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Academy alumni to say goodbye to Williams. 2A
GETTING FIRST LOOK
Blount Jamboree offers prep
hoops peek tonight. 1B
Beware: Cast of �Sons
of Anarchy’ coming
to Fanboy. Weekend
YOUR LIFE. YOUR TIMES. SINCE 1883
THURSDAY
November 6, 2014
Maryville, TN
thedailytimes.com
$1.00
The Power of Peers
One-lane
bridges may
be cut to 2
Commission to consider
projects totaling $1.2M
BY JOEL DAVIS
[email protected]
The list of remaining
one-lane bridges in Blount
County will shrink to two if
the Highway Department’s
request to spend $1.2 million is approved.
Sitting as the Agenda
Committee on Tuesday, the
Blount County Commission voted unanimously to
consider the matter at its
Nov. 20 meeting. The budget increase would fund
four projects being picked
up by state aid: replacement of East Millers Cove
bridge, $148,000; Big Elm
Road bridge, $475,000; and
Andy Harris Road bridge,
$200,000; and completion of the Defoe rightof-way project, $200,000,
and a $177,000 contingency
fund.
Normally, the county
would have to fund a 20
percent match for stateaid-funded bridge projects.
Currently, the state is offering the aid with only a 2
percent match required.
“We’re getting about
almost $900,000 work for
about $18,000,” Highway
Superintendent Bill Dunlap said.
At the start of Dunlap’s
first term in office, there
were 39 one-lane bridges
�We’re
getting
about
almost
$900,000
work for about
$18,000.’
Bill Dunlap
Blount County highway
superintendent
scattered throughout the
county. He has seen to the
replacement of 34. Most
recently, in 2013, the Highway Department replaced
one of two bridges on East
Millers Cove Road.
“This will be three of the
five remaining one-lane
bridges in the county,” he
said. “At this price, we can’t
afford not to do it.”
The Agenda Committee
also forwarded other items
including:
В›9fe[i\jfclk`fekf`jjl\
$27.5 million in bonds that
would be used to move
$21.1 million out of variable-rate debt to fixed rate
with a regular amortization
SEE BRIDGES, 5A
MARK A. LARGE | THE DAILY TIMES
GENERAL SESSIONS JUDGE KENLYN FOSTER swears in new Blount County Youth Court jurors Wednesday at the courthouse.
Youth court helps young
offenders change course
BY MIKE GIBSON
[email protected]
The 22 high-schoolage members of Blount
County Youth Court
have less authority, but
arguably more power
than any of the adult
judges, lawyers, and
youth court program
officials who swore them
in at Blount County
Courthouse Wednesday.
Begun in Blount
County in 2013, youth
court is a Tennessee Bar
Association program
whereby first-time juvenile offenders accused
of certain nonviolent
crimes can choose a
diversion and face a
five-person jury of
school-age peers, rather
than a General Sessions
judge. Youth jurors —
chosen from applicants
from across Blount
County’s school systems — hear cases, ask
questions, make evaluations and are vested
with the power to take
any number of remedial
actions.
YOUTH COURT JUROR J.T. RUSSELL (left) discusses legal matters
with State Sen. Doug Overbey (center) and Court of Appeals
Judge Kelly Thomas after the swearing-in ceremony.
Youth court officials
said there are now 20
youth boards across the
state, with the Blount
County court being one
of the more successful
examples of the program. According to Ann
Barker, executive director of Blount County
SEE YOUTH COURT, 5A
Federal grand jury charges former, current law enforcement officers
From Staff Reports
KNOXVILLE — A federal grand
jury has indicted four former
law enforcement officers and a
Pigeon Forge detective on extortion charges.
The indictment was returned
Tuesday against former University of Tennessee Police Officer
Robert E. Cummings, 61; former
Knox County Sheriff ’s Office
deputies Jimmy W. Douglas, 43,
and Samuel T. Hardy Jr., 42; former TVA Police Officer Benito
D. Lopez, 62; and Pigeon Forge
Blount Records . . . . 4A
Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8B
Classified . . . . . . . . . 7B
Comics . . . . . . . . . . . 10B
Crossword . . . . . . . . .11B
Dear Abby . . . . . . . . 10A
Deaths . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A
Horoscope . . . . . . . .11B
Police Detective David L. Joyner,
44.
Joyner resides in Sevier County,
while the four other men live
in Knox County, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Knoxville said in
a news release.
Another former deputy with
Lotteries . . . . . . . . . . 2A
Money & Markets . 7A
Nation & World. . . . 9A
Newsmakers . . . . . .11B
Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . 6A
Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1B
Sudoku . . . . . . . . . . . .11B
Weekend . . . . . . .Inside
the Knox County Sheriff’s Office,
Robbie D. Flood, pleaded guilty
Wednesday to a charge of violating the Hobbs Act.
Cummings, Douglas, Hardy,
Lopez and Joyner were indicted on two counts of violating
the Hobbs Act. The first count
Maryville, TN 37803
(865) 983-9330
SEE OFFICERS, 5A
Get The Daily Times sent to your
email box every day with a digital
subscription at TheDailyTimes.com.
Chance of
showers today
High 61 | Low 37 11B
1781 W. Broadway Ave
in the indictment is a charge of
conspiracy to commit extortion
under the color of official right,
while the second count is a charge
of attempt to commit extortion
under the color of official right.
JACK
DANIELS
WINTER
SPICE
$
19.99
Limited Supply
2A | BLOUNT COUNTY
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Thursday, November 6, 2014
BRIEFS
Alcoa Fire Department
warns of possible
solicitation scam
DARYL SULLIVAN | THE DAILY TIMES
RICHARD WILLIAMS JR. LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT ACADEMY ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR PATTY LITTLEJOHN (left), Ethan Littlejohn,
Ashley Lanagan, Danielle Wallace and Nell Koneczny share memories of the late George Williams, who served as the academy’s
executive director until his death Oct. 21, while planning a memorial for him. The nonprofit will host a memorial at 10 a.m. Saturday at St. John Missionary Baptist Church, 178 Bessie Harvey Ave., Alcoa.
�He was a good man’
Leadership academy to say goodbye Saturday to Williams
BY MATTHEW STEWART
George
Williams
[email protected]
The Richard Williams Jr.
Leadership Development
Academy will say goodbye this weekend to its late
co-founder and executive
director.
George Williams, who
founded the nonprofit
with Patty Littlejohn, will
be honored at 10 a.m. Saturday at St. John Missionary
Baptist Church, 178 Bessie
Harvey Ave., Alcoa. Community members are welcome to attend the twohour memorial.
“We’re standing strong,
and we’ll continue doing
whatever George wanted
us to do,” Littlejohn said.
“A lot of kids are taking
George’s passing really
hard, and we feel this celebration of his life will be
another step toward healing. We hope to start another session at the first of the
year.”
“George meant so much
to so many people in Blount
County and other communities served by the Academy,” said Nell Koneczny, a
former cadet. “He wouldn’t
want us to feel lost, and a
lot of us are feeling lost.
We’re going to respect
George’s memories, his
hopes, his dreams.”
Koneczny, who was a
cadet for three years,
worked the past four years
with the nonprofit while
attending Vanderbilt University. “I learned to be
a leader here. I wouldn’t
be who I am today without George. I was terrified of public speaking as
a (Maryville High School)
freshman, but George and
my teachers helped me
overcome it. I wouldn’t
have the bravery to do what
I feel is right without him.
Mission Smiles would have
remained an idea without
his interest and guidance. I
wouldn’t have started two
organizations — Russian,
East European and Central
Asian Club and the Disabilities Awareness Partnership — at Vanderbilt
without him. However,
George was more than a
mentor to us.”
Tiffany Costner was the
Williams founded
the Richard Williams
Jr. Leadership Development Academy.
first cadet to enroll in the
Richard Williams Jr. Leadership Development Academy. She will be doing the
hosting at the celebration.
“I just hope that we see a
lot of outcome from this.
Because George supported
the community so much, I
hope they can show support for him as well —
as well as for the family,”
Costner said.
“George was a father figure to me,” said Norval Parrish, a former cadet. “He
was the only male role
model I’ve known, and I
considered him to be my
father. He was a good man,
a role model to everyone.
He loved everyone with
his kind heart and taught
us we could be something
better and bigger. We could
become anything we wanted to become.”
Parrish, who received a
pacemaker at 11 years old
and spent time in Department of Children’s Service
custody, currently works
at TAC Air. “I wouldn’t be
who I am without George
... I wouldn’t be alive today
without him. He saved my
life.”
PUBLIC SERVANT
Williams, who was the
Alcoa City Center’s manager, served the Alcoa and
Blount County communities in a number of public capacities. He served
1989-99 on the Alcoa Board
of Education and served
2000-08 on Alcoa City
Commission.
Williams also served as
chairman of the Blount
County Chamber of Commerce and Blount County
Historical Museum. His
service also included the
boards of Blount County Community Action
Agency, Pellissippi State
Foundation, Tennessee
School Board Association
and United Way of Blount
County.
THE DAILY TIMES
Blount County’s only daily newspaper,
serving our readers
since 1883.
Your Life. Your Times.
Vol. 71 No. 220
The Daily Times
(USPS# 332-320)
is published daily by
Blount County
Publishers LLC,
307 E. Harper Ave., Maryville,
TN, 37804. Periodical postage
paid at Maryville TN 37804.
Send correspondence to:
The Daily Times
P.O. Box 9740
Maryville, TN, 37802-9740
In 2003, Williams and
Patty Littlejohn founded
the Richard Williams Jr.
Leadership Development
Academy. The nonprofit
is named after Williams’
late brother, who served 19
years on the Blount County
Commission.
GREATEST LEGACY
For many people, it would
become George Williams’
greatest legacy.
“I knew and worked with
George’s brother, Richard, before I worked with
him,” said state Rep. Bob
Ramsey, of Maryville, on
Oct. 21. “They were both
leaders in the community. They had different
leadership styles, and I
embraced George’s leadership and the wonderful things he did for the
community, including
the Richard Williams
Jr. Leadership Development Academy. He had a
tremendous personality
and a tremendous amount
of care and compassion.
His passing truly leaves
a void.”
Williams, who graduated from Charles M. Hall
School in 1965, went to the
University of Tennessee
for four years. He served
from 1970-79 with Oak
Ridge Associated Universities where he had a major
responsibility for training
services in the Manpower,
Education, Research and
Training Division.
Williams served 197997 with Tennessee Val-
The city of Alcoa Fire
Department has issued a
warning to its citizens of
a possible scam operation after St. Ives subdivision homeowners
reported solicitors going
door-to-door fraudulently asking for donations for the Alcoa Volunteer Fire Department.
The city of Alcoa Fire
Department is funded
through taxpayers dollars and does not solicit
for funds door-to-door,
by telephone or any other means.
“It is unfortunate that
someone would misrepresent the fire department in our community,” Fire Chief Roger
Robinson said. Citizens
are asked to report any
suspicious solicitations
from people identifying
themselves as a city of
Alcoa representative to
the city of Alcoa at 3804700 or the Alcoa Police
Department at 981-4111.
Overview of FLC
planting projects set
The public is invited to a presentation
tonight by the Foothills
Land Conservancy that
includes an overview of
FLC’s 2014 February and
March planting projects.
Last year the conservancy received a $5,000
grant, made possible by
the American Forests
�He wouldn’t
want us to feel
lost, and a lot of
us are
feeling lost.
We’re going to
respect George’s
memories,
his hopes, his
dreams.’
PUBLIC MEETINGS
Alcoa
CITY COMMISSION will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Commission
Chambers of the Alcoa
Municipal Building, 223
Associates Blvd.
Townsend
PLANNING
COMMISSION: Will
meet at 6 p.m. Nov. 13
at the the Townsend
Municipal Office, 133
Tiger Drive, Townsend.
CITY COMMISSION will
meet at 7 p.m. Nov.
18 at the Townsend
Municipal Office, 133
Tiger Drive, Townsend.
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY
From The Daily Times
on Nov. 2, 1989: The
combined school systems of Alcoa/Maryville
and Blount County
have received one of
the first Governors
A-Plus Awards for Community Commitment to
Excellence in Education.
and ALCOA Foundation’s Partnership for
Trees initiative, to plant
3,200 native trees and
shrubs across the East
Tennessee region.
The presentation will
highlight the many benefits of planting native
trees and shrubs in your
community or backyard.
The event starts at 6
p.m. in the upstairs conference room of Blount
Memorial Wellness Center, 220 Associates Blvd.,
Alcoa.
TENNESSEE LOTTERY NUMBERS
Cash 3 Evening
6-3-3, Lucky Sum: 12
(six, three, three; Lucky Sum:
twelve)
Cash 3 Midday
9-0-9, Lucky Sum: 18
(nine, zero, nine; Lucky Sum:
eighteen)
Nell Koneczny
former cadet at the academy
ley Authority, working as
a business development
specialist and customer
service representative
where he was responsible for $25 million in public works contracts. He
later served in the Natural Resources and Human
Resource Development
Division.
From 1998-2003, Williams operated The
George Williams Agency and provided financial
services through Prudential. He also enriched the
community in a number of
other ways, such as lending his voice to the Clayton Center for the Arts
on Maryville College’s
campus and Tornado TV’s
football broadcasts in the
’90s and early 2000s.
Cash 3 Morning
4-9-3
(four, nine, three)
Cash 4 Evening
7-7-8-3, Lucky Sum: 25
(seven, seven, eight, three;
Lucky Sum: twenty-five)
Cash 4 Midday
1-7-8-4, Lucky Sum: 20
(one, seven, eight, four;
Lucky Sum: twenty)
Cash 4 Morning
1-3-4-5 (one, three, four, five)
Mega Millions
09-15-24-39-41, Mega Ball: 1
(nine, fifteen, twenty-four,
thirty-nine, forty-one; Mega
Ball: one)
Estimated jackpot:
$321 million
Powerball
2-11-19-21-42; Powerball: 34;
Multiplier: 3
(two, eleven, nineteen,
twenty-one, forty-two;
Powerball: thirty-four;
Multiplier: three)
The City of Rockford
Christmas Parade
MK Russell & Abbott
Heating & Air
100 value for 50
$
$
Subscriptions: 981-1160
Paid-in-advance 7-day print delivery:
Monthly (via auto draft): $12
13 weeks: $41.50
26 weeks: $76.75
52 weeks: $142
Electronic (E-edition) subscriptions:
$5.95 per month
Other subscription packages available
Administration
President: Gregg K. Jones
Publisher: Carl Esposito
865-981-1137
[email protected]
Executive Editor: Larry Aldridge
865-981-1115
[email protected]
Managing Editor: Frank “Buzz” Trexler
865-981-1139
[email protected]
Circulation: 981-1160
Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday
through Friday. If you have any delivery
concerns, you can call from 6 a.m. to 10
a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday.
Advertising
Classified Marketplace: 865-981-1170;
8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday
Retail: 865-981-1152; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Monday through Friday
Advertising Director: Evelyn Sandlin
865-981-1152
[email protected]
Circulation Director: Bryan Sandmeier
865-981-1196
[email protected]
The City of Rockford’s 2014 Christmas Parade
will be held on Saturday, Dec.13, 2014, or in the
event of inclement weather, on Sunday, Dec. 14,
2014. Start time for the parade will be 2 p.m.
If you wish to participate in the parade, please
call Terry Willett at 970-9665 to register.
Lineup will start at 1 p.m. at the
Littlebrook Industrial Park.
Newsroom
Arts & Entertainment: 981-1144
Business: 981-1143
LifeTimes: 981-1149
News: 981-1143
Photography: 981-1167
Sports: 981-1145
Blount Life: 981-1168
Web: 981-1131
Deadlines
Obituaries: 6 p.m. for paid funeral notices
to be published in next day’s edition.
Weddings/Engagements: Tuesday prior
to Sunday publication.
Anniversaries/Birthday: Monday prior to
Wednesday or Thursday publication in
Applause.
Other Applause items: No deadline, but
published on space-available basis.
Submitting News
To have your story considered for
publication in The Daily Times, email it
to the appropriate department editor
under the Newsroom listing in this index,
fax it to 865-981-1175, or mail it using our
postal address. If you are not sure where
to send your idea, email it to editor@
thedailytimes.com. Please be sure to
include a contact name and phone
number in case we need to get in touch
with you. If you have a news tip, call
865-981-1115 in the daytime, or 865-9811143 in the evening.
Corrections
The Daily Times strives for accuracy. If
you see an error in the newspaper, call
Larry Aldridge at 865-981-1115, or Frank
“Buzz” Trexler at 865-981-1139.
Check us online for updates throughout the day: thedailytimes.com
BLOUNT COUNTY | 3A
THE DAILY TIMES
Thursday, November 6, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
Man sentenced in cocaine, money laundering case
From Staff Reports
KNOXVILLE — A 27-year-old
man was sentenced in federal
court this week to serve 39 years
in prison for his role in a cocaine
distributing and money laundering conspiracy.
Baltazar Camacho, Michoacan,
Mexico, was sentenced in Knoxville’s U.S. District Court Tues-
day to 39 years and two months
in prison after pleading guilty in
April to conspiracy to distribute
cocaine and crack cocaine and
conspiracy to commit money
laundering.
The sentencing hearing took
place before Chief U.S. District
Judge Thomas Varlan.
Varlan heard testimony from five
witnesses indicating Camacho dis-
tributed a minimum of between
150 and 450 kilograms of cocaine
and was aware at least half would
be used to make crack cocaine.
Camacho had organized extensive criminal activity and carried a
firearm during his crimes, according to a release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Knoxville.
Camacho was among 15 others
indicted following an 18-month
long investigation. Agencies
involved in the investigation
included the Federal Bureau of
Investigation, Drug Enforcement
Administration and the Roane
County, Knox County and Loudon County sheriff’s offices.
The Oak Ridge, Knoxville and
Clinton police departments were
also part of the investigation.
U.S. Attorney William Killian
said prosecuting these cases will
continue to be a priority.
“Even in a time of intensifying drug activities and fewer
law enforcement resources, we
will continue to pursue all those
who flood our streets with illegal
drugs, and particularly those who
lead large conspiracies such as
these,” Killian said in the release.
“That effort will never stop.
TVA mulls more energy efficiency No perfect entries in Times Football
to meet long-term power needs Contest; so grand prize rises to $400
KNOXVILLE — The
Tennessee Valley Authority is taking a closer look
at energy efficiency as
it works on a long-range
energy resources plan.
The Knoxville News
Sentinel reports the federal utility is using advanced
computer modeling to
determine how valuable
energy efficiency will be
in meeting its long-term
power needs.
The agency’s Integrated Resource Plan is being
revised to determine how
much electricity will be
needed over a 20-year
period and what resources
are needed to provide it.
The updated plan will
address changes in the
economy and the electric
utility industry since the
existing energy plan was
completed in 2011. TVA
officials held a public
meeting in Knoxville on
Monday about the effort.
TVA is the nation’s largest public utility, serving 9
million people in parts of
Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, Georgia, North Carolina and
Virginia.
TVA project manager
Gary Brinkworth says
a draft of the plan was
originally scheduled to be
out in the spring but will
likely be put off until the
summer due to enhancements added to the modeling.
“It’s taken us a little longer to get those techniques
sharpened up, but we have
confidence in the out-
comes of our modeling,”
Brinkworth said.
Stephen Smith, who is
executive director of the
Southern Alliance for
Clean Energy and criticized TVA for not emphasizing energy efficiency
in the last plan, said the
current modeling is a big
improvement.
“This IRP is letting the
model choose the right
amount of energy efficiency,” he said.
Joe Hoagland, TVA vice
president of stakeholder
relations, says the modeling will treat energy efficiency as a power resource
available in 10-megawatt
blocks.
“We will be able to look
at energy efficiency as if
it were one of our power
plants,” he said.
From Staff Reports
High school and college
football upsets last weekend kept anyone from
getting a perfect entry in
The Daily Times Football
Contest.
The best entry had
one missed pick, and
everyone else had two
or more. Since we didn’t
receive a perfect entry,
the grand prize this
weeks jumps to $400.
Charles Hill of Knoxville missed only Florida’s
upset over Georgia to win
$50 for second place.
To award the thirdplace prize, we used the
tie-breaker, closest guess
to the total number of
points scored in the Tennessee-South Carolina
game, 87. Out of the 23
two-miss entries, Danny Graves of Maryville
guessed closest at 69.
We will send checks to
our lucky winners.
For a chance at $400,
pick the winners in the
games featured on the
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entry form in Tuesday’s
sports section. Remember to use the actual
form from the newspaper and please write legibly in ink. All entries
must be received at The
Daily Times by 5 p.m.
Friday in order to be eligible.
Free picks: Since both
the Maryville-Farragut
and Heritage-Hardin Valley games were played
Thursday night, before
the Friday deadline, we
made both of them a correct pick for everyone in
the contest.
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4A | BLOUNT COUNTY
THE DAILY TIMES
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BLOUNT RECORDS
COURT RECORDS
Charged with driving under
the influence of an
intoxicant:
Blount County
Adam Robert Hammond,
40, Montvale Station Road,
Maryville
В™
Case filed Nov. 5 in Blount
County Chancery Court:
Regarding: Mark Wesley
Wright, name change
В™
Cases filed Nov. 5 in the
Equity Division of Blount
County Circuit Court:
В™
В™
Michael Russell vs. Mellissa
E. Russell, divorce
William Lee Parish vs. Rene
Marie Parish, divorce
Case filed Nov. 5 in Blount
County Probate Court:
Regarding: Sara J. Halcomb,
estate
В™
ARRESTS
В™
James Clay Romines, 49,
Triple Oak Street, Rockford,
was arrested Nov. 4 by Blount
County Sheriff ’s Office on a
charge of theft of less than
$500. He was released on a
$750 bond pending a Nov. 12
hearing.
Arrested for contempt of
court:
В™
Dewayne Demetr Rockymore, 27, E. Newcomen Street,
Alcoa, also charged with a
felony violation of probation
CITATIONS
В™
James Brian Cornwell, 42,
Ralph Phelps Road, Louisville, was cited for theft of
less than $500 when a loss
prevention employee at Walmart, 2410 U.S. Highway 411,
reported that Cornwell tried
to conceal and leave the store
with $72.96 in merchandise.
THEFTS
Alcoa
A manager at Candlewood
Suites, 176 Cusick Road, Alcoa,
reported at 9:42 a.m. Nov. 3
that three guests at the hotel
had left without paying their
bill. The charges occurred
Aug. 24, Sept. 3 and Nov. 1,
and totaled $2,163. The men
provided a credit card which
was declined, the manager
said.
В™
В™
A representative of Connection Taxi Airport Services,
920 Griselda Drive, Maryville,
reported at 6:06 p.m. Nov. 4
that a man never returned
to pay his $50 cab ride after
they stopped at Walmart,
1030 Hunters Crossing Drive,
Alcoa. The man was supposed to go inside and cash a
check so he could pay for the
ride, but he failed to return.
В™
An employee with Davis
Jones Construction, 1771 W.
Broadway Ave., Maryville,
reported at 9:43 a.m. Nov.
4 that $1,500 worth of
porcelain tile was stolen from
a house being built on Halifax
Court in Maryville. Theft occurred between Oct. 31 and
Nov. 3. There were no signs of
forced entry.
Blount County
Norman W. Dalton, Old
Knoxville Highway, Rockford,
reported at 10:24 a.m. Nov. 2
that someone took a Smith
& Wesson .38-caliber handgun, valued at $450, from his
home sometime in the past
month.
Hannah E. Mason, Stone
Tree Drive, Maryville, reported
at 1:36 p.m. Nov. 3 the theft
of $60 and her Social Security card from her vehicle.
Mason said the vehicle was
locked and there was no sign
of forced entry.
В™
В™
Maryville
The owner of Commercial
Cutting Equipment, 1706 W.
Lamar Alexander Parkway,
reported at 2:55 p.m. Nov. 4
that a customer had taken
a commercial lawn mower
demonstration model home
for a test and had not returned it. Police made contact
with the suspect, who agreed
to pay for the mower by Nov.
4, but he still has not made
payment arrangements,
reports said. The mower is
valued at $9,861.38.
В™
В™
Kimberly Yvonne Radford,
Maryville, reported at 10:28
a.m. Nov. 4 that she had
ordered a cell phone from Virgin Mobile. When the phone
didn’t come, the company
told her the phone had been
delivered. She told police she
believes it was delivered to
her porch and stolen. The
phone is valued at $200.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Blount County
Deputies responded to a
Townsend residence at 6:51
p.m. Nov. 1 to a domestic
disturbance. A 19-year-old
Rockford man told deputies a
49-year-old Maryville woman
was inside the home hitting
his 40-year-old father. A
deputy reported entering the
home and seeing the woman
hitting the man. She said
she was hitting him because
she was upset. The older
man said she had come over
uninvited after he stopped
replying to text messages
and phone calls. Once inside,
the woman slapped his face,
so he grabbed her in a bear
hug to keep her from hitting
him anymore. The man said
the woman had followed him
from room to room hitting
him. He said she was hitting
him in the face, and she
continued to yell and hit him.
An earring was pulled out of
the woman’s ear during the
incident, but no one could tell
deputies how it happened.
She was taken to Blount Memorial Hospital for treatment
and arrested on a charge of
domestic assault.
В™
В™
A 28-year-old Maryville
man reported at 5:42 p.m.
Nov. 4 that he and his
25-year-old brother had
fought with each other about
two or three hours earlier.
The man told deputies he
waited to call police because
he wanted to see if a family
member could resolve the
issue п¬Ѓrst. The man said his
brother hit him in the head,
mouth and bit his chest.
Deputies observed a cut on
his lip, bump above his eye
and bite mark on his chest.
He said the п¬Ѓght started
because of a disagreement
over an ex-girlfriend. The
brother told deputies they did
not п¬Ѓght, but did argue about
an ex-girlfriend. The younger
brother had a large bump
and swelling on his left eye,
bloody nose and cuts and
scratches around his neck. He
was intoxicated and uncooperative, according to the
report, and told deputies he
had no idea how he got the
injuries. Both men declined
medical treatment and were
each arrested on a charge of
domestic assault.
В™
Deputies responded to a
Maryville residence at 7:06
p.m. Nov. 4 to a report of
a stabbing. A 28-year-old
Maryville man said he and his
54-year-old uncle got into an
argument over where to put
a п¬Ѓre. The uncle reportedly
opened a knife and started
coming toward the man. He
said his mother stepped in
and the uncle shoved her.
The man said he picked up a
statue and hit his uncle in the
head and also hit his mother.
They then started scuffling
in the street, where the man
said he kicked his uncle in the
head. A witness told deputies
the uncle lost consciousness after being kicked. The
uncle, who was sitting on the
ground when deputies arrived, said he didn’t remember what happened. He had
blood on his head and hands,
the report said. The nephew’s
mother told deputies she
tried to get the knife away
from her son’s uncle, resulting
in her hand being cut. She
was taken by ambulance to
Blount Memorial Hospital.
Both the nephew and his
uncle were arrested on a
charge of aggravated domestic assault.
OTHER REPORTS
Alcoa
An employee at Twin City
Mazda, 3076 Alcoa Highway,
Alcoa, reported at 2:58 p.m.
Nov. 3 that a license plate
sent from the business to a
Knoxville residence in October
never arrived. The $26 license
plate is assumed lost or
stolen.
В™
В™
Bertha C. Evans of
Maryville reported at 2:31
p.m. Nov. 4 that a relative
had taken her credit card
without permission and used
it to make several purchases,
totalling $247.91.
В™
Jamie Wilson of Maryville
reported at 11:12 p.m. Nov. 4
that her credit card had been
used at the Kenjo market at
2003 E. Broadway Ave. to
make a $44.43 purchase. The
card went missing when the
victim reported having her
purse stolen at Blount County
Sheriff ’s Office days before.
Man indicted after fast-food robberies
From Staff Reports
A Knoxville man faces a hat trick of
heavy-duty charges in the wake of a grand
jury session that left him saddled with
indictments on allegations of robbery
and firing a gun.
Stephen Thompson, 25, was indicted for
the robbery of a Hardee’s restaurant at 3718
Western Avenue on Nov. 10, 2009, and for
the robbery of a Subway location at 446
North Cedar Bluff Road in October 2014.
His third indictment came for allegedly
discharging a firearm during the Hardee’s
incident; a restaurant employee was hit in
the chest by the gunshot, though he ultimately recovered from his injuries.
The indictments mean Thompson will
DEATH
RICHARDSON, JANE ELIZABETH,
84, of Townsend, died
Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014, at UT
Medical Center. Arrangements will be announced at
a later date. Smith Funeral & Cremation Service,
Maryville.
now stand trial on all three charges. Should
he be convicted, he could spend the rest
of his life in prison. The robbery counts
are both punishable by up to 20 years in
prison, and a fine of $250,000. If convicted
for discharging a firearm, Thompson will
have to serve a mandatory sentence of 10
years to life in prison, with that sentence
to be served consecutive to—rather than
concurrent with—any other prison term
he might receive. Because he is facing
federal charges, Thompson would not be
eligible for parole.
Thompson’s indictment came through
a joint effort of the Federal Bureau of
Investigation Safe Streets Task Force,
Knox County Sheriff ’s Office, and the
Knoxville Police Department.
OBITUARY POLICY
A funeral notice in The Daily Times costs 55 cents per word
plus $18 for a photo. The notice will appear in both our print
and online editions.
For anyone who does not wish to purchase a funeral notice,
The Daily Times will run a free death notice as a public
service, containing basic information such as survivors and
funeral arrangements. All information is verified through the
funeral home handling arrangements.
For more information, call 981-1166.
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Nissan pledges further
expansion of Miss. plant
BY JEFF AMY
The Associated Press
CANTON, Miss. — Nissan Motor Co. says it wants
to produce 507,000 vehicles a year at its Mississippi
plant by 2017, an expansion
that would add about 1,000
employees to the current
6,300 workers at the complex.
John Martin, Nissan North
America’s senior vice president for manufacturing,
supply chain management
and purchasing, made the
announcement Wednesday
at an event unveiling the
first Murano SUV made
at the plant. Nissan shifted
production of the Murano
from Japan to Mississippi
in an effort to build more
than 85 percent of vehicles
sold in the U.S. in North
America.
Martin said the expan-
sion, which includes adding
a third shift to the production line that makes Altima
sedans, is necessary to meet
sales goals. The company is
trying to sell 8 percent of all
cars produced worldwide.
It’s already above that level
in the U.S., having grown to
8.6 percent of the market so
far this year.
Nissan’s Canton plant currently has an annual capacity of 480,000 vehicles, and
will make about 300,000
this year.
“To build to 507, we do
a couple of crazy tricks,”
Martin said. “We have
lunch breaks but we work
through them. We have
special squads of people
that keep the lines moving.”
Small SUVs like the Murano have been the fastest
growing segment of the
U.S. auto market this year,
and now make up one out
of every four vehicles sold.
Martin said that the plant,
which will export Murano
models to up to 100 countries, will struggle to meet
demand at a rate of 94,000
a year once full output is
reached.
“We know what the customer wants,” Martin said.
“They want that high driving position, giving them
the forward view of the
road.”
The Canton plant is now
making eight models.
Besides the Murano, they
include the Armada and
Xterra SUVs, the Titan and
Frontier pickup trucks, the
NV cargo and passenger
vans and the Altima sedan.
Sentra sedans were made
in Canton for about a year
and half, but that production has now returned to
Mexico.
FUNERAL NOTICES
WILLIAM �RANDY’ BEASLEY
William “Randy” Beasley, 56, went to be with
God on Nov. 3, 2014. He is
survived by his spouse of
40 years, Jody “Aunt Jo”
Beasley, John Johnson and
Jaramiah Johnson; brothers, Glen Beasley and
Stanley Beasley; sisters,
Linda Dennis and Jansie
Beasley; along with many
nieces and nephews. He
was the best; a great friend
and a wonderful person.
We all love you and you
will be missed by many.
Donation towards services may be made to Jody
Beasley. Arrangements by
Cremation By Grandview,
806-8170; www.Cremation
ByGrandview.com.
