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The U.S. Department of Energy’s Ten-Year Plans
for the
Office of Science National Laboratories
Fiscal Year 2013
July 2013
Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................................3
Ames Laboratory ........................................................................................................................................................4
Argonne National Laboratory...................................................................................................................................17
Brookhaven National Laboratory .............................................................................................................................49
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory ...................................................................................................................79
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory .................................................................................................................95
Oak Ridge National Laboratory .............................................................................................................................128
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ..................................................................................................................171
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory ....................................................................................................................188
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory .................................................................................................................198
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility ....................................................................................................219
Appendix 1. SC Laboratory Core Capabilities ......................................................................................................233
Appendix 2. List of DOE/NNSA/DHS Missions ..................................................................................................237
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
2
Introduction
The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) is responsible for the effective stewardship of 10
national laboratories. The DOE national laboratories were created as a means to an end: victory in World War II
and national security in the face of the new atomic age. Since then, they have consistently responded to national
priorities: first for national defense, but also in the space race and more recently in the search for new sources of
energy, new energy-efficient materials, new methods for countering terrorism domestically and abroad, and
addressing the challenges established in the President’s American Competitive Initiative (ACI) and the Advanced
Energy Initiative (AEI).
Today, the 10 national laboratories for which SC is responsible comprise the most comprehensive research system
of their kind in the world. In supporting DOE’s mission and strategic goals, the SC national laboratories perform a
pivotal function in the nation’s research and development (R&D) efforts: increasingly the most interesting and
important scientific questions fall at the intersections of scientific disciplines—chemistry, biology, physics,
astronomy, mathematics—rather than within individual disciplines. The SC national laboratories are specifically
designed and structured to pursue research at these intersections. Their history is replete with examples of multiand inter-disciplinary research with far-reaching consequences. This kind of synergy, and the ability to transfer
technology from one scientific field to another on a grand scale, is a unique feature of SC national laboratories
that is not well-suited to university or private sector research facilities because of its scope, infrastructure needs or
multidisciplinary nature.
As they have pursued solutions to our nation’s technological challenges, the SC national laboratories have also
shaped, and in many cases led, whole fields of science—high energy physics, solid state physics and materials
science, nanotechnology, plasma science, nuclear medicine and radiobiology, and large-scale scientific
computing, to name a few. This wide-ranging impact on the nation’s scientific and technological achievement is
due in large part to the fact that since their inception the DOE national laboratories have been home to many of
the world’s largest, most sophisticated research facilities. From the “atom smashers” which allow us to see back
to the earliest moments of the Universe, to fusion containers that enable experiments on how to harness the power
of the sun for commercial purposes, to nanoscience research facilities and scientific computing networks that
support thousands of researchers, the national laboratories are the stewards of our country’s “big science.” As
such, the national laboratories remain the best means the Laboratory knows of to foster multi-disciplinary, largefacility science to national ends.
In addition to serving as lynchpins for major laboratory research initiatives that support DOE missions, the
scientific facilities at the SC national laboratories are also operated as a resource for the broader national research
community. Collectively, the laboratories served over 30,000 facility users and more than 7,000 visiting scientists
in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, significant portions of which are from universities, other Federal agencies, and private
companies.
SC’s challenge is to ensure that these institutions are oriented to focus, individually and collectively, on achieving
the DOE mission, that Government resources and support are allocated to ensure their long-term scientific and
technical excellence, and that a proper balance exists among them between competition and collaboration.
This year, SC engaged its laboratories in a strategic planning activity that asked the laboratory leadership teams to
define an exciting, yet realistic, long-range vision for their respective institutions based on agreed-upon core
capabilities assigned to each. 1 This information provided the starting point for discussions between the DOE/SC
leadership and the laboratories about the laboratories’ current strengths and weaknesses, future directions,
immediate and long-range challenges, and resource needs, and for the development of a DOE/SC plan for each
laboratory. This document presents DOE/SC’s strategic plans for its ten laboratories for the period FY 2013-2022.
1
A table depicting the distribution of core capabilities across the SC laboratories is provided in Appendix 1, along with the
definitions for each core capability category. Appendix 2 provides a listing of the DOE missions.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
3
Ames Laboratory
Mission and Overview
The Ames Laboratory (AMES) was formally
established in 1947 by the US Atomic Energy
Commission as a result of AMES' successful
development of the most efficient process to produce
high-purity uranium metal in large quantities for the
Manhattan Project. Situated on the campus of Iowa
State University, the Laboratory’s mission is to create
materials, inspire minds to solve problems, and address
global challenges. AMES is the premier DOE
Laboratory for research on rare earths and other critical
materials, and leads DOE’s Energy Innovation Hub for
critical materials research. Our scientific mission is
aided by the Materials Preparation Center, which
prepares, purifies, fabricates, and characterizes
materials in support of R&D programs throughout the
world. AMES performs research for the DOE’s basic
energy, applied energy, fossil energy, and
nonproliferation programs. Through work for others
activities, AMES conducts research for and provides
materials to the National Institute of Justice,
Department of Defense, various law enforcement
agencies, and corporations. AMES researchers have
won 18 R&D 100 Awards from R&D Magazine, and
lead the DOE Complex in converting its technology
into products (2011 and 2012 total economic
contribution of $1.1B). Educating future scientists is a
key component of our work; over 3000 Masters and
Ph.D. degrees in science and engineering have been
awarded to ISU students working on DOE-funded
projects.
Key areas of expertise are materials design, synthesis
and processing; analytical instrumentation design and
development; materials characterization; catalysis;
computational chemistry; condensed matter theory; and
computational materials science and materials theory.
These areas enable AMES to deliver its mission and
customer focus, to perform a core role in the DOE
laboratory system, and to pursue its vision for scientific
excellence and preeminence in the following areas:
• Materials research directed towards energy
technologies including optical, magnetic,
intermetallic, and catalytic materials; alternatives
for rare earths and other critical materials; studies
of high temperature materials and materials in
extreme conditions; and
• Analytical techniques and instrument
development to support energy research needs.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Lab-at-a-Glance
Location: Ames, Iowa
Type: Single-program Laboratory
Contractor: Iowa State University of Science
and Technology
Responsible Site Office: Ames Site Office
Website: www.ameslab.gov
Physical Assets:
• 8 acres (lease–long term, no cost) and 12
buildings
• 327,664 sf in buildings
• Replacement Plant Value: $76.8 million
• 0 sf in 0 Excess Facilities
• 0 sf in Leased Facilities
Human Capital:
• 310 Full Time Equivalent Employees (FTEs)
• 95 Joint faculty
• 51 Postdoctoral researchers
• 55 Undergraduate and 94 Graduate students
• 0 Facility users
• 5 Visiting scientists
FY 2012 Funding by Source (Costs in $M):
Other
DOE,
$2.9
WFO,
$4.4
NNSA,
$0.3
EERE,
$3.1
Other
SC, $3.7
BES,
$22.3
Total Lab Operating Costs (excluding
ARRA): $36.6 million
DOE/NNSA Costs: $32.2 million
WFO (Non-DOE/Non-DHS) Costs: $4.4
million
WFO as % Total Lab Operating Costs: 12%
DHS Costs: $0.1 million
ARRA Costed from DOE Sources in FY 2012:
$0.0 million
4
Core Capabilities
The Office of Science has identified 3 major core capabilities at the Ames Laboratory:
•
•
•
Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science
Chemical and Molecular Science
Applied Materials Science and Engineering
1. Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science. The Ames Laboratory is recognized worldwide for its
leading research in the theory, design, synthesis, processing and characterization of innovative, energyrelevant materials. Exceptional strengths in this core capability include rare-earth metals and alloys,
photonic-band-gap materials, metamaterials, magnetic materials, high-temperature superconductors,
correlated electron materials, and biomaterials. AMES is also internationally recognized for its ability to
grow high quality samples of unusual materials, which it distributes all over the world. To study these
materials, AMES’ condensed matter physics and materials sciences teams develop and use cutting-edge
techniques, including X-ray and neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and solid-state nuclear
magnetic resonance (SS-NMR). Computational methods such as quantum-Monte-Carlo simulations,
electronic structure calculations, and classical and quantum molecular-dynamics simulations are continually
being pushed to new limits for taming the complexity of material problems. Pioneering theoretical methods
with innovative numerical algorithms are being created to enable computational discovery of new materials
and to enable and to fashion materials by design using DOE’s significant computational resources. These
methods serve to guide experiments and reduce the time needed to develop advanced materials to serve the
nation’s energy needs. Additionally, novel methods for finding important data correlations are being explored
for material data-discovery where correlated data that are important are “discovered” rather than “mined”
based on preconceived relationships; unexpected correlations are the focus here. AMES continues to exploit
its ability to advance materials design by linking theory and experiment.
Shortages of rare earth and other energy critical materials have put the Ames Laboratory in the international
spotlight. AMES is home to DOE’s newest energy innovation hub, the Critical Materials Institute. Ames
Laboratory and its 18 partner institutions are focused on source diversification, material substitution, efficient
use of existing sources and the underlying science to meet these goals.
Major Sources of Funding: The Office of Science, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy the
Office of Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, and Work for Others.
2. Chemical and Molecular Science. Ames Laboratory interdisciplinary research teams develop and apply
theoretical, computational and experimental methods to study biological processes, catalysts, chemical
reactivity, energy conversion, and surface dynamics. World-leading research is conducted at the interface
between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis enabling the design of new catalysts that combine the best
characteristics of both. The Laboratory improves the understanding of molecular processes for energy and
security decision-making, and molecular design using new simulation and modeling techniques. These
methods are made available to other researchers throughout the world; our most popular code, General
Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System (GAMESS), has over 150,000 registered users.
The Ames Laboratory enables discoveries through the development of techniques to characterize a broad
range of materials at time scales and length scales never before possible. The Laboratory is internationally
recognized for advancing solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR), optical spectroscopy, mass
spectrometry, and single molecule spectroscopy. Our techniques are used in applications ranging from
bioenergy to bioremediation to national security. Fine spatial chemical analysis and optical imaging within
plants and solid catalysts are a forte of the Ames Laboratory. Recent discoveries resulted in a revised model
of plant cell walls and the first demonstration of enhancing chemical transformations by expelling the
byproducts from porous catalytic materials.
Major Sources of Funding: The Office of Science and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research.
1. Applied Materials Science and Engineering. The Ames Laboratory applies the knowledge derived from
fundamental computational, theoretical and experimental research to invent, design and synthesize new
materials with specific energy- and environment-relevant functionalities. AMES develops, demonstrates, and
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
5
deploys materials that accelerate technological advancements in a wide range of fields; from materials that are
keeping things cool in the European Space Agency’s Planck satellite, to a lead-free solder that is used
virtually in all electronics, to analytical techniques that can detect harmful chemicals in minute amounts, and
to a new material for more efficient transmission wires. AMES is world-renowned for developing materials
that improve energy efficiency and conversion, and reduce environmental impact. Our advanced titaniumpowder processing capabilities lead the world with unprecedented control over particle size and voiding, and
will have substantial impact on key advanced manufacturing capabilities and reduction of materials waste
during the manufacturing cycle (e.g., potential reduction of titanium feedstock-to-part ratio from 11:1 to
1.5:1). This technology has been licensed to the startup company Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies.
Key impacts of the Ames Laboratory’s work in applied materials science and engineering include catalysts,
ultra-hard materials, low-friction materials, special magnetic alloys, high-temperature superconductors,
powder processing for rapid and low-loss manufacturing, light-weight/high-strength materials and
engineering alloys that are responsive to energy and environmental concerns.
Renewed interest in critical materials and the recent announcement by DOE of the Critical Materials Institute
to be led by the Ames Laboratory has brought many industrial partners to the Laboratory. AMES is working
towards solutions in the science, engineering, and economics of critical materials to help assure economicallyviable processing techniques, new materials for clean-energy technologies, such as generators, motors and
lighting and magnets. We are working with key industrial partners to assure the availability of these
materials, develop new techniques to recover materials from waste and scrap or to find acceptable alternatives
to critical materials such as neodymium-iron-boron magnets.
AMES’ Simulation, Modeling, and Decision Sciences Program encompasses systems engineering and
impacts, for example, accelerated manufacturing. In particular, virtual engineering, simulation and modeling –
embodied in AMES’ integrated engineering design environment called VE-Suite – links together models,
detailed process simulations, data and real-time graphics to permit 3-D, real-time engineering design of
complex systems, such as next-generation power plants, efficient cars, and new video games. VE-Suite has
received two R&D 100 Awards. There have been 4,500 downloads of VE-Suite since October 2011 and it is
used daily by the US Army. VE-Suite has been incorporated into VirtualPaintВ®, a teaching tool that trains
spray technicians by users viewing and interacting with real spray application equipment while simulating the
actual application on to a virtual surface.
Major Sources of Funding: The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Office of Fossil
Energy, the Office of Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, and Work for Others.
Science Strategy for the Future
Reducing our Nation’s dependence on foreign oil and moving to a greener economy critically depend on the
development of new materials for energy production and efficient energy conversion. Agility in the invention and
production of new materials is the forte of AMES. From our scientific advances, the economy prospers with new
innovations enabled by novel materials that provide enhanced functionalities. Our initiatives build upon our
expertise, our traditional strengths and successes in materials development for energy technologies, and our
science and technology cornerstones. AMES couples advanced characterization techniques to reveal underlying
material properties and computational materials science to design desirable materials behavior. AMES has a core
contingent of scientists and engineers with the demonstrated ability to make transformational discoveries.
A key initiative continues to be materials discovery, design, synthesis and processing, with contributions from all
of our core science and applied engineering capabilities, including rare earths and other critical materials;
analytical instrumentation design and development; materials characterization; computational chemistry;
computational materials science; and condensed matter theory. With advanced characterization technique
development and implementation being a key strength and woven through AMES’ science and applied efforts, we
are advancing foundational methods the use of dynamic nuclear polarization for characterizing catalytic materials,
complex biomolecular materials and inorganic materials in materials and materials chemistry. The greener
advances for catalysis and energy is AMES’ initiative in specially designed catalysis more efficient energyconversion process streams for a cleaner environment. This initiative takes advantage of our expertise in
computational chemistry and chemical synthesis. The key science drivers and successes for our initiatives and
successful outcomes are discussed below.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
6
Mission Readiness/Facilities and Infrastructure
Overview of Site Facilities and Infrastructure. The Ames Laboratory strives to be a good steward of DOE
facilities by maintaining them in excellent condition with a long term viewpoint in order to maximize our ability
to support the mission of the Laboratory. While the facilities have been maintained in good condition, the
research buildings are all over 50 years old and there are limits to the ability to update them to support current
research initiatives. AMES has embraced the mission readiness process as a way to identify the mission critical
gaps in our facilities and infrastructure.
The basic strategy of this plan for meeting AMES' infrastructure needs is to design projects that address specific
gaps identified during the Mission Readiness process. By addressing specific gaps, our projects can be smaller
and easier to fund. However, this can create a patchwork of facility improvements rather than an integrated
facility improvement that meets multiple modernization needs. AMES will continue to pursue a multi-track
approach for meeting our infrastructure needs including projects supported by overhead, GPP, SLI, and LineItem. This flexible approach will provide more options and greater flexibility as AMES continues the dialog with
SC management concerning our infrastructure needs. Listed below are the key elements in our strategy and the
decision points that will affect the successful execution of the plan:
Sensitive Instrument Facility. This GPP funded facility will provide six instrument bays for high-resolution
microscopes and other sensitive instruments. We have received 55% of funding. AMES is currently in the final
design phase of the process. Decision Points: Further planning is impacted by the timing of receipt the remaining
GPP funds to begin the construction process.
Scientific Computing Building. This SLI or other Line-Item project to construct a building (~40,000 gsf) will
provide a comprehensive, long-term, solution to scientific and operational computing and computing
infrastructure needs. Decision Point: Ascertain if there is Program support for a comprehensive infrastructure
initiative through SLI/Line-Item funding. In particular this building will support Materials Infomatics, eDiscovery
and eDesign (MIneD).
Existing Facilities. We will maximize the mission readiness of existing facilities through the effective use of
maintenance and GPP resources. Decision Points:
1. Availability of GPP and maintenance funding for facilities and infrastructure.
2. Discuss with DOE the availability of IGPP funding for AMES to support needed capital improvements.
Table 1. SC Infrastructure Data Summary
Total Bldg, Trailer, and OSF RPV($)
(Less 3000 Series OSF’s)
Total OSF 3000 Series RPV($)
Total RPV($)
Total Deferred Maintenance($)
Total Owned Acreage
Total Leased Acreage
Site Wide ACI(B, S, T)
$76,792,393
$0
$76,792,393
$1,469,787
0
8
0.981
# Building
Assets
Mission Critical
Asset Condition
1 Mission Dependent
Index (B, S, T)
Not Mission Dependent
Office
Warehouse
Asset
Utilization
Laboratory
Index (B, T) 2, 3 Hospital
Housing
B=Building; S=Structure; T=Trailers
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
0.981
0.979
0
100
100
97.49
0
0
# Trailer
Assets
4
8
0
1
5
3
0
0
# OSF # GSF
# GSF
Assets (Bldg)
(Trailer)
0
1
280,825
0
1
46,839
0
0
0
0
46,991
0
25,798
0
233,834
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
Facilities and Infrastructure to Support Laboratory Missions. The Ames Laboratory is a Government-owned,
contractor-operated facility located on the campus of and operated by Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames, Iowa.
There is no federally-owned land at the site (See the Ames Laboratory Land Use Plan). Instead, the Laboratory is
situated on approximately 8 acres of state-owned land on the ISU campus under long-term, no cost lease. The
lease line can be adjusted to accommodate new Laboratory facilities in the future (see Attachment C). The real
property assets include 12 buildings that total 327,664 gross square feet. The three laboratory research buildings
represent over 70% of the total area and have an average age of 59 years. The newest research building in the
inventory was constructed over 50 years ago. The average age of the entire inventory (prorated by area) is 51
years. The buildings are highly utilized with an Asset Utilization Index (AUI) of 0.981. The buildings have been
well maintained over their lifetimes and are currently in good condition as indicated by an Asset Condition Index
(ACI) of 0.981. However, the research buildings were designed and built for the research needs and activities of
the 1950’s. As such, even though they are in good condition, they do not provide the effective and efficient
infrastructure needed to support current and future research activities at the cutting edge of materials research.
