close

Enter

Log in using OpenID

Aerial school on marijuana teaches how to spot plants

embedDownload
INSIDE
58551 69301
Poker Run helps
Phoenix Hospice
..........Page A-7
............Page A-3
The Ukiah
World briefly
.......Page A-2
7
Community
sports digest
0
50 cents tax included
ON THE MARKET
Guide to local real estate
.......................................Inside
Mendocino County’s
local newspaper
DAILY JOURNAL
ukiahdailyjournal.com
44 pages, Volume 148 Number 82
Tomorrow: Sunny
most of the day
FRIDAY
June 30, 2006
email: [email protected]
Aerial school on marijuana
teaches how to spot plants
Local class draws agencies
from around the country
By BEN BROWN
The Daily Journal
Pilots from law enforcement agencies throughout the country have been
in Mendocino County this week learning to identify marijuana gardens from
the air at the Aerial Observation
School.
Forty-two students from across
California and as far away as the East
Coast have been flying above
Mendocino County’s national forests
and private forest land learning to spot
the illegal gardens.
“It’s the biggest class we’ve run,”
said Rusty Noe, commander of the
County of Mendocino Marijuana
Eradication Team.
Pilots and students fly deep into the
forests and try to find marijuana gar-
CITY OF UKIAH
dens that Noe and members of COMMET have already identified. Noe
said marijuana gardens can be recognized from the air because they are a
different color than forest undergrowth and the plants are laid out in
an ordered fashion..
Because of their size, Noe said he
had seen gardens as large as half a
mile across; pilots can often identify
See MARIJUANA, Page A-13
Isaac Eckel/The Daily Journal
Forty-two students and 10 helicopters from throughout
California and the U.S. came to Ukiah this week for the
Aerial Observation School, a training hosted by the County
of Mendocino Marijuana Eradication Team.
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
FLOOD DAMAGE REPAIRS UNDER WAY
Beltrami
to fill in
as CEO
Council
says yes
to budget
By KATIE MINTZ
The Daily Journal
The Ukiah City Council
approved the Fiscal Year
2006-2007 budget Thursday
morning, following a full day
of
budget
hearings
Wednesday. The budget
shows about $11.2 million in
appropriations, not including
those that will be made possible by Measure S sales tax
money.
Revenues are also expected to be about $1.4 million
more than they were in 20052006 at $10.7 million. The
Measure S sales tax is also
expected to bring in about
$1.8 million.
Other highlights include:
•About $1.2 million earmarked for Measure S expenditures to benefit public safety, which will be used to fund
several police and fire positions and purchase two police
patrol cars among other
things.
Other requests from the
Fire and Public Works
Departments
are
being
researched by staff for further
consideration at a City
Council meeting. Additional
proposals from the Fire
Department included requests
for a $22,000 swiftwater rescue boat and $20,000 for
updating Hazardous Materials
and Urban Search and Rescue
equipment. The Public Works
department requested adding
a project manager position
and also suggested four roads
projects for consideration,
one of which included
$250,000 to cover partial
costs of installing two traffic
signals at the Perkins Street
exit.
•The addition of 14 staff
Brings 25 years of
experience with county
By KATIE MINTZ
The Daily Journal
Isaac Eckel/The Daily Journal
Tim Mitchell with GCCI Inc. of Santa Rosa works Tuesday to repair one of the flood damaged areas of Hopland Elementary School.
Hopland School being rebuilt
Some funding received,
but more is needed
By LAURA MCCUTCHEON
The Daily Journal
Ray Cook of Morten Smith Electric puts the final touches
on an outlet at Hopland School. Construction crews are
working to get the school ready by August and the start
of the new school year.
Money for renovating Hopland
Elementary School continues to
trickle in, but even the most generous donations don’t give Ukiah
Unified the cash flow it needs to
cover the cost of repairs to the
flood-damaged facility.
GCCI Incorporated, of Santa
Rosa, was hired in May to repair
structural damage to the school,
which was among the hardest hit in
the New Year’s Eve weekend
flood.
The cost of the project is estimated at around $1.2 million.
Several hundred thousand dollars
worth of contents, such as textSee HOPLAND, Page A-12
See BUDGET, Page A-12
See COUNTY, Page A-13
Summer school grant received
SH Cowell Foundation contributes
$75,000 to Ukiah Unified program
By LAURA MCCUTCHEON
The Daily Journal
One of Ukiah Unified’s lowest performing groups
of students will benefit most from a $75,000 grant
awarded to the district for its elementary summer
school program.
In fact, twice as many students this year, compared to last year, are enrolled in the English
Language Learners kindergarten-through-secondgrade summer program. This year’s six week program is also two weeks longer than last year’s.
When the Mendocino County Board
of Supervisors reconvened in open session after nearly two hours of closed session at Thursday evening’s special meeting called to appoint an interim chief
executive officer, things seemed eerily
similar to the day before.
But Chairman David Colfax delivered
surprising news. The seemingly split
board that decided to terminate CEO
John Ball’s services Wednesday afternoon had reached a unanimous decision.
With five votes of approval -Supervisor Hal Wagenet’s coming from
Monterey by teleconference -- Al
Beltrami was selected as the county’s
interim CEO, bringing a quarter-century
of experience to the table. Beltrami
served as Mendocino County’s chief
administrative officer from about 1965
until 1990 when he retired.
“The board anticipates that this
arrangement will be in place for approximately three to six months, during
which time the board and interim CEO
will prioritize the needs of the organization in preparation for recruitment for a
permanent CEO,” Colfax said in his
announcement.
Colfax then introduced Beltrami, who
thanked him from the entrance of the
supervisors’ chambers.
“Chairman, thank you for the opportunity of serving the county again -- for
a while,” Beltrami said.
During his expected short stint,
Beltrami hopes to come to the county
with a fresh view.
“It’s a serious, serious responsibility
right now with the situation as it is,”
Beltrami said. “I think following Mr.
Ball will be a difficult period, but I think
it’s also an opportunity.”
When Dolores Fisette, UUSD assistant superintendent of educational services, learned funding for
the program had been lost, she applied for an education grant. Her efforts paid off when the SH Cowell
Foundation awarded the district $75,000 of the
$177,544 the local elementary summer school costs.
“For the last two years Migrant Ed paid for a prevention program for K through 2 English learners,
however, their funding was cut and without the support of the SH Cowell Foundation we would not
have been able to offer summer school for this age,”
Fisette said.
“We also doubled the size. Last year we offered a
See GRANT, Page A-12
WAITING FOR WORD
Millview expecting answer
on Masonite water rights
By JAMES ARENS
The Daily Journal
The Millview County Water District
is waiting for an answer from the State
Water Resource Control Board about its
request to purchase the water rights for
the old Masonite property in the northern part of the Ukiah Valley.
“We filed a petition with the State
Water Resource Control Board and are
awaiting their approval,” said Tim
Bradley, general manager of Millview
County Water District. Millview has
been in negotiations for Masonite’s
water rights since 2001. “We have been
negotiating for quite a long time on
See WATER, Page A-13
A-2 – FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
DAILY DIGEST
Editor: Jody Martinez, 468-3517
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
POLICE REPORTS
FUNERAL NOTICES
[\
Sgt. JASON JAMES
BUZZARD
Sgt. Jason James
Buzzard, died in Iraq,
south of Baghdad, serving
his country in the
US Army as the result of
enemy action. A native of Willits, Jason was 31
years old having
lived in the area most of
those years and also
Colorado & Texas, not
counting his 8 years in
the military. He graduated
from Ukiah High
School and had worked for
Masonite Corp
prior to joining the Army.
He was most proud
of his wife, children and his
EOD patch. He
enjoyed bowling, fishing,
watching sports, and
helping with children’s
sports activities. Jason
will be remembered for his
smile and eyes,
dry sense of humor, his
ability to make his
wife smile and know when
she needed it. His
favorite quote was “carried
by six or judged
by 12”. Jason joined the
US Army Feb. 18,
1998 and was awarded the
Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Army
Achievement Medal,
Good Conduct Medal (2),
National Defense
Service Medal, Iraqi
Campaign Medal, Global
War on Terrorism Service
Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas
Service Ribbon, Combat Action Badge and EOD
patch.
Jason is survived by his
wife Michele Buzzard
of Fort Bragg, daughter
Michala Rae Buzzard, son Tristin James
Buzzard, sister Kelly
Lyn MacMillan of Ukiah,
parents Jerry & Marilyn Buzzard of Ukiah,
grandfather & grandmother Darrell & Faye
Buzzard, grandmother
Ruby Stoughton, numerous
uncles, aunts &
cousins. He was preceded
in death by his
grandfather James
Stoughton and uncle Darrell Kenneth Buzzard.
Friends and family are
invited to attend a visitation at The Eversole
Mortuary on Friday,
June 30, 2006 beginning at
9:00 am. Funeral
Service will commence at
1:00 PM at The Eversole Mortuary with interment to follow at the
Ukiah Cemetery. Memorial
contributions may
be made to Jason’s company: Buzzards Wolfpack, in memory of Jason
Buzzard, or to the
Michala Buzzard and
Tristin Buzzard College
Trust Fund c/o Savings
Bank of Mendocino
County, 200 N. School St.,
PO Box 3600,
Ukiah, CA 95482.
“Final Inspection”
A dead soldier was facing
God,
For lives will always pass;
He hoped his shoes were
shining,
Just as brightly as his brass.
“Step forward now
How shall I deal with you;
Have you always turned the
other cheek,
To my Bible always true?”
The soldier snapped to
attention,
“No, Lord, I guess I aint;
It seems that we who carry
guns,
Can’t always be a saint.”
“I’ve had to work most
Sundays,
My work was always rough;
At times I have been violent,
Because the job was tough.”
“But, I never took a penny,
That wasn’t mine to keep;
Though I worked a lot of
overtime,
When my bills became too
steep.”
“I never passed a cry for help,
But often shook with fears,
And sometimes, God, forgive
me,
I have wept unmanly tears.”
“I know I don’t deserve a
place,
Among these good folks here;
They never wanted me
around,
Unless a war was near.”
“But if you have room for me,
It need not be too grand;
I never had, or needed much,
I’m sure you understand.”
A silence fell around that
throne,
Where saints had often trod;
The dead soldier, with baited
breath,
Feared judgment from his
God.
“Step forward now, U.S.
Soldier,
You’ve borne your burdens
well;
Walk peacefully on Heaven’s
streets,
You’ve done your time in
hell.”
[\
BERTIE (DUFFLE) WISE
Passed away on June 28,
2006
in
the
home
of her son and daughter-inlaw,
in
Henderson,
Nevada. She was 88 years
old.
One of eight siblings, she
was
born
in
Paragould, Ark. spending the
last year in her son’s
home and prior to that
Ukiah, Ca. She was
very active in the Ukiah
community with First
Baptist Church and as a
volunteer at the local
Hospital.
She survived her first
husband, Fred Duffel
and second husband Dick
Wise
and
is
survived by her son (Gary
Duffle) and daughterin-law (Nicole), granddaughter (Lori Decaro),
and sister (Betty Brooks) in
Colorado.
Services will be held on
Friday, July 7th at
1:00pm at the First Baptist
Church
in
Ukiah,
Ca. Internment to follow
afterwards.
The family requests
donations be made in
lieu of flowers to the First
Baptist
Church
in
Ukiah, Ca., 302 W. Henry
Street,
Ukiah
Ca.,
95482. 707-462-2779.
Please sign the guest book at www.ukiahdailyjournal.com. Funeral notices are paid announcements. For information on how to
place a paid funeral notice or make corrections to funeral notices please call our classified department at 468-3529.
Death notices are free for Mendocino County residents. Death notices are limited to name of deceased, hometown, age, date of
death, date, time, and place of services and the funeral home handling the arrangements. For information on how to place a
free death notice please call our editorial department at 468-3500.
The world briefly
Supreme Court rules Bush overstepped
bounds, blocks war crimes trials for
Guantanamo detainees
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Thursday
that President Bush overstepped his authority in ordering military war crimes trials for Guantanamo Bay detainees, saying in
a strong rebuke that the trials were illegal under U.S. and international law.
Bush said there might still be a way to work with Congress
to sanction military tribunals for detainees and the American
people should know the ruling “won’t cause killers to be put out
on the street.”
The court declared 5-3 that the trials for 10 foreign terror suspects violate U.S. military law and the Geneva conventions.
The ruling raises major questions about the legal status of the
approximately 450 men still being held at the U.S. military
prison in Cuba and exactly how, when and where the administration might pursue the charges against them.
It also seems likely to further fuel international criticism of
the administration, including by many U.S. allies, for its handling of the terror war detainees at Guantanamo in Cuba, Abu
Ghraib in Iraq and elsewhere.
Egypt says Hamas has agreed
to conditional release of Israeli soldier
has not yet accepted their terms, Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak said in remarks published Friday.
In an interview with Egypt’s leading pro-government newspaper, Al-Ahram, Mubarak said “Egyptian contacts with several Hamas leaders resulted in preliminary, positive results in the
shape of a conditional agreement to hand over the Israeli soldier
as soon as possible to avoid an escalation.
“But agreement on this has not yet been reached with the
Israeli side,” Mubarak said.
Gideon Meir, a senior Israeli Foreign Ministry official, said
Israel did not know of such an offer and would have no comment until Friday.
“In general Israel’s stance is as the prime minister said earlier, that the soldier will only be released unconditionally and
there will be no negotiations with a gang of terrorists and criminals who abducted a soldier from Israeli territory. There is
nothing to talk with them about,” Meir told The Associated
Press.
U.S. military claims gains against
al-Qaida; nine bodies found in rivers
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) — The U.S. military claimed an
advantage in the fight against al-Qaida in Iraq on Thursday, saying raids since the death of its leader have forced many of its
foreign fighters out into the open to be captured or killed.
Iraq’s bloodshed continued. At least 46 deaths from violence
were reported across the country, including nine bullet-riddled
bodies pulled from rivers — apparent victims of sectarian death
squads.
Maj. Gen. William Caldwell, spokesman for U.S. forces in
Iraq, acknowledged Iraqi civilians were suffering most from the
insurgency, accounting for 70 percent of all deaths and injuries,
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) — Palestinian militants have agreed to
a conditional release of the kidnapped Israeli soldier but Israel
BIKRAM YOGA
UKIAH
See BRIEFLY, Page A-13
Watch Repair
Intro Special
115 W. Church St • Ukiah • 468-YOGA
462-4636
LOTTERY NUMBERS
DAILY 3: night: 1, 0, 3.
afternoon: 6, 9, 6.
FANTASY 5: 01, 02, 13,
28, 29.
DAILY DERBY: 1st
Place: 01, Gold Rush.
2nd Place: 04, Big Ben.
3rd Place: 06, Whirl Win.
Race time: 1:48.37.
Abalone poaching
case arrests made
The Daily Journal
Three men have been
arrested on suspicion of
repeatedly poaching abalone
from an off-limits section of
the Fort Bragg coastline and
selling it to restaurants in San
Francisco, state Attorney
General
Bill
Lockyer
announced Thursday.
Lance Anthony Robles, 43,
of Fort Bragg, and Martin
Linn Holloway, 44, of Beaver
Marsh, Ore., were arrested on
suspicion of conspiracy to
harvest abalone and sell it
commercially, possession of a
controlled substance and misdemeanors for allegedly illegally catching and selling
abalone. Leroy Nicolas
Robles Jr., 41, of Fort Bragg,
was arrested on suspicion of
two felonies and one misdemeanor for allegedly harvesting abalone.
Lance Robles reportedly
sold his abalone to the China
House Restaurant in San
Francisco, and Leroy Robles
reportedly sold his to Bob’s
Sushi, also in San Francisco.
Lance Robles has two previous convictions on his record
for similar charges.
“Action is needed to prevent the Northern California
red abalone fishery from joining those fisheries that have
already collapsed,” Lockyer
said. “Poaching is the main
contributor to the demise of
this resource, and restaurants
that are purchasing illegally
caught abalone are also
responsible.”
The arrest of these three
men was made possible by
tips given to the Department
of Fish and Game left on its
CALTIP hotline. Anonymous
callers reported that Lance
See ABALONE, Page A-12
Service CENTER
859 N. State Street
(707) 462-4472
TIRES
Air Conditioning Tune Up
$49.00
• Free Duct leakage test.*
• Free refrigerant charge.*
• Free report showing system
efficiency.
539-S Main St. Ukiah • 462-2021
* To qualify you must be a PG&E rate payer. Approved by
the California Public Utility Commission.
Let’s
celebrate
new beginnings... new experiences...
Midwifery Services
Pre-Natal
Gynecological Exams
Linda Dashiell, CNM
462-5025
Medi-Cal and most insurances accepted
FD-24
How to reach us
Business Hours ...........468-3500
Mon-Fri .................9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Sat-Sun............................Closed
Business Hours...........468-3533
Mon-Fri ........... 9 a.m.- 6:30 p.m.
Sun.......................7 a.m.- 9 a.m.
Switchboard..............................468-3500, 468-0123
Circulation.................................................468-3533
Classified..................................468-3535, 468-3536
Legal/Classified Advertising.......................468-3529
Kevin McConnell - Publisher ...................... 468-3500
K.C. Meadows - Editor................................468-3526
Cindy Delk - Advertising Director ..............468-3510
Sue Whitman - Group Systems Director ....468-3548
Tony Adame - Sports Editor.......................468-3518
Richard Rosier - Features Editor..................468-3520
Circulation Director...................................468-3532
Newspaper In Education Services..............468-3534
UDJ Web site..........................ukiahdailyjournal.com
E-mail...............................................[email protected]
James Arens - Ag & Land Use.....................468-3519
Katie Mintz - City Politics...........................468-3523
Isaak Eckel - Chief Photographer...............468-3538
John Graff - Advertising.............................468-3512
Joe Chavez - Advertising............................468-3513
Victoria Hamblet - Advertising...................468-3514
Emily Fragoso - Advertising Asst..................468-3528
Yvonne Bell - Office Manager......................468-3506
The following were
compiled from reports
prepared by the California Highway Patrol:
ACCIDENT -- A singlevehicle accident that occurred
on Sea Foam Road south of
Du Lard Road in Shelter Cove
at 2:03 p.m. Wednesday,
resulted in the death of
Condof Hoke, 85, of Rohnert
Park.
According to reports from
the California Highway
Patrol, Hoke was driving a
1987 Volvo west on Sea Foam
Road when she failed to negotiate a left curve in the road-
The Ukiah Daily Journal
reserves this space to correct
errors or make clarifications to
news articles. Significant errors
in obituary notices or birth
announcements will result in
reprinting the entire article.
Errors may be reported to the
editor, 468-3526.
Formerly with Dr. Held
Two chapels for large or small services
On site Crematory and Columbarium
Pear Tree Center
CHP REPORTS
CORRECTIONS
1367 S. Dora St., Ukiah
Crematory & Evergreen Memorial Gardens
Personal Service 24 hours a day
462-2206
Those arrested by law enforcement
officers are innocent until proven guilty.
People reported as having been arrested may contact the Daily Journal once
their case has been concluded so the
results can be reported. Those who feel
the information is in error should contact the appropriate agency. In the case
of those arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of an intoxicant: all DUI cases reported by law
enforcement agencies are reported by
the newspaper. The Daily Journal makes
no exceptions.
A New Location
Since 1893
Eversole Mortuary
Bikini Season Need a watch battery
or watch band?
is Here
Stop By today...
$29
D. William Jewelers
The following were
compiled from reports
prepared by the Ukiah
Police Department. To
anonymously
report
crime information, call
463-6205.
ARREST -- Kyle Byrne,
21, of Ukiah, and Cheryl
Larvie, 18, of Willits, were
arrested on suspicion of theft
or unauthorized use of a vehicle in the 400 block of East
Perkins Street at 5:29 p.m.
Wednesday.
way for unknown reasons and
crashed into a tree. Hoke was
pronounced dead at the scene.
Alcohol is not considered a
factor in this crash.
ENFORCEMENT PERIOD -- The Fourth of July holiday weekend will be a maximum enforcement period for
the California Highway
Patrol. Up to 80 percent of all
uniformed personnel will be
on duty from 6 p.m. Friday to
12 a.m. Wednesday. Officers
will be on the lookout for
those not wearing seat belts or
driving under the influence.
Last year, there were 61
roadway fatalities during the
holiday weekend, one of
which was in Mendocino
County. The CHP also made
1,600 DUI arrests during the
same period, nine of them in
Mendocino County.
LOCALLY OPERATED MEMBER
В©2006, MediaNews Group.
Published Daily by The Ukiah Daily Journal at 590 S. School St., Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA.
Phone: (707) 468-3500. Court Decree No. 9267 Periodicals Postage Paid at Ukiah, CA. To report a
missed newspaper, call the Circulation Department between 5 and 6:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday, or between 7 and 9 a.m. weekends. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Ukiah
Daily Journal, Post Office Box 749, Ukiah, CA. 95482. Subscription rates for home delivery as of
March 1, 2005 are 13 weeks for $30.78; and 52 weeks for $112.15.
All prices do not include sales tax.
Publication # (USPS-646-920).
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 – A-3
COMMUNITY
Editor: Richard Rosier 468-3520
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
What’s playing
HOGS FOR HOSPICE
TONIGHT
MOONLIGHT MOVIE MADNESS -showing movie: Madagascar; at dusk; Alex
Thomas Plaza on School St.; free event,
refreshments available.
BLUE SKY BAND -- Country dance
music; 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.; Ukiah Senior
Center; 499 Leslie St., Bartlett Hall; $8
members, $9 non-members; adults 21 and
over welcome.
TACHIYA -- music; Himalayan Cafe;
1639 S. State St.; reservations recommended; 467-9900.
DJ DANCE MUSIC – DJ dance music;
with Smokin’ Joe; Perkins Street Lounge;
228 E. Perkins St., Ukiah; 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.
STEPHEN HAHM -- acoustic music; 6
to 9 p.m.; Potter Valley Cafe; 10761 Main
St.; Potter Valley.
GIGANTIC -- live rock and roll and
dancing; 7 to 10 p.m.; El Sombrero
Cantina, on the corner of Mill St. and Main
St.; Ukiah; no cover charge.
SATURDAY
STEPHEN HAHM -- acoustic music; 8
a.m. to noon; at the Farmers’ Market; on
School and Clay St.; downtown Ukiah.
BELLY DANCING -- Himalayan Cafe;
1639 S. State St.; Ukiah; reservations recommended; 467-9900.
REDBUD -- Live music; 7 to 10 p.m.;
Potter Valley Cafe; 10761 Main St.; Potter
Valley.
DJ DANCE MUSIC -- DJ dance music;
with Smokin Joe; Perkins Street Lounge;
228 E. Perkins St., Ukiah; 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.
BELTONES -- Country dance music; 7
to 10 p.m.; Ukiah Senior Center; 499 Leslie
St., Bartlett Hall; $8 members,, $9 nonmembers; adults 21 and over welcome.
KARAOKE -- Yokayo Bowl; 1401 N.
State St.; 8:30 p.m.; no cover charge; for
more information, call 462-8686.
UNDER AN INNOCENT SKY -- art
reception
for
Michelle
Ray;
Scharffenberger Cellars’ tasting room;
8501 Hwy 128; Philo; 5 to 7 p.m.; for more
information, call 895-2288.
PAULA GRAY ART RECEPTION -Rookie-To Gallery; 14300 Hwy 128,
Boonville; 5 to 7 p.m.; for more information,
call 895-2204.
Local Harley-Davidson riders will raise funds for for Phoenix Hospice on July 8.
Poker Run to benefit Phoenix Hospice
The Daily Journal
Harleys and Hospice? You might think
it an odd combination, but on Saturday,
July 8 motorcycle riders from all over the
area will come together to ride the back
roads of the county, win prizes and raise
money for Phoenix Certified Hospice of
Mendocino County.
The celebration will continue with an
“After Run” party held at the Redwood
Empire Fairgrounds featuring food, games,
prizes and live music preformed by Ray
and The Reveleers.
Pre-registering can be done any day
before the event or you can register on
“run” day from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at HarleyDavidson of Ukiah 2501 N. State St. where
the event begins. The event ends at the
fairgrounds in Ukiah where the after party
celebration begins.
The entry fee is $20 per person and
includes lunch, raffle ticket and pin.
Registered riders will follow a pre-determined route stopping at several locations
along the way to pick up playing cards to
form a poker hand. At the end of the run,
prizes will be awarded those riders with the
best and worst hands. A party will be held
at the Ukiah fairgrounds where barbeque,
salads, soda, beer and wine will be served,
games will be played and the tunes of Ray
and the Reveleers can be heard.
Phoenix Certified Hospice Volunteers
will be there serving food, having fun and
thanking the riders for there participation.
This annual event sponsored by Harley
Davidson is a community fundraiser and
for the second year in a row will benefit
Phoenix Certified Hospice of Mendocino
County.
Phoenix Certified Hospice provides
comprehensive end-of-life care to terminally ill patients and their families throughout inland Mendocino County including,
Hopland, Ukiah, Willits, Laytonville,
Covelo and Anderson Valley. As a not for
profit, Phoenix Certified Hospice relies on
donations and fundraisers like this to continue its mission of providing certified hospice care to those in need.
For more information about this event
or about Phoenix Certified Hospice of
Mendocino County, please contact Diane
Clerihue Smith at 459-1818.
SUNDAY
DANCE WAVE -- Weekly Freestyle community dance for fitness and release;
Mendocino Ballet Studio; 205 S. State St.,
Ukiah; 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; sliding
scale donation; 489-3345.
TUESDAY
4TH OF JULY FIREWORKS AND
CONCERT
-Redwood
Empire
Fairgrounds 1055 N. State St.; gates open
at 5 p.m., concert begins at 6:30 p.m.; tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for children
aged 6 to 12.
KARAOKE -- Every Tuesday; Perkins
Street Lounge; 228 E. Perkins St., Ukiah; 8
p.m.; no fee.
Drive carefully
this summer
I read the
excellent
“heads up”
from Gail
Viera’s
Letter to the
Editor
recently
regarding
defensive
and negligent
driving. It
was an
excellent letBy Kathy Davidson
ter and I will
not repeat
her sage advice, as it was perfectly written
and very appropriate for the time of year.
However, I would like to add to it.
There are more cars about in the summer,
and more children in those cars. When the
weather gets good the bikes and scooters
come out. Summer also brings tourists and
lots and lots of out-of-towners who have no
vested interest in our community other than to
enjoy its many attributes, eat, gas up an pass
through.
All the more reason to be more attentive. It
is hot and steamy, sometimes, and when temperatures rise so does temperament. Many are
not as polite or courteous as they would be
under other circumstances. We are, after all,
human.
So we all must be a little more on the ball
when transporting precious cargo like children, spouse, family members, friends, or
pets. Ms. Viera points out the sad results of
not paying attention to the fact that you may
be driving 2000-plus pounds of steel that is,
in effect, a killer.
Everyone has regrets later, and we all wish
we could push that “rewind” button during
certain times in our life, but once taken, a life
ACHIEVERS
Student art
honored
Castellanos at top
of competition
North Coast Congressman
Mike Thompson has announced
that Mayra Castellanos, a junior
at Ukiah High School, topped
seven entrants to win the
Mendocino County portion of the
24th annual Artistic Discovery
Competition.