NELL MARIE COBBLE EVANS
Nell Marie Cobble Evans,
age 89, of Knoxville (formerly Maryville), passed
away at Tennova Residential Hospice on Nov.
5, 2014. She was a member
of First Baptist Church,
Maryville. Nell was a loving wife, mother, sister,
aunt and grandmother. She
was preceded in death by
her husband of 41 years,
Leonard O. Evans, Sr., her
parents, Ulia Uriah Cobble and Mary Louetta (Lou
Lou) Cobble; her brother, Bill Cobble; and sister,
June Cobble Moore. She
is survived by her son and
daughter-in-law, Leonard
O. (Len) Evans, Jr. and
Ginger Evans; her daughter and son-in-law, Mintha Evans Roach and Jon
G. Roach; grandchildren,
Leonard O. (Le) Evans,
III and his wife Casey,
Gina Evans, Jon G. Roach
II, and Evan G. Roach;
great-grandchildren, Mia
Evans, Michael Culpepper,
Jr. and Leonard O. (Oliver)
Evans, IV; sister, Mary Ann
Stiles; nieces and nephews,
John D. (Johnny) Moore,
Mary Ann (Susie) Stinnett, Jody Moore, Kendall
Stiles, Junelle Stiles Sellers, Tena Cobble Branam
and Tracy Cobble Vittetoe; and several greatnieces and nephews. Nell
attended Anderson Elementary School and graduated from Young High
School in 1941 at the age
of 16. During World War
II, she worked at ALCOA
as a crane operator contributing to the war effort.
It was at ALCOA where
she met her late husband.
More recently, she worked
for the State of Tennessee,
Department of Labor and
Work Force Development
as an adjudicator until
her retirement in 2008 at
the age of 83. The family
extends its appreciation
to the excellent staffs of
Arbor Terrace Assisted
Living and Tennova Residential Hospice for the
care provided in the last
years of her life. Private
graveside services and
interment will be held at
Woodlawn Cemetery on
Friday, Nov. 7, 2014, with
Dr. Jerry Askew officiating. Friends may call at
their convenience until
8 p.m., Thursday, Nov.
6, 2014, at Berry Funeral Home, 3704 Chapman
Highway, which is handling the arrangements.
Online remembrances
may be sent to www.berry
funeralhome.com. In lieu
of flowers, contributions
may be made to United
Way of Knoxville or a charity of the donor’s choice.
SYLVIA MAE SMITH MERRITT
Sylvia Mae Smith Merritt,
age 90, of Maryville, passed
away Monday, Nov. 3, 2014.
Family will receive friends
from 5 until 7 p.m., Friday, Nov.7, 2014, at Smith
Trinity Chapel with funer-
al service to follow at 7
p.m. Family and friends
will assemble for interment at 1 p.m., Saturday,
Nov. 8, 2014, at Grandview
Cemetery. Smith Funeral and Cremation Ser-
vice, Maryville, 983-1000,
www.SmithFuneraland
Cremation.com.
BARBARA SMITH SPEARS
The families of Kelly, Mike
and Tommy Spears and
Melinda Boling will be
hosting A Celebration of
the Life of Barbara Smith
Spears who passed away
Sept. 25, 2014. The Celebration will be held from 6-9
p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6,
at The Capitol Theatre
in downtown
Maryville.
McCammonAmmons-
Click Funeral Home, 9826812, www.mccammon
ammonsclick.com
UNA FLORENCE STEPHENS
Una Florence Stephens,
age 92, of Maryville,
passed away Tuesday, Nov.
4, 2014, at Shannondale
of Maryville. Preceded
in death by parents, Herbert and Dorothy Fipps;
brother Leland Fipps. Sur-
vivors include daughters
and son-in-law, Sherry and
Jeff Rogers and Cathy Russell. Private graveside service will be at Grandview
Cemetery. Smith Funeral and Cremation Service, Maryville, 983-1000,
www.SmithFuneraland
Cremation.com.
MILLER FUNERAL
HOME
“The Business That Service Built”
Pre-Arrangement Funeral Planning
www.millerfuneralhome.org
915 W. BROADWAY
65061817
982-6041
BLOUNT COUNTY | 5A
THE DAILY TIMES
Thursday, November 6, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
Lambert picks
up three honors
at CMA Awards
BY MESFIN FEKADU
AP Music Writer
MARK A. LARGE | THE DAILY TIMES
NEW YOUTH COURT JURORS in Blount County include (from left) Mercedes Dickerson, 17, Iman Coffin, 14, Emilee Smith, 18, Leah
Scueder, 15, and Charlie Garcia, 15.
YOUTH COURT: Jurors encouraged to use diverse approach
FROM 1A
Pflk_:flik#k_\cfZXc
program has seen a meager 2 percent recidivism
rate in its first year, with
100 offenders having
cycled through.
That’s half the 4 percent rate that youth
courts have seen statewide, and a mere fraction of the 18 to 40 percent recidivism rate that
`jZfddfekfalm\e`c\
offenders who are funneled through traditional
alm\e`c\Zflikj%
Why is the program so
jlZZ\jj]lc69Xib\i#Xe[
other officials, seem to
believe it has something
to do with the power of
peers.
“There’s something
about having one of your
peers sitting there, one
teen to another, saying,
�Hey, this is not a great
`[\X#ГЉГ€9Xib\ijX`[%Г‡K_`j
is not like having some
adult enforce something
on you.”
[email protected]\cX[plg
on a bench who doesn’t
know anything about
you,” said Division II
General Sessions Judge
B\ecpe=fjk\i#n_fgi\$
j`[\jfm\ialm\e`c\_\Xi$
`e^j`e9cflek:flekp%
“When you have someone your age, with your
experience talking to you
— what they say matters.
It’s peer pressure, but it’s
positive peer pressure.”
Nearly 75 local lawyers, proud parents and
�We also learn to
listen. We have to
listen to people’s
stories, and
consider how they
may not have been
taught the same
things we have
been taught.’
Andrew Ashmore
Blount Youth Court juror
e\ncpd`ek\[alifij
crowded into the front
lobby of the courthouse
Wednesday evening for
the swearing-in ceremoep%Jfd\f]k_\alifij
are holdovers from the
first year of the program,
and a couple of them
— including Maryville
High School sophomore
Andrew Ashmore —
spoke a few words before
taking the oath of office.
�PRACTICAL PROGRAM’
“It’s a very practical
program,” said Ashmore.
“It’s astounding how low
our reinfraction rate is.
And I find myself learning new life skills every
day.”
When asked what
new skills he had
gleaned from serving on
youth court, Ashmore
answered, with a hearty
laugh, “Public speaking,
for one thing. I couldn’t
speak in public at all
before entering this program.
“We also learn to listen. We have to listen
to people’s stories, and
consider how they may
not have been taught
the same things we have
been taught.”
A robotics enthusiast,
Pflk_C\X[\ij_`g9cflek
member and a clarinet
player in the Maryville
High School band, Ashmore said he entered
k_\pflk_alifigif^iXd
last year because he was
interested in law as a
career.
“I put in my application as soon as I heard
about it over the school
intercom,” he said. “I was
— and still am — interested in law as a possible
career opportunity, and
I knew this would be a
great way to learn about
it.”
Another reason for
the program’s success,
jX`[9Xib\i#`jk_Xkpflk_
alifijXi\\eZfliX^\[kf
take more diverse, creative approaches to sentencing.
“Instead of being about
punishment, it’s more
\[lZXk`feXc#Г€9Xib\ijX`[%
=fi`ejkXeZ\#pflk_
court offenders are
often required to think
about the impact of their
behaviors, then issue
apologies to the peo-
ple they hurt with their
actions. Sometimes they
are required to do assignments in workbooks,
or research and write
papers about the hazards
of particular activities
— maybe the dangers of
smoking, or the pitfalls of
teen alcohol abuse.
Restitution is also a
common youth court
j\ek\eZ\#k_fl^_=fjk\i
said there’s a financial
cap of $100, so as not to
burden first-time offenders with insurmountable
debt.
In addition to the
impressive statistics,
there are other, more
tangibly gratifying signs
that the youth court program is having a positive
impact. Ashmore noted
k_Xkpflk_Zflikalifij
have already received a
handful of thank-you letters from kids who went
through the diversion.
And statewide program
[`i\Zkfi;\e`j\9\ek$
ley said that many high
school students who
were once youth court
offenders themselves
came back to the program later on, serving as
pflk_Zflikalifij%
“You have those
moments when a youth
court member really
feels empowered to
jg\Xbflk#Г€9\ekc\pjX`[#
“and the young person
on the other end truly
listens, and takes what
they say to heart. Those
moments are the best.”
BRIDGES: Committee forwards payroll system proposal
FROM 1A
schedule and would terminate an associated interestrate swap;
В›:fekiXZkn`k_:_\cdj$
ford, Mass.-based Kronos
Inc. that would allow the
implementation of a $1.4
million automated county payroll and human
resources systems if
approved. The proposed
contract commits the
county to spending about
$2.3 million over five years
— including $1.4 million in
the current fiscal year —
for implementation and
operational costs. The
county also has option to
cancel with the contract
with 60-days notice;
В›=`eXci\gfikfeaX`cfm\i$
crowding from the Institute for Law and Policy
Planning. The report contains the assessment and
recommendations of consultant Alan Kalmanoff,
executive director of the
ILPP.
NASHVILLE —
Miranda Lambert is the
queen of contemporary
country.
The singer picked up
three awards at Wednes[XpГЉj:flekipDlj`Z
Association Awards,
including album of the
year for “Platinum.”
“Holy crap!” she said
onstage. “I turned 30
last year and I felt like I
need to sing about new
stuff.”
“This is really, really
special to me,” she said,
appearing teary-eyed.
Lambert, who earned
the most nominations of
any artist with nine, also
won music event and
single of the year. She
is the only female nominated for entertainer of
the year, to be presented
at the end of the show
X`i`e^c`m\fe89:]ifd
k_\9i`[^\jkfe\8i\eX
in Nashville.
Lambert kicked off the
show, teaming up with
Meghan Trainor for
a country-tinged version of “All About That
9Xjj#Г€ifZb`e^Y`^Ycfe[
hair and a happy vibe
That was followed
with a hilarious string
f]afb\j]ifd:Xii`\
Le[\inff[Xe[9iX[
Paisley, a white-hot
duo hosting the sev\ek_:D8jXe[\Xie$
ing laugh after laugh for
afb\jk_XkiXe^\[]ifd
Ebola to Taylor Swift.
Swift’s switch to
pop from country was
referred to as “Post Pardon Taylor Swift Disorder,” or PPTSD.
Г‡Gi\j`[\ek9XiXZb
Obama doesn’t care
about PPTSD!” Paisley
yelled. Underwood fol-
lowed with: “I’m pretty
sure it’s why the Democrats lost the Senate.”
Underwood and Paisley sang a version of
Dolly Parton’s “Jolene,”
calling it “Quarantine.”
Paisley also earned
roaring laughter when
_\efk\[k_Xkk_\89:
j\i`\jÇ9cXZb$`j_#È
which airs Wednesdays,
would not be airing
Y\ZXlj\f]k_\:D8j%
“If you were expecting
kfj\\k_\j_fnÉ9cXZb$
ish,’ this ain’t it ... I hope
pflГЉi\\eafp`e^Г‰N_`k\$
ish,”’ he said.
9\]fi\k_\j_fnY\^Xe#
Underwood glowed on
the carpet in a shimmering gold dress, while
Trainor went with a
blue lace mini and Kacey Musgraves made a
style statement as she
rocked her teased hair.
Musgraves, who earned
two Grammys earlier
this year, won song of
k_\p\Xi]fiÇ=fccfnPfli
Arrow,” which she conifk\n`k_9iXe[p:cXib#
who is openly gay and
was among the contenders for new artist of the
year.
“Oh my goodness! Do
you guys realize what
this means for country
music?” Musgraves said,
Xj:cXibXe[jfe^ni`k\i
Shane McAnally stood
behind her. “Our genre
was built on simple good
songs about real life and
that’s what this was.”
Musgraves performed
n`k_Cfi\kkXCpee#9cXb\
Shelton sang with Ashley Monroe and pop
diva Ariana Grande
sported a mini top and
skirt as she sang the hit
Г‡9Xe^9Xe^Г€Xcfe^j`[\
C`kkc\9`^Kfne#n_f
won vocal group of the
year.
OFFICERS: Five men face
maximum of 20 years
FROM 1A
The U.S. Attorney’s
Office defined “color of
official right” as a public official obtaining an
illegitimate payment with
the belief the money is
given in return for taking,
withholding or influencing official action.
If convicted, the five
men face a maximum
sentence of 20 years in
prison and a $250,000 fine
on each count.
The indictment resulted from an investigation
Ypk_\=\[\iXc9li\Xlf]
Investigation, the Tennes-
see Valley Authority —
Office of Inspector General and the Tennessee
9li\Xlf]@em\jk`^Xk`fe%
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Jeffrey Theodore will
prosecute the case.
A representative of
k_\G`^\fe=fi^\Gfc`Z\
Department said the
agency only learned
of the charges against
Joyner after the indictment was issued and an
active review of the situation was underway.
Joyner was still on active
duty with the department
as of Wednesday afternoon.
ON THE WEB: Editorials, letters and other
opinions, archived for your review.
www.thedailytmes.com/opinion
Scan this QR code to go to the Web page.
6A
THE DAILY TIMES
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2014
OUR VOICE
Homeless problem
is opportunity for
federal cooperation
A
s a videotaped comedy sketch on “Saturday Night
Live,” it would be a hoot. Picture a 90-year-old minister accompanied by two of his brethren in a city park.
The senior citizen is holding a plate of food as he is confronted by police.
“Drop that plate right now,” one officer says to the
90-year-old.
But this is no comedy. This is real. The officers were
doing their sworn duty as mandated by the city of Fort
Lauderdale, Fla. The Associated Press reported that the
three South Florida ministers were arrested last weekend
as they handed out food. They were charged with breaking
a new ordinance restricting
public feeding of the homeless, and each faces up to 60
days in jail and a $500 fine.
The homeless problem is
growing, and cities across the
nation are responding with
ordinances on the verge on
making homelessness a crime
— or at least making it illegal to help out folks living on
streets, in parks, under interstate overpasses and hidden
inside culverts.
It’s partly about the economy. Partly about social outcasts. Partly about mental illness. Partly about addiction.
Partly about lonely desperation. It’s all about humanity.
And it’s so sad.
Fort Lauderdale is the latest U.S. city to pass restrictions
on feeding homeless people in public places. Advocates for
the homeless say the cities are fighting to control increasing homeless populations but that simply passing ordinances doesn’t work.
In the past two years, more than 30 cities have tried to
introduce laws similar to Fort Lauderdale’s, according to
the National Coalition for the Homeless. The efforts come
as more veterans face homelessness and after two harsh
winters drove homeless people south, especially to Florida,
according to an expert on homelessness interviewed by the
AP.
Some cities conduct routine homeless sweeps. Some have
anti-panhandling campaigns. Many laws continue to target
public feedings.
As reported by the AP, the expert thinks he knows what
doesn’t work: street-feeding programs for one thing, outlawing homeless behavior for another. Many downtown
business people, residents, workers and tourists also know
what doesn’t work: ignoring the homeless.
What everyone is short on is a solution. With a new Congress on the ascent and a sitting president on the way out,
maybe as they cross paths homelessness can be a place for
common ground.
Let the hot-button issues like health care and immigration simmer for a while. Those snagged-up knots aren’t
getting untied anytime soon. Why not develop a working
relationship first? Do something to make a difference. Do
something about homelessness.
The efforts come as
more veterans face
homelessness and
after two harsh
winters drove
homeless
people south.
OTHER VOICES
A
The п¬Ѓnal frontier
mericans are spoiled when it comes to space travel.
We beat the Soviet Union (now Russia) to the moon.
We’ve sent unmanned crafts to Mars. We’ve sent craft
toward Jupiter. Our satellites roam the nightly skies.
So when there’s an accident involving a rocket, such as
the one involving an unmanned Orbital Sciences rocket
carrying supplies to the International Space Station that
exploded just above the launching pad, or the “anomaly”
experienced by the Virgin Galatic test vehicle SpaceShipTwo that crashed in the Mojave Desert, the question comes
up as to how such a thing can happen.
It all begs a larger question. Is there truly a place for
space travel for private companies taking civilians up into
the outer reaches of space? Given the exploratory nature of
humans, it’s a question that at some point, those companies
and the American people may not know how to answer.
The Daily Star, Hammond, La.
TODAY’S BIBLE VERSE
SUBMITTED BY VIVIAN SHIELDS, LOUISVILLE
Every man according as he purposeth in his heart, so let him
give; not grudgingly, or of necessity: for God loveth a cheerful
giver.
II Corinthians 9:7
THE DAILY TIMES
Blount County’s only daily newspaper, serving our readers since 1883
Published by Blount County Publishers LLC
Gregg K. Jones
President
Carl Esposito
Publisher
Frank Trexler
Managing Editor
Richard Dodson
News Editor
Dean Stone
Editor
Melanie Tucker
LifeTimes Editor
Robert Norris
City Editor
Larry Aldridge
Executive Editor
Marcus Fitzsimmons
Sports Editor
Daryl Sullivan
Photo Editor
Stuck in a Reagan time warp
T
he Republican debate about the shape of the
political future has begun, typically for conservatives, as a fight about the past. As President Obama has become a Jimmy Carter-like figure — hapless, luckless and increasingly friendless — most prospective GOP presidential candidates are positioning themselves as Ronald Reagan’s rightful heir. A thick fog of historical analogy
has settled over the Republican field.
“It took Jimmy Carter to give us Ronald Reagan,” argues Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.), who clearly
sees (and admires) a resemblance to the latter in
the mirror each morning. “I’m a great believer in
Ronald Reagan,” claims Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.),
even while proposing a Carthage-like destruction
of Reagan’s foreign policy. Sen. Lindsey Graham
(R-S.C.) has called Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) “the
son of Ronald Reagan when it comes to national security” — though Rubio is actually young
enough to be Reagan’s great-grandson.
The squabble over this inheritance is recounted
in a recent essay by Henry Olsen and Peter Wehner, provocatively titled, “If Ronald Reagan Were
Alive Today, He Would Be 103 Years Old.” (Credit the editors of Commentary for knowing how
to push conservative buttons in the good cause
of bringing more eyes to an important article.)
Olsen and Wehner are, in fact, deeply respectful
toward Reagan, whom they describe as the greatest Republican since Lincoln. They warn, however, that “the constant invocation of Reagan’s name
to bolster arguments for present-day policies
(and present-day politicians) actually hinders our
understanding of the substance of Reagan’s legacy
— and undermines the Republican Party’s ability
to make a case for itself in the here-and-now.”
For decades, Democratic policies and politicians
grew pale and scrawny in the shadow of Franklin
Roosevelt. It took Bill Clinton to modernize the
Democratic appeal — providing government, at
least in theory, with a catalytic, rather than supervisory, role. It is Republicans who now struggle
in the shade of presidential greatness, even when
they win congressional elections.
Olsen and Wehner point to two serious risks in
seeking “a posthumous seal of approval” from Reagan. First, there is the consistent temptation of all
idolatry — to craft a figure in our own image. Those
who claim Reagan as the first and purest tea party
leader find support not in history but in mythology.
The authors make what seems, at first, a fine distinction but turns out to be a decisive one. Reagan’s
guiding political principle was not human freedom — the belief of a doctrinaire libertarian — but
human dignity. The cause of dignity is served by
the ability of individuals to shape their own destiny, something denied in all forms of totalitarianism. But properly limited government can also
serve the cause of human
dignity. “We accept without reservation,” said Reagan, “our obligation to help
the aged, disabled and those
unfortunates who, through
no fault of their own, must
depend on their fellow man.”
At the time, libertarians
found Reagan “too kind,
gentle and sentimental”
and lacking a “blueprint for
radical governance” (David
Stockman), and the true
progenitors of the tea party
found him a captive of the
“establishment” (Richard Viguerie). In fact, Reagan’s presidency represented an accommodation of
the theory of the New Deal and the Great Society
(the existence and constitutionality of Social Security and Medicare), coupled with a strong objection
to the coercive, uniform and bureaucratic methods
of modern liberalism. On economic policy, Reagan
was deeply committed to cutting marginal tax rates
but willing to accept tax increases in other areas.
He operated, according to Olsen and Wehner,
“within the four corners of reality.” He was “more a
Burkean conservative than a Jacobin.”
The authors diagnose a second risk of Republican claims to be the vicar of Reagan. This strategy
is employed as a conversation-stopper: Reagan
said it; I believe it; that settles it. But this produces a Republican policy debate encased in amber.
“Some of his epigones,” argue Olsen and Wehner,
“today appear caught in a time warp, acting as if
every year is 1980. Reagan, while conservative to
the bone, would never have allowed himself to
become captive to the past.” Reagan inherited a
nation with high inflation and a 70 percent top
marginal tax rate. Our nation has wage stagnation
and a gap in skills and human capital that is hardening into a rigid class system.
This is a lesson that is particularly urgent for
newly elected Republicans and prospective presidential candidates. A party truly animated by the
spirit of Reagan will address the problems of our
time, not of his.
MICHAEL
GERSON
MICHAEL GERSON’S email address: michaelgerson@
washpost.com
YOUR VOICE
Letters to the Editor reflect the opinions of the writers and are not necessarily those of The Daily Times.
Blount hungry benefit
from Halloween
Dear Editor:
Once again, due to the work
of Blount County young adults,
Blount County’s hungry will
be fed. The annual Halloween
Trick or Cans program, headed
this year by co-chairs Elizabeth
Keller and Andrew Franks, was
hugely successful.
Elizabeth and Andrew headed
a group of young adults numbering approximately 115 who
canvassed areas of Maryville,
and for the first time areas of
Alcoa.
Rather than collecting treats
for themselves, they went doorto-door and collected food for
the Community Food Connection of Blount County (CFC),
311 Whitecrest Drive, Maryville.
The CFC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides
food for residents of Blount
County. CFC provides food for
over 6,000 people per month
and is staffed completely by
volunteers.
This Halloween effort began
in 1997 by youth at New Providence Presbyterian Church and
has expanded each year; current chairs select chairs for the
following year and in this way
continuity is assured and the
responsibility is passed from
year to year. These chairs are
now either Alcoa or Maryville
High School students and not
from any specified organization.
What a wonderful display
of responsibility and community service demonstrated by
our local young adults! Much
appreciation is also extended to each and every one of
you who answered the door
and gave food to these young
adults.
On behalf of Blount County
residents, thank you to Elizabeth and Andrew, each of the
approximately 115 volunteers,
all of their supporters and each
of you who donated food.
In spite of inclement weather,
due to the work of these young
adults, and the donations you
provided them, enough food
was collected to provide Blount
County residents with food for
approximately one week.
Merl Krull
CFC Volunteer Coordinator
202 Amy Drive
Maryville, TN 37801
VOICE YOUR OPINIONS
Letters to the editor are welcome. All letters must
be signed and include your address and a telephone
number where the writer may be reached. Those longer
than 300 words normally will not be considered for
publication. Address letters: Editor, The Daily Times,
P.O. Box 9740, Maryville, Tenn., 37802-9740.
Letters may be submitted via email to
[email protected] with verification included.
In addition, a signed copy of the email must be forwarded to the above postal address.
We do not accept letters via fax or by comments
posted to our websites or Facebook page.
| 7A
THE DAILY TIMES
Thursday, November 6, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
p
S&P 500
2,023.57
+11.47
NASDAQ
4,620.72
Today
Mouse house
q
-2.91
p
Money&Markets
+100.69
A batch of economic reports
helped give stocks a lift
Wednesday, driving stock indexes up. A survey showed hiring
picked up last month, while a
reading of activity in the service
sector increased. Nine of the 10
sectors in the S&P 500 ended
the day higher.
Devon Energy
DVN
Close: $61.62 5.60 or 10.0%
The oil and gas exploration company reported a jump in quarterly profit
and the financial results beat Wall
Street expectations.
$80
70
60
50
A
S
52-week range
$53.34
O
$80.63
Vol.: 8.7m (2.4x avg.)
Mkt. Cap: $25.21 b
PE: 15.3
Yield: 1.6%
TICKER CLOSE CHG
Alcoa
AllegTch
Alumina
AlumChina
ArcelorMit
Cameco g
CarpTech
FrptMcM
Gerdau
Nucor
POSCO
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SID
SCCO
STLD
TCK
TS
TX
TRQ
X
16.26
30.49
4.48
11.26
12.37
16.84
50.38
27.13
4.51
53.06
67.68
66.47
3.20
29.01
22.16
15.44
38.45
21.86
3.15
36.36
YTD
-.27 +5.63
-.41 -5.14
...
+.52
+.10 +2.56
... -5.47
+.55 -3.93
+.65 -11.82
-.66 -10.59
-.02 -3.33
+.19
-.32
+.35 -10.32
-.16 -9.37
-.04 -3.00
-.06
+.30
-.08 +2.62
+.45 -10.57
+.65 -5.24
+.24 -9.44
-.11
-.15
-.21 +6.86
30-YR T-BONDS
3.06%
p
+.01
CRUDE OIL
$78.68
p
+1.49
6 37.48
2 39.30
4 76.28
4 4.68
9 17.36
0 49.63
5 11.12
9 164.65
9 45.68
9 110.02
0 53.88
0 561.62
7 41.04
9 18.03
0 35.58
1 21.45
9 9.63
0 142.45
0 129.33
0 47.69
2 74.89
0 89.44
9 25.75
4 135.10
0 67.44
8 57.49
9 57.16
0 34.64
0 32.67
9 81.73
7 69.74
6 125.17
0 19.41
6 90.55
6 70.66
4 18.77
0 84.58
5 104.76
8 13.23
8 69.87
4 19.77
5 28.09
0 98.09
3 56.73
5 15.17
0 68.44
9 99.26
0 98.09
5 12.45
9 82.28
6 15.91
0 73.18
0 53.14
0 57.12
0 42.56
1 6.85
0 192.94
0 57.50
5 5.50
3 17.51
2 68.43
4 37.73
9 35.43
0 139.47
6 58.76
4 86.79
4 11.03
0 45.31
7 21.80
4 11.30
3 14.07
0 27.92
5 32.96
0 38.36
6 19.38
9 12.67
5 80.41
5 11.54
1 3.50
9 8.22
9 43.22
0 36.58
2 49.16
8 41.26
4 50.77
9 44.24
8 19.57
0 117.10
0 68.29
0 30.35
4 3.41
7 69.50
6 81.37
0 36.96
0 34.60
0 173.70
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s +53.0 +68.1
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s +11.4 +23.1
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t -37.8 -36.3
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+5.0
+0.2
s +20.5 +23.8
s +28.4 +29.0
s
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t
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+8.4
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+6.0 +15.2
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+1.7
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s
-0.9
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t -17.8 -24.9
s
+6.4 +15.3
s +20.3 +29.9
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-0.6
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s +107.5 +146.9
s
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s
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-3.7
-3.7
s
+2.2
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s -56.2 -54.2
s +11.1 +29.7
s +12.5 +27.9
s +95.1 +105.0
t -13.1 -13.5
s
+7.6 +17.3
t +25.2 +27.5
s +23.9 +49.9
t +29.2 +29.3
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s
-1.3
+2.4
s +34.1 +19.2
s
+8.9 +16.8
s +10.2 +16.8
EURO
$1.2478
Interestrates
q
TREASURIES
3-month T-bill
GOLD
$1,145.40
-.0078
q
-22.00
NET
1YR
YEST PVS CHG WK MO QTR AGO
.02
0.01 +0.01
s s r
.04
11 1.84
6-month T-bill
.05 0.06 -0.01 s s r
.08
dd
...
.10
52-wk T-bill
.09 0.09
... r s r
14 1.10
0.18e
2-year
T-note
.53
0.52
+0.01
s
s
s
.30
The yield on the
26 0.12
5-year
T-note
1.63
1.63
...
s
s
t
1.38
10-year
Trea23 2.08f
27 0.40 sury rose to
10-year T-note
2.34 2.33 +0.01 s s t 2.67
25 2.44 2.34 percent
30-year T-bond
3.06 3.05 +0.01 s r t 3.77
26 0.24f Wednesday.
15 1.36 Yields affect
NET
1YR
19 1.48 rates on mortBONDS
YEST PVS CHG WK MO QTR AGO
18
... gages and other
14 0.96 consumer loans.
Barclays LongT-BdIdx 2.89
2.88 +0.01 s s t 3.53
16 0.20f
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.39
4.38 +0.01 s s t 5.06
25 0.50f
27 0.20
Barclays USAggregate 2.28
2.28
... s s t 2.30
PRIME FED
cc
...
s t s 5.66
Barclays
US
High
Yield
5.88
5.82
+0.06
RATE FUNDS
17
...
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 3.89
3.90 -0.01 t t t 4.54
57 2.60a
YEST 3.25 .13
5 0.50
Barclays CompT-BdIdx 1.93
1.93
... s s s 1.60
16
... 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13
s s s 3.18
Barclays
US
Corp
3.07
3.06
+0.01
1
YR
AGO
3.25 .13
22 1.00f
19 0.95
11 4.28
6MO. 1YR.
25 0.80f
Foreign
MAJORS
CLOSE CH. %CH. AGO AGO
17 0.90
Exchange
USD per British Pound 1.5977 -.0027 -.17% 1.6869 1.6049
17 0.90
44 1.00 The dollar rose
Canadian Dollar
1.1400 +.0008 +.07% 1.0951 1.0462
13 0.42 against the
USD per Euro
1.2478 -.0078 -.63% 1.3877 1.3476
19 2.04 euro, British
Japanese Yen
114.71 +1.14 +.99% 102.12 98.60
45 0.40 pound and
15 0.24
Mexican Peso
13.5711 +.0168 +.12%13.0376 13.1573
Japanese yen.
24 0.68
EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST
13 1.40 It’s close to its
Israeli Shekel
3.7991 +.0124 +.33% 3.4590 3.5356
21 1.88f highest level
29 0.70 against the yen Norwegian Krone
6.8340 -.0108 -.16% 5.9531 5.9885
14 3.32 since 2007,
South African Rand 11.1430 +.1147 +1.03%10.5361 10.2371
12 2.76 before the start
Swedish Krona
7.3786 +.0012 +.02% 6.5506 6.5264
14 0.20 of the Great
Swiss Franc
.9650 +.0055 +.57% .8776 .9128
15 1.32 Recession.
dd
...
ASIA/PACIFIC
18 0.88
Australian Dollar
1.1652 +.0216 +1.85% 1.0776 1.0535
22 2.30
Chinese Yuan
6.1140 -.0015 -.02% 6.2457 6.1009
2.46e
Hong Kong Dollar
7.7522 -.0002 -.00% 7.7522 7.7518
...
12 1.48
Indian Rupee
61.415 +.005 +.01% 60.178 61.630
23 1.88
Singapore Dollar
1.2938 +.0052 +.40% 1.2501 1.2434
18 2.07f
South Korean Won
1091.03 +13.45 +1.23%1027.99 1063.66
20 0.16
Taiwan Dollar
30.64
+.09 +.29% 30.10 29.44
27 0.80
dd
...
22 2.72
16 1.60f
FUELS
CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD
19 0.74f Commodities
Crude Oil (bbl)
78.68
77.19 +1.93
-20.1
23 2.04 The price of
Ethanol (gal)
1.92
1.87
...
+0.2
dd
... crude oil rose
Heating Oil (gal)
2.44
2.44
-0.16
-20.8
19 6.00f for the first time
Natural Gas (mm btu)
4.19
4.13 +1.57
-0.9
24 0.92 in five days,
Unleaded Gas (gal)
2.09
2.08 +0.42
-25.1
cc
...
bouncing back
5
...
METALS
CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD
15 1.40 after hitting a
Gold (oz)
1145.40 1167.40
-1.88
-4.7
... three-year low.
19 0.68 The price of
Silver (oz)
15.42
15.93
-3.20
-20.3
15 2.80 natural gas rose Platinum (oz)
1210.60 1224.70
-1.15
-11.7
26 1.48 for the seventh
Copper (lb)
3.02
3.03
-0.36
-12.2
18 1.08 straight day.
