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CCM_07.07_cover.v2
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Page 1
myCCM.ORG’S — MISSY OLIVER • KRISTIN DEL ROSSI • SHERRAL • STEVEN S. BILLINGS
BarlowGirl
REFUSES THE RIGHT
TO REMAIN SILENT
THE NEW SIDE OF
PROJECT 86
DAVID CROWDER
BAND LIVE!
OUT OF SECLUSION:
MANDISA &
the Christian Invasion
of “AMERICAN IDOL”
BRIAN “HEAD” WELCH
6
THINGS BEBO
NORMAN LOVES
IN THE STUDIO WITH
THOUSAND
FOOT KRUTCH
CCM_07.07_TOC.v3
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07.07
[
]
CONTENTS
26—COVER STORY
With some Christians hoping for a
tone-downed message, BarlowGirl goes
another round without pulling punches.
features
30—Mandisa
Mandisa Hundley had no problem staying
in the background—that is, until the fall
of 2005 when “American Idol” came calling.
32—Project 86
Last year fans named Project 86 a runner-up
in the “Favorite Hard Music Artist” category
of CCM’s Readers’ Choice Awards. Just
imagine if the voting had taken place
after the band’s most melodic album had
been heard.
36—Katie Herzig
Sure she’s been opening tour dates for The
Fray and hearing her songs played on
shows like “Smallville” and “ER,” but that’s
not what sets independent artist Katie
Herzig apart.
departments
05—Editor’s Notes
06—yourCCM
09—What Now!
The 411 on new band Wavorly, Chris Tomlin,
Red, Thousand Foot Krutch and more
18—Hit Lists
This month’s radio & retail charts
21—Trend Watch
The gospel according to mainstream radio
22—New Noise with
Andrew Schwab
Play Radio Play, The Becoming,
The Devil Wears Prada and more…
24—Loose Ends
Nichole Nordeman unlocks some truth.
39—In Review
The major label debut from The Rocket
Summer, plus new tunes from Waking
Ashland, Willie Will, MxPx and more
55—Tour Scrapbook
David Crowder Band
56—Roots
Robbie Seay joined his brother in a bold
church planting effort. To say that Houston’s
Ecclesia fellowship has become a
neighborhood church in the years since
would be a major understatement.
8
58—The Final Word
34—Brian “Head” Welch
When founding Korn guitarist Brian “Head”
Welch went public with his newfound faith two
years ago, a media feeding frenzy immediately
ensued. Eventually, the rock star went into
seclusion—and for good reason…
Louie Giglio encourages you to do
“whatever.”
CCM_07.07_EditorsLetter.v3
5/31/07
Christ • Community • Music
volume 30 issue 1
Exploring redemptive music and the
culture it influences.
CCM Magazine is a publication of Salem Publishing,
a division of Salem Communications.
U
Publisher Jim Cumbee
Associate Publisher Rick Edwards
Editor Jay Swartzendruber
Managing Editor Lindsay Williams
Senior Art Director Mary Sergent
Associate Art Director Martina Ahlbrandt
Associate Art Director Andrew Scates
Contributing Editors Andy Argyrakis, Christa A.
Banister, Beau Black, Louie Giglio, Caroline Lusk,
Douglas Kaine McKelvey, Nichole Nordeman, Andrew
Schwab, Chris Well
Contributors Adrienne, Margaret Becker, Steven S.
Billings, Chad Bonham, Margret Boyd, Grace S. Cartwright,
Jackie A. Chapman, Chuck, Kristin Del Rossi, Brenten
Gilbert, Christy Gordon, Brandon Haan, Lulu Hickey, Kate
McDonald, Katie McNeil, Chris Molnar, Ken Mueller, Brian
Quincy Newcomb, Missy Oliver, Justin Pot, Jasen Rauch,
Gregory Rumburg, Andrew Scates, Sherral, Dr. Tony
Shore, John J. Thompson, Mark Weber
Production & Operations Director Ross E. Cluver
Web Projects Director Joan Dyer
Media Editor Kristi Henson
Fulfillment Manager Jamie Kunzmann
Customer Service Representatives Angela Banks, Amy
Cassell, Natalie Delph, Emeka Nnadi
Executive Director of Advertising Jerry Charles
615/312-4244
Senior Director of Advertising DeDe Donatelli-Tarrant
805/987-5072
Account Executive Pat McAbee 770/237-5400
Account Executive Gary Miller 970/203-0417
Advertising Marketing Manager Brian Lawing
Advertising Traffic Manager Carol Jones
Administrative Sales Assistant Melissa Smart
Main Office 104 Woodmont Blvd., Suite 300, Nashville, TN
37205 615/386-3011 (ph) • 615/386-3380 (business fax)
615/385-4112 (editorial fax) • 615/386-3380
(advertising fax)
Subscriptions/Customer Service CCM, 104 Woodmont
Blvd., Ste 300, Nashville, TN 37205, 800/527-5226 or
[email protected] Annual subscription
rates: United States, $21.95/one year; Canada, (U.S. funds)
$29.95 per year; all other countries, (U.S. funds) $35.95
(surface). For address changes or other inquiries, please
include both old and new addresses and mailing label.
Allow four to six weeks for new subscriptions
to begin.
Cover photo: Jeremy Cowart
Cover design: Mary Sergent
Page 5
ARTISTS AND THE
PRIVILEGE OF GOD
EDITOR’S NOTES
CCM MAGAZINE
5:05 PM
When was the last time you were given a dosage of truth that you
couldn’t shake or ignore? You know the kind I mean—truth that
threatens not only the way you approach life, but your very identity.
Something my pastor conveyed back in February has been
doing just that…haunting me for months. And, frankly, now
more than ever.
As part of a Sunday morning sermon, he read this remarkable
quote from William Wilberforce’s book Real Christianity:
“It is undeniably clear that, in the judgement of the Word of God, the love of worldly
admiration and applause is basically corrupt. For it tends to exalt and aggrandize ourselves;
to pride ourselves on our natural or acquired endowments; or to assume credit and merit for
our own qualities. It chooses this self-esteem instead of ascribing all honor and glory where
they are due. It is false, therefore because it exalts that which we should demean. It is also
criminal because it intrudes on the privilege of God.”*
If you feel the need to read that several times to really let it sink in, go ahead. I know I
did. In fact, I keep revisiting it.
Wilberforce’s words are not only a profound menace to my true—and very private—nature,
they also call into question the way I approach my vocation, specifically, this magazine.
Let me put it this way: What are we, the editors, literally doing with CCM? As we
champion redemptive music, are we going about it in such a way that we are nurturing
“the love of worldly admiration and applause” among artists of faith? Are we encouraging
artists to “exalt and aggrandize” themselves; “to pride” themselves on their “natural or
acquired endowments; or to assume credit and merit for” their “own qualities”?
And, if so, are we urging you to treat artists that way?
Or, rather, do we prompt artists (and you) to ascribe “all honor and glory to where
they are due”?
Those are hard questions. They make me feel uncomfortable. That, no doubt, means
I need to keep asking them. And not just asking, but being more intentional in fostering
a spirit of humility and gratefulness within our magazine’s pages.
Since my early teen years I’ve had the reputation of being a “super fan.” From my
vocal enthusiasm for countless artists of faith to my championing of sports stars Steve
McNair, Vince Young and Ichiro Suzuki to my awe at the creativity of Hollywood types
M. Night Shyamalan, Joss Whedon and Chris Carter. When I love someone’s work or
performance, I love it…often becoming enamored with who that influencer is. Yes, a
super fan. When I’m at my best, I’m celebrating God’s creativity and gifts as expressed
through those whom He’s created. When I’m at my worst, well…let’s call a spade a
spade, I’m committing idolatry. And if I’m doing that in the presence of an artist and
directing it at them, it’s safe to say I’m not urging them toward humility.
All that to say, there’s a way to affirm people in their gifts, speaking life into their
vocations and passions, without encouraging them to “exalt or aggrandize” themselves.
We at CCM want to become fluent in that skill, while encouraging you, dear reader, to
do the same. Simply put, if we truly love our favorite artists, we won’t idolize them.
Love well,
Jay Swartzendruber
[email protected]
myCCM.org/Jay
NASDAQ SYMBOL: SALM
*William Wilberforce, from Real Christianity: Discerning True Faith from False Beliefs, Victor Books, 2005
[ccmmagazine.com] 5
5/31/07
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yourCCM
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I REALLY ENJOYED YOUR TOBYMAC COVER STORY [“DIVERSE
CITY OR BUST,” MAY]. I NEVER REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT HOW
MUCH DIVERSITY THERE IS. THE MORE I THINK ABOUT IT, THE
MORE IT BOTHERS ME. AS CHRISTIANS YOU WOULD THINK WE
WOULD BE THE LEAST JUDGING OF OTHER CULTURES, BUT WE ARE
PROBABLY THE WORST. ” Kelly Owen, Reedsburg, WI
GO “T”
I really enjoyed your tobyMac cover
story [“Diverse City or Bust,” May]. I
never really thought about how much
diversity there is. The more I think
about it, the more it bothers me. As
Christians you would think we would
be the least judging of other cultures,
but we are probably the worst. Our
churches are all split; there’s black
churches and white churches. Why
don’t we all come together and
celebrate the goodness of God!
Kelly Owen, Reedsburg, WI
CHRIST. COMMUNITY. MUSIC.
I’ve been a devoted fan of this
magazine for the past two years now.
Sometimes I will go out and even buy
three extra copies just because I think
some people in my high school need a
magazine like this.
Today I got the May issue and saw
the new layout and was kinda taken
back by how different it looked. The
first thing I read was your column
about defining “CCM” and thought you
got it right. I’m excited how you have a
whole lot more CD reviews. And, wow,
the “Buzz Factor” section that lets us,
the readers, dive in and give some
insight—I think that’s totally
awesome! I know for sure I’m gonna
join myCCM.org now. At first I was
kinda on the fence. But after reading
“The Proof is in the Blogging,” I feel it’s
a great tool to just have fellowship
with one another.
You guys did an awesome job with
the magazine’s new layout. To get
uncomfortable and be more like
Christ, sometimes we gotta do new
and different things. I can tell you
6 [ccmmagazine.com]
guys are doing that with this month’s
new issue. I love it!
Michael Tackett, via email
I just had to write a quick note of
appreciation on your diversity of
album picks to review. I just picked up
the May issue of CCM and was blown
away to see reviews of Between The
Trees, Rosie Thomas and The
Innocence Mission! Wow! A few years
ago, I don’t think I would’ve seen such
an eclectic mix of reviews; it seemed
more focused on the traditional
“contemporary Christian” artist. I just
wanted to thank you and let you know
your new direction is being noticed
(and thoroughly enjoyed)!
Ray Swartz, Orlando, FL
I don’t think the magazine’s new name
makes as much sense. Everyone who
I’ve mentioned the new name to so far
has said something like, “Huh? What’s
�Christ. Community. Music.’ supposed
to mean? It just sounds like a random
combination of words.” However, I
love that you’re giving myCCM
members involvement in the
magazine content, and it’s awesome
that you’re actually reviewing some
indie CDs in the “In Review” section.
“MusicianChick,” Somewhere, NY
myCCM.org/musicianchick
I just got the May CCM issue a few days
ago, and I love the new look! I think it’s
really awesome you changed the
acronym to “Christ. Community. Music.”
Cherryfly, via CCMmagazine.com
I’ll come right out and say it: I’m
disturbed at the direction my favorite
magazine has taken starting with the
May 2007 issue. By including “artists
of faith” who make music that doesn’t
necessarily reflect their beliefs, the
first thing that comes to mind is, how
are you going to define an artist who
is a “Christian”? Do you require a
written or spoken confession of faith?
In North American society, we know
that many people call themselves
“Christians” without living a life
mirroring that. What if one member of
a band is a Christian and the others
live like Tommy Lee at a frat party?
Does someone who “thanks God” at an
awards ceremony now qualify as an
“artist of faith”? We used to think of
a Christian artist as one who claims
Between The Trees
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[Sara Jaquette, Saginaw, MI
& THOUSAND FOOT KRUTCH]
My friend, Kelly, and I recently went to
tobyMac's “Portable Sounds Tour.” It was
an amazing show. Afterwards we got our
picture taken with [opening act] Thousand
Foot Krutch and talked to the guys for a
few minutes. They were all really nice, and
meeting them was awesome!
myCCM.org/sarajay19
BarlowGirl
Jesus as Savior, and that hope is
evident in the fruit of their art. Why
isn’t that important now?
Woody Woodland, LIFE 100.3
Barrie, Ontario, Canada
Actually, Woody, the only thing that’s
changed for us there is we’re no longer
defining music by what kind of record
label releases it or by where it’s
distributed. For CCM Magazine, “Christian
music” now means Christian worldview
music. In other words, we’re all about
Philippians 4:8: “Finally, brothers,
whatever is true, whatever is noble,
whatever is right, whatever is pure,
whatever is lovely, whatever is
admirable—if anything is excellent or
praiseworthy—think about such things”
(NIV). And yes, we believe the fruit of an
artist’s life is as important as ever...
MOONLIGHTING IN THE MAINSTREAM
I just wanted to respond to the article
about Christians who happen to
moonlight as mainstream artists [“Salt
and Light, Part 1” May]. While I’ve
partaken in and heard a lot of chatter
and uproars from different sides of
opinions on this topic, I think that it is
AMAZING that these artists are out
there doing this. As a musician, who is
deeply rooted in the “Christian,” indie
and varied progressive music scenes,
I can attest that there is a great
mission field in this industry. It’s great
to know that there are bands out there
THANKS SO MUCH
FOR �IN THE STUDIO
WITH BARLOWGIRL’
(MAY). I THINK WHEN
THEIR NEW ALBUM
COMES OUT THEY
SHOULD GET A FRONT
COVER STORY. ”
Lauren Murray, via email
who are going into the field with their
torches held high. Thanks for covering
the bands that are psuedo-known for
being Christians. It’s interesting to
read about their backgrounds and see
just where they are in their careers and
where they’ve come from.
David Hess, Boise, Idaho
Christians in the mainstream—it’s not
a new thing. It’s just a new concept to a
generation that grew up thinking
“Christian music” existed separately
from “secular music” in clear, plainly
labeled markets. Not so before the
1970s, not so now. Even during the
heyday of “Contemporary Christian
Music,” musicians of faith were in both
markets. They always have been and
always will be. The lines between
“Christian” and “secular” are so blurry
because they never really existed at all.
Christian culture tried desperately to
make them exist, but it just didn’t
stick. Thank God.
Kevin C. Neece, via email
That’s very well put, Kevin. Thank you.
For thought-provoking insight on the
ways many of us divide life itself into
the “sacred” and “secular,” check out
Louie Giglio’s brilliant submission this
month for “The Final Word” column on
Page 58.
YOUR WISH, OUR COMMAND
Thanks so much for “In the Studio with
BarlowGirl” [May]. I think when their
new album comes out they should get
a front cover story. They are awesome
girls, great role models, and have
beautiful voices. Their lyrics are great,
and they don’t conform! Please give
them a front cover story! PLEASE!
Lauren Murray, via email
WRITE US!
We welcome your comments.
Email: [email protected]
or address your letter to: Feedback,
CCM Magazine, 104 Woodmont Blvd., Suite
300, Nashville, TN 37205; fax 615/385-4112,
Attn: Feedback. Always include your full
name, address and phone number. Letters
may be edited for length and clarity.
[Rochelle Welbaum, Ansonia, OH
& FAMILY FORCE 5]
Some friends and I went to tobyMac's
“Portable Sounds Tour” [Um...Is there an
echo in here?] in Tipp City, Ohio. This is a
picture of me and Nadaddy from [opening
act] Family Force 5. The show was
amazing, and we stayed after the show for
over an hour and hung out with the band.
It was great! Soul Glow Activatur even
gave me the gangsta' name of
“Googaflex.” It was an amazing time!
myCCM.org/welby091
[Steve Busby, Oroville, CA
& KUTLESS]
This is a picture of me with Kutless that
was taken on March 30, 2007 outside
the Adventure Christian Church in
Roseville, Calif., during the “Go Tour”
with the newsboys and Stellar Kart. I
am holding a guitar signed by Kutless
which I won in a missions-oriented
fund-raising auction at last year's
Joshua Fest in Quincy, CA.
Have you recently taken a picture with one of
your favorite artists at a concert, in-store
appearance, church event, or, hey, at the flea
market? If so, send us the photo and tell us
who you met, where you met ’em, and what it
was like. Email the photo and info to
[email protected] or use CCM’s
regular mailing address (Attn: Feedback).
[ccmmagazine.com] 7
yourCCM
WHEN ARTISTS GET TO MEET YOU
CCM_07.07_WhatNow.v4
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10
10
11
12
CCM READER MISSY OLIVER HAS THREE
QUESTIONS THAT ONLY CHRIS TOMLIN
CAN ANSWER.
JESSY RIBORDY’S DVD PICKS
RED’S JASEN RAUCH
DISHES ON HIS BAND’S HIT SINGLE,
“BREATHE INTO ME.”
IN THE STUDIO WITH
THOUSAND FOOT KRUTCH
<
LEARNING TO FLY
Inspired by C.S. Lewis, new rock act WAVORLY is poised
for success as its debut album takes to the sky.
Modern rock band Wavorly sounds nothing like its pop
punk roots. The new Flicker Records act became a
melting pot of musical influences as Jaime Hayes
(drums), Seth Farmer (guitars) and former road
manager, Ryan Coon (keyboards), joined original
members Dave Stovall (vocals) and Matt Lott (bass). This
collective of college students diversified[ccmmagazine.com]
the pop punk 9
CCM_07.07_WhatNow.v4
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<
sound of a band formerly known
as Freshmen 15 with hardcore
rock, atmospheric pop, metal
and progressive rock as heard on
its debut album, Conquering the
Fear of Flight (Flicker).
The musical eclecticism, by
way of one example, comes
through in classical string
arrangements by Stovall. “We
have used string sounds in our
live set, but it was [producer]
Rob Graves’ idea to record using
real strings in the studio,” says
the band’s primary music writer.
“I like songs to sound like big,
wide musical landscapes that
make you feel like you’re
somewhere else.”
The influence of C.S. Lewis’
imaginative The Great Divorce, an
allegorical tale about a journey
through heaven and hell, adds
to the �somewhere else’ feel on
Conquering the Fear of Flight.
“Lyrically, our songs describe
certain situations that God has
helped us through, like love and
loss,” says Lott, “but as you listen
more, you find that deeper
meaning,” especially on songs
like “Madmen,” “Endless Day”
and “Part One,” which connect to
the Lewis story.
