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Auburn
Highlights
Directly mailed to the residents of Auburn and Danville
Maine’s largest direct mail community publication company serving nearly 250,000 homes and “It’s All Good” News!
November 2014 • Volume 14, Issue 8
Just Good News Since 1992
A Product of
WWW.CENTRALMAINETODAY.COM
Turner Publishing Inc., PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 • 207-225-2076 • Fax: 207-225-5333 • E-Mail: [email protected] • Web: www.turnerpublishing.net
March of Dimes Holds Fundraiser
National March of Dimes Ambassador Aidan Lamothe carried a Tom Brady-signed
football to each of the tables at the fund-raising auction at Auburn’s Hilton. With the
help of Family Team Specialist Aubrey Martin (right), Aidan was selling chances on
the item. Purchasing tickets are Sharron Seileman (left) and Judy Deegan of Central
Maine Medical Center nursing department. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)
The March of Dimes organization held its Signature
Chef’s Auction at Auburn’s Hilton Garden Inn on October 17. The event was organized by local March of Dimes
Community Director Catherine Tanous. The evening featured an ongoing Silent Auction that featured items donated by over five-dozen local businesses, and ranged from
skin massages and fitness to sporting event tickets and
furniture.
The Signature Chefs on hand to share their culinary
talents were Kevin Cunningham of Marche Kitchen and
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Little Sophia Asselin was the local ambassador for the March of Dimes auction event
on October 17 in Auburn. Her father, Rich, is talking with WMTW weatherman, Matt
Zidel while Sophia is looking at Matt’s father. Zidel was the emcee of the Signature
Chef’s Auction.
Wine Bar, Jon Cunningham of Gritty McDuff’s, Austin
Perreault of Central Maine Community College and Jill
Drew of The Winery Baker. Guests were able to visit the
food tables during the silent auction part of the evening.
Before the Live Auction began guests heard from the
various March of Dimes staff and the Ambassadors and
their families. The speakers shared the March of Dimes
mission and what its efforts in the care of premature babies
meant to the children and parents. Local event Ambassador Sophia Asselin, a cute, little toddler, was there with
her parents Rich and Stephanie Asselin. Adding a special
touch to the event was a visit from 7-year old National
Ambassador, Aidan Lamothe from Manchester, New
Hampshire.
WMTW Channel 8 weatherman Matt Zidel was the emcee for the Live Auction that closed out the evening. Zidel
LiпїЅle Caesars
is a Lewiston native and has done the March of Dimes
event in the past. Items bidden on ranged in price from
$450 to $1800 and weekend getaways to specialty furniture.
The March of Dimes organization was founded in 1938
by Franklin D. Roosevelt. Roosevelt suffered with Polio,
which took his ability to walk without assistance during
much of his political career. The disease of Polio was epidemic through the 30s and early 50s until the creation of
the vaccine by Dr. Jonas Salk. With the vaccine putting
an end to the epidemics and spread of Polio by the late
1950s, the vision of the March of Dimes changed. In 1959
the organization’s new focus would be the lowering infant
mortality rates, due to premature birth and other natal defects. n
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Page 2
November 2014
Saint Dominic Cross Country
St. Dominic runner, Diego Villamarin, earned 20th place
in the Class C Western Regional Championships. This
qualified him for the State Championships in Belfast on
November 1, where he finished 33rd (18:36) among 90
athletes from all over Maine. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)
Ella Brown, Saint Dominic High School runner, was the
first to cross the finish line for the Saints at the Class
C Western Championship race in Cumberland. Ella was
12th over all among 92 female athletes. Her time was
22:46. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)
Saint Dominic Cross Country runner, Sidney Sirois, ran
for 15th place in the Class C Regional Championship
and 17th place (21:32) in the State Championships the
following weekend in Belfast. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)
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Edward Little Girls Soccer - Class A Eastern Champs
Red Eddie senior Hannah Smith made good on this penalty kick during
Edward Little Girls Soccer team celebrate their 3-2 overtime win over Mount Ararat on November 5 in the second half with Mount Ararat. The goal tied the game at 2-2 as the
Auburn. They are holding the Class A Eastern Plaque aloft before running across the field to share it with clock was ticking away. Olivia Paione sneaked in the winning goal from
a deflection off a teammates head, just a few minutes into overtime,
the Red Eddie fans. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)
making the girls the Class A East Champs. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)
Member of the EL Boys Soccer team and other students ran the track after the girls’ team scored the winning, overtime goal against Mount Ararat on Wednesday. The Eddie
ladies will play Windham on Saturday, November 8 at Hampden Academy. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)
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Page 4
November 2014
Maine Deer Season Outlook
V. Paul Reynolds
Contrary to a recent
press release issued by
the Maine Department
of Inland Fisheres and
Wildlife, Maine’s 2014
firearms season for deer
kicks off with a Maine
residents only opening
day November 1st, not
November 2nd. Starting
the following Monday,
November
3rd,
the
deer season is open to
all licensed big game
hunters. ( If you wait until
MDIF&W’s announced
start date of November
4th you will have missed
opening day).
What’s the Maine deer
season outlook?
Pretty darn good if you
combine the statistics,
the
deer
biologist’s
forecast and the so-called
“anecdotal evidence.”
According
to
the
harvest data and all the
buzz there has been a
definite rebound of deer
numbers following the
severe winters of 2008
and 2009.
Kyle Ravana, Maine’s
deer biologist, estimates
that if normal hunting
conditions and hunter
effort prevail, this year’s
dear kill will be in the
25,750 range, nearly a 20
percent increase from last
year’s kill. The total deer
kill for the last ten years is
as follows: 2012 – 21,553;
2011 – 18,839; 2010 –
20,063; 2009 – 18,092;
2008 – 21,062; 2007 –
28,885; 2006 – 29,918;
2005 – 28,148; 2004 –
30,926; 2003 – 30,313.
According to Ravana,
harvest trends support the
fact that the population
has rebounded.
Ravana says, “Last
year, WMD 3 in Eastern
Aroostook County had
its highest buck harvest
ever, and WMD 6, while
not a historical high, had
one of its highest buck
harvests ever. As a result
of the increasing deer
population in WMDs 3
and 6, the department
issued any-deer permits
in these WMDs 3 and 6
for 2013. Hunter surveys
also show that hunters are
seeing more deer.”
“Most telling is the
annual buck kill, an index
used by the department
to note trends in the
population. Maine’s buck
kill has increased each
of the past four years.
Last year’s buck harvest
increased 23% from the
previous year. In much
of the state, the buck kill
exceeded the 10-year
average, another sign
the deer population has
rebounded.”
The deer recovery is
attributted to a number of
factors: first and foremost,
consecutively
mild
winters, “focused predator
control” (dead coyotes),
and better protection of
deer wintering areas.
In general, outdoor
people are reporting deer
sightings from one end of
the state to the other. This
has not been the case for
too long. Deer hunters are
pumped.
Most exciting of all,
perhaps, are some nearrecord buck harvests last
fall in the big woods of far
northern Maine.
This trend, combined
with the likely survival
of Maine’s traditional
bear hunt, can only help
Maine’s
hard-pressed
rural economy. It will take
time to bring back many
non-resident deer hunters
who have been staying
away in droves.
The promotional arm
of the Maine Department
of Inland Fishheries and
Wildlife, when it gets its
calendar organized, might
consider some overdue
marketing
initiatives
to get the word out
about the long-awaited
recovery of Maine’s oncebeleaguered deer herd.
The author is editor of
the Northwoods Sporting Journal. He is also a
Maine Guide, co-host of
a weekly radio program
“Maine Outdoors” heard
Sundays at 7 p.m. on The
Voice of Maine NewsTalk Network (WVOMFM 103.9, WQVM-FM
101.3) and former information officer for
the Maine Dept. of Fish
and Wildlife. His e-mail
address is [email protected]
net.. He has two books
“A Maine Deer Hunter’s
Logbook” and his latest,
“Backtrack.” n
St. Mary’s Recognized for Outstanding Safety Record
St. Mary’s Regional
Medical Center was honored with an “A” grade in
the fall 2014 Hospital Safety Score, which rates how
well hospitals protect patients from errors, injuries
and infections. The Hospital Safety Score is compiled
under the guidance of the
nation’s leading experts on
patient safety and is administered by The Leapfrog
Group (Leapfrog), an independent industry watchdog.
The first and only hospital
safety rating to be peer-reviewed in the Journal of
Patient Safety, the Score is
free to the public and designed to give consumers
information they can use
to protect themselves and
their families when facing a
hospital stay.
“We are pleased to be
recognized for this signif-
icant achievement,” said
Lee Myles, President and
CEO of St. Mary’s Health
System. “This could not
have been accomplished
without the support of our
Board of Directors, our
clinical leadership, and all
staff who have been so diligent in following safety
protocols, keeping our patients health a number one
priority.”
“Patient safety needs to
be a 24-7 priority for hospitals, as errors and infections are all too common
and often deadly,” said
Leah Binder, president
and CEO of The Leapfrog
Group, which administers
the Hospital Safety Score.
“We commend the �A’ hospitals, including St. Mary’s
Regional Medical Center
for helping us to raise the
standards of health care na-
tionwide, and demonstrating that they’ve made the
well-being of patients a top
priority.”
Developed under the
guidance of Leapfrog’s
Blue Ribbon Expert Panel,
the Hospital Safety Score
uses 28 measures of publicly available hospital
safety data to produce a
single “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,”
or “F” score representing a
hospital’s overall capacity
to keep patients safe from
preventable harm. More
than 2,500 U.S. general
hospitals were assigned
scores in fall 2014, with
about 31-percent receiving
an “A” grade. The Hospital
Safety Score is fully transparent, with a full analysis
of the data and methodology used in determining
grades available online.
To see how St. Mary’s
Named Turner Business of the Year 2013
by the Androscoggin County Chamber
Maine’s largest direct mail community
publication company serving nearly
250,000 homes and “It’s All Good” News!
Senior Designer
Michelle Pushard
Designer
Danielle Pushard
OfпїЅice/Billing
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Advertising
Jess Small
Dede Libby
Erin Savage
Dan Smiley
Jim Foster
Paul Gagne
Betsy Brown
zation using the collective
leverage of large purchasers of health care to initiate breakthrough improvements in the safety, quality
and affordability of health
care for Americans. The
flagship Leapfrog Hospital
Survey allows purchasers
to structure their contracts
and purchasing to reward
the highest performing hospitals. The Leapfrog Group
was founded in November
2000 with support from the
Business Roundtable and
national funders and is now
independently
operated
with support from its purchaser and other members.
About St. Mary’s Re-
Outdoor Unit
gional Medical Center
St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center in Lewiston is a
233 bed hospital providing
a full complement of medical, behavioral, emergency, and surgical services to
residents of Androscoggin,
Oxford, Cumberland and
Kennebec counties. The
hospital is fully accredited
by the Joint Commission,
offers the latest in diagnostic testing services, has an
Accredited Chest Pain Center within the Emergency
Department, and is a member of Covenant Health
Systems and an affiliate of
MaineHealth. n
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Turner Publishing Inc., PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 • 207-225-2076 • Fax: 207-225-5333 • E-Mail: [email protected] • Web: www.turnerpublishing.net
CEO/Publisher
Jodi Cornelio
Operations Manager
Dede Libby
Regional medical Center’s
score compares locally and
nationally, and to access
consumer-friendly tips for
patients and their loved
ones, visit the newly updated Hospital Safety Score
website at www.hospitalsafetyscore.org. Consumers
can also go to www.hospitalsafetyscore.org for a free
download of the Hospital
Safety Score mobile app.
About The Leapfrog
Group.
The Hospital Safety
Score (www.hospitalsafetyscore.org) is an initiative
of The Leapfrog Group
(www.leapfroggroup.org),
a national nonprofit organi-
Writer/Photographer
Bill Van Tassel
Proof Reader
Hal Small
Published by Turner Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 214, Turner, ME 04282-0214. Advertisers and those wishing to submit articles of interest
can call, 1-800-400-4076 (within the state of Maine only) or 1-207-225-2076 or fax us at 1-207-225-5333, you can also send e-mail to us
at: [email protected] Any views expressed within this paper do not necessarily reflect those of this paper. This paper assumes
no responsibility for typographical errors that may occur, but will reprint, at no additional cost, that part of any advertisement in which the
error occurs before the next issue’s deadline. This paper also reserves the right to edit stories and articles submitted for publication. This
paper is mailed on a monthly basis. Founded by Steven Cornelio in 1992
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November 2014
Page 5
So Close
John McDonald
No one from Maine has
ever been elected president of the United States.
James G. Blaine, one of
Maine’s most famous and
successful
politicians,
came closest. Our western
neighbor New Hampshire
gave the country President
Franklin Pierce, but many
historians consider him
one of our worst. I’d rather not claim any than have
to claim Pierce.
