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1.  How to Register for the 2014 – 2015 school year - Home - Home

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1.  How to Register for the 2014 – 2015 school year
Enrollment for classes at OCHS begins with pre-registration in the spring. During pre-registration,
9th, 10th and 11th grade students will meet with their counselors to review their progress and their goals.
They will then develop a list of course requests for the upcoming year. Because proper selection of
classes is crucial to one’s ultimate success in high school, we urge parents and students to work with our
counselors and teachers to develop a schedule that will satisfy the student’s educational objectives.
Parents can participate in this process by scheduling an appointment through the Counseling Center
secretary/registrar, Ms. Doris Buzzell (661-4292). Counselors are Mrs. Kim Harris, Mr. Dave Kohstall,
Dr. Nora Coleman, Mrs. Amy Carr, and Mr. Kevin Weber. In most cases the student is assigned a
counselor based on first letter of his or her last name.
Mr. Kohstall- All freshmen
Mr. Weber- Letters R—Z grades 10-12
Dr. Coleman- Letters A-E grades 10-12
Mrs. Carr- Letters F-L grades 10-12
Mrs. Harris- Letters M-Q grades 10-12
Please note: Planning course requests for the 2013-2014 school year is extremely important because
the opportunity to change classes after students have been scheduled is limited. Any such request
will be granted on a space-available basis and must be approved by a counselor and an
administrator. In other words, if a student registers for a course, he or she will most likely have to take
that course for the entire fall or spring term.
Pre-Registration Requirements
To complete pre-registration for classes for the 2014-2015 school year, students must:
п‚· Review the 2014-2015 OCHS Program of Studies information and develop an individual
four-year preferred plan of study.
п‚· Attend a pre-registration conference with their school counselor. This meeting generally
occurs as a small group assembly.
п‚· Following their meeting with a counselor, students will need to complete their course
selection through the online portal. This can be completed at home or at school, and
parents are encouraged to be involved.
п‚· Satisfy the requirements necessary for placement in the classes requested
Scheduling Guidelines
Orange County High School follows a Flex Schedule with “4x4” (four by four) semester blocks, 4x4
A/B year long, and some split blocks with 45 minute classes. The academic year consists of a fall and a
spring semester. Students can take a minimum of four different classes each term. OCHS students can
earn four credits each semester or eight credits per year.
п‚· All students must take four classes per semester. Any exceptions must be approved by the
counselor or administrator assigned to that student.
п‚· Seniors who fail a course required for graduation in the fall are NOT guaranteed a position in that
class in the spring and may forfeit their opportunity to graduate in June. Positions are available on
a space-available basis to those seniors who need credits for graduation and every effort will be
made to reschedule seniors into classes they have failed but it is not guaranteed.
п‚· Students can accumulate 32 credits in a four-year high school program. Although only 22 credits
are required for graduation with a standard diploma, Orange County High School students are
1
encouraged to take courses beyond the basic requirements to prepare for entrance into the
increasingly competitive job market or post secondary education.
п‚·
Students may leave school early on a daily basis if they have:
пѓј Enrolled in ICT or Agricultural Business and are employed.
пѓј Enrolled in the Dual Enrollment program.
пѓј Written consent from the Administration.
пѓј Senior Internship
пѓј Enrolled in an off-campus CTE program.
2. пЂ­ What You Need to Know about Curriculum and
Graduation Requirements
Requirements for Promotion
The minimum criteria below must be met to enter the grade level listed.
9th grade –
10th grade –
11th grade –
12th grade –
Completion of the 8th Grade.
Earn five credits including English 9.
Earn nine credits including English 10.
Complete a class schedule that allows the student to earn the 22-26 credits
for graduation in June.
Promotions take place at the beginning of the fall term.
Grading Scale
Prior to the 2010-2011 school year
A
B
C
D
F
Beginning with the 2010-2011 school year
93 – 100
85 – 92
77 – 84
70 – 76
0 – 69
A
B
C
D
F
90-100
80-89
70-79
65-69
Below 65
Graduation Requirements
The following graduation requirements were adapted from the Virginia Standards of
Accreditation (SOA) by the State Board of Education in the Spring of 2011.
Requirements for Graduation
The requirements for a student to earn a diploma from a Virginia high school shall be those in
effect when that student enters the ninth grade for the first time. Students may be awarded a diploma or
certificate upon graduation from a Virginia high school.
2
Requirements for a Standard Diploma (prior to the graduating class of 2015)
Students shall earn the standard and verified units of credit outlined in Table 1. Students who complete the requirement for a
Standard Diploma with a grade average of “A” will receive a Board of Education Seal on their diploma.
Table 1: Credits Required for Graduation with a Standard Diploma
Discipline Area
Standard Units
Required
English
Mathematics
Laboratory Science
History & Social Studies
Health and P.E.
Fine or Practical Arts
Electives
Student Selected Test
Total
4
3
3
3
2
1
6
-22
Verified Units
Required
2
1
1
1
---1
6
Mathematics:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall be at or above the level of algebra and shall include at least two course
selections among: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra 2, Computer Math or other mathematics courses above the level of algebra
or geometry. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
Science:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include selections from at least two different science disciplines: earth
science, biology, chemistry, or physics. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
History and Social Studies:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include Virginia & U.S. History, U.S. Government, and one world
history/geography course. Courses which satisfy the world history/geography course are (a) World Studies 1, (b) World
Geography. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
Electives:
Students pursuing a Standard Diploma should take courses to satisfy this requirement which include at least two sequential
electives as required by the Standards of Quality. Sequential electives are a series of two related one credit courses in a
content area.
Student Selected Test
A student must pass one or more SOL tests of their own choosing. As an alternative, a student may utilize additional tests for
earning verified credit in computer science, technology, or other areas as prescribed by the Board in 8VAC 20-1310110.B
Examples of sequential electives are as follows:
Accounting- Computer Accounting Advanced
Microsoft Office-Advanced Microsoft Office
Marketing-Advanced Marketing
Information Technology- Programming
Agriculture Mechanics and Plant Science I (Ag I) - Ag II
Life Management- Life Planning and Parenting
Culinary Arts I- Culinary Arts II
Computer Assembly and Configuration I and Computer
Assembly and Configuration II
Nursing Assistant I (NA I)-NA II
Industrial Cooperative Training I (ICT I) - ICT II
High School Drafting I- HS Drafting II
Digital Media Productions I (DMP I) - DMP II
Technology Foundations- Technology Transfer
JROTC I- JROTC II
3
Requirements for a Standard Diploma (starts with graduating class of 2015; entering
high school in the 2011-2012 school year)
Beginning with students entering ninth grade for the first time in 2013-2014, a student must also:
-Earn a board-approved career and technical education credential to graduate with a Standard Diploma; and
-Successfully complete one virtual course, which may be non-credit bearing.
Table 1: Credits Required for Graduation with a Standard Diploma
Discipline Area
English
Mathematics
Laboratory Science
History & Social Studies
Health and P.E.
Foreign Language, Fine Arts
or Career & Technical Education
Economics and Personal Finance
Electives
Student Selected Test
Total
Standard Units
Required
Verified Units
Required
4
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
--
2
1
4
-22
---1
6
Mathematics:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall be at or above the level of algebra and shall include at least two course
selections among: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra 2, Computer Math or other mathematics courses above the level of algebra
or geometry. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
Science:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include selections from at least two different science disciplines: earth
science, biology, chemistry, or physics. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
History and Social Studies:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include Virginia & U.S. History, U.S. Government, and one world
history/geography course. Courses which satisfy the world history/geography course are (a) World Studies 1, (b) World
Geography, (c) World Studies II. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
Electives:
Courses to satisfy this requirement shall include at least two sequential electives as required by the Standards of Quality.
Sequential electives are a series of two related one credit courses.
Student Selected Test
A student must pass one or more SOL tests of their own choosing. As an alternative, a student may utilize additional tests for
earning verified credit in computer science, technology, or other areas as prescribed by the Board in 8VAC 20-1310110.B
Examples of sequential electives are as follows:
Accounting- Computer Accounting Advanced
Microsoft Office-Advanced Microsoft Office
Marketing-Advanced Marketing
Information Technology- Programming
Agriculture Mechanics and Plant Science I (Ag I) - Ag II
Life Management- Life Planning and Parenting
Culinary Arts I- Culinary Arts II
Computer Assembly and Configuration I and Computer Assembly and Configuration II
Nursing Assistant I (NA I)-NA II
Industrial Cooperative Training I (ICT I) - ICT II
High School Drafting I- HS Drafting II
Digital Media Productions I (DMP I) - DMP II
Technology Foundations- Technology Transfer
JROTC I- JROTC II
4
Requirements for an Advanced Studies Diploma (prior to the class of 2015)
Students who complete the requirements for an Advanced Studies Diploma with an average grade of “B” or better, and
successfully complete at least one advanced placement (AP) course, or one college-level course for credit will receive the
Governor’s Seal on the diploma.
Table 2: Credits Required for Graduation with an Advanced Studies Diploma
Discipline Area
Standard Units
Required
English
Mathematics
Laboratory Science
History & Social Studies
Health and P.E.
Foreign Language
Fine or Practical Arts
Electives
Student Selected Test
Total
4
4
4
4
2
3
1
2
-24
Verified Units
Required
2
2
2
2
----1
9
Mathematics:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall be at or above the level of algebra and shall include at least three different
course selections from among: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra 2, and one other mathematics courses above the level of
Algebra 2. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
Science:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include course selections from at least three different science disciplines
from among: Earth Sciences, Biology, Chemistry, or Physics or completion of Principles of Technology Part 1 and Part 2.
The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
History & Social Studies:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include World Studies I or World Geography, World Studies II, Virginia
& U. S. History, and U.S. Government. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
Foreign Language:
Three credits of one language or two credits of two languages.
Student Selected Test
A student must pass one or more SOL tests of their own choosing. As an alternative, a student may utilize additional tests for
earning verified credit in computer science, technology, or other areas as prescribed by the Board in 8VAC 20-1310110.B
5
Requirements for an Advanced Studies Diploma (starts with the graduating class of
2015; entering high school in the 2011-2012 school year)
Students who complete the requirements for an Advanced Studies Diploma with an average grade of “B” or better, and
successfully complete at least one advanced placement (AP) course, or one college-level course for credit will receive the
Governor’s Seal on the diploma. Beginning with students entering ninth grade for the first time in 2013-2014, a student must
successfully complete one virtual course, which may be non-credit bearing, to graduate with an Advanced Studies Diploma
Table 2: Credits Required for Graduation with an Advanced Studies Diploma
Discipline Area
English
Mathematics
Laboratory Science
History & Social Studies
Health and P.E.
Foreign Language
Fine Art or Career &
Technical
Economics and
Personal Finance
Electives
Student Selected Test
Total
Standard Units
Required
Verified Units
Required
4
4
4
4
2
3
2
2
2
2
---
1
--
1
3
-26
--1
9
Mathematics:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall be at or above the level of algebra and shall include at least three different
course selections from among: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra 2, and one other mathematics courses above the level of
Algebra 2. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
Science:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include course selections from at least three different science disciplines
from among: Earth Sciences, Biology, Chemistry, or Physics or completion of Principles of Technology Part 1 and Part 2.
The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
History & Social Studies:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include World Studies I or World Geography, World Studies II, Virginia
& U. S. History, and U.S. Government. The Board may approve additional courses to satisfy this requirement.
Foreign Language:
Three credits of one language or two credits of two languages.
Student Selected Test
A student must pass one or more SOL tests of their own choosing. As an alternative, a student may utilize additional tests for
earning verified credit in computer science, technology, or other areas as prescribed by the Board in 8VAC 20-1310110.B
6
Requirements for a Modified Standard Diploma
The Modified Standard Diploma will not be an option for students with disabilities who enter the ninth grade for the first
time beginning in 2013-2014. Credit accommodations allow students with disabilities who previously would have pursued a
Modified Standard Diploma to earn a Standard Diploma
1.
2
3
4
5
The Modified Standard Diploma program is intended for certain students at the secondary level who have a
disabilities and are unlikely to meet credit requirements for a Standard Diploma. Eligibility and participation in the
Modified Standard Diploma program shall be determined by the student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) team
and the student, where appropriate, at any point after the student’s eighth grade year.
The school must secure the informed written consent of the parent/guardian and the student to choose this diploma
program after review of the student’s academic history and full disclosure of the student’s options.
The student who has chosen to pursue a Modified Standard Diploma shall also be allowed to pursue the Standard or
Advanced Studies Diploma at any time throughout that student’s high school career. The student must not be
excluded from courses and tests required to earn a Standard or Advanced Studies Diploma.
Students pursuing the Modified Standard Diploma shall pass the Grade 8 Reading and Mathematics SOL tests.
The student must meet any additional criteria established by the Board.
Table 3: Credits Required for Graduation with a Modified Standard Diploma
Discipline Area
Standard Units Required
English .
4
Mathematics
3
Laboratory Science
2
History & Social Studies
2
Health and P.E.
2
Fine or Practical Arts
1
Electives
6
Total
20
Mathematics:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include content from among applications of algebra, geometry, personal
finance, and statistics in courses that have been approved by the Board.
Science:
Courses completed shall include content from at least two of the following: applications of earth science, biology, chemistry,
or physics in courses approved by the Board.
History and Social Studies:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include one unit of credit in Virginia & U.S. History and one unit of
credit in U. S. Government in courses approved by the Board.
Electives:
Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include at least two sequential electives in the same manner required for
the Standard Diploma.
7
Grade Point Average
Grade Point Average (GPA) is one of the primary factors used by colleges, scholarship
committees, and employers in the selection of students for admission, scholarship awards, and
employment. It is imperative that a student’s GPA accurately reflects the performance of the student.
Orange County Public Schools utilizes a weighted Grade Point Average which is calculated in
the following manner:
The number of graduation credits carried by a course is multiplied by a numerical grade equivalent. That product is
added together with the product of every other course taken by the student. The result is divided by the total number of
credits attempted by the student. The resultant number is the student’s GPA.
All courses taken at Orange County High School are included in the calculation of GPA.
Numerical grade equivalents are weighted on the basis of difficulty of courses. Generally, numerical
equivalents are assigned on the four point scale listed here:
A=4; B=3; C=2; D=1; F=0
Advanced Placement (AP) courses, dual enrollment courses, Teachers for Tomorrow, and Blue
Ridge Virtual Governor’s School (BRVGS) courses have a higher numerical equivalent than other high
school courses to reflect their substantially greater difficulty. The following numerical equivalents are
used for AP and BRVGS courses:
A=5; B=4; C=3; D=2; F=0
If a student retakes a course for a higher grade, the higher of the two grades will be counted
toward the GPA. The lower of the two grades will be designated as an audit and will not count against
the student’s final GPA.
3. пЂ­ For Students Enrolled in Special Programs
Alternative Education
Orange County High School strives to offer educational opportunities for all students. Occasionally,
it is necessary for a student to attend an alternative educational setting to continue progressing in school.
Students are placed into this program based on behavioral, academic, and/or attendance issues. These
programs include:
п‚· After-school Program- Students who require an alternative placement may apply or may be
asked to apply for the Alternative Education Program (an application can be obtained from the
Counseling Center). Students participating in the after-school program will be placed in four
classes per semester that meet at OCHS after regular school hours. Classes offered will include
those in the areas of English, mathematics, science, and social studies.
п‚· GED Preparation- General Equivalency Diploma Preparation classes are offered at OCHS. Any
student age 16 or older interested in applying for this program should consult with a counselor.
Students in this program will work to prepare for the GED test and must remain in the program
until they have passed. Participating students must display proficiency in selected areas.
п‚· APEX Lab- The APEX Lab program is provided as a preventive support for students who are
not succeeding in the traditional classroom setting. Students obtain academic credit and extended
8
teacher support in an alternative setting. The ultimate goal is for students to develop the attitude
and habits required to successfully transition back to mainstream classrooms and to graduate.
Special Education Services
A case manager will be assigned and an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) will be developed for
students who are found eligible for special education services. Services may range from an occasional
consultation with a special education teacher to a fully self-contained educational program.
Students receiving a standard diploma are expected, with accommodations, to meet the same course
requirements as the general student population. Another possible diploma is the modified standard
diploma for students who have an identified disability and are seeking a standard diploma but have not
passed the required SOL tests with accommodations.
п‚·
Diploma Options for Special Needs Students
A.
B.
C.
D.
п‚·
Advanced Studies Diploma or Advanced Studies Technical Diploma
Standard Diploma or Standard Technical Diploma
Modified Standard Diploma (ending with the class of 2017)
IEP Diploma
1. Students will participate in a life-skills curriculum
2. Students will participate in the Virginia Alternative Assessment Program
Special Service Levels at OCHS
A. Mainstreaming: Students will be placed in general education classes with accommodations
put in place by the IEP team and provided by the general education teacher.
B. Inclusion: Students are placed in the general education classroom with both a special and
general education teacher. Accommodations are put in place by the IEP team, and provided
by both classroom teachers.
C. Parallel Curriculum: Students are placed in a special education classroom. Parallel classes
follow the SOL guidelines, and students are responsible for taking the SOL exam.
D. LCCE (Life and Career Centered Education): Students are in a special education
classroom and participate in a life-skills curriculum.
Academically Gifted Student Services
Academically gifted students are encouraged to take a rigorous program of studies as their special
abilities and interests permit. In developing their four-year academic plans, students need to be aware of
the availability of special interest classes at each grade level which include Honors/Advanced Placement
(AP) Program, the Blue Ridge Virtual Governor’s School, and the Dual Enrollment program. Other
programs such as the Summer Governor’s School and Destination Imagination are available to
interested students. Academically gifted students should consult their school counselor for opportunities
to enrich their high school curriculum.