Mayra’s winning artwork is a
watercolor and ink piece titled
“Pretentious Angel,” described
by judges as “reflective of the
current interest in Japanese
manga and increasingly,
American fashion illustration.”
The runner-up was Jisu Youn
of Mendocino Community High
School, who created an acrylic
painting entitled “The Sea Clef.”
Judges described the painting as
“pulled from imaginative sources
and carried out a broad range of
surrealism and post modern
invention with color and texture.”
The other entries included a
pencil portrait by Ayla Jewel of
Point Arena High School; a colored pencil and ink “Moon
Princess” by Jennifer Beauchamp
of Ukiah High; and photographs
entitled “Urban Rooftop” by
Ryan Keiffer of Ukiah High and
“Green Grass, Blue Skies, Seven
Months After Katrina in
Wakeland, Mississippi,” by
Heather Young of Ukiah Junior
Academy. Bob Rhoades, art professor at the College of the
Redwoods in Fort Bragg, judged
the entries.
As the Mendocino winner,
Mayra’s piece competed with
finalists from each of the seven
counties in the first congressional
district. The district-wide winner,
Kelly Gustafson of Woodland
High School, will have her art
displayed in the Capitol through
May of 2007.
of American ethnic studies.
The list of 2006 Whitman
graduates included at one student
from Mendocino County:
Cheyenne Cotler, senior sociology major was a graduate of
Willits High School. She is the
daughter of Lanny and Karina
Cotler of Willits.
Cotler graduates
from Whitman
College
Boston University
graduates Stutsman
A graduating class of 400
seniors -- a record number for
Whitman College -- received
bachelor of arts degrees in May
21 commencement ceremonies.
With new Whitman president
George S. Bridges presiding over
his first commencement, the ceremonies featured a keynote
address by University of
California professor Ron Takaki,
a pioneering scholar in the field
Boston University awarded
academic degrees to 5,487 students in May 2006. Among the
graduates was Ukiah resident
Steven D. Stutsman, who received
a bachelor’s degree in political
science.
Boston University is the fourth
largest independent university in
the United States, with an enrollment of more than 29,000 students in its 17 schools and colleges.
ENGAGEMENTS
Community
chatter
See CHATTER, Page A-8
Harvey-Little
Pirlot-Huff
Burke-Sangiacomo
Bob and Melissa Burke and Bill and
Vickie Sangiacomo announce the engagement of their children Emily Burke and
Corey Sangiacomo, all of Ukiah. Burke is the
granddaughter of the late Bob and Juanita
Burke; Les and Joanne Younie of Roseburg,
Ore.; and great-grandmother Mrs. Elody
Masolini of Westport.
Sangiacomo is the grandson of the late
Frank Sangiacomo and Mrs. Isolene
Sangiacomo, of Santa Rosa; and the late Al
Zurcher and Mrs. Elaine Zurcher, of San
Francisco.
Burke is a graduate of Mendocino
Community College. Sangiacomo is a graduate of Sonoma State University. The couple
both work for their family businesses and
have planned a September wedding.
Dana Marie Pirlot and Shane Aaron Huff, of
Albuquerque, New Mexico announce their engagement to marry August 5, 2006 at Redwood Valley
Cellars in Ukiah.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of Craig and
Karen Pirlot, of Gallup, New Mexico. She graduated from Gallup High School in 1999, and
University of New Mexico in 2004 with a bachelors of science degree in psychology. She is currently pursuing a masters degree in physical therapy at the University of New Mexico and plans to
graduate in 2007.
The future groom is the son of Steve and Linda
Huff of Ukiah. He graduated from Ukiah High
School in 1993; California State University
Bakersfield with a bachelors of science degree in
physical education; and University of New Mexico
with a masters degree in exercise science and sports
administration in 2003. He is completing a dissertation for Ph.D and is teaching at the University of
New Mexico.
Tara Jane Harvey and Anthony Paul
Little, both of Sacramento, have
announced their engagement to be married.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of Lori
Harvey of Ukiah. She graduated from
Ukiah High School in 1999 and from
California State University, Sacramento in
2004 with a bachelor of science in kinesiology and in 2006 with a master’s degree
in physical therapy. She is currently
interning in physical therapy at Shasta
Memorial Hospital in Redding.
The groom-to-be is the son of Paul and
Cheri Little of Lotus. He graduated from
Ponderosa High School in Shingle Springs
in 2000 and from California State
University, Sacramento in 2005 with a
bachelor of science in mechanical engineering technology. He is employed as a
project engineer at Granite Construction,
Sacramento Office.
The wedding is planned for Feb. 17,
2007.
A-4 – FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
FORUM
Editor: K.C. Meadows, 468-3526
VIEWPOINTS
Letters from our readers
Thank you
To the Editor:
There are many many people to thank
for making Ukiah’s 2006 Memorial Day
Parade the success that it was. First of all
those who so eagerly marched or rode in
the parade itself – and the imagination and
work that was put into their entries. And
secondly, all those who worked behind the
scene to make things come together. A very
special thanks to Capt. Trent Taylor of the
Ukiah Police Department (whose patience
and help provided this first-time-everparade organizer invaluable assistance) and
my sister, Barbara Webster (who not only
worked with me, but gave me some muchneeded moral support). Plus – and please
forgive me if I miss a few – the names of
those who provided so much assistance:
Charlie Kelly, Bob Parker, Jim Stephenson,
Jim Wilson, Rick Buckman, Gary Smith,
Alice Watkins, Cherie Blower, Joanne
Campbell, Marston Gillette, Sgt. Greg
Heitkamp, Jerry Whitaker, Richard Dale,
Chuck Johnston, Tim Norgard, Phil
Carnahan, Linda Phelps-Wilson, Carol
Hester, Richard Rosier, Charlie Sparks and
the Christian Motorcyclist Association,
Allen Ott and the Harley Owner’s Group,
the Legacy Vets, the many California
Conservation Corps volunteers, Roger
Kellerman, and Rory Tiedemann thanks
again to everyone! P.S. The roses were
beautiful.
Myrna Hurst
Memorial Day Parade Coordinator
THOMAS D. ELIAS
Arnold vs.
Angelides
rising hate and intolerance, widespread ballot fraud, and the decline of civil liberties.
At this critical juncture in American history, the intolerant haters in Congress want to
discontinue any law that gives ordinary citizens a fair right to vote. It’s no wonder
that they want to terminate the Voting
Rights Act 1964. MLK is probably turning
over in his grave.
Robin Cole Sunbeam
Ukiah
Thank you
What are the
sports priorities?
To the Editor:
Would it be too much to expect to see a
compilation of the final statistics for the
NBA playoffs, or the final series in the
championship round, or at least, the final
game instead of the, at best, pointless AP
story about a college basketball game that
will occur more than six months in the
future, 1,000 miles from Ukiah? What are
your sports page space priorities? Let us
also honor fallen heroes, Terry, Howard,
Harris, not to mention Bell, Nash, Prince
and Hamilton, who are disposed of like
used Kleenex.
Robert Gold
Ukiah
Sports editor Tony Adame’s response:
Thank you for writing in. Regarding the
NBA Finals, we would have loved to have
gotten in all the statistics for the series.
However, with time constraints imposed by
deadlines and the uncertain length of playoff games (add one hour for advertising in
the postseason) we have had to plan accordingly with both the availability of pictures
and stories. Therefore, our coverage isn’t as
comprehensive as, say, USA Today. We actually were able to run a rather lengthy story
on the Tuesday’s final game between the
Mavericks and Heat, which included very
detailed statistics and a well-written summary of the game. Our sports page space
priorities are, if there are local sports happening, that’s the priority. If there are not
local sports going on, then we will refer to
the Bay Area to see what’s going on there,
then national sports. But local stuff comes
first, always. As far as honoring the fallen
heroes, a.k.a. Terry, Howard and Harris, I
have but one question: What about
Nowitzki?
Voting rights at risk
To the Editor:
The Mendocino County Martin Luther
King, Jr. Organization (McMLK) would
like to thank the following event providers
and others for their support and participation in the 3rd annual Mendocino County
Juneteenth Celebration, held Monday, June
19 at 1 :30 p.m. in Ukiah. Thanks to Joyce
and Reginald Wiles for sharing their stories
and their perspective about Juneteenth.
Thanks to the Stewarts for opening up their
home for the gathering. Thanks to those
who brought instruments and gave a brief
history lesson on the origin of the instruments and a special thanks to Gloria,
Woodrow, Kevin, Samantha and Gene for
providing traditional soul food (which is
not available everyday in Mendocino
County). Juneteenth is the oldest know celebration of the ending of slavery dating
back to 1865. It was June 19 that the Union
soldiers, led by Major General Gordon
Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with
news that the war had ended and that the
enslaved were now free. One of General
Granger’s first order of business was to
read to the people of Texas, General Order
Number 3 which began with: “The people
of Texas are informed that in accordance
with a Proclamation from the Executive of
the United States, all slaves are free. This
involves an absolute equality of rights and
rights of property between former masters
and slaves, and the connection heretofore
existing between them becomes that
between employer and free laborer.” This
day was an important day in the history of
African Americans. “On the 1st day of
January, 1863, all persons held as slaves
within any state or a designated part of a
state the people whereof shall then be in
rebellion against the United States shall be
then, thence forward, and forever
free........” these were the words of
President Abraham Lincoln on September
22, 1862, as he read from the Emancipation
Proclamation. Classroom textbooks proclaimed Lincoln’s proclamation of January
1,1863 as the date signaling the ending of
slavery, but contrary to many history
books, the proclamation didn’t free many
slaves at all. One of the things many history books fail to note is that the state of
Texas didn’t oblige with the Emancipation
To the Editor:
Tens of thousands marched and many
lost their lives, including Martin Luther
King, Jr., during the Civil Rights movement. By 1965, Congress determined that
the existing federal anti-discrimination
laws were not sufficient to overcome the
resistance by discriminatory state officials
to enforcement of the 15th Amendment.
The Voting Rights Act was passed with a
time limit based on the logic of a better,
President George Bush: The White
more peaceful, tolerant, compassionate and
civil society in the future. On the contrary, House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washingour society today has evolved into one with ton, D.C. 20500; (202) 456-1111, FAX
(202)456-2461.
Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger:
LETTER POLICY
State Capitol, Sacramento, 95814. (916)
445-2841; FAX (916)445-4633
The Daily Journal welcomes letters to the
editor. All letters must include a clear name,
Sen. Barbara Boxer: 112 Hart Senate
signature, return address and phone number.
Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20510;
Letters are generally published in the order
(202)224-3553; San Francisco, (415) 403they are received, but shorter, concise letters 0100 FAX (415) 956-6701
are given preference. Because of the volume
Sen. Dianne Feinstein: 331 Hart Senof letters coming in, letters of more than 400
ate Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20510.
words in length may take longer to be print(202)224-3841 FAX (202) 228-3954; San
ed. Names will not be withheld for any reason. If we are aware that you are connected
Francisco (415) 393-0707; [email protected] a local organization or are an elected offi- stein.senate.gov
cial writing about the organization or body
Congressman Mike Thompson: 1st
on which you serve, that will be included in
District, 231 Cannon Office Bldg, Washingyour signature. If you want to make it clear
ton, D.C. 20515. (202) 225-3311; FAX
you are not speaking for that organization,
(202)225-4335. Fort Bragg district office,
you should do so in your letter.All letters
are subject to editing without notice. Editing 430 N. Franklin St., PO Box 2208, Fort
is generally limited to removing statements
Bragg 95437; 962-0933,FAX 962-0934;
that are potentially libelous or are not suitwww.house.gov/write rep
able for a family newspaper. Form letters
Assemblywoman Patty Berg: State
that are clearly part of a write-in campaign
Assembly District 1, Capitol, Rm. 2137,
will not be published. You may drop letters
Proclamation until approximately two and
a half years after Lincoln’s proclamation
speech. However, many classroom textbooks state little or nothing on the impact
of General Granger’s arrival in Texas on
January 19. Later attempts to explain this
two and a half year delay of this important
information was: that the bearer of the
information was murdered on his way to
Texas with the news of freedom; or that the
information was deliberately withheld by
the enslavers to maintain the labor force on
the plantations. But, the truth is buried
along with the person(s) who ordered the
delay. In early years of Juneteenth celebrations historically, most of the festivities
were held in rural areas because there was
an outward resistances by many toward this
celebration, that resistance resulted in barring the use of public property for
Juneteenth festivities. McMLK Juneteenth
events have all of the elements of
McMLK’s, McUSA (music, celebration,
understanding, soul food). McUSA is
specifically designed for McMLK’s countywide Juneteenth event.
LaCretia Peoples
Founder and Managing Director
McMLK
Ukiah
Flag or pole, or both?
To the Editor:
Is it about the flag or is it about the
pole? Mr. Piffero has erected a flag pole
which is 25 feet above the height which the
city allows on private residences. That is
25 feet higher than it is supposed to be
without asking for a permit. That is a lot of
feet!
According to city ordinances one can
fly any flag one wants to on one’s own
property and pole. I wonder what kind of
responses and letters to the editor there
would have been if Mr. Piffero had flown
the Mexican flag there instead of the
American flag. What response would there
be if someone was flying the Iraqi flag high
on the hillside? Or, perhaps a flag with a
woman in a bathing suit or two men hugging.
I think the problem here is that whatever happens on those beautiful Westside
hills, of which I live just below, affects the
visual delights of all that relish the natural
beauty of those hills. Sure, change is
inevitable. Differences of opinion there will
always be. And, people with power will
always try to exercise their power.
Perhaps some day there will be 25 flags
on 100 foot poles flying on those hills. My
goodness! This has created fuel for
thought. I believe that is a good thing.
Charlene Light
Ukiah
WHERE TO WRITE
off at our office at 590 S. School St., or fax
letters to 468-3544, mail to Letters to the
Editor, P.O. Box 749, Ukiah, 95482 or email them to [email protected] E-mail letters
should also include hometown and a phone
number.
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
Sacramento, 95814. (916) 319-2001; Santa
Rosa, 576-2526; FAX, Santa Rosa, 5762297. Berg's field representative in Ukiah
office located at 104 W. Church St, Ukiah,
95482, 463-5770. The office’s fax number is
463-5773.
E-mail
to:
[email protected]
Senator Wes Chesbro: State Senate
District 2, Capitol Building, Room 5100,
Sacramento, 95814. (916) 445-3375; FAX
(916) 323-6958. Ukiah office is P.O. Box
785, Ukiah, 95482, 468-8914, FAX 4688931. District offices at 1040 Main St., Suite
205, Napa, 94559, 224-1990, 50 D St., Suite
120A, Santa Rosa, 95404, 576-2771, and
317 3rd St., Suite 6, Eureka, 95501, 4456508. Email: [email protected]
Mendocino County Supervisors:
Michael Delbar, 1st District; Jim Wattenburger, 2nd District; Hal Wagenet, 3rd District; Kendall Smith, 4th District; David Colfax, 5th District. All can be reached by writing to 501 Low Gap Road, Room 1090,
Ukiah, 95482, 463-4221, FAX 463-4245.
[email protected]
Visit our web site at ukiahdailyjournal.com
email us at [email protected]
You hear the complaint all the time from voters:
"There really is no difference between the political
parties. These guys are all the same."
And some politicians deliberately try to obfuscate
the differences that do exist. One example: Republican
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has very cleverly adopted a largely Democratic agenda for the last eight
months after plumping for a conservative Republican
agenda for the previous two years.
This leaves it up to his Democratic reelection rival
Phil Angelides to make it clear there really are major
differences, big reasons for voters to pick either him or
Schwarzenegger.
Angelides has been trying to do exactly that since
the June 6 primary election, traveling up and down the
state with the message that he is the "anti-Arnold" and
has been since the former muscleman actor took office.
So, to a degree, has Schwarzenegger, whose latest TV
commercials imply Angelides would impose new taxes
on all Californians, while he really advocates taxing
the extremely wealthy and closing corporate tax loopholes.
Angelides is trying to highlight not only major policy differences with Schwarzenegger, but also what he
maintains are personality differences.
Among the broken promises Angelides mentions
are Schwarzenegger's pledge never to take money
from special interests, then accepting more than $150
million in campaign donations from corporations and
other interests that either do business with the state or
fall under state regulations.
Another promise Angelides mentions was the
Schwarzenegger pledge to "tear up" the state's "credit
card" and do no more borrowing if voters passed two
2004 initiatives designed to help balance that year's
budget. Soon after those measures passed,
Schwarzenegger began plumping for $68 billion in
new construction and repair bonds.
"There's a difference between borrowing to balance
the budget and borrowing to build the state up," says
Schwarzenegger spokeswoman Julie Soderlund.
To Angelides, though, borrowing is borrowing.
"The list of broken promises is long, both in both
personal and policy areas," he said in an interview.
"With me, what I say is what I'll do."
And what he'd do is very different from what
Schwarzenegger has either done or wants to do.
"If I'm elected, within one month I'll sign a minimum wage increase with an annual inflation factor,"
Angelides pledges. Schwarzenegger twice vetoed bills
passed by the Legislature that would have created just
such an increase. But he tried to obfuscate this by asking the previously moribund state Industrial Welfare
Commission - which had not met in two years - to
order a $1 an hour minimum wage increase with no
indexing for inflation.
Angelides also pledges to make good on a promise
implied in many of his campaign commercials, which
complained that loopholes allow corporations and the
wealthy (annual family income over $500,000) to
escape about $10 billion in taxes "they ought to pay."
"I'm going to ask them to pay their share because
fair's fair," Angelides said. "If I win on this platform, I
believe I'll have a mandate for it, and I will collar legislators and get them to close those loopholes. Arnold
never will do that. I'm not afraid of asking corporations
and the rich to step up. He's afraid of asking this from
even one corporation or multi-millionaire.”
With the money he might raise, Angelides says he
will "roll back state college and University of
California tuition and fees raised by Arnold." And he
pledges to "fully fund" public schools. What about the
fact that Schwarzenegger's current budget brings
school funding back up to what's legally required?
"When I say fully funded, I don't mean just what's
legally required," Angelides said. "If we just keep
limping along, our economy will never really be strong
in the long term. We need to make our universities
financially accessible to more of our young people.
But if Arnold wins, tuition will go up. I won't do that.
I'm not running for governor by running up the flag of
surrender."
Then there's liquefied natural gas, where
Schwarzenegger supports building large terminals to
import foreign energy supplies, a tactic that would lock
in current high prices for decades to come, no matter
what happens on world markets.
"When the Legislature considered a bill to require
full hearings on environmental and economic aspects
of LNG, I was the only statewide official to back it,"
he said. "I'll insist on that if I'm elected."
All of which means there are contrasts in this election that go beyond the obvious difference between
Schwarzenegger's flamboyance and the Angelides policy wonk personality. Despite some surface appearances and the lapdog demeanor of top legislative
Democrats whenever they're around Arnold, there are
real choices here, real reasons to vote one way or the
other this fall.
Thomas D. Elias is a syndicated columnist.
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL
Publisher: Kevin McConnell
Editor: K.C. Meadows
Advertising director: Cindy Delk
Office manager: Yvonne Bell
Circulation director: Cornell Turner Group systems director: Sue Whitman
Member
Audit Bureau
Of Circulations
Member California
Newspaper Publishers
Association
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 -A-5
C OMMUNITY
A-6 – FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
COMMUNITY BRIEFS
St. Mary’s rummage sale begins today
The public is invited to come to the bargain hunter’s bestkept-secret for some wonderful deals on everything from
clothing to cookware, books to blankets, jewelry to jazz cds.
Drop by St. Mary’s School’s bi-annual rummage sale and pick
up a treasure or two. Held in the school auditorium, the rummage sale will be open today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., on
Saturday, July 1 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., and on Sunday, July 2,
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday is “$1 a Bag” day but don’t
wait till then because your favorite bargain may be gone.
The rummage sale is currently accepting donations of clean
and gently used clothing and household goods. The school is
located at 991 S. Dora St. in Ukiah. For more information,
please contact the St. Mary’s School during their summer
office hours from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 462-3888 or Susie Levoe
at 459-9230.
Tuesday night McFarm canceled July 4
Vendors Michael, Grillas Acres, Phil Cool, Covelo Organic,
and Valerie, Debbie, Jim and Jo Gowan will be back in full
swing Tuesday, July 11 from 3 to 6 p.m. under the pavilion at
Clay and School St. The Tuesday evening farmers’ market
will continue through Oct. 25
CodePink Willits to bring
peace message to July 4 parade
Code Pink of Willits, the new group that created the
Mothers’ Day weekend peace parade in May, is now planning
a festive entry in the annual Frontier Days July 4 parade in
Willits. All are invited to join the CodePink entry starting at 9
a.m. Tuesday (the 4th) at the meeting area along Commercial
St. Look for pink banners and lots of people dressed in pink.
Bring signs with positive peace messages and wear pink. For
more information, call 459-3780.
Re-build Thrift Store to open July 1-2
The Ukiah Community Center (UCC) and Food Bank are
embarking on a new adventure. Beginning this weekend the
UCC is opening a thrift store that specializes on building
materials such as lumber, drywall, siding, fencing, flooring,
windows, cabinets, power tools and electrical and plumbing
items. They will kick it all off with a weekend-long parking
lot sale. The idea behind this came from a need to keep ongoing funds coming into the programs UCC operates such as the
food bank, crisis line, homeless services and supportive and
transitional housing and Coast Community Center in Fort
Bragg.
The community center is now accepting donations of any of
the materials mentioned and will even pick items up throughout the area. To donate items, please call Kari Hackett at 4628879 during the week of 272-1006 evenings and weekends.
The parking lot sale will begin July 1 from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at
the Re-Build store’s new location at 195 E. Gobbi St., and
again July 2 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Hot dogs, doughnuts and
beverages will be available on the first day. The thrift store
will then be open every Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. beginning July 7 and hopes to increase hours soon after
that. Come help the Community Center launch this exciting
thrift store.
HazMobile collects in Ukiah on July 8
The HazMobile household hazardous waste site will be
open in Ukiah Saturday, July 8 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. to
accept dangerous chemicals that can’t go in the trash.
The HazMobile also features a “free store” with like-new
usable products including paint, available without charge to
the public.
The collection site at 298 Plant Rd., located behind the
County Animal Shelter, is open every Tuesday (except July 4)
throughout the year and the second Saturday of each month
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The HazMobile is free to households but there is a limit of
15 gallons per vehicle per day (or 60 feet of fluorescent
tubes).
When bringing materials to the HazMobile, the public
should be careful that items are kept in their original containers (except motor oil which can be consolidated), that nothing
ELECTRONIC
PROTECTION
BY
DEEP
VALLEY
SECURITY
(707) 462-5200
Customized Wireless Security
For Your Individual Needs
Security Pro
Authorized Dealer
960 N. State Street, Ukiah
www.deepvalleysecurity24.com
LIC.#AC03195
1-800-862-5200
CONT. LIC.#638502
Sunday, July 9
The Skunk Train presents
a showcase of local music groups both
on board the train and at Northspur, where
you will also enjoy a delicious barbecue.
Music + food + the Skunk train
equals a day of fun for the whole family!
is leaking, and that all containers are tied down.
Toxic items like paint, antifreeze, pesticides, herbicides,
pool chemicals, gasoline, solvents, acids, bases, toxic cleaners,
mercury, household batteries and fluorescent light tubes are
accepted by the HazMobile. Explosives and road flares are
excluded.
Motor oil, vehicle batteries, computer monitors and televisions can be recycled at the Ukiah Transfer Station, 3151
Taylor Drive, open Monday-Saturday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The HazMobile collects at some location in Mendocino or
Lake Counties almost every weekend. The schedule and more
information is available by calling the local Recycling
Hotline, 468-9704, or on the internet at
www.mendoRecycle.org.
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
BIRTHS
Comments invited on OHV applications
The Mendocino National Forest is requesting comments on
proposed applications for cooperative agreements with the
California Dept. of Parks and Recreation, Off-Highway Motor
Vehicle Recreation Division. The agreements would support
facility operations and maintenance, trail maintenance, law
enforcement, and restoration. Beginning July 1, 2006, copies
of the draft agreements are viewable at :
www.fs.fed.us/r5/mendocino/projects/ohv/ or hardcopies may
be obtained from Mike Burmann, Upper Lake Ranger District
OHV manager. You may send your requests for drafts or comments to the Mendocino National Forest, Attn: Mike
Burmann, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, Calif., 95988 or
call (530) 934-3316 or (530) 963-3128. Submit comments
electronically to [email protected] or to the above listed
address, no later than July 21, 2006.
Lawson
A baby son, Jordan Matthew Lawson, was born Tuesday,
May 30, 2006, to Alexandra and Justin Michael Lawson, of
Ukiah. He weighed 7 pounds, 4 ounces.
The new baby is welcomed by Sheldon Lawson. His grandparents are John and Gabriele Daly and Kathy and Don
Lawson.
4th OF JULY
State parks in Mendocino County
offer summer Sunday hikes
A series of special hikes for the whole family have been
scheduled for July, August and September in Van Damme,
Russian Gulch, Big River, Mendocino Headlands and
MacKerricher State Parks. The parks are located in the
Mendocino Village-City of Fort Bragg area.
Lead by State Parks Volunteers Bill Adams and Louise
Young, interested hikers will meet at 9:30 a.m. for each
Sunday hike (dates below). They need to bring water, a light
lunch, hat, light jacket, sturdy shoes and sunscreen. No pets
will be permitted on the hikes.
For directions or more information, email volunteer hike
leaders Adams and Young at [email protected] or call 937-1686.
The hiking dates are:
• Sunday, July 9: Russian Gulch Waterfall Loop, about six
miles, (four hours), moderate difficulty. Pay day use fee at the
park gate and meet in the recreation center parking lot.
• Sunday, July 23: Van Damme Fern Canyon to the Pygmy
Forest; five miles, (three hours), moderate. Meet at beach
parking area. One short, steep climb.
• Sunday, Aug. 6: Big River Beach and watershed, six
miles, (three hours), easy. Meet at Big River Beach below
Mendocino Village. Will be on the beach and old haul (logging) road.
• Sunday, Aug. 20: Mendocino Headlands Loop, four miles,
(three hours), easy hiking with many scenic breaks along the
ocean. Meet at parking area on Heeser Street (off Lansing) in
Mendocino Village.
• Sunday, Sept. 3: Glass Beach to Ward Avenue along
MacKerricher Beach, including a possible crossing of the
soon-to-be-restored Pudding Creek Trestle. Easy, five miles
with scenic breaks. For meeting place, call 937-1686.
Trail Ratings: Easy means shorter distance, little or no elevation gain or loss with fairly level ground. Moderate means
longer distance, some elevation gain or loss with some broken
ground.
Point Cabrillo Docent-Lead History Walks: Point
Cabrillo Light Station State Park and Nature Preserve will
offer 11 a.m. docent-led history hikes through the 300-acre
park every Sunday during the summer. Meet at the Farmhouse
Visitor Center parking on Point Cabrillo Drive at the entrance
to the light station. Walks include a tour of the Frolic goldrush era shipwreck site and the Point Cabrillo Lighthouse, a
marine education exhibit and the lightkeeper’s Residence
museum. For more information on Point Cabrillo, visit
www.pointcabrillo.org or call 937-0816.