Palladium (oz)
757.50 790.30
-4.15
+5.6
21
...
27
...
AGRICULTURE
CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD
dd 0.75
Cattle (lb)
1.65
1.67
-0.87
+22.8
dd
...
Coffee (lb)
1.86
1.88
-1.04
+68.3
dd
...
Corn (bu)
3.70
3.65 +1.58
-12.3
23 1.08
Cotton (lb)
0.63
0.63
-0.14
-25.9
15 1.04
Lumber (1,000 bd ft)
327.10 324.40 +0.83
-9.2
21 1.28
q 1.56a
Orange Juice (lb)
1.30
1.32
-1.03
-4.5
q 1.08
Soybeans (bu)
10.21
10.10 +1.04
-22.3
16 0.88
Wheat (bu)
5.25
5.31
-1.08
-13.3
12 0.20
62
...
dd
...
26 0.88
PERCENT RETURN
FUND
CAT NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR
22 0.24 FAMILY
15
...
American Funds GrthAmA m
LG 46.31 +.04 +7.7 +13.5 +19.3 +14.2
13 0.80
IncAmerA m
MA 21.81 +.12 +8.1 +10.8 +13.5 +12.0
8 0.40
InvCoAmA m
LB 40.62 +.25 +11.9 +17.7 +19.8 +14.3
15 0.30
GrowA m
LG 49.96 +.07 +6.4 +12.8 +13.2 +12.3
dd
... Calamos
NYVentA m
LB 39.96 +.24 +4.7 +11.3 +16.4 +12.2
21 2.00f Davis
IntlStk
FB 44.14 +.19 +2.6 +6.8 +14.5 +8.9
23 1.28f Dodge & Cox
44
... Dupree
TNTxFInc
SI
11.64 -.01 +7.1 +6.9 +4.4 +4.7
dd
... Fidelity
Contra
LG 102.35 +.16 +7.6 +13.1 +17.8 +15.5
47 0.24
DivrIntl d
FB 36.07 +.10 -2.3 +3.0 +11.5 +7.2
16 1.92
IntlSmCp d
FR 25.16 -.04 -6.1 -2.6 +12.4 +9.9
24 1.30
Magellan
LG 96.46 +.39 +11.3 +17.5 +20.0 +13.4
26 1.16
Nicholas
Nichol
MG 68.06 +.29 +10.3 +16.7 +22.2 +19.1
18 3.00
Oppenheimer
CapApA m
LG 66.83 -.03 +11.6 +18.4 +17.0 +13.4
Dividend footnotes: a- extra dividends were paid, but are not included b- annual rate plus stock c- liquidating dividend e- amount
GlobA m
WS 80.28 -.02 +1.9 +7.7 +14.6 +11.3
declared or paid in last 12 months f- current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i- sum of div- PIMCO
HiYldA m
HY
9.59
... +4.4 +5.2 +8.0 +9.0
idends paid after stock split, no regular rate k- declared or paid this year - a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m- current
TotRetAdm b
CI 10.94 +.01 +4.0 +3.3 +4.0 +4.9
annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p- initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown
r- declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t- paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
Putnam
DynAstAlBalA m MA 14.92
... +7.3 +10.4 +13.2 +11.7
DynAstAlConA m CA 11.29 +.03 +6.9 +8.6 +8.8 +8.3
2,040
4,680
DynAstAlGrA m AL 17.86
... +7.0 +11.0 +15.5 +12.6
S&P 500
Nasdaq composite
Thrivent
BalIncPlsA m
MA 13.41 +.02 +4.7 +7.5 +11.6 +10.7
Close: 2,023.57
Close: 4,620.72
1,980
4,540
Change: 11.47 (0.6%)
Change: -2.91 (-0.1%)
MidCapA m
MB 23.58 +.11 +9.2 +15.1 +17.8 +15.9
1,920
4,400
MuniBdA m
ML 11.64 -.02 +8.4 +8.3 +4.7 +4.9
10 DAYS
10 DAYS
OpIncPlsA m
MU 10.37
... +3.8 +4.1 +3.3 +5.5
2,050
4,800
SmCapStkA m
SB 20.05 +.09 +2.1 +8.3 +14.4 +13.6
Vanguard
500Inv
LB 186.98 +1.13 +11.2 +17.0 +19.7 +15.9
2,000
4,600
Explr
SG 104.61 +.13 +1.2 +6.9 +17.8 +17.6
ExtndIdx
MB 65.58 +.05 +4.5 +9.9 +18.9 +17.7
1,950
4,400
GrowthIdx
LG 52.80 +.17 +11.2 +17.4 +19.3 +16.7
ITTsry
GI 11.35
... +3.7 +2.4 +1.3 +3.8
1,900
4,200
InflaPro
IP 13.45 +.02 +4.5 +2.8 +0.4 +4.1
IntlGr
FG 22.51 +.06 -3.6 +1.1 +10.2 +7.8
Prmcp
LG 107.15 +.49 +16.1 +22.2 +22.7 +17.5
1,850
4,000
M
J
J
A
S
O
M
J
J
A
S
O
REITIdx
SR 26.45 -.05 +26.2 +21.0 +15.5 +18.9
HIGH
LOW
CLOSE
CHG. %CHG. WK MO QTR YTD
SmCapIdx
SB 55.09 +.10 +4.6 +9.7 +18.9 +17.8
TotBdMkInv
CI 10.85
... +4.9 +4.3 +2.4 +4.1
17486.59
17385.76
17484.53 +100.69 +0.58% s s s +5.48%
NYSE NASD DOW
USGro
LG 31.60 +.13 +10.1 +17.7 +19.6 +15.3
DOW Trans.
8846.10
8773.57
8839.91 +41.00 +0.47% s s s +19.45%
Vol. (in mil.)
3,683 1,944 DOW Util.
609.31
597.65
608.74 +12.10 +2.03% s s s +24.09%
ValueIdx
LV 32.44 +.24 +10.7 +15.9 +20.0 +15.3
10777.52
10824.07 +65.99 +0.61% s s s +4.07%
Pvs. Volume
3,807 1,887 NYSE Comp. 10824.89
Welltn
MA 40.40 +.20 +8.4 +12.1 +14.0 +11.6
NASDAQ
4650.39
4607.73
4620.72
-2.91
-0.06% s s s +10.63%
WndsrII
LV 39.77 +.29 +9.4 +14.6 +19.2 +14.6
Advanced
1841 1402
S&P 500
2023.77
2014.43
2023.57 +11.47 +0.57% s s s +9.48%
Declined
1288 1271 S&P 400
AdvCoBdAd
CI 12.73
... +5.1 +4.3 +3.2 +4.9
1422.13
1414.68
1419.88
+5.01 +0.35% s s s +5.76% Wells Fargo
New Highs
250
137 Wilshire 5000 21291.81
SCpValInv
SB 34.53
... +2.7 +2.5 +9.3 +10.7
21176.35
21269.72 +93.37 +0.44% s s s +7.94%
New Lows
70
59 Russell 2000
1172.03
1163.68
1167.07
+1.65 +0.14% s s s +0.29%
SpMdCpValIv
MV 34.76 +.21 +10.3 +15.9 +21.6 +18.2
34.92
18.99
60.75
3.20
16.26
49.75
9.72
158.94
41.95
106.62
54.20
559.15
37.91
17.34
35.16
10.97
9.14
142.92
128.85
47.79
56.97
88.98
25.13
117.05
66.80
55.09
54.91
34.37
32.81
80.24
65.09
105.90
19.54
82.04
64.41
14.69
83.70
95.07
12.69
63.68
16.85
25.82
98.79
45.14
12.49
69.34
95.78
96.71
11.54
80.84
14.25
74.02
52.38
57.51
42.01
2.80
189.73
56.94
4.06
12.70
52.25
28.00
34.50
137.84
53.06
68.66
7.28
42.99
19.87
7.23
9.51
27.50
30.04
38.46
17.94
12.42
71.01
10.11
1.23
7.70
41.78
36.75
34.16
39.60
34.12
41.46
17.29
116.41
68.50
30.33
2.51
64.17
77.70
36.77
34.38
172.85
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+.03
-.27
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-.19
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-.22
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-.31
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-.32
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+.48
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+.34
+.70
-.73
+.19
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+.23
-.09
+.03
-.09
+.21
+.11
+.02
+.72
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-.04
+1.00
+.10
+.03
+.06
+.15
+.32
+1.43
+.55
+.21
+.43
-.21
+1.13
+.59
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...
+.67
+.44
+.01
-.08
+.13
+0.4
+6.4
+3.3
+0.9
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-0.9
...
+0.9
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...
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...
-0.2
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15153
988
1533
6197
17626
5115
25
4025
324
1247
493
333
4176
57006
163
26536
3
2811
798
811
3360
263
8946
6531
187
9226
2008
2913
897
273
14
403
3689
1104
3866
38
3674
12332
1735
462
335
31160
975
3540
13
284
4966
2764
2
1672
820
527
2955
2878
122
51
1732
4856
100
175
1481
2362
1723
1326
1184
896
171
21
318
9665
179
2289
18389
230
123
50
311
19572
11
631
23
9703
7214
2555
3805
2643
49
3895
1277
122
1
1573
5561
545
2993
587
MutualFunds
StocksRecap
Industrial Metals 20
NAME
q
-.01
Stocks of Blount Interest
AT&T Inc
T
31.74
Acxiom Corp
ACXM 16.04
Albemarle Corp
ALB
51.35
Alcatel-Lucent
ALU
2.28
Alcoa Inc
AA
8.78
Altria Group
MO
33.80
Am Softwre
AMSWA 8.47
Amgen
AMGN 108.20
Arkansas Bst
ARCB 25.25
Ashland Inc
ASH
86.90
ATMOS Energy
ATO
43.50
AutoZone Inc
AZO 432.55
BB&T Corp
BBT
32.82
Bank of America
BAC
13.80
Bank of the Ozarks
OZRK 24.50
Barrick Gold
ABX
11.33
Bear State Financial BSF
7.00
Berkshire Hath B
BRK/B 108.12
Boston Prop
BXP
98.04
Brunswick Corp
BC
38.17
Cameron Intl
CAM
53.22
Carlisle Cos
CSL
71.51
CenterPoint Energy
CNP
21.07
Chevron Corp
CVX 106.65
Clarcor Inc
CLC
52.70
Comcast Corp A
CMCSA 46.58
Comcast Spl
CMCSK 45.55
ConAgra Foods
CAG
28.09
Cooper Tire
CTB
20.55
You’ve got earnings
Cullen Frost
CFR
69.82
DEL
58.05
AOL reports third-quarter financial Deltic Timber
Dillards Inc
DDS
80.88
results today.
Duke Realty Corp
DRE
14.18
The internet pioneer has been
EMN
70.38
trying to bring in more revenue from Eastman Chem
Emerson Elec
EMR
57.76
a digital advertising market led by
Ennis Inc
EBF
12.53
Google and Facebook. In SeptemEntergy
ETR
60.22
ber, AOL inked a deal to provide
Exxon Mobil Corp
XOM
86.91
Microsoft’s MSN with more video
Fst Horizon Natl
FHN
10.84
and additional news stories from
GATX
GMT
47.84
popular sites such as The HuffingGenCorp
GY
15.11
ton Post and TechCrunch in a bid to Gen Electric
GE
23.69
sell more digital ads.
Genuine Parts
GPC
76.50
GlaxoSmithKline PLC GSK
41.91
Grupo Simec
SIM
10.42
$43.87
AOL
Hanover Insurance
THG
52.86
$55
Home Depot
HD
73.96
’14
Honeywell Intl
HON
82.89
50
HopFed Bancorp Inc HFBC 10.80
Hunt, JB Transport
JBHT 69.33
45
iStar Financial
STAR 11.77
40
Integrys Energy
TEG
52.08
$42.02
Intl Paper
IP
43.05
35
Kroger Co
KR
35.13
LTC Prop
LTC
34.77
Operating
Lo Jack
LOJN
2.38
$0.55 $0.52
est.
EPS
Lockheed Martin
LMT 134.91
Lowes Cos
LOW
44.13
Martha Stewart Liv
MSO
2.77
3Q ’13 3Q ’14
Modine Mfg
MOD
10.79
Price-to-earnings ratio:
49
Murphy Oil Corp
MUR
49.38
based on past 12 months’ results
NCR Corp
NCR
22.83
NWL
28.27
Source: FactSet Newell Rubbermaid
Northrop Grumman
NOC 106.67
Nucor Corp
NUE
46.39
Oceaneering Intl
OII
58.54
Omnova Solutions
OMN
5.15
PAM Transp
PTSI
16.01
Parkway Properties
PKY
16.93
Penney JC Co Inc
JCP
4.90
Better quarter?
Pep Boys
PBY
8.36
Higher prices have helped offset
Pepco Holdings Inc
POM
18.50
a decline in global beer sales for
Pfizer Inc
PFE
27.51
Molson Coors Brewing.
Piedmnt Nat Gas
PNY
31.94
Molson Coors’ latest quarterly
Pimco Corp &Inco Opp PTY
16.08
earnings should provide insight
Pimco Income Strat
PFL
11.07
into whether the trend continued in Regal Beloit
RBC
62.15
the July-September quarter. Wall
Regions Fncl
RF
8.85
Reliv Intl
RELV
1.14
Street expects the beer maker,
Ruby Tuesday
RT
5.14
whose brands also include Blue
Simmons Fst Natl
SFNC 32.01
Moon, Miller High Life and Cobra,
Swst Airlines
LUV
17.52
is expected to report today that
SWN
30.60
earnings and revenue increased in Sthwstn Energy
Suntrust Bks
STI
33.57
the third quarter.
Trinty Inds
TRN
24.38
Tyson Foods
TSN
27.33
USA Truck
USAK 11.95
Union Pacific Corp
UNP
76.38
VF Corp
VFC
54.03
Vascular Solutions
VASC 18.35
Virco Mfg
VIRC
2.00
Vulcan Matl
VMC
53.55
WalMart Strs
WMT
72.27
Weingarten Rlty
WRI
27.21
Weyerhaeuser
WY
27.48
Whirlpool
WHR 124.39
AP
6-MO T-BILLS
.05%
52-WK RANGE
YTD 1YR
VOL
TICKER LO
HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR CHG%RTN (Thous) P/E DIV
NAME
Financial analysts anticipate that
Disney’s latest quarterly earnings
improved versus a year ago.
The media giant, due to report its
fiscal fourth-quarter financial results
today, has been riding a string of
box-office hits, including “Frozen”
and “Guardians of the Galaxy.” The
Marvel superhero epic has racked
up more than $765 million
worldwide since its Aug. 1 release.
DOW
17,484.53
Automobiles & Parts
Travel & Leisure
NAME
TICKER CLOSE CHG
AmAirl n
BurgerKng
Carnival
CarnUK
Chipotle
DeltaAir
Hilton n
LVSands
MarIntA
McDnlds
MelcoCrwn
Priceline
RylCarb
Ryanair
SwstAirl
Starbucks
StarwdHtl
UtdContl
Wynn
YumBrnds
YTD
AAL
42.25
-.45 +17.00
BKW
32.98 +.79 +10.12
CCL
39.99 +.02
-.18
CUK
40.05 +.13 -1.40
CMG 642.59 -5.09 +109.81
DAL
41.87
-.36 +14.40
HLT
25.04 +.44 +2.79
LVS
58.31 -1.36 -20.56
MAR
74.90 +.33 +25.55
MCD
94.64 +.17 -2.39
MPEL 24.39 -1.08 -14.83
PCLN 1095.34 -2.36 -67.06
RCL
67.33 +1.04 +19.91
RYAAY 64.10 +1.27 +17.17
LUV
36.75 +.32 +17.91
SBUX 76.66
-.05 -1.73
HOT
75.64 +.20 -3.81
UAL
54.11 -1.10 +16.28
WYNN 179.74 -5.52 -14.47
YUM
72.44 +.38 -3.17
NAME
TICKER CLOSE CHG
Autoliv
BorgWrn s
DanaHldg
DelphiAuto
FordM
GenMotors
Gentex
GenuPrt
Goodyear
HarleyD
Honda
JohnsnCtl
LKQ Corp
LearCorp
MagnaInt g
TRWAuto
TeslaMot
Toyota
Visteon
WABCO
ALV
BWA
DAN
DLPH
F
GM
GNTX
GPC
GT
HOG
HMC
JCI
LKQ
LEA
MGA
TRW
TSLA
TM
VC
WBC
93.86
57.32
20.42
69.94
13.94
30.73
33.51
98.79
24.43
64.36
31.69
48.56
28.76
92.39
102.93
101.66
230.97
121.37
93.51
100.52
+2.17
+1.61
+.49
+1.50
-.01
-.09
+.85
+.96
+.45
+.25
+.67
+.87
+.58
+1.55
+5.96
+.26
-7.96
+1.97
+.05
+2.50
YTD
+2.06
+1.41
+.80
+9.81
-1.49
-10.14
+.67
+15.60
+.58
-4.88
-9.66
-2.74
-4.14
+11.42
+20.87
+27.27
+80.54
-.55
+11.62
+7.11
Company
Spotlight
Mondelez raises outlook
Shares of Mondelez International shot up 6 percent
Wednesday after the snack company raised its full-year
earnings outlook.
The maker of Oreo cookies, Cadbury chocolate and
Trident gum expects full-year adjusted
earnings in the range of $1.67 to
$1.72 per share. When
adjusted for currency
exchange rates, that’s a
range of $1.82 to $1.87.
The company also
Mondelez (MDLZ)
Wednesday’s close: $37.15
Price-earnings ratio: 19
52-WEEK RANGE
$32
AP
reported third-quarter earnings of 53 cents per share.
Earnings, adjusted for one-time gains and costs, were
50 cents per share. The results were far ahead of Wall
Street expectations. The average estimate
of analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of
39 cents per share.
Mondelez shares are up 5
percent this year, compared with
the 10 percent rise of the Standard
& Poor’s 500 index.
40
Price change through Nov. 5
(Based on past 12 month results)
Price change YTD
MDLZ
5.2%
Div. yield: 1.6%
*annualized
3-yr*
17.3
5-yr*
16.0
Dividend: $0.60
Source: FactSet
8A | BLOUNT COUNTY
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Senator spurred
by committee
chairmanship
BY ERIK SCHELZIG
The Associated Press
CORKER EXCITED
Corker, who has been a
vocal critic of President
Barack Obama on foreign
policy matters, said in a
statement Tuesday that
he looks forward to the
change.
“After years of gridlock,
this election represents
a unique opportunity for
Congress and the administration to govern responsibly,” he said. “Some of our
country’s greatest achievements have occurred
when one party controls
Congress and another the
White House.”
Alexander suffered a
closer-than-expected primary contest against teaparty styled challenger
Joe Carr in August, but
he resoundingly defeated
Democrat Ball by 30 percentage points in the general election Tuesday.
The wide margin of victory likely came as a surprise even to Alexander,
who as late as Monday
was making the case to
�I ran for
re-election to
be part of a new
majority in the
Senate that will
fix our broken
system, get the
right things
done, and begin
to move our
country in a new
direction.’
Sen. Lamar Alexander
R-Tennessee
reporters that a far smaller victory would have still
been convincing.
“In my policies experience, anybody who wins
and election by 5 or 6 percentage points has a good
win, and if you win by 10
you’ve got a massive win,”
Alexander said.
HASLAM CRUISES
Also cruising to re-election Tuesday was Republican Gov. Bill Haslam,
who beat Democrat Charlie Brown by 47 percentage points. Brown had
no organized campaign
and reported raising no
money for his gubernatorial bid.
Haslam in his victory
speech pledged to “double
down on the progress that
Tennessee is making,” particularly in education.
“We’ve moved too far in
terms of real progress in
education,” he said. “We
want to have Tennessee
be a different place for
educational outcomes
for our children.”
Haslam has been heavily criticized by the tea
party wing of his party for
the state’s participation in
Common Core education
standards.
MARK A. LARGE | THE DAILY TIMES
NANCY BAUGH, HELEN LAMBERT and Irene Huff (from left) show some of the items that will be available at the Pre-Thanksgiving
Dinner and Country Store to be held Saturday at Fairview United Methodist Church.
Pre-Thanksgiving dinner, store slated
BY MELANIE TUCKER
INVITATION TO COMMUNITY
[email protected]
The United Methodist Women of
Fairview United Methodist Church
have once again worked to host
an event that many in the community attend as a way to usher in the
holiday season, and it takes place
Saturday.
The event is the Pre-Thanksgiving Dinner and Country Store. It
will be held from 4 to 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, and takeout will be available. The meal that consists of
turkey, cranberries, green beans,
sweet potatoes, bread and homemade desserts costs $10 for adults
and $4 for children. Preschoolers
can attend for $1.
In addition to the great meal,
there will be a Country Store full
of handmade crafts, quilts, bakery
items, vintage jewelry and more. It
The annual Fairview United Methodist Women’s Pre-Thanksgiving
Dinner and Country Store will be
held from 4 to 6:30 p.m. Saturday at Fairview United Methodist Church, 2508 Old Niles Ferry
Road in Maryville. Cost is $10 for
adults, $4 for children ages 5-12.
Preschoolers can attend for $1. The
Country Store will be held beginning at 3 p.m. Tickets may be purchased at the door or the church.
For more information, call 9832080.
gets underway at 3 p.m.
The United Methodist Women
of Fairview UMC was started in
1960. There were three Tedford
sisters who became very active
— Irene Huff, Nancy Baugh and
Helen Lambert. They are still part
of the Fairview family. What began
as one circle has over the years
become various circles with lots
of projects and goals. There is the
quilting circle and the craft circle.
They are the ones who work on
items throughout the year for this
annual event.
There will be a quilt for sale Saturday with the top made by Maxie
Blevens. The Blevens and Tedford
families were among the founders
Fairview Church.
This tradition of hosting community events dates back decades.
In the late 1940s, the women held
dinners in the basement of the
church to raise money to purchase
the property where the church was
first built on Old Niles Ferry Road.
Proceeds from the Saturday dinner and country store will go to
missions and scholarships.
78 municipalities OK wine sales in grocery stores
The Associated Press
NASHVILLE — Seventyeight Tennessee municipalities have passed a referendum for wine to be sold
in supermarkets.
They collected enough
signatures to place the ref-
erendum on the Tennessee ballot Tuesday. Final
voting results show all the
communities passed the
measure.
Currently, wine can be
sold only in liquor stores.
Because of a state law
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Supermarkets and convenience stores can sell beer
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1, are able to sell items
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as beer, mixers, glasses,
corkscrews, food and cigarettes.
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NASHVILLE — Tennessee is about to gain new
clout in the U.S. Senate
following national gains
by Republicans in Tuesday’s election.
Republicans succeeded
in picking up at least seven seats, one more than
they needed to take over
control of the Senate.
That means Sen. Lamar
Alexander, the Maryville
native who resoundingly
defeated Democrat Gordon Ball on Tuesday, is
now poised to head the
Health, Education, Labor
and Pensions Committee,
while Sen. Bob Corker is
set to become chairman
of the Foreign Relations
Committee.
Alexander, a former governor and two time presidential candidate, had said
the prospect of becoming
a committee chairman had
motivated him to run for
a third term.
“I ran for re-election to
be part of a new majority in the Senate that will
fix our broken system, get
the right things done, and
begin to move our country in a new direction,”
Alexander said in his victory speech in Knoxville.
“I’ll do this in a way Tennesseans know well — to
work with others to get
results.”
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NATION&WORLD | 9A
THE DAILY TIMES
Thursday, November 6, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
After GOP gains, Obama vows �to take care of business’
Incoming Senate leader warns
president not to act unilaterally
BY DAVID ESPO AND JULIE PACE
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — One
day after sweeping Republican election gains, President Barack Obama and
incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell pledged to try and turn
divided government into a
force for good rather than
gridlock on Wednesday,
yet warned of veto showdowns as well.
Trade legislation loomed
as one possibility for quick
compromise, and immigration as an early irritant.
“There is no doubt that
Republicans had a good
night,” the president said
at the White House, referring to big gains that left
the GOP in control of the
Senate, with an expanded House majority and in
possession of a handful of
governorships formerly in
Democratic hands.
To voters who handed the
GOP control of Congress,
he said, “I hear you. ... It’s
time for us to take care of
business.” He cited construction of roads, bridges
and other facilities as one
area ripe for cooperation,
and trade as another.
At the same time, he noted, “Congress will pass
some bills I cannot sign.
I’m pretty sure I will take
some actions that some in
Congress will not like.”
Obama and McConnell
presented differing profiles
at news conferences a little
more than an hour apart.
The 53-year-old president now faces a Congress
under two-house control
by Republicans for the first
time in his tenure — and
a lame duck status that
becomes more of a check
on his political power with
each passing day.
M c Co n n e l l , 7 2 a n d
famously taciturn, smiled
and joked with reporters
on the day after achieving
a lifelong ambition.
TWO TALK ON PHONE
Still, the two said they
had had a pleasant telephone conversation earlier in the day.
“I would enjoy having
some Kentucky bourbon
with Mitch McConnell,”
said Obama.
Said McConnell, “In our
system the president is the
most important player” who
can veto legislation or persuade lawmakers of his own
party to back compromise.
Obama said that unless
Congress takes action by
the end of the year, he will
order a reduction in deportations of working immigrants living in the country
illegally.
He made his pledge a
short while after McConnell warned him against
acting unilaterally.
“It’s like waving a red flag
in front of a bull to say if
you guys don’t do what I
want I’m going to do it on
my own,” McConnell said
at a news conference in
Kentucky.
McConnell also cited trade
and taxes among areas ripe
for compromise.
“There will be no government shutdown or default
on the national debt,”
he said, making clear he
doesn’t agree with some
tea party-backed lawmakers who have supported one
or the other in the past — or
may want to in the future.
McConnell will take
office in January as Senate
majority leader, and he and
House Speaker John Boehner will have the authority
SCOTT APPLEWHITE | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SENATE REPUBLICAN LEADER MITCH MCCONNELL of Kentucky holds a
news conference in Louisville, Ky., on the day after the GOP gained
enough seats to control the Senate in next year’s Congress.
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA GESTURES as he speaks during a news
conference Wednesday in the East Room of the White House.
to set the congressional
agenda.
B o e h n e r ce d e d t h e
Republican limelight to
McConnell for the day. The
Ohio Republican is in line
for a third term as House
leader — and his first with
a Republican majority in
the Senate.
At his news conference,
McConnell said, “When
America chooses divided
government, I don’t think
it means they don’t want
us to do anything. It means
they want to do things for
the country.”
OIL PIPELINE VOTE
Beyond that, he made it
clear Congress will vote
on legislation to approve
the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada through
the United States, and
work to repeal portions
of the health care law that
stands as Obama’s signature domestic accomplishment. He said a tax on medical devices and a mandate
for individuals to purchase
health insurance are also
Republican targets.
Obama ruled out ending
the requirement for purchasing of health care. But
he pointedly did not reject
repeal of the tax, which
many Democrats as well as
Republicans have already
signaled they are ready to
jettison.
Republicans are also
expected to mount a major
attack on federal deficits.
In the second midterm
elections of Obama’s presidency, Republicans were
assured of a gain of seven
Senate seats. They bid for
another in Alaska, where
challenger Dan Sullivan
led Sen. Mark Begich. Also
uncalled was a race in Vir-
ginia, where Democratic
Sen. Mark Warner faced
challenger Ed Gillespie.
In Louisiana, Rep. Bill
Cassidy led Democratic
Sen. Mary Landrieu into
a Dec. 6 runoff.
Despite the reverses,
Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada
announced he intended to
remain as the Democratic
leader. There was no sign
of opposition.
House Republicans were
within hailing distance of
their largest majority since
World War II, 246 seats in
1946, when Harry Truman
sat in the White House.
Even so, Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she would
seek another term as Democratic leader.
Only one governor’s race
remained uncalled, in Alaska, where independent Bill
Walker led Republican
Gov. Sean Parnell.
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10A | NATION&WORLD
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Child critics determine gifts
BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer
NEW YORK — A snaggletooth
eight-year-old. A middle schooler
with a punk rocker bob cut and big
earrings. Tween siblings with a penchant for playing.
These are among the young power
brokers who will determine the toys
that will be under Christmas trees
this year.
At a time when toy sales have stagnated for years at $22 billion, children who review toys on YouTube
are wielding increasing influence.
Toy makers are courting them for
their ability to connect with a generation that views the online video
sharing service like baby boomers
do HBO.
“Kids trust other kids more so than
they would an adult,” says Marc
Rosenberg, a Chicago-based toy
consultant.
Leading the pack of pint-sized YouTube personalities is Evan, 8, who
has dimples and a few missing teeth.
With over 1 billion views between
his three channels, he’s YouTube’s
most popular kid.
He gets over 800 million views from
EvanTubeHD, where he reviews the
toys. EvanTubeHD, which features
special effects thanks to his dad, Jared, who runs a video production
company full-time, is known for telling kids how to play with toys.
Evan speaks directly to them, with
occasional cameos from his little
sister and mom.
JOHN RAOUX | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GRACIE HUNTER (LEFT) and her mom, Melissa, make a video for a doll review while on
vacation on Oct. 27 in Kissimmee, Fla. The mother-daughter duo, stars of the “Mommy
and Gracie” YouTube show, review dolls for kids.
Behind Evan are a few other young
YouTube phenoms. Most of the children are identified by first name
because their parents don’t want to
risk their safety:
• RadioJH Audrey has over 60
million views. Audrey, 11, speaks
to tweens, frequently saying “cool”
and “awesome.” She also streaks her
bobbed hair in a rainbow of colors
and wears big jewelry and studded
tees. Audrey’s trademark: reviewing mystery toy bags that are sold
at places like Toys R Us.
Julie Krueger, industry director of
retail at Google, which owns YouTube, says the channels have “huge
followings of fans.”
• Gracie Hunter, 11, pairs up with
her mother, Melissa, in “Mommy and
Gracie,” which has close to 90 million views. Gracie, a redhead who
sometimes sports black glasses with
rhinestones, searches for hard-tofind dolls with her mom. They’ve
even traveled to Canada from their
New Jersey home to find a Monster
High doll.
Survey finds people text, drive knowing dangers
BY BARBARA ORTUTAY
AP Technology Writer
SAN FRANCISCO —
Nearly everyone agrees
that texting and driving is
dangerous. Many people do
it anyway.
In an AT&T-sponsored
survey of frequent drivers
who text daily — regardless
of where they are — 98 percent said they were aware
of the dangers of texting
behind the wheel. Nonetheless, three-quarters of
them admitted to texting
while driving, despite broad
public-service campaigns
and laws against it in some
states.
Two-thirds said they have
read text messages while
stopped at a red light or
stop sign, while more than a
quarter said they have sent
texts while driving. More
than a quarter of those
who texted while driving
believed they “can easily
do several things at once,
even while driving.”
AT&T Inc. released the
survey Wednesday as part
of an anti-texting-anddriving campaign. AT&T
designed the survey with
David Greenfield, founder
of The Center for Internet
and Technology Addiction
and a professor at the University of Connecticut’s
School of Medicine.
The survey came as AT&T
expanded availability of a
free app that silences text
message alerts and activates
automatically when a person is moving 15 miles per
hour or faster. (Passengers
can turn it off.) The Drive-
5,25HYROXWLRQ&KXUFK
(DVW/DPDU$OH[DQGHU3NZ\
0DU\YLOOH71
Mode app is coming to
iPhones after being previously available on Android
and BlackBerry phones
for AT&T users only. The
iPhone version will be available to customers of competing carriers as well, but
some functions will work
only on AT&T devices.
The study in May was of
cellphone owners ages 16 to
65 who drive almost every
day and text at least once a
day. It has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus
3.1 percentage points.
Dinner-table bully
may have health issues
DEAR ABBY: In reference
to “It’s All Good, Until
...” (Aug. 1), the woman
whose otherwise easygoing husband turns hypercritical every evening
at dinner, he may have
hypoglycemia (low blood
sugar) or be pre-diabetic
as my husband is.
My husband is eventempered and a great
partner — until his sugar
gets low. Then he turns
from Dr. Jekyll into Mr.
