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AZ Speaks Catalog 12.15.14 - Arizona Humanities Council

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AZ Speaks Master Catalog
2013-2015
Road Scholars, History Alive, & Speakers in the Schools
www.azhumanities.org
WELCOME TO AZ SPEAKS!
В AZ SPEAKS (formerly known as the Speakers Bureau) is the longest running and most popular
program of Arizona Humanities (AH). This program offers a wealth of experts and scholars who give
entertaining and informative presentations on a wide range of topics.
AZ SPEAKS presenters represent a diverse range of expertise, from a variety of professional
backgrounds, including archaeology, art history, film studies, history and heritage, law, and
philosophy. Speakers are carefully selected based on their expertise and ability to offer content and
insight that inspires discussion with audiences of all ages and backgrounds.
AZ SPEAKS is a great way for your organization to enjoy an interesting program that is inexpensive
and easy to arrange. Each year, Arizona Humanities Speakers deliver hundreds of engaging
presentations in every corner of the state.
В AZ SPEAKS PROGRAMS
Within AZ SPEAKS, there are three types of speakers or presentations:
ROAD SCHOLARS (RS)
The Road Scholars program brings the best in humanities scholarship to virtually every corner of
Arizona. Presentations are designed to connect local experts to an inquiring public, and foster lively
discussions on cultural and historical topics.
HISTORY ALIVE (HA)
History Alive presents scholars assuming the roles of significant figures from the past. Scholars present
as historical characters, and answer questions from the character's perspective. They end by stepping
out of character and answering questions as themselves, providing scholarly context and insight.
SPEAKERS IN THE SCHOOLS (SS)
The Speakers in the Schools program offers top-quality lectures on a wide variety of humanities subjects
relevant to Arizona K-12 curricula. Speakers work directly with teachers prior to the program in order
to tailor the presentation to a specific grade level, meeting Arizona educational standards.
Arizona Humanities ‫ ׀‬1242 N. Central Ave. ‫ ׀‬Phoenix, AZ 85004 ‫ ׀‬602-257-0335 ‫ ׀‬www.azhumanities.org
APPLY TO HOST A PRESENTATION
В ELIGIBLEВ ORGANIZATIONSВ Eligible organizations include: Nonprofit organizations (such as a library, historical society, museum,
social-service organization or community center), educational institutions, tribal entities, government
entities or other organizations at AH’s discretion. Closed membership organizations are not eligible.
В HOSTINGВ REQUIREMENTSВ п‚·пЂ The AZ SPEAKS presentation must be free and open to the public - Presentations may not be
scheduled for closed audiences such as classes, membership meetings, docent trainings, or
conference sessions. Hosts may not require participants to pay a fee or buy a meal to attend.
п‚·пЂ Allow at least one hour for each presentation, including sufficient time for conversation.
п‚·пЂ Generate publicity for the program, and secure an audience of at least 30 people Publicity
must be generated beyond the host organization's membership and AH must be acknowledged in
all promotional and printed materials. AH will provide a toolkit to help promote the event.
В PROGRAMВ FEESВ п‚·пЂ There is a $100 administrative fee for each Road Scholar and History Alive program
п‚·пЂ Speakers in the Schools programs are FREE of charge to Arizona K-12 educational institutions.
п‚·пЂ Arizona Humanities covers the cost of speaker honoraria, travel, lodging, and meals.
п‚·пЂ Host organizations are responsible for the administration, promotion, and evaluation of each event.
В BOOKВ AВ PRESENTATIONВ If you are interested in hosting an AZ SPEAKS presentation, please follow the steps below:
В п‚·пЂ Review the AZ SPEAKS Catalog and select the speaker(s) and presentation(s) you are interested in
hosting.
п‚·пЂ Contact Whitney Klotz at 602-257-0335 x23 or e-mail [email protected] If your
organization is eligible and funding is available to support your request, you will be given contact
information for the speaker of your choosing.
п‚·пЂ Contact the speaker to schedule his or her participation.
п‚·пЂ Go to the Arizona Humanities website (www.azhumanities.org ) and complete the online
application form. You should contact the speaker and submit your application at least six weeks
before the presentation is to take place.
п‚·пЂ Once your application is processed, we will provide further instructions to publicize, administer,
and evaluate the program. Funding is limited and not all requests are approved. (Allow two weeks
for your application to be processed.)
п‚·пЂ There is no limit to the number of times your organization may request speakers.
 Arizona Humanities ‫ ׀‬1242 N. Central Ave. ‫ ׀‬Phoenix, AZ 85004 ‫ ׀‬602-257-0335 ‫ ׀‬www.azhumanities.org
В What Has Passed and What Remains: Using Oral History to Understand
Arizona’s Changing Landscapes
(RS)
How do we know how our towns, neighborhoods, and landscapes have changed
over time? One way is through our stories. Oral histories of long-time residents
can reveal a great deal about environmental and cultural change, providing a
record that might otherwise be lost with time. Using photos and video interviews,
this presentation shares stories from northern Arizona homesteaders, ranchers,
Native Americans, and other keen observers of the land, and sheds light on a vast
landscape during a time of extensive change. It also discusses how anyone can use
oral history to explore place.
Type of Presentation
Road Scholars (RS), History Alive (HA),
or Speakers in the Schools (SS)
В Title of the presentation
Description of
the presentation
How to Read a Speaker’s Profile Page
Peter Friederici
P
Speaker Name and Bio
Subject/Category of
Presentations
(click to return to the list
of subject categories)
eter Friederici is an
essayist and journalist
who lives in Flagstaff,
Arizona. He has written
about science and nature for
numerous periodicals and for
several books, including What
Has Passed and What
Remains: Oral Histories of
Northern Arizona’s Changing
Landscapes (2010). Friederici
also teaches journalism at
Northern Arizona University.
Since 2005 he and his
students have been gathering
oral histories from Arizona
residents whose lived
experiences serve as testament
to changes in regional
environment and culture.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
4В All Speakers by Name
Click name to see bio and presentations
Lisa Adeli
Peter Friederici
Dianne Post
Rod Ambrose
Matthew Goodwin
Wayne Ranney
Michael Amundson
Reba Wells Grandrud
H. Christine Reid
Akua Duku Anokye
Brian Gratton
Steve Renzi
Erik Berg
Hugh Grinnell
Mary Rothschild
David Berman
Paul Hietter
Jeremy Rowe
Elena Diaz Bjorkquist
Gladys Preshenda Jackson
Bob Sharp
Todd Bostwick
Barbara Jaquay
Dan Shilling
Brenda Brandt
Janice Jarrett
Marshall Shore
Wallace Brown
Bjorn Krondorfer
Brooks Simpson
W. James Burns
J.J. Lamb
Jeff Stein
Leticia Carey
Elizabeth Larson
Pam Stevenson
Gary Carter
Erik Larson
Elsie Szecsy
Albrecht Classen
Geta LeSeur
Judy Nolte Temple
Jan Cleere
Ann-Mary Lutzick
Laura Tohe
Jim Covarrubias
Barbara Marriott
Jim Turner
John Craft
Tom Martin
Agnes Umuligirwa
Jay Cravath
T.J. McMichael
Tom Van Dyke
Ahmad Daniels
Gregory McNamee
Jay Van Orden
Allen Dart
Tom Miller
Bella Vivante
Carolyn O'Bagy Davis
Don & Alleen Nilsen
Todd Weber
Lili DeBarbieri
Heidi Osselaer
John Westerlund
Jody Drake
Evangeline Parsons Yazzie
Matthew C. Whitaker
Betsy Fahlman
Michael Peach
Caleb Winebrenner
Kathy Farretta
Robin Pinto
Kenneth Zoll
Dan Fellner
James Pool
Arizona Humanities ‫ ׀‬1242 N. Central Ave. ‫ ׀‬Phoenix, AZ 85004 ‫ ׀‬602-257-0335 ‫ ׀‬www.azhumanities.org
Presentation Subject Categories
Click subject to view list of presentations by title
п‚·пЂ Archaeology (pg. 7)
п‚·пЂ Art, Architecture, and Music (pg. 7)
п‚·пЂ Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies - General (pgs. 7-9)
п‚ЁCulture, Gender, and Identity Studies - African American
п‚ЁCulture, Gender, and Identity Studies - Asian American
п‚ЁCulture, Gender, and Identity Studies - Chicano & Mexican American
п‚ЁCulture, Gender, and Identity Studies - Native American
п‚ЁCulture, Gender, and Identity Studies - Women's Studies
п‚·пЂ Film, Media, and New Media (pg. 9)
п‚·пЂ Geography and Environment (pg. 9)
п‚·пЂ History & Heritage (pgs. 10-12)
п‚ЁHistory & Heritage - Arizona and the Southwest
п‚ЁHistory & Heritage - United States
п‚ЁHistory & Heritage - World
п‚·пЂ Humanities in Contemporary Issues (pg. 12)
п‚·пЂ Language and Literature (pgs. 12-13)
п‚·пЂ Law and Civic Engagement (pg. 13)
п‚·пЂ Philosophy, Ethics, and Religion (pg. 13)
п‚·пЂ Political Science (pg. 13)
п‚·пЂ History Alive (pg. 13)
п‚·пЂ Speakers in the Schools (pgs. 13-14)
В 6В Presentations Listed by Subject
Archeology
Click title to see abstract and speaker’s bio
п‚ЁпЂ Archaeology and Cultures of Arizona (pg. 36)
п‚ЁпЂ Archaeology's Deep Time Perspective on Environment and Social Sustainability (pg. 36)
п‚ЁпЂ Arts and Culture of Ancient Southern Arizona Hohokam Indians (pg. 36)
п‚ЁпЂ The Eagle and the Archaeologists: The Lindberghs' 1929 Southwest Aerial Survey (pg. 20)
п‚ЁпЂ Landscape of the Spirits: Hohokam Rock Art of South Mountain Park (pg. 24)
п‚ЁпЂ Set in Stone but Not in Meaning: Southwestern Indian Rock Art (pg. 36)
п‚ЁпЂ Southwestern Rock Calendars and Ancient Time Pieces (pg. 36)
п‚ЁпЂ Working in the Salt Mine: Native American Procurement and Ritual in the Southwest (pg. 24)
В Art, Architecture, and Music
п‚ЁпЂ Adventurous Spirits: Arizona's Women Artists, 1900-1950 (pg. 40)
п‚ЁпЂ American Arts and Crafts Style Architecture (pg. 41)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona Is for Art Lovers: Museums, Murals and Movements Through the Ages (pg. 38)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona Kicks on Route 66 (pg. 79)
п‚ЁпЂ Centuries Old Global Ambassadors: Jazz and the American Identity (pg. 52)
п‚ЁпЂ The Constant Traveler: How Music Breaks National, Cultural, and Ethnic Boundaries (pg. 52)
п‚ЁпЂ Cowboys and Cowgirls: Icons of the American West (pg. 40)
п‚ЁпЂ The Form of Connection: Understanding Cities (pg. 81)
п‚ЁпЂ From China to Mexico: A Journey of Decorative Arts (pg. 25)
п‚ЁпЂ Honky Tonks, Brothels and Mining Camps: Entertainment in Old Arizona (pg. 34)
п‚ЁпЂ The Instruments and Music of Arizona's Pioneers: A Time Capsule Opened (pg. 34)
п‚ЁпЂ The Landscapes of Arizona: A Cultural History (pg. 40)
п‚ЁпЂ The Math and Science of Music: A Snapshot (pg. 52)
п‚ЁпЂ The Melody of Arizona (pg. 34)
п‚ЁпЂ The Poetry of Song: From Fanciful to the Ineffable (pg. 52)
п‚ЁпЂ POP-Pourri: Pop Culture in Arizona (pg. 79)
п‚ЁпЂ Romancing Arizona: Songs of Love and Marriage (pg. 34)
п‚ЁпЂ Signs of the Times: The Golden Age of Neon in Arizona (pg. 79)
п‚ЁпЂ Swing into History: Popular Music of the Big Band Era (pg. 56)
п‚ЁпЂ Talking Machine Cowboys and Indians: The First Western Recordings, 1902-1913 (pg. 18)
п‚ЁпЂ We Must Grow Our Own Artists: Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton (pg. 27)
п‚ЁпЂ Your Brain and Music: Can Music Make You Smarter, Happier, Healthier? (pg. 52)
Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies - General
п‚ЁпЂ Descansos: Marking Passages (pg. 50)
п‚ЁпЂ Love and Marriage: From a Medieval and Early Modern Perspective (pg. 30)
п‚ЁпЂ Revitalizing Rural and Small Town America: Folk Art and Folklore (pg. 50)
п‚ЁпЂ Stories from the Other Side (pg. 19)
В 7В Presentations Listed by Subject
Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies Click title to see abstract and speaker’s bio
African American
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњA New Day in Babylon”: Black Latino Relations (pg. 93)
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњAnd Ya Don’t Stop”: Hip Hop and American Popular Culture (pg. 93)
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњPeace Be Still”: Modern Black America from WWII to Barack Obama (pg. 93)
п‚ЁпЂ A Story, A Story: African and African American Oral Tradition and Storytelling (pg. 19)
п‚ЁпЂ African American Pioneers of Arizona (pg. 57)
п‚ЁпЂ After the Promised Land: The Miracle Valley Story (pg. 57)
п‚ЁпЂ Beyond the Cotton Fields: Black Migrant Women Building Communities (pg. 57)
п‚ЁпЂ The Black Indians in the Age of Casinos: Whose Game Is It Anyway? (pg. 57)
п‚ЁпЂ By the Time They Came to Phoenix: African American Cotton Pickers in Arizona (pg. 19)
п‚ЁпЂ The Harlem Renaissance: Literary Movement (pg. 49)
п‚ЁпЂ Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Minister Malcolm X: Were Their Struggles the Same? (pg. 35)
п‚ЁпЂ Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Review of Phase I and Phase II of His Life (pg. 35)
Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies - Asian American
п‚ЁпЂ Art of the Internment Camps: Culture Behind Barbed Wire (pg. 40)
п‚ЁпЂ Historic Phoenix Chinatown, 1880-1930 (pg. 24)
В Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies - Chicano & Mexican American
п‚ЁпЂ Growing Up Chicana in Morenci, Arizona (pg. 22)
п‚ЁпЂ In the Shadow of the Smokestack (pg. 22)
В Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies - Native American
п‚ЁпЂ Ancient Native American Astronomical Practices (pg. 95)
п‚ЁпЂ Armed with Our Language, We Went to War: The Navajo Code Talkers (pg. 85)
п‚ЁпЂ The Billingsley Hopi Dancers (pg. 95)
п‚ЁпЂ Boarded Up: Social and Historical Interpretations of the American Indian Boarding School Era (pg. 66)
п‚ЁпЂ Geronimo and the Apache Surrender: The C. S. Fly Photographs (pg. 89)
п‚ЁпЂ Hopi Quilting: Stitched Traditions from an Ancient Community (pg. 37)
п‚ЁпЂ Hopi Summer (pg. 37)
п‚ЁпЂ INYAHOSKIE (The Stone Boy): A Lakota Legend (pg. 32)
п‚ЁпЂ Kayenta and Monument Valley: 100 Years of Settlement and Trading in Indian Country (pg. 37)
п‚ЁпЂ The Long Walk of the Navajo People, 1864-1868 (pg. 66)
п‚ЁпЂ Native Roads: A Virtual Guide to the Hopi and Navajo Nations (pg. 86)
п‚ЁпЂ People Call Us Navajo, But We are DinСђ. There is a difference. (pg. 26)
п‚ЁпЂ Walking the Corn Pollen Path (pg. 26)
п‚ЁпЂ Working in the Salt Mine: Native American Salt Procurement and Ritual in the Southwest (pg. 24)
Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies - Women's Studies
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњWomen’s Rights Are Human Rights”: The Global Case for Women’s Rights (pg. 74)
п‚ЁпЂ An Immigrant's Struggles: The Diary of Mary "Mim" Walsh (pg. 84)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona Women, Past and Present: An Oral History Presentation (pg. 74)
п‚ЁпЂ Aviatrix: Bessie Coleman, That’s Me! (pg. 28)
п‚ЁпЂ Barnstormers, Daredevils, and Flying Waitresses (pg. 73)
п‚ЁпЂ Business Not as Usual: Arizona's Early Women Entrepreneurs (pg. 31)
п‚ЁпЂ Cora Viola Slaughter: Ranch Wife and Poker Player Extraordinaire (pg. 45)
В 8В Presentations Listed by Subject
Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies Click title to see abstract and speaker’s bio
Women's Studies (continued)
п‚ЁпЂ Helen: Divine Model for Spartan Women’s Identity (pg. 90)
п‚ЁпЂ History of Women in the Western World: Medieval and Early Modern Women (pg. 30)
п‚ЁпЂ In Their Own Words: Overland Diaries of 19th Century Westering Women (pg. 45)
п‚ЁпЂ Meeting the Challenges: Arizona Women's Hall of Fame (pg. 45)
п‚ЁпЂ No Turning Back: Feminism Then and Now in America (pg. 74)
п‚ЁпЂ Not Just a Pretty Face: Helen of Troy in Sparta and Egypt (pg. 90)
п‚ЁпЂ Oh Heavens! Saviors and Saints on the Arizona Frontier (pg. 31)
п‚ЁпЂ On the Wrong Side of Allen Street: Businesswomen in Tombstone, 1879-1884 (pg. 65)
п‚ЁпЂ Planes, Trains, and Automobiles (and Stage Coaches and Boats, too): Women Travel in Arizona (pg. 65)
п‚ЁпЂ Prostitution: Legal Slavery or Victimless Crime? (pg. 70)
п‚ЁпЂ Skirting Traditions: Arizona Women Journalists, 100 Years of Change (pg. 82)
п‚ЁпЂ The Roads Are for the Timid: The Arizona Adventures of Mai Richie Reed (pg. 20)
п‚ЁпЂ Status of Women in the U.S.and the World (pg. 70)
п‚ЁпЂ Teacher, Teacher: Early Women Educators of Arizona (pg. 31)
п‚ЁпЂ Teresa Urrea: Spiritual Healer (pg. 23)
п‚ЁпЂ There's a New Sheriff in Town: Early Women in Arizona Law Enforcement (pg. 65)
п‚ЁпЂ This Land is Our Land: Early Women on the Arizona Frontier (pg. 31)
п‚ЁпЂ What Do You Mean, Women Can’t Vote? A Look at the First Women’s Rights Movement, 1848-1920 (pg. 74)
п‚ЁпЂ Winning Their Place: Arizona Women in Politics, 1883-1950 (pg. 65)
п‚ЁпЂ Women of the Arizona State Prison (pg. 72)
п‚ЁпЂ Women, Equality and the West, 1848-1920 (pg. 74)
п‚ЁпЂ Written in Thread: Arizona Women’s History Preserved in Their Quilts (pg. 82)
Film, Media, and New Media
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona's Movie and Television History: Silent Films, Westerns, and Much, Much More! (pg. 38)
п‚ЁпЂ Gazing at Helen: Portraying Ancient Helen in Modern Film (pg. 90)
п‚ЁпЂ The History of Television Humor from the 1950s to the Present (pg. 64)
п‚ЁпЂ Inventing Local TV News (pg. 82)
п‚ЁпЂ Journalism Ethics in an Economically Challenged Media World (pg. 33)
п‚ЁпЂ The Most Trusted Man in America: The Life and Times of Walter Cronkite (pg. 33)
п‚ЁпЂ The Role of the Mass Media in Our Uncertain and Uncivil Society (pg. 33)
п‚ЁпЂ Tom Mix: King of the Cowboys (pg. 72)
п‚ЁпЂ Where's It Headed? The Future of Mass Media (pg. 33)
Geography and Environment
п‚ЁпЂ Aldo Leopold in the Southwest (pg. 78)
п‚ЁпЂ Ancient Landscapes of the American Southwest (pg. 71)
п‚ЁпЂ The Arizona Connection to Sacagawea (pg. 91)
п‚ЁпЂ Big Water, Little Boats (pg. 60)
п‚ЁпЂ Carving Grand Canyon (pg. 71)
п‚ЁпЂ Cattle and Grasslands: A History of Ranching in Southeastern Arizona (pg. 68)
п‚ЁпЂ Chora: The Relationship Between Place and the Individual (pg. 77)
п‚ЁпЂ Cultural and Physical Geographies of Southwest Asia and Afghanistan (pg. 55)
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњDear Emma” (pg. 92)
п‚ЁпЂ Exploring the Depths: A 3D 1940 Hike into the Grand Canyon (pg. 18)
В В 9В Presentations Listed by Subject
Geography and Environment (continued)
Click title to see abstract and speaker’s bio
п‚ЁпЂ Grand Canyon Through a Hiker's Eye (pg. 60)
п‚ЁпЂ Herding Cats down the Colorado River (pg. 60)
п‚ЁпЂ The History of the River Runners of the Grand Canyon (pg. 91)
п‚ЁпЂ In the Footsteps of River Running Ghosts (pg. 60)
п‚ЁпЂ Integrating Human Settlement Patterns into the Natural World (pg. 77)
п‚ЁпЂ Journey Stories: 100 Years After Statehood (pg. 55)
п‚ЁпЂ Monumental Places: Arizona's National Parks and Monuments (pg. 62)
п‚ЁпЂ Oh, the Shape We're In!: How Arizona's and the Western States' Borders Were Determined (pg. 57)
п‚ЁпЂ Pauline Weaver and the Mountain Men of Arizona (pg. 91)
п‚ЁпЂ Rock Hounds and River Rats: The 1937 Carnegie-CalTech Grand Canyon Expedition (pg. 20)
п‚ЁпЂ Sedona Through Time (pg. 71)
п‚ЁпЂ Seeing Arizona, Imagining Mars (pg. 18)
п‚ЁпЂ The Two Worlds of Meaningful Placemaking (pg. 77)
п‚ЁпЂ The Wolf: Friend or Foe? (pg. 61)
п‚ЁпЂ U.S. Population Beyond 300 (pg. 55)
п‚ЁпЂ What Is the World Growing To? Earth Beyond 6 Billion! (pg. 55)
History & Heritage - Arizona and the Southwest
п‚ЁпЂ 19th Century Arizona Through the Stereoscope (pg. 76)
п‚ЁпЂ A Day in the Old Tubac Schoolhouse (pg. 23)
п‚ЁпЂ A Most Colorful Character: The Life and Times of George W.P. Hunt, Arizona's First Governor (pg. 21)
п‚ЁпЂ A Photographic History of Arizona from Prehistory to the Present (pg. 86)
п‚ЁпЂ A Woman of Courage: The Life of Francis Hunt Udall (pg. 59)
п‚ЁпЂ Ahead of Her Time: Architect Mary Jane Colter in the Southwest (pg. 58)
п‚ЁпЂ All Hat and No Cattle: The Language of the American West (pg. 73)
п‚ЁпЂ Along Old Route 66 (pg. 33)
п‚ЁпЂ Anchors Aweigh: The U.S. Navy at Arizona State Teachers College, Flagstaff, 1943-45 (pg. 92)
п‚ЁпЂ Annie’s Hotel: A Visit to a Luxury Frontier Hotel (pg. 59)
п‚ЁпЂ The Arizona Connection to Sacagawea (pg. 91)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona Kicks on Route 66 (pg. 79)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona Place Names: Names on the Land (pg. 62)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona Tourism from Stagecoaches to Kayaks (pg. 86)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona’s Civilian Conservation Corps and Our National Parks and Forests (pg. 68)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona's Historic Trading Posts (pg. 37)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona's War Town: Flagstaff, Navajo Ordnance Depot, and World War II (pg. 92)
п‚ЁпЂ The Ballad of Arizona: Our First 100 Years (pg. 34)
п‚ЁпЂ The Butterfly Effect or Travels in Search of Arizona's Unusual Historic Events (pg. 51)
п‚ЁпЂ Building Community During the Progressive Era (pg. 41)
п‚ЁпЂ C. G. W. French (1820-1891) (pg. 69)
п‚ЁпЂ Coast-to-Coast in 48 Hours: A Pioneering Transcontinental Air Route Through the Southwest (pg. 20)
п‚ЁпЂ Community Builders: The Riordan Families of Flagstaff, 1884-1904 (pg. 41)
п‚ЁпЂ The Creation of the American Southwest, 1750 to 1950 (pg. 46)
п‚ЁпЂ Crosscurrents in the Desert: The U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps in Arizona (pg. 83)
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњDear Emma” (pg. 92)
В 10В Presentations Listed by Subject
History & Heritage - Arizona and the Southwest
Click title to see abstract and speaker’s bio
(continued)
п‚ЁпЂ Deceptions, Lies and Alibis (pg. 67)
п‚ЁпЂ Desert Trader: Goldie Tracy Richmond, Trader, Trapper, and Quiltmaker (pg. 37)
п‚ЁпЂ Desperado Trails: Outlaws on the Arizona Frontier (pg. 31)
п‚ЁпЂ Dia de los Muertos - A Celebration of Life and Death (pg. 22)
п‚ЁпЂ Elizabeth "Baby Doe" Tabor (pg. 84)
п‚ЁпЂ Eloy's Gun and Cotton Stories: Romanticizing the Real (pg. 57)
п‚ЁпЂ Fascinating Florence, AZ: Not Just a Prison Town (pg. 72)
п‚ЁпЂ Father Kino: Journey to Discovery (pg. 50)
п‚ЁпЂ Flagstaff and the Austrians: World War II Prisoners of War at Navajo Ordnance Depot (pg. 92)
п‚ЁпЂ The Food of Arizona: Many Cultures, Many Flavors (pg. 62)
п‚ЁпЂ For God, Gold, and Glory: The Coronado Expedition, 1540‒1542 (pg. 86)
п‚ЁпЂ For Love or Money: The Western Saga of Horace and "Baby Doe" Tabor (pg. 84)
п‚ЁпЂ Ghost Towns of the Second World War: Arizona's Historic Military Sites (pg. 20)
п‚ЁпЂ The History of the River Runners of the Grand Canyon (pg. 91)
п‚ЁпЂ How the Judge's Brother Got Away with Murder: The Prosecution of Frank C. Kibbey (pg. 48)
п‚ЁпЂ How Wild Was It? Crime and Justice in Arizona Territory (pg. 48)
п‚ЁпЂ Images of Grandeur: Artists and Photographers of the Grand Canyon (pg. 86)
п‚ЁпЂ In the Footsteps of Martha Summerhayes (pg. 71)
п‚ЁпЂ The Incorporation of Arizona: From Territory to Statehood (pg. 18)
п‚ЁпЂ Indian Labor: Navajo and Hopi Workers at Navajo Ordnance Depot, World War II (pg. 92)
п‚ЁпЂ King Cotton (pg. 72)
п‚ЁпЂ Macabre, AZ (pg. 79)
п‚ЁпЂ Marcos de Niza in Phoenix: Fact or Fantasy (pg. 24)
п‚ЁпЂ The Mysteries of Everett Ruess (pg. 78)
п‚ЁпЂ Native in a Strange Land: The Life of Mike Burns, Indian Scout and Autobiographer (pg. 62)
п‚ЁпЂ The New Deal in Arizona (pg. 54)
п‚ЁпЂ No Better than Murderers: The Story of the Canyon Diablo Train Robbery of 1889 (pg. 48)
п‚ЁпЂ The Old Spanish Trail (pg. 45)
п‚ЁпЂ Pearl Hart, the Lady Bandit: Victim or Vixen or Both? (pg. 72)
п‚ЁпЂ PaulineWeaver and the Mountain Men of Arizona (pg. 91)
п‚ЁпЂ People Call Us Navajo, But We Are DinСђ. There is a difference. (pg. 26)
п‚ЁпЂ Popular Justice Run Amok: The Globe Lynchings of 1882 (pg. 48)
п‚ЁпЂ Post Card Images of Arizona, 1900-1920 (pg. 76)
п‚ЁпЂ Regional Historic Tours of Arizona (pg. 76)
п‚ЁпЂ Riding with the Duke: John Wayne in Arizona (pg. 62)
п‚ЁпЂ Selling the Southwest: Fred Harvey and the Promotion of Native American Cultures (pg. 58)
п‚ЁпЂ Sharlot Mabridth Hall (1870-1943) (pg. 39)
п‚ЁпЂ Silver Images on Glass Plates: Early Photography in Arizona, 1850-1920 (pg. 76)
п‚ЁпЂ Sprechen Sie Deutsch? German-Speaking Jesuit Missionaries as Founders of Sonora/Arizona (pg. 30)
п‚ЁпЂ Steam and Steel Rails: The Arrival of the Railroad and Its Impact on Arizona (pg. 54)
п‚ЁпЂ Telling It Like It Was: Interviews with Arizona Pioneer Women (pg. 54)
п‚ЁпЂ They Was Out to Kill Us: The Power Cabin Shootout (pg. 65)
п‚ЁпЂ Timber Tales (pg. 41)
В 11В Presentations Listed by Subject
History & Heritage - Arizona and the Southwest
Click title to see abstract and speaker’s bio
(continued)
п‚ЁпЂ The Tully and Ochoa Wagon Train Fight (pg. 89)
п‚ЁпЂ Two Six Shooters Beat Four Aces: The Lives of Men on the Arizona Frontier (pg. 59)
п‚ЁпЂ The Vulture Gold Mine (pg. 29)
п‚ЁпЂ Walking the Corn Pollen Path (pg. 26)
п‚ЁпЂ What Has Passed & What Remains: Using Oral History to Understand Arizona’s Changing Landscapes (pg. 43)
п‚ЁпЂ Winslow's La Posada: The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Harvey Grand Hotel (pg. 58)
п‚ЁпЂ With a Beefsteak and a Cup of Coffee: The Harvey Girls in the Southwest (pg. 58)
п‚ЁпЂ Written in Basalt, or Graffiti on the Gila (pg. 45)
History & Heritage - United States
п‚ЁпЂ 407 Years of Immigration to America: Ethnicity, Public Opinion and Policy, 1607 to 2014 (pg. 46)
п‚ЁпЂ Connecting the Cultural Dots: Meso-American Art History (pg. 32)
п‚ЁпЂ Emancipation and the Destruction of Slavery, 1861-1865 (pg. 80)
п‚ЁпЂ Saving the Great American West: The Story of George Bird Grinnell (pg. 47)
п‚ЁпЂ He Called It a Dream, but It Woke Us Up! (pg. 17)
п‚ЁпЂ Our Civil War: Reflections at the Sesquicentennial (pg. 80)
п‚ЁпЂ The American Presidency (pg. 80)
п‚ЁпЂ Why the Union Won and the Confederacy Lost (pg. 80)
History & Heritage - World
п‚ЁпЂ Differing Perspectives: An Overview of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict (pg. 15)
п‚ЁпЂ Eastern Europe's Dramatic Democratic Revolution (pg. 42)
п‚ЁпЂ Every Person Their Own Historian: A Quick Lesson on Doing Oral History (pg. 74)
п‚ЁпЂ Memory and Family History in Post-War Germany (pg. 53)
п‚ЁпЂ Muslim Rescue and Resistance during the Holocaust (pg. 16)
п‚ЁпЂ Reconciliation: Creative Approaches and the Power of the Arts (pg. 53)
п‚ЁпЂ The Ottoman Empire: Why It's Important (pg. 16)
п‚ЁпЂ The Outbreak of World War I: Teenage Assassins, Balkan Unrest, and the "Shot Heard Round the World" (pg. 40)
п‚ЁпЂ World War I in the Middle East: Roots of Contemporary Conflict (pg. 15)
В Humanities in Contemporary Issues
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњCan’t We All Just Get Along?” Historicizing Civil Discourse (pg. 93)
п‚ЁпЂ Surviving Genocide: Race, Ethnicity, Immigration and Thriving after Great Loss (pg. 93)
п‚ЁпЂ Understanding Culture and Building Community (pg. 93)
В Language and Literature