SALE
Open
July
4th
Specials
SPAS
TO
P
U
E
SAV 000 OFF
$ ,20
2
pe
Esca
d
e
al
sl s
e
rp ic
e
17
d
mo
0 DOWN, 0 PAYMENTS
UNTIL OCTOBER 2006 OAC
POOLS
More community announcements on Page A-8
Finally! A hearing device you’ll
actually want to wear.
MENDO-LAKE
AUDIOLOGY
For information
& appointments:
730 Dora, Ukiah • 463-2966
15
MO
DE
LS
I
NS
TO
CK
GARDEN & PATIO DECOR
$AVE UP TO 50%
OFF (reg price)
PATIO ITURE
FURN
Made in
America
Made to Last!
Departs Fort Bragg Depot
at 10:00 a.m.,
Willits Depot at 9:45 a.m.
ce
Fares: $70.00 Adult
30.00 Child
Half price for
Mendocino County residents
ri
le p
sa
ro
Opening
July 1!
g
r 18
ove
Train trips from
Willits Depot to
Northspur — call for
schedule or more
information!
7 0 7 9 6 4 - 6 3 7 1 o r w w w .S k u n k T r a i n . c o m
s
up
POOL, SPA, PATIO SHOWROOM
509 So. State St., Ukiah
462-7305
*Limited to stock on hand
HOURS: Mon-Sat. 9-5:30
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 – A-7
SPORTS
Sports Editor: Tony Adame, 468-3518
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
NBA DRAFT
LOCAL
CALENDAR
TODAY
JOE DIMAGGIO BASEBALL
• Keith Connelly Fourth of July Invitational,
Mendo vs. San Bruno, 5:30 p.m. at
Yountville
SATURDAY, JULY 1
SWIMMING
• Soroptomist Swim Meet, Ukiah, all day
MOTORCROSS
• Motorcross of Ukiah, Ukiah Speedway,
2:30 p.m.
SUNDAY, JULY 2
SWIMMING
• Soroptomist Swim Meet, Ukiah, all day
JOE DIMAGGIO BASEBALL
• Keith Connelly Fourth of July Invitational,
Mendo vs. San Mateo, 10 a.m. at JustinSiena
MOTORCROSS
• Motorcross of Ukiah, Ukiah Speedway, 10
a.m.
-Calendar listings are culled from the most
recent schedules provided by the schools
and organizations in our coverage area.
Please report schedule changes or incorrect
listings to The Daily Journal Sports
Department at 468-3518.
Powe’s slip in stock may have been about knee
By Jeff Faraudo
ANG Newspapers
OAKLAND – After waiting nearly
four hours and watching players from
10 foreign countries selected ahead of
him, Cal sophomore Leon Powe finally heard his name called Wednesday
night in the NBA draft.
Then, 10 minutes after the Denver
Nuggets selected him with the 49th
pick, they traded his rights to the
Boston Celtics.
“I was going crazy,’’ Powe said of
the draft-night experience. “It wasn’t
fun at all . . . waiting and waiting and
waiting. I got kind of frustrated. But
I’m happy. Boston called and said they
were happy to have me.’’
Projected as possibly a late firstround selection or more likely an early
second-round pick, the Oakland Tech
High grad slipped below those predictions, perhaps because teams still are
worried about his twice surgically
repaired left knee.
The 6-foot-7 forward got a clean
bill of health from his surgeon after
Cal’s season, but apparently not everyone was convinced.
“Everywhere he went, he performed well,’’ said Aaron Goodwin,
Powe’s Oakland-based agent. “I think
it became a concern with the knee.
Some teams formulated their opinion
of Leon early on. We were fighting an
uphill battle.’’
“I think all of a sudden they started
worrying about my knee again,’’ said
Powe, who led the Pac-10 Conference
in scoring (20.5 ppg) and rebounding
(10.1 rpg) this season and worked out
for 10 NBA clubs over the past month.
“I had to show them either way. I
thought I did. I guess I’m going to
have to show them in Boston.’’
Players from Italy, Senegal,
Switzerland, Ukraine, Spain, Serbia,
Brazil, Israel, Belarus and England –
the latter a 6-foot-10 grocery store
bagger – were chosen before Powe.
Two similar, under-sized power forwards went sooner – Craig Smith to
Minnesota at No. 36 and Paul Millsap
to Utah at No. 47.
ESPN analyst Jay Bilas questioned
Powe’s decision to enter the draft with
two years of college eligibility remaining.
“He is a specimen – he’s really
strong,’’ said Bilas, speculating that
Powe’s health history was the issue.
“He needed to stay in school a little bit
longer. I’m not sure you leave school
this early to be picked at this point.”
MLB | GIANTS 2, RANGERS 1
TV LISTINGS
TODAY
TENNIS
Wimbledon, Early Rounds, 5 a.m. (ESPN2)
Wimbledon, Early Rounds, 9 a.m. (ESPN2)
WORLD CUP SOCCER
Germany vs. Argentina, Quarterfinals, 7:55
a.m. (ESPN)
Italy vs. Ukraine, Quarterfinals, 11:55 a.m.
(ESPN2)
MLB
Baltimore at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. (TBS)
San Francisco at San Diego, 7 p.m. (FOX)
GOLF
U.S. Women’s Open Championship, Second
Round, 11 a.m. (ESPN)
AUTO RACING
NASCAR Busch Series, Winn-Dixie 250,
4:30 p.m. (FX)
BOXING
Friday Night Fights, Naoufel Ben Rabah vs.
Juan Urango, 7 p.m. (ESPN2)
Omar in the clutch
By STEPHEN WILSON
The Associated Press
COMMUNITY
DIGEST
Six-A-Side Soccer
Tournament Aug. 19
The Ukiah Host Lions and the
Ryan Rones Dickey Memorial
Soccer Fund are sponsoring a
six-a-side soccer tournament for
high school age boys and girls on
Aug. 19 at Ukiah High School.
Games begin at 8 a.m. and will
go until about 5 p.m. Entry fee is
$150 per team and applications
can be picked up at 601 N. State
Street or via e-mail at [email protected] Applications are
due by Aug. 1. For more information call 468-5711.
Margaret Vaughan
Memorial Softball
Tournament July 22-23
The Ukiah Women’s Athletic
Association is holding the 29th
annual
Margaret
Vaughan
Memorial Slow-Pitch Softball
Tournament July 22-23.
The Tournament is double elimination, and a fee of $185 is due
before July 10, and goes up to
$200 after. Deadline to register is
July 18. For more information call
972-1719.
Ukiah Lions Youth
Football &
Cheerleader sign ups
The Ukiah Lions Youth Football
& Cheer will be holding sign ups
for football players and cheerleaders on July 8 from 8 a.m. - 10
a.m. at Anton Stadium.
For more information call Chuck
Thornhill at 485-7600.
City of Ukiah 2006 CoEd Softball Season
The City of Ukiah Community
Service Department announces
the beginning of the 2006 Co-Ed
Softball Season.
League play is scheduled to
begin in mid-August and run
through October.
Sponsor fees are $350 per
team and $30 per player. The
sponsor fee is due at the time of
registration, and player fees will
be collected from team managers
at the first game.
Registration will be accepted
through July 28. Registration
forms or additional infortmation is
available at the City of Ukiah
Recreation Department or at
www.cityofukiah.com.
Ukiah Dolphins Swim
Club Fundraising
BBQ July 1
The Ukiah Dolphins Swim Club
would like to invite retired Dolphin
swimmers, their families, friends,
and the general public to a
fundraising BBQ in Todd Grove
Park on Saturday, July 1 from 6-9
p.m.
The Dolphins, in coordination
with the Ukiah Soroptimist and
the City of Ukiah, are working
together to support the renovation of the Ukiah city pool and the
associated complex.
The cost will be $10 for adults
and $5 for children ages eight
and under, with cobbler dessert
available for an additional $1.
For tickets, please call Kristin at
462-3594 or Sheryn at 489-5346.
Ukiah Dolphins Swim
Team Registration
The Ukiah Dolphins is a year
round competitive swim club for
children aged five through 18.
Any child that can swim 25 yards
continuously may join the
Dolphins.
The hot summer months are a
great time to get your child
involved in swimming. Children
are placed into different swimming groups depending on their
ability and age.
For more information leave a
message by calling the Ukiah
Dolphin Swim Team office at 4635253, ext. 1301.
Williams
rallies in
England
Jeff Trouette/For The Daily Journal
San Francisco shortstop Omar Vizquel singles home Jason Ellison for the go-ahead run Thursday during the eighth inning of the Giants 2-1 win over Texas Thursday in San Francisco.
Giants pick up their first three-game home sweep since April 2005
By JANIE McCAULEY
The Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO — Omar
Vizquel’s go-ahead single with two
outs in the eighth inning sent the San
Francisco Giants to a 2-1 victory over
the Texas Rangers on Thursday, completing a three-game sweep.
Jason Ellison hit a sacrifice fly to
drive in the Giants’ first run in the second and scored on Vizquel’s single to
right off Francisco Cordero, who
relieved Scott Feldman (0-2) after he
allowed Ellison’s leadoff walk and a
sacrifice bunt by Eliezer Alfonzo.
Cordero came in to face pinch-hitter
Jose Vizcaino with one out, and
Vizcaino grounded out to shortstop to
move Ellison to third.
Jonathan Sanchez (2-0) recorded
two outs in the seventh for the win, getting Mark Teixeira to ground into an
inning-ending double play. Jeremy
Accardo finished for his third save.
Texas lost its fifth straight game and
has scored only 11 runs during the skid.
This marked the Rangers’ first losing
road trip of the year (1-5).
The Giants had their first three-game
home sweep since April 8-10, 2005,
against Colorado.
Vizquel had two hits and Pedro Feliz
had a hit and scored a run for the
Giants, who faced a left-handed starter
for the second consecutive game.
San Francisco ended a 6-3 homestand and now leaves town for a seasonlong 11-game road trip against its NL
West foes — San Diego, Colorado and
Los Angeles — leading into the AllStar break. The trek includes a doubleheader Saturday against the Padres to
make up an early rainout.
Jason Schmidt, making his first
career appearance against Texas, saw
his winless stretch reach four starts
with his third no-decision during that
span since winning six straight deci-
sions. He still has a six-game home
winning streak.
After allowing a leadoff single to
Gary Matthews Jr. to start the game,
Schmidt got nine straight outs before
Mark DeRosa’s triple to right-center
leading off the fourth. DeRosa scored
to tie the game at 1 on Teixeira’s fielder’s choice after third baseman Feliz
booted a routine grounder by Michael
Young for an error.
Feliz was part of a great play in the
fifth, when the Giants turned a rare 5-64 double play. Feliz charged John
Koronka’s bunt, threw to shortstop
Vizquel covering third, then Vizquel
fired to second baseman Ray Durham
at first to get the pitcher.
Schmidt escaped a jam in the seventh.
With runners on first and second
with one out, he got pinch-hitter Jason
Botts to fly out, then ended the threat
when Matthews grounded out.
WIMBLEDON, England —
Venus Williams waited until the
last minute to get going.
Down a set and 5-2, the
defending champion won 11 of
the next 13 games to stave off a
huge upset and beat Lisa
Raymond 6-7 (4), 7-5, 6-2 on
Thursday in the second round at
Wimbledon.
The three-time champion was
two points from defeat, when
Raymond served for the match
leading 5-3 in the second set,
before she roared back to overcome the 84th-ranked American.
At one stretch, Williams won
34 of 39 points, including 18 in a
row. She won six of her last
seven service games at love, and
closed out the match with her
11th ace.
French Open champion
Rafael Nadal pulled off a similar
escape, coming back from two
sets down to defeat 237thranked American qualifier
Robert Kendrick on Centre
Court.
Kendrick, who plays mainly
on the lower-tier challenger circuit, came within two points of
victory in the fourth set before
the Spaniard took charge to win
6-7 (4), 3-6, 7-6 (2), 7-5, 6-4. It’s
only the second time Nadal has
come back from a two-set
deficit.
Nadal will next face Andre
Agassi, who beat Andreas Seppi
of Italy 6-4, 7-6 (2), 6-4 to
extend his run in his 14th and
final Wimbledon.
The 36-year-old American,
the oldest player in the men’s
draw, dropped serve only once
— while serving for the second
set — and broke three times to
subdue the 68th-ranked Seppi.
Just as he had after his opening round win Tuesday on
Centre Court, Agassi received a
raucous standing ovation from
the fans on Court 1. Agassi, who
won the first of his eight Grand
Slam titles here in 1992,
announced last weekend that he
will retire after the U.S. Open in
September.
Maria Sharapova, the 2004
women’s champion, overpowered Ashley Harkleroad 6-2, 6-2
in 67 minutes. The match was
slightly tougher than her 51minute 6-2, 6-0 win the previous
day over Anna Smashnova.
“I didn’t think I had a enough
of a challenge to see where my
game was at in the first round,”
the third-seeded Russian said.
“The points were very quick.
But today I played a few rallies
and I definitely did a lot of good
things.”
MLB | ATHLETICS 6, PADRES 5 (14 INNINGS)
Bases loaded walk pushes A’s past San Diego
By BERNIE WILSON
The Asssociated Press
SAN DIEGO — Pinch-hitter Antonio Perez drew a
bases-loaded walk with two
outs in the 14th inning, and
the Oakland Athletics edged
the San Diego Padres 6-5
Thursday to avoid a threegame sweep in a matchup of
the top two teams out West.
After Oakland closer
Huston Street squandered a
two-run lead in the ninth, the
A’s rallied against Scott
Cassidy (4-4) without getting
a hit. They had three walks,
including one intentional, a hit
batsman and a sacrifice.
Perez, hitting .082, got
ahead of Cassidy 3-0. The
right-hander
threw
two
strikes, then missed outside to
bring in Marco Scutaro, who
drew a leadoff walk.
Ron Flores (1-1) held San
Diego to one hit in four
innings for the win.
Padres right fielder Brian
Giles ended the top of the 11th
by throwing out Mike Rouse,
who tried to score the goahead run on Jason Kendall’s
single. Giles gloved the short
hop and threw a one-bouncer
to catcher Josh Bard, who
went up the first-base line to
field it, then dove and swipetagged Rouse.
Chad Gaudin pitched the
14th for his second save. With
two runners on, Giles lined
into a game-ending double
play — Mike Cameron was
doubled off second by second
baseman Rouse.
The Padres twice tied the
game in the late innings
Bard hit a two-run single
off Street with two outs in the
ninth to tie the score at 5. The
runs were unearned because
of first baseman Dan
Johnson’s error on a pickoff
attempt. It was Street’s second
consecutive blown save and
sixth this season.
Street walked Josh Barfield
and pinch-hitter Mike Piazza
to open the ninth before
Cameron’s
comebacker
moved Barfield to third and
forced pinch-runner Ben
Johnson at second. Street
faked a throw to third and
caught Cameron off first, but
Johnson dropped the throw
and the ball rolled into foul
territory, allowing Cameron to
take second.
C OMMUNITY
A-8 – FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
COMMUNITY BRIEFS
New childbirth education
series begins July 13
“Care for Her” announces the start of a
six-class childbirth preparation series beginning Thursday, July 13; the series ends on
August 17. During the series, expectant parents will learn about their growing baby and
prepare themselves for childbirth. Topics
include nutrition during pregnancy, body
changes throughout pregnancy, relaxation and
preparing for childbirth, breastfeeding and
infant safety. The classes meet Thursday
evenings at 6 p.m. in MCHC’s main conference room at 333 Laws Ave. Participation is
limited and registration is required; call 4724603 to register. “Care for Her” is a women’s
health center operated by local, nonprofit
Mendocino Community Health Clinic, Inc.
(MCHC).
Spaghetti Dinner benefit
set for Friday, July 14
The Fort Bragg Fire Department will be
hosting a spaghetti dinner benefit on Friday,
July 14 at 6 p.m. at 141 N. Main St. Tickets
are $12 for adults and $6 for children 10 and
under. Advance tickets are available at the
Fort Bragg Fire Dept. at 141 N. Main St.;
Redwood Investments at 319 N. Main St.; and
Fort Bragg Credit Union at 120 N. Franklin
St., make checks payable to the Fort Bragg
Fire Dept.
This benefit dinner is being held to help the
Sanderson family pay for medical and travel
expenses for Crystal Sanderson and her family. Crystal is undergoing treatment for a large
tumor at the UCSF Medical Center.
For more information, call Darrell Orsi at
272-1579.
Summer reading at
Ukiah Library has begun
The Mendocino County Library summer
reading program has begun. The library is
sponsoring a free summer reading club open
to children in second through fifth grades.
Interested parties are asked to sign up at the
front desk. A reading log and a book bag will
be given to all participants, prizes and certificates will be awarded at summer’s end.
Other coming events at the library are
planned for Wednesdays at 3:30 p.m. On July
5 will be a reptile show with Cyndi Diekmann
Chatter
Continued from Page A-3
cannot be restored. A leg may
never support a body again,
or a body may never function
perfectly as it did once, after
an automobile accident.
About two years ago I was
broadsided by a young man
borrowing his dad’s SUV. He
was a really nice young man,
but his inattention caused me
to have my knee replaced. I
am OK, and I survived, but
he will never forget the fact I
could not function for awhile,
as I was stunned after also
hitting my head against the
side window. I am sure the
fear he felt was staggering.
In one wrong decision to
pull out too fast onto a street
where he could not safely see
left and right, his life and
mine, changed forever. I felt
more sorry for him than I did
for myself and tried very hard
to console him- he was so
upset.
Last week coming from an
appointment I was literally
creeping (thankfully) trying
to cross Main Street behind
the Victory Theater when two
young girls about 11-12 were
on bikes, clearly enjoying the
warm sunny day, and looking
quite cute on their bikes,
toodling around the area.
As I crossed Main, one of
the girls made a quick, unexpected turn across the path of
my car within one foot of the
bumper. I hit my “stop-on-adime” brakes so hard I almost
hit the windshield. The other
girl had stopped on her bike
and watched the scene and I
opened my window, and told
her to tell her friend that I
almost hit her and to be more
careful. I wasn’t yelling or
angry, but very concerned.
She nodded and I looked over
to my right where the other
girl had driven her bike in the
Victory Theater parking lot
and she was heading towards
me with a pinched up face
and holding her hand up
shaking it and flipping me
off!
I could not believe what I
saw. She may have looked
cute and innocent but she
clearly was not and was playing with fire doing that to a
complete stranger. I left the
scene just shaking my head
and Greg Frost. July 12 brings the Willits 4-H
rabbit group. July 19 will be animal action
with Charlene Light, including stories, music,
movement and art.
On July 26, Sage Mountainfire will offer
dog rescue and training tips. August 12 will
bring storytelling with Dorothy Gayle Haas.
Finally, on August 9, children can have fun
stamping around with Emmy Good and her
animal friends.
The Ukiah Library is located at 105 N.
Main St., on the corner of Main and Perkins.
For more information, contact Ina Gordon, the
children’s librarian, at 463-4153.
Pure Mendocino needs
volunteers for fall event
The Cancer Resource Center of Mendocino
County is organizing its Second Annual Pure
Mendocino events for September 15-17. Pure
Mendocino is a celebration of Mendocino
County’s leadership in organic and sustainable
lifestyles, and a benefit for the Cancer
Resource Center of Mendocino County.
Volunteers are needed to assist with meal
preparation, food and beverage service, event
setup and event cleanup in the Ukiah area. A
staff dinner will be provided for some volunteer positions.
The Friday, Sept. 15 event will take place
at Parducci Wine Cellars, featuring tastings of
organic and biodynamically grown wines and
foods, 4-7 p.m. The Saturday, Sept. 16 dinner/auction event will be located at winemaker Paul Dolan’s Dark Horse Ranch outside of
Ukiah, 4-9 p.m., and will feature a menu of
organically grown fare. Farm tours are being
scheduled to take place on Sunday, Sept. 17.
For volunteer sign ups, please call Rachel
Kradin at CRC, 1-800-449-6483.
CRCMC’s mission is to provide free services to Mendocino County residents, family,
and friends facing cancer by providing a wide
range of information, support and advocacy.
All of the funds raised at this event stays in
the county. Tickets to the events are now
available. A contribution of $20 at the door
will admit one for the tastings at Parducci
Wine Cellars on Friday, Sept. 15. The
dinner/auction tickets for Sept. 16 are $125
per person – seating is limited so order your
tickets early. Call Rachel Kradin at 1-800449-6483 or go online at www.puremendocino.com.
Third annual
�Legends’ Run coming
On Friday, July 28 and Saturday, July 29,
Ukiah commemorates and celebrates two
Native American foot races. The ultra-
thinking “what is the world
coming to?” and very frustrated. Her parents I am sure
would be appalled at her
behavior and very angry that
she so carelessly risked her
life.
Then I read another Letter
to the Editor from Gerald F.
Bond regarding his experience at a 4-way stop where a
woman flipped him off, and
thus this article was written.
What act could make anyone
so angry that they would hurl
this filthy, non-verbal insult
to a complete stranger?
What background does
such a person come from, and
what do they do when they
really get angry? And remember, this raging, irrational personality is behind the wheel
of this same 2000-plus lb.
killer driving around among
us? The girl that flipped me
off, though ill-mannered is
still a kid, and somehow saw
this behavior from someone.
So the bad behavior perpetuates.
I have one more interesting
road-rage story to share. A
gentleman I dated about a
year ago, told me that he had
frequently dated a very nice
professional woman. He
described her as a classy, well
dressed, and easy going
woman. He even considered
marriage. He was always the
driver during their dates. One
day his car broke down and
he called and asked her to
pick him up to take him
home. She gladly obliged and
within minutes after he got in
the passenger side, he saw an
unbelievable transformation
occur.
This woman changed her
entire persona. She was
swearing at the other drivers,
flipping them off, opening the
window and yelling and cutting off others. He could not
believe it and never called her
again. He told me that it was
the most clear case of road
rage he had ever witnessed
and it scared the heck out of
him.
I suppose that is what is
happening behind the wheels
of many cars. Some people
we know, some are strangers,
so we must be aware.
Flipping someone off is an
action that may get a “reaction” and I think one is taking a big risk to attempt it.
Someone may have a gun or
knife or just get out of the
car, and do who knows what?
That young girl on the bike
put herself at risk doing what
E Center - Mendocino Fisheries Program
FLOOD PROTECTION & EROSION CONTROL
STREAMBANK STABILIZATION
STORM DAMAGE REMEDIATION
Lic #836177
468-0194 ext 131 or 121
[email protected]
[email protected]
since 1981
Consultation
Design and
Construction
Lake and Mendocino Co.
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
marathons were run from San Francisco to
Grants Pass, Oregon, in 1927 and 1928. The
Grace Hudson Museum holds a reception on
Friday afternoon, July 28, and hosts a
run/walk on Saturday morning the 29th. The
run/walk finish line is in the Sun House Park
adjacent to the Museum.
The July 28th Reception will include presentations about the Redwoods Marathon.
Activities on July 29th begin at 8:30am with
the North Coast Striders’ 6-mile run and 3mile walk/run, on a course that follows level
paved roads. The awards ceremony for the run
will be at 10:15am.
U.S. Highway 101 and U.S. Highway 199
connected San Francisco to Grants Pass,
Oregon, in the 1920s. Eager to promote travel
and tourism along this route, The Redwood
Empire Association in San Francisco and The
Caveman Association of Grants Pass promoted the “Redwood Highway” by staging a
marathon from San Francisco to Grants Pass,
480 miles, the “longest race of its kind in history.”
The first Redwoods Marathon was held in
1927, the second (and last) in 1928. Given
the length and difficulty of the event the participants were all Native Americans, a people
that historically had integrated running into
their culture. The 1927 event was won by a
23-year-old Karuk named Mad Bull with a
winning time of 7 days, 12 hours and 34 minutes. In the 1928 event the second place finisher was a 62 year old Zuni who had run
from northern New Mexico to San Francisco
just to enter the race.
Proceeds from the Grace Hudson
Museum’s Legends celebration and reception
will be used to help establish the museum’s
new native plant garden. The garden will feature plants utilized in daily life by Native
Americans and will be part of the museum’s
regular tour.
For more information about this community celebration, please visit
www.goMendo.com or www.gracehudsonmuseum.org, or telephone the Mendocino County
Promotional Alliance at (707) 462-7417.
Leadership Mendocino
accepting applications for
2006/2007 class
Leadership Mendocino, the county-wide
non-profit group whose mission is to educate
“people who want to make a difference in our
community,” has applications available for the
next class year which begins in September.
Applications are available at the Greater
Ukiah Chamber of Commerce, 200 S. School
St., or via E-mail (as a PDF file) from proshe did to me. She did not
know how I would react. If I
was a hot head, who knows
how I would have retaliated?
So if you have family that
drive cars or bikes, especially
youngsters- sit down and
have a little talk. Talk about
safe bicycling rules and laws,
defensive driving, and keeping your cool behind the
wheel or handlebars.
gram director Rusty Eddy at
[email protected] Any resident of
Mendocino County may apply.
Applicants should show a genuine commitment to building community in Mendocino
County, should be willing to commit to the
hours required (approximately 120 over the
year) and should have an endorsement from
their employer. Tuition for the 2006/2007
class year is $600 per person.
Applications will be accepted through the
end of July. Interviews will be scheduled
beginning in July and applicants will be notified of their acceptance in August.
Leadership Mendocino meets one day a
month for 10 months in various locations
throughout the county. The program presents
information and ideas from local and outside
experts on a variety of subjects related to
leadership, community issues and quality of
life in Mendocino County.
Topics covered include agriculture, the arts,
health care, the economy, government and
education. Class includes an overnight retreat.
In addition to classes, the group sponsors
leadership seminars and an annual fundraiser.
For more information on Leadership
Mendocino or to obtain an application, call
the group at 462-7196, or E-mail:
[email protected]
$69,650 approved
for forest projects
On June 16, the Mendocino County
Resource Advisory Committee for the
Mendocino National Forest approved, by
unanimous vote, funding to benefit the
National Forest.
• $10,800 will be used to improve a landslide area. Local Native American and/or
school nurseries will collaborate with volunteers, the California Conservation Corps, and
the Forestry Service to improve land health
and water quality in the landslide area.
• $52,000 was earmarked to create shaded
fuel breaks near Howard Lake, a popular
camp site used primarily by county residents.
Shaded fuel breaks help slow the destructive
force of catastrophic wildfires by providing an
escape route for campers and a safer access
for fire crews.
• Educational signs giving geographic and
topographical information will be placed at
frequently visited sites in the forest with an
additional $6,850.
Local groups or individuals are invited to
attend RAC meetings and apply for funding.
Meetings are convened the third Friday of
each month from 9 a.m. to noon at the
Mendocino County Museum in Willits. Call
Roberta Hurt at 983-6118 for more info.
By the way, adult bike riders are equally as careless
about the rules, and are
putting themselves at risk
with their disregard for the
law. I realize the police are
understaffed, but I sure wish
there was a police officer on
a bicycle around town. I think
the city would make big
bucks fining adults as well as
kids and teens on two wheels.
So drive safe out there
folks. There are people who
care about you, and have
families they care about. And
to Ms. Viera and Mr. Bondsyou are not alone in your
frustrations. Add me to the
list.
Remember, Out of the
Mud, Grows the Lotus.
1661 Talmage Rd. • Ukiah
NOW OPEN!