Transporting a listener with
music and lyrics is important to
Wavorly, but the band also works
to connect with its audiences
here. “We want to make the best
songs that we can and not just
throw something out there that
sounds like everything else. This
is about connecting to people
through music, to give hope to
others—especially connecting
with kids,” Lott says. “Our main
focus is to tell people who don’t
know Jesus that there is hope
Jackie A. Chapman
for life.”
10 [ccmmagazine.com]
[Chris Tomlin]
“IF YOU COULD
ASK YOUR FAVORITE
BAND OR SINGER
THREE QUESTIONS,
WHO IS THAT
ARTIST, AND WHAT
WOULD THOSE
QUESTIONS BE?”
4
WHAT NOW!
Ask Your
Favorite
Artist
CCM reader Marla “Missy” Oliver of
Antioch, Calif., (myCCM.org/missymo)
has three questions for worship artist
Chris Tomlin. As she explains, “I
recently saw Chris in concert (�How
Great Is Our God Tour’). I had not been
to a concert in a few years and, wow,
I felt like I was in a church instead
of a concert. Very inspiring.”
ARTIST’S
CHOICE
[Must-See DVDs]
Missy: Writing and singing songs of intimacy with God is intended to be a very personal
experience. When you are in an auditorium with an earpiece and thousands singing with
you, do you feel that same intimacy as you sing?
Chris: Absolutely, and sometimes even more... There is something incredibly special about
joining in worship with thousands of other believers. We were not meant to live out this life
alone, and I think many times it causes my faith to be that much stronger when I get a
picture of just how massive God’s kingdom really is!
Missy: After the show, time to wind down...what is your favorite “after-show” activitiy?
Chris: Well, I really enjoy meeting people. It’s always a good time to have a few moments
with new people and encourage one another. To hear a story about how these songs affect
someone’s life never gets old to me.
Missy: Has your wildest dream come true yet? If yes, what was it—if no, care to share?
Chris: I have been blessed to live many of my dreams so far. I am a dreamer by nature, so I
continue to wonder and pray for what might be next while I marvel at what is...
If you could ask your favorite artist three questions, what would they be? Let our editor
know by leaving a message at his personal page at myCCM.org/Jay. You may just have
your questions answered in one of the next issues of CCM!
This month Falling Up’s Jessy Ribordy recommends five “must-see” DVDs…
1
2
3
4
1—The Blue Planet It’s an ocean documentary that Discovery Channel BBC did, and it’s the most amazing two hours
of my life. 2—Gattaca It’s my favorite movie of all time. I love this movie because it’s about human genes and DNA,
and it’s a love story. The storyline is amazing, and the dialog is super smart. 3—The Goonies There are so many
reasons why I love this movie. For starters, I live just a few hours south of Astoria, and it’s one of my favorite towns in
Oregon. Also, I love early Spielburg stuff, and there are so many crazy things he did when he wrote the movie; it’s just
really interesting. 4—Apocalypse Now It’s a very edgy and tense movie, and the special features have a lot of great
historical facts about Vietnam. 5—The Office (1st and 2nd season) I think this is the funniest show. This type of
comedy is exactly what makes me laugh the hardest.
5
CCM_07.07_WhatNow.v4
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RED, “BREATHE INTO ME”
WHAT NOW!
Essential Records rock band Red is currently enjoying its first
general market radio hit thanks to breakout track “Breathe
Into Me” from the debut album End of Silence. At press time,
the song—which had already been a No. 1 single at the
Christian rock format—cracked the Top 10 of America’s Active
Rock chart according to Radio & Records. Red
guitarist/songwriter JASEN RAUCH recently took a few
moments to pen the story behind the hit.
STORY BEHIND THE SONG:
The song “Breathe Into Me” was one of the first songs we wrote as a
band. Anthony [Armstrong] came with a guitar part that seemed to
stick out from all the rest of the material we had written at the time.
We spent some time with it, and it evolved into the main riff and verse
content for “Breathe Into Me.” A lot of heavier music we grew up
listening to talked about going through hard times or tough
experiences that brought about anger, frustration, and was generally
written from a very dark perspective. As Christians, who had been
through some of the same things those songs talked about, we chose
to write about our experiences, but from a redemptive, encouraging
point of view. The theme of redemption stuck, and “Breathe Into Me”
became the backdrop for the rest of the record.
JASEN RAUCH
[SMITH] Smith is my son, and
no he wasn’t named after
Michael W. He’s only a few weeks
old, but he’s pretty much the
coolest person I know on the
planet, next to his mom—my
wife, Roshare.
THINGS
T
BEBO
NORMAN
[MY 1976 FORD BRONCO] I bought my
Bronco about five years ago and have slowly
been fixing it up ever since. It’s my dream car,
and one of these days it’ll run like a dream.
AND JUST WHAT DOES
SINGER/SONGWRITER
BEBO NORMAN LOVE?
[MY KAYAK] I’m not quite the kayaker
I once was, but it’s still one of my favorite
things in the world to do. I used to get to
take my kayak with me out on tour, so I’ve
had the chance to paddle some of the
most beautiful rivers in the country.
[THE GEORGIA BULLDOGS] Really, I love all college football.
It’s the last true, unspoiled American sport. I’m always touring
in the fall, so I don’t get to go to many games, but we always
buy the ESPN GamePlan Package on the bus satellite so I can
see every single Georgia Bulldog game of the season!!! Thank the
Lord for modern technology!
[THE RIVER] My family has a lake
house down in Georgia, where I grew
up, that we just call “the river.” I’ve
had the chance to travel all over the
world playing music, and there is still
no place on the planet that I would
rather be than at the river. I love to
wakeboard and ski and take long boat
rides, but, mostly, I love it because it’s
the most peaceful place I know.
THE PEOPLE WHO
HAVE MADE THE
MOST IMPACT IN MY
LIFE HAPPENED TO
HAVE BEEN PEOPLE
WHO HAVE EITHER
SEEN OR
EXPERIENCED THE
MOST SUFFERING...”
[OTIS] I’ve always loved big dogs, and I made my wife promise
me before we got married that we would never have to get a
small dog. And then we found Otis. He’s the smallest, fluffiest,
wimpiest dog on the planet...and you know what? I love him
more than I’ve ever loved any dog I’ve ever had. Yep, I’m man
enough to admit it...I love my wimply little small dog Otis!
Bebo Norman’s current album is called Between the
Dreaming and the Coming True (Essential). His
current single, “Into the Day,” is impacting radio now.
Check out bebonorman.com for the latest.
LACEY MOSLEY
[ccmmagazine.com] 11
5/31/07
5:26 PM
Page 12
FAITH ON THE MOVE
MARK ACROSS AMERICA
MARK SCHULTZ is literally on the move, sharing stories and songs from
his latest album on a tour that fans will not soon forget…
“If I was doing this just for me, I wouldn’t make it 200 miles,” says Mark Schultz
with a laugh.
Lucky for him, he’s doing it for something much bigger than himself…because
he’s got a long way to go—3,500 miles to be exact. Since mid-May, Mark has been
on tour—on his bike. That’s right, his bike.
Mark has partnered with the James Fund, a non-profit organization borne out
of the Family Christian stores, to raise money for widows and orphans. “Mark
Across America” is the concept behind his bike tour. He is performing 15 concerts
across the country—West Coast to East, donating all proceeds from the concerts
to the widows and orphans that the James Fund supports.
“We want to provide for today,” says Mark, “and we want to provide for a future.”
And it’s a future that he knows a lot about. An adopted child himself, Mark’s
passion for the work of the James Fund was stirred when he and his wife went on
a mission trip to an orphanage in Monterey, Mexico. There, they saw firsthand how
the James Fund was providing food for the immediate needs of the children and
families for their tomorrow.
“They bring in American families and build them a home,” Mark explains. And
then, those families open their home to a child from the orphanage, providing
them with faith, education and hope.
When it all comes down to it, Mark says it best: “Everyone can talk about
problems…but I want to be a part of the solutions.”
And so after six months of training at the YMCA, spin classes and 75-mile trips
through the hills around his home, he’s taking his heart to the streets across America.
To learn more about Mark’s adventures and to join in the cause, log on to
markacrossamerica.org.
CAROLINE LUSK
;
WHAT NOW!
CCM_07.07_WhatNow.v4
THE MUSIC:
“In one word: RAWK. In a bunch of words: This record has a bit more of a mix tape
sensibility to it, without feeling disjointed. I think it has something for everybody.
You always want to push your own boundaries and keep trying to reinvent what
you’ve already done, and I think we’ve done that by stepping into some new
territories and redefining a few places we’ve been before. This results in some very
quiet and very heavy moments… After wanting to for some time, we got a chance
to work with some real deal string sections, no keyboard strings or samples on this
one, just big, fat, beautiful orchestration.”—Trevor McNevan (lead singer)
4
IN THE STUDIO
WITH THOUSAND FOOT KRUTCH
Going behind the scenes to get you ahead of the curve…
12 [ccmmagazine.com]
THE LYRICS:
“There are quite a few new lyrical themes on this record dealing with everything
from addictions to true love and what home has become after being on
the road so long, to the realization that we don’t have all the answers,
ALBUM TITLE: The Flame In All Of Us
and we are not in control here… �The Flame In All Of Us’ is about the
LABEL: Tooth & Nail
common thread between people of every age, race, background and
RELEASE DATE: September 18
belief, that no matter what category we fall under, God created all of us
RECORDING STUDIO: The Firehouse in
with a purpose.”—T.M.
Pasadena, CA
PRODUCERS: Ken Andrews (Beck/Mae/
THE MUSICAL GUEST:
Pete Yorn/Tenacious D)
“There is a cameo appearance by Charlotte Martin, a friend of ours on
NUMBER OF SONGS: 12 (plus two
Dinosaur Fight Records. She’s got a beautiful voice; it’s actually quite
more on special edition)
haunting.”—T.M.
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Page 14
SIGHTINGS
WHAT NOW!
[of Faith in Culture]
BY CHRIS WELL
%
ON THE TUBE
IN MAY, FANS OF RED COULD HEAR THE BAND’S SONG
“LET GO” IN PROMOTIONAL SPOTS FOR THE CBS HIT
DRAMA “WITHOUT A TRACE.” THE SONG, FROM THE
BAND’S GRAMMY®-NOMINATED END OF SILENCE
(ESSENTIAL), WAS USED IN MID-DAY AND PRIMETIME
SPOTS. OTHER TV NOTES: THE LEGENDARY MAVIS
STAPLES PUT IN AN APPEARANCE ON THE “LATE SHOW
WITH DAVID LETTERMAN” IN MAY, AND DARWIN
HOBBS AND HIS WIFE, TRACI, WERE FEATURED ON
“CBS THIS MORNING” THE SAME MONTH.
MULTI-TASKING
Hip-hop artist and pastor Urban D. (Tommy Kyllonen) has a
new project—and it’s coming at you from three directions:
print, CD and DVD. The book Un.orthodox: Church. Hip-Hop.
Culture. (Zondervan) shares unique, inside perspectives on
how to reach today’s urban culture with the message of
Jesus. Fascinating, troubling, inspiring and moving, this is a
powerful resource for engaging today’s unchurched, 35and-under generation. The companion album Un.orthodox
(EMI Gospel) is a double disc with a DVD documentary
plus all of Urban D.’s music videos.
2
In a thought-provoking thriller this July, “Bible
Answer Man” Hank Hanegraaff and suspense
novelist Sigmund Brouwer team up for Fuse of
Armageddon (Tyndale House). The story follows a
maverick hostage negotiator who must come face to
face with his past to stop the worst terrorist threat of
all time—a plot to bring about the ultimate
religious uprising by destroying one of the most
sacred relics in history.
14 [ccmmagazine.com]
(
citizenjane
For the magazine’s 40th anniversary, the editors of
Rolling Stone interviewed 20 artists and leaders who
helped shape our culture. Among the list was
“actress/activist/fitness instructor/author/lightning rod”
Jane Fonda. In their interview, Fonda talked about the
wild 1960s, the infamous “Hanoi Jane” fiasco—and being
a born-again Christian: “I very much feel the presence of
God. And then this person Jesus—I am utterly fascinated
by this man. I feel that what he preached was
revolutionary, and it’s totally what we need now.”
INDIE ARTISTS:
GMC WANTS YOU!
)
MAN OF
INFLUENCE
Super Bowl-winning coach
Tony Dungy was named to
TIME Magazine’s “100 Most
Influential People in the
World,” a list that also
includes the likes of
Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice and
Queen Elizabeth II. In July,
Dungy’s memoir, Quiet Strength (Tyndale
House), describes his upbringing, athletic
career, family life and coaching career, as
well as his spiritual journey. Dungy became
the first African-American to coach a Super
Bowl champion earlier this year when the
Indianapolis Colts defeated the Chicago
Bears, 29-17, in Super Bowl XLI.
GOSPEL MUSIC CHANNEL HAS LAUNCHED A NATIONWIDE
SEARCH FOR MUSIC VIDEOS FROM UNDISCOVERED AND
UNSIGNED TALENT ACROSS ALL GENRES OF GOSPEL AND
CHRISTIAN MUSIC. VIDEOS CHOSEN CAN BE SHOWCASED
ONE OF SEVERAL WAYS, INCLUDING ON TV, ONLINE AND
ON-DEMAND. “THIS IS NOT A CONTEST; WE WANT TO
SHOWCASE THE COUNTRY’S UNTAPPED GOSPEL AND
CHRISTIAN TALENT ON TV,” SAYS GMC VICE PRESIDENT OF
PRODUCTION, REX HUMBARD. DETAILS AND GUIDELINES
ONLINE AT GOSPELMUSICCHANNEL.COM.
CCM_07.07_WhatNow.v4
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5:27 PM
Page 15
SIGHTINGS
[of Faith in Culture]
BELLS
In June, the Christian graphic novel Eye Witness: Acts
of the Spirit was awarded the Silver Medal in the
Graphic Novel category at the 2007 Independent
Publisher Book Awards, held in conjunction with
BookExpo America in New York City. Created by
author/illustrator Robert James Luedke and published by Head Press Publishing, it
is the second volume in a trilogy. Comics and pop culture guide Wizard Magazine
tagged Eye Witness: Acts of the Spirit one of the “42 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW
ABOUT INDIE COMICS IN 2006.”
.
FALL INTO
TV
CCM READERS WILL SEE SOME FAMILIAR FACES IN
THE FALL TV LINEUP: EMMY-WINNER PATRICIA
HEATON (“EVERYBODY LOVES RAYMOND,” THOU
SHALT LAUGH) CO-STARS WITH KELSEY GRAMMER
IN A NEW WORKPLACE SITCOM, “BACK TO YOU.”
MEANWHILE, KRISTIN CHENOWETH (“WEST
WING”) RETURNS TO THE SMALL SCREEN FOR
ABC’S DARK COMEDY “PUSHING DAISIES.” (AND
“BIONIC WOMAN” ALSO LOOKS KINDA COOL, BUT
THE ONLY EXCUSE I CAN FIND TO MENTION IT IN
“SIGHTINGS” IS THIS PARENTHETICAL STATEMENT.)
WHAT NOW!
SILVER
BY TH3 NUMB3RS
From the bar codes on your groceries and the numbers on a sports team
uniform to that PIN you use at the ATM, numbers are everywhere: They sponsor
“Sesame Street”; they tell us our place in line; they even save us the trouble of
calling every movie sequel “Reloaded” or “Again.” We would suggest throwing
down the oppression of the Numbers, but we just got all our friends’ numbers
programmed into our cell phone. (And we’re too lazy to start that over.) On that
topic, here are four bands that decided if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em…
1
2
3
4
BUILDING 429
This band gets its name from Ephesians 4:29—Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of
your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may
benefit those who listen. “It’s not enough to not say something bad,” says front man Jason
Roy. “It’s about going out of your way to lift people up when everything else is beating them
down.” Building 429’s brand new album, Iris To Iris (Word), is in stores now. Find them on
myCCM at myCCM.org/building429.
33MILES
The members of 33Miles are on a mission to encourage the church. The band’s name is a
metaphor for the 33 years that Christ spent on Earth and how He lived them. “We want to
follow Christ,” says the band’s Jason Barton. “We aren’t promised a certain number of miles,
so what are we going to do with the �miles’ that we are given?” The band’s debut album was
released by INO Records in April. Learn more at myCCM.org/33miles.
GROUP 1 CREW
With a unique hybrid of hip-hop, rock, funk and soul, Group 1 Crew has distinguished itself
with the 2007 self-titled debut on Fervent Records. And the three members have teamed
together for one unified purpose—hence the name Group 1 Crew. Unlike many popular
acts where members individually vie for the spotlight, they wanted a name that
communicates their singular purpose to shine the love of Christ through the power of song.
Find them at myCCM.org/group1crew.
9TH HOUR
This indie band takes its name from the passage in Luke 23:44-46, which tells us that in
the “ninth hour,” Jesus died for the sins of the world. At the 2007 King Cat Christian Music
Awards, 9th Hour was nominated in multiple categories and won both “Contemporary
Christian Artist of the Year” and “Acoustic Rock Artist of the Year.” The band’s new album
is Perfect Timing. Download a free song at myCCM.org/9thhour.
This month, Eric Wilson has a brand new mystery in stores, A Shred of Truth
(WaterBrook). He also recently passed on these happy bits of news: He’s written a
novelization of the surprise hit indie film Facing The Giants, which will be
published by Thomas Nelson this September. Also, he’s finally found a home for
his “vampire trilogy based in Biblical history”—WestBow Press (Thomas Nelson)
is publishing the first book in the series in 2008.
HONORABLE MENTION:
Family Force 5, Project 86, 21:03, Detour 180, Eleventyseven, Jump 5, The 77’s, Take
6, Starflyer 59, 2 or More, 4HIM, 7Thunders, 12 Stones , KJ-52, Pax217, Plus One,
Third Day, Three Crosses, Seven Places, Sixpence None The Richer, Tree63, Seventh
Day Slumber, Trin-i-tee 5:7, U2, and a partridge in a pear tree.
Keep up with the latest Sightings at myCCM.org/sightings.
[ccmmagazine.com] 15
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Page 16
myCCM
WHAT NOW!
[Where the Peeps Are]
BY CHRIS WELL
featuredartists
1
2
3
4
5
AARON SHUST
UNKNOWN SOULDIER
DJ MORPHIZIZ
MONICA DENNINGTON
FIREFLIGHT
myCCM.org/unknownsouldier
In 1993, rocker Terry Baert
walked away from mainstream
music. Since then, he has
ministered in many capacities as
a church helper and pastor.
Listen to four songs from his
new indie album on his myCCM
profile. (Pre-production demos
of more songs at
myCCM.org/brotherterry.)
1
AUTHORS
knows
myCCM
myCCM.org/aaronshust
After serving for five years as a
worship leader in Atlanta,
Georgia, Aaron Shust is now
serving a much larger
congregation. His debut,
Anything Worth Saying (Brash),
sold more than 200,000 copies,
while “My Savior, My God” was
downloaded over 85,000 times
on iTunes.