Blue Ridge Virtual Governor’s School
The Blue Ridge Virtual Governor’s School is available to a limited number of students at Orange
County High School. In this program, students from OCHS along with students from five neighboring
counties learn through local instruction and through instructional technology. Students who successfully
complete the BRVGS curriculum, which will include specific, technologically-delivered courses as well
as existing Honors and Advanced Placement high school courses, will receive a Governor’s School seal
on their diplomas upon graduation.
9
BRVGS courses will be limited to fifteen students per year. Admission to BRVGS is available to
incoming ninth-graders through a rigorous application process that will include ability testing, portfolio
review, and personal interviews.
The program began in the 2000 – 2001 school year, with a course in which the World Studies
Honors curriculum was supplemented by the study of historical disciplines. The specific BRVGS
course offerings for 2014-2015 include:
*Ninth Grade - World Studies I and II/Technology Through the Ages. This course incorporates the
Standards of Learning for World History I and II, and focuses on the development and use of
technology throughout history. Field trips include the University of Virginia and Washington, DC.
Students also develop, research and present year-long projects. Students receive two credits for this
two semester course. Students in the ninth grade of BRVGS will also take Biology I to prepare them
for the sophomore course.
*Tenth Grade – AP Biology- This year long course incorporates Biology Standards of Learning and
the study of modern biotechnology. Students participate in college level laboratory projects. Field
trips include Washington, DC and the Virginia Science Museum in Richmond. Students receive two
credits for this two semester course.
*Eleventh Grade – Computer Science. Primarily a programming course, Computer Science is taught
online through Blackboard, which is a popular “virtual classroom” used at many colleges and
universities. Students collaborate on programming solutions to problems that they identify and
research and then present their results to their peers. Students receive one credit for this one
semester course.
*Twelfth Grade – Senior Internship. Seniors identify subjects of interest for research and an
internship. In addition, seniors turn their knowledge and talents to school or community service.
Students present the results of their research and experiences to a panel of evaluators at the end of
their senior year. Students earn one credit for this one semester course. For more information
about Blue Ridge Virtual Governor’s School please go to: www.brvgs.k12.va.us
Beginning with the freshman class of 2009-2010, BRVGS students will be required to take the
highest level of courses available to them throughout their high school career. Students must
complete either dual enrollment (or advanced placement) Statistics or advanced placement
Calculus.
Students and parents interested in the Blue Ridge Virtual Governor’s School should contact their current
school counselor as early as the 7th grade or at least by the fall of the student’s 8th grade year.
4. пЂ­ To Enroll in Classes for College Credit
Eligible students may earn post-secondary credit while they are enrolled at OCHS by taking dual or
joint enrollment classes, a college class taught over the Internet, or an Advanced Placement class.
Eligible Students
OCHS juniors and seniors wishing to take post-secondary classes while enrolled at OCHS must have
met the following entrance requirements:
п‚· Earned a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher.
п‚· Passed all pre-requisite high school classes
п‚· Earned a passing score on any required placement test.
п‚· Submitted any required admission application to the college or school.
10
п‚·
Paid all required tuition and related fees. Students who wish to register for post-secondary
classes should be prepared to pay their tuition within 15 days of receipt of a bill form the dual
enrollment liaison.
Lack of academic progress or failure to carry the minimum classes will result in an administrative
review leading to possible removal from the post-secondary program. Official course information
such as withdrawal action and final grades must be sent to the OCHS principal and will appear on
the OCHS transcript.
Dual Enrollment Program
Three types of Dual/Joint Enrollment programs are available to OCHS students:
Joint Enrollment at a community or four-year college. To be eligible students must:
п‚· Satisfy the college's admission requirements and course pre-requisites prior to
registering for classes.
п‚· Be responsible for transportation, tuition, books, and related fees.
п‚· Take at least one 3-hour course each semester at the admitting institution.
п‚· Follow the college's academic policies and calendar.
Full Day Dual Enrollment at a community or four-year college or at an accredited
technical school. To be eligible students must:
п‚· Satisfy the college's admission requirements and course prerequisites prior to
registering in classes
п‚· Be responsible for their own transportation, tuition*, books, and related fees.
п‚· Take at least four three-semester-hour courses each semester at the admitting
institution
п‚· Follow the college's academic policies and calendar.
OCHS/Germanna Joint Enrollment courses are approved community college courses
taught at OCHS. To be eligible students must:
п‚· Satisfy the college's admission requirements and course prerequisites prior to
registering in classes.
п‚· Be responsible for their own transportation on the days classes do not meet, tuition*,
books, and related fees.
 Follow Germanna Community College’s academic policies and calendar.
п‚· Please see page 34 of this guide for the classes being offered in 2013-2014
Dual Enrollment Practical Nursing Program
(in cooperation with Germanna Community College (GCC) and Culpeper County Public
Schools)
GCC will offer the Practical Nursing Program to qualified Orange County High School students
on a space available basis. All pre-requisites or equivalents cited in the GCC college catalog
must be completed to qualify for admission. Students who successfully complete the two year
program will receive the practical nursing certificate and will be eligible to take the National
Council State Boards of Nursing examination for licensure. Upon successful passing of this
exam the graduate will be eligible for award of licensure by their selected State Board of
Nursing, as a Licensed Practical Nurse or L.P.N.
Practical Nursing Program Coursework
Semester
First
Second
Nursing
PNE 161
Courses
Summer
11
Third
PNE 130
PNE 162
Fourth
PNE 145
PNE 158
PNE 164
Non-Nursing
Courses
NAS 150 or US
BIO 142/143 Government
SDV
PSY 230
ENG 111 and
ENG 112
ITE 115 or
Challenge
Exam
Students applying for this program must be in good standing (no attendance or discipline infractions),
must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher, and must pass all required placement tests. Students will
be required to present evidence of a physical examination and will be required to pay for a criminal
history records search. Students will be responsible for their own transportation for classes, and for
clinical and lab learning experiences while in the program. Classes will be held at Eastern View High
School for the first two semesters and at the Locust Grove Campus of GCC thereafter.
*Future Scholars scholarships are available.
Internet Classes
Eligible students who wish to earn on-line college credits from accredited colleges while enrolled at
OCHS may do so through an interactive, computer-based model of instruction. Flexible scheduling is
available to students who wish to begin work towards a bachelor’s degree. However, OCHS
recommends that students who do so be highly motivated and have strong writing ability. Computer
experience, while helpful, is not necessary, and OCHS will try to assist those students who lack the
computer hardware necessary to participate in this program. Interested students should contact their
counselor for further details.
Advanced Placement Program
The Advanced Placement (AP) Program, sponsored by the College Board, is recognized across the
country by most colleges and universities as one of the best opportunities that high school students have
for earning college credit. At OCHS, some AP classes are one-year courses, which award two high
school credits (1 elective credit for prep course in fall semester, 1 core credit in spring semester). In the
spring, AP students are offered the opportunity to take AP exams, which are scored by the College
Board and sent to colleges of the student’s choice. The awarding of college credit is determined by the
policies of the college and the score the student earns on the AP exam. Students should confer with the
college regarding the school’s policy with regard to AP credit.
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
AP GUIDELINES
AP grades are weighted for GPA calculation on a five-point scale: A = 5, B = 4, C = 3, D = 2,
F = 0.
Some Advanced Placement classes that are taught as full-year courses have the first term
designated AP Prep and the second term designated AP. Not all AP classes are full-year classes.
Unless otherwise noted, classes will be one semester in duration.
Any student receiving an F as a final grade for an AP Prep class will be removed from the spring
term AP class. A student earning a D in an AP Prep class must obtain the permission of the
teacher and counselor to continue in the AP class for the spring term.
All students taking AP Prep and AP classes should have an intense interest in the subject matter
and be willing to give the full amount of time required to be successful. Students who are
experiencing difficulty in the AP class or AP Prep class must meet with their teacher, school
counselor and administrator (if necessary) to develop a plan to ensure successful completion of
the class.
Summer enrichment work will be required for all AP courses.
12
AP Class Selection Recommended Guidelines
Counselors will use the following guidelines to assist student who wish to enroll in AP courses:
AP English Literature and Composition (AP English 12) full year; paired with AP US
Government
п‚· Complete AP English 11 with a C or above
п‚· Be recommended by the previous English teacher.
AP English Language and Composition (AP English 11) full year; paired with AP US History
п‚· Complete English 10 Honors
п‚· Be recommended by the previous English teacher
AP U.S. History (full year; paired with AP English Language and Composition)
п‚· Complete (2) AP Human Geography, World Studies, or World Studies II with a C or above.
п‚· Be recommended by the previous social studies teacher.
AP Biology (full year)
п‚· Complete Biology I Honors and Chemistry Honors with a C or above.
п‚· Complete Algebra I with a C or better.
п‚·
Be recommended by the previous science teacher.
AP Calculus (full year)
п‚· Complete Pre-calculus with a C or above.
п‚· Be recommended by the previous math teacher.
AP Chemistry
п‚· Complete Chemistry I with a C or above.
п‚· Complete Algebra II with a C or above
п‚·
Be recommended by the previous science teacher
AP Latin
п‚· Complete Latin III with a C or above.
п‚· Be recommended by the previous Latin teacher.
AP French
п‚· Complete French IV with a C or above.
п‚· Be recommended by the previous French teacher.
AP Environmental Studies
п‚· Complete Earth Science I, Biology I, and Algebra I
п‚· Be recommended by science teacher.
AP European History
п‚· Complete World Studies I
п‚· Be recommended by the previous social studies teacher.
AP Government (full year; paired with AP English Literature and Composition)
п‚· Complete World Studies II or AP European History, and American Studies or US History.
п‚· Be recommended by the previous social studies teacher.
AP Statistics
п‚· Complete Algebra II and Geometry.
п‚· Be recommended by the previous math teacher.
AP Human Geography (full year; paired with English 10 honors)
п‚· Complete World History I
13
Future Scholars Scholarships Available
The Orange County School Board offers all qualifying OCHS students scholarships in the maximum
amount of $150 per course. A scholarship may be used to pay $45 of an Advanced Placement exam or
be applied toward $150 of the tuition cost of a 3 or 4 hour college course taken on OCHS campus prior
to high school graduation and will be paid directly to the College Board or the educational institution.
To qualify, a student must have completed or be scheduled to take all courses required for graduation;
must not have excessive absences from any one class in the preceding semester; and, for college courses,
must have completed the admission and registration process for the course. Only one $150 scholarship
can be applied to each 3 or 4 hour course. Scholarships can only be applied to dual enrollment courses
offered at OCHS or for AP exams.
A student may receive no more than two scholarships in any academic year. The number of
scholarships awarded is dependent on the student’s cumulative grade point average (GPA) at the end of
the preceding semester, as follows:
2.00 – 2.49:
one scholarship
2.50 or higher: two scholarships
Expectations for Advanced Placement, Dual Enrollment and Honors Courses
Orange County High School
14
AREA of STUDY
PAGES OF
READING
PER CLASS
AP English
Literature and
Composition (12)
(year long- every
other day)
10-35 pages
depending on
unit
AP English
Language and
Composition (11)
(year long- every
other day)
20-50 pages
English 10 Honors
(year long- every
other day)
Depending on
unit 1-20 pages
English 9 Honors
(one semester
course)
Depending on
unit 1-20 pages
AP Statistics (one
semester course)
Dual Enrollment
Statistics -MTH
240 (one semester
course)
Dual Enrollment
Pre-CalculusMTH 163/164
(one semester –
two courses- 6
hours of college
credit)
10-12 pages
Dual Enrollment
Biology
BIO 101/102
(year along- every
day)
Dual Enrollment
10 pages
SCIENCE
1 hour
3 unit tests; 1 essay; 4 1 major project per
labs
quarter
10 pages
1 hour
10-12 pages
Read each
section for
understanding
however long it
takes
HOURS OF
TESTS, ESSAYS,
STUDY PER PAPERS PER
CLASS
QUARTER
ENGLISH
1-2 hours
6 at home writing
assignments; 6 in
class writing; test for
each poetry unit; 120
vocabulary words;
poetry multiple
choice modeled after
AP format
1-2 hours
At least on 1 ВЅ page
paper weekly; four
major essays/projects
over course of
semester; tests
modeled after AP
Format
0.5-1 hour
6 tests; 2 major
essays; 3-4 mini
essays; weekly
vocabulary quizzes
0.5-1 hour
3 tests; 2-3 major
essays; 2 smaller
writing assignments
MATHEMATICS
1 hour
2-3 unit tests; daily
quizzes
1 hour
2-3 unit tests; daily
quizzes
MAJOR PROJECTS
2 hours
n/a
2-3 unit tests; daily
quizzes
5 unit test; 5 labs
15
Advanced grammar
unit; reading units(2
major poetry units and
10 major literary
works); research
essays; summer,
winter & spring break
work
Research essay;
summer work
Research essay;
summer work
Report writing;
summer work
1 major project per
quarter
1 major project per
quarter
2 major projects per
Anatomy &
Physiology- BIO
141/142 (year
long- every day)
AP Environmental
Science (semester
long class)
quarter
15 pages
2 hours
5 tests, 7 essays, 7
labs (per quarter)
SOCIAL STUDIES
1-2 hours
3 tests; 5+ essays &
short answer; 2
papers
AP European
History
10- 15 pages
AP US
Government and
Politics(year longevery other day)
AP US History
(year long- every
other day)
5-20 pages
1-3 hours
2-3 unit tests; 4
essays per quarter
10-20 pages
1-2 hours
AP America
Studies (year long
–every day
25-35 pages
1-2 hours
AP Human
Geography
(year long- every
other day)
10-20 pages
1-2 hours
2-3 unit tests; 10
reading quizzes; 1-2
essays (AP exam
format
3-4 take home essays
(1200 words –per
semester); 1 in class
essay every 2 weeks;
vocab quiz weekly;
quizzes/tests every 12 weeks; midterm is
multiple choice AP
exam format
2 exams; 3 essays; 6
reading quizzes, 4
map quizzes
Environmental
timelines, biomes
research projects, read
State of Fear, summer
read Silent Spring
Trial case; 2 DBQ’s, 2
FRQ’s; Cumulative
mid-term; Final
project; summer,
winter, & spring break
work
2nd & 4th quarter
research project/paper
Summer & winter
break work
No projects; summer
work
Research essay (one
per semester); group
presentation (one per
semester)
No projects; summer
work
5.  Governor’s Initiatives for Education for a Lifetime
Virtual Virginia Advanced Placement Program
The Virtual Virginia Advanced Placement Program provides a variety of college-level courses and
enables students to earn college credit. Students can earn up to 15 hours of college credit during high
school. Online Internet-based AP courses are available to all qualified Virginia students.
16
Online courses include: AP English Literature and Composition, AP U.S. History, AP Statistics, AP
Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, AP Government & Politics, AP Government and Politics: Comparative,
AP Environmental Science, AP Latin Literature, AP Physics B, AP English Language and Composition,
AP Micro Economics, AP Macro Economics, AP Biology, AP Psychology, AP Human Geography, AP
Spanish Language, AP Chemistry, AP Art History, AP European History, and AP World History.
Interested juniors or seniors should meet with their school counselor to determine if they qualify for this
program.
Other courses offered by the Virtual VA program are available each year. For additional information,
see the links at http://www.virtualvirginia.org.
Early College Scholars
Early College Scholars can save thousands of dollars in tuition and interest on student loans by earning a
full semester of college credit before graduating from high school. Students become early college
scholars by signing an Early College Scholar Agreement. To qualify, a student must:
 Have a “B” average or better
п‚· Be pursuing an advanced studies diploma; and
п‚· Be completing or have completed college-level coursework (i.e. Advanced Placement, or dual
enrollment) equal to at least 15 transferable college credits.
п‚· Tuition costs for Virtual VA AP courses will be covered by the Virginia Department of
Education
п‚· Costs for the AP tests for students taking Virtual AP courses will be covered by the Virginia
Department of Education
Interested juniors or seniors should meet with their school counselor to determine if they qualify for this
program. For additional information please see the links at http://www.pen.k12.va.us/ .
Costs for Dual Enrollment courses taken off the OCHS campus will be the responsibility of the student.
6. пЂ­ About Administrative Policy
Spring Term Schedule Adjustments
Because availability is limited, requests for spring term schedule changes are prioritized as follows:
п‚· Students transferring from other high schools.
п‚· Seniors who have failed classes required for graduation and who have attended school regularly.
п‚· Underclassmen who have failed part 1 level classes for spring term classes.
п‚· Students who request schedule changes due to change in educational plans.
п‚· Seniors who have poor attendance.
п‚· Previously withdrawn students.
Withdrawal Policy
Students who withdraw from scheduled classes after the first three weeks of the term may have a
W/F figured into their grade point average (GPA). Any exceptions for extenuating circumstances
must be approved by an administrator.
17
Registration for New Students during the School Year
п‚·
New students enrolling in OCHS during the school year must present evidence of enrollment in
another school. Students enrolling after the first 20 hours of classroom instruction will follow a
program designed to maximize their opportunity to learn. All students and their parents or
guardian will work with the OCHS Counseling Center to develop a course of study that meets
graduation requirements for the student’s desired diploma.
п‚·
Parents or legal guardians* who enroll new students in OCHS for the first time must present the
following before classes will be assigned:
o Original birth certificate
o Social Security number
o Immunization records
o Proof of residence
o Custody assignment documents
Additionally, the following information must be received from the student’s previous school:
o Official transcript of classes earned to date, current grades, test scores, and when special
services are required, individual educational plans from the previous school.
o Discipline records (students with discipline records may be required to meet with an
administrator to determine the student’s appropriate placement.)
o Attendance records
o Results of SOL testing
Students entering OCHS from out of state will be required to have a physical examination before
being enrolled.