Although he hated to
admit it, James G. Blaine
was actually “from away.”
He was born in 1830
in the sleep little town
of West Brownsville,
Pennsylvania,
coming
to Maine in 1854 when
he was hired as editor of
the Kennebec Journal in
Augusta. Later, in what
some would call a step up
and others would consider
a step down he moved to
Portland to become editor
of the Portland Advertiser.
In 1859 Blaine was elected to the Maine House of
Representatives, where
he served three years, the
last as Speaker. He then
moved on to the U.S.
Congress as Maine’s representative. He did so well
as Speaker of the Maine
House that his colleagues
in Congress elected him
Speaker there as well.
Wanting a better job,
Blaine resigned from
Congress in 1876 and
ran unsuccessfully for
the Republican nomination for president. He ran
for the same nomination
four years later and lost
again. Third time being
the charm – at least for the
presidential nomination –
Blaine became the Republican candidate for President in 1884, but managed
to lose the election, anyway, to Grover Cleveland.
But he came sooo close.
How close?
Well, he lost New York
State, and thereby the
election, by about one
thousand votes.
Many people, including
Blaine, thought he lost because of inflammatory remarks made in New York
on the eve of the election
by Reverend Samuel D.
Burchard, supposedly on
Blaine’s behalf. In a fiery speech Rev. Burchard
referred to the opposing
party – the Democrats –
as the party of “… Rum,
Romanism and Rebellion!” Blaine sat there on
the podium, powerless to
do anything
As expected, the emotional speech got lots of
people all riled up. And remember, this all occurred
well before talk radio,
iPhones, facebook, twitter and texting. The reverend’s words spread like
wildfire throughout New
York’s immigrant population, offending many Irish
Catholics in the process.
In the remaining hours of
the campaign, Blaine reminded New York voters
that his own mother was
a Catholic, but it was not
enough. Too much damage had been done by the
reverend’s remarks and
Blaine lost the election.
The campaign between
Blaine and Cleveland became famous for two silly campaign slogans, one
aimed at each candidate.
I know. What campaign
slogans aren’t silly?
Cleveland supporters
often chanted, “James G.
Blaine, James G. Blaine,
the continental liar from
the State of Maine.” While
Blaine supporters, after
discovering that Cleveland fathered a child out
of wedlock, chanted, “Ma,
Ma, where’s my pa?”
After Cleveland won
the election, the ending of
the chant became, “Gone
to the White House,
ha,ha,ha.”Don’t you wish
our politics still had such
wholesome scandals?
I suppose Longfellow
could have written better
slogans, but, as far as we
know, he never offered his
services to either candidaten.
Exercises to Flatten Your Stomach
Jodi Cornelio
Live Long, Live Well
Jodi R. Cornelio, AS, BA, MBA
Nutritionist, Personal Trainer
and Motivational Speaker
[email protected]
Listed below are five
exercises you can do
anywhere to flatten your
stomach. Not only are
these exercises good for
flattening your stomach
they are great for your
entire core strength and a
healthy back.
Just do each exercise
every other day, 3 sets of
12 repetitions, and feel
your core tighten, see
your stomach flatten and
improve your posture.
The best thing about these
movements is that you can
do them all standing. No
floor mats or heavy equipment needed and you can
actually sneak a few in
while you are at work.
Give these a try:
1. Slow motion front
kick: Stand with straight
posture, lift right knee
belly button height then
extend your leg out
straight, draw it back in
and toe touch the floor to
the starting position. Repeat 12 times. Repeat on
the opposite leg.
2. Side Bends with or
without weights: Heavy
weights are not necessary
if you are trying to thin the
waist line. The exercise
is exactly how it sounds.
Just point your index finger to your baby toe and
FIND THE PHONY AD!!!
You could win a Gift CertiпїЅicate to an area
merchant from one of our papers!
It is easy to пїЅind - just read through the ads in this issue and пїЅind the phony ad.
Either пїЅill out the entry form below (one entry per month please) and mail to: Find
The Phony Ad Contest, P.O. Box 214 Turner, ME 04282 or email to: phonyad@
turnerpublishing.net. (one entry per household please)
You must include all the information requested below to be eligible to win.
Note: Turner Publishing will not lend or sell your email address to a third party.
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Address:
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Please tell us your age (circle one) 12-25 yrs. 26-35 yrs. 36-45 yrs. 46-55 yrs. 56 yrs. & up
The Phony Ad is:
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bend side to side. The
more the better. Try to do
100 side to side.
3. Torso twist with
weight: This exercise is
very affective with a light
to moderate hands weight.
Hold one dumbbell with
both hand straight out in
front of you, chest high
with straight arms. Rotate
to the left and then rotate
to the right. Leave hips
stationary and only twist
at the waist as the upper
body follows.
4. Overhead side chop
knee pull: No weight
needed but you can add
weight if you need a little more. With hands over
head at a left side angle
bring your opposite knee
into your chest to meet
your arms and repeat up
and down 12 times on
each side.
5. Cross over extensions
with weight. Use light to
moderate weight. Reach
for the sky to your left and
then reach for the floor
to your right extending
the body with each reach.
Squat and bend the knees
when reaching to the floor
to protect the back. This
works the oblique on each
side of your waist and
also works the abdominal
muscles that cross your
midsection. Repeat 12
times of each side.
One could easily whip
through these simple exercises in 15 to 20 minutes.
Remember to always consult your physician before
performing any new exercise program especially if
you have a specific medical condition.
Live Long, Live Well. n
We have October
Contest Winners!
FIND THE PHONY AD!
Congratulations!
All of the winners listed have won gift
certificates to one of our advertisers.
If you haven’t won - keep playing!
We get hundreds of entries each month!
It’s easy to enter - read through the ads in this
issue and find the phony ad, fill out the entry
form found in this paper and mail it in. If you
have the correct answer, your name will be
entered into a monthly drawing!
Connie Berry Minot
Eliane McLeod Bridgton
Christy Desjardins Lisbon Falls
Peter Sirois Madison
Judy Carleton Augusta
Debra J. Perry Bethel
June Leighton Mount Vernon
Anna Donahue Harrison
Phyllis Dow Auburn
Sandra Choate Farmingdale
Patrick Herbert Jay
Kimberly Long Lewiston
Desiree Thompson Waterville
Ian Fournier Livermore Falls
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Page 6
November 2014
Mechanics Savings Bank Donates to L/A Arts
Joshua Vink, Executive Director of L/A Arts accepts a $2,000 check from Rick Vail,
President and CEO of Mechanics Savings Bank.
Mechanics Savings Bank
recently donated $2,000 to
L/A Arts. Three quarters of
the funding is designated
for the organization’s Arts
in Education program. This
level of monetary support
offers L/A schools a tenweek after school residency, a three day in-school
residency for four classes,
plus an artist performance,
or four professional development workshops for L/A
classroom teachers.
Courses offered to the
students include: visual
arts (painting; photography), literary arts (poetry;
bookmaking), music (songwriting; singing; African
drumming), dance, and
theatrical arts (storytelling; puppetry). These programs challenge students
to explore artistic content
as a means to promote academic learning, while de-
veloping their conceptual
understanding and personal
points-of-view to showcase their unique style and
voice.
One quarter of the bank’s
donation will support the
Twin Cities popular Ice
Festival. The three-day
fundraiser consists of beautiful ice sculptures, ice bars,
ice carving demonstrations,
live music, outdoor games,
family entertainment, and
food from over two dozen local restaurants. Event
organizers are anticipating
3,000 people in attendance
this year. The ice festival
will culminate with a free,
fun-filled family day on
Sunday, February 22, 2015,
11am-2pm. For more information, go to: www.icefestla.com.
“L/A Arts is grateful to
Mechanics Savings Bank
for their support of our Arts
in Education programs and
Ice Festival L/A. This donation will help forward
our mission of using the
arts as a way to contribute
to the vibrancy and creativity of this great region,”
said Joshua Vink, Executive Director of L/A Arts.
Mechanics Savings Bank
is a full service community bank with branch offices in Auburn, Brunswick,
Lewiston, and Windham,
Maine. The bank’s charitable contributions committee meets monthly to
consider all community
requests. Non-profits seeking funding should submit
written requests to: Charitable Contributions Committee, Mechanics Savings
Bank, 100 Minot Avenue,
Auburn, ME 04210. Mechanics Savings Bank is an
Equal Housing Lender and
Member FDIC. n
Surgeon Joins Central Maine Medical Center
Dale Dangleben, M.D.,
a general and trauma surgeon, has been appointed
to the Central Maine Medical Center Medical Staff.
He is practicing with Central Maine Surgical Associates in Lewiston.
Dangleben comes to
CMMC from the Lehigh
Valley Health Network in
Allentown, Pa., where he
has most recently served as
a surgical specialist and as
associate surgery residency program director.
Dangleben’s professional experience includes an
assistant clinical professorship at the University of
Pennsylvania, seven years
as the surgical clerkship
director at Lehigh Valley
Health Network, and work
as a high school teacher
on the island of Dominica. He was also an assistant professor of surgery at
the University of Southern
Florida’s College of Medicine.
He is a graduate of Hunter College, City University
of New York, and received
his doctorate of medicine
from Pennsylvania State
University’s College of
Medicine. He served his
residency and fellowship
at the Lehigh Valley Health
Network between 2000
and 2006.
Dangleben has completed numerous special
training programs. He is a
member of the Society of
Critical Care Medicine and
the Association of Surgical
Education, and is a Fellow
of the American College of
Surgeons.
He is certified in surgery
and surgical critical care
by the American Board of
Surgery.
Dangleben has given
dozens of presentations at
forums and medical conferences around the country. His work has appeared
in numerous publications.
He is an editor or author
of six books on medicine,
and has presented lectures
to the American College of
Surgeons and the Association of Program Directors
in Surgery, as well as other
schools and organizations.
Among numerous accolades, Dangleben is
the 2007 recipient of the
Halsted Award in General
Surgery Legacy of Excellence in Education and the
2002 winner of the Arnold
P. Gold Foundation’s Humanism and Excellence in
Teaching Award.
He practices in association with surgeons Christina M. Bertocchi, M.D.,
Nina K. Edwards, M.D.,
Shiraz Farooq, M.D., Rajeev N. Puri, M.D., James
F. Reilly, M.D., Joseph
R. Taddeo, M.D., Rosa E.
Turcios, M.D., and Laura
Withers, M.D., and certified physician assistants
Sheila Boese, Sharon Brezinski, Timothy Brown,
Kimberly Budd, and Jane
Vanni. Central Maine Surgical Associates can be
reached at 795-5767. n
L/A CA$H - VITA Program
pointments using our
on-line system. This can
be done from home or at
our Lewiston City Hall
office.
Greeters - Help taxpayers at our Lewiston Armory Site with organizing
paperwork and filling in
the intake questionaires.
Tax Preparers - Become an IRS Certified
CDL Class A
Drivers Wanted
Forest Freight - Skowhegan
• Must have a current Medical card
• Must be able to stay in truck if needed
• Owner Operators Welcome
• Looking for drivers from Jay, Livermore Falls,
Turner, and Auburn areas
• All Drivers Welcome to Apply
Contact Ken Doane at
474-2775 or 399-8870
Volunteer Tax Preparer
and prepare tax returns
at our Lewiston Armory
Site. Training is available
on-line through the IRS
Link and Learn Program
and through classes offered by AARP Tax aide
in early January. All tax
returns are reviewed by a
quality reviewer and you
will have plenty of on-site
GET ON B
OARD!
Volunteer Opportunities
We are looking for
volunteers to assist low/
moderate income and
edlerly taxpayers with
Federal and Maine Tax
Preparation. You can help
in a variety of ways.
Phone Appointments
- Return phone calls to
taxpayers and make ap-
assistance and support.
Time commitment is
flexible. The site runs 3
to 4 hours on M, T, TH, F
and Sat, from late January
to April 1st. Phone work
may be done from home
at your convenience.
For more information
pleas call KC Geiger at
207-513-3160 and leave
a message. n
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Page 7
Nothin’ But Small Talk…Horses Helping Soldiers
Jess Small
This month we pay tribute to those military personnel who have served
our country. They have
fought for our freedom
and put their lives on the
line to ensure our safety.
Now they are home and
we need to make sure they
know our appreciation and
are taken care of.
For decades horses have
carried soldiers bravely
into war, carried cannons
and ammunition for the
artillerymen, pulled wagons full of supplies for the
all military, and carried
the American flag proudly
head on into battle. Today
horses are helping wounded soldiers on the road to
recover from their physical and emotional injuries,
as well as help them to adjust back into civilian life.
When you are in the
presence of a horse you
feel a rush of emotions
– strength, focus, energy, awe, and just overwhelmed with their beauty and power. Scientists
and therapists have recognized these complex
emotions and the quick
bond between humans and
horses and have begun to
use them for many therapeutic purposes. Horses
are smart and perceptive
animals. Each horse has
its own personality, just
as humans do. Their personality traits are not the
same as human traits, but
they are traits that we as
humans can relate to and
that is what helps seal the
bond between our species.