There are also two other real property assets defined in the Facility Information Management System (FIMS), an
electrical switch pit and parking lot. Staffing includes 750 people who work at the Ames Laboratory as staff,
students, or associates. Being located on the University campus, allows the Laboratory to take full advantage of
the infrastructure services provided by ISU, such as steam, chilled water, water and sewage service, compressed
air, grounds maintenance, telecommunication systems, and roads without the need for Federal investment to
construct, maintain, or recapitalize. The availability of these services allows the Laboratory to focus on
maintaining and operating its research and support buildings. The relationship with ISU also enables the
Laboratory to use space in University-owned buildings through a space usage agreement without investing in
permanent space or long-term leases. The Laboratory currently occupies 39,531 nusf of university space but, only
pays for 23,820 nusf due to the allocation of the space for DOE research. The balance of the time spent in those
spaces is for university related activities such as teaching or non-DOE research. However, a concern is Iowa State
University’s enrollment has increased 20% over two years from 25,000 to 31,000 and the administration has
announced plans to hire 300 new faculty. The Laboratory continues to work with the University on the
availability of space in University buildings to accommodate future growth.
No real estate actions were carried out in FY 2012. In FY 2013, AMES plans to modify the land lease between
DOE and ISU to accommodate building the Sensitive Instrument Facility at the university’s Applied Science
Complex site.
The Ames Laboratory is dedicated to providing facilities and infrastructure that will effectively support its
mission now and into the future. AMES strives to be an effective steward of the DOE assets entrusted to it by
managing them with a long-term view that is quality driven and is commensurate with the value and mission
impact of the asset; look at the life cycle of the assets; and utilize best industry practices. This management links
real property asset planning, programming, budgeting, and evaluation to program mission projections and
performance outcomes. Resources are directed to facilities and infrastructure in the context of the overall needs
and operation of the Laboratory to carry out its mission.
A peer review of the Mission Readiness Process was performed in July 2011, by a team representing SC
Laboratories and industry. The Peer Review Objectives and Lines of Inquiry provided a thorough assessment of
the planning process and its integration with the mission of the Lab. The review team presented a very favorable
assessment of the Ames Laboratory Mission Readiness process. The executive summary stated, “The Ames
Laboratory demonstrated a clear commitment to the Mission Readiness tenets; the processes and work products
offered as part of this review demonstrated implementation. The dedication of the Ames Laboratory staff was
evident from both the scientific and the support organizations of the Laboratory. It is apparent that all involved
fully understand the importance of facilities and infrastructure to support the core missions.”
The Mission Readiness tables (Appendix 2) provide a summary of the condition of the facilities from a mission
readiness point of view, now and into the future. These tables list the core capabilities and the investments
required to make the facilities and infrastructure meet the mission needs within the 10-year planning window. In
accordance with the definitions from the Mission Readiness Model, the Technical Facilities and Infrastructure, i.e.
the research buildings, are currently considered “Partial.” This means that deficiencies require minor resources
(work-arounds) to ensure achievement of mission investments to return to mission ready, and if capital, are within
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
8
the GPP limit. The Technical Facilities and Infrastructure can be upgraded to be fully capable through projects
that fit within the GPP limit of $10M per project. AMES is unable to pursue those projects without special GPP
allocations because the historic level of annual GPP funding is not sufficient (normally $0.6M/year, $0.2M in FY
2012). While projects up to $10M in size can allow AMES to improve our research capabilities, a line-item
project may be a more efficient and effective way to improve capabilities and capacity. Support Facilities and
Infrastructure are all rated as capable. The completion of the Spedding Hall auditorium remodeling improved the
Conference and Collaboration Space category from Partial to Capable. Major projects that are included in the
Lab’s improvement plan are as follows:
• Sensitive Instrument Facility – The Office of Science has allocated partial funding ($5.5M) for constructing
the SIF using GPP funds. This project is targeted to meet specific mission-critical needs identified through
the mission readiness process in dealing with the operations of certain sensitive equipment. Total estimated
cost for the SIF is $9.9M.
• Scientific Computing Building – This project is targeted to be funded under the SLI program. This building
will be designed to consolidate computational specialists and related resources into one facility freeing up
space in existing research Lab space. Total estimated cost for the SCB is $25M.
• Infrastructure Improvements – Efforts at AMES are supported by an annual GPP allocation from the Office
of Science typically $0.6M. GPP funding is needed to upgrade the capabilities of our existing research
buildings and support facilities to achieve mission readiness.
• Maintenance Projects – These projects are charged to indirect funding. Maintenance focuses on the everyday
needs of the facilities to keep them operational including utilities, repairs, and minor updates.
These projects are described in greater detail in the next section. The strategy of utilizing GPP, SLI, and overhead
funded projects to address specific mission needs will be effective at the Ames Laboratory, particularly for very
focused needs.
The level of GPP funding has limited management’s ability to improve mission readiness in the research
buildings. When the Mission Readiness process and the SLI programs were developed the rule of thumb used for
facility investments was 2% of replacement plant value (RPV) for maintenance funded from overhead and 2% of
RPV for improvements funded as capital projects (GPP). This would equate to $1.6M for each in FY 2014. The
Lab’s investment in maintenance has tracked this metric closely but the investment in capital improvements has
fallen far short at $0.6M normally and $0.2M in FY 2012. This insufficient funding level for GPP has multiple
impacts on the AMES facilities. Repairing aged building systems rather than updating them does not equip the
building for the needs of modern day science. System components begin to fail at a faster pace requiring a greater
investment in maintenance putting a greater strain on the science mission. Deferred maintenance increases as
facility investments fall short of the metric. Most important is that building controls needed for today’s science
are not implemented leaving our buildings with 50-60 year old control systems. With Office of Science-Basic
Energy Sciences (BES) leadership, the Laboratory would like to formulate a viable plan for the funding needed to
support the DOE-SC vision of improving all laboratories to enable research in the 21st century and beyond.
More general capital improvement projects are also incorporated into the Mission Readiness tables in Appendix 2.
These projects address more general needs in utility systems, security infrastructure (access control), safety,
energy conservation, and facility modernization. The general GPP program is described in greater detail in the
next section also.
Strategic Site Investments. The Ames Laboratory embraced the Office of Science SLI Infrastructure
Modernization Initiative that has the goal of the SC laboratories operating thoroughly modernized complexes by
the end of the ten-year period (FY 2010 - FY 2020). The modernized facilities will encompass the following
characteristics:
• Safe, Secure, and Environmentally Sound Infrastructure
• A Highly Productive Working Environment
• Efficient Operations and Maintenance
As part of this effort, AMES developed a modernization strategy. The 2011 and 2012 Laboratory Plans proposed
GPP-scale projects to address what AMES sees as its highest priority needs for consideration by DOE's Office of
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
9
Science. As a result, partial funding has been received for the Sensitive Instrument Facility. This project is
currently in the Final Design phase and will proceed to construction when the balance of the funding is obtained.
The following plan continues with that approach with a smaller line item project for a Scientific Computing
Building requesting funding from the SLI program. This project will leverage this investment by allowing the
laboratory to vacate space in existing laboratory buildings and repurpose it for research activities that require the
higher level of support utilities. Utilized space in University-owned buildings will also be vacated. We request
feedback on the relative merits of these requests.
•
Sensitive Instrument Facility. The Sensitive Instrument Facility (SIF) is a stand-alone GPP project that
incorporates site-specific vibration-isolation technology and design. The SIF will provide specialized
space for current and anticipated state-of-the-art instrumentation such as high-resolution transmission
electron microscopes and scanning probe microscopes. Current space within the Ames Laboratory is
marginally adequate for instruments presently in use and is unacceptable for today’s state-of-the-art
instruments. The project will address this critical gap as identified in our mission readiness process.
This project will build a facility with six instrument bays, wet and dry sample preparation labs, control
rooms, and staff support space. The electron microscope bays will provide vibration isolation, acoustic
separation and control, electromagnetic interference (EMI) control, tight control of air flow, and strict
ambient temperature and humidity control. The SIF design is organized to optimize the site and program
elements. In a compact, space efficient envelope, the building is planned to be approximately 12,600
gross square feet. Total cost is estimated at $9.9M.
Progress to Date:
• Initial GPP funds of $5.5M have been received to begin the project. To avoid cost associated with
phasing this project, construction will begin when all the funds needed for construction are received.
• A site evaluation was performed by a consulting firm assessing five potential sites with respect to
•
•
•
•
architectural considerations, vibration and electromagnetic interference, and a site has been selected.
Procurement of the architect/engineer services for the design of the facility was completed.
The project management plan is complete and describes how the project will be executed to stay
within the parameters of available funding (anticipated to be $9.9M) and under the hard GPP limit of
$10M.
The design team has completed the programming, schematic design, and preliminary design phases.
The final design is in progress.
Funding Risk: The architect/engineer team has designed a building costing under $10M that would meet
the needs of our research program. There is concern that delays in funding will prevent us from
completing this project as designed. With the economy improving building costs will certainly inflate
and the longer the delay in funding the greater the impact to the project cost.
•
Scientific Computing Building. This project builds a dedicated scientific computing building that will
house many of the research and support staff whose efforts center around computing and provides for the
current and future computing facility needs of the Laboratory. With our efforts to support the President’s
Materials Genome Initiative, and our computationally based initiatives that look for ways to reduce the
time needed to develop new materials, the role of computation continues to grow at the Laboratory. The
building supports the AMES’ computational and theoretical research and support staffs to enhance the
flow of ideas that comes from working in centralized space. We will dedicate a portion of the building to
housing high performance computers, to address our expanding computer needs, reduce energy
consumption, improve heat management, consolidate cluster management, and free up usable lab space
currently housing computers in space that was not designed as a machine room.
The current computational facilities, developed due to critical need without having critical infrastructure,
are filled to capacity and scattered throughout our facilities in space originally designed for bench science.
They lack the full complement of features that are part of modern computing centers, such as raised
floors, redundant systems, or energy efficient components. Without the project, new computers will have
to be installed in laboratory buildings not designed for computing. Converting existing laboratory space
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
10
to house new computers cannot be done efficiently. It fragments the computing and networking
resources, it over-taxes utility capacity, it does not allow for energy efficient features such as heat
recovery, it’s inefficient to manage, and diverts valuable laboratory space away from its designed
function. Having multiple computer rooms scattered throughout the facilities requires an excess of UPS
and HVAC infrastructure because spare capacity and redundancy have to be built into each location.
SC leadership encouraged AMES to propose an SLI project of $20M to $25M in line for funding in FY
2015. After reviewing the facility needs of the Laboratory and the gaps in resources, Contractor and
Laboratory leadership determined the next highest priority would be a facility to house the scientific and
operational computing. The project would fund a multistory building of approximately 40,000 g.s.f. that
would greatly enhance the research capabilities of the Laboratory. Co-locating research and Information
Systems personnel in the facility will facilitate coordination of data processing resources and
management. Housing research personnel and support staff in the facility would have additional benefits:
vacate laboratory space that has the full utility distribution and fume hood systems needed for
experimental research; allow the Laboratory to reduce the amount of ISU space that is used under the
space utilization agreement; reduce overcrowding in the Information Systems area; and free up space for
expanding scientific and administrative staff needs in existing buildings. Consolidating the Lab’s various
machine rooms and incorporating them in a dedicated facility will have energy conservation/sustainability
benefits. It will be a LEED Gold building. The facility will have greater opportunity for utilizing waste
heat from the machine room. Energy conserving features of the new building will allow the machine
room to operate at a Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) approaching 1.1. Current machine rooms operate
at a PUE of 1.7 to over 2.0.
In particular, the project would have direct impact on the Lab’s initiatives and core capabilities. The
existing core capabilities and the science strategy for the future continue to demand greater computational
resources. As ISU continues to develop the campus, there is greater pressure on suitable building sites for
the growth of the Laboratory. The multistory building meets the ISU standards for higher density
construction and would allow it to be sited adjacent to existing AMES research and administration
facilities.
•
Energy Conservation. The Ames Laboratory was unable to utilize funding for energy savings projects
through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) due to beryllium contamination discovered in
the three research buildings. The ESPC partner had identified projects that would generate savings of
15% in energy consumption and 16% of water consumption. The projects included stack lining, lighting
upgrades, and low-flow water fixtures. Though the ESPC was discontinued, AMES is using overhead
and GPP funds to complete the conservation projects. The Lab has completed the stack lining project and
is working on the lighting and water projects.
•
General Capital Improvements. Historically, our GPP funding level has been relatively constant at
approximately $0.6M per year, which is less than 1% of our replacement plant value. FY 2012 GPP was
initially funded at $0.6M, but was cut back to $0.2M during the second quarter of the year. FY 2013 GPP
funding of $0.6M has been approved. The limited GPP funding often necessitates doing projects in
phases over several years. Planning and managing these projects is further complicated when funds are
cut back during the year. A heating, ventilating, & air conditioning (HVAC) upgrade project in Spedding
Hall is currently in progress with existing GPP funding. This project will upgrade the existing systems of
heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) and makeup air controls in Spedding Hall to improve
the safety, reliability, energy efficiency, and flexibility of the systems. The existing system has been in
service for nearly 50 years and cannot provide the level of control, air balance, reliability, and safety
monitoring that is beneficial for laboratory activities. The total cost of the project is approximately
$3.2M, which is well under the statutory limit for GPP projects. But because the size of the project is
much greater than the annual GPP funding level, it had to be defined in phases over several years using
GPP funds that now stretch into FY 2014. Once the HVAC upgrade project is completed, GPP funding
will be directed to other projects as defined by our planning process. Projects will include renovations for
mission readiness; upgrade electrical service, Metals Development building; upgrade HVAC system,
Metals Development building; energy conservation projects; upgrade access control system; upgrade
Spedding Hall windows; upgrade electrical distribution, Spedding Hall; and upgrade of handicapped
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
11
access. The renovations will systematically take out-of-date research space out of service and completely
refurbish it to modern standards. Unused and underutilized space will be reclaimed and modernized. This
will provide the resources to restructure and reorganize space utilization to improve the work environment
for research operations and will consolidate research programs for more efficient operations. It will also
create the space needed to house new planned initiatives. In order to meet DOE’s general guidelines for
recapitalization at 2% RPV, GPP would be $1.6M in FY 2014. Annual funding at this level would enable
AMES to do a better job of modernizing existing facilities to serve the research effort. The complete list
of the GPP funding plan will be included in the Integrated Facilities and Infrastructure (IFI) Budget
Crosscut.
•
Maintenance. The maintenance program consists of maintenance and repair activities necessary to keep
the existing inventory of facilities in good working order and extend their service lives. It includes
regularly scheduled maintenance, corrective repairs, and periodic replacement of components over the
service life of the facility as well as the facility management, engineering, documentation, and oversight
required to carry out these functions. The facilities were well built and the condition of the research
buildings has been maintained even as they age into the later stages of service life. AMES anticipates that
we will need to continue to operate in these buildings over the 10 year window of this plan. To date, the
level of maintenance resources has been able to control deferred maintenance in the buildings. However,
looking forward, the combination of limited capital improvement resources and aging facilities will place
a greater demand on maintenance resources. Just maintaining the condition of a facility does not ensure
that it will continue to meet the needs of research activities. We anticipate that maintenance expenditures
will need to increase more than escalation to maintain and update the facilities and replace aging
components. For this reason we have increased our planning level for maintenance to exceed 2% RPV to
$1.7M in FY 2014.
•
Current and Planned Excess Facilities. There are currently no excess facilities at the Ames Laboratory
and none are planned.
Trends and Metrics. Performance measures are utilized to link facility and infrastructure performance to outputs
and outcomes. Broad-based measures are used so that a small sample of key results can provide a high level,
integrated grasp of the stewardship of DOE assets at the Ames Laboratory. The DOE corporate-wide measures
defined in the Real Property Asset Management Order are the Asset Condition Index and the Asset Utilization
Index. These values are reported directly in the DOE Facility Information Management System (FIMS) as well as
being incorporated in the Laboratory Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP). AMES continues
to perform well in the measures with high values for Asset Utilization and Asset Condition that continue to
improve, though it is important to note that even when old buildings are maintained in good condition, it does not
guarantee that they can provide infrastructure that meets the mission needs of cutting-edge research. This
observation certainly is reflected in an ACI of 0.981 but mission readiness ratings of “Partial” for Core
Capabilities.