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona History and Storytelling for Students of All Ages: Inspiring Imagination, Finding Your Own Voice,
Acquiring Insight and Skills (pg. 88)
п‚ЁпЂ Family Secrets: The Uneasy Tradition of Diarists and Their Readers (pg. 84)
п‚ЁпЂ Growing Old with Humor (pg. 64)
п‚ЁпЂ How I Learned English (pg. 63)
п‚ЁпЂ Humor in Names and Naming (pg. 64)
п‚ЁпЂ Mary Hunter Austin: Desert Writer and Rebel (pg. 84)
В 12В Language and Literature (continued)
п‚ЁпЂ Monsters, Magic and the Movies: An Introduction to Horror
Literature's Greatest Icons (pg. 38)
п‚ЁпЂ Nature Writing and the Southwest (pg. 38)
п‚ЁпЂ The Reinvention of Humor Through Digital Media (pg. 64)
п‚ЁпЂ The Role of Humor in Arizona Politics (pg. 64)
п‚ЁпЂ Thornton Wilder's Arizona Days (pg. 63)
п‚ЁпЂ Writing on the Edge: Borderlands Literature (pg. 63)
Presentations Listed by Subject
Click title to see abstract and speaker’s bio
Law and Civic Engagement
п‚ЁпЂ An Ethic of Service (pg. 94)
п‚ЁпЂ Private, For-Profit Prisons: Good Policy or Bad Choice? (pg. 70)
п‚ЁпЂ Stories of Cooperation (pg. 94)
п‚ЁпЂ Voluntary Association (pg. 94)
п‚ЁпЂ What Can One Person Do? And How? (pg. 94)
В Philosophy, Ethics, and Religion
п‚ЁпЂ The Art of Shaping the Sky: James Turrell's Roden Crater Project (pg. 44)
п‚ЁпЂ Connecting Craters: Scientific, Ritualistic, and Artistic Reactions to the Arizona Landscape (pg. 44)
п‚ЁпЂ Grand Canyon: Philosophical Wonder (pg. 44)
п‚ЁпЂ Masculinities in Christianity, Judaism and Beyond (pg. 53)
п‚ЁпЂ The Quest for Religious Otherness: Medieval Mysticism and Modern Spirituality (pg. 30)
п‚ЁпЂ Religious Fundamentalisms: A Comparative Perspective in the World Religions (pg. 53)
п‚ЁпЂ The Rise of Antisemitism and Nazi Propaganda (pg. 53)
п‚ЁпЂ Sustainability Issues in Arizona: A Moral Responsibility? (pg. 44)
п‚ЁпЂ Witnessing a Jewish Revival in Eastern Europe (pg. 42)
В Political Science
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona's Age of Reform: Populists, Radicals, and Progressives, 1890-1920 (pg. 21)
п‚ЁпЂ Radicalism in the Mountain West: The Case of Arizona, 1890-1920 (pg. 21)
History Alive
Presentations Listed by Type
п‚ЁпЂ Aviatrix: Bessie Coleman, That’s Me! (pg. 28)
(History Alive & Speakers in the Schools)
п‚ЁпЂ C. G. W. French (pg. 69)
Click title to see abstract and speaker’s bio
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњDear Emma” (pg. 92)
п‚ЁпЂ Elizabeth "Baby Doe" Tabor (pg. 84)
п‚ЁпЂ Saving the Great American West: The Story of George Bird Grinnell (pg. 47)
п‚ЁпЂ Mary Hunter Austin (pg. 84)
п‚ЁпЂ Sharlot Mabridth Hall (pg. 39)
п‚ЁпЂ Teresa Urrea: Spiritual Healer (pg. 23)
п‚ЁпЂ The Wolf: Friend or Foe? (pg. 61)
Speakers in Schools
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњA New Day in Babylon”: Black Latino Relations (pg. 93)
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњAnd Ya Don’t Stop”: Hip Hop and American Popular Culture (pg. 93)
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњCan’t We All Just Get Along?” Historicizing Civil Discourse (pg. 93)
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњPeace Be Still”: Modern Black America from WWII to Barack Obama (pg. 93)
п‚ЁпЂ вЂњWomen’s Rights Are Human Rights”: The Global Case for Women’s Rights (pg. 74)
п‚ЁпЂ A Day in the Old Tubac Schoolhouse (pg. 23)
В 13В Presentations Listed by Type
Speakers in Schools (continued)
п‚ЁпЂ All Hat and No Cattle: The Language of the American
(History Alive & Speakers in the Schools)
West (pg. 73)
Click title to see abstract and speaker’s bio
п‚ЁпЂ An Ethic of Service (pg. 94)
п‚ЁпЂ The Arizona Connection to Sacagawea (pg. 91)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona History and Storytelling for Students of All Ages: Inspiring Imagination, Finding Your Own Voice,
Acquiring Insight and Skills (pg. 88)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona Is for Art Lovers: Museums, Murals and Movements Through the Ages (pg. 38)
п‚ЁпЂ Arizona Women, Past and Present: An Oral History Presentation (pg. 74)
п‚ЁпЂ Barnstormers, Daredevils, and Flying Waitresses (pg. 73)
п‚ЁпЂ The Butterfly Effect or Travels in Search of Arizona's Unusual Historic Events (pg. 51)
п‚ЁпЂ Connecting the Cultural Dots: Meso-American Art History (pg. 32)
п‚ЁпЂ Crosscurrents in the Desert: The U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps in Arizona (pg. 83)
п‚ЁпЂ Descansos: Marking Passages (pg. 50)
п‚ЁпЂ Dia de los Muertos - A Celebration of Life and Death (pg. 22)
п‚ЁпЂ Eastern Europe's Dramatic Democratic Revolution (pg. 42)
п‚ЁпЂ Every Person Their Own Historian: A Quick Lesson on Doing Oral History (pg. 74)
п‚ЁпЂ Father Kino: Journey to Discovery (pg. 50)
п‚ЁпЂ The Form of Connection: Understanding Cities (pg. 81)
п‚ЁпЂ The Harlem Renaissance: Literary Movement (pg. 49)
п‚ЁпЂ The History of the River Runners of the Grand Canyon (pg. 92)
п‚ЁпЂ INYAHOSKIE (The Stone Boy): A Lakota Legend (pg. 32)
п‚ЁпЂ Mary Hunter Austin: Desert Writer and Rebel (pg. 84)
п‚ЁпЂ Masculinities in Christianity, Judaism and Beyond (pg. 53)
п‚ЁпЂ Memory and Family History in Post-War Germany
п‚ЁпЂ Monsters, Magic and the Movies: An Introduction to Horror Literature's Greatest Icons (pg. 53)
п‚ЁпЂ Muslim Rescue and Resistance during the Holocaust (pg. 15)
п‚ЁпЂ Nature Writing and the Southwest (pg. 38)
п‚ЁпЂ Oh, the Shape We're In!: How Arizona's and the Western States' Borders Were Determined (pg. 51)
п‚ЁпЂ The Ottoman Empire: Why It's Important (pg. 15)
п‚ЁпЂ The Outbreak of World War I: Teenage Assassins, Balkan Unrest, and the "Shot Heard Round the World" (pg. 15)
п‚ЁпЂ Pauline Weaver and the Mountain Men of Arizona (pg. 92)
п‚ЁпЂ People Call Us Navajo, But We Are DinСђ. There is a difference. (pg. 26)
п‚ЁпЂ POP-Pourri: Pop Culture in Arizona (pg. 79)
п‚ЁпЂ Reconciliation: Creative Approaches and the Power of the Arts (pg. 53)
п‚ЁпЂ Religious Fundamentalisms: A Comparative Perspective in the World Religions (pg. 53)
п‚ЁпЂ Revitalizing Rural and Small Town America: Folk Art and Folklore (pg. 50)
п‚ЁпЂ The Rise of Antisemitism and Nazi Propaganda (pg. 53)
п‚ЁпЂ Stories of Cooperation (pg. 94)
п‚ЁпЂ Surviving Genocide: Race, Ethnicity, Immigration and Thriving after Great Loss (pg. 87)
п‚ЁпЂ Voluntary Association (pg. 94)
п‚ЁпЂ What Can One Person Do? And How? (pg. 94)
п‚ЁпЂ What Do You Mean, Women Can’t Vote? A Look at the First Women’s Rights Movement, 1848-1920 (pg. 74)
п‚ЁпЂ World War I in the Middle East: Roots of Contemporary Conflict (pg. 15)
В 14В В В World
War I in the Middle East: Roots of Contemporary Conflict
(RS, SS)
Although World War I began 100 years ago, its effects are still evident in the
Middle East today. The war ended the Ottoman Empire and created new states,
yet the peace settlements left many Middle Eastern people dissatisfied. The treaties
left millions of Kurds without a country, Arab lands divided into various British
and French mandates, Turks battling Greeks, and Jews and Palestinians
increasingly locked in conflict over the same land. This presentation looks at the
legacy of World War I in the Middle East, and the Great War’s impact on recent
conflicts in Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, and Israel/Palestine.
Speakers in the Schools: Arizona Academic Standards
Strand 2 (World History), Concept 8 (World at War) and Concept 9 (Contemporary World)
Strand 4 (Geography), Concept 2 (Places and Regions) and Concept 4 (Human Systems)
The Outbreak of World War I: Teenage Assassins, Balkan Unrest, and
the “Shot Heard Round the World”
(RS, SS)
How, and more importantly, why, did a group of Bosnian teenagers assassinate an
Austrian archduke? How did this action lead to the First World War? Did the
young revolutionaries expect the serious consequences of their action? Through
the lens of this incendiary event and on the eve of its 100th anniversary (June
2014), this talk explores big issues, such as nationalism, terrorism, the impact of
less developed areas on international politics, and the role of individuals in history.
Speakers in the Schools: Arizona Academic Standards
Strand 2 (World History), Concept 8 (World at War)
Strand 4 (Geography), Concept 2 (Places and Regions) and Concept 4 (Human Systems)
Differing Perspectives: An Overview of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict
(RS)
The Palestinian-Israeli conflict is often described solely in terms of international
diplomacy, particularly Western involvement in exacerbating or attempting to
resolve instability in the region. However, more crucial to an understanding of the
nature of the conflict are internal issues, namely the differing perspectives that
separate Palestinians from Israelis and make their disagreements so intractable.
This presentation provides an historical overview that highlights how each group
holds different interpretations of their shared history and provides the background
on the eight key issues in contemporary life that further divide the two peoples
and pose challenges for those seeking peace in the region.
Lisa Adeli’s Presentations Continued on the following page. Lisa Adeli
L
isa Adeli is the Outreach
Coordinator at the
University of Arizona Center
for Middle Eastern Studies.
She has a Ph.D. in history,
specializing in modern
Balkan history and minoring
in Ottoman/Middle Eastern
history. She is a teacher
fellow with the National
World War I Museum and
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Museum as well as a
volunteer with the Educators’
Institute for Human Rights
and through such positions
teaches high school. She has
also participated in educator
programs to Armenia,
Turkey/the Balkans, and the
Palestinian Territories. And
in 2012, Adeli received the
National Council for the
Social Studies award for
Global Education.
History & Heritage / World
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
15В В Muslim
Rescue and Resistance During the Holocaust
В (RS, SS)
The Holocaust was planned in Europe and its geographical center was the
European heartland. Nonetheless, Muslim populations on the periphery – in the
Balkans, the “fertile crescent” region, North Africa, as well as Middle Eastern
diplomats in Europe – came into contact with the Nazi persecution and played
significant supporting roles in the drama. Muslims assumed a variety of positions,
surprisingly often as rescuers and resistors. This topic provides a lens through
which to examine critically many key issues in world history and to challenge
many Western stereotypes.В В Speakers in the Schools: Arizona Academic Standards
Strand 2 (World History), Concept 8 (World at War)
Strand 4 (Geography), Concept 2 (Places and Regions) and Concept 4 (Human Systems)
The Ottoman Empire: Why It’s Important
(SS)
Lasting more than 600 years and spanning parts of three continents, the Ottoman
Empire is extremely important in history, yet its structure and organization is not
very well understood in the West. How could the empire be a Muslim state and,
simultaneously, allow Christians to be administered by their own church? Why did
the empire give slaves positions of military and political power? What did the empire
have in common with the West? This presentation will focus on Ottoman ideas and
institutions and their important legacy in the world today.
Lisa Adeli
Speakers in the Schools: Arizona Academic Standards
Strand 2 (World History), Concept 3 (World in Transition)
Strand 4 (Geography), Concept 2 (Places and Regions) and Concept 4 (Human Systems)
History & Heritage / World
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
16В В В Called It a Dream, but It Woke Us Up!
He
(RS)
Vicariously experience the environment and atmosphere of a 1960s-era Civil
Rights Movement camp. Through theatrical performance, music, poetry, and
participatory activities, audience members will examine the culture of
discrimination, racial prejudice, and social injustice in the United States as it was
during the 1960s. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s strategy of passive resistance is
explored and the effects and continued impact of the movement on today’s society
are discussed.
Rod Ambrose
R
od Ambrose acts as the
Prevention Education
Coordinator for the city of
Phoenix’s Project BRAVE
(Bringing the Reality About
Violence Education).
Additionally, Ambrose serves
as Chairman of the South
Mountain WORKS
Coalition and is a dedicated
board member of the George
Washington Carver Museum
& Cultural Center. He also
spends a good deal of time on
stage with the Black Theater
Troupe, of which Ambrose is
a founding member. In
2010, the Arizona Chapter of
the LINKS conferred upon
him the Living History award
and in 2012 Phoenix Mayor
Greg Stanton proclaimed, in
Ambrose’s name, November
30 as Community Artist and
Youth Activist Day.
History & Heritage /
United States
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
17В В В Seeing
Arizona, Imagining Mars
(RS)
Many Arizonans are familiar with Flagstaff astronomer Percival Lowell’s theories
about Mars and its irrigation canals. Disputed by many contemporaries and
disproved by the 1970s Viking missions, Lowell’s Mars theories nevertheless
resonated with many Americans. This presentation explains how Lowell’s Arizona
travels – from planting his observatory in Flagstaff to his many Arizona sojourns
into its mountains and deserts – helped him to imagine what Mars must be like.
Also explained is how his imaginings gained traction with the people of Arizona
who were developing their own irrigation projects like the Roosevelt Dam and the
Salt River Project.
В Exploring the Depths: A 3D 1940 Hike into the Grand Canyon
(RS)В In 1940, photographer Clyde A. McCoy hiked down the South Kaibab trail at
Grand Canyon National Park making color, stereo photographs as part of a
nationwide project. Two years later he was murdered in a Detroit robbery. In
1996, Dr. Amundson purchased McCoy’s photograph collection and has been
researching McCoy’s story ever since. This presentation includes a brief biography
of McCoy, an overview of Amundson’s detective-like historical research, and a
visual recreation (in glorious 3D!) of McCoy’s hike using scanned images of
digitally restored slides from the collection.
В Talking Machine Cowboys and Indians: The First Western Recordings,
1902-1913
(RS) Between the Columbia cylinder recording of “Navajo” in 1902 and the Victor
record of “Ragtime Cowboy Joe” in 1912, America experienced a cowboy and
Indian music craze. Not your typical ballads featuring fiddles and guitars, these
ditties were created in New York’s Tin Pan Alley and then preserved on early
records. This presentation provides an overview of the early recording industry
and a visual presentation of the beautiful original sheet music. And, best of all,
original recordings of the music are played on a 1905 Edison Cylinder and a 1913
Victor. В В The Incorporation of Arizona: From Territory to Statehood
(RS)
This presentation focuses on the many ways the nation incorporated Arizona into
the national scene, beginning with the establishment of Arizona Territory in 1863
and then statehood almost fifty years later. Expanding the concept of
incorporation to include politics, economics, culture, and environment, it explains
why statehood was so elusive for Arizonans and what they finally did to make it
happen. Along the way, the relationship between Arizona and the federal
government in regard to railroads, agriculture, race, ethnicity, tourism, and water,
is discussed.
 AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Michael
Amundson
M
ichael Amundson is a
professor of history at
Northern Arizona University
in Flagstaff. A specialist on
the history of the American
West, Amundson teaches
undergraduate and graduate
courses on Arizona and the
Southwest, the American
West, U.S. History,
American sports history, and
the history of photography.
His publications include two
books on nuclear history and
three books focusing on
rephotography in Wyoming.
He is currently working on a
book about early Edison
recordings featuring the
American West. He and his
wife, Lauren, live in Flagstaff
with their border collie,
Tessa.
Geography and Environment
Art, Architecture, and Music
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
18В В В African American Pioneers of Arizona
(RS)
Featuring compelling documentaries based on interviews, this presentation shares
stories about prominent African Americans who contributed to the life and culture
of Arizona. Such luminaries include the late Dr. Eugene Grigsby, Betty Fairfax,
Judge Jean Williams, Rev. Warren Stewart, Councilman Calvin Goode, and Carol
Coles Henry. Each individual’s life is contextualized using prominent events that
have taken place in Arizona and the impact his/her work had on the social,
cultural and political lives of the state is discussed.
В A Story, A Story: African and African American Oral Tradition and
Storytelling
(RS)
When the African slave was brought to the Caribbean and North and South
America, s/he brought her oral literature and performance style. This presentation
focuses on the transfer of those oral traditions from African culture to African
American culture. Such traditions can be heard in trickster stories, but also
observed in the narration of myths, folk tales, sermons, jokes, proverbs, folk
sayings, signifying, capping, testifying, toasting, on street corners, in barbershops,
in beauty shops, the blues, rapping and hip-hop. In demonstration of the
connections between African and African American oral traditions, a variety of
Ananse tales, African American proverbs and other verbal arts are performed.
В By the Time They Came to Phoenix: African American Cotton Pickers in
Arizona
(RS)
Featuring a documentary that tells the stories of early African American cotton
pickers in El Mirage and in other regions of Arizona, this presentation explores the
lives of African Americans who came to the cotton fields from Texas, Arkansas,
Louisiana, and Oklahoma during the 1940s through the 1960s. These individuals
made significant cultural, historical, and economic contributions to life in Arizona,
from founding churches to serving as civic and social leaders. Notable families
include the Cutrights, Marshalls, and Dunbars.
В Stories from the Other Side
(RS)
Featuring Stories from the Other Side, a documentary film, this presentation
explores the travels of a group of Phoenix school teachers, ASU faculty, and
graduate students during their visit to Ghana, West Africa on a Fulbright-Hays
Group Project Abroad. In addition to immersing themselves in the music, dance,
and spiritual events of the country, the group visited slave castles and interviewed
prominent experts on the issues of historical and contemporary slave trafficking.
This presentation shares the educators and students’ journey of discovery and how
they all came to understand the culture, life, art and education of Ghana. This
presentation connects issues of global education to multicultural curricula.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Akua Duku
Anokye
A
kua Duku Anokye,
Associate Director of
SHArCS and Associate
Professor of Africana
Language, Literature, and
Culture in Arizona State
University's New College, is
past chair of the Conference
on College Composition and
Communication (CCCC),
and co-chair of the College
Board’s Advanced Placement
English Language and
Composition Development
Committee. Anokye’s
research centers on African
Diaspora orality and literacy
practices, folklore, and oral
history focusing on Ghanaian
culture, religion, storytelling,
and dance. Her work in oral
history on community
mothers has led to the
production of several
documentaries on African
American women activists
including Jean and Betty
Fairfax, and Judge Jean
Williams in Arizona.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/African American
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/General
19   The Eagle and the Archaeologists: The Lindberghs’ 1929 Southwest
Aerial Survey
(RS)
Charles Lindbergh is best known for his famous 1927 flight across the Atlantic Ocean.
But few realize that Lindbergh and his wife, Anne, played a brief but important role in
archaeology. In 1929 they teamed up with noted archaeologist Alfred Kidder to conduct
an unprecedented aerial photographic survey of Southwest prehistoric sites and geologic
features including Chaco Canyon, the Grand Canyon, and Canyon de Chelly. Featuring
Lindbergh’s historic photographs, this presentation describes this adventurous pioneering
collaboration of aviation and archaeology.
В Coast-to-Coast in 48 Hours: A Pioneering Transcontinental Air Route
Through the Southwest
(RS)
In 1929, the newly-formed Transcontinental Air Transport (TAT) company launched an
ambitious plan to establish the country’s first coast-to-coast airline service from New York
to Los Angeles. Assisted by famous pilots Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart, the
TAT established a series of pioneering airports along the route (including Clovis,
Albuquerque, Winslow, and Kingman) and helped establish the modern age of air travel.
Using historic photos and film, this presentation will discuss the history of the TAT with
a special focus on its activities and airfields in the Southwest.
 Ghost Towns of the Second World War: Arizona’s Historic Military Sites
(RS)
During the Second World War, Arizona’s open spaces, sparse population, and mild
weather made it an ideal location for a wide range of military operations including
combat training, POW camps, and flight training. By war’s end, more pilots received
their wings in Arizona than in any other state. This presentation discusses the war’s
impact on Arizona with a special focus on those sites that still have significant features,
foundations, or remains from the war period. Using both historic and contemporary
photographs, this presentation describes the original purpose of the remaining features at
the sites and their significance to the war effort.
Rock Hounds and River Rats: The 1937 Carnegie-CalTech Grand Canyon
Expedition
(RS)
In 1937, CalTech geologists teamed up with a tough and rowdy crew of boatmen and set
out in small wooden boats on an expedition through the Grand Canyon to study the
ancient rocks of the Inner Gorge. At the time, fewer than a dozen parties had successfully
run the canyon, often with a loss of boats or crew. Leveraging excerpts from trip
journals, as well as original photographs and film footage , this presentation discusses the
adventures, hardships, conflicts, and triumphs of this important, yet little-known, early
science expedition and sets it in the context of earlier Grand Canyon river trips and
geologic studies.
“The Roads Are for the Timid”: The Arizona Adventures and Romance of
Mai Richie Reed*
(RS)
In 1907, an adventurous young woman from Philadelphia hopped on a train to see the
distant Grand Canyon and thus launched an adventure that would change the course of
her life. Over the next several years, she visited the mesa-top pueblo of Acoma, explored
the Grand Canyon, lived in a rustic cabin, and struck up a romance with a famous early
Arizona painter. Based on Reed’s recently discovered travel journals and photographs,
this presentation describes one woman’s experiences during the waning years of the
Arizona territory and the impact of Western culture on the women’s rights movement.
Erik Berg
R
aised in Flagstaff,
Arizona, Erik Berg is an
award-winning historian and
writer with a special interest
in the early twentieth century
Southwest and the impact of
science and technology. In
addition to contributing to
several books, his work has
appeared in the Journal of
Arizona History, Arizona
Highways, and Sedona
Magazine. A past president
of the Grand Canyon
Historical Society, Berg
currently lives in Phoenix.
Archaeology
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Geography and Environment
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
20В В В A Most Colorful Character: The Life and Times of George W.P. Hunt,
Arizona’s First Governor
(RS)
Arizona has had its share of colorful politicians but none more so than George W.
P. Hunt, Arizona’s first governor. From his birth in rural Missouri in 1859 to his
death in Phoenix in 1934, Hunt was always the character. He was elected to office
seven times, but declared the loser in his 1916 bid for re-election. Following this
loss, he locked himself in the governor’s suite and refused to vacate the premises.
This presentation offers an up-close examination of Hunt, delving into his
background, personality, views, and career, and thus providing insight into the
politician’s unusual behavior, like that which ensued his 1916 re-election loss.
Arizona’s Age of Reform: Populists, Radicals and Progressives, 18901920
(RS)
Discover Arizona’s progressive roots, beginning with an exploration of the late 19th
-century forces that ultimately produced an “age of reform.” Then, examine the
reform and its long-term impact in the state, beginning with the framing of the
Arizona Constitution in 1910 and ending in the U.S.’s entry into World War I in
1917. Discover the leading political figures of the movement, including Populist
Buckey O’Neill, Progressive/Labor Democrat George W.P. Hunt, and the more
radical elements in the movement as represented by the Western Federation of
Miners and left-wing third parties.
Radicalism in the Mountain West: The Case of Arizona, 1890-1920
(RS)
Given the strong streak of conservatism in the Mountain West today, the fact that
it was at one time a hotbed of radical activity may come as a surprise to many. This
presentation explores the radical movement in the Mountain West – a movement
by which people were not simply trying to reform the capitalist system but to
replace it with something that they felt was better. Emphasizing Arizona and the
state’s mining areas, this presentation provides an overview of the development of
radical activity through the party system and through the union movement.
David Berman
David Berman is a Professor
Emeritus of Political Science
and a Senior Research
Fellow, Morrison Institute
for Public Policy, Arizona
State University. He has
spent his career researching,
writing, and speaking about
state and local government,
politics, and public policy in
Arizona and around the
country. His books include:
Arizona Politics and
Government (1998);
Radicalism in the Mountain
West (2007); and Politics,
Labor, and the War on Big
Business, The Path of Reform
in Arizona (2012). He holds
a bachelor’s degree from
Rockford College in
Rockford, Illinois, and both a
master’s degree and a
doctorate from the American
University in Washington,
D.C.
