close

Enter

Log in using OpenID

9pm - Playgrounds Magazine

embedDownload
PlayGrounds
m a g a z i n e
Columbus, GA’s entertainment resource
oct 2014
free
Music Midtown
Americana
Music Fest
theatre, poetry,
music
SoHo
Bar and Grill
smokers welcome
A MUSIC ROOM
5751 Milgen Road, Columbus, GA 706-568-3316
OCTOBER 2014
MONDAY
TUESDAY
MONDAYS TUESDAYS
Karaoke
with
Rob
Hall
WEDNESDAY
8
THURSDAY
Cadaver Dogs
Free
Pool
8pmclose
music
videos
with
DJ Doug
Free Popcorn
Every Day!
FREE Pool
Thursday 8-close
Saturday 2-8pm
Free popcorn
every day!
WEDNES
DAYS
Pool
Poo
Tournamentt
T
9pm
FRIDAY
10
SATURDAY
11
11
17
18
23
2
24
30
3
0
31 Halloween Party Nov 1
National
Bologna
Day
25
PlayGrounds
m a g a z i n e
PlayGrounds PET of the MONTH
October
obber
er 22014
014 • vvolume
olum
me
e 2200 • iissue
ssu
su e 8
pg monthly
To the Magic Store
Ftn City Poetry
Places to go...
Word of Mouth Film
Reviews
RiverCenter Events
BGCCV
Colgay Pride News
ISIS
Directory
feature stories
10
11
12
15
18
19
22
21
21
PG contributors
Vickie Carson, editor
Alice Barkwell
Tonie Rae
Blair Burgess
Curtis Lynch
Nicole DeVries
Doris Morris
Will Dockery
Dylan Nabors
Brian Doohan Montrel Woodhouse
Theatre Events
Clear Plastic Masks
Music Midtown
Steeplechase
New Metra Routes
JunkFest
The Bird was the Word
Americana Fest
4-5
5
6
7
8
9
14
16
Play
PlayGrounds
P
layGr
Grou
ound
ndss Magazine
Maga
Ma
gazi
zine
ne is
is an independently
iind
ndep
epen
ende
dent
ntly
ly pubp
pub
ub-lished entertainment tabloid. Views expressed
in PlayGrounds Magazine do not necessarily
rrepresent
epresent those of anyone other than the person
n
who
w
ho expressed them. PlayGrounds Enterprises,
Columbus, Georgia,
Georgi
g a, established 1994
PlayGrounds Magazine P.O.
Box 8154, Columbus, GA 31908.
706-562-0074. www.playgroundsmag.
PAWS is the no-kill shelter at 4900 Milgen
Road next door to Animal Control, which frequently refers dogs, cats and other beasЖџes
to them. While shelters in some ciЖџes do not
adopt out black cats in October (due to a few
creepy Satanists known to sacrifice the criЖ©ers),
PAWS is confident that their adopter veЖ«ng
process will weed out the madmen and Mansonistas. With this in mind…
“Juda” is a year-old black domesƟc shorthair
with a happy personality who was turned into
Animal Control as a stray and found her way to
PAWS. Juda is always busy and ready to play.
She loves aƩenƟon, as well – she is curious and
mischievous but prefers to stay indoors. Juda
has been spayed, microchipped and is current
on her vaccinaЖџons. She might not take to being dressed up for Halloween, but is sure to keep
you entertained!
com [email protected]
Music
M
usic in
in the
the Valley
Valley
photos
p
hotos by Toni Rae
Double Wide Revival
at S
SoHo
SoH
oHo
o
Mark of The Bureau at Del
Ranch
Ranc
Ra
nch
nc
h
Keith Smith at Bikes on
Broadway
Broa
Br
oadw
dway
ay
y
James Wright of Spent at
Legends
Lege
Le
g nd
ge
nds
s
Mike Scroggins of
Side Efects at Scruffy
y
Murp
Murphy’s
phy
y’s
Ambitious
Amphibian
Musical
Hops To
Springer
Stage
A Broadway musical for the younger set opens at the
McClure Theatre at the Springer at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10.
A Year with Frog and Toad is a musical adaptation of the
popular Frog and Toad children’s stories. Four books were
written about a frog and toad by Arnold Lobel, the second
of which, Frog and Toad Together, was named a Newberry
Honor book. Lobel illustrated nearly 100 children’s books
and wrote the stories for many of them. He won the Caldecott Medal for a collection of animal tales called Fables.
The musical A Year with Frog and Toad was nominated
in 2003 for Tony Awards for Best Musical, Best Book and
Best Original Score. The music is a jazzy 1930s style which
appeals to all ages.
Waking from hibernation, Frog and Toad plant gardens, swim, rake leaves, go sledding and learn life lessons,
singing and dancing along the way. The two best friends
celebrate and rejoice in the differences which make them
unique and special. A Year with Frog and Toad is an exuberant musical story of amphibian friendship that endures,
weathering all seasons.
“We’re really proud about tackling �A Year with Frog
and Toad,’” said Springer Theatre Academy director, Ron
Anderson. “It has more music than any other show that the
Springer Theatre for Young People has ever produced. And
it’s the first production that has been presented in the round
in our new McClure Theatre.”
Being in the round means the stage is in the middle and
the audience sits around it.
In addition to performances for school groups, A Year
with Frog and Toad will have public performances at 7pm,
Fridays and Saturdays (Oct. 10-18) and at 2pm, Sundays
(Oct. 12, 19).
A Macabre
Wedding
The Liberty Theatre
October 17-26 • Directed by Mr. E.L. SƟless
��To love the Lord is to love all His children—
—
all of them, everyone!—and suffer with them
m
and rejoice with them and never count thee
cost!’’
- Amen Cornerr
AЕЊer giving a fiery Sunday morning sermon,,
Margaret is confronted by the unexpected ar-rival of her long estranged husband, Luke, who
o
collapses from illness shortly thereaЕЊer. Theirr
son, David, along with several elders of thee
congregaЖџon, learn from Luke that, while Mar-garet had led everyone to believe that he had
d
abandoned her with their son years ago, it wass
in fact Margaret who had leЕЊ a dysfuncЖџonall
Luke and pursued a religious life. This informa-Жџon precipitates confrontaЖџons between Mar-garet and her son, her congregaЖџon, and herr
estranged husband, regarding what they per-ceive as the hypocriЖџcal nature of her religiouss
convicЖџons, and the breakup of her family.
Friday and Saturday shows start at 8pm;;
Sunday maЖџnees start at 4pm. The housee
opens an hour before show Жџme. Tickets aree
$15 advance;, $20 at the door; $10 for stu-dents, military and seniors. For groups of 10 orr
more, Жџckets are $10 per person; 1 free Жџckett
will be given for every 10 Жџckets purchased
d
(advance purchase only). To purchase Жџckets,,
call the Liberty at 706-653-7566, stop by, orr
ps://www.facebook.com/LibCulture.
visit hЖ©p
s://www.facebook.com/LibCulture.
Murder Mystery Dinner
Theatre with a Twist
at Callaway GardensВ®
Saturday, October 18
A Macabre Wedding, the most unholy of matrimonies, is a wedding like no other between a
vampire groom and a true “witch” of a bride. This
festive occasion will be shared with family and
friends, goblins and gremlins, zombies and zombettes. Some guests will be in the present and in
person, some only in spirit. But, this ghoulishly
good time will be disrupted by a ghastly murder.
With so many suspects in the room, how in the devil will the perpetrator be discovered? Guests will
have to put aside their blood feuds and work together if the newlyweds are to make their midnight
flight to their honeymoon destination … Transylvania.
A Murder Mystery Dinner Theater includes a little detective work while you dine on delicious cuisine from the Callaway Gardens culinary team led
by Executive Chef Michael Gonzalez. This evening’s mystery will include opportunities for guests
to interact with the cast. Guests selected just before
the show will receive reading parts and will be cued
to deliver their award-winning performances. Expect a few surprises and activities to add to the fun;
plus, solving the mystery comes with token prizes
for the winning team. And, guests are invited to
dress up to match the evening’s theme.
Reserve your “A Macabre Wedding” Fall Murder Mystery Dinner Theater overnight package by
calling 800-463-6990. Packages include reception,
dinner, Mystery Theater, lodging and admission to
Callaway Gardens. Dinner theatre-only reservations are $89 per person and based on availability.
www.callawaygardens.com
Hey all you tuba and baritone players out there.
TUBA
T
UBA CHRISTMAS IS COMING!
Get ready for the annual Columbus Tuba
Christmas concert at Peachtree Mall Saturday
December the 6th.
There will be a practice that morning at the
JJordan
ordan High School band room and the concert
will be at 1pm.
For details call Steve Scott - (7
((706)
06)) 315-9117
PlayGrounds Magazine
4
octtob
ber 2014
2014
october
Sherlock’s Monster Mash Murders performs every Friday and Saturday night thru November 8 at 7pm at the
Downtown Historic Columbus Marriott Hotel. Reservations are required and are $610 per person plus tax and
can be purchased online at www.SherlocksColumbus.
com or by calling 706-604-5634. Reservations include the
show, a 3-course dinner, water, tea & coffee. A cash bar
is provided and the show and dinner last approximately 2
hours and 15 minutes.
THE PLAY - Sherlock’s Monster Mash Murders
Halloween characters unite! It is time for the annual
Monster Mash Ball, where creatures from all over the world
join together to celebrate All Hallows Eve. But one of the
guests has other plans. Will they succeed in destroying
Halloween for good? Join us for this hilarious evening of
murder and mayhem. Dress up as your favorite monster
and have a chance to win a prize! Not that brave? Business casual works fine as well. Sherlock’s Mystery Dinner
Theatre: We’re Just Dyin’ to Make You Laugh!!
Sherlock’s Mystery Dinner Theatre ® is a fully interactive murder mystery dinner theatre. Audience members
arrive around 6:45pm to check in with the House Manager outside the Empire Mills Room or the Chattahoochee
Room in the Marriott Lobby and are soon greeted by actors in costumes. The actors circulate around the guests
and pass out audience participation “speaking parts” to
those who wish to get into the action. At 7pm, everyone
will take their seats and Act One will begin. At this point,
no late seating is allowed until Act One is completed. Meal
courses and beverage service will resume in between the
four acts. The entire evening lasts approximately 2 1/2
hours and due to some minor adult humor the event receives a PG-13 rating.! !
boo
The Loft will open both stages, and rooms, for threee
iincredible
ncredible bands on Friday, October 10th at 9pm!
Clear Plastic Masks is headlining the night withh
ttheir
heir true rock and roll from the soul! CPM has toured
d
with
w
ith Alabama Shakes, City and Colour, White Denim,
Denim
m,
F
ly Golden Eagle and many more! As the band’s monike
er
Fly
moniker
iindicates,
ndicates, there’s not much to hide with one of the mos
st
most
ttalked
alked about groups in Nashville’s burgeoning rock scene
e.
scene.
T
his is the sound of heart-on-your-sleeve blue-collar soul
l.
This
soul.
F
ormed in New York City in 2011, Clear Plastic Masks
Maskks
Formed
qquite
uite literally have honed a world of influence into sharp
p,
sharp,
ttight,
ight, nostalgic rock n’ roll that is at once bone-deep famil
lfamiliiar
ar and not like anything else you’ve heard.
American Roommates will open for Clear Plasticc
M
asks in The Loft Music Hall. American Roommates aree
Masks
a local, indie rock band with a dynamic sound evolvingg
ddaily
aily since they are literally roommates and play/write to
tooggether
ether every day. They have opened for The Weeks, Bravee
B
Baby,
aby, Flagship and many more.
Fellas and the Vine are also a local favorite! They aree
a fun, Americana band with amazing talent and great har
harrmony!
m
ony! They will play all night on the main stage/listeningg
rroom.
oom.
Tickets are $10 at TheLoft.com or at the door. Ages 211
aand
nd up only.
5
october 2014
review and photos by
Kelly Burnham Brown
The past two years we have closed out our festival
season by attending Music Midtown in Atlanta. This
event has been held annually since 1994, but took a hiatus from 2005 until 2011. It has been located in several
different venues, but Piedmont Park has been its home
for the last four years. This year’s lineup included: Jack
White, John Mayer, Eminem, Zac Brown Band, Iggy
Azalea, Lorde, Bastille, Lana del Rey, Run DMC,
B.O.B, and many others.
Our Friday began with Run DMC. The crowd was
huge for the hip hop icons, who performed all of their
classics like It’s Tricky, It’s Like That, and Walk This
Way. I suspect most of the people in the crowd weren’t
even born yet when the trio’s first album came out, but
most knew every word and danced the entire set. It was
a great way to kick off the first sunny festival in Atlanta
that we have ever attended.
After Run D.M.C., we tried to make it back through
the sellout crowd to see Iggy Azalea, but there were just
too many people for us to be able to get any pictures.
While I am not a huge fan of Iggy Azalea, she put on
quite a show and she had a huge crowd. We stood off
to the side of the stage and heard a few songs. I tried to
get video of her performance of Fancy for my stepson,
but it just wasn’t going to happen. Finally we decided to
wait until her set was over so we could attempt to get up
front for Jack White, but the set ended thirty minutes
early and there was no way I was going to stand in the
crowd for an hour and a half. I have seen Jack White
twice before, so we went to check out Lorde’s performance and maybe see a few songs by John Mayer.
17 year old Ella Marija Lani Yelich-O’Connor,
known by her stage name, Lorde, is a New Zealand
singer-songwriter who is the youngest person since Tiffany in 1987 to achieve a number one song in the US.
Her smash hit Royals also won Best Pop Performance
and Song of the Year at the 2014 Grammys. Her album
Pure Heroine is one of my faves of the year, so I was
eager to see her perform. I have to say it was amazing
to see a teenager command a crowd of 75,000+ people. Most artists in her genre just stand onstage with a
macbook and never move. She was all over the place
dancing and whipping her hair around. Out of the three
female solo artists that performed at the fest, Lorde’s set
was the best by far.