Gifts – Gadgets – Decorations
Large Balloon Selection
For All Occasions
Also Featuring
AS SEEN ON
TV
Products
Mon - Fri 10 am to 6 pm
Saturday 9 am to 12 pm
Closed Sundays
707.467.1449
Six Packs
Pilsner Ukiah
“To Go”
102 S. State St. Ukiah
468-5898
Local Micro
Brews
FAST
FRIENDLY SERVICE
462-8849
152 Talmage Rd., Ukiah
When your job prospects are buried...
Turn to the Classifieds.
We have postings for
positions in many areas,
including Automotive,
Clerical, Retail, Service
and Telemarketing.
Take advantage of the
Classifieds and uncover a
treasure chest of
opportunity.
LARGEST
~ PICK-UP ACCESSORIES ~
Lakeport Camper
Featuring
590 S. School St.
Ukiah
468-3500
Monday - Friday 8am - 5pm •263-7755
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
NATION
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 – A-9
Free tire recycling
available in
September
COMMUNITY BRIEFS
Coyote Valley
summer food
program to run
through Aug. 25
The USDA and Coyote
Valley Tribal Council are
sponsoring a summer food
program, providing free
lunches for children aged one
year to eighteen years old.
From June 19 through Aug.
25, lunches will be served
Mondays through Fridays
from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the
Coyote Valley Gym. Adults
cannot be served. For more
information, call 485-6770.
Dam Dog Walks to
take place Sundays
at Lake Mendocino
This is no ordinary dog
walk. Inspired by Cesar
Millan, The Dog Whisperer,
this is a structured one-hour
dog walk designed to get
dogs moving in a migrating
pack mode to promote a more
balanced pooch. It’s good for
the humans as well. All dogs
must be on leash and under
control.
Meets every Sunday morning at 8:45 a.m. at the Lake
Mendocino Dam, Lake
Mendocino Dr. Pack leader is
Sallie Palmer of Well
Mannered Mutts 463-3647.
Cost $1 donation to the
Humane Society for Inland
Mendocino County. a 501C3
non-profit organization.
Grateful Gleaners
promote sharing
The Grateful Gleaners are
dedicated to promoting the
growth, preservation, and
sharing of local, seasonal,
organic food through communally harvesting fruits, vegetables, and nuts. They harvest and distribute the excesses offered by generous growers in the community. A portion of the harvest is donated
to certain groups in the community. People who grow
fruits, vegetables or nuts and
who have extra to share, and
people who would like to
glean with the Grateful
Gleaners are welcomed to
contact Karen Gridley at
459-2101.
support group
forming
An eating disorder support
group for adolescents is now
forming. This will be led by a
certified therapist in a Ukiah
office. For more information,
or if interested in joining, call
354-0612. Parents with questions are welcome to call
also.
MTA’s summer
schedule now in
effect
The Mendocino Transit
Authority (MTA) has introduced revised summer bus
schedules for the Inland service, the Ukiah Valley service
and the
Hopland/Talmage/Ukiah service. Most changes are minor
in nature and have been made
to improve passenger convenience and system productivity. The schedules will be in
effect through August 27,
2006. New fall schedules will
be issued prior to that date.
Significant changes include
the following:
Number 9 local bus service
times have been adjusted to
serve Ukiah High School’s
summer school sessions from
Ukiah. The most significant
change is to the
Hopland/Ukiah service, route
54, and the Talmage/Ukiah
service, route 52. These
routes have been adjusted to
provide morning service to
Mendocino College and afternoon service from the college.
Summer time also means
summer youth passes are
available. MTA summer
youth passes provide young
people 18 years and younger
unlimited rides throughout
the county on all MTA bus
routes. The price is $25 dol-
Ukiah Farmers’ Market continues
The Ukiah Farmers’ Market is every Saturday morning, from 8:30 to noon through October, at the Alex
Thomas Plaza in downtown Ukiah. Live music and fresh
coffee and pastries are available every week. This
month’s markets will offer large varieties of fresh veggies and handpicked fruits, oyster and ocean-fresh
salmon, honey, spices, meats, and flower and bouquet
arrangements, and much more.
Ukiah’s Farmers’ Market will have special events for
children the last Saturday of every month through
October.
Every Saturday of the Farmers’ Market season, families can meet local farmers and learn about their food
sources. Certified Farmers’ Markets are a guarantee that
the farmer or an employee of the farmer grew the product. It directly links farmers and their fresh picked products with customers looking for superior taste.
lars for all summer. Summer
youth passes can be purchased from any MTA bus
driver on MTA vehicles, or
by calling the main office.
Passengers are reminded to
pick up their new schedules
on MTA buses, or at local
libraries, city halls, or chambers of commerce. To have a
schedule mailed to you, or to
purchase a summer youth
pass, please call 462-1422 or
1-800-696-4MTA.
Ukiah High to
hold 20 year
reunion Aug. 5
Ukiah High School Class
of 1986 is holding a 20 year
reunion August 5, 2006. For
more information, contact
[email protected] or call
468-5344. To help locate
missing classmates, read current biographies, and get tickets for the party go to
www.ukiahi86.com.
McMLK to hold
2nd annual
�Freedom of
Expression Events’
in September
The Mendocino County
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Organization (McMLK) will
hold “Freedom of Expression
Events” on Sunday, Sept. 17
and Monday, Sept. 18. Both
events will take place at the
Ukiah Civic Center -- council
chambers at 300 Seminary
Ave. at 6 p.m.
The program for Sunday
will include a seven member
panel discussion regarding
the United States
Constitution. Audience participation and public comments
are encouraged.
The program for Monday
will involve students in
Mendocino County expressing their perspective of “what
is freedom and equality,” and
“what does freedom and
equality mean to them.”
The events are in recognition and support of a federal
law that requires the federal
government and any school
receiving federal funding to
have Constitution-related
activities on or around
September 17, the day the
document was adopted in
1787.
McMLK’s freedom of
expression event and projects
is based on the fundamental
fact that we are all entitled to
live in a free and just society.
The events are provided to
the public by McMLK and
friends.
P R E - A P P ROVA L
A complimentary pre-approval
A wide variety of fixed and
adjustable rate home loans
To work with a full-service lender,
call us today.
Douglas Klyse
Daulton Abernathy
Loan Consultant
Loan Consultant
387 N. State St.
Ukiah, CA 95482
707-462-3332
Programs subject to change. Certain restrictions apply. Borrower Pre-Approval
subject to acceptable property/appraisal. Washington Mutual has loan offices and
accepts applications in: Washington Mutual Bank – many states; Washington
Mutual Bank fsb – ID, MT, UT.
Redwood Valley
Community
Market seeking
vendors
Interested in selling fruits,
vegetables and crafts in addition to having fun at a local
market? Redwood Valley
Community Market is in its
third season and it is growing. The market is seeking
vendors with produce, crafts,
and certified prepared foods.
Redwood Valley Community
Market meets on Sundays
from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. This
year the season is beginning
on July 23 and concluding on
Oct. 15. There is a weekly or
seasonal rate for vendors. For
additional information and to
apply, please call 485-6523.
September is time to clean
out those old tires, for free.
Households can recycle up
to 9 passenger or light truck
tires per day, without charge,
at the four transfer stations
throughout Mendocino
County for a two-week period
in September
There is a 17" diameter
size limit. No rims are
allowed, and no tire dealers
may participate.
Locations and dates are:
Ukiah Transfer Station,
3151 Taylor Drive.
September 5-20 (closed
Sundays)
Willits Transfer Station,
350 Franklin Avenue.
September 5-20 (closed Sun.Mon.)
Caspar Transfer Station,
Prairie Way. September 5-20
(closed Thurs.-Fri)
South Coast Transfer
Station, Fish Rock Road,
Gualala. September 5-20
(closed Mon-Tues., Thurs.Fri)
The program is sponsored
by the Mendocino Solid
Waste Management
Authority. A grant from the
California Integrated Waste
Management Board supports
the program.
The free tire amnesty program will help households
clean up accumulations of
used tires, and lessen the illegal dumping of tires along
roadsides. The usual tire
recycling fee is waived. Last
year, 7,000 tires were collected, saving the public more
than $21,000 in fees.
Clean up of old tires is
especially important now that
West Nile Virus has come to
Mendocino County. Water
collected in old tires is a
breeding ground for mosquitoes, which carry the virus.
Check
Classifieds
468-3500
Eating disorder
Come to the
77
TH
TH
OUNTY
C
E
K
A
L
RODEO
don’t wait for
gas to go down!
Beginning in June, for every 2,500 base points you earn,
you can cash in for a $25 gas certificate or a casino cash
coupon worth $25 in play. Just play with your Players
Club card and earn the gas or cash points.
If you don’t have a Players Club card,
sign up today. It’s free!
July 7 th & 8 th • 7:00 pm
Professional Rodeo - CCPRA
Mutton Bustin’ to Team Roping
Saturday Night Rodeo Dance
with Lou Derr Bootleg
9:00 pm
(707) 857-2777 • (877) 883-7777 toll-free
3250 Highway 128, Geyserville, CA 95441
Visit www.riverrockcasino.com for driving directions
An enterprise of the Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians
Please visit the front desk for details. Gas or casino cash in lieu of cash back.
River Rock Casino reserves the right to cancel or modify any promotion in whole or part,
without prior notice. Must be 21 years or older.
RRC-14194 • BW Ukiah Gas Promo Ad
2c (3.9375”) x 9” • Runs: 6/23 & 6/30
FINAL
A-10- FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
Ukiah Speedway in cooperation with the
Redwood Empire Fair hosting fourth of
July fireworks, celebration & concert
Gates will open at 5:00 p.m and the Concert
will start at 6:30, so make sure you get there early
to get a good spot. Adult Tickets are $10.00 and
children 6 to 12 years old are just $6.00.
This Years musical entertainment will start with
Traditional style Country Western Music at its
best, starting with The Michael Thomason Band,
staying true to their Texas roots, they have toured
throughout Europe, with much success, as well as
the United States. They have performed with the
likes of Emmy Lou Harris, Asleep at the Wheel,
Tammy Wynette & Johnny Paycheck.
Our featured performers this year are the
Pulsators. This Award winning band has been a
staple in Sonoma County for some time now and
always gets the crowd jumpin’! a funky style of
Rock and Roll that throws in a creative mix of
New Orleans Funk, with a dash of Rhythm &
Blues, and have performed at the New Orleans
Jazz & Heritage Festival with the Neville
Brothers, as well as having previous recordings
produced by them as well.
This is Truly an All American musical show
that is no to be missed!, and would not be possible without the generous support of the following
sponsors…
Mendocino County Farm Supply
The Red Fox Casino
Shodakai Coyote Valley Casino
Motorsports of Ukiah
Budwiser
DFM Car Stereo & Cellular
Ukiah Ambulance Service
The Clarion Inn of Eureka
KWINE 94.5 Radio
KMKX 93.5 Radio
KUKI 103.3 Radio
Grand Opening
s
a
G
r
a
l
u
g
l
e
a
R
G
0 Cash ly
8
.
2
$ plies to ers on
old
Ap
H
d
Car
6
7
or
$24
Oil
.95
Ch
an
ge
Come Celebrate with Us
Enter to win free gas for two months!
(Some restrictions apply)
hhhh
• 16 oz. Rock Star $1.50 • 20 oz. Vitamin Water $1.00 • 20 oz. Smart Water $1.00
Saturday, July 1st 10-3pm only
734 S. State Street Ukiah 462-3515
Still Offering Full Service For All Your Vehicle Needs.
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 -A-11
JULY 2006
CASH BACK FOR PLAYER’S CLUB POINTS!
TUESDAY, JULY 4TH
Free BBQ 11 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Drawings 3 p.m. – 9 p.m.
$1600 Total Cash Give Away!
Sherwood Valley Rancheria
BIG TIME
2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Pomo Dancers • Vendors • Sno-Cones • Raffle
Traditional Salmon BBQ w/master chef Pat Renick
100 Kawi Place • Willits
459-7330
CREEKSIDE CAFE
Daily Specials (Watch for our menus)
SERVING BEGINS AT 4 P.M.
Casino reserves all rights to change or cancel promotions at any time. Must be 18 years of age to enter the Casino. Pending Gaming Commission Approval. Must be present to win.
LOCAL
A-12 – FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
Abalone
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
Budget
Hopland
Continued from Page A-2
Continued from Page A-1
Continued from Page A-1
and Leroy Robles were diving
for abalone behind a rental
house in Fort Bragg, an area
that has been designated as
off-limits to commercial
abalone harvest.
Anonymous callers also
stated that Lance and Leroy
Robles were harvesting well
above the legal limit and selling their catch to restaurants.
The arrests were part of an
extensive
sturgeon
and
abalone poaching bust that
targeted 20 people and
involved 29 teams of game
wardens.
Commercial abalone fishing was banned in Northern
California
in
1949.
Recreational harvesting is
limited to three per day with
an annual limit of 24. The
North Coast is considered to
have the least viable population of red abalone in the
world.
Those who harvest abalone
recreationally
are
only
allowed to use skin-diving
gear or harvest them off the
rocks during extreme low
tides.
It is also illegal to purchase
wild abalone, and each violation is punishable by a maximum of six months jail time
and a $1,000 fine. The
abalone served in most
restaurants comes from farms.
Though once abundant,
abalone numbers have dwindled along the North Coast
due to overfishing. Abalone
are easily overfished because
their reproduction cycle is
slow and infrequent, occurring only once every seven to
15 years.
Anyone with information
regarding illegal poaching is
encouraged
to
contact
CALTIP at 1-888-DFGCALTIP.
books, materials, furniture,
phone and alarm systems, and
so forth, were also destroyed
by floodwaters.
Donations from the community -- most recently
$14,500
from
Fetzer
Vineyards -- have been instrumental in helping pay for
many of the book titles lost,
said UUSD Superintendent
Ray Chadwick. who extended
his thanks to the community.
FEMA funds have also
come in, but the district is still
short about $900,000.
“FEMA has concluded its
inquiry and has funneled
money for repairs of the
Hopland School project into
the California Office of
Emergency
Services,”
Chadwick said. “That office
has issued us four checks
totaling $203,125, which
doesn’t nearly cover the cost
of the project,” he said.
The district plans to
approach the state to apply for
a Facilities Hardship Grant to
make up the shortfall.
Meanwhile, money set aside
to
renovate
the
old
Montgomery Ward building
next to Grace Hudson School
into a district office is being
used upfront to carry the pro-
positions across 11 departments, including a traffic
safety police officer, a public
safety service mechanic and a
fire prevention officer, all
funded through Measure S.
Other positions include two
parks service workers, a purchasing clerk, an electric
engineer, a water treatment
plant operator, an airport
assistant and others.
•$110,000 in the Planning
Department’s budget for the
Downtown/Perkins
Street
Form Based Code project.
•Operating expenditures
for the Electric Department
being reduced by $1 million.
The Electric Department will
also spend $210,000 on
machinery and equipment to
ensure employee safety and
$35,000 to complete a rate
study.
•Expenditures in the Parks
Division of the Community
Services Department for park
development to the tune of
$834,256, most of which will
go toward the Ukiah Skate
Park.
•Total city debt reduced by
approximately $1.8 million
since the end of the 20052006 Fiscal Year.
Grant
Continued from Page A-1
summer school program for
approximately 140 (kindergarten through second grade)
students; this year we are at
280,” she said.
“We believe in prevention - helping kids get a jump start
on school, rather than intervention once they have
failed,” Fisette said.
“We targeted the English
Language Learners for three
reasons: one, prevention; two,
the SH Cowell Foundation has
an interest in supporting projects that benefit the Latino
Isaac Eckel/The Daily Journal
An alphabet poster still adorns the door to a classroom at Hopland School, while
construction takes place all around.
ject forward, Chadwick said.
Hopland Elementary is
expected to reopen at the
beginning of the new school
year. Following the flood, students and staff were relocated
to Oak Manor and Nokomis
schools.
“They (construction crews)
are making excellent progress
and we are on schedule to
open in August,” the superin-
tendent said. “It’s a two phase
completion. The six original
classrooms, the kindergarten
room and the office will be
finished by August and that
has the capacity to house the
entire student population. The
modular classroom wing and
the multipurpose room will be
completed by October.”
The majority of the interior
walls and the floors at the
community.
“The third reason is when
we look at our subgroups of
students, as far as academic
achievement, there is a huge
gap between all students and
our
English
Language
Learners subgroup. They are
one of two groups of students
in the Ukiah Unified School
District that are the lowest
performing academically,”
she said, noting Special
Education students are the
other group.
English Language Learners
are at a disadvantage, she said,
because they are held to the
same standards as their
English-only peers, yet they
are learning the core curriculum while they are also learn-
ing English.
Houghton
Mifflin
Publishers also assisted in this
year’s elementary summer
school program, providing the
district more than $20,000
worth of curriculum materials,
and two days of professional
development for the summer
school teachers, Fisette said.
Migrant Education -- the
district’s other collaborative
partner -- is dishing out about
$37,500 to pay the salaries of
the two lead teachers and 12
mini corps tutors (Mendocino
College students who are
aspiring to be teachers).
The school district’s matching funds of approximately
$45,244 will help with transportation as well as other dis-
school need to be replaced, as
does electrical and signal
wiring, cabinets, wooden furniture and fixtures in the
restrooms.
Gravel in the playground
areas, contaminated with mud
during the flood, needs to be
removed and replaced as well.
Laura McCutcheon can be
reached at [email protected]
trictwide expenses, such as
food and custodial services,
nursing, supplies, and so
forth.
The SH Cowell Foundation
is also paying for 12 MESA
(Math Engineering Science
Achievement) tutors for the
high school program, Fisette
said.
Approximately 185 Special
Education students, 198 middle school students and 464
high school students are also
attending summer school this
year. A handful of students at
the high school are there to
prepare for the next California
High School Exit Exam, to be
administered July 25 and 26.
Laura McCutcheon can be
reached at [email protected]
Clip Your Way
To Savings!
Advertisers
put their
best
deals
in
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL
Katie Mintz can be reached at
[email protected]
Stay
Informed
on Local
Issues
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL
WEATHER
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 – A-13
.
3-DAY FORECAST
SUN AND MOON
REGIONAL WEATHER
CALIFORNIA CITIES
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
TODAY
91В°
Sunrise today ............. 5:50 a.m.
Sunset tonight ............ 8:43 p.m.
Moonrise today ........ 10:39 a.m.
Moonset today .................. none
Mostly sunny
Rockport
63/54
Laytonville
92/57
MOON PHASES
TONIGHT
First
Full
Westport
63/54
New
Last
Covelo
93/58
54В°
Fort Bragg
60/50
July 3 July 10 July 17 July 24
Clear
ALMANAC
94В°
53В°
Sunny most of the day
SUNDAY
94В°
55В°
Willits
92/52
Elk
67/55
Ukiah through 2 p.m. Thursday
Temperature
High .............................................. 91В°
Low .............................................. 55В°
Normal high .................................. 87В°
Normal low .................................... 54В°
Record high .................. 109В° in 1932
Record low ...................... 39В° in 1909
Precipitation
24 hrs to 2 p.m. Thu. .................. 0.00”
Month to date ............................ 0.02”
Normal month to date ................ 0.27”
Season to date ........................ 55.84”
Last season to date ................ 42.18”
Normal season to date ............ 38.89”
SATURDAY
Willows
95/64
Redwood Valley
92/54
UKIAH
91/54
Philo
76/52
Lakeport
88/53
Lucerne
88/53
Boonville
94/55
Gualala
61/52
Clearlake
86/52
Cloverdale
86/56
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. В©2006
Plenty of sunshine
City
Today
Hi/Lo/W
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
City
Today
Hi/Lo/W
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
Anaheim
Antioch
Arroyo Grande
Atascadero
Auburn
Barstow
Big Sur
Bishop
Blythe
Burbank
California City
Carpinteria
Catalina
Chico
Crescent City
Death Valley
Downey
Encinitas
Escondido
Eureka
Fort Bragg
Fresno
Gilroy
Indio
Irvine
Hollywood
Lake Arrowhead
Lodi
Lompoc
Long Beach
Los Angeles
Mammoth
Marysville
Modesto
Monrovia
Monterey
Morro Bay
88/66/s
89/55/s
70/49/pc
99/53/pc
96/61/s
106/76/s
65/54/pc
96/57/t
110/83/t
94/68/s
99/66/s
88/58/s
85/66/pc
95/64/s
61/51/pc
116/88/s
86/65/s
81/64/pc
90/63/s
60/51/pc
60/50/pc
98/68/s
88/52/s
111/81/s
84/66/pc
88/67/s
86/57/t
94/60/s
73/56/pc
87/66/pc
86/66/s
79/46/t
98/59/s
96/64/s
95/68/s
66/53/pc
67/55/pc
87/67/s
89/56/s
69/48/pc
97/52/pc
97/63/s
108/75/s
63/54/pc
97/56/pc
112/85/s
92/67/s
102/66/s
81/58/s
84/65/pc
96/64/s
61/52/pc
118/86/s
87/65/s
81/64/pc
90/63/s
60/51/pc
60/50/pc
98/68/s
87/52/s
112/80/s
83/65/pc
89/66/s
87/56/s
94/60/s
74/58/pc
86/65/pc
86/65/s
79/42/pc
96/59/s
95/64/s
94/67/s
66/53/pc
67/54/pc
Napa
Needles
Oakland
Ontario
Orange
Oxnard
Palm Springs
Pasadena
Pomona
Potter Valley
Redding
Riverside
Sacramento
Salinas
San Bernardino
San Diego
San Fernando
San Francisco
San Jose
San Luis Obispo
San Rafael
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Cruz
Santa Monica
Santa Rosa
S. Lake Tahoe
Stockton
Tahoe Valley
Torrance
Vacaville
Vallejo
Van Nuys
Visalia
Willits
Yosemite Valley
Yreka
78/52/pc
112/87/t
67/56/pc
98/67/s
97/63/s
74/60/pc
111/84/s
92/70/s
99/62/s
92/54/s
97/63/s
100/67/s
91/58/s
70/53/pc
99/67/s
77/66/pc
94/66/s
66/55/pc
78/56/pc
86/53/pc
79/54/pc
84/66/pc
87/58/s
72/55/pc
79/63/pc
79/50/pc
77/41/pc
96/61/s
77/41/s
79/65/pc
93/59/s
79/53/pc
96/66/s
97/64/s
92/52/s
87/56/t
91/52/s
80/51/pc
111/85/s
71/55/pc
98/67/s
96/63/s
75/60/pc
113/84/s
90/69/s
97/61/s
93/54/s
98/67/s
98/66/s
93/60/s
71/54/pc
98/66/s
75/67/pc
94/67/s
67/54/pc
80/56/pc
84/52/pc
82/54/pc
82/65/pc
83/55/s
72/55/pc
77/63/pc
77/50/pc
78/42/pc
94/60/s
78/42/pc
78/65/pc
95/59/s
82/53/pc
96/67/s
98/63/s
93/52/s
93/55/s
91/53/s
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Lake Mendocino – Lake level: 747.76 feet; Storage: 85,952 acre-feet (Maximum storage 122,500 acre-feet) Inflow: 96 cfs Outflow: 254 cfs
Air quality – Ozone: .064 ppm (State standard .090 ppm) Carbon monoxide: .50 ppm (20.0 ppm) Nitrogen dioxide: .019 ppm (.25 ppm)
BEST PRICE EVER
on
Doughboy
*in stock pkgs. only.
Pools
on Doughboy Pools
509 S. State St. • Ukiah
Shop till You Drop or... Come in & Get the BEST PRICE TODAY!
462-7305
Marijuana
Continued from Page A-1
them from as high as 500 or
600 feet. Noe said it is actually easier to recognize marijuana gardens from higher up
because it gives officers a
fuller view of the area.
“The lower you fly, the
harder it is to see it,” Noe
said.
Mendocino County has
been hosting the observation
school since 1998 with the
help of the Butte County
Sheriff’s Department, Placer
County law enforcement, the
National Guard and the Drug
Enforcement Agency, among
others.
“The whole situation is a
collaborative effort,” Noe
said.
Mendocino County hosts
the school because there are
many large marijuana gardens
in the area. Officers also come
to take advantage of the
expertise of Noe and the officers on COMMET.
Aerial identification of
marijuana gardens is essential
to fighting the cultivation of
marijuana, Noe said. COMMET receives some of its tips
from the public, but most
large gardens are hidden deep
in the woods where people
aren’t going to see them.
Noe said he has been seeing more and bigger gardens
Water
Continued from Page A-1
this,” Bradley said.
The Masonite property has
been closed for several years
now, and the possibility of
losing the water rights in the
future was a concern. “That
can happen,” said Roland
Sanford, general manager of
the Mendocino County Water
Agency. “You might lose
those rights if you don’t use
the water.”
The purchase price of the
water rights is set, but the
total acre feet depends on the
State Water Resource Control
Board. “Right now the price
for the water rights are $1,000
per acre feet, but we won’t
know how much the total cost
will be until we hear from the
board about how many acre
feet they approve,” Bradley
said. “We are unsure of the
total, so it will be whatever
they approve.”
Bradley said the maximum
amount anticipated that
Millview could be approved
for is about 1,250 acre feet,
but when it will receive the
state’s answer is unclear. “We
are unsure how long it will be
’til they approve the petition,”
Bradley said.
James Arens can be reached
at [email protected]
this year than in previous
years. He said he wasn’t sure
why that might be.
“It goes in cycles,” he said.
“This is the year they’re going
for broke.”
Noe said the heavy rains
that plagued Mendocino
County until March have
slowed the marijuana crop.
He said COMMET has been
seeing baby plants and plants
in nurseries, two things that
are almost unheard of this late
in the season.
Smaller plants may mean a
later harvest season for many
marijuana growers. Normally,
the harvest season runs
between July and October. It
is also during this season that
COMMET performs raids on
identified marijuana gardens.
COMMET often works
with the California attorney
general’s Campaign Against
Marijuana Planting to raid
gardens and eradicate plants.
In 2005, CAMP seized and
destroyed 1,134,692 marijuana plants, which had an estimated street value of $4.5 billion.
In 2005, COMMET raided
more than 397 marijuana gardens in Mendocino County
and eliminated 144,159 marijuana plants.
The Aerial Observation
Training School will continue
training through Friday.
Ben Brown can be reached at
[email protected]
NOYO THEATRE
• Willits •
459-NOYO (6696)
Visit us at our website www.cinemawest.com
INDEPENDENT FILM SERIES 7:00PM WED & THUS ONLY
Returns in August
Superman Returns
1:00, 4:10, 7:30 PG13
Click
PG13
1:10, 4:20, 7:10, 9:30
The Lake House
6:50, 9:20
PG
Carfield: Tale of Two Kitties
12:50, 4:00
PG
Please call theater recording for wheelchair
accessibility information
Adv. Tix on Sale PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD
MAN'S CHEST (PG-13) в�…
SUPERMAN RETURNS (PG-13) в�… DIG (1225 345) 700
1015
THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA (PG-13) DIG (115 415) 715
950
CLICK (PG-13) DIG в�…
(120 430) 730 1000
CARS (G) DIG
(130 440) 725 1010
NACHO LIBRE (PG) DIG
(1235 245 500) 710 930
FAST & THE FURIOUS 3 (PG-13) DIG (1230 515) 1005
THE LAKE HOUSE (PG) DIG
(255) 740
Times For 6/30
В©2006
The Journal
Delivers!