*Must be official county residents or have permission from the School Board office to enroll their child in school.
Summer School
Summer school offerings for 2014 will include remediation for students who have failed SOLs.
Announcements of other summer school offerings will be made through the counseling center.
Homebound Instruction
Students who suffer from a medical difficulty that prevents them from attending school may obtain
homebound instruction from the Orange County School Board free of charge. A physician must sign the
appropriate form specifying that homebound instruction is necessary and possible, and the doctor must
list the dates it will be required. Homebound instruction will be provided for students who will be out of
school for two or more weeks. Certain limitations may apply because of course requirements.
Textbooks & Supplies
Textbooks are free; however, some classes such as art, science, and physical education (P.E.)
require fees for necessary materials or for clothing that is needed for participation. Those who cannot
afford these fees may apply for assistance through the Counseling Center. Note: Because active
participation will be required from the beginning of each physical education class, students need to bring
the necessary payment to purchase their gym uniform the first day. Students enrolled in dual enrollment
classes are responsible for their own tuition, books, and related fees.
Full-time Employment
Seniors who wish to begin full-time employment during the spring term must register for a full high
school schedule of classes until all requirements are satisfied. To be eligible for full-time employment,
the senior must:
18
п‚· Maintain a cumulative 2.0 GPA.
п‚· Earn at least one credit in ICT or Agriculture Business during the senior year.
п‚· Satisfy all graduation requirements by the end of the fall term.
When a student meets all of the criteria listed above, he or she will be dropped from the spring term
schedule of classes and will be enrolled in the full-time work program.
7. пЂ­ Sports Eligibility
Guidelines
As a member of the Virginia High School League, Orange County High School adheres to VHSL
policies and practices. Therefore, all OCHS students who wish to participate in interscholastic sports
or drama competition must meet the following standards set by the VHSL:
п‚· Be enrolled in Orange County High School.
п‚· Be promoted to the ninth grade or have earned 3 credits in the previous school term/semester.
п‚· Be enrolled, during the term in which they are participating, in classes for which they can earn at
least 3 credits.
п‚· Submit a completed Athletic Participation / Parental Consent / Physical Examination Form. This
form, which must be submitted each school year, permits the student to participate for the entire
school year. Note: Students will not be allowed to practice or play if the Athletic Director does
not have this form on file.
п‚· Students and their parents are also required to review the Athlete & Parent Handbook and to sign
the acknowledgement that they understand the information on concussions and the proper care
for an athlete with a concussion.
п‚· All students transferring to Orange County High School from another county in Virginia or
another state are required to follow the same eligibility guidelines as mentioned above, given that
the student has not participated in a particular interscholastic sport at any time during the school
year in their previous school.
 All athletes must maintain a “C” average in all of their classes; if students do not maintain a “C”
average, they have the potential of being placed on academic probation and/or may not be
eligible to play their sport.
Sports Offerings
Orange County High School is a Level AAA member of the Virginia High School League (VHSL)
and a member of the Commonwealth District and Northwest Region.
Orange participates
interscholastically with high schools in the district and with schools of other districts and levels.
Currently, the following sports are available for eligible students:
*
Fall
Winter
Spring
Football*
Cross Country
Girls’ Field Hockey*
Cheerleading
Golf
Volleyball*
Girls’ Basketball*
Boys’ Basketball*
Cheerleading
Wrestling*
Gymnastics
Indoor Track
Swim Team
Softball*
Baseball*
Track, Boys’ and Girls’
Tennis, Boys’ and Girls’
Soccer, Boys’ and Girls’*
Varsity and JV
19
8. Course Offerings
Selection of Courses
Students are encouraged to work with the counseling staff, teachers, and parents to develop a four
year high school and post secondary plan. All students are expected to choose rigorous and meaningful
courses in order to prepare them for college or entry into the workforce. All courses listed within this
publication are subject to cancellation or change if an instructor is not available or if the
administration determines that there are too few students requesting the course. All courses are one
credit courses unless otherwise noted.
Course Listings by Department:
Virginia Department of Education course codes are listed in parentheses after each course’s name.
participating in a supervised agriculture experience
(SAE), contributing to community service projects, and
taking part in activities in the local FFA. Agriculture
courses are designed to enhance SOLs in core areas.
FRESHMAN ORIENTATION
Academic Pathways: Welcome to OCHS [9893]
This is a local elective designed for rising ninth grade
students and students transferring to Orange County High
School from other divisions. It is a virtual offering
designed to orient students to Orange County High School
and prepare them for a successful high school experience.
Units include an orientation to the physical layout of the
high school, creating a four year plan toward graduation,
eligibility for high school sports and activities, an
introduction to the CTE programs and their associated
certification tests. Additional units will vary based the
changing demands both on high schools and on high
school students. This course is designed with the
expectation that it will be completed prior to a student’s
entry in the high school. It will meet the Virginia
Department of Education virtual requirement for
graduation.
Agriculture Mechanics & Plant and Animal Science II
[8008]
This class is a continuation of Agriculture Mechanics &
Plant Science I, with emphasis on plant, biotechnology,
environmental, and animal science. Students must earn
the additional 1.0 credit by participating in a supervised
agricultural experience (SAE), contributing to community
service projects, and taking part in activities in the local
FFA. Agriculture courses are designed to enhance SOLs
in core areas.
Agricultural Production Technology III [8010]
This course emphasizes one or more areas of plant
science, animal science, soil science, agricultural business
management, and agricultural mechanization, based upon
the student’s employment objective. The competencies
for the selected livestock enterprise are considered
essential for the course. Supervised occupational
experience programs and leadership training are important
parts of the course.
CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION
Students pursuing the Standard Diploma or
the Modified Standard Diploma must complete
two sequential electives. Selecting a Career
and Technical concentration will meet this
requirement. Keyboarding and Accelerated
Agriculture Business III [8022]
This class provides the basic education required for
employment both on and off farms in the broad field of
agriculture. Students are exposed to a variety of business
and management procedures. They must earn the
additional 1.0 credit by participating in agricultural workstudy, which requires each student to accumulate 450
hours by working in an agriculturally-related workplace,
contributing to community service projects, and
participation in membership activities of the local FFA.
(Juniors and seniors who have completed Agriculture I
may request permission to take Agriculture III).
Agriculture courses are designed to enhance SOLs in core
areas.
Keyboarding Applications are not included in these
sequential electives. Please see your counselor for more
details.
Please see your counselor for more details.
AGRICULTURE
Agriculture Mechanics & Plant and Animal
Science I [8006]
Credit: 1.0 or 1.5
This introductory course covers the broad field of
agriculture. Topics include: principles of soil science,
rural and urban living, leadership training, and resource
conservation. Half of the class is devoted to shop-work,
which includes welding, metal work, and woodworking.
Students may earn an additional 1/2 credit by
Agricultural Business IV [8024]
Credit: 2.0
Agricultural Business IV continues Agricultural Business
III, with emphasis on land leasing and purchasing,
insurance, taxes, Ag Law, and the role of agriculture in
20
our economy. One half of the year is devoted to the
development of marketable shop skills. Students must
earn the additional 1.0 credit by participating in
agricultural work-study, which requires each student to
accumulate 450 hours by working in an agriculturallyrelated workplace, contributing to community service
projects, and participation in membership activities of the
local FFA. Agriculture courses are designed to enhance
SOLs in core areas.
Accounting [6320]
Students learn basic accounting principles as they relate to
manual and computerized financial bookkeeping systems.
Subjects covered include: the accounting cycle, financial
statements, business ownership, payroll and banking
procedures, bank statements, depreciation, inventories,
and overhead costs. Students will attain competency in
reading and interpreting consumer materials, organizing
ideas in a logical sequence and revising, collecting and
evaluating data, and creating technical writings.
Mathematically, students will solve algebraic equations,
use matrices, design an algorithm to solve problems, and
solve practical consumer problems. Topics reinforce
math SOLs.
Electronic calculators are used to study the relationships
and processes of manual accounting procedures.
Agricultural Business Management V [8026]
This occupational preparation course should be operated
on a cooperative on-the-job training basis with local
agricultural
BUSINESS & MARKETING
Economics and Personal Finance [6124]
This course presents economic concepts that help students
interpret the daily news, economic concepts that help
students interpret the daily news, understand how
interdependent the world’s economies are, and anticipate
how events will impact their lives. The understanding of
how economies and markets operate and how the United
States’ economy is interconnected with the global
economy, prepares students to be more effective
participants in the workplace. Students learn the benefits
of compound interest over time and that poor money
management can lead to difficulty in obtaining credit.
Students practice weighing costs and benefits of options
when making choices about such things as careers,
insurance, housing, investments, savings, automobiles,
and health care. This course is required fro graduation for
freshmen entering the 9th grade in 2011
Computer Accounting-Advanced [6321]
Students utilize microcomputers to automate, analyze, and
interpret business applications including payroll,
inventory, accounts payable and accounts receivable. The
software program used is a Peachtree-based program.
Students continue the analyzation of data, development of
algebraic expressions, selection of appropriate
computation techniques, manipulation of numeric data,
function relations, use operating system commands, and
solve mathematical problems using formulas, equations,
functions, probability, data analysis, and statistics. Topics
reinforce math SOLs. Students will analyze market
economies in terms of labor, capital, and resources,
supply/demand, profits, and relationships to the global
economy. **Completion of Keyboarding is recommended
prior to enrollment in this course. It is necessary to
complete first year Accounting (6320) before enrolling in
Computer Accounting-Advanced (6321).
Microsoft Office [6612]
Students apply problem-solving skills to actual business
situations developing skills in word processing,
spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphics software.
Microsoft Office suite programs will be used which
include Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. Students
must be able to read and follow oral and written
directions.
Upon completion of this course and the
Advanced Microsoft Office course, the student will have
learned all of the competencies needed to take the
Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) exam in two of
the four areas. The Specialist designation distinguishes
students from their peers as knowledgeable in using the
Microsoft program which can make them more
competitive in the job market. Topics reinforce English
and Mathematics SOLs. **The Virginia Department of
Education requires students to successfully complete
Keyboarding Applications (6152) before enrolling in this
course.
Principles of Business & Marketing [6115]
Students will be prepared for additional business courses
and will attain a general working knowledge about types
of business, economics, world affairs, marketing, business
management, and communication. Students will read and
analyze a variety of printed material. Students will
develop technical writing skills and communication skills.
Various businesses will be researched using the Internet.
Topics reinforce English, math and economic SOLs.
Upon completion of the competencies in this course and
Business Management, the student will qualify for 3
credits for Business 100 at Germanna Community
College.
Keyboarding Applications [6152]
Skills learned include entering alphabetic, numeric and
symbolic information using the electronic keyboard with
the touch system. Students learn to communicate using
personal and business correspondence, outlines,
manuscripts and tabulated reports. Spelling, grammar,
and proper sentence structure are emphasized. Speed and
accuracy development is stressed. Through the use of
word processing programs, students will learn basic word
processing formats. Topics reinforce English SOLs.
The Virginia Department of Education requires students
to successfully complete this course before enrolling in
several other Business and Information Technology
courses.
Advanced Microsoft Office [6613]
Students apply problem-solving skills to real-life
situations through advanced integrated software
applications, including multimedia presentations, word
processing, spreadsheet, and database applications.
Microsoft Office suite programs will be used which
includes Word, Excel, Access, Outlook, and PowerPoint.
Students must be able to read and follow oral and written
directions. Mathematically, students will solve practical
21
consumer problems, use formulas, and solve probability,
data analysis, and statistical problems. Upon completion
of this course and the Microsoft Office course, the student
will have learned all of the competencies needed to take
the Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) exam in
two of the four areas. The Specialist designation
distinguishes students from their peers as knowledgeable
in using the Microsoft program which can make them
more competitive in the job market. Topics reinforce
English and Mathematics SOLs.
**The Virginia
Department of Education requires students to successfully
complete Microsoft Office (6612) before enrolling in this
course.
Information Technology Fundamentals [6670]
The students will be introduced to the essential skills
needed for them to pursue specialized programs leading to
technical and professional careers and certifications in the
Information Technology (IT) industry. Students will have
an opportunity to investigate career opportunities in four
major IT areas: Information Services and Support,
Network Systems, Programming and Software
Development, and Interactive Media. Students will also
be introduced to Internet fundamentals network systems,
computer
maintenance/upgrading/trouble-shooting,
computer applications, programming, graphics, web page
design, and interactive media. Topics reinforce English
and Math SOLs. *Basic keyboarding skills are necessary
to be successful in this class.
Business Management [6135] Credit: 0.5
Topics in business management include: the functions of
management, planning leading, organizing and
controlling; management responsibilities, conducting
financial activities, marketing, supervising employees,
human relation functions, and communication skills.
Students will analyze and evaluate a variety of printed
material, write in a variety of forms, analyze, evaluate,
synthesize and organize information from a variety of
sources, and develop expository and technical writing
skills.
Students develop historical analysis skills.
Students will develop skills of discussion, debate, and
Internet research. Topics reinforce English and Social
Studies SOLs.
Upon completion of the course
competencies in Principles of Business and Business
Management, the student will qualify for 3 credits of
Business 100 at Germanna Community College.
Word Processing [6625]
Students develop intermediate to advanced level wordprocessing skills using Microsoft Word software containing graphics and desktop publishing. Keyboarding
speed building and accuracy improvement are stressed.
File management, production of complex business
documents, proofreading, editing documents, insertion,
deletion, and copying are highlighted.
In desktop
publishing, basic layout, design, typography, tables and
importing graphics are learned. Writing, revising, and
editing personal and business correspondence is included.
Topics reinforce English SOLs. Students should be able
to read, follow directions, and format business
correspondence. Students learn the competencies needed
to take the Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS)
exam for Microsoft Word. The Specialist designation
distinguishes you from your peers as knowledgeable in
using Microsoft program which can make you more
competitive in the job market.
**The Virginia
Department of Education requires students to successfully
complete Keyboarding Applications (6152) before
enrolling in this course.
Business Law [6131] Credit: 0.5
Topics in business law include examining legal
foundations, consumer rights and responsibilities,
criminal law, tort law, international law, employment law,
and law careers. Students will analyze and evaluate a
variety of printed material, write in a variety of forms,
analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information
from a variety of sources, developing expository and
technical writing skills. Students develop historical
analysis skills. Students will develop skills of discussion,
debate, and Internet research. Topics reinforce English
and Social Studies SOLs. This course is ideal for students
exploring legal professions.
Marketing [8121]
Students are introduced to the functions and foundations
involved in the marketing of goods, services and ideas.
They also achieve the competencies necessary for
successful marketing employment. Students study risk
management, selling, promotion, pricing, purchasing,
marketing-information management, product/service
planning, distribution and financing. Foundation
competencies include economics, human resources,
marketing, and the business skills necessary for success in
marketing occupations. Topics reinforce English and
math SOLs. **Students should have taken Principles of
Business and Marketing prior to enrolling in this class.
Managing Your Finances [6120]
Students explore many facets of financial decision
making necessary for life skills. The study of basic
economic concepts, insurance, and credit enhance skills in
money management, record keeping, and banking.
Students are also prepared to plan, manage, and analyze
the financial and monetary aspects and success of
business enterprises, banking institutions, and other
organizations. Topics reinforce English, economic, and
math SOLs. Students develop purchasing decision skills,
planning skills for housing and leisure expenses, and bank
transaction skills. Students analyze insurance functions,
identify taxes, develop a personal finance plan, and
investigate the monetary system.
Students learn
economic principles while discussing the Great
Depression, the relationship of government, market
economies, and fiscal policies. Writing skills developed
include: analyzation of various written materials, write,
revise, and edit various business and personal
correspondence, and technical and expository writings.
Advanced Marketing [8131]
Students continue to gain knowledge of marketing
functions and foundations as they relate to supervisory
and management responsibilities, and as they develop the
skills needed for advancement. They also develop
competencies for supervisory positions and for continuing
their education in marketing-related fields.
Topics
reinforce English and math SOLs.
Digital Media Production I [6635]
DMP I is an introduction to creating various forms of
22
digital media (logos, digital photography, multimedia
presentations, Web pages, e.g.). The student will learn
the basics of generating computer artwork by utilizing
industry-standard software packages such as Adobe
PhotoshopВ® and Macromedia FireworksВ® on state-ofthe-art multimedia computers. Elements of good design
are incorporated into all aspects of the students work.
Web pages and Websites will be created by the students
to serve as the framework for display and distribution of
their digital work. The course is conducted with a
business focus; assignments and grading are completed in
such a way as to emulate the business environment.
Students and their parents can find out more about this
course by visiting the following Websites:
Students complete a variety of demonstrations and written
projects. SOLs in science, math and communication are
highlighted throughout.
Life Planning [8226]
Credit 0.5
This course is a combed with the Parenting course and
focuses on building and maintaining constructive
relationships; building and maintaining strong, functional
families; coordinating personal and career opportunities;
and developing strategies for lifelong career planning.
http://www.hornetmedia.com/DMP/home.htm
The Digital Media Production Website
Parenting [8231]
Credit: 0.5
This course is combined with the Life planning course
and focuses on meeting the developmental needs of
children, building positive parent-child relationships; and
using positive guidance and discipline techniques.
Students complete a variety of written and group projects
including an independent living simulation and two
research activities. SOLs in science, math, and
communication are highlighted throughout. **Students
are recommended to take Life Management Skills prior to
taking Life Planning and Parenting. This combination
will satisfy the student CTE completer credit.
