close

Enter

Log in using OpenID

Country Courier - Turner Publishing Inc.

embedDownload
The
Country Courier
ECRWSS
PRSRT STD
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
PERMIT #130
POSTAL CUSTOMER
Maine’s largest direct mail community publication company serving nearly 250,000 homes and “It’s All Good” News!
A Product of
Directly mailed to the residents of Turner, No. Turner, Greene, Leeds, Buckfield, Canton,
Hartford, Sumner, Monmouth, No. Monmouth, East Livermore, Livermore and Livermore Falls.
November 7, 2014 • Volume 23, Issue 15
“Just Good Reading - Since 1992” • Home of CentralMaineToday.com
Turner Publishing Inc., PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 • 207-225-2076 • Fax: 207-225-5333 • E-Mail: [email protected] • Web: www.turnerpublishing.net
Join us as we
Remember the Fallen
Raffle News From
The Museum
Turner Museum and
Historical
Association
held its annual meeting
recently and volunteers
reported their collaborative efforts with the
Turner Public Library for
a RAFFLE to be drawn
at the Winter Festival on
December 13, 2014 at the
Leavitt Institute Building.
1st prize is $300 cash, 2nd
prize is one ton of Maine
Wood Pellets, 3rd prize
is a $200 LL Bean gift
certificate, 4th prize is a
trip for 2 to Cabbage Island clambake. Tickets
are available at the Town
Office on Election Day
Tuesday November 4 and
Craft Fair at Leavitt High
School on Saturday November 8. Tickets can also
be purchased from Museum Association members and Library Trustees.
They are $ 1 each or a
book of 6 for $ 5.
The 2015 Museum Calendar will be available for
sale October 30th until
they are all sold.
Other plans are in the
works for an Antique Appraisal Night sometime in
February at the museum
and the following officers
were elected: James Talbot, President; Joan Ricker, Vice President; Natalie
Pilsbury Treasurer; Eva
Leavitt, Secretary; Elvera
Pardi, Historian; Sterling
Hinkley, Genealogist; and
Barbara Beedy, Curator.
The Museum is located
on the 4th floor of the
Leavitt Institute Building at 98 Matthews Way
and is open Tuesday and
Thursday noon to 4 for
winter hours and also by
appointment on Saturday
morning by calling 2253271. n
Blanchard’s Cash Fuel
HEATING OIL
Please join the American Legion Post 111 and Boy Scout Troop 187 as they honor veterans. The ceremony will take
place Tuesday, November 11, at 11 a.m. at the Turner Village Monument.
RICKER HILL ORCHARDS
WWW.RICKERHILL.COM
DESIGN & SALES CENTER
Much More Than You Will Find in a Box Store!
CALL: 225-3588
3 Conant Road
(On the Auburn/Turner Line) Turner
r
Don’t Shiver... We Deliver! • www.blanchardscashfuel.com
Hard Cider & Carbonated Cider Tasting
Room 11am-6pm Daily
Now Taking Pie Orders for Thanksgiving
Shop & Support Local with us and get great prices
and the best customer service
995 CENTER ST., IN AUBURN • 784-3100
PRE-ORDER
YOUR PIES
AND RECEIVE
10% OFF!
•Pumkin
•Blueberry
•Pecan
•Raspberry
•Apple
•Mixed
ed B
Berry
eerrry
rr
p
•Apple-Cranberry
225-5552
2
Open D
Daily 10-5 • RT. 117
7 TURNER
R
Stop by and visit our showroom!
www.kitchensolutionsmaine.com
ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTORS
CALL FOR TODAY’S LOW CASH PRICEE
•#2 Heating Fuel (featuring BOE 3000)
•Kerosene
•Off Road Diesel (ULSD)
•Propane
•Ultra Low Sulfur Heating Oil
•Dyed Off Road ULS Diesel
•Clear On Road ULS Diesel
OPEN THRU CHRISTMAS
224-8299
CCALL
ALL US FIRST FOR YOUR PLUMBING AND HEATING SERVICES!
TURNER, ME
KEN GILBERT 207-713-8733
207 713 8733
Electricity rates are doubling for
commerical users. Upgrade to LED
with JAPELCO and receive HUGE
Efficiency Maine incentives!
ASK US HOW
The Country
Page 2
Courier
November 7, 2014
www.centralmainetoday.com
Rivalry on the Gridiron: Leavitt vs. Spruce Mountain
Leavitt’s Gabe Seeley intercepts a pass intended for Spruce Mountain’s Matt Vigue in
the final moments of the first half at a recent game between the Leavitt Hornets and
Spruce Mountain Phoenix. Leavitt won the game with a final score of 28-14. Pictures
courtesy of Dustin Williamson.
Spruce Mountain’s Austin Darling is tackled by Leavitt’s Isaiah Calder. Taylor
Woodbury (88) provided coverage.
Spruce Mountain’s Peter Theriault breaks his way through the Leavitt defense on his
way to a first down.
Leavitt’s Julian Kirouac carries the ball
while Spruce Mountain’s Matt Vigue
comes in for a tackle.
Spruce Mountain’s Peter Theriault gets tackled by Leavitt’s Maxwell Green. Theriault’s
run was good enough for a first down.
Finley Funeral Home
15 Church Street,
Livermore Falls • 897-3588
BRAGDON-FINLEY
P. O. Box 188
Monmouth • 933-4444
www.finleyfuneralhome.com
ALL OUR PAPERS ARE ONLINE FREE AT
www.turnerpublishing.net
PROPANE
EXCEPTIONAL ENERGY
CALL US TODAY TO SEE
HOW PROPANE CAN
WORK FOR YOU
Cook Stoves • Space Heaters
Dryers • Hot Water Heating
Home Heating • Generators & More
Don’t Worry, Call Murray
Phone: (207) 225-3000 • Toll-Free: (800) 491-7888
www.murrayoil.com • [email protected]
The Country
November 7, 2014
Church Supper
November 1-Community Supper at the Congregational Church of East
Sumner, 50 Main Street,
5:30 PM. Turkey dinner
put on by Church Youth
to benefit camp scholarships. Donation requested
for the meal. Raffle items
available. FMI Cyndy
388-2667.
November 26-Thanksgiving Eve Service at the
Congregational Church
of East Sumner, 50 Main
Street. Soup and salad at
6:00 PM, Service at 7:00
PM. FMI Cyndy 388-
Courier
Page 3
www.centralmainetoday.com
2667
December 6-The Congregational Church of
East Sumner will have a
raffle table at the Holiday Fair at Buckfield Jr/
Sr High on Rte 140 in
Buckfield from 9:00 AM
to 2:00 PM. FMI Cyndy
388-2667.
December 6-Community Potluck Supper at the
Congregational Church
of East Sumner, 50 Main
Street, 5:30 PM. Bring
a dish to share or make
a donation for the meal.
FMI Cyndy 388-2667. n
Veterans Day Nov. 11th
Craft Fair
Monmouth PTO proudly presents the annual
Craft Fair and Marketplace. Featuring local
crafters, artists, makers,
producers and small businesses.
The date is Saturday,
November 22 from 10
AM - 3 PM.
FREE ADMISSION
The Craft Fair will be
held at the Monmouth
Middle School.
Spaces still available.
For more information call
207-215-7487. n
Leeds Food Pantry
Needs Your Help!
More and more families need our help this
holiday season.
Can you help?
BUY A TURKEY
Our goal is to provide
Thanksgiving Food Baskets for 80 familieis here
in Leeds.
We need to raise $1200
to make this happen.
Every turkey, every
grocery store gift card,
every donation will
help!
We are grateful for
your generosity.
THANKS SO MUCH!
For more information,
Call for your
call Joyce 524-5171
Donations can be
mailed to Leeds Community Church Deacons
PO Box 228, Leeds ME
04263. n
FREE
Water
Test
and Consultation
Commander,Tracy Gray, from the American Legion Post 204
will conduct a memorial ceremony on
Veterans Day, November 11, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. at East
Monmouth to dedicate a new monument.
A special thanks to Collette Monuments for a donation and
placement of the monument.
Custom, T-Shirt Design • Embroidery • Logo Wear
Corporate • School • Sports
877 - 687 - 4887
41 Chestnut St. Lewiston, ME 04240
www.actionscreenprinting.net
A E R U S
We Fix
Water
Problems
We carry a range of
products that deal with
arsenic, hard water, iron
and much more
207-622-0125
www.aeruswater.com
MARY LEAVITT Vice President & Senior Trust Officer, Norway Savings Asset Management Group
Financial expertise
is our
strength.
Personal relationships
are our
Add a taste of authentic
Maine humor to your
next banquet, luncheon,
conference, convention or
company get together.
Contact humorist and bestselling
Maine author John McDonald
NOW BOOKING FOR FALL AND WINTER
Call: 207.899.1868
Email: [email protected]
passion.
We believe developing relationships with our clients
is fundamental to achieving success. We’ll get to
know your short-term plans and your long-term
goals to determine the best way to manage your
money. Let our experienced team earn your trust,
and together, we’ll invest in your future.
#ALL-ARY,EAVITT
WWWNORWAYSAVINGSBANKCOM
s).6%34-%.4-!.!'%-%.4
s425343%26)#%3
s&).!.#)!,!$6)#%
s%34!4%0,!..).'
s .OT&$)#)NSURED
s .O"ANK'UARANTEE
s -AY,OSE6ALUE
The Country
Page 4
Courier
www.centralmainetoday.com
November 7, 2014
So Close
John McDonald
No one from Maine has
ever been elected president of the United States.
James G. Blaine, one of
Maine’s most famous and
successful
politicians,
came closest. Our western
neighbor New Hampshire
gave the country President Franklin Pierce, but
many historians consider
him one of our worst. I’d
rather not claim any than
have to claim Pierce.
Although he hated to
admit it, James G. Blaine
was actually “from away.”
He was born in 1830
in the sleep little town
of West Brownsville,
Pennsylvania,
coming
to Maine in 1854 when
he was hired as editor of
the Kennebec Journal in
Augusta. Later, in what
some would call a step up
and others would consider
a step down he moved to
Portland to become editor
of the Portland Advertiser.
In 1859 Blaine was elected to the Maine House of
Representatives, where
he served three years, the
last as Speaker. He then
moved on to the U.S.
Congress as Maine’s representative. He did so well
as Speaker of the Maine
House that his colleagues
in Congress elected him
Speaker there as well.
Wanting a better job,
Blaine resigned from
Congress in 1876 and
ran unsuccessfully for
the Republican nomination for president. He ran
for the same nomination
four years later and lost
again. Third time being
the charm – at least for
the presidential nomination – Blaine became the
Republican candidate for
President in 1884, but
managed to lose the election, anyway, to Grover
Cleveland.
But he came sooo close.
How close?
Well, he lost New York
State, and thereby the
election, by about one
thousand votes.
Many people, including
Blaine, thought he lost because of inflammatory remarks made in New York
on the eve of the election
by Reverend Samuel D.
Burchard, supposedly on
Blaine’s behalf. In a fiery speech Rev. Burchard
referred to the opposing
party – the Democrats –
as the party of “… Rum,
Romanism and Rebellion!” Blaine sat there on
the podium, powerless to
do anything
As expected, the emotional speech got lots of
people all riled up. And remember, this all occurred
well before talk radio,
iPhones, facebook, twitter and texting. The rev-
erend’s words spread like
wildfire throughout New
York’s immigrant population, offending many Irish
Catholics in the process.
In the remaining hours of
the campaign, Blaine reminded New York voters
that his own mother was
a Catholic, but it was not
enough. Too much damage had been done by the
reverend’s remarks and
Blaine lost the election.
The campaign between
Blaine and Cleveland became famous for two silly
campaign slogans, one
aimed at each candidate.
I know. What campaign
slogans aren’t silly?
Cleveland supporters
often chanted, “James G.
Blaine, James G. Blaine,
the continental liar from
the State of Maine.” While
Blaine supporters, after
discovering that Cleveland fathered a child out
of wedlock, chanted, “Ma,
Ma, where’s my pa?”
After Cleveland won
the election, the ending of
the chant became, “Gone
to the White House,
ha,ha,ha.”Don’t you wish
our politics still had such
wholesome scandals?
I suppose Longfellow
could have written better
slogans, but, as far as we
know, he never offered his
services to either candidaten.
community’s
support.
The pantry’s stock is very
low and the Deacons
don’t have enough cash
to purchase the turkeys
and fixings. The Deacons
are hoping to be able to
provide a Thanksgiving dinner to 80 families
again this year and make
plans for their Christmas outreach. An appeal
for help is going out to
the schools and the local businesses. Donation
cans have been placed at
the town office, Red Roof
store and Twin Bridge
market. Canned goods,
cash donations, gift cards
and turkeys would all be
gratefully accepted by
the Deacons and can be
dropped off at the Leeds
town office, the church
office, or mailed to Leeds
Community
Church,
attn: Deacons, P.O. Box
228 Leeds 04263. Watch
this paper and area bulletin boards for future
announcements. Let’s get
behind this effort to stock
the food pantry and help
those in need in our community. I’d like to wish
all of my readers a bountiful Thanksgiving and a
blessed holiday season. n
The Leeds Line
By Debbie Hite
Just got back from a
visit to Rome, Italy where
our son Tom is studying
this semester. We walked
our feet off, visiting the
many churches and ancient sites in the Eternal
City. Although each of
us had been to Rome 40
years ago, this time Larry
and I benefitted from our
own personal tour guide,
who was delighted to
show us around. We also
went to Siena and Assisi
in the beautiful region of
Tuscany. I’ll eventually
get some photos posted
on Facebook, so check
in with me there if you’re
interested.
The Leeds post office recently expanded
its hours of counter service: M-F, 7-10 a.m.,
1:15-4:15 p.m. Saturday
schedule is 9-11 a.m. For
hours of other facilities in
the area, go to www.usps.
com/locations.
I’ve had several inquiries about the level of
Androscoggin Lake. The
lake association ALIC
has been closely monitoring the lake, which
in October reached its
lowest level since July
1998. However, it was
only about a foot from
the recognized “normal”
reading of 269’ above
sea level. The alarming
reaction came from many
seasonal folks and recent
residents who had grown
accustomed to higher
levels resulting from wet
summer months of the
past few years. This September, however, was the
driest on record and August didn’t produce much
measureable precipitation either. Currently,
though, the lake is back
to “normal,” thanks to the
hefty storm of a couple
weeks ago.
The town is hosting a
rabies clinic on Sat., Nov.
8, from 9am-11am at the
fire station. Cost of the
vaccination is $10. Town
personnel will be available to register your dogs;
fee is $6 for spayed or
neutered animal, $11 for
others. State law requires
that dogs be licensed,
with the annual renewal
due at the end of the year,
so take advantage of this
opportunity.
Upcoming closures at
the town office and in our
schools include the following: Thursday, Nov.
6, half-day of school,
with parent-teacher conferences in the afternoon/
evening; Monday, Nov.
10, no school-teacher inservice; Tuesday, Nov.
11, no school and town
office closed in observance of Veterans’ Day;
Nov. 26-28 no school,
Thanksgiving
break,
town office closed Nov.
27-28.
The Leeds PTC would
like to remind community members that the current IGA Hometown Label Savers program ends
on Dec. 31. Each bundle
of 500 original UPC barcode labels from eligible
IGA brands is worth
$15. The group appreciates everyone who has
been collecting labels for
them, not only IGA bar
codes but also the General Mills box tops and
Campbells soup labels.
Keep them coming! Collection boxes are at the
town office, the school,
Red Roof store and Twin
Bridge market. Thank
you! The next meeting of
the Leeds PTC is Thurs.,
Nov. 13, at 4:30 p.m. at
the school; parents are
encouraged to attend.
This is the season of
craft fairs and holiday
festivals and there are
two very popular events
in our area. The Leavitt
Craft Fair is Sat., Nov.
8, at the high school and
“Christmas by the Lake”
fair is at St. Philip’s
Church on Rt. 4 across
from Lake Auburn on
Sat., Nov. 22, from 9am3pm. See more details in
this paper.
The Deacons at Leeds
Community Church, who
operate the food pantry
at the church, are facing
a big challenge this year
to their holiday meal outreach and are asking the
Pineland Carpets & flooring
“A cut above”
Pineland Carpets has been servicing Auburn, MAINE.
Area for over 68 years! We offer quality products and
honest, dependable craftsmanship.You will always find
Pineland Carpets prompt and courteous.
Family Owned and Operated
1520 Hotel Road Auburn, ME 04210 207-784-1511
377-2121
75 Main Street, Winthrop ME 04364
*Each office is independently owned and operated.
Look Your Best!
946-3380
693B • Route 202 •
Greene • Maine
Quality • Value • Service
www.ronthebarber.biz
Tue-Fri: 9:00-6:00 • Saturday: 9:00-1:00
Visa • MasterCard • Credit/Debit
1155620 Richmond - On a quiet Street
in Richmond. This oversized farmhouse
has renovated kitchen, hardwood floors,
Mantels, Old-fashion charm, detailed
trim. Attached massive 4 car garage
high ceilings with overhead storage
room. Near the river close to Swan Island Parks. $128,735
1103218 Sabattus - ROW to Sabattus
Lake Duplex First Unit - New Kitchen
Maple Cabinets Galore, Hardwood
Floors, 1 Bedroom, Full Bath, Laundryroom. Second Unit-Galley Kitchen, 2
Bedrooms, Full Bath, Walk-in Closet,
Open Living Concept. Possible owner
financing. $111,735
1100449 Monmouth - Easy access to
Cobbossee Lake HW floors, custom
kitchen, master bedroom with huge
walkin closet and bath,walkout rec room
with wetbar, Oversize 2 car heated garage, sunny water view deck and lovely
shaded covered porch. Additional garage, dock & more! $450,000
www.coldwellbankerthomas.com / [email protected]
November 7, 2014
The Country
Courier
www.centralmainetoday.com
Page 5
Turner Publishing invites our readers children to
send in their “Letters to Santa” to be published in
their local Turner Publishing paper. All letters will be
published for all our readers to enjoy.