After Lorde’s set, it was time to attempt to use the
restroom. Music Midtown is notorious for having insane lines at the port-a-potties. Last year we waited in
line to use the restroom and missed entire sets. The organizers must have been paying attention to the crowd
PlayGrounds Magazine
complaints,because this year there were plenty of restrooms
and on the second day they even had toilet paper! We actually got to see a bit of John Mayer’s set because going
to the bathroom didn’t take half as long as we thought it
would. However, John Mayer was so boring that we left
after two songs and went to catch a bit of Jack White to
close out the evening.
I have decided that I will go to any fest as long as Jack
White is playing. This performance was by far his most energetic. He seemed at ease and I even saw him smile once
or twice. It was the perfect ending to a great Friday night.
On Saturday we decided to take it easy and lounge
around by the hotel pool for awhile. We didn’t head out
to the festival until around 4. The crowd on Saturday was
huge. There were so many people that we had no signal on
our phones. We decided the best thing to do would be to sit
on the “Old Folks’ Hill” for the day and just relax. From
our lovely spot on the hill we saw: B.O.B., Fitz and The
Tantrums, Lana Del Rey, Bastille, and Eminem.
The most energetic performance of the afternoon would
have to be Fitz and The Tantrums. The neo-soul indie
group of Los Angeles put on a soul-filled, nostalgic performance that was perfect for a cool, sunny day.
As we had a most energetic of the day award, we also
have to have a least energetic, or as I like to call it: Worst
Act of the Fest. That award would have to go to Lana Del
Rey. It was absolutely the most boring performance I have
ever had the misfortune of seeing and when a performer
stops twice to smoke onstage, you know they are just as
bored as you are. In comparison to Iggy Azalea and Lorde,
she was definitely my least favorite female solo performance of the weekend.
Bastille was the perfect act to take the stage as the sun
was setting. I saw them at the beginning of the summer at
Hangout Festival and I must say that this performance was
a lot more solid and put together. The band stated that Music Midtown was their last festival of the season and I could
tell that they thoroughly enjoyed themselves. Their cover
of TLC’s No Scrubs was especially entertaining.
The last act of the day was the one we had been waiting
for. Eminem hasn’t played Atlanta in a decade and I think
everyone who attended day 2 of the festival was there to
see him. The crowd at his stage was over capacity more
than an hour before he started.The crowd was told to step
back from the front of the stage or they would be hosed
down with water. For a moment I was kind of afraid that
something bad might happen, but the crowd complied and
Eminem went on without incident.
In closing, we had a great time at the festival and may return next year depending on the schedule. Atlanta is logistically a nightmare for festivals. The hotels that are within
walking distance to Piedmont Park are always very pricey
and getting around town is difficult. Music Midtown is one
of the cheaper fests, but it is also basically a day and a half.
Their VIP option is overpriced and from the looks of it, it’s
not really worth it. I don’t know about you,but I don’t eat
and drink $500 worth of stuff in a day and a half.
Oh yea, and I almost forgot...they had drones.
6
Run DMC
Jack White
Lana Del Ray
BasЖџlle
Fitz & the Tantrums
Eminem
october 2014
interview with ZAC Young of
Stereomonster
PlayGrounds: Tell us a little about stereo
monster and the beginning.
Zac: Well we’ve been together for about 5-6
years. In the beginning, really didn’t always
knew what I was doing... I still don’t lol. But
I’ve grown a lot and I think we’ve grown a
lot musically.
Tuesday, October 14 Sunday, October 19
Tuesday – Thursday / 5pm – 11pm
Friday / 5pm – 12 am
Saturday / 11am – 12 am
Sunday / 2pm – 11pm
Columbus Civic Center at
South Commons
Local and regional entertainment daily
on the main stage inside the fairgrounds..
Puppetone Rockers – This na onallyy
known show brings a wholesome mes-sage of posi ve re-enforcement like no
o
other show. It’s Priceless! This non-stop
p
ac on show features outrageous per-forming characters, screaming back audi-ence par cipa on, a huge driving perfor-mance piano, and endless skits make thiss
a must see show.
The Torres Family Circus – This one ringg
circus is fun for the en re family and fea-tures aerial acts, juggling and balancingg
acts, circus clowns, a living carousel and
d
the motorcycle Globe of Death.
Bob Bohm’s Family Magic Show – A blend
d
of baffling magic and hilarious comedy,
comedyy,
this family oriented show is filled with lotss
of audience par cipa on and fun. You’ll
be amazed one minute and bowled overr
with laughter the next. You don’t wantt
to miss the an cs of THURSTON, the Per-forming Parrot.
PeЖ«ng Zoo - A zebra, camels, a kangaroo,,
exo c cows, sheep, baby sheep, babyy
goats, donkeys, llamas and more.
STEM EducaƟon Hall – The exhibit hall,,
located inside the Columbus Civic Cen-ter and will feature “LET’S GROW STEM””
project entries that were submi ed byy
students grades Pre-K - 12 in the catego-ries of STEM (science, technology, engi-neering and math), Literary Wri ng, Artss
& Robo cs. Exhibit Hall Hours: Tuesday &
Wednesday, 5-9pm. STE(A)M Awards cer-emonyy – Wednesdayy 7p
pm
7pm
boo
b
oo
PG: What is your role in the band?
Zac: I play guitar and sing. I think you’ve
got to find your nitch. My nitch is performing and song writing. With the band, they
make me a better performer and with “B”
(the Band’s Rapper) he makes me a better
lyricist.
PG: I hear you have a book coming out
in 2015?
Zac: Yes! it’s called “God’s In the Water”
very random yeah. But it’s about a traveling
musician that ends up in a dive bar in the
middle of no where.
PG: Sounds interesting, can’t wait!
What else can we expect from Stereomonster?
Zac: We are doing a lot of experiementing and new musical concepts right now!
We’ve got some new “SOUNDS” we are
gonna be giving a sneak peak for our fans
at our Oct 17th show.
PG: Yyou guys are playing at MIX Ultra Lounge on Friday Oct 17th. It’s
been over 4 months that you guys have
played locally.
Zac: Yes I know our fans are hungry! We
have a fantastic fanbase and we consider
them family.
PG: How do you describe your sound to
people who haven’t heard you guys?
Zac: To the consumer, I guess people may
say we are a Rock / Hip Hop band. But to
me, we’re just a Rock & Roll Band because
I consider Rock & Roll more of a style not
just a genre, if that makes any sense. It’s
an attitude.
Catch Zac and Stereomonster at Mix Ultra
Lounge Friday October 17th. Doors open at
9pm, showtime is 9:30. Afterwards catch some
surprise performances of the band jamming out
with DJ Roonie G.
Peace & Beats, DJ Roonie G
7
Wednesday, October 8, 10am
to
Sunday, October 12, 11pm
Atlanta, GA
A3C [All 3 Coasts] Festival is the
preeminent hip-hop festival in the US. A3C is one of the largest
hip-hop events in the world with performances from over 500
artists/DJs, including: legends, rising stars, trendsetters, up-andcomers and aspiring talent from across the world. The 5-day festival takes place annually each October in the Atlanta area. A3C
has become a cultural institution.
Burt’s Place
Good Food at Good
Prices & Plenty of it!
2932 Warm Springs Rd
706-653-0677
october 2014
Another
One Rides
The Bus
by Brian Doohan
If you’re fortunate enough to own a vehicle in good
working condition, you’re likely to encounter Muscogee County Transit (METRA) only when stuck behind
one of its lumbering buses that always seem to stop
to pick up or discharge passengers and back up traffic
when you’re in a hurry.
If you’re disabled, can’t afford a car or truck, or if
Old Faithful breaks down, things get worse… and fast.
When my starter gave up the ghost, I had to walk two
miles from one of the system’s many Dead Zones, then
take three buses, paying full fare each time… a journey
of about five miles in nearly three hours.
Some people take METRA regularly to work or shop.
Then again, some people devour nothing but tofu, bran
muffins and broccoli and seem none the worse for it.
Be that as it is, most Columbus residents regard METRA with a sort of “there but for fortune” distaste… the
illogical, squiggly routes, the frequent unavailability
and absence of evening services, the transfer gouging.
Muscogee County is one of the largest (in area)
in America. Politicians, patriots and other do-gooders
harp on the real and hidden costs of auto use (pollution,
gas prices and the realization that our payments at the
pump are going to Al Qaeda through the ever-friendly
Saudis) but alternatives, hereabouts, are few and far between.
So the Columbus Planning Department and METRA
scheduled three public meetings to receive citizen input on public transportation in Columbus – the third,
and last, held (ominously) on 9/11, featuring not only
city officials, but a quartet of Atlanta-based consultants
from no less than three consulting firms… all hired to
PlayGrounds Magazine
advise the locals on the near and distant future of said
public transit.
Funds to hire the consultants and, eventually, to
enhance METRA service, have been raised through a
$22 million Transportation Act levy, as well as another
TSPLOST penny sales tax that went into effect shortly
after the start of the year and will linger through 2022.
The consultants projected population and employment
trends as far off as 2035, mapped disability services
that require riders to use the Dial-a-Ride service and focused on ensuring that active duty military and veterans
would have better access to Fort Benning.
Over the short range… sometime in 2015… they
recommended that Columbus add three cleaner, natural
gas-burning buses and two more Dial-a-Ride vehicles
to the city’s inventory. For the longer range plan… effective in or about 2018… they projected a need for five
new buses.
One of their proposed remedies to try and bring
some order to the iggly-squiggly routes that have been
in effect since METRA took over the half-century old
private Howard Lines in 1978. Population density and
demographics having changed considerably over thirty-six years, questions have been raised as to why the
service doesn’t keep to more major thoroughfares…
(Victory, Veterans’, Macon and Manchester, Buena
Vista, Cusseta and crossing routes, perhaps even utilizing I-185) and provide services to the new industrial
and residential areas opening on the north and eastern
fringes. Among the numerous “Dead Zones” are a vast
wedge of residences south of Manchester and north
of Forrest Road, most of the Lakebottom District and
smaller black holes in South and East Columbus as well
as everything north of I-80.
“We’ve sought help from the City Planning Department,” said Steve Noble, one of the consultants, and
Planning Director Rick Jones noted that three more
transit mini-hubs will be added to the hub at Linwood
8
Boulevard – a Gateway mini-hub at the Wal-Mart near
Manchester and the J. R. Allen Parkway, a Midtown
mini-hub serving the shopping centers on Macon Road
and City Services Building, just west of I-185, and a
South Columbus unit at the Winn Dixie at Victory and
Benning Drives.
The proposed Short Range service plan (2015) will
introduce Monday to Saturday evening service until 10pm and two new routes will extend service into
Columbus Park Crossing and further east along Warm
Springs Road and Milgen Road, terminating at the
Gateway Wal-Mart.
By 2018, the planners hope to have the other two
mini-hubs in place, provide new service to Victory
Drive, Flat Rock and Forrest Roads and re-align Fort
Benning service with three new routes, bringing the total to fourteen. Four new Dial-a-Ride vehicles will be
commissioned and accessibility improvements as well
as shelters are also on the drawing board.
However, some improvements are yet to gather official support. The size of the “dead zones” have been
reduced, but many residents will remain a mile or more
away from any line. No plan has been proposed to
institute a transfer system, without which riders who
have to transfer will pay more than those in Atlanta or
New York (officials said they will encourage residents
to purchase monthly fare cards and visitors to obtain
day-passes) and the proposed high-speed rail terminal
Metra continued next page
october 2014
Metra continued
by the Columbus Airport remains in
one of the deadest of the dead zones.
Taxi drivers and owners will be
pleased.
If government and business want
to get more commuters out of their
cars and onto METRA, park and ride
stations need to be established along
the busiest routes – preferably near
shopping centers who may allow
day parking in some of their more
remote lots in the hope of attracting
more clients lingering thereabouts to
shop. According to Jones, TSYS has
expressed interest in adopting a park
and ride service but the rest of business community has been hesitant.
METRA advises that, although
there will be no more public meetings, comments will be accepted
through October. Write or call METRA direct, or voice your views
to [email protected]
To see a map of the existing Metra
route as well as drafts of short and
long proposed routes go to www.columbusga.org/metra
boo
ConnecЖџng The Lines 2014
photos by Tiffany Wilson, Fund Development/ Marke ng
Coordinator, Cha ahoochee Valley Libraries
9
Calling all high school dance lines! Studio Inc. presents,
the 2nd Annual ConnecЖџng the Lines dance team compe on for High School Marching Band Dance Teams. This highenergy compe on will be on Sunday, November 9th at 3pm,
at the new Carver High School Gymnasium. This fun and exci ng showcase is sponsored by The NB Agency, The Wright
Legal Group, Ameri-Group, Kontrol Girl Magazine, Revel by JL
Cosme cs, and Trendy House Founda on, LLC.
We are searching for the best dance line teams in Columbus, Fort Benning, Phenix City, Russell County, LaGrange and
all the surrounding areas. Schools already registered to parcipate in the 2nd Annual Connec ng the Lines are Albany
H.S. Emerale es, Hardaway HS Dancin’ Hawks, and South
Plaquemines High School in Louisiana.
This friendly compe on is designed to promote healthy
physical ac vity and encourage school pride. The high school
squad with the highest final score will win a cash prize for their
team. The deadline for team registra on is midnight on October 13, 2014.
Tickets are $15 and can be purchased on the website, www.
connec ngthelines.com. The showcase will feature special
guests Fort Valley State Dancing Doll Divas and Albany State
Golden Passione es.
For more Informa on on par cipa ng in or sponsoring the
event, please contact: MzB Richardson, www.connec ngthelines.com, connec [email protected], Facebook.com/
connec ngthelines
october 2014
Music in the Valley
To The Magic Store
byy Will
Dockery
“I intend to collect all my work and reinsert my pantheon of uniform
nnames,
ames, leave the long shelf full of books there, and die happy...”
-Jack Kerouac
Sketches of Shadowville... for 30 years Kerouac’s statement of intent
hhas
as been my driving force in poetry, music, art, to tell “the story”. With the
rrequired
equired (as deemed by Rock Killough) 500+ works, I can lay them down
aand
nd line them up chronologically, the story of Shadowville Speedway and
hher
er people. If you are reading this you probably are one of those people.