DAVID NASSER (Glory Revealed)
myCCM.org/davidnasser
2
STA AKRA THRILLER WRITERS
myCCM.org/staakra
3
COLLEEN COBLE (Midnight Sea)
myCCM.org/djmorphiziz
This mixologist has shared the stage
with quarterback Peyton Manning
and comedian Jerry Lewis—not to
mention Switchfoot, tobyMac,
Third Day, KJ-52, Thousand Foot
Krutch, Casting Crowns, Hawk
Nelson and many more. Says KJ52 of DJ Morphiziz: “His discipline
in his career is only matched by
his desire to grow in Christ.”
myCCM.org/monicadennington
This singer/songerwriter and
women’s speaker has all sorts of
spiffy resources on her myCCM
profile page, including music
downloads, videos, a photo
album and even a map that tells
where you are RIGHT THIS
MOMENT. (In case you forgot.)
myCCM.org/fireflight
Hailing from Eustis, Florida (just
outside Orlando), the members
of Fireflight got together thanks
to a mutual love for bands like
The Juliana Theory, Zao and Def
Leppard. After five years on the
indie circuit, they signed with
Flicker Records for their first
national record, The Healing
of Harms.
CONTESTS AT
CCMMAGAZINE.COM
DESIGN YOUR OWN
MOCK CCM MAGAZINE COVER!
Get out the crayons and protractors, kids, because your mission
this month is to design your very own custom CCM cover! Starting
July 1, you have the chance to show the world your mad design
skills. So design your cover, hit CCMmagazine.com in the month
of July and upload your entry!
myCCM.org/colleencoble
4
JOHN THOMPSON (Raised By Wolves)
myCCM.org/jjt
5
CELEBRITY DON’T-LOOK-ALIKES
RACHEL HAUCK (Diva NashVegas)
myCCM.org/rachelhauck
6
BRANDT DODSON (The Lost Sheep)
myCCM.org/brandtdodson
7
David
Crowder
Lunch
Box
Kierra “Kiki”
Sheard
Killer
Robot
MARY CONNEALY (Petticoat Ranch)
myCCM.org/maryconnealy
8
MIKE NAPPA (The Courage to be Christian)
myCCM.org/books
9
CHRISTY BARRITT (Hazardous Duty)
myCCM.org/christybarritt
10
MICHELLE D. STARR (Inoculation Eternity)
myCCM.org/michelledstarr
16 [ccmmagazine.com]
Krystal
Meyers
Electric
Fan
CCM_07.07_WhatNow.v4
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Page 17
myCCM
[Where the Peeps Are]
FROM THE MYCCM BRAIN
myCCM.org/thebrain
[WE’LL NOT ONLY TELL YOU WHO AND WHAT AT
MYCCM YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT EACH
MONTH, WE’LL EVEN SHOW YOU WHY. CONSIDER
THESE TWO RECENT BLOG ENTRIES…]
FROM
STEVEN S. BILLINGS
myCCM.org/crownbearer
“SPIDER-MAN 3”
I was never a huge fan of the webslinger. But I’ve seen
this film twice now; the second time was yesterday at
the IMAX. And I must say that I really enjoyed it both
times. One of the main reasons is that Toby McGuire
embodies Peter Parker in such a realistic way, you
almost believe he’s an actual living soul.
For me, the best moments in the film are not when
Spidey dons the suit—red or black—but when Toby
and Kirsten Dunst are interacting as Peter and Mary
Jane. Their emotions never seem manufactured or
“methodized,” but are authentic and very real. I
ached for Peter on the bridge in the park. I felt the
bruised spirit of M.J. as she lay sprawled on the floor
of the jazz club. In fact, the emotional motivation of
all the key players in this film is strong and genuine,
from the leads through the entire supporting cast.
Pacing is excellent, with the darker moments
balanced by great humorous bits (especially with J.K.
Simmons as J. Jonah Jameson). Particularly poignant
is the message of personal responsibility brought
home in the closing monologue, where Peter reminds
the viewers that we make our own moral decisions in
life. Very refreshing.
The film leaves us hoping for more. I, for one,
definitely look forward to Spider-Man 4!
В© 2007 by the author
FROM
SHERRAL
myCCM.org/sherral/blog
Ask the Brain:
"Nashville City Fest"
Our family attended the Luis Palau Nashville City
Fest this weekend (May 19 & 20). Wow, what an
awesome weekend. Everything was free and there
was something for everyone. The youngsters had
face painting, VeggieTales, and all kinds of fun
things. Of course, there were lots and lots of food
vendors and sponsors’ tents and such. Then there
were concerts! Free ones! We saw Tye Tribbett,
Steven Curtis Chapman, tobyMac, BarlowGirl and
Jeremy Camp. They were all great! That was the
first time we’d heard or seen Tye Tribbett....he was
really awesome.
The real highlight of the weekend came after the
Jeremy Camp concert, though. We had decided to
make our way over to Joe’s Crab Shack for supper and
we happened upon tobyMac! The kids got their
pictures taken with him and were totally
thrilled...especially Hannah! She had gotten his
autograph on a poster at another concert and now
has pictures of her with him. Thanks Toby!
В© 2007 by the author
9
*If you hope to see yourself in this column, the first step is to
set up your own profile at myCCM.org. Act today—operators
are standing by! (Well, it’s all computerized, but you know
what we mean…and, hey, it’s FREE.)
CHECK OUT THIS MONTH’S FEATURED PODCASTS ON
MYCCM.ORG
JULY 3—JAKE SMITH • JULY 10—TODD AGNEW
JULY 24—BARLOWGIRL • JULY 31—MANDISA
•
JULY 17—CHRIS RICE
HOW DO I CHANGE MY
PRIVACY SETTINGS?
Your myCCM account allows YOU to control
how easily friends—and strangers—can see
your page or even contact you. On your
dashboard, go to the grey column (it’s to your
left) and click “My Profile.” Then click on
“My Settings.”
MY PROFILE
MY SETTINGS
YOUR “PRIVACY OPTIONS” INCLUDE:
* My profile is completely private. No URL should be
accessible.
* My profile can be accessed by anyone.
* My profile can only be accessed by my peeps.
You can also check this box (if you want): “Only
allow my peeps to leave messages in my inbox.”
YOUR “EMAIL NOTIFICATION OPTIONS” INCLUDE:
* Notify me by email if someone leaves a comment
on my profile.
* Notify me by email if someone requests to be
my peep.
* Notify me by email if a peep sends me a message.
* Notify me by email if anyone sends me a message.
YOUR “PROFILE COMMENT OPTIONS” INCLUDE:
* Don’t publish comments until I approve them.
* Don’t allow HTML in comments added to my profile.
myCCM puts the power in your hands—use it
wisely! Yours always, The Brain
Chris Well claims to be an awardwinning editor and acclaimed
novelist. His latest novel, the laughout-loud Christian thriller
Tribulation House (Harvest House),
has gotten rave reviews from the
likes of Publishers Weekly, RT Book
Reviews and more. Visit Chris online
at myCCM.org/chriswell.
[ccmmagazine.com] 17
WHAT NOW!
WORDS OF WISDOM
CCM_07.07_HitLists.v3
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Page 18
>
[CHARTING THE TOP ALBUMS AND SONGS]
>
HIT LISTS
TOP ROCK/ALTERNATIVE ALBUMS
THE TOP-SELLING CHRISTIAN ALBUMS
ACCORDING TO NIELSEN SOUNDSCAN
ARTIST—Album (Label) )
1 1 7
MARTINA MCBRIDE—Waking Up Laughing
22 --- 40
TOBYMAC—Portable Sounds (ForeFront)
7
3
12
RELIENT K—Five Score and Seven Years Ago (Capitol/Gotee)
4
84
FLYLEAF—Flyleaf (Octone/S-R-E)
5
8
THIRD DAY—Chronology, Vol. 1 1996-2000 (Essential)
6
33
SKILLET—Comatose (Ardent/S-R-E/Lava/Atlantic)
7
50
RED—End of Silence (Essential)
8
3
BUILDING 429—Iris to Iris (Word)
9
14
SUPERCHICK—Beauty from Pain 1.1 (Columbia/Inpop)
5
64
ALAN JACKSON—Precious Memories (ACR/Arista Nashville)
4
6
13
TOBYMAC—Portable Sounds (ForeFront)
5
7
7
THE ALMOST—Southern Weather (Tooth & Nail/Virgin)
6
4
2
VARIOUS—WOW Gospel #1’s (Verity)
7
10 11
RELIENT K—Five Score and Seven Years Ago (Capitol/Gotee)
8
2
2
YOLANDA ADAMS—Best of Me—Greatest Hits (ATLG)
9
8
33
VARIOUS—WOW Hits 2007 (Sparrow/EMI)
10 20 84
FLYLEAF—Flyleaf (Octone/S-R-E)
11 9
8
THIRD DAY—Chronology, Vol. 1 1996-2000 (Essential)
12 24
38
VARIOUS—Three Wooden Crosses (Word)
13 19
57
MAT KEARNEY—Nothing Left to Lose (Aware/Columbia/Inpop)
14 18
7
J. MOSS—V2 (Gospo Centric)
15 11
6
THE CLARK SISTERS—Live: One Last Time (EMI Gospel)
16 23 33
SKILLET—Comatose (Ardent/S-R-E/Lava/Atlantic)
17 13 90
CASTING CROWNS—Lifesong (Beach Street)
18 16
CHRIS TOMLIN—See the Morning (sixsteps)
19 12 71
JUANITA BYNUM—Piece of My Passion (FLOW)
20 15
RUSH OF FOOLS—Rush of Fools (Midas)
2
1 14
THE ALMOST—Southern Weather (Tooth & Nail/Virgin)
(RCA/Provident)
3
34
ARTIST—Album (Label) )
22
TOP CHRISTIAN/GOSPEL ALBUMS OVERALL
TW LW WO
TW WO
21 14 16
VARIOUS—WOW Gospel 2007 (Verity)
22 ---
1
JOHN COOK—Heaven’s Pen (ALNT)
23 22
11
VARIOUS—Glory Revealed (Reunion)
10 14
SWITCHFOOT—Oh! Gravity. (Columbia/Sparrow)
11 81
THIRD DAY—Wherever You Are (Essential)
12
9
HASTE THE DAY—Pressure the Hinges (Solid State)
13
8
THIRD DAY—Third Day (Essential)
14 35
GUESS WHO’s
going to be on
the cover of CCM
next month?
ANBERLIN—Cities (Tooth & Nail)
JONNY LANG—Turn Around (A&M)
15 26
P.O.D.—Greatest Hits (The Atlantic Years) (Atlantic)
16
BECOMING THE ARCHETYPE—Physics of Fire (Solid State)
2
17 48
UNDEROATH—Define the Great Line (Tooth & Nail)
18 60
FAMILY FORCE 5—Business Up Front, Party in the Back (Gotee)
19 116
KUTLESS—Strong Tower (Deluxe Edition) (BEC)
20 86
BARLOWGIRL—Another Journal Entry (Fervent)
TOP R&B/HIP-HOP ALBUMS
TW WO
ARTIST—Album (Label) )
1 7
KJ-52—The Yearbook (BEC)
22 26
3
CHRIS TOMLIN
answers a reader’s
questions on
Page 10.
7
PATTI LABELLE—The Gospel According to Patti LaBelle (Bungalo)
FLAME—Our World Fallen (Cross Movement)
4 100
TOBYMAC—Welcome to Diverse City (ForeFront)
5
41
LECRAE—After the Music Stops (Cross Movement)
6
10
SHIRLEY MURDOCK—Soulfood (TYSC)
24 35 29
JEREMY CAMP—Beyond Measure (BEC)
25 31 29
NEWSBOYS—Go (Inpop)
7
4
PETTIDEE—Resurrections: Past, Present & Future (Beatmart)
26 17
11
VARIOUS—WOW Hymns (Word)
8
2
URBAN D—Unorthodox: When Hip-Hop Meets the Church (EMI Gospel)
27 21
11
ELVIS PRESLEY—Elvis: Ultimate Gospel (Provident)
9
89
28 28 100
CASTING CROWNS—Casting Crowns (Beach Street)
10 32
LATTIMORE/MOORE—Uncovered (La Face)
29 34 85
KIRK FRANKLIN—Hero (Gospo Centric)
11 26
GRITS—Redemption (Gotee)
30 39 50
RED—End of Silence (Essential)
12 33
VARIOUS—Body + Soul Gospel (TIme Life)
31 37
3
BUILDING 429—Iris to Iris (Word)
13 43
TRIP LEE—If They Only Knew (Reach)
32 27
56
MERCYME—Coming Up to Breathe (INO)
14 10
EVERYDAY PROCESS—Process of Illumination & Elimination (Cross Movement)
33 42
52
TYE TRIBBETT—Victory (Integrity)
15
VARIOUS—Kurtis Blow: The Block Iz Hot (EMI Gospel)
34 25
28
MICHAEL W. SMITH—Stand (Reunion)
Read the story
behind RED’s hit
“Breathe Into Me”
on Page 11.
4
CECE WINANS—Purified (Pure Springs Gospel/INO)
16 60
GRITS—7 (Gotee)
35 33 34
MARK SCHULTZ—Broken & Beautiful (Word)
17 87
DA T.R.U.T.H.—The Faith (Cross Movement)
36 55
17
ERNIE HAASE & SIGNATURE SOUND—Get Away Jordan (Springhouse)
18 30
TEDASHII—Kingdom People (Reach)
37 50
2
PURENRG—pureNRG (Fervent)
19 40
VARIOUS—Hip Hope 2007 (Gotee)
38 64 6
33MILES—33Miles (INO)
20 44
21:03—Twenty One O Three (Verity)
39 43
13
ANBERLIN—Cities (Tooth & Nail)
40 56
21
SWITCHFOOT—Oh! Gravity. (Columbia/Sparrow)
Each chart reflects Christian and general market combined album sales for the week ending May 20, 2007. All
charts В© 2007 by Nielsen SoundScan (a division of VNU Marketing Information) and Christian Music Trade
Association. All rights reserved. No reproduction without permission.
*
Hit Lists cont. on Page 20
18 [ccmmagazine.com]
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Page 20
Hit Lists cont. from Page 18
TOP ADULT CONTEMPORARY/POP ALBUMS
TOP PRAISE & WORSHIP ALBUMS
TW WO
ARTIST—Album (Label) )
TW WO
ARTIST—Album (Label) )
SUPERCHICK—Beauty from Pain 1.1
1 32
CHRIS TOMLIN—See the Morning (sixsteps)
>
1 44
HIT LISTS
(Columbia/Inpop)
22 11
2
33
VARIOUS—WOW Hits 2007 (Sparrow/EMI)
3
57
MAT KEARNEY—Nothing Left to Lose (Aware/Columbia/Inpop)
3
4
91
CASTING CROWNS—Lifesong (Beach Street)
4 139
CHRIS TOMLIN—Arriving (sixsteps)
5
2
RUSH OF FOOLS—Rush of Fools (Midas)
5
82
VARIOUS—Open the Eyes of My Heart (INO)
6
29
JEREMY CAMP—Beyond Measure (BEC)
6
69
AARON SHUST—Anything Worth Saying (Brash)
7
29
NEWSBOYS—Go (Inpop)
7
59
VARIOUS—WOW Worship Aqua (Provident)
8
11
VARIOUS—WOW Hymns (Word)
8
37
HILLSONG—Mighty to Save (Integrity)
21
7
VARIOUS—Glory Revealed (Reunion)
VARIOUS—WOW Worship Blue (Integrity)
9 190
CASTING CROWNS—Casting Crowns (Beach Street)
9
10 56
MERCYME—Coming Up to Breathe (INO)
10 28
VARIOUS—iWorship Platinum (Integrity)
PASSION—Best of Passion Band (So Far) (sixsteps)
11 28
MICHAEL W. SMITH—Stand (Reunion)
11 59
UNITED—United We Stand (Integrity)
12 34
MARK SCHULTZ—Broken & Beautiful (Word)
12 12
VARIOUS—51 Must Have Modern Worship Hits (Integrity)
13
2
PURENRG—pureNRG (Fervent)
13 11
VARIOUS—Beautiful Worship (INO)
14
6
33MILES—33Miles (INO)
14 11
JEREMY RIDDLE—Full Attention (Varietal)
15 117
MERCYME—Almost There (INO)
15 297
MICHAEL W. SMITH—Worship (Reunion)
16
7
NICOLE C. MULLEN—Sharecropper’s Seed (Word)
16 28
LINCOLN BREWSTER—Let the Praises Ring (Integrity)
17 59
MARK HARRIS—The Line Between the Two (INO)
17 19
MATT REDMAN—Beautiful News (sixsteps)
18 11
NICHOLE NORDEMAN—Recollection: The Best of Nichole Nordeman (Sparrow)
18 86
DAVID CROWDER BAND—A Collision (sixsteps)
19 37
JARS OF CLAY—Good Monsters (Essential)
19 82
RANDY TRAVIS—Glory Train: Songs of Worship (Word)
20
NEWSBOYS—Go Remixed (Inpop)
20 49
VARIOUS—Very Best of Praise & Worship (Verity)
2
See “MARK
ACROSS
AMERICA” on
Page 12.
Each chart reflects Christian and general market combined album sales for the week ending May 20, 2007. All charts В© 2007 by Nielsen SoundScan (a division of VNU Marketing Information) and Christian Music Trade Association. All rights reserved. No reproduction
without permission.
*
THE TOP SONGS ON CHRISTIAN RADIO ACCORDING TO
TOP ADULT CONTEMPORARY/POP SONGS
TOP CONTEMPORARY HIT SONGS
RUSH OF FOOLS—Undo —Rush of
1
RELIENT K—Forgiven—Five Score and
1
Fools (Midas)
2
BIG DADDY WEAVE—Every Time I Breathe—Every
3
JEREMY CAMP—Give You Glory—Beyond Measure (BEC)
4
LINCOLN BREWSTER—Everlasting God—Let the Praises
5
CHRIS TOMLIN—How Can I Keep From Singing—See
6
NEWSBOYS—Something Beautiful—Go (Inpop)
7
Time I Breathe (Fervent/Word-Curb)
Ring (Integrity)
the Morning (sixsteps/EMI)
MERCYME—Bring the Rain—Coming Up to Breathe (INO)
9
POWELL, LITTRELL, CHAPMAN AND HALL—By His
Wounds—Glory Revealed (Reunion/PLG)
10
THIRD DAY—Tunnel—Wherever You Are (Essential/PLG)
11
BEBO NORMAN—I Will Lift My Eyes—Between the
12
BRANDON HEATH—I’m Not Who I Was—Don’t Get
Comfortable (Reunion/PLG)
13
ECHOING ANGELS—You Alone—You Alone (INO)
Dreaming and the Coming True (Essential/PLG)
14
GEOFF MOORE—When I Get Where I’m Going—Speak
15
JOHN WALLER—The Blessing—The Blessing
to Me (Rocketown)
(Beach Street/Reunion/PLG)
ARTIST—Song—Album (Label) )
1
SKILLET—The Last Night—Comatose
22
ANBERLIN—A Whisper and a Clamor—Cities (Tooth & Nail)
Seven Years Ago (Gotee)
22
3
DISCIPLE—After the World—Scars Remain (INO)
SANCTUS REAL—Don’t Give Up—The Face of Love
(Sparrow/EMI)
4
SKILLET—The Last Night—Comatose (Ardent/S-R-E)
5
EVERYDAY SUNDAY—Find Me Tonight—Wake Up!