There is no charge for having the letters
published and they will be run exactly as they are
submitted, misspellings and all.
“Letters to Santa” is a great keepsake for parents,
grandparents and the children themselves.
So get
gett your chil
hildre
d n to
t writ
i e a letter to Santa
(which will be forwarded to the North Pole...)
to share with all your friends and family.
Mail your letters to: “Letters to Santa” PO
Box 214, Turner, ME 04282. Letters will
not be returned but may be picked up at
the Turner Publishing office in Turner.
The Country
Page 6
Courier
November 7, 2014
www.centralmainetoday.com
Maine Deer Season Outlook
V. Paul Reynolds
Contrary to a recent
press release issued by
the Maine Department
of Inland Fisheres and
Wildlife, Maine’s 2014
firearms season for deer
kicks off with a Maine
residents only opening
day November 1st, not
November 2nd. Starting
the following Monday,
November
3rd,
the
deer season is open to
all licensed big game
hunters. ( If you wait until
MDIF&W’s announced
start date of November
4th you will have missed
opening day).
What’s the Maine deer
season outlook?
Pretty darn good if you
combine the statistics,
the
deer
biologist’s
forecast and the so-called
“anecdotal evidence.”
According
to
the
harvest data and all the
buzz there has been a
definite rebound of deer
numbers following the
severe winters of 2008
and 2009.
Kyle Ravana, Maine’s
deer biologist, estimates
that if normal hunting
conditions and hunter
effort prevail, this year’s
dear kill will be in the
25,750 range, nearly a 20
percent increase from last
year’s kill. The total deer
kill for the last ten years is
as follows: 2012 – 21,553;
2011 – 18,839; 2010 –
20,063; 2009 – 18,092;
2008 – 21,062; 2007 –
28,885; 2006 – 29,918;
2005 – 28,148; 2004 –
30,926; 2003 – 30,313.
According to Ravana,
harvest trends support the
fact that the population
has rebounded.
Ravana says, “Last
year, WMD 3 in Eastern
Aroostook County had
its highest buck harvest
ever, and WMD 6, while
not a historical high, had
one of its highest buck
harvests ever. As a result
of the increasing deer
population in WMDs 3
and 6, the department
issued any-deer permits
in these WMDs 3 and 6
for 2013. Hunter surveys
also show that hunters are
seeing more deer.”
“Most telling is the
annual buck kill, an index
used by the department
to note trends in the
population. Maine’s buck
kill has increased each
of the past four years.
Last year’s buck harvest
increased 23% from the
previous year. In much
of the state, the buck kill
exceeded the 10-year
average, another sign
the deer population has
rebounded.”
The deer recovery is
attributted to a number of
factors: first and foremost,
consecutively
mild
winters, “focused predator
control” (dead coyotes),
and better protection of
deer wintering areas.
In general, outdoor
people are reporting deer
sightings from one end of
the state to the other. This
has not been the case for
too long. Deer hunters are
pumped.
Most exciting of all,
perhaps, are some nearrecord buck harvests last
fall in the big woods of far
northern Maine.
This trend, combined
with the likely survival
of Maine’s traditional
bear hunt, can only help
Maine’s
hard-pressed
rural economy. It will take
time to bring back many
non-resident deer hunters
Maine Guide, co-host of
a weekly radio program
“Maine Outdoors” heard
Sundays at 7 p.m. on The
Voice of Maine NewsTalk Network (WVOMFM 103.9, WQVM-FM
101.3) and former information officer for the
Maine Dept. of Fish and
Wildlife. His e-mail address is [email protected]
net.. He has two books
“A Maine Deer Hunter’s
Logbook” and his latest,
“Backtrack.” n
who have been staying
away in droves.
The promotional arm
of the Maine Department
of Inland Fishheries and
Wildlife, when it gets its
calendar organized, might
consider some overdue
marketing
initiatives
to get the word out
about the long-awaited
recovery of Maine’s oncebeleaguered deer herd.
The author is editor of
the Northwoods Sporting Journal. He is also a
Exercises to Flatten Your Stomach
Jodi Cornelio
Live Long, Live Well
Jodi R. Cornelio, AS, BA, MBA
Nutritionist, Personal Trainer
and Motivational Speaker
[email protected]
Listed below are five
exercises you can do
anywhere to flatten your
stomach. Not only are
these exercises good for
HAVE
YOU
FOUND
THE
PHONY
AD
YET!
Like
Us
flattening your stomach
they are great for your
entire core strength and a
healthy back.
Just do each exercise
every other day 3 sets of
12 repetitions and feel
you core tighten, see your
stomach flatten and improve your posture. The
best thing about these
movements is that you can
do them all standing. No
floor mats or heavy equipment needed and you can
actually sneak a few in
while you are at work.
Give these a try
1. Slow motion front
kick: Stand with straight
posture, lift right knee
belly button height then
extend your leg out
straight, draw it back in
and toe touch the floor to
the starting position. Repeat 12 times. Repeat on
the opposite leg.
2. Side Bends with or
without weights: Heavy
weights are not necessary if you are trying to
thin the waist line. The
exercise is exactly how
it sounds. Just point your
index finger to your baby
toe and bend side to side.
The more the better. Try to
do 100 side to side.
3. Torso twist with
weight: This exercise is
very affective with a light
to moderate hands weight.
Hold one dumbbell with
both hand straight out in
front of you, chest high
with straight arms. Rotate
to the left and then rotate
to the right. Leave hips
stationary and only twist
at the waist as the upper
body follows.
4. Overhead side chop
knee pull: No weight
Maine-ly Cleaning Services
“Quality Cleaning at your Fingertips”
Specializing in:
Homes • Businesses • Rental Units
в�…
Insured
In Business Since 1996
Free estimates & summer cleaning specials! • 207-685-7240
45 - MOFGA INSPECTED
COW MANURE COMPOST
$
35 - RAISED BED MIX
(4’x10’x8” one yard)
$
30 - AGED COW MANURE
$
25 - LOAM
(Delivery Available, All Products)
$
20 - Fresh Cow Manure
$
Ralph
754-3871
needed but you can add
weight if you need a little
more. With hands over
head at a left side angle
bring your opposite knee
into your chest to meet
your arms and repeat up
and down 12 times on
each side.
5. Cross over extensions
with weight. Use light to
moderate weight. Reach
for the sky to your left and
then reach for the floor
to your right extending
the body with each reach.
Squat and bend the knees
when reaching to the floor
to protect the back. This
works the oblique on each
side of your waist and
also works the abdominal
muscles that cross your
midsection. Repeat 12
times of each side.
One could easily whip
through these simple exercises in 15 to 20 minutes.
Remember to always consult your physician before
performing any new exercise program especially if
you have a specific medical condition.
Live Long, Live Well. n
Boothby Perry Law LLC
L. Clinton Boothby Esq.,
Alan J. Perry, Paul D. Corey Esq.
Taylor S. Kilgore, Esq.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
• Divorce & Family Law
• Real Estate: Transaction &
Litigation
• Criminal Law
• Small Business/Corporate
• Estate Planning, Probate
& Trusts
• Personal Injury
22 School House Hill Rd., Turner
Phone: 207-225-5044
Castonguay Excavation
Livermore Falls
897-4283
Jean & Adam
Castonguay
November 7, 2014
The Country
Courier
Page 7
www.centralmainetoday.com
CLUES ACROSS
1. Live in a tent
5. Capital of W. Samoa
9. Seer’s prop
12. Household God (Roman)
14. Leavened rum cakes
15. Swiss river
18. Deepsea fishing line
21. “Taming of the
Shrew” city
23. Tapioca source
25. Stems used for wickerwork
26. Very bad in degree or
extent
28. 14 lines with a fixed
rhyme scheme
29. Enfeebles
31. Pops
32. Not a convenient
time
38. Estimates
39. Making easier
41. Finished a skirt edge
42. Leprosy sufferers
44. Hasidic spiritual
leader
45. Wife of Abraham
46. Runner used for gliding over snow
47. Not plain
52. Airport code for
Gaborone
53. A mother’s summoning words
58. London Modern Art
Museum
59. Motorcar
CLUES DOWN
1. Atomic #24
2. Pharaoh 1323-1319
BC
3. Mutual savings bank
4. Community school
assoc.
5. Winglike part
6. NPR TV equivalent
7. Farm state
8. Atomic #13
9. Extended neck for a
better view
10. Blood group
11. And gentlemen
12. Your store of remembered information (abbr.)
13. Father of Araethyrea
16. Your father’s sister
17. A scrap of cloth
19. Take as a wife
20. Killers Leopold &
___
21. Breathe rapidly
22. ____ Frank’s diary
24. Made dry and brittle
25. Not inland
27. Ladyfish genus
28. Look at with fixed
eyes
30. Wedding vow
32. Shakespeare’s pentameter
33. Deprived of feeling
34. Double curve
35. Employees
36. Type of palm or grass
37. Forceful exertion
38. Oddball computer
expert
40. Grasp suddenly
41. Time units (abbr.)
43. Refers to a female
47. Federal excise tax
48. Ingested
49. Not yes
50. Awards org. for country music
51. Not me
54. Overtime
55. 1/1000 of an ampere
56. Montana
57. Atomic #42
Straight Shooters Guns & Ammo Open in Jay!
Ken Lyman of Livermore
Falls has always been a
passionate hunter and has
enjoyed it over the years
as a fun activity with
his family, including his
daughter Kendra LymanHood. In September they
opened the doors of their
new guns and ammo shop,
sharing the same building
as their long time business,
Ken’s Appliance Sales and
Service. Ken and Kendra
wantedtosharetheirpassion
with their local towns and
people, while giving them
convenient and easy access
to gun supplies, especially
during the busy hunting
season that is now upon us.
Straight Shooters Guns &
Ammo supports shopping
local, especially at small
hometown, locally owned
businesses like themselves.
Family owned and operated
businesses are dying off but
Ken and Kendra are proud
and excited to have opened
their second family run
business.
The shop’s inventory
is growing weekly and
Kendra is inviting everyone
to check them out and let
her know what you are
looking for. If an item you
are seeking is not in stock
they can order it and start
carrying it for you. They
are getting particularly busy
now with early Christmas
purchases, including youth
hunting rifles. They are also
accepting used guns and
have a growing selection of
new as well.
Ken’s Appliance and
Sales has been at its new
location in Jay at 99 Main
St., across from the Jay
Fire Department, for over
a year now. Ken has 35
years experience servicing
appliances and 22 years of
selling them. Kendra joined
the business in 2013. You
can visit her most days
in the showroom where
you can check out GE
washers, dryers, stoves,
microwave, refrigerators,
and dishwashers. Ken’s
services everything that
he sells as well as all other
brands. The showroom is
open 9 to 5 Monday thru
Friday, as well as Straight
Shooters. Kendra and Ken
would like to thank all of the
customerswhocameoutand
supported us during their
Grand Opening on October
25th. “We are so thankful
to the community for your
support and look forward to
being your firearms supplier
in the future. Without our
customers this dream of
dad and mine wouldn’t
be possible. WE love our
customers and hope more of
you will stop by and join the
Straight Shooter family.” ~
Kendra.
Both Ken’s Appliance
and Straight Shooters can
be reached at 897-5104
and they can also be found
on facebook with their own
pages. Give Kendra a call
today to purchase that new
appliance that you need or
get that pretty rifle you have
always wanted!n
“Jam the Gym” at CMCC to Benefit At-Risk Kids
The men’s varsity basketball team from Central
Maine Community College
will be facing a somewhat
unusual team on their home
court on November 18.
They will be taking on the
Auburn Police Department
“All-Stars.” The game,
which is all in good fun, is
part of an event called “Jam
the Gym” is a fundraiser
that the college is hosting to
benefit the Auburn Police
Activities League (PAL).
The APD team will consist of officers of every
rank and skill level. “We
are pretty confident that we
will give them some good
competition,” said Chief
Phil Crowell. “They may
be younger and faster, but
don’t count us out – our
guys have �game.’ Either
way, it’s going to be a great
event!”
“Our goal is to pack the
CMCC gym with folks who
want to have some fun,”
said CMCC Athletic Director David Gonyea. Gonyea,
who is also the men’s basketball coach, serves on
the PAL Board of Directors
and had the idea to host
$ Buy Now & Save Big $
$
5,000
Rebate from Efficiency
Maine on Pellet Boilers
SAVE UP TO
650
$
$
ON E-CLASSIC MODELS
Greene, Maine • 946-4444
Savings available for a limited time only on in-stock E-Classic and Maxim models. Savings shown is on an E-Classic 3200 model and a Maxim 250 pellet boiler. **12.99%
APR based on 48 months.
Savings
Savingsavailable
availablefor
foraaalimited
limitedtime
timeonly
onlyon
onin-stock
in-stockE-Classic
E-Classicand
andMaxim
Maximmodels.
models.Savings
Savingsshown
shownis
ison
onan
anE-Classic
E-Classic3200
3200model
modeland
andaaaMaxim
Maxim250
250pellet
pelletboiler.
boiler.
Savings
available
for
limited
time
only
on
in-stock
E-Classic
and
Maxim
models.
Savings
shown
is
on
an
E-Classic
3200
model
and
Maxim
250
pellet
boiler.
independentpowermaine.com
“Jam the Gym.”
“The boys are thrilled to
host the APD All-Stars,”
said Gonyea. “I sure hope
that they have been running
and playing daily to prepare. We know how badly
the PD wants to teach our
kids a lesson,” he joked.
“Seriously though, the college kids love games like
this one. Anything we can
do to help the PAL Center
is positive. Many of our
students volunteer at PAL.
They are invested and they
have a real bond with the
kids there.”
Auburn PAL is a non-
profit organization that provides after school and summer programs for Auburn
youth in the highest-crime,
lowest-income neighborhood in the city. Staff, officers and community volunteers mentor kids at the
Auburn PAL Center, which
opened a year and half ago.
“We took a look at our
calls for service, and 25%
of them were happening
within a ВЅ mile radius of
where the PAL Center is
now located,” said Crowell. “At PAL, these kids
now have a safe place to
spend some time, get help
with homework, have a nutritious snack, play sports,
and have a great time.”
“Jam the Gym” will be
held on Tuesday, November 18 at 7:00pm. Tickets
are $3 or 4 for $10 and they
can be purchased at the Auburn Police Department (60
Court Street), the CMCC
Bookstore, or at Republic Jewelry & Collectibles
(212 Center Street).
For more information or
to sponsor this event, contact Liz Allen at the APD:
[email protected]
or 333-6650 x2070. n
Named Turner Business of the Year 2013
by the Androscoggin County Chamber
The
COUNTRY COURIER
A Product of
Maine’s largest direct mail community publication company serving nearly 250,000 homes and “It’s All Good” News!
Directly mailed to the residents of Turner, No. Turner, Greene, Leeds, Buckfield, Canton,
Hartford, Sumner, Monmouth, North Monmouth, East Livermore, Livermore and Livermore Falls.
Turner Publishing Inc., PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 • 207-225-2076 • Fax: 207-225-5333 • E-Mail: [email protected] • Web: www.turnerpublishing.net
CEO/Publisher
Jodi Cornelio
Operations Manager
Dede Libby
Senior Designer
Michelle Pushard
Designer
Danielle Pushard
OfпїЅice/Billing
Tom Tardif
Advertising
Jess Small
Dede Libby
Erin Savage
Jim Foster
Dan Smiley
Paul Gagne
Writer/Photographer
Bill Van Tassel
Proof Reader
Hal Small
The Country Courier is published by Turner Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 214, Turner, ME 04282-0214. Advertisers and
those wishing to submit articles of interest can call, 1-800-400-4076 (within the state of Maine only)or 1-207-225-2076 or
fax us at 1-207-225-5333, you can also send e-mail to us at: [email protected] Any views expressed within
this paper do not necessarily reflect those of this paper. This paper assumes no responsibility for typographical errors
that may occur, but will reprint, at no additional cost, that part of any advertisement in which the error occurs before the
next issue’s deadline. This paper also reserves the right to edit stories and articles submitted for publication. This paper is
mailed on a monthly basis all postal patrons of Turner, N. Turner, Greene, Leeds, Buckfield, Canton, Hartford, Sumner,
Monmouth, N. Monmouth, E. Livermore, Livermore, Livermore Falls, and Fayette. Founded by Steven Cornelio in 1992.
The Country
Page 8
Courier
www.centralmainetoday.com
GET YOUR NEW
GARAGE THIS YEAR!
November 7, 2014
Runner of the Year
CALL TODAY!
TURN THIS...
INTO THIS!
s
As Low A o*
/m
$
71
Harrison Knowlton of Leavitt placed second at the Western Maine Class B Regionals
on Saturday at Twin Brook, qualifying for the state meet on November 1st. Harrison
was also the KVAC Class B Cross Country Champion and was voted and selected as the
2014 KVAC Class B Runner of the Year.
Morse Memorial
Library Offers Saturday
Morning Story Time
ney Down
o
With NO M
•Frustrated with lack of room?