To
Subscribe
call:
468-3533
County
Briefly
where it would be ineffective
for a long period of time,”
Caldwell said. “It is very disorganized right now. And it is
very disrupted right now.”
Continued from Page A-1
Continued from Page A-2
Ball was there to shake
Beltrami’s hand after the
meeting was adjourned.
Former Chief Operating
Officer Alison Glassey, who
was listed on the meeting’s
agenda under the new title of
assistant chief executive officer,
also
congratulated
Beltrami, saying that he was
her first boss when she began
working for the county.
Supervisor
Jim
Wattenburger said the board
is very happy with the decision.
“He was the longest running CAO in the state of
California in Mendocino
County his entire time,”
Wattenburger said. “He’s very
personable, he communicates
extremely well, he has an outstanding sense of humor...and
keeps it on a business level
instead of a personal level.”
Wattenburger did not support the decision to remove
Ball from his position but is
optimistic for the future of the
county.
“We were on a good path.
We’ve been derailed. We will
get back on a good path,”
Wattenburger said.
while he said the number of
U.S. casualties did not appear
to be on the rise.
But he said the Americans
gained momentum in the fight
against al-Qaida in Iraq after
killing Abu Musab alZarqawi, and have devoted a
lot of resources to targeting
his successor as leader, Abu
Ayyub al-Masri. “There is no
question, if we can take him
down, that will just disrupt the
organization ... to the point
Evacuation order
for Wilkes-Barre,
Pa., lifted
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) —
Muddy, coffee-colored floodwaters poured into homes,
basements and stores on both
sides of the Delaware River
and rose as high as the street
signs Thursday in some of the
worst flooding to hit the
Northeast in decades. At least
15 deaths were blamed on the
deluge. The city of WilkesBarre in Pennsylvania’s coal
country was spared when the
newly raised levees held back
the raging Susquehanna
River, and officials lifted an
evacuation order covering
200,000 people. But other
communities drenched by
days of record-breaking rain
were not as lucky. Along the
swollen
and
still-rising
Delaware River, thousands of
people were driven from their
homes and officials closed 10
bridges connecting New
Jersey and Pennsylvania.
Katie Mintz can be reached at
[email protected]
KONOCTI HARBOR
resort & spa
On Beautiful Clear Lake
6/30...HILARY
DUFF
7/1...3 DOORS DOWN
7/2...SCORPIONS
7/7...NICKEL CREEK
7/8...rob thomas
7/11...MIRANDA LAMBERT
7/19...BRUCE HORNSBY
7/22...CHRIS ISAAK
7/23...311...WAILERS & PEPPER
7/27...ROBIN TROWER
7/28...ALL-AMERICAN REJECTS
7/29...VELVET REVOLVER
8/2...CASTING CROWNS
8/5...HANK WILLIAMS JR.
8/9...THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND
THE MARSHALL TUCKER BAND
8/17-20...BOARDSTOCK XI
• BOARDSTOCK ROOM PACKAGES
• BOARDSTOCK DAY PASS TICKETS 8/18, 19 & 20
• SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER, WONDERBREAD 5, 8/19
8/16...STAIND W/SEETHER
8/17...LIFEHOUSE & COLLECTIVE SOUL
8/18...KID ROCK
8/20...ALICE IN CHAINS
8/25 & 26...LYNYRD SKYNYRD
8/27...LOS LONELY BOYS
8/31...REGGAE SUNSPLASH
UB40 • MAXI PRIEST • TOOTS & THE MAYTALS • THIRD WORLD
9/1...WILLIE NELSON
WITH SHOOTER
JENNINGS & DEANA CARTER
9/2...“Takin it to the Streets” Motorcycle Road Rally...
THE STEVE MILLER BAND
9/16...T R A I N
9/23...CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVISITED
10/8...
800-225-2277
WWW.TICKETS.COM
KONOCTI HARBOR RESORT & SPA
Friday, July 7 at 8 pm
Frankie Avalon, Fabian & Bobby Rydell
Golden Boys
The
Reserved Seating $30
Get Your Tickets Today!
800.809.3636
Bring this coupon to the
Players’ Club for your
Free Gift
Limit one per person. Expires July 30, 2006.
Code UDJ060602
www.rrrc.com
800-660-LAKE
w w w . k o n o c t i h a r b o r. c o m
1545 E. HWY 20 IN NICE ON THE BEAUTIFUL NORTH SHORE OF CLEAR LAKE
8727 SODA BAY RD. KELSEYVILLE, CA
Management reserves all rights.
A-14- FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
Family, Food and Fun! It’s...
Premium
Ground Beef
Club Pack
1.49
12-Pack Coke
Selected varieties
12 oz. cans
Premium Ground Beef
1.99 lb.
4 for$12
[ special offer ]
lb.
+CRV CA only
Buy Four 12-Packs
for $12, Get $12 Back
Vlasic Pickles
Selected varieties
24 oz. to 46 oz.
2 for $5
Vlasic Spears or Chips
Selected varieties
16 oz. to 24 oz.
2 for $4
with mail-in rebate available at in-store Coca-Cola display.
.99
Hamburger
or Hot Dog Buns
Save $1.50
Sunnyside Farms
Selected varieties
8 count
off Fresh Ground Beef
when you buy any 2 Vlasic
pickles or relish. See store
display for coupon.
Whole Seedless
Watermelon
A classic refresher from Arizona or California.
Average weight: 12 lb. to 17 lb.
2 for 7
$
Large Limes
Add zest to your drinks
and dishes. Grown in
Mexico.
.97
Bar-S Jumbo Franks
Meat or Chicken
16 oz.
6 for $1
[ п¬Ѓne bakery ]
10.99
2 for 4.98
+CRV CA only
12-Pack Corona
8 Inch Apple Pie
Selected varieties
12 oz. bottles
Loaded with plump, juicy apples.
Lay’s Potato Chips
Selected varieties
11 oz. to 11.5 oz.
2 for $3
Get 4” x 6” Prints From
Your CD or Digital Media
• Your media is returned with your
completed order.
• Must be submitted in Digital Order Envelope.
• Excludes on-site prints.
• 2 to 4 day service.
9
Вў
Special Limited
Time Offer
per each
4” x 6” print
Dreyer’s Ice Cream
or Frozen Yogurt
Selected varieties
half gallon
3.78
Prices effective through July 4, 2006. We reserve the right to limit quantities. We reserve the right to correct any printing errors. Some items not available at all stores. No sales to dealers or wholesalers. raleys.com
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 – B-1
LIVING
Editor: K.C. Meadows, 468-3526
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
FOOD: Bay Area ballpark cuisine
By STEVE DULAS
The Oakland Tribune
T
ake me out to the ball game, Take me
out with the crowd. Buy me some
chowder and a turkey panini ...
You can still find peanuts and Cracker Jack
at the ballpark. But the traditional staple, an
old-fashioned hot dog on a steamed bun with
a big swipe of mustard, seems to be passe.
"I think it's good that people can get more
than just hot dogs," says Amber Johnson of
Aramark, the concessionaire which handles
food at McAfee Coliseum in Oakland.
Make that way more than just hot dogs.
Oh, you can still find a hot dog at the game steamed or grilled - but there is plenty to tantalize the adventurous and tempt the timid.
AT&T Park
Across the bay at AT&T Park in San
Francisco, it is possible to spend the entire
game searching for different food choices (but
don't worry, there are dozens of TV screens
throughout the park so you can watch the
game while standing in line for a barbecue
sandwich, a seafood salad sandwich or pizza).
Maybe the best way to pick out your food
at a Giants game is to arrive an hour before
the first pitch and stroll around the park on
the Promenade level.
The Promenade - the walkway behind the
lower deck seats that runs all the way around
the park, is like a carnival. Every few feet the
offerings, and the smells, change.
Garlic lovers, head for the third base side
of the park. Not far from one of the park's
nine Gordon-Biersch garlic fry stands is a
new entry this year - Taste of North Beach.
The first item on its menu is the Forty Clove
Garlic Chicken Sandwich from the Stinking
Rose, San Francisco's popular North Beach
restaurant.
My companion and I amble on a little (the
garlic fries can wait for later) and land on a
bratwurst from one of three Say Hey Sausage
stands in the park. The brat is tasty, but seems
to be steamed, not grilled, and is served in a
warm, soft bun.
The best spot in the park for the diner who
wants something truly different is in the centerfield plaza behind the scoreboard (next to
the giant Coke bottle slide and the Build-ABear Workshop). The plaza features an outdoor dining area with a terrific view of San
Francisco Bay. Next to the seating area is
Fresh Catch, which features crab, shrimp and
lobster salad on torpedo rolls. (A couple of
Boudin Bakery stands offer clam chowder in
a bread bowl.) We share a crab roll, though its
Sean Connelley/Oakland Tribune
A San Francisco Giants fan holds a cha-cha bowl at AT&T Park.
delicate flavor is overpowered by the garlic
fries.
Nearby is Orlando's, Caribbean cuisine
from Giants Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda's
family recipes. Downstairs, at Big Guy
Barbecue, is a pretty good pulled pork sandwich, right next to a piece of history. The
sandwich needs a little more barbecue sauce
(which is available at the counter) and is best
served hot. The history is just a few feet away
- the Big Guy Barbecue adjoins the hot dog
stand where Barry Bonds' 715th home run
was caught.
The other dining hot spot is at the end of
the Promenade on the first base side. In addition to Port Walk Pizza (which has garlic fries
and a very short line) the area also has the
new California Cookout, though we don't try
the Ahi tuna fillet sandwich this time. When
you want something stronger than a soda or
coffee, the Mission Creek Cantina is there to
serve up a cold one.
The traditionalists haven't been forgotten.
There are 10 Doggie Diners throughout the
park, with old-fashioned hot dogs, peanuts,
popcorn and (just like the song) Cracker Jack.
Susan and Marc Rankin of San Francisco
settled on some traditional hot dogs since it
was their 2 1/2-year-old son Connor's first trip
to the ballpark. The Rankins, recently relocated from Seattle, say they're a little disappointed with the family's first AT&T dining experience. "In Seattle (at Safeco Field, the
Mariners' home park) they had better hot dogs
and better Polish (sausages)," says Susan.
For the health-conscious, veggie burgers,
veggie dogs and turkey burgers are available
at the four John J. McGraw Derby Grills. It
seems, though, that many fans choose to leave
their dietary cares at the ticket gate. On this
chilly night, the line at the Ben & Jerry's
stand was nearly as long as the line for the
women's room.
Bring your appetite, and bring your wallet:
The bratwurst from Say Hey Sausage was
$5.50, the garlic fries are $6.25, and the exotic sandwiches start at about $9.
See BALLPARK, Page B-2
HONDA
OUR 4TH OF JULY SALES EVENT STARTS NOW!
NEW 2006 Accord EX
4DR A/T #089344
$
NEW 2006 Element
EX-P
4WD
A/T
#003334
$
00
21,699
NEW 2006 CR-V
4WD EX A/T
$
00
22,499
NEW 2006 Ridgeline
RTS #543304
$
21,488
NEW 2006 Pilot
#000707 EX-L 2WD
#041731
$
00
00
29,229
NEW 2006 Civic DX
4DR 5-Speed
#068126
00
27,629
$
00
14,099
Se Habla EspaГ±ol
All vehicles subject to prior sale. All prices plus government
fees, taxes, any finance charges, any dealer document
preparation charge of $45, and any emissions testing charge
and CA tire fee. Sale ends 7/2/06.
HONDA
1400 Hastings Rd • Ukiah
www.thurstonhonda.com
1-800-287-6727
707-468-9215
CREDIT
UNION
DIRECT
LENDING
LIVING
B-2 – FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
Rock Paper
Scissors in
a renaissance
By CANDACE MURPHY
The Oakland Tribune
As usually happens, the
argument is unresolvable.
But in this case, the more
familiar problems needing
solving - who will take out
the trash, who gets to ride
shotgun, who has to pay the
drink tab - are absent.
Instead, these two men
have juris doctor degrees, are
embroiled in an insurance
lawsuit and cannot agree
about where to conduct the
deposition of a witness.
So at the order of a federal
judge in Florida, the two
lawyers will settle their dispute the old-fashioned way.
On June 30 they will convene
at a neutral site and engage in
a solitary game of Rock Paper
Scissors.
``I think it's great the judge
ordered Rock Paper Scissors
for conflict resolution,'' says
Matti Leshem, co-commissioner of the USA Rock Paper
Scissors League, headquartered in Los Angeles. ``But
let's make sure they're playing
by the rules.''
Thought to be one of the
oldest children's games, Rock
Paper Scissors - also called
RPS and Roshambo - is in the
midst of a renaissance. While
the Florida judge's ruling certainly swiveled a spotlight on
the game, RPS has enjoyed a
groundswell of popularity
over the past months.
To wit:
A monthly RPS podcast - a
full 30 minutes devoted to
RPS news, interviews with
players and game strategy launched earlier this month.
An RPS documentary written, directed and produced
by Mike McKeown of
Alberta, Canada, and titled
``Rock Paper Scissors - The
Movie'' - is soon to be
released.
The first official stateside
organization - the aforementioned USA RPS League was formed last year.
One time journeymen players - like Master
Roshambolla, often called the
Bobby Fischer of RPS, and C.
Urbanus, a legend out of
Philadelphia - are now household names.
And, finally, any RPS list
would be remiss if it didn't
mention the rogue game that
broke out earlier this year on
reality television juggernaut
``Survivor.'' Settling the argument of who would be the
first to spend the night on
comfort-free Exile Island,
RPS not only met the needs
of those stymied decisionmakers, it sealed itself in pop
cultural history.
``We're in an RPS boom
right now,'' says Alex Apter,
co-host of RPS Radio, the
monthly podcast available at
rpsradio.com and on iTunes.
``We could easily go weekly.
There's so much material out
there right now.''
Though growing in stature
on these shores, RPS is
worldwide. A sport that
evolved from the decisionmaking game akin to flipping
a coin, drawing straws or
counting out a solid eeniemeenie-minie-moe, RPS is
known in various parts of the
globe as Janken, Shnik Shnak
Shnuk, Ching Chong Chow,
Farggling and Scissors Paper
Stone.
Its universality owes to its
simplicity: Game players
choose one of three signs,
throw it at an appointed time,
and the superior throw wins.
According to international
rules, rock beats scissors;
scissors beats paper; and
paper beats rock.
Dynamite, contrary to
some unethical rule-bending
on various American playgrounds, does not exist and is
not a fourth option for a
throw.
``The rules are simple, and
clear,'' says Leshem, 43, noting that the RPS League's 10
rules - or, as he prefers, commandments - are listed on his
organization's Web site
(www.usarps.com). ``People
start playing it very, very
young, and can play it up
until they're on their deathbed.
It's the perfect sport. What
other sport are you equipped,
out of the womb, to play?''
While RPS' history is no
doubt rich, a founding date
for the game is unknown.
Most RPS veterans throw
their hands up in futility when
asked to pinpoint when the
first decision by RPS was
made, allowing only that the
invention of scissors traces
back, according to some
archeologists, to 1500 B.C.
Others maintain that the game
was invented in Japan, where
it's called Jan Ken Pon.
Others cast the net back even
further.
``RPS has been played
since the caveman days when
it was known as Rock Rock
Rock," maintains Leshem of
the RPS League. ``Mostly,
cavemen died of exhaustion
because it was very difficult
to determine winners.''
Though it's tempting to
cast off RPS as just another
fringe sport - where sport is in
quotation marks and comparisons to other seemingly
unathletic activities like
backgammon and competitive
eating lie close by - it's all
serious business. At least, it
must be, if controversy within
its athletes' ranks is any indication.
That dispute lies in the fact
that there are two competing
governing bodies for the
sport. The first is the World
RPS Society (worldrps.com),
founded by Graham and
Douglas Walker, headquartered in Canada, represented
by the motto, ``Serving the
needs of decision makers
since 1918'' and bearing a
coat of arms of, well, arms throwing rock, paper and scissors.
The other is the newly
formed USA RPS League,
which is sponsored by Bud
Light, resides in cyberspace
on MySpace and just last
April wrapped up its first RPS
tournament with a cash purse
of $50,000.
The USA RPS' Leshem
scoffs at the World RPS
Society's claim to global
stature, likening it to any
American football team who
claims the title of world
champion after winning the
Super Bowl.
While the World RPS
Society had no response - a
phone call placed to Douglas
Walker of the World RPS
Society in interest of providing equal time was not
returned in time for publication - students of the game
say such growing pains are to
be expected when a sport
breaks out from the underground and goes mainstream.
For some, it's been bittersweet
to watch.
``Anything that gets people
interested in RPS as a sport is
fantastic,'' says RPS Radio's
Apter, 28. ``But it is sad to
see something that came from
such passion, and wake up
and see it on Bud Light labels
and on an A&E special. But I
guess that happens with any
sport.''
The real question that
remains unanswered is just
how much more RPS can
grow. Locally, RPS is bursting
at the seams, or at least it
seems to be to Naomi
Brilliant, president of the
unconventional Roshambo
Winery in Healdsburg, which
held its fourth Rock Paper
Scissors contest June 3.
While the first tournament
had just 84 competitors, this
year's drew 256, with Kristen
Lantz, a 28-year-old resident
of Philadelphia, taking home
the $1,000 first place prize
and trophy. Adding to the
drama was the New York film
crew present, in town to tape
the competition for ``CBS
Sunday Morning.''
``We started out really
small. Basically, after we
named the winery, it just
made sense to have a small
competition,'' says Brilliant,
33. ``I always liked the idea
of the game - you don't have
to be a jock, and anyone can
do it.''
Ballpark
Continued from Page B-1
McAfee Coliseum
Remember the old railcar
luncheon in "Diner?" That's
what the Coliseum would be
on a smaller scale: Nothing
worthy of a three-star restaurant, but there are some good
things on the menu. If they
served breakfast at the
Coliseum, it would be two
eggs over-easy with crisp
bacon, slightly greasy hash
browns and toast - not elegant, but satisfying.
The utilitarian Coliseum (it
remains one of the few major
league stadiums built to
accommodate baseball and
football) has a much more
scaled-down menu than
AT&T Park. But when it
comes to the established standards for baseball fans, the
Coliseum does it pretty well.
The A's replaced their old
steamed standby, the Colossal
Dog, with the vastly
improved Grilled Coliseum
Dog ($4.50). My last
encounter with a Colossal
Dog, during a high school
football playoff game here,
left a bad taste in my mouth literally. The dog was undercooked and tasted more like
Vienna sausage.
As if to prove its authenticity, the Grilled Dog has
actual grill marks. This one is
served on a slightly toasty
sesame seed bun; add some
mustard and sauerkraut, a
side of Gordon-Biersch garlic
fries and a soda...it's almost
better than watching Reggie
Jackson or Mark McGwire
take batting practice back in
the day. (The garlic fries at
the Coliseum and at AT&T
had the same great flavor, but
the Coliseum fries were a lit-
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
If you're contemplating buying season
tickets at AT&T Park, maybe some
strawberry shortcake will seal the deal.
In the Field Club and luxury box levels open only to season ticket holders Bon Appetit's offerings rival those of
most San Francisco restaurants.
tle soggy - though 75 cents
cheaper.)
The Coliseum has the
somewhat swanky West Side
Club, a public restaurant on
the mezzanine level with an
enormous bar, reserved tables
with a view of the field and
open tables with big-screen
TVs above the bar. Here, the
West Side Carvery serves
grilled turkey panini sandwiches. For $13.50, we also
get serve-it-yourself sides of
spinach salad and fruit salad,
and a bag of chips.
The sandwich, served on a
soft French roll, is big and
the tasty turkey has a bit of
spice to it. I can't figure out,
though, how a grilled sandwich would have cold meat
and unmelted cheese.
Les and Karen Horton,
longtime A's fans from
Alameda, say they swear by
the Saag's sausages.
"We're Saag's dogs fans,"
says Les. "I love the
bratwurst, with the grilled
onions."
Horton says he does forego
the brat on Oakland's Dollar
Hot Dog Nights, Wednesday
night games when the traditional dogs can be had for
just a buck.
"On Dollar Hot Dog
Nights, I'll have five or six,"
he says.
Acting on his recommendation, I make my way downstairs for a Saag's bratwurst.
Alas, little more than an hour
into the game, there was not a
brat to be found. The linguica
is a good second choice, a
great snap on the first bite,
terrific taste. But the rest of
it? A swing and a miss: The
sesame seed bun is cold, so it
won't wrap around the meat,
and most of the not-too-well
grilled onions and bell peppers end up in the cardboard
tray. The Grilled Dog, garlic
fries and a soda is $14, and
the linguica is $5.50.
If you're strapped for cash,
both parks are ready, willing
and able to take credit cards
at most concession stands.
Win or lose, you won't leave
hungry.
Bon Appetit shortcake
If you're contemplating
buying season tickets at
AT&T Park, maybe some
strawberry shortcake will seal
the deal. In the Field Club
and luxury box levels - open
only to season ticket holders Bon Appetit's offerings rival
those of most San Francisco
restaurants. Bon Appetit of
Palo Alto handles catering for
the Field Club and the luxury
boxes, and their strawberry
shortcake has become a sensation at AT&T Park.
"The look on their faces as
the people try to get a bite
out of this before they get
back to their seats, and they
have whipping cream all over
their face," says Markus
Hartmann, district manager
for Bon Appetit.
The shortcake is far more
than just a glob of frozen
strawberries on a piece of
shortcake with a big spritz of
whipped topping. That would
never fly with Bon Appetit's
philosophy. Twice a week,
during the baseball season,
chefs from the company
stockpile fresh fruits and vegetables from the Farmer's
Market at the San Francisco
Ferry Building, then make the
short trip to AT&T Park.
There, the fresh strawberries
from Yerna Farms are prepared, with an ample supply
pureed for the topping.
Strawberries and sauce are
scooped onto a freshly made
shortcake biscuit - "It's a nifty
recipe," Hartmann says - then
buried in fresh whipped
cream.
The stand in the Field Club
is called, appropriately, the
Farmer's Market, Hartmann
says. It started in 2001 with a
display of a single wooden
cart. There are now four carts
in the Field Club, and the
items served are made from
what the cooks find at the
Ferry Building Farmer's
Market. "We go there twice a
week, buying fresh, available
produce and building relationships with the growers,
then come back, put it on a
big table and the chefs prepare it and serve it that
night," Hartmann says.
A daily special - though
it's often not the same every
day - is the Farmer's Market
Baguette, grilled vegetables
on a fresh baguette with fresh
leaf lettuce and either goat
cheese or salsa verde. "We
use whatever's there," Hartmann says.
A parfait made with organic
whole-milk yogurt, blackberries and organic granola, then
topped with dried apricots or
nectarines, is another fan
favorite, he says.
Buy One Free.
Get One Free.
Get a FREE* Sony Ericsson z300 after
instant rebate and get another z300
FREE* w/ 2-year agreement on each line.
Add up to 4 share lines
to any host plan $5999 and
up for only $999/mo. each!
Plan
Du Jour:
Carryover 10-Western State Plan
1000 Anytime Minutes
59 99
$
/mo.
Unlimited Nights/Weekends & Mobile-to-Mobile Calling
SIMPLE STYLE.
*
w/2-yr agreement per line
& $2999 in-store rebate.
edgewireless
* Advertised phone & accessory prices are valid only at Edge Wireless Sales & Customer Service Centers. Prices and availability may vary at Authorized Edge Wireless Dealer locations.
Sales & Customer Service Centers:
Authorized Edge Wireless Dealers:
Ukiah
516 East Perkins
(707) 468-0600
Pear Tree Center
Ukiah
Nor-Cal Telecom at Foods Etc.
Clearlake
Nor-Cal Telecom (707) 994-2348
Lakeport
Nor-Cal Telecom (707) 263-4848
Middletown
Nor-Cal Telecom (707) 263-4848
Offer ends 8/10/06. Requires new activation, credit approval, and 24-month service contract. A termination fee of $25 per month remaining (not to exceed $250) applies per line. GSM device
required. At least 50% of your included Anytime Minutes and Night / Weekend Minutes must be on the Edge Wireless Network in each billing cycle or we may terminate your service. Included
Anytime and Night / Weekend minutes are valid for calls made from or received in your Rate Plan Area. All other usage is roaming. Night / Weekend is 7:00 p.m. to 6:59 a.m. M-F, all day
Saturday and Sunday. Unlimited Mobile-to-Mobile Minutes apply only to voice calls between Edge Wireless phones that are placed, received and completed entirely on your local Edge Wireless
Network. Airtime is rounded up to the next full minute and billed based on information in our billing system, not the phone's display. Carryover Minutes accumulate and expire through 12 rolling
bill periods. Unused Carryover Minutes will expire upon the 12th billing period, upon default, if you move between Local, Western, or National Carryover rate plans, or if you move to a
non-carryover rate plan. Carryover Minutes are not redeemable for cash or credit and are not transferable. Limited to stock on hand. Other taxes, assessments and surcharges apply including a
Regulatory Programs Fee of $.50/line/month to recover costs associated with state and federal mandates. Please see an Edge representative for complete details.
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 - B-3
TIME OUT
Editor: K.C. Meadows, 468-3526
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
by Charles M. Schulz
PEANUTS
by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
ZITS
by Scott Adams
DILBERT
by Art and Chip Sansom
THE BORN LOSER
BLONDIE
by Dean Young and Jim Raymond
by Bob Thaves
FRANK AND ERNEST
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
by Lynn Johnson
BEETLE BAILEY
by Mort Walker
DOONESBURY
by Gary Trudeau
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
by Dik Browne
Datebook: Friday, June 30
Today is the 181st day of 2006 and the 10th
day of summer.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1966, the
National Organization for Women (NOW) was
formed.
In 1971, the 26th Amendment, lowering the
voting age from 21 to 18, was ratified.
In 1982, the proposed Equal Rights
Amendment failed when its ratification deadline passed.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS: Lena Horne
(1917-), actress, is 89; David Alan Grier (1955), actor, is 51; Vincent D’Onofrio (1959-), is
47; Rupert Graves (1963-), actor, is 43; Mike
Tyson (1966-), boxer, is 40; Michael Phelps
(1985-), Olympic swimmer, is 21.
ASTROGRAPH
By Bernice Bede Osol
Saturday, July 1, 2006
In the year ahead, you may
get involved in numerous
undertakings, and, although
each may be small or minimal,
their collective yield could turn
out to be rather astounding.
What you learn from this will
serve you well for years.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
— Your thinking cap will be
sufficiently organized to analyze and discuss a complicated
issue or situation with associates whose support would be
quite helpful. Make your case
now.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) —
This may be a good time to go
shopping for things you want or
need. You’ll have a sharp eye
for what is a good bargain, and
you are likely to get considerable mileage out of your funds.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
— Your judgment on what is
best for you to do will be superior to others, whose interests
are their own. Don’t let them
talk you into doing things you’d
rather not.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
— Problems that are plaguing
you are best worked out in solitude. Listening to others about
your concerns may only confuse you more. Get off by your-
TODAY’S SPORTS: In 1994, U.S. ice
skater Tonya Harding was stripped of her
national championship title and banned from
competition for life because of her role in the
assault on rival skater Nancy Kerrigan.