Hyde.
My advice to her is
to have a doctor check
her husband for those
issues. In the meantime,
he might start having an
afternoon protein snack
so his sugar doesn’t drop
by dinner if that is, in
fact, the problem. Peanut butter crackers are
excellent. — SOMEONE WHO
KNOWS IN KNOXVILLE
DEAR SOMEONE: Thank
you for the headsup. Dozens of readers
offered similar opinions about the husband’s
behavior, including a
registered nurse who
wrote: “What’s happening may be that his blood
sugar or glucose is getting too low at that time
and causing personality
changes. ... This time of
day is crucial for people
with either diabetes or
other insulin problems.
Please suggest her husband see a doctor to have
this checked.”
DEAR ABBY: “Ingrid” and
I have been dating for a
couple of months. We’re
in our early 50s and both
of us have been married
before. We get along fine
and our relationship is
proceeding slowly, but
appropriately.
My problem is, when
we talk on the phone we
don’t really have a conversation. Ingrid will talk
without interruption,
sometimes for five minutes at a time. I can’t get a
DEAR
ABBY
word in. I can put the
phone down and come
back and she’ll still be
talking. Often, she’ll ask
me a question, then interrupt me when I try to
answer. It really bugs me.
It has reached a point
that I don’t want to talk
to her on the phone. The
calls can last 30 minutes
or more, and I get bored
and irritated. How do
I address this with her
without hurting her feelings or affecting our relationship? She’s starting
to feel my reluctance to
call her back. — GETTING AN
EARFUL IN ARIZONA
DEAR GETTING AN
EARFUL: If Ingrid is starting to feel your reluctance to return her calls,
I’m guessing she has
found a way to let you
know. This is your opening for a truth session
with your lady friend in
which you explain how
those phone monologues
make you feel.
What she’s doing is
rude. The cause may be
nervousness, thoughtlessness, or that she’s a
compulsive talker. Being
honest with her is the
only way to get this fixed,
if the problem IS fixable.
At your ages, lifelong
habits may not be easy to
break.
CONTACT DEAR ABBY at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
Kiwanis Club of Alcoa
Annual Autumn Gala
Live and Silent Auction
Friday, November 7, 6 PM – 9:30PM
Airport Hilton, Knoxville, TN
All proceeds go
to support our
children programs.
Tickets are
$30 per person
Heavy
hors d’oeuvres
Keynote Speaker
Steve West
Never give up. Never back down. Never lose faith.
)5((0RYLH1LJKWDORQJZLWK
)5((+RW'RJV3RSFRUQ
'ULQNVDQG'HVVHUW
6DWXUGD\1RY WK
7:00 PM
&KLOGFDUHSURYLGHGIRUFKLOGUHQXQGHUDJH
)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO
Our Kiwanis Club
supports numerous
activities that add
value to children’s lives
and the community,
including college
scholarships, Children’s
Hospital, 4-H Camp,
The Gate,
Remote Area Medical,
Special Olympics, etc.
Sponsorship of
tables is available
for the evening
event. Contact
number below for
details.
Contact any Alcoa Kiwanian
or leave a message at (865) 977-8057
NATION&WORLD | 11A
THE DAILY TIMES
Thursday, November 6, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
�Terrorist attack in Jerusalem’
Israeli police:
Driver slams car
into pedestrians
BY TIA GOLDENBERG
The Associated Press
JERUSALEM — A Hamas militant
slammed a minivan into a crowd
waiting for a train Wednesday in
Jerusalem, killing one person and
wounding 13. Hours later, the Israeli
military said a Palestinian motorist
drove into a group of soldiers in the
West Bank, injuring three.
The incidents and a similar attack
two weeks earlier raised concern that
Israel could be facing a new type of
threat. Police said they would put
concrete barricades in front of train
stations as a first step.
Hamas said the Jerusalem attack
was meant to protect the city’s most
sensitive and sacred site — the compound known to Muslims as the
Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as the
Temple Mount.
Police identified the van’s driver
— who was killed by police — as
Ibrahim al-Akari, a 38-year-old Palestinian.
His wife said he was angered by a
confrontation between police and
Palestinians at the Al-Aqsa Mosque
earlier in the day in which part of the
shrine was damaged.
It was not clear how much damage there was at the mosque. Israeli police had dispersed dozens of
masked Palestinians who threw rocks
and firecrackers near the site in the
Old City ahead of a visit by a group
of Jewish activists.
Neighboring Jordan recalled its
ambassador to Israel for consultations in a strong protest of the police
action at the site and filed a complaint
to the U.N. Security Council. Under
an arrangement with Israel, Jordan
has custodial rights over Muslim holy
sites in the Old City, which includes
the Al-Aqsa Mosque.
SEBASTIAN SCHEINER | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AN ISRAELI FIREFIGHTER WALKS at the scene of an attack in Jerusalem on Wednesday.
A Palestinian man rammed his car into a crowded train platform in east Jerusalem
and then attacked people with an iron bar, killing one person and injuring 13 in what
authorities called a terror attack before he was shot dead by the police. The militant
Islamic group Hamas took responsibility for the attack.
KERRY CONDEMNS ATTACK
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry condemned what he called “the
terrorist attack in Jerusalem,” and
added that “the confrontation at the
�Holy sites should not
become the sites of tension,
and concrete steps need to
be taken now by all sides to
de-escalate this situation.’
Abbas and “his Hamas partners,” a
reference to a unity government led
by Abbas and backed by the Islamic
militant group.
“We are in a prolonged battle in Jerusalem. I have no doubt we will win. We
are deploying all the necessary forces
to restore calm and security to all parts
of the city but it may certainly be a
prolonged struggle,” he said.
John Kerry
U.S. Secretary of State
TRYING TO DIFFUSE
SITUATION
Al-Aqsa Mosque is also of particular
concern.”
“Holy sites should not become the
sites of tension, and concrete steps
need to be taken now by all sides to
de-escalate this situation,” Kerry said,
noting that the U.S. was in touch with
both Jordan and Israel and hoped that
“all parties will draw back and reduce
these tensions.”
The developments raised fears of
worsening violence after months of
simmering tensions in the holy city
and injected new religious fervor into
a wave of unrest fueled by failed peace
efforts and stepped-up Jewish settlement construction.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu blamed the Jerusalem
attack on incitement stemming from
Palestinian President Mahmoud
Israel has been trying for months
to quell the unrest in east Jerusalem that began this summer but has
surged over tensions surrounding
the holy site.
In Wednesday’s attack in Jerusalem, police said the motorist drove
the minivan into pedestrians waiting for the train at a stop. The driver
backed out and drove away, hitting
several cars along the way. He then
got out of the van and attacked civilians and police officers on the side
of the road with a metal bar before
he was shot and killed.
The train stop is located along an
unmarked line between west Jerusalem and the eastern sector captured in 1967.
Police said al-Akari was recently
been released from prison after serving time for security offenses.
BRIEFS
WASHINGTON
— President Barack
Obama asked Congress on Wednesday to
work with him on a new
authorization to use
military force against
the Islamic State group
to replace the outdated
authorization forged
after 9/11.
Speaking the afternoon after his party was
dealt a punishing blow
in the midterm elections, Obama said a new
military authorization
is one of a few areas
where he will seek to
work with Congress
during the lame-duck
session before a new
Congress is seated in
January.
Suspected poachers
escape police post
PARIS — With time
running out on the latest
round of negotiations,
France and the United
States on Wednesday
stepped up demands
GRANDVIEW
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IC
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ETER
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BY
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SMITH EVENT
C
PORT ORCHARD,
Wash. — Authorities
are searching for a man
suspected of killing
his 30-year-old live-in
girlfriend in Washington state after graphic
photos posted online
appeared to show her
body hours before it was
discovered.
David Kalac is suspected of second-degree
murder in the death of
Amanda Lynn Coplin,
according to court documents.
Photos posted on websites appeared to be of
the deceased woman
and the inside of the
home, according to a
probable cause document.
The person who posted the photo commented on how the woman
was killed and wrote of
planning to be fatally
shot by police. It was
unclear if the online
photos led to the discovery.
US, France concerned
with Iran nuclear talks
E
CR
AND
AT I O N S E R V
Man sought after
photos posted online
JOHANNESBURG —
Two alleged elephant
poachers in Mozambique escaped from a
police station while
awaiting trial, undermining efforts to implement a new anti-poaching law in the southern
African country, a conservation group said
this week.
Authorities were
investigating how the
two suspects, Paolo
Nyenje and Antonio
Bernardo, were able on
Oct. 27 to slip out of
the Mecula police station in Niassa National
Reserve, a vast wildlife area in northern
Mozambique.
SMITH FUNERAL
EM
for Iran to prove that
its nuclear program is
peaceful — or risk scuttling the closest chance
for a deal in years and
losing a chance to ease
crippling sanctions on
Tehran’s economy.
The entreaty to Iran
comes days before
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry is to meet
with top diplomats to
Iran and the European
Union to discuss how
to break the years-long
deadlock before a Nov.
24 deadline.
Iran is seeking global
recognition for its right
to generate nuclear
power — which it says
it will use for energy, medical and other
benign purposes — and
the removal of at least
some Western penalties
against its oil and financial sectors.
Obama to seek force
approval against ISIS
NDVIE
(865) 806-8170
12A |
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Thursday, November 6, 2014
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Well-paved drives, smooth sidewalks and
beautiful patios and walkways are a part of
our lives. Of course, master craftsmanship
and gorgeous results don’t just happen. We
all notice when something’s not finished
quite right — and we never forget a
pothole.
That’s why Bob and Rowdy McCall and
their crew at Foothills Asphalt and Concrete
take such pride in the work they do. Owner
Bob McCall has thirty years experience in
the asphalt and concrete business and he
puts every bit of that know-how to work on
each and every job.
The people of Blount County have
shown their appreciation for Foothills
Asphalt and Concrete’s high quality
craftsmanship by voting the company the
number one choice for asphalt services
in the 2014 Daily Times Readers’ Choice
Awards.
McCall’s son, Rowdy McCall III has
been working in the family business,
alongside his father, for many years.
Together, the two of them, along with
all the staff at Foothills Asphalt and
Concrete, continue a tradition of customer
satisfaction that has been the company’s
hallmark. And he thinks that commitment
to excellence is what earned his company
the top place in the 2014 Readers’ Choice
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Whether it be patching a pothole,
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asphalt drive or concrete curbing, Foothills
Asphalt and Concrete has the tools and
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The McCalls strive for 100% satisfaction
in every job. Quality is the top priority. That
means getting to the job site when they say
they will, handling each task efficiently and
leaving the job site in tip-top shape. Every
member of the team is dedicated to making
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Asphalt and Concrete employee strives to
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personal attention to every detail.
Everyone on the team is committed
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expectations. But it’s more than just
dedication that makes the Foothills Asphalt
and Concrete team so special. Everyone
on staff is also highly skilled and very
experienced. “These aren’t just randomly
picked men,” McCall said.
It’s time to put Foothills Asphalt and
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excellence and a track record of success
you can trust, Bob and Rowdy McCall are
ready to take your project no matter how
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The company offers asphalt and
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STARTING UP
Alcoa not looking
past Longhorns. 5B
REBELS BRING EXTRA DEPTH TO PLAYOFFS. 6B
NFL 4B | PREPS 5B | CLASSIFIEDS 7B | COMICS 10B | PUZZLES 11B
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2014
THE DAILY TIMES
1B
Situation let Hurd show what he could do
BY GRANT RAMEY
UP NEXT
[email protected]
KNOXVILLE — Tennessee
trailed South Carolina 35-21 midway through the fourth quarter
Saturday night, facing a fourthand-6 from the Gamecocks’
21-yard line. Quarterback Josh
Dobbs dropped back, found Jalen
Hurd waiting on a screen pass
and let his freshman running
back go to work.
Hurd ran out of one wouldbe-tackler grasping for his right
ankle, then planted his right leg
in the turf to juke left and leave
another defender short. The end
result was a touchdown that kept
the very-much-desperate Vols in
the game, but the process of getting there was a glimpse of the
The Vols take their second bye
week and close out hosting
Missouri and Kentucky before
traveling to Vanderbilt.
talent possessed by the former
five-star recruit.
“I think Jalen Hurd is playing
well,” Tennessee coach Butch
Jones said after practice Tuesday. “Saturday night he finally
got a chance to showcase some
of his skill set. Especially on the
fourth-and-(6) screen with the
balance, the spin and then getting vertical and getting the ball
into the end zone.”
Hurd finished the game with
183 total yards in the 45-42 over-
time win. He ran 21 times for a
career-high 125 yards and added 58 receiving yards on seven
catches, including the showcase
touchdown.
It was by far his most productive game of the season and biggest outing since accounting for
138 total yards — 119 rushing, 19
receiving — at Georgia.
“He made some plays,” running
backs coach Robert Gillespie
said Wednesday. “We were in a
situation where we had over 100
snaps. With the more snaps we
get as an offense, he’s going to
touch the ball more.
“So our theme for the week on
offense was win the first downs.
We stay ahead of the chains,
SEE HURD, 3B
KNOXVILLE NEWS SENTINEL | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TENNESSEE RUNNING BACK JALEN HURD (1) escapes South Carolina’s Chris Lammons
(3) Saturday during a Southeastern Conference contest in Columbia, S.C.
Getting ready to jam
Lady Govs bringing
the Wright stuff
BY JARED DUGGER
[email protected]
SCOTT KELLER | THE DAILY TIMES
MARYVILLE’S BRYCE MILLER WORKS for inside position against Knox West defender Chris Cook during a Jan. 14 game last season.
Miller is a key returner and one of several Rebels still involved with football when the Blount County Jamboree tips off tonight.
Maryville boys provide sneak peak at jamboree
BY JARED DUGGER
[email protected]
The first glance won’t
give away too much tonight
when the Maryville boys’
basketball team puts its
November edition on display in the third quarter of
the Blount County Jamboree at William Blount.
There are high hopes for
the Rebels again this season
with a senior-laden squad
that has won three district
tournaments in a row, but
the early team is just a cliff
note version with some of
the pages missing at that.
At the moment, the Rebels are without four key
players due to football’s
second season but coach
Mark Eldridge is very
accustomed to the required
adjustments.
“We do it every year,
and it will happen again
this year,” the eighth-year
Maryville head coach said.
“There are a couple of reasons I like it. It allows us
to peak at the right time a
lot of times, I think.
“It also allows some of
BLOUNT COUNTY PREP
HOOPS JAMBOREE
6 p.m. Today
at William Blount
Qtr 1 – Heritage vs.
Maryville girls
Qtr 2 – William Blount
vs. Alcoa girls
Half: Free Throw, 3-point
and Dunk contests
Qtr 3 – Heritage vs.
Maryville boys
Qtr 4 – William Blount
vs. Alcoa boys
the young kids to get some
experience that will help us
down the road, not just this
year but in the future also.
It is a struggle sometimes
early when we don’t have
everybody, but in the long
run I think its beneficial.”
Once the Rebels do have
a full deck at their disposal,
one of the most impressive
attributes will be the number of aces Maryville will
have to play.
“I could list you 10 guys
or even 11 guys that could
be our leading scorer at
any time,” Eldridge said.
“We’ve got 10 or 11 guys
that will get playing time
every game, so it’s a cast
of some really good basketball players.”
Keeping that balance will
trickle down to the leadership of a talented senior
class. Bryce Miller was an
All-District player last year
and will be one of the keys
to the Rebel attack once
again. Andrew Petree is
another returning starter
who will be instrumental
in Eldridge’s plans. The
pair are joined by fellow
seniors Tyler Vaught, Jake
Headrick and Dalton Price,
who give the Rebels a good
combination of depth and
experience.
“I do like our team and
what we’ve got. We shoot
it well, we handle it well.
With our ability to shoot
it, we should be in great
shape,” Maryville coach
Mark Eldridge told The
Daily Times.
The Rebels will once
again go with a look to push
the pace but will temper it
to the situation and at first
to the depth of the bench,
which will be short-handed
while the football playoffs
continue for the Rebels.
“We always try to play uptempo, but sometimes you
have to play a slower tempo
in half-court sets. We want
to be able to do every style
of play some, and based
on who we play, we’ll play
that style,” Eldridge said.
As three-time defending
district tourney champs,
Maryville will wear that
bulls eye on its back in a
tough District 4-AAA but
the possibility of a fourpeat isn’t out of reach.
“Our district and our
region are both always
really tough,” Eldridge
said. “In our league, every
night out you have to play
your best ball or really bad
things will happen, but I
like our chances. We’ve
won the district tournament three years in a
row, and at Maryville High
School, the kids know how
to win.”
The Rebels will tip off
the regular season Nov. 11
at home against Jefferson
County.
Once William Blount
girls’ basketball coach
Todd Wright can get
past the hosting responsibilities for tonight’s
Blount County Jamboree, the WB skipper is
pretty optimistic about
this season’s group of
Lady Govs.
“I’m excited about
this year. We’ve got a
pretty good group of
young players in our
sophomore and freshman classes that are
excited to be here in
the program, and we’ve
got some great leadership in our junior and
senior classes,” the
Lady Govs’ head man
told The Daily Times.
“The combination of
those two things makes
it an exciting year and
makes this a fun group
to coach.”
Wright, who has made
coaching stops at Oliver
Springs, Lenoir City and
Maryville College has
always embraced a fast
up-and-down the court
attack with efficiency
the key to the chaos.
“That’s just kind of my
philosophy as a coach,”
Wright said. “Everywhere I’ve been, we’ve
tried to play fast. But
we’re also going to do
whatever we’re capable
of doing. If that doesn’t
work, we’re not going
to do it just because it’s
my philosophy. My philosophy is do what your
team does the best.”
Wright thinks the key
to success this year for
the Lady Govs will be
the chemistry of the
team.
“The key to succeeding in girls’ basketball
is how well your team
gels,” Wright said.
“What’s the chemistry
like on your team? In
girls’ basketball, even
more so than boys’, the
girls have to get along in
the locker room, on the
court and off the court,
at school and socially.
“I like where this team
is at. I like that they’ve
SEE WRIGHT, 7B
Devices keep track
of players’ exertion
BY ERIC OLSON
AP College Football Writer
LINCOLN, Neb. —
Nebraska’s Tommy
Armstrong Jr. was running play after play during a preseason practice and was beginning to wear down in
the heat.
He could have asked
for a break, but he didn’t
have to. An assistant
strength coach who
was keeping electronic tabs on Armstrong
could tell by looking at
his laptop that the quarterback was fatigued.
Armstrong was ordered
to the sideline.
“Dial it down,” he was
told.
Armstrong had just
entered the “red zone”
— and not the kind that
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Now thru January 31, 2015. Rates subject to change.
Restrictions/Conditions apply - see a Loan officer for details.
MARYVILLE GIRLS ready
for jamboree, 7B
extends from the end
zone to the 20-yard
line. This “red zone”
meant Armstrong —
who was wearing a
tracking device relaying biomechanical data
to the staffer’s laptop in
real time — was overexerting himself and at
greater risk for injury.
It’s one of the features
of technology being
used by about 30 college football teams and
15 NFL teams to monitor the movements
and physical output of
players during conditioning, practices and
games.
The Australia-based
co m pa ny Ca t a p u l t
developed the system
about eight years ago.
SEE DEVICES, 3B
FOLLOW US: @TDT_Sports
for scores, links, delays, thoughts
WRITE US: [email protected]
YOUR SPORTS. YOUR TIMES
2B
THE DAILY TIMES
Bradley 471, Sylvia Porter 470, Lennis Walvoort 464.
ON THE SCHEDULE
HIGH GAMES
PREP BASKETBALL
6 p.m. — Blount County Jamboree, at William Blount
Qtr 1 – Heritage vs. Maryville girls
Qtr 2 – William Blount vs. Alcoa girls
Halftime contests: Free Throw, 3-point and Dunk contest
Qtr 3 – Heritage vs. Maryville boys
Qtr 4 – William Blount vs. Alcoa boys
PREP BOWLING
3:30 p.m. — Heritage vs. Hardin Valley, at Crest Bowling Lanes
3:45 p.m. — William Blount vs. The King’s Academy (boys only), at
Sevierville Community Center
4 p.m. — Seymour vs. Knoxville Catholic (Location TBA)
ON THE AIR
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m......... Clemson at Wake Forest ...........................................ESPN
7:30 p.m. ....... Bethune-Cookman at Norfolk St. ........................ ESPNU
10:30 p.m. ..... Grambling St. at MVSU (same-day tape)........ ESPNU
GOLF
2 p.m. ............. PGA Tour, Sanderson Farms Championship ............TGC
10 p.m. ........... PGA Tour-WGC, HSBC Champions .............................TGC
NBA
8 p.m. ............. San Antonio at Houston ............................................. TNT
10:30 p.m. ..... Dallas at Portland ........................................................ TNT
NFL
8:25 p.m. ....... Cleveland at Cincinnati ................................................NFL
SOCCER
1 p.m. .............. UEFA Europa League, Tottenham at Tripoli ............. FS1
3 p.m. ............. UEFA Europa League, Lille at Everton...................... FS1
4 a.m. ............. UEFA Europa League, Inter Milan at Saint Etienne FS1
25 YEARS AGO FROM TIMES HISTORY
From the Nov. 6, 1989 edition of The Daily Times: Alcoa
High School beat Austin-East in a nail biter, 36-30, for the
1989 District 3-AA Championship. Quarterback Kevin Jackson
scored on a three-yard dash to put the game away in overtime. Jackson also had 25-yard touchdown pass to Billy Williams.
ODDS
GLANTZ-CULVER LINE
NCAA FOOTBALL
NBA
FAVORITE ..............LINE.... O/U ..........UNDERDOG
at Houston ........... 31вЃ„2 ... (205) .. San Antonio
at Portland .............. 4 ... (2071вЃ„2) ..........Dallas
Tonight
FAVORITE ....... OPEN .. TODAY .O/U ..UNDERDOG
Clemson .............. 21 .... 211вЃ„2 ... (421вЃ„2)at W. For.
Tomorrow
Memphis .............. 6 ..... 71вЃ„2.... (521вЃ„2)at Temple
Utah St. ............ 61вЃ„2 ....... 7 ...... (45)at Wyoming
Saturday
Penn St..................5 .....61вЃ„2 ... (44) ..at Indiana
Georgia................. 11 ...... 10 ..... (58 1вЃ„2) .....at Ky.
Louisiana Tech 41вЃ„2 .....31вЃ„2.... (58 1вЃ„2) ..at UAB
Iowa .................. 21вЃ„2 ..... 11вЃ„2 .... (431вЃ„2)..at Minn.
Michigan ............ Pk ........1 ...... (401вЃ„2)at N.west.
Georgia Tech........5 .....31вЃ„2.... (601вЃ„2) at NC St.
Wisconsin ............17 .......17 ..... (55 1вЃ„2)at Purdue
at Appalachian St. .....21вЃ„2.... 31вЃ„2..(54)L-Mon.
Duke .......................4 .....31вЃ„2.... (51) at Syracuse
Florida ................. 15 .... 141вЃ„2 ... (45 1вЃ„2)at Vandy
Louisville ..............3 ....... 3...... (46)at Bos. Coll.
Iowa St. ............ 51вЃ„2 .....31вЃ„2.... (54 1вЃ„2)atKansas
at Arkansas St.OFF ... OFF ... (OFF)South Ala.
at Houston ..........17 ...... 18 ..... (45) ........Tulane
at Troy ...................7 .....61вЃ„2 ... (64) Georgia St.
at Rice................... 11 ...... 10 ..... (48).......... UTSA
at Old Dominion .3 ....... 5...... (61 1вЃ„2)...........FIU
West Virginia .......4 .....31вЃ„2.... (52) .....at Texas
UCLA ................. 41вЃ„2 .....41вЃ„2 ... (55) .... at Wash.
at Tulsa ................ 11 .... 121вЃ„2 ... (55 1вЃ„2)....... SMU
UConn ............... 31вЃ„2 .....41вЃ„2 ... (48)....... Army-x
at Auburn .......... 20 .... 211вЃ„2 ... (671вЃ„2)Tex. A&M
Alabama .............. 6 .....61вЃ„2 ... (45 1вЃ„2) ... at LSU
at Oklahoma .......4 .....51вЃ„2.... (73 1вЃ„2) ....Baylor
at Florida St. ..191вЃ„2 .... 191вЃ„2... (551вЃ„2).. Virginia
at W. Kentucky 71вЃ„2 ....... 7 ...... (70 1вЃ„2)..... UTEP
at Oregon St. ...71вЃ„2 .......8...... (62 1вЃ„2) Wash. St.
Air Force ........... 61вЃ„2 ....... 6...... (541вЃ„2) at UNLV
at San Diego St. 21 ....201вЃ„2 .. (53) .......... Idaho
at Southern Miss.OFFOFF... (OFF) . Marshall
FAU.........................4 .....31вЃ„2.... (56) at N. Texas
Georgia Southern10.. 121вЃ„2 ... (61 1вЃ„2)at Tex.St.
at Arizona ........... 16 .... 161вЃ„2... (69)....Colorado
Boise St. ...............17 ...... 18 ..... (64)at N. Mexico
at Colorado St.161вЃ„2......17 ..... (56)........Hawaii
at Michigan St. ....2 .....31вЃ„2.... (58)......Ohio St.
La.-Lafayette 161вЃ„2 ...... 16 ..... (64)at N.Mex.St.
at Arizona St........2 .....21вЃ„2.... (59 1вЃ„2)No.Dame
Oregon ............. 91вЃ„2 .....81вЃ„2 ... (60) ......at Utah
at TCU................... 6 ....... 6...... (57 1вЃ„2) .. Kan.St.
at Fresno St. ... 31вЃ„2 ....... 2...... (59)San Jose St.
x-at New York Off Key
South Alabama QB questionable
Southern Miss. QB questionable
NFL
Tonight
FAVORITE ....... OPEN .. TODAY .O/U ..UNDERDOG
at Cincinnati ....... 6 ....... 6...... (45) ..Cleveland
Sunday
Jacksonville-x OFF .... OFF ... (OFF) ......Dallas
at Detroit ..............2 ....... 3...... (43 1вЃ„2) .... Miami
Kansas City ...........1 ....... 2...... (41 1вЃ„2)at Buffalo
at New Orleans31вЃ„2.....41вЃ„2 ... (49) ...San Fran.
at Baltimore ......10 .....91вЃ„2 ... (44) .Tennessee
Pittsburgh ....... 21вЃ„2 ....... 5...... (451вЃ„2)atN.Y. Jets
Atlanta ................. + ..... 11вЃ„2 .... 1..(45 1вЃ„2) at T.B.
Denver .............101вЃ„2 .....111вЃ„2 ... (49) at Oakland
at Arizona .........71вЃ„2 ....... 7 ...... (43) .....St. Louis
at Seattle .........71вЃ„2 ....... 9...... (44 1вЃ„2) ...Giants
at Green Bay ........7 ....... 7 ...... (53 1вЃ„2) .Chicago
Monday
at Philadelphia51вЃ„2 ...... 6...... (48)..... Carolina
x-at London Off Key
Dallas QB questionable
NHL
FAVORITE ..............LINE.... UNDERDOG .........LINE
at Boston............-220 ... Edmonton ......+ 180
at Philadelphia ..-165 ... Florida ............. + 145
at Ottawa ............-125 ... Minnesota ...... + 105
at Tampa Bay .... -180 ... Calgary ............+ 160
Pittsburgh ...........-130 ... at Winnipeg ....+ 110
at St. Louis ......... -190 ... New Jersey ..... + 165
at Dallas ............. -140 ... Nashville ......... + 120
at Colorado .........-130 ... Toronto ............+ 110
at San Jose ..........-155 ... Vancouver ...... + 135
at Los Angeles .. -190 ... N.Y. Islanders . + 165
AUTO RACING
ROOKIE STANDINGS
SPRINT CUP
1. Kyle Larson, 291
2. Austin Dillon, 208
3. Justin Allgaier, 174
4. Cole Whitt, 164
5. Michael Annett, 162
6. Alex Bowman, 148
7. Ryan Truex, 114
8. Parker Kligerman, 41
Brenda Bradley 194, Lennis Walvoort 188,
Judy Moss 180, Sue Cooper 179, Maxine Falls
176, Melissa Ownby 173, Sylvia Porter 173.
BASKETBALL
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
4
Brooklyn
2
New York
2
Boston
1
Philadelphia
0
Southeast Division
L
Pct
GB
1
2
3
3
5
.800
.500
.400
.250
.000
—
11вЃ„2
2
21вЃ„2
4
W
L
Pct
GB
Washington
Miami
Atlanta
Charlotte
Orlando
Central Division
3
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
4
.750
.600
.500
.400
.200
—
1вЃ„2
1
11вЃ„2
21вЃ„2
W
L
Pct
GB
Chicago
Milwaukee
Cleveland
Detroit
Indiana
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
.750
.500
.333
.250
.250
—
1
11вЃ„2
2
2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
Houston
5
Memphis
4
Dallas
3
San Antonio
1
New Orleans
2
Northwest Division
L
Pct
GB
0
0
1
1
2
1.000
1.000
.750
.500
.500
—
1вЃ„2
11вЃ„2
21вЃ„2
21вЃ„2
W
L
Pct
GB
Portland
Minnesota
Denver
Utah
Oklahoma City
Pacific Division
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
4
.500
.500
.333
.250
.200
—
—
1вЃ„2
1
11вЃ„2
W
L
Pct
GB
Golden State
Sacramento
Phoenix
L.A. Clippers
L.A. Lakers
3
3
3
3
0
0
1
1
1
5
1.000
.750
.750
.750
.000
—
1вЃ„2
1вЃ„2
1вЃ„2
4
Tuesday’s Games
Milwaukee 87, Indiana 81
Washington 98, New York 83
Toronto 100, Oklahoma City 88
Houston 108, Miami 91
New Orleans 100, Charlotte 91
Chicago 98, Orlando 90
Portland 101, Cleveland 82
Phoenix 112, L.A. Lakers 106
Wednesday’s Games
Orlando 91, Philadelphia 89
Charlotte 96, Miami 89
Detroit 98, New York 95
Toronto 110, Boston 107
Minnesota 98, Brooklyn 91
Chicago at Milwaukee, late
Indiana at Washington, late
Atlanta at San Antonio, late
Memphis at Phoenix, late
Cleveland at Utah, late
Denver at Sacramento, late
L.A. Clippers at Golden State, late
Today’s Games
San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Chicago at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Washington at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Utah, 9 p.m.
Cleveland at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
1. Chase Elliott, 311
2. Ty Dillon, 259
3. Chris Buescher, 228
4. Dylan Kwasniewski, 163
5. Ryan Reed, 156
6. Dakoda Armstrong, 143
7. Ryan Sieg, 135
8. Tanner Berryhill, 89
9. Chad Boat, 53
10. Tommy Joe Martins, 47
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
1. Ben Kennedy, 181
2. Tyler Reddick, 157
3. Mason Mingus, 135
4. Tyler Young, 132
5. Jimmy Weller, 74
6. Gray Gaulding, 73
7. Chase Pistone, 47
8
6
6
5
5
4
3
4
2
4
5
4
5
5
6
8
1
2
0
2
2
3
2
0
17
14
12
12
12
11
8
8
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIP
Eastern Conference
Leg 1 — Nov. 23: teams TBD, 1:30 p.m.
Leg 2 — Nov. 29: teams TBD, 3 p.m. Western
Conference
Leg 1 — Nov. 23: teams TBD, 5 p.m.
Leg 2 — Nov. 30: teams TBD, 5 or 9 p.m.