В History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Political Science
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
21В В Growing
Up Chicana in Morenci, Arizona
В (RS)
“Growing Up Chicana in Morenci, Arizona” is a plática (informal talk) about
Chicanas who lived in the mining town of Morenci, Arizona, during the early to
middle 1900s. Through historic photographs, readings from Suffer Smoke and
Water from the Moon, and oral history interviews, Björkquist portrays the lives of
girls and women of Morenci. Audience members leave with a historically accurate
picture of life for Mexican Americans in a segregated copper mining town. This
inspirational presentation pays tribute to four generations of Chicanas who, in
spite of discrimination, persevered and showed that si se puede (“it can be done”).
В In the Shadow of the Smokestack
(RS)
Learn about the lives of Mexican miners and their families. This plГЎtica (informal
talk) traces the lives of Mexican Americans who worked in the early underground
copper mines of Morenci, Arizona. Björkquist examines the social, political, and
cultural experiences of these miners and their families to explain how they met the
everyday challenges of living in a different environment without giving up their
values, language, or traditions. Such challenges included deportation during the
depression of 1920 and the Great Depression of the 1930s and the struggle for
equality in pay, benefits, and job opportunities.
В DГ­a de los Muertos: A Celebration of Life and Death
(RS, SS)
What is DГ­a de los Muertos? From where does it originate? And how is it
celebrated? DГ­a de los Muertos or Days of the Dead is a significant and highly
celebrated holiday in Mexico, Latin America, and the Southwestern United
States. To understand DГ­a de los Muertos one has to set aside preconceived
notions. To many Mexicans, death is not a subject to be feared, ignored, or
divorced from the living. One cannot celebrate life without also celebrating death.
This plГЎtica (informal talk) traces the origins of this Mexican festival and describes
the traditional elements associated with the holiday including food, folk crafts and
altars.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards:
Social Studies Standard Strand 1: American History, Concept 2
Social Studies Standard Strand 1: American History, Concept 3
Social Studies Standard Strand 4: Geography, Concept 2
Visual Arts Standard Strand 2: Relate, Concept 1
Visual Arts Standard Strand 2: Relate, Concept 3
Visual Arts Standard Strand 2: Relate, Concept 4
Visual Arts Standard Strand 3: Evaluate, Concept 1
Visual Arts Standard Strand 3: Evaluate, Concept 2
For details, please refer to the Speakers in the Schools catalog.
Special focus will be given to the folk crafts that teachers may want to teach their students,
such as papel picado, papier-mГўchГ© mask-making, sugar skulls, skeleton puppets, and paper
flowers. Samples will be displayed. Older students will be introduced to the artist Jose
Guadalupe Posada and his etchings and lithographs that are still popular in Mexico. They
will also learn about his calaveras – scathing satirical poems in which he depicted social and
political personalities as skeletons.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Elena DГ­az
Bjorkquist
E
lena Díaz Björkquist is a
writer, historian, and
artist based in Tucson,
Arizona, but originally of
Morenci, Arizona. She is the
author of two books, Suffer
Smoke and Water from the
Moon, and the co-editor of
Sowing the Seeds, una cosecha
de recuerdos and Our Spirit,
Our Reality: Celebrating Our
Stories. When not busy
writing, Björkquist serves as a
scholar and research affiliate
with SIROW at the
University of Arizona. She is
the recipient of the 2012
Arizona Humanities Council
Dan Shilling Public
Humanities Scholar Award
and the Arizona Commission
on the Arts Bill Desmond
Writing Award.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Chicano & Mexican
American
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
22В В Teresa Urrea: Spiritual Healer
(HA)
Meet Teresa Urrea, a curandera (spiritual healer) and
reluctant political figure. She was born in Sinoloa,
Mexico, in 1873 to a fourteen-year-old Tehueco Indian
in the employ of TomГЎs Urrea, a wealthy hacendado
(owner of a hacienda). When she was 16, she lapsed into
a cataleptic state that lasted over three months. Upon
awakening, Teresa reported that the Virgin had visited
her and informed her that she had special powers to heal
the sick and injured. From serving as an inspiration for
Mexican Indian tribes revolting against the government to her exile from her
homeland, Teresa Urrea lived a life that was anything but ordinary.
A Day in the Old Tubac Schoolhouse
(SS)
The oldest European settlement in Arizona, Tubac was settled in the Pimeria Alta,
the northern wilderness of New Spain and it later became part of Mexico.
Although a small town, it served as a settlement, presidio, and cultural center and
when southern Arizona was acquired by the United States in the Gadsden
Purchase of 1853, Tubac served as the commercial center of the area. A one-room
schoolhouse provided the education for the town’s children. Using photos, oral
history interviews, and stories from Tubac’s history, students will see and hear
what a typical day in an 1880’s Arizona one-room schoolhouse was like.
Elena DГ­az
Bjorkquist
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies Standard 1: American History, Concept 1: Research Skills for History – use of
primary and secondary sources to obtain accurate and relevant information.
Social Studies Standard Strand 1: American History, Concept 3: Exploration & Colonization –
The varied causes and effects of exploration, settlement, and colonization shaped regional
and national development of the U.S.
В Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Chicano & Mexican
American
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
23В В В Historic
Phoenix Chinatown, 1880 - 1930
(RS)
It’s not a well-known fact that there was once a thriving Chinatown in downtown
Phoenix, right on the spot where the Phoenix Suns basketball stadium now stands.
This close-knit Chinese community contained businesses, boarding houses, and
popular restaurants, as well as underground opium dens that were visited by many
non-Chinese people. This presentation discuss the history of Phoenix Chinatown
and the archaeological excavations that unearthed the buried remains of this lively
town within a town. Photographs of the numerous artifacts that were recovered
are shared, helping audiences to envision and understand this historic and unique
community.
В Working in the Salt Mine: Native American Salt Procurement and Ritual
in the Southwest
Todd Bostwick
(RS)
odd Bostwick has
conducted
archaeological research in the
Southwest for 35 years, and
was the Phoenix City
Archaeologist at Pueblo
Grande Museum for 21
years. Bostwick is currently
the Senior Research
Archaeologist for PaleoWest
Archaeology in Phoenix and
Director of Archaeology for
the Verde Valley Archaeology
Center in Camp Verde. He
has an M.A. in anthropology
and a Ph.D. in history from
Arizona State University, and
has taught classes at Arizona
State University and
Northern Arizona University.
Bostwick has published
numerous articles and books
on Southwest history and
prehistory and has received
several awards, including the
Governor’s Award in Public
Archaeology in 2005.
Salt has been a valuable trade item throughout human history. Native American
salt procurement in the Southwest involved dangerous journeys across sacred
landscapes associated with the deity Salt Woman. This presentation focuses on the
prehistory of a famous salt mine in what is now known as Camp Verde. In the
1920s, miners discovered prehistoric salt-mining tools deep inside tunnels dug
into a thick, fresh-water salt deposit. These were the mining tools of the
prehistoric Sinagua culture. Numerous photographs of these well-preserved, 700year old tools, along with photos of other Sinagua artifacts, will be shared so as to
illustrate the story of this unusual discovery.
В Landscape of the Spirits: Hohokam Rock Art of South Mountain Park
(RS)
The South Mountains in Phoenix contain more than 8,000 ancient petroglyphs.
This program discusses Dr. Bostwick’s long-term study of these Hohokam
petroglyphs and describes the various types of designs, their general distribution,
and their possible meanings. Interpretations of the petroglyphs include the
marking of trails, territories, and astronomical events, as well as dream or trance
imagery based on O’odham (Pima) oral traditions. Most of the trails currently
used by hikers in the South Mountains contain Hohokam rock art, indicating that
these trails date back at least 800 years.
В Marcos de Niza in Phoenix: Fact or Fantasy
(RS)
Fray Marcos de Niza is a well-known figure in Arizona’s Spanish history. By the
order of Francisco Coronado, Marcos de Niza traveled to the so-called Seven
Cities of Cibola (Zuni) with the express mission of finding gold. The route he
took is highly debated, with many left wondering if he passed through what is now
known as South Mountain Park (Phoenix). “Marcos de Niza,” along with the year
1539, can be found carved into rock at the park. Using findings from an episode
of the History Detectives, the exact route of Marcos de Niza is explored and
discussed.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
T
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Asian American
Archaeology
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Native American
24В В В From
China to Mexico: A Journey of Decorative Arts
(RS)
Mexico (New Spain) in the 17th and 18th centuries was an area that enjoyed
enormous economic prosperity. Each year, galleon ships crossed the Pacific and
brought porcelain, silks, ivory, spices and a myriad of other goods from China to
Mexico. The stylistic features and design of many of these trade items influenced
the artists and designers working in Mexico. Mexican talavera pottery displayed
the impact of galleon trade most vividly, while Manila silk shawls, featuring
Chinese motifs and decorative techniques, inspired the decoration of Mexican
textiles.
Brenda Brandt
B
renda Brandt holds a
Ph.D. from Florida
State University. She is a
published author who has
held faculty positions at the
University of Arizona and
Colorado State University as
a researcher and educator.
Past museum experience
includes curatorial and
education responsibilities in
history and cultural museums
in the Phoenix metropolitan
area. Her study of the social
relationships that people have
with material culture, as well
as her study of the design,
meanings and significance of
objects worldwide, led her to
open BMB Artifact
SERVICES, a consulting
business based in Phoenix.
Art, Architecture, and Music
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
25В В Walking the Corn Pollen Path
(RS)
Knowing one’s culture implies being educated about who you are, what social
order expects of you, and it provides the primary steps to individual identity.
Stories of the Emergence, Trotting Coyote, First Man and Spider Woman,
among others, teach the past, suggest the present, and create a pathway to a
satisfying future. Through recurring themes rich in symbolism, we discover the
Corn Pollen Path, the Navajo way of life, and aspire to continue life’s journey
upon it.
В People Call Us Navajo, But We Are DinГ©. There Is a Difference.
(SS)
About 500 years ago, somewhere in the Southwest, a Spaniard asked a Native
person, “Who is growing this crop?” The Native person responded with
“nabahu.” This word was recorded in a Spanish journal. It then became the term
used to refer to the people with the distinct planting style. Later, other “facts”
were used to identify these people who are known today as the Navajo. But, as
Brown claims, “We are not Navajo. We are Diné.” This program teaches
students the importance of listening to people tell their own histories and
cultures. It teaches that assumptions often lead to misunderstandings and
misrepresentations.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
п‚·пЂ PreK-Grade 3: Social Studies, Strand 1, Concept 2, Early Civilizations; Strand 4, Concept
1,World in Spatial Terms; Strand 3, Concept 1, Foundations of Government
п‚·пЂ Grades 4-6: Social Studies, Strand 1, Concept 2, Early Civilizations; Strand 4, Concepts 12, World in Spatial Terms and Places and Regions; Strand 3, Concepts 1-2, Foundations
of Government and Structure of Government
п‚·пЂ Grades 7-12: Social Studies, Strand 1, Concepts 2-3, Early Civilizations and Exploration
and Colonization; Strand 4, Concept 4, Human Systems; Strand 3, Concept 3, Functions
of Government
В Wallace Brown
(of the Bitter Water DinГ©)
C
ultural foundations,
given to Brown by long
-lived grandparents, helped
him weather the changing
world on the Navajo Nation.
Life experiences taught him
the value of preserving the
traditional teachings that are
not available in print.
Hoping to bring a restoration
to his people, he began
“talking culture” and found
an ever-broadening audience,
one who desires a greater
understanding of Navajo
people, the DinГ©.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Native American
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
26В В We Must Grow Our Own Artists: Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton
(RS)
Discover art educator Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton’s contributions to the
progressive education movement and the American Indian arts and crafts
movement. Artist, author, ethnographer, educator, and curator, these were but a
few of the talents of Colton, co-founder of the Museum of Northern Arizona and
early art advocate on the Colorado Plateau. Colton labored to increase public
awareness of the importance of art education and to revive Native American arts
on the Colorado Plateau. Her work contributed to a better understanding of the
culture of the peoples of the Colorado Plateau and to the preservation of Navajo
and Hopi traditions.
W. James Burns
W
. James Burns,
Executive Director at
the Desert Caballeros
Western Museum in
Wickenburg, Arizona, holds a
B.A. in history from the
University of Arizona, an
M.A. in public history from
Arizona State University, and
a Ph.D. in educational policy
studies from Georgia State
University. Burns is a
graduate of the Museum
Management Institute at the
Getty and has worked in
museums since 1990. His
research interests include the
social and environmental
history of the American
West. Burns has served on
several state and regional
museum association boards
and currently is an
Accreditation reviewer for the
American Alliance of
Museums.
В Art, Architecture, and Music
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
27  Aviatrix: Bessie Coleman, That’s Me!
(HA)
Ms. Bessie Coleman was born on January 26, 1892. She was a dreamer and a
woman with a mission. As a young adult, she decided that she wanted to fly. She
would have preferred to receive flight lessons in the United States, but due to
racial segregation, she found herself traveling to Paris, a trip definitely worth
taking. On June 15, 1921, she became the first African American to receive her
International Pilot’s License. Overcoming great adversity to achieve her goals,
Coleman’s story is full of heart, hard work, bravery, and determination.
В Leticia Carey
L
eticia Carey is a
visionary storyteller, as
well as an aspiring writer and
actress who enjoys
inspirational dance. Carey is
also a licensed pilot, having
earned her multi-engine and
instruments ratings and
commercial pilot license
from San Juan College in
Farmington, New Mexico.
She is a graduate of Arizona
State University with a B.S.
in purchasing and logistics
management and is very
active in the Arizona
community. When not
telling stories, she serves as
the founder and CEO of
Inspire Faith, L.L.C.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
Leticia Carey as Bessie Coleman
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
28В В The Vulture Gold Mine
(RS)
Discovered in 1863 by Henry Wickenburg, the Vulture Gold Mine was the first
big gold mine in Arizona. The mine and its colorful cast of characters, along with
the town of Wickenburg, were instrumental in stimulating considerable growth
and development in Central Arizona. This presentation shares the multi-layered
story of the gold mine, thus illustrating its unique role in early Arizona history.
Gary Carter
A
graduate of the Idaho
School of Mines, Gary
Carter enjoyed a 36-year
career in education, with
curatorial experience of
mineral collections,
development of geology
exhibitions and extensive
study of mining history. He is
an avid mineral collector and
in 2012 he completed a
substantial research report on
the history of the Vulture
Gold Mine. For the past
couple of years, he has been
sharing his knowledge and
experience with audiences at
colleges, libraries, museums
and historical societies.
В History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
29В В В Love
and Marriage: From a Medieval and Early Modern Perspective
(RS)
Both love and marriage play major roles in everyone’s life, and many of our modern
discussions center on these two concepts. But we are often much too stuck in our own
emotions to understand fully love and marriage. This presentation offers a culturalhistorical perspective on the concepts, examining their associated approaches, values,
norms, and ideas. The audience will learn what constitutes true love and marriage
according to a variety of medieval poets, artists, theologians, and philosophers.
Ultimately, audience members are invited to critically analyze their own
understandings of love and marriage.
В The Quest for Religious Otherness: Medieval Mysticism and Modern
Spirituality
(RS)
The human quest for spirituality is an eternal tradition, and we are as much engaged
in this quest now as we were centuries ago. This presentation explores medieval
mysticism, one of the most powerful, but also often misunderstood, phenomena of
the Middle Ages. Mysticism provided medieval religious women with tremendous
spiritual power, as well as political power. These religious women were graced with
divine visions and revelations, which they communicated through text, images, and
music. Such women and their experiences are still in existence today. Audience
members learn to understand this present-day mysticism through the lens of history.
В History of Women in the Western World: Medieval and Early Modern
Women
(RS)
Contrary to modern perceptions, the struggle for gender equality has a long tradition
reaching far back into the Middle Ages. Feminist and gender research over the last
four to five decades has uncovered dimensions of women’s participation in public life
and culture previously unknown. This presentation examines what we really know
about women in the Middle Ages and the early modern age, and highlights their roles
in literature, the arts, music, the sciences, and politics. The audience will learn that
modern-day feminism has deep historical roots and that today’s attempts to address
gender issues would be well served by incorporating a historical perspective.
В Sprechen Sie Deutsch? German-Speaking Jesuit Missionaries as
Founders of Sonora/Arizona
(RS)
We commonly assume that the early history of the Pimeria Alta (now Sonora/
Arizona) was greatly determined by the Spanish colonizers. But, in reality, the Jesuit
Order can be credited with having had the greatest impact on the region, perhaps best
represented by Padre Eusebio Kino. A surprisingly large number of his successors
hailed from German-speaking lands and they all played major roles in the early history
of the Southwest. This presentation illuminates the historical background of the Jesuit
Order and explores some of the key German Jesuit missionaries to the Pimeria Alta.
Moreover, this presentation brings to light some of the most recent research on this
topic, including an exciting collection of original texts and letters.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Albrecht Classen
A
lbrecht Classen is
University
Distinguished Professor of
German Studies at the
University of Arizona,
focusing his research and
teaching on the Middle Ages,
the early modern age, and on
modern issues, such as the
environment, gender,
immigration, the border, and
transcultural experiences.
More specifically, his topics
of interest concern love and
marriage throughout time,
the relationship between Jews
and Christians in past and
present, the history of early
Sonora/Arizona through the
lens of the German-speaking
Jesuit missionaries of the
eighteenth century, and
borderlands in Germany in
comparison to borderlands of
the United States. For
Classen, all research in the
humanities must be related to
the concerns and interests of
those living today.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/General
Philosophy, Ethics, and
Religion
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
30В В В This
Land is Our Land: Early Women on the Arizona Frontier
(RS)
Meet five early Arizona women who endured troubles and hardships during the territory’s
early days, all of whom brought a unique perspective to the raw land. Apache warrior
Lozen fought to hold onto land once freely roamed by her people. Larcena Pennington
crawled down the Santa Rita Mountains after surviving captivity by the Apaches. Mary
Aguirre found traveling the 1300-mile Santa Fe Trail an exhilarating adventure. Ada Bass
played an integral role in one of the first tourist businesses at the Grand Canyon and
Mormon Emma Lee French survived untold hardships raising a family at the site of what
is now Lees Ferry.
Oh Heavens! Saviors and Saints on the Arizona Frontier
(RS)
Women of many faiths cared for the bodies and souls of Arizona’s early inhabitants. Meet
five of these altruistic women who influenced the history of the territory. Theresa Ferrin’s
holistic practices and comprehensive understanding of healing herbs earned her the title
“Angel of Tucson.” Florence Yount is recognized as Prescott’s first woman physician.
Teresita Urrea was considered a saint for her hands-on healing powers. St. Katharine
Drexel invested much of her vast fortune to educate Navajo children. And the Sisters of
St. Joseph of Carondelet trudged across the blazing desert enduring untold hardships (and
marriage proposals!) before arriving safely in Tucson.
Business Not as Usual: Arizona’s Early Women Entrepreneurs
(RS)
Women have always been in business of one type or another. Meet five of Arizona’s early
female entrepreneurs. Prospector Nellie Cashman established restaurants in towns across
the territory. Sarah Bowman, a shrewd businesswoman with a tarnished reputation,
operated dining establishments for the soldiers of Fort Yuma. Trading post owner Louisa
Wetherill replicated intricate Navajo sand paintings, preserved Navajo stories, and
maintained vast collections of Native herbs and plants. African American Elizabeth Smith
successfully built and ran Wickenburg’s Vernetta Hotel and Angela Hammer, the first
female newswoman in the territory, constantly battled unscrupulous men who believed no
woman should run a newspaper.
Teacher, Teacher: Early Women Educators of Arizona
(RS)
Playing an integral role in early Arizona communities, teachers attained goals far beyond
what was expected in the classroom. Mary Elizabeth Post taught school in an abandoned
saloon as well as an old jailhouse. Hopi teacher Polingaysi Qöyawayma (Elizabeth White)
educated Hopi and Navajo students, bridging the gap between Anglo and Native cultures.
Eulalia “Sister” Bourne introduced newsletters to teach English to her Spanish-speaking
children. Maria Urquides’ heritage made her the ideal teacher for Tucson’s bilingual
(Spanish/English) schools. And, earning less than her Anglo counterparts, African
American Rebecca Huey Dallis had an enormous influence on the African American
children of Casa Grande.
Desperado Trails: Outlaws on the Arizona Frontier
(RS)
Hang on to your hats as you ride the trails beside some of Arizona’s most wicked
renegades during a time when massacres, mayhem and mischief ran rampant throughout
Arizona Territory. Learn the sordid details of desperadoes such as cattle/horse rustler and
murderer Augustine Chacon who claimed he killed over fifty men, ladies-man Buckskin
Frank Leslie who had a deadly aim and an impatient trigger finger, lawman-turned-outlaw
Burt Alvord, and murderer Charles P. Stanton. And watch out for the ladies! Meet petite
horse and cattle thief Cecil Creswell, and everyone’s darling, stagecoach robber Pearl Hart.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Jan Cleere
Historian, author, and
lecturer, Jan Cleere writes
extensively about early settlers
of the desert Southwest. An
American studies magna cum
laude graduate of Arizona
State University West, she is
the author of the awardwinning books Levi’s & Lace:
Arizona Women Who Made
History; Amazing Girls of
Arizona: True Stories of Young
Pioneers; Outlaw Tales of
Arizona; and More Than
Petticoats: Remarkable Nevada
Women. She has presented
papers at numerous Arizona
history conventions and has
received recognition and
honors from organizations
such as the Arizona
Newspapers Association,
Arizona Book Publishers
Association, and the Nevada
Women’s History Project.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
31В В В Connecting
the Cultural Dots: Meso-American Art History
(SS)
A curious phenomena exists in modern America. Much Native American culture is
part of our daily lives, yet we rarely connect the cultural dots. What was life like in
ancient America, how did they live and what kinds of art did they make and
admire? The epicenter for our region of America points south to Mexico, the
birthplace of major civilizations that resonated to the very corners of the Americas.
What did they use that we still use today? What foods, what games, what place
names, what people living today can trace their heritage to those ancient peoples?
And, finally, what can we learn from them to help sustain our sacred Mother
Earth?
INYAHOSKIE (The Stone Boy): A Lakota Legend
(SS)
In ancient times the lessons of life and guides to a moralistic life were taught via
fables of ancestors and their adventures in a magical world fraught with monsters
and heroes. INYAHOSKIE is one of those heroes who sets out to explore the
world and journeys to the Southwest where he encounters a rude and mean tribe
all covered with mud. They are hostile towards strangers and INYAHOSKIE is
taken captive and prepared for sacrifice to the feathered serpent. But,
INYAHOSKIE is resourceful and creative! Listen to Covarrubias share this Lakota
legend and find out if INYAHOSKIE escapes from the fatal hands of his captors.
This presentation educates audience members on the cultural teachings of Native
Americans and on the principals guiding communities of a not so ancient past.
В Jim Covarrubias
Covarrubias is an
J imArizona
native who grew
up in Kingman, Arizona, in
the beautiful Hualapai
Mountains. There are
Mexican artists in his lineage
so the love of the arts was
nurtured as was his
fascination for the Western
cowboy and Native American
history. He travels to art
events in Mexico, Japan,
Europe and throughout the
U.S., where he is billed as the
"Fastest Drawer in the West."
He tells stories as he paints
and his deftness of painting
techniques and in-depth
knowledge of Native
American, Mexican and
Southwestern cultures fill his
entertaining performances
with fascinating details.
History & Heritage/
United States
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Native American
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
32В В В The
Most Trusted Man in America: The Life and Times of Walter Cronkite
(RS)
Walter Cronkite was known as the most trusted man in America. After a long career in
journalism (both broadcast and print), Cronkite retired from the “CBS Evening News.”
In 1984 he offered his name to the Department of Mass Communication at Arizona
State University thus setting the stage for dramatic growth of that school. This
presentation traces Cronkite’s career from his early cub reporter days in Texas and in
Kansas City, through his coverage of World War II, the political conventions, the space
program, the Kennedy assassination, Viet Nam, and, finally, to his critical view of
broadcast news in the first decade of the 2000s.
 Where’s It Headed? The Future of the Mass Media
(RS)
Traditional sources of information about our communities, our government, our economy,
and our society have been newspapers, magazines, radio and television.
In more recent times, circulation and ratings have dropped significantly, leading many
media owners to give up on the news business or to be forced out by economic realities.
The information sources that are replacing the traditional radio, television and
newspaper stories of the past are based on the internet, accessed by computer-based
mobile devices, and generally called the social media. This session explores how the
changes in delivery systems may well change what we know of our world as seen
through the mass media.
В Along Old Route 66
(RS)
This presentation is based on segments from two television documentaries that were
produced in Arizona and broadcast on public television stations and cable networks
throughout the United States. Longtime residents of Northern Arizona recount tales of
the impact of “the mother road” (Route 66) on their communities. A history of the
road is illuminated by scenes of roadside attractions and historic landmarks.
В Journalism Ethics in an Economically Challenged Media World
(RS)
In this presentation, the five pillars of contemporary U.S. society, namely government,
religion, education, commerce, and communication, are examined as means to pass the
ethical and moral values of one generation to the next. The ethical values of our society
are traced from the 5th century Greek philosophers, through the writings of Milton and
Locke, down to the philosophies that guide the journalist as he/she reports the news. In
an era in which the use of mass media, and trust in the messages that the media is
providing, are declining, it is important to discuss the processes that the media use in
providing the images and beliefs that we hold about our society.
The Role of the Mass Media in Our Uncertain and Uncivil Society
(RS)
In our complex and diverse society, most of us rely on the mass media in order to know
and understand events that are happening beyond our immediate environment. But
many of us are becoming increasingly distrustful of the images of our world that the
media portray for us. This presentation will examine the role that the media is expected
to play in our democratic society, and identifies specific incidents of success and failure.
One such example involves the 2005 incident of Newsweek publishing the Quran story
without a named source or second source.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
John Craft
Craft is a professor
John
at the Walter Cronkite
School of Journalism and
Mass Communication at
Arizona State University.
Prior to coming to Arizona
in the early 1970s, he
worked as a producer/
director, program director,
and manager in public and
educational television. He
has served as a media
consultant for businesses,
cable, and educational
institutions. In addition,
Craft has published
numerous articles and
textbooks on the media
and has produced
television documentaries
that have been broadcast
internationally, as well as
in the United States.
Film, Media, and New Media
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
33В В В Honky
Tonks, Brothels and Mining Camps: Entertainment in Old Arizona
(RS)
In pioneer Arizona, among the best places to experience the performing arts were in the
mining towns. Striking it rich meant having disposable income and miners, like the wellheeled of the Gilded Age, wanted to demonstrate their sophistication with culture. From
the early popular music of ragtime and minstrelsy evolved orchestras, operas and glee
clubs that performed in Tombstone and other hamlets. Perhaps the most popular form of
musical entertainment was the concert band, in shells and stages throughout the state.
CravГЎth shares stories and plays music of a time when performing live was the only way to
enjoy the arts.
В The Ballad of Arizona: Our First 100 Years
(RS)
This engaging program, similar to a “Prairie Home Companion” but with an Arizona
twist, uses live music, storytelling, video, and other visual aides to highlight stories of
Arizona’s first century. Jay Craváth and Dan Shilling form the nucleus of the program,
relating vignettes through song and story, such as the murder of reporter Don Bolles, the
Buffalo Soldiers, Aldo Leopold in the Southwest, and other famous and lesser-known
chapters of the Arizona narrative. Additionally, host organizations can choose one of three
other award-winning scholars to join in on the fun: Christine Marin (“1957 Miami
Championship Basketball”), Peter Iverson (“Indian Rodeo”), and Laura Tohe (“Navajo
Codetalkers”).
 The Instruments and Music of Arizona’s Pioneers: A Time Capsule
Opened
(RS)
The story of our state is not complete without music. This interactive program focuses on
the various genres of music that reflect the milieu and personalities of Arizona’s diverse
immigrants. Using musical instruments and stories, audience members are presented an
artistic tableau of our past: heroes, villains, and the immigrants who passed through and
settled in Arizona. From the skilled hands of CravГЎth, the audience will be treated to
sounds that once came from town squares, hogans, and dance halls throughout our great
state.
В Romancing Arizona: Songs of Love and Marriage
(RS)
The abundance of love songs did not begin with Italian opera or Top 40 radio.
Troubadours and trouvГЁre of the 11th and 12th centuries created the notion of romantic
love and the lonely soldiers, cowboys and adventurers of early Arizona built on the
medieval poet-musicians’ artistic traditions. During this interactive program, the
audience will learn about the roots of love songs and the many ways music has been used
by diverse cultures throughout Arizona, including the first Arizonans, like the Apache and
the Navajo. The audience will also enjoy the live musical stylings of CravГЎth.