Horses can help facilitate healing because they
have a natural ability to
know what a person needs
to heal, whether it is an
emotional block, a bad repetitive behavior, or even
a physical problem.
Equine assisted therapy
programs are becoming
more and more popular
all over the country. More
farms and programs are
opening their doors every year. Many of them
are now focusing on post
traumatic stress disorder
(PTSD). Horses and soldiers are a lot alike. They
are both hard wired to stay
alert, aware, and ready for
danger at all times, as a
soldier in a combat zone
or in hostile territory has
to be. Horses are also able
to calm themselves quickly, as a soldier is trained to
do as well.
In most equine assisted
therapy programs, horses
are teamed with mental
health professionals and
an equine professional
to address the issues that
each veteran is facing
when they return home.
On the ground activities
with horses are also used
to mimic real live issues
and combat zones. This
allows the therapist to see
where the problems are
and then are able to help
them to find solutions. The
participants quickly learn
and recognize unhealthy
behaviors, acknowledge
their strengths and weaknesses and work to incorporate new healthy behaviors.
Horses are also used
to help wounded soldiers
heal their physical aliments. Riding a horse is
soothing, stress free, and
one can find comfort with
the rhythmic rocking motion of the horse. Soldiers
who have trouble walking
or can’t run feel at one with
the horse and can focus on
their balance and posture
as well as using all muscle
groups while in the saddle.
Horses and humans have
a pelvis that works the
same way, both with identical hip movements while
walking. Sitting on a horse
allows a person’s body
parts do move naturally.
Therapeutic riding also
helps with traumatic brain
injuries and PTSD. While
riding your mind must be
in the present and focused
on yourself, the horse, and
your riding. Being in the
saddle helps your brain
work on the “right now”
and does not let rider focus on any intrusive thinking or distracted thoughts.
Many researchers have
discovered and proved
that horses tend to mirror
the human emotions and
the claim that horses are
very effective partners for
helping a human heal as
well as helping them to
achieve higher levels of
personal growth. A horse’s
behavior can change the
emotional state of a person.
One session of Equine
Assisted Psychotherapy
(EAP) can be equal to five
sessions on the “couch”.
Our soldiers deserve to be
at peace and feel comfort
upon their return home.
Horses can give that to
them. Farms and ranches
that offer equine therapy
on the ground and in the
saddle are becoming more
and more popular. Many
of them are branching out
and primarily focusing
on our wounded soldiers
while a majority continues
to focus on children and
therapy needs.
Our services members
and their families make
daily sacrifices for all of us
living in the United States
and it’s the utmost importance that we take care of
those who give endlessly
for our freedom once they
return home! n
Rob Foley (shown above), a retired Navy Seal, helped to get the Equine Assisted Therapy for Veterans program started at Equine Journeys in Bridgton, Maine. Equine Journeys
started 7 years ago with providing therapeutic riding and driving, mostly with developmentally delayed adults. 3 years ago they were able to start their veterans program. They
have a licensed therapist and psychiatric nurse who, along with Therapeutic driving and riding instructors, form the therapy team. Equine Journeys has been seeing veterans at
no charge to them. They seek out veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury, or Military Sexual Trauma.
The Healthy Geezer
By: Fred Cecitti
Q. Do people who
are color blind see everything in black and
white?
“Color blindness” is
the common term used
to describe color vision
deficiency. The term is
misleading, because total color blindness that
turns the world into
shades of gray is rare.
The most common
type of color blindness
makes it difficult for
people to discriminate
between red and green.
The next most common
form of the deficiency
affects the perception
of blues and yellows.
Those with blue-yellow blindness almost
always have red-green
blindness, too.
Many people with
color blindness don’t
know they have it.
For example, they are
taught at an early age
that grass is green. They
look at lawns and see
yellow grass. Subsequently, if you ask them
what color the grass
is, they will tell you it’s
green.
(Please don’t ask me
how they handle shopping for bananas.)
Color blindness affects about ten percent of men, but only
one percent of women.
Most people with color
blindness inherited it.
There is no treatment
to correct inherited color blindness. However,
there are specially tinted eyeglasses that can
help people with defi-
ciencies to discriminate
between colors.
Another cause of color blindness is simple
aging, which gradually
diminishes our ability
to see colors.
Diseases can affect
your color vision, too.
Usually, diseases affect
the perception of blue
and yellow. Some conditions that can cause
color blindness are diabetes, glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration,
Alzheimer's
disease,
Parkinson's
disease, leukemia and
sickle cell anemia.
Some drugs can alter
color perception, too.
These include drugs for
heart problems, high
blood pressure, rheumatoid arthritis, nervous disorders and psychological problems.
Exposure to certain
chemicals can cause
color blindness. These
include carbon disulfide, fertilizers, styrene
and mercury.
The eye is like a camera. There’s a lens in
the front that focuses
images on the retina
in the back. The retina contains nerve cells
that react to light and
transmit information to
your brain. If the cells
responsible for color
don’t work properly,
you suffer from color
blindness.
If you think you are
having a color-vision
problem, see an eye
doctor. You’ll be asked
to look at a book containing several multicolored dot patterns. If
you have a color vision
deficiency, you won’t be
able to pick out numbers and shapes from
within the dot patterns.
If you would like to
ask a question, write
to [email protected]
com. n
Page 8
November 2014
JoAnn Pike Humanitarian Award Recipient
Good Shepherd Food
Bank announced that
it will award the 2015
JoAnn Pike Humanitarian
Award to Bill Williamson,
Maine Market President
for Bank of America. The
award will be presented
at a banquet at the Food
Bank in April.
Each year Good Shepherd Food Bank selects an
award recipient in honor
of its founder, JoAnn Pike.
This year the Food Bank is
inviting the community to
come together to honor an
outstanding leader and advance the important mission of ending hunger in
Maine.
Fifteen percent of Maine
households face hunger,
according to USDA statistics. It is estimated that
one in four Maine children
does not get the nutritious
food they need to grow
and thrive. Good Shepherd Food Bank is committed to working with
partners across the state to
find solutions to the problem of hunger.
“Because of Bill’s outstanding level of commitment to supporting the
communities and people
of Maine, and his dedication to fighting hunger,
this was a perfect fit,” said
Kristen Miale, president
of Good Shepherd Food
Bank. “The Food Bank is
honored to give him this
award in recognition of his
efforts.”
Williamson describes
himself as an ardent supporter of efforts to end
hunger in Maine. Working
with Good Shepherd Food
Bank and other hunger relief organizations, he contributes expertise to assist
with advocacy, fundraising and strategic planning.
“Good Shepherd Food
Bank has been helping to
fight hunger in our community for more than 30
years,” said Williamson.
“The efforts of the Food
Bank and its partners continue to make a tremendous impact on the lives
of individuals and families
in need.”
Williamson serves as
Bank of America’s leader
in Maine and focuses on
integrating Bank of America business lines across
the state. He also directs
the company’s local corporate social responsibility program, which
includes
philanthropy,
community development,
environmental initiatives,
diversity efforts, arts and
culture projects, and volunteerism.
Additionally, William-
son serves as a Senior
Client Manager in Bank
of America’s Commercial
Banking Group for Northern New England, bringing 33 years of commercial banking experience
to the role. Currently, he
manages the commercial
banking needs of a diverse
group of public and private companies in Maine,
New Hampshire, and Vermont.
Williamson is a board
member
of
Educate
Maine, the Maine State
Chamber of Commerce,
the United Way of Greater Portland, and the Alfond Scholarship Fund.
Previously, he worked in
the field of education as
Director of Development
for Phillips Academy in
Andover, Massachusetts
and Vermont Academy in
Saxton’s River, Vermont.
He has served as a Director of School Administrative District #51 in
Cumberland, Maine and
as a board member of the
Greater Portland Chamber
of Commerce and the Susan Curtis Foundation.
For information about
sponsoring this event
please contact Julie Guerette at [email protected]
or call (207) 782-3554 ext.
1164. n
Urologic Surgeon Joins Central Maine Urology Center
Christopher
Henry,
M.D., has joined the Central Maine Medical Center
Medical Staff. He is practicing as part of the Central
Maine Urology Center surgical team.
Henry earned his medical degree from the University of Missouri School
of Medicine in Columbia, Mo., and completed a
general surgery internship
and urologic surgery residency at the University of
Tennessee Health Science
Center in Memphis.
His educational background includes time at the
Goethe Institute in Munich,
where he studied German,
as well as courses at the
Middlebury College German Language School in
Middlebury, Vt., and Bowdoin College in Brunswick,
from which he received a
bachelor’s degree in 2000.
Henry graduated from
Bowdoin with honors, having studied German with a
concentration in archaeology and classics. He was
a co-director of Bowdoin
College’s volunteering program, and was a member
of a 1997 archaeological
excavation in Paestum, Ita-
ly. He subsequently studied
at Western State College in
Gunnison, Co., Rockhurst
University in Kansas City,
Mo., and the University of
Missouri, in Columbia.
The coauthor of numerous professional articles,
Henry has worked as a research associate at the University of Kansas Health
Science Center in Kansas
City, Kan., and at Proteon
Therapeutics in Kansas
City, Mo. His healthcare
background also includes
work as an EKG technician
and an emergency room
technician at North Kansas
City Hospital in Kansas
City, Mo.
A member of the American Urological Association, he is eligible to
gain certification from the
American Board of Urology.
Henry practices in association with urologists
Michael Corea, M.D., Jordan M. Kurta, and Paul
R. Mailhot, M.D., nurse
practitioner Rosa Hamilton, and physician assistant Heather Renihan. The
practice can be reached at
795-2171.n
Maine Public Relations Council Accepting
2014 Scholarship Applications
The Maine Public Relations Council (MPRC),
the state’s professional
association of public relations and communications
practitioners, recently announced it is now accepting applications for its
2014 Scholarship.
The annual scholarship
of $1,000 is awarded to
one college freshman,
sophomore or junior attending an accredited
Maine college or university and majoring in public
relations, broadcasting,
journalism,
marketing,
advertising or any communications field.
In addition to a completed application, the
submission requires two
faculty references, two
faculty letters of recommendation and an essay of
no more than 500 words.
Applications will be accepted now through Friday, December 5, 2014
and must be post-marked
no later than December
5, 2014. MPRC will announce the 2014 scholarship winner on Monday,
December 22, 2014.
For more information and to download the
scholarship application,
please visit www.mepr-
council.org.
About the Maine Public
Relations Council
Now in its 37th year, the
approximately 300-member-strong Maine Public
Relations Council is a
professional association
of Maine public relations
practitioners. MPRC is
dedicated to the professional development of
its members and a greater awareness of the role
of public relations in the
world today. It is a member of the Universal Accreditation Board. More
information is available at
www.meprcouncil.org. n
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November 2014
Tuna Tourney
Endowment Gets
Another Boost
Organizers of the Sturdivant Island Tuna Tournament (SITT) hosted
representatives of the
Maine Community Colleges at a reception in
South Portland recently
at which they presented
checks for the colleges’
endowed SITT scholarship funds.
The 17th annual tournament was held in August out of the Spring
Point Marina in South
Portland. The tourney has
made more than $600,000
in charitable contribu-
tions since the inaugural
event in 1998. Most of the
funds have gone toward
establishing scholarship
endowments at Maine’s
community
colleges.
The SITT endowment at
CMCC is now approaching $40,000.
This year’s tournament
winner was Captain Phil
Chase and the crew of
“Hook'r1,” who reeled in
a 537.4 pound slammer.
Captain Patrick Simmons
and his “Kelly Ann” crew
came in second with a
430.6 catch. n
Page 9
Good Shepherd Receives Funding
Thanks to a $200,000,
two-year grant from the
Sandy River Charitable
Foundation, in addition to
several awards from other funders, Good Shepherd Food Bank will be
able to purchase 520,000
pounds of local foods to
distribute to Maine families facing hunger.
The additional funding awards come from
the Sam L. Cohen Foundation, the Elmina B.
Sewall Foundation, the
New Balance Foundation, the John Merck
Fund, and Nestle, for a
total of $340,000.
The funds will support
the Food Bank’s Mainers
Feeding Mainers program. Through this program, the organization
makes bulk purchases
from local farmers and
food producers and dis-
tributes these nutritious,
local foods to food pantries, meal sites, and directly to families facing
hunger. The Food Bank
currently purchases from
25 farms across the state.
The majority of the
grant funding will be
used to purchase nutritious foods, such as fresh
or lightly processed fruits
and vegetables, cheese
and other dairy products, and frozen fish and
meats. These healthy
items can be difficult for
the Food Bank to acquire
through its traditional food donors. Making
bulk purchases ensures
that the organization’s
partner food pantries and
meal sites will have ongoing access to nutritious
items.