(Ardent/S-R-E)
3
FLYLEAF—Perfect—Flyleaf (Octone)
4
THE WEDDING—Say Your Prayers—Polarity (Brave New World)
5
THIS BEAUTIFUL REPUBLIC—Going Under—Even
6
EVERYDAY SUNDAY—Wake Up! Wake Up!—Wake Up!
7
THE ALMOST—Say This Sooner—Southern Weather
8
DEAS VAIL—Surface—All The Houses Look the Same
Wake Up! (Inpop)
6
JARS OF CLAY—Work—Good Monsters (Essential/PLG)
7
NEWSBOYS—Something Beautiful—Go (Inpop)
8
SEVENTH DAY SLUMBER—Missing Pages—Once
9
JIMMY NEEDHAM—Dearly Loved—Speak (Inpop)
10
TOBYMAC—Made to Love—Portable Sounds (ForeFront/EMI)
TOBYMAC—Made to Love—Portable Sounds (ForeFront/EMI)
8
TOP ROCK SONGS
ARTIST—Song—Album (Label) )
ARTIST—Song—Album (Label) )
Upon a Shattered Life (BEC)
Heroes Need a Parachute (ForeFront/EMI)
Wake Up! (Inpop)
(Tooth & Nail)
(Brave New World)
9
PILLAR—When Tomorrow Comes—The Reckoning
10
SWITCHFOOT—Awakening—Oh! Gravity. (Sparrow/EMI)
(Flicker/PLG)
11
TOBYMAC—I’m for You—Portable Sounds (ForeFront/EMI)
12
JEREMY CAMP—Let It Fade—Beyond Measure (BEC)
11
FAMILY FORCE 5—I Love You To Death—Business Up
13
SUPERCHICK—Stand in the Rain—Beauty From Pain
12
RED—Break Me Down—End of Silence (Essential/PLG)
13
STELLAR KART—Procrastinating—We Can’t Stand
14
FIREFLIGHT—Attitude—The Healing of Harms (Flicker)
14
1.1 (Inpop)
BIG DADDY WEAVE—Every Time I Breathe—Every
Time I Breathe (Fervent/Word-Curb)
Front, Party in the Back (Gotee)
Sitting Down (Word-Curb)
15
CASTING CROWNS—Set Me Free—Lifesong
(Beach Street/Reunion/PLG)
15
THE SEND—An Epiphany—Cosmos (Tooth & Nail)
16
DAVID CROWDER BAND—Foreverandever Etc.—A
16
DISCIPLE—After the World—Scars Remain(INO)
BUILDING 429—I Believe (with Jesus is the
Answer)—Rise (Word-Curb)
17
RELIENT K—Forgiven—Four Score and Seven Years Ago
18
CHASING VICTORY—Fiends—Fiends (Mono vs. Stereo)
Collision (sixsteps/EMI)
16
AARON SHUST—Give Me Words to Speak—
17
33MILES—What Could Be Better (The Days Ahead)—
What Could Be Better (The Days Ahead) (INO)
18
BRITT NICOLE—You—Say It (Sparrow/EMI)
18
DAVID CROWDER BAND—Foreverandever Etc.—A
19
SWITCHFOOT—Awakening—Oh! Gravity. (Sparrow/EMI)
19
KJ-52—Wake Up—The Yearbook (BEC)
THIRD DAY—Tunnel—Wherever You Are (Essential/PLG)
20
WAVORLY—Madmen—Conquering the Fear of Flight (Flicker/PLG)
Whispered and Shouted (Brash)
Collision (sixsteps/EMI)
19
NATE SALLIE—Lone Ranger—Ruined for Ordinary (Curb)
20
CASTING CROWNS—Does Anybody Hear Her—
Lifesong (Beach Street/Reunion/PLG)
20 [ccmmagazine.com]
17
20
*Each
(Gotee)
chart reflects Christian radio airplay for the week ending May 18, 2007 as tabulated by Christian Radio & Retail Weekly. В© 2007 CRW. All rights reserved.
christianradioweekly.com
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}
[TUNING INTO THE FUTURE] By Beau Black
TREND WATCH
From left: J Moss, Mary Mary, Kirk Franklin
THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MAINSTREAM RADIO
Earlier this year, Kirk Franklin’s hit single, “September,” spent 14 weeks on the Urban AC charts. That was followed
immediately by J Moss’ new hit duet with Anthony Hamilton, “I’m Not Perfect.” These two tracks are just the latest
in a long line of songs from gospel artists who have been making inroads into the culture at large.
With the crush of Christian acts breaking into mainstream music, it’s hard to
remember the days when Amy Grant was “finding her way” into the Top 40 (and
getting roundly criticized for it). Grant and her leopard-print jacket now 20-plus years
in our rearview mirror, making that leap has become almost common, at least for
rockers such as Mat Kearney, P.O.D., Switchfoot and the like. Just as regularly, but less
often noted, you’ll find gospel acts like Kirk Franklin, Yolanda Adams and Mary Mary
camping out on various urban charts—often doing it with explicitly “gospel” lyrics.
No stranger to success in urban and gospel markets, artist/producer J Moss
proclaims, with characteristic understatement, “Gospel is the new R&B.” He
oughta know, having produced with his PAJAM crew artists ranging from *NSYNC
to Vanessa Bell Armstrong. Moss is currently making a run at radio himself with
the sinewy, vocoder-drenched “I’m Not Perfect,” a duet with soulster Anthony
Hamilton. (The single was No. 27 on R&R’s Urban AC chart at press time.)
Jeff Grant heads radio promotion at Moss’ home Verity, gospel’s largest label.
“I usually don’t go into a project looking for a mainstream record,” Grant says. “My
first responsibility is to the natural audience of the artist. If I approach
mainstream, it’s because the artist either has a mainstream profile, i.e., Kirk
Franklin or Kelly Price, or a song that would be a good fit.”
Picking that song isn’t as easy as it might seem; for every “Stomp” or
“Shackles,” there’s a churchier counterpart, like Franklin’s debut “Why We Sing,”
Yolanda Adams’ “Open My Heart” and Smokie Norful’s “I Need You Now.” Grant
recalls Dr. Charles Hayes’ “Jesus Can Work It Out,” “basically a Sunday morning toe
tappin’, hand clappin’, rollickin’ choir song.” Not exactly a natural candidate—but
“it struck a chord with the listening audience,” he says.
Often, the hits get rolling at the grassroots level. Grant says, “Every once in a
while, a song such as Donnie McClurkin’s �We Fall Down’ is picked up by a
mainstream station, as was the case at [Los Angeles’] KJLH, and the song turned
out to be one of the biggest songs on radio. It started from the owner of the
station, Stevie Wonder, hearing it.” From there, “it just spread like wildfire.”
To an extent, urban radio seems much more receptive than rock or Top 40 have
ever been to explicitly Christian messages. (Two Big Exceptions: MercyMe’s “I Can
Only Imagine” and Carrie Underwood’s “Jesus Take The Wheel.” Can’t get more
explicit than that.) Though Grant says urban radio’s concerned “that a record
doesn’t cause tune-out,” there’s still an openness that’s M.I.A. at rock radio.
Monica Coates has worked with Fred Hammond, EMI Gospel and Verity, leaving
the last to write and manage rising star Joann Rosario. One key difference, says
Coates, is that “gospel is a part of African-American culture in a way that Christian
music is not a part of mainstream American culture.”
There’s a world of meaning in that, even beyond the implications of this story.
Where in the urban world, “gospel” seems largely positive, artists coming out of the
“Christian rock” world are routinely stigmatized. Look no further than a Blender
review for a dismissive example.
Just as rock and pop artists of faith face accusations of “selling out” by bringing
their music to a wider audience, so gospel artists tread a fine line. “I think our
strength of our music is in its
authenticity,” says Coates. “Our audience
loves our artists best and longest when
they feel a genuine connection with that
artist, and that’s difficult to maintain
when you’re not authentic.”
Carla Williams, another EMI Gospel
alum who now runs Kirk Franklin’s Fo
Yo Soul label, recalls that after
McClurkin and Franklin’s initial
successes, other artists tried to repeat
it “with urban-sounding stuff.” Didn’t
work. “Programmers want gospel music
with an authentic gospel style. It’s
almost the kiss of death to do that. It’s
got to be genuine.”
“We try to champion what’s true to
them,” says Coates. “What do they need
to say now? What do they feel like that
sound is right now? When it stops being true to you, people feel that.” She cites CeCe
Winans as an example of an artist who’s done “what felt authentic to her, and the
audience followed. If you try to chase after the audience, you look like you’re chasing
success, and our consumers don’t respond to that.”
TO AN EXTENT,
URBAN RADIO
SEEMS MUCH
MORE RECEPTIVE
THAN ROCK OR
TOP 40 HAVE
EVER BEEN TO
EXPLICITLY
CHRISTIAN
MESSAGES.”
Beau Black teaches English for Weatherford College and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical
University near his home in Fort Worth, Texas. He has written about the Christian music
industry for more than a decade. myCCM.org/beaublack
[ccmmagazine.com] 21
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5
[HUNTING FOR THE SPIRITUALLY SOUND AND GOOD]
FLASHLIGHT
5
NEW NOISE WITH ANDREW SCHWAB
PLAY RADIO PLAY
[A CLOSER LOOK]
Seventeen-year-old Texan Dan Hunter is PLAY RADIO PLAY, an
electronic, indie pop act which is nothing short of a phenomenon (and
phenomenal). The closest reference point is The Postal Service, though
the fact that Hunter is a one-man show with the songwriting and
instrumentation places him in another atmosphere. He has more than 6
million plays on his MySpace page and was recently picked up by Island
Records, all in less than a year’s time. This is one of those rare cases of
true explosion. And although the music industry (myself included) has
already begun crowning Play Radio Play as the next black or pink or
whatever color typifies the “it” in current fashions, his words are both
humbling and motivational:
“Jesus Christ is my Lord and Savior,” he says in his press kit bio. “I don’t
drink, smoke, do drugs, or have sex; and I am proud to say I am still a virgin.
Although I am signed, I still do it for fun—not for money, not for girls—
simply because I enjoy making music. My music seems to make people happy,
and I enjoy making people happy. I get along with all types of people.
“I am a pacifist,” he continues. “I believe there are better ways to solve
things than violence. I truly believe every person is beautiful. I love everyone.”
THE BECOMING
New school goth-rockers The
Becoming are poised for
something very large in the
months to come. Take my word
for it. With a sound akin to HIM,
Joy Division and The Cure, and
one of the most killer “looks”
around, it won’t be long before a label snatches these guys up. Under normal
circumstances I wouldn’t cover a band with no national tours under its belt,
but there is always an exception to the rule. This Nashville quintet has a
promising two-song demo available on their MySpace page, which boasts
20,000 “friends.” You can find out more at myspace.com/wearethebecoming.
22 [ccmmagazine.com]
Play Radio Play’s influences range from Sigur Ros to Muse to Smashing
Pumpkins to Mos Def. As plans for his first LP are in the works, he has just
released his first commercial recording in the form of an EP titled The
Frequency EP. He is on “The Vans Warped Tour” this summer as his plans to
take over the known universe unfold (God willing, of course). For more info,
visit myspace.com/playradioplay and playradioplay.com.
IVORYLINE
The Tyler, Texas, fivesome that
is Ivoryline recently joined the
Tooth & Nail Records family.
This is the new wave of melodic
emo/pop/rock Г la Anberlin
and Emery, however this band
is more progressive in nature.
Ivoryline’s debut EP, The Life You Have, boasts brilliant production and honed
songwriting which is quite impressive for a new artist. Currently in the studio
with famed producer Aaron Sprinkle, the band’s full-length debut is due out
this fall. To order the EP and delve into Ivoryline more deeply, please visit
myspace.com/ivoryline.
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KEN ANDREWS
As the renown producer for
Pete Yorn, Mae and most
recently, Thousand Foot Krutch,
Andrews is also known for
fronting the widely influential
’90s rock band Failure, along
with his more recent major
label project, Year of The Rabbit. This is Ken Andrew’s first stab at a solo effort,
where he displays his multifaceted, aural talents by playing everything from
the mellotron to the synth bass. It does not disappoint. This is definitive
space-rock with multiple layers of instrumentation and emotion. His sound is
as atmospheric as it is unsettling, not unlike Radiohead. Though he once
existed completely outside the spheres of faith, his recent professions have
raised eyebrows. It will be interesting to see how his spirituality will emerge
with this new project. The album is titled Secrets of the Lost Satellite. Check out
kenandrews.com and myspace.com/kenandrews.
NEON HORSE
As mystifying as it is
mysterious, Neon Horse has
emerged from the selfproclaimed “wreckage of over
20 Los Angeles bands” to bring
a sound that is indescribable.
Indescribably awesome, that is.
The band members themselves hide behind pseudonyms and fictitious
personas (The singer calls himself simply “Norman Horse.”), which adds a
certain mystique to a genius sound. Although I promised to take their
identities to the grave, I can tell you that these guys are the real deal.
Musically, they rival The Cars, AC/DC and Danzig. Norman’s vocals are piercing
wails of melody that will send chills up your spine. The band’s debut is simply
called Neon Horse, just released on Tooth & Nail. Visit myspace.com/
neonhorse to find out more.
THE DEVIL
WEARS PRADA
With nearly 6 million plays on
its MySpace page and more
than 130,000 “friends,” The
Devil Wears Prada has defined
underground success in the
hardcore scene. The band’s first album on Rise Records, Dear Love: A Beautful
Discord, has flown off the shelves. The Devil Wears Prada is joining “The
Sounds of the Underground Tour” this summer with Every Time I Die and
Chimaira, as well as performing at Cornerstone and Purple Door. Did I
mention the band’s sound is heavy and vicious, much like Bleeding Through,
As I Lay Dying and Norma Jean? Front man Mike Hranica says this about his
band’s name: “When standing before God, He won’t care about your sweet
Prada scarf or Gucci shoes or whatever. It’s a Christian reasoning for the
name; we didn’t name it to be fashionable or whatever.” For more, visit
myspace.com/tdwp.
FAREWELL
FLIGHT
As recent signees to Mono vs.
Stereo, Farewell Flight just
finshed up in the studio
recording its first full-length.
With a couple of EP’s under its
belt (the most recent of which is titled Lost at Sea), this Harrisburg band has
asserted itself to be the hardest working act in Pennsylvania. The album (yet
to be titled at press time) is due out next month. Sounds like? True emo (not
the watered-down, recycled, contemporary version)—like Sunny Day Real
Estate, Death Cab for Cutie and Elliot Smith. To purchase Farewell Flight’s EPs
and find out more information, check out farewellflight.com and
myspace.com/farewellflight.
Andrew Schwab is the lead vocalist and lyricist for the band Project 86. He is also the author of
three books, as well as an independent journalist. Visit him online at myCCM.org/andrewschwab,
andrewschwab.com and project86.com.
[ccmmagazine.com] 23
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9
LOOSE ENDS
[CONFESSIONS OF AN UNFINISHED FAITH] By Nichole Nordeman
RED, WHITE AND YOU
Some years ago, my dad and my stepmom took me to France as an early college
graduation trip. Sick with excitement, I bought a brand new Nikon and a very
expensive lens that took me many waitressing shifts to pay for, so I might
document as many magical moments as I could. In addition to all of the obvious
highlights—Paris, The Louvre, the cheese, the chocolate, the vineyards, Monet’s
gardens, the beaches of St. Tropez—my favorite memory of all was never on an
itinerary.
My parents had some family friends who owned a house (among many others)
in the country outside of Paris. Actually, to say they owned a “house” would be a
bit like saying Bill Gates makes “decent” money. It was a fortress. A real life castle,
complete with trap doors and cellars and towers where even Rupunzel would
have needed extensions. Henri (our gracious host) told us that it was completed
years before Columbus even sailed for America. I was dumbfounded at its beauty
and mystery and kept thinking I would wake up at any moment to find myself
back at Le Hampton Inn.
The castle was nestled in acres of lush rolling hills, and on the same grounds
stood a small Catholic church and cemetery, no longer in use. Apparently, when
Henri purchased the property, the old church and cemetery (once used by a poor
neighboring village) sort of came with the package. Abandoned for ages, much of
what was inside the church remained largely untouched. I was captivated at the
stories that those old stone walls must have harbored—the confessions they’d
heard, the communion they’d presided over, the weddings and baptisms they’d
witnessed. Henri must have noticed me lingering on the church grounds more than
once, because he went to his office and dug around until he found the key that
unlocked the door to that crumbling old sacred space and pressed it into my hand,
giving me permission to go meet God, if I wished, with all “ze dust and ze cobvebs.”
I got up early the next morning and jostled the key in the old door until it
creaked open. There is no real way to explain the simple beauty I found in that
space and in my relationship with Christ that day. It was as if I had blown dust off
of more than the pews. I sat down, placing my Bible next to a worn and faded
French translation and stared up at the centuries old Jesus gazing down from the
crucifix over the dilapidated altar. And in the silence, I began to weep.
I wept with gratitude, and I wept with shame. Gratitude that the love of God was
so big, it could find me in an abandoned church in the French countryside, and
shame, because I’d insisted that same love be small enough to accommodate my
American faith, alone, alongside my political leanings and my vocabulary. I
worshipped on the same pew where hundreds of French villagers, who were now
buried in the cemetery just a few yards away, had worshipped faithfully before
anyone even set foot on American soil. I wished, in that moment, that I could
transport myself to a church in Africa and in Egypt and in New Zealand and in Israel
so that I could sit in those pews too, and enlarge my understanding of how vast the
love of God is for His people, independent of how exclusive I had misunderstood
Evangelicalism to be. And how much I had confused my Savior with my citizenship.
Somewhere in the corners of our minds, we imagine that Christianity hitched a
ride over on the Mayflower. We gush and romanticize about the forefathers of our
country and how we need to return to the values America was founded on. Do we?
What were those values, again?