The Melody of Arizona
(RS)
A melody is like a story – a linear narrative with a beginning, middle and end. When
performed, it can arouse profound emotion: move a young girl to love or reawaken the
poignancy of times long forgotten. CravГЎth discusses the nature of song and why some
tunes remain so endearing, using the music of Arizona, as well as classical, and the
American Songbook, to do so. Live and recorded music, featuring such instruments as
the guitar, banjo, dulcimer, and mandolin, enlivens the program.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Jay CravГЎth
CravГЎth is a composer,
J aymusician,
writer, and
scholar in the field of music
and Indigenous studies. He
holds a Ph.D. from Arizona
State University in
curriculum and instruction,
with an emphasis on cultural
education. He crafts
programs built on his
interests, creating interactive
experiences that include
stories, musical performances,
illustrations and
photography. His most recent
publication is The Mohave
Book for Little Ones. CravГЎth
currently serves as the
Cultural Director for the
Chemehuevi Indian Tribe.
Art, Architecture, and Music
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
34В В Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Minister Malcolm X: Were Their
Struggles the Same?
(RS)
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Minister Malcolm X were both pivotal figures
whose shoes have yet to be adequately filled by successors. Their voices were a
clarion call to America to take note of the disparities faced by African Americans.
While their approaches to ameliorating these inequitable conditions were far from
similar, they were both adamant in their mutual efforts to articulate the political
oppression, economic exploitation, and social degradation experienced by African
Americans. The audience will leave this presentation with a fuller understanding
of and appreciation for the similarities of these two freedom fighters.
В Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Review of Phase I and Phase II of His Life
(RS)
Dr. Martin L. King, Jr. was a multi-dimensional man all too often remembered
solely for his “I Have a Dream” speech delivered at the March on Washington in
1963. Yet, there was another Dr. King that emerged after the Selma to
Montgomery march and the subsequent Voting Rights Act of 1965. It was this
King that was no longer invited to President Johnson’s White House and it was
this King who believed the war in Viet Nam was unjust, evil, and futile. How
familiar are you, really, with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.?
Ahmad Daniels
A
hmad Daniels holds a
Master of Education
from the University of North
Carolina in Charlotte and for
decades has facilitated
workshops both within and
outside of the U.S. that serve
to broaden people’s
understanding of the African
American experience. He
played an active role in the
2001 United Nations World
Conference on Racism,
Racial Discrimination,
Xenophobia and Related
Intolerance, and he has
chaired meetings of the
Global Afrikan Congress in
Amsterdam, London, Berlin,
Paris, and Accra. To keep his
mind and body sharp, he is
an active athlete, having
completed over a dozen
marathons.
В Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/African American
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
35   Archaeology’s Deep Time Perspective on Environment and Social
Sustainability
(RS)
The deep time perspective that archaeology, geology, and related disciplines provide about
natural hazards, environmental change, and societal development often is ignored when
today’s societies make decisions affecting social sustainability and human safety. Studies of
ancient peoples and natural events can help modern society deal with problems of
environmental and social change, overpopulation, and sustainability. This presentation
looks at long-term effects of such things as exposure to natural chemical hazards, ancient
and modern agricultural techniques, and biological and geological records of past climate
and natural disasters to show the value of research in subject areas that are “beyond
history.”
Set in Stone but Not in Meaning: Southwestern Indian Rock Art
Allen Dart
(RS)
Ancient Indian petroglyphs (symbols carved or pecked on rocks) and pictographs (rock
paintings) are claimed by some to be forms of writing for which meanings are known. But
are such claims supported by archaeology or by Native Americans? Dart illustrates how
petroglyph and pictograph styles changed through time and over different regions of the
American Southwest prehistorically and historically, and discusses how even the same rock
art symbol may be interpreted differently from popular, scientific, and modern Native
American perspectives.
A
Arts and Culture of Ancient Southern Arizona Hohokam Indians
(RS)
The Hohokam archaeological culture flourished in southern Arizona as early as the sixth
century. Hohokam artifacts, architecture, and other material culture provide clues allowing
archaeologists to identify where the Hohokam lived, interpret how they adapted to the
Sonoran Desert for centuries, and explain why their culture collapsed in the mid-1400s.
This presentation illustrates Hohokam material culture and presents possible
interpretations about their relationships to the natural world, time reckoning, religious
practices, beliefs, and deities, and possible reasons for the eventual demise of their way of
life. Abundant illustrations of Hohokam artifacts, rock art, and archaeological features are
included.
Southwestern Rock Calendars and Ancient Time Pieces
(RS)
Ancient Native American cultures of the Southwest, including the Mesa Verde culture of
southern Colorado and Utah, the Chaco culture centered in northwestern New Mexico,
and the Hohokam culture of southern Arizona, developed sophisticated skills in astronomy
and predicting the seasons centuries before Old World peoples first entered the region. In
this presentation Dart examines these early people’s architecture, settlement planning, and
petroglyph sites for archaeological evidence of ancient Southwestern astronomy and
calendrical reckoning, and suggests how these skills may have related to ancient Native
American rituals.
Archaeology and Cultures of Arizona
(RS)
Many different peoples have contributed to making Arizona such a unique and fascinating
cultural place. In this presentation Dart summarizes and interprets the archaeology of
Arizona from the earliest Paleoindians through the Archaic period hunters and foragers, the
transition to agriculture and village life, and the later prehistoric archaeological cultures
(Ancestral Pueblo, Mogollon, Sinagua, Hohokam, Salado, and Patayan). He also discusses
connections between archaeology and history, and between Arizona’s Native Americans
and people derived from the Old World.
llen (“Al”) Dart holds a
master’s degree in
anthropology from The
University of Arizona and is a
Registered Professional
Archaeologist who has
worked and volunteered in
Arizona and New Mexico
archaeology since 1975. He
currently serves as a State
Cultural Resources Specialist/
Archaeologist with the USDA
Natural Resources
Conservation Service and as
the Executive Director of the
Old Pueblo Archaeology
Center, a Tucson non-profit
organization that he founded
in 1993 to provide
educational and scientific
programs in Southwestern
archaeology and cultures.
Dart is a recipient of the
Arizona Governor’s Award in
Public Archaeology and the
Arizona Archaeological
Society’s Professional
Archaeologist of the Year
Award for his efforts to bring
archaeology and history to
the public.
Archaeology
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
36   Arizona’s
Historic Trading Posts
(RS)
Early traders traveled through Arizona Territory, selling goods from their wagons, but they
soon built stores that evolved into trading and social centers where wool, sheep, and Native
arts were exchanged for sugar and salt, pots, pans, bridles, and saddles. Navajo trading
posts are best known, but trading posts existed on every reservation in Arizona. Traders
became the intermediaries between Native peoples and the outside world, providing not
only hard goods, but other services including translation, correspondence, and
transportation. Trading posts also became destinations for artists, authors, movie stars, and
tourists. Although trading posts have mostly disappeared today, they remain a romantic
and historic part of our great Southwest.
В Hopi Summer
(RS)
During a 1927 road trip to the Hopi Indian Reservation in northern Arizona, Maud and
Carey Melville of Worcester, Massachusetts, befriended Ethel and Wilfred Muchvo at First
Mesa. This presentation portrays the lives of the Hopi people during the 1920s and 1930s,
prior to the tremendous cultural changes that occurred before World War II. Daily life on
the mesas is illustrated through letters from Ethel, interviews, and vintage photographs.
This snapshot of history tells of the friendship between the Melvilles and the Muchvos, a
poignant and memorable story of Hopi life. As one Hopi elder commented, “This is our
history.”
В Desert Trader: Goldie Tracy Richmond, Trader, Trapper, and Quiltmaker
(RS)
Goldie Tracy Richmond came to southwestern Arizona in 1927 where she lived in a canvas
lean-to. To survive, Goldie mined, ran traplines, and operated Tracy’s Trading Post, living
among the Tohono O’odham people for four decades. She was a large woman, and the
stories told by the O’odham people of Goldie’s life are legendary. Goldie also made
magnificent quilts with images of the desert landscape and Indian life; one was named one
of the 100 most significant quilts of the twentieth century. Goldie spoke the Tohono
O’odham language, and was known as a friend to the O’odham people. Her amazing story
is a compelling chapter in Arizona history.
В Hopi Quilting: Stitched Traditions from an Ancient Community
(RS)
For centuries, Hopi men grew cotton and wove the fibers into blankets and clothing. In
the 1880s, with the arrival of Anglo missionaries and government officials, quilting was
introduced to the Hopi people and it quickly became integrated into Hopi culture and
ceremony with quilts being used in every Hopi household. Hopis today are 4th and 5th
generation quiltmakers and as the artistic traditions of two cultures are blended, it is not
uncommon to see a quilt with a traditional Anglo pattern and an ancient Hopi image, such
as a kachina or a clan motif. This presentation includes a trunk show of Hopi quilts.
В Kayenta and Monument Valley: 100 Years of Settlement and Trading in
Indian Country
(RS)
John and Louisa Wetherill went to northern Arizona in 1910, where they established
Kayenta Trading Post. Both were fluent in the Navajo language, and they befriended the
local people, often serving as liaisons on their behalf to the U.S. government. Kayenta was
the most distant trading post from civilization – it was the jumping off point for
expeditions to Rainbow Bridge, Monument Valley, and unexplored canyons and cliff
dwellings. The Wetherills were hosts to the artists and authors, anthropologists, and
tourists who made the long trek to Kayenta. Even though stationed in a remote location,
the Wetherills had a powerful influence on people from varied cultures.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Carolyn O’Bagy
Davis
C
arolyn O’Bagy Davis, a
fourth-generation
descendant of Utah pioneers,
is the author of thirteen
books on archaeology,
quilting, and the history of
the Southwest. Her book
Hopi Summer was selected as
OneBookArizona for 2011,
and Desert Trader was named
one of the Best Books of the
Southwest 2012. She was the
founding president of the
Tucson Quilters Guild and
Old Pueblo Archaeology
Center and is an inducted
member of the Arizona
Quilters Hall of Fame and
the Society of Women
Geographers. Davis has
appeared on HGTV, PBS,
and Lifetime programs, and
has curated many traveling
museum exhibitions.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Native American
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
37   Arizona’s Movie and Television History: Silent Films, Westerns, and Much,
Much More!
(RS)
Join DeBarbieri for a lively overview of motion picture history in Arizona from 1896 to
present day. Discuss the silver screen magic of the West through stories, film clips and
stills of the people, places and scenes of Hollywood in Arizona. Journey to significant sites
in Arizona’s movie history near and far and go behind the scenes with the classic Westerns,
musicals, Indie flicks and more, all filmed on location across the state. Then, put your
Arizona film knowledge to the test in a movie trivia contest!
Arizona Is for Art Lovers: Museums, Murals and Movements Through the
Ages
(RS, SS)
Take a tour of heritage art with DeBarbieri and explore Arizona’s influential visual artists
throughout history, including John Mix Stanley, Thomas Moran, Salvador Corona, Jimmy
Toddy, and Ted DeGrazia. Learn about these artists and their significant works and
contributions to the state’s cultural scene. Topics and periods range from Indigenous to
Modern, Colonial, Surrealist, “Pop Art” and Mexican-American. Also, if requested,
audience members or students can create a unique collage inspired by themes from
Arizona’s art history.
Lili DeBarbieri
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Category: Visual Arts, Strand 2: Relate, Concept 1: The student will describe the role that art
plays in culture and how it reflects, records, and interacts with history in various times, places,
and traditions.
Monsters, Magic and the Movies: An Introduction to Horror Literature’s
Greatest Icons
(SS)
Perfect enrichment for the fall or spring – spooky tales are always in season – join
DeBarbieri for an illustrated and fun-filled presentation on the lives, times and works of
classic horror authors and novels, including Frankenstein, Dracula, The Island of Dr.
Moreau, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and The Haunting of Hill House. Students will read chapter
excerpts, respond and discuss prevalent themes in gothic horror literature, all while making
connections with well-known films, re-tellings, and pop culture.
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Category: English Language Arts, Strand 2: Comprehending Literary Text, Concept 1: Elements
of Literature—Identify, analyze and apply knowledge of the structures and elements of
literature
Nature Writing and the Southwest
(SS)
Students will be introduced to influential writers of nature and environmental literature
who have used the landscape and natural beauty of the Southwest as inspiration for their
works. Such authors include John Muir, Edward Abbey, Terry Tempest Williams, Barry
Lopez, and Jon Krakauer. Then, through short writing prompts and journaling activities,
students will use Arizona’s high and low desert ecology to inspire their own creative and
non-fiction writing (optional activity).
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Category: English Language Arts, Strand 2: Comprehending Literary Text, Concept: Historical
and Cultural Aspects of Literature—Relate literary works to the traditions, themes and issues
of their eras.
L
ili DeBarbieri is the
author of Location
Filming in Arizona and the
best-selling travel narrative A
Guide to Southern Arizona’s
Historic Farms and Ranches,
recently named a New
Mexico-Arizona Book
Awards Finalist. Over the
years, DeBarbieri’s writing
and photography have
appeared in a diverse range of
publications including the
conservation book The Utah
Prairie Dog. She is a local
stringer for Agence FrancePresse and serves on the
Creative Advisory Board of
Save Rex Ranch. DeBarbieri
holds a master’s degree in
library and information
science from the University of
Southern Mississippi and is
an active professional in
Arizona’s library community.
Film, Media, and New Media
Art, Architecture, and Music
Language and Literature
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
38В В Sharlot Mabridth Hall (1870-1943)
(HA)
Known as the Little Lady of the Governor’s Mansion, Hall was a poet, activist,
politician, and Arizona’s first territorial historian. One of the West’s most
remarkable women, she was in love with the state of Arizona and, if not for her
efforts, much of the state’s history may have been lost. Beginning in 1927, she
worked on the restoration of the first Territorial Governor’s residence and offices,
opening it as a museum in 1928. And, to the museum, she contributed her
impressive personal collection of artifacts and historical documents.
В В Jody DrakeВ B
orn and raised in
Prescott, Arizona, Jody
Drake is a playwright and
actor, having written and
produced 22 historical plays,
developed and trained a
dozen first-person presenters,
and portrayed the historical
figure of Sharlot Hall
throughout the western
United States. An Arizona
Culture Keeper, a Governor’s
Arts Award nominee, and a
Soroptimist Woman of
Distinction, Drake is the
Founding Director of the
Blue Rose Heritage and
Culture Center in Prescott
Valley. She is honored to
have performed for Sandra
Day O’Connor, Janet
Napolitano, Jane Hull, and
Janice Brewer.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
39В В В Art
of the Internment Camps: Culture Behind Barbed Wire
(RS)
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s 1942 WWII Executive Order 9066 forced
the removal of nearly 125,000 Japanese American citizens from the west coast,
incarcerating them in ten remote internment camps in seven states: Arizona,
Arkansas, California, Colorado, Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming. Government
photographers Dorothea Lange, Russell Lee, and Ansel Adams documented the
internment, and artists Toyo Miyatake, Chiura Obata, Isamu Noguchi, Henry
Sugimoto, and Miné Okubo made powerful records of camp life. Arizona’s two
camps, Gila River and Poston, were among the largest, and this chronicle
illuminates an important episode of state history, one grounded in national
agendas driven by prejudice and fear.
 Adventurous Spirits: Arizona’s Women Artists, 1900-1950
(RS)
Before WWII, the resident art community of Arizona was comprised mostly of
women, and this talk explores these independent spirits. Kate Cory, one of the first
to arrive in 1905, chronicled the Hopi mesas. Marjorie Thomas was Scottsdale’s
first resident artist. Lillian Wilhelm Smith came to the state to illustrate the works
of Zane Grey. Impressionist Jessie Benton Evans’s Scottsdale villa became a social
center for local artists. Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton and her husband Harold
founded the Museum of Northern Arizona in 1928. The Grand Canyon
parkitecture of Mary Jane Colter is also an important part of the story.
В Cowboys and Cowgirls: Icons of the American West
(RS)
Few symbols have been more durable than the American cowboy. This program
will give an overview of this populist figure, whose image was first defined by
painters Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell. Also important to the story
are brave cowgirls and the Mexican vaqueros. Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show
showcased mythic cowboy culture, with singing cowboys, pretty girls on horses,
and plenty of Indians in his internationally popular extravaganzas that for many
defined the American West. Arizona’s contribution to this chronicle is significant,
and includes Lon Megargee (the state’s original cowboy artist). Contemporary
artists continue to portray this tradition. В В The Landscapes of Arizona: A Cultural History
(RS)
Arizona’s signature landscape feature is the Grand Canyon, but we are a state
comprised of many landscapes, each of which has an important story to tell. These
include the landscapes of early exploration by European visitors, landscapes of
tourism (Fred Harvey Company, Santa Fe Railroad), landscapes of enterprise
(mining towns, dams), landscapes of agriculture and ranching, landscapes of
literature and movies (Zane Grey, John Ford), and finally landscapes of
internment (Gila River, Poston). Aggressive post World War II development
meant that many of these landscapes have disappeared, but these works of art
enable us to reclaim a vivid cultural history.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Betsy Fahlman В B
etsy Fahlman is
Professor of Art History
at Arizona State University.
An authority on the art
history of Arizona, her books
include New Deal Art in
Arizona (2009) and The
Cowboy's Dream: The Mythic
Life and Art of Lon Megargee
(2002). She is the author of
two essays in catalogues
published in 2012 by the
Museum of Northern
Arizona in Flagstaff: “New
Women, Southwest Culture:
Arizona’s Early Art
Community” (in Mary-Russell
Ferrell Colton: Artist and
Advocate in Early Arizona)
and “Making the Cultural
Desert Bloom: Arizona’s
Early Women Artists” (in
Arizona’s Pioneering Women
Artists: Impressions of the
Grand Canyon State).
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Asian American
Art, Architecture, and Music
40В В В Building
Community During the Progressive Era
(RS)
Many different people chose to move west for myriad reasons and together they
formed new communities. Informed by places they lived before, and filled with
the news and ideas of the times, the towns they built reflected and represented the
world in which they lived. Flagstaff began as a temporary railroad camp in 1882
and began to aspire to permanence when a lumber mill was constructed soon after.
The first twenty years of Flagstaff’s story is a tale of Progressive Era America.
В Community Builders: The Riordan Families of Flagstaff, 1884-1904
(RS)
As the largest employers in town, Matt Riordan and his younger brothers assumed
leadership roles in the fledgling community of Flagstaff. Together they guided
their fellow citizens toward building institutions of learning and science,
encouraging community investment in technology and infrastructure, and
developing a diverse economy. The brothers sought to create a viable community
which would thrive well into the future. Today, Riordan Mansion State Historic
Park provides an opportunity to learn the story of a family who greatly influenced
the history of northern Arizona.
В American Arts and Crafts Style Architecture
(RS)
Architecture tells the story of lives and in the U.S. during the early 1900s, small
homes, known as “bungalows,” were built for the growing middle class. Though
these homes utilized space carefully, open spaces encouraged family and friends to
come together for conversation. Paintings of western landscapes and Native
American pottery and blankets were displayed throughout. Outside, these homes
appeared to have grown up naturally from the land, the boundary between outside
and inside deliberately blurred through the use of local materials and wrap-around
porches. People wished to celebrate the sublime beauty and culture of the
American West and they did so through residential architecture.
В Timber Tales
(RS)
Featuring historic photographs, this presentation will share the fascinating story of
northern Arizona’s logging lifestyle of the early twentieth century. The combined
efforts of men, animals, and machinery turned raw timber into finished lumber,
and helped build the community of Flagstaff. While it is easy to think of
Arizona’s economy as defined by the “Five C’s,” it is important to remember that
northern Arizona has a different, yet equally important, story.
Kathy Farretta
K
athy Farretta holds
a master’s degree in
history from Northern
Arizona University in
Flagstaff. She teaches
U.S. history at Coconino
Community College, as
well as volunteers at the
Riordan Mansion State
Historic Park, for which
she previously served as
the Assistant Park
Manager. During her
more than 11 years at
Riordan Mansion State
Historic Park, she has
developed a deep love for
how the ideals of the
Progressive-era American
reformers are reflected in
American Arts and Crafts
Architecture. When
Farretta is not teaching,
or musing over the
Progressive Era, she can
be found hiking or curled
up with a good book.
Art, Architecture, and Music
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
41В В Witnessing a Jewish Revival in Eastern Europe
(RS)
After the Holocaust, the Jewish population in Eastern Europe was nearly
extinguished. However, since the collapse of Communism, there has been a
small, yet significant revival of Jewish life in several countries. Synagogues are
being rebuilt and congregations in some areas are growing. For the first time
since the Holocaust, every single European capital city now has a Jewish house of
prayer. This highly visual presentation chronicles Fellner’s many experiences with
Eastern European Jewish life and reveals his optimism for a continued Jewish
revival in the region.
 Eastern Europe’s Dramatic Democratic Revolution
(RS, SS)
During the past 25 years, Eastern Europe has thrown off the shackles of
Communism and experienced a dramatic transformation toward Democracy.
After a half-century of Soviet domination, much of the region has embraced
Western ideals while still maintaining a unique and highly diverse culture. How
has the democratization changed the face of Eastern Europe? What has been
America’s role in the region? What are the challenges still facing this vitally
important geopolitical area? This highly visual presentation will take students on
a fascinating journey to Eastern Europe and give them a unique overview of the
region’s recent history and culture.
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies, Strand 2, Concept 9
В Dan Fellner
D
an Fellner is a faculty
associate at Arizona
State University and a faculty
affiliate with Arizona State
University’s Melikian Center
for Russian, Eurasian and
East European Studies. He is
a two-time Fulbright Scholar
and a two-time Fulbright
Senior Specialist in Eastern
Europe, where he has taught
courses in journalism and
public relations at universities
in Latvia, Lithuania and
Moldova. In August 2013,
he taught a course at the
Fulbright International
Summer Institute in Bulgaria.
Fellner also has written
extensively about Eastern
Europe for various
newspapers and magazines.
History & Heritage/World
Philosophy, Ethics, and
Religion
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
42В В What Has Passed and What Remains: Using Oral History to Understand
Arizona’s Changing Landscapes
(RS)
How do we know how our towns, neighborhoods, and landscapes have changed
over time? One way is through our stories. Oral histories of long-time residents
can reveal a great deal about environmental and cultural change, providing a
record that might otherwise be lost with time. Using photos and video interviews,
this presentation shares stories from northern Arizona homesteaders, ranchers,
Native Americans, and other keen observers of the land, and sheds light on a vast
landscape during a time of extensive change. It also discusses how anyone can use
oral history to explore place.
В Peter Friederici
P
eter Friederici is an
essayist and journalist
who lives in Flagstaff,
Arizona. He has written
about science and nature for
numerous periodicals and for
several books, including What
Has Passed and What
Remains: Oral Histories of
Northern Arizona’s Changing
Landscapes (2010). Friederici
also teaches journalism at
Northern Arizona University.
Since 2005 he and his
students have been gathering
oral histories from Arizona
residents whose lived
experiences serve as testament
to changes in regional
environment and culture.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
43В В В The
Art of Shaping the Sky: James Turrell’s Roden Crater Project
(RS)
In northern Arizona artist James Turrell is building a naked-eye observatory at the
site of an extinct volcano called Roden Crater. He is building beautiful “sensing
spaces” directed toward atmospheric and celestial events where perception itself
becomes the object of art. Turrell’s modifications to the volcanic crater enable one
to experience, among other things, the “celestial vaulting” of the sky and the
rotation of the earth. This presentation explores the intersections of science, art,
and philosophy at this very unique site, as well as the Turrell skyspaces located at
ASU’s Tempe campus and the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art.
В Grand Canyon: Philosophical Wonder
(RS)
The Grand Canyon never ceases to fascinate as we uncover more facets of its
geology, biology, and human history. But when we combine all of these aspects we
see there is yet more to discuss: the philosophical significance of this natural
wonder. This presentation explores the many fascinating philosophical themes this
place inspires—from life to death, and everything in between. These include the
ways in which the canyon makes us wonder about ourselves, what we are doing
here, and what kinds of responsibilities we have while we are here.
В Sustainability Issues in Arizona: A Moral Responsibility?
(RS)
Join Goodwin in a conversation about sustainability issues facing Arizona. Topics
can include the coal-burning Navajo Generating Station, the Colorado River
dams, uranium mining around the Grand Canyon, wind turbines, water
conservation and catchment, the costs of water and electricity, preservation of
natural landscapes, and others. The presentation can be focused on one or more
issues. Background information about these topics will be provided, but the
presentations will focus on what personal, moral, legal, or policy issues are
involved. The goal is to think clearly about what responsibilities and expectations
we have concerning the resources that are available.
В Connecting Craters: Scientific, Ritualistic, and Artistic Reactions to the
Arizona Landscape
(RS)
The Arizona landscape offers innumerable places for scientific, ritualistic, and
artistic inspiration. This presentation explores a common thread connecting
history, geology, art, and astronomy. From cultural sites with petroglyph-covered
walls to volcanic peaks to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, the common thread is
the sense that this place is meaningful and important. But what does it mean? This
is a place that makes us pause, take notice, and enquire further. This is the
common root of science, religion, and art making us connect the dots between
features on a landscape and imagine they represent something more, something
more true.
 AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Matthew
Goodwin
M
atthew Goodwin
holds a Ph.D. in
philosophy and teaches in
that discipline at Northern
Arizona University. His
current research interests lie
in aesthetics, environmental
ethics, and how these areas
overlap in and around the
Grand Canyon region. For
NAU’s Philosophy in the
Public Interest Program,
Goodwin facilitates
community discussions at the
Sedona International Film
Festival, as well as for Hot
Topics CafГ©, a program that
brings together the public for
civil and informed discussion
of various topics of
community concern.
Art, Architecture, and Music
Philosophy, Ethics, and
Religion
Geography and Environment
44В В В In Their Own Words: Overland Diaries of 19th Century Westering
Women
(RS)
What was it like to be a woman traveling on the Oregon Trail, the California Trail, or
the Southern Route to California? Who were these women? How did they feel about
uprooting their lives? Americans moved west by the thousands, searching for free
land, to strike it rich, and to provide a better life. Women went along because they
had no choice but to follow their husbands, fathers, or brothers. They were "ordinary
women, caught up in a momentous event of history."
В Meeting the Challenges: Arizona Women's Hall of Fame
(RS)
Creative and courageous, feisty and far-sighted, eighty-nine fascinating Arizona
women – all significant in Arizona’s variegated past and worthy of being remembered
– have been inducted into the Women’s Hall of Fame since 1980. Their birthdates
range from 1788 to the 1930s. Many were “firsts,” like Ana Frohmiller of Flagstaff,
the first woman to run for governor of Arizona. She lost the race to Howard Pyle in
1950 by a very small margin. All Arizona communities have exemplary women, now
deceased, who should be nominated to this illustrious Hall of Fame roster.
В Cora Viola Slaughter: Ranch Wife and Poker Player Extraordinaire
(RS)
While still in her teens, this prim, pampered, headstrong young woman found
romance on a cattle drive across western New Mexico Territory, but her “knight in
shining armor” was twice her age, and had a gunslinger reputation and a penchant for
gambling! What were the chances for marital happiness in such an incongruous
relationship? Cora Viola Slaughter had much to learn about post-Civil War life on
Arizona’s remote frontier. In this engaging program, Grandrud explores the times of
an extraordinary woman and the legends and legacy of her life.
В Written in Basalt, or Graffiti on the Gila
(RS)
Christopher “Kit” Carson watched a handful of his Mountain Men carving initials on
a volcanic boulder in the Gila River floodplain. Tongue in cheek, he dubbed the
point, “Independence Rock.” A year later, four Army of the West officers preserved
the incident for posterity by recording Carson’s words in their respective journals.
Following the Mexican War, the Gold Rush, and even into the Civil War period,
other travelers along the Gila, also, took time to document their presence.
В The Old Spanish Trail
(RS)
Is the name a misnomer? Was it old? Was it even Spanish? How did the Ute Trail,
Apodaca Trail, Old Conejos Lane, or the Trappers' Trail fit into what is now called
the Old Spanish National Historic Trail, the fifteenth National Historic Trail in the
nation, the second National Historic Trail in Arizona? This presentation provides
“tales of the trail,” fascinating stories of what has been called "the longest, crookedest,
most arduous pack mule trail in the history of America.”