JJunk
unk Fest 2014 best one ever, all agree
Damn Skippy at SoHo.
photo by Toni Rae
We just came off the Junk Fest weekend, heavy fun and enlightenment.
m
ent. Junk Fest was a blast. I had a great time hanging out at Junk Fest
aand
nd truly enjoyed playing music with my brothers in The Shadowville
All-Stars.
A
ll-Stars. Thanks to Gina Klinner Waters-Colbert and Mark, Sean Rox
Michael
M
ichael Schoff, Dan Davidson, Gini Woolfolk Davidson, Wildman Steve
aand
nd all the others who make this happen. It was fun.... Wildman Steve said
iitt best, anyhow:
“Best Junkfest EVER! Thank you to Columbus Hospice, Gina, Sean
R
ox Michael Schoff, Spicer’s Music, The Deadfields, Wayne Minor, Will
Rox
D
ockery, The CyberKats, Shady Branches, Rick Edwards, and everyone
Dockery,
eelse
lse that graced the stages, volunteered, and the fabulous artists that dispplayed
layed their talents today at Junkfest. I appreciate you all and had so much
ffun
un I nearly died! Love to you all!” -Wildman Steve
Henry
H
enry Parker Remembered
Zac Young and Randy May rocked Belloo’s.
photo by Latrell Boswell
Marshall Tucker band members Chris
Hicks and Ricky Whitley joined members of
Jimmy Noles band on stage at SoHo after
their concert at Phenix City Amphitheatre.
photo by Vickie Carson
PlayGrounds Magazine
Henry Parker passed away in August, a major talent and local folk
rrock
ock legend of the Columbus-Phenix City music scene. Tonight I think
bback
ack on the night he joined The Shadowville All-Stars, and thus became a
member
m
ember forever. Here was how our friend Larry Caddell saw it that night
ooff a decade ago...
“...Henry Parker manages the old “coin op” laundry and accompannying
ying garage-style building on Sixth Street and First Avenue. Henry has
bbeen
een renovating and restoring the old building in hopes of turning it into
a music and arts complex. Floor plans have been created featuring performance
m
ance space, meeting rooms and a recording studio. The building is made
ooff brick and features a wooden-arched roof. The large main room has a
ssmall
mall stage on one end and has surprisingly good acoustics, thanks to the
aarched
rched ceiling. After several acoustic performers, the Shadowville AllStars
S
tars took the stage with their eclectic, imagery-laden, neo-beatific poeems
ms with music. Chain-smoking, spontaneously gesturing towards makebbelieve
elieve objects and addressing imaginary characters, Dockery sang with
a gravel-throated limp to a rolling, bluesy romp in the swamp. Sounding
llike
ike a cross between Tom Waits, Lou Reed and the soundtrack to Pulp Ficttion,
ion, Dockery and crew chugged through their myriad of originals about
ppool
ool halls, bridges, tragedies, lost love and relationships. The music of
tthe
he Shadowville All-Stars was gritty and down-to-earth: a solid backbeat
eencircled
ncircled by the meandering bass lines and two blues-infused electric guittars
ars (one tremolo-heavy surf-induced). The band was joined on stage by
Henry
H
enry Parker on harmonica for a long, bombastic version of Sweet Jane.
I was glad to hear this crew of upstarts carving out musical sketches of
Smith-station,
S
mith-station, the Dillingham Street Bridge and other Columbus-inspired
llandmarks.”
andmarks.”
Adios, Henry Parker, The Columbus-Phenix City music scene will not
hhear
ear the likes of yo
yyou
u ag
again,
gain, myy friend. You were a true orig
original.
ginal.
10
Tea Olive
Te
Oliive Ilk
Ol
Ilk
A bootleg sequel to Raw Silk,
with
w
ith the newfound Tea Olive Ilk.
Mainlining
M
ainlining in Mar-zi-pan
iin
n such dirty years.
Raise
R
aise a hat to the incoming king
ssit
it and ponder other things.
Crisscrossing
C
risscrossing state lines,
up
up and down the line.
Up
U
p and down the line,
up
u
p and down the line.
Another
Another images
sshaped
haped the moment.
Behind
B
ehind Woody’s in a summerr
ttorrent.
orrent.
Great
Great American Sloth Band
llaughter
aughter and also tears.
Make
M
ake a toast to the Mayor and
d
his
h
is wife
no
no vulgar talk or he’ll shorten
n
yyour
our life.
High
H
igh speed lead poisoning
up
u
p and down the line.
Up
U
p and down the line,
up
u
p and down the line.
Heard
H
eard the news Bibb Mill
had
h
ad just been burned down.
Over
O
ver by the railroad tracks,
ggeeking
eeking like a shaking clown.
SShots
hots fired at the duck shed
tthe
he park is gripped in fear.
IIn
n the booth in the Waffle King,
ccoff
offee, verse and other things.
Ghosts
G
hosts from the highway,
up
u
p and down the line.
Up
U
p and down the line.
Wee had a real good me.
W
Up
U
p and down the line.
-Will Dockery (words);;
Henr
He
nryy Conley
Conl
Co
nley
ey (music)
(mu
(musi
sic)
c) В©20
В©
2014
14
Henry
В©2014
octob
ber 2014
2014
october
Fountain City Poetry Slam Group Expands
Offerings With “New ISH!”: Open Mic and
Poetry Slam Series For Adults
This month The Fountain City Poetry Slam will kick
off their adult series, targeting the 18 and over crowd.
Through writing workshops, open mics, and poetry
slams, local artists can find creative outlets and have
a positive impact on our community. All events held at
Fountain City Coffee, 1007 Broadway, 31901.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 7:30pm- New ISH!
Open Mic: Poets, singers, comedians, rappers- all talent is welcome to the mic. Sign-up starts at 7pm. There
are only 10 performance slots. Material must be 5 minutes or less. Hosted by local comedian, Gabe Davis.
Free.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 7:30pm- The NEW
ISH! Slam Poetry Tour- October Featured Artist:
Andrew Crigler: Andrew Crigler, is a writer, performer, and
teacher of life, the universe,
and everything. This Spoken
Word Artist also writes the
“Entertaining
Christianity”
blog wherein he talks about
serious topics with ridiculous
adjectives from a Christian
worldview (not the crazy kind). Atlanta Spoken Word
ArЖџst, Andrew Crigler
He also facilitates workshops
and gives advice about what it’s like to live life with
both ADD and Dyslexia. Free and open to the public.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 7:30pm- The NEW
ISH! Monologue Slam: Actors are invited to come
out and express themselves in this fun-filled slam! The
slam will feature up to 10 actors, of any age, who’ll get
boo
2 minutes each to shine, impress and slam the stage.
With three rounds, participants are asked to prepare
two theatrical monologues from a published or original
play. Those advancing to the third round of competition, will be required to do a cold read from the “script
crypt”. Bring us your best Denzel or Meryl for a chance
to win $30. Sign-up starts at 7pm. Slam begins immediately following the featured artist. Free and open to
the public.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 5:30-7pm– SLAM
101: Poetry Writing & Performance Workshop: All
ages are welcome. Come out and sharpen your writing
and performance skills. Bring at least 2 poems of your
own creation, paper, pencil, and creativity! Free and
open to the public.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 5:30-7pm– New
ISH! Rookie Poetry Slam!: For anyone looking to
give the art form a try. Poets, of all levels, are invited
to come out and express themselves in this fun-filled
poetry slam! This poetry slam is only open to participants who have not slammed at any of the previous
New ISH!/Fountain City Poetry Slams. In 3 rounds,
poets must perform an original poem, no longer than
3 minutes in length. There will be a 10 second grace
period for each round of competition. There will be a
.05 deduction for every 10 seconds a poet goes over the
allotted time. Bring us your best poems for a chance to
win $30. Admission: Free.
Area Youth Invited To Speak Out Against
Violence
The Fountain City Teen Poetry Slam was in full swing
this summer. In mid-July, the slam team participated in
Brave New Voices, a national poetry slam competition
for youth in Philadelphia. Competing amongst teams
from Chicago to Nashville to Cape Town, South Africa,
the 2014 Fountain City Slam Team represented the city
well. The 2014 Fountain City Slam Team: Michaela
Brown (Carver), Madison Johnson (Columbus),
11
Chance Kester (Northside),
Jacobe Love (Shaw), and
Krystopher Mason (CVCC).
This month the Fountain
City Slam is inviting area youth
to come out and speak against
violence in our community. (A
poetry slam is a competitive
event in which poets perform Madison Johnson
their work and are judged by performing at the
members of the audience.) The 2014 Brave New
Fountain City Slam is open to Voices FesЖџval in
youth of all backgrounds as a Philadelphia, PA.
safe house to use poetry as a means of self expression
and exploration. All events held at Fountain City Coffee, 1007 Broadway, 31901.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 5:30-7:30pm- Fountain City Poetry Slam Competition and Open Mic:
Open to area youth grades 9-12. Those interested in
slamming should come prepared with at least 3 original
poems, no longer than 3 minutes in length. At least one
of the poems has to tackle the subject of “violence”.
The top 3 finishers from each monthly preliminary slam
will advance to the finals in March. The top finishers
from the finals will represent the city at The 2015 Brave
New Voices Festival. Local young artists are also invited to take part in the open mic portion of the slam. Poets, singers, comediens, rappers, all talent is welcome
to the mic. Sign-up starts at 5pm. The first 12 slammers
to sign up will be allowed to compete. Material must
be 5 minutes or less. www.fountaincityslam.wordpress.
com for official rules.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 5:30-7pm- SLAM
101: Poetry Writing & Performance Workshop: All
ages are welcome to this exciting and interactive workshop. Sharpen your writing and performance skills.
Bring at least 2 poems of your own creation, paper,
pencil, and creativity! Free, open to the public.
october 2014
places to go...people to see...
art
SATURDAYS
Saturday Drop-In Tours: Every Saturday the Museum offers
drop-in tours of the permanent
collection and temporary exhibitions. Visitors can take an hour
tour with a weekend gallery
guide. These tours are free and
no registration is required. Columbus Museum, 11am-3pm.
the Columbus Guards from the
perspective of a soldier in the
ranks in 1863. A brief background history of the famed
militia unit will set the stage for
a description of the historic railroad transfer of the company
from Virginia to Georgia during
the Chickamauga Campaign.
Copies of Tides of War: A Novel
of the American Civil War by
LeBron Matthews will be available in the Museum Shop prior
to the talk and available for signing. Optional lunches are available for pre-order; $10. Contact
[email protected]
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11
Second Saturday: Family Fun
Day: Explore mosaics and get
hands-on while creating a torn
paper mosaic piece. Then go
on a fun gallery hunt! Stop by
for story time as we read Is
a Camel a Mammal? by Tish
Rabe by our camel sculpture,
Camella. Columbus Museum,
10am- noon. Free.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16
Lunch & Lecture: Primal
Space and Form with Susan
York: Artist Susan York will discuss the arc of her work during
the past 20 years including installations of graphite rooms,
drawings, and sculpture. Influenced by Minimalism, the European Concrete Art movement
and the stark New Mexico landscape. Hosted in partnership
with Columbus State University
Columbus Museum, noon-1
pm. Free. Optional lunches are
available for pre-order; $10.
Contact [email protected]
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16
Third Thursday: Columbus
State University’s Percussion
PlayGrounds Magazine
Ensemble and Minimalism:
An evening celebrating Minimalism. Columbus State University’s Percussion Ensemble
will present several of Pulitzer
Prize-winning composer Steve
Reich’s seminal percussion
works; Dr. Lisa Oberlander and
the CSU Clarinet Studio will
present New York Counterpoint;
guest lecturer/performer from
the Bang-On-A-Can All-Stars,
Derek Johnson, will lead a version of 2x5 for two rock bands,
as well as Electric Counterpoint
written for guitar legend Pat
Matheny. Gallery walks featuring the Kramarsky Collection of
Minimalist art, as well as other
key works will be highlighted.
Columbus Museum, 6-8pm.
Free.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25
Fall Fest: Get hands-on at five
craft stations to explore different
types of art including still lifes,
landscapes, and portraits! Play
fun games, go on a gallery scavenger hunt, stop by for a story
time, and join our costume contest for a chance to win prizes!
For even more Fall Fest fun, go
trick or treating in the galleries
or take a break and watch a film
in the Patrick Theater. Contact
[email protected]
Columbus Museum, 10am-3
pm. Free.
EXHIBITS
THROUGH JANUARY 4
Leaving Mississippi – Reflections on Heroes and Folklore:
Works by Najee Dorsey. The
mixed-media works in the exhibition showcase a number
of the heroes of the civil rights
movements, participants of civil
Let’s Dance Y’all meets
every Monday at First
Presbyterian Church, 1100
First Avenue, Columbus.
Line dancing at 6:00 p.m.
and ballroom at 6:45 p.m.
You do not need a partner
to attend. Donations accepted. Call Len Clegg at 706327-6268 for information.
disobedience in the early 20th
century, and folklore legends
including Dangerfield Newby,
Bass Reeves, and Robert
Charles. The work combines
themes that have interested
Dorsey for the past few years:
journeys that people embark
upon as they search for a better life, and the resistance of
those who stay where they are
to fight the powers that be. The
artist uses a variety of materials,
including photographic imagery,
ripped paper, paint and found
objects.
Each
composition
blends multiple textures, colors,
and layers to make the stories
tangible for viewers. Legacy
Gallery
THROUGH MARCH 8
Valley Painters: Works from
the Permanent Collection. For
over 60 years, the Columbus
Museum has been assembling
a collection of notable art by
both national and regional artists. This exhibition highlights
works from the collection by
some of the best-known artists, both past and present, who
have lived and worked in the
Chattahoochee Valley. FREE
THROUGH JUNE 7
Memory’s Cabinets: An Exhibition of Fascinating Gadgets
from the Vault of the Museum.