I understand that they didn’t have to
contend with gay marriage or abortion
rights or stem cell research, but is that
evidence of a more Godly time? Slavery
justified and widely embraced? Mass
slaughter to acquire land that was
already inhabited? If you ask me, our
country was founded on sin. Because it
was inhabited by human beings, whose
every fingerprint leaves a smudge of
Adam’s DNA on whatever we touch. And
like yesterday, today and tomorrow—
where there is sin, grace abounds. For the early settlers and for us.
I took a picture [above] of the key in the door of that old church, and it sits in
a frame above my piano to remind me to think globally about God’s love. It
reminds me to cherish the liberty I enjoy in this blessed country but to not allow
entitlement to sneak under the fence. It reminds me of what I unlocked that day.
And on the 4th day of this month, when the hotdogs and potato salad are gone,
and I’m sitting under the fireworks trying to fight back the sappy tears that Lee
Greenwood song always evokes, I will remember that I am proud to be an
American...where at least I know I’m free.
But I’m even more proud to be a Christian, where at least I know I’m loved.
SOMEWHERE
IN THE CORNERS
OF OUR MINDS,
WE IMAGINE
THAT CHRISTIANITY
HITCHED A RIDE
OVER ON THE
MAYFLOWER.”
[
]
The new album, Recollection: The Best of Nichole Nordeman (Sparrow),
features two new songs, including the hit single “Sunrise.” Visit Nichole
online at myCCM.org/nicholenordeman and nicholenordeman.com.
24 [ccmmagazine.com]
CCM_07.07_BarlowGirl.v3
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B
WITH SOME
CHRISTIANS
HOPING FOR A
U
TONE-DOWNED
MESSAGE,
BARLOWGIRL
S
GOES ANOTHER
ROUND
WITHOUT PULLING
I
PUNCHES.
N
E
S
S
BY: GREGORY RUMBURG
PHOTOS BY: JEREMY COWART
[ccmmagazine.com] 27
(From left: Becca, Alyssa, Lauren)
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It’s no longer
business as usual
for BARLOWGIRL.
Suffice to say there’s been
some good, oldfashioned house
cleaning taking
place on the heels of the band’s most
striking year yet.
On the road 228 days last year, these sisters—
Alyssa, Lauren and Becca Barlow—pushed hard in
support of their sophomore record, Another Journal
Entry (Fervent), from which BarlowGirl’s fourth No. 1
hit, “I Need You to Love Me,” propelled the band to be
recognized as one of Yahoo!’s Who’s Next music artists
in early ’06. Later that track was dubbed Christian
radio’s most played CHR song of the year. Keeping
momentum going, BarlowGirl wrote its third record
after their fall tour ended in November and, after the
holidays, settled into a several-week stint in Nashville
to record How Can We Be Silent, which streets on July
24. Simultaneously, the trio received its first “Group of
the Year” GMA Dove Award nomination.
“We have loved every bit of it. If we had to do it all
over again, we wouldn’t change a thing,” says Becca.
“But I do love, now, getting into a different rhythm”—
a change of pace that began with a “working” cruise
soon after the group talked with CCM Magazine in April
during Gospel Music Week. All its notoriety suggests
BarlowGirl has earned some breathing room. Now,
28 [ccmmagazine.com]
with deeper, established roots in the music scene, they
can be more selective about their work schedule.
“We go out on the weekends and do three shows—
Friday, Saturday and Sunday—and then we’re home
Monday through Thursday,” Lauren says. “It’s really
cool to have so much time [at] home.” Just in the nick
of time, too. This past year, the women gained some
much-needed perspective for themselves.
“We’ve realized what boundaries are this year,”
Becca explains, “how we’re real people and we need to
take time to do real things,” like laundry, making your
own bed and being home for more than 24 hours.
Lauren sums up the matter, saying, “This past year has
really been refreshing. We want to be a family again.”
“WE’VE HEARD THE
BROKENNESS OF OUR
GENERATION, AND OUR
DESIRE IS TO GO
DEEPER WITH THEM TO
HEAL THEIR
BROKENNESS.”
turbulent peace
The notion that this last year or so has been
“refreshing” comes up several times during the
interview, and one can’t help but believe the group has
been, indeed, reenergized to take care of business.
That has to do, in part, with the new home the family
purchased this spring.
“We had two weeks off from making the album until
we were going on the road again—and we had to
move into our new house,” Alyssa says, describing the
back-to-nature, country property. That’s two weeks to
sort, box, move and unpack everything from a
childhood home of 16 years.
“We decided that if we worked really hard moving
that first week, then we’d get to relax the second
week,” Alyssa continues. “So the first week, even
though it was strenuous, it was fun to paint the rooms
together as a family and wallpaper as a family and
unpack boxes. We went through old pictures. It
reminded us, �Oh, yeah, we don’t always have to do
business together. We are a family.’”
That two-week stretch was one of the longest at
home the Barlows had been able to have together in
nearly five years.
“We got everything done the first week, which was a
miracle,” Alyssa picks up, “so that next week we had so
much family that would come by and ring the bell saying,
�We just thought we’d stop by.’ We saw old friends,
played games and people brought over ice cream.”
With home improvements taking place on the
outside, there was also emotional restoration taking
place inside.
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“With the family stuff,” Lauren says, “it was [all
about] business these last few years, since our parents
are our managers—which is amazing. I wouldn’t have it
any other way. But we were together every day and it
[became] about business. We girls love to be informed
about what’s going on, all the details, so they’d just tell
us. It just became business all the time, and we had to
find boundaries.” So, for example, the band aims to talk
business only from noon to 1 p.m. so as to avoid
slipping into old, all-consuming habits.
The women also felt lead to do some personal
gut checks.
Says Alyssa, “I think this year I felt, all of us felt, that
God came in taking another step to purify us. It was as
though God said, �Girls, it’s going to hurt, but you are
going to be different because of it. Will you allow Me to
go a little bit deeper in your hearts? I’m going to have
to chisel away at some different things that you are
holding on to.’”
Lauren shares part of her experience. “One of the
things that God is trying to teach me is dying to
myself,” she says. “That’s been my thing this year,
pushing down all the things that I idolize above
everyone else. Rather than put me first, I put others
first…to love like Christ.”
wounded healers
The psalmist writes, “Weeping may linger for the night,
but joy comes with the morning.” Getting together their
own business—vocational and emotional—is dawn
breaking for Becca, Alyssa and Lauren, and it’s giving
them a new authority with which to offer a cup of cool
water to suffering hearts on How Can We Be Silent.
“Hearing all the brokenness,” Lauren says, “kids who
are in line and you’re trying to take as much time as you
can—which is about 15 seconds—and they say, �I’ve
never told anybody this, but my parents abuse me,’ or
�I’m a cutter, and I need prayer.’ What do you do with
that, the brokenness of this generation? That’s where a
lot of this [record] is coming from. We’ve heard the
brokenness of our generation, and our desire is to go
deeper with them to heal their brokenness.”
BarlowGirl hopes to redeem at least some of that
pain by shining a light into the suffering. With the
group’s signature three-part harmonies, songs such as
“Here’s My Life,” the jazz-influenced “One More Round”
and the dramatic, rock-guitar driven lament “Song for
the Broken” add a darker-than-expected shade to the
new project, drawing out noticeable contrast when
compared to the group’s previous work.
The mid-tempo “I Believe in Love” was inspired by a
book Alyssa was reading. The chorus reveals a
statement found on the walls of a World War II
concentration camp:
I BELIEVE IN THE SUN
EVEN WHEN IT’S NOT SHINING
I BELIEVE IN LOVE
EVEN WHEN I DON’T FEEL IT
AND I BELIEVE IN GOD
EVEN WHEN HE IS SILENT.
“I just bawled as I read those lines,” Alyssa says. “I think
I was feeling that because of my sin and some of the
stuff God was dealing with, I felt like maybe I couldn’t
run into His arms as much as I normally did. But the
thing I love about God is that it doesn’t end there. You
have that statement of faith: I believe, even when you
seem distant from God.”
Tried and true is the balance of How Can We Be Silent.
BarlowGirl stands well-known for its anti-conformity
posture against narcissistic cultural messages that, as
BarlowGirl sees it, only end in people’s suffering,
expressed pointedly in drug and alcohol abuse, cutting
and other forms of poor self-image.
“I don’t know that we’ll ever stop growing in our
passion about this subject of not conforming,”
Alyssa says. “It’s something that God challenges us
on every day.”
Lauren cites what’s perhaps BarlowGirl’s most
aggressive track yet, “Million Voices,” as a hammer at
such cultural perspectives. “The album’s title actually
comes from this song,” she explains. “It’s saying,
�Generation, we have a voice. We can speak. God has
given us something to say and to speak up for Him.’
Honestly, this world is trying to make us shut up about
our faith, and we’re not going to stand for it.”
Alyssa picks up her sister’s thought. “I think we keep
wanting to say to people, �We’ve found our voice.’ We’ve
realized that as Christians God has given us a voice, and
we want to give people permission to use it.”
What’s mystifying to the ladies is that sometimes other
Christians suggest the band tone down its message.
Lauren reveals, “There are definitely people who say to us,
�You know, if you didn’t talk about God so much, then
maybe more people would listen to your music.’”
“They say, �You have such great appeal,’” Becca
continues. “�If you would just stop talking about God,
you’ll sell more albums.’ And we’re just like, that’s not
what this is about.”
The song “Keep Quiet” addresses the matter. “It’s
about how we as Christians feel like we are not supposed
to speak so that we will be more acceptable and more
relevant to this world,” Lauren says. “I know we’re not
supposed to push it down people’s throats, but do you
realize we have the answers to all of the world’s
problems, [but] we don’t want to be offensive?” She
drives the point home. “I don’t think I can talk about
anything else. God is everything to me. What He does in
my life is all that I am. We can sing songs that help
people feel dandy, like they’re on a sugar high—but I
want people’s lives to be touched. I want people’s lives to
be changed. Any way that I can speak into someone’s life
and have their lives changed like I’ve been changed by
the love of God, that’s what I want to do for people.”
“I definitely don’t want us to come across as, �Just be
bold! Just speak His name!’ and not have actions that
follow it,” Alyssa responds. “I think what’s definitely on
our heart is that people would know us first and foremost
as girls who serve God and that our words back it up.”
How Can We Be Silent emerges, then, as a call to action.
“We want to be bold and faithful in actions and in
words,” Alyssa says, “and to make people realize they
can do that, too. Jesus was bold when He stood up in
the temple and read Isaiah 61 saying to the people,
�Today this has been fulfilled. I am He.’ His works and
His actions portrayed that. We as Christians, as artists,
our works need to back up our faith, too.”
Gregory Rumburg is a freelance writer and chaplain based in Nashville.
Lyrically
SPEAKING
CCM’S EDITOR BLOGGED ABOUT THE CURIOUS
RESPONSE BARLOWGIRL’S GOTTEN FROM CHRISTIANS
who suggest the band change its message. He asked,
“Do you think some artists’ overt lyrics should be
toned down a bit so they can reach more people?” And
on the flip side, “what about songs that are written
about various aspects of life but aren’t specifically
faith-evident? If they’re written by Christians, should
all such songs contain clear expressions of faith?” Here
are some excerpts from the feedback he received:
I definitely don’t think artists’ overt lyrics should be toned
down to reach more of an audience. Isn’t it a Christian
artist’s goal to reach souls for Christ in a poignant way?
For some artists (such as Switchfoot and Relient K),
reaching into mainstream radio has been great. However,
I don’t think that going into the mainstream world is the
main focus of any Christian artist is it?
Kristin Del Rossi, Howell, NJ
myCCM.org/atruebarlowgirl
As a songwriter and singer myself, I have recently wrestled
with the notion of whether or not to be overt about Jesus
and faith in the songs I “put out.” While I’d like to tell the
world about Jesus, I worry that if I “put out” Jesus-y songs,
I will only be singing to the “saved” crowd, and I don’t want
to end up stuck in that—what I’d really like to do is make
a splash as a “secular” singer/songwriter first, so everyone,
not just Christians, “trusts me,” and then I can put out
songs, later on, to “lead �em to Jesus.”
Mark Weber, via CCMmagazine.com
I’ve long believed that each of us is responsible to
follow the path laid for us by the Lord. For some, that
will mean presenting the message He’s given to those
“in the family.” To others, it’ll be overt trumpeting on a
street corner, calling those who don’t know the Lord to
consider their actions. Still others will follow the
lifestyle approach, Г la St. Francis of Assisi, who
purportedly said: “Preach the gospel everywhere you
go. If necessary, use words.” Yet others, like myself, will
be called to those on the cusp: those uncertain of the
need for a commitment to Christ; those who don’t fit in
with the Christianese-loving crowd; those who have
been hurt by the ones who should’ve helped them heal.
Margret Boyd, Elk Grove, CA,
via CCMmagazine.com
Jesus commanded that we reach out to all mankind
and He was very specific in some of His �lessons’ that
we find in the Bible. Jesus would go into the home of
the “lowliest” citizen. He did not expect “here comes
the King” to be playing every moment of His life, but
He expected to show examples of love and compassion
at every stop. Positive music is something we do not
have enough of in the mainstream, therefore a song
such as “American Idol’s” “This Is My Now” (written
by Scott Krippayne and his pastor) is a message that can
reach our teenagers and share the message of dreams
being fulfilled. I, as a youth leader, can talk about
listening to the �positive’ music of Christian artists but
if kids can still hear it on mainstream because of the
willingness of Christians to reach beyond the barriers,
then we should be giving thanks.
Missy, via myCCM.org
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Mandisa Hundley had no problem
staying in the background—that
is, until the fall of 2005. As a studio
vocalist and backup singer for
various
Christian
artists
and
women’s conferences led by
best-selling author Beth Moore,
Mandisa was living out her dream
by combining her musical gifts
as both a career and a ministry.
And then came “American Idol.”
By: C h a d B o n h a m
TRUE AMERICAN BEAUTY
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A
ppearing on one of the decade’s hottest TV shows can push even the most stage shy
person from anonymity to a surreal level of popularity in a matter of moments.
Y
CHRISTIAN IDOLS?
And that’s exactly what happened to the Sacramento,
Calif., native and Nashville, Tenn., resident—now simply
known as Mandisa—when a stint on the fifth season of
“American Idol” changed her life forever.
“I was so content,” she says. “I could have done that
for the rest of my life and would have been completely
happy with that. But I just felt like the Lord was saying
this was the time for me to do this. Now I see why.”
Over the past 18 months, Mandisa says she has
become increasingly comfortable with the idea of being
center stage. That seems to prove true in light of the
current media blitz for her autobiography IdolEyes
(Tyndale House) which hit stores in May, her debut
album True Beauty (Sparrow) which streets July 31, and
a recent a modeling contract.
But while traveling to her “American Idol” tryout, she
simply wanted to leave everything on the table and
walk away with no regrets—knowing that she would
never have to ask the question, “What if?”
“Honestly, I didn’t have very many expectations,”
Mandisa says. “I never expected to make it as far as I did,
and I certainly believe that God had bigger dreams for
me than I ever had for myself… I know that the Lord is
kind of using me as His mouthpiece because I’m so
vocal about Him.”
Early on, Mandisa was considered by critics to be one
of the strongest vocalists to advance to the final round of
12. But following her performance of Mary Mary’s urban
gospel hit “Shackles” and some comments that were
misconstrued as anti-gay, the diva quality vocalist was
ousted as the ninth place finisher.
THE IRONY ISN’T LOST ON MANDISA.
But for the outspoken woman of faith, it all
made sense once she realized just how
powerful the show’s reach really was.
“Every time I think about this, I think it’s
funny—and just like the Lord that I know—
that He would actually take a show like
�American Idol’ and use it as a platform for
Him,” Mandisa says. “That’s who He is. And
so I don’t think it’s a coincidence. I think
He’s up to something in our generation.”
Considering how many singers launch their
careers from church platforms all over the
country, maybe it shouldn’t be so surprising
that musicians with strong faith backgrounds
have so prominently infiltrated the ranks of
the iconic talent competition. Idol winners
Kelly Clarkson, Ruben Studdard, Fantasia
Even though she admits she had been sheltered before
going to Hollywood, Mandisa says she wasn’t surprised
that her outspoken beliefs caused such an uproar that
included protesters and online campaigns.
“My faith is the polar opposite of what the world
believes,” she says. “But it didn’t make it any easier to
go through. People yelling and screaming at me for
what I believe was not easy, and it’s not something I
would have chosen for myself. But as a result, I came out
purer than when I went in. I feel like I could identify
more with the Lord. The Bible talks about sharing in the
fellowship of His sufferings, and I tasted a very small bit
of that with everything that happened to me. I feel
closer to Him, and I feel stronger in my faith because it
was tested.”
Mandisa weathered the storm and became one of
nine finalists to sign record deals.
“I’m someone who loves the Lord, and I love to have
a good time,” Mandisa says. “I feel like the Lord loves to
have a good time, too. So I guess that’s what my CD is
going to be like.”
And Mandisa’s tell-all book is just another step in this
young woman’s journey—an important step in which she
hopes to identify with the thousands of people who, like
her, have struggled with weight and self-image.
“I felt the Lord was saying I needed to do it for me,”
Mandisa says. “Like journaling, it’s cathartic to start writing
things down. You start to see things in yourself, and you
start to deal with emotions that you didn’t even know you
had. And I feel like it can help others, too.”
Barrino, Carrie Underwood and, most recently,
Jordin Sparks are just some of the contestants
to find base support in the church.
Other participants such as R.J. Helton,
Kimberly Locke, Kellie Pickler and Chris
Daughtry have also displayed their beliefs
through music and personal commentaries.
And the most recent sixth season of
“American Idol” has produced perhaps the
largest number of Christians with, in addition
to Sparks, standouts such as Melinda
Doolittle, Phil Stacey and Chris Sligh.
Sparks has participated in various
Christian talent events; Doolittle has sung
backup for Martha Munizzi and Anointed;
Stacey has led worship at a church in
Shawnee, Okla., and Sligh covered songs by
dcTalk and Mute Math.
And season six’s finale had one last twist
of faith when Christian artist Scott Krippayne
and his pastor friend Jeff Peabody won the
songwriting contest which provided the
“American Idol” finalist with a debut single
titled “This Is My Now.”
Mandisa says all of these things are just
another sign of how God is using the foolish
to confound the wise—and hopefully
changing lives in the process.
“Our success on [�American Idol’] isn’t just
about how we can reach the fans,” she says.
“This is also about reaching out to the people
who are involved with the show. I can’t say
enough about what I hope the impact is on
Paula, Simon and Randy. I think the Lord is
using contestants to be His mouthpiece. I
just don’t think it’s a coincidence.” C.B.