Digital Media Production II [6633]
Continues the curriculum of DMP I. Programming
concepts will be introduced through the use of the
scripting languages built into Macromedia’s programs for
developing interactive multimedia, FlashВ® and
DirectorВ®. In this advanced class, emphasis is placed on
the fundamentals of object-oriented programming.
Students will undertake a comparative survey of four
modern programming languages: C++, Java, Perl, and
JavaScript. They will complete working programs in each
environment. Students will create software solutions to
satisfy needs or to solve problems for the school system.
As part of DMP II’s career focus, qualified students have
the opportunity to apply for internships with area
businesses. Students and their parents can find out more
about this course by visiting the following Websites:
Nutrition and Wellness [8228]
Credit: 0.5
This course is combined with the Intro to Fashion Design
course and focuses on making choices that promote good
heath; choosing foods that promote wellness, preparing
and serving nutritious meals and snacks; selecting and
using equipment for food preparation, and identifying
strategies to promote optimal nutrition and wellness of
society. Students complete a variety of written and group
projects including a group demonstration. SOLs in
science, math and communication are highlighted
throughout. **Students are recommended to take Life
Management Skills prior to talking Nutrition and
Fashion. This combination will satisfy the student CTE
completer credit.
http://www.hornetmedia.com/DMP/home.htm
The Digital Media Production Website
Digital Media Production III—Digital Video and 3D
Game Programming [6632]
This course builds on the programming concepts covered
in DMP II. Students will study 3-dimensional modeling
techniques in order to create their own characters and
game environments. DarkBasic Professional, a leading
game development environment, will be used to program
3D games that the students create. Digital video capture
and editing will be demonstrated and students will create
digital video to use in their games or as stand-alone
animations.
Introduction to Fashion Design [8247]
Credit: 0.5
This course is a combined with the Nutrition and
Wellness and focuses on skills and characteristics
necessary for success in careers in the textile industries,
making clothing decisions and budgets, construction and
repair of clothing, and career development. Students
construct a garment and complete various projects.пЂ пЂ Teachers for Tomorrow [9062]
(weighted grade)
Teachers for Tomorrow is an honors course that
introduces juniors and seniors to a career in teaching and
education. It is a study of the history, development,
organization and practices of preschool, elementary, and
secondary education. The primary components of the
curriculum include experiencing learning, experiencing
the profession, and experiencing the classroom.
Students must complete the following eligibility
Digital Media Production—OCHS Website [6634]
This unique course gives students the opportunity to
maintain the Orange County High School website
(http://www.orangecountyhighschool.com). Students will
be assigned a portion of the site to maintain. Project
planning, teamwork, principles of good design and
communication are all skills that will be developed
through participation in this class.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES
пЂ Life Management Skills [8219]
Life Management focuses on managing resources to
achieve individual goals; making informed consumer
choices; creating and maintaining a living environment
that supports the well-being of individuals; living in a
global environment; making decisions related to nutrition,
clothing and housing; and managing a household.
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requirements to be considered for enrollment in the
program:
*Have and maintain a minimum 2.7 grade point average
or its equivalent.
*Submit three satisfactory teacher recommendations.
*Submit a brief essay and application.
In addition to the fundamental curriculum components, all
student s will observe and participate in an internship
outside the Teachers for Tomorrow classroom. The
internship may be completed from the pre-school level
through the 11th grade during the Teachers for Tomorrow
scheduled time.
Culinary Arts III (8523)
The course is designed to further advance students’
knowledge of foodservice. The course focuses on
exploring the different cuisines of the world, and the
different foodstuffs found in different regions. The art of
the table service and communicating with customers are
emphasized. In addition, there will be a more advance
development of food production. Students’ abilities will
be expanded in the areas of stocks, soups, sauces, meat,
poultry, seafood, and pastries in a small class atmosphere.
Individual and interpersonal skills will be emphasized in
the context of the culinary arts field. Basic math and
practical problem solving skills are expected in order to
be able to perform the tasks in the course. The course is
structured in an on-the-job training format. The goal of
the course is to build ability and confidence in the student
for employment opportunities within the culinary field.
Introduction to Culinary Arts/Early Childhood
Education [8250]
The culinary arts competencies focus on identifying and
exploring the individual careers within the food service
industry. Units of study include food science and
technology, dietetics and nutrition services, contemporary
cuisines and service styles, food and beverage production
and preparation, and food safety and sanitation.
The early childhood education competencies focus on the
principles of child growth and development; development
of self-concepts and building self-esteem; learning
experiences for children; principles of guiding children;
healthy and safe environments; career development; and
careers related to child care.
Critical thinking, practical problem solving, and
entrepreneurship opportunities within the field of culinary
arts and childcare are emphasized. Basic skills of math,
science, and communication when appropriate in the
content are highlighted.
пЂ Culinary Arts I [8521]
Students prepare for managerial, production, and service
skills used in government, food establishments and related
food industry occupations. Their study includes planning,
selection, storing, purchasing, preparing and serving of
food products; basic nutrition, sanitation and food safety;
the use and care of commercial equipment; serving
techniques; and the operation of institutional food
establishments.
Students run the Hornet CafГ©, a
restaurant for faculty and staff.
Critical thinking, practical problem solving, and
employment skills within the field of culinary arts are
emphasized.
Basic skills of math, science, and
communication skills are applied in the course. Students
are required to work one day of a catering event.
пЂ Culinary Arts II [8522]
Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I
Students extend and expand skills learned in Culinary
Arts I, while preparing for occupations such as chef/cook,
baker/pastry helper, pastry, hospitality worker, dietetic
aide and mixologist. A cooperative (on-the-job) training
or an internship under the supervision of the instructor is
an option. Students operate the Hornet CafГ©, which is a
restaurant for faculty and staff.
Critical thinking, practical problem solving, and
entrepreneurship opportunities within the field of culinary
arts are emphasized.
Basic math, science, and
communication skills are applied in the course. Students
are required to work four days of catering events.
HEALTH & MEDICAL SCIENCES
пЂ Introduction to Health Occupations [8302]
Introduction to Health Occupations is a fast-paced course
designed for the student who is interested in a career in
the health/medical field. Topics to be covered, which
reinforce science, math and English SOLs, include the
history of health care, career choices, medical
terminology, the metric system, anatomy and physiology,
diseases, vital signs, CPR, medical ethics, patient’s rights
and human development. Students research and apply
realistic information to their interest in the health/medical
field.
Nursing Assistant I [8360] Credit: 2.0
Nursing Assistant I is double-block course spring
semester. It is an introduction to the skills and knowledge
necessary for the field of nursing. The manual skills are
practiced in the classroom laboratory and two mornings
each week at Orange County Nursing Home. They
include communicating with patients, serving food trays,
feeding patients, passing fresh water, and basic personal
care skills. Students complete class work on the qualities
and attitudes of a Nursing Assistant, nursing ethics,
patient observations and communication, basic anatomy
and diseases, infection control and patient transfer.
English and science SOLs are reinforced. Students
completing Nursing Assistant I may continue, with
instructor approval, in Nursing Assistant II for a Nurse
Aide certificate.
Nursing Assistant II [8362] Credit: 2.0
Nursing Assistant II is a double-block course fall
semester. It is a continuation of Nursing Assistant I with
emphasis on the practical application of skills and
knowledge dealing with direct patient care. Three
mornings each week are spent in clinical rotations with
on-the-job experience at Orange County Nursing Home,
Orange Elementary School, doctor’s offices, physical
therapy clinics, a veterinary office, and a dental office.
Students completing Nursing Assistant II are awarded a
Nurse Aide certificate and may take the State Board of
Nursing C.N.A. Registry test. Upon passing this test, an
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elective verified credit is earned and students qualify to be
employed as a Nursing Assistant in nursing homes,
hospitals, hospice and home health care facilities.
English, math and science SOLs are reinforced in the
classroom and at clinical practice sites.
Advanced Drawing and Design [8438]
Drafting IV is a computer-aided drafting course
working with AutoCAD and DATACAD. Students
prepare to enter the workforce and develop a sense of
responsibility. Math SOLs are reinforced.
Sports Medicine I (7660)
Prerequisite: Biology II recommended
Prevention, recognition and treatment of common athletic
injuries will be covered in this class along with First Aid
and CPR training (with Red Cross Certification
opportunity). Information learned in the classroom will be
applied in the laboratory and field settings. Health and
basic biology background recommended. This class is
recommended for students interested in Athletic Training,
Personal Training, Physical Therapy or Coaching careers.
Technology Foundations [8403]
This is the beginning course in Technology Education.
The course focuses on introducing students to the process
of design, while providing a foundation for the use of
technological equipment and processes. Laboratory
activities allow students to create new designs and
products; improve on existing designs; build systems; and
analyze technology products. Units include: desktop
publishing, computer-aided design (CAD), computer
assisted manufacturing (CAM), aerodynamics (aircraft
and ground vehicle), robotics, computer graphics, tool and
machine use, and product design and model building
(prototyping). The course reinforces and builds upon the
SOLs by allowing students to control computer systems,
apply mathematics and sciences practices and principles
to technological problems, research technological
subjects, build upon their technical writing skills, and
study the evolution of engineering practices and
technology solutions.
Sports Medicine II (7662)
Prerequisite: Biology II recommended and successful
completion of Sports Medicine I.
This class is intended for students who wish to more
actively pursue a career in the field of Sports Medicine
(Athletic Training, Physical Therapy, Coaching,
Kinesiology or Exercise Physiology, or as a Medical
Doctor). It will embrace a hands-on approach to learning
more advanced topics in Sports Medicine as set forth by
the Instructional Framework for Health and Medical
Sciences by the Virginia DOE. Self-directed research and
out-of-classroom experiences will be incorporated.
Technology Transfer [8405]
An advanced design course that builds on the skills
presented in Technology Foundations. Focus is on
integrating design skills with critical thinking and
problem solving in a technological environment. The
SOLs are reinforced through design problems that allow
students to apply mathematics, science, and language arts
skills to areas of technological study. These areas include:
production, prototyping, computer applications, desktop
publishing, desktop presentations, large format printing
and design layout, CAD and architectural design, video
production, transportation and communication, production
planning and application, and other related technologies.
Emergency Medical Technician [8333]
Students focus on the role and responsibilities of
emergency rescue workers, basic medical terminology,
and health care skills that include first aid;
cardiopulmonary resuscitation; aseptic technique; and
related anatomy, physiology, and disease knowledge.
Supervised work education is provided in a hospital or
with rescue squads and is managed by the HOE teacher.
Principles of Technology I [9811] & II [9812]
1 credit per class
These are courses in applied physics. After completing
Principles of Technology I & II, and two other lab
sciences, students will receive a Physics credit.
Principles of Technology consists of 14 units: force, work,
rate, resistance, energy, power, force transformers,
momentum, waves & vibrations, energy converters,
transducers, radiation, light & optical systems and time
constant. Each unit explains how the concept applies to
mechanical, fluid, electrical and thermal systems.
Students learn to understand complex systems in which
these sub-systems work together. Math labs and activities
introduce the art of "instrumentation" and problem
solving. Students use a wide range of modern equipment
such as winches, belts & pulleys, dual trace oscilloscopes,
function generators, strip-chart recorders, and digital
multimeters. These courses are recommended for students
who want to enter technical and engineering programs
after high school.
TECHNOLOGY EDUCATIONпЂ Technical Drawing and Design [8435]
This course focuses on developing a skills-base for
students to begin drafting. Emphasis on: basic lettering
and freehand sketching; use of drawing instruments;
practice orthographic projections; and isometric drawings
to scale. Computer-assisted Design (CAD) is also
introduced. Math SOLs are reinforced.
Engineering Drawing and Design [8436]
Architectural Drawing and Design [8437]
Drafting II and III introduce more sophisticated
techniques and skills used in the drafting field. Students
practice CAD, drafting skills and techniques, and
complex problem solving. Students interpret blue prints
and use handbooks and references related to drafting.
Topics include: architectural drafting, models, working
drawings, and engineering drawings. Students draw using
the CAD systems used by professional draftsmen. Math
SOLs are reinforced.
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A+ Certification test. In addition, this course will expose
Advanced Interns to other areas in technology they may
choose to further explore. Some of the initial topics for
the course will include basic web design, networking
fundamentals and troubleshooting, operating systems, and
wireless networking. Future content for the course will
change as the preparation needs of Advanced Interns
change and as technology continues to evolve.
TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
HORNET TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIPS
Hornet Technologies is a long-term, school-based
enterprise designed to provide internships to high school
students who want to explore a career in information
technology, computers, or networking. It is operated by
OCHS and is a respected business in the community.
Interns at HT gain practical hands-on experience with
computers in a real-life working environment. After
successfully completing their Beginning Internship,
students can choose additional advanced training in
preparation for certification exams like A+ and Network+
(both of these are independent, industry standard
credentials available at the national level).
A+ Certification Training [8624]
A+ Certification provides a national standard for
computer technicians. Holding this certification has
become a requirement for many of the careers in
computer technologies. The A+ Certification Training
course is designed to help prepare students who plan to
acquire A+ Certification.
This course includes an
extensive review of knowledge gained in prior levels of
internship as well as specific preparation for the A+
Certification Test format. Because of the prerequisites for
this course, it is only offered every other year in the
Spring semester.
Computer Network Software Operations [6650]
Grade Level:11 – 12
Computer Network Software Operations builds on the
introduction to networking in the Survey class and enters
a much deeper study of those things that allow computers
to function together. Through classroom study, research,
and hands-on lab activities, interns learn about a variety
of topics including the OSI model, network topologies,
types of cabling and related specifications, networking
devices, standards for wired networks, and the standards
for wireless networks. Drawing on their knowledge of
desktop computer hardware and operating systems,
interns will work to configure a variety of functioning
network models.
Computer Assembly and Configuration: Beginning
Internship 1 [8621]
The Beginning Internship program at Hornet
Technologies explores PC fundamentals. Combining a
mixture of classroom work and hands-on lab activities,
interns learn what goes into a functioning computer.
They extend this learning in a true business environment
through the manufacture of new computers. By the end
of their Beginning Internship, students will know more
than simply how to put computers together; they will
understand what makes them work.
Computer Assembly and Configuration: Beginning
Internship 2 [8622]
This course continues the Beginning Internship program
at Hornet Technologies, continuing the exploration of PC
fundamentals. Combining a mixture of classroom work
and hands-on lab activities, interns learn what goes into a
functioning computer. They extend this learning in a true
business environment through the manufacture of new
computers. By the end of their Beginning Internship,
students will know more than simply how to put
computers together; they will understand what makes
them work.
Advanced Computer Network Software Operations
[6651]
Grade Level: 11 – 12
Network+ Certification is a widely accepted, vendor
neutral, network technician certification. Advanced
Computer Network Software Operations is the final step
in preparation for Network+ Certification testing.
Working through a variety of situations, interns study
TCP/IP concepts and fundamentals, IP services, network
management, networking with a variety of operating
systems, wide-area network fundamentals, network
security, and troubleshooting. This course builds on prior
learning acquired throughout the program in preparation
for Network+ Certification testing.
Computer Tech Support: Advanced Internship [8623]
Advanced Interns continue to build on the knowledge and
experience gained in their Beginning Internships as they
move into the tech support area. Working with HT
instructors, Advanced Interns learn to upgrade,
troubleshoot, and repair computers brought in from the
county schools and the community at large. As a result of
the wide variety of components encountered, Advanced
Interns build research skills, using the Internet as a tool to
provide both information and support for unfamiliar
equipment.
Advanced Interns also begin to build
leadership skills and practice supervisory skills as they
work with Beginning Interns in the production of new
computers.
Security + Certification Training
Grade 12
CompTIA Security+ is an international, vendor-neutral
certification that demonstrates competency in: network
security, compliance and operational security, threats and
vulnerabilities, application, data and host security, access
control and identity management, and cryptography. This
course builds upon prior learning acquired throughout the
Hornet Technologies program and the Network +
Certification class.
Computer Tech: Advanced Internship—Technology
Survey [8625]
The Advanced Internship—Technology Survey provides
Advanced Interns with an exposure to topics tested on the
26
tools. Instruction in common system of framing,
construction materials, estimating, and blueprint reading
is included.
Available upon completion of Carpentry sequence:
Basic Principles of Construction: Residential
Construction Academy Examination (Thomson Delmar
Learning/Home Builders Institute)
Core: Introductory Craft Skills, National Construction
Career Test (NCCER)
Carpentry Assessment (NOCTI)
Carpentry, National Construction Career Test (NCCER)
Carpentry Level One, National Construction Career Test
(NCCER)
Carpentry: Residential Construction Academy
Examination (Thomson Delmar/Home Builders Institute)
Industrial Cooperative Training I (ICT I) [8901]
ICT I is a work-related class with an emphasis on job
related skills and attitudes. The class is open to all Juniors
and Seniors. The course is designed to enhance the SOL
core areas in Math and English. Classroom instruction
includes units that are designed to help students be
successful in the world of work. Students who are
dismissed early from the school day must be employed
and be enrolled in ICT Work (8903).
Industrial Cooperative Training II (ICT II) [8902]
ICT II is a continuation of ICT I. Job skills and work
attitudes are emphasized with enhancement of the SOLs.
Classroom instruction includes units on maintaining
employment and increasing job performance. Students
who are dismissed early from the school day must be
employed and enrolled in ICT WORK (8903). Students
must be employed to be enrolled in ICT II.
ENGLISH
All OCHS English classes are taught in accordance with
the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs). Students take
two English SOLs, Reading & Writing in the Eleventh
grade.
Industrial Cooperative Training Work [8903]
**Students who are enrolled in or have successfully
completed ICT I and ICT II are entitled to earn credit for
their part-time employment. Students will need to have
an instructor-approved place of employment by the first
week of the semester. Students can earn 0.5 credits per
semester for 270 hours of work experience.