“Fresh, nutritious foods
are often the most diffi-
cult items for struggling
families to access and afford, and this can have serious health consequences,” said Kristen Miale,
president of Good Shepherd Food Bank. “These
grants provide us with
the means to make sure
Maine families, no matter
what their income or circumstances, have access
to the nutritious food they
need to live healthy lives.
And the funding feeds
right back into Maine’s
local economy, so it’s really a win-win.”
A portion of the funds
from these grant awards
will also go toward improving
infrastructure
capabilities to safely, efficiently and effectively
meet the challenges of
distributing perishable
foods. The Food Bank
will improve the cold
storage facilities in its
Auburn warehouse and
will provide several partner agencies with refrigerators and freezers to
increase their capacity.
Fifteen percent of
Maine households face
hunger, according to
USDA statistics. It is estimated that one in four
Maine children does not
get the nutritious food
they need to grow and
thrive. Good Shepherd
Food Bank is committed
to providing nutritious
food for Mainers facing
hunger through its network of partner hunger
relief agencies across
Maine.
For statistics on hunger
and poverty, photos, or
interview requests, please
contact Clara Whitney at
(207) 782-3554 x1166 or
[email protected] n
Make plans to Attend the th Annual
Saturday, November Nd
10AM - 8PM
Pictured here after received a check at the Sturdivant
Island Tuna Tournament (SITT) scholarship reception
are Dean of Planning & Public Affairs Roger Philippon,
center, along with this year’s scholarship recipients Ryan
Levesque and Chyanna Millett-Cordwell.
Sunday, November 2RD
10AM - 5PM
Wednesday, November 2th
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Page 10
November 2014
Critter Chatter: Foxes and Helpful Folks
Carleen Cote
Foxes present the fewest health issues. Nevertheless, they are not
immune to mange, their
biggest problem. Mange
is caused by a mite that
burrows under the skin.
The excreted mites' waste
causes the itch. The fox
scratches until open
wounds occur. These become infected and crusty
and their hair falls out.
If this happens in cold
weather, the fox will die
from hypothermia. The
mites survive by sucking blood which causes
anemia and may lead to
death.
As with most wildlife,
foxes might have other
internal parasites, such as
round worm, hook worm
and lung worm. The stress
of captivity apparently
cause these parasites to
multiply and cause health
issues. External parasites
include lice, ticks and
fleas. These are treatable.
Rabies in foxes has
not been a problem for
many years. However in
southern Maine, three aggressive grey foxes that
attacked humans tested
positive for this virus.
This year, 22 young foxes arrived at the Center
in need of care. This is
the most we have ever received in one year. Many
calls came in about foxes hanging out around
homes and on golf courses. With the explosion
of fox families and the
loss of habitat, inevitably some virus will affect
this animal, as it has with
raccoons, skunks, woodchucks and bats.
Most folks who offer
to volunteer at the Center want to work with the
animals, until they learn
about the required vaccinations, but this summer
two people called to volunteer who had no interest
in working with animals.
We happily welcomed
Gerard, from Augusta, who said he'd do any
work that needed doing.
True to his word, he raked
lawns, weeded and cared
for flower beds, cleaned
out a building in which
we'd raised chickens for
the storage of food and
equipment, and washed
tubs and kennels used for
the wildlife. If there was
a job to be done, he was
willing. When the school
year started, we bid Gerard farewell as he returned to his paying job.
Thank you, Gerard, for all
your assistance this summer!
Brenda,
from
Waterville, initially wanted to work with the animals, but stayed with us
anyway. Joining us on
Saturdays (she works at
her job four days a week),
she did the dirty work of
scrubbing and sanitizing
the raccoon water dishes and food trays, and
washing containers used
to transport the animals,
A fox pup at the Duck Pond Wildlife Care Center. Contributed photo.
taking care of anything
that was dirty and needed cleaning. Like Gerard,
Brenda did it all these
tasks without ever a murmur of complaint. Thank
you, Brenda!
We also want to thank
Bob, who has mowed the
lawns at the Center for
many years. His pay is a
large bag of dog food and
biscuits for his animals!
Our lawns would become hay fields without
his help! We continue to
count our blessings.
Note: Carleen and
Donald Cote operate the
Duck Pond Wildlife Care
Center on Rt. 3 in Vassalboro, Maine, a non-profit
facility, supported entirely by the Cotes' own
resources and outside donations. Call the Cotes at
445-4326 or write them
at 1787 N. Belfast Ave.,
Vassalboro, ME 04989. n
Railroad Club to Present ExTRAINaganza
Gavin Labbe admires the locomotive coming though the G-Gauge tunnel near the entrance to the Great Falls Model Railroad Club, 144 Mill Street, Auburn. The railroad
club will be hosting its annual ExTRAINaganza, a family fun event with Christmas
trees and trains, on November 22, 23, 24, 28, and 29.
The Great Falls Model
Railroad Club of Auburn
and Lewiston is holding
its sixth annual Christmas “ExTRAINaganza,”
a unique model train show
with special activities
for children, at 144 Mill
Street in Auburn during
the last two weeks of November.
The handicapped-accessible club house, across
from the Barker Mill, will
be decorated for Christmas with trains of various
sizes running throughout
the two-story building for
everyone’s enjoyment.
Model trains will be operating on temporary and
permanent layouts which
are different each year
as club members contin-
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ue to develop them. The
G-scale layout always
features creative winter
scenes designed for the
occasion by club members. Children will be
able to run trains on the
extensive HO layout, and
younger children will enjoy operating trains with
Thomas the Tank Engine.
A variety of train sets under the Christmas trees
will be raffled off, with
the drawing to be held on
Saturday, November 29.
TRAIN TIME videos
produced by the Great
Falls Model Railroad Club
are seen on Time-Warner
cable from Augusta and on
local access cable channels throughout the state,
including Lewiston-Auburn (Great Falls TV);
Norway-Paris (NPC-TV);
Greene, Leeds and Turner
(WGLT-TV 4); and Lake
Region (LR-TV). TRAIN
TIME videos will be
shown continuously each
day, and will be available
for sale. ExTRAINaganza T-shirts, hand-crafted
Christmas ornaments, and
Christmas cards created
from the club’s large collection of train slides may
also be purchased.
Snacks and light refreshments are offered in
“The Dining Car.” Parents can enjoy the refreshments from conveniently
located tables and chairs,
while watching the play
area with age-appropriate
trains for younger children. Other activities include decorating cookies
and Christmas tree ornaments.
The “FEZtival of Trees”
at the Kora Shrine Center
in Lewiston takes place
on the same days, giving
families an opportunity
to enjoy both events on
the same day or alternate
days: Saturday, November 22, from 10 a.m. to
8 p.m.; Sunday, November 23, from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m.; Monday, November
24, from 4 to 8 p.m.; Friday, November 28, from
10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Saturday, November 29, from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $3 for adults and
free for children under 12.
For more details and
photos of the ExTRAINaganza in previous years,
check our websites at
www.greatfallsmodelrrclub.org and www.gfmrrc.
com. n
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November 2014
Page 11
University of Maine at Augusta
SPRING 2015
Course Guide
Take a class you need or one that interests you
at our low public tuition rate.
BUSINESS
BIOLOGY
AVI ASL
ART
ART HISTORY
ARCHITECTURE
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NOVEMBER 6TH.
For information on courses,
schedules and how to register:
go to
uma.edu/courseguide
Or call 1-877-862-1234
with any questions.
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AME 205 Religion and American Culture
AME 389 Girls on Fire: Gender, Culture, and Justice in YA
ANT 102 Cultural Anthropology
ARC 102 Architectural Design I
ARC 123 The Principles and Philosophy of Architecture
ARC 111 History of Art & Architecture
ARC 204 Architectural Design III
ARC 251 Sustainable Design Concepts
ARC 261 Computer Aided Design and Drafting
ARC 262 Building Information Modeling
ARC 306 Architectural Design V
ARC 322 Structures II
ARC 332 Construction Techniques
ARC 408 Architectural Design VII
ARC 430 Architectural Design VII, Thesis Capstone
ARC 489 Topics in Architecture: Sustainable Preservation
ARH 105 History of Art & Architecure
ARH 106 History of Art and Architecture II
ARH 206 History of Photography II (1930 to Present)
ARH 375 Modern Art II
ART 100 Introduction to Studio Art
ART 109 Photographic Vision and Digital Discovery
ART 112 2-D Design
ART 113 3-D Design
ART 115 Drawing I
ART 140 Intro to Digital Imaging
ART 202 Electronic Arts I
ART 210 Intaglio Printmaking
ART 215 Drawing II
ART 235 Photography I
ART 302 Electronic Arts II: Design for Sound, Video and Web
ART 309 Intermediate Printmaking
ART 335 Photography II
ART 402 Electronic Arts III: Interactivity
ART 409 Advanced Printmaking
ART 430 Senior Project
ART 435 Photography III
ASL 102 American Sign Language II
AUD 319 Advanced Audio Technology
AVI 320 Aviation Law
BIO 100 Human Biology
BIO 100 Human Biology LAB
BIO 104 Introduction to Human Nutrition
BIO 110 General Biology I
BIO 110 General Biology I LAB
BIO 111 General Biology II (Blended)
BIO 111 General Biology II LAB
BIO 116 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II
BIO 116 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II LAB
BIO 210 Anatomy and Physiology
BIO 210 Anatomy and Physiology LAB
BIO 215 Introduction to Human Genetics
BIO 280 Intro to Human Disease
BIO 310 Biology of Cancer
BIO 321 Microbiology
BIO 321 Microbiology LAB
BIO 322 Biochemistry
BIO 345 Pathophysiology
BIO 440 Immunology
BIO 485 Techniques in Molecular Biology
BIO 490 Perspectives on Global Health
BUA 100 Introduction to Business
BUA 101 Fin. Acct for Managemnt Decisions
BUA 202 Intermediate Financial Reporting II
BUA 211 Acct. for Management Decisions
BUA 215 Principles to Banking
BUA 222 Fund. of Property & Casualty Insurance
BUA 223 Principles of Management
BUA 230 Business Law
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AUGUSTA • BANGOR • ONLINE
and CENTERS STATEWIDE
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ENG 5 Basic Writing
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ENG 10 Writing Improvement
ENG 101 College Writing
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ENG 102W Introduction to Literature
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ENG 103W Writing for Allied Health
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ENG 111W Journalism
ENG 185W Intro. to Mythology: The Origins of Literature
x
ENG 203W Sur.British Lit: Romantics to the 20th Century
x
ENG 289 Topics: From Science to Fiction: the Lit of Sustain
ENG 301W History of the English Language
ENG 317W Professional Writing
x
ENG 351W Creative Writing
x
ENG 360W Selected Work of Shakespeare
x
ENG 366 Children and Young Adult Literature
ENG 389W Regional American Literature, Detroit
x
ENG 389 Girls on Fire: Gender, Culture and Justice in YA Dys
ENG 389 Topics: Mentoring Writers: Practice and Pedagogy
ENG 450W Poetry: Cross-Cultural Forms and Themes
x
ENG 499W Senior Seminar
x
FRE 102 Elementary French II
x
FRE 103 Basic French Conversation: Beginners and Beyond
x
FRE 204 Intermediate French II
x
FRE 306 Language and Culture of the Francophone World II
x
GEY 101 Physical Geology
GEY 101 Physical Geology LAB
HGH 301 Holocaust: From Prejudice to Genocide
x
HON 300W Critical Thinking and Writing
HON 401 Leadership Seminar
HTY 103 United States History I
HTY 104 United States History II
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HTY 106 World Civilizations II, 1500 to the Present (Delayed View) x
HTY 310 History of Maine
HTY 341 History of American Slavery
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HTY 389 Topics in History: Russia on the Global Stage
x
HUM 122 Native American Cultures II
HUS 101 Introduction to Human Services
x
HUS 125 Chemical Dependency
x
HUS 130 Developmental Disabilities
HUS 134 Cultural Competence in the Helping Professions
HUS 204 Practicum
HUS 212 Case Management
x
HUS 215 Introduction to Therapeutic Activities
x