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Reba Wells
Grandrud
R
eba Wells Grandrud,
Ph.D., enjoys being a
Road Scholar and an active
volunteer for diverse
nonprofits, such as
Partnership for National
Trails System, Old Spanish
Trail Association, Arizona
History Convention,
Westerners Corrals, Pioneer
Cemetery Association, and
the Sunnyslope Historical
Society. In 2012, Grandrud
co-authored an awardwinning Arizona Centennial
Legacy book, Addie
Slaughter: The Girl Who Met
Geronimo. Her Sunnyslope
book was published in July
2013. Grandrud was
honored in 2010 as an
Arizona Culturekeeper for
her work in teaching,
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
45В В 407 Years of Immigration to America: Ethnicity, Public Opinion and
Policy, 1607 to 2014
(RS)
While immigration is an icon of our national identity, the reaction of the
American public to newcomers has often been less than welcoming. Using images
and audio and video, Gratton presents the changing world of immigration in the
United States across four centuries. Immigrant groups shift, nativism rises and
falls, yet a tolerant policy rarely changes. Concluding with a review of nativism
and politics in the contemporary debate over immigration, Gratton lets the
audience judge whether history has lessons to teach us.
В В The Creation of the American Southwest, 1750 to 1950
(RS)
Gratton uses unique census data, images, and maps to reveal the historical
experience of Indians, Hispanics, other Americans, and immigrants in the region
we call the American Southwest. Before the Mexican American War, the region
was dominated by indigenous nations. Migrants from other parts of the United
States and European immigrants sparked a rapid growth of population after 1848
and, between 1900 and 1930, mass immigration from Mexico created the
distinctive Southwest we know today.
В Brian Gratton
B
rian Gratton, a
Professor of History at
Arizona State University,
studies immigration and
ethnicity in the United
States, Latin America and
Europe. His publications
include two books, as well
as articles in a wide variety
of journals. He worked on
immigration and ethnicity
while a Fulbright Fellow in
Spain (1996) and Ecuador
(2002). Gratton has won
several National Institutes
of Health grants,
developing new evidence
on immigration and on
Mexican Americans in the
United States. He uses
these unique data in his
teaching and in his
numerous public
presentations on
immigration and the
American Southwest.
History & Heritage/
United States
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
46В В Saving the Great American West: The Story of George Bird Grinnell
(HA)
The great West that George Bird Grinnell first encountered in 1870 as a 21-yearold man was shortly to disappear before his eyes. Nobody was quicker to sense the
desecration or was more eloquent in crusading against the poachers, the hidehunters, and the disengaged U.S. Congress than George Bird Grinnell, the “Father
of American Conservation.” Grinnell founded the first Audubon Society, cofounded the Boone and Crockett Club with Teddy Roosevelt, and led the effort to
establish Glacier National Park. Audiences will travel back in time to the 19th
century, listening to Grinnell’s own words as taken from his field journals,
memoirs, personal correspondence, and newspaper editorials. Additionally,
audiences will enjoy dozens of 19th-century photographs, which visually capture
Grinnell’s many expeditions and discoveries.
Hugh Grinnell
В H
ugh Grinnell received
his bachelor’s and
master’s degrees from The
University of Arizona. Since
his retirement in 2004,
Grinnell has studied the
history of the great American
West. After discovering an
old Great Northern Railway
(GNR) passenger car named
“Grinnell Glacier,” he
researched the car’s name,
only to learn that the glacier
was named in honor of the
efforts of George Bird
Grinnell, a distant cousin of
Grinnell’s who was a
naturalist and explorer.
Grinnell continues to carry
on his research of George
Bird Grinnell and the
Grinnell family, writing
articles and producing
DVDs. In 2010, he
presented “Saving the Great
American West” at the
annual convention of the
GNR Historical Society and
100th anniversary of the
establishment of Glacier
National Park, held in
Glacier National Park.
Hugh Grinnell as George Bird Grinnell
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
History & Heritage/United
States
Geography and Environment
47В В В How
Wild Was It? Crime and Justice in Arizona Territory
(RS)
Arizona’s territorial era has the reputation of being a violent and crime-ridden
place with ineffective criminal justice institutions. This presentation provides an
overview of crime and justice in Arizona Territory. Based on data from court cases
and newspapers, it describes the types of crimes most commonly committed and
the justice system’s response to them. Contrary to popular perception, crime was
not particularly violent, nor was crime itself a particular problem. Moreover,
Arizona Territory’s justice system was relatively effective compared to other areas
of the country.
В No Better Than Murderers: The Story of the Canyon Diablo Train
Robbery of 1889
(RS)
In March 1889, four men robbed the Atlantic Pacific train near Canyon Diablo.
The robbers were eventually caught in what became an epic manhunt that lasted
nearly two and a half weeks, and covered a reported 300 miles. The robbery also
served as the first test case for a new Arizona law making train robbery a capital
offense. The bandits eventually pled guilty, but were not sentenced to death.
Instead, they received sentences ranging from twenty-five to thirty years. This
presentation examines the Canyon Diablo robbery, the subsequent manhunt, and
explains why the bandits were not executed for their crime.
В Popular Justice Run Amok: The Globe Lynchings of 1882
(RS)
During the summer of 1882, three men attempted to rob the Wells Fargo &
Company's express between Casa Grande and Globe. The results were a disaster.
The robbers ended up killing two local residents. Three days later, the bandits
were in jail awaiting a day in court that never came. Enraged Globe residents
intimidated the sheriff, seized the prisoners, and after a brief and informal trial,
hanged two of the culprits. Globe residents seemed to be relatively peaceful,
orderly and law-abiding - certainly not individuals who would engage in a public
lynching. But they did anyway. This presentation explains why.   How the Judge’s Brother Got Away with Murder: The Prosecution of
Frank C. Kibbey
(RS)
W. Wood Porter was riding his bicycle on Florence's main street on June 24,
1892, when he was shot and mortally wounded by Frank Kibbey. Kibbey had
recently concluded that his wife and Porter were having an affair. Kibbey was the
brother of territorial supreme court justice and future territorial governor Joseph
H. Kibbey. His victim was the nephew of former supreme court justice William
Wood Porter. The prominence of victim and attacker guaranteed that the criminal
proceedings would be sensational. This presentation tells the story of the murder
and its aftermath, and explains how a judge’s brother got away with murder.
Paul T. Hietter
H
ietter currently serves
as a history professor
and the chair of the Social
Sciences Department at Mesa
Community College. He
received his Ph.D. in history
from Arizona State University
and has published a number
of articles and book reviews
on his area of specialization,
namely crime and criminal
justice in frontier Arizona and
the West. Hietter has been a
member of the Arizona
Humanities Speakers Bureau
for more than 10 years and is
excited to continue sharing
his knowledge and passion
with Arizonans statewide.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
48В В В The
Harlem Renaissance: Literary Movement
(SS)
The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural movement that spanned the 1920s and
early 1930s and it was an unprecedented period of expression by African
Americans in music, literature, art, dance, poetry, politics, and economics. Never
before had America seen such a rich explosion of black culture. This interactive
presentation, which includes storytelling, poetry, theatre, art, and song, will
engage students in an exploration of the unique and exciting history of African
Americans.
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Reading Literature, Strand 2: Concept 1, 2
Social Studies, Strand 1: American History, Concept 1: Research Skills for History
Social Studies, Strand 2: Concept 1, 2
Social Studies, Strand 4: Geography
Language Arts, Strand 3: Literature, Listening and Speaking
Music, Strand 2: Concept 1
Gladys Preshenda
Jackson
G
ladys Preshenda
Jackson is a fourthgeneration storyteller, an
award-winning poet, and a
performing artist. During
her tenure as an Artist in
Residence for the FRIENDS
of Arts Education at the
internationally-acclaimed
Cerritos Center for the
Performing Arts in Cerritos,
California, she shared her
stories with tens of thousands
of K-12 students, putting to
good use her exceptional
verbal artistry. Jackson holds
a certificate in business and
entertainment management
from the University of
California, Los Angeles, and a
Bachelor of Arts degree in
political Science from
California State University,
East Bay.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/African American
Art, Architecture, and Music
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
49В В В Descansos:
Marking Passages
(RS, SS)
Marking the location of deaths with crosses or descansos is a very old custom which
has been traced back to twelfth-century Europe. The custom diffused to the
Americas with the arrival of the conquistadors in the sixteenth century. This
presentation traces the evolution and diffusion of the roadside memorial, the
typology of the crosses, states’ policies on the placement of roadside shrines, and
the controversy surrounding the placement. The roadside memorial is truly a
cultural icon from the past.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Standard: Social Studies Strand 2 Concepts 3, 5, 8
В В Revitalizing Rural and Small Town America: Folk Art and Folklore
(RS, SS)
The automobile revolutionized how and why Americans traveled. “Pleasure
driving” opened up the off-the-beaten path, providing opportunities to discover
the real culture and history of an area. The birth of roadside architecture and “folk
art” followed in its wake as communities competed for the new business
opportunities the pleasure driving created. Communities found ways to showcase
their historical significance and place it in the larger framework of the state. This
presentation looks at the how and what of pleasure driving, examples of where and
how roadside architecture and folk art were used, and its significance today in our
fast-paced society.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Standard: Visual Arts Strand 2, Concepts 1, 2, 4; Social Studies Strand 1, Concept 7
Father Kino: Journey to Discovery
(RS, SS)
In 2015 it will be the 50th anniversary of the dedication of the Father Kino statue in
the U.S. Capitol Hall of Heroes, Washington, D. C. Father Kino was many things: A
mathematician, astronomer, geographer, map maker, explorer, rancher, and friend to
the Indians of the PimerГ­a Alta. Journeying on horseback or foot, multiple
explorations of the PimerГ­a Alta were made by the padre, resulting in the first detailed
map of the area. He traveled trails mostly unknown to outsiders, through inhabited
territory of unknown native tribes. This presentation will concentrate on Father
Kino’s expeditions and discoveries into the Pimería Alta. This presentation showcases
the use of primary and secondary sources.
This topic can be adapted to any of the listed standards so as to fit the needs of the host
teacher and to allow for maximizing the understanding of maps, explorers and explorations
of early Arizona, and learning about early cultures and their interactions as they came in
contact with other groups.
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Standard: Social Studies Strand 1 Concept 3, Strand 2 Concept 5, Strand 4 Concepts 1, 2 and
5.
Barbara Jaquay’s Presentations continued on the following page.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Barbara Jaquay
W
ith a Ph.D. in
geography, it comes
as no surprise that Jaquay has
hosted visitors from many
countries and that she herself
has traveled to over forty,
including India, Bhutan,
Nepal, China, Cuba, and out
-of-the way islands such as
Robinson Crusoe, Easter
Island and the Galapagos.
She has even hiked the
Himalayas in pursuit of
furthering her knowledge of
archaeological, historical, and
geographical mysteries.
Jaquay has written several
publications on topics
concerning Middle America
and Arizona Native
Americans. Currently, she is
working on several Arizona
geographical projects and
publications, as well as a
children’s chapter book on
penguins.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/General
Geography & Environment
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
50   Oh, The Shape We’re In!: How Arizona’s and the Western States’
Borders Were Determined
(RS, SS)
The original 13 colonies and their influence on our country’s expansion to the
Pacific, along with how Arizona’s growth led it to become the 48th state, illustrate
the connection between geography, politics, economics, and social forces, all of
which played a role in the determination of the state borders west of the
Appalachian Mountains. Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson Davis, “manifest destiny,”
gold strikes, treaties, land purchases, railroads, and wars are just a few of the
people, events, and ideas that influenced the establishment of Arizona’s presentday borders. In this presentation, Jaquay will discuss how exactly Arizona’s and
the southern western states’ borders were determined.
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Standard: Social Studies Strand 1, Concept 1, 4, 5
The Butterfly Effect or Travels in Search of Arizona’s Unusual Historic
Events
(RS, SS)
Barbara Jaquay
During her travels in the state, Jaquay compiled a collection of extraordinary
stories and events, each of which detail an overlooked episode that is unique and
unusual to Arizona and that helped shape and change the state’s history.
Steamboats, camels, telegraphs, and heliographs all played a role in creating
Arizona’s history. These and other happenings were short-lived but were
important nevertheless to Arizona, as they helped tie Arizona and its fellow
western states to their counterparts in the East.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Standard: Social Studies Strand 1, Concept 1, 4, 5, 6, 7
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/General
Geography & Environment
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
51В В В The Constant Traveler: How Music Breaks National, Cultural and Ethnic
Boundaries
(RS)
How could musicians create Afro-Celtic music? How did American hip-hop appear in
Paris in the 1970s? How could jazz bands in Nazi-run Europe exist? Music has the power
to connect disparate peoples and history reveals music as a restless, global traveler with
free passage – unabated by borders, taboos, prejudice, or laws. Tracing journeys of
musical styles across time, and geography, informs us about the universal need for
musical expression, the commonalities that lie behind the artificial barriers human
communities create, and perhaps explains why music is called the “universal language.”
В Your Brain and Music: Can Music Make You Smarter, Happier,
Healthier?
(RS)
Many neuroscientists study music to elucidate mysteries of the brain. Why is music such
a rich resource? Not only can scientists physically track the process of learning music as
different areas of the brain light up, they can trace music’s powerful effect on our
emotions, muscles and memory. The benefits of music span well beyond entertainment
and many believe music will be the healing art of the future. Accumulating data about
our “brain on music” unmistakably supports how important, positive and valuable music
is to our well-being and our cultures, as well as its role in the human evolutionary
process.
В The Math and Science of Music: A Snapshot
(RS)
Long before Pythagoras divided a string in ancient Greece to observe vibrations and
calculate pitch frequencies, we were curious about the phenomenon of music. And we
are still exploring its mysteries – physicists compare the workings of the universe to the
complex interaction of an orchestra! From acoustic science to the structure of scales,
modes, harmonies, and rhythms, music and math are constant working companions. This
presentation clarifies for the non-musician some mathematical patterns and foundational
principles on which music is based: resonance, harmony, sympathetic vibrations,
overtones, timbre, and the fascinating interplay of nature and physics when it comes to
sound.
The Poetry of Song: From Fanciful to the Ineffable
(RS)
From Homer we know songs existed before the invention of written language. What do
we sing about? How are songs created? Like the chicken or the egg conundrum, do lyrics
or melody come first? We know songs are far more than the sum of their parts – melody
and lyrics somehow magically combine and articulate the otherwise inexpressible. Using
musician and scientist Daniel Levitin’s six song categories, we can better understand
songs’ beauty, their poetry, why they are created, and how important they are both to
individuals and to societies. This presentation will conclude with a fun exercise in lyric
writing.
В Centuries Old Global Ambassadors: Jazz and the American Identity
(RS)
Duke Ellington watched Nazis building sniper towers, while a Parisian reviewer declared
Ellington’s music “a reason to live.” Embraced and lauded abroad more than at home,
jazz’s DNA has always reflected the core revolutionary principles that created our nation:
freedom, equality and individualism. From black choirs touring Europe in the 1880s, to
1920s jazz bands in Havana, to 2013’s International Jazz Day celebrated in 196
countries, learn the reasons for jazz’s lasting, worldwide inspirational appeal and how its
invention and history is a window into a deeper understanding of its native country.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Janice Jarrett
Jarrett, a jazz singer,
J anice
published lyricist, and
arranger, is also an educator
and journalist with a Ph.D. in
ethnomusicology, a M.A. in
world music and a B.A. in
voice and composition. She
has taught and performed
across the country and abroad
and she currently runs her
own music studio in Tucson,
while continuing to perform
jazz with Tucson’s best.
Jarrett also writes, with pieces
published in the Arizona
Daily Star, the Tucson
Weekly and the Phoenix New
Times.
Art, Architecture, and Music
52В В В The
Rise of Antisemitism and Nazi Propaganda
(RS, SS)
How did antisemitic propaganda rise in 20th century Germany? Starting with a
brief look at antecedents in the 1890s and World War One, we focus on how Nazi
propaganda developed from the 1920s onward. We cover early crude political
satire and trace it through legal sanctions and (pseudo-) scientific justifications.
This presentation also touches on the Nazi policy of Lebensraum (living space), in
which race and space ideologies paved the way for the eventual genocide campaign
against European Jews, known as the Holocaust.
В Memory and Family History in Post-War Germany
(RS, SS)
This presentation provides a personal look at the effects of the Holocaust and war
memories on German society post-1945, with special focus given to how they are
passed on intergenerationally within German families. Audiences will hear about
Krondorfer’s father who was drafted into the German army at age 17 and who
found himself in the vicinity of a Jewish slave labor camp in Poland. More general
themes relating to German society are also addressed and this presentation
concludes with brief remarks on the value of dialogue between communities
affected by historical trauma due to violent, state-sponsored ideologies.
В Reconciliation: Creative Approaches and the Power of the Arts
(RS, SS)
At the end of massive conflicts, what do communities and individuals need to do
in order to remember and heal? This presentation illustrates the power of artistic
engagement when dealing with post-conflict justice and reconciliatory practices
among victims and perpetrators and their descendants. Krondorfer will also discuss
his reconciliatory work with Israelis, Palestinians, and Germans.
В Masculinities in Christianity, Judaism and Beyond
(RS, SS)
Our gender matters when we talk about religions and our religious identities.
Often, we assume that “gender” means “women,” but this presentation focuses on
men and masculinities. After a general introduction, we will trace changing ideals
of masculinity in early Christianity (first 400 years) and how we can hear echoes of
that past even today. We will also look briefly at the question of masculinity in
contemporary Judaism and Hinduism.
В Religious Fundamentalisms: A Comparative Perspective in the World
Religions
(RS, SS)
In this presentation, we take a scholarly perspective on defining and describing the
features of religious fundamentalism in the traditions of Christianity, Judaism,
Islam and Hinduism. We do not seek to identify fundamentalism as either “right”
or “wrong,” nor do we seek to do so for a particular religious tradition. Rather, we
learn why fundamentalism emerged in the beginning of the 20th century, why it is
a strong and dynamic religious force, and how fundamentalist religious traditions
differ from each other.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Björn Krondorfer
B
jörn Krondorfer is
Director of the MartinSpringer Institute and
Professor of Religious Studies
at Northern Arizona
University. He also holds a
visiting position as Faculty
Affiliate at the University of
the Free State, South Africa,
and has served as a guest
professor at the Freie
University Berlin, Germany.
His expertise lies in religion,
gender and culture, and
(post) Holocaust and
reconciliation studies. He
explores the connections
between memory, restorative
justice, and social/moral
repair. Putting his scholarship
to work, he facilitates
intercultural encounters both
at home and abroad and
collaborates with visual artist
Karen Baldner on art
installations.
Philosophy, Ethics, and
Religion
History & Heritage/World
53В В В Steam and Steel Rails: The Arrival of the Railroad and Its Impact on
Arizona
(RS)
The building of the railroad across Arizona in 1879-1880 was a wonder of
technology and human will. It created a series of small communities linked by
their role in supporting that technology and the initiatives behind it. Overnight it
transformed southern Arizona, including Vail, whose story resonates with many
other southern Arizona communities. Business and human interaction changed
significantly in response to the new technology. Discover Chinese rail workers,
Mexicans fleeing revolution, settlers working to establish land ownership,
businessmen, and the nationalistic fervor expanding a nation.
В В The New Deal in Arizona
(RS)
Arizona’s New Deal built sidewalks, post offices, provided school lunches and
outhouses. It produced roadside shrines and monuments to encourage tourism,
check dams and mud stock tanks to support Arizona ranchers, as well as golf
courses and pools for recreation. The federal investment in the built and cultural
landscape of 1930s Arizona and the nation was sweeping and continues to provide
much of our infrastructure. This overview of President Roosevelt’s New Deal in
Arizona highlights stories of local politics that brought in federal dollars to bring
Arizona’s New Deal to life.
J.J. Lamb
Lamb, founding
J.J. member
of the Vail
Preservation Society, has
collected over 80 oral
histories related to the New
Deal and local history. She
developed the Voices of Vail
and Civilian Conservation
Corps exhibits housed
respectively at the Old Vail
Post Office and the CCC
Museum at Colossal Cave
Mountain Park. She also
coordinated development of
the New Deal in Arizona
heritage tourism map, which
earned a 2009 Governor’s
Heritage Preservation Honor
Award. An Arizona Culture
Keeper, Lamb is currently
leading efforts to preserve the
1915 Marsh Station Foreman
House and the Old Vail Post
Office. She is a graduate of
the University of Arizona
with a degree in history and
anthropology.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
54В В В Cultural
and Physical Geographies of Southwest Asia and Afghanistan
(RS)
Two regions of the world—Southwest Asia and Central Asia (of which
Afghanistan is a part)—are in the news every day. Often we lump the countries
and regions together and use the term "Middle East" to describe that part of the
world, yet the regions are very geographically complex, physically and culturally.
This region is the Arab world and it is the world of the Persian Empire and
modern-day Iranians and Turks. It is also where ethnic Kurds live, a people
without a nation who straddle four countries. All of these people (and more!)
reside in this vast, diverse region. This program helps organize and sort out the
geographic and demographic complexities of this part of the world.
В U.S. Population Beyond 300
(RS)
In the fall of 2006, the United States population reached 300 million. The country
has the world's third highest population tally, yet, in terms of density of human
population, it is at about 142 out of 192. Using U.S. Census data, maps, graphs,
charts, and photos, this illustrated presentation looks at demographic patterns and
trends in the U.S. It raises questions and issues related to population in the
country over the last several decades, including diversity and assimilation issues,
environment and resource depletion issues, and labor needs and the labor force.
В What Is the World Growing To? Earth Beyond 6 Billion!
(RS)
Earth's population has grown beyond 6 billion people. China and India alone
account for about 2.5 billion. The United States has about 300 million. Where is
everyone else? While some world regions are growing rapidly, such as countries in
Africa, Asia, and Latin America, some European countries and Japan are
experiencing little or even negative growth, and the United States is growing
slowly as well. This program examines the 'age-structure' of a population, offering
insight into future population trends.
В Journey Stories: 100 Years After Statehood
(RS)
Historically, Arizona was thought of as the land of three cultures—Anglos,
Hispanics, and Indians. This program uses national census data, media coverage,
and other graphics to explore the way in which Arizona's population has changed
over the decades and, given certain trends, how it will grow in the future. It
examines current immigration and ethnicity, socio-economic disparities, the age
distribution of Arizona's population by county, as well as other factors that
provide perspective on the changing face of Arizona, 100 years after statehood.
В Elizabeth Larson
E
lizabeth Larson teaches
in the School of
Geographical Sciences and
Urban Planning at Arizona
State University. In 1997, she
coordinated "Voices from
Communities in Transition"
for Arizona Humanities, a
project that earned the
Schwartz Prize for
"Excellence in Public
Programming" from the
Federation of State
Humanities Councils. In
2002, she received the
Distinguished Public Scholar
award from Arizona
Humanities (AH) and,
currently, she serves as the
Arizona State Scholar for the
Smithsonian Museum on
Main Street Journey Stories
project, a collaboration of the
Smithsonian Institution and
AH.
Geography and Environment
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
55В В Swing into History: Popular Music of the Big Band Era
(RS)
With the exception of the most ardent collectors and the older generations, the
influence and legacy of the big bands is largely forgotten despite their
overwhelming popularity and significant role in early radio. Join Larson as he
revisits the sounds that America listened and danced to for more than three
decades. Learn how iconic artists like Bing Crosby and Ella Fitzgerald first got
their start, along with fellow vocalists, composers, and musicians. And, enjoy the
real thing, as Larson plays from his personal collection of recordings and shares
sheet music, posters, and postcards from the era.
В Erik Larson
L
arson, a graduate of San
Diego State University,
spent the majority of his
career with the Boys Clubs of
America (now Boys & Girls
Clubs), managing and starting
clubs around the country and
serving on the national staff,
responsible for volunteer
training and board, program
and resource development.
Upon retirement, Larson
joined the volunteer staff at
Riordan Mansion State
Historic Park in Flagstaff,
Arizona, and has been
assisting with their efforts for
sixteen years. He has always
had an interest in popular
American music, both
passionately studying and
collecting it. His primary
focus is music of the Swing
era.
В Art, Architecture, and Music
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
56В В В The
Black Indians in the Age of Casinos: Whose Game Is It Anyway?
(RS)
The past 15 years has seen the development of a plethora of gambling casinos in
the United States, the majority of which sit on American Indian lands. Many
have applauded this trend and see it as the Native people’s victory over White
domination and thievery – a real source of empowerment for American Indians.
Missing from the conversation, however, is the little known fact that freed Black
slaves and runaway slaves made a pact with various tribes who befriended them,
rescued them from slave hunters, granted them access to “tribal naming,” and
extended other rights and privileges to them. These so called “Black Indians” have
had to fight, though, for what they see as their rightful inheritance. In this
presentation, LeSeur traces the original agreements made between the tribes and
Black slaves and presents current information on the challenges, controversies, and
status of these claims.
В After the Promised Land: The Miracle Valley Story
(RS)
This presentation is based on events relating to the 1982 conflict between Cochise
County sheriffs and Black migrants from Southside Chicago, a religious and
church-centered group who sought a haven near Sierra Vista, Arizona. Eventually,
following numerous lawsuits, the church disbanded and the Blacks returned to
Chicago. Since the 1990s, a variety of itinerant Pentecostal groups have come to
the Valley with hopes and a missionary zeal to restore Rev. Allen’s original dream.
They have had difficulty prospering and their efforts are a sore subject for Cochise
County. Join LeSeur as she examines this story and attempts to answer some big
questions.
Beyond the Cotton Fields: Black Migrant Women Building Communities
(RS)
This presentation is based on the stories of five women from the Casa Grande
Valley towns (Eloy, Randolph, Coolidge, Casa Grande, and the Gila Reservation)
who, despite their busy and oppressive lives of work, family, poor housing, etc.,
managed to become politicized, self-educated activists. They rebuilt their lives and
created lively communities even after "the cotton machine" robbed them of job
opportunities. This presentation is a tribute to these resilient women and can
feature a visit from at least one of the women or their "daughters"/"relatives" so as
to add further depth to the discussion.
В Eloy's Gun and Cotton Stories: Romanticizing the Real
(RS)
This presentation focuses on the lively and lawless days of Eloy, Arizona. Eloy
might have had a reputation that rivaled that of Tombstone, with its killings,
graft, good time houses, and mysterious murders. Explore this turbulent time in
Territorial Eloy, when the influx of seasonal cotton pickers "raised hell" on the
weekends.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Geta LeSeur
G
eta LeSeur is a
professor of English
and Africana studies at The
University of Arizona,
specializing in African,
Caribbean, and African
American literature. Her
book Not All Okies Are White:
The Lives of Black Cotton
Pickers in Arizona was
selected as one of the best
books of the Southwest for
2000. LeSeur aims to present
history not as a litany of
dates, battles, and politicians,
but as the stories of those
who lived before us – the
stories of ordinary individuals
facing the challenges and
triumphs of life.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/African American
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
57В В В With
a Beefsteak and a Cup of Coffee: The Harvey Girls in the Southwest
(RS)
The Fred Harvey company operated its exceptional chain of restaurants and hotels
along the Santa Fe Railway from 1876 through the 1960s. Among its many
innovations was the employment of “Harvey Girl” waitresses: single women who
chose to leave their families and adhere to strict lifestyle restrictions for the
opportunity to work at respectable jobs. This visual presentation explores the
creation of the Harvey Girls, their life and work at the Harvey Houses in the
Southwest, their influence on the changing roles of women in the American
workforce, and the Harvey Girls in popular culture.
Ahead of Her Time: Architect Mary Jane Colter in the Southwest
(RS)
Architect Mary E.J. Colter worked for the Fred Harvey company from 1902 to
1948, when the profession was mostly dominated by men. A perfectionist who
demanded authenticity, Colter’s use of Southwestern landscapes, materials, forms,
and cultural motifs has influenced the region’s architecture and décor. The
commercial accessibility of her work, along with her promotion of Native
American cultures through collaborations with Indian artists and the Fred Harvey
Indian Department, helped develop tourism in the Southwest. This presentation,
which features Lutzick modeling an Indian Detours uniform, includes images
from Colter’s work in Arizona and New Mexico.
В Selling the Southwest: Fred Harvey and the Promotion of Native
American Cultures
(RS)
In partnership with the Santa Fe Railway, the Fred Harvey company vigorously
promoted travel to the Southwest and was an early innovator of “cultural heritage
tourism.” Travelers experienced an idealized version of the Southwest’s Native
American cultures through the company’s grand hotels along the Santa Fe line,
their Indian Department’s museum rooms and curio shops, and the Harveycar
Indian Detours touring service. This visual presentation, which features Lutzick
modeling an Indian Detours uniform, explores both the benefits and drawbacks of
the commercialization of Native American cultures.