Chad Bonham is an 18-year veteran freelance journalist, published author and volunteer youth pastor from Broken Arrow, Okla. He
is also producing a sports television show and a documentary about the Christian hip-hop industry for his company, Name Brand
TV. myCCM.org/chadbonham
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D
RIVAL BID
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9
LAST YEAR FANS NAMED PROJECT 86
A RUNNER-UP IN THE “FAVORITE HARD
MUSIC ARTIST” CATEGORY OF CCM’S
READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS. JUST
IMAGINE IF THE VOTING HAD TAKEN
PLACE AFTER THE BAND’S MOST
MELODIC ALBUM HAD BEEN HEARD.
By Brian Quincy Newcomb
“OUR GOAL AS A BAND HAS BEEN TO NEVER MAKE
THE SAME RECORD TWICE,” says singer/lyricist Andrew
Schwab of the musical changes on the sixth album from
Project 86, Rival Factions (Tooth & Nail). “The only rule is
that there are no rules. If there is a rule, it’s that we try
not to over-think things, that the music that comes out
is honest and real, spontaneous and from our heart.”
But Schwab & Co. realize their brave new music is
not for everyone, something they address in
“Caveman Jams,” a derogatory term used to criticize
their sound. In the song, someone complains about
the music’s aggression, asking, “Why don’t you write a
track that’s sensitive?” In the final verse, however, a
fan testifies how their music was integral to stopping
his downward spiral of self-destruction.
“That song was written to be funny,” says Schwab,
“given this is by far our most melodic record to date.
That song was definitely written as a response to
some experiences we’ve had as a band over the years,
but in such a way that we’re having fun with it. I tried
to approach it comically.”
Whatever Project 86 does, says guitarist Randy
Torres, the band’s goal is keeping it real. “Most of our
records have been a product of where we were at—
musically, spiritually, personally—at the time,” he says.
“Our first record is a product of the fact that we were all
super into hardcore, that really heavy music. But on the
next record, we were listening to different music, so it
evolved. The record for Atlantic (2002’s Truthless
Heroes) was probably something we thought about too
much. I think we learned from that—to stop thinking
so much about music and get busy making it.”
This time around, making music happened with the
three remaining members— Schwab, Torres and bassist
Steven Dail—continents apart. “Steve was in the
Netherlands at the time, because he was getting
married. Andrew was in Southern California, and I was in
Seattle,” says Torres. “We pretty much just wrote on our
own, and then emailed each other MP3s. We were
definitely collaborating as if we were right next to each
other, but we were using the capabilities of the Internet
to its full extent. Steve wrote “Evil (A Chorus of
Resistance),” one of the first songs we did; it was way
different than anything we’d done before. That
influenced all of us to write everything after that to be as
different as possible from things we’d done prior.”
“In the past,” says Schwab, “we’d just jam out ideas
together as a band. This time around, we were each
more prolific than we’d ever been. We ended up with
40 songs to choose from. We set the goal to perform
every song before we actually went into preproduction, which I feel really enhanced the
performances. From a sonic standpoint, this is the
first time we have keyboard as a featured instrument.
“Our major influences over the years have always
been hardcore bands like Snapcase, Sick of It All,
Sepultura,” says Schwab. “We were never really
influenced by all the nu metal stuff. I think we got
lumped in with that music because we’d toured with
P.O.D. and Linkin Park. Our influences have always been
different from that, and this record really blows the
doors off anything we’ve done in the past. This is the
most different album we’ve ever put out. The influences
on these songs came often from old goth influences like
Sisters of Mercy, Joy Division, Psychedelic Furs, the Cure,
Depeche Mode—all that ’80s mood music.”
Still not for the tame of heart, Rival Factions is more
melodic and approachable than Project 86 of the past.
Alongside the music’s aggression, the unfamiliar were
sometimes put off by the intense images of the lyrics.
“Our music has always been an attempt to resolve
honest, emotional conflict,” says Schwab, “to address
spiritual struggles that can’t be painted accurately or
referred to in everyday conversations held within the
walls of the church, the extremes of emotion.”
Aptly named, Rival Factions is a disc filled with
conflict. The band’s first single, “Evil,” Schwab says, is
as current as the latest Spider-man 3 movie trailer. “I
swear they almost quoted the lyric, the line about how
�every hero has a battle to fight within himself.’ Spiderman is fighting Venom that has become a part of him.
That’s essentially about how each day we have a
decision to make about which voice we are going to
follow in our own heads. That may be a real simple way
to express the battle between the spirit and the flesh.”
In addition to connecting deeply with countless fans,
Schwab—named “Best Lyricist” in HM Magazine’s latest
readers’ poll—has seen his approach influence fellow
artists. Just ask Falling Up’s lead singer/principal
songwriter, Jessy Ribordy. “Andrew’s lyrics have always
been a source of inspiration to me,” he tells CCM. “I’ve
tried to use more imaginative metaphors and things
that are more symbolic, so that the songs can mean
more things and have a bigger impact.”
Schwab says the song title “The Forces of Radio Have
Dropped a Viper into the Rhythm Section,” is a quote
from a Seattle disc jockey, and “it works because the
drumming on that song is intense. It’s about having
moved on from a relationship or a situation that you
needed to leave behind because it was questionable or
destructive. The song is about revisiting those
memories; the past comes back to bite you.
“I think it’s a reflection of the human soul,”
responds Schwab to the idea that his conflict-driven
lyrics strike some as excessive. “In Christian culture
today, there is that desire to live in this place where
everything is soft and smooth, politically correct and
comfortable, and we’re afraid to face the harsh
realities of life. But the metaphor of extreme
situations applies so well to the spiritual life, because
it was in violence that Christ paid for our sins; it’s not
for the faint of heart.”
Brian Quincy Newcomb-Quincy is The Rev. Dr. Brian Q. Newcomb, pastor of Christ Church UCC in Maplewood, Mo., just left of St. Louis...and just left of
about everybody, for that matter. myccm.org/bqn
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he past couple years have been remarkable for Brian
“Head” Welch, guitarist and founding member of one of the
most successful metal bands of all time. Korn, the group
Welch formed with friends from Bakersfield, California,
spawned the nu-metal revolution in the ’90s and sold more
than 25 million records worldwide. Their rocket trip to the
top came at a price, though; one that included loneliness,
depression, self-destruction and a desperate drug
addiction for Welch.
The 36-year-old guitarist unpacks it all in his new
autobiography, Save Me From Myself: How I Found God,
Quit Korn, Kicked Drugs and Lived To Tell About It (Harper
One). From his early childhood in a typical, if not idyllic
American family, through his formative teen years and
his discovery of heavy metal, right through to the birth
and success of his dream band, Welch pulls no punches.
While certainly not your usual “tell all” (He, in fact, shows
remarkable restraint and respect when discussing
anything related to the band.), the memoir is also not a
typical testimony account.
Welch’s book reads like the reluctant but thorough
confession that it is—one spurred by obedience to a
calling. When originally approached about the idea of
writing out his testimony, he flat refused. “I don’t even
think I really prayed about it,” Welch tells CCM via phone
from his home in Arizona. “I just said, �No.’” In fact, after
a flurry of media interest and exploitation following his
public confession of faith and departure from Korn,
Welch disappeared from the public eye and went into a
two-year seclusion during which he focused on
increasing his understanding of the Bible and worked
out his new faith with anonymous fear and trembling
amidst a small and devoted community of believers.
“I was fresh off drugs when God revealed Himself to
me,” Welch explains of his first days as a believer thrust
into the spotlight. “It was such a real encounter that I had,
and I was just so happy that God was alive and that life
meant something different now. I was so excited to leave
the band because I wasn’t happy there. I wasn’t happy
being rich and famous. I was done with it. After I got
saved, I just went full force. I wanted to do interview after
interview. But now I know I was saying stuff that wasn’t
really right sometimes. There were some people that were
warning me and suggesting that I needed to grow in the
Lord and take some time with Him. I went into seclusion
until very recently. I’ve been in hibernation.”
The seclusion turned out to be a difficult but important
part of the journey for Welch. “Pain, pain, pain,” he says of
the process God took him through. “I went through
brokenness, and I went through tears. I cried. I’m still in a
phase of healing and brokenness. I had to learn about the
cross. I had to learn about love. I had to learn about
suffering. I had to learn about all that stuff of the
Kingdom, and I’m still learning. I thank God for the
seclusion. I thank God that He settled me down to just
chill for a while and learn about His ways.”
The time away from the public eye is documented in
the pages along with all that led up to it. Welch describes
his discovery of spiritual gifts and his eventual decision
to leave everything in California and build a quiet new
life for his daughter and himself in Phoenix, Arizona. He
spent the last two years writing and recording music for
what will be his solo debut, eventually deciding to
chronicle his story in written form after all.
Though Welch’s publicist insisted CCM not ask him
questions about his future musical plans (ostensibly due
to unsettled contractual issues), the artist goes on to give
several hints without provocation. “I believe God has
called me as a kind of prophetic voice,” he offers at one
point. “My music is pretty prophetic. It’s really heavy. I’ve
actually finished my first album, and I’m going to mix it in
a couple weeks.” In regards to his decision to keep details
under wraps for now, Welch indicates a specific reason for
the ambiguity. “I want to get my testimony out there to
show everyone what happened to me,” he says. “I want
people to know where my music is coming from.”
Getting that music out is next on the agenda, but for
now, it’s all about getting his story told, and told
accurately. He felt it was important as an act of
confession and obedience to God. An early attempt at
using a ghost writer left him unsatisfied before suddenly
going on a writing tear that shocked him thoroughly.
“I’m not a good writer,” he readily admits, “and I’ve never
been good with school and stuff like that.” But once he
started, the words just flowed and, in short order, he had
hundreds of pages done. “The Lord just totally anointed
me to pour out my life onto these pages. I would sit
there for six to eight hours just typing. I’ve never typed
in my life, but for eight to 10 months it just flowed out
of me!” The resulting 225 pages of dark and often
shocking details are immediately accessible and
surprisingly engrossing. In the end, they are also
inspiring.
And his goals for the book? “My dream is that it would
ignite a hunger in the hearts of Christians to know God
deeper and to press into more of Him. There’s nothing
else that will satisfy us!” He also hopes his story might
help other drug addicts get clean.
“Another message that I want to get across,” he
continues, “is that I was able to test-drive this world. I got
the fame and the money. I tried all the drugs, the women
and all that stuff. And when Christ touched me, none of that
stuff compared. I would be content if the Lord called me to
be a quiet guy who was never out in the public anymore. I
could pray to Him and intercede and never have a bunch of
material possessions and never have the fame again. I
would be so happy because Christ is the only one that can
fulfill. All that stuff is just meaningless without Him.”
Though there is a plan in place for his music, Welch is not
revealing it just yet. “I’m living day by day, you know? I know
the Lord’s going to give me more and more understanding
of my future and my calling as the days go by, but I just try
to take one day at a time because I’m still new, and I don’t
want to fall into pride. I’m still learning.”
“I went through brokenness,
and I went through tears.
I cried. I’m still in a phase of
healing and brokenness.
I had to learn about the cross.
I had to learn about love.
I had to learn about suffering.
I had to learn about all that
stuff of the Kingdom,
and I’m still learning.”
John J. Thompson has at various times previous—and is occasionally now—an
artist, author, pastor, music journalist and industry veteran. He founded True
Tunes and Gyroscope Arts and just recently moved his family to Nashville.
myCCM.org/jjt
[ccmmagazine.com] 35
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Sure she’s been
opening tour
dates for The
Fray and hearing
her songs played
on shows like
“Smallville” and “ER,”
but that’s not what sets independent artist
KATIE HERZIG apart. For starters,
consider some of the most incredibly
personal songwriting you’ll ever hear. And
then that voice…and her talent with multiinstruments…and…Is she for real? We
asked fellow recording artist—and former
CCM contributing editor—Margaret
Becker to find out. Illustration by Annie Herzig
every last bit of her Mbox gack, including a haunting little background vocal part, sung
through a guitar plug-in on “Not Even Close,” one of my favorite songs on the record.
SHE SAYS SHE SOMETIMES HAS A HARD TIME SAYING EXACTLY WHAT SHE WANTS TO
SAY. Coulda’ fooled me. Katie Herzig is an indie, the kind that writes brilliant songs, selfproduces a record, and runs around the earth saying the things we’re all afraid to say.
Her newest record, Weightless, is simply stunning. My only gripe is that it should’ve
come labeled with a WARNING: This record may induce feelings of euphoria and despair
at inconvenient times. May cause watering of the eyes and slapping of the forehead. May
make some songwriters wish they’d become plumbers instead.
Some fans already know Katie as a former member of the Colorado-based band
Newcomers Home, while, lately, others are discovering her thanks to recurring opening
slots for The Fray. Katie also contributed lead vocals to several songs on Sparrow
Records’ new conceptual worship album Oceans Above.
As she sits across from me in my mock studio, I ask her the question that’s been
burning in my brain ever since first hearing the 14 songs on her latest album Weightless.
“You did this in your bedroom???”
Smile, then, “Yes—on an Mbox [portable micro studio].”
Stammering, “An Mbox?! What kind of mics?”
To this Katie cocks her head and studies the ceiling. She offers up some letters and
numbers I don’t recognize, and does a few calculations, closing with, “I think they both
cost about…mmm…150 together.”
“One-hundred and fifty dollars?”
“Well, seventy-five each technically.”
Here’s the truth: For around the price of a good pair of running shoes, Herzig has
recorded a beautiful soundscape that will leave you spellbound. Rarely does a lyricist
catch you off guard, make you feel every raw emotion and deliver it all in a unique
musical package. Katie does.
The songs on Weightless are sparsely orchestrated, restrained. Every production
event on the record serves a purpose. Some of it is performed live—as in no overdubs
on the guitar or vocal. There is a raw quality to it. It’s quirky as well, with Katie using
36 [ccmmagazine.com]
I have a dream of living a life that’s easier said than done
Stare in the mirror, I’m unfascinated with everything I’ve done
I’m faking my way, living it down
Oh my God, I’m lazy and frenzied
Licking my wounds and moving ahead.
So honest, much like her voice, which has a girlish quality to it. Sometimes I hear hints
of Kate Bush, sometimes Feist, but always uniquely Katie.
She played most of the instruments on the record—no small feat. Guitars (both
electric and acoustic), banjos, programming (which is very, very organic), keys,
percussion; she is refreshingly melodic.
Katie says this is a record about sorting through life issues. You can hear that in my
favorite song, “Jenny Lynn.” Written for her sister, Katie manages to both encourage
and lament vulnerability, even admitting a hint of envy for those who are brave enough
to get hurt. One of my new favorite lines lays it out there:
Jenny Lynn, I wish I had your thin skin
I wish that I could let love right in
Maybe I’d rather feel the pain.
Listen—this record is simply brilliant. This is what being an indie should bring us—
fresh, unrestrained perspective delivered from the gut and delightful to the ears. If you
buy anything this year—buy this. It is authentic art. Weightless is a classic, and Katie
Herzig is delightful. And you will be changed by her work.
To purchase your copy of Weightless or to get more info, visit katieherzig.com.
Margaret Becker lives in Nashville with her handsome Golden Retriever, Max, and is an accomplished musician, songwriter,
publisher, speaker, author and philanthropist. Her forthcoming CD, Air, which thematically corresponds to her latest book
(Coming Up for Air), is slated for release later this year. Visit maggieb.com for more info.
5/31/07
(
QQQQQ
QQQQ
QQQ
QQ
Q
INSTANT CLASSIC
EXCELLENT
GOOD
FAIR
ENOUGH SAID
7:57 PM
Page 39
41
41
43
THE RETURN OF MXPX.
WILLIE WILL’S STAR IS ON THE RISE
WITH THE RELEASE OF REFLECTION.
WAKING ASHLAND’S MAINSTREAM
LABEL DEBUT
<WELCOME BACK,
GOOD
FRIEND
Having released two impressive and well-received
albums via the indie Militia Group, The Rocket
Summer makes his major label debut.
THE ROCKET
SUMMER
Do You Feel (Island/EMI CMG)
File Under: Power Pop
QQQQ
Since 2003’s Calendar Days, The Rocket Summer (aka
Bryce Avary) has been steadily churning out toetapping backbeats matched with endearingly
Hanson-esque vocals. Sounding like a younger, less
accomplished Ben Folds with a weakness for emo,
>
CCM_07.07_InReview.v3
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5/31/07
7:57 PM
Page 40
IN REVIEW music
<
Avary has carved a place for himself in
the power pop scene with a unique
combination of faith-tinged lyrics,
power chords and piano. Now, The
Rocket Summer is back with Do You Feel.
TRS’ previous release, 2005’s Hello,
Good Friend, would be a tough act for
any performer to follow. A nearly
flawless album, its only true pitfall was
its lack of a broad emotional spectrum.
Even the sad songs sounded happy, and
unrealistically so. Unfortunately, with
Do You Feel, this remains the same. Cuts
like “Taken Aback,” about a bittersweet
reunion of father and son and “Run
to You,” a touching commentary on
turning to Jesus, should feel more
somber than they do.
But TRS’ strength is in their
happiness, and that strength is
delightfully apparent.
The bouncy opener “Break It Out”
sets the tone for the 12 solid tracks
that follow. As was the case with both
Calendar Days and Hello, Good Friend,
there’s not a bad song in the bunch,
and they’re catchier than ever before.
Playful “High Life Scenery,” danceable
“Hold It Up,” and epic closer “So, In This
Hour” are particularly worthy of head
bobbing. And though there is a bit of
sameness from song to song, each cut
has some unique touch (like the
addition of saxophone to the album’s
encouraging lead single “So Much
Love”) that sets it apart. And if it
wasn’t already good enough, Do You
Feel has snappy, creative lyrics to
complement its musical prowess.
So if it’s upbeat songs and singalongs you’re looking for, this will
more than satisfy. Do You Feel is one of
the better power pop albums to see
release in quite some time.
THE CROSS MOVEMENT
HIStory: Our Place in His Story
(Cross Movement)
File Under: Hip-Hop
QQQQ
LEAVING A
LEGACY
Some say that
it’s best to retire
when you’re at
the height of
your career. The Cross Movement, a
flagship artist in faith-based hip-hop, may
be taking that advice to heart by capping
off its 10-year career with this year’s
release, HIStory: Our Place in His Story.
From the outset of the album, the
listener is treated to the unique blend
of forces that includes DJ Official’s
thundering beats, Phanatik’s wordplay
and the smooth flow of T.R.U.-L.I.F.E.
Tracks such as “Our God,” “Clap Your
Hands” and “Now Who’s the Man”
revitalize the crew’s identifiable sound
while sharing the importance of
elevating God in our lives. Purposefully
grounded in Biblical advice, the album
also addresses our need to find
identity in Christ, learn from our past
experiences and play our role in God’s
unfolding story of redemption.
If the rumors are true and this is The
Cross Movement’s last release
together, HIStory certainly stands as a
testament to the influence and
passion fans have been drawn to
during the group’s 10-year career. We
certainly haven’t seen the last of these
guys, however, as their careers will
continue as solo artists, producers and
mentors to the next generation. Quite
a legacy indeed.