The Ames Laboratory continues to improve and document our Mission Readiness process. A peer review was
performed in July 2011. The Peer Review Objectives and Lines of Inquiry provided a thorough assessment of the
planning process and its integration with the mission of the Lab. The review team presented a very favorable
assessment and found that the Lab was meeting the four Objectives of the Mission Readiness process. This year’s
mission readiness interviews with Laboratory Management, Program Directors, key researchers and Functional
Managers were led by the Assistant Director for Scientific Planning, the Chief Operations Officer and the
Facilities Services Manager. The input and insight obtained from these interviews was incorporated into the
Laboratory infrastructure plans. The process helps Laboratory management and facilities personnel to have an
excellent understanding of the facility condition and needs.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
12
Table 2. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments ($M)
Maintenance
DMR
EFD (Overhead)
IGPP
GPP
Line Items (SLI)
Total Investment
Estimated RPV
Estimated DM
Site-Wide ACI
2012
1.3
-
2013
1.7
-
2014
1.7
-
2015
1.7
-
2016
1.9
-
2017
1.9
-
2018
2.0
-
2019
2.3
-
2020
2.3
-
2021
2.4
-
2022
2.5
-
2023
2.5
-
-
0.6
2.3
78.2
1.49
0.981
6.7
8.4
79.6
1.51
0.981
2.8
29.5
90.9
1.53
0.983
1.6
3.5
92.6
1.55
0.983
2.0
3.9
94.2
1.57
0.983
1.4
3.4
95.9
1.59
0.983
1.5
3.8
122.6
1.61
0.987
1.5
3.8
124.8
1.63
0.987
1.5
3.9
127.1
1.65
0.987
1.5
4.0
129.4
1.67
0.987
1.5
4.0
131.7
1.69
0.987
4.2
5.5
Figure 1. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments ($M)
1.000
0.990
0.980
0.970
0.960
0.950
0.940
0.930
0.920
0.910
0.900
35.0
30.0
25.0
20.0
15.0
10.0
5.0
0.0
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total Investment ($M)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Site-Wide ACI
13
Attachment 1. Mission Readiness Tables
Core
Capabilities
Condensed
Matter Physics
and Materials
Science
Time
Frame
Now
Applied
Materials
Science and
Engineering
N
M
P
X
X
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
X
X
X
X
X
Action Plan
DOE
Note 1
-SPH. HVAC Upgrade (GPP)
-Sensitive Instrument Facility (GPP)
-Scientific Computing Facility (GPP)
-Renovation for CREEM (GPP)
-SIF (SLI/>GPP) Note 2
-SCF (SLI/>GPP) Note 2
-CREEM (SLI/Program)
SPH, HWH,
MD
Note 1
-SPH. HVAC Upgrade (GPP)
-Sensitive Instrument Facility (GPP)
-Scientific Computing Facility (GPP)
-Renovation for CREEM (GPP)
-SIF (SLI/>GPP) Note 2
-SCF (SLI/>GPP) Note 2
-CREEM (SLI/Program)
SPH, HWH,
MD
SPH, HWH,
MD
SPH, HWH,
MD
SPH, HWH,
MD
SPH, HWH,
MD
Note 1
-SPH. HVAC Upgrade (GPP)
- Scientific Computing Facility (GPP)
SCF (SLI/>GPP) Note 2
SPH, HWH,
MD
X
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
C
X
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
Chemical and
Molecular
Science
Mission Ready
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure - Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facility and
Key Buildings
Infrastructure
Laboratory
Capability Gap
SPH, HWH,
MD
SPH, HWH,
MD
N = Not M = Marginal P = Partial C = Capable
SPH = Spedding Hall HWH = Harley Wilhelm Hall MD = Metals Development Building
Note 1 The buildings are in good shape but are old and do not provide the modern infrastructure to serve current research paradigms. They cannot provide the flexibility, efficiency,
environmental control, and preferred working environment that is possible with new research buildings. Specialized space is needed for increasingly sensitive instruments, such as
electron microscopes. Existing space is not adequate because the vibration levels, noise levels and electromagnetic interference do not meet the installation requirements needed for the
instruments to perform to their capability. The computation facilities are filled to capacity so that expansion requires creating new space or retiring existing computers to create space.
Note 2 (SLI/>GPP) AMES has several projects that are needed in order to allow the facility to support the science planned for the next 10 years. The projects cost less than $10M each
and would qualify for GPP funding. However, AMES’ current level of funding ($0.61M) is inadequate to fund the proposed projects in a timely manner. Another option is to consolidate
the projects into one SLI project and execute them as separate milestones as funding becomes available.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
14
Support Facilities and Infrastructure - Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property Capability
Work Environment
User Accommodations
Site Services
Conference and
Collaboration Space
Utilities
Roads & Grounds
Security Infrastructure
Mission Ready
Current
N M P C
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure Capability Gap
Laboratory
Services such as recreational/fitness, child care, cafeteria etc. are
provided to the Ames Laboratory by Iowa State University in
accordance with the operating contract.
The age of the research buildings makes it difficult to provide
modern energy efficient preferred office facilities.
Visitor housing is available near the site by private enterprises. The
size of the laboratory does not support a dedicated visitor center.
Visitors are served by host personnel in existing laboratory facilities.
Many site services such as fire service, emergency medical and
library services are provided by offsite personnel or the contractor.
On-site services such as storage and shop facilities are capable.
Completion of the remodeling of the Spedding auditorium provides
state of the art conference and presentation space. The facility has
extensive A/V, networking, and distance learning capability. It
provides great flexibility to support different types of meetings and
presents an excellent image of the Laboratory to visitors and staff.
Utility services are provided by the contractor, the municipality, and
private enterprise. The Lab is working on projects designed to
conserve energy and make the buildings more compliant with DOE’s
sustainability initiatives
Roads and grounds are provided and maintained by Iowa State
University in accordance with the operating contract.
Fifteen year old electronic access control has been upgraded to
current proximity technology (FIPS 201 compliant). Coverage is
being expanded on the site to begin replacing pin and tumbler locks.
DOE
Systematic Space
Modernization (GPP)
Systematic Space
Modernization (GPP)
Energy Conservation
Projects (GPP/Indirect)
Upgrade Access
Control (GPP)
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
15
Attachment 2. Laboratory Site Map
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
16
Argonne National Laboratory
Mission and Overview
Argonne National Laboratory is a multi-disciplinary
science and engineering research center, where “dream
teams” of world-class researchers work alongside
experts from industry, academia, and other
government laboratories to address vital national
challenges in energy, environment, and security.
Argonne leverages its Chicago-area location to speed
the progress of highly promising energy technologies
from laboratory to marketplace by convening top-tier
research collaborations. In 2012, Argonne stood up the
Joint Center for Energy Storage Research Energy
Innovation Hub, a national consortium of labs,
universities, and industry focused on developing
revolutionary, commercially viable batteries for
transportation and the power grid. Argonne also hosts
two Energy Frontier Research Centers — the Center
for Electrical Energy Storage and the Institute for
Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations — and is a
major partner in the Argonne-Northwestern Solar
Energy Research Institute at Northwestern University
and the Center for Emergent Superconductivity at
Brookhaven National Lab.
The impact of Argonne’s research is enhanced by its
unique suite of cutting-edge scientific facilities, which
annually draw more than 5,000 users from around the
globe. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility’s
newly operational Mira — a 10-petaflop IBM Blue
Gene/Q high-performance computer — is one of the
world’s fastest, enabling simulations and analysis of
massive datasets that can yield perspectives on
worldwide climate change, optimize battery
performance, or model complex functions within a
single human cell.
The Advanced Photon Source, one of the world’s
highest-energy X-ray imaging devices, provides
extraordinary characterization capabilities that make it
possible to study samples in situ, in real time, and
under realistic conditions. The national user facilities
at Argonne also include the Center for Nanoscale
Materials, the Electron Microscopy Center, the
Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System, the
Southern Great Plains and Mobile Facility II
Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate
Research Facilities, and the Transportation Research
and Analysis Computing Center.
The University of Chicago has managed Argonne for
the U.S. Department of Energy since the Laboratory’s
founding in 1946, guiding its development into an
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Lab-at-a-Glance
Location: Lemont, Illinois
Type: Multi-program laboratory
Contractor: UChicago Argonne LLC
Responsible Site Office: Argonne Site Office
Website: www.anl.gov
Physical Assets:
п‚џ 1,500 acres and 99 buildings
п‚џ 4.7M sf in buildings
п‚џ Replacement Plant Value: $2,250 million
п‚џ 56,811 sf in 10 Excess Facilities
п‚џ 267,000 sf in Leased Facilities
Human Capital:
п‚џ 3,402 FTEs
п‚џ 163 Joint faculty
п‚џ 274 Postdoctoral researchers
п‚џ 148 Undergraduate and 664 Graduate students
п‚џ 5,525 Facility users
п‚џ 979 Visiting scientists
FY 2012 Funding by Source (Costs in $M):
DHS,
29.3
Other
DOE, 9.4
WFO,
90.7
NNSA,
78.8
ASCR,
61.7
BER,
27.6
BES,
224.8
NE, 27.1
EERE,
77.5
EM, 20.2
Other
SC, 52.3
HEP,
NP, 34.1 22.5
Total Lab Operating Costs (excluding ARRA):
$741.9 million
DOE/NNSA Costs: $636.0 million
WFO (Non-DOE/Non-DHS) Costs: $90.7 million
WFO as % Total Lab Operating Costs: 12.0%
DHS Costs: $29.3 million
ARRA Costed from DOE Sources in FY 2012:
$14.2 million
17
internationally renowned institution where more than 3,000 researchers and support staff work together
to address the most pressing scientific and societal needs of our nation.
Core Capabilities
The DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC) has identified 12 core capabilities that distill the scientific and
technological excellence that defines Argonne National Laboratory:
Fundamental Sciences
Applied Sciences and Engineering
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
Large-scale user facilities/advanced
instrumentation
Condensed matter physics and materials
science
Chemical and molecular science
Applied mathematics
Advanced computer science, visualization,
and data
Nuclear physics
Particle physics
Accelerator science and technology
Applied materials science and engineering
Chemical engineering
Applied nuclear science and technology
Systems engineering and integration
1. Large-Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation. Argonne is a leader in the conception, design,
construction, and operation of world-class scientific user facilities. In FY 2012, more than 5,400 visiting and
resident researchers used these facilities to probe the most fundamental materials properties and chemical
processes, advance the understanding of nuclear matter, and deliver forefront computational and networking
capabilities. Argonne operates five such facilities:
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
п‚џ
Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF)
Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM)
Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)
Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS)
Argonne’s internationally renowned user facilities support virtually the entire spectrum of DOE and federal
agency S&T missions as enablers of vital research performed by both visiting and resident scientists and
engineers. Funding for these facilities is provided primarily by DOE/SC-BES, -ASCR, and -NP. Some APS
instrumentation is funded by the National Institutes of Health and industry, and some ATLAS instrumentation
is funded by NSF.
APS is a unique national source of high-energy X-rays for scattering, spectroscopy, and imaging studies of
inorganic, organic, and biological materials. The pulsed nature of the X-rays allows time-resolved studies of
dynamics over a wide range of time scales (from seconds to ~100 ps), while the high energies make possible
experiments at extremes of pressure and temperature or in situ observations during chemical reactions.
Continued enhancement of the APS is required so that this facility remains state of the art. Working closely
with DOE/SC-BES, Argonne has begun a significant upgrade to the facility (the APS-Upgrade Project or
APS-U) that will keep the APS among the world’s best light sources. CD-1 for the APS-U Project was
awarded in September 2011, a CD-3a to start construction of the Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering
Beamline was awarded in August 2012, a CD-2 review was completed in December 2012, and we anticipate
receiving CD-2 approval by the end of FY 2013. Looking beyond APS-U, Argonne is exploring options for a
next generation hard x-ray source, to be planned in collaboration with DOE and other national laboratories. In
addition, construction is under way for the Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility, which will support
structural biology research and will be located adjacent to the APS. This project, funded by the State of
Illinois, will be completed in the fall of 2013.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
18
ALCF operates Mira, an IBM Blue Gene/Q system, one of the world's largest supercomputers dedicated to
open science. The facility provides petascale computing capabilities to the computational science and
engineering community to run the largest and most complex scientific applications. In addition to the user
base, whose investigations span all DOE interests from the basic to the applied — from fundamental materials
science to energy grid optimization — the ALCF anchors a wide-ranging computational ecosystem that
underpins every major research initiative at Argonne. Expertise resident to the ALCF will be critical to
advancing the major technology and design challenges necessary to achieve exascale computing capabilities.
CNM supports basic nanoscience research and the development of advanced instrumentation that will help
generate new insights into mesoscale science, create innovative nanomaterials with unique functionality, and
contribute significantly to energy-related R&D. The CNM combines advanced imaging and visualization
techniques with organic, inorganic, and digital synthesis; nanofabrication capabilities; and theory and
modeling. Imaging is carried out using a large suite of probe-based techniques, including an X-ray nanoprobe
beamline at the APS that provides fluorescence, nanodiffraction, and transmission imaging at a spatial
resolution of better than 30 nm, which is combined with scanning probe microscopy techniques. User and
staff science is organized around a single crosscutting theme: energy and information transduction at the
nanoscale.
EMC provides state-of-the-art, chromatic-aberration-corrected electron microscopy with applications to highresolution and three-dimensional elemental imaging and is developing new capabilities for in situ
environmental studies of energy processes in nanoscale materials and mesoscale systems. The EMC also
supports several user-accessible instruments for high spatial resolution microanalysis, field imaging,
nanoscale structural characterization, nanoscale fabrication and manipulation, and in situ studies of materials
under the influence of ion-beam irradiation.
ATLAS is a superconducting linear accelerator and the only DOE user facility for low-energy nuclear
research. It provides heavy ions in the energy domain best suited to study the properties of the nucleus. An
energy and efficiency upgrade of ATLAS is under way and scheduled for completion in 2013. In addition, a
unique new capability, the CAlifornium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) to ATLAS, is now delivering
science. CARIBU began its research program in 2012, first with so-called stopped rare isotopes and
subsequently with reaccelerated beams. CARIBU beams are requested in roughly 50% of all proposals for
experiments — underscoring users’ considerable interest in this facility.
2. Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science. The nation’s critical needs for technology advances in
energy production, distribution, storage, and efficiency are addressed through Argonne’s core capabilities in
the design, synthesis, fabrication, and characterization of nanomaterials, complex oxides, catalytic and
electrocatalytic assemblies, and other advanced materials. The objective is to create, understand, and control
complex materials with tailored functionality for uses in energy and environmental sustainability; and to
develop cutting-edge tools, expertise, and infrastructure. This set of expertise is particularly important for
advancing the critical frontier of mesoscale science, bridging the nano to the macro and harnessing the true
promise of quantum and molecular engineering.
This multidisciplinary capability encompasses the continuum from basic to applied research, integrating
strong programs in materials, chemistry, nanoscience, and biology that leverage Argonne’s APS, CNM,
EMC, and ALCF user facilities. Argonne’s expertise includes theory and modeling for materials design and
insight into properties and phenomena; synthesis of new materials, including bulk crystals, bio-inspired
materials, nanomaterials, films, and heterostructures; exploration of electronic, magnetic, and photonic
behavior; patterning methods, including self-assembly and electron beam lithography; and characterization
utilizing scanning probes, ultrafast optics, X-rays, photoemission, electrons, and neutrons, including in situ
studies. Argonne’s materials focus includes superconducting and magnetic bulk, thin film, and nanoscale
materials; ferroelectrics; ionic and electronic conductors; metal and metal oxide nanoparticles; bionanoparticle hybrids; nanocarbons; granular and soft matter; and catalytic materials. Argonne’s initial thrusts
in mesoscale science include theory and computational modeling and in situ research aimed at understanding
the evolution of mesoscale architectures in complex oxides and compound nitride semiconductors that are at
the heart of solid state lighting, power electronics, fuels cell, and thermoelectric and electrocaloric
applications.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
19
The APS-U will provide the greatly enhanced brilliance at hard X-ray energies necessary for real-time
imaging and scattering studies of materials synthesis and processing in order to provide new materials that
address DOE’s mission. Upgrades to the ALCF will enable an expanded program in computational materials
design and discovery at the atomic scale, nanoscale, and mesoscale and in modeling and simulation of
microstructure evolution at relevant length and time scales during the processing of advanced materials. This
work is complemented by new efforts that use transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as a threedimensional imaging tool to improve our understanding of materials microstructure and function.
Primary funding for this core capability is through DOE/SC-BES and is complemented by DOE/EERE;
ARPA-E; and WFO activities sponsored by DARPA, NASA, other federal agencies, and industry. EERE,
ARPA-E, and industry support helps Argonne move from discovery to applied materials science and
engineering activities, particularly in the integration of materials into novel architectures. NASA funding
leverages fundamental research in surface chemistry and trace element analysis for specific applications.
The condensed matter physics and materials science programs are Argonne’s primary mechanism for
delivering on a number of specific DOE missions, such as those to: discover and design new materials and
molecular assemblies; conceptualize, simulate, and predict processes underlying physical transformations,
particularly in complex materials with emergent behavior; probe, understand, and control the interaction of
photons, electrons, and ions with materials; advance the scientific frontiers upon which Argonne’s user
facilities are based; and feed technology programs at the Laboratory, particularly in energy storage,
sustainable transportation, solar energy conversion, nuclear energy, catalysts for alternative fuels production,
and accelerators.
Argonne’s Energy Sciences Building (ESB), under construction with Science Laboratories Infrastructure
(SLI) funding, will co-locate much of the Laboratory’s work in condensed matter physics and materials
science, chemical and molecular science, and chemical engineering. An adjacent building, the planned
Materials Design Laboratory (MDL), will enhance this consolidation and will be the primary home for
discovery and use-inspired research in the areas of materials synthesis, interfacial engineering for energy
applications, materials under extreme conditions, and in situ characterization and modeling. Together, these
facilities will support Argonne’s development of new materials-focused programs, including the Materials for
Energy initiative, which will support the “science of synthesis” efforts, and the UChicago-Argonne Institute
for Molecular Engineering (IME), which is a major scientific collaboration between the two institutions and
will pioneer growth of Argonne’s soft matter and quantum engineering programs. This year, the first three
senior hires into IME have greatly enhanced our capabilities in the areas of soft matter and quantum
engineering.
3. Chemical and Molecular Science. Argonne’s core capability in the synthesis, characterization, and control
of molecules and chemical processes is focused on transforming energy production and use. Thrust areas
include artificial photosynthesis; catalysis; combustion; interfacial geochemistry; heavy-element and
separations chemistries; ultrafast phenomena; atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; and the
conversion and storage of energy in batteries and fuel cells. The dramatic improvements in intensity and in
time resolution to be enabled by the APS-U are essential to Argonne’s in operando studies of catalysis and its
in situ and real-time studies of reactions at solid-liquid interfaces and to understanding excited states in
molecular energy transduction. Notably, Argonne’s catalysis programs benefit from collaborations between
theoretical and computational chemists and experimentalists and have developed computational approaches
for ground-breaking studies of electronic structures, as well as a unique set of in situ analytical tools for the
APS that improve understanding of catalytic systems under “real-world” operating conditions.
Synthesis is an essential component of most of the research activities in chemical and molecular sciences.
High-throughput facilities have been developed to increase the speed of synthesizing organic molecules,
inorganic chemical platforms, and mesoscale assemblies. By enabling the end-to-end automation of the
synthesis, characterization, and testing of new compositions, Argonne will advance the rate at which new
systems with new properties are discovered.
Other research priorities include the study of photo-induced energy and electron transfer reactions in natural
photosynthesis for a variety of biomimetic and synthetic systems. Studies to promote the synthesis of solar
fuels are carried out on multiple spatial and temporal scales using techniques developed at Argonne, such as
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ultrafast X-ray structural determination, high-field electron paramagnetic resonance, and ultrafast laser
spectroscopy/microscopy imaging. Research into the fundamental chemical dynamics that underpin
phenomena such as combustion benefits from strong collaborations between theoretical and computational
chemists and experimentalists. Experimental facilities in this area include several unique instruments for
studies of high-temperature kinetics and dynamics. New insights into combustion mechanisms are possible
thanks to the design and building of a totally new type of shock tube — specifically designed to work at
synchrotron light sources — that researchers will use to investigate combustion chemistry at conditions
relevant to the next generation of engines.