TODAY’S QUOTE: “When one has much
to put into them, a day has a hundred pockets.”
— Friedrich Nietzsche
TODAY’S FACT: In 1872, Susan B.
Anthony registered and voted in Rochester,
self where they can’t interfere.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
— You’ll enjoy spending some
of your time with friends, as
long as the activity is enjoyable
or constructive in some manner.
Wasting your time doing nothing will leave you empty.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23Dec. 21) — Once you set your
mind on a goal or objective, it is
unlikely that anybody or anything will steer you off the
course you set. The targets
you’ll be going after will be
worth hitting.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) — You are apt to have
much greater strength in your
mind than you will in your
back. If possible, let mental
N.Y.; she was arrested and fined $100 for
breaking the law.
TODAY’S NUMBERS: 8 — number of
states that had more Electoral College votes in
the 2004 presidential election than in the 2000
election. 10 states had fewer votes in 2004 than
in 2000.
TODAY’S MOON: Between new moon
(June 25) and first quarter (July 3).
projects take precedence over
those that require muscle and
prowess.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) — You have a natural knack
for rooting out information pertinent to your immediate needs.
Once you have all the facts at
hand, you’ll know it will
enhance your chances for success.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
— If you are trying to put a deal
together with another, use all
the skills at your disposal to
your
best
advantage.
Compromise is fine, as long as
it doesn’t interfere with a
promising outcome for you.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
— It always behooves you to be
more attentive to your health
habits, and this could prove to
be right. If you don’t avoid eating and drinking things that you
shouldn’t, you could pay a big
price.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) — You’ll be especially
good at managing persons who
are younger or less experienced
than yourself. When asked to
take charge of such types, don’t
hesitate to use your talents.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
— Because you’re apt to be
more domestically conscious at
this time, today could be an
excellent day to put those finishing touches on several projects you have yet to complete.
D. WILLIAM JEWELERS
We believe by
advertising in
Celebrating 24 years of Business
The Ukiah Daily
Journal
It has helped
make our
508 E. Perkins Street, Ukiah business
teries In The Pear Tree Center
successful for
Watch Bat d
e
l
l
a
t
Ins
the past 24 years.
462-4636
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL
Linzi Andrus, Martha and David Bookout and
Heather Penny, look forward to seeing you!
FULL COLOR!
Since October 2000
Mendocino County’s
Local Newspaper
ukiahdailyjournal.com
B-4 – FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
TIME OUT
Editor: K.C. Meadows, 468-3526
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
Puzzlers
THE LEARNING
CHALLENGER
by Robert Barnett
DIRECTIONS:
A. Using each "Chaos Grid" number with its
letter one time, arrange the numbers with
their letters for the "Order Grid" so each
vertical column, horizontal row, and two
diagonals each ADD to numbers inside
thick lined cells.
B. Some correct numbers with their letters
have been put into the "Order Grid" to
get you started. Also, above the "Order
Grid" is a "Decoded Message" clue.
C. After you have solved the "Order Grid"
doing as direction "A" says, put the letters from horizontal rows, from left to
right, under "Decoded Message" and
make words to form the answer.
CHAOS GRID
13
I
10
R
16
U
17
P
22
D
11
L
10
G
13
E
13
U
22
O
8
H
16
I
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion
8
V
13
L
19
S
13
B
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NASPY
CLUE: MAKE KNOWN
ORDER GRID
56
56
10
G
56
10
R
56
16
U
56
В©2006 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
DIGUE
56
8
H
56
56
56
56
6/30/2006
DECODED MESSAGE:
SPEEXO
ANSWERS IN NEXT EDITION
В© 2006 Robert Barnett
www.jumble.com
ARROMT
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Answers to Previous
Learning Challenger
ABODE AND DOMICILE
38
A
41
E
43
D
40
C
38
B
45
A
41
O
38
I
44
O
39
N
37
M
42
L
42
D
37
D
41
I
42
E
Ans: A
Yesterday’s
6/29/2006
OF
(Answers tomorrow)
PENCE
GIGGLE
HARDLY
Jumbles: FACET
Answer: When the diver was interviewed, his
comments were — IN “DEPTH”
Adoptee’s birthday doesn’t have to be a downer
Dear Annie: I have a birthday coming up,
and to put it briefly, it’s a sad occasion for me
because I was put up for adoption, making my
birth cold and disconnected. My birthday has
gotten increasingly difficult for me to enjoy,
and I would prefer that any celebration happen
after the fact, if at all.
My parents think I am being selfish, that I
am making the occasion all about me, and that
I do not appreciate my existence or what they
have given me. This is not true. It just makes
me sad that my life had to start out that way.
I have other emotions that I can’t really
understand. I only know that my birthday is
sad and I would like to be left alone. I don’t
want presents, but my parents want to celebrate. Last year’s birthday was horrendous (I
burst into tears at a restaurant), and I would not
like a repeat.
Please help me convince my parents that I
do appreciate what they’ve given me. This day
simply has more to do with a broken relation-
ANNIE’S MAILBOX
By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
ship from my past. -- Anonymous
Dear Anonymous: We think you are a little
obsessed with your birth. Of course your parents want to celebrate -- the day you were born,
a much-wanted child came into their lives. It’s
also the day you found a loving and supportive
family. We do not know why you insist on
looking at your birth in the most negative way
possible, but since your focus hasn’t improved
over time, it might help to talk to a counselor
about it and those “other emotions” you don’t
understand.
Dear Annie: A few years ago, my husband
had a colostomy. Since then, every time I’ve
FRIDAY EVENING
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00
mentioned taking a vacation, he looks for
excuses not to go, claiming it would be difficult to empty and clean the colostomy bag.
I realize that toilet facilities in some parts of
the USA and Western Europe are not the best,
but there must be tourists who have coped with
this situation. Maybe your readers can come up
with answers. -- Need To Get Away
Dear Get Away: According to the United
Ostomy Associations of America (uoaa.org; 1800-826-0826), many people with ostomies
travel extensively. The organization has recommendations about how to pack, what to bring
on the plane, how to store supplies in your car,
etc. Your husband needs to feel secure about
managing a trip. Please contact the United
Ostomy Associations of America for some
helpful tips and reassurance.
Dear Annie: I would like to present a different idea of how to entertain out-of-town
wedding guests instead of inviting them to the
rehearsal dinner.
At a wedding I attended recently, there were
probably three dozen out-of-town guests. A
hospitality room with a nice buffet supper was
set up in the hotel where the guests were staying. Guests were informed that they were welcome there anytime after 5 p.m. After traveling
all day, we frankly were relieved that we did
not have to attend a formal rehearsal dinner.
We expected to just grab a bite and go to our
rooms, but found the other guests so interesting
that we stayed a couple of hours. I highly recommend this. -- A.S., Indianapolis, Ind.
Dear A.S.: We caught a lot of flack over that
response, so we will retract it -- to a point. You
are not required to include out-of-town guests
at the rehearsal dinner, but it is both gracious
and appropriate to provide a way for them to
eat upon arrival. They are, after all, probably
unfamiliar with the city and its restaurants, and
they have gone through a lot of effort to attend
the festivities. We like your idea of having a
hospitality room with food available. Other
readers suggested individual baskets of goodies in the hotel rooms. We’re sure people can
come up with innovative and helpful ideas of
their own. Just don’t abandon your guests,
please.
6/30/06
BROADCAST CHANNELS
C
E
F
G
G
I
J
U
e
i
m
s
News
Friends $
News
News %
News %
News-Lehrer
Infarto
Noticiero
News-Lehrer
Brady
Fresh Pr.
Bernie Mac Yes, Dear
King of Hill Malcolm
Malcolm
Simpsons
The Insider Entertain
MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at San Diego Padres. (Live) %
Extra (N) Hollywood Dateline NBC $ %
Las Vegas $ %
Bay
Judge J.
Ghost Whisperer %
Close to Home $ %
Jeopardy! Fortune
Funniest Home Videos Kyle XY “Pilot” $ %
Wash Wk Connected Bob Hope: The Road
Glenn Miller
Ventaneando
Amor en Custodia (N)
Azul Tequila
Business N. Calif.
Wash Wk Connected Bill Moyers on Faith
My Wife
My Wife
What I Like Twins % Reba % Living-Fran
’70s Show ’70s Show 24 $ %
24 $ %
Raymond Raymond 24 $ %
24 $ %
Malcolm
Simpsons WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) $ %
News
Yes, Dear Raymond Becker $ Frasier $ Raymond
Ten O’clock News %
Law & Order $ %
NUMB3RS (iTV) $ %
20/20 %
NOW (N) McLaughlin
Nivel Mundial
NOW (N) Kornbluth
King of Hill King of Hill
Frasier $ Bernie Mac
News $ %
Simpsons South Park
News
Becker $
Seinfeld $
News
News %
News %
Keep Up
Noticiero
Spark %
Drew
Yes, Dear
Will-Grace
Will-Grace
Yes, Dear
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
AMC
COM
DISC
DISN
ESPN
FAM
FSB
LIFE
NICK
SCI FI
TBS
TNN
TNT
USA
WGN
American Justice
American Justice
Biography “Johnny Depp” Actor Johnny Depp.
Bio.: Crowe
Justice
Movie: “Species II”
(5:00) (( “Gothika” (((“A Nightmare on Elm Street”
(:45) Movie: (( “Puppet Master” (1989)
Daily Show Colbert
South Park
Movie: ( “Sorority Boys” (2002) %
Movie: (* “Superstar” (1999) %
How-Made How-Made Survival Stories
Lobstermen: Jeopardy
Dirty Jobs
Survival
Survivorman %
So Raven Suite Life Montana
So Raven Montana
Suite Life Movie: “Tarzan II” (2005) �G’
Dragon
Suite Life
Paintball
Baseball Tonight (Live) SportsCenter (Live) % World Cup Baseball
SportsCenter (Live) % SportsCtr.
Whose?
Whose?
Whose?
Whose?
Whose?
Whose?
700 Club
Falcon Beach $ %
7th Heaven $ %
Baseball
Pregame MLB Baseball Arizona Diamondbacks at Oakland Athletics. (Live)
Best-Sports
Baseball
Golden
Golden
“A Girl Like Me: The Gwen Araujo Story” (2006) Will-Grace
Movie: “Cradle of Lies” (2006), Dylan Neal %
School
Phantom SpongeBob Catscratch (((“Rugrats in Paris:The Movie”
Nicktoon
Fresh Pr. Roseanne Roseanne
Stargate
Stargate Atlantis %
Stargate Atlantis %
Stargate Atlantis %
Stargate Atlantis %
Stargate Atlantis %
MLB Baseball: Orioles at Braves
Yes, Dear Home Imp. Home Imp. Seinfeld $ Seinfeld $ Raymond
(((“The Negotiator”
Wildest Police Videos
CSI: Crime Scn
CSI: Crime Scn
CSI: Crime Scn
Disorderly
The Shield $ %
Movie: “Once Upon a Time in Mexico” (2003)
Law & Order % (DVS) Without a Trace %
“Once Upon a Time in Mexico” %
Law Order: CI
Law Order: CI
Law & Order: SVU
Monk %
Monk %
House %
(5:00) “Major League” WGN News at Nine $ Sex & City Becker $ Funniest Home Videos Da Vinci’s Inquest %
Elimidate
Check out the Classified section for more details.
PREMIUM CHANNELS
HBO (:15) Movie: ((( “Forever Young” (1992)
MAX (:15) Movie: ((( “Internal Affairs” (1990) $
SHOW (:15) Movie: (( “Saved!” (2004) �PG-13’
Deadwood $ %
Deadwood $ %
(:15) Movie: ((* “Land of the Dead” �R’
Movie: (( “Be Cool” (2005) John Travolta.
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL
Lucky Lou
Deadwood $ %
Movie: “Meet the Fockers” (2004)
Family Biz
HUFF (iTV) $ %
Over 18,000 Readers
590 S. School St.
468-3500
Mendocino County’s
Local Newspaper
ukiahdailyjournal.com
UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 -B-5
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL Classified
468-0123
Announcements
010...Notices
020...Personals
030...Lost & Found
040...Cards of Thanks
050...In Memoriam
060...Meetings & Events
070...Travel Opportunities
Services
200...Services Offered
205...Financial Services
210...Business Opportunities
215...Businesses for Sale
220...Money to Loan
230...Money Wanted
240...Investments
250...Business Rentals
350...Rooms for Rent
360...Rest Homes
370...Wanted to Rent
380...Wanted to Share Rent
390...Mobiles & Space
Mon.–Fri.
8:00 to 5:00
480...Miscellaneous for Sale
490...Auctions
590...Garage Sales
Farm-Garden-Pets
500...Pets & Supplies
General Merchandise 510...Livestock
400...New & Used Equipment 520...Farm Equipment
530...Feed/Pasture Supplies
410 ... Musical Instruments
540...Equipment Rentals
420...Boats
550...Produce
430...Building Supplies
Rentals
300...Apartments Unfurnished 440...Furniture
450...Wanted to Buy
Transportation
310...Apartments Furnished
460...Appliances
320...Duplexes
600...Aviation
470...Antiques
330...Homes for Rent
610...Recreational Vehicles
475...Computers
340...Vacation Rentals
620...Motorcycles
Employment
100...Instruction
110....Employment Wanted
120...Help Wanted
130...Sales Help Wanted
140...Child Care
Call us today to place your ad
• Locally • Statewide • Countywide • Nationwide •
One Call – One Bill – We make it EASY for you!
Copy Acceptance
The Daily Journal reserves the
right to edit or withhold publication & may exercise its discretion in acceptance or classification of any & all advertising.
Deadlines
New classified ads, corrections
& cancellations is 2:00 p.m. the
day before publication.
Payment
All advertising must be paid in
advance unless credit account
630...Auto Parts & Acc.
640...Auto Services
650...4X4s for Sale
660...Vans for Sale
670...Trucks for Sale
680...Cars for Sale
690...Utility Trailers
Real Estate
710...Real Estate Wanted
720...Mobile Homes for Sale
730...Mobile Homes with Land
740...Income Property
750...Ranches
760...Lots/Acerage
770...Real Estate
has been established. MasterCard & Visa are accepted.
Errors
When placing your ad, always
ask for the ad to be repeated
back to you. Check your ad for
any errors the FIRST DAY.
The Ukiah Daily Journal will be
responsible for only one incorrect insertion & no greater
extent than the cost of the
space occupied.
Your Ad Is
Seen On The
Internet!!!
ukiahdailyjournal.com
486-06
6-30-06
AN IMPORTANT NOTICE REQUIRED BY
THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT
OF
HEALTH SERVICES
BACTERIOLOGICAL WATER QUALITY
FAILURE
City of 10,000 Buddhas
The drinking water served by the City of
10,000 Buddhas during the month of May
2006, exceeded the maximum contaminant
level for total coliform bacteria, as specified
in Section 64426.1, Title 22 of the California
Code of Regulations (DDR).
The California Department of Health Services
(Department) sets drinking water standards
and had determined that the presence of total coliform bacteria is a possible health concern. These bacteria are common in the environment and are generally not harmful themselves. Their presence in drinking water is
usually the result of a problem with the water
treatment or with the pipes that distribute the
water and indicates that the water may be
contaminated with organisms that can cause
disease. Disease symptoms may include diarrhea, cramps, nausea, jaundice, headaches, and fatigue. However, these symptoms are not just associated with diseasecauseing organisms in drinking water. They
may also be caused by a number of factors
other that your water. The Department has
set up an enforceable drinking water standard for total coliform to reduce the risk of
these adverse health effects. Under this
standard, no more than 5 percent of the samples collected during a month can contain
these bacteria for systems that collect 40 or
more samples per month. Systems that collect fewer than 40 samples per month cannot
have more than one total coliform positive
sample in a month without violating the
standard. Drinking water which meets this
standard is usually not associated with a
health risk for disease-causeing bacteria and
should be considered safe.
This notification of the public is being done in
compliance with Section 64464, Title 22 of
the CCR as a means of keeping the public informed.
Persons wishing more information should
contact:
/s/ Craig Cassin
CRAIG CASSIN
391-5014
490-06
6/30/06
LEGAL NOTICE OF DECISION
Elk Mountain Fuelbreak Phase II
As the Responsible Official, Upper Lake District Ranger Blaine Baker signed a Decision
Memo on June 29, 2006 authorizing construction of 300-foot wide shaded fuelbreak along
the Elk Mountain Road to serve as a strategic
control point for fire suppression, assisting in
the protection of life and private property within the wildland-Urban Interface and wildlife
habitat in the Pine Mountain Late-Successional Reserve. Phase I of the project constructed the fuelbreak from Middle Creek
Campground to the junction of Packsaddle
Road (18N25), and Phase II will continue
from the Packsaddle Road, north along the
Elk Mountain Road, to the junction of the road
to the Rice Fork Summer Homes located in
T17N, R10W, Sections 3, 4, 10 and T18N,
R10W, Sections 22, 23, 27, 28 and 33,
MDBM. Construction of the fuelbreak will involve removal of brush and thinning of understory trees, and disposal of resulting slash.
Copies of the Decision Memo and Project
Planning Record are available at the Upper
Lake Ranger District Office.
This decision is not subject to appeal in accordance with the 19 October 2005 order issued by the U.S. District Court for the Eastern
District of California in Case No. CIVF-036386JKS, and the 24 April 2006 order of the
United States District Court in Montana in
Case No. CV 03-119-M-DWM. No interest,
other than positive comments, was received
by the close of the comment period.
459-06
6-30/06
Notice is hereby given that the preliminary
budget for Redwood Valley-Calpella Fire District for 2006/2007 has been approved and is
available for inspection by interested persons
at the Redwood Valley-Calpella Fire House in
Redwood Valley. On July 13, 2006 at 7;00
p.m. at the Redwood Valley-Calpella Fire
House in Redwood Valley the District Board
will meet for the purpose of fixing the final
budget and any person may appear and be
heard regarding the increase, decrease, addition or omission of any item of the budget.
6-30-06
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to Chapter 10, commencing with
21700 of the Business & Professions Code,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that C&M SelfStorage, 297 Brush St., Ukiah, Ca. 95482
(707462-1299), will cause to be sold to the
general public by oral auction at 9:00 am on
July, 7 2006 the property described as furniture, household goods, appliances, tool, &
miscellaneous.
Name
Dianne Reisman
Antonia Gonzalez
Linda Brown
Reyna Reed
Sylvia Henson
Erica George
Mark Drouin
Justin Anderson
Thomas Castro
Unit#
116
148
412
518
551
595
1099
1206
1244
Landlord reserves the right to bid at the sale.
Purchase must be made with cash only and
paid for at the time of sale. All purchased
goods are sold “as is” and must be removed
from the premises by 6:00 pm on the date of
sale. Sale subject to cancellation in the event
of settlement between Landlord and obligated
par ty. Auction conducted pursuant to Sec.
2328 of the Commercial Code and 535 of
Public Code.
Auctioneer: Robert McCarthy Bond# 0347716
PUBLIC NOTICE
379-06
6-9,16,23,30/06
FICTITIOUS
BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT
File No.: 2006-F0277
THE
FOLLOWING
PERSON(S)
IS
(ARE) DOING BUSINESS AS:
THE SPORTS ATTIC
BAR AND GRILL
108 Standley St
Ukiah, Ca 95482
Ronald Ray Madden
760 Canyon Ct.
Ukiah, CA 95482
This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the fictitious business
name or names listed
above on April 18,
2006. Endorsed-Filed
on April 17, 2006 at
the Mendocino County Clerks Office.
/s Ronald Ray
Madden
RONALD RAY
MADDEN
436-06
478-06
6-30,7-7,14/06
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No.
1078059-08 APN: 160-272-07 TRA: 154028
Loan No: xxxxx7992 Ref: Jones, Danny Unver Important notice to property owner: You
are in default under a Deed of Trust, dated
October 16, 2001. Unless you take action to
protect your property, it may be sold at a public sale. If you need an explanation of the nature of the proceeding against you, you
should contact a lawyer. On July 20, 2006, at
10:00 am, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and
pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded November 01, 2001, as Inst. No. 2001-21541, in
book -, page -, of Official Records in the office
of the County Recorder of Mendocino County,
State of California executed by Danny R.
Jones and Warene B. Jones, husband and
wife, as joint tenants will sell at public auction
to highest bidder for cash, cashier's check
drawn on a state or national bank, a check
drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a
check drawn by a state or federal savings and
loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in
this state: At the main entrance to the Mendocino County Courthouse, 100 North State
Street Ukiah California all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said
Deed of Trust in the property situated in said
County and State described as: Completely
described in said Deed of Trust . The street
address and other common designation, if
any, of the real property described above is
purported to be: 1233 Skyloah Way Redwood
Valley CA 95470. The undersigned Trustee
disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of
the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be
held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession,
condition, or encumbrances, including fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee and of
the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to
pay the remaining principal sums of the
note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust to wit:
$ 151,167.48 with interest thereon from September 01, 2005 @ the rate of 9.990% per
annum as provided in said note(s) plus cost
and any advances with interest. Estimated total debt $ 168,645.31. If the Trustee is unable
to convey title for any reason, the successful
bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be
the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and
the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of
Trust heretofore executed and delivered to
the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and
Election to Sell to be recorded in the county
where the real property is located. For sales
information: Mon-Fri 9:00 am to 4:00 pm
(714) 259-7850, Cal-Western Reconveyance
Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box
22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: June
23, 2006 By: Rhonda Rorie Authorized Signature
ASAP#
777786
06/30/2006,
07/07/2006, 07/14/2006
6-9,16,23,30/06
FICTITIOUS
BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT
File No.: 2006-F0418
THE
FOLLOWING
PERSON(S)
IS
(ARE) DOING BUSINESS AS:
CONTACT
MORTGAGE
759 South State St.
Ukiah, CA 95482
Neece Investments
L.L.C.
9401 Laughlin Way
Redwood Valley, CA
95470
This
business
is
conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the fictitious business
name or names listed
above on January 1,
2006. Endorsed-Filed
on June 7, 2006 at
the Mendocino County Clerks Office.
/s/William Neece
WILLIAM NEECE
Owner
438-06
6-9,16,23,30/06
FICTITIOUS
BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT
File No.: 2006-F0421
THE
FOLLOWING
PERSON(S)
IS
(ARE) DOING BUSINESS AS:
WEST COAST CNC
PRECISION
MACHINING
355 Kunzler Ranch
Road Ste. H
Ukiah, Ca 95482
Jesse Lopez
7920 Oak Pond Ct.
Redwood Valley, CA
95470
This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the fictitious business
name or names listed
above on June 8,
2006. Endorsed-Filed
on June 8, 2006 at
the Mendocino County Clerks Office.
/s Jesse Lopez
JESSE LOPEZ
454-06
6/16,23,30,7/7/06
FICTITIOUS
BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT
File No.: 2006-F0442
THE
FOLLOWING
PERSON(S)
IS
(ARE) DOING BUSINESS AS:
PUBLIC NOTICE
I.R.I.S. Ideal Retail
Internet Sales
490 Milani Drive,
Ukiah, CA 95482
Christine Keri
Lapides
1200 Marina Drive
Ukiah, CA 95482
Amanda Joy Shaw
490 Milani Drive
Ukiah,CA 95482
This business is conducted by a General
Partnership.
The
registrants
commenced to transact
business under the
fictitious
business
name or names listed
above on July 10,
2006.
EndorsedFiled on June 15,
2006 at the Mendocino County Clerks Office.
/s/Christine Lapides
CHRISTINE
LAPIDES
/s/Amanda Shaw
AMANDA SHAW
453-06
6/16,23,30,7/7/06
FICTITIOUS
BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT
File No.: 2006-F0441
THE
FOLLOWING
PERSON(S)
IS
(ARE) DOING BUSINESS AS:
WALK AND ROLL
ADVERTISING
15201 HWY 101
Hopland, CA 95449
Mindy Blumann
15201 HWY 101
Hopland, CA 95449
This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the fictitious business
name or names listed
above on June 15,
2006. Endorsed-Filed
on June 15, 2006 at
the Mendocino County Clerks Office.
/s Mindy Blumann
MINDY BLUMANN
C
L
A
S
S
I
F
I
E
D
S
468-3535
or
468-3536
or
468-3529
10
NOTICES
ADOPTIONS &
FOSTER CARE
True to Life Children's
Services seeks families.
Reimbursement, training
& professional support
provided. 463-1100
#236800809
WANTED
Best
Black
Bart
& Entries
for
Redwood Valley
Black Bart
Parade
Saturday
July 1, 11 a.m.
485-0487
20
PERSONALS
Anyne wtnss’g a hit &
run of red Frd Rnger
trck in Applebees
pking lot Tues June
27 at approx 1:15pm
call Rob Winiger @
Sherzer Ins. 463-1010
WANTED CUSTARD
RECIPES Please
send to PO Box 1914
Ukiah Ca 95482
30
LOST &
FOUND
$100 REWARD
on info leading to
stolen property.
Poulan chain
Saw/case
Purple/Green
Brand New
called Wild Thing.
House key tool set
& white purse also
please call
462-3746
FOUND:
Bible between Upper
Lake Hwy 20 and
Blue Lakes.
462-0415
Lost Cat 6/28
Sliver Tabby
Empire Gardens
468-1230
LOST June 26
Female Dog “Tiny”
S. End of Willits
456-0565
110
EMPLOYMENT
WANTED
Summer Tutoring
available for K-8
students. Have CA
multiple subject
credential.
Please call Nicolena
Hutchins at
463-2529
120
HELP
WANTED
BARTENDER
Vic’s Place
485-8422
Cabinetmaker/
Stainer/Finisher
Ukiah
Custom Cabinets
is currently seeking
a skilled Stainer/
Finisher. 5 yrs. min.
exp. 707-391-7967
120
HELP
WANTED
ROP TEACHER
OFFICE
OCCUPATIONS
PT (2 hrs/day, 3
dys/wk, + staff
mtgs) in Ukiah
$27.84-$46.36/hr.
Provide instruction
in general office occupations. Requires
knowledge of basic
comp. operations,
Word/Powerpoint/
Excel. Exp. in business
marketing.
Regular teaching
cred not req’d. Designated Sub Cred
issued based upon
work exp. or possession of Single
Sub Cred. in Business.
Mendocino
County Office
of Education
For an app packet
www.mcoe.us/jobs
or call
707-467-5012
DEADLINE: 6/30/06
ACCT Clerk,
PT, for local nonprofit. Duties: AP/AR
bank reconciliations,
gen. office tasks.
Min. 2 yr computerized acct’g req’d.
QuickBooks exp. preferred. Pick up application
@ Project Sanctuary,
499 Leslie St.,
Ukiah or @
[email protected] Deadline
4:30PM July 7, 2006.
All Shifts Available!
Full-Time & PartTime. No experience
needed. Full training
provided. Drug test
required, cannabis
not tested for hire.
Help disabled in their
home. 485-0165.
Banking
Assistant
Customer Service
Supervisor
Savings Bank of
Mendocino County
is accepting
applications for
Assistant Customer
Service Supervisor
at our Ukiah Main
Office. Customer
service oriented,
experienced teller
with at least
two years bank
operational experience to promote
customer service
excellence. Midlevel supervisory
duties in teller operations. Assists
Operations Officer
with various
assigned duties.