33
42
38
30
31
34
15
17
41
32
33
27
27
31
20
45
45
33
36
30
37
38
25
30
23
37
39
35
39
37
37
41
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
MANUFACTURER STANDINGS
SPRINT CUP
1. Chevrolet, 246 (18)
2. Ford, 234 (14)
3. Toyota, 166 (2)
NATIONWIDE
1. Chevrolet, 209 (15)
2. Toyota, 194 (9)
3. Ford, 185 (7)
4. Dodge, 94
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
1. Toyota, 168 (16)
2. Chevrolet, 106 (2)
2. Ford, 106 (2)
4. Ram, 21
BOWLING
MORNING COFFEE LEAGUE
Wednesday
at Crest Lanes
HIGH SERIES
Dora Headrick 490, Maxine Falls 488, Melissa Ownby 480, Sandy Atkins 478, Brenda
St. Louis
12
Nashville
12
Winnipeg
13
Chicago
13
Minnesota
11
Dallas
12
Colorado
14
Pacific Division
8
7
7
7
7
4
3
3
3
5
5
4
4
6
1
2
1
1
0
4
5
17
16
15
15
14
12
11
30
30
25
34
36
35
33
23
25
27
23
22
42
43
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim
13 10 3
Vancouver
13 9 4
Calgary
14 8 4
Los Angeles 13 7 4
San Jose
13 7 4
Arizona
12 5 6
Edmonton
12 4 7
NOTE: Two points for a
overtime loss.
Oct. 31
Pensacola 6, Peoria 0
Nov. 1
Pensacola 4, Peoria 3
Fayetteville 3, Columbus 0
Knoxville 4, Mississippi RiverKings 1
Huntsville 5, Louisiana 1
Nov. 2
Peoria 3, Louisiana 0
Mississippi RiverKings 5, Huntsville 3
Friday’s Games
Fayetteville at Louisiana, 8:05 p.m.
Knoxville at Peoria, 8:05 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Fayetteville at Louisiana, 8:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Fayetteville at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Knoxville at Peoria, 4:05 p.m.
Eastern Conference
New England 1, Columbus 0
Leg 1 — Nov. 1: New England 4, Columbus 2
Leg 2 — Sunday: Columbus at New England,
5 p.m.
New York 1, D.C. United 0
Leg 1 — Nov. 2: New York 2, D.C. United 0
Leg 2 — Saturday: New York at D.C. United,
2:30 p.m.
Western Conference
LA Galaxy 0, Real Salt Lake 0
Leg 1 — Nov. 1: LA Galaxy 0, Real Salt Lake 0
Leg 2 — Sunday: Real Salt Lake at LA Galaxy,
7:30 p.m.
Seattle vs. FC Dallas
Leg 1 — Nov. 2: Seattle 1, FC Dallas 1
Leg 2 — Nov. 10: FC Dallas at Seattle, 10:30
p.m.
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
11
12
11
11
12
12
11
12
OL Pts GF GA
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Atlantic Division
Pittsburgh
New Jersey
N.Y. Islanders
N.Y. Rangers
Philadelphia
Washington
Carolina
Columbus
W L
Pensacola
4 4 0 0 8 18 5
Knoxville
3 3 0 0 6 14 6
Peoria
4 2 1 1 5 9 11
Louisiana
4 2 2 0 4 10 11
Huntsville
3 1 2 0 2 9 9
Fayetteville
3 1 2 0 2 6 9
Miss. RiverKings 4 1 3 0 2 9 15
Columbus
3 0 3 0 0 4 13
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one
point for an overtime or shootout loss. Overtime or shootout losses are only denoted in
the OL column, not the loss column.
Eastern Conference
Oct. 30: New York 2, Sporting Kansas City 1
Western Conference
Oct 29: FC Dallas 2, Vancouver 1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
19
17
16
15
14
13
12
8
GP
PLAYOFFS
KNOCKOUT ROUND
NHL
1
1
0
3
2
1
4
2
SPHL
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
HOCKEY
Montreal
14 9 4
Tampa Bay 12 8 3
Boston
14 8 6
Detroit
12 6 3
Ottawa
11 6 3
Toronto
12 6 5
Florida
10 4 2
Buffalo
14 3 9
Metropolitan Division
Los Angeles 3, Dallas 1
Vancouver 5, Colorado 2
Arizona 3, Toronto 2
Wednesday’s Games
Montreal 2, Buffalo 1, SO
Detroit at N.Y. Rangers, late
N.Y. Islanders at Anaheim, late
Today’s Games
Edmonton at Boston, 7 p.m.
Florida at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Colorado, 9 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Edmonton at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Carolina, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Arizona at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
SOCCER
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
NATIONWIDE
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2014
0 20 36 24
0 18 43 36
2 18 41 32
2 16 31 27
2 16 41 35
1
11 31 44
1
9 30 43
win, one point for
Tuesday’s Games
Boston 2, Florida 1, OT
Philadelphia 4, Edmonton 1
Calgary 4, Washington 3, OT
Carolina 4, Columbus 2
St. Louis 1, New Jersey 0
Chicago 5, Montreal 0
Ottawa 3, Detroit 1
Pittsburgh 4, Minnesota 1
Winnipeg 3, Nashville 1
MLS CUP
Dec. 7: Conference champions, 3 p.m.
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE
GP
W D
L GF GA Pts
Chelsea
10 8 2 0 26 10 26
Southampton
10 7 1 2 21 5 22
Man. City
10 6 2 2 20 10 20
Arsenal
10 4 5 1 18 11 17
West Ham
10 5 2 3 19 14 17
Swansea
10 4 3 3 13 10 15
Liverpool
10 4 2 4 13 13 14
Tottenham
10 4 2 4 13 14 14
Everton
10 3 4 3 19 17 13
Man. United
10 3 4 3 16 14 13
West Brom
10 3 4 3 13 13 13
Newcastle
10 3 4 3 11 15 13
Stoke
10 3 3 4 10 12 12
Hull City
10 2 5 3 13 14 11
Sunderland
10 2 5 3 11 18 11
Aston Villa
10 3 1 6 5 16 10
Crystal Palace
10 2 3 5 14 19 9
Leicester City
10 2 3 5 11 16 9
Q.Park Rangers 10 2 1 7 9 20 7
Burnley
10 0 4 6 5 19 4
Nov. 1
Newcastle 1, Liverpool 0
Arsenal 3, Burnley 0
Chelsea 2, Queens Park Rangers 1
Everton 0, Swansea 0
Hull City 0, Southampton 1
Leicester City 0, West Brom 1
Stoke 2, West Ham 2
Nov. 2
Manchester City 1, Manchester United 0
Aston Villa 1, Tottenham 2
Monday
Crystal Palace 1, Sunderland 3
Saturday
Liverpool vs. Chelsea, 1245 GMT
Burnley vs. Hull City, 1500 GMT
Manchester United vs. Crystal Palace, 1500
GMT
Southampton vs. Leicester City, 1500 GMT
West Ham vs. Aston Villa, 1500 GMT
Queens Park Rangers vs. Manchester City,
1730 GMT
Sunday
Sunderland vs. Everton, 1330 GMT
Tottenham vs. Stoke, 1330 GMT
West Brom vs. Newcastle, 1330 GMT
Swansea vs. Arsenal, 1600 GMT
Lawyer: A-Rod admitted steroid use to DEA
BY CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer
MIAMI — A lawyer for
the University of Miami’s
former pitching coach
said Wednesday that Alex
Rodriguez admitted to federal investigators he used
steroids supplied by the
owner of a now-closed
South Florida clinic.
Attorney Frank Quintero
Jr., who represents Lazaro “Laser” Collazo in his
defense against charges
of conspiracy to distribute performance-enhancing drugs, told The Associated Press that the New
York Yankees third baseman confessed to steroids
use, according to Drug
Enforcement Administration documents provided by the government to
defense lawyers.
The Miami Herald first
reported Rodrig uez’s
admission Wednesday,
saying he met with DEA
agents on Jan. 29 at the
agency’s South Florida field office. Given a
grant of immunity from
prosecution, Rodriguez
told investigators he did
use banned substances
between late 2010 and
October 2012 supplied
by Anthony Bosch, who
owned the Biogenesis of
America clinic in Coral
Gables.
Rodriguez has publicly
denied any use of banned
substances during his
time with the Yankees,
which began in 2004.
The three-time AL MVP
acknowledged in 2009 that
he using performanceenhancing drugs while
with Texas from 2001-03.
Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig suspended
Rodriguez for 211 games in
August 2013 for violations
of the sport’s drug agreement and labor contract,
and the penalty was cut to
the 2014 season in January by arbitrator Fredric
Horowitz.
ALCOA HIGH TECHNOLOGY DEPT.
ALCOA SENIOR KATI TOWNSEND signs to play volleyball with
Hiwassee College on Tuesday with support of parents Kristi
and Joe Townsend (right) as well as Hiwassee coach Hannah
Powers (far left) and an unidentified assistant (left).
Townsend signs
with Hiwassee
BY MARCUS FITZSIMMONS
[email protected]
There was a lot of excitement for Kati Townsend on
Tuesday as the Alcoa senior
kept sticking her head into
the athletic director’s office
to make sure everything
was still on schedule and
ready.
It’s the same attention
and dedication that made
Townsend stand out on the
volleyball court for Alcoa
the last four years, so it was
no surprise it was again at
work when it came to her
signing the offer to keep
playing volleyball on the
next level.
Townsend signed with
Hiwassee College Tuesday afternoon, matching
her athletic dreams with
her academic ones.
“She has been an integral
part of Alcoa volleyball and
has contributed outstanding play while growing
as a mature young lady,”
Alcoa volleyball coach
Sam Thomas told The Daily Times. “She will make
an immediate impact for
Hiwassee’s program whether it is on the floor or just
as a team member because
of her hard work and dedication.”
Townsend has been a varsity starter all four seasons
with the Lady Tornadoes,
twice selected for the AllCounty and All-District
teams. When it came to
making the college decision, the District 4-AA
tourney MVP trusted in
her touchstone phrase for
making the decision.
“I try to always keeps
in mind �a woman’s heart
plans her way but the
Lord directs her steps,’
Townsend told The Daily Times Wednesday. “I’m
really thankful for the
opportunity to be a college
athlete but more importantly was the chance to be
in the academic program I
wanted to pursue.”
Visiting Hiwassee to
see the campus, meet the
team and observe practice
allowed Townsend to settle her athletic ambitions.
Checking out the medical
program for dental hygiene
though helped seal the
decision.
“I felt right at home there
with the team,” Townsend
said. “I toured the campus
and they had this great program for what I want to do.
I knew that’s where I wanted to be.”
Still when the day to commit arrived Tuesday, the
senior was as wound up as if
there was one more match
and the outside hitter was
getting ready to unload.
“I was super excited to
sign,” Townsend said. “I
had been in the ADs office
all day making sure it was
still on.”
BRIEFS
Lady Vols upset Florida to make semis
The Lady Vols soccer team took the 1-1 (5-4) win on
penalty kicks Wednesday in Orange Beach, Ala. to
knock off second-seeded and nationally-ranked Florida
to advance to the SEC tournament semifinals. Cheyenne
Spade scored the winning goal in the PK session as UT
outscored Florida 5-4, following a 1-1 tie in double overtime. Spade scored in the low right corner to put Tennessee ahead and Florida’s Tessa Andujar shot wide.
The 10th-seeded Lady Vols struck in the third minute
when Michele Christy found Hannah Wilkinson on the
right side and Wilkinson sent a perfect ball into the left
side of the box for Spade and her eighth goal of the season. Annie Speese evened it for Florida in the 44th.
Tennessee, which upset No. 7 seed Alabama on Monday to reach the quarterfinals, advances to Friday’s
semifinal match against No. 3 seed Kentucky.
UT baseball recruiting class ranked 13th
The latest recruiting class for the University of Tennessee baseball team was ranked 13th by Perfect Game
the school announced Wednesday. Tennessee is one
of nine Southeastern Conference schools with teams
listed in the Top 25 by Perfect Game, finishing ahead of
No. 14 Vanderbilt, No. 18 Ole Miss, No. 20 Texas A&M
and No. 22 Missouri. Last year, Serrano’s second official recruitment class brought in a No. 15 national ranking from Baseball America, along with a No. 14 spot
from Collegiate Baseball’s annual recruiting rankings.
Among Tennessee’s 13 total newcomers, this year’s class
consists of seven new pitchers including Steven Kane
(34th round Cubs) and Zach Warren (23rd, Pirates).
Alcoa’s Evans commits to Chattanooga
Alcoa sophomore wrestler Sammy Evans has committed to the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
according to The Times Free-Press. Evans won a state
title last year as a freshman, pinning Signal Mountain’s
Micah Pressley in the Class A/AA championship match
as one of three Alcoa champs that helped the Tornadoes finish runner-up to Hixson in the traditional tournament in Franklin. Evans was fourth in his age group
in the cadet and senior nationals this past summer.
“Heath (Eslinger, UTC’s head coach) came up and did
a summer camp for us, and I think Sammy realized then
that UTC was where he wanted to go,” Alcoa wrestling
coach Brian Gossett said. “He is Heath’s kind of kid —
Heath’s ethics, how he has built his program and his
care for the kids.”
SPORTS | 3B
THE DAILY TIMES
Thursday, November 6, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
HURD: Jones says Lane, North should be back in action against Kentucky
FROM 1B
we feel like we can stay on the
field more, which will allow Pig
(Howard) to touch the ball more,
Jalen, (Josh) Dobbs to touch the
ball more.”
Tennessee put up 645 total
yards on 95 plays, averaging 6.8
yards per snap. The Vols were
7-of-16 on third down conversions, 2-of-3 on fourth down and
scored on five of six trips to the
red zone.
Hurd’s 183 total yards were
heavily overshadowed by the 467
total yards and five touchdowns
put up by Dobbs. Howard had 138
total yards and a score.
“I thought as an offense Jake
(Tennessee offensive coordinator Mike Bajakian) did a really
good job calling plays, which
allowed us to have more offensive plays and allowed (Hurd)
to have more touches,” Gillespie
said. “And when he touched the
ball he made plays.”
NO DICE: Tennessee trailed by 14
points with two minutes to play
in the comeback win at South
Carolina. The Vols combined to
go 160 yards in 19 plays to score
the game’s final two touchdowns,
DEVICES: Catapult data can
be used to help recovery
FROM 1B
Rugby and soccer teams
were among the first to
use it. Football teams in
the United States began
signing on with Catapult
three years ago, and several hockey and basketball
teams have followed.
“You build a portfolio of
data on each player so over
a period of time you can
tell when they’re wearing down, do they need an
extra rest, do they need a
day off, all those things,”
Tennessee coach Butch
Jones said. “The most
important thing is what
you do throughout the
week to get them ready
to perform at their peak, at
their optimal level, come
game day.”
At Nebraska, the top
50 football players slip a
monitor weighing about
3 ounces into a pouch in
the back of the tight-fit
shirts they wear under
their shoulder pads. Head
strength coach James Dobson said it’s too expensive
to track all of the Huskers’ 130 players. As it is,
Nebraska will pay Catapult more than $363,000
over three years to rent
equipment.
Each monitor includes
a GPS device and other
sensors that measure hundreds of variables per second, many of them hard to
pronounce.
Some of the basic metrics: how far and fast did
the player travel during a
practice or game, his rate
of acceleration, how many
times he went right vs. left
and whether he moved
faster when he went one
way or the other. The
monitor is so sensitive
that it can detect even a
slight change in a player’s
gait, which can be a sign
of fatigue or injury.
Data collected is put into
an algorithm developed by
Catapult, and the result is
a number called “player
load.”
The load is a number
that varies depending on
a player’s position, but the
average in college football would be about 350,
said Catapult sports performance manager Ben
Peterson. The higher a
player’s number goes, the
greater his exertion.
A baseline is established
for each player, and his
readings can be monitored
in real time.
“On certain days you
have to be in certain
zones,” said Armstrong,
the Nebraska quarterback. “If you go over that,
they tell you, �Hey, yesterday you were in the red,
so make sure you’re not
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today.’ If you are in the
red zone, you take a few
series off.”
Under NCAA rules,
Catapult data cannot be
looked at in real time
during games because it
could provide a competitive advantage if one team
is using the system and the
other is not.
Peterson said college
teams using the system
have reported an average
of a 27-percent decrease in
soft-tissue injuries.
When an athlete does
get hurt, sports medicine
personnel can use Catapult data to manage his
recovery.
For instance, if an injured
wide receiver were able to
reach only 70 percent of
his maximum acceleration or speed, it would
show he has a ways to go
before he’s ready to play
in a game.
The data also could be
used to establish points
�They don’t want
to overwork us.
It shows that
they care.’
Brian Randolph
Tennessee safety
of emphasis in a hurt athlete’s rehabilitation protocol.
Alabama coach Nick
Saban said he looks at
player load readings to see
which players are working
as hard as they can and,
conversely, to identify
ones who aren’t.
Saban said players who
know they’re going to
play on Saturdays tend
to give maximum effort
all the time, but that’s not
necessarily the case for
those who aren’t as likely
to play.
Saban said it’s telling to
track defensive backs.
“When they’re covering
a good receiver, their numbers are higher,” Saban
said. “When they’re covering a guy who’s not as fast,
they’re not as good.”
Tennessee safety Brian
Randolph said the technology helps coaches put
players in the best position for success.
“They don’t want to overwork us. It shows that they
care,” Randolph said.
“They definitely tell you
when you’ve had a lot of
reps or when you have
a lot of mileage on your
legs from the day before,
so they tell you to get in
the cold tub and get extra
recovery.”
needing just four minutes, 13 seconds off the game clock to complete the rally and force overtime.
But even with an offense running efficiently behind Dobbs,
Jones never considered going for
a two-point conversion to try for
the win in regulation after scoring
with 11 seconds left in the game.
“It was all about overtime,”
Jones said Wednesday on the SEC
coaches’ teleconference. “We’ve
trained for that situation starting in spring football and training camp.
“We had worked ourselves into
position to finish the game in
overtime. So going for two was
never a point (of thought).”
INJURY REPORT: Jones said on the
teleconference Wednesday that
both running back Marlin Lane
(ankle) and receiver Marquez
North (shoulder) should be back
for next week’s game against Kentucky.
“Marlin Lane is back practicing,” Jones said. “We were really
concerned that it was a significant injury Saturday night, but
he’ll be going through practice
today.”
Lane had to be carried off the
field Saturday. He went down late
in the game after appearing to reaggravate an ankle injury suffered
earlier in the year. North, Tennessee’s leading receiver, left the
game with a shoulder injury.
Lane practiced, during portions
open to the media Wednesday,
but North was not dressed.
“Marlin’s fine,” Gillespie said.
“He just likes the theatrics of it.
He practiced today.”
The Vols are off Saturday for
their second bye week of the
season.
“We fully anticipate having
them next week,” Jones said.
More than yards, TDs
SEC loaded with talented, sizable running backs
BY MARK LONG
AP Sports Writer
GAINESVILLE, Fla. —
The Southeastern Conference has a talented pack
of big backs.
The league that has
produced countless sizable runners — Herschel
Walker, Bo Jackson and
Shaun Alexander for
starters — has a number
of them punishing opponents this season.
It’s not just yards and
touchdowns that make
these guys stand out.
Looking at heights and
weights, this crop just
might be special.
“It’s no different than
when you’re buying a boxing ticket,” Florida coach
Will Muschamp said. “Do
you buy it to go see the
JOHN RAOUX | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
featherweights fight or
the heavyweights? The GEORGIA RUNNING BACK NICK CHUBB (27) gains yardage as he breaks away from Florida defenders
during the first half Saturday in Jacksonville, Fla.
heavyweights.”
Suspended Georgia star
Todd Gurley, a 6-foot-1, Mike Davis (5-9, 223) and Lacy, Auburn’s Ben Tate, They’re not going any226-pound junior who Brandon Wilds (6-2, 222) South Carolina’s Marcus where.”
leads the SEC at 155 have combined for 1,264 Lattimore, Mississippi
True, but some SEC teams
State’s Vick Ballard and have experimented with
yards rushing a game, is yards and 11 scores.
the class of the field. But
“It’s almost becoming Anthony Dixon also were smaller backs, believing
there are plenty of oth- normal with each team a load to handle in col- faster, shiftier guys could
er big backs making an having these kind of lege.
get the edge in spread
“Watching from afar, I offenses that are designed
impact in the league this backs,” South Carolina
season, including Gur- defensive tackle J.T. Sur- always thought the SEC to run more outside than
ley’s backup, freshman ratt said. “So we’re just had big backs,” Vander- between the tackles.
Nick Chubb. The 5-10, going to do what we’ve bilt coach Derek Mason
It’s hardly the case any
228-pound Chubb has got to do to prepare for said.
longer, with SEC teams
“You see very few small more willing to spread
three consecutive games them.”
The SEC has a sto- backs in this conference. defenses out and try to
with at least 140 yards on
ried list of bulky backs, With that being the case, pound them up the midthe ground.
Much like the Bulldogs, including Heisman Tro- they’re here to stay. dle.
Alabama, Arkansas, LSU phy winners Billy Canand South Carolina have non (LSU, 1959), Walker
two big backs sharing car- (Georgia, 1982), Jackson
(Auburn, 1985) and even
ries.
Derrick Henry, a 6-3, Mark Ingram (Alabama,
241-pound sophomore, 2009). Alabama’s Trent
and T.J. Yeldon, a 6-2, Richardson and Eddie
221-pound junior, have
combined for 1,148 yards
and nine touchdowns for
the Tide.
Alex Collins and Jonathan Williams have
been even better for the
Razorbacks. The 6-foot,
225-pound Williams ranks
third in the league with
877 yards rushing and 10
scores, one spot ahead of
Your Hometown
his teammate. The 5-footPest Control
11, 215-pound Collins has
840 yards and 10 TDs.
Company!
Leonard Fournette, a 6-1,
230-pound, highly touted
freshman, and Kenny Hilliard, a 6-foot, 232-pound
senior, have helped LSU
get back in the SEC West
race by winning three consecutive games. Throw
in 5-9, 217-pound senior
Terrence Magee, and
509 W. Lamar Alexander Pkwy.
the Tigers have a nearly
700-pound rotation in the
backfield.
South Carolina’s duo
T.D.A. 381
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4B | SPORTS
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
INSIDESUNDAY
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Thursday, November 6, 2014
WWW.ATHLONSPORTS.COM
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Cleveland
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at
Cincinnati
8:25 p.m.
Buffalo
Detroit
Dallas (at London)
New Orleans
Baltimore
N.Y. Jets
Tampa Bay
Oakland
Arizona
Seattle
Green Bay
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia
8:30 p.m.
"82*(;>39>
Kansas City
Miami
Jacksonville
San Francisco
Tennessee
Pittsburgh
Atlanta
Denver
St. Louis
N.Y. Giants
Chicago
at
at
vs.
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
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Carolina
at
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New England, San Diego, Washington
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This battle for Buckeye State supremacy is by far the
most nationally relevant matchup between Cleveland
and Cincinnati since the expansion Browns returned
to the league in 1999 and will be must-see TV on
Thursday night. Although Cleveland’s sports scene is
providing a feel-good story — complete with a national ad campaign featuring LeBron James — it’s too
soon to overreact (on the gridiron or hardwood). The
Browns’ five wins have come against teams with a
combined 13–28 record (7–25 if Pittsburgh’s 6–3
mark is removed) and they are the only team to lose
to lowly Jacksonville (24–6 in Week 7).
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BIG BEN STRIKES 12
T
he greatest Pittsburgh Steeler of all time — Hall of Fame D-lineman
Regardless of what happens in the future, Roethlisberger’s two-week tear is
“Mean Joe” Greene — was on-hand to provide a fiery pregame
already in the record books. And his back-to-back six-TD games are not likely
speech before having his famed No. 75 jersey retired. And, just like
to be matched anytime soon. Then again, no one would have believed that he
during his four-Super Bowl, Steel Curtain heyday, when “Mean Joe”
would have a repeat performance.
spoke, the entire Steeler Nation followed his lead.
“You could have never sold me that during the week, even though he did it
“When Joe says to kick some (butt), you kick some (butt) out
last week,” said Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs. “But he had a
there,” Steelers linebacker Lawrence Timmons told the Pittsburgh
helluva game, and that’s a reflection on us all. You have to stop
Post-Gazette.
him in some certain situations.”
Two-time Super Bowl-winning quarterback Ben Roethlisberger
Even Roethlisberger’s teammates — especially defenderscertainly kicked some (butt) during a 43–23 victory over the AFC
turned-fans with front-row, field-level “seats” — were awestruck
North rival Baltimore Ravens. “Big Ben” posted his second
by what they were witnessing first-hand against a stingy Ravens
straight six-TD performance, setting a new NFL record just one
defense that entered the game ranked No. 2 in red zone scoring.
week after becoming the first player in league history with two
“It was like a video game out there,” said Timmons. “Guys
500-yard games — falling just 33 yards shy of the 63-year-old
were scoring touchdowns left and right. It was amazing to see.”
single-game mark held by Norm Van Brocklin — in a 51–34
An iconic defensive
(7-(2>!86victory over the Indianapolis Colts in Week 8.
player like “Mean Joe”
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In statement wins over the Ravens and Colts, Roethlisberger
has seen nearly every>=">>#> """>>%">
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has thrown for a combined 862 yards, 12 TDs and zero INTs.
thing during his lifePlayer
Yds.
Game
time in football. But
Markus
Wheaton
18
Colts
Greene never saw anything like the
“I don’t think any
of us are surprised by
show Roethlisberger has put on these
Martavis Bryant 5
Colts
past two weeks. Big Ben has 12 TDs
anything he does,”
Antonio
Brown
8
Colts
said Steelers coach
in two games; Terry Bradshaw’s
Mike Tomlin. “We
Antonio Brown
47
Colts
shortest route to 12 scoring strikes
appreciate it nonethewas a five-game span (Weeks 1-5) in
Martavis
Bryant
2
Colts
less, but we aren’t
1980. Bradshaw’s highest singleHeath Miller
11
Colts
surprised by it.”
game total was five TDs at Atlanta in
Le’Veon Bell
5
Ravens
Through nine games this season, Roethlisberger has passed for 2,720 yards,
1981, Greene’s final season.
22 TDs and three INTs for the 6–3 Steelers. That puts Big Ben on a 16-game
But these Steelers put on a fireMartavis Bryant 19
Ravens
pace of 4,800-plus yards, 39 TDs and five INTs — which would represent new
works display worthy of the legend
Markus Wheaton 47
Ravens
personal bests for passing yards (4,328 in 2009), TDs (32 in ’07) and INTs
being celebrated.
Antonio Brown
54
Ravens
(five in 12 games in ’10).
“It was an opportunity to salute the
Health permitting, the 32-year-old Roethlisberger is likely to produce his
great Joe Greene,” said Tomlin. “It
Martavis Bryant 18
Ravens
best statistical season — and, in turn, the best passing stats in Steeler history
was just a great environment to work
Matt Spaeth
33
Ravens
— even if he doesn’t keep up the unbelievable success rate he’s enjoying in his
in. I think the guys just rode that
11th year in the league.
emotional wave.”
Since Jim Harbaugh took over the 49ers
in 2011, the Niners’ bread and butter has
been their power running game — except
near the goal line in big games, strangely.
In both Super Bowl XLVII and last year’s
NFC title game, San Fran was criticized for
abandoning the run when it was needed
most. Same song, different verse during a
13–10 loss to NFC West rival St. Louis.
With the game on the line, coordinator
Greg Roman dialed up two pass plays and
a quarterback sneak with Colin Kaepernick, who fumbled the ball into the end
zone to secure the loss. Where was Frank
Gore? “They go play-action and don’t give
it to Gore. Then, on the last play, they don’t
give it to Gore either,” Rams linebacker
James Laurinaitis said. “He’s one of the
best backs in football at falling forward.”
… The Packers announced that coach Mike
McCarthy has signed a new multi-year contract extension. Terms of the deal were not
disclosed. McCarthy’s previous contract paid
an annual salary of more than $5 million
and was set to expire following the 2015
season. Since taking over in 2006, McCarthy
has an 87–48–1 regular season record and
6–5 mark in the playoffs, including a victory
in Super Bowl XLV. … Eagles quarterback
Nick Foles suffered a collarbone injury that
will not require surgery but will cause him to
miss considerable time. In his absence,
backup Mark Sanchez will take over and
the former Jets starter looked good subbing
for Foles during a 31–21 win at Houston. …
Nothing is going right for the Redskins, even
the bus ride to the game. The team bus
wrecked prior to a 29–26 loss to the Vikings.
“Unique way to start the day,” said coach Jay
Gruden. “Five feet from driving off a cliff.”
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Miami is on fire. Following a Week 5 bye, the Fins
have a 3–1 record — with a 27–24 loss to Green Bay
in Week 6 — and a combined scoring edge of 115–54,
including a 37–0 domination of San Diego last week.
The Dolphins will provide a serious test for the Lions,
a team fresh off a bye week following a last-second
win over the Falcons at Wembley Stadium in London.
Fans — both Detroit and fantasy football — hope to
see a healthy Calvin Johnson, who has not played
since suffering an ankle injury on Oct. 5.
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This Sunday night main event is the 190th meeting of
the NFL’s oldest rivalry — which dates back to 1921.
This will be the second showdown of the season, with
Green Bay crushing Chicago, 38–17, in Week 4. After
telling Cheesehead Nation to “R-E-L-A-X” following
the Packers’ 1–2 start to the season, Aaron Rodgers
responded by completing 22-of-28 passes (78.6 percent) for 302 yards, four TDs and zero INTs against
the Bears. Rodgers is now 11–3 against his NFC North
rivals, including a victory in the 2010 NFC title game.
Green Bay is coming off a bye week; but prior to that,
the Pack lost 44–23 at New Orleans to snap a fourgame winning streak. Chicago is also fresh off a bye;
but the Bears lost four of their previous five games
before the much-needed break.
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Written and compiled by Nathan Rush
Follow Nathan on Twitter: @AthlonRush
Email: [email protected]
Good through
Nov. 16th, 2014
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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2014
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Getting back to business
THE DAILY TIMES | 5B
STANDINGS
D I ST R I C T 4 -A A A
Dist.
Maryville (6A)
Knox West (5A)
Hardin Valley (6A)
Farragut (6A)
William Blount (6A)
Heritage (6A)
Lenoir City (5A)
Bearden (6A)
7-0
6-1
5-2
4-3
2-5
2-5
1-6
1-6
All.
10-0
9-1
6-4
4-6
3-7
3-7
3-7
1-9
WEEK 9
Maryville 62, Bearden 0
Farragut 63, William Blount 31
Knox West 62, Heritage 21
Hardin Valley 56, Lenoir City 0
WEEK 10
Maryville 49, Farragut 14
Hardin Valley 50, Heritage 21
Bearden 34, William Blount 14
Knox West 55, Lenoir City 16
D I ST R I C T 4 -A A
Dist.
Alcoa (3A)
Catholic (4A)
CAK (3A)
Scott (4A)
Kingston (3A)
4-0
3-1
2-2
1-3
0-4
All.
9-1
9-1
5-5
7-3
2-8
WEEK 9
Alcoa 31, Maplewood 22
Livingston Academy 35, CAK 14
Kingston 42, Sweetwater 34
Catholic 24, Webb 6
Scott 42, Cumberland Gap 0
WEEK 10
Alcoa 21, Catholic 14
CAK 42, Kingston 20
Bye: Scott
SCOTT KELLER | THE DAILY TIMES
ALCOA’S KEISHAUN JOHNSON (1) pulls away from Catholic defenders Chase Kuerschen (36) and Austin Rowan (57) Friday in Knoxville. Johnson scored on the
run but a holding penalty against the Tornadoes brought the play back.
D I ST R I C T 3 -A
Dist.
Tornadoes not taking Johnson County opener lightly
BY DARGAN SOUTHARD
[email protected]
Gary Rankin knows it’s a different animal.
With 24 straight playoff appearances
tucked under his belt, it’d be hard pressed
to find a local individual with more insight
on the postseason’s treacherous elements.
“It’s one-and-done if you don’t get it
done,” the Alcoa head coach told The Daily Times on Tuesday. “So right now, we’re
not 9-1. We’re 0-0 just like everybody else.
That’s the way you have to look at it.
“Hopefully, you set your plate where you
can have some home playoff games, but
besides that, it’s all even.”
For Alcoa, the journey to what would be a
ninth state title in 11 years commences Friday when Rankin’s top-seeded Tornadoes
(9-1) welcome Johnson County (4-6) to
Goddard Field for the opening round of the
3A playoffs.