Argonne’s research in atomic and molecular sciences focuses on understanding the electronic response to
ultra-intense X-ray radiation from the world’s first X-ray free electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source
at SLAC, and on developing high-precision, high-repetition-rate methodologies for ultrafast X-ray probes of
molecular motion at the APS.
Interfacial science activities leverage the unique capabilities of the APS to probe interfacial structures and
reactions with elemental and chemical specificity to understand the reactions at mineral surfaces that control
transport of contaminants in Earth’s near-surface environment. Housed in purpose-built radiological facilities,
studies on transuranic systems aim to extend the fundamental understanding of the chemistry exhibited by
these heaviest of elements. Their underlying bonding and energetics are targeted, within the context of
separations relevant to nuclear energy, by using a wide range of analytics, including state-of-the-art laser
spectroscopy and X-ray techniques available through the APS.
Chemical, electrochemical, and molecular science are the cornerstone of Argonne’s advanced battery research
programs. Furthering our basic understanding of complex solid-state and interfacial chemical interactions has
resulted in breakthroughs that may ultimately enable deployment in hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and electric
vehicles. Importantly, Argonne’s battery research has successfully leveraged both the APS and advanced
computational capabilities to develop new understanding of solid-state battery electrode systems, soluble
electrolyte materials, and interfacial reactions that occur in advanced battery systems. Argonne’s expertise in
electrochemistry and electrical energy storage provides the foundation upon which we have built the Joint
Center for Energy Storage Research, the Energy Innovation Hub that integrates government, academic, and
industrial researchers from many disciplines to overcome critical scientific and technical barriers and create
new breakthroughs in energy storage technology.
Funding for Argonne’s Chemical and Molecular Science program comes from DOE/SC-BES.
4. Applied Mathematics.Argonne’s applied mathematics research focuses on optimization, partial differential
equations and algebraic solvers, and automatic differentiation. Work in these areas enables scientists to
accurately describe and understand the behavior of complex energy and environmental systems involving
processes that span vastly different time and length scales. Argonne’s research also advances key areas of
computational science and discovery through partnerships with applied programs and interagency
collaborations. Motivated by the sharply increasing complexity of the nation’s energy systems and the
increased variability in future energy sources, Argonne’s researchers integrate advances in optimization,
linear algebra, numerical integration, discrete mathematics, and uncertainty quantification to solve problems
that present simultaneous discrete, continuous, dynamical, probabilistic, and nonconvex facets.
Argonne has earned international renown for devising key concepts in optimization (trust-region methods,
filter methods, complementarity, and performance profiles) and for developing a number of leading toolkits,
including: MINPACK, Network-Enabled Optimization Systems (NEOS), MINOTAUR (for solving mixedinteger, nonlinear optimization problems), and the Toolkit for Advanced Optimization (TAO). Work on
NEOS and the filter methods won the 2003 Beale-Orchard-Hays Prize and the 2006 Lagrange Prize,
respectively. TAO, the first toolkit for solving large-scale optimization problems on high-performance
distributed architectures, was downloaded more than 800 times in 2012. Argonne is extending its expertise
into novel areas of optimization, such as stochastic, mixed-integer nonlinear, and derivative-free optimization.
The leaders of Argonne’s partial differential equations and solvers research have written influential textbooks
on domain decomposition and on spectral methods and their applications to complex simulations. Argonne
has also gained recognition for its superb software in this area. The Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific
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computation (PETSc), for example, is the most widely used parallel numerical software library for partial
differential equations and sparse matrix computations, with more than 44,093 downloads by more than 13,111
unique users. In 2008, PETSc was identified as one of ten noteworthy breakthroughs in computational science
funded by DOE/SC-ASCR; in 2009, it won an R&D100 award for the release of version 3.0; and in 2011, two
of the leads of PETSc shared the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for its development.
Argonne has also developed Nek5000, a leading high-order code for simulations of complex fluid flows that
has scaled to more than a million processes. Algorithmic or automatic differentiation, which originated at
Argonne in 1989–1992, was cited as one of the top ten developments in scientific computing for 1970–2000.
Argonne’s algorithmic differentiation program is considered the best in the world, and its three major toolkits
(ADIFOR, ADIC, and OpenAD) are used for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification in climate
modeling and nuclear safety analysis. Argonne develops open-source libraries for representing
CAD geometry (CGM) and unstructured and structured mesh (MOAB); the MeshKit library uses CGM and
MOAB and provides a suite of open-source mesh generation algorithms.
Argonne’s applied mathematics research is funded by DOE/SC-ASCR and specifically supports the DOE
mission for developing mathematical descriptions, models, methods, and algorithms.
5. Advanced Computer Science, Visualization, and Data. Argonne’s advanced computer science,
visualization, and data core capability is built on leadership in finding new solutions to challenges
surrounding extreme-scale computing; grid and cloud computing; and large-scale data storage,
communication, analysis, and visualization. Application groups worldwide use Argonne-developed software
on the largest supercomputers. The development of networking and collaboration tools is also enabling
scientists worldwide to work together using large-scale observation, experiment, and computation facilities.
Of particular note are (1) MPICH — a high-performance, portable implementation of the Message Passing
Interface (MPI) standard, which is used by the vast majority of scientific applications running on the largest
supercomputers in the world and is an R&D100 award winner; (2) Darshan — a scalable I/O characterization
tool used by the largest supercomputer centers to improve data storage efficiency and inform future designs;
(3) ZeptoOS — an extreme-scale operating system for leadership-class supercomputers; and (4) Globus
Online — a cloud-based data mover for large datasets.
Argonne researchers develop software that enables computational science from desktop to massively parallel
machines and advanced heterogeneous clusters. Much of this research software is deployed at the Argonne
Leadership Computing Facility, one of the largest open supercomputing resources in the world, as well as at
Magellan, one of the first scientific cloud computing testbeds. These two user facilities support many of the
nation’s scientific and engineering applications. The software is also deployed at the National Energy
Research Scientific Computing Center, Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, and at most large
supercomputers within DOE and across the world. Argonne researchers are heavily involved in developing
DOE’s strategy for and solving the scientific and technical challenges enabling peta-to-exascale computing,
including via our leading international partnerships with Japan and Europe. From the operating system to
runtime software, I/O subsystem, visualization and workflow support, Argonne provides key technologies
used by scientists worldwide. Looking to the challenges of big data, Argonne is exploring the management
and analysis of the increasingly large and complex datasets produced by the advanced DOE facilities.
Argonne’s advanced computer science, visualization, and data research activities are funded primarily by
DOE/SC-ASCR, with additional support from other DOE/SC programs and NSF through the
Argonne/University of Chicago Computation Institute and the Northwestern/Argonne Institute for Science
and Engineering. Much of this funding supports the interdisciplinary research partnerships of scientists and
engineers. Research teams for this core capability are located in Argonne’s Theory and Computing Sciences
Building, which brings together the practitioners of a broad array of computing and computational activities.
6. Nuclear Physics. Argonne’s research in nuclear physics has a long, proven track record in addressing the
DOE mission for basic research in nuclear physics, as well as the scientific goals prioritized in long-range
plans published by the DOE-NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee. This research supports the DOE
mission for understanding how protons and neutrons form atomic nuclei and how nuclei have emerged since
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the origin of the cosmos; understanding the fundamental properties of the proton and the neutron; and better
understanding the neutrino.
Key to Argonne’s work in this area is ATLAS, described earlier in Section 3 along with the Laboratory’s
other user facilities. Argonne staff and visiting scientists use ATLAS’s stable ion and rare isotope beams to
(1) highlight aspects of nuclear structure that vary strongly with the proton-to-neutron ratio and are not readily
apparent in stable nuclei, (2) investigate reactions far from stability as the basis of astrophysical processes
generating the chemical elements, and (3) test nature’s fundamental symmetries. The facility is equipped with
state-of-the-art instrumentation such as Gammasphere (the national gamma-ray facility), HELIOS (a
spectrometer for the study of reactions in inverse kinematics), ion and atom traps, and a fragment mass
analyzer. A gas-filled spectrometer is in development, and design studies are under way for a higherefficiency separator for the in-flight production of radioactive beams. In FY 2014, ATLAS will host the
national gamma-ray tracking array (GRETINA) for a one-year campaign in nuclear structure research.
Based on a californium fission source and a gas stopper, CARIBU, a recent ATLAS upgrade, delivers beams
of rare isotopes not available anywhere else in the world at energies relevant for research into nuclear
structure and astrophysics topics. This new facility started its research program in 2012, first with so-called
stopped rare isotopes and subsequently with reaccelerated beams. An Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) is
under construction with the aim of improving the charge breeding efficiency and the beam purity from the
CARIBU facility. An ARRA-funded efficiency and intensity upgrade of ATLAS is nearing completion. The
new radio-frequency quadrupole was installed in October 2012 and became fully operational in January 2013,
demonstrating the anticipated improvement by a factor of 2 in beam transmission. A new cryostat of
resonators with world-leading accelerating fields will be installed in summer 2013. Further upgrades are
planned, to provide roughly one-order-of-magnitude-higher-intensity, re-accelerated CARIBU beams and
stable heavy ions over the full energy range available at ATLAS with 10–100 pµA intensities.
To address high user demand for ATLAS beam time, a concept for multiuser capability is being developed in
which several beams of different species and energies would be delivered at the same time.
Argonne’s nuclear physics research program also strives to obtain a deeper understanding of the underlying
strong force and its basis in quantum chromodynamics as it applies to protons and neutrons (addressing how
quarks and gluons assemble into various forms of matter), and to the strongly coupled nuclear many-body
system. As part of large collaborations, Argonne scientists design, construct, and operate instruments at JLab
and Fermilab to carry out these investigations. Argonne’s nuclear physicists also are collaborating on key
elements of the Michigan State University FRIB project, including on accelerator systems and detectors.
Argonne nuclear physics is supported by strong theory efforts that leverage Argonne’s computer visualization
and data core capabilities, and by research in accelerator S&T — particularly in superconducting radiofrequency technology and beam dynamics. Additional applications include: characterization of spent nuclear
fuel for reactor design using accelerator mass spectrometry and total absorption spectrometry; new production
techniques of isotopes for medicine; and radio-krypton and radio-argon dating with atom traps for
geophysical, oceanography, and fundamental research.
The impact of Argonne’s nuclear physics programs in other critical areas of the DOE mission is illustrated by
fundamental research in atom trapping that has application in ultrasensitive trace analysis. An international
workshop on tracer applications of noble gas radionuclides held in June 2012 has identified a number of
important issues in geosciences that can be addressed with a dedicated dating center for krypton and argon
isotopes. A collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency is working to characterize about
100 major aquifers around the world using 81Kr dating. A second example is Argonne’s leadership in low-beta
superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity technology, a critical skill set that enables ATLAS to achieve
state-of-the-art performance and that underpins future plans for ATLAS upgrades, as well as other nuclear
physics capabilities within the DOE complex. This SRF expertise is being leveraged by APS-U as part of its
development of ultrashort pulse sources and also by high-energy and particle physics for advanced accelerator
concepts.
The DOE/SC Office of Nuclear Physics supports this research, with some contributions from DOE/SC-HEP,
and DOE/NNSA for accelerator R&D and detector development.
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7. Particle Physics. Argonne’s particle physics core capability supports the primary science mission of the
DOE/SC-HEP office with a proven track record of making unique contributions derived from Argonne’s
multidisciplinary nature. The research focus is on understanding the properties and interactions of the
fundamental particles making up the universe, the symmetries underlying the fundamental forces of nature,
and the constituents of matter. Argonne’s particle physics research teams are composed of theoretical and
experimental physicists, engineers, computing professionals, and technicians. The teams also include staff
from other Argonne disciplines, and this connection is used both to bring other expertise into particle physics
and to export expertise within particle physics to other disciplines. An important aspect of the program is the
development of fundamentally new technologies that will provide breakthrough platforms for future
instrumentation and future accelerators. Research in accelerator science is discussed in Section 3.8. Specific
activities in the various thrusts of particle physics research are detailed below.
Argonne’s efforts in the area of developing new or extending existing theoretical models include Higgs
production, as well as MSSM and SUSY predictions. These efforts are funded by DOE/SC-HEP and
supported by joint appointments with Northwestern University and the University of Chicago. A new effort in
computational cosmology has been initiated with two new hires who have already been successful in
exploiting their backgrounds and connections in the disciplines of theoretical particle physics, cosmology, and
high-performance computing needed for this area. This group has successfully formed a collaboration of all
HEP players in this field, whose SciDAc proposal was funded in FY 2012. The group (Gordon-Bell finalists
for 2012) has also initiated a strong collaboration with Argonne Leadership Computing activities.
Argonne is pioneering the development of new, large-area photo-detectors with pico-second timing resolution
(LAPPD — winner of an R&D 100 award for 2012); of polarization-capable bolometers for Cosmic
Microwave Background experiments; and of new, cheap, fast, radiation hard optical modulators. In these
efforts, connections to industry are important. With a particular focus on the LAPPD project, several Small
Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants and one Small Technology Transfer Innovation Research
(STTR) grant have been funded in FY 2013. This effort is funded by DOE/SC-HEP and is supported by joint
activities with Argonne’s Materials Science Division and the University of Chicago.
The development of large detector systems to study particle interactions is an area of great success for
Argonne. Of note is the Laboratory’s role in the design, construction, and commissioning of the large tile
calorimeter for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland that
enabled the discovery of the Higgs particle in July 2012. The Laboratory has also prototyped the NOvA
detector for neutrino interactions and has developed new instrumentation for astrophysics experiments, such
as the transition-edge sensor array detectors that were installed in the South Pole CMB experiment. Funding
for these efforts comes from DOE/SC-HEP and is supported by collaborations that extend worldwide.
In developing advanced acceleration techniques for future accelerators, Argonne has taken major steps in
expanding its dielectric two-beam Wakefield accelerator (DWFA) facility, with an extensive increase in floor
space and in power, so that gradients of order 500–1,000 MeV/m can be achieved and multi-stage
acceleration can be demonstrated. Argonne researchers are also developing a new, flexible, and novel concept
for a future generation light source based on DWFA having a small footprint and capable of supporting many
users. Another area of multidisciplinary research is the realization of layered superconducting RF cavities for
use in many accelerators for HEP and other applications. In collaboration with Fermilab, processing of ILC
SRF Nb cavities is performed in a specially designed Argonne facility. This work is supported by DOE/SCHEP, with funding from the DOD Office of Naval Research, and draws heavily on collaborations with
Argonne’s Materials Science and Physics divisions and the Advanced Photon Source.
To support the design and creation of software and computing infrastructure for very large data sets, Argonne
has supported creation of the ATLAS events and metadata databases, and has also facilitated worldwide
access to those databases. The Laboratory also led the Tier 3 development for all U.S. institutions. New effort
and direction were started on FY 2013: “HPC for HEP” has successfully ported — for the first time — large
parts of HEP simulation code, especially for ATLAS at the LHC to high-performance computing supported
by ASCR. Work is now under way to build on this capability to enable running of the large-scale simulations
needed to extract science from the LHC on platforms like Intrepid, Mira, and other world-class leadership
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computing facilities. This work is funded by DOE/SC-HEP and performed in collaboration with ASCR in
funding Argonne’s computer science component.
Argonne’s expertise in analyzing experimental data for insights in particle physics is demonstrated through its
work on MINOS analysis, CDF electroweak, and B physics analysis. Argonne HEP physicists played major
roles in the analyses of ATLAS data leading up to the Higgs discovery in 2012. They have also established an
ATLAS/LHC analysis center at Argonne, and one member filled the ATLAS/LHC physics coordinator
position, all supported by DOE/SC-HEP.
As evident above, although funding is predominantly from DOE/SC-HEP, Argonne’s high-energy physicists
leverage WFO funding as well as expertise from across the Laboratory to improve instrumentation and
accelerator techniques. Over the last two years, the division has expanded into an adjacent building to satisfy
the need for more office, laboratory, and conference room space; and Argonne has expanded the Argonne
Wakefield Accelerator building, which is critical for accommodating planned and funded research, as well as
for other synergistic accelerator R&D activities, including those in superconducting RF cavities. Argonne’s
computational science strategy also includes plans for addressing the frontiers in accelerator and nonaccelerator particle physics.
8. Accelerator Science and Technology. Argonne’s accelerator science and technology (S&T) research is
critical to the improvement of the nation’s accelerator-driven scientific user facilities, and contributes to
accelerator technology used in societal applications. The APS Upgrade described in Section 3.1, along with
upgrades of Argonne facilities in high energy and nuclear physics, leverage the accelerator research activities.
Argonne has notable accelerator design and development expertise that is of strategic importance to the
accelerator S&T community in the United States and abroad. For accelerator-based X-rays, Argonne has
significant expertise in modeling, design, and operation of both electron accelerators and free electron lasers;
undulator design, fabrication, and measurement; control systems; and vacuum chamber design and
construction. Codes developed at Argonne for X-ray facility design are used worldwide. Argonne is
continuing development of a strong and unique R&D effort in support of X-ray optics — a critical need given
the increasing number of hard X-ray sources, including the APS Upgrade. Furthermore, the APS has, within
its existing organization, a strong accelerator R&D capability.
For high-energy physics, Argonne plays a significant R&D role in linear collider challenges and is exploring
application of advanced concepts to hard X-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs). The Argonne Advanced
Wakefield Accelerator is the only facility in the world where two-beam acceleration techniques and
dielectrically loaded structures (a promising concept for linear colliders and X-FELs) are being developed.
Nuclear physics applications include creating, accelerating, and manipulating beams of rare isotopes and
developing high-performance, low-velocity superconducting accelerating structures. End-to-end simulations
for hadrons and heavy ions are carried out with new codes that take advantage of the Laboratory’s ALCF and
will be further enabled by its upgrades.
Argonne is a U.S. leader in the processing of superconducting radio-frequency cavities by techniques
developed for ATLAS and its upgrades. There is considerable interest, in the United States and abroad, in
applications of this technology to high-current hadron linear accelerators with energies in the MeV–GeV
range, including the FRIB at Michigan State University.