HUS 218 Community Mental Health
x
HUS 220 Child Mental Health
x
HUS 221 Adolescent Mental Health
HUS 222 Psychosocial Rehabilitation
x
HUS 224 Fund. of Community Practice & Involvement
x
HUS 229 Models of Addiction
HUS 232 Crisis Counseling
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HUS 233 Sexual Abuse and Trauma (Delayed View)
HUS 236 Foundations of Vocational Rehabilitation
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HUS 261 Early Childhood Curriculum (Delayed View)
HUS 263 Family Interactions
HUS 305 Group Process
x
HUS 308 Assessment and Planning
HUS 318 Adolescence, Substance Abuse & Criminality
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HUS 326 Chemical Dependency Counseling
x
HUS 328 Creative Development and Art for Young Children
HUS 329 Science and the Project Approach for the Young Child
HUS 330 Interviewing and Counseling
x
HUS 331 Substance Abuse Counseling for Special Populations
HUS 332 Addiction and the Family
HUS 345 Problems and Interventions in Childhood
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HUS 349 Supervision in Human Services
HUS 350 Mental Health and Aging
HUS 352 Interventions for Families with Children
HUS 354 Behavioral Health Professional (BHP)
x
HUS 362 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood
HUS 364 Human Rights Violation: Torture and Trauma
HUS 416 Applied Professional Ethics for Human Services
HUS 436 Counseling Co-Occurring Mental Disorders & Addiction
HUS 460 Pre-Internship Seminar
HUS 461 Internship in Mental Health and Human Services
HUS 462 Capstone Internship Mental Health/Human Services
HUS 463 Capstone Internship Mental Health/Human Services
ILS 100 Introduction to Libraries and Library Careers
ILS 101 Foundations of Information and Library Science
ILS 109 Information Literacy
ILS 150 Introduction to Reference Services and Materials
ILS 175 Cataloging and Technical Processes
ILS 201 Library Services to Teens
ILS 202 Library Materials and Services for Children
ILS 250 Collection Development
ILS 299 Library Assistant Practicum and Capstone
ILS 312 Introduction to Archives and Manuscripts
ILS 325 Digital Library Technology and Services
ILS 350 Advanced Reference Services and Materials
ILS 441 Info. Brokering & Entrepreneurial Options for
Library/Media Professionals
ILS 499 Senior Capstone Internship or Advanced Research
ISS 210 Introduction to Information Systems Security
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ISS 340 Computer Security
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ISS 360 Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery
ISS 410 Cyber Security I
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ISS 452 Security Strategies Web Applications & Social Networking
ISS 470 Information Systems Security Management
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BUA 252 Business Ethics
BUA 259W Strategic Managemt for Small Business
BUA 286 Topics in Business: QuickBooks
BUA 303 Management Information System
BUA 315 Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
BUA 345 Cost Management I
BUA 355 Introduction to Operations Research
BUA 357 Business Finance
BUA 362 Labor-Management Relations
BUA 365 Organizational Behavior
BUA 376 Advanced Taxation
BUA 387 Fraud Examination
BUA 420 International Business
BUA 448 Auditing, Assurance, & Consulting Services
BUA 458 Acct. Seminar
BUA 459 Seminar in Strategy and Policy Planning
CHY 105 Fund. of Chemistry
CHY 106 Fund. of Chemistry LAB
CHY 108 Allied Health Chemistry
CHY 108 Allied Health Chemistry LAB
CHY 116 General Chemistry II
CHY 116 General Chemistry II LAB
CIS 100 Introduction to Computing
CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Science
CIS 131 Web Applications and Development
CIS 135 Intro. to Info. Systems and Applications Development
CIS 212 Introduction to Visual Basic Programming
CIS 221 Operating Systems: UNIX
CIS 225 Introduction to Health Informatics
CIS 240 Networking Concepts
CIS 241 Network Administration
CIS 243 Web Applications Programming: XML
CIS 280 Internship
CIS 303 Management Information Systems
CIS 312 Advanced Visual Basic Programming
CIS 314 Advanced Java Programming
CIS 340 Advanced Networking
CIS 351 Database Management Systems: Oracle
CIS 352 Data Visualization
CIS 354 Algorithms and Data Structures
CIS 380 Internship
CIS 438 Electronic Commerce
CIS 460 Computers and Culture
CIS 470 Project Management
CIS 475 Advanced Health Informatics
CIS 480 Internship
COL 100 Introduction to the College Experience
COL 214 Professionalism in the Workplace
COM 101 Public Speaking
COM 102 Interpersonal Communications
COM 104 Communication in Groups and Organizations
DEA 152 Dental Office Management
DEA 154 Biodental Sciences II
DEA 250 Clinical Practice
DEA 251 Clinical Dental Assisting Theory
DEA 251 Clinical Dental Assisting Theory LAB
DEA 253 Dental Health Education
DEH 250 Clinical Dental Hygiene I LAB
DEH 251 Clinical Dental Hygiene Theory I
DEH 252 Oral Pathology
DEH 254 Nutrition in Oral Health
DEH 255 Oral Health Considerations for Target Populations
DEH 302 Pharmacology
DEH 350 Clinical Dental Hygiene III
DEH 351 Dental Hygiene Theory III
DEH 352 Dental Specialties
DEH 353 Community Dentistry II
DEH 354 Ethics and Jurisprudence
DRA 101 Introduction to Theatre
DRA 151 Play Production
DRA 251 Introduction to Acting
DRA 280 Introduction to Films
DRA 330 Dramatic Literature: Plays and Politics
DRA 389 Topics in Film and Theatre
ECO 100 Introduction to Economics
ECO 201 Macroeconomics
ECO 202 Microeconomics
EDU 250 Foundations of Education
EDU 261 Early Childhood Curriculum
EDU 328 Creative Development and Art for Young Children
EDU 329 Science & the Project Approach for the Young Child
EDU 352 Interventions for Families with Children
EDU 366 Children and Young Adult Literature
EDU 380 Literacy and Technology Across the Curriculum
EDU 387 Teaching the Exceptional Child in Regular Classroom
EDU 390A Methods of Teaching Art (K-12)
EDU 390B Methods of Teaching English (7-12)
EDU 390C Methods of Teaching Life Science (7-12)
EDU 390D Methods of Teaching Physical Science (7-12)
EDU 390F Methods of Teaching Mathematics (7-12)
EDU 390G Methods of Teaching Social Studies (7-12)
EDU 401 Educational Psychology
EDU 490A Internship in Teach Art (K-12)
EDU 490B Internship: Student Teaching English (7-12)
EDU 490C Internship: Student Teaching Life Science (7-12)
EDU 490D Internship: Student Teaching Physical Science (7-12)
EDU 490F Internship: Student Teaching Social Studies (7-12)
EDU 490G Internship: Student Teaching Mathematics (7-12)
November 2014
SECURITY
EDUCATION
ECON
DRAMA
DENTAL HEALTH AND HYGIENE
COMMUN.
COMPUTER INFORMATION
CHEMISTRY
BUSINESS
Course Number and Description
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PHY 116 General Physics II
PHY 116 General Physics II LAB
POS 101 American Government
POS 223 Principles of Management
POS 234 American State and Local Government
POS 354 Public Budgeting & Financial Admin.
POS 362 Labor-Management Relations
POS 365 Organizational Behavior
POS 383 Survey of Constitutional Law
POS 488 Public Program Evaluation
PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology
PSY 229 Models of Addiction
PSY 302 Psychology of Childhood
PSY 304 Psychology of Adolescence
PSY 308 Human Development
PSY 345 Problems and Interventions in Childhood
PSY 362 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood
PSY 364 Psychology of Men and Boys
PSY 400 Abnormal Psychology
PSY 401 Educational Psychology
PSY 415 Cross-Cultural Psychology
REA 8 Reading for Understanding
REL 205 Religion and American Culture (Blended)
SCI 110 Environmental Science
SCI 110 Environmental Science LAB
SCI 150 Human Ecology and the Future
SCI 210 Introduction to Marine Science
SCI 210 Introduction to Marine Science LAB
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 201 Social Problems
SOC 311 Social Theory
SOC 360 Sociology of the Family
SOC 370 Sociology of Culture
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II
SSC 110 Introduction to Human Sexuality
SSC 205 Religion and American Culture (Blended)
SSC 317 Leadership Seminar
SSC 318 Adolescence, Substance Abuse & Criminality
SSC 319 Social Gerontology
SSC 332 Addiction and the Family
SSC 364 Human Rights Violation: Torture and Trauma
SSC 420 Social Science Senior Projects
VTE 100 Introduction to Veterinary Technology
VTE 123 Clinical Laboratory Methods
VTE 123L Clinical Laboratory Methods LAB
VTE 128 Radiology
VTE 128L Radiology LAB
VTE 223 Pharmacology
VTE 224 Surgical Nursing and Anesthesiology I
VTE 224L Surgical Nursing and Anesthesiology I LAB
VTE 230 Practicum in Veterinary Technology
VTE 324 Advanced Veterinary Surgery and Anesthesia I
WGS 101W Intro to Women's Studies
WGS 389 Girls on Fire: Gender, Culture and Justice in YA Dys
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POLITICAL SCI.
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PSYCHOLOGY
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SCIENCE
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SOCIOLOGY
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SOCIAL SCIENCE
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JUS 105 Legal Research and Materials
JUS 121 Criminal Law
JUS 123 Contemporary Corrections
JUS 160 Intro to Forensic Science
JUS 200 Principles of Investigation
JUS 218 Estate Administration
JUS 223 Principles of Management
JUS 250 Consumer Fraud and White Collar Crime
JUS 271 Due Process in Criminal Justice
JUS 296W Professional Responsibility
JUS 302 Juvenile Justice
JUS 307 Violence in the Family
JUS 341 Law of Criminal Evidence
JUS 363 Comparative International Justice Issues
JUS 364 Human Rights Violation: Torture and Trauma
JUS 375 Counter-Terrorism
JUS 390 Advocacy and Public Policy
JUS 392 Hate Crimes
JUS 488 Senior Seminar and Capstone Experience
JUS 489 Topics in Justice Studies: Restorative Justice
MAT 9 Foundations of Mathematics
MAT 20 Algebra I (Part I)
MAT 21 Algebra I (Part II)
MAT 30 Algebra I
MAT 100 Mathematics and Its Applications
MAT 111 Algebra II
MAT 112 College Algebra
MAT 113 Math for Business And Economics I
MAT 114 Math for Business & Economics II
MAT 115 Elementary Statistics I
MAT 124 Pre-Calculus
MAT 131 Math for Elementary Teachers II
MAT 261 Applied Linear Algebra
MAT 315 Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
MAT 355 Operations Research
MLT 395 Hospital Practicum
MUH 104 Classic-Era Music: Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven
MUH 110 Popular Music
MUH 118 Golden Age of Country Music 1950-1970
MUH 123 Understanding Music
MUH 124 Music of the Twentieth Century
MUH 160 World Music
MUH 190 Women in Western Music
MUS 100 Recital Lab
MUS 102 Music Theory and Practice II
MUS 115A Basic Applied Music: Sec
MUS 115B Applied Music: Secondary
MUS 122 Fundamentals of Music
MUS 122N Fund of Music(Non-Major)
MUS 125 The Songwriters Toolkit: Melody, Harmony and Form
MUS 151 First Year/Sophomore Ensemble Sequence
MUS 151N Freshman Ensemble I for Non-Majors
MUS 152 First Year/Sophomore Ensemble Sequence
MUS 152N Freshman Ensemble II
MUS 182 Piano Lab II
MUS 204 Music Theory and Practice IV
MUS 222 Arranging II
MUS 253 First Year/Sophomore Ensemble Sequence
MUS 253N Sophomore Ensemble Sequence for Non-majors
MUS 254 Sophomore Ensemble Sequence
MUS 254N Sophomore Ensemble Sequence for Non-majors
MUS 262 Woodwind Techniques
MUS 263 Brass Techniques
MUS 264 String Techniques
MUS 265 Percussion Techniques
MUS 266 Vocal Techniques
MUS 270 Music Business LAB
MUS 271 Sonic Arts I: Digital Music Systems
MUS 315 Transcription
MUS 324 Composition II
MUS 355 Junior Ensemble Sequence
MUS 356 Junior Ensemble Sequence II
MUS 361 Music Pedagogy
MUS 362 Music Methods
MUS 457 Senior Ensemble Sequence I
MUS 458 Senior Ensemble Sequence II
MUS 463 Studio Teaching Lab
MUS 471 Music Business
NUR 102 Nursing Care of the Adult Client I
NUR 202L Promoting Health Lab LAB
NUR 204 Nursing Care of the Adult Client II
NUR 205 Nursing Care of the Adult Client III
NUR 225 Introduction to Health Informatics
NUR 230 Promoting Health, Wellness, & Ethical Nursing Practice
NUR 301 Health Assessment Throughout the Lifespan
NUR 302 Pharmacology for Nurses
NUR 304 Concepts of Professional Nursing Practice
NUR 326 Caring for Aging Adults
NUR 352 Nursing Research (Blended)
NUR 356 Community and Global Health Clinical
NUR 389 Topics Nursing: Thanatology for Nurses
NUR 499W Senior Seminar
PHI 250 Ethics
PHI 252 Business Ethics
PHI 370 East Asian Philosophy
Page 13
WOM/GEND.
JAZZ AND CONTEMPORARY MUSIC & MUSIC HISTORY
MED LAB
MATH
JUSTICE STUDIES
Course Number and Description
ust
a
November 2014
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GO TO: www.uma.edu/courseguide
TO FIND DETAILED
COURSE INFORMATION
Stay Close. Go Far.