Nestled in the 2,500-person town of
Mountain City, the Longhorns reside about
10 miles west of the Tennessee-North Carolina border. Although Johnson County’s
trek south will cover more than 160 miles
and take upwards of six hours round-trip,
the Longhorns have found ways to generate
success away from home.
On the season, three of Johnson County’s
four victories have come on the road.
“Not a whole lot,” Rankin said in regards
to his knowledge of the Longhorns. “We
swapped film with them. Got good coaches
and stuff. They’ll come in here, and … we
don’t overlook anybody. We respect everybody. We work hard everyday no matter
who we’re playing.”
That mentality certainly proved true last
Friday as well.
In one of the higher anticipated matchups
of the year, the Tornadoes clinched the District 4-AA title on a damp and frigid evening in Knoxville, pulling out a 21-14 victory over previously undefeated Catholic.
For weeks, both teams had the regular
season finale circled; the game considered a solid measuring stick before the allimportant postseason begins.
In comparison, the buildup this Friday is
somewhat lacking. There aren’t any official
odds, but Alcoa would likely be considered
a double-digit favorite over the eighthseeded Longhorns.
The preparation, though, doesn’t change.
“We came back and did the same thing
(this week at practice),” Rankin said. “We
knew we were going to do that — win
the (Catholic) game, lose the game, game
called off. We knew we were going to come
back this week and do the same thing we
always do.”
Once again, Alcoa’s offensive output was
headlined by senior running back Jaquez
Tyson, who brushed off the wintry ele-
Grace (2A)
Greenback (1A)
Rockwood (2A)
Meigs County (2A)
Harriman (1A)
Midway (1A)
Tellico Plains (2A)
5-1
5-1
4-2
4-2
2-4
1-5
0-6
All.
7-3
8-2
7-3
6-4
5-5
4-6
2-8
WEEK 9
Greenback 42, Tellico Plains 20
Rockwood 28, Midway 7
Meigs County 45, Harriman 19
Bye: Grace
WEEK 10
Meigs County 47, Tellico Plains 18
Greenback 37, Midway 16
Rockwood 22, Grace 15
Bye: Harriman
D I ST R I C T 2-A A A
Dist.
South-Doyle (5A) 7-0
Sevier County (6A) 6-1
Mo. West (5A)
5-2
Mo. East (6A)
4-3
Cocke County (5A) 3-4
Jefferson County (6A)2-5
Seymour (5A)
1-6
Cherokee (5A)
0-7
ALCOA’S JAQUEZ TYSON FIGHTS through a trio of Catholic defenders trying to reach the end zone Friday
during the Tornadoes’ 21-14 win at Knox Catholic.
3A PLAYOFFS
QUAD 1
First Round
7 p.m. Friday
No. 8 Johnson County at No. 1 Alcoa
No. 5 Sweetwater at No. 4 G-P
No. 6 West Greene at No. 3 Pigeon Forge
No. 7 CAK at No. 2 Chuckey-Doak
QUAD 2
No. 8 Chatt Chr at No. 1 Notre Dame
No. 5 York Inst at No. 4 Upperman
No. 6 Bledsoe at No. 3 Red Bank
No. 7 Grundy at No. 2 McMinn Central
QUAD 3
No. 8 Harpeth at No. 1 CPA
No. 5 Fairview at No. 4 Westmoreland
No. 6 Lipscomb Acd at No. 3 E Nashville
No. 7 Cascade at No. 2 WH Heritage
QUAD 4
No. 8 Lewis at No. 1 Camden
No. 5 Milan at No. 4 Westview
No. 6 Hickman at No. 3 Manassas
No. 7 Fairley at No. 2 Waverly
ments and carried the ball 43 times for 194
yards and three touchdowns against the
Fighting Irish.
More importantly, the workhorse-like
outing provided a promising update on
Tyson’s health and durability — the Alcoa
ball carrier has been suffering from a
recent bone bruise and played only sparingly the previous Friday against Maplewood.
“He’s about to get 100 percent healthy,”
Rankin said. “I don’t think he was 100 percent the other night. There were some
cuts in there that he usually makes, but he
ran hard. He sucked it up, but I think he’s
probably 95 percent, So he’s fine. He’ll be
fine.”
But unlike many teams still surviving
in the early days of November, the Tornadoes’ injury report basically stopped
there. Rankin admitted that quarterback/
linebacker Mitchell McClurg has been
“banged up for a couple of weeks” but
added that the Alcoa junior is “getting
close to being 100 percent healthy” in time
for what expects to be another deep playoff run.
One that Rankin believes should be significantly trimmed down sooner rather than
later.
“It’s another half a season, and it’s too
many games, there’s no doubt,” said Rankin,
who coached in more than 100 postseason
games during his 33-year head coaching
tenure. “Five playoff games in high school
football is too many. We play more games
than the University of Tennessee plays, and
that just doesn’t make sense sometimes.
“But that’s what it is, and we’ve done a
good job handling that. And you better
know what you’re doing if you plan on
playing 15 games because it can get pretty
brutal at times.”
WBCR 1470 AM THE DAILY TIMES
All.
10-0
7-3
7-3
6-4
3-7
2-8
2-8
1-9
WEEK 9
Mo. West 52, Seymour 0
Sevier County 63, Jefferson County 10
South-Doyle 13, Mo. East 10
Cocke County 60, Cherokee 24
WEEK 10
South-Doyle 33, Sevier County 19
Mo. East 28, Jefferson County 14
Seymour 26, Cherokee 14
Mo. West 24, Cocke County 10
DIV II, A, EAST&M IDDLE
Dist. All.
Webb
Friendship Chr
DCA
The King’s Acad
Ezell-Harding
Mt. Juliet Chr
5-0
4-1
3-2
2-3
1-4
0-5
7-3
9-1
8-2
7-3
1-9
2-9
WEEK 8
Webb 42, Ezell-Harding 6
TKA 60, Mt. Juliet Chr. 16
Friendship 13, DCA 6
WEEK 9
Catholic 24, Webb 6
TKA 42, Cosby 14
Friendship 49, Fayetteville 14
DCA 56, Davidson 26
Mt. Juliet Chr 34, Zion Chr. 10
Bye: Ezell-Harding
WEEK 10
Webb 50, TKA 14
Friendship 48, Ezell-Harding 13
DCA 44, Mt. Juliet Chr, 8
DANIEL HINSON
Seymour
JAQUEZ TYSON
Alcoa
The back had 11 carries
for 100 yards and a TD
in Seymour’s second
win.
The senior had 43
carries for three TDs
and 189 yards in the
win over Catholic.
6B | SPORTS
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Maryville again opens playoffs against Bradley County team
BY JAMES VAUGHN
6A PLAYOFFS
[email protected]
For the second straight year, a
team from Bradley County will
travel to Maryville attempting to
deal the Rebels their first opening
round defeat since 1994.
Walker Valley (5-5), making only
its third playoff appearance since
2005, will be seeking its first playoff win in school history Friday
night at Jim Renfro Field. The
Mustangs clinched the final playoff spot in Quad 1 with a 34-27 win
over Soddy-Daisy in the finale,
led by sophomore running back
Alex King who rushed for 180
yards and all four Walker Valley
touchdowns.
Maryville head coach George
Quarles remembers last season’s
early playoff test against Bradley
Central before the Rebels finally
pulled away for a 42-21 win.
“Just like the last Bradley County team that came here, (Walker
Valley) is a well-coached team,”
the 16th-year head coach said.
QUAD 1
No. 8 Walker Valley at No. 1
Maryville
No. 5 Hardin Valley at No. 4
Sevier County
No. 6 Mo. East at No. 3 DobynsBennett
No. 7 Bradley Cent at No. 2 Science Hill
“They don’t seem to be out of
position much. They’re also very
sound offensively and run the
ball well.
“Any time you’re playing teams
with a 5-5 record, there can be a
tendency to let up a little bit. I
don’t necessarily think that was
the case last year, though. (Bradley Central) came up and played
us well, so hopefully this time we
do a better job in making sure that
we’re good to go.”
Quarles, who is 32-0 in the first
two playoff rounds as a head
coach, said that Walker Valley
runs offensive and defensive
schemes that the Rebels haven’t
seen often this season.
“(Walker Valley) runs a 3-4
defense, which we haven’t faced
much,” Quarles told The Daily
Times. “For the most part, they’re
a two-back team offensively.
That’s different for us because
we’ve seen a lot of spread and
one-back teams this year.”
Rebel senior quarterback Tyler
Vaught, who committed to the
Air Force Academy in the summer, missed three weeks during
the regular season after suffering a shoulder injury at Hardin
Valley. Maryville turned what
could have been a devastating
loss into a positive with junior
Zach Cardwell and sophomore
Austin Ensley both getting game
experience at quarterback and
Ensley taking strides forward to
share time with Vaught since his
return to the starting lineup.
“We’ve got more depth (at quarterback) now than we did at the
start of the year,” Quarles said.
“Austin has really stepped up and
given us a spark and different
dimension. He is a little more of a
drop back passer and down field
threat throwing the ball. Tyler has
also played better for us since he’s
been back on the field.”
In addition to quarterback
depth, Maryville has been building up the stable of running backs
as well. Playing the second half of
the finale against Farragut, freshman Isaiah Cobb and sophomore
Michael Hall became the team’s
top two rushers against the Admirals.
“You’ve got to have some depth,
and I don’t think it’s possible to
have too many running backs,”
Quarles said. “Jaylen Burgess has
been the bell cow guy. For a while,
he was averaging 100 yards per
game, but since we’ve been ahead
in a lot of games, he hasn’t gotten
as many carries lately. But we’ve
had some injuries there, too. We
lost Jordan Ervin for the season
with a knee injury, and Dylan
Shinsky has battled through some
injuries this year but has given us
a lot of good games.
“Joel Hopkins has also run hard
for us this year. Sophomore Cameron Russell is probably the one
that has come on the most, and
Michael Hall had a big game for
us last week (against Farragut). At
the quarterback spot, we’ve also
had a lot of rushing yards from
both Tyler and Austin.
We feel good about the running
back spot, and I think it’s been
proven that you’ve got to have
numbers there.”
Friday will be the first meeting
between Maryville and Walker
Valley, which opened in 2001.
Quarles is 6-0 all-time against
schools in Bradley County with
five wins over Cleveland and last
year’s first round test against
Bradley Central.
“It’s a big challenge, but it’s playoff football. You expect that at this
time of year,” Quarles said.
Maryville looks to extend its
40-game home winning streak at 7
p.m. Friday against the Mustangs
at Jim Renfro Field.
INDIVIDUAL PREP FOOTBALL STATISTICS THROUGH WEEK 10
PASSING
Player, Sch
Cmp-Att Yards TD INT Rating
Dustin Richardson (H)
Sam McCloud (G)
Reed Daniels (W)
Brandon Burgess (K)
Austin Myrick (W)
Jacob Hoffman (K)
Austin Ensley (M)
Tyler Vaught (M)
Jaylen Myers (A)
Clayton Ogle (S)
Mitchell McClurg (A)
Isaiah Gilmore (K)
Cameron Carter (H)
Devyn Harris (H)
Zach Cardwell (M)
Ridge Palmer (K)
Kyle Cunningham (M)
Chandler Viscardis (K)
Hunter Willis (G)
101-196
91-152
83-134
52-106
98-156
41-69
33-51
34-57
37-58
44-107
29-54
11-18
3-6
1-2
7-11
1-1
2-5
1-3
4-7
1712
1416
1161
1064
1029
772
650
602
551
448
374
234
87
66
53
50
42
40
27
14
15
8
15
8
9
12
8
1
7
2
4
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
12
4
7
3
8
5
1
4
3
10
3
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
136.2
165.4
144.0
174.4
124.9
182.0
245.5
180.6
138.9
79.2
113.0
243.6
193.5
492.2
104.1
520.0
110.6
255.3
89.5
RUSHING
Player, Sch
Att Yards Avg
TD
Jaquez Tyson (A)
Devin Fair (W)
Phillip Sellers (K)
Jaylen Burgess (M)
Jordan Anderson (G)
Jason Maduafokwa (K)
Joel Hopkins (M)
Orlando Bledsoe (H)
Tanner LaForce (G)
Mitchell McClurg (A)
Zach Amburn (H)
Dylan Shinsky (M)
Karim Shereef (A)
Tyler Vaught (M)
Daniel Hinson (S)
Devin Divine (G)
Brandon Tipton (W)
Keishaun Johnson (A)
Tanner Hanley (G)
Isaiah Gilmore (K)
Samuel McCloud (G)
Austin Ensley (M)
Michael Hall (M)
Austin Brewster (S)
Jaylen Myers (A)
Jalynn Sykes (A)
Braxton Dockery (A)
Malik Salter (A)
TayLen McNear (A)
Luke Sharpe (S)
Dustin Richardson (H)
Cameron Russell (M)
Jake Warwick (A)
Zach Cardwell (M)
Gilbert Breeden (G)
Isaiah Cobb (M)
Isaiah Jeffers (K)
Cameron Sullivan (S)
Michael Bryant (W)
Dustin Clabough (A)
Taylor Swicegood (H)
Devin Gardner (H)
Ben Kitts (S)
Dylan Pratt (A)
Reed Daniels (W)
Joel Graham (W)
Chase Nuchols (W)
Brian Tillery (M)
Cameron Ogle (S)
Tyler Key (W)
Jeremy Wiggins (G)
Cameron Bostick (K)
Jeremy Bryant (S)
Christian Markham (M)
Caleb Woody (A)
Jae Williams (M)
Kyle Cunningham (M)
Kevin Ogle (G)
Devante Farmer (S)
Cameron Carter (H)
Tommy Myers (W)
Jack Warwick (A)
Jordan Ervin (M)
Payne Looney (M)
Sam Gallemore (M)
Nick Robinson (A)
Christian Ogle (S)
Nicholas Quigg (M)
Davis Maples (A)
Zac Headrick (M)
Blaise Rooney (S)
Owen Rodgers (A)
Jonathan Atchley (K)
Josh Jordan (S)
Jared Wright (S)
Chance Shuler (S)
Chandler Viscardis (K)
Larry Hodge (A)
Dominic Kellog (M)
Grant Wallen (S)
Isaiah Johnson (S)
Hunter Willis (G)
Clayton Ogle (S)
Jacob Hoffman (K)
Brandon Burgess (K)
Austin Myrick (W)
185
143
73
114
85
50
69
99
63
63
50
48
47
48
52
38
55
19
56
30
48
22
16
46
19
15
7
18
6
23
51
13
10
10
14
11
15
15
16
5
6
6
11
7
33
8
10
5
1
8
7
4
7
3
4
9
6
6
8
3
4
2
6
4
3
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
6
3
1
1
1
1
68
5
9
51
25
9
13
10
9
9
3
10
4
5
3
3
5
3
1
2
0
1
1
0
3
3
1
2
1
3
1
0
0
0
3
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
1
1492
849
772
766
669
530
487
486
447
389
352
347
329
278
246
228
212
209
196
191
186
137
130
130
128
122
117
107
107
101
94
93
87
84
78
76
76
69
63
60
58
58
48
41
39
39
34
32
30
27
27
23
19
17
15
15
14
14
14
14
13
12
11
11
10
9
9
7
6
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
1
0
-1
-4
-11
-14
-20
-38
8.06
5.94
10.58
6.72
7.87
10.6
7.06
4.91
7.1
6.17
7.04
7.23
7
5.79
4.73
6
3.85
11
3.5
6.37
3.88
6.23
8.13
2.83
6.74
8.13
16.71
5.94
17.83
4.39
1.84
7.15
8.7
8.4
5.57
6.91
5.07
4.6
3.94
12
9.67
9.67
4.36
5.86
1.18
4.88
3.4
6.4
30
3.38
3.86
5.75
2.71
5.67
3.75
1.67
2.33
2.33
1.75
4.67
3.25
6
1.83
2.75
3.33
4.5
4.5
7
6
3
3
5
2.5
2
4
3
0.5
0.67
1
0
-1
-4
-0.16
-2.8
-2.22
-0.75
RECEIVING
Player, Sch
Rec Yards Avg
TD
Joel Graham (W)
Kelby Brock (M)
Hunter Terry (H)
Chandler Viscardis (K)
Ben Sexton (K)
Ridge Palmer (K)
Devin Gardner (H)
Isaiah Hannah (W)
Devyn Harris (H)
Tavin Kilpatrick (G)
Bryce Miller (M)
Zac Martin (G)
Chase Nuchols (W)
62
19
31
28
22
25
22
31
21
22
21
24
27
12
9
6
7
5
8
3
2
4
5
5
3
1
802
562
559
559
542
531
494
471
444
414
370
363
351
12.94
29.58
18.03
19.96
24.64
21.24
22.45
15.19
21.14
18.82
17.62
15.13
13
DARYL SULLIVAN | THE DAILY TIMES
MARYVILLE QUARTERBACK AUSTIN ENSLEY drops back to pass Friday during the Rebels’ 49-14 win over Farragut at Shields Stadium. Maryville found a way to
turn a key midseason injury to starter Tyler Vaught into a depth-building exercise while completing an undefeated regular season.
Jordan Anderson (G)
Isaiah Jeffers (K)
Caleb Woody (A)
Brian Tillery (M)
Brandon Tipton (W)
Isaiah Gilmore (K)
Zach Amburn (H)
Riley Hill (H)
Tanner Hanley (G)
Braxton Fox (G)
Hunter Pesterfield (W)
Devante Farmer (S)
Brenden Teeter (A)
Bailey Short (W)
Keishaun Johnson (A)
Devin Fair (W)
Jaquez Tyson (A)
Tykee Kellogg (A)
Christian Markham (M)
Jaylen Minifield (S)
Ryan Clark (A)
Jaylen Burgess (M)
Cameron Bostic (K)
Orlando Bledsoe (H)
Cameron Ogle (S)
Luke Sharpe (S)
Tanner LaForce (G)
Braxton Dockery (A)
Jordan McBrayer (S)
Daniel Hinson (S)
Austin Brewster (S)
Damian Love (W)
Jake Warwick (A)
Larry Hodge (A)
Dustin Clabough (A)
Dylan Shinsky (M)
Jaylen Myers (A)
Karim Shereef (A)
Blaise Rooney (S)
Ayden Gist (A)
Dyllan Caldwell (G)
Chase White (M)
Devin Divine (G)
Scottie Kenley (M)
Tommy Myers (W)
Gilbert Breeden (G)
Grant Wallen (S)
Jonathan Atchley (K)
Hunter Willis (G)
Tyler Jones (G)
Jason Maduafokwa (K)
Malik Salter (A)
Vincent Marino (K)
Khalil Abuhania (H)
Austin Myrick (W)
17
18
11
14
13
4
9
14
9
7
15
7
8
16
13
12
4
7
9
4
2
6
7
5
3
16
9
4
4
3
3
4
3
3
5
3
2
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
310
303
248
203
194
160
159
151
133
130
129
128
121
118
99
95
81
77
73
70
67
66
64
56
56
54
53
51
51
47
44
37
36
33
33
33
25
24
22
20
20
20
10
10
7
6
6
4
3
3
3
2
2
1
-3
18.24
16.83
22.55
14.5
14.92
40
17.67
10.79
14.78
18.57
8.6
18.29
15.13
7.38
7.62
7.92
20.25
11
8.11
17.5
33.5
11
9.14
11.2
18.67
3.38
5.89
12.75
12.75
15.67
14.67
9.25
12
11
6.6
11
12.5
8
22
20
20
6.67
5
10
7
6
6
4
3
3
3
2
2
0.5
-3
3
6
1
3
1
2
1
2
1
3
0
2
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TACKLES
Player, Sch
Solo Asst Total TFL Sack
Chandler Viscardis (K) 81
Samuel McCloud (G) 51
Cody Gregory (W)
56
Jacob Krajnik (W)
51
Ridge Palmer (K)
57
Jason Maduafokwa (K)54
Isaiah Hannah (W)
48
Cole Lusby (K)
37
TD Blackman (M)
46
Jayden Harris (G)
33
Jordan Romero (K)
47
Cameron Bostick (K) 48
Phillip Sellers (K)
41
Tony Mejia (W)
32
Tanner Hanley (G)
28
29 95.5 9
73 87.5 8
50
81 7
43 72.5 5
18
66 3
22 65 6
33 64.5 4
44 59 4
23 57.5 3
48 57 4
18
56 8
14
55 1
24 53 4
35 49.5 0
39 47.5 4
3
0.5
3
1
0
6
0
2
1
1
5
1
1
0
1.5
Zane Sutherland (K)
Gabe Emert (W)
Jordan Thrasher (W)
Isaiah Jeffers (K)
Tommy Sparks (W)
Tommy Myers (W)
Tanner LaForce (G)
Tyler Zwolinski (M)
Cody Huff (S)
Will Moore (K)
Tim Russell (G)
Josh Yoakum (M)
Braxton Fox (G)
Dylan Jackson (M)
Zack Clabough (M)
Ben Sexton (K)
Paul Bristol (M)
Noah Jennings (W)
Brandon Tipton (W)
Ritchie Koons (M)
Blake Henderson (M)
Matt Young (M)
Luke Sharpe (S)
Jordan Anderson (G)
Drake Martin (M)
Ethan Dudley (M)
Jordan McBrayer (S)
Dustin Carver (W)
Cameron Ogle (S)
Shawn Hamilton (K)
Devin Fair (W)
Tylor Jones (G)
Jeremy Bryant (S)
Tavin Kilpatrick (G)
Kyle Withrow (M)
Cameron Russell (M)
Devin Divine (G)
Josh Perkins (W)
Jonathan Atchley (K)
Tucker Brown (G)
Elijah Davis (M)
Dylan Canupp (K)
Isaiah Gilmore (K)
Jaylen Minifield (S)
Blake Nance (K)
Michael Thacker (G)
Ryan Louallen (S)
Joel Graham (W)
Christian Ogle (S)
Jacob Pierce (S)
Devante Farmer (S)
Colton Murrell (M)
Hunter Townsend (M)
DaDa Love (W)
Ian Millsaps (G)
Jacob Blevins (M)
Isaiah Johnson (S)
Hunter Willis (G)
Will Weekly (K)
Austin Brewster (S)
Kevin Ogle (G)
Austin Myrick (W)
Dylan Delozier (M)
Ben Kitts (S)
Roman Nelson (M)
Anthony Dyer (G)
Gilbert Breeden (G)
Daniel Summers (G)
Ramadan Gibril (M)
Trey Grayson (S)
Isaac Keller (M)
Riley Hall (K)
Chase Nuchols (W)
35
34
38
34
31
30
26
22
26
26
24
26
32
27
24
24
21
20
24
21
24
20
21
23
22
18
20
20
16
15
18
20
17
11
12
17
16
16
11
11
14
15
15
9
14
7
9
12
10
13
12
9
11
9
4
9
8
6
7
8
8
8
7
7
7
2
6
4
5
2
5
4
5
24
23
15
20
25
25
24
30
21
21
23
18
5
14
18
16
21
23
14
18
10
16
12
7
8
15
11
10
17
19
13
8
13
24
20
9
10
10
18
16
10
8
8
19
7
20
16
10
13
5
6
9
5
9
17
5
7
10
8
5
4
4
5
5
3
12
3
7
5
11
4
6
3
47 9
45.5 6
45.5 0
44 7
43.5 4
42.5 3
38 16.5
37 3
36.5 0
36.5 8
35.5 7.5
35 0
34.5 0
34 9
33 2
32 0
31.5 2
31.5 2
31 1
30 3
29 1
28 6
27 0
26.5 1
26 0
25.5 4
25.5 0
25 0
24.5 0
24.5 4
24.5 2
24 0
23.5 0
23 3.5
22 2
21.5 0
21 3
21 0
20 3
19 1
19 2
19 2
19 0
18.5 0
17.5 5
17 1.5
17 1
17 0
16.5 0
15.5 0
15 0
13.5 1
13.5 1
13.5 0
12.5 1
11.5 1
11.5 0
11 1.5
11 0
10.5 0
10 0
10 0
9.5 1
9.5 0
8.5 0
8 0.5
7.5 0
7.5 0
7.5 0
7.5 0
7
1
7
1
6.5 0
1
2
0
2
1
2
4
2
1
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
6
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
Ethan Gantte (K)
Austin Shaffer (K)
Cade Ramsey (W)
Gage Hearn (M)
Dylan Shinsky (M)
Daniel Hinson (S)
Blake Oliviera (M)
Creasman (K)
Kelby Brock (M)
Jack Bristol (M)
Gavin Blythe (S)
Mataj Grycz (S)
Hunter McCleary (S)
Nathan Wampler (G)
Kellen Lee (G)
Michael Hall (M)
JJ Jerman (S)
Kurt Duelley (K)
RJ Fanti (K)
Trevor Breeden (G)
Mason Sliger (G)
Lucas Blair (M)
Reid Taylor (S)
Grant Wallen (S)
Jacob Hoffman (K)
Dylan Caldwell (G)
Jeremy Wiggins (G)
Isaiah Cobb (M)
Austin Ensley (M)
CW Walker (M)
Dakota Liedel (S)
Blaise Rooney (S)
Jake Covington (M)
Zach Payne (M)
JC Cogan (S)
Dallas Woody (S)
Vincent Marino (K)
Jacob Rhyne (G)
Luke Orren (M)
Austin Ramsey (M)
Clay Strawn (M)
Brian Tillery (M)
Colin Ward (M)
Cody Willis (M)
Harrison Coker (S)
Jaren King (S)
Chance Shular (S)
Cameron Sullivan (S)
Zach Williams (S)
L Hall (K)
Blaid Smith (K)
Andrew Jones (M)
Bryce Miller (M)
Harper Rose (M)
Tyler Vaught (M)
DC Walker (M)
Isaiah Kitts (S)
Alex Shields (S)
Nathan Bullock (S)
Spencer Bailey (S)
Jordan Donaldson (S)
Brandon Bentley (S)
Michael Huffaker (K)
5
3
5
4
5
4
4
2
4
3
2
1
3
2
2
2
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
6
2
3
0
2
1
5
0
1
3
5
1
2
2
2
0
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
3
1
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
6
6
5.5
5
5
4.5
4.5
4
3.5
3.5
3.5
3.5
3
3
3
3
3
3
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Player, Sch
Int
FR
TD
TOT
Samuel McCloud (G)
Josh Yoakum (M)
TD Blackman (M)
Devante Farmer (S)
Braxton Fox (G)
Tanner Hanley (G)
Jayden Harris (G)
4
4
0
3
3
1
0
1
1
4
1
0
2
3
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
5
5
4
4
3
3
3
TAKEAWAYS
Drake Martin (M)
Cameron Bostick (K)
Ridge Palmer (K)
Ben Sexton (K)
Chandler Viscardis (K)
Tony Mejia (W)
Devin Divine (G)
Cameron Russell (M)
Kyle Withrow (M)
Isaiah Gilmore (K)
Cole Lusby (K)
Cody Gregory (W)
Brandon Tipton (W)
Jordan Anderson (G)
Dylan Caldwell (G)
Tavin Kilpatrick (G)
Kevin Ogle (G)
Paul Bristol (M)
Zack Clabough (M)
Elijah Davis (M)
Ethan Dudley (M)
Ritchie Koons (M)
Roman Nelson (M)
Matt Young (M)
Jeremy Bryant (S)
Trey Grayson (S)
Jonathan Atchley (K)
Ethan Gantte (K)
Shawn Hamilton (K)
Isaiah Jeffers (K)
Jason Maduafokwa (K)
Will Moore (K)
Blake Nance (K)
Phillip Sellers (K)
Dustin Carver (W)
Gabe Emert (W)
Joel Graham (W)
Isaiah Hannah (W)
Jacob Krajnik (W)
DaDa Love (W)
3
1
3
2
2
3
1
2
0
2
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
2
0
1
1
0
1
0
2
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
KICKING
Player,Sch
XPM-XPA FGM-FGA LG Pts
Braxton Fox (G)
37-39
Luke Orren (M)
46-48
Augustine Posada (A) 37-38
Will Hodgson (W)
23-24
JJ Jerman (S)
11-11
Jonathan Atchley (K) 12-22
Justin Pearson (M)
3-4
Evan Pratt (A)
6-8
Matthew Cone (M)
2-4
Kyle Broome (H)
3-5
8-11
4-5
4-4
6-9
3-6
0-0
1-2
0-0
1-1
0-0
28
x
x
35
40
x
30
x
22
40
61
58
49
41
20
12
6
6
5
3
PUNTING
Player,Sch
NO
YDS
LG
AVG
JJ Jerman (S)
Hunter Willis (G)
Luke Orren (M)
Ayden Gist (A)
Ben Sexton (K)
Braxton Dockery (A)
Braxton Fox (G)
Jonathan Atchley (K)
30
24
19
14
12
8
5
1
1212
829
759
495
389
225
125
11
52
41
53
44
40
58
36
11
40.4
34.54
39.95
35.36
32.42
28.13
25
11
NOTES
В™EgZeHiVihVgZYZg^kZY[gdb\VbZgZedgihhZci^cWn
the coaching staffs each week. Reports are due from
coaches or designees by 8 p.m. Tuesday each week to
[email protected] or fax 981-1175.
В™IdiVaIVX`aZhVgZXVaXjaViZYl^i]hdadhidehVhdcZ
and assisted stops as a half.
В™ 6aXdV Y^Y cdi gZedgi YZ[Zch^kZ hiVih# =Zg^iV\Z VcY
Seymour stats are incomplete.
SPORTS | 7B
THE DAILY TIMES
Thursday, November 6, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
Get over the hump
Lady Rebels
look to build
upon past
success
BY JARED DUGGER
[email protected]
It certainly isn’t easy to win big in
District 4-AAA in girls basketball, but
that hasn’t stopped the Maryville Lady
Rebels from putting together a string of
very successful seasons. After reaching
the state sectionals in two of the past
three seasons and compiling 25 wins
last year, the Lady Rebels are looking to
get over the hump and reach the state
tournament. According to Maryville
head coach Scott West, the way to get
there will be to keep doing more of
the same.
“Everybody knows what to expect
out of Maryville girls’ basketball. We’re
going to play really hard defense. Hopefully we’re fundamentally sound and
don’t beat ourselves. We can also shoot
the ball well,” West told The Daily
Times.
“I think we have a winning spirit.
These girls expect to win, and it hurts
them when they don’t. They’re motivated to come out and compete, and
you better be, because our district is so
strong,” the Lady Rebel skipper said.
West expects the district to be as
tough and as deep as ever.
“We had four teams with 25 wins this
year, with us, Heritage, Farragut and
Bearden. William Blount is going to be
much better. They’ve got a really talented core of players. I expect Hardin
Valley to be solid, too,” West said.
“I don’t think there’s a ton of separation in the top four. Farragut may be
considered the best, but on any given
night anything can happen. That’s what
makes our district so tough. It should
be a really competitive district season
with about five teams with a shot of
taking first.”
Maryville is going to be young this
year, but they will still have plenty of
talent to trot out on the hardwood. Five
sophomores and a freshman are expected to log heavy minutes, but the team
DARYL SULLIVAN | THE DAILY TIMES
WILLIAM BLOUNT’S AMBER CLICK (left) and Maryville’s Dee Cook
battle for control of a rebound in a Jan. 17 game last season.
WRIGHT: Lady Governors
building team chemistry
FROM 1B
SCOTT KELLER | THE DAILY TIMES
MARYVILLE’S KAYLA TILLIE DRIVES to the basket last season against Alcoa’s Hannah
Trout in a Feb. 7 contest. Tillie is the lone senior on a Lady Rebel squad that offers
its first glimpse of the new season tonight during the Blount County Jamboree at
William Blount.
will go as senior Kayla Tillie goes.
“She’s our only senior. She’s a good
scorer, and she was also the District
4-AAA Most Valuable Player last year,
so that’s a nice one to have back,” West
said about his senior leader.
The talented quintet of sophomores
that will be counted on to provide
balance and depth is led by Madison
Coulter, who was an All-District wing
as a freshman.
“Madison Coulter is a tremendous
shooter, and she’s worked on other
things in her game to make her even
better this year,” West said.