In addition to continuing the activities noted above, Argonne’s goal is to further leverage unique Laboratory
strengths to address accelerator S&T challenges. This goal has led Argonne to (1) concentrate on “cavity”based accelerating structures; (2) use materials science and other expertise at Argonne to understand surface
phenomena that currently limit performance; (3) improve surfaces by both standard surface treatments and
new materials synthesis technologies, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD); (4) explore new techniques for
cavity construction combining ALD and X-ray lithography; and (5) explore the technological challenges
associated with the acceleration and manipulation of very-high–intensity, high-power beams. These activities
are possible because of Argonne’s interdisciplinary culture and its materials and chemical science expertise.
Examples include the application of Wakefield Accelerator developments to photon science needs for an FEL
driver and the work performed on accelerator-driven systems for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel.
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Argonne, along with Fermilab, has developed a seminal program for introducing undergraduates to
accelerator S&T to help meet the overall needs of the DOE/SC community and ensure development of the
nation’s future accelerator scientists.
Funding for this core capability comes primarily from DOE/SC program offices that use accelerators for
research, namely BES, HEP, and NP. DOD and international laboratories also provide some funding. Future
plans are being evaluated for other synergistic accelerator R&D activities, including those in assembly and
testing of superconducting RF cavities.
9. Applied Materials Science and Engineering. Argonne’s expertise in the development, synthesis,
application, and engineering of scalable production technology for materials provides the foundation for
advances in next-generation technologies for energy production, storage, distribution, and use. This capability
draws on expertise from multiple divisions, including discovery synthesis in the Materials Sciences, Chemical
Sciences and Engineering, and Center for Nanoscale Materials; characterization at the Advanced Photon
Source; modeling and simulations at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility; and process engineering
and scale-up in the Energy Systems Division. Argonne’s applied materials science and engineering program
fosters the integration of basic materials research with DOE-EERE technology programs in areas such as
electrical energy storage, solar energy conversion, solid state lighting, catalysis, biofuels, wide bandgap
semiconductors, advanced manufacturing for traditional and emerging industries and other applications to
improve energy efficiency. The APS-Upgrade will provide new capabilities for real-time interrogation of
scalable process technologies and thus shorten the time to deployment of novel, efficient materials production
approaches.
Achieving cost and performance goals in traditional and transformational energy technologies requires
innovations in both new materials as well as scalable processes for the production and application of those
materials. For example, Argonne is developing superhard nanocomposite diamond and diamond-like carbon
coatings to provide low friction and increased wear resistance for automotive drivetrain applications and wind
turbine gearbox components, using modified plasma coating technology for volume production. Argonne’s
diverse program in atomic layer deposition includes extending this technology to applications ranging from
high-performance catalysts for the chemical industry to more efficient solar cells and solid-state lighting
based on abundant materials, such as TiO2, ZnO, and Cu2S. Argonne bridges the gap between research and
commercialization by advancing the necessary process engineering research to help ensure that these
materials and processes for coating large-area planar substrates, as well as micro- and nanoparticles, can be
deployed cost effectively.
Argonne’s applied materials science and engineering capabilities also include development of new materials
for energy storage technologies, particularly advanced batteries and ultracapacitors focused on transportation
applications, and organic and inorganic membrane materials and systems for gas- and liquid-phase separation
for applications such as hydrogen production, carbon dioxide separation, and biofuels processing. Argonne
completed the construction of its new Materials Engineering Research Facility (a 10,000-ft2 facility) in
FY 2012. This state-of-the-art facility provides the capability to conduct process R&D for the development of
“production ready” process technology for advanced materials. Argonne is also advancing a
nanomanufacturing capability with the objective of developing the engineering capability necessary to
transition nanomaterials to commercial processes for applications including nanocatalysts, thermal nanofluids,
nanolubricants, solar cells, flat-panel displays, and large-area detectors, and RF cavities for particle
accelerators.
Whereas DOE/SC-BES funds development of basic materials, funding for Argonne’s applied materials
science and engineering research is primarily provided by DOE/EERE program offices, including the
Advanced Manufacturing Office, the Vehicle Technologies Program, the Biomass Program, the Fuel Cell
Technologies Program, and the Solar and Wind Programs. DOE funding is often complemented by costshared funding from industry to enable a transition of research to sustainable domestic manufacturing
capability for advanced energy technologies.
10. Chemical Engineering. Chemical engineering research at Argonne is at the forefront of solving the nation’s
energy and security challenges, by both receiving and informing our basic energy research and demonstrating
transformational technologies for electrochemical energy storage, nuclear energy, nonproliferation, and
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radiological forensics. Argonne’s advanced battery program has been a hub of activity supporting an
integrated innovation pipeline since the late 1960s and is responsible for a large portfolio of intellectual
property.
Argonne research programs are expanding technologies in advanced battery chemistries for demonstration in
internally fabricated and sealed cells with comprehensive post-test diagnostics. A key component of the
Argonne battery research program is a state-of-the-art dry room, which enables research on commercial-grade
cells both to validate performance and understand transformations during use. The Battery Post-Test Facility
allows scientists to analyze battery components after use to identify the exact mechanisms that limit the life of
battery cells. This facility is one of the few in the world capable of conducting this post-mortem research on
battery cells. Combined with Argonne’s Applied Materials Science and Engineering capabilities described
above, the coupling of basic materials R&D with the ability to scale materials to a pre-pilot level, incorporate
the materials in commercial-grade cells, run them through a battery of tests, and then analyze the materials
down to the molecular scale is unique in the DOE complex. This set of engineering capabilities is intended to
be accessible to external organizations; that is, non-Argonne programs developing battery materials and
chemistries can leverage these capabilities, further enhancing U.S. competitiveness in the area of advanced
battery development and manufacturing.
A crosscutting effort at the Laboratory is developing advanced membranes, electrodes, and electrocatalysts
that reduce the cost and improve the durability of fuel cells based on both solid oxide and polymer electrolyte
membrane technologies.
Researchers in the Argonne Chemical Engineering program also continue to pioneer separations chemistry for
nuclear fuel processing and have become increasingly active in advancing the security of nuclear processing
and the capability for responding to a radiological dispersal event. Argonne is a leader in the development of
methods for medical isotope separation (e.g., Mo-99), is exploring alternative methods for isotope production,
and is participating in the conversion of foreign and domestic test reactors from HEU to LEU fuel. In
addition, Argonne is leveraging its electron linac accelerator expertise and isotope separations technologies to
develop processes to generate research samples of Cu-67. A stable, economical supply of Cu-67 has not been
established, thereby hampering progress in using this isotope as an effective radioimmunotherapy reagent.
One promising application of Cu-67 is in the treatment of Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.
Funding for these programs is provided by DOE/EERE programs in Vehicle Technologies, Fuel Cells, Solar
Energy, and Biomass; DOE Nuclear Energy; and the NNSA, DOD, and DHS. Collectively, these research
activities support agency missions in isotope production, next-generation nuclear energy technologies,
safeguards by design, energy storage, vehicle technologies, energy systems optimization, nonproliferation,
and chemical defense.
11. Applied Nuclear Science and Technology. With extensive experience in nuclear reactor and fuel cycle
R&D, Argonne is a technical leader in advancing nuclear energy as an affordable, safe, and environmentally
clean energy source. Argonne’s nuclear science and technology expertise also positions it to support key
national objectives related to managing used nuclear fuel; securing the disposition of fissile materials and
nuclear waste; and controlling safety, proliferation, and nuclear materials security risks as the use of nuclear
energy expands around the world.
Argonne’s scientific user facilities, particularly the APS and EMC, provide unique capabilities for in situ
characterization of nuclear energy materials and processes. The ALCF is a major resource for high-fidelity
simulation of nuclear energy systems. Radiological laboratories at Argonne enable materials research and
analytical chemistry on a range of activated materials and radioisotopes in various matrices. Engineering
development laboratories enable detailed studies of nuclear reactor components under prototypic conditions
through the engineering scale. Coupled with Argonne’s world-class expertise in nuclear engineering,
materials science, and separations science, these facilities are major national assets for obtaining improved
understanding of the operating behavior of nuclear reactors and fuel-cycle systems.
Argonne is well positioned to make essential contributions to DOE/NE programs aimed at sustaining the safe
operation of existing light water reactors; addressing the challenges of used nuclear fuel and nuclear materials
management; and advancing the design, licensing, and construction of new reactors such as small modular
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reactors. This expertise also uniquely positions Argonne to (1) lead the assessment and conceptual
development of innovative reactors operating with a variety of neutron energy spectra, coolant types, and
fuel-cycle schemes; (2) partner with industry in developing and commercializing innovative nuclear systems;
and (3) support U.S. engagement of other nations in cooperative research and assessments aimed at advancing
the safety and security of nuclear energy systems worldwide.
Capabilities to examine and characterize irradiated fuels and materials under diverse service conditions are
essential for confirming reactor safety. These capabilities support the NRC by enhancing the technical basis
for its regulation of existing plants’ operations and of industry initiatives to optimize power generation,
increase fuel burnup, and extend plant lifetime.
Argonne’s capabilities in applied nuclear S&T are also applied to critical national security and
nonproliferation needs, including the conversion of research reactors to low-enrichment fuels, nuclear
materials management, safeguards, technology export control, risk and vulnerability assessments, and modern
information systems. These efforts are vital for the national security and nonproliferation missions of the
NNSA and other federal agencies.
Sensor and detector development expertise at Argonne also supports national programs in border, cargo, and
transportation security, as well as chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear incident mitigation and
management. Examples include millimeter wave technologies for remote detection and sensors and forensics
to identify sources of nuclear and biological materials. These capabilities support DHS, as well as the needs of
the NNSA and several agencies of the DOD, including DIA and DTRA.
12. Systems Engineering and Integration. Moving a robust, mission-driven research program toward
commercial deployment requires a strong applied R&D program that focuses on the demonstration and
deployment of critical energy technologies. Argonne’s capstone R&D programs are supported by crosscutting
systems engineering and integration research that supports an integrated systems approach to technology
development.
Argonne’s staff conducts research from basic science through engineering to system deployment, often with
multidisciplinary research teams that include physical and biological scientists, engineers, computational
scientists, social scientists, and decision analysts. In addition, Argonne maintains a unique set of facilities that
support integrated systems research, such as (1) the APS, used to study the physics and chemistry of
combustion in automotive engines; (2) high-performance computers, used to model engine function and
performance; and (3) the Center for Transportation Research (CTR), which conducts experimental research
on vehicle systems and life cycle analyses.
Argonne’s agent-based modeling capability, a cross-cutting computational technology that has been used to
address many problem domains related to energy systems analysis and national security, is world renowned
for helping to solve some of the great challenges in electric power system behavior, market acceptance of
advanced technology, and homeland security system operation.
Funding for Argonne’s systems engineering and integration research comes from many DOE sources,
including DOE/SC-BER, -BES, and -ASCR (e.g., for basic research on climate change, advanced materials,
and high-performance computing, respectively); DOE/NE’s Generation IV, fuel cycle R&D, and international
programs (e.g., for research on the nuclear fuel cycle); DOE/EERE’s biomass, geothermal, hydrogen, vehicle,
wind and hydropower, and industrial and building technologies programs (e.g., for research on transportation
technologies, such as electrification, as well as wind and hydropower); DOE/OE’s advanced grid modeling
program (e.g., for research on power grid computing and electrical transmission planning); and DOE/OPIA
(e.g., for research on the rare earth elements supply chain).
Argonne’s work in this area is also supported by multiple WFO sources, including the DHS Science and
Technology Directorate, its National Protection and Programs Directorate, and FEMA (e.g., for research on
critical infrastructure protection, command-and-control systems for responding to weapons of mass
destruction, and emergency preparedness for catastrophic events); DOD’s Army, Navy, Air Force, DIA,
DTRA, Joint Staff, and USTRANSCOM (e.g., for logistics planning, life cycle systems analysis, and
information technology); and private entities such as GE Healthcare (e.g., for forecasting a population’s future
healthcare and healthcare infrastructure requirements).
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
28
Many of the products of this research have been operationally deployed by the supporting agencies both for
their own use and for commercial applications. This work supports the mission of integrating research work
across multiple DOE, DHS, and DOD organizations to advance their contributions to energy, environmental,
and national security missions.
Science Strategy for the Future
Argonne’s vision is to deliver innovative basic and applied research leveraging the laboratory’s worldclass facilities to solve grand challenges in basic science, energy, environment, and security. The
Laboratory continues to pursue a series of major initiatives that ensure the continued development and
upgrade of its world-leading facilities, as well as producing transformative, high-impact science and
technology for both discovery and the developing of next-generation energy and security technologies.
The DOE National Laboratory complex is charged by DOE in its strategic plan to help maintain a
vibrant U.S. effort in science and engineering, with a focus on transforming energy systems that position
the United States to be a leader in developing clean energy technologies. Argonne’s major initiatives
may be grouped into three integrated research areas that support the common vision: discovery science,
energy innovation, and enabling science and technology. Argonne’s discovery science initiatives focus
on extending the knowledge base of the natural world in fundamental physics, materials for energy
applications, computer science and math, and biological and environmental systems. Innovation in
energy technologies is driven by initiatives in electrical energy storage, sustainable transportation, and
nuclear energy. Many of these research activities rely on modern tools and facilities, for which Argonne
supports major initiatives in hard X-ray science — including upgrade of the Advanced Photon Source —
and in computing and computational science research that leverages the newly operational Mira, IBM’s
next-generation Blue Gene/Q supercomputer.
None of Argonne’s research portfolio would exist without a strong supporting staff and 21st century
facilities. The Laboratory’s Argonne NEXT initiative will coalesce efforts for both the physical and
virtual environments that enable an engaged community to competitively perform world-class research.
Mission Readiness/Facilities and Infrastructure
Overview of Site Facilities and Infrastructure. Argonne National Laboratory is a 1,500-acre, federally owned
site in DuPage County, Illinois, and is overseen by the DOE/SC. The site is located about 25 miles southwest of
Chicago and accommodates approximately 4,700 persons (including DOE employees, contractors, facility users,
and guests). The Laboratory is surrounded by Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve, a 2,470-acre greenbelt. The
Argonne site includes 99 buildings having 4.7 million total square feet (or gross square feet [GSF]) of floor space.
The site also includes New Brunswick Laboratory, a DOE-operated facility, as well as the University of Chicagooperated Howard T. Ricketts Regional Biocontainment Laboratory. In addition, roughly 267,000 ft2 of space is
leased, approximately 240,000 ft2 of which — Building 240, the Theory and Computing Sciences (TCS) facility
— is located adjacent to the main entrance to the site.
As shown in Table 2, the replacement value of existing facilities and other structures at Argonne is estimated to
exceed $2.32 billion. The average age of the facilities is 39.7 years, with more than 64% of the facilities more
than 40 years old. Argonne facilities are roughly 97% occupied. The asset utilization index (AUI) values related
to use-specific measures exceed the DOE goals for the laboratory, warehouse, and housing use types. The current
overall asset condition index (ACI) is 0.954 (“good”). The ACI for buildings is 0.943 (“adequate”). The ACI for
other infrastructure, including site utilities (electrical power, water, sewers, and steam) and civil infrastructure
(roads, parking, and walks), is 0.98 (“good”). The ACI is based on identified deferred maintenance as it relates to
the estimated plant replacement value.
The current Land Use Plan has been provided to DOE/ASO. There are no real estate actions, including new (or
renewal) leases of 10,000 ft2 or more or disposals of DOE land via leasing, sale, or gift, planned for FY 2013 or
FY 2014. The Land Use Plan may be accessed via the Argonne Intranet.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
29
Table 1. SC Infrastructure Data Summary
Total Bldg, Trailer, and OSF RPV($)
(Less 3000 Series OSF’s)
Total OSF 3000 Series RPV($)
Total RPV($)
Total Deferred Maintenance($)
Total Owned Acreage
Total Leased Acreage
Site Wide ACI(B, S, T)
$2,322,354,859
$487,364,578
$2,809,719, 437
$128,655,632
1,508.32
574.11
0.945
# Building
Assets
48
39
11
9
14
44
0
9
# Trailer # OSF
Assets Assets
0
51
0
27
0
9
0
0
0
0
0
# GSF
(Bldg)
3,679,434
827,742
72,619
493,535
227,252
3,272,261
0
170,886
0.948
Mission Critical
Asset Condition
0.906
Mission
Dependent
Index (B, S, T) 1
0.994
Not Mission Dependent
90.29
Office
92.69
Warehouse
Asset
95.91
Utilization
Laboratory
Index (B, T) 2, 3 Hospital
0
100
Housing
B=Building; S=Structure; T=Trailers
1
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings, Trailers, and OSF’s (excludes series 3000 OSF’s).
2
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings and Trailers.
3
Only includes assets with usage codes that fall into these 5 FRPC categories. Other usage types are not included.
# GSF
(Trailer)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Facilities and Infrastructure to Support Laboratory Missions. Argonne’s ongoing challenge is to revitalize
and reshape its existing facilities and infrastructure to meet the current and emerging needs of scientific missions.
This challenge includes ensuring compliance with standards of environmental performance and safety and
eliminating legacy waste and obsolete facilities, while optimizing operating and maintenance costs. The Argonne
physical site has few constraints to expanding the Laboratory’s role in 21st century research beyond the need for
modern, flexible, multi-program research facilities and the elimination of outdated and legacy buildings. These
actions are crucial to allowing the Laboratory to meet the functional and economic performance requirements
associated with evolving programmatic needs and emerging technologies.
Argonne’s mission is executed through twelve core capabilities and eight major initiatives with broad support
from a professional operations staff. Charts 1a–1j and Chart 2 at the end of this section (i.e., the information
provided for the mission-ready templates) provide an overview of the condition evaluation of the existing
facilities and infrastructure in the context of the core capabilities; the charts also identify the associated
investments and actions needed to ensure mission readiness. For brevity, only larger investments are discussed.
Strategic Site Investments. Argonne has developed a structured site modernization plan to provide a productive,
safe, secure, and environmentally sound workplace that will efficiently and effectively support its core
capabilities. Needs identified in the plan were prioritized, with the timing and sequencing of actions chosen to
optimize the benefits and leverage the resources available for execution. The investments in the near term
(i.e., within the next five years) are discussed by program or funding type. The pre-conceptual locations of the
recommended actions are summarized in the map attached in Appendix 2 and entitled “Projected 10-Year Status,
FY 2013 Annual Laboratory Plan.” Argonne’s modernization program has evolved through a combination of
laboratory strategic planning and mission readiness review. The modernization projects will replace or rehabilitate
aging and inadequate facilities and infrastructure, which severely constrain the ability to deliver much-needed
innovative research and technologies.