The exhibit displays unusual
and seldom-seen gadgets, contraptions, and machines from
the Museum’s permanent collection in grouped cabinets of
wonder based on themes of
people who might have used
them. Memory’s Cabinets will
provide opportunities for visitors to create their own stories
about the objects, which will be
featured on labels that change
throughout the run of the show.
concerts
SATURDAY,
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
Blue
Harvest
Bluegrass
Band: The Columbus Chapter of the Southeastern Bluegrass Association meets the
last Sunday of each month. All
bluegrass musicians and fans
12
are invited. Bring your acoustic instruments or just come and
listen. Lake Pines Campground
and Event Center, 6404 Garrett
Road, Midland (Columbus), GA,
31820. Member band 3pm; jam
session 4-6pm. Free and open
to the public. Please, no alcohol
and no pets. Contact: Call Andy
Gilbert 706-561-9675 or email
[email protected],
www.
LakePinesEventCenter.com
film
The Screening Room film series at The Ritz 13 (Hollywood
Connection), presented by the
Film Society of the Columbus
Museum and Carmike Cinemas,
features a different critically acclaimed film each week. Tickets
are $6 ($5 matinee)
nature/science
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11
Pine Mountain Trail Association Overnight Hike: Led
by Jim Hall and Mark Hughes.
Overnight backpacking trip to
Old Sawmill Campsite, 5.0 moderate miles. Bring water and a
snack. Meet at FDR Park Office
at 1pm. Please call (706-5690497) or email Jim (via PMTA
web site) for reservations.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18
Pine Mountain Trail Workday:
Meet at FDR Park Office, 10am.
Bring, lunch snacks, water and
gloves. Tools provided. Volunteers of all ages welcome. Call
Carl Carlson, 706-628-5336, for
more info.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 81
Pine Mountain Trail Association Pre-Pig Out Hike: Led by
PMTA board members. Meet at
FDR Park Office. Meet at FDR
Park Office at 1:30pm. Hike
Pine Mountain Trail to Pool Trail
to Liberty Bell Pool parking lot.
4.0 moderate miles. Bring water
and a snack.
nightclubs etc
Comedy
THURS, SATURDAY: The Loft
DJs
EVERY SUNDAY
DJ: Mr. Wing
EVERY WEDNESDAY
DJ Fattboi: Martini’s On Broadway (no cover charge)
DJ Alvin: Mix Ultra Lounge (Ladies and Industry night, 50 cent
beer)
EVERY THURSDAY
Latin Fuzion Mix: Martini’s On
Broadway
DJ Karl - Top 40 Mix: Mix Ultra
Lounge
EVERY FRIDAY
80’s Party- Live DJ: Applebee’s, 3229 Gentian Blvd
DJ Alvin D. Martini Mix: Martini’s On Broadway
Mix Allstar DJ’s: Mix Ultra
Lounge
EVERY SATURDAY
Video Dance Party: Martini’s
On Broadway
DJ Roonie G: Mix Ultra Lounge
Karaoke
SUNDAY
Del Ranch
MONDAY
Karaoke with Rob Hall: SoHo
TUESDAY
Karaoke Contest: Mr. Wing
Sports Grill and Bar, 8-11
WEDNESDAY
Applebee’s, 3229 Gentian Blvd
Del Ranch
LiL Kim’s Cove, 8pm
Maple Sports Bar
THURSDAY
Karaoke with JJ: Rafters
FRIDAY
Karaoke with Keith: Moose
Bluegrass
B
luegrass att tthe
he B
Barn
arn
Southeastern Bluegrass AssociaЖџon Columbus
Chapter meets the last Sunday of every month. Announcements at 3pm followed by a featured band unЖџl
4:30
4
:30 and then an open Jam Session unЖџl 6 pm. AcousЖџc
instruments only. No alcohol and no pets.
Lake Pines Campground and Event Center
6404 GarreЖ© Road, Midland (Columbus) GA 31820. 706-315-6500.
www.sebabluegrass.org
www.sebabluegr
g ass.orgg www. • LakePines.net
octto
oc
tobe
tob
ber 2014
ber
2014
october
The Columbus LiЖ©le Ukulele Bunch (CLUB) meets the first
Monday of each month at Gorilla Guitars (6440 West Hamilton
Park Drive, Columbus, GA 31909 706-507-0462) from 7:15 to
8:45 or so. Just a fun group of ukulele folks that sit around and
jam, trade chords, playing Ɵps, etc. It’s an enthusiast group–
high school age and up. All ukulele players, and wannabe
ukulele players welcome!
Lodge in Phenix City
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Grovers Bar
LiL Kim’s Cove, 8pm
Open Mic
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Open Mic hosted by Henry
Conley: Hitch-N-Rail
EVERY THURSDAY
Hosted by Julian Hernandez
and Brian Mallard: Fountain
City Coffee, 8-10pm, all ages
Trivia
EVERY TUESDAY
Fountain City Coffee, 7pm
Locos Grill, Will Ross hosts
trivia at 8:30. Get a team together to win prizes!
Mellow Mushroom
Live Music
MONDAY, OCTOBER 6
Jon Saunders: Mr. Wing
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8
Jon Saunders and Kurt Richardson: Buffalo Wild Wings
Columbus
Jazz
Society’s
Monthly Concert Series- Joe
Gransden (trumpet, vocals)
and Kenny Lewis (piano): The
Loft
Cadaver Dogs: SoHo
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10
David Banks Ensemble (Gospel Jazz): The Loft
Crashing Broadway: SoHo
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11
Brad Smith: Luke’s Pub
Tim O’Brien Project: SoHo
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12
Johnny Hotpocket: The Sports
Page
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13
Jon Saunders: Mr. Wing
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15
Jon Saunders and Kurt Richardson: SoHo
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16
Jesse Warren: Maple Mart
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17
Stereomonster: The Mix
boo
Silversyde: SoHo
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18
By Small Ruin: SoHo
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19
Johnny Hotpocket: The Sports
Page
MONDAY, OCTOBER 20
Jon Saunders: Mr. Wing
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22
Jon Saunders and Kurt Richardson: Buffalo Wild Wings
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23
Captain Green: SoHo
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24
Jon Saunders: Hitch N Rail
: SoHo
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25
Jon Saunders: Luke’s Pub
Side Effect: SoHo
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26
Johnny Hotpocket: The Sports
Page
MONDAY, OCTOBER 27
Jon Saunders: Mr. Wing
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29
Jon Saunders and Kurt Richardson: Buffalo Wild Wings
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30
Ajeva: SoHo
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31
Departure (Journey tribute
band): Hangout
Damn Skippy: SoHo
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Radar vs Wolf: SoHo
theatre
OCTOBER 17-26
The Amen Corner: Written by
James Baldwin and directed by
E.L Stiles, The Amen Corner is
a story about faith and family,
about the gulf between black
men and black women and
black fathers and black sons. It
is a scalding, uplifting, sorrowful and exultant masterpiece of
the modern American theater.
Liberty Theatre & Cultural Center. 8pm Fri and Sat; 4pm Sun.
Tickets are $15 advance, $20 at
the door, and $10 for students
and military with I.D. For groups
10 or more tickets are $10 per
person! For more information
contact the Liberty Theatre at
706-653-7566.
EVERY FRIDAY
No Shame Theatre: No censors, no discrimination, no
shame! See improv, music,
comedy, poetry, dance and
other fresh new works of all
kinds. Springer Opera House,
10:30pm. $5.
tor of the School of the Arts at
the University of West Georgia.
Together, Greg and Chad have
also co-authored two textbooks:
Analyze Anything: A Guide to
Critical Reading and Writing
(Continuum, 2012) and Writing
Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches (Palgrave Macmillan,
2009).
etcetera
classes/workshops
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8
h (Carson McCullers Center):
An Evening with Poets Chad
Davidson and Gregory Fraser.
Talk at 4:30 p.m. and reading
at 6:30 p.m. Gregory Fraser is
the author of three poetry collections: Strange PietГ (Texas
Tech University Press), Answering the Ruins and Designed for
Flight (both from Northwestern
University Press). He is coauthor, with Chad Davidson,
of the textbooks Writing Poetry (Palgrave-Macmillan) and
Analyze Anything: A Guide to
College Reading and Writing
(Bloomsbury). His poems have
appeared in The Paris Review,
The Southern Review, and The
Gettysburg Review, among others. The recipient of a grant
from the National Endowment
for the Arts, Fraser serves as
professor of English and creative writing at the University of
West Georgia. Chad Davidson
is the author of From the Fire
Hills (2014), The Last Predicta
(2008), and Consolation Miracle
(2003), all three from Southern
Illinois UP. His poems have appeared in AGNI, Boston Review,
DoubleTake, The Paris Review,
Ploughshares, Virginia Quarterly Review, and many others.
He is a professor of literature
and creative writing and direc-
NorthWords Toastmasters Club Meets
on the second and fourth
Tuesdays of the month at
Columbus Technical College Board Room, Patrick
Hall, 928 Manchester
Expressway, 6:45-8pm.
For information e-mail
[email protected] or visit
www.toastmasters.org
13
Basic Wilderness First Aid:
classes to be taught at Oxbow Meadows Environmental
Learning Center, S Lumpkin
Rd., Columbus. Call Oxbow for
pre-registration, 706-507-8550.
Saturday, Nov 15, 9-5, $89.
Wilderness First Aid: Class
participants will receive an ASHI
certification card valid for two
years. Saturday and Sunday,
Nov 15 and 16, 9-5 each day.
$175. Questions or more info,
contact Southeastern Remote
Medical at 706-665-3207, or
southeasternremotemedical@
gmail.com.
Basic First Aid: Class participants will receive an American
Safety and Health Institute
(ASHI) certification, valid for two
years. Sat, Nov 1, 9am-noon,
fee $55.00, taught at Oxbow
Meadows Environmental Learning Center on S Lumpkin Rd.,
Columbus. Pre-registration is
required, call Julie at Oxbow
Meadows, 706-507-8550.
CPR/AED:, Class participants
will receive ASHI CPR/AED
Adult, Child and Infant certification, valid for two years. Sat,
Nov 1, 1-4pm.$45. taught at Oxbow Meadows. Pre-registration
is required, call Julie at Oxbow
Meadows, 706-507-8550.
CPR/AED: Class participants
will receive ASHI CPR/AED
Adult, Child, and Infant certification, valid for two years. Tues,
Nov 4, 6-9pm. $45. Taught at
The Outside World Outfitters
Store on Broadway, downtown
Columbus. Pre-registration is
required, call Chris at the Outside World, 706-322-4200.
Wilderness First Aid: Classes
to be taught at Oxbow Meadows
Environmental Learning Center.
Call Oxbow for pre-registration,
706-507-8550. Basic Wilderness First Aid, Saturday, Nov
15, 9-5, $89. Wilderness First
Aid, Sat AND Sun, Nov 15 AND
16, 9-5 each day, $175. Class
participants will receive an
ASHI certification card valid for
two years. Questions or more
info, contact Southeastern Remote Medical at 706-665-3207,
southeasternremotemedical@
gmail.com, or visit us on facebook.
CPR/AED: Upon completion of
the course, each participant receives an ASHI CPR/AED certification card valid for two years.
First Tuesday of each month
from 6-9 pm at The Outside
World Outfitter Store, on Broadway, Downtown Columbus. Fee
$45, pre-registration required,
register by calling Chris at The
Outside World, 706-322-4200.
Beginner’s Tai Chi for Health,
Stress, Balance and Back
Pain: New eight week T’ai Chi
classes for beginners will be
available starting September
30. A fun and easy approach to
Qigong will be introduced. Select from three convenient time
slots. Tuesdays at 5 or Thursdays at 1 or 5:30pm. $80 for 8
weeks. Bring a roll of 2” wide
masking tape. For information
and to register for these and
other classes, call Dr. Chan any
day after 10am, 706-563-3539.
Brushes & Beverages: A social setting, with paint, wine and
beer. Classes run Monday-Saturday from 7pm-9pm. Reservations are needed. Visit the web
site at BrushesandBeverages.
com. We are licensed for beer
and wine, either to sell or BYOB!
Devotional Exercise Class.
Wholy Fit: A Christian alternative to yoga. 7:30-8:30
a.m. and 5:30-6:30 p.m. Monday and Thursday. The Wynn
House Community Center, 1240
Wynnton Road. $5 per class.
Please bring an exercise mat
and towel. 706-392-0758.
T’ai Chi for Health, Stress,
and Balance: Cane Defense
for Dummies: Learn the Yang
Style Long Form with all its
health benefits. Martial applications and an elegantly simple
approach to cane defense are
explored. Every Tuesday, 7:309pm. $10 per class. Bring a
classes continued on page 22
october 2014
Word Of Mouth
Film Reviews
that much better!
Overall, this movie gets a B. Great
view and the surprise twists the movie
offers is easily the best feature of it!
When THE BIRD was the WORD
By Montrel Woodhouse
Movie Critic/ Host
A Walk Among the Tombstones
No Good Deed
Director: Sam Miller
Cast: Taraji P. Henson, Idris Elba
Synopsis: A prisoner escapes captivity
and takes a woman and her two kids as
hostages.
Review: I am huge fan of both Henson
and Elba however I didn’t expect much
from this movie. So glad I was wrong!
This film definitely goes beyond what is
shown on the previews. It’s an exciting
thriller with a great twist you won’t expect. I really enjoyed this!
Acting (B+): Henson performed of
course. Being a mother, I’m sure it was
simple to channel that side of her. However, Elba steals the show. Elba is notorious for being the hero and swooner of
ladies on and off film. However, we get
to see a darker side of Elba. He is a ruthless killer in the film and does it well!
Plot (A): I totally misjudged the plot.
I felt this was the cliché, “take woman
for hostage and she musters up the courage to defeat her captor” plot. There is a
hidden plot that is hinted at throughout
the movie but cleverly concealed until
it’s time to reveal itself. Best aspect of
the movie.