Honors
Refers to classes designed to prepare students to take
college-level English in 11th & 12th grade (AP English 11
& 12). Refer to AP Guidelines for more information.
Strategic Reading [1506] Credit: 1.0
Students interested in and/or recommended to enroll in
the one-semester Strategic Reading Seminar will receive
explicit instruction on how to increase their vocabulary
and how to approach reading strategically. Students will
participate in thirty minutes of Word Study (Vocabulary
Building); thirty minutes of Strategy Instruction
(Comprehension Support); thirty minutes of independent
reading through the Scholastic Reading Counts! Program.
Strategies that will receive special attention include:
Prediction, Monitoring Understanding, Inquiry and
Reasoning, Inferential Thinking, Visualization, Making
Connections, Summarization, and Reflection. Strategy
application in other classes will be one of the graded
components of this class. Students interested in improving
their reading skills are invited to enroll.
ICT – Full Employment [8904] Credit: 3
Students may begin full employment during the second
semester of their senior year if they have successfully
completed ICT I or ICT II and satisfied their graduation
requirements. Students will need to work 30 hours/week.
Aircraft Pilot Training I, II, III [8731, 8732, 8733]
(Tentative. Offering depends on finding an instructor
and space) Credit: 1.0 per class
Students will participate in flight training, ground school,
and simulator instruction to support the flight syllabus
while studying meteorology, aerodynamics, navigation,
physiology, airfield and flight environments, aircraft
maneuvers, and aircraft weight and balance.
Firefighting I [8705]
Students learn to fight fires and control the outbreak of
fire. Instruction includes fire department organization;
use of various kinds of equipment such as extinguishers,
pumps, hoses, ropes, ladders, gas masks, hydrants, and
standpipe and sprinkler systems; methods of entry and
rescue; salvage practices and equipment; and fire and
arson inspection and investigation techniques.
Power Reading [1505]
This course is designed for students to learn and
understand the 13 key skills that are necessary to be
successful in English 9. The course focuses on language,
reading comprehension, writing, research, speaking, and
listening. Students will finish the course fully prepared
for English 9.
Carpentry I (8601), Carpentry II (8602), Carpentry
III (8603) Credit: 1.0 per class
Prerequisite: must be 16 years or older
This program is offered off campus. In this program
students lay out, fabricate, erect, install, and repair
wooden structures and fixtures, using hand and power
English 9 [1130]
In addition to focusing on reading skills through the study
of various types of literature, students concentrate on
research skills, critical thinking, and writing skills,
including foundational grammar. At the end of the
course, students take a placement test to determine
readiness for English 10.
27
examination of American history. Excellent preparation
for 12th grade American Government and 12th grade AP
English Literature, this is a challenging class that will
require a substantial amount of work out of class, such as
novel and textbook reading and essay writing. Also, all
students will be required to do summer reading. At the
end of the course, students may elect to take both the AP
US History test and the AP English Language and
Composition exams. Students will also take the US
History and 11th grade English SOL tests. A fee is
charged for AP US History workbooks.
English 9 Honors [1133]
In addition to focusing on reading skills - both
independent and summer - through the study of various
types of literature, students concentrate on research skills,
advanced critical thinking, and writing skills, including
foundational grammar. To be successful in this course,
students should be self motivated and have advanced
reading skills, as well as grade level writing skills. At the
end of the course, students take a placement test to
determine readiness for English 10. This Honors class
will prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP)
English courses in 11th & 12th grade
Advanced Placement English 11 (AP Language and
Composition) [1196]
The goal of the AP English Language and Composition
course is to not only prepare students for the AP English
Language and Composition test; it will also enable
students to write effectively and confidently in all their
college courses and in their professional and personal
lives. The course is designed to help students become
skilled readers of American prose and poetry written in a
variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, as
well as skilled writers in a variety of forms: narrative,
exploratory, expository, and argumentative. They will
write on a variety of subjects from personal experiences
to public policies, from imaginative literature to popular
culture. Students will become aware of the writer’s
purpose and audience expectations, as well as the way
generic conventions and the resources of language
contribute to effective writing. It will help students move
from the conventional five paragraph essay to more
sophisticated, detailed prose aimed at a mature audience.
In addition, it will also enable students to become aware
of their own composing processes, including several
stages of drafts, as well as know how to organize thoughts
and write concisely under time constraints which parallel
those on the AP exam. Students should have successfully
completed English 10 and be motivated for a highly
rigorous curriculum.
English 10 [1140]
After the successful completion of English 9, students
focus on reading skills through the study of the
similarities in world literature. Students continue studying
research skills, critical thinking, and writing skills,
including grammar.
English 10 Honors [1143]
Students focus on advanced reading skills, both
independent and summer, through the study of the
similarities in world literature. Students complete
extensive essays and reading out-of-class. Students
continue studying critical thinking and writing skills,
including grammar and writing a research essay. To be
successful in this course, students should have
successfully completed English 9 Honors or shown the
ability to do honors level work in English 9. This Honors
class will prepare students for the Advanced Placement
(AP) English courses in 11th & 12th grade
English 11[1150]
After the successful completion of English 10, students
focus on reading skills through the study of American
literature. Students continue studying critical thinking
and writing skills, including grammar. Students write a
research essay.
English 12 [1160]
After the successful completion of English 11, students
focus on reading skills through the studies of British and
world literature. Students continue studying critical
thinking, and writing skills, including grammar. Students
write a research essay.
American Studies [2314 & 2315] Credit: 1.0/semester
Students have the unique opportunity to take English 11
and U.S. History as a combination two-semester course
that is team taught. Students study both U.S. history and
American literature building upon reading, writing, and
critical thinking skills, including grammar. Students will
take the English and US History SOL tests at the end of
second semester. Students receive credit for both courses
at the end of second semester.
Advanced Placement English 12 (AP Literature and
Composition) [1195]
Students focus on advanced reading skills, through the
study of world literature with an emphasis on poetry.
Students read extensively out-of-class, which includes ten
novels. Students continue studying critical thinking, and
writing skills, including grammar and writing a research
essay. To be successful in this course, students should
have successfully completed English 11 Honors or shown
the ability to do honors level work in English 11. At the
end of the course, students may take the AP Literature
test, which could give them college credit.
Advanced Placement American Studies (AP English
Language and Composition & AP US History) [2305]
Credit: 2.0
This year-long two-credit course combines AP US
History and 11th grade AP English Language. Taught at
the college level, this course will combine reading and
writing about American literature with the close
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OC Marching Hornets [9243]
Grade level : 9-12
Credit: 0.5
Pre requisite: Entrance will be determined on an
individual case basis. Also necessary for admission into
the marching band program is the student’s enrollment in
one semester of Wind, Concert or Symphonic band.
Please note that extenuating circumstances regarding
scheduling difficulties should be brought to the band
director’s attention for enrollment consideration.
Journalism [1200]
Journalism is the study of the art of reporting and the
profession of journalists. Beginning journalism students
receive instruction in all areas of journalism including:
interviewing, beat reporting, feature writing, news stories,
layout design, advertising, journalistic ethics, and
professional standards. This course includes extensive
reading of models of excellent journalistic techniques and
evaluates and analyzes journalistic writing through
discussions and critiques. This is not a student
publications course; it does not satisfy English
requirements
Band members will participate in an elite ensemble of
core-style marchers and will be exposed to the skills and
methods necessary for collegiate and corps level
marching. While the benefits of said experiences are
great, it should be known that marching band is an
ensemble which requires summer and after school
rehearsals, as well as attendance at numerous football
games and competitions. All skills necessary for success
will be taught during band camp, and through practice
sessions. Therefore, no prior marching experience is
necessary.
Journalism II [1210]
Prerequisite: Journalism I
Journalism II is an in-depth continuation of the writing
process and research on journalists who made valuable
contributions to print and television journalism. There
will be no formal research paper, but students will have to
be prepared to present information on a variety of
reporters/columnists, as well as pick an area of
newspaper/magazine writing (sports, science, and
entertainment) and focus on a writing specialty for a
semester’s work.
Jazz Ensemble
Grade level: 9-12 [9296]
Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Entrance will be determined on an
individual case basis. Also necessary for admission into
the jazz program is the student’s enrollment in Wind,
Concert or Symphonic band. Please note that extenuating
circumstances regarding scheduling difficulties should be
brought to the band director’s attention for enrollment
consideration.
FINE ARTS
Instrumental Music
Concert Band [9241]-fall semester
Symphonic Band [9240]- spring semester
Wind Band Fall [9246]
Wind Band Spring [9247]
Grade level: 9-12
Prerequisite: Entrance will be determined on an
individual case basis, yet it should be noted that all
students willing to develop further their skills as
instrumentalists are welcome. Also note that all of these
ensembles satisfy the requirement for an in-school
ensemble so that students may be admitted to marching
band and/or jazz ensemble.
Jazz Ensemble members will be exposed to the widely
diverse genre and styles of jazz music. Through listening,
practice, and performance, all members of the jazz
ensemble will be exposed to the skills and methods
necessary for collegiate level jazz performance. Jazz
band rehearsals will occur after school on selected days.
No prior jazz performance experience is necessary.
After-School Concert Band [9232]
Grade level: 9-12
Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite An interest in pursuing instrumental music:
This ensemble will meet after school on selected days and
will explore the world of concert band music, orchestral
transcriptions, and modern wind ensemble repertoire.
Band students will be exposed to and explore the world of
concert band music, orchestral transcriptions, and modern
wind ensemble repertoire. All band rehearsals occur
during the school day, however it should be noted that
there are typically 2-4 concerts throughout the course of a
usual semester.
Orchestra [9239]
Grade level 9-12
Prerequisite: Entrance will be determined on an
individual case basis.
This course is designed for students who demonstrate
proficiency in playing a strings instrument and who would
like to perform in an orchestral setting. Any questions
regarding fees, practice responsibilities, and required
performances should be addressed by contacting the
orchestra director.
**NOTE: Students wishing to enroll in any of the four
ensembles listed above should simply designate “Band:
1 semester” or “Band: 2 semesters” when completing
course requests for the following year. The OCHS
Director of Bands and other Music Department staff
will then dictate enrollment within the four listed
ensembles.
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the beginning of human sound production to the current
trends of our modern music industry.
Vocal Music
Chorus I, II and III [9260], [9261], [9263] formerly
Concert Choir, Women’s Chorale, Choral & Vocal
Techniques
Grade Level: 9-12
Prerequisite: Entrance into each group will be at the
director’s discretion, however; all students who are
interested in choral singing, who wish to perform, and are
willing to develop their skills as singers are encouraged to
enroll. Also note that these ensembles satisfy the
requirement for an in-school ensemble so that students
may be admitted to audition for after school groups and
individual district festivals.
Guitar: The Study of Western Music History and
Theory with Guitar as a Lab Instrument [9245]
Grade level: 9-12
This course will provide the fundamental skills necessary
for the initial development of guitar performance and
understanding. No prior guitar performance
experience is necessary. In fact, this course is designed
for the student who is only beginning his or her journey
on the instrument. Elements of music theory and guitar
history will be integrated into the curriculum.
Piano I, II, III [9255], [9256], [9257]
Grade level: 9-12
Credit 1.0 per class
Prerequisite: none
Piano and Music Theory will provide an introduction to
keyboard skills and basic music theory necessary for the
successful understanding of piano performance. No prior
piano performance is necessary. In fact, this course is
designed for students who have very minimal experience
in piano. Music theory is introduced and taught as the
student uses the piano as a lab instrument to further his or
her understanding of the concepts.
Choral students will perform a wide variety of quality
literature that spans all musical time periods and explores
a variety of cultures. Fundamentals of correct vocal
production, music reading, and solfeggio, and proper
performance etiquette will be taught. Students are
expected to participate in daily rehearsals and several
after school concerts in order to fulfill the requirements of
these courses.
**NOTE: Students wishing to enroll in any of the four
ensembles listed above should simply designate
“Chorus: 1 semester” or “Chorus: 2 semesters” when
completing course requests for the following year.
The OCHS Director of Choirs and other Music
Department staff will then dictate enrollment within
the four listed ensembles.
Performing Arts
Introduction to Drama [1410]
Advanced Drama [1440]
This course is a beginner’s look at the skills involved in
dramatic movement, voice, and scene work. It will
benefit students who want to pursue theatre training and
those who want to gain confidence in public speaking,
interviews, etc. While this is primarily a performance
based class, some of the student’s grade is based upon the
reading and analyzing of plays and scenes in a written
journal. ** Please note that interest in full-scale
productions with an audience should be taken up with the
faculty involved in the after-school drama program.
Orange County Singers (OC Singers) [9264]
Grade level: 9-12 Credit: 0.5/semester (5th Block)
Prerequisite: Entrance will be determined through the
recommendation of the director. Also necessary for
admission into this after school group is the student’s
enrollment in Concert Choir or Women’s Chorale.
OC Singers is designed for the advanced choral singer
who wishes to further their mastery in a smaller, select
group. Music from all time periods and a variety of
cultures will be performed in a setting that calls for
independence and confidence as a choral performer.
Students are required to participate in weekly after school
rehearsals and school and public performances.
Visual Arts
Art I [9120]
Students are exposed to the purpose and functions of
graphic and plastic arts in society. Such design concepts
as shapes, colors, single-point perception, and balance are
covered. Established art will provide source material for
the class. Student activities include drawing and printmaking. Research has shown that Art enhances SOL
scores. Lab fees are collected.
Music Electives
Music Appreciation [9222]
Grade level: 9-12
This course will provide a basic understanding of the
form, function, history, and relevance of music in human
history. Through text study, demonstration, and listening
activities, the students will gain an appreciation for this
art form, as well as to recognize its role through history
and its connection to other fine arts. This exploration will
include multicultural studies of music, and will span from
Art II [9130]
Entrance will be determined on an individual case basis.
Art II is a continuation of the theories, histories, and
practices taught in Art I. Research has shown that Art
enhances SOL scores. Lab fees are collected.
Advanced Art [9140]
Entrance will be determined on an individual case basis.
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The curriculum encourages the development of technical
skills, perception, and problem solving. Students are
given the opportunity to prepare a portfolio for admission
to the college of their choice. Research has shown that
Art enhances SOL scores. Lab fees are collected.
French IV-V [5140, 5150] Credit: 1.0 per class
(This course may be taken twice in consecutive years;
course content will alternate each year and is not
sequential.)
French IV/V classes offer students an advanced study of
French through exploration of literature, cinema, art,
music, history and contemporary customs of the Frenchspeaking world. Skills in oral and written expression are
enhanced through an in-depth review and expansion of
vocabulary and grammatical structures introduced in
Levels I-III.
Graphic Arts [9153]
Entrance will be determined on an individual case basis.
Students will explore the drawing techniques and tools
used in computer art and graphics. They will learn the
basic skills of design, illustrations, and production layout
in the graphics environment. Emphasis is placed upon the
practical aspects of commercial art and how this art is
used in publishing, design, illustration, and multimedia
presentation. Students will prepare a portfolio of their
work, which is usually required for employment and/or
entrance to other training in computer graphics.
Latin I [5310]
Latin I introduces students to the vocabulary and basic
structures of Latin with an emphasis on reading skills.
Students will also explore the history, culture, and
mythology of Classical Rome and its impact on Western
European civilization. Attention will be given to Latin
derivatives in English as well as Latin phrases still used in
a variety of content areas.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
The Virginia Board of Education approved Foreign
Language Standards of Learning in June 2000. These
SOLs are based on national standards. Course objectives
in each language level at OCHS are congruent with the
state foreign language SOLs. In addition, all foreign
language courses support the English and Social Studies
SOLs.
The Foreign Language Dept. strongly encourages
college-bound students to take at least four levels of one
language, or two of one and three of a second language.
Students should plan their language courses so that they
are completing their last course in the 11th or 12th grade.
Students also should take care not to wait more than two
semesters before continuing to the next level. When more
than two semesters have elapsed, students may want to
audit last level taken or have the instructor’s permission
to continue to the next level.
Latin II and III [5320, 5330] Credit: 1.0 per class
Latin II and III builds on the foundation established in
Latin I, developing more advanced reading and grammar
skills. Students will extend their knowledge of Roman
history, culture, and mythology and their understanding of
Rome’s impact on the English language and modern
Western culture.
Latin IV and V [5340, 5350]
Credit: 1.0 per class
These classes are an introduction to ancient Roman
authors in the original Latin including Julius Caesar,
Martial, Virgil, Catullus and Ovid. Attention is given to
the conventions of genre, literary translation, and the
influence of these authors on the art and literature of
Western Europe.
French I-III [5110, 5120, 5130] Credit: 1.0 per class
French I-III courses are taught based on the TPRS method
of instruction. TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through
Reading and Storytelling) uses storytelling as the primary
means to utilize and expand acquired vocabulary as well
as grammatical structures. The vocabulary and structures
are contextualized in high-interest stories which students
hear, see, act out, and eventually tell and write in their
own words. Students also read and discuss short novels
in each level. Opportunities for understanding French and
Francophone culture are provided through independent
and class projects.
Spanish I [5510]
Spanish I is an introductory course designed to develop
listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Spanish.
Emphasis is on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and
grammatical structures. To be successful in this course,
English grammar skills are recommended. Aspects of
Spanish culture are also discussed.
Spanish II, III, IV and V [5520, 5530, 5540, 5550]
Credit: 1.0 per class
Spanish II, III, IV, and V are continuations of the
previous Spanish courses, which cover, progressively,
more advanced levels of listening, speaking, reading and
writing skills.