The rest of those sophs include last
year’s starting point guard Abbie Anderson, Olivia Pepperman, Anna Ray and
Emory Spears. They will be complimented by junior Dee Fritz and freshman Abby Young. Despite the youth,
West believes there is enough talent on
the team to reach their lofty goals.
“The goal is the same as it is every
year, and that’s to get this team to the
state tournament. We’ve been just seconds away from that two times in the
past three years. I don’t think that’s an
unrealistic goal, because we’re usually
playing our best basketball in February, and that’s when you really want
to turn it up.”
The Lady Rebels give a quick peak of
the season in tonight’s jamboree then tip
off the new season Nov. 11 against Jefferson County in a Hall of Fame game.
started molding together. The seniors hang out
with freshmen, and the
sophomores hang out with
juniors, and the juniors
hang out with freshmen.
I think that that says a lot
about their character, and
it says a lot about our leadership.”
One of those leaders is
Amber Click. Click has
been a starting guard since
she was a freshman and
has twice been named
to the All-District team.
Now a captain, the senior
is embracing the leadership role.
“I’ve adjusted well to
it,” Click said. “I don’t put
myself above anybody. I try
to lead the team through
my actions. I don’t want
to yell at anybody, I just
try to encourage everybody and show them what
they’re supposed to do,”
the senior said.
Senior Bailey Ritter
and junior guard Lindsay
Roddy, who was named
All-District last season,
are key cogs to the Lady
�I don’t put
myself above
anybody.’
Amber Click
WB senior captain
Gov machine. Sophomore
Hannah Fuller played
sparingly as a freshman,
but Wright says she has
earned a starting job for
this season. While there
is plenty of talent on
the William Blount roster, it will be tough sledding as always in District
4-AAA.
“We’ll have to bring
our lunch pails and our
hard hats and go to work
every night we have a
district game, there’s no
doubt about it,” Wright
said. “Hopefully we’ll be
competitive and be right
there against those toplevel teams and see how
far we go.”
The Lady Govs will get
the regular season underway Nov. 13 at Oneida in a
Hall of Fame game.
Public Notices
Lost and Found
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
Estate of Samalynn Baker, late of
Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on the
15th day of October, 2014, Letters
Testamentary in respect to the Estate
of Samalynn Baker deceased, who
died on 30th day of June, 2014, were
issued to the undersigned by the Probate Clerk of Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and
non-resident, having claims, matured
or unmatured, against the estate are
required to file the same with the clerk
of the above named court on or before the earlier of the dates prescribed
in (1) or (2), otherwise their claim will
be forever barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
This the 18th of October, 2014
WENDALYN C. BOWMAN
Personal Representative
CHARLES DUNGAN
Attorney for the Estate
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
November 6, 13, 2014
Lost and Found
MISSING ALMOST 2 MONTHS in
Smoky View Estate area. Young directionally challenged male Beagle
mix. Call 865-254-0094
Lost and Found
Of Interest
Maryville
General Help Wanted
MISSING PET?
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD
JAPANESE GARAGE SALE by 7+
families. 925 Elsborn Ridge rd. Friday
& Saturday, 9am-2pm.
JANITORIAL CLEANER needed
PART TIME evening Shift from
6:30pm-9:30pm, Monday thru Friday
for office building in Alcoa area. Must
have clean background & valid ID.
Call 933-1766 Monday-Thursday
11am-2pm Only, for interview.
Be sure to check with the
local animal shelter.
Maryville Animal Shelter
865-681-2241
Blount County Animal Shelter
865-980-6244
In print and online.
FOUND - YOUNG, SMALL, black and
white dog on Louisville Rd. in Alcoa
on Wednesday, October 29. Please
call 865-919-3800 for further information.
Call 981-1160
to subscribe
for errors the FIRST DAY it
appears in print. Our paper will not
be liable for incorrect ads after the
first day of publication. You may
request a proof of your ad be sent
to you by fax or email before
it prints to correct any errors.
Deadline for Corrections:
Noon 1 day prior to publication.
865-981-1170
Classified hours are:
Monday-Friday 8am-5pm
Garage / Yard Sales
ATTENTION ADVERTISERS
No cancellations or corrections will be made on the day of publication. It is the
Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and
notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Blount County Publishers,
LLC, is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid
for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or
rescission of approval by Blount County Publishers, LLC. The position, subject
matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement
are subject to approval of Blount County Publishers, LLC, which reserves the
right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time,
before or after insertion. Blount County Publishers, LLC does not investigate
statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes
any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services
or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising
agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Blount County Publishers, LLC. their officers, agents, and employees
against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and loses resulting from
the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims
or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, Blount
County Publishers, LLC, shall not be liable for any damages resulting from error
in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to,
incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or
lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Blount County Publishers,
LLC, for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of
the ad or the printing of one make- good insertion, in the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing
the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one
make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance
shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Blount County Publishers,
LLC, shall not be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion
of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due
to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of
Blount County Publishers, LLC, shall not be liable for errors in or nonpublication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or
payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any
court situated in Blount County, Tennessee. Other terms and conditions, stated
on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts may apply. This service is not to
be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Blount County Publishers, LLC, reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Blount County Publishers, LLC, or others or to respond to
subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.
ESTATE SALE 4886 Masters Dr in
Royal Oaks. Friday, Saturday & Sunday. Open 9AM. Full house and
garage. Furniture, Some Antiques &
Collectibles, Crystal, Housewares,
Tools, Appliances Etc. plus much
more! See Craigslist for Pics.
Garage/Yard Sales
Deadline:
NOON 1 day prior to
publication.
Call 981-1170 for pricing or
place your ad online at
www.thedailytimes.com
Maryville
1110 OAK PARK AVE
0-6yr boys and girls clothes, baby
items, name brand adult clothes,
wakeboards and gear.
MOVING SALE! Fri. & Sat., 8a-1p.
2742 Timberline Dr. Furniture, linens,
kitchen items, Singer Sewing Machine,
lawn furniture, ladders. Rain or shine.
Adult Care
FOR 10 YEARS, our trained,
bonded and insured CAREGivers
have provided home care services
for local seniors. Call us.
Home Instead 865-273-2178.
LOOKING FOR KIND elderly or
handicapped person who needs personal assistance on a PT basis. Will
do light housekeeping, laundry, light
meals, errands, groc. shopping, etc.
Have experience with handicapped.
Flexible schedule. Call 865-724-5516
WILL WORK & CARE for sick & elderly. 25 years experience. Excellent
references. Call 423-519-2402
House Cleaning
HOUSE CLEANING – Honest and
dependable. Reasonable rates. Call
865-243-1241.
MARYVILLE COUPLE needs housekeeper. Approx. 2 days per week.
Dusting, vacuuming, ironing, etc.
Successful candidate will have at
least 2 years experience. For interview, call 865-984-7756, M-F, 6-8pm.
NOW HIRING Part-time Cleaners.
Bckgrd chk., drug testing. Great environment, can work into FT. 556-0459.
PROFESSIONAL CLEANING Monday-Friday, days only. Paid weekly.
West Knox. location. 865-670-0025
WAFFLE HOUSE is accepting applications for dependable people who take
pride in their job and enjoy a fun, fast
paced environment. Benefits include flexible hours, health, dental and vision insurance, 401K, paid vacation, competitive
pay and opportunity for advancement.
Come join a fast growing company by applying in person Tues.-Friday, 7am to
4pm at Waffle House - Alcoa Hwy, Lenoir
City or Lovell Rd.
Medical / Dental
PT CARE FOR SENIORS Background
checks. Blount and surrounding counties. 865-558-8431 or rescare.com
EOE/M/F/D/V
Technical
General Help Wanted
FOOD MICROBIOLOGY LAB seeking seasonal lab tech. Biology, microbiology or food science background
required. Lab experience desired.
PCR experience desirable. Send resume to fax (865) 573-7298 or email
[email protected]
CHURCH SALE
Forest Hill Baptist, 1850 Forest Hill
Road (corner of Montvale and Forest Hill.) Clothing for children, men,
and women; furniture; kitchenware;
baby items; home decor; more.
Lunch offered at a low price. No
early birds please. November 8
(Saturday only) 8am-2pm.
FT/PT flex scheduling. Great job for retirees, students, or looking for supplemental income. Outbound fundraising
for Shrine charity. $8-14 per hour.
(865) 246-1823
HELP CHURCH Yard Sale. Friday &
Saturday. Pay by donation. Harmony
Church, 718 Gethsemane Rd.
LAWN & LANDSCAPE help needed.
Must have exp., transportation & DL.
Drug free, pay DOE. 995-2815 or
582-5411
IMMEDIATELY HIRING
LOUDON COUNTY BUSINESS is
now taking resumes for full and parttime CNC machinists. Requirements
include: programming & set-up skills,
technical certification, and 3-5 years'
experience. Experience with Mazak
machines a plus. Compensation will
be related to experience. Drug testing
is required. Email resume to Blind Box
“M” c/o The Daily Times, PO Box
9740, Maryville, TN 37802.
Apartment / Duplexes
$34.99 DAILY; $150 WEEKLY; $549
(4) weeks., 1 person. Budget Inn,
865-251-2525 or 865-300-2855.
8B | CLASSIFIEDS
THE DAILY TIMES | thedailytimes.com/classifieds
Apartment / Duplexes
Daily Bridge Club
By FRANK STEWART
Tribune Content Agency
and he cue-bids two hearts. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Your partner doesn’t
have hearts. He has a huge hand with
spade support and perhaps a control
in hearts. Bid two spades — your
most discouraging action — and try
not to betray unhappiness. A good
partner will let you out below game
unless he has a hand such as A K Q 2,
A 3, K 6, A K 7 4 3.
South dealer
Neither side vulnerable
The actual West confidently cashed
his high spade, and South even more
confidently pitched his king of clubs,
unblocking. Whatever West led next,
South could run the clubs for nine
tricks.
West was overconfident and forgot
to analyze. After he takes the ace of
clubs, he must lead the king of diamonds, killing dummy’s entry. If
South takes the ace, he wins only one
spade, three hearts, two diamonds
and two clubs. If South ducks, West
cashes his high spade for down one.
DAILY QUESTION
You hold: 8 7 4 3 10 8 6
10 8 5 4 10 6. The dealer, at
your left, opens one heart. Your partner doubles, you respond one spade,
WEST
K Q 10 9
9 7 5 2
K J
A 8 3
EAST
8 7 4 3
10 8 6
10 8 5 4
10 6
SOUTH
A 6 2
A K Q
Q 6 3 2
K Q J
South
2 NT
West
Pass
North
3 NT
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, with Basement on Landau (off 321). $750/mo.
Meadowland Property Mgmt & Realty
865-970-4476
2BD, 1BA Maryville. Stove, refrigerator, W/D connection. $625/mo., $600
deposit. 984-8923
3BR, 1BA, upstairs. $675 mo., $350
dep. Housing approved. Call 865-9825482.
CITY OF MARYVILLE, 1BR above
commercial bldg. Walking distance to
shopping & dining. References &
background check. $400 mo, $400
sec. dep. Call 865-983-8516 between
10am-6pm, Mon-Sat.
FOREST HILL APARTMENTS
2 BR $525, $300 dep. No pets.
Call 865-740-1745
NORTH
J 5
J 4 3
A 9 7
9 7 5 4 2
HIGH SPADE
Houses For Rent
1365 REMSEN STREET Alcoa
schools! 3 BR, 2 bath totally remodeled home! 1746 sq ft. $975/mo. Call
Bill Mclain with Realty Executives at
865-454-1451 or 865-983-0011
Lack of understanding
Cy the Cynic defines confidence as
the feeling you have before you fully
comprehend the situation.
As today’s West, you lead the king
of spades against 3NT, and when you
see dummy’s J-5, you feel confident
of beating the contract. South plays
low, also ducks your queen and wins
the third spade with the ace. He leads
the jack of clubs: three, deuce, ten.
Then comes the queen of clubs, you
take your ace, and East follows.
Maybe you should have won the
first club. But what do you do now?
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Grayson Apartments in Alcoa.
2 BR, $595 mo., 3 BR, $695 mo.
W/D hook-ups, limited + $30.
Housing accepted. Move in Special, Earn $150. 865-982-3427
SPACIOUS LAKESIDE LIVING! 2BR
Garden Style Apts., off Alcoa Hwy.
New Saltwater pool, Basketball &
Tennis courts, dock for fishing. Call
for more details. 865-982-9678.
Condominium Rental
2BR, 1.5BA, City of Maryville,
W/D Connection, CH/A.
Please call 865-977-5489.
East
All Pass
Opening lead — K
CONDO – Conveniently located, City
of Maryville. 2 story, 2 BR, 2.5 BA,
$830 mo; Security Deposit negotiable.
Call 865-982-3427.
Houses For Rent
2BD, 1BA, 2002 Sevierville Rd. CH/A,
W/D conn., gar., basement. $700 mo.,
$500 dep. No pets. 982-6446
2BR IN TOWN. References required,
$600 mo., $500 dam. dep. Call 865363-1085.
COMMERCIAL WAREHOUSE
Commercial property, City of
Maryville, .65 acres. Powered drive
thru overhead doors. Electrical up
to code. Square ft. 5,000 plus,
Rubber roof, loading dock. 900 Sevierville Road. Maryville, TN 37803.
$195,000 Contact: (865) 292-5056
Houses For Sale
HOUSE FOR SALE with 4.1 acres.
2938 Dixon Rd. 3BR, 2BA, LR,
kitchen, garage. Also, has 36 x 36 detached shop with water & power. Suitable for small business, $189,900.
Call 865-977-6064, shown by appointment only.
2BR, 2BA 1200 SF, appliances, CH/A,
water & lawn care furnished. $700/mo.
+ dep. No pets. Call 865-363-8847.
2BR, MEADOWBROOK SUBD., clean,
carport, fenced yard, CH/A. $650 mo. +
$650 sec. dep. Call 865-983-6543.
3BR, 2BA, Mtn. view near Heritage,
full basement. No pets, no smoking.
$950 mo. + dep. Call 865-679-8947.
RE/MAX FIRST
612 Crawford St.
Maryville, TN 37804
(865) 981-1004
www.maryvillerentalproperties.com
3902 HWY 411 SOUTH (HOUSE)
2Bd, 1Ba $700/mo., $700 dep.
2717 JEFFERSON ST (HSE) KNOX
3Bd, 1Ba $800/mo., $800 dep.
3012 MARVIN CIR (HOUSE)
3Bd, 2Ba $1150/mo., $1150 dep.
2363 SKYVIEW DR (HOUSE)
3Bd, 2Ba $1250/mo., $1250 dep.
2563 SEVIERVILLE RD (HOUSE)
2+Bd, 3Ba $1300/mo., $1300 dep.
(C) 2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
Commercial
Apartment / Duplexes
Apartment / Duplexes
Apartment / Duplexes
$345 - $450 GREAT VALUE,
RIVERSIDE MANOR, Alcoa Hwy.
865-970-2267 1, 2 & 3 BR's
riversidemanorapts.com
1-2 BR APTS.
$325-$395, No Dogs.
865-977-4300
1BR, 1BA, Hardwood floors, Maryville
City, walk to Greenbelt. $650/mo. No
smoking/pets. Call 865-300-6206.
SHERWOOD MEMORIAL 2 lots.
$2795 OBO. Call 865-984-5861,
leave message.
1 & 2 BR, C/H/A, W/D conn., ref's &
lease, no pets. Starting at $375/mo.
+ dep. 1258 Upton, Alcoa. 982-6446
1BR DUPLEX between mall & airport.
$500/mo., includes electric & water.
No pets. Call or text 865-640-6656.
2BD, 1BA Alcoa. Stove, refrigerator,
D/W, W/D connection. Reserve parking. $600/mo, $500 dep. 984-8923
Check out our
Real Estate section
ON LINE
SEYMOUR BEAUTY!
2 Acres and wooded lot. FULL
BRICK 2-Story BASEMENT with 4
BR + 4.5 BA + BONUS. 615 Sunrise Trail, Seymour TN, MLS #
900665 . $400,000.
Carrie Dougherty, Realtor, e-Pro
Realty Executives Associates
865-693-3232 or 865-804-0998
[email protected]
www.carriedougherty.com
Lots & Acreage
3 LOTS, 6809 Holiday Dr., Top of the
World. Water and electricity available,
$15,000. Call 513-240-7107.
Vacation / Time Share
TIME SHARE – Virginia Beach, 11th
week. Best offer over 1K. Call 865724-4047.
Cemetery Lots
3BR, 2BA, 1 car garage. 1501 Irwin
Ave. $725 mo. Call 865-984-9139.
Mobile/ManufacturedHome Lots
LOT FOR RENT Maximum size,
14x60. Garbage pick up included.
No outside pets. $150/mo. 982-5222
Air Conditioning
Excavating
Home Improvements
Lawn Maintenance
Plumbing
Tree Services
SUTTON'S AIR COMFORT
FARMERS EXCAVATING
SLANSKY BUILDERS
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
(865) 983-6144
STAN'S LAWN CARE
*Aerating *Seeding *Fertilizing
Service *Fall Leaf Pickup *Mulching
865-679-7550
SANDS PLUMBING
*Decks *Screen/Sun Rooms
*Kitchens *Bathrooms *Flooring
*ADA compliant and Custom
Tile Showers
*Small Projects Welcomed!
No money down. FREE Estimates
Family owned and operated in
Blount Co. since 2001.
TN Contractor, licensed, & insured
to $1,000,000.
Call now to speak to a live person.
Legal Services
ARBORSCAPES TREE SERVICE
Over 26 yrs exp. Hazardous
Tree removal, Pruning, Trimming.
Lic. & Ins. Give Us A Call.
865-679-7540
LAW OFFICE OF GENA LEWIS
Criminal Defense. Flat fees for General
Sessions Court, $750-$3500.
Call 865-268-9911 for an appointment.
www.slanskybuilders.com
BRICK/BLOCK MASON
Its Fall! Service & Sales of most
name brands. Also, Mobile Home
parts and some mixed matches.
R-22 equipment.
Call us for questions.
Call 865-216-5028.
TENNAIR – 1 HEATING/AIR
Fast, reliable service. Installations.
Professional duct cleaning.
We service all brands.
865-983-1384 or 865-995-9660
Car Wash /
Detailing
AUTO CLEAN & SHINE
Complete Auto Clean-up
10% off full detail with this Ad.
В™LVming В™7uffing В™Hhining
В™+time Readers Choice Linner
В™777 Accredited
Teds Auto Detailing
2532 E. Broadway Ave
865-982-3600, owner Ted McKee
Cleaning Services
MAID 2 SHINE
CLEANING SERVICE
В™8VW^nsВ™GZciVa=dbZs
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865-254-4690
*Bobcat *Backhoe *Tractor
*Bushhog *Dump Truck
*Tree/Stump Removal
No Job Too Small, Reasonable
Rates, Licensed & Insured
865-661-2565 or 865-705-5403
MURPHY'S BOBCAT
Your complete excavating
and hauling company.
No job too big or small.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
865-389-7231
Landscaping
Fencing
RC CALDWELL & SON
The Fence Specialist
В™6luminum Fence
В™Galvanized and Vinyl Coated
Chain Link Fence
В™Kinyl Picket and
Privacy Fence
865-850-1289
WWW.FENCEPROS.COM
Hair Care
CALL SANDRA F.TEFFETELLER
at Hair Studio for your fall hairstyle,
cut & color. $5 off if you mention ad.
865-643-0133
Handy Man
Concrete Services
1. HONEY DO HANDYMAN
В™Painting В™Pressure Washing В™Odd
JobsВ™Light CarpentrnВ™Landscaping
Free Estimates, Gutter Cleaning.
Army Vet. Call Mike at 865-724-6817
BILL'S CONCRETE SERVICE
Grade, Form, Pour, Finish,
30 Years Experience
Bill Correll 865-856-8632
20 YEARS MAINTENANCE EXP.
No Job Too Small!
Free Estimates, Vietnam Vet.
865-388-0029
BRIAN OWNBY CONCRETE
865-765-8387
Commercial & Residential,
Stamped Concrete, Driveways,
Patios, Slabs, Garages &
Basements, Form & Finish, Tearout
& Replace. Quality work by an experienced finisher.
ONE MAN HANDYMAN
Painting, flooring, baths, kitchens &
more. Very experienced, take pride in
workmanship. Call 865-320-7267.
STORY CONCRETE
Form, grade and finish, driveways,
slabs, parking lots, etc. 25 plus
years' experience. 865-977-4373
Home Improvements
*HELP IS A PHONE CALL AWAY
Carpentry, screening, painting,
plumbing, pressure washing
& miscellaneous repairs.
Honesty & Integrity, Lic. & Ins.
PROGREEN
Aeration, Over Seeding
& Slice Seeding.
В™CZlaVlchfrdbhZZYhdY
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CALL FOR ALL YOUR LAWN
AND LANDSCAPING NEEDS
Family Owned & Operated
Comm./Res., Lic. & Ins.
865-982-5946
Lawn Maintenance
AFFORDABLE LAWN SERVICE Mowing, Trimming, Mulching. Leaf clean-up
& any other lawn care services needed.
Free Estimates. Call 865-455-4014
BLOUNT LAWN SERVICE, LLC
Free estimates
Licensed and insured
All lawn care
All landscape
(865)805-4572 or 805-1147
www.blountlawnservice.com
FALL CLEAN-UP!
Leaves, shrubs, grass.
Whatever you don't want to do.
Call Chris 865-556-6026.
FULL SERVICE LAWN CARE,
LLC. Licensed & Insured,
Free Estimates.
Trust us for all your
lawn care needs.
Call Taylor or Josh
865-776-5791 or 865-776-7328
[email protected]
JETT LAWN CARE
Masonry
All Types Brick Work & Repair
Quick, Professional Service
35 Years Experience
Christian Ethics
Licensed & References Available.
Pressure Washing
M3 PRESSURE WASHING
В™RoofhВ™Siding
В™DrivewayhВ™Parkic\Lots
FrZZestimates,Lic.Ins.
SPECIALIZING IN LOW-PRESSURE SOFT WASH!
ChrihMars]865-253-3075
!! BUBBA'S !!
TREE & STUMP REMOVAL
Licensed and Insured.
Proudly serving Blount
County for 20 yrs.
Specializing in all types
of tree work.
No tree too tall, No limb
too small, We do it all!
Local References.
24 hr. Emergency Service
Remodeling
865-977-1422
Miscellaneous
BUILD DECKS & Remodeling 40 yrs. exp. All work guaranteed.
No money up front. Terry Morton
865-661-1015 & 865-984-5059.
DEWAYNE'S TREE SERVICE
Take downs, trimming, all types of
tree work. 24 hour emergency service. Free estimates. 865-681-6861
ROBERT BREHM REMODELING,
PAINTING AND PLUMBING.
40 years' experience. References.
Licensed and Insured. 865-556-1738.
GOT STUMPS?
MURPHY'S
BOBCAT
Fill dirt and gravel. Year round
dry topsoil. Mushroom Compost
by scoop or dump truck load.
865-389-7231
Painting
ROCKY TOP BUILDING
& REMODELING
Painting, Doors/Windows, Honey-Do
List, Drywall, Siding, Trim Work, Fixtures. Licensed & Insured 254-3455
В™Hmall $5 and up
В™Bedium $25 and up
В™AVg\Z$40 and up
Job minimum $50.
865-984-8815
Roofing
JIM'S TREE SERVICE
and LANDSCAPING
ABOVE ALL ROOFING
All types of roofing. All work guaranteed. References available. Licensed & insured. 865-321-3532
В™Igee gZmoval
В™8lean upВ™Ig^mm^cg
В™;^gewood
;gee Esi^mates, Ins. & Ref.
865-233-4212 or 865-209-3864
PAINTING & PRESSURE WASHING
Interior/Exterior. Hollis Morton & Son.
100+ years combined experience.
865-984-3329 or 865-332-9168
As low as Zero % Financing
available on all home
improvements.
Free Estimates! Call 865-233-5888
Petree Arbor Local Tree Service
Its Pruning Season. We have 2
Certified Arborist on staff to help you.
We have Workers Comp...Do they?
865-980-1820
PAINTING – Interior & Exterior,
Pressure Washing. 40 yrs. exp.
Terry Morton 865-661-1015
or 865-984-5059.
“Roof it right. Call Jim White!”
JIM WHITE BUILDERS INC.
PREMIERE
TREE SERVICE
COLONIAL PAINTING
& WATERPROOFING
Interior, exterior, residential, commercial. Quality, creative, affordable, solutions for your home and
business needs. 30 years exp.
Free Estimates. US Navy Vet.
Ken Bear В™ 865-982-8840
DORAN PAINTING
Call now for our "Winter Interior" &
"Doran Painting for a day" specials!
(865) 233 - 3791
Doranpainting.net
Paving
The Handi-Helper
865-681-8298
ALL DRYWALL REPAIRS,
patching, finish, texturing. Small
jobs OK. Rocky Top Drywall
865-335-4877 or 865-771-0812
American Owned LIBERTY CONST.
Specializing in Insurance Claims.
*Painting *Remodeling *Ceiling & Wall
Repair. Call 865-242-7370. Lic. & Ins.
В™;all Leaf Clean-up
В™Dverseeding
В™Pressure Washing
В™Landscaping
865-661-6872 or 865-414-4510
KENNY'S HOME REPAIR
& REMODELING
Rob's Lawn &
Handyman Service
Painting, drywall, tile, flooring, all
carpentry & much more. Quality
work, reliable contractor. Lic. & Ins.
Call 865-268-9854.
Located in Friendsville, TN
Free Estimates,
No Job Is Too Small
www.asphaltmaintenanceoftn.com
Call Rob or Randy
**2014 Reader's Choice
Runner-up**
865-255-8699 or 865-304-7413
865-209-5195
Please Call 865-216-7474
Drywall
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SEALCOATING
В™Driveways
В™Parkin\Lots
В™HoiRubberized
Crac`Sealing
В™Striping/Pavement
Markings
LiXZchZYInsured
865-719-2340
Owens Corning Preferred Contractor
License # 42429 Since 1999
В™WindowhВ™Painting В™Insulation
В™SidingВ™Decks В™Gutters В™Roofing
865-977-0769 JimWhiteBuilders.com
TERRY MORTON
В™Hhingles В™Betal Roofing
В™Eressure Washing
Free Estimates
38 yrs. experience
References on request.
Over 25 Years Experience
*Hazardous Tree Removal
*Trimming *Pruning
*Brush Clearing & Chipping
*Firewood For Sale
24 Hour Emergency Service
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
865-661-1015 or 865-984-5059
865-306-2430
Siding
FIND IT!!! SELL IT!!!
AFFORDABLE SIDING
AND GUTTERING
Call James Stinnett
at 865-977-9092
Whatever you need...
THE DAILY TIMES
Classifieds can help!
Thursday, November 6, 2014
CLASSIFIEDS | 9B
THE DAILY TIMES |thedailytimes.com/classifieds
Mobile/ManufacturedHome Lots
Mobile Manufactured
Home Rentals
MOBILE HOME LOTS $200
www.edgeotownmhc.com
Or 865-719-1467
Mobile Manufactured
Home Rentals
Appliances
Electronics
Jewelry
3 BR, Section 8 welcome. No pets.
$650 per month. 865-405-1327
BLACK & DECKER Food Processor,
like new. Lots of attachments, black
base. Reg. $169, now $60 obo. Call
865-983-5945.
CANON INKJET ALL-IN-ONE Printer
(print, copy, fax or scan), model number MP 530. Excellent condition. $50
865-983-4430
MARQUEE DIAMOND Engagement
Ring with 12 Princess diamonds on
each side, TDW 1.5 w/platinum, size
4ВЅ, $2500. Call 865-982-6679.
3BR, 2BA DW on private lot. No pets,
no smoking. $700 mo., $700 dep. Call
865-980-0094 or 865-254-9170.
GE WASHER/DYER PAIR Good condition. $130 865-523-7267 or 865254-2171
OPEN FACE Cellphone, $16. Call
865-336-6399. Must sell immediately.
Lawn & Garden
MOBILE HOME PARK located off
Hwy 411 S. 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes.
$400-$500 month. Call 865-856-0639.
KENMORE DRYER, white, works
good, $125. Call 865-363-8085.
TV AND STAND, older model TV and
black TV cabinet, works great. Free to
pick up. Call 865-548-5680.
2 FOLDING BENCHES Hard plastic.
$25 865-977-0617
KENMORE WASHER & DRYER
Matching set. $250 865-255-7491
Firewood
RENT TO OWN - 2BR, 1BA, 14x60
mobile home. 124 Zina Ln. $490 mo.
+ down payment. Call 865-982-1516.
LARGE MICROWAVE $50 865-3100705.
WHY RENT when you can own?
Small down payment, no banks.
2BR/1BA in Walland. 865-548-2021
Mobile/Manufactured
Home Sales
2012 NEW 28X72 4BR, 2BA (Must be
moved.) $39,900. ALSO A SPECIAL
ON A 3BR, 2BA, garage, shop at 1017
Ridgeview Dr. $79,000 865-386-7451
3BR, 2BA, 80x16, all appl. Convenient to Knox, Blount & UT. $12,500
Call 865-207-8825.
3BR/2 BA Double Wide $5000
down (Why rent when you can
own). Owner Finance with monthly
payments.
I BUY OLDER
MOBILE HOMES
Any size, age considered.
Call 865-207-8825
**YOU CAN Rent It or YOU CAN Buy
It!** “WE FINANCE” Regardless of
Credit! Many Available 865-696-2571
Electronics
on AM 1470
Saturdays
9am to 10am
To Hear YOUR Ad!
32” COLOR TV with remote and DVD
player with remote, works great. $40
both with DVDs too, $40. Call 865789-9398.
Appliances
2 or 3 BR, $400-$550 mo.
Rent to own, Friendsville.
No pets. Call 865-995-2825.
DISHWASHER $50. 865-310-0705
CULTIPACKER HAS DOUBLE
rollers, excellent condition, $3500.
Call 865-856-3689.
2 ROCKING CHAIRS Excellent condition. $30 each. 865-977-0617
LIFT CHAIR Used 4 years. Neutral
color. Original price $1300, asking
$450. 865-983-6345
Hay, Feed, Grain
52” CEILING FAN Gold plated. $25
865-310-0705
Miscellaneous
CHERRY HIGH BOY chest of drawers, $250. Call 865-306-0678.
50 pc. SET Fine China from 1940's,
$35. Call 865-995-2426.
CHINA CABINET, cherry finish, Federalist style, $650 obo. Call 865-3863868.
BOYD'S BEARS, Barbie Collectibles.
Excellent condition, make reasonable
offer. Call 865-724-4047.
CURIO CABINET, good shape, $65.
Call 865-518-1260.
COMFORTER SET Full size, great
condition. Comforter, 2 shams, 4 toss
pillows. Burgundy, tan & olive green.
$25 865-719-9606
DECORATIVE CHAIR Solid wood
folding chair, hand painted bird houses & flowers. Holds up to 300 lbs.
$15 865-719-9606
LADIES LEATHER Jacket, size S.
East 5th, front zipper, excellent condition, $75. Call 865-437-9168.
TRADIN' TREASURES
2 BR, Section 8 welcome. No pets.
$550 per month. 865-405-1327
HOSPITAL BED Electric, used 11
days. $225 865-776-2679
SOFA & LOVESEAT, grayish blue,
very comfy. Smoke free home, in
good condition, $250. Call 865-3638085.
TELL CITY BEAUTIFUL, maple Dining Room suite. Table with 2 leaves
and 6 chairs, matching china cabinet.
Like new $1200. Call 865-805-5884.
9” TV WITH VCR, Broksonic. $15
OBO. Working condition. Ideal for
dorm or camper. 865-336-6399,
please don't hang up. Must sell immediately.
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED Armchair
with footstool. $65. 865-983-4430
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Mon. - Sat. 8:30a - 9p / Sun 1-6p
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LOCALLY MADE Dog Irons and Pokers. Lincoln General Store, 705 E.