Entertainment (B-): This is definitely
entertaining. Anytime you find yourself
talking to the actor/actress in the movie
(or yelling at them), you’re being entertained. It’s a good thriller and Elba is so
unpredictable it makes the experience
PlayGrounds Magazine
Director: Scott Frank
Cast: Liam Neeson, Dan Stevens, Brian
“Astro” Bradley
Synopsis: A private investigator is hired
by a drug dealer to find his wife’s killer.
Review: This was a good detective
crime thriller. One of Neeson’s better
roles. Not saturated with too much action, this was a good story and mystery.
Acting (B): We are used to seeing Neeson as some “ex-killing machine” so he
does that well. This character had much
more of a story and jaded past with made
him more complete and relatable.
Plot (B): This is a good suspense and
the plot is odd. Murders are being committed against criminal’s family members. I loved the originality of that. You
see Neeson’s character battle morals of
going against the law to still preserve the
law. The irony plays out rather well.
Entertainment (B-): This is a good
movie but there are some drawn out
parts. Not too much action in the beginning. As the movie picks up, it definitely
gets more intense. This is a movie that
may gross you out. Mild gore and somewhat graphic but it fits the tone of the
movie perfectly.
Overall, this movie gets a B rating. If
you like a good thriller and mystery film
you can’t miss this one!
PICKS OF THE MONTH
Redbox: Think Like A Man Too.
Blended Netflix: Silver Linings
Playbook. Rio 2
www.youtube.com/thewomshow
[email protected]
14
14
by Brian Doohan
Before PlayGrounds, before
Creative Loafing, before…
even… the Internet and its
millions of furious bloggers,
there was the Great Speckled
Bird.
The Bird, as staffers and
the metro Atlanta communities that made up its friends
and enemies came into being
in the spring of 1968 amidst
the tribulations of Vietnam, the
Civil Rights movement and the cultural and generational conflicts of the time and
against all odds… finicky advertising revenues, police harassment of its street
vendors, even a firebombing… survived for nearly a decade and outlasted the
counterculture, the war and Richard Milhous Nixon.
Its low and unpaid editors, reporters, visual artists and vendors went their separate ways but, last month, Joe Miller and Gary Sprayberry of Columbus State
brought three of the founding members of the Bird’s collective in to Columbus to
swap stories, answer questions and reminisce.
Tom and Stephanie Coffin and Steve Wise gathered at Emory and, after
Governor Lester Maddox commissioned a mass rally at Fulton County Stadium
affirming segregation and the Vietnam War, published a one-time one-page predecessor of the Bird called the Emory Herald-Tribune; succeeded by the Big
American Review, which survived for half a dozen issues. By 1968, some thirty
contributors and supporters felt it was time to launch a weekly paper and the
name was chosen from a song recorded by Roy Acuff, among others, concerning
the little bird of the Bible “who tells the truth and does not give up,” Tom Coffin
said.
Howsoever short of money and what passed for journalistic experience at the
time, the Bird had no shortage of wedge issues to confront. Martin Luther King
was assassinated in the first month of its existence; LBJ had just declared his
non-candidacy, leaving Robert Kennedy and Clean Gene McCarthy to convince
a nation that each had the better solution for getting out of Vietnam (a scrap
that ended with Kennedy’s assassination and Hubert Humphrey’s burglary of the
nomination, leading to an election with three pro-war candidates and the attendant street reaction) and, of course, there were drugs, sex and rock and roll.
“We did interviews with lots of musicians,” Stephanie Coffin recalled, “including country singers who were being ignored by the establishment press. We
covered the first free show that the Allman Brothers gave in Piedmont Park. And,
of course, the drugs… all of the marijuana busts that were going down, just as
they are today. But we also covered local issues – conflicts in the school and the
workplaces. We had deliberately established ourselves as a collective… anybody could pitch an idea to the group and if we liked it, we published it.”
This, of course, led to “hundreds of meetings”, the panelists grimaced, sometimes contentious.
As
the years rolled by, new
issues like women’s and
gay liberation appeared.
“A women’s caucus demanded more women
writers,” Stephanie said,
“and this caused a wave
of divorces.”
Asked to reply by moderator Sprayberry, Tom
Tom and Stephanie Coffin and Steve Wise
october 2014
Coffin threw up his hands and shook his head.
Wise, who served as advertising manager, said that roughly half the funding
for the Bird (outside of the nickels and dimes that poured in from street sales)
was put up by the music industry… mostly record labels and a few local clubs.
Still, their situation was ever-precarious, “we were never more than about 25%
advertising,” Wise noted, “Creative Loafing was and is about 80% advertising.”
And even that revenue stream sometimes ran dry.
Nixon, who hated the underground press, leaned on executives at Columbia
and other record labels to defund and kill the pestiferous “hippie papers” that
were questioning his authority but, the three ex-Birders agreed, local distributors took up the slack. So did musicians. “When Warner Brothers refused to
publicize his album,” Wise recalls, “Little Richard came down to our offices
and paid for an ad himself. In cash. He took out a roll of twenties and started
peeling off the bills.”
Bird street vendors would purchase bulk copies at a dime each and then retail
them for fifteen cents (or whatever they could get). Many were teenage runaways with no other options for supporting themselves save prostitution and
drugs, and Atlanta’s police seemed to take special delight in harassing and
arresting them. Marietta and Decatur cops were particularly vicious and, Wise
said, “we were always in court.” Defended by the ACLU, the Bird took its cases
to the Appeals Court, which ruled, 2-1, that the harassment had to stop.
But that was hardly the end of the resistance. Christian conservatives
like J. B. Stoner and the American Nazi Party called the paper a Jewish conspiracy and their campaign against political corruption earned them the enmity
of Sam Massell (ironically, the City’s first Jewish mayor), who also initiated
police sweeps of young people on Peachtree Street. In 1972 the Bird was
firebombed… no perpetrator was ever caught, but the three editors have their
suspicions.
“Massell claimed that we started the fire ourselves to attract
publicity,” Wise scoffed.
For the next three years, the Bird would be published out of Montgomery.
But in the end, it wasn’t reactionary violence that killed the paper, it was the
changing culture. By 1976, disco was in the fashion and the burning passions
of a decade earlier… not only segregation and Vietnam but labor issues and
the environment… had been moderated, if not solved. Creative Loafing, published by right-wingers, poached much of the Bird’s corporate advertising, and
people were getting tired of working long hours for no pay.
Tom Coffin found construction jobs, eventually going back to Georgia State to
get a forestry degree that led to a position as Atlanta’s City Arborist; Stephanie
worked as a teacher. Staffers found other jobs or dropped out or died… another founder, Nan Orrock, was elected to the State Senate.
Was all the trouble worth it? Absolutely, agreed the panelists.
“The Bird was instrumental in spawning other underground papers like
Kudzu in Jackson,” said Wise, “as well as numerous high school papers.” Few
survived long… “the South is still retrograde due to slavery and segregation,”
he opined, “we’ll be dealing with that for generations.”
“The underground press emerged because mass media was in denial about
issues of the day,” was Tom Coffin’s take on the Bird. “When you’re young and
dumb, anything is possible.”
He considers the issues of today more serious than those of half a century
ago; gentrification in Atlanta neighborhoods is forcing many long-time residents
out - and the powers that be are still in denial. “I don’t worry about myself, but
I worry about our grandchildren. We thought Nixon was bad… then we got
Bush and Obama! Crony capitalism is driving issues more so than in 1968…”
“Most progressive news today is on the internet or radio,” Stephanie said,
more hopefully. “The 60’s were a great time, and I hope they’re coming around
again.”
A display of Great Speckled Bird memorabilia, sponsored by the Georgia
Humanities Council remains at CSU’s Simon Schwob Library through October
31st.
Fairfield Four at City
Winery - Gospel Brunch
presence and command of the songs made this
my favorite set of the day.
As a visitor to Nashville, I really enjoy the daytime shows, because I can pretend I live here and
get to do this stuff all the time. On Saturday afternoon at Grimey’s Americanarama, Kevin Gordon
showed no signs of slowing down after his previous night’s gig with the Hard Working Americans
and along with the gospel-blues of Mike Farris,
they kept the day’s energy crackling. Over in East
Nashville, at the Groove, Cory Branan and Matt
the Electrician played acoustic sets while the
Mas Tacos food truck kept folks fed and, check
this, the first tasting of Yazoo Americana Fest Ale,
a beer brewed especially for the fest.
The success of Americana, both as a festival
and conference and as a genre, has been a fascinating, upward-spiraling, wonderful thing to watch
and this year’s edition didn’t disappoint. As the
festival continues to expand each year, one has to
wonder what’s next. There are high expectations
for 2015.
Mike Farris at G
Grimey’s
Gri
rime
meyy s Americanarama
Amer
Am
eric
ican
anar
aram
ama
a
Curtis Lynch
McCrary Sisters at
City Winery - Gospel Brunch
photos by Steve Moran/Lifeslicez Media
The dates are misleading. The math may say
five days, but this Nashville extravaganza has
spilled out on both sides, bleeding into pre-festival shows, post-festival concerts and mid-festival lunches and brunches and who knows what
else. Nearly two hundred artists and nine venues
just don’t seem to be enough. This is not, on the
whole, a bad thing.
The awards show, held at the Ryman Auditorium, has stepped it up each year but this time,
instead of the red carpet, black tie and bluegrass,
I opted something a little more down home on the
other side of the Cumberland River at The Family Wash. While Jason Isbell was using a broom
on the hallowed planks of the Mother Church to
sweep up the three major awards, I was comfortably ensconced in East Nashville where Tommy
Womack, Lisa Oliver-Gray, Adam Klein and
several other acts played short sets to an appreciative, friendly crowd. This is a reminder that
there is wonderful original music everywhere in
this town and you don’t have to work hard or go
far to find it.
The nightly showcases are the real attraction
during the Americana Music Festival, of course.
Forty-five minutes to do what you do, then clear
the stage. For me, the highlights were the very
strong sets in the Mercy Lounge from Billy Joe
Shaver (born 1939) and Parker Millsap (born
1993, fifty-four years later), Amy Ray, who played
tunes from her excellent new release Goodnight
Tender, and the always amazing Willie Sugarcapps at the Basement, where Grayson Capps
surprised the rest of the band by playing a song
they’d never heard before. And speaking of surprises, on Saturday, Cory Chisel’s Soul Obscura
project did it for me. At the City Winery, armed with
a set of semi-obscure soul covers, Chisel’s stage
Americana Music Honors & Awards 2014 Winners
Cory Chisel’s Soul Obscura at
The City Winery
Album
A
lbum of the Year: Southeastern, Jason Isbell, Producer Dave
e
Cobb
Artist
A
rtist of the Year: Jason Isbell
Duo Group of the Year: The Milk Carton Kids
Song of the Year: Cover Me Up, Jason Isbell
Emerging Artist of the Year: Sturgill Simpson
Instrumentalist of the year: Buddy Miller
Spirit of Americana / Free Speech in Music Award co-presented
d
by the Americana Music Association and the First Amendment Center:
Jackson Browne
Lifetime Achievement for Instrumentalist: Flaco Jimenez
Lifetime Achievement for Performance: Taj Mahal
Lifetime Achievement Award for Songwriter: Loretta Lynn
President’s Award: Jimmie Rodgers / Award Presented to Jimmie
e
Rodgers Museum in Meridian, MS.
Ian McLagan at Grimey’s
PlayGrounds Magazine
Elizabeth Cook - Gospel Brunch
16
october 2014
Steeplechase– 30 Years Racing for the Arts
In its 30th year of racing and raising
funds for the Arts, the Steeplechase at
Callaway Gardens has entered into an
alliance with RiverCenter for the Performing Arts to receive a portion of its
2014 profits. Mason Lampton, the visionary who was raised in the equestrian country of Kentucky, brought
Steeplechasing to our area to support
the Arts when he was Chamber President thirty years ago. “Our mission
has always been to support the arts
and the RiverCenter being a keystone
to the arts makes sense and is a grand
addition to our beneficiaries.” says
Mr. Lampton. “Our efforts and finances directly impact the economic
development and enhance the quality
of life for our community; therefore
we are delighted to partner with RiverCenter in an effort to make this the
best community it can be.
The Steeplechase at Callaway Gardens, the largest single contributor to
the Arts in the Chattahoochee Valley,
is a unique event that provides patrons
an opportunity to watch Thoroughbred
racehorses as they jump over 52” high
hurdles at premium speeds. Since the
first race in 1985, the Steeplechase has
given $3.3 million to its existing beneficiaries: the Columbus Museum,
Columbus Symphony Orchestra, Historic Columbus Foundation, Springer
Opera House and the Ida Cason Callaway Foundation. This year’s event
is Saturday, November 1st. Purchase
tickets at www.steepelchaseatcallaway.org or by calling (706) 324-6252.
For thirty years Mason Houghland Lampton has hosted the largest and
most unique social event in our area. Many patrons see the Steeplechase at
Callaway as just that, a social event; but for Mason and his family, it is much
more!
Steeped in tradi on, Lampton is carrying on a family legacy. His grandfather, Mason Houghland, an avid foxhunter, founded the Hillsboro Foxhounds
in 1932. As a foxhunter, those involved would run their horses at high speeds
over natural fences, fields, and streams. Since he loved the compe ve nature of foxhun ng, he was led to steeplechasing.
Not only did Houghland take part in steeplechasing as a jockey, in 1941 he
inaugurated the Iroquois Memorial Steeplechase which is held in Nashville,
Tennessee. The first winning jockey and horse combina on of the Iroquois
Steeplechase was none other than the father of Mason Lampton, Dinwiddie
Lampton, Jr. and “Rockmayne.”
Mason Lampton and his father Dinwiddie Lampton founded the Hard Scuffle Steeplechase in 1974. O en referred to as the “Kentucky Derby of Steeplechasing,” this has been called “glamorous, picturesque, and pres gious.”
Fortunately, for Columbus, Georgia and the surrounding area, Mason
Houghland Lampton married a Columbus na ve, Mary Lou Hardaway. Mary
Lou brought Mason back to our area where he took a vested interest in suppor ng our community. Since joining the Hardaway family, Lampton has
had the honor of learning from a foxhun ng legend, his father-in-law, Mr.