CHRISTY GORDON
BRENTEN GILBERT
PROJECT 86
Rival Factions (Tooth & Nail)
File Under: Intelligent Hard Rock
QQQQ
THE HARD
TRUTH
Project 86
40 [ccmmagazine.com]
Spider-Man is not
the only one
battling inner
demons and the
dark side of self this summer; we all are.
Project 86 tackles this classic good vs.
evil theme on Rival Factions, the band’s
sixth full-length release and its most
original and enjoyable album to date.
With dark lyrics that tackle sin
nature and the struggle to do what’s
right, Andrew Schwab & Co. throw a
curveball at critics and fans with the
addition of keyboards, layered vocals
and odd sounds that add a quirky twist
to the dark mood. Not to fret, these
songs will rock you hard, but with
better hooks and more intelligence
than ever before.
The album opens fast with “Evil (A
Chorus of Resistance)” featuring a
classic sounding guitar riff, intense yet
melodic rock vocals, and lyrics that get
right to the point. “Deep in the recess of
every man is a thief, a robber, a
criminal/Below the surface of every hero
is an envy, a restless evil.” Then before
you start to think this is just another
Project 86 release, “Put Your Lips to the
TV” begins with a piano intro that
sounds like it was lifted right off of a
’70s rock ballad. The creativity and
surprises don’t stop there, as the band
continues to amaze and flirt with new
styles on the hooky and ’80s-influenced
“Molotov” and the progressive groove
of “Pull Me Closer, Violent Dancer,” two
of the best tracks on the album.
Fans will have a lot to love here, and
those who have not been into the band
need to give this epic doppelganger a
DR. TONY SHORE
serious listen.
JON MCLAUGHLIN
Indiana (Island/EMI CMG)
File Under: Singer/Songwriter/Pop
QQQQ
INDIANA: THE
CROSSROADS
OF AMERICA
Jon McLaughlin’s
debut displays
his astounding
skill as a pianist, only to be matched
by his sincere songwriting. While
many of Indiana’s songs have spiritual
nuances, the album contains mainly
thoughtful tunes about life and love,
showcasing McLaughlin’s gift for
penning beautiful word pictures
married with gorgeous, accessible
melodies and smooth vocals. Take
first single “Beautiful Disaster,” which
tells the story of young girls
everywhere. He profoundly sings,
The Cross Movement
“She’s just the way she is, but no one’s
told her that’s OK.”
Indiana opens with “Industry,” a
bold statement that reveals his
humility, finding McLaughlin pleading
for the “industry” to be taken from him
if he finds himself in over his head.
With a flair for beautiful phrasing,
“Human” is another obvious gem:
“After all we’re only human/Always
fighting what we’re feeling/Hurt instead
of healing…/Is there any other reason
why we stay instead of leaving.” The
music world needs more of this
transparent brilliance.
“People” is a remarkable opus to
humanity with stunningly intricate
instrumentation, while the title track is
simple and gracefully picturesque. In
contrast, “Anthem for American
Teenagers” soars with Switchfoot-esque
grandeur. With immense production
muscle behind each song, it comes as no
surprise that the album was produced
by Jamie Houston (Santana, Jessica
Simpson) and Greg Wells (Natasha
Bedingfield, Rufus Wainwright).
While the general market version of
this CD contains the song “Amelia’s
Missing” which features mild profanity
in its chorus (Yes, a word used
repeatedly in the Bible), it is replaced on
the Christian market version with what
becomes the most spiritually overt song
on the album, “Proud Father.”
No matter which Indiana you buy,
Jon McLaughlin’s bow is a must for
your iPod—one of the strongest
LINDSAY WILLIAMS
debuts this year.
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JOURNEY
MXPX
Secret Weapon (Tooth & Nail)
File Under: Pop/Punk
QQQ
VINTAGE MXPX
With a stake in the area of
longevity, pop punkers MxPx
have returned. Formed in
1992, the band has seen the
completion of a number of
accomplishments—all with only one member change,
which came only three years into their 15-year saga.
They’re a band with history, to say the least, and
they’re revisiting some of it with a return to their
original label, Tooth & Nail, marked by the release of
their eighth studio album, Secret Weapon.
Produced by Aaron Sprinkle (Anberlin, Eisley), the
album continues the band’s typical style with catchy
melodies and solid instrumentals. Lyrically upbeat
and musically superior to much of its previous work,
the band has successfully continued to keep the
same sound it’s always had. However, this has a
slight drawback.
Much of the record sounds the same after a very
short time. Individual tracks often blend right into
each other with barely any distinguishable aspects.
This makes for great continuity but a disappointing
feeling of hearing the same song over and over.
Despite this, a few tracks distance themselves from
the rest of the album, most notably “Shut It Down”
and “Angels,” which both feature standout
instrumentals and impressive chorus work vocally.
“Punk Rock Celebrity” is another track that, with a
very unique bridge toward the middle, marks itself
from the rest of the album.
With songs like these on their latest effort, MxPx
has no doubt continued their maturation as
musicians with the completion of a musically good
album, even if in variety it is a little lacking.
BRANDON HAAN
WILLIE WILL
Reflection (Beatmart)
File Under: Hip-hop
QQQQ
CLEARLY A HIP-HOP STAR ON
THE RISE
From Willie Will’s earliest
experiences, music was always a
family affair. With a quartet
singer father and a choir director
mother, he couldn’t help but have music in his blood.
But when his father often hustled because he
seldom had a job, Will learned the meaning of the
phrase “like father, like son” as he eventually followed
in his dad’s footsteps. That is, until he met Christ
when he was 20 and quit the hustling for God.
That tumultuous time in his life—and the sweet
redemption that followed—is what provides the
colorful background for the catchy rhymes of his
music. Having released three independent albums
that caused a stir in the Northwest, this Seattle-based
artist now makes his national debut with Reflection.
While tracks like “Bottom Dollar” and “Blame Game”
definitely provide the goods on the beats front, it’s
ultimately the lyrics that stick with you for the long
haul, providing strong evidence, yet again, that
redemptive rhymes are far from second rate.
In fact, with artists like Will, they make a far more
compelling artistic statement than the tired
braggadocio of artists in the mainstream hip-hop
scene. Need proof? Check out Will’s “We Don’t Back
Down” or “God’s Been Good.”
CHRISTA A. BANISTER
to THE
OF
WORSHIP
now
ster
regi pecial
for s bird
y
earl ing
pric
At seminars4worship you will:
• Learn the keys to leading your
congregation into deep and
meaningful worship.
• Discover how to design more effective
worship services.
MIKE FARRIS
Salvation In Lights (INO)
File Under: Jazz/Gospel
QQQ
SCREAMIN’ CHEETAH
WHEELY
• BE refreshed in God's presence and
renew your creative and spiritual edge.
• Develop a more unified, focused and
effective ministry team.
Learn from the best!
Having toured with the likes
of Blues Traveler, Sheryl Crow,
The Allman Brothers Band
and his own group, The
Screamin’ Cheetah Wheelies, Mike Farris’ eventual
entry into the world of Christian music has been
anything but typical. Not surprisingly, his second
solo effort, Salvation in Lights, isn’t typical either.
Teamed with a band that features Johnny Cash’s
longtime bassist Dave Roe, vocalist Ann McCrary and
a number of other obviously talented Nashville
musicians, Mike Farris offers a mix of jazz, blues,
rock and gospel.
The album starts on a high note with “Sit Down
Servant,” a lively African-American spiritual that
gives the band a chance to showcase the extent of
its musicianship. Quality is consistent even as the
feel changes from the darker groove of Farris’
own “Devil Don’t Sleep” to the driving blues of
“Selah! Selah!”
Expect a variety of musical styles centered
around a soulful vocalist. Although the solos leave
something to be desired in terms of length and
frequency, the band’s tightness and versatility
make this album hard to tire of. One can’t help but
want to hear Farris’ band live, freed from the
constraints of production.
JUSTIN POT
DON
MOEN
Lenny
LeAnn
PAUL
BALOCHE Albrecht LeBlanc
It’s a journey like no other
and you’re invited!
Gather and grow with others who share
your love for worship and God.
• Worship leaders
• Songwriters
• Vocalists and instrumentalists
• Technical, multimedia, and visual teams
REGISTER TODAY AT
OR CALL 800.503.0629
[ccmmagazine.com] 41
IN REVIEW music
CCM_07.07_InReview.v3
5/31/07
7:58 PM
RUTH
Secondhand Dreaming (Tooth & Nail)
File Under: Rock
QQQQ
YOU CAN’T
HANDLE
THE RUTH
After
several
years of playing
shows in both
Los Angeles and his hometown of
Portland, Oregon, Dustin Ruth tired of
trying to do things his own way and
decided to commit his plans to God. It
took a few more years before everything
fell into place, but he soon found
himself surrounded by a group of likeminded musicians, and suddenly they
were playing shows and selling an EP,
before finally signing with Tooth & Nail.
Recorded by the producer/mixer
team of Aaron Sprinkle and J.R.
McNeely (Jeremy Camp, Anberlin),
Secondhand Dreaming is a solid album
with straightforward rock songs that
somehow sound modern while evoking
flavors of post-’90s radio rock with a
singer/songwriter flair (“One Foot In,
One
Foot
Out,”
“Secondhand
Dreaming”), to songs with a definite
americana influence (“Here to New
York”), and closing the album with the
worshipful “Well With Soul.”
Lyrically, the songs on Secondhand
Dreaming deal with living life and a
dependence upon God to get through
the trials. Dustin Ruth sings with a
passion that shows that these are
issues that he has experienced, well,
firsthand, and his desire to proclaim to
others that God’s strength can see
them through the valleys as well.
Secondhand Dreaming, if anything, is a
ANDREW SC ATES
message of hope.
Page 42
POCKET FULL OF ROCKS
Manifesto (Myrrh)
File Under: Worship/Pop
QQQ
SOPHOMORE
TURN
As a follow up
to its highly acclaimed debut,
Song to the King,
as well as its two Dove nominations, the
second project from Texan quintet Pocket
Full of Rocks falls a little short. Lead
vocalist Michael Farren lacks the range of
Casting Crowns’ powerhouse Mark Hall,
which is needed for the charismatic
“Beautiful You.” His delicate, yearning
vocals are better suited to songs such as
“Who is This King?” where his David
Crowder-esque stylings carry the ballad to
soaring heights. Also, the track “It is Good
to be Here” is the best showcase of the
group’s vocal and instrumentation,
featuring a singable chorus and rousing
drum backbeat, reminiscent of its
previous single “The Welcome Song.” The
band’s instrumentation succeeds on the
jazz-based “Take Me There” but falters on
“At the Cross” where a lackluster guitar
line disappoints.
Ultimately, what Pocket Full of
Rocks lacks in vocal prowess, they
more than compensate for in heart.
What shines through in Manifesto is
the theme of grace, summed up in
“Even the Worst of Us,” where the
verse states, “Come you broken
lonely/From the rubble find your
place/…greater than our demons are
the open arms of grace.” Even with a
few uninspiring sequences, Pocket Full
of Rocks delivers a fairly substantial
GRACE S. C ARTWRIGHT
second album.
Ruth
42 [ccmmagazine.com]
Pocket Full of Rocks
TAYLA HODGES
Footprints
File Under: Pop
(independent)
QQQQ
PURE POP FOR
TEEN GIRLS
Not even yet old
enough to drive,
Tayla
Hodges
recently released
her debut album. The Washington state
teenager began singing at a young age
and wrote her first song four years ago
as well as the 10 other tracks that
comprise Footprints.
Geared toward a younger audience
both thematically and musically, the
album hits its mark. From the opening
track, “So Alive,” with its Stacie Orricoesque programming and digitally
stacked background vocals, the
influence of modern pop production is
evident. Tayla’s solid vocals work well
within the context of the music as she
sings on a variety of topics from the
rescuing nature of God to sexual purity.
Tayla shines most in her upbeat,
more pop flavored tunes such as the
title track, “Footprints.” Based loosely
on the poem by the same name, the
chorus has a perfectly crafted hook.
“Hideaway,” a track every teen could
relate to, exhorts the wounded listener
to not hide him/herself and boasts
some of the best songwriting on the
record. “Make Some Noise” has a killer
bridge melody that (unfortunately)
becomes a more typical youth group
sounding worship song.
Although she has some room to
grow as a songwriter and vocalist, the
talented and focused Tayla is one artist
it will be exciting to watch do that
growing! Footprints is a great pop
album for every young female teen in
your life.
To learn more about Tayla and her
music, visit taylahodges.com. Footprints
is now available for purchase on iTunes.
K ATE McDONALD
SEVEN PLACES
Glowing (BEC)
File Under: Modern Worship/Pop
QQQ
LESS ROCK,
MORE WORSHIP
It’s been nearly
three years since
we’ve heard from
Seven Places, and
a lot has happened in that time. With two
full-length CDs under the band’s belt, it
lost two members to label mate Kutless
and pretty much called it quits. But leader
Seth Gilbert continued writing and is back
with yet another worship-oriented disc.
On Glowing, Seven Places sounds less
like a rock act and more like a worship
band, which is fitting since this is primarily
Gilbert’s project, featuring members of
the worship team he leads at his church in
Oregon. While the band’s earlier discs
were produced by Aaron Sprinkle (Kutless,
Anberlin), Gilbert takes the reins this time
around, and the difference is evident. The
CD starts strong with the upbeat and very
singable “Glowing Hearts,” but then the
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Page 43
pace slows down, and the disc ends up
quite mellower than previous outings.
Another standout tune is Gilbert’s
arrangement of “Closer to Thee.”
Gilbert says his goal is to create music
that blesses and encourages Christians,
and, to that end, he succeeds. But in the
crowded world of worship CDs, there is
little to make this disc stand out, even
though there are a few songs that could
conceivably become a part of our
collective church worship experience for
KEN MUELLER
years to come.
THE SEND
Cosmos (Tooth & Nail)
File Under: Alternative Rock
QQQ
FALLING
FORWARD
Former Falling Up
guitarist Joseph
A. Kisselburgh
seems to have
made the right decision by leaving his
former band and calling upon the
services of Christian alternative rock
legend Aaron Sprinkle. While The Send
retains the emo rock punch of
Kisselburgh’s earlier work, Sprinkle’s
production adds immeasurably with
arena filling arrangements and
complimentary instrumentation.
The opening track, “Need,” stands
out especially as an instance where
Kisselburgh’s serviceable lyrics and
melodies are completely enveloped in a
mass of beautiful sound, courtesy of his
own guitar work and Sprinkle’s piano
and atmospherics. Elsewhere, the
memorable progression of finale “In
Repose” shows a pop sensibility that is
uncommon in the industry.
However, too often the solid musical
build of the verses, often constructed
around polyrhythmic drums and
interacting keyboards and guitar, are an
awkward fit for the simple emo chord
progressions of many choruses. For
example, lead single “An Epiphany”
begins promisingly with a piano melody
and guitar lead but starts to lose
distinction as those disappear in favor of
power chords.
As a start for Kisselburgh, this is a
remarkable step forward from his
previous material, and at 20, he has all
the time in the world to further forge a
path for himself as The Send. Already,
his music is showing a maturity beyond
his years, and hopefully Sprinkle can
help him successfully follow his muse
past his origins.
CHRIS MOLNAR
KEN MUELLER
BREAD OF STONE
Letting Go (independent)
File Under: Top 40
QQQ
A GIANT STEP
IN THE RIGHT
DIRECTION
With
several
notable
tours
under its belt
(including Petra’s international farewell
tour with Sarah Brendel), this Sioux City,
Iowa, band has much to celebrate along
with the recent release of its full-length
sophomore album. Letting Go is a giant
step forward in musical maturity from
the band’s first self-produced project,
Broken Vessels (2005).
Although a three piece (not
including lead vocalist Ben Kristijanto),
Bread of Stone creates a very full sonic
experience for the listener on the
highly palatable Letting Go. From
beginning to end, the album offers a
well-produced almost Top 40 sound
that leaves the audience with a sense
of familiarity.
Though not forging new territory,
the project is an enjoyable listen with
lyrics worthy of an attentive ear. The
title track features a praise-worthy
hook and great movement under
the perfectly blended vocals
proclaiming, “I am letting go of my
life/Letting go of me/I am letting go of
my life/I lay it at Your feet.” “Not My
Own,” another notable tune, is a
beautiful worship ballad with female
background vocals that give it a
singable quality. Tracks like “I Want”
and “Obsession” leave something to
be desired and fall short of nailing
the band’s true niche. Still, overall
the album provides enough special
moments to negate the importance
of a few predictable songs.
Check out breadofstone.com for
concert dates and blog updates from
the band. Letting Go is available for
purchase at indieheaven.com. Bread
of Stone is also currently leading
worship for the Song of Solomon
Conferences, so check their website to
attend a conference near you.
K ATE McDONALD
WAKING ASHLAND
The Well (Immortal)
File Under: Indie/Piano Rock
QQQQ
DO DRINK THE
WATER
Waking Ashland
made a splash in
2005 with its
Tooth & Nail
debut Composure, featuring the popular
song “Hands on Deck.” Heads were
turned, and the band eventually made
the move to general market label
Bread of Stone
[ccmmagazine.com] 43
IN REVIEW music
The Send
Immortal Records (30 Seconds to Mars,
Hot Rod Circuit, Scary Kids Scaring Kids).
With a new rhythm section in place,
Waking Ashland has refined its sound
and released The Well, a very listenable
CD produced by Chris Shaw (Bob Dylan,
Death Cab for Cutie).
This disc is less influenced by Ben
Folds than the band’s earlier work,
which may partly be due to founders
Jonathan Jones and Ryan Lallier giving
up some control of the songwriting
process. They explore the struggle we all
face as we seek to balance faith with
living in a fallen world, a theme
particularly evident on “Take Me With
You” and the jazzy “Diamonds in the
Hillside.” The band also puts
materialism under the microscope on
“Money” (though some listeners might
want to note this song contains one
instance of mildly “rough” language).
Other strong numbers include “Your
Intentions” and “Change.”
The Well is a solid outing that could
garner plenty of general market airplay
on a variety of radio formats (ГЎ la The
Fray) with quite a few toe-tapping, head
bopping, indie pop tunes.
IN REVIEW music
CCM_07.07_InReview.v3
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7:58 PM
Page 44
NEW
RELEASES
JULY 2007
JULY 3
Khul Rhema ......................................What the World Needs Now (Provident)
[CCM READERS SOUND OFF ON THEIR FAVORITE NEW ALBUMS.]