Honors Level French I-III [5115, 5125, 5135]
Credit: 1.0 per class
Students choosing the Honors option in French I, II or III
demonstrate superior control and understanding of more
abstract linguistic concepts in their written and spoken
expression of French. Highly motivated students who
plan to continue their study of French to Levels IV-V and
beyond high school are encouraged to choose this option,
which is offered after the first six-weeks of each course.
Spanish Practicum [5561]
This class will be an instructional class in which students
will work on teaching teams. The teams will go to the
elementary schools and teach basic Spanish vocabulary
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and concepts four days per week. The teams fifth day
will be classroom instruction, and preparation. Students
should have: strong organizational skills, ability to work
in teams, sense of responsibility, minimal absences.
Students are responsible for their own transportation.
Leadership Education and Training (LET) 1-8
[7901, 7913, 7916, 7918, 7919, 7921, 7922, 7923]
Credit: 1.0 per class
Prerequisite: LET 1 – complete the 8th grade; LET 2 – 8
completion of prior level
JROTC is a leadership development program sponsored
and supported by the U.S. Army to encourage and
promote leadership, citizenship, personal ethics, moral
responsibility and self discipline. The mission of JROTC
is to motivate young people to be better citizens. JROTC
is neither a military recruitment effort nor “boot camp”
training. The focus is on citizenship and leadership.
HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE 9/Health [7310]
Students will spend 50% of this class in physical
education training and 50% of this class in health
education. Physical education content includes: fitness
and conditioning; fitness planning; lifelong fitness and
wellness; and lifetime sport activities
Health education content includes: alcohol, tobacco, and
other drug prevention education; mental health education;
nutrition education; personal and community health and
safety; lifelong health management; health and lifestyle;
first aid; CPR; disease and personal wellness.
Content and Credit: Each LET level is a semester course.
One credit is earned for each semester class. Cadets
advance in rank and responsibility and have repeated
opportunities to serve in leadership positions. JROTC is
performance based learning that requires cadets to make
decisions, demonstrate skills, provide services, solve
problems, or create a product. Course content draws from
six different units: Citizenship, Leadership Theory,
Foundations for Success, Wellness Fitness & First Aid,
Geography, American History, and Government.
Typically, cadets will concentrate on academic efforts
Monday through Wednesday.
PE 10/Driver’s Ed [7425]
Students will spend 50% of this class in physical
education training and 50% of this class in driver’s
education training.
Physical education content includes: fitness and
conditioning; fitness planning; lifelong fitness and
wellness and; lifetime sport activities
Driver’s education content includes: Virginia driver
responsibility, preparing to operate a vehicle; basic
maneuvering tasks; information processing; driver
performance; and driver responsibilities. Successful
completion of the Virginia Driver Education classroom
Standards of Learning is a prerequisite to obtain a
Virginia driver’s license. The Behind the Wheel
requirement will be offered to students once they have
successfully completed the classroom requirements and
will be offered at a cost to student and parents.
Uniforms: Cadets are required to maintain a military
appearance and wear uniforms once a week. All uniforms
and instructional materials are furnished free of charge.
Thursdays are usually uniform days. Cadets will
participate in physical training (PT) once a week
Normally, Fridays are reserved for PT. Cadets
participate in many community-service activities, field
trips and social events. Cadets may volunteer to attend a
one-week summer camp on a military post at minimal
cost. Cadets that attend camp will wear a camouflage
uniform with boots.
Future: JROTC enhances a student’s competitiveness for
appointment to a military academy or for Senior ROTC
college scholarships. For those who join the military after
high school, JROTC will earn them early promotions.
Health & Physical Education Electives
Advanced PE [7640]
Students will work on improving individual athletic skills
required to play a team sport. Students must have
mastered Physical Education and be highly motivated to
participate.
Dis-enrollment: The Senior Army Instructor can drop
those cadets that do not achieve course standards from the
JROTC program
JROTC Teams [7920] Credit: 0.5 (each year)
JROTC has six teams – Color Guard, Honor Guard, Drill
Team, Raider Team, Rifle Team (pellet rifles) and
Orienteering Team. Practices are held after school.
Students who are members of a team or teams for at least
one year are awarded the OCHS Varsity Letter “O”.
Weight Training and Strength Development [7642]
Students will build on knowledge and application of
concepts learned in Health and Physical Education.
Students will learn proper weight lifting techniques in a
controlled program to increase strength for a wide variety
of sports. Flexibility, interval running, cardiovascular
training and other training techniques needed for intense
athletic competition are also covered.
Leadership and Citizenship (Independent Study)
[7925]
Credit: Same as regular LET Senior Army Instructor’s
permission is required.
Known as “5th Block JROTC”, this independent study
program is available to a select few who have proven
JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING
CORPS (JROTC)
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themselves to be superior cadets and who are unable to fit
the regular LET class into their schedules. This option is
for one semester only; thereafter, the student must return
to the regular LET class. Students must be able to meet
with the instructor, to take exams, and to participate in
other JROTC activities after school.
and graphing. A graphing calculator will be used. The
state end of course SOL test will be taken at the end of
Algebra I part II. It is recommended that students will
take both courses in the same school year.
Algebra Functions & Data Analysis [3134]
This course is intended to bridge the gap between Algebra
I and Algebra II. It will place emphasis on deeper
understanding of mathematical relationships by solving
problems in a series of realistic situations or
investigations. Students will construct, reflect on, apply
and describe their own mathematical models to interpret
real-life data verbally, numerically, symbolically, and
graphically using appropriate technology.
LEAD 134 - Military History Staff Ride
This interactive, participatory seminar/workshop invites
participants to explore, experience, and evaluate
leadership techniques in historical settings in the United
States. It presents students with the issues and challenges
faced by acknowledged leaders of the 19th and 20th
centuries during periods of armed conflict and great
societal changes. Students delve into the decision-making
process of these historical figures via their writings, and
by student presentations of case studies on the
consequences of these decisions at the actual historical
sites. Local Civil War site location visits will reinforce
learning objectives providing capstone exercises that
reinforce required readings/research. (1 to 3 credits).
Cost. $80 per credit
Number of Students: 15
Duration: 1 school year, meeting weekly for 30-45
minutes, 3 local day field trips, one overnight culminating
exercise at Gettysburg (tent camping and chaperons
required, early May).
Geometry [3143] Credit: 1
Geometry Honors is an extremely rigorous and fast paced
semester course. Students need to have a strong Algebra I
background. Topics covered in the course include:
symmetry, similarity, congruence, logic, polygons,
trigonometry, and three dimensional shapes. Students
will be using a graphing calculator and should expect
daily homework. The students will take the state SOL
test at the end of the course.
Geometry (part I) and Geometry (part II) [3144, 3145]
1 credit per class
Geometry is a yearlong course using Algebra I skills.
Topics covered include symmetry, similarity, congruence,
logic, polygons, and three dimensional shapes. Students
will have more time to master the topics and skills needed
to complete the Geometry requirements. It is strongly
encouraged that students will take both courses in the
same school year. Students will receive both an elective
and Math credit upon completion. The state SOL test is
administered at the end of the second semester.
MATHEMATICS
All OCHS Math classes are taught in accordance with the
Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs).
**These courses may last one semester or a full school
year based on student performance.
Power Algebra [3128]
This course is designed for students to learn and
understand the 12 key concepts that are necessary to be
successful in Algebra I. Students will finish the course
fully prepared for Algebra I.
Algebra II [3135]
This is a fast-paced rigorous course for students with
strong Algebra I and Geometry skills, who are ready to
focus on new material including matrices, radicals,
conics, graphing, equations, and problem solving.
Students will need a strong background in solving
equations, factoring, and graphing. Students will use
critical thinking skills and will be expected to complete
daily homework. Graphing calculators will be used daily.
Algebra I [3130]
This is a rigorous, fast paced semester course designed for
students with a strong understanding of basic
mathematical concepts. Topics studied in this course will
include solving equations, working with variables,
polynomials, radicals, graphing, and introduction to
trigonometry. A graphing calculator will be used.
Students will take the state Algebra I SOL at the end of
the semester. Students will be expected to complete daily
homework.
Advanced Math [3160]
Prerequisite: Algebra II
This course is designed as a preparatory course for
students needing additional support in passing the VPT
for dual enrollment access. It focuses on application of
advanced algebra skills and conceptual development.
Algebra I (part I) and Algebra I (part II) [3131, 3132]
1 credit per class
This is a year long course sequence of Algebra designed
to give students more time to master the skills required to
pass the state required SOL. The topics include solving
equations, working with variables, polynomials, radicals,
Discrete Mathematics (3154)
Prerequisite: Algebra II
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Discrete Mathematics is the study of mathematics needed
for the 21st century. Topics to be studied include
probability, statistics, logic, matrices, graph theory,
recurrence relations and mathematical modeling.
Emphasis is placed on problem solving, real world
applications and statistics.
including graphing, problem solving and application, trig
unit circle and identities. Students will participate in class
and complete daily homework. Students enrolled in this
course in the spring are required to take the AB exam in
May. A graphing calculator is required.
Statistics [3190] This course is designed to introduce
students to the methods of statistical analysis. Critical
thinking and algebraic equation solving skills are
necessary for this class. Topics include: experimental
design, descriptive methods for picturing data and
inferential methods for making predictions.
Trigonometry[3161] Trig/Advanced Math is a rigorous
algebra based course using critical thinking skills
involving concepts that include angles, graphs, triangles,
trig functions, inverses and ratios. Students taking this
course need a strong background in Algebra, skills such
as solving equations, factoring and graphing. Students
will need to provide a calculator, either scientific or
graphing. Students will be expected to complete daily
homework.
Advanced Placement Statistics [3192]
This course is a rigorous course that prepares students to
take the AP Statistics exam. The AP curriculum and
guidelines set by the College Board will be followed.
Topics include: experiment design, data collection, data
analysis, regression lines, descriptive statistics, and
predictions made from data analysis. Students should
expect a fast pace and daily homework.
Pre-calculus [3162]
Pre-calculus is a rigorous college prep course that builds
on the skills learned in Trig/Advanced Math. Students
will be studying topics including polynomial and rational
functions, exponential and logarithmic functions,
graphing, sequences and series, systems of equations, and
other advanced algebra topics. Students will need to
provide a graphing calculator. Students will be expected
to complete daily homework.
PHOTOJOURNALISM
Yearbook I [1215] & Yearbook II [1216]
1 credit per course
In this class, students prepare the OCHS
yearbook. Training in writing, editing,
photography, layouts, deadlines and leadership
are provided as part of the publication process.
Summer marketing and fundraising are required.
All staffers must enroll in the first semester.
Editors should enroll in the first and second
semesters. **Students must complete and be
selected through an application process in the
spring.
Computer Math [3183]
Students will apply programming techniques and skills,
using the graphing calculator to solve practical problems
in mathematics arising from consumer, business, personal
finance, leisure activities, sports, probability and statistics,
and other mathematics. Problems will include
opportunities for students to analyze data in charts,
graphs, and tables and to use their knowledge of
equations, formulas and functions to solve these
problems. Students will design, write and debug, and
document a complete structured program that requires the
synthesis of many concepts contained in previous math
course standards. Algebra I SOL remediation will also be
incorporated into the curriculum.
SCIENCE
All OCHS Science classes are taught in accordance with
the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs). Lab exercises
are an integral part of every science class and lab fees
are collected for all courses.
**These courses may last one semester or a full school
year based on student performance.
Math for Success [3129] 1 elective credit
This course is for students who have not demonstrated
mastery on the 8th grade SOL test and will review basic
math concepts which are the foundations to success in the
high school mathematics program. Students will review
number theory, properties of equality and inequality,
rational numbers (fractions) and geometric concepts. An
8th grade SOL math retest will be administered at the end
of the course
Biology I, Honors [4310, 4315]
This class is designed to provide students with a detailed
understanding of living system. Topics include: the
nature of science, chemistry of life, cellular biology,
genetics, evolution, ecology, and human anatomy.
Emphasis is placed on examining alternative scientific
explanations, conducting controlled experiments,
analyzing data, and using scientific literature. Students
take the Biology SOL after completing Biology I or
Biology I Honors. Biology I Honors credit is given to
Advanced Placement Calculus [3175, 3177]
Credit: 2.0 (1 elective credit, 1 math credit)
AP Calculus is a full year long, 2 semester college level
course. The AP curriculum and guidelines set by the
College Board will be followed to complete differential
and integral calculus. Students need strong algebra skills
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students who complete an enriched curriculum
emphasizing critical thinking skills, in-depth analysis and
application.
completed the core science curriculum and are now
prepared to pursue more advanced and specialized
studies. All students are required to take the Advanced
Placement exam.
Biology II: Human Systems [4330]
Prerequisite: Biology I
This course is designed for the student who has completed
Biology I and wants to continue studying topics in
Biology. Human Systems is the study of the human body
and how form is related to function during life. Critical
thinking, problem solving, dissection, and research are
required. Students considering health-related careers will
benefit from this course. This course is structured to aid
students in making the transition to college level classes.
Chemistry I or Chemistry I Honors [4410, 4415]
Chemistry I is a rigorous, fast-paced, one semester college
preparatory course that focuses on the interactions of
matter and energy. Chemistry is an algebraic based
science. Prior completing of Algebra II is highly
recommended prior to taking Chemistry I. Students may
be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II (one semester
course) the same semester as taking Chemistry I or
Algebra II - Part II the same semester. Chemistry I
Honors credit is given to students who complete an
enriched curriculum emphasizing critical thinking skills,
in-depth analysis and application. Students take the
Chemistry SOL after completing Chemistry I.
Biology II: Ecology [4320]
Grade Level 11 -12
Prerequisites – Successful completion of Earth Science I
AND Biology
This course is designed to incorporate the knowledge
students gained in Biology I and Earth Science I into the
investigation of relationships between organisms and their
environments. Students will use scientific methodology
to investigate chemical cycles, species diversity,
population biology, biomes and environmental issues.
The course will also include study of the natural history of
mammals, birds, plants and other organisms located in
and around Orange County. Students should expect to do
field investigations in order to complete certain lab
requirements.
Advanced Placement Chemistry (4470)
Prerequisite: Chemistry I & Algebra II
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to take
the Advanced Placement examination, for which college
credit and/or placement may be given if a qualifying score
is achieved. Advanced Placement Chemistry is a secondlevel, laboratory-centered course that provides an
opportunity for students to undertake a more
comprehensive investigation of some aspects of chemistry
than is normally possible in the first year chemistry
course. It is designed for students who have completed a
core science curriculum and are now ready to pursue
more advanced and specialized studies. All students are
required to take the Advanced Placement exam.
Biology II: Ecology Honors [4325]
Grade Level 11 -12
Prerequisites – Successful completion of Earth Science I
AND Biology
This course offers higher level students an opportunity to
enrich their understanding of environmental science.
Class time will be spent both in school and in field.
During class time, students will be expected to conduct
intensive research of current ecological issue. The field
portion of this class would provide an opportunity for
students to engage in data collection and analysis.
Students will focus on analyzing local riparian
ecosystems and best management practices. They will be
responsible for providing this data and solutions to land
owners. This can provide an opportunity for industry
certification for riparian habitat assessment.
Earth Science I, Honors [4210, 4215]
An exploratory class divided into four specific area of
study: astronomy, geology, meteorology, and
oceanography. The course stresses the interpretation of
maps, charts, graphs, and profiles as related to each of the
four subject areas within the course. Problem solving and
decision-making skills are emphasized, especially as they
relate to the costs and benefits of utilizing Earth’s
resources. Students take the SOL upon completion of
Earth Science I or Earth Science I Honors. Earth Science
I Honors credit is given to students who complete an
enriched curriculum emphasizing critical thinking skills,
in-depth analysis and application.
Earth Science II – Astronomy/Oceanography [4260]
Prerequisites: Earth Science I
This course is designed for students who want to further
their studies in the earth science sub disciplines of
astronomy and oceanography. This is an 18 week course
divided into nine weeks of astronomy and nine weeks of
oceanography.
Advanced Placement Biology [4369, 4370]
Prerequisites: Biology I & Chemistry I
Credits: 2.0 (1 science and 1 elective)
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to take
the Advance Placement Biology exam for which college
credits and/or placement may be granted by an approving
institution if a qualifying score is achieved.
AP Biology is a second-level biology course that utilizes
laboratory research activities to acquaint students with the
means by which biological information is collected and
interpreted. The course is designed for students who have
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Advanced Placement Environmental Science [4270]
The AP Environmental Science course is designed to
provide students with the scientific principles, concepts,
and methodologies required to understand the
interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and
analyze environmental problems both natural and humanmade, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these
problems, and to examine alternative solutions for
resolving and/or preventing them. Topics include but are
not limited to: environmental ethics, worldviews,
renewable and nonrenewable resources, toxicology and
human health, ecosystems, climate change, the Earth’s
structure, and sustainability. In the spring students will
take the AP Environmental Science Exam. It is suggested
that students have skills in the area of basic earth science
and biology prior to taking the course, however highly
motivated students may handle the course work without
much background.
solving skills and test taking strategies. Student will
retake the Biology and/or Earth Science SOL upon
completion of this course. Note: this class does not
count as a lab science for graduation requirements.
Physics I (4510) Physics I is a rigorous, fast paced, one
semester college preparatory course that focuses on basic
concepts such as motion, forces, energy, matter, heat,
sound, light, and the composition of atoms. Physics is an
algebraic based science; it is a class of applied math. This
course follows the Virginia Standards of Learning for
Physics; however there is no end of course SOL test. Prior
completion of Algebra II is highly recommended prior to
taking Physics I Honors. Students may be concurrently
enrolled in the Algebra II (one semester course) the same
semester as taking Chemistry I Honors or Algebra II Part
II the same semester.