Ben Hardaway. Mr. Hardaway is well known around the world for his famous
cross-bred hounds. Lampton has taken over the reins from Mr. Hardaway and
is currently the Master of the Midland Foxhounds.
Star ng Steeplechase events is in his blood – growing the community is his
passion. These traits led him to host the first horseracing event in the area,
The Steeplechase at Callaway Gardens. A strong believer in the arts, Mason
has generously donated the event’s profits to the local arts community. He
believes that a strong cultural community improves quality of life.
It has been proven that communi es that invest in the arts reap the benefits of more job availability; economic growth, and a diverse group of talented
people are drawn to the area. The arts play a vital role in the community, and
the Hardaway/Lampton families are proud to support that effort 110%.
ConЖџnuing the TradiЖџon- Mason Houghland Lampton has a son, Mason
Hardaway Lampton. Growing up in this horse and hound world, he has accepted and excelled in the role. Just as Dinwiddie Lampton won his father-inlaw’s first Iroquois Steeplechase, Mason has also had a successful career as
a jockey.
A er gradua ng from business school, young Mason Lampton purchased
his first racehorse and began riding for himself. In 1999, Mason won his first
Steeplechase event and in 2000, Mason won a hurdle race at the event his
father created, Steeplechase at Callaway Gardens.
“It All Begins With A Song”
Columbus Regional Workshop
Next Meeting
Tuesday, October 14, 7pm
presents a
free workshop
Saturday, October 18
10:30-11:30am
Every genre of music welcome.
How to Get Your
Products into Stores
NSAI will provide a lesson on how to further the knowledge and cra
of songwri ng. Bring a CD or your guitar and 15 copies of your lyric
sheet for a song evalua on.
Mildred Terry Library
640 Veterans Pkwy, Columbus
Ac vity Room, Covenant Woods, 5424 Woodruff Farm Rd
InformaЖџon call 706-565-7362. NSAI Columbus Facebook page.
boo
More information: Mike Turner 706-225-9587
17
Supporting military families through
equestrian
equestrian training and other services..
www.WarriorOutreach.com
t b 2014
october
Sid
d The
h Science Kid
d Wants You to Come Outt
and Play: Before and During the Show
Purchase tickets at www.rivercenter.org or
in the Box Office, Mon-Fri, 10am-5:30pm
Branford
B
ranford Marsalis And The Chamber
Orchestra
O
rchestra Of Philadelphia
Wednesday,
W
ednesday, October 22
LLegacy
egacy Hall• 7:30pm
Branford Marsalis has
rrecorded
ecorded with jazz giants
Miles
M
iles Davis, Dizzy Gilllespie,
espie, Herbie Hancock,
aand
nd Sonny Rollins, and he
has
h
as also collaborated with
ssuch
uch diverse ar sts as
S ng, the Grateful Dead, and Bruce Hornsby.
The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia,
ffounded
ounded in 1964, is a 33-member professsional
ional ensemble led by Music Director Dirk
BrossГ©.
B
rossГ©. The Chamber Orchestra has a well
eestablished
stablished reputa on for dis nguished perfformances
ormances of repertoire from the Baroque
period
p
eriod through the twenty-first century.
Marsalis, a Grammy Award-winning saxophonist
p
honist and Na onal Endowment of the Arts
JJazz
azz Master, is one of the most revered instrumentalists
m
entalists of his me. He made his Broadway
debut
d
ebut as the original music composer for the
TTony
ony Award winning Broadway revival of Auggust
ust Wilson’s play Fences. For this work, he
rreceived
eceived the Tony nomina on “Best Original
SScore
core (Music and/or Lyrics) Wri en for the
TTheatre”
heatre” and a 2010 Drama Desk Award for
““Outstanding
Outstanding Music in a Play”.
If you appreciate the soothing yet invigorraa ng sounds of music in pure form, Marsalis
W
ell-Tempered
d is sure to speak to you. The
Well-Tempered
p
erformance of Baroque masterpieces will
performance
ffeature
eature selec ons by Albinoni, Bach, Handel,
P
urcell and others.
Purcell
RiverCenter is offering a pre-performance
d
inner of sophis cated tastes and textures.
dinner
TThe
he evenings’ menu: endive and baby arugulla,
a, spiced nuts, oranges and salty pance a,
ssweet
weet citrus vinaigre e bacon-wrapped pork
lloin
oin with cherries, rosemary potatoes, roasteed
d brussels sprouts and leeks. And for desssert,
ert, baked Brie in puff pastry, fresh berries
aand
nd preserves. Dinner also includes bread,
w
ater, tea, coffee and one complimentary
water,
gglass
lass of wine. All for the prix fixe of $25.
M
eals prepared by Chef Dawn Farrow. TickMeals
eets
ts to the p
erformance are $49
performance
PlayGrounds
PlayG
Pl
Grounds
d Magazine
Magazine
i
The popular PBS KIDS® television show, “Sid the Sci-ence Kid”, is coming to life in this incredible live stagee
experience at RiverCenter for the Performing Arts on
n
Thursday, October 23rd at 7:30pm.
Kids and parents alike will be thrilled as Sid, May,,
Gabriela and Gerald discover the excitement and cu-riosi es of the world around them. Sid and his friendss
set off on a day of excitement and adventure. Theyy
explore their five senses through fun games and ex-periments. They ask curious ques ons and find fasci-na ng answers. Teacher Susie keeps the music flow-ing as the kids explore the world around them with
h
interac ve audience ac vi es, coopera ve problem
m
solving, and plenty of laughs to go around.
Sid The Science Kid LIVE—Let’s Play! will have thee
whole family cheering, exploring, dancing, and excited
d
to figure out more about the great unknown together..
But Sid and his friends aren’t the only ones who willl
have a chance to explore and be amazed… The sun
n
and moon will align perfectly on October 23rd so thatt
your family can experience a solar eclipse togetherr
LIVE! In partnership with the Coca-Cola Space Sciencee
Center, RiverCenter will project the live eclipse insidee
the Grand Lobby in real me.
Join us at 6:30pm to witness the eclipse, learn
n
about space science, enjoy age appropriate scien fic
ac vi es, robots, and so much more!
Sid The Science Kid LIVE: Let’s Play! is created forr
the stage by the imagina ve minds of Michael Lewiss
(veteran Broadway performer and producer of Imagi-nOcean), John Tartaglia (creator and writer of Imagi-nOcean and Tony Award-nominated actor), and Thee
Jim Henson Company.
The Sid the Science Kid television series is an edu-ca onal animated show produced by The Jim Henson
n
Company for PBS KIDSВ® that uses comedy and musicc
to promote explora on, discovery and science readi-ness among preschoolers. Since it’s debut on Septem-ber 1, 2008, the show has since been honored with
h
five EMMY nomina ons and mul ple awards includ-ing the most recent CINE Golden Eagle Award.
Tickets to the performance are $19
18
Buffalo Wild Wings Awards Sports
Grants to Boys & Girls Clubs of the
Chattahoochee Valley For Football
and Cheerleading All Stars
Buffalo Wild Wings is supporting Boys & Girls
C
lubs of the Chattahoochee Valley ALL STARS flag
Clubs
ffootball
ootball and cheerleading programs this fall with a
$
12,000 grant. As part of Buffalo Wild Wings’ Team
$12,000
U
p for KidsВ® initiative and partnership with Boys &
Up
G
irls Clubs of America, the company is supporting
Girls
2
85 Clubs across the country this fall, creating sports
285
p
rograms that promote physical fitness and good
programs
ssportsmanship.
portsmanship.
The grants also includes team jerseys and tools
a
nd resources from the National Alliance for Youth
and
S
ports (NAYS) which provides education and training
Sports
p
rograms for administrators and volunteer coaches to
programs
u
se across all team sports programs.
use
Buffalo Wild Wings is committed to donating $4 million to Boys & Girls Clubs of America by 2016 including funds raised through sauce and seasoning bottle
ssales
ales and events in their restaurants. Now through
October
O
ctober 31st, Buffalo Wild Wings is promoting a
ffundraising
undraising campaign where 100 percent of every paper
p
er pinup guests purchase in-restaurant will support
BGCA
B
GCA youth sports programs. The paper pinups can
be
b
e purchased for a $1 minimum donation and will be
displayed
d
isplayed in restaurants.
Boys
B
oys & Girls Clubs of America believes that all kids
deserve
d
eserve a great future. Through the organization’s
Great
G
reat Futures Campaign, Clubs and supporters are
working
w
orking to mobilize the country around the critical isssues
ues facing America’s youth. Boys & Girls Clubs are
ccommitted
ommitted to leading the way, assuring that every
yyoung
oung person who enters a Club is on track to gradua
te from high school on time, and is prepared to sucate
cceed
eed in college or a career, while demonstrating good
ccharacter
haracter and living a healthy lifestyle.
T
hanks to Buffalo Wild Wings, the ALL STARS proThanks
g
ram motivates kids to lead a healthy lifestyle through
gram
tteam
eam sports while building good sportsmanship and
sself-esteem
elf-esteem for Club kids. For more information, visit
w
ww.buffalowildwings
g .com/g
giving.
g
www.buffalowildwings.com/giving.
t b 2014
october
October Music Calendar
6
6
7
8
9
9
10
10
11
11
11
11
12
Historic Westville
Fabulous Fall Event
Oct 30-Nov 1, 10am-5pm
boo
bo
o
Mix 4 Years Anniversary
In the last few years Mix Ultra Lounge has been a staple of Co-lumbus Nightlife. Designed by world reknowned local Colum-bus resident DJ Roonie G and his team, theMix brings a taste
of big city nightlife to Columbus. Join the Mix Friday Oct 10
and Saturday Oct 11 for their 4 Years Anniversary celebraЖџon.
On Saturday Oct 11, there will be a $2000 Cash & Prize Balloon
n
drop, FREE party favors, and DJ Roonie G will be performing.
Forr VIP
Fo
VIP Tables
Tabl
Ta
bles
bl
es aand
nd rres
reservaЖџ
eser
es
erva
er
vaЖџ
va
Жџon
ons
ons,
s, p
s,
please
leas
le
ase
as
e ca
callll 7
706
706-221-2112.
06-2
06
-221
21-2
-211
112
2.
2.
photos by Toni Rae
Smell the cane juice being
ccooked
ooked into syrup. Hear the crack-ling of the fires. See the leavess
tturning
urning and the snow white cotton
b
being
eing ginned. In our three kitch-e
ens
ns we will bake with cane syrup,
ccook
ook with peanuts and preserve
e
ssummer’s
ummer’s bounty the old fash-io
ioned
oned way.
Muscogee Creek Indians will
d
demonstrate
emonstrate traditional ways off
sstoring
toring food for the winter. Ourr
h
historic
istoric cotton gin will be up and
rrunning.
unning. The blacksmith will be
e
pounding
p
ounding iron. The tinsmith will
b
be
e hammering tin. We will be dip-ping
p
ing candles, spinning cotton, and
w
working
orking wood.
Visit Westville’s village and lett
our
o
ur costumed interpreters take
e
yyou
ou back to an earlier time and
place.
p
lace.
Special Event Admission: Adultss
& Children (K-12) $10; Pre-K Free;
Seniors/College/Military
S
eniors/College/Military $8
Historic Westville is located at:
9294
9
294 Singer Pond Road Lumpkin,
31815.
888-733-1850
GA 3
318
1815
15.. 88
8888 73
7333 18
1850
50
Spent, Bikes on Broadway
Corbon Hoots at Legends
19
S
Sam
am S
Smith
miith
h
T
Tabernacle
aberna
b
cle
l
Government Mule Bama Theater Tuscaloosa
Coheed and Cambria
Tabernacle
Lykke Li
Tabernacle
Citizen Cope
Tabernacle
Flyleaf
Loft/Atlanta
Drive-By Truckers
Tabernacle
Australian Pink Floyd Show Fox
Widespread Panic
Verizon Wireless
5 Finger Death Punch. Hellyeah
Gwinnett
Wiz Khalifa
Kennesaw State
King Diamond
Center Stage
Newfound Glory
Masquerade and
Criminal Records
13 Lisa Loe
Vinyl
14 Jordan Knight, Nick Carter Center Stage
14 Styx Alabama National Fair Montgomery
14 Straight No Chaser
Fox
15 Paul McCartney
Phillips Arena
17 Confederate Railroad
Outlaws
17 Alice Cooper Montgomery Performing Arts Ctr
18 Miranda Lambert
Kicks Country Fair
Verizon Wireless
17 Ziggy Marley
Variety Playhouse
19 Kidz Bop
Center Stage
21 Macy Gray
Variety playhouse
22 Enrique Iglesias. Pitbull
Gwinnett Arena
22 Shooter Jennings
Zydeco Bham
22 Julian Casablancas
Masquerade
23-31 Phantom of the Opera
Fox
23 Ne-Yo
Tabernacle
24 Jim Gaffigan
Cobb Energy Ctr
24 Bill Cosby Montgomery Performing Arts Ctr
25 Paul Thorn
Variety Playhouse
26 Jimmy Eat World
WorkplayTheater B’ham
26 Susan Boyle
Symphony Hall Atl
28 Judas Priest
Gwinnett Arena
29 Chris Robinson Brotherhood Center Stage
oct
tob
ber 2014
2014
october
Fall
F
all Plant Sale At Callaway GardensВ®
Fall is a wonderful time to get plants in the
gground
round in time to establish a beautiful garden
ffor
or spring and summer. In October will have the
oopportunity
pportunity to purchase plants including trees,
sshrubs,
hrubs, and perennials. There also will be a limiited
ted assortment of garden mums while they last.
The
T
he Fall Plant Sale, in the gift shop of the John
A.. Sibley Horticultural Center, is scheduled to
A
bbee open through November 9 or while supplies
llast.
ast.
Proceeds from the Center’s sales support the
nnon-profi
on-profi
p t Ida Cason Callaway
y Foundation.
Family
F
amily
il F
Fright
i h Ni
Nights:
h
H
Halloween
lll
Movies
M
ovies On The Beach In October
$$55 Admission after 5 p.m.