•Don’t suffer through another
winter without a garage!
Call A-Smart Today!
FULLY INSURED • FREE ESTIMATES
FREE CONSULTATION
We also do... Windows, Siding & Decks
Metal Roofs for what you expect to pay for shingles.
NO DOWN PAYMENT FINANCING AVAILABLE**
866-422-3758 512-8280
www.aSmartMaine.com
*$71 per month based on 0 down payment on $5950 over 120 months at 6.99% annual percentage
rate (APR). Rates vary and are based on individual credit scores and could be lower than 6.99% or
higher than 6.99% based on credit. Not all customers will qualify. Total interest paid over life of loan
based on 9.9% is $2526.80. Please call for full details if needed. **Subject to credit approval.
Morse Memorial Library in Greene will launch
a weekly family story time
on Saturday, November
1. The 15- to 20-minute
sessions will take place
at 10 a.m. each Saturday
until December 13. While
the program is best-suited
for kids ages 2 to 6 and
their parent(s) or adult
caregiver(s), younger and
older siblings are also welcome to attend. Leading
the sessions on alternate
weeks will be new Morse
Library volunteers Sandra
Fowler and Nancy Hinds.
Fowler is a retired educator who has worked as a
teacher and school librarian at the elementary and
secondary school levels.
She also worked as an assistant librarian at Belgrade
Public Library, where she
still leads a weekly story
time. She volunteers at the
Wayne Elementary School
Library and at the Cary
Library in Wayne Village.
She especially enjoys children’s stories featuring
multicultural themes.
Hinds is a retired educator who has volunteered
and worked in public
schools, including as an
elementary Title I reading and writing instructor. She is certified by the
State of Maine as a literacy
specialist and as a K-12
English as a Second Language teacher. She lives in
Greene with her husband,
Stanley, and their cat, Tiger Lily. She especially
enjoys children’s stories
featuring outstanding artwork and illustration.
“This is something
we’ve been hoping to do
for a long time,” said librarian Steve Bouchard.
“Reading to kids is so important, we hope families
will take a little time on
their busy weekends to
come over and enjoy some
great stories. As one of our
volunteers pointed out,
great children’s books can
be both fun and profound
at the same time, so we
really think this is some-
thing families can enjoy
together.”
Bouchard says that, after the holidays, he and the
volunteers will meet again
to discuss how the series
went and to plan another
series for winter-spring
2015.
Morse Library is located at 105 Main Street
in Greene Village, just off
Route 202 and a quarter
mile down from Greene
Central School. Library
hours are Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from
12pm-7pm and Wednesday and Saturday from
9am-3pm.
Among its other collections and services, the
library offers a wide variety of new fiction, a growing collection of movies
and audiobooks, e-books
through the Maine InfoNet
Download Library, and an
interlibrary loan service.
For more information
about the library, call 9465544.n
The Country
November 7, 2014
Raffle Tickets
on Sale Now!
The Turner Public Library and Turner Museum and Historical Association Raffle tickets
are now on sale! Tickets
provide an opportunity
to win:
1st prize is $ 300 cash;
2nd prize is 1 ton of
Maine Wood Pellets;
3rd prize is a $200
L.L.Bean gift certificate
;
4th prize is a trip for
2 to a Cabbage Island
Clambake.
Tickets are $1.00 each
or a book of 6 tickets
for $5.00. Tickets are on
sale at the Library, at the
LAHS Annual Craft Fair
on November 8th, or
from a Library Trustee
or Historical Association
member. Be sure to take
a chance on these great
items and support the
work of the Library and
Historical Association at
the same time!
Story Hour
Saturday, Nov. 8th
Preschool and Kindergarten children are invited to join Boy Scout
Volunteers for Story
Hour at 10am on Saturday, November 8th.
Volunteers from the local Boy Scout troop will
help celebrate Veterans
Day by reading to the
kids. A follow up activity will be making cards
to send to the Veterans
Home to brighten the
day for the veterans in
residence. Many thanks
to the Boy Scouts for
reaching out and sharing their time with both
youngsters and Veterans
Courier
to make this a special
day.
8th Annual
Silent Auction
The library is finalizing plans for the 8th annual Silent Auction with
exceptional donations
that include 2 nights in
a yurt on Pleasant Pond
with the loons, 2 hours
of services of a cleaning
woman and her professional talent, the always
popular organic beef
package from Caldwell
Farms, a paddle boat
excursion for a summer
day, a beautifully crafted Paddington Bear for
that special little person
in your life and many,
many other intriguing
items. Truly something
for everyone’s holiday
shopping list! All items
will be on display for
bidding at the library
November 8th through
December 13th at 3 pm.
Please bid often to make
this our most successful
fundraiser ever!
TPL Amazon
Wish List
During this holiday
season please consider
a gift to the Library in
honor of the 75th year.
Visit the TPL website
or Facebook page for
the link to the Amazon
Wish List for TPL. Also
if there is a book you
would like to see added
to the library wish list
please let the TPL staff
know so the title might
be added to the wish
list. It is always helpful to know what patrons
would like added to the
TPL collection.
Main Street
Dental Hygiene
Help the Boy Scouts honor Veterans by joining them for the November 8th Story Hour!
Boy Scout volunteers will host Story Hour on Saturday, November 8th at 10am!
Your Preventative Oral
Care Office
PSYCHIC/HEALING FAIR
Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Elizabeth Mahar Doherty, IPDH
131 Main St., Mexico
Fast - Friendly Service
364-1480
Order Early for Christmas!
Owned and Operated
by Ken Lyman and
Kendra Lyman-Hood
897-5104
Page 9
www.centralmainetoday.com
Hours: 9am to 5pm Mon
to Wed, 9am to 7pm
Thur & Fri, 9am to
NOON on Saturday.
897-5104
Located at 99 Main St., Jay (across from Jay Fire Dept)
B&W Copies
Color Copies
1030 Western Ave (Route 202) - Manchester
Blueprint Copies
Business Cards
Business Forms
Large Color Posters
E-mail: [email protected]
Wedding Invitations
Hours: Mon - Fri 8-5
Fax Service
Now Offering
Laminating
Labels
Banners - Job Site Signs - Vinyl Lettering
623-1312
WE WANT YOUR
GOOD NEWS!
[email protected]
at the Four Seasons Function Center, 187 Main St., South Paris
Mediums * Foot Bath Detox * Energy Healing * Crystals * Reflexology * Jewelry * Medical
Intuitive * 3 D Aura Photography * Hypno Therapy * Ritual Items * Astrology * Much More
Admission: $5.00. Free workshops included with the price of admission to the fair.
For more information visit www.soulintentions777.com or
www.facebook.com/CommunityAwakeningHolisticFair
FREE ESTIMATES
ARMAND’S
AUTO BODY, INC.
Rob Armstrong
31 Blake Street • Lewiston
782-7113 • armandsautobody.com
The Country
Page 10
Courier
www.centralmainetoday.com
November 7, 2014
Critter Chatter: Foxes and Helpful Folks
Carleen Cote
Foxes present the fewest health issues. Nevertheless, they are not
immune to mange, their
biggest problem. Mange
is caused by a mite that
burrows under the skin.
The excreted mites' waste
causes the itch. The fox
scratches until open
wounds occur. These become infected and crusty
and their hair falls out.
If this happens in cold
weather, the fox will die
from hypothermia. The
mites survive by sucking blood which causes
anemia and may lead to
death.
As with most wildlife,
foxes might have other
internal parasites, such as
round worm, hook worm
and lung worm. The stress
of captivity apparently
cause these parasites to
multiply and cause health
issues. External parasites
include lice, ticks and
fleas. These are treatable.
Rabies in foxes has
not been a problem for
many years. However in
southern Maine, three aggressive grey foxes that
attacked humans tested
positive for this virus.
This year, 22 young foxes
arrived at the Center in
need of care. This is the
most we have ever received in one year. Many
calls came in about foxes
hanging out around homes
and on golf courses. With
the explosion of fox families and the loss of habitat, inevitably some virus
will affect this animal,
as it has with raccoons,
skunks, woodchucks and
bats.
Most folks who offer
to volunteer at the Center want to work with the
animals, until they learn
about the required vaccinations, but this summer two people called
to volunteer who had no
interest in working with
November means
remembering and supporпїЅing
our veterans and a time to give
thanks and say a prayer for peace.
A time to prepare for Thanksgiving
with fami
ffamily
i and пїЅiends and share
iinn nat�re’s har�est.
We carry immune
building products to prepare
for cold season.
Fresh Maine Produce Still Available!
We are not only local but also the longest
running natural food store in Maine!
Hours: Mon- Fri 8:30am-8pm, Sat- 8:30am-6pm, Sun- 10am-4pm
120 Center Street Plaza - Suite 300 - Auburn - (207) 782-3348
Quality Used
Cars at
Affordable
Prices
Credit union financing assistance.
Several lending sources to get you into
a quality used vehicle.
1148 Auburn Road • (Rt. 4) • Turner
740-2277 or 225-3656
www.duvalautosales.com
QUALITY USED CARS FOR
HARD WORKING PEOPLE!
animals.
We happily welcomed
Gerard, from Augusta,
who said he'd do any
work that needed doing.
True to his word, he raked
lawns, weeded and cared
for flower beds, cleaned
out a building in which
we'd raised chickens for
the storage of food and
equipment, and washed
tubs and kennels used for
the wildlife. If there was
a job to be done, he was
willing. When the school
year started, we bid Gerard farewell as he returned to his paying job.
Thank you, Gerard, for all
your assistance this summer!
Brenda,
from
Waterville,
initially
wanted to work with the
animals, but stayed with
us anyway. Joining us on
Saturdays (she works at
her job four days a week),
she did the dirty work of
scrubbing and sanitizing the raccoon water
dishes and food trays, and
washing containers used
A fox pup at the Duck Pond Wildlife Care Center. Contributed photo.
to transport the animals,
taking care of anything
that was dirty and needed
cleaning. Like Gerard,
Brenda did it all these
tasks without ever a murmur of complaint. Thank
you, Brenda!
We also want to thank
Bob, who has mowed the
lawns at the Center for
many years. His pay is a
large bag of dog food and
biscuits for his animals!
Our lawns would become hay fields without
his help! We continue to
count our blessings.
Note: Carleen and
Donald Cote operate the
Duck Pond Wildlife Care
Center on Rt. 3 in Vassalboro, Maine, a nonprofit facility, supported
entirely by the Cotes' own
resources and outside donations. Call the Cotes at
445-4326 or write them
at 1787 N. Belfast Ave.,
Vassalboro, ME 04989. n
The Country
November 7, 2014
Courier
Page 11
www.centralmainetoday.com
Nothin’ But Small Talk…Horses Helping Soldiers
Jess Small
This month we pay tribute to those military personnel who have served
our country. They have
fought for our freedom
and put their lives on the
line to ensure our safety.
Now they are home and
we need to make sure they
know our appreciation and
are taken care of.
For decades horses have
carried soldiers bravely
into war, carried cannons
and ammunition for the
artillerymen, pulled wagons full of supplies for the
all military, and carried
the American flag proudly
head on into battle. Today
horses are helping wounded soldiers on the road to
recover from their physical and emotional injuries,
as well as help them to adjust back into civilian life.
When you are in the
presence of a horse you
feel a rush of emotions
– strength, focus, energy, awe, and just overwhelmed with their beauty
and power. Scientists and
therapists have recognized
these complex emotions
and the quick bond between humans and horses
and have begun to use
them for many therapeutic purposes. Horses are
smart and perceptive animals. Each horse has its
own personality, just as
humans do. Their personality traits are not the same
as human traits, but they
are traits that we as humans can relate to and that
is what helps seal the bond
between our species.
Horses can help facilitate healing because they
have a natural ability to
know what a person needs
to heal, whether it is an
emotional block, a bad repetitive behavior, or even
a physical problem.
Equine assisted therapy
program are becoming
more and more popular all
over the cover. More farm
and programs are opening their doors every year.
Many of them are now focusing on post traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD).
Horses and soldiers are
a lot alike. They are both
hard wired to stay alert,
aware, and ready for danger at all times, as a soldier in a combat zone or in
hostile territory has to be.
Horses are also able to
calm themselves quickly,
as a soldier is trained to do
as well.
In most equine assisted
therapy programs, horses
are teamed with mental
health professionals and
an equine professional
to address the issues that
each veteran is facing
when they return home.
On the ground activities
with horses are also used
to mimic real live issues
and combat zones. This
allows the therapist to see
were the problems are and
then are able to help them
to find solutions. The participants quickly learn
and recognize unhealthy
behaviors, acknowledge
their strengths and weaknesses and work to incorporate new healthy behaviors.
Horses are also used
to help wounded soldiers
heal their physical aliments. Riding a horse is
soothing, stress free, and
once can find comfort with
the rhythmic rocking motion of the horse. Soldiers
who have trouble walking
or can’t run feel at one with
the horse and can focus on
their balance and posture
as well as using all muscle
groups while in the saddle.
Horses and humans have a
pelvis that works the same
way, both with identical hip movements while
walking. Sitting on a horse
allows a person’s body
parts do move naturally.
Therapeutic riding also
helps with traumatic brain
injuries and PTSD. While
riding your mind must be
in the present and focused
on yourself, the horse, and
your riding. Being in the
saddle helps your brain
work on the “right now”
and does not let rider focus on any intrusive thinking or distracted thoughts.
Many researchers have
discovered and proved
that horses tend to mirror
the human emotions and
the claim that horses are
very effective partners for
helping a human heal as
well as helping them to
achieve higher levels of
personal growth. A horse’s
behavior can change the
emotional state of a person.
One session of Equine
Assisted Psychotherapy
(EAP) can be equal to five
sessions on the “couch”.
Our soldiers deserve to be
at peace and feel comfort
upon their return home.
Horses can give that to
them. Farms and ranches
that offer equine therapy
on the ground and in the
saddle are becoming more
and more popular. Many
of them are branching out
and primarily focusing
on our wounded soldiers
while a majority continues
to focus on children and
therapy needs.
Our services members
and their families make
daily sacrifices for all of us
living in the United States
and it’s the utmost importance that we take care of
those who give endlessly
for our freedom once they
return home! n
Rob Foley (shown here), a retired Navy Seal, helped to
get the Equine Assisted Therapy for Veterans program
started at Equine Journeys in Bridgton, Maine. Equine
Journeys started 7 years ago with providing therapeutic
riding and driving, mostly with developmentally delayed
adults. 3 years ago they were able to start their veterans
program. They have a licensed therapist and psychiatric
nurse who, along with Therapeutic driving and riding
instructors, form the therapy team. Equine Journeys has
been seeing veterans at no charge to them. They seek out
veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Traumatic
Brain Injury, or Military Sexual Trauma.
Greenwood Orchards
Derek & Dave McLaughlin
Dixfield Discount Fuel, Inc.
NOW ARE A FULL SERVICE PROPANE SUPPLIER!
Also offering: #2 Heating Oil, Kerosene & Diesel
On Road/Off Road DDF WILL be there when you
need us for fuel or service needs!
We are dedicated are committed to keeping prices as
low as possible for our customers.
562-0972
Call us today to find out how we can make it easier for you to stay warm!
T.W. Varney
Excavation LLC
Troy Varney,
Owner/Operator
Fully Insured
• Sit
Site W
Workk • Septic
S ti Systems
S t
• Excavation
44 Knight Farm Rd., Turner
225-2749
SPENCERS, MCINTOSH,
CORTLAND APPLES, AND
NATIVE VEGETABLES
Now Taking Orders
for Thanksgiving Pies,
Rolls, and more!!
OUR
OWN
CIDER
(No Preservatives,
Unpasteurized)
SShipping
hipping apples
Open Daily 9-5pm
Rt. 4-Turner, Maine
www.turnerpublishing.net
225-3764
The Country
Page 12
Boxtops for
Education
I would like to send out
a very grateful thank you
to everyone who sends
in their General Mills
Boxtops to the Hartford Sumner Elementary
School.
The proceeds are used
by the Nezinscot Valley
Music Boosters and the
HSES Student Council
to provide musical and
theatrical programs PreK to 12 and educational
prgrams (Slim Goodbody,
the Mad Scientist, Friends
of the Kotzschmar Organ)
to Pre-K to 6.
Parents, if your certificate or coupon has an
expiration date, send it to
school right away! Please
try to separate Campbell’s
labels from General Mills;
they are two separate programs. The School does
not use Betty Crocker
labels. If you have time
to trim the boxtops, that
is wonderful. When we
mail them in, we pay
for weight. I can’t give
enough praise and thanks
to Arlene and Morril Nason and Cindi Wallace
and her children, Jake and
Shelby, for the countless
hours they spent trimming
and bundling into groups
of 50 boxtops.
Because of those who
sent in boxtops, the classroom teachers who had
their students paste them
onto sheets, and my very
special volunteer clippers,
our school will be receiving a check for more than
$1600 in December.
We collect year-round.
So please save your boxtops and certificates,
along with the Campbell’s
labels, and send them to
the school. They can be
mailed (we have a loyal
Hartford resident who
sends them in) to:
Hartford Sumner Elementary School 145 Main
Street Sumner ME 04292.
It would be wonderful to end the school year
with more than $2,000 in
earnings.