Teacher Aide [0010] 0.5 credit
Students who are on track to graduate with a 2.0 GPA or
better may use one block to serve as a Teacher Aide. This
is not a study hall block, but rather an opportunity to
develop additional skills while helping a teacher or other
staff member with errands, setting up for labs, tutoring,
etc. Teacher Aides earn one-half credit per semester, and
the supervising teacher issues the student’s grade. The
student is responsible for finding a teacher who will
sponsor him/her as a Teacher Aide. An application form,
available in the counseling center, must be completed in
order to register for this program.
Advanced Placement Physics (4570)
Prerequisite: Physics I, Algebra II, & Trigonometry
The course focuses on providing students a survey of
major areas of physics- mechanics, fluids, waves, optics,
electricity, magnetism, and modern physics (atomic and
nuclear). Students learn to think like scientists: making
predictions based on observations, writing hypotheses,
designing and completing experiments, and developing
conclusions based on the analysis of data derived from
these experiments. In addition, students apply what they
learn in class to their personal experiences. The course
provides guided inquiry and student-centered learning
activities to foster critical thinking. All students are
required to take the Advance Placement exam.
SOCIAL STUDIES
Advanced Science Skills
Grade Level 11-12
Prerequisites – Successful completion of Earth Science I
and Biology I
This elective course is designed for students who have
earned a passing grade in Biology I and Earth Science I
but were unsuccessful earning the verified credit for one
or both of these classes. This course will provide a
detailed review of the science SOL objectives, problem
World Geography [2210]
World Geography Honors, when completed successfully,
provides students with either an elective credit or a social
studies credit. The study of the people, places, and
environments with historical emphasis on Asia, Latin
America, Africa, and the Middle East as to examine the
physical and cultural geography is the central focus of the
course. The use of texts, maps, globes, graphs, and a
variety of other materials require students to consider the
SERVICE LEARNING
Service Learning I and II [9890], [9891] Credit: 0.5
Students who are on track to graduate with a 2.0 GPA or
better may earn a credit for service in a local agency
through service-learning. Students must have their own
transportation and parent permission to leave the school
campus during the day. Excellent attendance is crucial
for this program, and the supervising agency will issue the
student’s grade. Many students serve at Orange
Elementary School, but other sites may be arranged. The
student must take responsibility for finding an appropriate
site and supervisor. An application form, available in the
counseling center, must be completed in order to register
for this program.
All OCHS Social Studies classes are taught in accordance
with the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs).
Social Studies Department Designations
Advanced Placement
Refers to a challenging course of study for students who
are considering post secondary education. Courses with
this designation are clearly differentiated by the emphasis
on the extended use of research, analysis, and writing
skills. Students are offered college credit for AP classes
if they perform well on the appropriate AP exam
(according to the standards set by the College Board).
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relationship between people and place. Students take the
SOL test on World Geography.
Advanced Placement American Studies (AP English
Language and Composition & AP US History)
Credits: 2
This year-long two-credit course combines AP US
History and 11th grade AP English Language. Taught at
the college level, this course will combine reading and
writing about American literature with the close
examination of American history. Excellent preparation
for 12th grade American Government and 12th grade AP
English Literature, this is a challenging class that will
require a substantial amount of work out of class, such as
novel and textbook reading and essay writing. Also, all
students will be required to do summer reading. At the
end of the course, students may elect to take both the AP
US History test and the 11th grade AP English Language
test. Students will also take the US history and 11th grade
English SOL tests. A fee is charged for AP US History
workbooks.
World Studies I [2215]
World Studies I is a required course for students who
wish to earn either a standard or advanced diploma and,
when completed successfully, students are awarded one
credit. It is suggested that the course be completed in the
ninth grade year, however, it is not required to be taken
during the freshman year. The course emphasizes the use
of research, analysis, and writing skills to study the
physical, political, and cultural geography of world
regions and cultures. Students are provided a number of
resources including computers and literature to study
history and current events. The course provides
preparation for the SOL test in World History and
Geography to 1500 AD.
World Studies II [2216]
World Studies II is a required course for students who
wish to earn an advanced diploma and, when completed
successfully, students are awarded one credit. Students
may take the course at anytime during their high school
career, however, students who wish to take AP courses
their junior or senior year should take the course their
sophomore year. World Studies II Honors covers history
and geography during the Modern Era with an emphasis
on Western Europe. While the course is a continuation of
World Studies I, an increasing amount of attention is
given to political boundaries and situations that continue
to develop today. An emphasis is placed on the use of
research, analysis, and writing to provide the skills
necessary for AP classes. Students take the SOL test in
World History and Geography from 1500 AD.
US History [2360] Credit: 1
US History provides one social studies credit to satisfy
the graduation requirements for both the standard and
advanced diploma. The course provides an overview of
the political, social, and economic development of the
country from the Age of Exploration to the present day.
The development of the United States is studied through
major events, documents, eras, and personalities. A wide
variety of activities supplement the textbook. Students
take the US History SOL test at the end of the course.
Advanced Placement US History [2319]
AP US History provides one social studies credit to
satisfy the graduation requirements for both the standard
and advanced diploma. The course traces the political,
economic, and cultural development of the United States.
Emphasis is on essay writing, reading, and class
discussion as preparation for the Advanced Placement
exam. Along with the AP exam, students take the SOL
test in US History. A fee is charged for AP US History
Workbooks.
Advanced Placement European History [2399]
AP European History is offered as both an elective course
and as a social studies course. Students who are taking
the course for social studies credit must take the SOL test
in World History and Geography from 1500 AD. The
course examines the economic, political, and social
developments of western civilization from 1350 to the
present. An emphasis is placed on essay writing, reading,
and class discussion as a preparation for the Advanced
Placement exam. Students who are taking the course for
social studies credit in lieu of World Studies II take the
SOL test for World History and Geography since 1500
AD. A fee is charged for AP History Workbooks.
US Government [2440]
US Government offers the student who completes the
course successfully with a credit that satisfies the
graduation requirement for both the standard and
advanced diploma. This course is designed to develop an
awareness of national, state, and local governments.
Major course themes include the mechanics of
democracy, individual rights and responsibilities, foreign
policy, and the capitalist economic system. Current issues
and events are also discussed. Writing and oral
presentations are required for successful completion of
the course.
American Studies [2314, 2315] Credit: 1 per semester
Students have the unique opportunity to take English 11
and U.S. History as a combination two-semester course
that is team taught. Students study both U.S. history and
American literature building upon reading, writing, and
critical thinking skills, including grammar. Students will
take the English and US History SOL tests at the end of
second semester. Students receive credit for both courses
at the end of second semester.
Advanced Placement Government and Politics: United
States [2445]
Students earn one credit that satisfies the graduation
requirements for either the standards or advanced
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diploma. AP US Government and Politics is a collegelevel course that provides analysis of the structure and
function of local, state, and federal governments and a
comparison and contrast of the different political systems
throughout the world. Emphasis is on essay writing,
reading, and class discussion as preparation for the AP
Government and Politics exam.
Comparative Religion [2197] Comparative Religion is
a one credit elective course designed to examine the role
of religion in human societies – past and present as well
as non-Western and Western. Students will become
proficient in the various methods used by scholars to
describe and explain religion, to assess the influence and
success of these methods, and to develop new methods for
increasing their knowledge of and religious philosophy,
thought, and practice. Students will have the opportunity
to raise questions about the present and future
significance of religious philosophy, thought, and
practice. Students will be able to either work on
independent projects or remediate skills and knowledge
necessary to be successful in SOL classes within the
Social Studies Curriculum. Students who are using the
class to earn a verified credit will take the appropriate
SOL test.
AP Government and Politics: Comparative [2450]
Due to College Board requirements, AP Comparative
Government is open to those students who are either
taking or have taken AP US Government. It is a collegelevel course that helps students develop an understanding
of some of the world’s diverse political structures and
practices. Five countries form the core of the AP
Comparative Government Exam – Great Britain, France,
China, Russia/Former Soviet Union, and either India,
Mexico, or Nigeria (teacher discretion). Students will
examine specific issues such as the structures of each
country’s government, as well as the general themes that
connect all of the countries covered. Emphasis is on
essay writing, reading, and class discussion as preparation
for the AP Comparative Exam.
African-American History I & II [2998]
Credit: 1 per class
African American History offers an elective credit for
those who complete the course successfully. Besides
earning the credit, students who are in need of
successfully completing asocial studies SOL course or an
SOL are able to do so. Each student in the course has
independent work to complete; it would be during this
time that students who are working on SOL remediation
or course completion would do that work. This course
offers a view of the history of the United States and the
world from the African-American perspective. Through
reading and research involving the use of books, diaries,
narratives, and the internet, students will explore and
examine the impact of the African people on the
development of the United States. Students take any
necessary SOL tests at the end of the course.
Sociology (2500) Credit: 1
The purpose of this course is to study man in social
groups. Students will learn about similarities and
differences among cultures. The class will focus on basic
institutions of society and the nature of social class.
Students will investigate the variety and scope of social
problems in the United States such as poverty,
discrimination, suicide, and ageing.
Criminology (2997)
This course is a study of criminal behavior within society.
Definitions, trends, theories, treatments, control of crime,
in addition to its victims are all examined within the
framework of the criminal justice system.
Advanced Placement Psychology (2902)
AP Psychology provides an overview of current
psychological theory and practice. Students will explore
the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and
mental processes of humans and other animals. Students
will be exposed to the principles, concepts and
phenomena associated with major subfields within
psychology, including biological bases of behavior,
cognitive and emotional processes, and diagnosis and
treatment of psychological disorders. In accordance with
the driving principles of current psychological practice,
this course will emphasize scientific method and
procedure, ethical standards in research, and critical
thinking skills. Student academic performance is
expected to meet or exceed the rigorous requirements of
an introductory-level college survey course.
Art History [9170]
Art History provides those students who complete the
course successfully with an elective credit. Students may
also earn verified credits or may remediate for courses
they have yet to successfully complete. Art History is a
survey course with a focus on the great monuments of art
and architecture from their roots in caves, continuing with
an examination of the arts from ancient to post-modern
art. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of
critical analysis methods and approaches as tools to
develop personal voice. The course is designed to make
art accessible to students without a background in the
subject. Students will learn the ways in which painting,
sculpture, and architecture are related to mythology,
religion, politics, and daily life. Students who need to
earn a verified credit will take the necessary SOL test at
the end of the course.
Advanced Placement Human Geography (2212)
Prerequisite: World Geography or World Studies I
This course introduces students to the systemic study of
patterns and processes that have shaped human
understanding, use and alteration of the Earth’s surface.
Students will study diverse peoples and areas organized
around concepts that include location and place, scale,
pattern, spatial organization, and regionalization. They
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They know the types of schools and degrees they may
choose to pursue after high school and gain wide
exposure to the financial resources available that
make college attainable.
will also learn about the methods and tools geographers
use in their science and practice.
Geography of National Parks and World Sites [2995]
The purpose of this course is to help students better
understand the National Park System and other
destinations around the country and globe. The class will
also help students create a mental map of the U.S. and
globe and improve their spatial understanding of where
things are and how to get there. While there will be some
knowledge based expectations, the primary focus of
assessments in the class will be skill based. Navigation,
Finances, finding appropriate sources on the Internet,
using technology, Public Speaking will all be included in
the class. The students will understand the significance of
popular places that they have heard of, some of which are
important historical sites and others that are just scenic
areas.
College and Career Preparation II [????]
College and Career Preparation II also instructs
students in interviewing techniques and provides
career guidance. Students explore valuable
opportunities such as job shadowing and internships
when preparing for a career.
20th Century American History [2387] Students will
examine the country’s economic, political,
governmental, cultural, and technological growing
pains during the 1900s. This web-based course allows
students to broaden their knowledge of history and
geography for a better understanding of today’s world.
Art History 9170
Is an elective that challenges students to examine art's
big picture through the cultural and societal shifts that
have affected art through the ages. Students will learn
how to analyze art and will explore various periods
and movements with a focus on the evolution or art
from its origins to modern times.
ACADEMIC ELECTIVE PROGRAMS
Achievement Seminar (0131)
A course designed specifically for 9th grade students to
help prepare them for their high school career and for
post-secondary education. The course emphasizes
writing, reading, inquiry, and collaboration in order for
students to learn the necessary academic skills to succeed.
Business Computer Information Systems I-A [????]
High school students increase their knowledge base
for the use and function of the computer while also
developing the practical skills necessary to compete in
the global environment. With built-in multimedia
exercises focusing on effectiveness and productivity,
this one-semester elective also supports student
success in other subjects as their technological
aptitude expands.
STUDENT COUNCIL ASSOCIATION
Student Government Leadership Class [9826]
Course length: 18 or 36 weeks
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Prerequisites: SCA Officer and advisor selection
Students improve their own personal leadership abilities
by taking on responsibility for planning and implementing
student government proposals and activities throughout
the year. Students work with Seminar representatives and
class officers in fulfilling the tasks of student government.
They determine issues of concern to students, conduct
meetings to elicit student opinions, write policy proposals,
and represent student opinions to faculty and principals.
They also plan and put on various student activities such
as Homecoming, Spirit Weeks, Pep rallies, Holiday
Assemblies, and Community Services.
Business Computer Information Systems I-B (?)
Credit: 1
This semester-length elective is a targeted study of
telecommunications technology, desktop publishing
technology, presentation technology, computer
networking, and computer operating systems.
Multimedia-rich lessons help illustrate concepts to
bolster understanding. Plug your curriculum into the
21st century with ODYSSEYWARE.
ONLINE ELECTIVE OPPORTUNITIES
The Civil War [????]
From the secession of South Carolina to the
Confederacy’s surrender at Appomattox, the pivotal
events of the Civil War come to life with compelling
stories that recreate the major battles and examine
key figures through interactive lessons, audio, and
video clips.
Additional electives offered in the online format through
APEX and ODESSEYWARE may be available to
students with special permission.
College and Career Preparation I [????]
High school students have many questions about the
college application process, what it takes to be a
successful college student, and how to begin thinking
about their careers. Students are informed about the
importance of high school performance in college
admissions and how to prepare for college testing.
Consumer Math (Math Models) [????]
This web-based elective covers basic money
management including employment issues, budgeting
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and recordkeeping, insurance, loans, taxes, banking
and credit cards. Interactive, multimedia-infused
lessons and relevant content keep students engaged.
Physical Fitness [????]
Physical Fitness course is designed not only to explore
the benefits of basic nutrition, physical fitness, and
healthy lifestyles, but to encourage off-computer
fitness activities by requiring that students log daily
activities that promote health and fitness.
Digital Arts [????]
This semester-long elective introduces students to the
effective use of digital cameras and the manipulation
of digital images with imaging and editing software.
Students will also explore audio recording and editing,
cinematography, and 3D technology. Project-based,
this course places a strong emphasis on student
inquiry, research, and writing.
Technology and Research (?)
Students will learn to evaluate, choose, and utilize
resources, and ultimately write a comprehensive 1015 page research paper and deliver an oral
presentation. Not only will students learn about the
use of technology for research, but they will also
investigate the connection between science and
technology and the ways technology affects the society
and its people.
Essentials of Communication (Speech
Fundamentals) [1300]
This elective teaching students the fundamentals of
the communication process is conveniently available
on the web. From interpersonal strategies to effective
public speaking, ODYSSEYWARE Essentials of
Communication promotes practical communication
skills that last a lifetime.
The Vietnam Era (?)
From the initial involvement of the United States in
Vietnam to the Paris cease-fire agreement signed in
1973, this elective chronicles three turbulent decades
of conflict that began in Southeast Asia but affected the
entire world. Lessons examine French colonization,
the Cold War, military strategy, and America’s antiwar movement.
General History [????]
This course gives students a broad overview of
history, beginning with a study of the earth, the
hemispheres, and the sun, bringing them to the
present day for a look at the future of human
civilization.
Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Systems
[8259]
The introductory course establishes a foundation for
the concept of tourism, travel, and hospitality as a
system. It includes the study of the importance of
interrelated system activities and discusses the
components integral to international and domestic
travel and tourism.
High School Health [7320]
Engaging content includes discussions on growth and
the human body, nutrition and healthy eating, healthy
social and emotional choices, safety, disease,
substance abuse, and environmental health. This
interactive course is a healthy alternative for students
and teachers.
Media Studies [????]
Lessons and projects encourage students to think
critically about the ways our culture shapes and is
shaped by advertising, television, the Internet, and
other pervasive forms and vehicles of information
delivery.
Transportation and Tours for the Traveler [????]
This examination focuses on the relationship between
operations and management within tourist
transportation systems, the regulatory bodies
impacting the tourist transportation industry, the
interaction of challenges arising from society and its
increasing demand upon transportation systems, and
transportation services for use by tourists
Music Theory elective [9225]
With emphasis on theory, this course lays the
foundation for a lifetime appreciation of music and
allows students to discover the basics of rhythm,
timing, melody, and full composition.
Food Safety and Sanitation [????]This
comprehensive course will cover the principles and
practices of food safety and sanitation that are
essential in the hospitality industry for the protection
and well being of staff, guests, and customers.
Personal Financial Literacy [8214]
This course prepares high school students to make
thoughtful and effective financial decisions throughout
their lives. Interactive, multimedia-rich lessons will
help students learn how to assess financial
information, explore career options from a monetary
perspective, create a budget, and plan for the future.
Sustainable Service Management for Hospitality
and Tourism [????]
This course will introduce the student to the
management issues relating to service, quality
assurance and sustainability in global tourism, and
40
travel and hospitality. It includes an in-depth
examination by the student of the concept of service
and components of s of businesses providing tourism,
travel, and hospitality.
students to recognize issues of public health interest
and concern in their daily lives.