Must pass teller
test. Salary range:
$2126-$3188 D.O.E.
Apply in person at
Savings Bank
120
HELP
WANTED
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN
NEEDED:
A premier automotive
shop in Ukiah is looking for an experienced auto tech. We
offer an excellent
work
environment
with quality equipment. We pay for ongoing training; we
have the best clients
in the valley. We offer
a benefit package
that includes paid
holidays that you can
chose, paid vacation,
and paid medical.
Paid health conscious activities, a
great incentive program plus many other benefits. We are
looking for someone
that takes great pride
in their work, someone that can work
well as part of a team
and also on their
own. If you enjoy
showing off your
skills and are open to
continually training in
the automotive field,
then we are looking
for you. Call Adam at
707-696-4332 to set
up a time that we can
talk. All applications
are confidential.
Banking
Central Services
Assistant Manager
Savings Bank of
Mendocino County
is accepting applications for Central
Services Assistant
Manager. Carries
out supervisory
responsibilities in
accordance with
the banks policies
and applicable laws
in the absence of
the Central Services Manager.
Includes check and
statement processing, overdraft and
stop payment
review, research,
various customer
service duties.
Salary range:
$2126-$3188 D.O.E.
Apply in person at
Savings Bank
200 N. School St.
Ukiah CA
by Monday
July 10, 2006
at 4:00 pm.
AA/EOE m/f/v/d
CONFIDENTIAL
Admin Asst.
AVUSD-F/T w/bene.
$32,253-$36,937/yr.
Apply Sara I.,
Anderson Vly.
District Office
Box 457
Boonville, CA 95415
120
HELP
WANTED
Banking
Central Services
Telephone Desk
and Stop
Payment Desk
Savings Bank of
Mendocino County
is accepting
applications for
Central Services
Telephone Desk
and Central
Services Stop
Payment Desk.
Both Desks handle
telephone inquiries,
stop payment
and statement
processing, customer requests,
performing a variety
of daily departmental tasks. Customer
service experience
required. Banking
experience helpful.
Apply in person at
Savings Bank
200 N. School St.
Ukiah CA
by Monday
July 10, 2006
at 4:00 pm.
AA/EOE m/f/v/d
Ceramic Tile
Distributor looking
for Sales Associate
with a positive attitude & able to provide excel. customer
service. Must be reliable & able to work
Sats. Apply at 169-A
Mason St. in Ukiah.
Btwn10-12 wkdays.
Chainsaw & Pick Up
truck req. Temp/PT
country job. Ok for
teen. 228-6887.
Chevron is now
accepting apps. for
FT & PT positions at
all 3 Ukiah locations.
Apply in person.
Clinical
Services
Associate
Mendocino County.
MH Dept, $2837$3449/Mo. Req BS
in Social Work,
Psych, or related;
and four yrs exp
providing rehab
services in a MH
setting. Apply by
7/14/06 to: HR Dept,
579 Low Gap Rd,
Ukiah, CA 95482,
(707) 463-4261,
w/TDD (800)
735-2929. www.co.
mendocino.ca.us/hr
EOE
200 N. School St.
Ukiah CA
by Monday
July 10, 2006
at 4:00 pm.
AA/EOE m/f/v/d
100 Kawi Place,
Willits • 459-7330
HELP WANTED
• IT System Administrator
• Casino Host
• Tech Manager
Paid Full Benefits
Please contact the Casino at
(707)459-7330
Applications may be picked up at the Casino
or go to www.blackbartcasino.com
The leader in
correctional health
care, has an
immediate opening
in the
TOP NURSING
POSITION
TOP
POSITIONS
489-06
MENDOCINO
COUNTY JAIL
LVN
Per Diem Nights
Salary $30.60
per hour
Call Claire 707-463-4538
or e-mail
[email protected]
www.cfmg.com
B-6- FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
120
HELP
WANTED
CITY
OF WILLITS
ENGINEERING
TECHNICIAN II/III
Annual Salary:
Engineering Tech. II:
$39,543 - $48-064;
Engineering Tech. III:
$48,648 - $59,132 annually, plus an excel.
ben. pkg & 2% at 55
CalPERS. Must be
self-motivated & play
a major role in performing a variety of
paraprofessional &
tech. functions relative
to civil eng. functions
& activities for City
projects & activities.
Desirable skills incl
sufficient field and/or
office paraprofessional
exp. in civil eng. design & construction
practices as well as
courses in math, computer-sided design,
construction practices,
surveying, materials
testing, and/or other
related courses. A
cert. of completion
from an accredited
Civil Eng. Tech. or
other related tech.
prgm may be substituted for a portion of
the exp. req. Only 1
pos. avail. Will be
classified at either the
Tech II or Tech III level DOE & qual. Apps.
can be obtained at
Willits City Hall
111 E. Commercial St.
Apply by 5 pm
Fri., 07-21-06. EOE.
Classified
Representative
position available.
Approximately 32 to
40 hours per week.
No weekends. Must
have great customer
service skills and excellent phone skills.
good spelling and
typing abilities are a
plus. Must be reliable
and able to pass
mandatory drug test.
Star ting pay $8.50
per hour plus commission and benefits.
P/U application @
Hometown
Shopper,
194 Ford Rd.
Ukiah
CNA’s F/T, P/T,
days & PM’s.
Great working cond.
Apply in person
Valley View Skilled
Nursing Center,
1162 S.Dora, Ukiah
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
120
HELP
WANTED
Cloverdale
Healthcare
We’re expanding!
Seeking dietary aides
& cooks. Join
our winning team!
P/T & F/T positions.
Jill @ 894-5201
COMMERCIAL
DRIVER
w/class A or B
license, year around
position, consistent
hours, benefits
include health,
retirement, holiday,
vacation, etc.
Job description
and application
available at
SOLID WASTES
OF WILLITS, INC.
351 Franklin Ave.,
Willits 459-4845
CONSTRUCTION
SUPERINTENDENT
Established General
Contractor seeks motivated Superintendents with multi-family
residential & commercial experience
for projects in Oakland, Berkeley and
SF. Proficiency with
computers required.
Competitive Salar y
and full benefits.
Submit resume to
fax: 510-444-4195 or
email: [email protected]
Dental Front Office
P/T w/room for
growth. Ins. billing,
A/R, Reception.
Comp skills req.
Dentrix a+. To Start
July or Aug. Fax res.
707-462-7601 Or
send to 1091 S. Dora
St. Ukiah, CA 95482
DRIVER deliver
in our van.
Starting $8 hr
489-5115
Howard Hospital
Opportunities
RN, ICU, FT
RN, ER, per diem
RN, PACU, PT
RN, M/S Shift Sup,
FT
FNP/Inf. Cntrl/Empl.
Hlth, PT OT, FT
RN, HomHlth, PT
Pharm Tech, FT
Switchboard Op, FT
CRNA, FT
HowardHospital.com
or call 456-3105
120
HELP
WANTED
DRIVERS - Golden
State Overnight is
hiring drivers with
van
or
pickup
w/shell for local
morning small package delivery routes
based in Mendocino
County area. Earn
$10.00 per hour
plus mileage reimbursement plus additional reimbursement based on local
fuel cost. Benefits
available including
health coverage and
401K with Company
match.
Call Steven Koller
866-779-7726.
Drivers-Class A.
Chips and Logs,
local haul. Current
DMV printout
459-4131
Executive Secretary
work & communicate
effectively with commissioned staff members, grantees &
par tners, organize
meetings & events including logistics &
materials. Strong organizational skills,
consistent & professional work demeanor. 32-40 hrs. wkly.
with some scheduling
flexibility. Sal. approx. $17.85 DOE.
Please submit cover
letter & resume by
fax or email:
462-5570 or tami@
mendochildren.org.
F/T OPTOMETRIC
ASSISTANT
to handle all
aspects of dispensing eyeglasses &
contact lenses &
some office procedures. 462-5361
F/T Plumber
Technician
Professional & friendly, Basic plumbing/
mech. skills, knowledge of res., Must
have C.D.L., and
clean DMV, Class B
or A lic. a +, Will provide vehicle and
equip., Good bens,
will train, salary depends on skill level.
Please send resume
to P.O. Box 1496,
Ukiah or call
462-4012
120
HELP
WANTED
FORD STREET
PROJECT
120
HELP
WANTED
120
LIKE
CHILDREN?
Outpatient Counselor
Provide assessment
& AOD Educ.
Min. 2 yr exp. F/T
Benefited. $14.32 hr.
Pick up job description & application at
139 Ford Street,
Ukiah, CA
www.fordstreet.org
FSP is an EOE
Gaming
Commissioner &
Compliance
Inspector
For job desc & app
call 707-744-1647
ext. 1342 or email
dhendricks@
hoplandtribe.com
Graveyard shift
WORKING with kids,
small homelike environment, good pay &
benefits. Fax resume
to 463-6957
INVENTORY
CONTROL
Hvy data entr y &
genr’l clerical duties
in a wood products
mfg. environ. Dependability & accuracy a must, 10 key by
touch, computer lit.
Mass 90 knowl. desirable, but not req.
Temp. F/T. poss.
perm F/T. Star ts
immed. Sal. DOE.
Email or fax resume
& cvr ltr to L. Erfurth
at 707-459-1018
[email protected]
Night Staff
FT, 32 hr. & 40
hour shifts. Full
benefits. $9.40 to
start.
Qualifications: Pass
medical and drug
exam. TB test,
criminal
background check and
have valid Ca. drivers license. Great
new medical, dental, vision pkg.,
matching
403B,
TSA Plan, paid holidays & vacation,
paid training’s, on
duty meals. Apply:
Trinity Youth
Services
915 W. Church St.
or on line @
www.trinity cfs.org
HELP
WANTED
This might be
the job for you.
CHILDCARE
WORKERS,
ALL SHIFTS.
Superior Court
Mendocino
County
COURT
REPORTER
$4283 - $5740/Mo
Full Benefit
package
To ensure consideration of your application for the earliest round of interviews please apply
by: July 14, 2006,
however, this position will remain open
until filled. For application/information
Call: (707)
463-6815. Or apply
at: 100 North State
St Room 303,
Ukiah, CA 95482.
www.mendocino.
courts.ca.gov
Senior
Prevention
Services
Coordinator
Mendocino County.
Mental Health Dept,
$3802-$4622/Mo.
Req BA in Public
Health, Social Science or related and
two yrs exp. Program serving
homeless people
with Mental Illness.
Req: Data Coll.
Apply by 7/14/06
to: HR Dept, 579
Low Gap Rd, Ukiah,
CA 95482, (707)
463-4261, w/TDD
(800) 735-2929.
www.co.mendocino.
ca.us/hr EOE
Janitorial Maint/
Housekeeping
F/T Apply in person
1162 S. Dora
F/T 4 day week.
Star ting
salar y
$9.40 per hour.
On call $9 per hour.
Qualifications:
Pass medical and
drug exam, TB test,
criminal
background check and
have valid Cal.
Drivers license.
GREAT NEW
MEDICAL, DENTAL,
VISION PKG.
matching
403B
TSA Plan, paid holidays & vacation,
paid training’s, on
duty meals.
FREE Co-op Day
Care Provided
Apply:
TRINITY YOUTH
SERVICES
915 W. Church St.
or on line@
wwwtrinitycfs.org
LOADER
OPERATOR
w/class A or B
license, year around
position, benefits
include health,
retirement, holiday,
vacation, etc.
Job description
and application
available at
SOLID WASTES
OF WILLITS, INC.
351 Franklin Ave.,
Willits 459-4845
Looking for a
Career in Printing?
Maverick Enterprises,
manufacturer
of secondary
closures has openings for the following positions;
Press Operators &
Press Assistants.
FT, rotating shifts,
full benefits.
Drug screen &
physical req.
Apply
751 E. Gobbi St.
Ukiah, CA 95482
Fax: 707-463-0188
jbrown@
maverickcaps.com
120
HELP
WANTED
LVN/RN Case Mngr.
Community Health
Clinic in Willits seeks
exp. nurse. Competitive pay. DOE great
bens. Fax: 468-0793
[email protected]
www.mchcinc.org
Maintenance
Associate
Busy Prop. Mgt. firm
seeks motivated,
dependable, individual w/basic construction exp. for
F/T position. Must
have reliable vehicle
& valid DL. Benefit
pkg avail. Apply at
Selzer Realty 300
E. Gobbi St., Ukiah
Marine Crews Seekg
Lic Mates 500T
w/ARPA, Lic’d Engineers, AB,s &
QMEDs. STCW95 &
MMD req FT/PT
Mark 425-407-0751
EOE
NCO
Head Start - Ukiah
Site
Super visor/
Teacher I-IIIAA/BA in CDV &
exp. or qualify for
CDE. Site Supe
Permit. Exp w/low
income
fam
+
Supvn.
$14.91$16.63/hr.
Asst
&
Assoc
Teach I-II - Asst
Teach - Must have
6 Core CDV units.
$8.80/hr.
Assoc.
Teach
I-II-Must
have 12 Core CDV
units & 6 mos. ECE
exp. $10.32-11.28/
hr.
Family
Suppor t
Specialist - work
w/low income families enrolled in
head Star t Ctr.
Posn’s range from
Trainee to FSS II
$10.01-$12.84.
Sp/Eng. Bil pref.
All posn’s w/ranges
DOQ & exp.+ bens.
Aide - for HS Ctr.
Sp/Eng Bil preferred. $8.04/hr.
Must
complete
NCO app. Incl transcripts
(Copies)
707-462-1954 x 302
or www.ncoinc.org.
Closes 5 PM 7/5
(Postmarks not accepted). EOE.
120
HELP
WANTED
NCO RCCC - Ukiah
CC Subsidy
Specialist I.
Enroll families, AA
degree in child dev
or rel’td fld pref. Exc
math + comm skills
req. Computer + human
svs
exp.
Sp/Eng Bil pref.
$10.95 - $11.50/hr
DOQ, 35 hr/wk & full
bene. Must submit
NCO app: 467-3200
x302 or www.ncoinc.org
Closes 5 PM 7/5
(postmark not accepted). EOE
NEW EXCITING
POSITION WORKING WITH KIDS
6 wks pd vacation
401 K. Day & Eve
avail. Small homelike
environment, good
pay & benefits. Fax
resume to 463-6957.
Now Hiring servers,
bussers, & kitchen,
cooks & bartenders.
Please apply @
Crushed Grape
13500 Hwy 101
Hopland
OFC MGR Community Foundation.
30
hr.wk;
full
health/F/V. Job/aplication
infor
at
www.communityfound.org
OFFICE
ASSISTANT I
Mendocino
County
Department of
Social Services
Salary: $804-$976/
Bi-weekly
Entry level/trainee
clerical position.
Seeking individuals
with superb organizational and communication skills.
FT w/benefits.
For info call
707-467-5866
or go to:
www.mss.ca.gov
to “Career
Opportunities”.
Closes 7/14/06
Park Falls Dental
Seeking a
Hygienist for 2 days.
Competitive pay.
Resume to:
fax 463-8632
or call 462-8719
Ask for Tonia
120
HELP
WANTED
Office Assistant/
Receptionist
F/T position w/busy
Prop. Mgt. firm. Must
be professional, detail oriented, able to
multi-task, knowledge
of office equip. & procedures. Benefit pkg.
avail.
Applications avail. at:
Realty World
Selzer Realty
300 E. Gobbi St.
OFFICE MANAGER
20 hrs. wk. Exp. in
data entry, bkkping,
Micro Soft, Quick
Books Pro, File
Maker, Resume to
MCAVN PO Box 1350,
Ukiah, Ca 95482 or
[email protected]
P/T Cook
RA’S & MA’s
Will train.
Apply in person
1343 S. Dora St.
P/T Lndscp’g, P/T
Cln’g prsn want’d.
Gen Knw. of Plnts &
Mach. AVBC-Steve
H/ Dan H 895-2337
ext. 13 or 42
PRESCHOOL
TEACHER (aftnoons)
Starts 8/31. Waldorf
School. 22 hrs/wk.
$13/hr. ECE units
req. Waldorf exp pref.
485-8719 or fax
485-7335. employment
@mendocinowaldorf.org
RDA - Little Lake
Health Center in
Willits F/T regular.
Competitive $ DOE.
Great benefits.
Fax: 468-0793.
[email protected]
www.mchcinc.org
RDA
Sal. & benes. DOE.
Contact office mgr.
702 S. Dora St.Ukiah
RECEPTIONIST-Exp.
for busy dental clinic.
Srong customer service. $10-$12/hr DOE.
Great benefits.
Fax: 468-0793.
[email protected]
www.mchcinc.org
Round Table Pizza
Now hiring for eves &
wkends. Must be 18
or older. Apply in person between 1-4 @
292 S. State St.
120
HELP
WANTED
SALES CLERK.
Must be avail. eves.
& wkends. Apply at
New Realese Video
1072 N. State
Mon.-Fri. 10am-5pm
Schat’s Bakery
is looking for a
CAKE
DECORATOR.
Exp. pref. Apply at
113 W. Perkins St.
SECRET
SHOPPERS Needed
to evaluate Local
Business. Flex hrs,
E-mail Req’d 800585-9024 ext 6520
SECRETARY
INSURANCE
OFFICE.
Fax res. 468-0910
SECRETARY/
RECEPTIONIST
Wanted for busy
professional office in
Willits. Immediate
full/part time opening
for motivated, dependable individual.
Experience
mandatory. Excellent
organizational,
communication and
secretarial skills,
computer knowledge
including Word and
Excel required. Salary commensurate
with experience.
Please send resume
to: PO Box 820,
Willits, CA 95490.
Security Guard/
Event Staff. P/T to
F/T. $7.00 hr. to start
DOE. For more info.
call 888-211-2321.
Seeking people to
work one on one supporting DD invididual
in a home setting.
Call Cindy 468-9331
Septic/Plumbing
Indp. contr. to install
new/maint. in mobile
home park. 696-0363
Skills Coach
All Shifts. No exp.
nec. Must like
working with people.
$8.50-$10. Drug test.
DMV printout. H.S.
diploma or equiv. req.
EOE. Apply at 401A
Talmage Rd. Ukiah
462-2395
Water/Wastewater
Operator Flex hrs.
1/2-3/4 time $10-$14
DOE & license.
744-1522
We’re Taking The Classifieds
!
n
o
i
s
n
e
m
i
D
w
e
To A N
www.
ukiahdailyjournal
.com
468-3500
Every d
ay
appear , all the classif
ieds tha
in
t
will als The Ukiah Da
ily Jour
o be po
n
sted on
our We al
b site.
• Helpwanted
ads
• Perso
nals
• Cars/
Trucks
• Real E
state
• And l
ots, lots
more!
Get your daily dose of savings. Don’t miss
www.ukiahdailyjournal.com
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
120
HELP
WANTED
SOLID WASTE
SYSTEMS
Seeks Class A Lic
driver,full benefits,
401K local work only.
Salary depends
on Exp.Send
Resume to
PO BOX 60
Ukiah CA 95482 or
Fax to 707-987-1181
SPANISH TEACHER
Starts 9/5. Waldorf
School 10-15 hrs wk.
$20/hr. 485-8719.
Fax 485-7335
employment@
mendocinowaldorf.org.
SUMMER JOBS &
BEYOND NOW!!!
Full-Time & PartTime. No experience
needed. Experienced
workers please apply
and new high school
grads and next year’s
seniors welcome.
Drug test required,
good DMV a plus.
Assist disabled in
their home and on
community outings.
Call for interview
485-5168
Tasting Room Sales
Locals Tasting Room
a 10 Winery Collective in Geyser ville.
P/T, req. wkends, or
flex. F/T incl wkends.
Ability to lift 40 lbs.
req., computer literate, & foster a real interest in wine. The
position will suit a
fun, flexible & energetic person who
thrives on challenges
& is looking for career growth potential.
Must have prev. retail
and/or wine exp. Review website at taste
localwines.com then
fax resume & cover
letter to 707.857.1885
or attach to an e-mail
to [email protected]
localwines.com
Tasting Room
Sales Associate
High energy with exp.
in retail sales. Passion for wine a plus.
Will train. Contact
Don 744-1396
Truck Drivers
Wanted/ Laborers
Exc. pay & bens.
462-8741
Truck Drivers
Wanted/ Laborers
Exc. pay & bens.
462-8741
TRUE TO LIFE
CHILDREN’S
SERVICES
seeks 2 additional
homes for Shelter
Care program
Applicants need to
have at least 1 spare
bdrm to house a child
for up to 30 days.
Guaranteed monthly
allotment. Generous
increase upon placement. Income tax-exempt. Exp. with children req. Parents will
receive training, + Social Worker, in-home
support & respite.
Need 1 or 2-parent
homes, with 1 parent
home full time. Home
with no more than 1
biological child considered.
Retirees invited to
apply. Contact TLC
707-463-1100
Lic#236800809
UKIAH
VALLEY LUMBER
is looking for an
individual with a current class B lic. Applicant must bring DMV
print out & pass
pre-employment drug
screen. Pick up
application at
901 S. State St.
WILLITS UNIFIED
SCHOOL DISTRICT
is now accepting
applications for a
Literature/Language
Arts/Social Studies
teacher for Baechtel
Grove Middle School.
Applicants must have
a Multiple Subject
Credential with a
Supplemental
Authorization in
English or a Single
Subject in English/
and CLAD or BCLAD
authorization or
equivalent.
Call 459-5314 for
more information.
WILLITS UNIFIED
SCHOOL DISTRICT
is now accepting
applications for
athletic coaches for
the fall season of
2006. Call 459-5314
for more information.
Ukiah Daily
Journal
Delivered
to Your
Door
468-0123
120
HELP
WANTED
Wine Server
Meet interestiing people from all over the
USA while pouring
Mendocino wines &
serving cheese & fruit
at the Hampton Inn at
the Ukiah Nightly
Managers Reception
held 5-7pm. Flex.
schedule. Weekend
work req. Must be
over 21 yrs. old.
Apply in person at
the Hampton Inn
Airport Park Blvd.
200
SERVICES
OFFERED
Reading Specialist
offering Summer
Tutoring. One on
one instruc affordable
rates 463-2835
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 -B-7
300
330
APARTMENTS
UNFURNISHED
MOVE-IN
SPECIAL!!!
Sierra Sunset offers
2 bd. apts. w/pool &
laundry facilities,
carports & more!
Selzer Realty
468-0411
S. DORA
2 bed., 1 ba. apt.
H20 & garb. Pd.
Carport, HUD OK.
$724 + Dep.
Beverly Sanders
Realty 462-5198
S. DORA
2 bed., 1.5 ba.
twnhse. H20 & garb.
pd. HUD OK, carport.
$735 + Dep.
Beverly Sanders
Realty 462-5198
205
FINANCIAL
SERVICES
BANKRUPTCY
is it for me?
FREE
consultation by phone!
Atty Ed Dechant
800-823-0600
215
BUSINESSES
FOR SALE
Wholesale Food
Dist. Co Accts.
Truck & Training est
1981 85K 743-1326
250
BUSINESS
RENTALS
1000 Sq. Ft.
Prof. Business Office.
486 N. State.
468-0179 9-5
Banquet Hall &
Kitchen Ukiah Senior
Center 499 Leslie St.
462-4343
COMMERCIAL
LEASE UKIAH
2030 Industry Rd.
1. 5000 Sq.Ft. Aprx.
w/400 sf office
2. 5000 Sq. Ft. Aprx.
720 sq ft clean room
w/1500 sf office.
Melanie 707-485-1328
COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL &
OFFICE SPACE
AVAILABLE
For recorded Listings,
Call 462-1840 Ext. 195
GARDEN
OFFICE PARK
Spaces from 445sqft
To 726sqft. & up
SPRING RENT
SPECIAL
HOMES
FOR RENT
3bdrm, 2bth, 2 car
garage. new carpet
$1000 per mo. $2000
dep. 462-1395
460
Beautiful 2 bdr. 1 ba.
2nd home on 3.5 ac.
small P.V. Farm.
$1200/mo. incl.
PG&E. N/S, pets
neg. 769-7708
480
Main St. Ptr. Vly.
2bd. 2 ba. + den. 1/4
ac. Pool & hot tub.
$1050/mo. 263-2909
Spacious 2bd
227 Washington
Gar, frplc, fncd
N/S, N/P 468-9003
350
UKIAH
CENTURY 21
370
Les Ryan Realty
Property Management
468-0463
310
APARTMENTS
FURNISHED
Country Travel Trailer For Rent, $400 +
dep. No drugs or
alcohol. 468-1257
320
DUPLEXES
2 bd. 351 Creekside,
Willits. Lndry rm. No
pets. Sml. bk yd. Garage. $800. 485-0841
Avail now 2 bdrm
w/W.D. hu. priv. yd.
gar. Clean! no dogs.
$850/mo. 481-1206
330
HOMES
FOR RENT
1Bd. House on Blue
Lakes: S/W/G pd.
N/dogs. $675/Mo. +
$700 dep. 275-3327
3 bdrm, 2 bth, quiet
neighbrhd, $1650 per
mo., nice bkyard 410
Nokomis, avail. now
489-8600
3bd in country 1ac.
Rwd. Vly N/S, wood
ht, well wtr. Av. 8/1.
$1250mo. 823-5076
FURNITURE
Lg Early American
dresser w/mirror 10
drawers & night
stand $1000.
solid oak bunk bed or
two twins incl ladder
$400. 984-8127
3bedr. 1bath, large
lot in shop near
Nokomis School Avil.
07/10 one year lease
707-252-8791
ROOMS
FOR RENT
A quiet cntry home,
near hwy 101, $430
lg bdrm. . no pets,
drugs, alch.
Cell 650-630-0172
140 Zinfandel
1bd1ba. $660
Hud OK.
440
WANTED
TO RENT
Quiet Mendo College
student seeks 1 or
2bd in Ukiah on Aug.
1st. Reliable inc/ ref.
354-3248 or 459-3639
380
WANTED TO
SHARE RENT
Lrg. rm. $495.
$495 dep. Util. incl.
House priv.
468-0244
ROOM FOR RENT
$450 incl. util.
468-9332
490-7157
420
BOATS
1990 MERCURY
Outboard, 15hp,
electric start, excellent condition, low
hours, $1100,
275-3240
�97 Bayliner Capri
19.5 ft. Open bow.
Low hrs. $7000.
743-2318
440
FURNITURE
Couch dark red 1 yr
old. Good shape
new $800. sell $400.
621-1056
GET A
JOB!
Find It In
The Ukiah
APPLIANCES
USED
APPLIANCES
& FURNITURE.
Guaranteed. 485-1216
DAILYJOURNAL
MISC.
FOR SALE
POOL TABLE,
8”hdwd,leather/fring
e cups,1 1/4” 3-pc
slate. New Felt.
Ex.-Cond.($3500
orgin) $2000obo,
Gary
707-462-3246
45rpm, 300, 50-60 yr
old records. Good
cond. Variety of
Music. 485-0709
�98 Frd Cont. $1,900.
�94 Mzda $300. Gme
Cbe $75. Plyst. gms
trde/sell 462-6208
500
PETS &
SUPPLIES
5 Yr Blck Lab Feml,
nt fxd, luvs to play &
is grt retriver Free to
good home 462-1671
500
Astro Van 1995, 2
light trailers, 1 gas
dryer, 1 sears tractor,
call 489-1023 to
preview
Display cases with
lights, 5’ long. 1
straight one angled.