If anyone has questions,
please call me at 3882667 or email me at [email protected]
Cynthia Norton, Coordinator 137 Bonney Road
Sumner Maine 04292. n
Courier
www.centralmainetoday.com
November 7, 2014
YWCA Christmas Fair
The Christmas Fair
Committee has been making plans for Saturday before Thanksgiving event
set to be held on Saturday,
November 22nd from 9
am to 1 pm at 130 East
Avenue in Lewiston. This
year’s fair will feature the
ever popular jewelry table,
candy table (lots of homemade Maine Needhams
and fudge, handmade
items (clothes for 18”
dolls), knit items (hats and
mittens), affordable gifts
for giving, baked goods,
Christmas items, raffles,
teddy bears, elegant collectibles, and more. n
Our committee members have been hard at work!
Ariens Compact Series
ACUPUNCTURE
•
CRANIOSACRAL
Cristi DeMarco
THERAPY
ACUPUNCTURE
•
CHINESE
244 Main St. Kingfield
193 Front St., Farmington
HERBAL
491.2884
778.9700
MEDICINE
www.demarcoacupuncture.com
•22” Clearing Path
•3-40 ft. throwing Distance
•9.5 Ft - lbs (208cc) Engine Power
•2.5x Quick Turn Chute Rotation
•Pin Lock Steering
•Speeds - 6 Forward / 2 Reverse
Compact 22 - 920013
Innovating primary
care, leading as a
Patient-Centered
Medical Home.
A lightweight snowblower engineered to provide heavy-duty results, the Ariens Compact Sno-Thro is
robust and dependable so you can take on harsh winter conditions all season long. Durable from the
dash panel to the housing, it comes complete with folding handlebars for easy storage. Exceptional results along with unsurpassed performance and design make the Ariens Compact an ideal snow removal
solution for up to 12” of average snowfall.
•24” Clearing Path
•3-50 ft. throwing Distance
•12.5 Ft - lbs (254cc) Engine Power
•2.5x Ice Drill
•Auto Turn Steering
•Speeds - 6 Forward / 2 Reverse
Your health.
Your community.
Your home.
Exceptional patient-centered care in your own community.
LEEDS | MONMOUTH | TURNER
W W W.D FDRUS SEL L .ORG
Deluxe 24 - 921024
Don’t let Mother Nature’s winter fury slow you down. From light accumulation to dense, heavy snow,
the Ariens Deluxe Sno-Thro series snowblowers empower you to clear your path through 16” of snow
with a throwing distance of up to 50 feet. Featuring a large 14-inch, 3-blade high-speed impeller, you’ll
throw more snow in less time so you can get back to what matters.
At Turner Publishing
we publish 20 papers monthly,
all available
FREE ONLINE!
www.turnerpublishing.net
FRECHETTE’S Sales & Service
15 Streaked Mountain Road, Buckfield • (207) 336-2986
FULL SERVICE REPAIR SHOP
The Country
November 7, 2014
Courier
Page 13
www.centralmainetoday.com
University of Maine at Augusta
SPRING 2015
Course Guide
Take a class you need or one that interests you
at our low public tuition rate.
BUSINESS
BIOLOGY
AVI ASL
ART
ART HISTORY
ARCHITECTURE
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
rs
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
REGISTRATION OPENS
NOVEMBER 6TH.
For information on courses,
schedules and how to register:
go to
uma.edu/courseguide
Or call 1-877-862-1234
with any questions.
x
x
x
x
x
Stay Close. Go Far.
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
nte
r
go
Ba
n
Au
g
x
Ce
AME 205 Religion and American Culture
AME 389 Girls on Fire: Gender, Culture, and Justice in YA
ANT 102 Cultural Anthropology
ARC 102 Architectural Design I
ARC 123 The Principles and Philosophy of Architecture
ARC 111 History of Art & Architecture
ARC 204 Architectural Design III
ARC 251 Sustainable Design Concepts
ARC 261 Computer Aided Design and Drafting
ARC 262 Building Information Modeling
ARC 306 Architectural Design V
ARC 322 Structures II
ARC 332 Construction Techniques
ARC 408 Architectural Design VII
ARC 430 Architectural Design VII, Thesis Capstone
ARC 489 Topics in Architecture: Sustainable Preservation
ARH 105 History of Art & Architecure
ARH 106 History of Art and Architecture II
ARH 206 History of Photography II (1930 to Present)
ARH 375 Modern Art II
ART 100 Introduction to Studio Art
ART 109 Photographic Vision and Digital Discovery
ART 112 2-D Design
ART 113 3-D Design
ART 115 Drawing I
ART 140 Intro to Digital Imaging
ART 202 Electronic Arts I
ART 210 Intaglio Printmaking
ART 215 Drawing II
ART 235 Photography I
ART 302 Electronic Arts II: Design for Sound, Video and Web
ART 309 Intermediate Printmaking
ART 335 Photography II
ART 402 Electronic Arts III: Interactivity
ART 409 Advanced Printmaking
ART 430 Senior Project
ART 435 Photography III
ASL 102 American Sign Language II
AUD 319 Advanced Audio Technology
AVI 320 Aviation Law
BIO 100 Human Biology
BIO 100 Human Biology LAB
BIO 104 Introduction to Human Nutrition
BIO 110 General Biology I
BIO 110 General Biology I LAB
BIO 111 General Biology II (Blended)
BIO 111 General Biology II LAB
BIO 116 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II
BIO 116 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II LAB
BIO 210 Anatomy and Physiology
BIO 210 Anatomy and Physiology LAB
BIO 215 Introduction to Human Genetics
BIO 280 Intro to Human Disease
BIO 310 Biology of Cancer
BIO 321 Microbiology
BIO 321 Microbiology LAB
BIO 322 Biochemistry
BIO 345 Pathophysiology
BIO 440 Immunology
BIO 485 Techniques in Molecular Biology
BIO 490 Perspectives on Global Health
BUA 100 Introduction to Business
BUA 101 Fin. Acct for Managemnt Decisions
BUA 202 Intermediate Financial Reporting II
BUA 211 Acct. for Management Decisions
BUA 215 Principles to Banking
BUA 222 Fund. of Property & Casualty Insurance
BUA 223 Principles of Management
BUA 230 Business Law
O
De nline
lay /
ed
Vie
w
AM. STD.
Course Number and Description
us
ta
AUGUSTA • BANGOR • ONLINE
and CENTERS STATEWIDE
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
GET THE DETAILS AT www.uma.edu/courseguide
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
JUSTICE STUDIES
x
C
x
x
x
MATH
x
x
x
x
x
On
De line/
Vie layed
w
ter
s
Ce
n
r
go
Ba
n
us
ta
x
x
x
x
ENGLISH
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
MED LAB
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
JAZZ AND CONTEMPORARY MUSIC & MUSIC HISTORY
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
ENG 5 Basic Writing
x
ENG 10 Writing Improvement
ENG 101 College Writing
x
ENG 102W Introduction to Literature
x
ENG 103W Writing for Allied Health
x
ENG 111W Journalism
ENG 185W Intro. to Mythology: The Origins of Literature
x
ENG 203W Sur.British Lit: Romantics to the 20th Century
x
ENG 289 Topics: From Science to Fiction: the Lit of Sustain
ENG 301W History of the English Language
ENG 317W Professional Writing
x
ENG 351W Creative Writing
x
ENG 360W Selected Work of Shakespeare
x
ENG 366 Children and Young Adult Literature
ENG 389W Regional American Literature, Detroit
x
ENG 389 Girls on Fire: Gender, Culture and Justice in YA Dys
ENG 389 Topics: Mentoring Writers: Practice and Pedagogy
ENG 450W Poetry: Cross-Cultural Forms and Themes
x
x
ENG 499W Senior Seminar
FRE 102 Elementary French II
x
FRE 103 Basic French Conversation: Beginners and Beyond
x
FRE 204 Intermediate French II
x
FRE 306 Language and Culture of the Francophone World II
x
GEY 101 Physical Geology
GEY 101 Physical Geology LAB
HGH 301 Holocaust: From Prejudice to Genocide
x
HON 300W Critical Thinking and Writing
HON 401 Leadership Seminar
HTY 103 United States History I
HTY 104 United States History II
x
HTY 106 World Civilizations II, 1500 to the Present (Delayed View) x
HTY 310 History of Maine
HTY 341 History of American Slavery
x
HTY 389 Topics in History: Russia on the Global Stage
x
HUM 122 Native American Cultures II
HUS 101 Introduction to Human Services
x
HUS 125 Chemical Dependency
x
HUS 130 Developmental Disabilities
HUS 134 Cultural Competence in the Helping Professions
HUS 204 Practicum
HUS 212 Case Management
x
HUS 215 Introduction to Therapeutic Activities
x
HUS 218 Community Mental Health
x
HUS 220 Child Mental Health
x
HUS 221 Adolescent Mental Health
HUS 222 Psychosocial Rehabilitation
x
HUS 224 Fund. of Community Practice & Involvement
x
HUS 229 Models of Addiction
x
HUS 232 Crisis Counseling
HUS 233 Sexual Abuse and Trauma (Delayed View)
x
HUS 236 Foundations of Vocational Rehabilitation
x
HUS 261 Early Childhood Curriculum (Delayed View)
HUS 263 Family Interactions
HUS 305 Group Process
x
HUS 308 Assessment and Planning
HUS 318 Adolescence, Substance Abuse & Criminality
x
HUS 326 Chemical Dependency Counseling
x
HUS 328 Creative Development and Art for Young Children
HUS 329 Science and the Project Approach for the Young Child
HUS 330 Interviewing and Counseling
x
HUS 331 Substance Abuse Counseling for Special Populations
HUS 332 Addiction and the Family
HUS 345 Problems and Interventions in Childhood
x
HUS 349 Supervision in Human Services
HUS 350 Mental Health and Aging
HUS 352 Interventions for Families with Children
x
HUS 354 Behavioral Health Professional (BHP)
HUS 362 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood
HUS 364 Human Rights Violation: Torture and Trauma
HUS 416 Applied Professional Ethics for Human Services
HUS 436 Counseling Co-Occurring Mental Disorders & Addiction
HUS 460 Pre-Internship Seminar
HUS 461 Internship in Mental Health and Human Services
HUS 462 Capstone Internship Mental Health/Human Services
HUS 463 Capstone Internship Mental Health/Human Services
ILS 100 Introduction to Libraries and Library Careers
ILS 101 Foundations of Information and Library Science
ILS 109 Information Literacy
ILS 150 Introduction to Reference Services and Materials
ILS 175 Cataloging and Technical Processes
ILS 201 Library Services to Teens
ILS 202 Library Materials and Services for Children
ILS 250 Collection Development
ILS 299 Library Assistant Practicum and Capstone
ILS 312 Introduction to Archives and Manuscripts
ILS 325 Digital Library Technology and Services
ILS 350 Advanced Reference Services and Materials
ILS 441 Info. Brokering & Entrepreneurial Options for
Library/Media Professionals
ILS 499 Senior Capstone Internship or Advanced Research
x
ISS 210 Introduction to Information Systems Security
ISS 340 Computer Security
x
ISS 360 Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery
ISS 410 Cyber Security I
x
ISS 452 Security Strategies Web Applications & Social Networking
ISS 470 Information Systems Security Management
NURSING
x
x
November 7, 2014
PHILOS.
x
x
x
FRENCH
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
HONORS
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
HISTORY
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
HUMANITIES
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
MENTAL HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
LIBRARY SCIENCE
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Ce
nte
rs
On
l
De ine/
Vielayed
w
x
x
Ba
ng
or
Au
gu
sta
BUA 252 Business Ethics
BUA 259W Strategic Managemt for Small Business
BUA 286 Topics in Business: QuickBooks
BUA 303 Management Information System
BUA 315 Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
BUA 345 Cost Management I
BUA 355 Introduction to Operations Research
BUA 357 Business Finance
BUA 362 Labor-Management Relations
BUA 365 Organizational Behavior
BUA 376 Advanced Taxation
BUA 387 Fraud Examination
BUA 420 International Business
BUA 448 Auditing, Assurance, & Consulting Services
BUA 458 Acct. Seminar
BUA 459 Seminar in Strategy and Policy Planning
CHY 105 Fund. of Chemistry
CHY 106 Fund. of Chemistry LAB
CHY 108 Allied Health Chemistry
CHY 108 Allied Health Chemistry LAB
CHY 116 General Chemistry II
CHY 116 General Chemistry II LAB
CIS 100 Introduction to Computing
CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Science
CIS 131 Web Applications and Development
CIS 135 Intro. to Info. Systems and Applications Development
CIS 212 Introduction to Visual Basic Programming
CIS 221 Operating Systems: UNIX
CIS 225 Introduction to Health Informatics
CIS 240 Networking Concepts
CIS 241 Network Administration
CIS 243 Web Applications Programming: XML
CIS 280 Internship
CIS 303 Management Information Systems
CIS 312 Advanced Visual Basic Programming
CIS 314 Advanced Java Programming
CIS 340 Advanced Networking
CIS 351 Database Management Systems: Oracle
CIS 352 Data Visualization
CIS 354 Algorithms and Data Structures
CIS 380 Internship
CIS 438 Electronic Commerce
CIS 460 Computers and Culture
CIS 470 Project Management
CIS 475 Advanced Health Informatics
CIS 480 Internship
COL 100 Introduction to the College Experience
COL 214 Professionalism in the Workplace
COM 101 Public Speaking
COM 102 Interpersonal Communications
COM 104 Communication in Groups and Organizations
DEA 152 Dental Office Management
DEA 154 Biodental Sciences II
DEA 250 Clinical Practice
DEA 251 Clinical Dental Assisting Theory
DEA 251 Clinical Dental Assisting Theory LAB
DEA 253 Dental Health Education
DEH 250 Clinical Dental Hygiene I LAB
DEH 251 Clinical Dental Hygiene Theory I
DEH 252 Oral Pathology
DEH 254 Nutrition in Oral Health
DEH 255 Oral Health Considerations for Target Populations
DEH 302 Pharmacology
DEH 350 Clinical Dental Hygiene III
DEH 351 Dental Hygiene Theory III
DEH 352 Dental Specialties
DEH 353 Community Dentistry II
DEH 354 Ethics and Jurisprudence
DRA 101 Introduction to Theatre
DRA 151 Play Production
DRA 251 Introduction to Acting
DRA 280 Introduction to Films
DRA 330 Dramatic Literature: Plays and Politics
DRA 389 Topics in Film and Theatre
ECO 100 Introduction to Economics
ECO 201 Macroeconomics
ECO 202 Microeconomics
EDU 250 Foundations of Education
EDU 261 Early Childhood Curriculum
EDU 328 Creative Development and Art for Young Children
EDU 329 Science & the Project Approach for the Young Child
EDU 352 Interventions for Families with Children
EDU 366 Children and Young Adult Literature
EDU 380 Literacy and Technology Across the Curriculum
EDU 387 Teaching the Exceptional Child in Regular Classroom
EDU 390A Methods of Teaching Art (K-12)
EDU 390B Methods of Teaching English (7-12)
EDU 390C Methods of Teaching Life Science (7-12)
EDU 390D Methods of Teaching Physical Science (7-12)
EDU 390F Methods of Teaching Mathematics (7-12)
EDU 390G Methods of Teaching Social Studies (7-12)
EDU 401 Educational Psychology
EDU 490A Internship in Teach Art (K-12)
EDU 490B Internship: Student Teaching English (7-12)
EDU 490C Internship: Student Teaching Life Science (7-12)
EDU 490D Internship: Student Teaching Physical Science (7-12)
EDU 490F Internship: Student Teaching Social Studies (7-12)
EDU 490G Internship: Student Teaching Mathematics (7-12)
Course Number and Description
SECURITY
EDUCATION
ECON
DRAMA
DENTAL HEALTH AND HYGIENE
COMMUN.
COMPUTER INFORMATION
CHEMISTRY
BUSINESS
Course Number and Description
Courier
www.centralmainetoday.com
Au
g
The Country
Page 14
Page 15
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
WOM/GEND.
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Ce
n
or
sta
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
ng
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Ba
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
PHY 116 General Physics II
PHY 116 General Physics II LAB
POS 101 American Government
POS 223 Principles of Management
POS 234 American State and Local Government
POS 354 Public Budgeting & Financial Admin.