Family Fright Nights will be the theme of the
October
O
ctober “Movies on the Beach” series. Famillies
ies are invited to enjoy a fun, family Halloween
movie
m
ovie on Robin Lake Beach. Bring a blanket or
cchair
hair and enjoy these movie nights. Snacks and
ddrinks
rinks will be available for purchase.
• October 11: Hocus Pocus
• October 18: Frankenweenie
• October 25: Hotel Transylvania
Admission for these special nights is $5 per
aadult;
dult; $2.50 per child age 6 to 12 and free for
cchildren
hildren 5 and younger. Admission will be
ccomplimentary
omplimentary for annual passholders. Guests
vvisiting
isiting the Gardens during the day will be admitted
m
itted
d tto
o th
thee mo
movi
movies
vies
es aatt no aadd
additional
ddit
itio
iona
nall co
cost
cost.
st.
Georgia
G
eorgia
i JJunior
i D
Duck
k St
Stamp Art
A t On
Exhibit
E
xhibit At Callaway GardensВ®
Callaway GardensВ® is proud to host the 2014
Georgia
G
eorgia Junior Duck Stamp Exhibit. This year is
tthe
he 22nd anniversary of the Junior Duck Stamp
pprogram,
rogram, which is made available through the
U.S.
U
.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to promote
m
ote conservation through the arts.
Each year Georgia youth participate in the
JJunior
unior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design
Contest.
C
ontest. Students in grades K-12 select a North
American
A
merican duck, goose or swan; research the
sspecies
pecies and its habitat; then depict the bird in an
aartistic
rtistic medium.
Following the competition, the artwork goes
oonn an exhibition tour around Georgia. The exhhibit
ibit will be on display from 9am to 5pm in the
D
aisy Classroom of Callaway’s Virginia Hand
Daisy
C
allaway Discovery Center through October 31.
Callaway
Bethany Panhorst, 17, from Savannah Arts
PlayGrounds
PlayG
Pl
Grounds
d Magazine
Magazine
i
Accad
Academy,
A
adem
demyy, w
won
on tth
the
he aann
he
annual
nnua
uall 20
2014
14 G
Geo
Georgia
eorg
rgiia
ia JJun
Junior
uniior
ior
Duck Stamp Art Competition on April 8, in At-lanta. Five judges unanimously selected Pan-horst’s acrylic rendition of a green-winged tea
teal
al
out of 588 entries as the Georgia Best of Show.
Prizes and ribbons are also given for the bestt
student conservation message that expresses thee
spirit of what they learned while researching and
d
planning for their Duck Stamp Contest artworkk
entry. This year’s winning conservation messagee
was submitted by 12-year-old Brock Taylor from
m
Savannah Country Day School: “Conservationn
is like a half-full cup, you can always do more.””
To support conservation programs, Juniorr
Duck Stamps may be purchased for $5, plus ship-1-800-STAMP-24.
ping and handling by calling 1-800-STAMP-24
4.
http://duckstamps.fws.gov.
The USFWS sponsors this program annuallyy
to promote conservation through arts. It is thee
principal federal agency responsible for conserv-ing, protecting and enhancing fish and wildlifee
and their habitats for the continuing benefit off
the American people. Since 1934, sales of Fed-eral Duck Stamps to hunters, stamp collectorss
and other conservationists have raised millionss
of dollars which has been used to acquire moree
than 5.3 million acres of habitat for the Nationa
National
al
Wildlife
Refuge
System.
fee R
Ref
efug
ugge Sy
yst
stem
em..
Herball T
Tea W
Workshop
kh
Learn about herbs from horticultural therapistt
Chanchal Cabrera as she presents Healing andd
Pleasure Teas from the Garden,” on Saturday
Saturday,
y,
November 8. Cabrera will share some of her fa-vorite tea recipes and discuss ways to make plea-sure and healing teas. Participants will also learnn
about growing and drying herbs, blending teass
for morning energy or for deeper sleep at night
night,
t,
as well as blending teas for better memory or bet-ter digestion.
Bring a lunch or pick up something from thee
nearby Discovery CafГ© and then taste a variety
y
of tea blends and discover the top 10 plants too
grow for teas.
Cabrera is a certified Master Gardener andd
Horticulture Therapist as well as a member of thee
(UK).
National Institute of Medical Herbalists (UK)
).
She lives on Vancouver Island, British Columbiaa
without
where she and her husband run Gardens withou
ut
Borders, a seven-acre botanic garden specializ-ing in food and medicine plants. They grow foodd
restaurants,
for 20 households, culinary herbs for restaurants
s,
and medicinal herbs for her clinic. They also runn
therapy gardens for people with disabilities andd
herbal
host internships in organic farming and herba
al
medicine.
The workshop fee is $35 per person and in-cludes
admission
Callaway
Gardens.
clud
cl
udes
ud
es aadm
dmis
dm
issi
is
sion
si
on ttoo Ca
Call
llaw
ll
away
aw
ay
yG
Gar
arde
ar
dens
de
ns..
ns
20
october 2014
ASK ISIS
Ghosts
Cassonya K. Douglass
I was thinking of Halloween and the fact that my
husband passed away right around Halloween. For
someone who was deceased he was more active after
death than he had been for quite some time before.
My first knowledge of his remaining on earth was
when one of my friends called me up to inform me that
her five year old had been up in her playroom-playing
ball with �Grandpa’ Pierre. She then ran downstairs and
turned on the TV because �Grandpa’ Pierre wanted to
watch wrestling.
A few days later, I was visiting a witch friend and
she told me that during a coven meeting the doorbell
rang and a white robed nun was at the door and with her
was my deceased husband-who did not look deceased.
He stayed for a few minutes and then he and the nun
disappeared.
He would speak through a telephone or a Ouija
Board. For a while, he was very active, and then he left.
To go where?
Ghosts... I never remember not knowing about
ghosts but my most memorable time was when I was
a child and about six of us (some were adults) were in
a room wondering what to do, when one of the adults
said that she’d like to see her baby that had died. We
turned out the lights and lit a candle, and asked to see
the baby. Her maternal grandmother soon appeared carrying the baby in her arms. Everyone in the room saw
the grandmother and the baby.
I was a newlywed and my new husband and
I were discussing families. He informed me that both
of his parents had passed on to the other side. Since it
was Halloween, I thought it would be fun to bring them
Pick up a free copy
of Playgrounds
at these loca ons.
APARTMENTS
Bri wood 2444 W BriЖ© David Rd 3271443
The Grand Reserve Luxury Apartment
Homes 1700 Fountain Ct 653-8111
Greystone Farms 7401 Blackmon Rd 221
9200
Grove Park Apartments 1448 Grove
Park Drive 706-507-3630
Inverness 7175 Moon Rd 571-9200
The Lodge 464 N Oakley 689-4402
Milgen Village 5800 Milgen Rd 563-2550
Sherwood Arms 3909 Baker Plaza Dr
689-1759
Whisperwood 6029 Flat Rock Rd 706563-0001
Windsor Village 3700 Bridgewater Rd
561-5935
Woodlands 6000 River Rd, Green Island
boo
here for me to meet them. By this time, my husband
was asleep and as I lay in bed, I thought of his parents.
We were sleeping upstairs and I heard someone walking up the stairs. Then I heard the door open (although
it never did) and a woman walked into the room. She
stood at the foot of the bed, put out her arms, and repeated my husband is three times then disappeared.
Just then, the bedroom window opened virtually and a
man appeared and sat in the window. He did not speak
just smiled. The next day I informed my husband that
I had met his parents. He gave a disbelieving snort that
changed when I described them perfectly, even down to
the dress his mother wore.
Time went on and ghosts came and went but then
my husband became ill and the doctors said that he was
terminal. I spent many an hour sitting by his bed. Then
one night a male ghost appeared wearing black. He
stood over my husband looking at him and shaking his
head. I panicked! I screamed! “Get away from my husband,” I yelled. He looked at me, shook his head, and
disappeared. My husband recuperated and the doctors
were amazed. Had the ghost done something to my husband? Fast-forward about twenty-years, and now my
husband was really dying with cancer of his lungs. At
the time, doctors were not allowed to give dying people
very much narcotics because they might get addicted
to it. Yeah sure. So my husband, being in so much pain
would take walks on the astral plain. One night I looked
at him and realized that the ghost that I had seen so
many years before was the man lying in the hospital
bed. Had his astral-self help heal himself then because
he knew that it was important that he live as long as he
did? I never thought to ask that question when he was
wandering around with his spirit nurse.
When I moved to Columbus, Georgia, I, along with a
few friends and relatives, founded the “Temple of Isis,
Incorporated”. We were looking for a place to hold our
meetings and maybe have a little store when a friend
informed me that she was moving from a house on 3rd
Ave and the rent was reasonable. We immediately rented the house and the moment she moved out we began
fixing it up.
I was taking a break from work one day and sitting
on the porch reading when I �felt’ someone standing beside me. I had not heard anyone come up the stairs but
thought nothing of it, as I had been deep into the book.
I looked up and asked the woman standing there, “May
I help you?” She shook her head in disgust and walked
into the house. At that moment my partner came walking out of the house rubbing her arms. “What did that
woman want that just now walked into the house?” I
asked. Her answer: “No one came into the house but I
just walked through something cold”. Since Star had
always felt ghosts through their cold, we realized the
woman I had seen was a ghost. (Here is an important
fact: When most people encounter a ghost they feel the
cold because when a ghost is near they have a tendency
to borrow a little of our energies.) After that, we frequently saw the ghost woman who someone identified
as the first owner of the house.
It was interesting being in a haunted house. We
would hear people walking and talking and it was not
unusual to see Beth standing on the porch looking out
across the street. Frequently, ghost hunters would stop
by with their ghost hunting equipment, excited to have
a place where they could practice their ghost hunting
skills.
The Temple was also frequently called to other houses and either asked to get rid of a ghost or to explain
what the ghost wanted and why were they haunting the
house.
If you believ your house is haunted and you would like
to know for sure, contact PlayGrounds who will get in
touch with us.
CELLULAR SERVICE
ART
Bri David Studios 2700 W BriЖ© David Chatman Communica ons/ Cricket
Rd 571-5877 M-F10-4:30, Tu & Th 7p-9p Wireless 3473 N Lumpkin Rd Ste K 706685-3533 9am to 7pm www.chatcomBEAUTY SALONS
Hairmasters 5555 WhiЖ©lesey Blvd 324- mwireless.com
COFFEE SHOPPES
5744
Styles By Cooper 6298 Hamilton Rd 322 Iron Bank Coffee corner of 11th St and
7621 M 9:50-5, Tu & Th 9-7, W & F 9-6, Broadway.
Fountain City Coffee 1007 Broadway,
Sa 9-3
Columbus, GA 31901 M–Th 6:30am–
BOOKS
Barnes & Noble Booksellers 5555 Whit- 10:30pm, F 6:30am-2am, Sa 8am-2am,
Sunday: 9am-8pm
tlesey Blvd. 706-653-7880 M-Th 9a-10p,
Starbucks Coffee Veterans Pkwy
F-Sa 9a-11p, Su 9-9
Columbus Book Exchange 6440 W Ham- CONVENIENCE SHOPS
Money Back Amoco Williams Rd
ilton Rd 324-2559
Judybug’s Books 1033 Broadway 323- DONUTS
Golden Donuts 625 Manchester Expwy
5588
706-660-8783
BUTCHER SHOPPES
Burt’s Butcher Shoppe & Eatery 2932 GROCERY/ RETAIL
CVS all Columbus and Phenix City locaWarm Springs Rd 653-0677 Tu-Sa 9a-7p
Жџons
CAMPGROUNDS
Lake Pines Campground 6404 GarreЖ© K Mart all Columbus and Phenix City loRoad, Midland (Columbus) GA 31820. caЖџons
www.lakepines.net; [email protected], HEALTHCARE
Womencare, PC 1201 18th St, Colum(706) 561-9675
21
bus, GA 31901. 706-322-4950. M, Tu, Th
9-5; W, F 9-3. www.womencareofcolumbus.com
HOTELS
Baymont Inn & Suites 2919 Warm
Springs Rd 323-4344
Colony Inn 4300 Victory Drive 706-6891590
Comfort Inn 3460 Macon Rd 256-3093
Country Inns & Suites 1720 Fountain Ct
660-1880
Days Inn 3452 Macon Rd 561-4400
Days Inn S 3170 Victory Dr 689-6181
Econo Lodge 4483 Victory Dr 682-3803
Extended Stay America 1721 Rollins
Way 653-9938
Hampton Inn North 7390 Bear Ln 2562222
Holiday Inn Express at Northlake 7336
Bear Lane 706-507-7222
Howard Johnson 1011 Veterans Pkwy
322-6641
Microtel 1728 Fountain Ct 31904, 706653-7004
continued next page
october 2014
classes cont from page 13
cane with a round crook, a light
heart, and an open mind. For information and to register for this
and other classes, call Dr. Chan
any day after 10am, 706-5633539.
Reiki Level II: taught by Dr. Phil
Chan. Celestial Azul, Healing &
Wellness Salon Studio, www.celestialazul.com Cost: $200. Call
706-563-3539 to reserve your
space!
CALLAWAY GARDENSВ®
Marvelous Monarchs: Learn
about these amazing creatures: their astounding life cycle,
mechanisms of flight and details
of their yearly migratory journey.
Learn the perils these butterflies are facing in today’s world.
After classroom time, visit the
Day Butterfly Center for more
tips on attracting Monarchs and
try catching and tagging these
beautiful insects and learn why
this is important. Take home a
plant especially for these butterflies. Instructor: Michael Buckman, Manager, Day Butterfly
Center. Saturday, Oct. 11, 10am
to 12:30pm. $25 Guest; $22.50
Annual Passholder
Make your own Garden
Trough: Troughs are marvelous
for growing all sorts of plants
and add a wonderful decorative
element to any garden. Herbs,
cacti, ferns and bonsai all work
well in troughs both indoors and
outdoors.