Page 14
November 2014
Former Bruins at the Colisee
The Lewiston Police
Athletic League is proud to
bring to the Androscogging
Bank
Colisee
former
Boston
Bruins
greats
to play in the Annual
Lewiston PAL AllStars
Hockey
Game on Friday,
December
19th, at 7pm.
The
game
has become
a
tradition
for
Maine
residents with
a near capacity
crowd last year
featuring former Bruins
such as Kenny “The Rat”
Linseman, Reggie Lemelin,
John Carter and more. In
addition to the game there
John Carter, who does many charity events during the
year, and many other Bruins Greats will be once again
visiting Lewiston for their annual game against the
Lewiston PAL All Stars on Friday, December 19th at 7
PM at the Androscoggin Bank Colisee.
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November means
remembering and supporпїЅing
our veterans and a time to give
thanks and say a prayer for peace.
A time to prepare for Thanksgiving
with fami
ffamily
i and пїЅiends and share
iinn nat�re’s har�est.
We carry immune
building products to prepare
for cold season.
Fresh Maine Produce Still Available!
We are not only local but also the longest
running natural food store in Maine!
Hours: Mon- Fri 8:30am-8pm, Sat- 8:30am-6pm, Sun- 10am-4pm
120 Center Street Plaza - Suite 300 - Auburn - (207) 782-3348
will be opportunities for
autographs/photos
with
your favorite Bruins Greats
and more. Proceeds from
this fundraiser will go to
youth athletic programs
throughout
Androscoggin
C o u n t y
for
2015.
Tickets are
avilable by
calling 207432-6968.
Children
under
12
free. Families’
welcome. Doors
open at 6. The Colisee
is located at 90 Birch
St in Lewiston. FMI on
this event email alex@
ecmgevents.com . n
November 2014
Page 15
Healthy Androscoggin Honors Prevention Partners
Healthy Androscoggin recently held its 2014 Annual
Meeting at The Bates Mill Atrium in Lewiston. The Annual Meeting was a time for Healthy Androscoggin to share
its successes over the past year with partners and community members of Androscoggin County. This included
honoring three coalition partners with its annual Coalition Awards. The Coalition Awards are distributed to local and regional community partners on an annual basis
and consist of the Community Leadership, Will Bartlett,
and Partnership awards.
The 2014 Community Leadership Award was presented to Kristen Cloutier, Lewiston City Councilor and
Center Operations and Program Coordinator for the Harward Center at Bates College. This award, which recognizes an individual that has exempliпїЅied superior leadership through their work in the community, is granted
for diligent and altruistic work that improves the public
health and promotes the ideals of Healthy Androscoggin. Kristen has been a Lewiston City Councilor for less
than a year, but she has helped raise awareness of the
high number of childhood lead poisonings in LewistonAuburn and how lead poisoning can be prevented. She
helped garner support for the City of Lewiston to become
a Green and Healthy Homes Initiative site which leverages partnerships and resources to make our local housing stock safer.
Healthy Androscoggin presented the 2014 Will Bartlett
Award to Norma Larocque, Health Coordinator at Androscoggin Head Start and Childcare. Will Bartlett, a longterm Guidance Counselor in the Lewiston School Department, was a strong believer in the mission and vision of
The 2014 Partnership Award was presented to Michael
W. Wardrop, Maine Resident Agent in Charge for the
United States Drug Enforcement Administration. This
award, which recognizes an individual or organization
that has exempliпїЅied superior partnership with Healthy
Androscoggin, is granted for diligent and altruistic work
that helps further Healthy Androscoggin’s mission and
vision in the community. Mike has been Maine’s point
person and lead on organizing the DEA’s National Medicine Take Back Initiatives since they began in 2010. Mike
and his team, for four years, have coordinated with every
law enforcement department in Maine, as well as many
long-term care facilities, to carry out these programs.
The partnership in Lewiston/Auburn has been extremely successful and lead to the removal of over 5 tons of
unwanted and expired medicines from area households.
Kristen Cloutier, Leadership; Michael Wardrop, Partner- Statewide, the Medicine Take Backs have collected over
76 tons over the past 5 years. Mike has been a leading
ship; Norma Larocque, Will Bartlett.
advocate in Maine for better systems and options for
the safe disposal of unused and expired medicines. As
Healthy Androscoggin. This award is given out to a mema result of his hard work and dedication, more homes in
ber of our community for selпїЅless dedication, leaderMaine and Androscoggin County are safer.
ship, and compassion in promoting the ideals of Healthy
“What Kristen, Norma, and Mike have done for our
Androscoggin and improving the lives of children in our communities is immeasurable,” commented Healthy Ancommunity. Norma is extremely passionate and commit- droscoggin’s Executive Director, Steven Johndro. “Each
ted to Healthy Androscoggin’s mission to improve the one of these awardees has and continues to signi�icantly
public health of Androscoggin communities, particularly contribute to the ideals of Healthy Androscoggin and has
for children. Norma plans blood lead screening clinics been a wonderful partner to work with.”
for children attending Head Start’s programs and always
For more info about Healthy Androscoggin and their
promotes nutrition and employs creative approaches to work, visit www.healthyandroscoggin.org or call 7955990.
better reach families.
Playgrounds Get a Face Lift
Androscoggin Head
Start and Child Care
playgrounds get a face
lift thanks to United
Way Volunteers 2014
United Way’s Day of
Caring.
The
Androscoggin
Head Start Children
were happy to have fresh
mulch spread on the
playground by TD Bank
volunteers at the Family Development Center
site in Auburn. Thanks
to United Way’s Day of
Caring, TD Bank employees also converged
on the Head Start site at
the Hillview Resource
Center to spent the day
painting a playground
shed a cheerful red. n
Family Development Center, Auburn. TD Bank Volunteers spreading mulch, from ( botton row- left to right)
Nancy Dexler, Sarah Boyd, (top row- left to right) Melody Coburn, Vicki Runyon and Laurie Howard.
Installation of the Franco
American Veterans Post 31
The Installation was held
on Tuesday October 14, at
Rolly’s Diner in Auburn,
with many of our members,
guests, and a great group of
former ladies auxiliary. A
great meal was held with a
toast by the National Commander of Franco Vets,
from Connecticut.
The new installed officers were: Commander
Hank Bernier, 1st Vice
Commander Norm Bussiere, 2nd Vice Commander Don Gosselin, Adjutant
Cecile Beaudouyne, Judge
Advocat Bert Dutil, Chaplain Don Dube, Historian
Willie Danforth, Officer of
the Day Paul Emond, 3year
Trustee Armand Bussiere,
2yr trustee Dave Tananbond, 1year trustee Ray
Blackie Boulet. Next meeting for the Post, is on Tuesday November 18, 6:30 pm
at the Armory (change of
date because of Veterans
Day on the 11th). n
Page 16
November 2014
CM Foundation Honors Retiring Members
Two longtime members of the CM Education Foundation Board of
Directors were honored
recently for their distinguished service on the
board. The directors voted
unanimously to grant them
member-emeritus status.
Richard Roy served on
the board for almost 20
years and is a former chair.
He is executive vice president and chief banking officer at Mechanics Savings
Bank. Ed Cormier, also a
former board chair, served
on the board for over 15
years. He is retired from
Harriman Architects and
Engineers, where he
served as president from
1991 to 2008.
The CM Education
Foundation is a community-based,
non-profit
corporation that has as its
sole mission “support for
Central Maine Community College and its students.” The Foundation is
governed by a volunteer
Board of Directors comprised of community and
business leaders.
The
Foundation has raised
and contributed almost
one million dollars to the
college for scholarships,
program improvements
and capital projects. In
addition to an annual fund
campaign, the Foundation
holds an annual dinner and
co-hosts the annual Scholarship Scramble with the
Androscoggin Chamber
of Commerce.
For more information
about the CM Foundation, please contact Roger
Philippon at 755-5357 or
[email protected], or
visit the website at www.
cmcc.edu. n
Longtime board members Ed Cormier and Dick Roy, second and third from the left, were honored recently The CM
Foundation Board of Directors. They are pictured here with CMCC President Scott Knapp, left, and Board Chair
Dick Gleason, right.
District Deputy President to Visit Rebekah Lodges
Winnie Bellville and Cindy Larrabee are pictured.
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Winnie Belleville, Past
Noble Grand of Colfax
Rebekah Lodge #27, Mechanic Falls, has been appointed by the President
of the Rebekah Assembly
of Maine, Verna Jones of
Phippsburg, to be District Deputy President of
District #3. Winnie has
chosen Cindy Larrabee,
also a member of Colfax
Rebekah Lodge and a Past
District Deputy President,
to be her Marshal. They
will visit the three Rebekah lodges in District
#3, Colfax #27, Nina #86
in Lisbon, and Liberty #94
in Auburn, to present the
program of new President
of the Rebekah Assem-
bly, who has as her motto
“Whatever you do, work
at it with all your heart.”
Her choice of flowers
is daisies of all colors and
her hymn is “It Is No Secret”. She has also chosen
two of her favorite songs,
“This Love Is Mine” and
“Little Flowers.” Her Bible Verse is Ephesians
4:32 and her project is
the Odd Fellows and Rebekahs Home of Maine in
Auburn. She has a special
project which is Down's
Syndrome.
There are other pieces
to her program but special emphasis is the project of the President of the
International Association
of Rebekah Assemblies,
her Teddy Bear Project.
This challenges Rebekah
Lodges all over the world
to make a difference by
taking teddy bears to their
local Police Department
and Fire Department, boy
teddy bears and girl teddy
bears showing the name
Colfax for a boy and Rebekah for a girl. These
are to be given to children
who, at the time, are experiencing a traumatic experience.
Anyone interested in
learning more about the
work of the Rebekahs and
Odd Fellows may contact
Cindy Larrabee, Telephone 207-345-9533. n
Winter Session at CMCC
Registration is now open
for Winter Session classes
at Central Maine Community College in Auburn.
These course begin right
after the close of the fall semester and end before the
start of the spring semester
on January 20, 2015.
The following online
classes will begin on December 23 and end on
January 14: Criminology,
Developmental Psycholo-
gy, Intro to Visual Basic,
Intro to Psychology, Music Appreciation & History, Substance Abuse, and
US History to 1877. Four
classes will be delivered on
campus: Macroeconomics
(Monday-Friday, 12/29 –
1/14); First-Year Seminar
(Monday & Wednesday,
12/29 – 1/14); Automotive
State Inspection (Monday-Thursday, 1/5 – 1/8);
Intro to Automotive (Mon-
day-Thursday, 1/12 - 1/15).
Registration is open and
ongoing until the classes
start. More information on
Winter Session and spring
semester classes in available online at www.cmcc.
edu. Students not enrolled
in a program at CMCC
must register through the
Registrar’s Office (207755-5292). Payment is due
upon registration. n
November 2014
Page 17
Seniorsplus Education Center Classes
NewsBites
from the desk of Connie Jones...
Getting Old or Growing Old?
Similar phrases, but what a world of
difference between the two! Which are
you? – getting old or growing old?
Getting old. Just picture it. Drooping
shoulders, head hung low. “Getting old
isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.” “Things
sure aren’t like they used to be.” This
person is part of that statistic that always
KRUUL¿HV PH ± ò RI DOO HOGHUV¶ WLPH
is spent watching TV. These people
seem to be sitting on the sidelines,
just waiting for the days to go by until
they die. “Nobody wants us…I’m just
too old…” It seems that they got to a
certain point and just gave up.
Growing old. Ah-h-h. A huge
difference. This is active, we’re still
growing, becoming something new,
expanding, changing. Still not mature
or complete, we still have more to
become! I think of the trees in the fall
– that’s growing old. They don’t die
before they become a blaze of glory.
We are those leaves – still growing
towards maturity. We are not complete
yet, we are still growing. Let’s do it
ZLWK D EOD]H RI FRORU PDJQLВїFHQFH
changing ourselves and changing the
entire world around us.
These people are still learning, still
have new ideas, have new goals and
aims. They are still curious about the
world around them, want to better
understand themselves and the people
RI WKH ZRUOG 7KH\ DUH UHГЂHFWLYH
maybe spending more time listening
and watching, than expounding! This
becomes the wisdom of old age.
A very wise woman once said –
I look forward to how I will change in
5 or 10 years. This is what I think now.
I’m anxious to see how I’ll change in
the future. -- Coronetta Adams (my
mom)
Aging & Disability Resource
Center for Androscoggin,
Franklin, and Oxford counties
8 Falcon Rd.
Lewiston, ME 04240
В‡
www.seniorsplus.org
Like us on Facebook!
The following classes
have been announced at
the SeniorsPlus Education
Center, 8 Falcon Road,
Lewiston.
A One-on-One, OneHour Class Researching
Your Family History. Date
Choices: November 3, 6,
10, 18, 20. (These will be
the last classes for a few
months.) Time Choices: 9:00, 10:15, 11:30 a.m.