$300/both or best ofr.
Other retail fixtures
avail. 463-1470
New Sanyo CD6
player/changer/radio.
for Ford Escape.
$100. 463-2122 Jim
Rottweiler pups.
AKC. 12 wks old.
Shots current.
$1000 ea. 367-4288
SPA-Deluxe �06
model. 30 jets.
Therapy seat. Never
used. Warr.Can del.
$2750.707-468-4300
We recycle and pay $
for battery core,
radiators, alum. whls,
copper & brass. 4671959, 707-829-2950
Wine Barrell Halves
for planters Freshly
cut $10 each. Also
will be on the coast
2X a month 4624917. Cel 367-2596
500
PETS &
SUPPLIES
5 Yr Blck Lab Feml,
nt fxd, luvs to play &
is grt retriver Free to
good home 462-1671
510
LIVESTOCK
PETS &
SUPPLIES
BOSTON TERRIER
PUPPIES. Born May
8th Females
$800,males $700.
Real Cute! Parents
on site 707-279-8329
Rottweiler pups.
AKC. 12 wks old.
Shots current.
$1000 ea. 367-4288
PETS &
SUPPLIES
Blue Point Himy
female CFA reg.11
wks old $400. ea.
485-8991
BOSTON TERRIER
PUPPIES. Born May
8th Females
$800,males $700.
Real Cute! Parents
on site 707-279-8329
Pomeranian
puppies, 4 males,
ready July 3rd. $600$1000 462-7656
500
510
вќ¤вќ¤вќ¤вќ¤вќ¤вќ¤вќ¤вќ¤вќ¤
LIVESTOCK
WANTED
Billy
and his 4 sisters
and brothers
await new homes
at the
Mendocino County
Animal
Control Shelter
298 Plant Road in
Ukiah.
These pups are just
8 weeks old. Their
mother was a
purebred Rottweiler
and their father?
See them all on
Best
Black
Bart
& Entries
for
Redwood Valley
Black Bart
Parade
Saturday
July 1, 11 a.m.
485-0487
www.pawstoadopt.com
WANTED
Anderson Valley
Animal Rescue
Best
Black
Bart
& Entries
Blue Point Himy
female CFA reg.11
wks old $400. ea.
485-8991
Pomeranian
puppies, 4 males,
ready July 3rd. $600$1000 462-7656
590
GARAGE
SALES
BACK YARD SALE!
Fri, Sat, Sun(?) 8-3
1464 Lockwood Dr.
(by Frank Zeek)
1142 N. Oak
A little bit of everything SAT 6-4
SUN 6-12
590
GARAGE
SALES
MOVING SALE! Furniture, appliances &
more. 818 Cypress
Ave. between Pomolita & Golf Course.
7-1/7-15. 472-0624
590
GARAGE
SALES
Moving Sale 5100
East Side Calpella,
Sat & Sun 9-2, all
kinds of stuff.
Moving Sale Everything Must Go!
SAT 8-?
1159 Elm St
184 Court St.
Sat. 8-12 Sun. ?
Q. oak hdbd. Redline
BMX, jog strlr, child
carrier bkpack, BB
bkbd & hoop. spkrs,
womens & kids
apparel. 489-6188
MOVING SALE
LOTS TO GO
SAT & SUN 8-2
1595 Lockwood Dr
Multi family sale
July 1 & July 8th 8-5
735 Hwy 175
Old Hopland
475 Zinfandel Dr. Fri
& Sat 8am-2,
antiques, low
prices and lots more.
Sat 7-11, freezer,
washer/dryer, a/c,
lots of misc. 381
Zinfandel Drive.
Alert-Senior Center
Thrift Open Mon-Sat
10-4, Donations of
good quality furniture
only & volunteers
needed 462-4343
SAT 8-2 135 Marlene Bks, Antiq’s,
Collctbls lots more
frm strge No earlies
SAT JULY 1st 9-?
Multi Family. Ent.
center, hsehld items
1471 Reisling Ct
FRI SAT SUN 8-?
Tons of tls, hsehld
items, cmping gear
ect. 14200 Mountain
House Rd Hopland
Garage Sale
SAT 8-1
1021 Crystal Bay Crt
Garage Sale, comp.
supplies, hshld items,
and misc. Sat 8:301:00. 1154 N. Oak
HABITAT 4 HUMANITY
Fund.Bld.Mtrls.&Misc.
Fri & Sat 8-5.801
Lake Mendo Dr. #17
Yard Sale. Sat 7/1
9-2 2343 S Dora St.
bikes, Rainbow vacuum, clothes/boys
uniforms), comp.
cart, toys, misc.
FIND
WHAT YOU
NEED IN
THE
C
L
A
S
S
IFIEDS!
Cruise
On
In
TO THE CLASSIFIEDS
for
Redwood Valley
Black Bart
Parade
Saturday
July 1, 11 a.m.
485-0487
.90/sq.ft. 1st yr.
DOWNTOWN
2nd FLOOR
DANCE STUDIO
3500 sq. ft.
LEE KRAEMER
Real Estate Broker
468-8951
300
APARTMENTS
UNFURNISHED
$875-Marlene Tnhse.
2br.1.5ba. Pool. A/C.
No pets. Parking.
217-2764, 462-1546
1bd. Senior complex.
Downtown. No pets.
Super location.$675
+ dep. 463-8896
2 bed, 1 ba. condo.
Walking
distance
shopping/Sonoma
State. Newly remod.
hardwood
floors,
stainless steel appl.
$1100
dep./$1100
rent. 338-5151
2 New luxury 2
story 1 bd. townhoes. . Mason St.,
Uk. Apt. size w/d HU.
Full appl. Avail.
7/7.Starting $895/mo.
$1000 dep. App. at
216 Mason St. No
pets. By appt. only.
707-972-1294 Rob
2bd. 1 ba
$800
2 bd. TH
$825
No Section 8.
LEE KRAEMER
PROPERTY MGMT
463-2134
2bd2ba. townhouse.
All appliances. Garage, patio. $1025
mo. $700 sec. dep.
No pets. 468-5468
625 N. STATE ST.
PARK PLACE
1 bd. $725-$775
2 bdr. $850 TH $950.
Pool/garg. 462-5009
ALDERWOOD APTS
1450 S.State St.
NEW OWNERS
Refurbished 2 bd.
DW\Garage+pool
$850 mo. 463-2325
Avail. 7-1, New
studio, wat. & gar.
pd., a/c, covered
patio, with w/d,
$725/mo. $725 dep.
462-2611 463-1969
Clean 2bdrm. apts.,
nice Westside neighborhood. Good credit, N/S, no pets, Sec.
8 O.K. $685-$800
mo. 462-3563
Ukiah 1541 N. Bush.
1 bd. $650, 2 bd.
$740. Plus sec. HUD
OK, N/S. 462-5159
• Decide where the sale will take place.
• Place ads on bulletin boards in local
stores.
• Plan around other neighborhood events.
• Hold neighborhood sales to attract more
business.
• Extend the sale into early evening for
the after-work shoppers.
• Run classified ads with the time and
date of the sale.
• Provide adequate parking for the sale
and parking signs if necessary.
• Place directional signs in the neighborhood to lead shoppers to the sale.
• Plan physical arrangement of merchandise—allow plenty of time for setting up
tables and merchandise racks.
• Make sure you have enough change on
hand.
• Keep track of your inventory—make a
ledger with each item listed and check it
off when it’s sold.
• Make alternate plans in the event of bad
weather.
Garage sales take a lot of planning. But when you clear out your closets and see the results . . . you’ll know it was worth it!
468-3500
B-8- FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
610
REC VEH
CAMPING
2001 32FT Seabreeze 5th wheel 3
slide outs excel cond.
ideal for full timer
$33,500 485-0232
�83 Pace Arrow 31’
Motor home. clean.
$8500. Low miles.
467-1327, 391-9733
�82 Southwind GMC
27” Clean. As is.
$6,500. 462-2649
�01 Wkend Warrior
22FB will haul 2
Harleys, AC,CD,
Microwv $12,200
462-2259 aft 5 PM
Camper shell with
EZ lift boat loader.
Fits 8’ bed. $450/bo.
743-1048
620
MOTORCYCLES
SERVICE DIRECTORY
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
BEAUTY
ANTIQUE
COUNTERTOPS
with this coupon
FREE
Foundation to finish
Homes • Additions
• Kitchens • Decks
Lic. #580504
707.485.8954
707.367.4040 cell
Antiques &
Collectibles
Appraisals
EVERY WEDNESDAY 11-5
Redwood Valley
Antique Mall
HAIR & SKIN CARE
HAIRCUTS
COLOR
PERMS
STYLING
FACIALS
PEELS
WAXING
LASH TINTS
9621 N. State St.
Redwood Valley
485-1185
Buying Antiques &
Collectibles Daily.
Organic Hair Products
Therapeutic Skincare
Products
Mineral Makeup
468-7979
309 A West Perkins St.
TERMITE BUSINESS
GUTTERS
• Room Additions
• Painting
• Fences/Decks
• Garage/Shops
• Solid Surface
Countertops
• Kitchen & Baths
J.C. Enterprises
468-0853
lic. #871755 • John Johnson
SOLID SURFACE &
LAMINATE COUNTERTOPS
2485 N. State St. • Ukiah
Bill & Craig
707.467.3969
CL 856023
03’ Dyna Super Glide
thndr hdrs, wndshld
frwrd cntrls pls othr
opt. 6,600mls lke nw
$12,000 485-8824
630
AUTO PARTS &
ACCESSORIES
Ford F150 �98
Camper shell.
$350.
462-2525
22’Rims for 4x4
Brand New!
Call 272-2282
650
4X4'S
FOR SALE
Chevy �94 Silverado
1/2ton 4X4 AC,lumber
rack, cmpr shell,2 sets
tires/rims. Many nw prts
$6,000/bo 485-8831
TREE TRIMMING
FRANCISCO’S
Tree & Garden
Service
Yard Work
Dump Runs
Tree Trimming
670
TRUCKS
FOR SALE
Mits. �02 Montero
Sport LS wht. 29,3K
$14,500. 467-1259
call 9:30-10:00pm
Nissan Front. �01
61K, $8,800.
Great cond.
360-8241
680
CARS
FOR SALE
Honda CRVLX �96
Excel. cond. $8500.
Silver.
467-1327, 391-9733
Lincoln Towncar
2000 Excellent in
every way. $7,500.
OBO for quick sale.
894-7476
Mustang GT �97
4.6 L eng. Good
cond. Extras.
$7200/obo 468-0970
Pontiac 1994
Trans Am, GL audio
stereo syst., $4000
obo, 462-2525
Toyota Paseo �93
5sp manual.sprty low
prfile good cond.
$2000.467-1809
467-3901
RESTAURANT
Ogee
Gutter
DINE IN • CARRY OUT
707.462.3789
Indoor Smoke
Lounge
1109 South State Street, Ukiah
Open: Monday - Saturday
Fast Service: 11:00AM - 8:00 PM
Limited Lifetime Warranty**
FREE
ESTIMATES
License #OPR9138
2 Hrs/$65
(707) 459-3212
(707) 467-1888
Free Estimate
Serving Lake, Mendocino,
Sonoma Counties & beyond
707-621-0422
485-1881
Hardwood
Flooring
SPECIALIZING
IN REPAIRS
Auger
Electrical
Trenching Dump Truck
420 O.K.
By appointment 8am to 6:30pm, M-F
FLOORING
Serving Willits and Ukiah
SHANAHAN
ELECTRIC
My work is to reduce your pain,
improve your ability to do your
work, and allow you to play harder
1st Visit Special
H AND S CRAPED
S OLID O AK
50% OFF R ETAIL!
**To original owner.
ELECTRICIAN
Thorough & Sensitive
Deep Tissue & Sports
Massage
25 Years Experience
Robinson
~ Plumbing ~
462-2468
Insured Bonded
MASSAGE THERAPY
PLUMBING
Quality Service
Curved
Face
Gutter
4”
5 1/2”
5 1/2”
Aluminum • Copper • Steel
Lic. # 292494
Oolah Boudreau-Taylor
Fine Mediterranean
Delights
463-2333
Showroom - 756 S. State St.
Cabinets, countertops,
design, installation and
remodeling
Clines Unlimited
Construction, Inc.
•
•
•
•
•
We pay Workers Comp
Process Weekly Payroll
Pay all Payroll Taxes
Maintain all P/R Files
Invoice Client Weekly
707-744-1839
LANDSCAPING
REAL ESTATE
HOME REPAIRS
HOME REPAIRS
Carpentry - Plumbing
Electric - Tile
Cement - ETC
Residential
Commercial
Complete Landscape Installation
• Concrete & Masonry • Retaining Walls
• Irrigation & Drip Sprinklers
• Drainage Systems • Consulting & Design
• Bobcat Grading • Tractor Service
CAN FIX ANYTHING
Lic # 6178 • Insured
Cell: (707) 972-8633
Home: (707) 468-8136
Joe Morales
(707) 744-1912
(707) 318-4480 cell
EXCAVATING
Residential & Commercial
Specializing in Small Area
Excavation
www.alvarezhomerepairs.net
CONSTRUCTION
Road Grading
Road Rocking
Building Pads
Septic System
Rock Hauling
Portable Screening Plant
• Underground Utilities
• Storm & Water Systems
• Septic Systems
• Road Construction
• Demolition • Fencing
• Landscaping
• Lot Prep. & Cleaning
• 6”-30” Hole Bore
• No Cost Estimate
AND DUST CONTROL with
Office: 485-7536 • Cell: 477-6221
General Engineer • Lic.#878612
707-485-0310
NO JOB TOO SMALL
— Free Estimates —
General Engineering Contractor
Lic. #764005
REFINISHING
• Tractor
work
• Hauling
• Clean up
• Landscaping
• No job too small
• Free estimate
Furniture
and Antique
Repair
& Refinishing
391-5052 cell
Lic. #367676
• Consult • Design
• Install
Exclusive Line
of Bobcat track loaders
Established in 1970
Office (707) 468-0747
Cell (707) 391-7676
462-5617
158 S. Main St. Willits
(707) 456-9757
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
DUMP RUNS
30+ years experience
Laquer, Varnish, Oil,
Wax, Water-based finish
Workshop
in Redwood Valley
free estimates
MAINTENANCE
For more information
about our
Payroll Service,
call us.
LINK Personnel
545 N. State St.
Ukiah, CA
Mon-Fri. 9-5
www.link2hire.com
468-LINK (5465)
License #624806 C27
Non-licensed contractor
Sangiacomo
Landscape
PAYROLL SERVICE
CREEKSIDE
LANDSCAPE
(707) 485-0810
All Local Numbers
707-313-5811 office
707-456-9055 home
707-337-8622 cell
No CSLB Insured
LANDSCAPING
REPAIR
Non-CA licensed.
All work guaranteed.
Irv Manasse
Work
Guaranteed
LANDSCAPING
SPA & SALON
• Waxing
• Massage
• Make Up
• Body Wraps
Serving Ukiah,
Redwood Valley,
Calpella &
Willits.
Home Repair
• Electrical
Ceiling fans, wall outlets, wall
heaters (gas & electric),
Dryer hookups
• Carpentry
Doors, windows, fine finish trim
• and more
• Satisfaction Guaranteed
CABINETS
License #646710
30 yrs experience
Sewer Work, wtr
heater installation/
all phases of repair.
CalMend
All types of home repair,
remodeling, construction,
window & door repair,
carpentry & tile
Can fix almost anything.
Allen Strong
707-485-0802
license #608885
Hawks Plumbing,
Electrical &
AC Repair
Escobar Services
485-8659 mess
license #849949
Solid Oak $3.99/s.f.
Bamboo $2.99
Laminate 88 cents
HOME REPAIR
C-10 #825758
Laminate Center
468-7490 • 995-3290
We use and recommend
Aveda products.
Call Today
468-3500
Fascia
Gutter
41 Years of
Professional Service
Massage
• Hair Style
• Manicures
• Pedicures
• Facials
Great deals on items
you need!
27 Colors to Choose From
Call for appointment
485-7829
Redwood Valley
DAY SPA & SALON
There’s no
telling what
you’ll dig
up in the
classifieds!
Prepainted
Seamless Gutters
Insured
Jeep Cherokee 1990
Great cond. $2200.
AC power windows.
485-8802/463-7977
Like New
Honda 2005 Rebel
Kawk. 2003 4 wheeler used less than 10x
$4000/each/obo
eve/468-9247
From Covelo to
Gualala the most
trusted name in the
Termite Business!
HANDYMAN
CONSTRUCTION
R
VA
L
A
EZ CONSTRUCT
IO
N
• New Construction
• Additions
• Remodels
• Repairs
All phases
of construction
and repairs
Lic#872592
(707) 489-3158
POOL SERVICE
BEST VALUE
BEST QUALITY
No Job to Large
No Job To Small
10 years Experience
RAFA LLAMAS
621-0566
354-0293
UPHOLSTERY
OM CRE ATIONS
CUST
UPHOLSTERY
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
LICENSED & INSURED
Furniture • Auto • Marine
e
Larg Of
“We meet all
tion
c
le
e
your
upholstery
S
ic
r
Fab k.
needs.”
c
o
t
S
In
468-5883
275 Cherry St. • Unit A • Ukiah
NEXT TO UPS
PLANTING
• Supplies & Chemicals
• Equipment installation,
Repairs and Maintenance
PLANT SCIENCE
SPECIALIST
Want a beautiful
garden, but unable?
Call me to do it for you
Experienced in:
Small vineyard &
orchard management
/development.
Also offering services in
organic vegetable,herb,
&ornamental gardening
Call Jason or Tony
354.3323 • 354.1089
Call Chris 24/7
(707) 349-5282
pool service
NOTICE TO READERS
We publish advertisements from
companies and individuals who have been
licensed by the State of California and from
unlicensed companies and individuals.
All licensed contractors are required by
State Law to list their license number in
advertisements offering their services.
The law also states contractors
performing work of improvements
totaling $500 or more must be licensed
by the State of California.
Advertisements appearing in these
columns without a license number
indicate that the contractor or
individuals are not licensed by the State
of California. Further information can be
obtained by contacting the Contractors
State License Board.
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
NATION
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006 – B-9
Washington State offers nation’s first organic farming degree
By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS
Associated Press
PULLMAN, Wash. —
Even as enrollment in traditional agriculture degree programs waned, John Reganold
kept getting questions about
organic farming.
So the Washington State
University soils professor put
together a proposal to create
the nation’s first organic farming degree, and the state
approved the program last
month.
“We have as much experience as any university in the
country in organic agriculture,” said Reganold, himself
a major figure in the rise of
organic farming.
Once considered a niche
market with questionable economics, organic farming is the
fastest-growing and most
profitable field in agriculture,
and demand for food produced without hormones, pesticides or other chemicals is
exploding.
According to the Organic
Trade Association, sales of
organic food and beverages
rose from less than $4 billion
a year in 1997 to $13.8 billion
in 2005. Organics were 2.5
percent of all food and drink
sales nationwide, but have
been growing 20 percent per
year since 1990, the association said.
As a result, retailers are
expanding their organic food
sections, driving up demand
for people to work in the field.
Wal-Mart, the largest buyer of
organic foods, is also developing additional organic products.
But where to find the workers to grow, process, market
and certify organic foods?
That’s where the new program
comes in.
A university in Canada and
one in Wales are the only ones
in the world with organic
degrees. Michigan State
University and Colorado State
are on the verge of offering
organic degrees also.
But Washington State had a
headstart on all of them. The
university has three decades
of pioneering research on
organic farming and owns its
own organic research farm.
In addition, Washington
apple growers have been leaders in converting to organic
farming, largely to cut down
on pesticide use, which is
expensive and hazardous to
apply for a labor-intensive
crop, Reganold said.
Surprisingly, there was no
opposition from big agriculture groups that have long
depended on a variety of
chemicals to protect vast
quantities of uniform food.
“There was no resistance to
it,” said Ray Folwell, associate dean at the College of
Agricultural, Human and
Natural Resources. “It’s a hot
topic.”
The organic farming industry, which has suffered from a
lack of trained workers, is
cheering the move.
“As an organization that
hires people with organic agriculture experience, I see it certainly as significant,” said
Jake Lewin of the California
Certified Organic Farmers.
Made up of 1,300 different
businesses, the CCOF also
sees the degree program as
helping to legitimize organic
farming, Lewin said. Until
now, organic farming courses
were piecemeal, he said.
“This really is raising the
bar for degree programs,” he
said.
An organic farming degree
is also a natural for
Washington, a Democrat-leaning state where many citizens
are environmentally aware.
There are 597 organic farms in
Washington, and lots of farmers markets and organic food
stores.
Stephen
Jones,
a
Washington State University
wheat breeder, just received a
$680,000 grant from the U.S.
Department of Agriculture to
develop wheat varieties suited
for organic agriculture systems.
“There’s a tremendous
demand for organic wheat,”
Jones said.
For the past five years,
Jones has been crossing modern wheat varieties with 163
varieties grown from the
1840s to the 1950s, a period of
time preceding the use of
A university in Canada and one in Wales are the only ones in the world with
organic degrees. Michigan State University and Colorado State are on the verge
of offering organic degrees also. But Washington State had a headstart on all of
them. The university has three decades of pioneering research on organic farming
and owns its own organic research farm.
nitrogen fertilizers and other
chemicals.
Enrollment in traditional
agriculture programs has been
declining at WSU in the past
decade, because of a declining
number of family farms and
because many farm kids were
seeking better-paying careers.
Reganold said interest in
organic farming has been rising, even among students who
were not raised on farms.
But it is unclear how large
the organic farming program
will become, in part because
the chemistry and other science classes required may be
too daunting for some students, he said.
The
new
Organic
Agriculture Systems major is
expected to appeal not only to
aspiring farmers but also to
people interested in related
industries, such as global marketing, direct marketing or
organic food, Cathy Perillo,
coordinator of the new degree
program. Graduates in organic
farming can also expect to be
hired by grocery and restaurant chains.
“There’s quite a bit of
industry interest in the new
degree, too,” Perillo said.
“Large corporations increasingly interested in meeting the
nation’s growing appetite for
organic foods are seeking
employees who understand
organic agriculture systems,
which are significantly different than conventional agriculture.”
Organic agriculture is
attractive for several reasons.
It does not use expensive fer-
tilizers and other chemicals, it
is perceived as healthier to eat,
and it produces less stress on
farmland, Reganold said.
Reganold believes organic
farming will always be in the
minority, but believes it can
grow to 20 percent of the food
grown. But it can be more
complicated to grow a viable
crop, requiring more education for the farmer and often
higher labor costs.
“You can’t just spray.
You’ve got to plan ahead,”
Reganold said. “A lot of people don’t know how to do it.”
On the Web:
WSU: www.wsu.edu/
Organic Trade
Association: www.ota.com
B-10- FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 2006
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
Huge
Selec
tio
Low
s
e
c
i
r
P
NEW 2006 Aveo LT 4DR
New 2006 HHR
Chevrolet 30mpg/hwy
Has Done It
Again
Only
$
% *FOR 72 18,835
34
mpg/hwy
n
#622467
#635252
MSRP .................... $14,240
Factory Rebate ........... $500
Bonus Cash................$500
Thurston Discount ...... $248
Net Price $12,992
0.0
NEW 2006 Cobalt
32
mpg/hwy
MSRP .................... $14,615
Factory Rebate ........... $500
Thurston Discount ...... $222
Bonus Cash................$500
All New 2006
Chevrolets
#783295
Net Price
$
New 2006 Tahoe Z-71 4x4
MONTHS
ON APPROVAL
OF CREDIT
#151287
13,393
MSRP ............................ $48,335
Factory Rebate ................ $5,000
Thurston Discount ........... $5,000
$
Net Savings
*0.0% for 72 months is on approval of credit through GMAC on all new 2006 Chevrolets
(Excludes Corvette). Special financing and rebates cannot be combined.
10,000
moving forward
High gas
prices getting
you nowhere?
Check out these
MPG’s!
New 2006 Tacoma Ext Cab SR5 2wd
27
mpg/hwy
5 speed manual
#266053
Only $19,999
New 2006 Toyota Corolla S
%*
2.9
FOR 60
MONTHS
ON APPROVAL
OF CREDIT
On All new 2006
Toyota 4Runners,
Solaras and gas
Highlanders
New 2006 Highlander Hybrid 4x4’s
33
mpg/city
#030082, 030142
41
mpg/hwy
5-speed manual
#734720
$
Sale Price 16,826
All New
�07 Camrys
�07 FJ Cruisers
�07 Yaris’
IN STOCK
*2.9% for 60 months is on approval of credit through TFS for Tier I+, I and II
customers. See dealer for details. Special financing through TFS is not compatible
with factory rebates and cannot be combined. Sale ends 7/2/06.
Ready for immediate delivery
what moves you
в„ў
NEW 2006 SCION XB’s
NEW 2006 SCION XA’s
NEW 2006 SCION TC’s
34
38
29
mpg/hwy
mpg/hwy
mpg/hwy
MSRP Starts At
MSRP Starts At
MSRP Starts At
$14,570
$13,320
$16,940
All New Scions are Pure Priced and come standard with: Air Conditioning, Power Steering, Power
Windows, CD Player, Power Door Locks, Tilt Steering, Anti Lock Brakes, and more.
USED CAR CLEARANCE ZONE
05 Nissan
Murano
2003 Toyota Tundra
Access Cab Limited
#400607
$
#399920
2005 Jeep
Grand Cherokee
2003
Acura TL
#577790
$
21,991
$
2005 Saturn
Relay
#033786
$
$
#234794
$
20,990 19,999
$
41,994 25,995
2004 Dodge
Dakota
#135157
19,999
#567673
#102890
$
2003 Cadillac
Deville
2004 Dodge
Neon
2006 Dodge
Durango 4x4
#100741
#178059
23,993 24,994 29,992
$
2004
Corvette
2003 Lexus
GS300
#717654
$
17,997
$
9,699
2004 Dodge
Ram 2500
#236211
$
2003 Chevrolet S-10 2006 Chevrolet 2003 Toyota MR2
2005 GMC
Crew Cab 4x4
Canyon Crew Cab
Cobalt
Spyder Conv.
#136189
#181478
$
17,997
$
17,997
2004 Honda
Civic
2005 Ford
Ranger
#014820
$
12,992
$
18,888
$
#062013
18,888
9,799
$
#105498
14,994
$
2006
Ford 500
$
26,996 17,997
14,994
2005 Dodge
Quad Cab
#102796
#A10992
#275490
$
2004 Chrylsler
Sebring Conv.
#568046
$
2006 Ford
Expedition
2004 Chevy
Cavalier
#A62316
33,333 15,995
All vehicles subject to prior sale. All prices plus government fees and taxes
any finance charges and any dealer document preparation charge of $45, and
any emissions testing charge and CA tire fee. Sale ends 7/2/06.
#61555
$
2002 Toyota
Solara
#506017
$
18,888
2800 North State St. • Ukiah www.thurstonautoplaza.com
1-866-2-THURSTON
(707) 462-8817
CREDIT
UNION
DIRECT
LENDING
Document
Category
Lifestyle and Career
Views
616
File Size
9 192 KB
Tags
1/--pages
Report inappropriate content