Argonne requires significant recapitalization to replace many of the original multi-program scientific facilities and
thus to ensure the continued readiness of the facilities and infrastructure to support the core capabilities. The 10to 15-year planning horizon includes initiation of four major DOE Office of Science (SLI)-funded buildings, plus
related infrastructure rehabilitation, that will enable Argonne to move forward with the disposal of the most
seriously outmoded and ineffective buildings in the 200 Area.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
30
Argonne has successfully partnered with the State of Illinois to realize its goals of building facilities focused on
specific business lines, including the Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility (APCF). The site modernization
plan relies on DOE/EM funding for disposition of the buildings replaced by the DOE SLI projects (and other
contaminated facilities) to avoid the continued high costs of operations and eliminate the deferred-maintenance
backlogs associated with very limited operational lives. Where conventional funding sources are unavailable,
Argonne will continue its active pursuit of innovative approaches to acquiring timely and adequate resources that
will help ensure the Laboratory’s ability to meet its facility-related mission needs.
•
SLI Modernization Initiative. In response to the DOE SLI Modernization Initiative, Argonne
developed a proposed package of line-item projects that were specifically timed and scoped to optimize
the rehabilitation or replacement of programmatic facilities and the upgrade of the associated
infrastructure. The first project, ANL-001, Energy Sciences Building (ESB), received initial funding in
FY 2010 and, including the MEM Wing, will be completed in FY 2014. Funding for the next project,
ANL-002, Materials Design Laboratory (MDL), is now proposed for FY 2015 initiation. Initiation of
ANL-003, the Bioenvironmental Sciences Building (BSB) project, has been extended to FY 2017.
Funding for the two remaining SLI projects has also been delayed beyond the planning timeline to
FY 2021 and FY 2023.
The three initial line-item projects, which are consistent with the approach identified in the Laboratory’s
Modernization Plan, establish Argonne’s path forward in the next 10 years. The first project, the
173,000 ft2 ESB (ANL-001, $95M) will co-locate and consolidate scientific efforts and eliminate
excessive maintenance and operating costs associated with the most obsolete and inadequate buildings.
This will open in the summer of 2013. The second project, the 90,000 to 150,000 ft2 MDL (ANL-002,
$95M), will continue consolidation within the three closely associated core capabilities — Condensed
Matter Physics and Materials Science, Chemical and Molecular Science, and Chemical Engineering. The
MDL will also provide the laboratory and infrastructure for the Materials for Energy major initiative
detailed in Section 4, and is critical for the success of this initiative. Growing BES-sponsored projects in
IME, NST, and MSD will require investment in new cleanroom space to support them. Argonne is
requesting a third new project start to construct an additional new, ~140,000 ft2 building (ANL-003,
$95M) to support research in sustainable energy technologies in the biology, environmental science, and
renewable energy mission areas and to facilitate additional disposal of vacated, obsolete, and deteriorated
200-Area building space.
A significant portion of the Laboratory’s unfunded liability cost is legacy waste. Decontamination and
Decommissioning (D&D) and demolition comprise the remaining needs. The Laboratory’s strategy is to
devote operating funds to the initial cleanout/vacating of the facilities. Ultimately, the Laboratory will
seek DOE-EM funding to complete decontamination and demolition following completion of replacement
facilities.
Comprehensive infrastructure modifications and upgrades are needed throughout the site in support of the
significant changes associated with the construction of these new replacement facilities and the retirement
of (formerly key) multi-program facilities. Where feasible, the project scopes for the new facilities will
incorporate key infrastructure realignments and reliability upgrades and serve projected load shifts
associated with the reconfiguration of the site so that we deploy the new generation of flexible,
multipurpose research buildings in the best manner possible. Infusions of Institutional General Plant
Project (IGPP) funds will also be required to support this effort. Argonne’s modernization planning
projects include development of a new facility (SLI 4) to facilitate the removal of the additional legacy
facilities in the 200 Area and rehabilitation of Building 362 (SLI 5). These modernization projects will
allow additional removals of obsolete facilities.
The scopes of these projects — consistent with the Infrastructure Modernization Initiative screening and
selection criteria — support the core infrastructure, benefiting the overall programmatic mission through
co-location, synergy, and space optimization. Deferral of the SLI projects will result in increased total
project costs because of escalation associated with the delays and the increased costs of maintenance and
operation of obsolete, deteriorating facilities. These projects directly support Argonne’s core capabilities,
are critical to Laboratory and DOE missions, and will enable reduction of deferred maintenance and
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
31
elimination of excess space while providing a good return on investment (10–15 years). To supplement
the SLI investments, the Laboratory will support pre- and post-project implementation costs from its
operating funds and is pursuing DOE/EM funding for the removal of the contaminated, substandard
facilities that will become surplus after these projects are implemented.
•
Programmatic Initiatives. Several programmatic projects are requested in support of the Large-Scale
User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation core capability. These include build-out of the interior of
Laboratory Office Module (LOM) 437, currently under way; construction of a new laboratory and office
building to accommodate the program; a new Advanced Photos Source (APS) Assembly and Fabrication
Storage Building; and additions to the existing LOMs to house the support staff. Funding for these
projects will require a determination as to the source of funds (e.g., whether Argonne receives funding
directly from DOE or IGPP).
DOE is committed to continuing efficiency and intensity upgrades to the target and source beamlines of
ATLAS/CARIBU and is considering, as part of these projects, a dedicated CARIBU target transfer
capability that will be utilized after closure of the Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility. Additional facility
planning is under way to develop an integrated 400 Area Plan to support various proposed APS-related
institutes.
•
Third-Party Financing. The TCS facility was funded by State of Illinois revenue bonds, which are to be
retired through the lease payment. The facility provided needed space and facilities support to build on
Argonne’s strengths in high-performance computing software, advanced hardware architectures, and
applications expertise in support of the core capabilities of Applied Mathematics and Advanced Computer
Science, Visualization, and Data, as well as initiatives in Computational Science and Leadership
Computing. To accommodate the need for state-of-the-art experimental space for structural biology work
associated with Argonne’s Large-Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation core capability, the
State of Illinois has pledged $34.5M for approximately 55,000 ft2 Advanced Protein Crystallization
Facility (APCF). Initial utility construction for the APCF project is currently under way, with expected
occupancy in 2014. As part of the JCESR Energy Innovation Hub, the State of Illinois also pledged $35M
for an approximately 45,000 ft2 Energy Innovation Center (EIC) to house JCESR headquarters and
primary research activities. In addition, the central heating plant will be modified to provide a combined
heat and power capability, which will be third-party financed via an Energy Savings Performance
Contract (ESPC). The project completion is tentatively slated for 2015.
•
Projects Supported by Laboratory Operating Funds. Concurrent with the major construction projects
discussed above, the Laboratory will devote IGPP and Major Repairs program funding to address
pressing rehabilitation, upgrade, or maintenance needs in other facilities and infrastructure and to support
pre- and post-project implementation costs related to the SLI projects. The IGPP funding program will
address minor facility upgrades in existing buildings and infrastructure (e.g., safety, fire protection, and
mechanical/electrical systems), rehabilitate utility and site infrastructure, and support energy modification
projects. IGPP projects are of a general institutional nature, cost under $10M, and benefit multiple cost
objectives that could be completed with indirect funding. Indirect funds will not be utilized for IGPP
projects at the expense of maintenance or any other essential facilities program.
•
DOE/EM Funding. DOE/EM funding has been requested for removal of contaminated facilities that are
or will become inactive. However, federal budget constraints make EM funding an unlikely source for
consolidating cleanup efforts for the next several years. Argonne is aggressively consolidating
radiological facilities and reducing the inventory of radiological materials, while preserving the capability
to perform mission-important activities. However, current funding levels remain a significant challenge
and put the Laboratory at risk for executing its modernization plan. Partnering with DOE to identify
stable funding is required for expeditious cleanup, material and waste disposition, and the ultimate
disposition of these facilities. In conjunction with modernization planning, the Laboratory is pursuing the
transfer of legacy waste and nuclear material and excess nuclear/radiological facilities to DOE/EM for
disposition stewardship.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
32
Removal of legacy facilities is consistent with the DOE/SC goal of achieving an AUI ratio of 1:1 for
comparison of utilization-justified assets to current real property assets and to support complex-wide
DOE requirements for overall footprint reductions via space banking. The demolition and disposal of
these facilities will support responsible stewardship of nuclear material, contaminated equipment, and
facilities; align infrastructure assets with mission performance; and reduce overhead costs associated with
nuclear and radiological facilities. Estimates for the unfunded, nonrecurring liability total approximately
$600M based on recent in-house evaluations of the remaining legacy facilities.
•
Deferred Maintenance Reduction. Argonne is committed to reducing its maintenance backlog, with an
ultimate target of achieving the DOE-established ACI goals for “Mission Critical” and “Mission
Essential” facilities. The Laboratory’s Mission Readiness Initiative closely aligns facility maintenance
with anticipated facility uses. The management of deferred maintenance reduction involves multiple
investment strategies. A major component is adequate funding of routine maintenance and Major Repairs
programs, along with significant contributions from Laboratory operating funds through the IGPP
program and the SLI programs, as discussed above. The SLI modernization initiative will facilitate
removal of the backlog of facility needs through replacement or modernization of maintenance-intensive,
substandard existing facilities and infrastructure. Also contributing to the reduction of deferred
maintenance is the use of third-party or alternative financing options where economically feasible.
Trends and Metrics. As the Modernization Plan and Mission Readiness processes are executed, Argonne’s
facilities and infrastructure will become more efficient to maintain and operate, and the elimination of surplus and
substandard facilities will reduce the overall facility footprint. The Laboratory will benefit by reducing its
operating costs and improving productivity and performance in meeting AUI, ACI, and energy-related measures.
A significant portion of the deferred-maintenance total is related to facilities that are slated for replacement as part
of the modernization program. Argonne currently plans to meet all target maintenance investment index levels.
Any significant reduction in projected funding levels would impact the ability to achieve the targeted DM and
ACI levels.
As requested, Table 3 and Figure 1 show how the investments planned and proposed above will impact the sitewide ACI over the planning window.
Table 2. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments (BA in $M)
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
Maintenance
DMR
EFD (Overhead)
53.2
10.2
-
51.3
6.9
-
48.4
9.9
-
53.1
9.9
-
53.5
10.8
-
54.5
11.1
-
57.4
11.5
-
58.5
11.8
-
59.6
12.1
-
60.8
12.4
-
63.8
12.8
-
67.0
13.1
-
IGPP
GPP
Line Items (SLI)
Total Investment
Estimated RPV
Estimated DM
Site-Wide ACI
12.7
37.2
113.3
5.6
42.8
106.6
2,431
132.9
0.947
10.0
68.3
2,548
125.4
0.953
10.0
10.0
83.0
2,627
129.4
0.954
10.0
40.0
114.3
2,725
124.2
0.959
10.0
45.0
120.6
2,790
122.8
0.961
10.0
10.0
88.9
2,857
138.6
0.958
10.0
40.0
120.3
3,021
145.4
0.959
10.0
45.0
126.7
3,094
149.5
0.960
10.0
10.0
93.2
3,168
155.0
0.960
10.0
40.0
126.6
3,297
155.8
0.963
10.0
45.0
135.1
3,315
173.0
0.960
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
33
Figure 1. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments
160
1.000
140
0.990
0.980
120
0.970
100
0.960
80
0.950
60
0.940
0.930
40
0.920
20
0.910
0
0.900
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total Investment ($M)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Site-Wide ACI
34
Attachment 1. Mission Readiness Tables
Core Capabilities
Time
Fram
e
Now
In 5
Years
Accelerator S&T
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
Applied Materials
Science and
Engineering
In 10
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure
Ready
Key Buildings
Capability Gap
N M P C
Laboratory
Relocate high-bay SRF test
203, 208, 314,
facility. New clean rooms,
X
366
refrigeration, increased electrical
power for SRF facility – funding
source TBD.
Significant enhancement is
X
required of the
The most urgently needed
Superconducting RF (SRF)
rehabilitation of office and
facility for all SRF work done
laboratory spaces and HVAC
208, 366
at Argonne.
systems will be addressed via
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
X
see Support Facilities and
Infrastructure Chart.
X
Master IT plan and scientific
support plan development
under way. Will incorporate IT
needs into future planning.
X IT
infrastructure
X
X
212, 362, 369
X
362, 369
Additional office space
needed for funded programs.
Flexible laboratory space
including adequate ventilation
is required to support program
growth and ultimately for
relocation of personnel from
Bldg. 212.
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
362
DOE
Lab upgrades on 3rd floor of
Bldg. 362 could be made with
program funds but only if
adequate ventilation can be
provided. (A Fan Loft is
needed for the 3rd floor.)
Evaluate options for additional
office space based on space being
vacated by ESB moves.
Individual program-specific
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
or installation of specialized
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
funds.
The most urgently needed
rehabilitation of office and
laboratory spaces and HVAC
systems will be addressed via
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
see Support Facilities and
Infrastructure Chart.
35
Core Capabilities
Time
Fram
e
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission
Facility and Infrastructure
Ready
Key Buildings
Capability Gap
N M P C
Laboratory
Additional highbay/
experimental space is needed
to allow relocation of
Bldg. 212 program and to
accommodate program
growth.
X
X IT
infrastructure
X
Currently providing in-house
data center for scientific data
storage. Future expansion may
warrant consolidation into
centralized data center.
Action Plan
DOE
Master IT plan and scientific
support plan development
under way. Will incorporate IT
needs into future planning.
Planning and developing funding
requests for Exascale resource
needs.
Now
X 240, 369
Applied
Mathematics /
Advanced
Computer Science,
Visualization and
Data
In 5
Years
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
X 240
Chilled water and electrical
upgrades will be required to
support future high-speed
computing.
Accommodation of Exascale
machine(s) contingent on
emerging requirements,
demand growth.
Individual program-specific
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
or installation of specialized
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
funds.
Planning for Exascale resource
needs.
The most urgently needed
rehabilitation of office and
laboratory spaces and HVAC
systems will be addressed via
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
see Support Facilities and
Infrastructure Chart.
Utilize substation and chilled water
facility capacity for growth to
accommodate Exascale computer
program and data center storage.
Support for Exascale resource
needs.
Request funding for additional
chiller upgrades.
36
Core Capabilities
Time
Fram
e
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure
Ready
Key Buildings
Capability Gap
N M P C
Laboratory
DOE
Accommodation of Exascale
Explore funding to expand
machine(s) contingent on
infrastructure/ facilities to
Continue support for Exascale
X
emerging requirements,
accommodate Exascale program.
program support.
demand growth.
X
X
IT
infrastructure
In 10
Years
Now
Applied Nuclear
Science and
Technology
In 5
Years
X
100-GB connection to APS.
X
X
Facilities for Argonne
centralized data center storage.
200, 205, 206,
208, 212, 308,
309, 315, 316,
370, 240, APS
Modern radiological
laboratory facilities are needed
– perform strategic renovation
of space throughout the
Argonne complex. The
capabilities of existing hot cell
facilities for program work are
limited. Expansion to support
mission needs is potentially
required.
Existing nuclear facilities have
transitioned to a de-inventory
mission. Actinide and
radiological material research
facility needed in the APS
area. Aged office, high bay,
lab, and office spaces require
upgrade or replacement.
Further need for additional
office space and additional
classified meeting space.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Master IT plan and scientific
support plan development
under way. Will incorporate IT
needs into future planning.
Individual program-specific
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
or installation of specialized
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
funds.
The most urgently needed
rehabilitation of office and
laboratory spaces and HVAC
systems will be addressed via
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
see Support Facilities and
Infrastructure Chart.
Suitable replacement facilities
need to be identified before
disposition of key buildings.
Plans are being developed to
potentially relocate staff from
substandard and deteriorated space
into back-filled space vacated by
ESB.
37
Core Capabilities
Time
Fram
e
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
Chemical and
Molecular Science
/ Chemical
Engineering
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure
Ready
Key Buildings
Capability Gap
N M P C
Laboratory
DOE
Support consolidation and upgrade Support construction of
of office space and radiological
appropriate radiological
X
facilities to support applied nuclear facilities to support applied
S&T programs.
nuclear S&T programs.
Currently providing in-house
X
data center for scientific data
IT
storage. Future expansion may Master IT plan development
X
Infrastructure
underway. Will incorporate IT
warrant consolidation into
centralized data center. Need needs into future planning.
X
for secure communication
facilities.
Modernization needed of
200, 205, 211
X
radiological labs for heavy
elements and separations
200, 205, 211, science and applications in
X
ESB, EIC
Individual program-specific
Bldgs. 200 and 205.
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
Labs with modern fume hood
or installation of specialized
systems and upgraded
capabilities) will be addressed
electrical systems for Bldgs.
through programmatic operating
ESB SLI-1 Project under way –
200 and 205.
funds.
occupancy in 2013 and 2014 –
$95M
Laboratory space requires
The most urgently needed
rehabilitation as flexible,
rehabilitation of office and
MDL SLI-2 Project proposed –
ESB, MDL,
optimally functional space.
laboratory spaces and HVAC
X
$95M
211, EIC
systems will be addressed via
Modernization of some Bldg.
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
200
see Support Facilities and
E-Wing Labs funded by
Infrastructure Chart.
Division Funds.
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
IT
X
infrastructure
X
Energy Innovation Center
(EIC) $35M – funded through
State of Illinois for JCESR.
Currently providing in-house
space for computer cluster and
data center for scientific
research. Future expansion
may warrant consolidation
Master IT plan and scientific
support plan development
under way. Will incorporate IT
needs into future planning.
38
Core Capabilities
Time
Fram
e
Years
Now
In 5
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission
Facility and Infrastructure
Ready
Key Buildings
Capability Gap
N M P C
Laboratory
into centralized data centers.
X
200, 212, 223
X
200, 223, ESB
Environmental temperature,
humidity, and electromagnetic
interference control and clean
power are needed in all areas.
Ventilation/hood filter
capability generally
inadequate. Clean room
capability may be needed.
Condensed Matter
Physics and
Materials Science
In 10
Years
ESB, MDL,
X 223, 440, new
facilities
Building security access
control may be required for
transition between 223 and
ESB.
Majority of researchers to
move to ESB, which will
allow easier remediation of
223 issues and vacating of 212
spaces.