Forensics: Using Science to Solve a Mystery [????]
This course focuses on concepts including chain of
evidence, ethics, and record keeping. Related
professions include: CSI, forensic pathologist, forensic
anthropologist, forensic toxicologist, forensic
odontology, medical examiner, forensic nursing,
animation, art, and photography
Planning Meetings and Special Events [????]
This course offers an overview of the meetings and
events industry, the wide range of responsibilities
required of the people who manage meetings and
special events and skills necessary to successfully
direct meetings and special events.
Therapeutics: The Art of Restoring and
Maintaining Wellness [????]Focus on careers that
help restore and maintain mobility and physical and
mental health, this course will cover such professions
as Physical Therapists, Clinical psychologists,
Occupational Therapists, Respiratory therapists,
athletic trainers, massage therapists, dietician and
dietetic technicians, art therapists, neurotherapists,
physical therapy assistants, vocational rehab
counselors, surgical technologists, and social workers.
Marketing and Sales for Tourism and Hospitality
[8166]
This course is designed as an introduction to the study
of tourism and hospitality marketing and sales.
Students will be introduced to marketing theory and
how the basic principles of marketing are applied in
hospitality and tourism.
Careers in the Laboratory [????]
This course looks at both clinical and research and
development careers associated with health science.
In research and development, students will explore
careers such as medical scientist, medical
anthropology, economics, sociology, and psychology
physical therapy assistants, vocational rehab
counselors, surgical technologists, and social workers.
Food and Beverage Management [????]
Students will examine the basics of management in the
food and beverage area in this overview course. Topics
to be covered include: menu planning and pricing,
types of service styles, food and beverage marketing,
facility design and layout and financial controls and
other required areas for successful food and beverage
management.
Technology and Business [????]
Students will gain an understanding of emerging
technologies, operating systems, and computer
networks. In addition, they create a variety of business
documents including complex word-processing
documents, spreadsheets with charts and graphs,
database files, and electronic presentations.
Nursing: Unlimited Possibilities and Unlimited
Potential [????]
This section will focus on different types of nursing
licenses (CAN, LVN, RN (AND and BSN) and FNP) and
examples of several nursing careers from the
traditional nurse to the family nurse practitioner,
nurse midwife, nurse anesthesiologist, and nursing
informatics, and public health nurse.
Economics [2800]
This dynamic curriculum covers the topics of economics
and decision making, the roles of consumers, producers,
labor, and the government, the Federal Reserve,
competition, the macro-economy, and other economic
issues here and abroad.
Physicians, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians,
and Other Doctors [????]This course will focus on
professional degrees such as physician (allopathic
(MD), osteopathic (DO), and naturopathic (ND)),
chiropractic (DC), pharmacist (Phar.D.), Dentist (DDS),
Podiatrist (DPM), Veterinarian (DVM) and will also
include PA, although this is currently not a doctoral
degree in most states.
General Science [????]
This course covers physical science concepts like nuclear
energy, earth's surface, constellations, the future of
science, atomics, and oceanography, as well as a
comprehensive look at health in the human body.
Public Health: Discovering the Big Picture in
Health Care [????]
This course will introduce the discipline of public
health and its many related occupations. In addition,
issues of global health and the roles of the CDC and the
WHO will also be discussed. Finally, future public
health challenges in the 21st century will encourage
Small Business Entrepreneurship [????]
This course is designed to provide an overview on
running a business from start to finish. It examines the
skills needed to effectively organize, develop, create,
and manage a small business, while exposing students
41
to the challenges, problems, and issues faced by
entrepreneurs.
DUAL ENROLLMENT COURSES
In cooperation with Germanna Community College,
some of the following courses will be offered at OCHS
during the 2014-2015 school year.
BIO 101 Biology I(fall term) Credit: 1 (4 hrs college
credit)
Prerequisite: passing scores on the VPT tests
Bioloy101 explores fundamental characteristics of living
matter from the organization of the atomic level to the
molecular level of cell genetics with emphasis on general
biological principles. It introduces the diversity of living
organisms at the single cell level, their structure and function.
It increases the ability of the student to develop his/her
scientific methodology via practical applications
BIO 102: Biology II (spring term) Credit: 1 (4 hours
college credit
Prerequisite: successful completion of Biology 101
Biology 102 is designed to continue the education and
review of advanced biological concepts from genetic
research and application to the gross anatomical systems
of the human body. Comparative plant and animal genera
and morphology will be discussed as well as the
ecological community. Students should know the
characteristics of the six kingdoms of life and have an
appreciation for the diversity of life. They should also
understand the principles of taxonomy and evolutionary
relationships among organisms.
(3 hours college credit)
Prerequisite: passing scores on the VPT tests
This course introduces students to critical thinking and the
fundamentals of academic writing. Through the writing
process, students refine topics: develop and support ideas;
investigate, evaluate, and incorporate appropriate
resources; edit for effective style and usage; and
determine appropriate approaches for a variety of
contexts, audiences, and purposes. Writing Activities will
include exposition and argumentation with at least one
researched essay.
ENG 112: College Composition II [0412] Credit : 1
(3 hours college credit)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 111
This course continues to develop college writing with
increased emphasis on critical essays, argumentation, and
research, developing these competencies through the
examination of a range of texts about the human
experience. The course requires students to locate,
evaluate, integrate, and document sources and effectively
edit for style and usage.
MTH 163/164: Pre Calculus I &II [3164] Credit: 1
(6 hours college credit)
Prerequisite: passing scores on the VPT tests
and successful of Algebra II
Math 163 presents college algebra, matrices, and
algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
Math 164 presents trigonometric functions, trigonometric
graphs, trigonometric identities, equations and
applications; selected topics in analytic geometry;
sequences and series.
MTH 240: Statistics [3195] Credit : 1 (3 hours
college credit)
Prerequisite: passing scores on the VPT tests
Math 240 presents an overview of statistics,
including descriptive statistics, elementary probability
distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and
correlation and regression.
BIO 141 & 142 Anatomy and Physiology I & II
Credit: 1 per semester (4 hours college credit per
semester)
Prerequisite: passing scores on the VPT tests
These courses integrate anatomy and physiology of cells,
tissues, organs and systems of the human body. The
course integrates concepts of chemistry, physics, and
pathology. Successful completion of BIO 141 is required
for enrolling in Bio 142.
PHY201 & PHY202– Physics I & II
Credit: 1 per semester (4 hours college credit per
semester)
Prerequisite: passing scores on the VPT tests
These are lab science courses designed to teach
fundamental principles of physics. They cover mechanics,
thermodynamics, wave phenomena, electricity and
magnetism, and selected topics in modern physics.
Successful completion of PHY 201 is required for
enrolling in PHY 202.
BUS 100: Introduction to Business [6810] Credit: 1
(3 hours college credit)
Prerequisite: passing scores on the Compass tests
Business 100 presents a broad introduction to the
functioning of business enterprise within the U.S.
economic framework. Course material introduces
economic systems, essential elements of business
organization, production, human resource management,
marketing, finance, and risk management. Course work
helps students develop a business vocabulary.
PSY 200: Principles of Psychology [2996] Credit : 0.5
(3 hours college credit)
Prerequisite: passing scores on the Compass tests
Psychology 200 surveys the basic concepts of
psychology. The course covers the scientific study of
behavior, behavioral research methods and analysis, and
ENG 111: College Composition I [0411] Credit: 1
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SCIENCE
**Science classes require a lab fee**
theoretical interpretations. Course material includes topics
that cover physiological mechanisms,
sensation/perception, motivation, learning, personality,
psychopathology, therapy, and social psychology.
Biology I [4310]
Students in biology will learn about plants, animals, cell
function and ecology. They will learn to conduct
investigations and to apply biological concepts. Biology is
self-paced, differentiated curriculum designed to
accommodate the learning styles of all students.
SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
INCLUSION: For students earning an advanced,
standard, or modified diploma. Students in this program
are expected to complete course goals and participate in
SOL testing. There are two teachers in each class,
working together to maximize teaching and student
learning. Inclusion classes are subject to performance
grouping.
Earth Science [4210]
Students enrolled in Earth Science will study geology,
meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. This is a
hands-on course with many activities and laboratory
exercises.
MATH
Math for Success [3229]
This course is designed to remediate for the 8th grade
SOL. Students will focus on basic math skills including
addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, money,
fractions, and beginning algebra.
Earth Science II
Computer use and online research activities will be
integrated into the extension of Earth Science topics. This
course provides an opportunity for remediation of the
Earth Science SOL, if necessary.
Algebra I [Part I—3231, Part II—3232] 1 credit per
semester
This course can be completed in either one or two
semesters.
SOCIAL STUDIES
World Studies I [2215]
Students enrolled in World History will study maps,
themes of geography, and the effect of geography on
civilizations and cultures. Literature, research, and
writing are used in the examination of cultures and places.
Geometry [Part I—3244, Part II--3245]
1 credit per semester
This course can be completed in one or two semesters. It
covers such topics as symmetry, similarity, congruence,
vectors, polygons and three dimensional shapes. Students
will use graphing calculators regularly.
United States History [2360]
Students enrolled in US History will study the events that
shaped the fabric of our nation. Current events are in the
curriculum.
ENGLISH
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
English 9 [1130]
This course will focus on reading and writing skills while
studying the elements of epic, tragedy, short story, poem
and novel.
Health [7725]
Students will learn information concerning their physical
and mental health. Emphasis is placed on drug and
alcohol awareness, teenage pregnancy, and safe driving
techniques. This is a two-part course requiring a strict
attendance policy required by law.
English 10 [1140]
This course will focus on reading skills through various
genre in literature, including fiction, romance, tragedy,
and poetry. Writing emphasizes the application of
grammar skills in both personal and critical essays and the
development of style. Students will have instruction on
test-taking skills. An end of course battery of tests will
determine mandatory placement in either SOL Prep or
English 11.
PARALLEL CURRICULUM: Students
participating in parallel classes are on the advanced,
standard, or modified standard diploma track. They will
be responsible for taking all end-of-course SOL tests.
Also, there are several elective classes designed to assist
the self-contained student in the transition from high
school to real life.
English 11 [1150]
Students in this course will study American literature and
authors, as well as continue writing and grammar skills.
MATH
Math for Success [3229] Credit : 1
This course is designed to remediate for the 8th grade
SOL. Students will focus on basic math skills including
addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, money,
fractions, and beginning algebra.
English 12 [1160]
Students study chronologically the literature of England.
Review of grammar and usage as well as an emphasis on
expository writing is also a part of the class.
Algebra I [3235] Credit: 1 or 2
43
This course can be completed in either one or two
semesters.
supplement the text and lecture. Students will take the U.
S. History SOL test.
Geometry [3246] Credit: 1 or 2
This course can be completed in one or two semesters. It
covers such topics as symmetry, similarity, congruence,
vectors, polygons and three dimensional shapes. Students
will use graphing calculators regularly.
Transition and Career and Technical
Electives: Unless listed, electives for the students
receiving special services are offered through the general
curriculum. Cares should be taken to ensure that the
chosen elective or course is suitable for the student’s
needs and abilities and whether appropriate
accommodations can be made to enable the student to
achieve success.
Managing Your Finances
Students will become familiar with money management
skills, including budgeting and keeping financial records.
Students will choose an occupation of interest and create
a resume to accompany job applications. Students will
explore financial security and the process of saving
money for the future. Federal income tax, occupational
benefits, and other job related functions are just a few
money management skills that will be addressed during
the course of study.
Adaptive PE [7700]
Students will participate in activities designed to increase
physical activity, teamwork, gross and fine motor skills,
and sportsman-like conduct. Games, dance and exercise
are incorporated into the curriculum.
Careers [7835]
Students taking this class will explore different careers
and career pathways. They will complete hands-on
activities designed to assist them in planning their future.
ENGLISH
English 9 [1135]
This course will focus on reading and writing skills while
studying the elements of epic, tragedy, short story, poem
and novel.
Education Training Program
Students will investigate various occupational fields, and
examine occupation requirements. They begin to focus on
improving and gaining skills required for specific
occupations. They practice solving real world problems in
home, school, and the workplace.
English 10 [1145]
This course will build on skills acquired in English 9 with
emphasis on reading comprehension skills in various
genre of literature, including fiction, romance, tragedy,
and poetry. Writing will focus on the application of
grammar skills in both personal and critical essays and the
development of style. Students will also gain test-taking
skills in preparation for the English 11 SOL’s.
ETP II Credit: 1
Students begin to make the transition from school to work
by gaining technical skills, conducting a job search, and
maintaining successful employment by demonstrating
positive work traits and attitudes and continuing to
develop technical skills. They focus on balancing their
roles of worker, family member and citizen.
English 11 [1154]
This course will continue to build on skills acquired in
English 9 and English 10. Students in this course will
study American authors and their literature, as well as
continue to improve writing and grammar skills through
the compilation of a researched essay. Students will take
the English 11 Reading and Writing SOL test.
ETP CO-OP Credit: 1-3
Students receive school-based and community-based
instruction organized around an approved job that leads
toward their career goal. The teacher-coordinator, on-thejob training sponsor, parent, and student develop an
individualized training plan that identifies learning
experiences according to the student's occupational
objective. The on-the-job unpaid or paid training is an
extension of the classroom instruction coordinated by the
classroom teacher into a coherent set of performance
objectives and skills.
English 12 [1164]
Students study chronologically the literature of England.
Review of grammar and usage as well as an emphasis on
expository writing is also a part of the class.
SOCIAL STUDIES
Keyboarding [6152]
The student will develop basic keyboarding skills. The
student will learn how to process, store, and retrieve
information.
United States History [2460]
Students will study an overview of the political, social
and economic development of the United States from the
Age of Exploration to the present. These developments
are studied through major events, documents and
personalities. Maps, graphs, charts and tables will
44
Ornamental Horticulture
Students will participate in a hands-on vocational
curriculum designed to increase their knowledge and
skills in the area of horticulture, and be instructed on how
to grow and maintain healthy plants. Students will learn to
identify different plants, to identify insects and how to
control pests, the uses of chemicals, general landscaping
and beginning flower arranging. Students will also
explore the business and accounting aspects of owning
and operating a greenhouse, as well as explore advertising
and sales techniques.
care, self-care, cooking, and consumer skills. Community
Based Instruction is an instructional model used in this
class.
Resource for Vision Impaired and Hard of Hearing
This course provides support for students who are hard of
hearing or who have visual impairments. The class
provides instruction in study and organizational skills, as
well as support for instruction and remediation in all areas
of the general curriculum. Student receive their vision
and hearing services from a certified teacher of VI and the
Deaf/HH, as laid out in their IEP.
SUCCESS SKILLS LAB (SSL)
Engages lower performing and hard to motivate learners
and works toward improved commitment and
achievement.
п‚· Uses intervention strategies to change both
academic and social behavior of the student.
п‚· Collaborates among the school, public agencies,
and the juvenile judicial system.
п‚· Moves students from externally managed
behavior to the internalized self-control needed
for success in school.
п‚· Utilizes individualized and small group
instruction, incorporating available technology
into all aspects of the program.
SSL creates a classroom environment in which disruptive
behaviors and acting out become increasingly pointless
and unnecessary.
п‚· Builds cooperation without using threats or
manipulation.
п‚· Deals effectively with disruptive behavior
without violating a student’s dignity or self
worth.
п‚· Builds connections with students even when they
demonstrate inappropriate behavior.
п‚· Reinforces positive behavior without reinforcing
dependence.
п‚· Teaches students the techniques that will help
them manage their own behavior.
п‚· Holds students accountable for their behavior
and place the responsibility for appropriate
behavior with the student.
п‚· Provides instruction that will enable students to
return to a general or career education program
as soon as possible.
п‚· Focuses on learning and self-discipline.
п‚· Provides supervision and *counseling to enable
students to make academic progress.(*counseling
is provided by the school counselors, school
social worker, school, psychologist, intervention
specialist, services provided by Dept. Social
Services, etc. SSL will collaborate to provide
reinforcement.)
п‚· Involves parents and students and honors them
as stake holders.
п‚·
Maintains a small classroom setting.
Vocational Academics
[9th—7849, 10th—7859, 11th—7879, 12th—7889]
This class is designed to meet the vocational needs of the
LCCE student. Students will explore career options, as
well as begin the journey into the world of work. They
will complete projects for various community businesses,
as well as practice on-the-job-training within the school.
Self Advocacy [7892]
Students will explore and enhance their own self
advocacy skills. They will explore their rights as students
and citizens, including completing a unit on IEP's and
diploma styles. The class will offer instruction in
communication and independent living through direct
instruction, collaborative learning and role play.
Technology Awareness
This course is designed to allow students to explore the
basics of computers, complete hands-on technology
activities and learn the foundations of technology. This
class is an exploratory for Tech Foundations.
Youth Intervention (7860, 7861, 7862, 7863)
This class promotes a curriculum with the following
objectives: 1) problem solving, 2) managing frustrations
and emotions, 3) shedding negative labels, and 4)
establishing effective communication skills. Students
Placed in this program learn how to manage anger and
emotions in an effort to establish power and self
awareness.
LCCE CURRICULUM: Students enrolled in the
LCCE Curriculum (Life and Career Centered Education)
will be given the opportunity to learn in a hands-on, small
group environment. The students will take three classes in
the LCCE, and one elective per semester. Students in this
curriculum will earn an IEP diploma.
Functional Academics
[9th—7847, 10th—7857, 11th—7877, 12th—7887]
Students will work on basic education skills including
reading, math, science and social studies. Students will be
placed in classes according to their grade level.
Life Skills
[9th—7848, 10th—7858, 11th—7878, 12th—7888]
This class is designed to help students learn to live more
independently. They will work toward goals in home-
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