Instructor:
Carroll N.
Holmes, Researcher
The instructor will use
several genealogical web
sites to find people on your
family tree. Bring curiosity,
and if you have it, whatever
information (names, dates,
places) you may have.
Veterans Day: Celebrating and Honoring Our
Veterans. Tuesday, November 11. Maine Author
Series Author: Morgan Rielly. Book: Neighborhood
Heroes: Life Lessons from
Maine’s Greatest Generation. Time: 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Inspired by the proverb, “When an old man
dies, a library burns to the
ground,” the author sought
to preserve as many Maine
“libraries” as he could by
interviewing men and
women from Maine who
served in WWII, and by
telling their stories.
Cards for Vets: no registration needed. Refresh-
ments provided. We may
even have music! Come on
in anytime November 11
between 2:45 - 3:45 p.m.
to sign Christmas cards provided by the Red Cross
– that will be given to vets
around the state.
Facts about Health Care
Advance Directives and
POLST. Date: Friday, November 14. Time: 10:00
a.m. – Noon. Instructor:
Lynne Caswell, Esq. Legal
Services Developer / Staff
Attorney Office of Aging
and Disability Services,
State of Maine.
Advance Directives: Under Maine law, the term
means any spoken or written instructions you give
about the health care you
want if a time comes when
you are too ill to decide.
Physician Orders for
Life-Sustaining Treatment
(POLST) is a form that
states what kind of medical
treatment you want toward
the end of your life. POLST
helps give seriously ill patients more control over
their end-of-life care.
Gentle Morning Chair
Yoga for Seniors. Dates:
Mondays, November 17 –
January 12 (no class 12/29).
Time: 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. Instructor: Tisha Bremner.
Cost: $40 for 8 weeks.
Designed to increase vitality, gain a deeper sense
of balance, and find your
inner calm. Combines
meditation, easy warmups, light stretches, and
gentle yoga postures.
The Basics: How to Get
Started Building a Beehive
in Your Backyard. Date:
Tuesday, November 18.
Time: 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Instructor:
Wedgwood
Wheeler, Backyard Beekeeper. Come learn!
Leg Pain. Date: Tuesday,
November 18. Time: 1:00
– 2:30 p.m. Instructor: Dr.
Derek Mittleider, Interventional Radiologist, St.
Mary’s Hospital.
If you experience mild
to severe pain or cramping
in your legs during physical activity that goes away
soon after resting, you may
be interested in learning
more. PAD is a reduced
blow flow in your legs
caused by a blockage or
narrowing of the arteries.
Ebola Virus - The Facts.
Date: Wednesday, November 19, Time: 9:30 – 11:00
a.m. Instructor: Christopher Bowe, MD, Department Chair of Emergency
Services, St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center .
The Evaluation of Potential Ebola Virus Disease in
Lewiston, A Review of the
Facts
• Come learn what we
actually know about the
cases of Ebola in the United States.
• What the odds are of
acquiring the virus in our
local area.
• Bring your questions!
AARP Smart Driver.
Date: Wednesday, November 19. Time: Noon
– 4:00 p.m. Instructor:
AARP Cost: $20, payable
to AARP; $15 for AARP
Members. Drivers 55 +
completing this class are
eligible for discounts on
their auto insurance for 3
years. 
Healthy Aging Series:
Medical Terms You Should
Know. Date: Thursday,
November 20. Time: 1:00
– 2:30 p.m. Instructor: Dr.
Alan Verrill. Medical terminology can be baffling!
Alzheimer's Association,
Registration & Information: Alzheimer’s Assoc:
772-0115 or bkirkpatrick@
alz.org.
Living with Alzheimer’s,
Caregivers. Part III, Date:
Monday, November 20,
Time: 10:00 – Noon
Driving with Alzheimer’s: When Is It Time to
Give Up the Keys?, Date:
Monday, November 20,
Time: 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Our classes are free (unless noted). We are fully accessible. Hearing assistive
equipment is available. n
Stone Garden Dedication
Androscoggin Home
Care & Hospice hosted
a ribbon cutting event
unveiling its Stone Garden that represents the
migration of the spirit
for the patients and their
families who are cared
for at its Hospice House
in Auburn, Maine. The
ceremony was held on
Friday, October 17th on
a beautiful Friday afternoon with 25 guest, staff
and community members
joining in on the celebration.
Julie Shackley, President/CEO; Mary MacMahon,
Foundation
Chair,
Karen Flynn,
Hospice Director; sisters
Lucie and Dianne Boucher, Artist, and Claudia
Takacs wife of the late
Antony Takacs who created the iron stands for
the bowls, were present
to dedicate the new Stone
Garden.
The Stone Project rep-
Pictured from left to right: Dianne Boucher, Mary MacMahon, Julie Shackley, Lucie
Boucher, Claudia Takacs and Karen Flynn
resents the Migration of
the Spirit. After the actual loss of a loved one,
perhaps the greatest challenge for a survivor is
letting go emotionally.
While the passage
of time itself works to
this end, ceremony and
the physical things which
embody a ceremony can
make this easier, both
pointing the way and
leading the survivor to a
peaceful acceptance.
These are the ideas
behind Migration of the
Spirit, a collection of
fused glass vessels arranged to symbolize the
emotional letting go of a
loved one. Stones originally placed in a bowl
inside the Hospice House
are over time and with
appropriate
ceremony
moved, first outside and
then, through the descending sequence of five
vessels, to the ground and
the environment from
which all life originates.
Migration of the Spirit
is a collective artistic effort of professional glass
artist Lucie Boucher of
Stone Ridge Glass and
her sister Dianne Boucher, science teacher and
artist in training.
Androscoggin Home
Care & Hospice is a nonprofit Medicare-certified
agency that provides patient centered care that is
meaningful, organized,
developed, effective/efficient and has lasting quality. They provide specialized skilled, supportive
and hospice services to
Maine residents and their
families in the comfort
of their home and community. For more information on Androscoggin
Home Care & Hospice
and all of their services,
visit their website at
www.AHCH.org. n
Page 18
November 2014
CMMC DAISY Award Nurse
Registered nurse Erin
Stone has been recognized as a Central Maine
Medical Center DAISY
Award recipient.
The DAISY Award is
sponsored by the DAISY
Foundation and recognizes nurses who consistently demonstrate in
their work the following
attributes: compassion;
critical thinking skills;
passion about life; patient- and family-focused
care; patient advocacy;
support of all healthcare
team members; and nursing profession role model.
Stone works on fourth
floor Memorial Wing
Cardiopulmonary Nursing Unit. She was nominated for the award for
her ongoing job performance, which one recent
patient described as fitting “all of the criteria for
receiving a Daisy award.
Erin went far and beyond
what she needed to do.”
“As both a co-worker
and clinical and spiritual
mentor, Erin empowers
nurses to excel in their
roles. She is personally
invested in the mission
and values of Central
Maine Medical Center to
provide the highest quality, patient centered care.
Erin is legendary for her
teamwork, her holistic
values, her creativity in
delivering care, her excellent communication, and
her consummate clinical
skills,” says M4 Nurse
Manager Mary McRae.
“Erin offers the gift of
anticipating her patients’
needs, focusing on their
home situation, their current needs and values,
and then she is a zealous
patient advocate,” McRae
continues. “She makes
connections with patients
by fostering an affirmative framework, speaking
with them at their level, at
the bedside, holding their
hands and listening. Her
compassionate approach
works on all patients because they connect on
a deeper level and feel
heard. Erin uses the power of �presence’, listening
to the families concerns
and letting them verbalize their fears. She offers
comfort measures not
only to the patient, but the
extended family as well.”
McRae also notes that
Stone’s sense of service
extends to the community. “She volunteers at
the United Congregational Church of New
Gloucester in their food
pantry, and for 10 years
has worked with Edie’s
Angels, partnering with
Blake Street Towers to
provide meals, food baskets and spirituality to the
80-plus residents that reside there,” she says.
The DAISY Award was
established in 1999 by
the family of J. Patrick
Barnes, who died at 33
from complications of
idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. DAISY is
an acronym for “diseases attacking the immune
system”. The foundation
is headquartered in Glen
Community CU Raises
Funds for the Heart Walk
Giving back to the local community is part of
the mission of Community Credit Union. For
the third year in a row,
the Credit Union has participated in the Central
Maine Heart Walk. The
Central Maine Heart walk
benefits the American
Heart Association, the nation’s oldest and largest
voluntary
organization
devoted to helping fight
cardiovascular diseases
and stroke.
This year’s co-captains
at Community Credit
Union included Michelle
St. Hilaire and Audrey Allaire. Funds were raised
through the sale of gold
and red hearts at each of
our branches, a yard sale
that was held on September 6th at the Auburn
branch and also through
individual donations. A
total of $1,172.00 was
raised for the American
Heart Association.
Community
Cred-
Ellen, Calif.
The DAISY Award was
created to show gratitude
to the nursing profession,
because the Barnes family believed that nurses are
truly “unsung heroes”.
The DAISY Foundation
Fall
it Union is a member-owned, full service
financial institution that
has been serving its members and Androscoggin
County since 1945. Community Credit Union has
branches located at 144
Pine Street, Lewiston
and 40 Stanley Street,
Auburn. A new branch is
opening soon on Route 4
in Turner. For more information, log onto www.
communitycreditunion.
com. n
says the program “honors
the super human work
nurses do at the bedside
each and every day.” The
foundation also funds
research for the J. Patrick Barnes Grants for
Nursing Research and
Evidence-Based Practice
Projects.
Patients, visitors, physicians, and co-workers
can nominate nurses who
they feel deserve to be
recognized with the DAISY Award. n
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Representing Community Credit Union at the Central Maine Heart Walk are, from left
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November 2014
Page 19
Turner Publishing invites our readers children to
send in their “Letters to Santa” to be published in
their local Turner Publishing paper. All letters will be
published for all our readers to enjoy.
There is no charge for having the letters
published and they will be run exactly as they are
submitted, misspellings and all.
“Letters to Santa” is a great keepsake for parents,
grandparents and the children themselves.
So get your chil
hild
dren tto writ
i e a letter to Santa
(which will be forwarded to the North Pole...)
to share with all your friends and family.
Mail your letters to: “Letters to Santa” PO
Box 214, Turner, ME 04282. Letters will
not be returned but may be picked up at
the Turner Publishing office in Turner.
Page 20
November 2014
St. Dom’s Class of 1964 50th Reunion
Members of the Saint Dominic Class of 1964 are pictures at a recent reunion.
The Class of 1964 celebrated their 50th Class
Reunion on August 16th
at Saint Dominic Academy. More than 40% of
the class were in attendance, with a few members traveling from as
far as California. Pauline Vachon Beal, O.D.
and Paul Roy welcomed
all of the guests and acted as Emcee’s for the
evening. Connie Roy
Godfrey and Lorraine
Tardif Cavanaugh paid
tribute to each of the deceased members of the
class. Opening prayer
was done by Michelle
Martel Robitaille, as she
gave a special thanks to
all of their parents who
made great sacrifices
for all of them to attend
St. Dom’s. Marcel Morin made a toast to the
class remembering the
fond memories and special friends made at St.
Dom’s. Everyone enjoyed a delicious dinner
catered by Mac’s Grill.
After dinner the classmates got the opportunity
to enjoy a humorous presentation from classmate
Michael Parent who is a
professional story teller. Michael’s program
was titled, “A Beautiful
Game”, “mostly true”
recollections of his longtime connection to the
game of ice hockey. Set
in Lewiston, where he
grew up, the story follows him from his days
as a young boy struggling to stay upright on
his first pair of skates, to
his big moment as goalie
for the St. Dom’s hockey team which competed, against heavy odds,
at the Boston Garden
for the New England
Championship in 1964.
After Michael’s program all of the hockey
players and cheerleaders led the group in the
School song. The rest
of the evening was spent
enjoying and dancing
to music from the 60’s
played by Union Street
Sound.
The 1964 Reunion
Committee was made up
of Pauline Vachon Beale,
OD, Lorraine Tardif Cavanagh, Connie Roy
Godfrey, Marcel Morin, Beatrice Pomerleau
Mathieu and Michelle
Martel Robitaille. The
Class of 1964 reunion
committee would like
to thank Laurie Servidio
of the St. Dom’s Alumni/Advancement Office
for assisting with the
planning of their 50th
reunion. Saint Dominic
Academy would like to
give a special thank you
to the Class of 1964 for
donating $1,200 back to
the school. n
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The United States of America is the land that I love and call home.
So I proudly pledge my allegiance to our flag.
What’s more, I do affirm:
All across America I love to see out Country’s flag
flying in the breeze.
It makes me think of freedom and our homeland’s liberties.
I love to see a gleaming white, flagpole tall and true,
that under God, for peace unfurls
our flag’s red, white, and blue.