Marvin Sapp ......................................Thirsty (Verity)
JULY 10
Caedmon’s Call ................................Thankful: The Best of Caedmon’s Call
(Essential)
TOBYMAC
Portable Sounds
Da T.R.U.T.H.......................................Open Book (Cross Movement)
(ForeFront)
Half Past Forever ............................Take a Chance on
Something Beautiful (Brash)
Tom Hemby ......................................Chasing the Wind (Autumn)
JULY 17
Todd Agnew ......................................Better Questions (Ardent/INO)
Aly & AJ ..............................................Insomniac (Hollywood)
Between The Trees ........................The Story and the Song (Bonded)
“American Idol”
finalist CHRIS
SLIGH’s former
band releases its
national debut.
CO3 ......................................................Determined (Flagship/Infinity)
Sunny Hawkins ................................More of You (EMI)
The Mighty Clouds of Joy..............If Jesus Could Fix It (EMI Gospel)
Toby’s sincere, heartfelt songs show the
world that we are all weak at times and
can be strong only by our Lord and
Savior. The CD is musically diverse
(dance, rock, rap, even operatic) just like
his beliefs, with the passionate “One
World” to the semi-rockin’ “Boomin” all
the way to the end with the soulish
ballad of “I Don’t Want To Lose My Soul.”
Pure excellence is Toby’s work ethic. He
lives and breathes diversity, like we who
bare Christ’s precious name all should.
Lulu Hickey, Annapolis, MD
MxPx ....................................................Secret Weapon (Tooth & Nail)
Lashun Pace......................................For My Good (EMI Gospel)
Chris Rice ..........................................What A Heart Is Beating For (INO)
Micah Stampley ..............................The Songbook of Micah Deluxe Ed
(EMI Gospel)
The Rocket Summer ......................Do You Feel (Island)
SKILLET
Comatose
Various................................................The Best LIVE Worship Album…Ever
(Lava/Atlantic/
Ardent/S-R-E)
(Sparrow)
Various................................................YOW Reggae Street Gospel, Vol. 4 (EMI)
JULY 24
BarlowGirl ..........................................How Can We Be Silent (Fervent)
Pocket Full of Rocks ......................Manifesto (Myrrh)
pureNRG ............................................pureNRG DVD (Fervent)
Mark Roach........................................Every Reason Why (Myrrh)
Various................................................Absolute Smash Hits for Kids 3 (Word)
Skillet’s Comatose just blows me away.
John Cooper’s voice is simply amazing.
This CD kicks off with “Rebirthing,” a
powerful yet melodic song that makes
you wanna pump your fist out your
window while you are driving. The
album then takes you on a rollercoaster
ride of emotions, picking you up and
dropping you down. Every song is great.
Chuck, Muncie, IN
myCCM.org/judgement
JULY 31
Mandisa ..............................................True Beauty (Sparrow)
Michael Neale ..................................No Greater Audience (Integrity)
Jake Smith ........................................Real (Rocketown)
The Send ............................................Cosmos (Tooth & Nail)
Various................................................Kneel at the
Cross (Sparrow)
CeCe Winans ........................................Cece Winans
Presents Pure Worship (Pure Springs/EMI)
44 [ccmmagazine.com]
Former Falling
Up guitarist
JOSEPH
KISSELBURGH
makes his solo
debut this month. See Page
41 for a review of Cosmos.
BETWEEN THE
TREES
The Story and the
Song
(Bonded/Universal/EMI
CMG)
Between the Trees has a great sound
and amazing lyrics. A couple of the
songs on their debut are inspired by
Renee Yohe of To Write Love On Her
Arms [see “Faith on the Move” in CCM’s
June issue—Editor]. Ryan Kirkland,
Between the Trees’ lead singer, has a
very mature voice for only being about
20 years old. To anyone who hasn’t yet
checked this band out, please do!
Katie McNeil, Anacortes, WA
BUILDING 429
Iris to Iris
(Word)
Building 429’s new album is literally
burning a hole in my CD player. I
believe this is probably their best one
yet. I love how their rock sounds so
modern yet is worshipful at the same
time. This is definitely a group that will
have long-term staying power...
Building 429 just keeps getting better
and better!
Adrienne, Mobile, AL
myCCM.org/kahassler
RUSH OF FOOLS
Rush of Fools
(Midas)
Rush of Fools’ 11-song offering displays
guitar-driven melodies and poignant
lyrics sung with sincerity. Each track
demonstrates both joy and brokenness
in the Christian life as well as this
group’s authentic talent (They co-wrote
all 11 tracks, and Willis and Hughley
also co-produced).
Kristin, via e-mail
What’s your favorite new album?
Let us know at [email protected]
CCM_07.07_InReview.v3
5/31/07
7:58 PM
Page 45
Ever wonder what Simon’s really like
or just how much pressure comes with
being a contestant on America’s
favorite reality show? Well, in her first
book, Idol Eyes, Mandisa provides the
skinny on that—and so much more. In
a candid yet conversational tone, the “American Idol”
finalist tackles everything from her faith to her battle
with her weight. And while her story would be
interesting enough to read as a memoir, there’s
plenty of spiritual takeaway value that makes the
experience even more worthwhile.
MAX LUCADO
TRACEY BATEMAN
Without a doubt, Max Lucado’s books
have always resonated with the masses.
And while I’ve read a few of his most
popular titles over the years, most have
been a bit too touchy-feely for my taste.
But from beginning to end, Every Day
Deserves a Chance has surprised me (in a
good way). It’s not just another warm-and-fuzzy book
that’s chock full of touching anecdotes. Instead, Lucado
deals with the ups and downs of everyday life in a
surprisingly realistic (and encouraging) way. Ever have a
bummer of a day? Max Lucado feels your pain.
In what’s a great beach read, the
novel Catch a Rising Star is the story
of Tabby Brockman, an actress
whose character had been killed off
in TV’s most popular soap opera. But
just as she’s about to get a
professional break as her character
returns from the dead, she quickly realizes that
everything isn’t what it seems. To give more away
than that would be downright mean, so I encourage
you to pick up your own copy of this entertaining,
fast-paced novel.
Every Day Deserves a Chance (Thomas Nelson)
Catch a Rising Star (Faith Words)
Christa A. Banister is a freelance writer, author and blogger in St. Paul, Minn. Her first novel, Around the World in 80
Dates: Confessions of a Christian Serial Dater will be published by NavPress in October. myCCM.org/christabanister
LEIGH McLEROY
The Beautiful Ache (Revell)
On Bebo Norman’s latest album,
Between the Dreaming and the Coming
True (Essential), he sings about how it
was impossible to experience light in
everyday life without also experiencing darkness. Now, in This
Beautiful Ache, Leigh McLeroy further explores that
tension, especially in regard to the sadness (or
longings) that come even with the best earthly
achievements. Pointing readers heavenward, McLeroy
encourages without patronizing in this thoughtprovoking book.
ZACH HUNTER
Be the Change: Your Guide to Freeing Slaves
and Changing the World (Invert)
I know when I was 15 years old, I wasn’t
nearly as socially conscious as Zach
Hunter. But, with Be the Change, the
student spokesperson for The
Amazing Change Campaign (inspired
by the recent film Amazing Grace) is
hoping that more of his peers will join
him in his efforts to alleviate homelessness, AIDS and
more. While many might assume there isn’t much that
can be done about such pervasive problems, Hunter
assures readers there are plenty of small ways to make
a big impact. Bonus: The book also features an
encouraging letter from Switchfoot front man Jon
Foreman and props from Jars of Clay’s Dan Haseltine.
[ccmmagazine.com] 45
IN REVIEW books
MANDISA WITH ANGELA HUNT
Idol Eyes: My New Perspective on Faith,
Fat & Fame (Tyndale)
CCM_07.07_TourScrapbook.v3
5/31/07
By Andy Argyrakis
8:00 PM
Page 55
[TAKING YOU CLOSER TO CONCERTS THAN EVER BEFORE]
TOUR SCRAPBOOK
:
THE SHOW
ITSELF:
Anyone who caught the David Crowder Band
opening for Third Day in support of A Collision
(sixsteps) witnessed its electrifying stage presence. And
on this night when DCB was the only act on the bill, the
gang was able to perform a much longer set with a
plethora of fan favorites. Crowder dusted off his keytar
for an ’80s-tinged take on “No One Like You,” while the
band turned the old-time spiritual standard “I Saw the
Light” into a Texas hoedown, complete with a banjo
solo. Crowder & Co. also introduced songs from the
forthcoming Remedy CD, such as “O The Glory of It All,”
a track doused with Crowder’s momentum-building
style, merging lush acoustics with subtle electronics.
Add in some all-out praise (“Wholly Yours”) and some
joyous sing-a-longs (“Foreverandever, etc.”), and the
evening mixed the reverence of a worship service with
the grandeur of a concert spectacle.
DAVID CROWDER
BAND
A COLLISION CONCLU
SION MEETS A REMEDY
PRE
FAITH CHURCH—DYER,
IN
Thursday, May 17, 200
7
VIEW
FALL FOCUSED
After a series of solo headlining shows and festivals
this summer, the group officially launches the
“Remedy Club Tour” this fall with special guests Phil
Wickham and The Myriad. “It’s going to be so much
fun with both of them, and we’re going to hit [only]
clubs—a lot of the House of Blues venues and places
we’ve wanted to play for a long time,” Crowder told
CCM. “The venues are kinda small, so tickets are going
really quick, but it’s going to be an intimate
environment where we can really give back to fans
with an extended set.”
BACKSTAGE
BREATHER:
Amidst all the action, the guys had a chance to unplug from
show mode and try to top one another at video game bowling
backstage on their Nintendo’s Wii. As members took turns
tossing their imaginary ball down the TV-screen lanes, everyone
cheered and jeered the impressive and not so hot alley action.
David Crowder has been asked to sign countless
items over the years, from the obvious CDs, T-shirts
and stickers, to slightly less conventional
appendages. “I had no paper, so I thought this
would be pretty cool,” says 16-year-old Steve Lane
from St. John, Indiana, while holding up his arm. His
bud Drew Eenigenburg, also 16, from Dyer, Indiana,
took it a step further. “Different people have come
up to me and asked, �What’s on your forehead?’
and I tell them �David just signed it!’”
FANFARE
P.J. Gbur
Dyer, Indiana
Jennifer
Stevenson
Schererville,
Indiana (20)
(18)
“David Crowder
has a unique
musical style that I really like.
�O Praise Him’ was my favorite.”
“Besides tonight,
I saw him at the Passion
conference in Atlanta. He’s the
first artist who really touched my
heart, and it was probably the
best experience of my life!”
Andy Argyrakis is a Chicago-based writer/photographer.
He regularly contributes to the Chicago Tribune, runs a celebrity
column in the Daily Journal and writes daily for Concert Livewire,
amongst many other outlets. myCCM.org/andya
[ccmmagazine.com] 55
CCM_07.07_Roots.v3
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ROOTS
Page 56
[ARTISTS IN COMMUNITY]
By Douglas Kaine McKelvey
OPEN HOUSE
Robbie Seay, front man for Sparrow Records’ Robbie Seay Band, joined his brother, Chris, in a bold church planting effort. That
was eight years ago. To say that Houston’s Ecclesia fellowship has become a neighborhood church in the years since would be a
major understatement.
The most redemptive art is ultimately that which is drawn from the life of people
living in community. As such, it becomes an enduring expression of the common
life in all its facets: Love, work, celebration, beauty, laughter, tears and worship.
To create this kind of art, an artist has to know firsthand what it is to live in
relationship, experiencing themselves as a person among people, as a worshipper
among worshippers. The power of their work flows from the fact that their
creative gift is exercised as a gift to the community, not as a means of selfglorification. The artist is a servant, and his or her act of service is to create works
that are vital to the life of the community.
For Sparrow Records artist Robbie Seay, that kind of community life wasn’t
something he just stumbled into, it was something he intentionally and
prayerfully set out to create. In 1999, Robbie and his brother (author and pastor
Chris Seay) moved back to their hometown of Houston with the notion of
planting a church in the economically, culturally and artistically diverse Montrose
area. They imagined a community of believers that would reflect the diversity of
the neighborhood and a church that would become a hub for the life of the
community around it. They called the new church “Ecclesia.”
“We really wanted to be a part of the neighborhood,” Robbie says, “and it’s been a
crazy ride. We’ve been here eight years now. About 500 people come to our services,
but probably two thousand people a week use the building. There’s a farmer’s market
there twice a week. There’s an art gallery. There’s a café. There’s a recording studio.
There’s poetry night and DJ night and just all sorts of stuff that the neighborhood
really has their imprint on. It’s a space for those folks to call their own. Because we’re
believers, the gospel comes to the surface in a lot of non-traditional ways, but it’s not
backhanded and it’s not hidden. That building is a place where conversation can
happen and meals are shared and faith is shared in different ways.”
Because of where it’s positioned, Ecclesia draws in a wide mix of believers,
seekers, skeptics and broken people. In a given week, Robbie says, “We’ve got
everybody from big-time lawyers to male prostitutes and everybody in between…
We have a lot of college students, a lot of young people. And we reach out to the
homeless there, so there are a lot of homeless who join us on the weekends. It’s
just a really different kind of gathering.”
“From the beginning,” says Chad Karger, one of Ecclesia’s long-time pastors,
“Robbie has both reflected and shaped the spiritual development of the community.
Like the Psalms were for the ancient Hebrews, his—and the band’s—music has given
voice and melody to the contours of a people growing in Christ.”
“Ecclesia is where we’re connected,” acknowledges Robbie, whose band will
release its new album, Give Yourself Away (Sparrow), on August 14. “It’s where our
lifeblood is. A lot of our music comes from that place. A lot of it comes from
conversations and from sermons and from stories that happen in that community.
That means a lot to us.”
In addition to leading worship most Sundays, Robbie has also been
instrumental in gathering musicians, artists and worship leaders from across the
city twice a year to encourage them as artists and as believers.
“When we read Scripture,” Robbie says, “it calls us to make this journey in the
context of community. The Christian life is not to be lived alone. We believe a New
Testament church is one that’s open, honest and missional… A lot of our time and
efforts are spent missionally, and we’re finding that God really opens Himself up
to us when we give of ourselves and when we open the doors of the church and
realize it’s not just about us. It’s not about building some huge place. It’s not
about us feeling comfortable. It’s really about God opening the doors of faith to
us when we’re serving and loving those who He commanded us to love.”
The remote descendent of Scottish horse-thieving ancestors, Douglas Kaine McKelvey has
already bested the dubious achievements of his predecessors by penning four published
books, crafting lyrics for more than 130 recorded songs and launching lyrichead.com and
myCCM.org/lyrichead.
56 [ccmmagazine.com]
CCM_07.07_Classifieds.v3
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Page 57
CLASSIFIEDS
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country and present a motivational program
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CCM [ISSN 1524–7848] is published monthly by Salem Publishing. Copyright: CCM © 2007 by
Salem Publishing, 104 Woodmont Blvd., Suite 300, Nashville, TN 37205. Contents may not be
reproduced in any manner, either whole or in part, without prior written permission of the
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[ccmmagazine.com] 57
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THE FINAL WORD [with Louie Giglio]
WHATEVER
For far too long there’s been a great divide in the
Church between the sacred and the secular, the
former being important in the eyes of God and the
latter amounting to little or nothing at all. While
it’s true that some things are temporal and
fleeting, while others last forever, God never
intended for us to bail on worldly endeavors.
Rather, His call is to penetrate every inch of
humanity as a means of reflecting His light and
love to every person alive.
Such thinking amplifies the heart of true
worship, which is less about our “spiritual”
gatherings and far more about what happens
everywhere else we spend our days. Thus, Paul
makes a powerfully freeing, yet convicting
statement when he writes: And whatever you do,
whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the
Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through
Him (Colossians 3:17, NIV). In other words, it’s not
what you do that matters most, rather doing
whatever you do for the one name that lasts forever.
Each of us has a passion that ceaselessly stirs
within, something that captivates our desires and
dreams—something we’re uniquely wired to do.
For some it’s fine art, fashion, law or linguistics,
while others get cranked up about motherhood,
mergers or microbiology.
The key is that we never view these pursuits as
sub-spiritual options. There isn’t anything more
spiritual about being a pastor than a banker, a
missionary or a musician. Some desperately
desire to plant a church, while others dream of
creating the new IT solution that will enable that
church to function better. Both are just as valid in
the eyes of God, because, at the end of the day, we
are not rewarded for our field of pursuit, rather for
the way we made Jesus famous in the moments we
were given in this life.
If every follower of Jesus abandoned all
“secular” pursuits and joined the church staff, that
wouldn’t leave much glimmering light in the halls
of power or the towers of commerce. So we must
lose the tyranny of comparisons and instead dig
into the heart of the matter—namely, the
motivation behind the “whatever” we choose to do.
If we’re pursuing our dream out of self-indulgence
or to take a stab at earthly acclaim, riches or fame, we
are deluding ourselves and guaranteeing a tiny,
shriveling payoff for our fleeting journey on earth.
But Paul offers another prize and a greater purpose
when he summons us to do everything we do (in
word or in deed) in Jesus’ name. And why wouldn’t
we? We’re carrying rescue in our hearts as a result of
the staggering reality of the cross that bears His
name. Why would we not abandon self to live for a
more durable fame than our own? He’s the Creator
and Redeemer of all.
Each of us is holding something precious in our
hands, a sacred trust of talent and opportunity that
is a gift from God. It’s likely that what’s in my hands
is different from what He’s placed in yours. But the
cross unifies our purpose, assuring that both can
(and should) be leveraged for the name that
outshines all names.
So often Christians live such indistinguishable
lives in the “secular” arena, while shining so vividly
within the confines of the church. But the challenge
is for us to make a mark in the streams of culture,
which requires a massive devotion of life and energy
to the end that we do whatever we do with an
excellence, authenticity and Christ-like spirit that is
unmatched in the world.
It’s clear in Scripture that people will never hear
and know the face of Christ without a “preacher,” but
there’s a good chance they’re not searching for
someone in a suit with a podium between his
proclamation and their dilemma. I say this, though
often sans pulpit, as a communicator of God’s Story.
So I’m not knocking us preachers. But I believe the
world is waiting for someone elbow to elbow with
them in their daily pursuits who is exporting a
completely different Kingdom mentality by the
character they reflect in all they do.
So feel free to do “whatever,” as long as you can do
it all in His name. And do every single ounce in such a
way that makes the world wonder what makes you
tick the way you do. In that moment a door will open
to an audience who doesn’t realize they just asked
possibly the only preacher they know to tell them of a
God who is greater than everything they’ve ever seen.
A passionate communicator and author, Louie Giglio is the
founder of Passion Conferences, a collegiate movement
calling people around the world to lives that spread God’s
fame. Giglio also heads sixsteps records, a label partner with
EMI CMG, and home to artist-worshipers Chris Tomlin, David
Crowder*Band, Matt Redman and Charlie Hall.
268generation.com
58 [ccmmagazine.com]
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