POS 362 Labor-Management Relations
POS 365 Organizational Behavior
POS 383 Survey of Constitutional Law
POS 488 Public Program Evaluation
PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology
PSY 229 Models of Addiction
PSY 302 Psychology of Childhood
PSY 304 Psychology of Adolescence
PSY 308 Human Development
PSY 345 Problems and Interventions in Childhood
PSY 362 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood
PSY 364 Psychology of Men and Boys
PSY 400 Abnormal Psychology
PSY 401 Educational Psychology
PSY 415 Cross-Cultural Psychology
REA 8 Reading for Understanding
REL 205 Religion and American Culture (Blended)
SCI 110 Environmental Science
SCI 110 Environmental Science LAB
SCI 150 Human Ecology and the Future
SCI 210 Introduction to Marine Science
SCI 210 Introduction to Marine Science LAB
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 201 Social Problems
SOC 311 Social Theory
SOC 360 Sociology of the Family
SOC 370 Sociology of Culture
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II
SSC 110 Introduction to Human Sexuality
SSC 205 Religion and American Culture (Blended)
SSC 317 Leadership Seminar
SSC 318 Adolescence, Substance Abuse & Criminality
SSC 319 Social Gerontology
SSC 332 Addiction and the Family
SSC 364 Human Rights Violation: Torture and Trauma
SSC 420 Social Science Senior Projects
VTE 100 Introduction to Veterinary Technology
VTE 123 Clinical Laboratory Methods
VTE 123L Clinical Laboratory Methods LAB
VTE 128 Radiology
VTE 128L Radiology LAB
VTE 223 Pharmacology
VTE 224 Surgical Nursing and Anesthesiology I
VTE 224L Surgical Nursing and Anesthesiology I LAB
VTE 230 Practicum in Veterinary Technology
VTE 324 Advanced Veterinary Surgery and Anesthesia I
WGS 101W Intro to Women's Studies
WGS 389 Girls on Fire: Gender, Culture and Justice in YA Dys
gu
x
x
POLITICAL SCI.
x
PSYCHOLOGY
x
SCIENCE
x
SOCIOLOGY
x
Course Number and Description
SOCIAL SCIENCE
x
x
VET. TECH.
x
JUS 105 Legal Research and Materials
JUS 121 Criminal Law
JUS 123 Contemporary Corrections
JUS 160 Intro to Forensic Science
JUS 200 Principles of Investigation
JUS 218 Estate Administration
JUS 223 Principles of Management
JUS 250 Consumer Fraud and White Collar Crime
JUS 271 Due Process in Criminal Justice
JUS 296W Professional Responsibility
JUS 302 Juvenile Justice
JUS 307 Violence in the Family
JUS 341 Law of Criminal Evidence
JUS 363 Comparative International Justice Issues
JUS 364 Human Rights Violation: Torture and Trauma
JUS 375 Counter-Terrorism
JUS 390 Advocacy and Public Policy
JUS 392 Hate Crimes
JUS 488 Senior Seminar and Capstone Experience
JUS 489 Topics in Justice Studies: Restorative Justice
MAT 9 Foundations of Mathematics
MAT 20 Algebra I (Part I)
MAT 21 Algebra I (Part II)
MAT 30 Algebra I
MAT 100 Mathematics and Its Applications
MAT 111 Algebra II
MAT 112 College Algebra
MAT 113 Math for Business And Economics I
MAT 114 Math for Business & Economics II
MAT 115 Elementary Statistics I
MAT 124 Pre-Calculus
MAT 131 Math for Elementary Teachers II
MAT 261 Applied Linear Algebra
MAT 315 Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
MAT 355 Operations Research
MLT 395 Hospital Practicum
MUH 104 Classic-Era Music: Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven
MUH 110 Popular Music
MUH 118 Golden Age of Country Music 1950-1970
MUH 123 Understanding Music
MUH 124 Music of the Twentieth Century
MUH 160 World Music
MUH 190 Women in Western Music
MUS 100 Recital Lab
MUS 102 Music Theory and Practice II
MUS 115A Basic Applied Music: Sec
MUS 115B Applied Music: Secondary
MUS 122 Fundamentals of Music
MUS 122N Fund of Music(Non-Major)
MUS 125 The Songwriters Toolkit: Melody, Harmony and Form
MUS 151 First Year/Sophomore Ensemble Sequence
MUS 151N Freshman Ensemble I for Non-Majors
MUS 152 First Year/Sophomore Ensemble Sequence
MUS 152N Freshman Ensemble II
MUS 182 Piano Lab II
MUS 204 Music Theory and Practice IV
MUS 222 Arranging II
MUS 253 First Year/Sophomore Ensemble Sequence
MUS 253N Sophomore Ensemble Sequence for Non-majors
MUS 254 Sophomore Ensemble Sequence
MUS 254N Sophomore Ensemble Sequence for Non-majors
MUS 262 Woodwind Techniques
MUS 263 Brass Techniques
MUS 264 String Techniques
MUS 265 Percussion Techniques
MUS 266 Vocal Techniques
MUS 270 Music Business LAB
MUS 271 Sonic Arts I: Digital Music Systems
MUS 315 Transcription
MUS 324 Composition II
MUS 355 Junior Ensemble Sequence
MUS 356 Junior Ensemble Sequence II
MUS 361 Music Pedagogy
MUS 362 Music Methods
MUS 457 Senior Ensemble Sequence I
MUS 458 Senior Ensemble Sequence II
MUS 463 Studio Teaching Lab
MUS 471 Music Business
NUR 102 Nursing Care of the Adult Client I
NUR 202L Promoting Health Lab LAB
NUR 204 Nursing Care of the Adult Client II
NUR 205 Nursing Care of the Adult Client III
NUR 225 Introduction to Health Informatics
NUR 230 Promoting Health, Wellness, & Ethical Nursing Practice
NUR 301 Health Assessment Throughout the Lifespan
NUR 302 Pharmacology for Nurses
NUR 304 Concepts of Professional Nursing Practice
NUR 326 Caring for Aging Adults
NUR 352 Nursing Research (Blended)
NUR 356 Community and Global Health Clinical
NUR 389 Topics Nursing: Thanatology for Nurses
NUR 499W Senior Seminar
PHI 250 Ethics
PHI 252 Business Ethics
PHI 370 East Asian Philosophy
Au
rs
On
l
De ine/
l
Vie aye
w d
nte
Ce
ng
or
sta
gu
Ba
JUSTICE STUDIES
MATH
MED LAB
JAZZ AND CONTEMPORARY MUSIC & MUSIC HISTORY
NURSING
PHILOS.
Au
De /
Vie layed
w
Course Number and Description
Courier
www.centralmainetoday.com
ter
s
On
line
De /
Vie layed
w
The Country
November 7, 2014
x
x
x
x
x
x
GO TO: www.uma.edu/courseguide
TO FIND DETAILED
COURSE INFORMATION
Stay Close. Go Far.
The Country
Page 16
Courier
November 7, 2014
www.centralmainetoday.com
The Healthy Geezer
By: Fred Cecitti
Q. Do people who are
color blind see everything in black and white?
“Color blindness” is
the common term used
to describe color vision
deficiency. The term is
misleading, because total
color blindness that turns
the world into shades of
gray is rare.
The most common type
of color blindness makes
it difficult for people to
discriminate
between
red and green. The next
most common form of
the deficiency affects the
perception of blues and
yellows. Those with blueyellow blindness almost
always have red-green
blindness, too.
Many people with color
blindness don’t know they
have it. For example, they
are taught at an early age
that grass is green. They
look at lawns and see yellow grass. Subsequently,
if you ask them what color the grass is, they will
tell you it’s green.
(Please don’t ask me
how they handle shopping for bananas.)
Color blindness affects
about ten percent of men,
but only one percent of
women. Most people with
color blindness inherited
it. There is no treatment
to correct inherited color blindness. However,
there are specially tinted
eyeglasses that can help
people with deficiencies
to discriminate between
colors.
Another cause of color
blindness is simple aging,
which gradually diminishes our ability to see
colors.
Diseases can affect your
color vision, too. Usually,
diseases affect the perception of blue and yellow. Some conditions that
can cause color blindness
are diabetes, glaucoma,
cataracts, macular degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease,
leukemia and sickle cell
anemia.
Some drugs can alter
color perception, too.
These include drugs for
heart problems, high
blood pressure, rheumatoid arthritis, nervous
disorders and psychological problems.
Exposure to certain
chemicals can cause color
blindness. These include
carbon disulfide, fertilizers, styrene and mercury.
The eye is like a camera. There’s a lens in the
front that focuses images
on the retina in the back.
The retina contains nerve
cells that react to light
and transmit information to your brain. If the
cells responsible for color
don’t work properly, you
suffer from color blindness.
If you think you are
having a color-vision
problem, see an eye doctor. You’ll be asked to
look at a book containing several multicolored
dot patterns. If you have
a color vision deficiency,
you won’t be able to pick
out numbers and shapes
from within the dot patterns.
If you would like to ask
a question, write to fred@
healthygeezer.com. n
Donations Sought for Christmas Boxes
The
Cottrell-Taylor
Christmas Basket Fund
was established about 45
years ago in memory of
Henry L. Cottrell, a Monmouth principal and later,
Robert Taylor, a teacher.
Its purpose is to provide
Christmas dinners and
gifts for families in Mon-
mouth who are in need
during the holiday season.
The Committee is hard
at work and is accepting
donations for these families. We realize times continue to be difficult for all,
so we think it is important
to remember the children.
We were able to help 67
familes (128 children),
and 3 elderly couples
through your generous
contributions last year.
Your consideration is appreciated.
In addition to money we
are accepting new clothing, mittens, hats, gloves,
games, puzzles, school
supplies, and books for
kids of all ages which can
be left at one of the Monmouth Schools. If you
choose to donate money, a
check can be written to the
Cottrell-Taylor Christmas
Basket Fund. If possible
the committee would like
contributions on or before
December 3rd, but will
gratefully accept them at
a later date. The monetary
donations may be mailed
to: Laurie Gifford, P.O.
Box 218, Monmouth ME
02459.n
BUSH HOGGING,
Rototilling, Custom Sawing with the
Saw Mill. Have mill, will travel!
Hardwood & Softwood Slabs Available.
Now Selling Grade Stakes!
Low Rates!
Call Jim 215-5521
P.O. Box 303 • 32 Park Street
Livermore Falls, ME 04254
897-5367
Bruce Adams
Maureen Adams
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, CAMPS
AND REMOTE LOCATIONS.
Kid’s Camp Learning
Center, Inc.
14 Center Bridge Rd.
225-5443
Ages 6 weeks - 12 yrs
“Ready, Set, School!”
NOW ENROLLING FOR FALL
Hurry in and see all the options we
have for your child,
CELEBRATING 15 YEARS OF CARING!
Availability in all classrooms,
we can accommodate any schedule to
meet the needs of your family.
Wound Care Specialty Services
H
ard-to-heal wounds caused by diabetes, poor circulation, or other conditions keep
many from doing the things they love. In these cases healing may need special care.
Franklin Memorial Hospital’s wound care services offer a complete review of you and
your wound, followed by a carefully designed treatment plan with some of the most
advanced treatment options available.
Physicians, along with registered nurses trained in wound care, develop your care plan
and provide treatment. Dr. Gerald Tinguely, a board-certified family medicine provider
certified in wound care, provides services along with Dr. Daniel Buck, a surgical
podiatrist, who treats patients with wounds involving the feet.
If you have a wound that isn’t getting better, contact your primary care provider to see if
wound care specialty services are right for you.
COME JOIN THE FUN!
Open 6:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Mon-Fri Heidi Naylor - Owner and Director
111 Franklin Health Commons
Farmington, Maine
779-2539 (A referral is needed to receive wound care services)
www.fchn.org
The Country
November 7, 2014
Courier
Page 17
www.centralmainetoday.com
Medicare Annual Open Enrollment
Another year is winding its way down and low
and behold, Medicare
Open Enrollment is right
around the corner. With
all the priorities we have
day to day, it is easy to
forget that there is an incredible opportunity each
year with Medicare Open
Enrollment. If you are like
the average senior here in
Maine, you are likely receiving a daily mailbox
full of advertisements trying to sway you to change
to a new Medicare Plan.
While the insurance carriers may think it’s an
easy decision to make a
change, it’s not that easy.
Doing the paperwork
for a Medicare Supplement or Medicare Advantage Plan may be a relatively easy process but
it’s not always easy to sort
through the pile of options available from year
to year. Maine has historically not had that many
options available, but in
2015 more companies
have come to the state to
offer a greater selection of
benefits, lower premiums,
and co-pays. While we
all want more options and
expanded benefits, we are
not always ready to make
the change because what
we have may already
work just fine.
Every year is the same,
you open your mailbox
or grab the stack of pamphlets and flyers off the
counter and you sit down
to sort through the mess.
Marketing
companies
spend billions to get your
attention, and a full mailbox of shiny brochures
may do just that. Some of
these flyers really stand
out, and some may not,
of course it’s not until
you read them do you see
the subtle differences that
most plans offer. Many
of those plans really are
comparable, but everyone
has a reason to be on one
plan or another.
Now that you have
sorted through the mess,
tossed out what you
thought wasn’t interesting, you have likely
found a few things that
have peaked your interest. Now what do you do?
This is the yearly task that
most seniors face and for
most of you, it’s more
than probable that you
have given up and you
just throw all that paper
you get in the mail right
in the circular file. But
hold on a minute, because
doing the status quo for
this year’s Open Enrollment may not be the best
choice and maybe, just
maybe 2015 is the year
for a change.
Here’s what you need to
know:
В·More companies available in more counties in
2015
В·Expanded
Medical
networks
В· Premium Changes
Ok, so now that you
know some of the highlights, the real question is
what those companies are
and what are the details of
those new benefits? While
it’s not appropriate to go
into details here, there
are ways to sort through
the mish mash of options
and get right to the answers. Here is a short list
of items to consider when
doing your Medicare Plan
review.
В·Premium: Does my
current premium fit my
budget? Are there other
options?
В·Co-pays: Does my
current plan offer the best
and lowest possible copays?
В· Doctor/Specialist Network: Do I have a large
network of Specialists
and doctors to choose
from?
В·Additional Benefits:
Are there any additional
benefits that a new plan
may offer?
While the list above is
not a comprehensive list,
it certainly is the best
place to start for most seniors to considering while
contemplating a change.
Now I’m sure It’s entirely possible that as you
read this you be asking
yourself; Why do I need
to change at all? Well I
submit for your consideration that to ignore the
changes in the market for
2015 may just be a lost
opportunity. If you really
feel paralyzed and fearful
that change is dangerous,
I suggest that you find an
expert to help you sort
through the piles of options and make sure that
a solid and meaningful
Open Enrollment benefits
checkup is done. There is
a dearth of competent Insurance Agents out there
that specialize in the senior market; they spend
countless hours training
to remain on top of the
newest options available.
Find a qualified agent,
and take advantage of the
changes for 2015! n
Maine Public Relations Council Accepting
2014 Scholarship Applications
October 20, 2014 –
The Maine Public Relations Council (MPRC),
the state’s professional
association of public
relations and communications practitioners,
recently announced it is
Outdoor Unit
now accepting applications for its 2014 Scholarship.
The annual scholarship
Indoor Wall Unit
Controller
It Heats. It Cools.
It Saves You Money.
Mitsubishi
M
it bi hi High
Hi h Efficiency
Effi i
DDuctless
tll Heat
H t PPumps
Puumps
Cut Your Winter Oil Bill
Slash Your Summer Air Conditioning Bill
• H2i® Technology can heat effectively down to -13°F
• Replaces your noisy, inefficient A/C window units
• Operates quietly
• Installation is fast and easy
of $1,000 is awarded to
one college freshman,
sophomore or junior attending an accredited
Maine college or university and majoring in
public relations, broadcasting, journalism, marketing, advertising or any
communications field.
In addition to a completed application, the
submission requires two
faculty references, two
faculty letters of recommendation and an essay of no more than 500
words.
Applications will be
accepted from Monday, October 20, 2014
through Friday, December 5, 2014 and must
be post-marked no later
than December 5, 2014.
MPRC will announce the
2014 scholarship winner
on Monday, December
22, 2014.
For more information and to download
the scholarship application, please visit www.
meprcouncil.org.
About the Maine Public Relations Council
Now in its 37th year,
the
approximately
300-member-strong
Maine Public Relations
Council is a professional association of Maine
public relations practitioners. MPRC is dedicated
to the professional development of its members
and a greater awareness
of the role of public relations in the world today.
It is a member of the
Universal Accreditation
Board. More information is available at www.
meprcouncil.org. n
Like Us
On
Facebook!
$500 Rebate Available From Efficiency Maine
CALL: 207-946-4444
www.independentpowermaine.com
“WE MADE AN IMPORTANT DECISION TODAY”
We decided to pre-plan our funeral arrangements. We had many
questions about pre-planning. Our funeral director answered
our questions and presented us with options: what merchandise
and services are offered, the total cost for our selected funeral
arrangements and the available payment plans. For further
information on pre-planning contact:
Finley Funeral Home
15 Church Street
Livermore Falls, 04254
897-3588
BRAGDON-FINLEY
P. O. Box 188
Monmouth, 04259
933-4444
www.п¬Ѓnleyfuneralhome.com
Trust services provided by Interment Trust Services Division/Access Financial Group, Inc.
LARGE STEAK AND
CHEESE SUB
$4.99
2-BREAST CHICKEN
DINNER $6.79
16” 2-TOPPING
FRESH DOUGH PIZZA
$10.99
s
n
a
r
e
t
e
V
r
u
Remember O
The Country
Page 18
Courier
www.centralmainetoday.com
NewsBites
November 7, 2014
Veterans Day Remembrance
Dinner & Program At Norlands
from the desk of Connie Jones...
Getting Old or Growing Old?
Similar phrases, but what a world of
difference between the two! Which are
you? – getting old or growing old?
Getting old. Just picture it. Drooping
shoulders, head hung low. “Getting old
isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.” “Things
sure aren’t like they used to be.” This
person is part of that statistic that always
KRUUL¿HV PH ± ò RI DOO HOGHUV¶ WLPH
is spent watching TV. These people
seem to be sitting on the sidelines,
just waiting for the days to go by until
they die. “Nobody wants us…I’m just
too old…” It seems that they got to a
certain point and just gave up.
Growing old. Ah-h-h. A huge
difference. This is active, we’re still
growing, becoming something new,
expanding, changing. Still not mature
or complete, we still have more to
become! I think of the trees in the fall
– that’s growing old. They don’t die
before they become a blaze of glory.
We are those leaves – still growing
towards maturity. We are not complete
yet, we are still growing. Let’s do it
ZLWK D EOD]H RI FRORU PDJQLВїFHQFH
changing ourselves and changing the
entire world around us.