Helium recovery system could
provide 3-year payback/cost
savings for the Lab.
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
X
X IT
Infrastructure
X
Currently providing in-house
data center for scientific data
storage. Future expansion may
warrant consolidation into
centralized data center.
Action Plan
Develop mathematical
descriptions, models, methods,
and algorithms to enable
scientists to describe/understand
behavior of complex
systems/processes spanning
vastly different length/time
scales in energy and the
environment.
DOE
ESB SLI-1 Project under way –
occupancy in 2013 and 2014 –
$95M
MDL SLI-2 Project proposed –
$95M
Operate the Argonne Leadership
Computing Facility; advance key
areas of computational science
and discovery through
partnerships.
Hood upgrade program currently
under way.
Individual program-specific
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
or installation of specialized
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
funds.
The most urgently needed
rehabilitation of office and
laboratory spaces and HVAC
systems will be addressed via
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
see Support Facilities and
Infrastructure Chart.
Master IT plan development
underway. Will incorporate IT
needs into future planning.
39
Core Capabilities
Time
Fram
e
Now
In 5
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure
Ready
Key Buildings
Capability Gap
N M P C
Laboratory
X
Construction of Advanced Protein
Crystallization Facility in support
of bioscience research (third
Increased laboratory, office,
party/State of Illinois– financed) is
storage, and staging spaces are
under way. Occupancy in 2014.
required.
X
314, 400, 401,
402, 411, 412,
420, 431
through 438,
450
Large-Scale User
Facilities/
Advanced
Instrumentation
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
An upgrade is under way to
transform the APS storage
ring and beamlines to meet the
needs of 21st century science.
Accommodation of user
communities requires
additional space near the ends
of the beamlines.
Major facilities upgrade
initiative including
compliance with Executive
Order (EO) 13514 to meet
mandated energy and
greenhouse gas reductions.
X
X
X
212, 216
In 10
Years
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
X
Expansion of electron
microscopy capability
(potential doubling in size)
including possible
replacement of
212 D-Wing with a new
imaging institute.
DOE
APS Upgrade plan developed and
400 Area master plan in progress –
will identify options and resource
needs to meet user requirements.
IGPP project for expansion/ buildout of LOM 437 is under way FY 2013 completion.
APS Upgrade plan funded
through programmatic sources.
Other IGPP-funded facility
projects have been requested
beyond 2014.
Facility modifications for Facilities
437 and 438 will meet the EO
13415 requirements.
Individual program-specific
facility needs
Individual program-specific
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
or installation of specialized
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
funds.
The most urgently needed
rehabilitation of office and
laboratory spaces and HVAC
systems will be addressed via
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
see Support Facilities and
Infrastructure Chart.
Potential replacement of
microscopy facilities currently
housed in
212 D-Wing.
DOE EM funding to be
requested for eventual D&D of
Bldg. 212.
40
Core Capabilities
Time
Fram
e
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
Nuclear Physics
In 10
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure
Ready
Key Buildings
Capability Gap
N M P C
Laboratory
DOE
X
Individual program-specific
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
X
or installation of specialized
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
funds.
New scanning probe facility to
441
house state-of-the-art,
The most urgently needed
subatomic-level microscopes.
rehabilitation of office and
X
laboratory spaces and HVAC
systems will be addressed via
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
see Support Facilities and
Infrastructure Chart.
X
Currently providing in-house
New fiber-optic cable access being
data center for scientific data
installed – 2013.
X
IT
storage. Future expansion may
Infrastructure
warrant consolidation within
Master IT plan and scientific
in-house data center. Future
support plan development
needs to be evaluated
X
under way. Will incorporate IT
regarding consolidation of
needs into future planning.
data center.
X
Individual program-specific
X
Urgently need plans for
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
CARIBU target transfer and
or installation of specialized
RF facility relocation.
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
Bldg. 203 general office,
funds.
CARIBU target transfer
administration, and auditorium
203
capabilities will be required
spaces require significant
The most urgently needed
upon closure of Alpha-Gamma
rehabilitation. Overall need for rehabilitation of office and
Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF).
X
building window replacement, laboratory spaces and HVAC
lighting upgrades, and crane
systems will be addressed via
repair.
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
see Support Facilities and
Tandem accelerator will be
Infrastructure Chart.
removed next year;
Dynamitron also could be
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
41
Core Capabilities
Time
Fram
e
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission
Facility and Infrastructure
Ready
Key Buildings
Capability Gap
N M P C
Laboratory
removed – would free up
experimental spaces.
Action Plan
DOE
Ion source space west of
ATLAS needed, as well as
power and cooling for Ion
Separator.
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
X
X IT
infrastructure
X
X
In 5
Years
X
In 10
Years
X
Now
In 5
Years
366
Need teleconferencing
capabilities and upgrade of
203 auditorium equipment.
Master IT plan and scientific
support plan development
under way. Will incorporate IT
needs into future planning.
Expansion of Wakefield
Accelerator facility
completed. Assembly space is
adequate, capable of
supporting current level of
experimentation.
Individual program-specific
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
or installation of specialized
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
funds.
Clean fabrication and assembly
facilities needed (potentially
SLI-2).
X
Clean fabrication and assembly
facilities planning.
X
Particle Physics
Clean fabrication and
assembly facilities needed.
366 Area
In 10
Years
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
X
Program would benefit from
SRF facility, either 208 or
potential alternate location in
Bldg. 366.
Individual program-specific
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
or installation of specialized
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
funds.
The most urgently needed
rehabilitation of office and
laboratory spaces and HVAC
systems will be addressed via
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
see Support Facilities and
Infrastructure Chart.
42
Core Capabilities
Time
Fram
e
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
Systems
Engineering and
Integration
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure
Ready
Key Buildings
Capability Gap
N M P C
Laboratory
X
The most urgently needed
rehabilitation of office and
X
laboratory spaces and HVAC
Current office space is
systems will be addressed via
adequate, capable of
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
supporting current and
see Support Facilities and
planned level of staffing.
Infrastructure Chart.
360/362
Laboratory space requires
Individual program-specific
rehabilitation. Future plans
X
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
call for office space in both
or installation of specialized
360 and 362.
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
funds.
X
Master IT plan and scientific
IT
Moved IT to Bldg. 240 – no
support plan development
X
infrastructure
appreciable gap identified.
under way. Will incorporate IT
needs into future planning.
X
X
In 10
Years
Additional office swing space
now needed for flexibility in
accommodating staff growth –
including ability to
accommodate foreign
nationals separate from
potentially sensitive or
classified work.
X
203, 221, 315,
316
X
Specialized contiguous office
space/conference facilities
with integrated distribution
capabilities require enhanced
secure communications and
information capabilities.
DOE
Individual program-specific
facility needs (i.e., reconfiguration
or installation of specialized
capabilities) will be addressed
through programmatic operating
funds.
The most urgently needed
rehabilitation of office and
laboratory spaces and HVAC
systems will be addressed via
Major Repairs, LGB, or IGPP –
see Support Facilities and
Infrastructure Chart.
Seeking funding from DOE and
other agencies to support
additional development of
collaborative space expansions.
Washrooms are needed in
proximity to the Bldg. 203
conference space.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
43
Core Capabilities
Time
Fram
e
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure
Ready
Key Buildings
Capability Gap
N M P C
Laboratory
Currently
providing
in-house
X
data center for scientific data
X
storage. Future expansion may
warrant consolidation into
Master IT plan and scientific
centralized data center.
IT
support plan development
Specific concern for system
infrastructure
under way. Will incorporate IT
redundancy. Needs additional
needs into future planning.
X
video/remote computing and
collaborative capabilities.
Need more electrical
generation backup for IT.
DOE
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
44
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property Capability
Mission Ready
Current
N M P C
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
Work Environment
Office & Lab/Office
Buildings & Systems
High-Bay Industrial
Buildings/Space
X
Cafeteria
X
Recreational Facilities
X
Child Care
X
User Accommodations
Visitor Housing (Short
Term)
Visitor Housing (Student)
Older buildings have obsolete
mechanical & electrical systems
and roofing & envelope issues.
X
The demand for high-bay space
exceeds availability.
Lighting& HVAC system
controls are generally adequate
Generally adequate except in 600area
Generally good condition. Some
playground remodeling needed.
Siding replacement needed.
X
Additional refurbishment needed
in student (600) area housing.
X
Visitor Information Center
No apparent gaps.
X
Generally adequate – could use
some upgrade.
SC-SLI Modernization plan to
construct/refurbish various
buildings.
Continued routine maintenance and
improvements using major repair, LGB, and
IGPP programs (including stewardship
programs) as required to address current and
emerging needs.
Continue EM program for
D&D and disposal of excess
facilities.
• Funding (EM, SC, NNSA)
for waste removal and
disposal.
• Nuclear Footprint
Reduction.
• Potential for some direct
programmatic funding.
Rehabilitation of food services and public
spaces under way.
Continued routine maintenance and
improvements using Major Repair, LGB, and
IGPP programs (including stewardship
programs) as required to address current and
emerging needs. The most urgently needed
rehabilitation will be addressed via Major
Repairs, LGB, or IGPP.
Continued routine maintenance and
improvements using Major Repair, LGB, and
IGPP programs (including stewardship
programs) as required to address current and
emerging needs. The most urgently needed
rehabilitation will be addressed via Major
Repairs, LGB, or IGPP.
Site Services
Library
X
Medical
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
New facility in Bldg. 240. No
significant gaps.
Continue to maintain/upgrade
equipment and offices –
remodeling of selected spaces
Continued routine maintenance and
improvements using Major Repair, LGB, and
IGPP programs (including stewardship
programs) as required to address current and
emerging needs. The most urgently needed
45
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property Capability
Mission Ready
Current
N M P C
Shipping & Receiving
X
Fire Station
X
Security
X
Storage
X
Conference and Collaboration Space
Major
Conference/Auditorium 401 & TCS
Auditorium – 200, 203&
362
X
X
Conference Room – General
Collaborative Spaces –
General
X
X
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
currently under way.
Generally adequate – could use
some upgrade.
Generally adequate – could use
some upgrade.
Generally adequate – could use
some upgrade.
Limited storage – programmatic
space and highbays inefficiently
used to warehouse experimental
apparatus.
Action Plan
Laboratory
rehabilitation will be addressed via Major
Repairs, LGB, or IGPP.
DOE
No apparent gaps.
Aesthetics, electronic,
accessibility, and asbestos/fire
protection upgrades needed.
Communications/electronics
upgrades warranted – some
aesthetic issues should be
addressed.
Acceptable but improvements
warranted. Recent plans for
cafeteria and other meeting
spaces may address some
concerns.
Continued routine maintenance and
improvements using Major Repair, LGB, and
IGPP programs (including stewardship
programs) as required to address current and
emerging needs. The most urgently needed
rehabilitation will be addressed via Major
Repairs, LGB, or IGPP.
Rehabilitation of Bldg. 362 is
included under modernization
initiative.
Improved conference facilities
included in buildings being
constructed under
modernization initiatives.
Additional collaborative
spaces included in buildings
being constructed under
modernization initiatives.
Utilities
Communications
X
X
Central Heating Plant
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Mass notifications systems
integration and upgrade needed –
copper to fiber issues must be
addressed.
Existing facility requires
modernization to meet latest
environmental standards.
New combined heat and power
plant for base load/energy
efficiency.
Continued routine maintenance and
improvements using Major Repair, LGB, and
IGPP programs (including stewardship
programs) as required to address current and
emerging needs. The most urgently needed
rehabilitation will be addressed via Major
Repairs, LGB, or IGPP.
Major modification planned to construct new
Combined Heat and Power Plant – 3rd party
financing.
46
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property Capability
Mission Ready
Current
N M P C
Electrical
X
Water (potable and lab.)
X
Natural Gas
X
Wastewater Treatment
(sanitary)
Wastewater Treatment (lab
waste)
Sewer (Sanitary & Lab)
Steam Distribution
No apparent gaps.
X
No apparent gaps.
X
X
Flood Control
Roads & Grounds
Expansions and upgrades needed
to replace obsolete equipment –
new major substation being
constructed to provide expanded
capacity.
Water systems controls being
upgraded – elevated tanks require
refurbishment.
Plant requires modernization and
equipment upgrades/replacement.
X
X
Water (Chilled)
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
X
The 200 area sewers require
lining – combined effluent
conduits deteriorated and leaking.
No apparent gaps – expansion of
capacity under way.
Steam distribution lines require
some upgrading. East area feeder
trunk to be removed.
No significant gaps.
Parking lots and some roads
require replacement or
resurfacing.
Parking (surfaces &
structures) Roads,
Sidewalks & Paths
X
Grounds
X
Security Infrastructure
(Baseline Level of
Protection)
Upgraded street and parking lot
lighting needed for safety, energy
efficiency, and to replace existing
antiquated fixtures.
Sustainable landscaping required
to improve campus character.
X
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
Continued routine maintenance and
improvements using major repair, LGB, and
IGPP programs (including stewardship
programs) as required to address current and
emerging needs. The most urgently needed
rehabilitation will be addressed via Major
Repairs, LGB, or IGPP.
Continued routine maintenance and
improvements using major repair, LGB, and
IGPP programs (including stewardship
programs) as required to address current and
emerging needs. The most urgently needed
rehabilitation will be addressed via Major
Repairs, LGB, or IGPP.
No significant gaps.
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
47
Attachment 2. Laboratory Site Map
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
48
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Mission and Overview
Lab-at-a-Glance
Established in 1947, Brookhaven National Laboratory
(BNL) originated as a nuclear science facility. Today,
BNL maintains a primary mission focus in the
physical, energy, environmental, and life sciences,
with additional expertise in energy technologies and
national security. BNL brings strengths and
capabilities to the Department of Energy (DOE)
laboratory system to produce excellent science and
advanced technologies, safely, securely, and
environmentally responsibly, with the cooperation and
involvement of the local, national, and scientific
communities. With a long-standing expertise in
accelerator science and technology (S&T), BNL
conceptualizes, designs, builds, and operates major
scientific facilities available to university, industry and
government researchers, in support of its Office of
Science (SC) mission. These facilities serve not only
the basic research needs of the DOE, but they reflect
BNL and DOE stewardship of national research
infrastructure that is made available on a competitive
basis to university, industry, and government
researchers. While the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider
(RHIC) complex and the National Synchrotron Light
Source (NSLS) are the two facilities that account for
the majority of the more than 4400 scientists/year
served at BNL, the Center for Functional
Nanomaterials (CFN) served more than 440 users in
FY 2012 and that number continues to grow. To date,
seven Nobel Prizes have been awarded for discoveries
made at the Laboratory.
Location: Upton, New York
Type: Multi-program laboratory
Contractor: Brookhaven Science Associates
Responsible Site Office: Brookhaven Site Office
Website: www.bnl.gov
BNL’s strong partnerships with Stony Brook
University (SBU), Battelle Memorial Institute, and the
Core Universities (Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, MIT,
Princeton, and Yale) are important strategic assets in
accomplishing the Lab’s missions. Beyond their roles
in Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), which
manages the Laboratory, Stony Brook and Battelle are
key partners in all of BNL’s strategic initiatives, from
basic research to the commercial deployment of
technology, and figure prominently in BNL’s energy
research and development (R&D) strategy.
Core Capabilities
Twelve core technical capabilities underpin activities
at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Each of these
core capabilities is comprised of a substantial
combination of facilities, teams of people, and
equipment that has a unique and often world-leading
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Physical Assets:
• 5,320 acres and 302 buildings
• 4.4M sf in buildings
• Replacement Plant Value: $1,960 million
• 27,227 sf in 5 Excess Facilities
• 9,946 sf in Leased Facilities
Human Capital:
• 2,989 FTEs
• 24 Joint faculty
• 185 Postdoctoral researchers
• 229 Undergraduate and 170 Graduate students
• 4,427 Facility users
• 1,348 Visiting scientists
FY 2012 Funding by Source (Costs in $M):
EERE,
$6.8
NP,
$185.4
EM, NNSA,
$17.4 $23.3
Other
DOE,
$7.0
Other
SC,
$72.6
WFO,
$55.8
DHS,
$0.6
HEP,
$57.4
BES,
$280.7
Total Lab Operating Costs (excluding ARRA):
$727.0 million
DOE/NNSA Costs: $670.6 million
WFO (Non-DOE/Non-DHS) Costs: $55.8 million
WFO as % Total Lab Operating Costs: 7.2%
DHS Costs: $0.6 million
ARRA Costed from DOE Sources in FY 2012:
$26.9 million
49
component and relevance to national needs that includes the education of the next generation of scientists from
grades K – 12 through graduate school. These core capabilities enable BNL to deliver transformational science
and technology that is relevant to specific DOE/Department of Homeland Security (DHS) missions, as listed in
Appendix A.
1. Particle Physics. BNL provides intellectual and technical leadership in key particle physics experiments that
seek answers to seminal questions about the composition and evolution of the universe, i.e., the source of
mass, the nature of dark matter and dark energy, and the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the
universe. BNL’s major roles are: host institution for U.S. contributions to particle physics with the ATLAS
detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC); leadership in neutrino oscillation experiments with moderate
(Daya Bay) and long (e.g., Fermilab to Homestake Mine) baselines, to complete measurement of the neutrino
mixing matrix, including possible CP-violation; and development of a program of observational cosmology
(Large Synoptic Survey Telescope-LSST and precursor efforts, the Dark Energy Survey-DES and the Baryon
Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey-BOSS). These roles are enhanced by BNL theory efforts and by BNL’s
international leadership in critical detector and advanced accelerator research and development (AARD) for
next-generation facilities, including a possible energy-frontier Muon Collider. Detector R&D at BNL is
strongly leveraged by Laboratory support for the Instrumentation Division, which has made world-leading
contributions to radiation detectors of various types and to low-noise microelectronics (see core capability 12
– CC 12). BNL’s expertise in Nuclear Chemistry provides world-leading development of metal-loaded liquid
scintillator materials critical to contemporary neutrino experiments. BNL operates a unique national user
facility for AARD, the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), largely with Office of High Energy Physics (OHEP)
funding (see CC 3).