Join horticulturist
Helen Phillips in this hands-on
art and gardening adventure to
make a trough garden to take
home. Limit 15 people. Sat,
Oct. 18, 10am to 12:30pm. $35
Guest; $31.50 Annual Passhold
ho
lder
ld
er..
er
holder.
Please
Plea
Pl
ease
se send
s
sen
end
d events
even
ev
entts
ts to
to playplay
pl
lay-grou
gr
[email protected]
ound
ndsm
smag
[email protected]
@kno
nolo
logy
gy.n
.net
et
playgrounds remembers... by Brian Doohan
RICHARD
“JAWS”
KIEL
Att seven feet,
A
ttwo
wo
inchees,
s, Richard
Dawson
D
awson Kiel
was
w
as fated to
pplay
lay
pluguuglies,
glies, freaks
aand
nd villains
ffrom
rom his first
film effort as
““Eegah”
Eegah” the caveman, opposite Arch Hall
JJr.
r. Born in Detroit in 1939, Kiel worked
aass a cemetery plot salesman and, predictaably,
bly, a nightclub bouncer before going
Hollywood
H
ollywood – he toiled in numerous films
((Silver
Silver Streak, The Nutty Professor) and
TV
T
V series, (Rifleman, Honey West, The
Wild,
W
ild, Wild West) but still had to find side
jjobs
obs (often as a mathematics teacher) to
ppay
ay the bills.
Then, Cubby Broccoli, producer of
tthe
he Bond films, to portray the menacing
““Jaws”
Jaws” in The Spy Who Loved Me and
Moonraker
M
oonrakerr elevating Kiel into the panttheon
heon of evil grotesques – a British poll
nnamed
amed him the sixth best Bond villain
((ahead
ahead of Spy nasties Curt Jurgens and
Caroline
C
aroline Munro) and he would find future
rroles
oles along Clint Eastwood in Pale Rider
aand
nd Adam Sandler in Happy Gilmore. He
wrote,
w
rote, directed and starred in The Giant
ooff Thunder Mountain and co-authored a
bbiography
iography of abolitionist Cassius Marcelllus
us Clay called Kentucky Lion.
“Jaws” (he hated those painful metal
tteeth!)
eeth!) died on September 10th, three days
bbefore
efore his 75th birthday. “Richard was a
m
ost wonderful man!” his old friend Arch
most
H
all told PlayGrounds, “I’ve been truly
Hall
bblessed
lessed to have had him as a friend.”
TED
FLICKER
T
heodore JoTheodore
nnas
as Flicker was
a Jersey boy
w
ho
who
wanted
tto
o star on the
B
ritish stage,
British
sstudying
tudying at the
R
oyal DramatRoyal
PlayGrounds Magazine
ic Art in London, but taking a sharp career
detour (like fellow students Joan Collins
and Larry Hagman) to team up with Elaine
May at the Compass Theatre - America’s
first theater of improvisational comedy.
When not onstage, he acted (in Hagman’s Beware the Blob), co-wrote The
Troublemakerr with the legendary Buck
Henry, and created the TV series Barney
Miller. But his most famous work was, in
the beginning, a critical and commercial
flop that nearly landed him in prison.
The President’s Analystt (1967), which
Flicker wrote and directed, starred James
Coburn and was produced by Robert Evans
who, like the cast and crew, was hounded
by the FBI and CIA because the plot concerned government spying on citizens via
telephonic transmissions (indignantly denied by the powers-that-were as something
that could never, ever happen!). It was
heavily censored, but has become a cult favorite.
Flicker quit the TV and movie ratrace
to become a sculptor in the 80’s, moving to
New Mexico, where he died on September
12th at 84, survived by his wife of nearly
50 years.
BOB
CREWE
Stanley Robert Crewe was
a songwriter
and producer
responsible
for dozens of
hit
records
from the 50’s
through 80’s.
Also from Jersey, Crewe crossed the Hudson to study architecture at the Parsons
School of Design and dabble in songwriting, but when Silhouettes (co-written with
Frank Slay) became a doo-wop breakout in
1957, Crewe put down his drafting pencils
and went to work full-time in music.
He recorded a few of his own compositions which became regional hits, cut
an album Teen Idoll (long before the TV
show; it earned him a featured article in 16
Magazine), but it was not until he teamed
up with Bob Gaudio with the archetypical
Jersey Boys themselves, the Four Seasons.
22
The hits (Sherry, Rag Doll, Walk Like a
Man) kept coming and enabled Crewe to
launch DynaVoice Records in 1965.
DynaVoice struck immediate gold with
the Toys’ A Lover’s Concerto, and other
classic rockers and popsters whom Crew
wrote for or produced included Mitch
Ryder, The Mysterians, Norma Tanega
and, from England, the Tremeloes. His
house band, the Bob Crewe Generation,
scored the soundtrack for Jane Fonda’s
Barbarella and had a top-10 single, Music to Watch Girls By. He also wrote and
produced Frankie Valli’s solo Can’t Take
My Eyes Off You and Oliver’s Jean (collaborating with poet Rod McKuen) as
well as Good Morning Starshine from
the musical Hair.
Going disco, he wrote and produced
for Disco Tex and the Sex-o-Lettes and
Labelle ((Lady Marmalade
Marmalade)) and helped
bring Jersey Boys to the stage before his
health failed. Crewe retired to a Maine
nursing home where he died on September 11th at the age of 83.
ERIC the
MIDGET
Eric Shaun
Lynch was
born with
multiple
disabilities
in
1975
and
was
only three
feet
tall
when he began calling Howard Stern to
complain about this and that, inspiring
the shock-rock DJ to add Eric to his menagerie of strange characters.
Usually calling in (he made one appearance in Stern’s studio in 2008),
Lynch delighted in harassing the DJ, his
guests and his entourage and became an
Internet impresario himself, discoursing
on baseball, wrestling, reality programming and his aches and pains (which
were considerable).
The doctors had pronounced that he
would never live to adulthood, but Eric
fooled them, surviving until September18th. Stern told his fans to memorialize his little friend by eating bacon
and drinking Pepsi, his favorite consumables.
octtob
oc
tober
ber 2014
2014
october
Directory continued from page 21
The Residence Inn 2670 Adams Farm Dr
706-494-0050
Quality Inn 1325 Veterans Pkwy 3222522
Sheraton Inn 5351 Sidney Simons Blvd
327-6868
Springhill Suites by Marrio 5415 Whittlesey Boulevard 706-576-3773 MarrioЖ©.com/CSGSH
Staybridge Suites 1694 WhiЖ©lesy Rd
31904. 706-507-7777
Super 8 2935 Wm Springs Rd 322-6580
Wingate Inn 1711 Rollins Way 225-1100
Wyndham Garden Hotel 4027 Veterans
Court, 31909, (706)507-1111
Wyndham Hotel 800 Front Ave 3241800
METAPHYSICAL
Celes al Azul 3601 Hilton Avenue Suite
227, 31904, (706) 221-2421 Open for
appointments Sunday through Saturday,
9am-7pm. Walkin hours posted daily on
Facebook.
MOTORCYCLES
Cha ahoochee Harley Davidson 7373
Fortson Rd 324-4294
MUSIC- INSTRUMENTS
American Guitar Bou que
334-560-5202
Baker Music 2 Midtown Loop 563-7924
M-F 10-6, Sa 10-5
Everything Musical 2400 W BriЖ© David
Rd 323-1809 M-F 10-7, Sa 10-6
Gorilla Guitars 6440 West Hamilton Park
Drive Suite 1A, Columbus, GA 31909
706-507-0462 M-Sa 10-7
NIGHTCLUBS & PUBS
Belloo’s Mar ni and Cigar Bar 900 Front
Ave 706-494-1584, M-Sa 5p-3a
Benning Brew Pub Bldg 2784 Sightseeing Rd, Ft Benning 31905706-545-8426
Bootleggers Broadway
Grover’s Bar Phenix City
The Lo 1032 Broadway 596-8141 W-Sa
7p-2a
Mix Ultra Lounge 1040 Broadway 706596-8397 W-Sa 9p-3a
SoHo Bar 5751 Milgen Rd 568-3316
M-Sa 3p-3a,
PARTY SUPPPLIES
Cagney’s Party Shop 5751 Milgen Rd
568-1889 M-Sa 10a-11:45p
Peachtree Package Store 2928 Warm
Springs Rd 327-0311 M-Sa 8a-11:45p
RESTAURANTS
13th Street Bar-B-Q 5506 Veterans Pkwy
596-1833 M-W 10a-3p, Th-Sa 10a-7p
Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill and Bar
3229 GenЖџan Blvd 706-563-6116. [email protected]
2513 Airport Thruway 706-494-0977
Buffalo Wild Wings Grill and Bar 5555
WhiЖ©lesey Blvd 706-507-2110
Burt’s Butcher Shoppe & Eatery 2932
Warm Springs Rd 653-0677 Tu-Sa 7a-4p
(restaurant hours)
Caffe Amici 2301 Airport Thwy 653-6361
boo
M-Sa 11:30a-2p & 4:30p-10p
Cannon Brew Pub 1041 Broadway 706653-BEER
The Can na 1030 Broadway 706-3204520
Country’s Barbecue 3137 Mercury Dr
563-7604 Su-Th 11a-10p, F-Sa 11a-11p
Country’s Barbecue North 6298 Veterans Pkwy 650-1415
Country’s Downtown 1329 Broadway
596-8910 11a-11p daily
Deorio’s Cross Country Plaza 563-5887
M-F 11:30-3 & 4:30-9:30, Sa noon-10:30
El Carrizo Mexican Restaurant 3747 Macon Rd 706-561-6000
El Carrizo Mexican Restaurant 6575
WhiЖ©lesey Blvd 706-561-5714
El Vaquero 2976 North Lake Parkway
317-5900 317-0047
Firehouse Subs 2501 WhiЖ©lesey Rd 706507-0225
Gus’s Drive-in 3498 Victory Dr 687-5770
11a-2a daily
Hooters 2650 Adams Farm Dr 596-4668
Locos Grill & Pub 1358 13th St. 31901,
(706) 323-0700, [email protected]
com, www.locoscolumbus.com
LuLu’s Lunchbox 4022 University Ave
706-442=7652 M-F 11a-6p, Sa 11a-4p
Macon Road Barbecue 2703 Avalon Rd
653-0542 M-Sa 10a-8p
Mellow Mushroom 6100 Veterans Pkwy
322-4602
Newman’s Grill 1011 Veterans Pkwy (in
Howard Johnson’s) 322-6641 11a-2p &
5p-10p daily
Ok Sun Oriental Restaurant 2929 Victory Circle Tu-Sa 11a-6p
Peluso’s Italian Restaurant 5600 Milgen
Rd 563-9934 M-Th 11a-10p, F-Sa 11a-
10:30p
Peluso’s Italian Restaurant St Francis
Shopping Center 324-5888 M-Th 11:30a10p, F-Sa 11:30a-11p
Picasso’s Pizza 1020 Broadway, In front
of The Tap, 706-576-6991 M-Sat 11a-3a,
Su 1p-12a, www.picassopizzauptowncolumbus.com
Scruffy Murphy’s 1037 Broadway 3223460 10:30a-2a daily
The Speakeasy 3123 Mercury Dr 5610411 M-Th 11a-10:30p, F-Sa 11a-11p
The Sports Page 5736 Veterans Pkwy
641-9966 11a-12a daily
Twel h Street Deli 117 12th St 5766939 M-F 7a-3p
Willy T’s Chicken Fingers 7325 Fortson
Rd 507-2210 M-Th 10:30-9 F & Sa 10:3010 Su 11-8
Willy’s Wings 4405 Armour Rd 322-4020
Tu-Th 11a-12a, F-Sa 11a-2a
SHOPS
Crossroads- Smoke Shoppe, Botanica
and Hippie Store 3500 Victory Dr. 229395-0963
Daniel’s Wood Den 396 Highway 27
cataula 31804 706-660-9613
Gina’s Junk An que & Thri Store 6020
Buena Vista Rd 706-568-8641 Tu-Sa
11am-5:30pm, Su 1-5pm, www.GinasJunk.com
Northside Pawn Shop 1648 Manchester
Expwy 322-0561
The Skate Shed 4343 Armour Road 31904
706-322-4121, www.theskateshed.com
Starship Veterans Parkway
TANNING
Bermuda Tan 3507 Macon Rd 563-4044
M-Sa 10a-10p, Su noon-5
New Look Tanning Center 5120 Warm
23
Springs Rd Suite 1 569-7075 M-F 8:30a11p, Sa 10-7, Su 1-6
TATTOOS & BODY PIERCING
Ink 66 Ta oos 5256 Armour Rd Columbus GA 31909, M-Th 1pm-10pm, Fri-Sat
1pm-12am
Ta oo Tommy’s 4022 Victory Dr, #A, Columbus, GA 31903 (706) 685-1511
ETCETERA
Columbus Civic Center
Columbus State University
Col Conven on & Visitors Bureau
Columbus Technical Ins tute
Georgia Military College, Columbus
Campus 7300 Blackmon Road 31909,
706-478-3150
North Columbus Library
RiverCenter for the Performing Arts
106.9 Really Rocks
PHENIX CITY (area code 334)
Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill and Bar
2090 Hwy 280-431 334-448-2500
Colonial Inn Phenix City Bypass 2989361
Del Ranch Bar and Grill 4920 Lee Road
334-297-9177 Smoking allowed. M-Sa
3pm Жџl ?
Holiday Inn of Phenix City 1700 Hwy
280 Bypass S 298-9321
Perfect Tan And Travel 10630 Lee Road
240 (next to Dixie Wings) (334) 732 1777
hЖ©p://PerfectTanAndTravel.com
The Red Barn 1223 280 Bypass 298-9246
M-Sa 10am-2am, Su 1pm-10pm
13th Street Bar-B-Q 1310 7th Ave 2911833 M T Th F 9:30a-6p, W Sa 9:30a-3p
If you would like to distribute playgrounds,
e-mail business name, address, phone #,
hours to [email protected]
october 2014
Document
Category
Religion
Views
583
File Size
5 988 KB
Tags
1/--pages
Report inappropriate content