These people are still learning, still
have new ideas, have new goals and
aims. They are still curious about the
world around them, want to better
understand themselves and the people
RI WKH ZRUOG 7KH\ DUH UHГЂHFWLYH
maybe spending more time listening
and watching, than expounding! This
becomes the wisdom of old age.
A very wise woman once said –
I look forward to how I will change in
5 or 10 years. This is what I think now.
I’m anxious to see how I’ll change in
the future. -- Coronetta Adams (my
mom)
Aging & Disability Resource
Center for Androscoggin,
Franklin, and Oxford counties
8 Falcon Rd.
Lewiston, ME 04240
В‡
www.seniorsplus.org
Like us on Facebook!
Looking for a nice evening out, with a delicious
heritage dinner and entertaining living history programming in a one-of-a
kind setting? The Washburn-Norlands Living History Center in Livermore,
Maine, presents a special
tribute honoring local
Civil War Veterans and
highlights life on the home
front from the perspective
of local women. This special event takes place on
Saturday, November 8th at
6:30pm. There is limited
seating available. Tickets
must be purchased in advance by November 3rd
and the cost per person is
$22.00.
A heritage dinner will be
followed by readings and
music of the Civil War in
the Ladies’ Parlor of the
1867 Washburn Family
Mansion. Enjoy a delicious dinner of stuffed
roast pork wrapped in bacon, soup, roasted root
vegetables, coleslaw, biscuits and dessert in the
historic Farmer’s Cottage
and then adjourn to the
parlor for a rare opportunity to hear readings from
Washburn and other family
letters and songs of the era
sung with piano accompaniment. Jerry Ellis will
play the original Washburn
piano.
Presented
by
Norlands’ interpretive staff
in costume, the program
is directed by Willi Irish,
Norlands’ Director of Interpretation, who portrays
“Clara Howard.” “Aunt
Clara” will share reflec-
tions about her brother,
Adney Boothby, who went
off to fight in the War.
Other appearances include
Claire Tanner as “Mary
Maud Webster Washburn,”
wife of Maine’s Civil War
Governor Israel Washburn; Jeannette McDonald
as “Julia Coolidge,” wife
Augustus Coolidge, who
owned a general store in
serves on the Auburn City
Council, makes a special
appearance as “Elizabeth
S. Kingman Horr” (18331920). Elizabeth Horr was
the wife of Dr. Oren Alonzo
Horr who was a pioneer in
the use of antiseptic dressings. Working alongside
her husband, she served as
a nurse for wounded soldiers. After the War, they
purchased in advance by
November 3, 2014. To
purchase tickets, call 8974366 or email norlands@
norlands.org. A vegetarian
dinner option is available
by request.
WE MAKE HISTORY
FUN!
The WashburnNorlands Living History
Center is a multifaceted
museum offering in-depth
moved to Lewiston and
opened a medical practice.
She graduated from medical school in 1872.
The program features all
of these historical characters conversing with each
other, reading letters, and
singing songs of the period and concludes with
a roll call remembrance
of Livermore Civil War
soldiers. Tickets must be
experiences in 19th century rural life. Our mission
is to preserve the heritage
and traditions of rural life
in Maine’s past, to celebrate the achievements
of Livermore’s Washburn
family, and to use living
history methods to make
values, activities, and issues of the past relevant to
present and future generations. n
Aunt Clara
North Livermore; Robyn
Hakala as “Caroline Washburn”, the Washburn’s
youngest daughter and
wife of Civil War Surgeon Freeland Holmes;
and Anna Keller as “Olive Fuller,” a Livermore
schoolteacher whose three
neighbors, Albert Pray,
Nathan Bartlett, and Leroy
Stevens, served in the War.
Tizz E.H.Crowley, who
For More Information
WHITNEY
BROOKSIDE HOMES
Contact Stanford Management
Call 207-562-8455
TTY: 711 Me 04221
Whitney Brook
Ln., Canton,
* One bedroom and handicap/disabled apartments*
* DESIGNED FOR YOUR NEEDS!!!! *
Must be at least 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age.
Some income guidelines apply.
Very low income households have priority.
Rental Assistance Available
At Turner Publishing
we publish 20 papers monthly,
all available
FREE ONLINE!
For More Information
Contact Stanford Management
Call 207-369-0301 TTY: 711
This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
www.turnerpublishing.net
The Country
November 7, 2014
Courier
Page 19
www.centralmainetoday.com
Stay Safe when Cleaning Gutters
Come the fall, when
trees start to shed their
leaves and winds pick up
in advance of winter, gutters can easily become
clogged with all sorts of
debris. When clogged
gutters are not cleaned
out, a host of potentially
costly issues can result,
making gutter cleaning
an essential autumn chore
no homeowner should ignore.
Fully functioning gutters direct water away
from the structure of a
home and into nearby
drainage systems. When
clogged, gutters cannot
direct that water away,
and the result is often
costly water damage to
the home’s foundation.
Water that is not directed
away may find its way into
the basement of a home,
causing issues with flooding and mold. But clogged
gutters also prevent water
from leaving a roof, possibly leading to costly
roof repairs and damage
to the roof that can put a
home’s inhabitants in danger. When snowfall accumulates on a roof, melting
snow needs to make its
way off the roof via the
gutters. If those gutters
are clogged with debris
leftover from the fall, roof
damage, including leaks,
is more likely to occur.
Clogged gutters also
make a welcome respite
for unwelcome pests,
including rodents and
insects. In the warmer
months, clogged gutters
may make an inviting
home to mosquitoes and
other pesky insects, while
rodents may seek the
warmth of clogged gutters
when temperatures dip to
near or below freezing.
Cleaning gutters is not
that complicated, and
many homeowners can
clear their gutters of debris in a typical weekend
afternoon. But the ease of
cleaning gutters should
not overshadow the safety
risks homeowners take
when climbing a ladder to
clear out their gutters. The
following are a few safety
tips for homeowners to
keep in mind when cleaning their gutters.
* Wear appropriate
clothing.
Loose-fitting
clothing should not be
worn when cleaning gutters. Such attire is a tripping hazard and can easily
compromise your balance
by catching on the gutter or ladder as you reach
to remove debris. Wear
clothing that does not
hang off of you and choose
pants that do not fall below your sneakers. Pants
that might be a little long
in the leg can catch under
your feet as you climb the
ladder, momentarily costing you your balance and
possibly leading to a fall.
When choosing footwear,
avoid old sneakers or
work boots without much
traction, opting instead for
footwear that easily grips
each rung of the ladder.
* Don’t forget safety
gear. Many people forget to wear safety gear
when cleaning their gutters. Such forgetfulness
increases your risk of injury. When cleaning gutters, always remember to
wear work gloves, which
can protect your hands
as you dig into gutters.
Should you reach into a
gutter without gloves on
and grab something sharp,
not only will you be cut
but also you may be so
startled that you lose your
balance and fall off the
ladder. In addition to work
gloves, wear a dust mask
and safety goggles when
cleaning gutters to prevent debris from getting
into your mouth and eyes.
* Work with a partner.
Cleaning gutters alone is
a recipe for potentially
devastating injury. Even
if you are not afraid of
heights, scaling a ladder
is not something to take
lightly. Ladders can be
shaky, especially on brisk
autumn afternoons when
the wind kicks up. Working with a partner when
cleaning gutters ensures
someone is below you to
hold the ladder steady in
case of a stiff wind or if
your jostling unintentionally shakes the ladder.
Working with a partner
also means someone is
there to seek help should
you fall off the ladder or
suffer another type of injury that requires medical
attention.
Home-Auto-Recreational-Business
* Use a trowel instead
of your hands. Digging
into the gutter with your
hands, even if those hands
are covered by gloves, is
an unnecessary risk that
can leave you susceptible
to injury. When cleaning
the gutters, dig out the debris with a trowel.
* Dump debris below
into a large garbage can.
When cleaning the gutter,
do not carry a bucket with
you to the top of the ladder. Carrying something
as you climb up a ladder
only increases your risk of
injury. In addition, a bucket full of debris placed at
the top of a ladder may
tip over and compromise your balance. When
dumping the debris you
dig out with your trowel,
dump it into a large garbage bin below. If you
miss the bin every now
and again, you can always
sweep up after the job is
completed.
Few homeowners look
forward to cleaning their
gutters. But such a task
is necessary to prevent
water and roof damage to
your home. When cleaning the gutters, remember
to place safety at the top
of your priority list. - Metro n
Ready for Winter?
We are!
Maybe home repairs aren’t
the most exciting thing on
your fall “to do” list, but
we can help them to go
more smoothly.
Call or stop by and п¬Ѓnd out
about our home
equity loans or lines of
credit. We’re sure you’ll
п¬Ѓnd just the right п¬Ѓt for
your budget.
Interested in improving energy efficiency? Ask about
our popular Green Lending
Program which can be
used on any home
improvement project
that helps you
“Button Up” your home.
Green Loans:
10 Snell Hill Road, Turner
225-2334
Call or stop by today!
www.besseyinsurance.com
.25% discount off current rate is available for replacement
windows, new furnace, pellet stove, energy efficient appliances, new doors, insulation or adding solar, geothermal or
wind alternative energy sources. . . . whatever you need to
improve your home’s energy efficiency. Automatic payment
arrangements could reduce your rate by 0.25% more!
Why would anyone bank anywhere else?
Toll-Free 1-800-287-0752
River Valley - Farmington - Jay - Skowhegan - Rangeley - Wilton
Page 20
The Central Maine
Medical Center Woman’s Hospital Association (WHA) is featuring
the work of a painter
and a photographer at its
Rotating Art Gallery at
CMMC.
Paintings by Joseph
Cousins and photography
by Daniel J. Marquis will
be on display in the hospital’s lobby main corridor,
near the 60 High Street
entrance, from October
30 through December 4.
The Country
Courier
November 7, 2014
www.centralmainetoday.com
CMMC Art Gallery
Cousins, who maintains
a studio gallery in Freeport, has been invited to
exhibit in many New England juried shows, including the Maine Biennial at
Bowdoin College and the
Maine Biennial at the University of Southern Maine.
His work has been shown
at The Maine Coast Artist Gallery in Rockport,
The O’Farrell Gallery in
Brunswick, The Maine Art
Gallery in Wiscasset, and
at other galleries around
the state.
The distinct style of his
paintings captures the essence of Maine’s unique
beauty and unusual moods.
His work has received
many “Best in Show”
awards in Maine and other
New England states. He
was recently awarded the
“People’s Choice Award”
for the fourth year in a row
at the Brunswick Downtown Arts Festival, as well
as one of the top prizes for
acrylic paintings at the
Clothing Alterations
Sewing SerпїЅices
Lessons
207-224-7063
[email protected]
www.kellisews.com
Located in NorпїЅh TurпїЅer
FIND THE PHONY AD!!!
You could win a Gift CertiпїЅicate to an area
merchant from one of our papers!
It is easy to пїЅind - just read through the ads in this issue of The Country Courier
and пїЅind the phony ad. Either пїЅill out the entry form below (one entry per month
please) and mail to: Find The Phony Ad Contest, P.O. Box 214 Turner, ME 04282 or
email to: [email protected] (one entry per household please)
You must include all the information requested below to be eligible to win.
Note: Turner Publishing will not lend or sell your email address to a third party.
Name:
Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
)
Email Address:
Phone: (
Would you like to receive email notiпїЅication of local sales and specials___Y___N
Please tell us your age (circle one) 12-25 yrs. 26-35 yrs. 36-45 yrs. 46-55 yrs. 56 yrs. & up
The Phony Ad is:
Tell us what you think of this publication:
Londonderry, N.H., Annual Art Show. His work
is included in corporate
and private collections
around the world.
Marquis’s
photographic work has been
published in Nature
Photographer Magazine
and featured at Lyceum
Gallery in Lewiston. He
participates regularly in
landscape photography
workshops.
“My interest in photography was sparked by
my love of nature and the
outdoors,” Marquis says.
“I have been an avid bird
watcher and kayaker for
some 20 years. Both of
these pursuits afford me
many photo opportunities.”
“My favorite types of
photography are birds,
nature close-ups, landscapes and cityscapes .
. . opposite ends of the
photographic spectrum,”
he adds. “Landscape photography allows me to
show the grand picture,
the scenes that people
pass daily, but may not
see. With my close-up
images I try to illustrate
the patterns and colors
that nature offers to those
who are willing to take
the time to look for.”
The artwork on display may be purchased
through the WHA Gift
Shop, located adjacent
to the Main Lobby at
CMMC. A percentage
of sale proceeds benefit
CMMC. n
CASTONGUAY MEATS
FULL SERVICE CUSTOM SLAUHTERING
BEEF, PORK AND SHEEP
NOVEMBER FREEZER SPECIAL
“Fill’er Up”
•3-4lb. Pork Roast
•3lbs. Country Ribs
•3lbs. Bacon
•3lbs. Sausage
•4lbs. Rib-Eye Steak
•4lbs.
•5lbs.
•5lbs.
•2lbs.
Sirloin Strip Steak
Chicken Breast
Gr. Beef
Wheel Cheese
$165
234 Gibbs Mill Rd., Livermore
1-800-310-4989 • 207-897-4989
Now accepting food stamps.
We have October
Contest Winners!
FIND THE PHONY AD!
Congratulations!
All of the winners listed have won gift
certificates to one of our advertisers.
If you haven’t won - keep playing!
We get hundreds of entries each month!
It’s easy to enter - read through the ads in this
issue and find the phony ad, fill out the entry
form found in this paper and mail it in. If you
have the correct answer, your name will be
entered into a monthly drawing!
Connie Berry Minot
Eliane McLeod Bridgton
Christy Desjardins Lisbon Falls
Peter Sirois Madison
Judy Carleton Augusta
Debra J. Perry Bethel
June Leighton Mount Vernon
Anna Donahue Harrison
Phyllis Dow Auburn
Sandra Choate Farmingdale
Patrick Herbert Jay
Kimberly Long Lewiston
Desiree Thompson Waterville
Ian Fournier Livermore Falls
The Country
November 7, 2014
Teens To Trails (T3) is
pleased to announce this
year’s Outing Club grant
recipients from 16 high
schools across the state.
Grant awards were made to:
Ashland
District
School, Bangor High
School, Boothbay Region High School, Brunswick High School, Bucksport High School, Cape
Elizabeth High School,
Cheverus High School,
Cony High School,
Ellsworth High School,
Gorham High School,
Greely High School,
John Bapst Memorial
High School, Monmouth
Getting to and from
medical treatments is one
of the greatest concerns
cancer patients face during treatment. To ensure patients get to those
much-needed treatments,
the American Cancer Society provides free rides
through its Road To RecoveryВ® program.
The Society is currently looking for volunteer
drivers in Maine so that
all patients have transportation when they need
it. An estimated 9,270
Maine residents will learn
that they have cancer this
Courier
Page 21
www.centralmainetoday.com
Teens To Trails Announces Grants
Academy, Skowhegan
High School, Wiscasset
High School, Yarmouth
High School.
“High school Outing
Clubs are the most effective way we have found
for engaging teens in
their natural world, with
the potential to make
fun safe outdoor experiences accessible to every Maine student,”said
Carol Leone, Teens To
Trails Founder. These
schools were awarded
support funds totaling almost $7,000 from Teens
To Trails to help more
teens get active outside.
These grants were made
possible by ongoing support from L.L.Bean and
individual donors.
Since the inception
of the Grants-to-Clubs
Program in 2008, T3
has awarded 93 grants
in support of Maine high
school Outing Club programs (totally close to
$45,000) thanks to the
support of Maine businesses and foundations
as well as many heartfelt
personal donations.
This year, assistance
with transportation costs
helped to eliminate
one huge hurdle these
schools face in getting
their students outdoors.
In addition, these grants
allowed Outing Clubs to
purchase needed outdoor
gear & clothing, obtain
safety training for leaders, cover recreational
fees, and ensure trips
are accessible to all students regardless of their
financial situation. Megan Stanley (Ashland
District School Outing
Club Advisor) summed
it all up when she wrote
“Thank you for awarding this grant to the
Ashland District School
Outing Club. In a small
school, this means many
of our kids will get to
participate without worrying about the cost.”
Along with introducing many teenagers to
the outdoors for the first
time, Teens To Trails is
thrilled to be able to give
a boost to these amazing individuals who see
the "tremendous value of
healthy physical activity" in helping "to keep
kids happy and healthy
and on-track in school"
while also "promoting
good social skills with
peers and adults" as Wiscasset High School Prin-
Volunteer Drivers Needed
year; however getting to
their scheduled treatment
may be a challenge.
“One cancer patient requiring radiation therapy
could need anywhere
from 20 to 30 trips to
treatment in six weeks,”
said Elisa Madore, Mission Delivery Specialist
for the American Cancer Society. “A patient
receiving chemotherapy
might report for treatment
weekly for up to a year. In
many cases, a patient is
driven to hospitals or clinics by relatives or friends,
but even these patients
must occasionally seek
alternative transportation.
That’s where the Road To
Recovery program comes
in.”
“The program not only
helps patients, but is also
rewarding for the volunteer. Several of our drivers have volunteered for
a number of years,” added
Madore.
For additional information about the Road
To Recovery program or
to volunteer, call 1-800ACS-2345 or visit cancer.
org.
About the American
NO MORE DIETS!
Cancer Society.