В Winslow's La Posada: The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Harvey Grand
Hotel
(RS)
The Fred Harvey and Santa Fe Railway companies vigorously promoted tourism
to the Southwest through Harvey's grand hotels along the Santa Fe line.
Winslow’s proximity to natural and cultural sites made it an ideal tourism
destination, and so La Posada opened there in 1930. After the hotel closed in
1957, the building served as Santa Fe offices while local volunteers secured a
National Register listing and grant funds to save it. A group of friends from
southern California completed the process and reopened La Posada in 1997.
Through historic and contemporary images, this presentation explores the hotel's
heyday, dormancy, and rehabilitation.
В В В Ann-Mary Lutzick
A
nn-Mary Lutzick has
been the director of
Winslow’s Old Trails
Museum since 2010, and she
also serves on the board of
the Museum Association of
Arizona. She worked for
Arizona Humanities from
1999 to 2011, coordinating
their grants and Smithsonian
traveling exhibitions. Lutzick
earned her M.A. in public
history from Arizona State
University, her B.A. in
history from the University of
Virginia, and her professional
certificate from Arizona State
University’s Center for
Nonprofit Leadership and
Management. She lives with
her husband and pets in
Snowdrift Art Space, their
home, studio, and gallery on
Historic Route 66 in
downtown Winslow.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
58В В В Telling
It Like It Was: Interviews with Arizona Pioneer Women
(RS)
During the Depression, the Federal Writers Project conducted interviews with
over 144 women who arrived in the Arizona Territory between 1850 and 1890.
The women spoke of their long and dangerous journeys and with their words paint
pictures of the hardships and life-threatening situations of their frontier existence.
Through hard work, dedication, tenacity, and humor, they conquered and helped
make a state. In their own words, hear Arizona’s original pioneer women’s stories,
including those of the Udalls, Flakes, Kartchners, and Romeros.
  Annie’s Hotel: A Visit to a Luxury Frontier Hotel
(RS)
Annie Box Neal, a unique and talented woman, managed the world-famous
Mountain View Hotel in a tiny Arizona village. People came from all over the
world to Oracle, Arizona, to enjoy Annie’s food and entertainment. Annie and her
husband, William, shared ownership in the hotel, but, when you got down to it, it
was all Annie’s. At a time when women were rare in business, Annie, of African
American and Native American heritage, was an international star. Meet Annie
and five special guests including William Buffalo Bill Cody.
В Two Six Shooters Beat Four Aces: The Lives of Men on the Arizona
Frontier
(RS)
A saga of incredible action with gun battles, deadly weather, outlaws, and evasive
fortunes, this lively presentation shares the stories of the pioneer men who first
rode into the Arizona Territory when the law of the land was a gun. Some found
success, some found poverty, and some found an early death. Hear the true-life
stories of these Arizona characters including outlaw John Ringo, tough Pete
Kitchen, Rough Rider Bucky O’Neill, and Henry Wickenburg, the man who
found a rich mine but died a pauper.
В A Woman of Courage: The Life of Francis Hunt Udall
(RS)
In a place that bred only hardship, Francis Hunt Udall attacked adversity with
cheerfulness and capability, raising children that would leave an important imprint
on the future state of Arizona. Down through the years the Udalls have answered
the call for civic duty with patriotism, dedication, and intelligence, all learned at
their mother’s knee. Travel with Francis into the unpredictable and bleak frontier,
live her days as she struggles to care for her children, often without her husband’s
presence, and share her heartaches and joy.
Barbara Marriott
F
rom fashion copywriter
to management
consultant, from newspaper
editor to university professor,
Barbara Marriott’s insatiable
curiosity has taken her down
many paths. Now her hunt
for Western history has
added another twist of
excitement to her life.
Marriott uses her Ph.D. in
cultural anthropology as a
tool for understanding the
Old West and its fascinating
characters. After nine books
about the Southwest’s
pioneers and legends (with
many of the books awardwinning), she is on the trail
searching for the next bit of
unknown and unique history.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
59В В В Big
Water, Little Boats
(RS)
Join Martin for a program featuring original photographs and film clips from
various Grand Canyon river running expeditions of the 1940s through the 1960s.
Marvel at photos of the highest river flows ever boated in the Grand Canyon –
the 1957 flow of 126,000 cubic feet per second. Learn about known and little
known river runners of the mid twentieth century, including Norm Nevills,
Frank Wright, Otis “Dock” Marston, and Moulton Fulmer. Also, learn about the
history of river boat design, including how it was that the McKenzie River Dory
came to the Grand Canyon in 1955.
В In the Footsteps of River Running Ghosts
(RS)
Join Martin for a presentation featuring historic photo rematching of
photographs from the 1940s and 1950s taken by river runners in Grand Canyon
National Park. Follow along as Martin seeks out high water campsites and
matches photos taken by river runners on the highest river flows ever boated in
the Grand Canyon – the 1957 flow of 126,000 cubic feet per second. Learn what
it was like to raft the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon before the
construction of Glen Canyon Dam and discover what the 1957 river runners
accidentally left behind!
 Grand Canyon Through a Hiker’s Eye
Tom Martin
(RS)
T
This presentation follows Martin’s various hikes in Grand Canyon National Park,
from Lee’s Ferry to the Grand Wash Cliffs at Lake Mead. Follow along as Martin
explores the Grand Canyon’s remote regions where there are few trails. Many of
his hikes are day hikes that start at the Colorado River, while others are more
traditional backpacking expeditions. Either way, Martin’s over forty years of
exploration of the Grand Canyon ensures that audiences will see and learn about
parts of this world wonder that they have most likely never seen or heard of
before.
В Herding Cats down the Colorado River
(RS)
There’s nothing to it, right? You build a boat and row it through the Grand
Canyon. It should be as easy as herding cats. Join Martin as he and four other
river runners attempt to take five historic replica Grand Canyon river boats
through the Grand Canyon. Learn about the historical significance of these five
boats, all built in the 1950s and 1960s, and how river runners today still use these
same types of boats. Also, see what it is like to flip a historic boat in the Grand
Canyon.
om Martin has been
hiking in the Grand
Canyon and rafting its waters
since 1969. He worked for
twenty years as a physical
therapist at the Grand Canyon
Clinic at the South Rim and
now has shifted his efforts to
hiking the length of the Grand
Canyon from Lee’s Ferry to
Pearce Ferry. When not
outdoors, Martin writes.
Along with Day Hikes from the
River, Martin has written Big
Water Little Boats, and coauthored Guide to the Colorado
River in the Grand Canyon,
Lee’s Ferry to South Cove,
winner of the 2007 National
Outdoor Book Award.
В Geography and Environment
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
60В В The Wolf: Friend or Foe?
(HA)
What would it take to change a wolf killer into an eminent conservationist? Over
his fifty-year career, Aldo Leopold became a keen observer of nature, analyzing the
interrelationships of animals with their habitats. This wisdom led to the writing of
A Sand County Almanac, a landmark piece of American conservation literature.
Concepts of the “Land Ethic” and “Conservation Esthetic” give Leopold’s writings
an enduring appeal and relevance, even in today’s world. McMichael becomes
Aldo Leopold in this engaging presentation, allowing the audience to interact with
the influential philosopher and gain perspective on their place in the natural
world.
В T. J. McMichael
M.S.
T.J.inMcMichael,
wildlife
management, grew up in
rural Arizona, spending his
youth outdoors. Like
biologist Aldo Leopold, for
fifty years McMichael has
worked as a field biologist
and naturalist educator.
His outdoor classes have
sparked enthusiasm in
both youth and adults. He
inspires people to delve
into Leopold’s writings
and seek for themselves a
better understanding of
their relationship to the
land and their fellow
inhabitants.
T.J. McMichael
as Aldo Leopold
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Geography and Environment
61В В В Native in a Strange Land: The Life of Mike Burns, Indian Scout and
Autobiographer
(RS)
Mike Burns lived a long life in two worlds. Born in about 1862 into the
Kwevkepaya (Yavapai) people, he was taken prisoner by U.S. soldiers after his
family was massacred at a place called Skeleton Cave. He lived for years as
something between a captive and a servant until joining the Indian Scouts, riding
against Sitting Bull after the Battle of Little Bighorn and Geronimo in the Apache
Wars. McNamee, the editor of Burns’s memoir The Only One Living to Tell,
recounts Burns’s life in the context of nineteenth-century Arizona history.
В Riding with the Duke: John Wayne in Arizona
(RS)
John Wayne was born in Iowa and lived for most of his adult life in California.
Yet, he spent many years exploring, living, and investing in Arizona, where he
produced his own films, raised cattle, operated a game ranch, and was seemingly
everywhere at once. Wayne remains an iconic presence in American popular
culture. In this presentation, McNamee looks at the Duke’s long career in Arizona
and the memories he left behind.
 Monumental Places: Arizona’s National Parks and Monuments
(RS)
Arizona is home to some of the crown jewels in America’s national park system,
including Canyon de Chelly, Saguaro National Monument, and, of course, the
Grand Canyon National Park. It also harbors lesser known treasures, such as
Chiricahua National Monument, Hubbell Trading Post, and the recently added
Agua Fria National Monument. Join McNamee in exploring the beauty and
history of these natural treasures.
В The Food of Arizona: Many Cultures, Many Flavors
(RS)
Consider the taco, that favorite treat, a staple of Mexican and Mexican American
cooking and an old standby on an Arizonan’s plate. The corn in the tortilla comes
from Mexico, the cheese from the Sahara, the lettuce from Egypt, the onion from
Syria, the tomatoes from South America, the chicken from Indochina, and the
beef from the steppes of Eurasia. The foods of Arizona speak to the many cultures,
native and newcomer, that make up our state. Join McNamee in exploring these
many delicious traditions.
В Arizona Place Names: Names on the Land
(RS)
Place names are like fossil poetry: they afford a kind of folk history, a snapshot in
time that enables us to read them and reconstruct how people have assigned names
to the places to which they come. The U.S. has over 3.5 million place names, and
there is no part of the world where nomenclature is so rich, poetic, humorous, and
picturesque – a tradition to which Arizona has had more than its share of
contributions. In this presentation, McNamee examines the history of Arizona
place names, using lively anecdotes to discuss the little-known stories behind
names on the land.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Gregory
McNamee
G
regory McNamee is a
writer, editor,
photographer, and publisher.
He is the author of thirty-six
books and of more than four
thousand articles and other
publications. He is a
contributing editor to the
Encyclopædia Britannica, a
research fellow at the
Southwest Center of the
University of Arizona, and a
lecturer in the Eller School of
Management, also at the
University of Arizona.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Geography and Environment
62В В В Thornton
Wilder’s Arizona Days
(RS)
It’s 1962: Thornton Wilder has won three Pulitzer Prizes and tires of his role as
Public Intellectual. To escape incessant queries from strangers, he drives west until
his car breaks down outside Douglas, Arizona. He decamps at the Gadsden Hotel
where he meets normal people – and no one asks him about Archibald MacLeish
or abstract symbolism. After ten weeks at the Gadsden, he rents a nearby
apartment and joins Douglas’ barroom class. He writes home about Arizona’s
personality, food, and its foibles. He hides in Arizona eighteen months, total. This
presentation examines Wilder’s wry and cogent observations from his private
correspondence.
В Writing on the Edge: Borderlands Literature
(RS)
This presentation celebrates border literature, and addresses this question: What
qualities shape writing in this literary Third Country? Beginning with Mariano
Azuela (The Underdogs) up through the latest from Luis Urrea (Into the Beautiful
North), borderland writing contains many genres, from policiacos (Paco Taibo II)
to feminist (Gloria AnzaldГєa), from theater (Oscar Monroy) to beat era (Kerouac).
Borderland songs (Flaco Jiménez) complement poetry (Rubén Martínez). There’s
traditional fiction (Carlos Fuentes), memoir (Maya Angelou), and non-fiction
(Oscar Zeta Acosta). The audience hears key works read, and discusses its favorites.
В How I Learned English
(RS)
Learning English as a second language comes with a lot of baggage. It’s not just “i”
before “e” except after “c.” Influences include family, economics, culture,
immigration, geography, politics, the law, and education. This presentation
focuses on the different ways people learn English. Surprisingly, most people
surveyed, learned English by simply being tossed into the deep end of the pool, as
it were. Audience members who recall learning English will testify to their
experiences.
Tom Miller
T
om Miller has been
bringing us
extraordinary stories of
ordinary people for decades.
His books include The
Panama Hat Trail (South
America), On the Border (the
U.S.-Mexican
frontier), Trading With the
Enemy (Cuba), and Revenge
of the Saguaro (the
Southwest). He has
appeared in Smithsonian,
Rolling Stone, and The New
York Times, among other
publications. Born and
raised in Washington, D.C.,
Miller attended college in
Ohio, and since 1969 has
lived in Arizona. He is
affiliated with the University
of Arizona Latin American
Area Center, and has taught
writing workshops in four
countries. He owns 80
versions of “La Bamba.”
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Language and Literature
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
63В В В The
Reinvention of Humor Through Digital Media
(RS)
In the fall of 2012, the Nilsens taught an ASU Honors College course titled “Humor
across the Disciplines.” This highly visual presentation is based on what the students
in that honors course taught the Nilsens about Memes, Tumblr, Vine, Facebook,
YouTube, Twitter, Reddit, and other social media. This presentation illustrates the
increasingly important role of photography in Internet humor and how humorous
television talk-show hosts rely on “real” news to present their “fake” news reports.
Growing Old with Humor
(RS)
The Nilsens reveal ways that humor helps people face the challenges of growing
old. They discuss some of the differences between growing old as a male and growing
old as a female, and also how growing old differs in a capitalistic society like the
United States, as compared to a traditional society like Afghanistan, where they lived
for two years in the late 1960s. The Nilsens hope that audience members will come
ready to share some of their own favorite jokes related to this period of life, which
virtually all humans hope to experience.
The Role of Humor in Arizona Politics
(RS)
This presentation starts with frontier humor, as when in the 1880s Kit Carson testified
before Congress that parts of Arizona were so dry that even a wolf could not
survive. It goes on to talk about the more recent humor of Carl Hayden, Barry
Goldwater, and Morris Udall, and then shows how “insider vs. outsider” humor
works and how some old jokes are currently being adapted to new events, to new
people, and to the shorter and quicker humor that is the style of online
communication.
Humor in Names and Naming
(RS)
Because speakers have already agreed upon the sounds, spellings, and meanings of
ordinary words, names are the only bits of language that individual speakers are
authorized to invent. This has resulted in humorous naming becoming an
increasingly large part of the humor enjoyed by English speakers. Skilled authors,
ranging from William Shakespeare to J.K. Rowling, have given names to their
characters that serve purposes way beyond that of simple identification. And, in the
world of advertising, there are companies which do nothing but create such lexicallypacked names for products and services.
The History of Television Humor from the 1950s to the Present
(RS)
This presentation traces the history of sit-coms with a focus on how human and family
diversity were portrayed in these short, sweet, and funny productions. Audiences will
explore radio’s Amos �n Andy, the traditional TV families of the 1950s (Mayberry
RFD),the beginning of diversity in the 1960s (The Munsters), the more realistic
diversity of the 1970s (All in the Family),the realism and variation in the 1980s (The
Cosby Show), and finally the violations of taboos in the animated sitcoms of the 1990s
and 2000s. Also examined are the clever and comical scripts written for the hosts of
today’s night time talk shows.
Alleen and Don
Nilsen
T
he Nilsens joined the
faculty of Arizona State
University in the early
1970s. Don Nilsen holds a
Ph.D. in linguistics from the
University of Michigan, while
Alleen Nilsen holds a Ph.D.
in English education from the
University of Iowa. During
the 1980s, with support from
Arizona Humanities, the
Nilsens sponsored six
national and international
humor conferences, all of
which were held at ASU.
These conferences laid the
foundation for the founding
of the International Society
for Humor Studies, for which
the Nilsens act as
leaders. Since 2011, the
Nilsens have been active in
ASU’s Emeritus College,
Don Nilsen serving as the
Assistant Dean for the
Humanities and Alleen
Nilsen serving as the Editor
of Emeritus Voices.
Language and Literature
Film, Media, and New Media
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
64В В В They
Was Out to Kill Us: The Power Cabin Shootout
(RS)
The deadliest gunfight in Arizona did not take place on the streets of Tombstone, but
rather in a remote canyon of the Galiuro Mountains in Graham County in 1918,
decades after the frontier had closed. Much of this shootout remains a mystery: Were
the Power boys evading the draft during World War I? Who was ambushed that day,
the lawmen or the Power family? On the surface, the story looks like an Old West
shootout, complete with a feud, murder mystery, and conspiracy theories galore, but
it also foreshadows the emergence of a powerful federal government in the lives of
average citizens.
On the Wrong Side of Allen Street: Businesswomen in Tombstone, 1879-1884
(RS)
One of the most oft-repeated comments regarding Tombstone is that a proper
Tombstone woman would never have been caught walking down the wrong side of
Allen Street, where the prostitutes plied their trade. But in a frontier mining town,
lines were rarely so clearly drawn. Many women came to Tombstone hoping to cash
in on the silver boom and they ran legitimate businesses on both sides of Allen. These
women cannot be neatly categorized as either “saints” or “sinners.” Among others,
we’ll take a close look at Nellie Cashman and Molly Fly. Their stories will change the
way you perceive women in territorial Arizona.
Planes, Trains, and Automobiles (and Stage Coaches and Boats, too):
Women Travel in Arizona
(RS)
Arizona has some of the most stunning scenery in the world, but until recently,
traveling over this terrain was quite an adventure. Meet women like army wife Martha
Summerhayes, suffrage leader Josephine Brawley Hughes, the Harvey Girl waitresses,
Barry Goldwater's personal pilot Ruth Reinhold, as well as other daring women who
braved Arizona's extreme elements. The next time your car battery dies in the tripledigit heat, you might not think your luck so bad!
There’s a New Sheriff in Town: Early Women in Arizona Law
Enforcement
(RS)
Arizona has a tremendous record of electing women to office, but there is one position
that has been dominated by men – that of sheriff. Was the West just too wild for
female sheriffs? Learn how early women got involved in policing the state and find out
about the early female pioneers in this field, like Jewel Jordan, Maricopa County’s first
female sheriff. We’ll also discuss the life of Lucretia Roberts, whose career as an
elected law enforcement official was featured in a novel and a major Hollywood film
starring Debbie Reynolds.
В Winning Their Place: Arizona Women in Politics, 1883-1950
(RS)
In January of 1999, five women were sworn in as Arizona’s top executive officers by
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. But Arizona’s female politicians have
been making history since 1883, when they first demanded the right to vote. We’ll
discuss some of the state’s most important early female politicians, like suffrage leader
Frances Willard Munds, legislator Nellie Trent Bush, Congresswoman Isabella
Greenway, and Justice Lorna Lockwood. These women established a tradition of
holding office prior to 1950 that has allowed Arizona to become a leader in electing
women to public office.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Heidi Osselaer
H
eidi Osselaer holds a
Ph.D. in history and
teaches at Arizona State
University, Tempe, focusing
on women in Arizona history.
Her book Winning Their
Place: Arizona Women in
Politics was published by the
University of Arizona Press
and she served as the
historical consultant for a
documentary film on the
deadliest gunfight in Arizona
history, the Power shootout.
Osselaer is a recipient of the
Sharlot Hall Award for her
“valuable contributions to the
understanding and awareness
of Arizona and its history”
and she plays an active role
with the Arizona Women’s
Heritage Trail.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
65В В В Boarded Up: Social and Historical Interpretations of the American
Indian Boarding School Era
(RS)
American Indians are the only ethnic group in the United States who, for
generations, were subjected to forced education by the federal government. In the
early years, Indian children were hunted down and taken by force to boarding
schools, residing there for three or more years. These children were stripped of
their Native identities, not being allowed to speak their native languages or
practice their cultural traditions. This presentation provides historical and social
interpretations of this painful era in American Indian history, examining the U.S.
federal laws that put it into motion and the drastic life changes that occurred
across the Indian Nations as a result.
В The Long Walk of the Navajo People, 1864-1868
(RS)
In 1864, the Navajo people were forced to walk over 450 miles to Fort Sumner in
eastern New Mexico, an unfortunate event that is known in the Navajo language
as Hweeldi. The story of this fatal march has been recorded and interpreted in
historical literature by many non-Navajo authors and absent from that literature is
the Navajo perspective, a perspective that largely lives as oral history. This
presentation accesses those oral histories and shares Navajo elders’ stories of,
thoughts on, and emotions relating to, the Long Walk.
В Evangeline
Parsons Yazzie
E
vangeline Parsons
Yazzie, Ed.D., is
Professor Emeritus of Navajo,
Northern Arizona University.
A Navajo woman originally
from the small community of
Hardrock on the Navajo
Reservation, Parsons Yazzie
teaches and writes on behalf
of Navajo elders as a means of
acknowledging and honoring
her parents for their gifts of
language, culture-knowledge,
and teachings. She is an
award-winning author of a
bilingual children’s book, the
co-author of a Navajo
language textbook for high
school and college students
and, most recently, the
author of a fictional romance
novel based on Navajo
historical events.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Native American
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
66В В Deceptions, Lies and Alibis
(RS)
A killer camel, a tornado-riding con man, a dead dragon, and a naked horse thief
are some of the characters in the quirky stories from Southwest history that Peach
loves to share in his original cowboy poetry. Laugh at and learn from these very
tall and mostly true tales, like how Arizona forfeited a seaport for beer, how nature
foiled the perfect bank robbery and how a bobcat terrorized a tavern. Leave this
presentation with a smile and a few stories perfect for the campfire!
Photo by ReСђ Ruescas
Michael Coyote
Peach
N
ative Arizonan Michael
Peach holds a B.A.
with honors in philosophy
from Northern Arizona
University and an M.F.A. in
theatre from the California
Institute of the Arts. Peach is
a published author and poet,
and his original plays have
been performed on numerous
occasions, including the 1984
Los Angeles Olympics Arts
Festival. He is a certified
interpreter of cultural and
natural resources and a
certified trainer for the
National Association for
Interpretation and for Pink
Jeep Tours (Sedona, Las
Vegas, Scottsdale, and the
Grand Canyon). Peach also
performs monthly shows at
the Sedona Heritage Museum
and is the television and radio
voiceover spokesman for
Arizona Shuttle.
В Geography and Environment
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
67В В Cattle and Grasslands: A History of Ranching in Southeastern Arizona
(RS)
Cattle-raising was first introduced into Arizona in the late 1600s and the
grasslands of southeast Arizona were famous for their high quality and abundance
– “stirrup-high on a horse” as the old-timers described them. Cattle-raising was a
challenging enterprise for any rancher, from withstanding raiding Apache, to
protecting his investment in land and water, to surviving Arizona’s periodic
droughts, there was never a dull moment. Economic fluctuations, changing
climate, federal laws, and restricted access to grasslands made surviving in the
industry even more difficult. This presentation will present a brief history of
grasslands, the ranching industry, and some of the environmental changes
witnessed in southeast Arizona.
 Arizona’s Civilian Conservation Corps and Our National Parks and
Forests
(RS)
In 1933, at the nadir of the Great Depression, the Civilian Conservation Corps
(CCC) was born. The program was designed to help unemployed and untrained
young men learn new skills and earn money to support their families. CCCers
fervently claim that the skill-building experiences forever changed their lives. These
men built the roads, trails, picnic areas, ranger stations, fire lookouts and public
campgrounds that we still use and appreciate today. This presentation provides a
brief history of the Great Depression, the CCC program, and its tremendous
impact on our national park and forest development.
В Robin Pinto
R
obin Pinto’s interests lie
in the evolution of
cultural landscapes. Her
research centers on three
Arizona historic activities:
early settlement and
homesteading patterns, New
Deal work programs, and
ranching. She holds a
master’s degree in landscape
architecture and is currently a
doctoral candidate at The
University of Arizona. Pinto
has written numerous
histories for southern Arizona
national parks and she headed
the team that completed the
heritage tourism map “The
New Deal in Arizona:
Connections to Our Historic
Landscapes.” And, for the
Arizona Historical Society,
she developed the exhibition
It Saved My Life: The Civilian
Conservation Corps in
Southern Arizona.
Geography and Environment
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
68В В C. G. W. French (1820-1891)
(HA)
Charles G. W. French, born 1820 in a small southeastern Massachusetts town,
heeded the advice, "Go West, young man." Armed with letters of introduction
from Daniel Webster and Benjamin R. Curtis, French arrived in California in
1851. Achieving recognition as a lawyer and legislator in Sacramento, he was
appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Arizona Territory by President
Grant in 1876 and served in that post until 1884. This presentation explores four
intertwined aspects of French’s life: his education; his career as lawyer and judge;
his ownership of the Governor’s Mansion in Prescott; and a romance spanning
forty years.
James C. T. Pool
C. T. Pool holds an
J ames
A.B. in mathematics from
the University of Kansas and
a Ph.D. in physics from the
University of Iowa. Pool
retired after a long career
pursuing and managing
research in mathematics,
computer science, and their
application in science and
engineering. After moving
to Prescott, Arizona, in
2003, a visit to the Sharlot
Hall Museum launched his
second career, one that
nurtures his ever-growing
interest in Arizona history.
Recently elected President of
the Board of Trustees of the
Sharlot Hall Museum, Pool
serves as a docent at the
museum and pursues
research projects related to
the museum and early
residents of Prescott,
including Judges Allyn,
Fleury, and French.
В History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
James C.T. Pool as C.G.W. French
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
69В В Private, For-Profit Prisons: Good Policy or Bad Choice?
(RS)
Arizona has become a focus for the location of private, for-profit prisons. The
state also has one of the highest expenditure rates for corrections. Are we getting
what we paid for? Post addresses the history of for-profit prisons, the interconnections with issues of immigration and racial disparities, and the track record
of for-profit prisons in terms of costs and services. She also addresses the policy,
legal, and political issues surrounding the controversy.
В Prostitution: Legal Slavery or Victimless Crime?
(RS)
Post presents the findings of international studies on prostitution and its relation
to organized crime and sex trafficking. Today, there are four approaches taken in
regard to handling prostitution, namely legalization, decriminalization, the Nordic
Model, and turning a blind (but knowing) eye. In this presentation, U.S. federal
and state law on prostitution is examined and approaches from around the world
will be discussed as a source of comparison and alternate thinking. Additionally,
Arizona law and its focus on arresting children for prostitution and commercial
vice is discussed.
В Status of Women in the U.S. and the World
(RS)
Building on her personal experience of living in five countries and working in
fourteen, Post compares the status of women around the world in terms of
education, health, poverty, political participation and the gender gap. Countries
have tried myriad strategies to address these issues with varying results. Quotas are
frequently used throughout the world, but are anathema in the U.S. Post outlines
these different strategies, examining the pros and cons of each, and draws
comparison between the status of women in the U.S. and that found elsewhere in
the world.
В В Dianne Post
D
ianne Post received her
J.D. from the
University of Wisconsin in
1979. She served as a family
lawyer in Arizona for
eighteen years, representing
mostly battered women and
abused children, before
beginning a career in
international law, primarily
doing gender-based violence
work including training,
drafting of laws, and analysis.
Post has worked in fourteen
different countries, from
Eastern Europe to Africa to
Asia. She is currently
representing Roma IDPs in
Kosovo against UNMIK and
EULEX, and a group of
abused mothers and children
at the Inter-American
Commission on Human
Rights against the U.S.
Law and Civic Engagement
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
70В В В Carving
Grand Canyon
(RS)
One of the original Seven Natural Wonders of the World, the story of how and
when the Grand Canyon came to be is not completely understood. The canyon
was carved by the Colorado River but when it happened and how it occurred is still
somewhat of a mystery. Curiously, the first rivers flowed in the opposite direction
that the river flows today. Did these ancient rivers form all or parts of the Grand
Canyon? If so, how and when did the rivers reverse course? Where did the dirt go
that was eroded out of the canyon? Ranney answers these questions in this colorful
and stimulating presentation.
В In the Footsteps of Martha Summerhayes
(RS)
In the 1870s a refined New England woman traveled with her lieutenant husband
to the untamed Arizona Territory. Traveling in terrible conditions and initially
horrified by the desert landscape, she eventually gave birth to the first Anglo child
born at Fort Apache. Ultimately, Ms. Summerhayes came to love the starry nights,
the clear air and the relative simplicity of life in Arizona. In fact, she wrote what is
now a classic in Southwest literature, Vanished Arizona. Join Ranney as he
recounts this tale of hard-won love and reveals his personal connection to Martha
Summerhayes!