I love to see the Stars and Stripes
streaming from that pole
the spirit of America, -- our Country’s Honor Roll.
Aloft a quiet, village green, hill, or sparkling lake
our flag lifts high my eyes and heart
and resolve for our children’s sake.
From coast to coast Old Glory stands
free our land to keep!
In gratitude I tribute give to our brave in honored sleep.
Thanks to their deeds, our flag waves on
steadfast in the breeze,
inspiring us, reminding us of our precious liberties.
-Cornelius James Van Cott
Words and music, Copyright 2008
November 2014
Aruba: An Inviting Winter Getaway
Most people visit Aruba for its white sand beaches.
Aruba has a variety of landscapes, including cactus.
By Victor Block
Photos courtesy of
Len Kaufman
A gleaming white sand
beach that rims the azure
sea is set off by an explosion of scarlet, purple and
other vivid colors of lush
tropical foliage. Nearby,
stretches of rocks and pebbly soil interspersed with
cactus comprise a very
different terrain. The variety of landscapes found
on Aruba is echoed by the
diversity of its attractions.
The island’s stretches
of white sand beaches are
among the most beautiful
in the Caribbean. Touches
of European charm add to
its appeals.
The Dutch took control
of Aruba in 1636 and have
held sway over it since
then, except for a short period in the early 19th century. Reminders of this Dutch
heritage are everywhere.
One distinctive landmark is a windmill built
in 1804 that once drained
water from low-lying ar-
ings attest to their presence.
Reminders of Aruba’s
agricultural past in the park
include a long-deserted
adobe farm house, while
abandoned mines recall a
mini-gold rush that got underway in 1825 and lasted
for nearly a century.
Speaking of gold, 12
casinos have earned Aruba the nickname of “Las
Vegas of the Caribbean.”
While most are located in
resort hotels, two are in
Oranjestad, the capital city.
Oranjestad also has other attractions. The Dutch
colonial architecture of
many buildings, some dating back to the late 18th
century, comes in a variety
of pastel colors. The busy
port teems with boats, and
sidewalks with crowds of
sightseers and shoppers.
When not spending
money on shopping or
gambling, visitors have a
choice of several small but
interesting museums. The
Archaeological Museum is
housed in a cluster of col-
eas of Holland. In 1960, it
was taken apart, shipped to
Aruba and reassembled in
its unlikely Caribbean setting, where it has housed
several restaurants and
night clubs.
Most people visit Aruba for its beaches. A seven-mile stretch backs up
to high-rise hotels that rim
the sheltered southwestern
and western coastline. The
windswept northern and
eastern coasts, which are
battered by the sea, have
been left largely undeveloped.
Rugged limestone cliffs
run along much of the
northeastern
coastline.
They mark one boundary
of Arikok National Park,
an ecological preserve that
sprawls over nearly 20% of
the island.
Intriguing chapters of
Aruba’s history come alive
in this setting. Shallow
caves recall a time when
Arawak Indians inhabited
the island. Drawings that
ornament walls and ceil-
orfully painted homes that
were built around 1870.
Exhibits showcase the history of Indians on Aruba.
They range from an ancient
long house and native hut
to artifacts dating back as
far as 2500 BC.
The Historical Museum
of Aruba is housed in Fort
Zoutman. That fortification
was built in 1796-1798 to
protect the island from pirates.
The museum has displays about farming, fishing and other aspects of
island life, including interesting tidbits about villages I had explored. For example, Noord began as an
Indian community, while
Rancho was established
as a fishing village around
1855.
Stops at other towns also
provide introductions to
what locals call “the real
Aruba.” San Nicolas once
jumped to the beat of workers at the now-abandoned
nearby oil refinery, but
it’s on the quiet side these
Page 21
The Dutch colonial architecture of many buildings
comes in a variety of pastel colors.
birds and dragons.
days.
A mini-promenade along
Steps have been carved
the main street is lined by into the rock at Casibari
shops and restaurants, but and those who climb to
the biggest draw in town the top enjoy a panoramic
is Charlie’s Bar. Beginning view of the island. Some of
in the early 1940s, scuba the stones at Ayo still bear
divers who dropped by petroglyphs scratched and
attached their underwater painted onto the surface by
finds to the walls and ceil- Indian artists.
ing, creating what today is
Those boulders rising
a bric-a-brac heaven. Vir- from a flat, stark landscape
tually every inch of avail- provide a setting very
able space is adorned with different from the white
automobile license plates, sand beaches of Aruba.
paper money and busi- Both are among the someness cards from around the
thing-for-everyone variety
world, and other mementoes too varied and numer- that makes the island an
inviting winter getaway
ous to list.
The main claim to fame destination.
Victor Block is an
of Paradera village is its location close to two intrigu- award-winning travel jouring sites that were sacred nalist who lives in Washplaces to Indians. The Ayo ington, D.C., and spends
and Casibari rock forma- summers in Rangeley,
tions consist of huge boul- Maine. He is a guidebook
ders that rise up from the author who has traveled
desert terrain. Over time, to more than 70 counprevailing winds have tries. His articles appear
carved the rocks into un- in newspapers around the
usual shapes which, with a country, and on travel weblittle imagination, resemble sites. n
Auburn Highlights and The Lewiston Leader
Feel good newspapers.... because it’s all good news.
Turner Publishing, helping business and communities grow and prosper with
it’s directly mailed publications letting people know that there is a lot of good news in our communities.
Directly mailing 243,000 homes - that’s a
circulation of over 607,500 people.
225-2076 • [email protected] • www.turnerpublishing.net
Page 22
November 2014
Never Forget
Remembering
Our
Heroes
Stephanie Stevens
SSgt. USMC
12 years and 1 tour.
Thanks - ♥ U!
Fritz Gurschick
Air Force MSGT
We love you and appreciate
you and your many years of
service to this country.
Richard P. Ducharme Sr.
E3 - U.S. Navy
Thank You!
Love Michelle
Michael W Wentzel
USMC LCPL
We are very proud of you!
Thank You to all our Veterans
from all of us at Turner Publishing!
James T. Minkowsky
Jonathan Mark Bishop
PFC
Proud of your US Navy service in Iraq
and your continued leadership as a Navy
reservist. We love you Mom, Dad, family,
Daughters, girlfriend and closellp friends.
We commend your commitment, hard
work and the sacrifices you have made.
Stand strong and Proud. Semper Fi.
Peter M Leavitt
Robert Sylvia
of Turner, Maine
stationed with the USS
Detroit (AOE4) during the
Vietnam EraThank you, Eva
Lance McKusick
Gunnery Sergeant
Thank you for your years
of dedication and service
for our freedom.
Army Corporal
Falmouth, Mass
Wilder G. Purdy
1st LT - B-24 Co-pilot WWII
You are never forgotten!
From your family
Machinist Mate 3Rd Class –
Navy 1944 LCT Group 39 996
Tom Sylvia
Harold W. Small
Army Chief Warrant
Officer II
LOVE YOU PAPA
LOVE YOU DAD!
Henry B. Poisson
Ryan C. McCarthy
WWII & Korean Veteran
Bronze Star, Silver Star &
British Military Medal for
His Bravery
Edward “Diddy” Richard
SSG Army
Recently graduated from
Army Ranger School
A loving, caring and respectful
Husband, Father, Grandfather and a
honorable contributor to his country.
U.S. Navy - Vietnam
2nd Class Petty Officer
Purple Heart & Silver Star Recipient
Thank You & We Love You!
Albert E. Soucy
Ryan Stevens
SSgt. USMC
12 years and 8 tour.
Thanks - ♥ U!
Eric I. Mitchell
U.S. Army - Retired colonel
23 Years of Service
Walter Small
PFC-U.S. Army - Rifle
Squad & Infantry
WWII - Pacific/Philippines
We miss and will always be
proud of you!
Navy - Fireman 1st Class
Loving Husband, Father and Patriot.
We Love You!
November 2014
Page 23
Two Rivers Family Dentistry
TO OUR VALUED FAMILY OF PATIENTS
We want to clear up any confusion.
1) We have not changed our name.
2) We are not moving to another location or opening offices in any other states.
We are remaining at Two Rivers Medical Center in Lisbon.
3) If you are a patient of record at TWO RIVERS FAMILY DENTISTRY, regardless of the doctor you may have seen in our office,
you are still a patient of record with our office. We will continue to provide the same excellence of patient care and service
that our community has grown accustomed to and trusted for the last 38 years.
We look forward to seeing all of our current and new patients at our one and only location.
Two Rivers Medical Center | 4 Bisbee St., Lisbon, Me | (207)353-8676
www.tworiversfamilydentistry.com
Never Forget
Remembering Our Heroes
Bliss Richard
Alphonse J. Arsenault
Ivan J. Cormier
US Navy 1990-1993
Boiler Technician
Served USS Midway, USS
Kittyhawk - Persian Gulf War
Rumford & Mexico, Maine
Tech/Sargeant: H. CO-4th BN. Signal CORP.
US Army. Thank you Dad for serving in WW2,
in Normandy, France, June 4, 1944 “D” Day
& Liberating all those people. You are our
Hero! from your 4 loving daughters.
Mexico ME. MSG/E-8: US Air Force/
Retired. Thanks for serving
your country, especially Vietnam.
We are proud of you always.
Your family in Rumford ME.
Justin Buck
Robert M. Richard
Ryan Chamberlain
US Navy
Class of 2014 LHS
Proud of you, Love Mom
Specialist
Army 1971
Infantry (II Bravo)
Thank you for your service!
We’re proud of you.
Michael L. Madore
Mitchell Riley
Rumford Maine. Spec 4 US Army
78th Engineers BN 1975-1978.
We will never forget your service
to our country. You made your
family & extended family proud!
Thanks for protecting our
freedom! Love you, Mom
Flavia M. Maillet
Andrew Quasnitschka
WW2 LASLOW Yeoman
1st Class
My hero, my friend,
my dearest Mother
Army CPT
David Garippa
LCPL
Chief Petty Officer
In Loving Memory
1/26/88 ~ 4/1/2009
Your our hero!
Page 24
November 2014
“Jam the Gym” at CMCC to Benefit At-Risk Kids
The men’s varsity basketball team from Central Maine Community
College will be facing a
somewhat unusual team
on their home court on
November 18. They will
be taking on the Auburn
Police Department “AllStars.” The game, which
is all in good fun, is part
of an event called “Jam
the Gym” is a fundraiser
that the college is hosting to benefit the Auburn
Police Activities League
(PAL).
The APD team will
consist of officers of every rank and skill level.
“We are pretty confident
that we will give them
some good competition,”
said Chief Phil Crowell.
“They may be younger and faster, but don’t
count us out – our guys
have �game.’ Either way,
it’s going to be a great
event!”
“Our goal is to pack
the CMCC gym with
folks who want to have
some fun,” said CMCC
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Athletic Director David
Gonyea. Gonyea, who is
also the men’s basketball
coach, serves on the PAL
Board of Directors and
had the idea to host “Jam
the Gym.”
“The boys are thrilled
to host the APD AllStars,” said Gonyea. “I
sure hope that they have
been running and playing daily to prepare. We
know how badly the PD
wants to teach our kids a
lesson,” he joked. “Seriously though, the college
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“Jam the Gym” will be
held on Tuesday, November 18 at 7:00pm. Tickets
are $3 or 4 for $10 and
they can be purchased
at the Auburn Police
Department (60 Court
Street), the CMCC Bookstore, or at Republic Jewelry & Collectibles (212
Center Street).
For more information
or to sponsor this event,
contact Liz Allen at the
APD: [email protected] or 333-6650
x2070. n
Park Avenue Fair
The United Methodist
Church of Auburn, at 439
Park Avenue, will hold their
annual “Shop on Park Avenue” fair on Saturday, November 22nd from 9:00a.m.
to 1:00p.m. The fair will
have all the usual favorites
including the country store
with homemade cooked
items, baked goods, candy,
craft items for the home,
holiday decorations, and a
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large collection of books
and jewelry. There will be
numerous white elephant
rooms which promise to be
complete with bargains for
everyone. There will be a
children’s room where kids
can make or purchase their
own gifts. Christmas wreath
orders may also be placed.
Breakfast and luncheon
items will be available
during the fair as well.n
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teers mentor kids at the
Auburn PAL Center,
which opened a year and
half ago.
“We took a look at our
calls for service, and 25%
of them were happening
within a ВЅ mile radius of
where the PAL Center is
now located,” said Crowell. “At PAL, these kids
now have a safe place
to spend some time, get
help with homework,
have a nutritious snack,
play sports, and have a
great time.”
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kids love games like this
one. Anything we can
do to help the PAL Center is positive. Many of
our students volunteer at
PAL. They are invested
and they have a real bond
with the kids there.”
Auburn PAL is a
non-profit organization
that provides after school
and summer programs
for Auburn youth in the
highest-crime, lowest-income neighborhood in
the city. Staff, officers
and community volun-
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