The American Cancer
Society is a global grassroots force of more than
three million volunteers
saving lives and fighting
for every birthday threatened by every cancer in
every community. As the
largest voluntary health
organization, the Society’s efforts have contributed to a 20 percent de-
cline in cancer death rates
in the U.S. since 1991,
and a 50 percent drop in
smoking rates. Thanks in
part to our progress nearly 14 million Americans
who have had cancer and
countless more who have
avoided it will celebrate
more birthdays this year.
We’re finding cures as the
nation’s largest private,
not-for-profit investor in
cipal Cheri Towle wrote
in support of the efforts
of the Wiscasset Outing
Club.
With increasing research confirming that
positive outdoor experiences are critical to the
overall health and well
being of young people,
these Outing Clubs need
to be encouraged and
supported. “It is our
goal to establish an Outing Club in every one of
Maine’s high schools,”
said Leone. “The Grantsto-Clubs program helps
Outing Clubs get started
and stay active.” n
cancer research, ensuring
people facing cancer have
the help they need and
continuing the fight for
access to quality health
care, lifesaving screenings, clean air, and more.
For more information,
to get help, or to join the
fight, call us anytime, day
or night, at 1-800-2272345 or visit cancer.org/
fight. n
Do You Sudoku
Answer on page 22
LOSE UP TO 10 POUNDS
AND 11 INCHES IN JUST 4
WEEKS!!! ONE LADY DID
WITH OUR COMBINATION OF
EXERCISE AND NUTRITION!!!
GIVE US A CALL OR
COME TO THE GYM TO
CHECK OUT OUR NEW
NUTRITION PROGRAM!
1 year
membershi
p
Only $24 95
per month
Portable Toilet Rentals
Nickerson’s
Septic Service
778-1495
Roy and Randall Nickerson
225-3105 • Turner, ME
The Country
Page 22
Courier
November 7, 2014
www.centralmainetoday.com
Pet Raccoon
Retired Maine Game Warden John Ford Sr., left, and
retired Maine State Trooper
Mark Nickerson are on tour
in the great state of Maine
in response to repeated requests for their “Blue Lights
and Funny Cider” Seminar.
They are coming to
USM’s Lewiston Auburn
Senior College campus on
Friday, November 14 at the
popular Food for Thought
11:30 luncheon. The public
is cordially invited to join us.
John Ford Sr., a native
Mainer, comes from a long
line of Maine Game Wardens. His mother rehabilitated wildlife and rescued
Susie and raised her to full
grown as depicted in the picture. (The coon will not be
on tour.)
John was sworn into the
Maine Warden Service shortly
after finishing up a four-year
stint in the U.S. Air Force. He
spent his 20 year warden career in Waldo County. Upon
his retirement in 1990, he was
elected as county sheriff and
re-elected in 1994.
John has written a local
newspaper column and is
a regular contributor to the
Northwoods Sporting Journal and has two books under
his belt, “Suddenly The Cider Didn’t Taste So Good”
and “The Cider Still Tastes
Funny.” He also is an artist
known for his wildlife artwork. He lives with his wife
in Brooks, Maine.
Mark Nickerson originally studied to become a
dentist, but the lure of police work was enticing so he
followed in the footsteps of
his father, Millard E. Nickerson, who was Director of
the Bureau of Criminal Investigations of the Maine
State Police. Mark joined
the Maine State Police in
1977, graduating that year
from the 34th Maine Criminal Justice Academy.
He first served in Troop
C- Skowhegan and later in
Troop D-Thomaston during
his 28-year career with the
Maine State Police. After
retiring, Mark wrote columns about police work for
“The Citizen” in Belfast and
later for the “Knox County
Republican.” His stories
were later compiled into his
book “Blue Lights in the
Night.”
Ford and Nickerson regale audiences in Maine and
beyond with their hilarious
stories of law enforcement
Sudoku Puzzle Answer
Puzzle on page 21
“back in the day” based on
stories from their best-selling books. They have taken
their show on the road and
are on Tour throughout the
Great State of Maine and
leaving the folks behind
rolling inthe aisles!
Senior College, now in
its 17th year, presents the
monthly 11:30 luncheon
program in the Function
Room 170 at USM LAC.
The Publicis always welcome.
The cost, which includes
lunch, is $7 with advance
reservation or $8 at the
door. Reservations must be
made by noon on Thursday,
November 13, by calling
753-6510. Any late callers
will be considered “at the
door.”n
Crossword Puzzle Answer
Puzzle on page 17
Make plans to Attend the th Annual
Saturday, November Nd
10AM - 8PM
Sunday, November 2RD
10AM - 5PM
Friday, November 2th
10AM - 8PM
3ATURDAY.OVEMBERTH
10AM - 5PM
Monday, November 2th
10AM - 8PM 3ENIOR$AY
Tuesday, November 2th
!-0Wednesday, November 2th
!-0-
'RQ
WPLV
V
.LFN WKH2IILF
R
+ROLG IIWRWKH LDO
D
LQ'R \6HDVR
Q
ZQWR
ZQ/ $
I Can Help!
Over 20 years experience treating
soft tissue injury and pain
Excellent References
KENNETH W. RICHARDS, B.S., L.M.T.
OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES • SPORTS INJURIES
CHRONIC & ACUTE PAIN
Neuromuscular Massage Therapy
Over 35,000 treatments! “Specializing in Pain Relief”
783-3393
637 Minot Avenue
Auburn
Licensed Massage Therapist
778-4990
236 Broadway
Farmington
Now Available
1250 sq/ft commercial or retail.
For more infor mation
225-3737
GOOD RT. 4 LOCATION WITH
PLENTY OF PARKING & HIGH VISIBILITY
November 7, 2014
Alyson’s Salon Goes Pink
with Cuts for the Cure
From October 21st to
October 24th, Alyson’s Salon n Spa in Turner hosted
Cuts for the Cure. Owner
and stylist Alyson Bragg
and stylist Cortney Collette donated $5 from every men’s, women’s, and
children’s haircuts to a local non profit breast cancer research organization.
October was breast cancer
awareness month all over
the country and Alyson
and Cortney wanted to take
part with their own original
fundraiser. Alyson’s Salon
n Spa is located at 1520
Auburn Road (Route 4) in
Turner. You can find them
on facebook or contact
them at 225-2346. n
Jake Lord Play It
Safe Alumni
3rd Annual Jake Lord
Play It Safe Alumni Basketball Game.
The 3rd Annual JLPISF
Alumni Basketball Games
will be played on Friday,
November 28, 2014 at the
Spruce Mountain High
School North Campus
Gym.
There will be three
games this year.
5:00pm - SMHS Boys
Alumni
vs.
Current
SMHS Boys
6:30pm - Girls Alumni
vs. Current SMHS Girls
8:00pm - Jay vs. LF
Alumni (We have to bring
the rivalry back for a
night!)
If you would like to
make a donation please
send me a message or
contact me at [email protected]
or 207-931-9606. Donors
will be all be recognized
for their generosity at the
event.
If you would like to
play, please contact Chris
Bessey.
It’s guaranteed to be a
fun and exciting evening
of basketball, good food
and great raffle items!
The Jake Lord Play it
Safe foundation is about
high quality sports equipment, concussion awareness and screening programs, and promoting
policies that protect youth
athletes.
S
The mission of the Jake
Lord Play It Safe Foundation is to promote safety
in youth sports, to increase public awareness
of the impact of concussions on the mental health
of athletes and to promote
public policies that will
protect youth from the
devastating consequences
of head injuries.
The Jake Lord Play It
Safe Foundation raises
funds to purchase high
quality sports equipment
that will help diminish the
likelihood of concussions
and permanent or longterm injuries to young athletes. The money is being
used to help high schools
purchase better sports
equipment. The long term
goal is to provide helmets
throughout the state, and
perhaps in other states. In
addition, the Foundation
engages in public awareness activities to increase
public understanding of
the danger of head injuries to young athletes, and
also promotes statutory
and regulatory changes
at the state level to better
protect youth who engage
in school or town sports
programs.
For more information or
to help support the cause
please send a message to:
playitsafefoundation@
gmail.com. n
The Country
Courier
Page 23
www.centralmainetoday.com
Magical, Mystical Moments
(Is that you God?)
I stopped writing “to-do”
lists many years ago when I
found myself getting frustrated that the list was longer than
the day. Never able to get all
of my list accomplished was
causing me to be angry, so I
simply stopped writing lists.
What gets done, gets done, everything else will still be there
tomorrow. It is a fairly good
philosophy, but I still find that I
keep a list in my head and subconsciously check off things as
they are finished.
Some days I wake up and
feel like I will never get to do
the things I want to do, because I am always trying to do
the things I am supposed to do.
Occasionally, I wake up exhausted from doing too much
the previous day, yet when
I look at what I did, nothing
has been checked off from my
list (the one that I don’t write
down anymore). It’s like running on a treadmill, you exercise your body but you don’t
get anywhere. Running around
and doing things, yet feeling
like nothing got done.
Then I look a little bit clos-
er at what I did accomplish. I
met some people who needed
a sympathetic ear to listen, so I
listened. I was thinking about a
friend I haven’t heard from in a
long while, so I sent an e-mail.
I baked my husband’s favorite
cookies and got to see his eyes
light up like a little boy. I wrote
a sympathy card and a note to
a close family friend who had
lost a loved one. When I think
about it, I am so glad I stopped
writing lists.
Sharon Workman serves the
Hebron Community Baptist
Church.
It’s Your Health.
It’s Your Choice.
Norris K. Lee,
Otolaryngology M.D.
ley, M.D.
Charles E. Foy
er
rg
Su
tic
t
as
Pl
Robe
rt S. War
Otolaryngolog ner, D.O.
Treating your cancer near
ne home.
y
Bringing a world-class team to you..
ve to.
to
Going the distance so you don’t have
U N I Q U E S E RV I C E S A N D S U P P O RT
• Integrated multidisciplinary treatment team
for head and neck cancer patients
• The Arbor House & The Patrick Dempsey
Center for Cancer Hope and Healing –
exceptional support services and concern
for each person’s cancer journey
T E A M E XC E LLE N C E
• Plastic surgeon Charles Foley, M.D., performs
free tissue transfer procedures, a process in
which skin, muscle, bone, or a combination is
taken from one area of a patient’ s body to
reconstruct another. These techniques have
revolutionized the field of head and neck
reconstruction
• Ear, nose and throat specialists Norris Lee, M.D,
and Robert Warner, D.O., are skilled head and
neck surgeons with advanced training and
combined experience of almost 50 years
• Connection to Top Cancer Center - collaboration
with Massachusetts
General Hospital
Cancer Center
provides streamlined access to world-renowned
cancer program: patients referred from CMMC
are often seen within 24 hours, with follow-up
care delivered near home. Massachusetts
General genetics counseling provided in
Lewiston
• Other cancer services at CMMC include both
medical oncology and radiation therapy
TEVAN
R
U
T
T
PLUMBING
Fully Licensed & Insured
Quality Plumbing & Affordable Prices
480 Ryerson Hill Rd., South Paris • 595-5456
Kevin Sturtevant ~ Master Plumber
It’s your choice. It’s all here. CMMC.
www.cmmc.org/choice
The Country
Page 24
Courier
November 7, 2014
www.centralmainetoday.com
RECIPE OF THE MONTH
Cinnamon Cider Jelly
Camic - Armstrong
Measure sugar and set aside. Measure cider
and cinnamon candies in a stainless steel or
enamel pan, non aluminum. (I use a Dutch
oven as it needs to be large). Stir in Sure Jell
and mix well. Bring to a hard boil and add
sugar stirring constantly. Bring to hard boil
again (doesn’t stop boiling) and boil two
minutes. You may add ВЅ tsp. of butter to decrease foam. Pour quickly into hot sterilized
jars, cover with lids and screw tops.
Ingredients:
• 4½ cups sugar
• 4 cups fresh cider
• 2 tablespoons of
red cinnamon
candies
• 1 package of Sure
Jell Pectin
This is a rosy red jelly, delicious on toast, muiffins etc. - Enjoy!
Recipe submitted by Elaine Potter from Mechanic Falls
Christmas Bake Sale
Tommy’s Feral Felines
will hold its annual
Christmas Bake Sale on
Saturday and Sunday,
December 20 and 21
from 9 am to 5 pm at
Sports Trader located
at 707 Main Street in
Lewiston which is next
to Cumberland Farms
and across from Burger
King Due to a lack of an
available indoor venue the
event will take place in a
tent in the Sports Trader
parking lot.
In addition to a wide
variety of delicious treats,
coffee and hot chocolate
will be served. There
will also be a 50-50 raffle
along with other prizes.
Tommy’s Feral Felines
is a volunteer, no kill
organization
which
receives
no
official
funding and relies solely
on donations and the
results of its bake sales
and yard sales to keep
going. Tommy’s strives
to support abandoned cats
that live a feral existence
as a result of human
abandonment.
Volunteers build and
maintain outdoor shelters
to help protect the cats
through all kinds of
weather. Not only do they
bring food and water for
the cats but they stay with
them while they feed so
they can eat free of fear
from predators. The paths
to these shelters must be
cleared after each snowfall
or heavy rain. Some of the
shelters are hundreds of
feet into the woods one
shelter is a mile in.
Tommy’s also provides
spaying and neutering,
vaccinations and medical
care for sick and injured
animals. While some
cats come from too many
generations of feral living
to be domesticated, for
the ones who can be,
Tommy’s provides foster
care and rehabilitation,
with the goal of eventual
adoption.
Because this is a
popular two day event we
can use as many baked
goods as possible and
we are always looking
for bakers to add to our
roster. So many of us bake
during the holiday season
anyway so why not turn
out an extra dozen cookies
or whatever your specialty
is and donate it to an
organization that really
needs support. Winters
here are cold and long and
it takes a lot of funding to
do the work that Tommy’s
does. It will give you a
warm holiday glow to
know you’ve helped. If
you would like to be one
of Santa’s Little Baking
Helpers please call Norm
Blais at (207) 240-3604
or send a message to
[email protected]
or P.O. Box 274, Greene,
ME 04236.
Please
mark
your
calendars and join us in
December! n
The wedding of Theresa
Lea Camic and Casey Patrick Armstrong was held at
4:30 p.m. on August 9th at
Maine Maritime Museum
in Bath.
Mrs. Armstrong is the
daughter of Stan and Sherry Camic of Greene. Mr.
Armstrong is the son of Patricia and Paul Armstrong
of Lisbon.
Valerie Bosse was maid
of honor for her good
friend. Bridesmaids were
Randi Michaud, sister of
the bride, Kristen Camic,
sister of the bride, Paula
Nagy, Rebecca Gagnon and
Heather Greenleaf, all good
friends.
Serving as best man was
John Bilodeau, a good
friend of the groom, ushers were Kevin Michaud,
brother in law, Derek McEwen, nephew, John Grahm,
Jason Smith and Ed Collins al good friends of the
groom.
A reception followed at
the Maine Maritime Museum overlooking the water in Bath. After which the
couple traveled to Disney
World. They are now residing in Greene. The bride is
employed at Central Maine
Healthcare in Lewiston.
The groom is employed
at Delorme Publishing in
Yarmouth.n
Your Road To Maine Value
в„ў
General
Altimax
Arctic
Great d
G
deals
l on
Winter Tires
for your car or
truck!
$85.88
195/65/R15
All tires similar savings. Offer expires 12/31/14.
Winter Tire Change Special
Mount and Balance 4 Winter Tires ~
only $5999*
Maine Auto Service... Where the rubber meets the road!
62 Western Ave.
Augusta - 430-4000
234 Bath Road
Brunswick - 844-2166
512 Canal Street
Lewiston - 333-6000
*MOST
TIRES
570 Forest Ave.
138 U.S. Route One
1423 Main Street
Portland - 221-8999 Scarborough - 289-3000 Sanford - 490-4000
www.maineautoservice.com
November 7, 2014
The Country
Courier
Page 25
www.centralmainetoday.com
Aruba: An Inviting Winter Getaway
Most people visit Aruba for its white sand beaches.
Aruba has a variety of landscapes, including cactus.
The Dutch colonial architecture of many buildings
comes in a variety of pastel colors.
By Victor Block
Photos courtesy of
Len Kaufman
A gleaming white sand
beach that rims the azure
sea is set off by an explosion of scarlet, purple
and other vivid colors
of lush tropical foliage.
Nearby, stretches of
rocks and pebbly soil
interspersed with cactus
comprise a very different terrain. The variety
of landscapes found on
Aruba is echoed by the
diversity of its attractions.
The island’s stretches
of white sand beaches
are among the most
beautiful in the Caribbean. Touches of European
charm add to its appeals.
The Dutch took control of Aruba in 1636
and have held sway over
it since then, except for a
short period in the early
19th century. Reminders
of this Dutch heritage
are everywhere.
One distinctive landmark is a windmill
built in 1804 that once
drained water from low-
walls and ceilings attest
to their presence.
Reminders of Aruba’s
agricultural past in the
park include a long-deserted adobe farm house,
while abandoned mines
recall a mini-gold rush
that got underway in
1825 and lasted for nearly a century.
Speaking of gold, 12
casinos have earned
Aruba the nickname of
“Las Vegas of the Caribbean.” While most are
located in resort hotels,
two are in Oranjestad,
the capital city.
Oranjestad also has
other attractions. The
Dutch colonial architecture of many buildings,
some dating back to the
late 18th century, comes
in a variety of pastel colors. The busy port teems
with boats, and sidewalks with crowds of
sightseers and shoppers.
When not spending
money on shopping or
gambling, visitors have
a choice of several small
but interesting museums.