В Wayne Ranney
Sedona Through Time
(RS)
Sedona is known for its colorful rocks, but how did this striking landscape come
to be? Join Ranney on a thrilling trip back in time when the red rocks were part of
a coastal plain, a Sahara-like desert, and warm, tropical seas. Learn how the area
became sculpted into a maze of breathtaking buttes, spires, and mesas. And, be
sure to ask plenty of questions – Ranney has been studying the red rocks of
Sedona for over 35 years!
В Ancient Landscapes of the American Southwest
(RS)
The American Southwest is world-renown for its colorful, modern landscape, but
you’ll be amazed to learn what it used to look like. The Grand Canyon,
Monument Valley, the Superstition Mountains, and the Petrified Forest hold clues
to the fascinating story of how the Southwest was once the site of tropical seas,
Sahara-like deserts, coastlines stalked by huge dinosaurs, and rivers that once
flowed toward the Rocky Mountains. These long-lost and surprising scenes from
the past come alive as audiences travel back in time.
W
ayne Ranney is a
world-renowned
geologist and public speaker
who travels the globe
bringing the stories of Earth’s
landscapes to life. He has
lectured on all seven of the
Earth’s continents and is the
author of eight books,
including Carving Grand
Canyon, Sedona Through
Time, and Ancient Landscapes
of the Colorado Plateau.
Ranney seeks to inspire and
educate the public about
Earth’s geologic history and
its fascinating evolution.
Geography and Environment
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
71В В В Pearl
Hart, the Lady Bandit: Victim or Vixen or Both?
(RS)
Separating fact from fiction is no easy task regarding flamboyant stage coach robber Pearl
Hart. Many conflicting stories abound thanks, in no small part, to Pearl herself. Using
historic photographs and newspaper articles Reid will follow Pearl’s modest beginnings in
Canada to her notorious Arizona crime, trial, and questionable release from prison. Why
does a woman who committed a fairly insignificant crime still garner so much interest that
even a Broadway show was created to highlight her life? Reid will explore Pearl’s life as
both victim and vixen to help shed some light on an Arizona figure surrounded by
mystery.
Women of the Arizona State Prison
(RS)
Winnie Ruth Judd, Eva Dugan, Dr. Rose Boido, and Eva Wilbur Cruz shared one thing
in common. All were incarcerated at the Arizona State Prison in Florence. Some of their
stories made national headlines. Who were they and how did they end up in the Florence
prison? How did their crimes and trials impact Arizona? Through the use of photographs,
prison records and newspaper articles, their stories are told against the background of
women in the Arizona prison system in general, covering the transition from the Yuma
Territorial prison to Florence to the women on death row currently.
В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В Tom Mix: King of the Cowboys
(RS)
Cowboy movie star Tom Mix was internationally famous. Many legends and tall tales
have been told about his life. This presentation highlights some of the true stories about
Mix and his connection to Arizona and debunks some of the Hollywood hype. Why was
Mix on that highway south of Florence where he met his death? Find out about his
childhood, the early years in show business, the multiple marriages and divorces, his career
path, his presence in Arizona and the final hours of his life. A wide range of photographs
and newspaper articles illustrate this larger than life legend.
В Fascinating Florence, AZ: Not Just a Prison Town
(RS)
Florence began as a small rural desert town. In 1875 a major silver strike and designation
as Pinal County seat changed the character of the town. Despite the past tales of
shootouts and stage robberies that echo off the historic adobe walls, many people still find
Florence the essence of a “small town” that is rapidly disappearing in Arizona. Learn how
Florence’s unique historic district also reflects the wisdom of architectural response to
desert environment. This presentation will highlight some of the colorful characters who
called Florence home and reveal what continues to attract people to this off-the-beatenpath Arizona treasure.
В King Cotton
(RS)
Settlement along the Gila River has existed since before c. 1200 A.D. The prehistoric
dwellers grew and harvested cotton but it wasn’t until the late 1920s and 1930s that
towns like Eloy, Randolph, La Palma, and Coolidge in central Arizona and Pinal County
entered into the cotton industry in a major way. This presentation explores the history
and development of these towns and their impact on Pinal County, as well as a brief
overview of the cotton industry in Arizona. Use of Works Progress Administration
migrant photographs, newspaper clippings, and personal anecdotes bring this subject to
life.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
H. Christine Reid
H
. Christine Reid is
intrigued by Arizona’s
diverse and rich western
heritage as a writer and
researcher at the Pinal
County Historical Society.
She has been a Community
Scholar for the ASU Osher
Lifelong Learning Institute
since 2007. She continues a
deep interest in Arizona
history while serving on
many of the town of
Florence’s heritage and
historic preservation projects.
She leads cemetery and
historic district walking tours
in Florence. Committed to
sharing history in a lively
manner, she presents the
sometimes hidden or
forgotten aspects of Arizona’s
characters and history.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
Film, Media, and New Media
72В В В Barnstormers, Daredevils, and Flying Waitresses
(RS, SS)
Before women could vote, they could fly. Everyone knows of Amelia Earhart, but
few recognize and appreciate the courage and struggles of the women who came
before her. Join Renzi as he shares the stories of pioneering women who served as
pilots and aerial performers. Learn about Harriet Quimby, the first woman to fly
across the English Channel, doing so in a plane that was little more than a box kite
with a propeller. These determined women risked their lives to pursue their
interests and passions. They broke barriers and proved that aviation is not solely
man’s domain.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Category – Social Studies; Strand – American History; Concept 7 – Emergence of the Modern
United StatesВ В All Hat and No Cattle: The Language of the American West
(RS, SS)
Steve Renzi
Every day we use words and phrases whose roots lie in the American West. Words
like “brand,” “maverick,” and “railroaded,” along with phrases like “climb down
off your high horse” and “passing the buck” all grew out of the culture and
experiences of those who resided west of the Mississippi. These creative words and
phrases are poetic, descriptive and often quite humorous, like the saying “He’s got
a ten-dollar Stetson on a five-cent head.” Ride shotgun with Renzi as he explores
the meanings and historical origins of these Western words and slang phrases.
S
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Category – Social Studies; Strand 1 – American History; Concept 5 – Westward Expansion
В teve Renzi, a University
of Arizona graduate with
a degree in history, believes
that every generation must
learn about who and what
came before them or else the
lessons learned are lost. As a
writer and photographer
with a teacher’s certificate in
secondary education, Renzi is
always searching for new
ways of exploring our
history. He has written and
been published in over 200
magazine and newspaper
articles and is currently a
writing and photography
teacher, as well as a
basketball coach. Although
he derives great satisfaction
from his professional
pursuits, his proudest
moment was the birth of his
twin sons.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
73В В В Arizona
Women, Past and Present: An Oral History Presentation
(RS, SS)
“Arizona Women” is a digitized 30-minute presentation drawn from an oral
history project of Arizona women who were at least 70 years old and had lived
here all, or most, of their lives. Ethnically and racially diverse, these women built
the community institutions we revere today and give us a personal view of how
Arizona changed from a small frontier territory and state into the bustling, major
state we are today. These women’s stories vividly picture their lives, their families
and a growing Arizona.
В Every Person Their Own Historian: A Quick Lesson on Doing Oral
History
(RS, SS)
All people tell their stories their own way and recording people’s memories can be
extraordinary, an inspiring way to look into the past. This presentation will give
audience members and students the nitty-gritty skills to do oral history. It helps
people envision oral history projects they could do, give sample questions and
explain some of the ins and outs of doing good oral history work. Everyone will
get a chance to think about questions they might like to ask and to practice
interview techniques. All participants will receive examples of oral history release
forms, sample questions, and ideas for doing oral history.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies Strand 1, Concepts 9 and 10
В No Turning Back: Feminism Then and Now in America
(RS)
The story of American feminism is the story of profound change for American
women, expanding their rights, their possibilities and their responsibilities and it
has always been a political struggle. Although the movement started in 1848, over
Rothschild’s lifetime, women’s lives have changed so radically that her
granddaughters can’t imagine what it was like to be a girl or woman when she
grew up. This presentation examines what feminism is, how it has evolved and what it
means today.
В Women, Equality and the West, 1848-1920
(RS)
The 19th century feminist movement began in the East in 1848. Feminist ideals,
however, came to life in the American West. Although the battles were hard, in
1869 Wyoming women gained the right to vote and other western states soon
followed. Suffrage and laws guaranteeing women’s rights passed in the West long
before they did nationally. Why did equal rights for women find such fertile
ground here? Although it was never easy, women’s quest for equal rights in the
West, and their successes, tell us a great deal about our region and women’s desire
for equality.
Mary Logan Rothschild’s Presentations continued on the following page.
Mary Logan
Rothschild
M
ary Logan
Rothschild, Ph.D., is
Professor Emerita at Arizona
State University, where she
helped found the Women’s
Studies Program and taught
American History and
Women’s Studies. She
enjoys working with public
school teachers to include
women’s and oral history in
their classrooms and she
loves traveling the state of
Arizona talking to
community groups about
History and Women’s
Studies. During her tenure
at ASU in the Departments
of History and Women’s
Studies, she won several
teaching and mentoring
awards. She was Arizona
Humanities’ Scholar of the
Year in 1991.
History & Heritage/World
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
74   “Women’s Rights Are Human Rights”: The Global Case for Women’s
Rights
(RS, SS)
“Women’s Rights are Human Rights” was a new chant at the United Nations
Fourth World Conference on Women in 1995. At the time, women’s rights were
not considered “human rights.” While the lives of women and girls around the
world are often still vulnerable and diminished, the best, most cost-effective,
investment governments can make is educating women and girls. This
presentation examines the main issues facing women and girls around the world,
the rise of global feminism, and the integration of women’s rights into the global
human rights movement.
What Do You Mean, Women Can’t Vote? A Look at the First Women’s
Rights Movement, 1848-1920
(SS)
When American women and men organized in 1848 at Seneca Falls to examine
the status of women and organize for change, no women could vote and married
women had almost no legal rights. Seventy-two years later, women had gained
the vote, many legal rights and some political power. What stirred these women
and men to action in 1848? Who were the people who worked for change?
How did they accomplish their success? Are there examples today of women and
men working for change?
Mary Logan
Rothschild
History & Heritage/World
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
75В В В 19th
Century Arizona Through the Stereoscope
(RS)
This presentation addresses the history of stereoscopic photography in Arizona, from
the 1870s Hayden and Powell surveys of the Grand Canyon to the entrepreneurs
documenting the development of our state into the 1930s. The images selected are
high quality copies of rare original and little-seen historical Arizona stereographs
dating from ca 1864 – 1920 that depict activities in many little known regions of the
state, and the development of camps, forts, and towns throughout the Territory.
Included are background information about processes and techniques for making,
reproducing, and marketing stereographs, and reflections on photography and
changing societal perception of the West.
В В Post Card Images of Arizona, 1900-1920
(RS)
After the turn of the 20th century, the explosion in amateur photography, and changes
in postal regulation made the photographic postcards popular. The popularity of the
photographic postcard coincided with significant growth and development in Arizona,
and documents the social and cultural development of our state. This presentation
surveys historically important photographic postcard images of Arizona between ca
1900 and 1920. Appropriate background information about the processes and
techniques for making, reproducing, and marketing the photographs and of the boom
in post card collecting are included, reflections on postcard photography and captions
and changing societal perception of the West.
В Silver Images on Glass Plates: Early Photography in Arizona, 1850-1920
(RS)
Photographs have helped shape both historical and contemporary public perception of
Arizona and the West. This program presents a chronological history and social
development of photography in Territorial Arizona. Included are rare and unique
historical images of daily life, public events, personalities, mining, Native Americans,
and environment of early Arizona. Accompanying images are high-quality copies of
original vintage photographs of many little known regions of the state, and
development of the camps, forts, and towns throughout the Territory. Also provided
is information about photographic processes and techniques, and reflections on
postcard photography, captions and changing societal perception of the West.
В Regional Historic Tours of Arizona
(RS)
These presentations provide regional overviews of Arizona in rare and unique 19th and
20th century historical photographs. The programs include examples of the
photographic formats used and images of daily life, public events, personalities,
mining, Native Americans, and the built environment of early Arizona. Currently
available are presentations of early images of: Ajo, Bisbee/Douglas, Central Arizona
(Prescott, Jerome, Verde Valley), early auto travel and Route 66, Globe/Miami, Mesa/
Tempe, Maricopa County, Phoenix, and Yuma. Other topics and regions may also be
available on request. These presentations generate lively discussions with attendees as
the images, locations and events are presented and discussed.
Jeremy Rowe
Rowe, Ed.D., has
J eremy
collected, researched, and
written about 19th and early
20th century photographs
for over thirty years. Author
of Arizona Photographers
1850-1920: A History and
Directory, and Arizona
Stereographs 1865 - 1930,
and numerous chapters and
articles, he manages
vintagephoto.com. Rowe
serves on Boards of the
Daguerreian Society as
President, Ephemera Society
of America, INFOCUS,
Daniel Nagrin Theatre Film
& Dance Foundation, and
National Stereoscopic
Association, and has curated
many museum exhibitions.
Rowe was Executive Director
of the School of Computing
and Informatics, is Emeritus
Faculty at Arizona State
University, and consults,
researches and writes about
historic photography.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
76В В Integrating Human Settlement Patterns into the Natural World
(RS)
In this presentation, Sharp tells the story of development south of the Gila River
since 1539, discussing how the quality and efficiency of human settlement patterns
shape the spirit of place and reflect the essential bond between people and the
land. How and where we grow determine the degree of landscape fragmentation,
the amount of open space, the health of watersheds, and the overall sustainability
of a given bioregion. Sharp discusses elements of good settlement design and the
importance of introducing human learning and culture into ecosystems.
В The Two Worlds of Meaningful Placemaking
(RS)
We inhabit two worlds: the living natural world, and the humanized landscape of
cities, towns and transportation corridors. We think of these worlds as separate
systems, but in reality cities and countryside are symbiotic. To enhance this
relationship, we must become better stewards of place. Sharp discusses the human
motive for belonging to and caring for place. Love of home is enhanced if we replace
exurban sprawl with networks of towns that reflect identifiable places of culture where
residents value stewardship.
В Chora: The Relationship Between Place and the Individual
(RS)
The Greeks had two words for place. To Aristotle, topos was a simple point on the
ground. To Plato, place was chora, a choreography or common dance between
people and place. Sharp examines the chora’s deeper meaning, the relationship
between place and the individual. Humans live in a symbiotic relationship with
nature, generating a sense or spirit of place. We can co-create a relationship of
mutual respect and caring, or a one-sided relationship of control, domination and
commodification.
В Bob Sharp
R
aised in a threegeneration Arizona
ranching family, Sharp’s
primary concern is
responsible, effective land
stewardship. With more than
50 years of practical
experience as a rancher and a
master’s degree in landscape
architecture focusing on
bioregional planning, Sharp
offers a unique perspective
toward finding solutions to
aimless exurban sprawl in the
West. Sharp suggests
conservation ranching, along
with designing and
renovating towns based on
traditional and innovative
settlement patterns, to
replace large-lot
development. This approach
builds the foundation of
what Sharp calls a “new
ruralism.”
Geography and Environment
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
77В В В Aldo
Leopold in the Southwest
(RS)
Forester Aldo Leopold (1887-1948) is considered the founding voice of
environmental ethics, although the discipline didn’t exist when his book, A Sand
County Almanac, was published posthumously in 1949. At the time of his death,
Leopold was teaching some of the first courses in ecology at the University of
Wisconsin, where he emphasized the “land ethic.” Rather than focus on his
Midwestern years, this presentation maintains that the seeds of Leopold’s
revolutionary thought can be found in his years in Arizona and New Mexico
(1909-1924). In particular, the presentation explores how indigenous attitudes
toward nature helped shape Leopold’s intellectual journey.
В The Mysteries of Everett Ruess
(RS)
When Everett Ruess went missing in Utah in 1934, he’d been traversing the Four
Corners area for several years, on foot with his burro and dog. Ruess was only
twenty when he disappeared, but he’d already left hundreds of letters, journals,
and art works that celebrate his fascination with the natural and cultural
landscapes of the Southwest. The controversies surrounding Ruess’s disappearance
contribute to his legacy. Was he murdered? Succumb to an accident? Commit
suicide? Or did he drop out to live among the Navajo? For decades scholars,
friends, legal authorities, reporters, and others have tried to solve the mystery.
Dan Shilling
A
fter teaching high
school in Pennsylvania,
Shilling moved to Arizona in
1980 and earned a Ph.D. in
literature from Arizona State
University. He worked at
Arizona Humanities from
1984 until 2003, the last
fourteen years as executive
director. He has served on
more than fifty boards and
commissions. To
acknowledge his service,
ASU presented him its most
prestigious honor, the
“Distinguished Alumnus
Award.” Shilling guided
Arizona’s research on cultural
tourism, eventually
authoring the book, Civic
Tourism. Recently, he codirected two NEH Summer
Institutes for college faculty
on Aldo Leopold. He is
writing a book on the
cultural dimensions of
sustainability.
Geography and Environment
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
78В В В Signs
of the Times: The Golden Age of Neon in Arizona
(RS)
The rise of car travel in the 40s, 50s and 60s meant that thousands of people were
traversing the broad expanses of the Southwest looking for new landscapes and
adventure. As the cars sped past, restaurants, motels, curio shops and gas stations
needed large, bright signs to make an impression. This informative and entertaining
visual presentation explores the social significance of the rise of commercial neon
signs, and references the designers whose signs became iconic images that defined the
West in the age of the automobile.
В POP-Pourri: Pop Culture in Arizona
(RS, SS)
Post-war Arizona really popped and added to the pop culture known as Americana.
The housing pop for the returning military personnel who were moving to Arizona
changed the landscape. Iconic restaurants such as KFC, McDonald’s, and Bob’s Big
Boy owe Arizona for their POP culture status. Vestiges of these post-war days are still
around and Shore tells their stories, ensuring that the memories of our vibrant past
stay alive.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Speakers Standards
Category: Social Studies; Strand 1; Concept 9
В Macabre, AZ
(RS)
Through the vehicle of true crime and spine-chilling Arizona lore, this presentation
highlights macabre stories and their historical background, including the tale of
Winnie Ruth Judd, Arizona's most infamous murderer, and the tale of the Red Ghost
and the release into the wild desert of unknown animals (today, we know them as
camels). Shore uses a blend of storytelling magic, old photographs, ephemera, and
artifacts to bring our state’s heritage to life in this entertaining and educational
presentation. The audience will leave with a unique perspective of Arizona.
В Arizona Kicks on Route 66
(RS)
U.S. Route 66, known as the “Mother Road,” was built in 1926. It ran from Chicago
to L. A. During the depression of the 1930s, it became the major path by which
people migrated west, seeking work, warm weather and new opportunities. Shore
shares the history of Route 66 in Arizona, including the impact it had on the state
during its prime, and what happened when the interstate ultimately bypassed some of
the towns that drew life from the road. This multi-media presentation includes music,
video clips, still photos, and Shore’s storytelling magic.
Marshall Shore
В M
arshall Shore,
Arizona’s Hip
Historian. His passion is
uncovering the weird, the
wonderful, and the obscure
treasures from our past: the
semi-forgotten people,
places, and events that have
made us who we are today.
Shore uses storytelling magic,
found film footage, old
photographs, ephemera, and
artifacts to bring our state’s
heritage to life in
entertaining and educational
presentations.
В History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Art, Architecture, and Music
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
79В В В The
American Presidency
(RS)
Presidents often view the challenges they face and the decisions they make in light
of how their predecessors confronted similar situations. Many presidents stand in
the shadow of their predecessors; others seek out comparisons. What can
historical experience tell us about how presidents wrestle with the issues of the
day? Do we harbor unrealistic expectations of presidential power? Have we
contributed to making the presidency an office where we confuse personality with
character and mistake popularity for political skill?
В Emancipation and the Destruction of Slavery, 1861-1865
(RS)
The American Civil War resulted in the destruction of slavery in the United States,
yet it is not always evident how this came about. People argue over who - or what freed the slaves, the impact of the Emancipation Proclamation, and how the war
itself contributed to the destruction of slavery. Perhaps it may be better to ask a
simple question: how did freedom come? There were many reasons why the war
resulted in slavery’s ultimate demise, all of which are highlighted in this
presentation marking the sesquicentennial of the destruction of slavery in the
United States.
В Our Civil War: Reflections at the Sesquicentennial
(RS)
Between 2011 and 2015 Americans will commemorate the sesquicentennial of the
American Civil War. Different people have looked at this event in different ways
at different times, reminding us that history is in part a conversation between past
and present, and that in deciding how we approach this event we say something
about ourselves. How do we discuss divisive issues? How do we recall political
and military events? How do we identify and define what to commemorate …
and what do we overlook or set aside?
В Why the Union Won and the Confederacy Lost
(RS)
Suggesting that the triumph of the United Sates in the American Civil War was
not inevitable, this presentation highlights how Union strategy eventually targeted
Confederate weaknesses instead of playing to Confederate strengths. Both sides
aimed to erode the foe’s will to win; Union strategy also depleted Confederate
resources and limited the damage that Confederate counterthrusts might inflict,
while the Confederacy adopted measures in an effort to win the war that
undermined the principles and interests it was established to protect.
Brooks D.
Simpson
B
rooks D. Simpson is
ASU Foundation
Professor of History,
teaching in Barrett, The
Honors College, as well as in
the School of Historical,
Philosophical, and Religious
Studies. He received his
B.A. in History and
International Relations from
the University of Virginia
(1979), followed by his M.A.
(1982) and Ph.D. (1989) in
History from the University
of Wisconsin. Author of
seven books, co-author of
two more, and editor or coeditor of seven other
volumes, his area of expertise
is nineteenth century United
States history, especially the
period of the Civil War and
Reconstruction, as well as the
American presidency.
History & Heritage/United
States
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
80В В The Form of Connection: Understanding Cities
(RS, SS)
This presentation explores cities, buildings, geography, biology, and asks the
question, “How shall we live?” in Arizona, on planet Earth. Investigating our
current world, including how many of us there are on it, how we use energy, what
we use it for, where it comes from, and how all this is changing with a new
generation, Stein describes the work of that new generation – the children of this
audience – inventing new ways to connect with each other and with their
surroundings that build on recent discoveries about how Earth actually works.
ideas.
Jeff Stein
A
ward-winning architect,
writer, educator Jeff
Stein, AIA, is president of
Cosanti Foundation, the
urban research institute
founded by Paolo Soleri,
responsible for the
continuing design and
construction of the urban
laboratory Arcosanti, near
Cordes Junction, Arizona.
Stein has taught architecture
in the Career Discovery
program of the Harvard
GSD; headed the
department of architecture at
Wentworth Institute in
Boston; and was Dean of the
Boston Architectural
College. He has taught at the
Technicum Winterthur,
Zurich, the Ecole
d’Architecture LanguedocRousillon, in Montpellier,
France, and lectures and
writes about architecture and
energy issues throughout the
Southwest.
Art, Architecture, and Music
Geography and Environment
 AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
81В В В Written
in Thread: Arizona Women’s History Preserved in Their Quilts
(RS)
Join Stevenson as she traces Arizona history through women who recorded pieces
of their lives in their needlework. Beginning with 1860s Mexican women,
through 1990s Hopi women, this presentation introduces women who pioneered
Arizona through quilts they stitched. Some of the women featured are Atanacia
Santa Cruz Hughes, Tucson; Viola Slaughter, Southeastern Arizona; Alice Gillette
Haught, Payson; Mary Smith Lawler, Prescott; Ruth Woolf Jordan, Tempe/
Sedona; Sedona Schnebly, Sedona; Rose Livingston, Yuma; and Emma Andres,
Prescott. The colorful patterns of women’s quilts added a spot of brightness to
their homes and their lives. They also celebrated and recorded special events with
their quilts.
В Pam Knight
Stevenson
Inventing Local TV News
(RS)
Join Stevenson as she traces Arizona television news from mid-1950s live studio
broadcasts to 1980s live satellite broadcasts. The first television newscasters, many
of them veteran radio news reporters, faced the challenge of adding pictures to the
news before videotape. Arizona local television pioneered production of
documentaries such as “Copperstate Cavalcade.” Phoenix TV news departments
were also innovators of helicopter news and special reports such as “On the
Arizona Road” and “I-Team” investigations. This presentation is based on oral
history interviews of Arizona broadcast pioneers including: Jack Murphy, Homer
Lane, Bill Close, Karl Eller, Bob Ellis, Jack Clifford, Tom Chauncey, Jerry Foster
and Mary Jo West.
В Skirting Traditions: Arizona Women Journalists, 100 Years of Change
(RS)
Listen to Stevenson as she tells the story of the dramatic revolution of the news
media in the last century. Many young people today cannot imagine a time when
women were not allowed to do any job they chose. Stories of women writers who
broke barriers tell the history of change in women’s roles in society, as well as in
journalism and communication. This program includes stories of 28 women
including Sharlot Hall, Olgivanna Lloyd Wright, Nina Pullium, and Erma
Bombeck. As women around the globe continue to fight for dignity and equal
rights, this program assures the story of American women’s struggle for equality is
not forgotten.
В В В P
am Knight Stevenson
has been involved in
researching and writing
about Arizona history for
more than 30 years. A native
of Los Angeles, she earned a
history degree from the
University of California, Los
Angeles, and moved to
Arizona in 1972. She served
as Managing Editor of the
Phoenix CBS TV news
department and as Manager
of Production for KAETTV, the Phoenix PBS
station. She has conducted
hundreds of oral history
interviews, including Arizona
Historymakers; journalists;
quilters; Harvey Girls; and
Navajo Code Talkers.
Focusing on women’s
history, Stevenson coauthored the books, Grand
Endeavors: Vintage Arizona
Quilts and Their Makers and
Skirting Traditions: Arizona
Women Writers & Journalists
1912–2012.
Film, Media, and New Media
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
82В В Crosscurrents in the Desert: The U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps in Arizona
(RS, SS)
July 1, 2013, marked the 70th anniversary of the establishment of the U.S. Cadet
Nurse Corps, an innovation for its time that addressed a healthcare crisis during
World War II and improved nurse education across the United States. Through
speaker-led and learner-centered activities, participants will learn about Cadet
Nurses in participating hospital schools of nursing in Arizona. Also to be discussed
will be oral histories of a number of Cadet Nurses who received their training
elsewhere and followed a different path to Arizona. Participants who know a
Cadet Nurse will be invited to add to the discussion.
В Speakers in Schools Arizona Education Standards
Concept 1: Research Skills for History standards for Social Studies, grades 6-12
Elsie Szecsy
E
lsie Szecsy is a Research
Professional at Arizona
State University, where she
investigates problems of
importance in the Southwest
U.S.-northern Mexico region
and nationally that are
related to educational access
and excellence. She earned
her Ed.D. in educational
administration at Teachers
College, Columbia
University, and was
previously a middle and high
school foreign language
teacher on Long Island in
New York, as well as
administrator of a regional
distance learning program
there. Her research on the
U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps
focuses on it as a strategic
educational innovation in the
national interest. Her mother
was a Cadet Nurse.
В History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
83В В An
Immigrant’s Struggles: The Diary of Mary “Mim” Walsh
В (RS)
This presentation introduces audiences to the lively voice of diarist Mary “Mim” Walsh.
Her 50-year-long journal reveals her heartfelt experiences as an Irish immigrant to
Arizona. Her writings record her negotiations of several challenges, from invitations to
“perform” as Irish characters at social events to the desire to become a successful fiction
writer in the face of rejection. And, Mim’s diary account of a longed-for trip back
home – written at age 70 – reveals the complexities of home, memory, citizenship, and
reality. This presentation also addresses the challenges and joys of working with a long
historical manuscript, including its coding, inconsistencies, and mysteries.
В Family Secrets: The Uneasy Tradition of Diarists and Their Readers
(RS)
This illustrated presentation provides a history of diarists and the families about which
they write. It is organized by topic, including Husbands and Wives (starting with
Samuel Pepys, known as the “father of the diary”); Brothers and Sisters (including the
Wordworth and James families); and Children and Parents (including the recentlyrevealed paternal editing of the diary of Anne Frank). Audiences will appreciate the
opportunity to examine the handwritings of these diarists.
 For Love or Money: The Western Saga of Horace and “Baby Doe” Tabor
(RS)
Trace the legend – and historical reality – of the mining frontier Tabor family. In the
1880s, divorceé “Baby Doe” met and conquered married mining magnate Horace
Tabor. Just ten years after their notorious Washington, D.C. wedding, Horace went
bankrupt and many suspected that the “second Mrs. Tabor” would reveal her golddigging motives and abandon her elderly husband. But, Baby Doe stuck with Horace
and then, as a still-beautiful widow, guarded his last remaining silver mine in Leadville,
Colorado. The Tabor’s story remains relevant today, especially in the current economic
climate.