Lincoln Rd., Alcoa. 865-980-5725
- $2,125 TR Discount
- $2,700 Retail Cash
- $800 FMCC
- $2,170 TR Discount
- $1,500 Retail Cash
- $1,000 FMCC
$16,710
$22,715
�14 Ford Edge SE
-
$2,045 TR Discount
$3,000 Retail Cash
$500 Retail Bonus
$500 FMCC
$25,950
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- $1,500 Bonus Cash
$28,015
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VERY NICE BOY'S Ceiling Fan with
space ships, excellent condition, $50.
Call 865-981-8846.
WEIGHT BENCH Magnum 970. Fit
for Life. $15 Call 865-227-1595 before
9pm.
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condition, orange, size large. Reg.
$39.95, asking $15 obo. Call 865983-5945.
Want To Buy
TERRY'S FURNITURE & AUCTION
A Family Tradition since 1958
We are a consignment auction,
accepting new consignments daily!
We buy antiques, used furniture,
glassware & estates.
(865) 681-7228 or (865) 973-4577
TFL# 2485
CABLE'S RECYCLING
Mon-Fri. 9a-5:30p & Sat, 9a-3p
*Cans .60/lb., *Batteries $10/$13
*Computer Towers $2 ea.,*Alum. .45/lb.
*Scrap Metal $7/$8. Now Buying Gift
Cards, Cell Phones & Catalytic conv.
865-556-8812 Or 865-556-8845
WE BUY Used Furniture, Antiques,
Estates. Hall's Furniture & Auction
865-983-1598 or 865-983-2465
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Prices include $595 customer service fee. Customer pays Tax, Title & License. Stated Payments based on 72 Mos. at 2.99% w/ $1,000 down. *WAC. Prices good through 11-14-14.
†$5,500 goes toward any new car, truck or suv on the premises. Cannot be combined with any other offers.
LOUDON
4:30 - 5:15
:A� l„tc§§
l
„c§§
la
Se haa~nbol
Esp
Buying Repairable or
Runable Autos.
NO JUNK OR SCRAP
Don't play with the
little $$$
Deal with the
BIGGER $$$
JUNKERS &
CLUNKERS!
BEETLE В„;ГЄ
ГЄД„ВіГЄ "00" /$"2/
$
Auto, 2.5L
DON'T GET PLAYED
GET PAID!
REGISTERED Seriolithograph, “Nuages” by Littorio Del Signore, 2003,
27”x33½ ”, signed, unframed, $35.
Call 865-984-0848.
#EG1619A
All Power, 13
V-6, VW
Chrome Wheels
Г¤tД„
All Power,
V-6,
05
BMW
325CI
CONVERTIBLE
ГЄД„ВіГ¤
;20
Chrome Wheels
SEL0
ГЄД„ВіГ¤ $/EDGE
$
40
$
!$Г‚
!$Г‚
ВЄ;ВЃВ§Д„В„
!$Г‚
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2013 FORD F-150 4X2
0í¦Ô««}c "AûÂc 9c
.Г­AfRoof,
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Leather,
Sync
RubyГЄД„ГЏ
Red:oo›�
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40 0
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#EFU53B
380
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2013 FORD F-150 4X2
AT, All Power
c
53kВ„/c
Miles
ВЄ"ГЄВіД„ГќВЃ
l
ГЄВ„Д„
!$Г‚
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ГЄГќГќВЃ
#FT4157A
380
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#EG1619A
All Power,
11V-6,
FORD
Chrome Wheels
865-216-5052
865-237-2773
PAYING CASH
$36,558
#EG1619A
All
Power,
07
FORDV-6,
F-150 FX4
CREW;CAB
ГЄД„ВіВі
$"
$/
$
Chrome Wheels
#F1290
„ þ›Âc „/c íâ«c
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#EX873
MSRP $39,880
$1,820 TR Discount
$1,000 Customer Cash
$1000 FMCC
$500 Bonus Cash
l
!$Г‚
- $2,685 TR Discount
- $3,000 Retail Cash
- $1,500 FMCC
MSRP $32,335
-
#TA1253
MSRP $33,685
$2,450 TR Discount
$2,000 Retail Cash
$500 Retail Bonus
$1,000 FMCC
#EC2543
MSRP $30,640 -
l
AT, All Power
-
�14 Ford Escape S
#EG1593
MSRP $31,985
42 / 37 MPG
#FU2410
MSRP $26,555
#CM1052
MSRP $27,385
Free Pick up!
REGISTERED Seriolithograph, “Le
Vase Bleu de Madrid” by Jean-Claude
Picot, 2003, 30”x25”, signed, unframed, $35. Call 865-984-0848.
MUST SELL
1986 Ebony Kawai upright Piano
with bench. Excellent condition.
$750 OBO 865-803-8123
#FS3011
$2000
You Know Better
Call for best
CASH offer.
Musical Instruments
MSRP $22,335
$3000
FOR SALE high speed, Dot Matrix
Printers by GENICOM for information
processing, distribution networks.
business computing systems, mail
processing, bar codes, labels, and
forms.
Model 4840e: Out of working order;
good for parts $65
Model 5000 Series 500 LPM printer.
Out of working order; good for parts
$75. Greeneville, Tennessee, 423359-3151 or 423-359-3172.
TV STAND and Video Center. Hard
plastic, 38"x28". TV area is 21"x18",
room for game system and lots of
games. $15 Call 865-227-1595
PAYMENTS
UNTIL 2015*
Automotive Parts /
Accessories
JUNK CARS
REGISTERED Seriolithograph, “Grand
Orchestre” by Linda Le Kinff, 2002,
25”x31” signed, unframed, $35. Call
865-984-0848.
$5500
%
APR
Just Cut - HAY ROLLS, $25 ea.,
Square bales, $3/bale & Construction
Hay, $3/bale. Call 865-235-2357.
FOOT LOCKER great for storage,
30”x12”, good condition, $20. Call
865-983-5945.
PANASONIC COLOR TELEVISION
27", with manual. Works great. $50
OBO a 865-681-4198
ON ANY NEW
IN STOCK
FORD!†$
DRAPES & SHEERS, $5. Call 865995-2426.
OVAL BRAIDED RUG 5x7 with
matching 21x35 oval rug. Good condition. Pet/smoke free home. $40
865-719-9606
IF IT
DRIVES,
ITS WORTH
R THE LOT
WE NEED TO CLEA
S OF NEW 2015
D
A
O
L
K
C
U
R
T
E
V
WE HA
DAILY!
FORDS ARRIVING
5X6 HAY ROLLS, $25 per roll. Good
cow & horse hay. Call 865-856-3689.
PREMIUM BERMUDA HAY, square
bales, $6 each. Call 423-506-7203.
BOX OF GOOD clothes, $5. Call 865995-2426.
Tune In To
984-6385
WASHER & DRYER $150 865-6404759
LADIES GOLF SHOES Footjoy Terrains, size 9M, never worn. $50 865983-4430
3BR/2BA “Great Community
near Walmart” $3,000 down &
own it in 5 yrs.
Medical Supplies
2 BLUE HIGH Back chairs, good
shape, $60. Call 865-518-1260.
Clothing
Antiques
SMALL OUTDOOR GRILL Paid
$249, asking $75. 865-977-0617
Furniture
STACK WASHER & DRYER
Whirlpool, nice condition. $300 865640-4759
Midland Plaza
Tractor Parts,
Accessories &
Farm Antiques
SEASONED FIREWOOD Oak & Hickory. $60 per rick, delivered. 865-3062430, leave message if no answer.
M&D APPLIANCE Paying $20-$30.
Kenmore, Whirlpool, Roper Washers, Dryers, Ranges, Fridges.
Steve 253-6172 or Ernie 659-9198.
EXCELLENT TILLED TOPSOIL
Dump truck load, delivered.
865-856-4726 or 865-805-1412
Farm Equipment /
Supplies
@Valley Farmer’s Co-op
“LIKE” us on Facebook
FISHWAGON
We buy scrap cars.
HIGHEST price
paid in East TN!
WE ALSO BUY
YOUR OLD
CLUNKER!
865-856-4590
TIRE & WHEEL 2007 BMW SUV.
Tire of no value. $25 865-776-2679
TIRES & WHEELS Set of 4
P235/70R16, GMC. $200 865-6404759
Autos - Domestic
04 CHEVY IMPALA, looks & runs like
new. All options, 96,000 mi., $8000.
Call 865-380-9755.
PONTIAC G6
Used 2007 clean, no mechanical
problems, 119,000 miles, sun roof,
black paint. $4,300. 865-379-8044
Autos - Imports
100 PLUS cars $5,995 or less.
DougJustus.com New location:
Airport Motor Mall.
2001 VW BEETLE 54,000 miles, new
tires, automatic, good condition.
$5500 865-898-0855
LOCAL, 1 OWNER, 07 Nissan Sentra
S, 2.0, very clean, 181,000 mi.,
$4400. Call 865-742-3013.
watersmotorsinc.com
3019 E. Lamar Alexander Pkwy.,
2ВЅ miles past BMH
Lower prices to better serve you
– our customer!
Trucks - Domestic
1979 CHEVY PICKUP Short bed, 350
engine, great work truck. $3000 obo
865-983-4073 or 865-387-1694
To place an Order Call
Toll Free:
1-800-643-8439
www.fishwagon.com
50026698TDT
10B | COMICS
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
BETWEEN FRIENDS
WUMO
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
PEANUTS
[email protected]
THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN
SHOE
THE DUPLEX
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
PICKLES
PRICKLY CITY
MALLARD FILLMORE
BEETLE BAILEY
DUSTIN
BABY BLUES
SNUFFY SMITH
HI AND LOIS
B.C.
Thursday, November 6, 2014
WEATHER, PUZZLES | 11B
THE DAILY TIMES
Thursday, November 6, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
Today
Friday
Chance
showers
Saturday
Partly cloudy
Light wind
Monday
Sunday
Partly cloudy
Partly cloudy
Light wind
Partly cloudy
Light wind
61 37 51 33 5636 5534 62 41
!.$!,-2-.!(-) +,!%+%..%*)"*,!-."*,)**).* 2!(+!,./,!*'*,) -,!.* 24-+,! %.! $%#$-
Billings
64/42
Minn. St. Paul
41/28
San
Francisco
75/57
H
H
Detroit
51/34
LL
Chicago
44/31
HDenver
H
DFW
Metroplex
71/46
H
H
LL
Juneau
40/34
" !
'())+(
&'())+(
&#
(&%*
Miami
84/72
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for
Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014:
This year you will have so much
energy that sometimes others
can’t imagine joining you, even if
it’s just to go shopping. Try to center yourself more often. You will
make good decisions as a result.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
в�…в�…в�…в�… You might want to be
more creative in how you approach
a money venture. Taking a risk
might be tempting, but it also
could be problematic.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
в�…в�…в�…в�… Energy seems to surround you right now, which might
be necessary to get a project
launched. You seem willing to
break precedent and let go of
some of your basic points of view.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
в�…в�…в�… Read between the lines
and understand what it takes to
make someone happy. Once you
make that realization, you might
not want to relate on the same
level that you did in the past.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
в�…в�…в�…в�…в�… Zero in on what you
want, and remain sure of yourself.
A loved one might be stuck in the
past. Don’t worry -- he or she will
catch up, just maybe not as fast as
you would like.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
��� You’ll want to forge ahead
with a project. Know that others
will be observant and receptive.
You are likely to succeed beyond
your wildest dreams.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
в�…в�…в�…в�… Keep reaching out to
someone at a distance. Your perspective could change radically
after a volatile discussion. You can
merge both interests and make
peace, but it might seem as if all
parties involved are not on the
same page.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
��� You’ll want to handle a
money issue or change the way
you handle your funds. You might
not be as aware as you need to be
with your spending choices.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
в�…в�…в�…в�… You might try to reach
beyond your limits in order to get
what you want. Perhaps you are
not as aware as you need to be
about the outcome of playing
hardball with a friend or loved one.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
в�…в�…в�… Your creativity can make
nearly anything shine. You often
put more hard work and thinking
into what you do than you let on.
You might have to push harder
than you would like in order to
make a point.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
в�…в�…в�…в�…в�… Your ingenuity is likely
to come out without you even realizing it. Sometimes you push a bit
too hard to have a situation play
out as you think it should. Others
might feel left out of the decisionmaking process and act out.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
в�…в�…в�… You will feel the pressure
of the Full Moon. It might feel as if
you have demands being dropped
on you left and right, and you don’t
know which way to turn. Delegate
some work to others. Do not toss
yourself into an emotional frenzy.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
в�…в�…в�…в�… You could be hearing a
lot of news all at once. You might
decide to get some more information in order to clarify what you’ve
heard.
The Stars Show the Kind of Day
You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive;
3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult
+((%* !(
,# !% 1050.8'
0.7'
962.7'
1.1'
1666.8'
1.6'
812.4'
0.4'
1495.6'
1.7'
794.0'
0.3'
1005.6'
0.8'
'
0'
**"&%(/
(&%*
!&-()
)*&($)
"%
#+((")
%&-
&/ &$&((&"*/
"&. "&.
Atlanta
68/58/sh
59/42/s
Atlantic City
62/40/ts 58/30/pc
Baltimore
64/40/r 54/34/pc
Birmingham
69/39/sh
56/37/s
Boston
54/40/r
52/35/r
Charleston, SC 81/47/pc
65/42/s
Charlotte
71/41/sh
58/34/s
Chicago
44/31/sh 44/38/pc
Cincinnati
52/36/ts 46/34/pc
Dallas
71/45/f 69/50/pc
Denver
65/41/pc 65/34/pc
Destin
76/50/sh
66/47/s
Houston
70/55/sh 67/50/pc
NEWSMAKERS
&/ &$&((&"*/
"&. "&.
Jacksonville
83/52/f
68/46/s
Las Vegas
78/55/s
79/57/s
Los Angeles
83/57/s
79/59/s
Louisville, KY
55/39/sh 50/37/pc
Miami
84/72/pc 84/72/pc
Myrtle Beach
77/50/pc 63/43/pc
New Orleans
75/52/sh 64/48/pc
New York City 54/40/ts 53/36/pc
Orlando
85/58/pc 75/53/pc
Philadelphia
60/40/ts 57/33/pc
Raleigh
72/42/sh 61/34/pc
San Francisco
74/55/s 72/56/pc
St. Louis
52/33/pc 52/41/pc
Washington, DC 66/42/r 56/37/pc
$!+*''!)-!-*)$-!) ! !+*,.-0%'',!-/(!)!1.-+,%)#
*/,!,%$!'%''!,
''!,#2-.$() %)/-((/)*'*#2
GOOD
"%&##+*%* PM2.5
&/ good
7:02 a.m. 5:35 p.m.
5:41 p.m. 6:34 a.m.
Nov. 6 Nov. 14 Nov. 22 Nov. 29
Full
Last
New
First
Quarter
Quarter
Trivia Fun by Wilson Casey
What room in the average American home is the scene of more arguments? Bedroom, Kitchen,
Bathroom, Den
Of the 48 contiguous United States, which was last to be explored? Oregon, Washington, Montana,
Idaho
For what movie did Tom Hanks win his first Oscar? Big, Philadelphia, Forrest Gump, Apollo 13
More teasers? Comments? [email protected] — See answers below Sudoku
THURSDAY SPECIALS
I&RISH
P
UB
S
G
PORTS
RILL
$5.00 Pork Chop Sandwich All Day!
LIVE! Team Trivia
8pm-close
1720 W. Broadway Blvd Maryville, TN
(next to Jet’s Pizza)
CRYPTOQUOTE
For Tennessee, cloud and a few
showers are expected in the east.
Drier elsewhere.
&/ &$&((&"*/
"&. "&.
Bristol
60/37/sh 47/30/pc
Chattanooga
64/37/sh 54/34/pc
Crossville
55/32/sh 49/32/pc
Gatlinburg
60/35/sh 52/30/pc
Jackson
62/33/pc
54/36/s
Johnson City
60/38/sh 49/28/pc
Kingsport
61/37/sh 49/28/pc
Knoxville
62/37/sh 50/33/pc
Memphis
64/37/pc
56/42/s
Nashville
60/36/pc
52/34/s
PRECIPITATION
24 hours ending 6 p.m..................... 0.01"
Month-to-date.................................. 0.01"
Normal month-to-date................... 0.57"
Year-to-date................................... 35.34"
Normal year-to-date..................... 39.92"
&($#
.
1075'
$!,*&!!
1002'
*/#'-
1710'
*).)
*,.*/ */) 813'
%0--!! 1526'
!'.*)%'' 795'
1020'
*,,%-
).!!.'$ 1941'
)
)
)
)
)
)
) )
)
)
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Key: 10!.$!,-/-/))2","%,++,.'2'*/ 2''*/ 2$3$3!"#"*#-$-$*0!,-,,%) 3 ,%33'!
.-.$/) !,-.*,(--)-)*0-"5/,,%!-%%!-'!!.*,",!!3%)#,%)0%0%) 2(10%).!,2(%1,%)) -)*0
HUMIDITY
+(.* 2 83%
&**)* 91В° at Miramar MCAS, CA
&&#)* 12В° at Gunnison, CO
($
(&%*
TEMPERATURES
!-.!, 2$%#$'*0 54В°/46В°
Normal high/low.........................65В°/42В°
Record high............................. 84В° (1948)
Record low................................. 21В° (1991)
..%-.%-,!.$,*/#$
(2!-.!, 2
Atlanta
68/58
Honolulu
86/70
offthemark
Houston
70/55
Anchorage
29/22
! %)#--*"+(2!-.!, 2
New York
54/40
Washington D.C.
66/42
Kansas City
51/34
65/41
Los
Angeles
83/57
865.724.1300
Rockefeller Christmas
tree coming from Pa.
BLOOMSBURG, Pa.
— An 85-foot Norway
spruce that belonged to a
central Pennsylvania family will serve
as Rockefeller Center’s Christmas tree this
year.
Workers
cut down
the 13-ton
Dan
tree and a
Sigafoos
crane hoisted it onto
a trailer
Wednesday
morning for
the 155-mile
journey to
midtown
Manhattan. It’ll be
Rachel
illuminated
Drosdickfor the first
Sigafoos
time on Dec.
3 in a ceremony that’s been held
since 1933.
The tree was donated
by Dan Sigafoos, 38,
and Rachel DrosdickSigafoos, 29, who live in
a century-old farmhouse
about three hours west of
New York City.
After Christmas, the
tree will return to Pennsylvania and its wood will
be used to build homes
for Habitat for Humanity,
Drosdick-Sigafoos said.
Berlin Wall story
has book, movie deal
NEW YORK — A book
about attempted escapes
under the Berlin Wall
and the support of American television has been
acquired by Crown Publishers and optioned for a
feature film.
Greg Mitchell, an
author and contributor
to the Huffington Post,
has a deal with Crown
for “The Tunnels.” Set in
the early 1960s, when the
wall went up, the book
focuses on attempts by
West Germans to sneak
loved ones out of East
Germany. Sensing a dramatic story, NBC and
CBS each tried to help
the East Germans, while
John F. Kennedy’s
administration worried
about relations with the
Soviet Union. Mitchell
drew upon interviews
and previously classified
documents.
No publication date
has been set, Crown
announced Wednesday.
12B | CLASSIFIEDS
THE DAILY TIMES | thedailytimes.com/classifieds
Thursday, November 6, 2014
(865)
233-2697 (865) 233-2796 2123 Highway 411 South., Maryville, TN
t8FTU#SPBEXBZ.BSZWJMMF5/
Great Deals!
DEAL
AUTO
AUTO
SALES
SALES
FRESH MARKDOWNS!
SLASHED PRICES!
Come in and check out
our new location!
Ask for
lana or
Nick
WE GIVE YOU MORE FOR LESS
VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT
OPEN 8-7pm M-Saturday
Sunday 12-5:30pm
WE BUY TRUCKS
WWW.IDEALAUTOSALESONLINE.COM
TRUCKS
WE BUY CARS
MANAGERS SPECIAL
01 Dodge Ram
Ext Cab
#7046
$ 4 ,9 9 5 $6,995
$5,995
5 speed, Air, 90k, 4x4
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Local Trade
Auto, 4x4, Local Trade #7290
$ 6 ,4 9 5
01 Chevy
Silverado 2500
99 Dodge Dakota
00 Dodge Dakota
Crew Cab
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, 4x4,
Air, Local Trade #6862
#7197
$7 ,9 9 5
$8,995
07 Mazda Sport
Truck
Auto, 87k, 2WD #7132
$9 ,5 0 0
$11,995
$9 ,9 9 5 $11,995
$11,995
05 Chevy Colorado 05 Chevy Silverado
Crew Cab
Ext Cab, 2WD, PL-PW
03 Ford F150 Ext Cab
Camper Top, Auto, 101k,
2wd, Running Boards #7081
Auto, PL-PW, 4x4, Local
Trade #7317
$9 ,9 9 5
$1 0 ,9 9 5
$11,995
06 Chevy Silverado
Reg Cab, Auto, PL-PW,
Air, 84k, 2WD #7244
#6837
$1 0 ,9 9 5
$12,995
$13,995
$1 2 ,4 9 5
MANAGERS SPECIAL
Auto, 2wd, 81k, Air,
PL-PW #7264
09 Dodge Ram
Crew Cab
$1 2 ,9 9 5 $15,995
04 Chevy
Silverado 2500
5.7, Auto, PL-PW, 4x4,
Local Trade #7242
Auto, 4x4, Leather, PL-PW,
8.1, Air, Crew Cab #7263
$1 6 ,9 9 5 $17,995 $1 6 ,9 9 5
$17,995
Auto, Powerstroke Diesel,
4x4, New Tires #7305
07 Toyota Tacoma
07 Ford F250 Ext Cab
4x4, PL-PW, 6 Speed, Power Stroke
Diesel #7309
$23,995
$1 6 ,9 9 5
Auto, PL-PW, 4x4, 56k #C9698
$2 2 ,9 9 5
$23,995
Auto, 77k, Pl-PW, Air,
4 cyl, Local Trade
#7287
$5 ,9 95
$6,995
04 Volvo S560 TL
Auto, PL-PW, Air #7083
#C9999
Auto, Leather, PL-PW
$7 ,9 95
$26,995
#7178
$9,995
$7 ,9 95
#7028
$1 5 ,9 9 5
$1 9 ,9 9 5
$20,995
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4x4, 4k, Lift Kit,
Chrome Rockstar Wheels #7270
$2 4 ,9 9 5
$3 4 ,9 9 5
$35,995
Crew Cab, Auto, 135k, 4x4,
Leather, Air, PL-PW #7092
$16,995
08 Dodge Ram Crew
Cab
76k, 4x4, PL-PW, Air #7295
14 Dodge Ram Crew
Cab 1500
08 Dodge Ram Crew
Cab 2500
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 109k, 4x4
$2 4 ,9 9 5
$26,995
$1 8 ,9 9 5
CARS
09 Chrysler PT Cruiser
Touring
$9,995
Auto, PL-PW, 2wd, Air,
Leather, 68k, 4.7L #7196
$2 4 ,9 9 5
WE GIVE YOU MORE FOR LESS
03 Mitsubishi Eclipse GS
12 Dodge Ram Crew
Cab SLT
Leather, PL-PW, Air, 4x4,
Navigation, Sunroof #7199
$25,995
$1 8 ,4 9 5 $19,995
$1 7, 99 5 $19,995
05 Ford F150 Lariat
06 Ford F150
Crew Cab
04 Ford F350 Crew Cab
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4x4, Leather,
Powerstroke Diesel, Auto,
Sunroof, 87K #7166
PL-PW, Air, 4x4, Leather #7280
Auto, Leather, V8, 4x4,
Sunroof #7315
07 Ford F150
Crew Cab FX4
4x4, Auto, 122k
$1 5 ,9 9 5 $16,995
$1 4 ,9 9 5 $16,995
07 Ford Explorer Trac
04 Toyota Tundra
Crew Cab Limited
05 Ford F150
Sport
Auto, 5 cyl, PL-PW, Air,
4x4, Z71, 122k, Power
Sunroof #7027
4x4, PL-PW, Air #7121
$1 4 ,9 9 5 $15,995
$1 7 ,9 9 5 $18,995
$18,995
10 Ford Explorer
Trac Truck XLT
$2 1, 9 9 5
$22,995
06 Ford F150
Auto, 111k, PL-PW, Air,
4x4, Crew Cab #6953
06 Chevy Colorado
10 Dodge Dakota
Crew Cab
5 Speed, 2wd, PL-PW,
Air #7182
$1 3 ,9 9 5 $15,995
$15,995
06 Ford F250
Superduty Ext Cab
4x4, PL-PW, Air, Local Trade,
SR5, 86k, Auto #7185
$2 1, 9 9 5
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Local
Trade #7316
$1 3 ,5 0 0
$17,995
04 Ford Superduty
F350 Crewcab
04 Dodge Ram
Crew Cab SLT
Auto, 5.9 Diesel, 4x4 #7131
91k, Auto, 2WD #7255
$1 2 ,9 9 5 $14,995
$13,995
01 Dodge Ram
2500 Ext Cab
11 Ford F-150 Long
Bed Reg Cab
04 Dodge Ram
Auto, V8, PL-PW, 4x4, 5.7
Hemi, Leather #7277
$20,995
$1 9 ,9 9 5
11 Dodge Ram Crew
Cab 2500
Diesel Turbo Big Horn, 87k,
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4x4 #7162
$39,995
$3 5 ,9 9 5
LOW, LOW RATES
05 Volkswagen Beetle
Convertible
07 Ford Fusion
99 Mercedes SL 500
08 Ford Focus SES
Auto, PL-PW, Air
Auto, 126k, PL-PW
#7235
#7159
Leather, Auto, PL-PW,
2 Door #7236
5 Speed, Leather, PL-PW, Air, 121k
$8,995
$7 ,9 95
$8 ,2 50
$9,995
#7086
$8 ,9 95
$9,995
$8 ,9 95
$10,995
MANAGERS SPECIAL
08 Nissan Altima
08 Chevy Malibu
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 106k, Local
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, Local
Trade #7232
#7246
$9 ,9 95
$10,995
73k, Auto, PL-PW, Air,
Local Trade #7312
Auto, 68k, Leather, Pl-PW, Air
Trade #7172
$9 ,9 95
$10,995
10 Chevy Impala LT
05 Ford 500 Limited
$10,995
$9 ,9 95
$1 0, 99 5
$11,995
10 Dodge Avenger
07 Cadillac DTS
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 84k,
4 cyl #7289
08 Honda Civic
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, 87K
Auto, 96k, PL-PW
$1 0, 99 5
$11,995
#6871
$12,495
#7042
$1 0, 99 5
$12,995
$1 0, 99 5
MANAGERS SPECIAL
08 Buick Lacrosse
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Leather
#7254
$1 1, 4 95
$12,995
11 Chevy HHR
09 Toyota Camry XLE
06 Chevy Monte Carlo SS
04 BMW 745i
Auto, 4 cyl, PL-PW, Air, 78k
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, 129k
Auto. PL-PW, Air, Leather, 88k
Leather, PL-PW, Air, 91k
#7030
$12,995
#7260
$1 0, 99 5
$12,995
10 Dodge Charger
07 Chrysler 300-C
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 62k
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Navigation,
85K #7100
#7249
$15,995
$1 4 ,9 95
08 Audi A4 2.0T
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air
$1 4 ,9 95
$16,995
#7211
$16,995
2 Door, Auto, 4x4
$4,995
#7313
$3 ,9 9 5
$1 2 ,4 95
$13,995
#7284
$1 2 ,9 95
$13,995
08 Toyota Avalon Limited
04 Chevy Corvette
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Leather, Power
Sunroof #3232
46k, PL-PW, Air, Black Leather,
6-Speed #C1122
$1 8, 99 5
$1 6, 4 95 $19,995
03 BMW X5 AWD
06 Ford Explorer
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, Power
Sunroof, 3.0, Extra clean #c9595
Auto, Leather, V8, PL-PW, 4x4, Air,
Third Seat #7302
$8 ,9 9 5
$9,995
#7054
$2 3, 99 5
$24,995
Auto, 4 cyl, PL-PW,
Air, 34k
$13,995
#7214
$9 ,9 9 5
$10,995
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, 79k, V6
#7080
$1 2 ,9 95 $14,995
55k, Leather, Sunroof
#7276
$3 1, 99 5
$32,995
03 Chevy Tahoe
03 Chevy Tahoe
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Local Trade
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air
#7217
#7253
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air,
New Tires, Local Trade #7298
$8,995
25k, Auto, PL-PW, Leather #C7777
$31,995
$8 ,9 9 5
$9,995
$9 ,9 9 5
$10,995
06 Jeep Grand Cherokee
Laredo
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air,
6 cyl #7291
$11,995
07 Ford Explorer XLT
05 Chevy Tahoe Z71
08 Honda CRV
10 Ford Escape
07 Chevy Tahoe
Auto, Leather, 4x4, Third Seat,
DVD, Power Sunroof #7089
08 Ford Explorer
V6, Auto, PL-PW, Air,
4x4 #7200
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 2WD
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 94k
Auto, Eddie Bauer, 3rd Row, 2wd
#7208
#7198
Auto, Leather, 3rd Seat, 4x4,
PL-PW, Air #7128
$1 0 ,9 9 5
$11,995
$1 1, 9 9 5
$12,995
$1 2 ,9 95
$13,995
$14,995
$1 3 ,9 9 5
$1 3 ,9 9 5
$15,995
$15,995
$1 4 ,9 9 5
#7195
$15,995
$1 0 ,9 9 5
07 Jeep Wrangler
05 Ford Expedition
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, 4x4
#7283
$2 9, 99 5
SLASHED PRICES
05 Mercury Mariner
$8 ,4 9 5
$1 3, 99 5
10 Chevy Camaro SS
ZL427
09 Mercedes CL 550
SUVs & VANS
LOW, LOW RATES
95 Chevy Tahoe
$1 1, 99 5
08 Chevy Malibu LTZ
10 Nissan Sentra
$1 4 ,9 9 5
2 Wheel Drive, Ulimited
4 Door #7234
$18,995
$1 7, 99 5
MANAGERS SPECIAL
05 Porsche Cayenne
07 Jeep Wrangler
Auto, Leather, PL-PW-PS,
12 Jeep Liberty
6 Speed, Leather, 86k
51k, PL-PW, 4x4, Air
Power Sunroof, 93k, V6 #c6767
#c4444
#7777
$1 7 ,9 9 5
$19,995
$20,995
$1 8, 99 5
$21,995
$2 0 ,9 9 5
07 Chevy Tahoe LT
10 Nissan Murano
07 Jeep Wrangler
07 Yukon Denali XL
06 Dodge Grand Caravan
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Third Seat,
Leather, 4x4, CD #7259
58k, PL-PW, Air, Leather,
Local Trade #7241
4-Door, 6-Speed,
Sahara Hard Top #C1133
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air,
Third Seat, DVD #C3131
Auto, Stow & Go Seats,
PL-PW, Air, 75k #6670
$22,995
$2 0 ,9 9 5
$23,995
$2 1, 4 9 5
$22,995
$2 1, 9 9 5
$2 1, 9 9 5
$23,995
$8,995
$6 ,9 9 5
MANAGERS SPECIAL
06 Dodge Grand Caravan
08 Nissan Quest
Auto, 68k, PL-PW, Local Trade
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Third Seat, 48k
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 92k,
Local Trade
#7174
#6635
#7161
$8,495
$7 ,4 9 5
$9,995
$8 ,9 9 5
$13,995
$1 2 ,9 9 5
10 Chrysler Town &
Country
Auto, 3rd Seat, PL-PW, Air #7294
$14,995
$1 3 ,9 9 5
All prices include $250.00 doc fee. Not included TT&L.
07 Honda Odyssey EXL
DVD, Leather, Captain Chairs,
Power Sunroof, PL-PW, Air, Third
Seat #7147
$16,995
$1 4 ,4 9 5
09 Chrysler Town
& Country
Leather, PL-PW, Air Captain Chairs,
77k #7148
$18,995
Not Actual Colors Shown in pictures above.
$1 7 ,9 9 5
09 Honda Odyssey EXL
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, Power
Sunroof, Power Doors & Hatch, 82k,
DVD #7017
$18,995
$1 7 ,9 9 5
45026149DT
05 Kia Sedona
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