The Archaeological Mu-
A
mini-promenade
along the main street is
lined by shops and restaurants, but the biggest
draw in town is Charlie’s Bar. Beginning in
the early 1940s, scuba
divers who dropped by
attached their underwater finds to the walls and
ceiling, creating what
today is a bric-a-brac
heaven. Virtually every
inch of available space
is adorned with automobile license plates,
paper money and business cards from around
the world, and other mementoes too varied and
numerous to list.
The main claim to
fame of Paradera village is its location close
to two intriguing sites
that were sacred places
to Indians. The Ayo and
Casibari rock formations
consist of huge boulders
that rise up from the desert terrain. Over time,
prevailing winds have
carved the rocks into
unusual shapes which,
with a little imagination,
resemble birds and drag-
lying areas of Holland.
In 1960, it was taken
apart, shipped to Aruba
and reassembled in its
unlikely Caribbean setting, where it has housed
several restaurants and
night clubs.
Most people visit
Aruba for its beaches.
A seven-mile stretch
backs up to high-rise
hotels that rim the sheltered southwestern and
western coastline. The
windswept northern and
eastern coasts, which are
battered by the sea, have
been left largely undeveloped.
Rugged
limestone
cliffs run along much of
the northeastern coastline. They mark one
boundary of Arikok National Park, an ecological preserve that sprawls
over nearly 20% of the
island.
Intriguing chapters of
Aruba’s history come
alive in this setting.
Shallow caves recall a
time when Arawak Indians inhabited the island.
Drawings that ornament
seum is housed in a cluster of colorfully painted
homes that were built
around 1870. Exhibits
showcase the history of
Indians on Aruba. They
range from an ancient
long house and native
hut to artifacts dating
back as far as 2500 BC.
The Historical Museum of Aruba is housed
in Fort Zoutman. That
fortification was built in
1796-1798 to protect the
island from pirates.
The museum has displays about farming,
fishing and other aspects
of island life, including
interesting tidbits about
villages I had explored.
For example, Noord began as an Indian community, while Rancho
was established as a fishing village around 1855.
Stops at other towns
also provide introductions to what locals call
“the real Aruba.” San
Nicolas once jumped to
the beat of workers at the
now-abandoned nearby
oil refinery, but it’s on
the quiet side these days.
ons.
Steps
have
been
carved into the rock at
Casibari and those who
climb to the top enjoy
a panoramic view of
the island. Some of the
stones at Ayo still bear
petroglyphs scratched
and painted onto the surface by Indian artists.
Those boulders rising
from a flat, stark landscape provide a setting
very different from the
white sand beaches of
Aruba. Both are among
the
something-foreveryone variety that
makes the island an inviting winter getaway
destination.
Victor Block is an
award-winning
travel
journalist who lives
in Washington, D.C.,
and spends summers in
Rangeley, Maine. He is
a guidebook author who
has traveled to more
than 70 countries. His
articles appear in newspapers around the country, and on travel websites. n
Let me increase your efпїЅiciency
while maintaining your comfort,
thus reducing fuel usage...
KOHLERВ® generators keep your appliances on. The A/C cool.
And your food protected. The best part? They start automatically.
Mike Letalien
...r
...regardless
of
which fuel you
wh
are using
• System evaluations,
suggestions and ideas,
estimates and quotes.
• Tune-ups and maintenance
with an eye always toward
efпїЅiciency.
• Ef�iciency upgrades, system
replacements, fuel conversions,
or entire new systems.
Mike Letalien
DEALER
LOGO
HERE
Dealer Information
(555)123-4567
www.DealerWebsite.com
DON’T GET LEFT
IN THE DARK
www.midmainegenerator.com
Phone: (207)395-8066
NEW # 754-2826 • [email protected]
Oil, Wood, Propane, Natural Gas
Equipment Sales - Service - Installation
1 in 4 Maine children do not have
enough to eat. Thankfully, Maine's
credit unions have come together
since 1990 to help raise funds
through the Maine Credit Unions'
Campaign for Ending Hunger.
Rainbow FCU is proud to be a part of the
solution towards ending hunger in Maine
by donating to 10 local food pantry’s this
November.
AUBURN—MECHANIC FALLS—LEWISTON—SOUTH PARIS
Thank You Veterans!
Veterans Day - November 11
www.AmnetRealty.com
Residential - Commercial - Land
1071B Auburn Rd.
Turner, ME 04282
Office 207-225-5888
1-800-479-2298
Fax 207-225-3499
The Country
Page 26
Courier
November 7, 2014
www.centralmainetoday.com
Leeds Historical Society - Programs And Presents
Barn Guy, Don Perkins, answers
questions at Springbrook Golf Club
during the recent Leeds Historical
Society Barn Tour
Over 50 people took
advantage of a perfect
September Saturday blue skies, warm sun
and incredibly colorful
foliage - to board a yellow school bus to tour
four historic barns with
the Leeds Historical Society and barn “guru”,
Don Perkins, author of
The Barns of Maine: Our
History, Our Story. The
day started at Springbrook Golf Club where
Perkins gave a presentation on the history
Coffin Brook Farm in Leeds was the perfect setting to view the foliage on an autumn
barn tour
of barns in Maine and
how their use and construction had changed
over the last two centuries. After the presentation, the group explored
Springbrook’s wonderful Victorian barn, now
used as its clubhouse. Its
open space gave Perkins
an opportunity to point
out numerous features
and, unique among the
barns toured, the “ships
knees” in the basement.
Used in timber-frame
construction
“knees”
are natural sections of
wood which incorporate
a right angle or a slightly
obtuse one. When sawn
out of the larger timber,
these braces are naturally
strong and make excellent reinforcing members. They were used as
braces in ship building as
well as a in timber frame
construction.
Moving on, the group
rode the roads of Leeds,
passing numerous barns,
large and small, and
stopping a three more
wonderful examples of
the barns of Maine, ranging from an early English barn, to a small barn
with hand-hewn timbers
attached to a lovely farm
house, and finally, a fine
example of an affluent
farmer’s barn, complete
with a cupola and handturned posts on the large
workhorse stalls. A stop
at the Leeds Community
Church for lunch provided the tour with an
opportunity to socialize
and compare notes on
The harness still hangs in the cupboard on
the Deane Farm where it was stored when
the last of the draft horses was sold.
the various barns.
The Leeds Historical
Society’s next program,
planned for mid-January,
will focus on Leeds residents and their role in the
Civil War. Stay tuned for
more information as to
time and place.
With Christmas coming people are reminded
that they may once again
buy Leeds Commemorative pottery and the limited edition notecards
featuring paintings by
Leeds resident Ian B. Or-
mon. Each card shows a
scene of Leeds, and on
the back of the card, Ormon has written a short
piece about the scene’s
relevance to the the town.
Both the pottery and the
cards may be purchased
at the Leeds Town Office
at 8 Community Drive,
Leeds. Don Perkins excellent book The Barns
of Maine: Our History,
Our Stories can be purchased at your local
bookstore, Amazon, or
Barns and Noble. n
BlackFriday
100 OFF
%
EVERYTHING
IN THE STORE!
Visit Us Black Friday at
R U KIDDIN ME
1234567 Main Street
CHECK US OUT ON THE
WEB FREE!
www.turnerpublishing.net
The Country
November 7, 2014
Larry E. Purington
1941-2014
Larry E. Purington, 72,
a resident of Jay, passed
away, Tuesday, October
21st at Victorian Villa
Rehabilitation in Canton,
surrounded by his loving
family. He was born De-
cember 7, 1941, in Avon,
Maine, the son of Henry Purington and Alice
(Cushman) Purington. He
attended Wilton Academy
and later joined the United States Navy in 1959
serving on the U.S.S.
Independence. On June
6, 1964 he married his
wife, Aline Legere. Larry
worked for over 35 years
at International Paper
Company at both the Otis
and Androscoggin Mills
in Jay. He was a member
of the International Paper Quarter Century Club
and a former member of
Amvets of Wilton. He
enjoyed fly fishing, hunting, 4 wheeling and flying as a private pilot. He
is survived by his wife of
50 years, Aline Purington
of Jay; his son Joseph Purington and his wife Gail
of Hooksett, New Hamphire; his daughter, Jennifer White and her husband
Chris of Jay; and three
grandchildren; Jordan Purington and Morgan and
Bennett White; brothers,
Toby, Jan and Errol Purington and sisters, Lilla
Yates and Deb Purington.
He was predeceased by
his sisters, Bell Hurd, and
Tracy and Lorellie Purington. The family would
like to thank the nurses of
Androscoggin Home Care
and Hospice as well as the
staff at the Victorian Villa.
Messages of condolence
may be sent to: www.finleyfuneralhome.com. n
Post #153 Events
The wildly popular
country band Cold Blue
Steel will be playing at
the William J. Rogers
American Legion Post
153 on Friday, November 7th at 7pm to kick off
the event filled weekend
at the post. Please bring
a toy or gift for a child to
be distributed to infants
to young teens at our December Christmas party,
or a monetary donation as
admission.
Courier
Page 27
www.centralmainetoday.com
Saturday will see the
Legion Auxiliary host a
Happy Hour Pot Luck
from 4:30pm to 6:30pm at
the post.
Sunday, the Sons of the
American Legion will host
Mohitos, Bloody Mary's,
and Cosmos Pre-Veterans
Tribute event at the post
from 11:00 to 1:00.
Tuesday,
November
11th, the post host the
8th Annual Lewistion &
Auburn Firefighters Chili
Cook Off from 11:00 to
1:00 pm with a $50 award
to be presented to the top
vote getter.
All Veterans Day Weekend events will occur at
the William J. Rogers
American Legion Post
153, located at 71 South
Main Street, in New Auburn, Mane.
All events publicized
are open to the public. For
more inforomation, call
the post at 207.782.1118.n
Lois E Moulton
1910-2014
Lois E. Moulton,
104, a former resident
of Livermore Falls,
passed away peacefully,
Monday October 13th
at Pinewood Terrace
GET ON B
OARD!
CALL FOR UPCOMING CLASSES!
Tractor Trailer • Class B • School Bus
DRIVER TRAINING COURSES
Join the Professionals w/ A Good Paying Job.
High Job Placement Rate
Permit Preparation • Air Brake Adj. Certification
Hazardous Material and Tanker Endorsement
VA Approved • Maine Certified Instructors
Loaded Trailers • Defensive Driving
Competency Based Curriculum
Region 9
377 River Road, Mexico, ME 04257
A Good
Paying
Career is Right
Down The Road
364-3764 • 369-9058 • 369-0150
email: [email protected]
husband Floyd Moulton
in 1984 and her son
Bruce Moulton in 2005.
Her family would like
to thank everyone at
Pinewood Terrace and
how they spoke well
of her independence.
Messages of condolence
may be sent to: www.
finleyfuneralhome.
com..n
Gloria D. Wagner
1922 - 2014
Gloria D. Wagner, 92, a
resident of Livermore Falls,
passed away Wednesday,
October 29th at Franklin Memorial Hospital.
She was born January 25,
1922 in Livermore Falls,
the daughter of Adelard J.
Cold Blue Steel will play at the William J. Rogers American Legion Post 153 on Friday,
November 7th at 7pm, kicking off an event filled weekend at the post.
Assisted Living Center
in Farmington. She
was born February 8,
1910 in Solon, Maine,
the daughter of Walter
W. Knowles and Susie
(Sylvester)
Knowles.
She attended Solon
High School. On August
7, 1926 in Livermore
Falls, she married Floyd
Moulton. She is survived
by her daughter, Gloria
Moulton of Fort Walton
Beach, Florida, sons;
Francis Moulton of Ponte
Vedra, Florida, William
Moulton of Scarborough
and Lawrence Moulton
of
Ocala,
Florida,
13
grandchildren
and
several
great
grandchildren. She was
predeceased by her
“Eddie” Dumais and Hazel (King) Dumais. She
graduated from Livermore
Falls High School in 1939
and later became employed
with the Livermore Falls
School Department, retiring after 23 years.
On March 30, 1941 she
married Robie G. Wagner
in Gardiner, Maine.
Gloria was a member of
George Bunten Post #10
American Legion Auxiliary
and the President of the
Auxiliary in 1957. Gloria
and Robie spent 26 years
making Florida their second home.
She is survived by her
husband of 73 years, Robie
G. Wagner of Livermore
Falls, daughter, Dale (Wag-
ner) Brown and husband
Dennis of Bridgton, brother, Gary Dumais and wife
Juliette of Seminole, Florida, sister, Janine Cressey of
Titusville, Florida, grandchildren; Pamela (Brown)
Perry and husband Craig
of Brunswick and Daniel
Brown and wife Mary of
Stillwater, great grandchildren; Lauren Brown, Allison Brown, Mitchell Perry
and Sydney Perry.
She was predeceased by
her parents and brothers; E.
King Dumais and W. Kenneth Dumais, and brotherin-law, Bill Cressey.
Messages of condolence
may be sent to: www.finleyfuneralhome.com. n
Town of Turner
Rabies Clinic
• Saturday, November 15, 2014 from 9am to
11am, at the Turner Rescue/Fire Barn located
at 19 General Turner Hill Road, Turner.
• Rabies vaccination will be provided by the
Turner Veterinary Service, the fee is $10.00
• 2015 Dog licensing will be available for
Turner Residents only the fee is $6.00 for
Neutured/Spayed and $11.00 for unaltered
dogs.
•Any question please call me at the
Town Office 225-3414 or email me
at [email protected]
The Country
Page 28
Courier
November 7, 2014
www.centralmainetoday.com
Ripley & Fletcher
Local 743-8938
Toll Free (866) 598-2559
80 MAIN STREET • SOUTH PARIS
FEATURED USED VEHICLES
2008 CHEVROLET AVEO LS
#D206C LOCAL TRADE, NICE 4 CYLINDER, EASY TO BUY & DRIVE, HURRY!
SALE
PRICE
$7,987
or
$94
PER
MO.
2009 JEEP PATRIOT LIMITED
#P0229A 4WD, 38K MILES, MANY OPTIONS JEEP BUYERS WANT, COME SEE
SALE
PRICE
$16,987
or
$199
PER
MO.
2011 FORD FUSION SE
#PO362 CHARCOAL BLACK INTERIOR, ONE OWNER, SUNROOF, A MUST SEE
SALE
PRICE
SALE
PRICE
$9,987
or
$117
PER
MO.
$15,987
or
$188
PER
MO.
2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4WD
#P0377 ONE OWNER, SUN ROOF, POWER OPTIONS, WITH ONLY 27K MILES
SALE
PRICE
2005 FORD RANGER XLT 4X4
#E329A 4X4, AUTOMATIC, V6 ENGINE, LOCAL TRADE, POPULAR SMALL TRUCK
2014 SUBARU IMPREZZA
$21,987
or
$257
PER
MO.
#E334B GOOD OLD TRUCK, DIESEL, 4X4, A ONE OF A KIND, GOT TO SEE
$14,987
or
$176
SALE
PRICE
$21,987
or
$257
PER
MO.
2013 FORD EDGE LIMITED AWD
#E345A AWD, RUBY RED COLOR, MANY OPTIONS, 12K MILES, LOADED
SALE
PRICE
$31,987
or
$375
PER
MO.
2009 DODGE RAM 2500 TRX4
1999 FORD F250 CREW
SALE
PRICE
#P0304B PREMIUM EDITION, AWD, SATURN WHITE PEARL,LOADED, LOW MILES
PER
MO.
#E264A TRX4, QUAD CAB, LOCAL OWNER, 5.7L V8, 4WD AND A LOT MORE
SALE
PRICE
$21,987
or
$257
PER
MO.
SERVICE•PARTS•BODY SHOP
BIG CITY SERVICE
RATES? NOT HERE!
Jim Yates
Service Manager
Service rates for the big
city dealers is over $105
per hour. We still charge
$79 per hour and you
get our Factory Trained
Technicians providing
the work. We are happy
to quote a price over the
phone give us a call.
Service Labor Rate
Still ON
ONLY
$79
PER
HOUR
Service
rviice Open
Open 7
7:30-4:30,
:3
M-F
“THE WORKS” SPECIAL
The Works Vehicle Checkup
Blend Oil & Filter Change
• Synthetic
(oil change up to 5 qts)
Inspection
• Multi-Point
• Brake Inspection
of Tires
• Rotation
Fluid
Top-Off
• Battery Test
•
Check
• Filter
Belts
• & Hoses Check
$3995
BRAND NAME
AME TIRES
ES
Rebates
$140
UP TO
FISHER PLOW SERVICE
Oxford County’s ONLY
Authorized Fisher Service
SERVICING
FORD
CHEVY
DODGE
TOYOTA
GMC
CALL FOR AN
APPOINTMENT OR
PRICE CHECK.
DIRECT LINE
Scott Martel
207-393-3060 Service
Advisor
WE WORK
OR
RK ON ALL MAKES & MODELS
WITH THE PURCHASE
OF 4 TIRES,
ASK FOR DETAILS
ALL FINANCING SUBJECT TO CREDIT APPROVAL, ALL VEHICLES INCLUDE $149 DOCUMENT FEE, PAYMENTS WITH 25% DOWN CASH OR TRADE
NO MONEY DOWN TO QUALIFIED BUYERS 3.99% APR, 72 MONTHS FOR 2003 OR LATER, EXCLUDES TAX AND TITLE FEE
www.ripleyandfletcherford.com
Document
Category
Lifestyle and Career
Views
115
File Size
39 496 KB
Tags
1/--pages
Report inappropriate content