Mary Hunter Austin: Desert Writer and Rebel
(HA, SS)
Join Temple as she presents Mary Hunter Austin, an early twentieth-century writer of
diverse and controversial books. Austin’s early masterpiece Land of Little Rain (1903) is
still in print and provides a different view of the eastern Sierra than that of John Muir.
She also wrote on Native American arts and rights, as well as issues still germane today,
such as water policy, public lands, the environment, the battle of the sexes, and human
spirituality. She knew many writers and thinkers, including such notables as Jack
London, Willa Cather, Ansel Adams, and Diego Rivera.
 Elizabeth “Baby Doe” Tabor
(HA)
Explore history with Temple as she presents Elizabeth “Baby Doe” Tabor, the central
figure in a western mining frontier saga involving money, divorce, family heartbreak,
and pioneer resilience. Baby Doe was admired by miners and hated by “decent”
women, yet she captured the heart of the richest man in the West, Horace Tabor. After
winning Horace away from his respected first wife, Baby Doe fought to gain respect as
the second Mrs. Tabor. But bankruptcy and tragic relationships changed the course of
her life, giving her rags instead of riches. In this presentation, a mature Baby Doe talks
about her life experiences with mining, marriage, motherhood and miracles.
Judy Nolte
Temple
Nolte Temple teaches
J udy
in both the English and
Gender & Women’s Studies
departments at the
University of Arizona. Her
courses include “Women’s
Life Writing” and “Women
in Literature.” In 2003, she
received a Fulbright award
to conduct research in New
Zealand on women’s diaries.
She is the editor of two essay
collections on the literary
Southwest and the author of
two books, the most recent
of which is Baby Doe Tabor:
The Madwoman in the
Cabin. In preparation for a
forthcoming book, Temple
is currently editing selections
from the 50-year-long diary
of Mary Walsh, an Irish
immigrant to Arizona.
В Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
Language and Literature
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
84В В Armed with Our Language, We Went to War: The Navajo Code Talkers
(RS)
During WWII a select group of young Navajo men enlisted in the Marines with a
unique weapon. Using the Navajo language, they devised a secret code that the
enemy never deciphered. For over 40 years a cloak of secrecy hung over the Code
Talker’s service until the code was declassified and they were finally honored for
their military contributions in the South Pacific by Presidents Reagan, Bush, and
the Navajo Nation. The Code Talkers’ cultural background, how the code was
devised and used, photos, and how Navajo spiritual beliefs were used to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) form this presentation.
В Laura Tohe
L
aura Tohe is DinГ©. She
is Sleepy Rock clan born
for the Bitter Water clan.
She holds a Ph.D. in
Indigenous American
Literature. A librettist and
an award-winning poet, her
books include No Parole
Today, Making Friends with
Water (chapbook), Sister
Nations (edited), TsГ©yi, Deep
in the Rock, and Code Talker
Stories (oral history). Her
commissioned libretto,
Enemy Slayer, A Navajo
Oratorio made its world
premiere in 2008 and was
performed by The Phoenix
Symphony Orchestra. She is
Professor with Distinction in
Indigenous Literature at
Arizona State University.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Native American
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
85В В В Native
Roads: A Virtual Guide to the Hopi and Navajo Nations
(RS)
As editor of the third edition of Fran Kosik’s classic travel book, A Complete
Motoring Guide to the Navajo and Hopi Nations, Turner retraced her routes in
January 2013, updating information on dozens of intriguing Native American
trading posts, prehistoric ruins, museums, and natural wonders. Using the pictures
taken on that trip, this presentation creates a visual travelogue of this vast beautiful
and culturally unique domain.
В For God, Gold, and Glory: The Coronado Expedition, 1540-1542
(RS)
In 1540, Francisco Vasquez de Coronado entered Arizona with the largest
European expedition ever gathered in North America. Historians have puzzled
over Coronado’s exact route through Arizona. This program allows audiences to
travel with the entourage through images by famous artists, maps, and scenic and
historic photographs of the pueblos, crossbow dart points, and other
archaeological remains from one of Coronado campsites.
В Arizona Tourism from Stagecoaches to Kayaks
(RS)
Ever since the Grand Canyon became grand, tourists have been flocking to
Arizona to see the sights and experience the unique landscape and indigenous
cultures. This presentation covers the whole state over more than a century. From
1880s Grand Canyon stagecoach and mule rides, the Fred Harvey railroad era
(Harvey Girls and Indian Detours), auto camping on Route 66 in the 1920s,
Tombstone’s Helldorado Days, dude ranches, post-World War II getting your
kicks on Route 66, all the way to modern eco-tourism.
В Images of Grandeur: Artists and Photographers of the Grand Canyon
(RS)
What makes the Grand Canyon so grand? When and how did the Grand Canyon
change from being an impassable hole in the ground to the best of the Seven
Wonders of the Natural World? This presentation examines the Grand Canyon
through the eyes of conquistadors, military surveyors, writers, artists, and
photographers from 1541 to the present. It also explores the evolution of our
interaction with nature, from “that which must be conquered” to something to be
preserved and appreciated for its grandeur.
В A Photographic History of Arizona from Prehistory to the Present
(RS)
If a picture is worth a thousand words, this program could fill a seven-volume
history of Arizona. From the geological wonders of the Grand Canyon and the
Petrified Forest to cutting-edge biotech industries and Native American art
galleries, this whirlwind pictorial history tour of Arizona from prehistory to the
present shows it all. In addition to beautiful landscape photography and historic
site images, this engaging program addresses Arizona’s cultural diversity, mining,
and water use history.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Jim Turner
B
efore retiring from the
Arizona Historical
Society, Jim Turner worked
with more than seventy
museums in every corner of
the state. He wrote the
pictorial history book,
Arizona: Celebration of the
Grand Canyon State, is a part
-time editor for Rio Nuevo
Publishers, and writes articles
for magazines and
newspapers. Turner moved
to Tucson in 1951, earned a
master’s degree in U.S.
history from the University
of Arizona, and has been
researching, writing, and
teaching Arizona history for
almost forty years.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Native American
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Art, Architecture, and Music
86В В В Surviving Genocide: Race, Ethnicity, Immigration and Thriving after
Great Loss
(SS)
Survivors of genocide are not victims, they are heroes. It is hard to imagine that
there are real people involved in the dangers of ethnic cleansing, drones and other
weapons of destruction. Have you ever asked yourself, “What happens after war?
How do people deal with its effect? Where are those that have been ravaged and
affected by war?” Umuligirwa examines and describes the survivors’ struggles as
they deal with trauma, loss, stress about fitting into a new community, and the
courage to face change and start new lives. As a survivor of genocide, Umuligirwa
explains how she personifies resilience and courage. She defines valor, and her life
defines courage. She has built lasting and effective skills and she discusses how all
of us can survive loss, and thrive.
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies Strand 1, Concept 3, 4, 5, Strand 4: Concept 2
Agnes
Umuligirwa
A
gnes Umuligirwa
(Aggie Umu), a
storyteller, international
liaison and community
advocate, speaks out for and
on behalf of refugee women
from all walks of life. She
educates others about the
plight of refugees worldwide.
Umuligirwa is an
international public speaker,
a volunteer for different
organizations such as
Flight33 Inc. and Project
C.U.R.E. She is also a
consultant for HEAL
International, International
Foundation for Education &
Self-Help, and the World
Academy for the Future of
Women. Umuligirwa is a
community liaison and
bulletin editor at
Resurrection in Tempe,
Arizona. Umuligirwa holds a
B.A. in education, an A.A. in
sociology, and a certificate in
women’s studies. She loves
travelling, reading and speaks
multiple languages.
Humanities in Contemporary
Issues
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
87В В В Arizona History and Storytelling for Students of All Ages:
Inspiring Imagination, Finding Your Own Voice, Acquiring Insight and
Skills
(SS)
Inspiring students! A Cowboy Christmas An American Tale, Van Dyke’s exciting,
adventure-filled book, tells the story of a boy and girl not yet sixteen coming of age
in Arizona, 1873. Experiencing a hostile frontier, they persevere in search of each
other and discover strengths, skills and values. Education will be served on the
plate of entertainment. Van Dyke’s presentation provides moments of selfdiscovery, inspiring student imagination and provoking insights and talking points
for happy, positive lifestyles.
Tom Van Dyke
V
an Dyke received his
M.F.A. from Cranbrook
Academy of Arts. A member
of Western Writers of America,
he has written screenplays since
1970. One of his motion
pictures was considered for
nomination of an Academy
Award В®. His creative
expression of writing and
film production is shared
with his creation of fine
art. Van Dyke’s sculptures,
paintings and photography
have been exhibited or are
in the permanent collections
of the NY Museum of
Modern Art, the Carnegie
Art Institute, the Buffalo
Bill Historical Center, the
Detroit Institute of Arts, the
Henry Ford Museum, and
the Butler Institute of
American Art.
Language and Literature
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
88В В В The
Tully and Ochoa Wagon Train Fight
(RS)
This is the story behind participant Edward Zinns’ painting of an Indian attack on
an 80 mule, 9 wagon train. On May 11, 1869, the Tully & Ochoa Company
team left Tucson for Camp Grant. On the second day a band of Araviapa
Apaches attached the 14 teamsters in Canon Del Oro, north of Tucson. At 8:00
a.m., the starving Araviapa’s yelled out their offer: “leave the wagons and you can
go….” Of the few paintings of Apaches in battle with soldiers and settlers, none is
so vivid, accurate in detail, and informative as this one. It is the only know
painting by a participant. This and other attacks led to the Camp Grant Massacre
in 1871.
В Geronimo and the Apache Surrender: The C. S. Fly Photographs
(RS)
In March of 1886, Geronimo and Tribal Members met with General George
Crook in Sonora, Mexico, to discuss the terms of surrender. C. S. Fly, of
Tombstone fame, was on hand to document this historic event with photographs.
These are the only known photographs ever taken of American Indians “At War”
and as “Enemy-in-the-Field.” Audiences will be able to view these photos and
learn more about the suspenseful days that led up to Geronimo’s ultimate
surrender. Explore questions such as: Who were the Apaches? What were their
customs and religious beliefs? Why did they fight? What were their rules of
warfare?
Jay Van Orden
Orden worked for
J aytheVan
Arizona Historical
Society (AHS) for 33 years
and was their Director of
Field Services. He served as
Chairman of the Council on
the Centennial of Chiricahua
-Warm Springs Apache
surrender and subsequently
worked with the Apaches for
ten years on various AHS
projects. In 1985-1986, he
had the privilege of
interviewing five of the 13
living ex-prisoners of war.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Native American
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
89В В В Not
Just a Pretty Face: Helen of Troy in Sparta and Egypt
(RS)
This presentation presents the many faces of Helen, ancient Greek icon of beauty
and eroticism, known as Helen of Troy, whose love affair ignited a ten-year war.
We will explore Helen’s literary and visual images: an actively worshipped goddess,
a legendary queen, and a mythological figure with multiple tales set in Sparta,
Troy and Egypt, including tales that her phantom was in Troy, an illusionary
cause for war. Ancient Greek Helen raises diverse meanings about women’s
identity, ritual associations, mythic ideas, and storytelling traditions that appeals to
audiences interested in women’s studies, oral storytelling and folklore traditions.
 Helen: Divine Model for Spartan Women’s Identity
(RS)
With literary and visual examples, Vivante shows how ancient Greek Helen’s
divine and legendary images shaped Spartan women’s identity. Though familiar as
Helen of Troy, adolescent girls worshipped her in major transition rites, married
women celebrated her female powers of beauty and sensuality for productive
marriages, and she was important in Spartan dynastic legend. For audiences
interested in gender, cross-cultural and women’s studies we will explore ideas
significant in formation of identity; significance of female divinities and femaleaffirming rituals; significance of cultural validation of women’s roles; and what we
might learn from ancient ways of positively constructing women’s images.
В Gazing at Helen: Portraying Ancient Helen in Modern Film
(RS)
Due to her complex ancient qualities, cinematically depicting Helen, ancient
Greek icon of female beauty and eroticism, has challenged modern film directors.
Illustrated with film clips, this presentation explores how four directors have
variously portrayed this powerful cultural icon: two depict her with her ancient
powers and two virtually eliminate her ancient meanings. These portrayals reflect
different ideas about beauty and women’s roles, and they offer insights into
important contemporary issues. This presentation appeals to audiences interested
in film, media, gender and women’s studies and in the media’s role in constructing
social values.
Bella Vivante
B
ella Vivante holds a
Ph.D. in classics from
Stanford University and is a
professor at The University
of Arizona. With feminist
and Native American
perspectives she innovatively
researches Homer, oral
traditions, Greek drama, and
ancient women’s empowered
ritual and cultural roles. She
has performed roles in
ancient Greek; her
forthcoming book on Helen
as feminine/poetic icon
examines her diverse ancient
and modern portrayals. She
aims to make the ancient
world dynamic to
contemporary audiences:
scriptwriter/actor, Women,
Marriage, Family in Ancient
Greece (Paideia Project dvd);
Daughters of Gaia: Women in
the Ancient Mediterranean
World (Praeger; Oklahoma);
translator, Euripides’ Helen,
in Women on the Edge: Four
Plays by Euripides
(Routledge).
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Women's Studies
Film, Media, and New Media
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
90В В В The
History of the River Runners of the Grand Canyon
(RS, SS)
Through this visually rich presentation, Weber carries his listeners along a historical
timeline. Beginning with a Hopi legend, he takes his audience through the years of
human history in the Grand Canyon, culminating in the river runners of today.
Weber recounts the fascinating experiences of those who have been drawn to the
wonders of the Colorado River. Featuring tales of the Powell expedition, the
ingenuity of the Kolb brothers, and the mystery of the Hydes disappearance, Weber
uncovers the centuries of human history buried in the walls below the rim.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Category: Social Studies: Strand 1, Concepts 1-7; Strand 3, Concept 4; Strand 4, Concept 1-6;
Strand 5, Concept 1
В Pauline Weaver and the Mountain Men of Arizona
(RS, SS)
This presentation explains who the mountain men were, how they lived, and why they
were in Arizona. Using a colorful presentation, Weber, clad in buckskins, focuses on
the life and times of Pauline Weaver, Prescott, Arizona's first white citizen, and other
famous mountain men who made their way through this territory. Using photos,
maps and filmed demonstrations, Weber explains the work these men did, the routes
they traveled, and the arms, tools and accoutrements they used for commerce and
everyday life.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Category: Social Studies: Strand 1, Concepts 1-7; Strand 4, Concepts 1-6; Strand 5, Concept 1
The Arizona Connection to Sacagawea
(RS, SS)
Beginning with a short overview of the epic 1804 journey of Lewis and Clark, Weber
then focuses on the little known history of Sacagawea's son, Jean Baptiste
Charbonneau. Jean Baptiste Charbonneau was born on the expedition, adopted by
William Clark, and went on to become one of the most interesting and foremost
figures in early Arizona history. Clad in period clothing and displaying the tools and
accoutrements of the time, Weber also explains what explorers and guides carried and
utilized as they traveled through the desert and wilderness territories.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Category: Social Studies: Strand 1, Concepts 1-5; Strand 2, Concept 1; Strand 3, Concept 1;
Strand 4, Concepts 1, 2, 6; Strand 5, Concepts 1, 2, 5
“Dear Emma”
(HA)
Surrounded by cargo, Weber presents as John Wesley Powell
writing a letter to his wife, Emma, the night before embarking on
his 1869 journey of exploration into the "Great Unknown."
Preparing to face the perils and the mysteries of the Colorado
River through the Grand Canyon, he contemplates what may lie
ahead, the colorful crewmembers accompanying him, and his
thoughts of when he will see his wife again. This presentation puts
the listener into the mind of a man who is both anticipating and
fearing his future challenges.
Todd Weber
A
t a young age Todd
Weber became
enthralled with the stories of
the fur traders, American
Indians and explorers in
American history. Through
years of reading journals and
studying historical accounts
of the fascinating characters
of America's past, he became
well-versed in the facts and
details of this time in history.
Along with being an artist
and jeweler, Weber has
worked as an Elderhostel
coordinator and instructor.
He now guides small ships
on the Columbia River and
in Alaska, and leads his own
tours, sharing his
appreciation for the stamina,
ingenuity, and character that
existed in those who helped
shape the American West.
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
Geography and Environment
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
91В В В Arizona's War Town: Flagstaff, Navajo Ordnance Depot, and World War II
(RS)
Just weeks after Pearl Harbor, the War Department announced the construction of a
massive ammunition depot ten miles west of Flagstaff. The Army rushed the $17 million
project to completion in a spasm of boomtown upheaval. One thousand Navajo and Hopi
construction workers stayed on to run the struggling new depot. Meanwhile, the Navy
halted plummeting enrollment at the teachers college by shipping in one thousand sailors
and marines as part of its "V-12" program. Then, the Florence prisoner of war camp sent
250 POWs to Flagstaff. The Flagstaff story shows the remarkable co-existence of
sometimes contentious ethnic communities and illustrates the results of military
expansion on social, economic, and community development in Arizona.
В Indian Labor: Navajo and Hopi Workers at Navajo Ordnance Depot,
World War II
(RS)
When 8,000 workers were needed immediately for the Army's massive construction
project ten miles west of Flagstaff at Bellemont, several thousand Navajo and Hopi
workers and their families signed on. The commander faced a myriad of problems and
quickly decided to invite the Navajo and Hopi families to build an "Indian Village" of
their own on the military base. Tribal representatives accepted the invitation and soon, for
the first time in American history, a community of about 3,750 Native Americans
voluntarily settled onto the military installation. Soon, working Indian women were part
of this cultural experiment. This story shows how the Indian Village experience set the
mold for future Navajo tribal leadership, yet also contributed to unwanted social and
cultural problems.
В Anchors Aweigh: The U.S. Navy at Arizona State Teachers College,
Flagstaff, 1943-1945
(RS)
By early 1943, college officials knew they were in serious trouble. Enrollment had
dropped to 80, seventy-six women and four men. Once closed, would it ever reopen?
College officials applied for every military program that might save the school. Finally, the
U.S. Navy sent 400 sailors and marines to the college on July 1, 1943. Part of the "V-12"
program, this group would be the first of over one thousand to be trained in Flagstaff. The
small, quiet campus turned into a military camp overnight. Bugle calls, drills, uniforms,
navy language, and discipline became de rigueur. This presentation discusses how the Navy
not only saved the school, but also left behind a legacy of new traditions and enduring
memories of a vibrant academic and extracurricular life.
В Flagstaff and the Austrians: World War II Prisoners of War at Navajo
Ordnance Depot
(RS)
In early 1945, the Army sent 250 Austrian POWs to Navajo Ordnance Depot. The
Austrians labored in all areas except those directly involved with munitions and they
provided valuable work during a period of severe labor shortage. At the same time, local
citizens protested against what appeared to be lenient treatment and the prisoners'
abundant supply of rationed items. Tempers flared and some flocked to the POW camp
to taunt the enemy soldiers. Conditions deteriorated quickly after V-E Day, when the
men were no longer considered "prisoners of war." Likewise, problems multiplied after VJ Day when it was obvious the men were not returning home anytime soon. They
remained until April 1946, and provided over 50,000 man-days of labor vital to the
Pacific Theater.
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
John S.
Westerlund
S. Westerlund served
J ohn
as a U. S. Army field
artillery officer for 26 years,
retiring in 1994 as a
lieutenant colonel. He
earned an M.A. in American
history from Utah State
University and a Ph.D. in
American history from
Northern Arizona
University. He is a frequent
contributor to the Journal of
Arizona History. His book
Arizona’s War Town:
Flagstaff, Navajo Ordnance
Depot, and World War II tells
the wartime story of Flagstaff
and won several awards. He
was a seasonal ranger with
the National Park Service at
the Flagstaff Area National
Monuments for 11 summers.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Native American
History & Heritage/Arizona
and the Southwest
92В В Understanding Culture and Building Community
В (RS)
Why do employees often struggle to work together effectively and consistently? Why
do many employees fail to make the most of their collective potential? In what ways
do racial, gendered, and religious notions and stereotypes erect silos and undermine
productivity? In this address, Whitaker will answer these questions and offer coherent
and practical solutions for leveraging diversity and inclusion to increase teambuilding,
innovation, and productivity.
 “Peace Be Still”: Modern Black America from WWII to Barack Obama
(RS, SS)
Based upon Whitaker’s new book of the same title, this presentation is a “concise,
engaging, and provocative history of African Americans since World War II; an
alternate history of the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. Organizing this
history around culture, politics, and resistance, Whitaker takes listeners from World
War II as a galvanizing force for African American activism and the modern civil
rights movement to the culmination of generations of struggle in the election of
Barack Obama.”
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies Standard: Strand 1, Concept 5
 “A New Day in Babylon”: Black Latino Relations
(RS, SS)
This address historicizes the relationship between African American and Latinos,
paying particular attention to the period between World War II and the present.
Whitaker emphasizes conflict and collaboration, and makes recommendations, based
upon historical precedent, for ways to improve Black and Latino relations, “especially
in regions in which these groups have a shared, and at times tense, past and present.”
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies Standard: Strand 1, Concept 5
 “And Ya Don’t Stop”: Hip Hop and American Popular Culture
(RS, SS)
This presentation will demonstrate that hip hop and rap is, as Robin D.G. Kelley
argues, “arguably the post Civil Rights Era’s highest form of creative, extemporaneous,
ever evolving form of communication and expression.” Whitaker will argue that it
developed as collective critique of the stigmatization and marginalization of black
youth, and has evolved into a transracial, multilayered, global analysis of perception
and power.
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies Standard: Strand 1, Concept 5
 “Can’t We All Just Get Along?” Historicizing Civil Discourse
(RS, SS)
Many observers have argued that America’s politics, and public discourse, has become
increasingly boorish and coarse. Is this true? If so, is it a reflection of society’s
devolution in general? In this address, Whitaker will place the notion of civil public
discourse in proper historical context, and reassure listeners that although we are
living in an increasingly ill-mannered period, we remain architects of our own future.
Matthew C.
Whitaker
M
atthew C. Whitaker
is Arizona State
University Foundation
Professor of History and the
founding director of the
Center for the Study of Race
and Democracy. He
specializes in U.S. history,
African American history and
life, civil rights, race
relations, social movements,
and sports and
society. Whitaker is the
author of Race Work: The Rise
of Civil Rights in the Urban
West and the recently
released Peace Be Still:
Modern Black America from
World War II to Barack
Obama. He has spoken
throughout the world, won
over 30 awards for his
teaching, research, and
service, and offered
commentaries on CNN,
NPR, PBS, and other media
outlets.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/African American
Humanities in Contemporary
Issues
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies Standard: Strand 1, Concept 5
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
93В В В Stories
of Cooperation
(SS)
This presentation uses traditional folklore stories and stories from American
history to illustrate the importance of cooperation in order to bring about civic
discourse and community engagement. Connecting the stories to their own lives,
students will explore their choices in different situations, how their participation is
beneficial, and the beliefs and actions that make civic engagement possible.
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies, Strand 3 (Civics & Government), Concept 1
В Voluntary Association
(SS)
In this presentation, Winebrenner acts as a modern-day Alexis de Tocqueville,
author of Democracy in America. His presentation will center on de Tocqueville's
observations of America, especially the critical importance of “voluntary
associations.” With different source materials as reference, students will be asked
how citizen roles in civic life have shifted (or not) since de Tocqueville's time.
Where are voluntary associations found today? Where are places that ordinary
citizens go to serve? How has the country changed? Why would the independent
sector/nonprofits matter in the political landscape?
Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies, Strand 3 (Civics & Government), Concept 1 and Concept 4
В What Can One Person Do? And How?
(SS)
Margaret Mead said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed
citizens can change the world; indeed it's the only thing that ever has.” Who were
these citizens then? In this presentation, students learn about different groups of
citizens who have engaged to make a difference. The focus of the presentation will
be on students brainstorming ideas for meaningful service projects for their
community, and reflect on how their own skills, talents, and interests can bring
that project to fruition.
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies, Strand 3, Concept 4
В An Ethic of Service
(SS)
This presentation aims to engage students in dialogue around civic service.
Winebrenner offers personal examples from his time serving in AmeriCorps, as
well as excerpts of famous speeches such as Washington's Farewell Address,
Kennedy's 1960 speech at the University of Michigan (where he called for the
creation of the Peace Corps), or Martin Luther King's “I Have A Dream.”
Students will use stories to connect these speeches to their own lives, as well as
learn more about service programs after high school.
В Speakers in the Schools Arizona Academic Standards
Social Studies, Strand 3, Concept 4
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
Caleb
Winebrenner
C
aleb Winebrenner is a
storyteller, teaching
artist, and community
builder based in Tempe,
Arizona. His work focuses on
empowering young people
and engaging them in civic
dialogue through playing
games, sharing personal
stories, and creating
performances. His
presentations focus on
sharing his passion for civic
engagement, the stories of
people who have made an
impact in their communities,
and the value of every person
– yes, even you! – in being a
part of the conversation
around issues that matter.
Law and Civic Engagement
Humanities in Contemporary
Issues
94В В В Ancient
Native American Astronomical Practices
(RS)
Throughout history, the ability of a people to survive has been tied to
environmental conditions. The skill to predict the seasons was an essential
element in the ability to “control” those conditions. Seasonal calendars became the
foundation of early cultures for hunting and gathering, planting and harvesting,
worshiping and celebrating. The goal of cultural astronomy is to understand how
these early skywatchers fashioned and refined systems for regulating their calendars
around celestial events, both cyclical and unique. This presentation describes the
diverse ways in which prehistoric Native American cultures perceived and
integrated the objects in the sky into their worldview.
The Billingsley Hopi Dancers
(RS)
In 1921 the Hopi were told that “church people” petitioned Congress to stop their
“pagan” dancing. A platform was erected on the U.S. Capitol steps where both Houses of
Congress assembled with their families to see the Hopi dancers. Following the
performance, Congress passed a Resolution giving the Hopi permission to carry on their
dancing “for all time.” The dancers continued to perform culminating in performances at
Carnegie Hall in 1955. The Verde Valley Archaeology Center and Hopi Tribe jointly
received a grant to preserve a rare 1957 film of the dancers. This presentation provides
background and shows the film.
Ken Zoll
K
enneth Zoll is the
Executive Director of
the Verde Valley
Archaeology Center in Camp
Verde. He is also a site
steward with the Arizona
State Historic Preservation
Office, and a volunteer
docent at cultural heritage
sites in the Coconino
National Forest. He has
conducted extensive
fieldwork in cultural
astronomy of the Southwest
and is a certified instructor in
cultural astronomy with the
Arizona Archaeological
Society. Zoll is the author of
several popular books on
cultural astronomy and rock
art in Central Arizona, as
well as several cultural
astronomy articles in
professional publications.
Culture, Gender, and Identity
Studies/Native American
AZ SPEAKS Master Catalog • www.azhumanities.org
95В About Arizona Humanities
Arizona Humanities (AH) builds a just and civil society by
creating opportunities to explore our shared human
experiences through discussion, learning and reflection.
Founded in 1973, AH is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization
and the Arizona affiliate of the National Endowment for the
Humanities. AH is not a state agency.
AH supports public programming in the humanities that promotes understanding of human thoughts,
actions, creations, and values. AH works with museums, libraries, and other cultural and educational
organizations to bring humanities programs to residents throughout Arizona. All AH-supported activities
must involve the humanities disciplines-history, literature, philosophy, and other studies that examine the
human condition.
Arizona Humanities Staff
Brenda Thomson, Executive Director
[email protected]
Julie Gavin, Assistant Director
[email protected]
Jamie Martin Bengtson, Programs and Grants Manager
[email protected]
Whitney Klotz, Programs and Grants Coordinator
[email protected]
Marilyn Murphy, Marketing and Communications Coordinator
[email protected]
Hannah Schmidl, Marketing and Programs Assistant
[email protected]
Updated December 15, 2014
Arizona Humanities ‫ ׀‬1242 N. Central Ave. ‫ ׀‬Phoenix, AZ 85004 ‫ ׀‬602-257-0335 ‫ ׀‬www.azhumanities.org
Notes:
Arizona Humanities ‫ ׀‬1242 N. Central Ave. ‫ ׀‬Phoenix, AZ 85004 ‫ ׀‬602-257-0335 ‫ ׀‬www.azhumanities.org
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