BNL develops advanced software and computing facilities for applications in high energy experiments and
theory. Key expertise has been developed in the management and processing of petabyte-scale data sets
generated at high rates and distributed computing for analysis, facilitated by the RHIC-ATLAS Computing
Facility (RACF), the Physics Analysis Software group, and US-ATLAS Analysis Support Center. Lattice
Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) simulations utilize high performance computing facilities that include the
recently augmented BlueGene/Q (BG/Q) machines. These now include two racks purchased by RIKEN and
one purchased by BSA, both in 2012 (QCDCQ – QCD with Chiral Quarks), as well as the half rack purchased
in 2013 by the U.S. Lattice QCD Collaboration (LQCD) to explore theoretically the properties of elementary
particles. Particle physics software and computing development for both experiment and theory benefit very
strongly from synergies with RHIC facilities funded by Nuclear Physics and with the RIKEN-BNL Research
Center (RBRC), funded by the Japanese RIKEN Institute.
2. Nuclear Physics. BNL conducts pioneering explorations of the most fundamental aspects of matter governed
by QCD. Heavy-ion collisions at RHIC probe matter at temperatures and densities representative of the early
universe, mere microseconds after its birth. RHIC experiments discovered that the infant universe was filled
with a previously unknown type of liquid matter, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The QGP produced in
RHIC collisions has a lower viscosity, relative to its density, than any other material known and has been
called the “perfect fluid.” The RHIC results have led to profound intellectual connections with other physics
frontiers, including String Theory, the origin of the universe’s matter-antimatter asymmetry, strongly
correlated condensed matter systems, fermion gases trapped at nano-Kelvin temperatures, and analysis of
baryon acoustic oscillations in cosmic microwave background maps.
Heavy ion collisions, guided by theory, are used: to quantify the transport properties of the QGP and its
response to energetic probes, especially jets and heavy quarks; to probe the gluon structure of nuclei at high
energy; to study local fluctuations within the QGP corresponding to violations of fundamental symmetries; to
search for a predicted critical point in the QCD phase diagram; and to search for predicted fundamental
transformations of the QCD vacuum at extreme temperatures. Collisions of polarized protons, uniquely
available at RHIC, are used to elucidate the spin structure of the proton. Future addition of an electron
accelerator to RHIC would facilitate quantitative study of a regime of saturated gluon densities, present in all
ordinary matter and featuring the strongest fields in nature.
RHIC offers a synergistic environment for collaboration with universities, other National Labs, and industry.
To date, the RHIC program has produced more than 300 Ph.D. nuclear physicists. Nuclear theory efforts at
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
50
BNL and throughout the international theory community guide and stimulate planning and interpretation of
RHIC experiments. They include world-leading programs in high-temperature lattice QCD simulation and
the theory of QCD matter at high gluon density.
Experimental, theoretical, and computational research is enhanced by the presence of the RBRC. In addition
to its contributions to the RHIC research program and its role in facilitating scientific collaboration with
Japan, the RBRC continues to have a major role in the development of the U.S. nuclear science workforce by
helping to establish faculty positions at leading research universities (33 to date, of which 22 are tenured).
BNL develops advanced software and computing facilities for applications in nuclear physics experiments
and theory. Key expertise has been developed in the management and processing of petabyte-scale data sets
generated at high rates and distributed computing for analysis, facilitated by the RACF. Lattice QCD
simulations utilize high performance computing facilities at BNL (the recently installed BlueGene/Q QCDCQ
machines), as well as at leadership class computing facilities to explore theoretically the phase diagram of
QCD.
BNL scientists are leading a national effort to develop the science agenda for a future Electron Ion Collider
(EIC) facility, for which the BNL plan, called eRHIC, is to upgrade the RHIC facility with a high energy
electron beam to collide with the existing heavy ion and polarized proton beams. BNL administers a DOEfunded, peer-reviewed R&D program to support universities and Laboratories in the development of
advanced instrumentation technologies for an EIC detector.
Development and enhancement of RHIC accelerator facilities benefits from a first-rate program of advanced
accelerator R&D (see CC 3), while enhancement of the RHIC detector capabilities benefits from the BNL
support of the Instrumentation Division (see CC 12).
BNL operates the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), an international resource for the dissemination of
nuclear structure, decay, and reaction data that serves as the focal point for the U.S. nuclear data program and
reactor design.
3. Accelerator Science and Technology. BNL has long-standing expertise in accelerator science that has been
exploited in the design of accelerators around the world, beginning with the Cosmotron in 1948 and now
including RHIC and NSLS. Among the now “standard” and widely-used technologies developed at BNL are
the strong-focusing principle and the Chasman-Greene lattice, which are the foundation of all modern
accelerator and synchrotron light sources, respectively, and high brightness electron guns and high gain high
harmonic generation. Innovative BNL designs of superconducting magnets are in use at worldwide
accelerator facilities, including LHC. Expertise in high temperature superconducting magnets is expected to
be of central importance to future facilities, including the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), a possible
Muon Collider, and also to Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage systems. Complementing the above is
BNL’s core capability in Advanced Instrumentation (CC 12).
With the construction of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), the Laboratory began adopting
high energy accelerator technology to achieve unprecedented brightness, integrating damping wigglers in a
unique configuration. BNL’s development and implementation of stochastic cooling for high-energy bunched
beams has enabled an earlier and less costly completion of the RHIC-II luminosity upgrade. Full
implementation of stochastic cooling has enhanced RHIC heavy-ion collision luminosities by about an order
of magnitude. BNL’s pioneering development of the acceleration of spin-polarized proton beams to high
energy using Siberian snakes made RHIC the world’s only polarized proton collider and allows for the unique
exploration of the polarization of quarks and gluons inside the proton. The Lab’s developing competencies in
superconducting RF technology for high intensity beams, high-brightness high-energy Energy Recovery
Linacs (ERL), and innovative electron cooling techniques, together with its established world leadership in
acceleration of spin-polarized beams to high energy, lay the groundwork for a future EIC using the RHIC
facility. The ERL development is also relevant for possible future very high brightness X-ray free electron
lasers (FELs).
BNL scientists have provided leadership from the outset in international R&D efforts toward development of
a future Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. BNL operates the ATF, a unique national user facility for
beam physics experiments, which also provides training for the next generation of accelerator scientists in
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cutting-edge tests of advanced accelerator concepts. A unique strength of the ATF is the interaction of highpower fast-pulsed lasers with high-brightness electron beams. The development of such lasers at long
wavelengths (~10 Вµm) has led to recent breakthroughs in the generation of mono-energetic ion beams from
laser bombardment of gas jets, with game-changing potential for radiotherapy. Shorter-term collaboration
with industry for improved ion beam therapy facilities is being driven by recent patents building on BNL
expertise in developing synchrotrons and Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient accelerators for nuclear and
particle physics projects.
With the selection of Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) as the backbone of the
NSLS-II control system, BNL has become the center for development and maintenance of EPICS and its
applications software.
BNL possesses strength as a world-class accelerator laboratory, which is the backbone of the Laboratory and
DOE’s research programs. The Lab is pursuing stronger integration of the Accelerator Science and
Technology (AST) effort to foster cross-fertilization between the accelerator R&D effort towards eRHIC
under the Nuclear and Particle Physics Directorate, the high brightness photon R&D effort under the Photon
Sciences Directorate, and the advanced acceleration R&D at the ATF. AST drives, both internally and
externally, the projects currently envisioned to sustain the Laboratory. AST underscores the creativity,
breadth, and flexibility of BNL’s expertise in this area.
In order to extend BNL’s strong tradition of creative accelerator design well into the eRHIC era, a joint BNLSBU Center for Accelerator Science and Education (CASE) was established. The mission of CASE is to
educate and train the next generation of accelerator scientists and technologists, who will support the growing
needs, not only of BNL, but also of the community at large. About ten Ph.D. students are currently engaged
in accelerator research at BNL under the auspices of CASE.
4. Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science. BNL conducts world-leading fundamental research in
Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science focusing on new and improved complex, nanostructured,
and correlated-electron materials for renewable energy, energy storage, and energy efficiency.
The objective of BNL’s program in the area of correlated materials is to understand the properties of a range
of complex materials, particularly the high Tc superconductors. This is accomplished through
interdisciplinary and tightly coupled research programs in materials synthesis, including both single crystal
growth and thin film growth in the form of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and pulsed laser deposition
(PLD); advanced characterization using a range of experimental techniques, both lab and facility based,
including scanning tunneling microscopy, photoemission, X-ray scattering, electron microscopy; and
theoretical studies using a range of different approaches. Future developments include the construction of a
unique tool that brings together in one instrument the ability to fabricate thin films and examine their
properties in situ using both scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoemission.
In the area of nanostructured materials, the program addresses fundamental questions associated with selforganized growth and the liquid-solid interface, including wetting at the nanoscale, using both X-ray
scattering and atomic force microscopy.
The Brookhaven research approach leverages core scientific, university, and industry expertise, including that
in chemical and molecular science, with BNL’s unique suite of complementary facilities that include NSLS,
NSLS-II, the CFN, high performance computers, and BNL’s Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy. An
emerging aspect of these programs is research at the gap between basic and applied science to provide an
environment where research innovations may be developed to the point of deployment more rapidly. The
Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department is the lead institution in the Center for
Emergent Superconductivity, an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) that involves collaboration with
Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Illinois. BNL is also partnering in the EFRCs on
Excitonics and Photovoltaic Efficiency, led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Columbia
University, respectively. The participation of several CFN staff in these EFRCs is attracting new CFN users
from these institutions, and will undoubtedly lead to high-impact results on energy-related topics.
BNL is also engaged in two ARPA-E projects targeted at the use of superconducting wire technologies in the
areas of energy storage (superconducting magnets) and energy generation (wind turbines).
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5. Chemical and Molecular Science. In the chemical and molecular sciences, BNL focuses on basic and
applied research that addresses scientific challenges in fields of catalytic chemistry important to energy
conversion processes and fundamental studies in chemical dynamics and radiation chemistry.
The research in catalysis, electrocatalysis, and photocatalysis addresses energy science challenges in fuel
synthesis, with an emphasis on fuel generation from renewable energy resources, and efficient fuel use in fuel
cells.
Heterogeneous catalysis research elucidates catalyst structure and reaction mechanisms to establish design
principles for improved catalysts. The research links in situ studies of powder catalysts under reaction
conditions with studies of model nanocatalysts and computation. The effort focuses on energy conversion
catalysis for clean fuel production, fuel synthesis from renewable energy sources by activation of small
molecules, such as CO2 and H2O, and sustainable production and use of alternative fuels, such as hydrogen.
Electrocatalysis research builds on world leadership in synthesis and characterization of nanostructured coreshell metal and metal oxide electrocatalysts to develop improved fuel cell catalysts for hydrogen and liquid
fuel cells, as well as electrocatalysis of water splitting and fuel forming reactions.
Photocatalysis addresses fundamental scientific challenges in the direct conversion of solar energy to fuels,
based on a strong program in molecular inorganic catalysis linked to expertise in mechanistic chemistry and
computational studies of reaction mechanisms. This effort makes extensive use of radiation chemistry as a
unique tool for time-resolved mechanistic studies of oxidation and reduction reactions.
Radiation chemistry research addresses fundamental chemical events arising from ionizing radiation, based on
advanced pulse radiolysis capabilities at the Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER). The methods
enable study of oxidized or reduced molecular systems for mechanistic studies of chemistry important in
solar-chemical energy conversion and for study of single-molecule charge conduction, important in organic
photovoltaic materials. Studies also address radiation-induced chemistry in novel processing media,
particularly ionic liquids, for applications in advanced nuclear energy cycles.
The chemical dynamics groups are leaders in the development of advanced, time-resolved laser spectroscopy
methods for characterization of molecular dynamics in the gas phase, important in combustion processes and
for study of molecule-surface interactions underlying catalytic and photocatalytic processes. These efforts
combine leading experimental capabilities along with computational methods in quantum molecular
dynamics.
Chemical and molecular science research makes extensive use of NSLS (and soon, NSLS-II), the CFN, high
performance computers and leverages expertise in core programs, including those in condensed matter
physics and materials science, with collaborations from universities, other National Labs, and industry.
6. Climate Change Science. BNL’s world-class climate change programs seek to understand the role of
greenhouse gases (GHGs), aerosols, and clouds on Earth’s climate. Research includes partnering on the
Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities; designing and conducting global
change experiments that explore the effects of increased CO2 on the biosphere; studying the lifecycle and
optical properties of clouds and aerosols; providing three dimensional (3-D) cloud reconstructions; and
developing and testing physics-based representations of important climate-related atmospheric processes for
implementation in large-scale climate models.
This research utilizes climate and climate-related models that have been implemented on high performance
computing systems at BNL and elsewhere and leverages BNL’s expertise in the core programs, including
experimental studies of clouds and aerosols and skills in the development of theory needed to understand the
relevant processes with collaborations from universities and other National Laboratories and institutions.
BNL’s capabilities in the area of large-scale observational and manipulative environmental experiments are
widely recognized since the first generation experiments that involved multi-year exposures of ecosystems to
elevated levels of carbon dioxide. BNL researchers now participate in the tundra experiment (Next
Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) – Tundra) on the north slope of Alaska and are actively involved
in planning the NGEE-tropics, which is expected to get underway very soon.
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7. Biological Systems Science. The goal of BNL’s programs in the biological sciences is to develop a
quantitative understanding of complex biological systems, from the molecular to the organism level at
different temporal scales. BNL emphasizes applications in plants of interest to missions of the DOE in both
energy and the environment. Expertise ranges from investigating structures of individual proteins, elucidating
the structures and multi-dimensional interactions within protein complexes, measuring and modeling
metabolic fluxes from single cells to the whole plant, to studying epigenetic mechanisms in plants. In all
cases, the objective is to relate structure and function, so that desired manipulations, such as increasing
growth rates, altering metabolic pathways to enable the accumulation of desired products, environmental
adaptation or detecting disease can be carried out easily and reliably. The tools used include structural
biology in a wide variety of forms, molecular biology, biological imaging, and a close coupling of
experiments with modeling and simulation.
Macromolecular interactions are the main focus of an interdisciplinary effort between investigators in the
Biosciences Department and the CFN, who develop novel biomimetic approaches that use bio-programmable
self-assembly for the creation of well-defined hierarchical nanoscale structures that are built from inorganic
nano-objects and biological molecules (see CC 9). This work has great potential to impact a broad range of
nanotechnologies related to the fabrication of nanomaterials and devices for energy conversion, single
molecular detection, and catalysis. Moreover, these efforts are among the building blocks for an emerging
focus at BNL on biodesign, i.e., understanding and exploiting the design principles of biological systems for
engineering systems of great impact to DOE missions in energy and environment. BNL conducts worldleading research in the development of radiolabeled tracers, such as sugars, chemical messengers, and
signaling molecules for monitoring biological processes, including transport and plant metabolism using
Positron Emission Tomography (PET). This is made possible by using dedicated advanced detectors
developed at BNL, utilizing the capabilities of the Instrumentation Division and the expertise in detector
physics resident in the Physics Department. Using the beamlines at NSLS, cryo-electron microscopy (EM),
and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, BNL performs structural analysis on complex biological systems.
This capability will greatly expand when NSLS-II becomes operational and world-leading new analytical
capabilities become available to probe molecular structure and dynamics at unprecedented spatial and
temporal resolutions.
The radiation biology program characterizes the effects of ionizing radiation on living systems. The radiation
biology program at BNL also features a flagship facility supported by NASA, the NASA Space Radiation
Laboratory (NSRL). NSRL supplies ion beams from the Collider-Accelerator Department’s (C-AD) Booster
synchrotron, which is part of the RHIC complex of accelerators. NSRL operations are managed by C-AD,
with support from the Biosciences Department.
BNL has a widely recognized basic research capability involving multiple principal investigators in plant
biochemistry with particular focus on lipid production in plants. This pioneering research has attracted
support from application-oriented programs striving to transfer the results from model plant systems to
potential feedstocks for bio-based products including fuels.
The bioinformatics and computational biology capability is an integral and growing part of the BNL
biological systems program. BNL researchers with their partners at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL)
and at Yale University are members of the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (Kbase) development team
(including Argonne, Lawrence Berkeley, and Oak Ridge National Laboratories), selected by BER to develop
and deploy Kbase. The Lab’s partnership with the Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology at
SBU is an important element of its growing computational biology capability.
With these well-recognized capabilities in place and further developing, BNL is in a strong position to build a
capability in biodesign for energy or synthetic biology in alignment with the direction of the BER portfolio.
Specifically, BNL is leveraging the existing plant biology, biochemistry, radiotracer development, and plant
imaging capabilities with the modeling, simulation, and Kbase capabilities to build a leading center for
quantitative plant science.
8. Applied Nuclear Science and Technology. BNL’s nuclear science programs span the gamut from medicine
to national security. At the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), BNL plays a critical role in preparing
radioisotopes for the nuclear medicine community and industry that are unavailable commercially. BLIP is
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one of the world’s major sources of Sr-82, the parent of Rb-82. This short-lived positron emitter is Federal
Drug Administration-approved and now used routinely for assessment of cardiac function following a heart
attack in more than 30,000 patients per year. This work continues BNL’s long leadership tradition in
radiotracer development.
The present strategic R&D vision concentrates on the development of “theragnostic” radioisotopes – that is,
radioisotopes or radioisotope pairs that combine both emission of imaging photons and alpha or beta particles.
The current highest priority in this vein in collaboration with Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National
Laboratories is the development of a new route to produce Ac-225, an alpha emitter with high potential for
cancer therapy, especially for difficult diffuse cancers. Ac-225 is a rare but medically prized radioactive
isotope, since it has the ability to destroy cancer cells more precisely, without damaging healthy surrounding
cells. However, its production has been costly and too meager to support essential clinical trials based on the
isotope. Those shortages of Ac-225 could be significantly lessened by this research. Using high-energy
proton beams irradiating thorium targets at BLIP, BNL researchers demonstrated that the current annual
supply of Ac-225 can potentially be produced in a week. Proposed beamline upgrades and installation of a
beam raster at BLIP will enhance its capability. BLIP also supports an active program of radiation damage
studies of interest to Fermilab (FNAL), FRIB, and LHC and for future high power accelerators.
This role could be further amplified if the BNL-proposed Cyclotron Isotope Research Center (CIRC) were to
be constructed at the Lab. A potential commercial partner is interested in working with BNL to build such a
stand-alone isotope production facility. A doubling of the Linac beam current for radioisotope production and
addition of a second beamline and target station for BLIP are also under consideration in the future. BNL’s
expertise in accelerator development has led to a recent patent for a Rapid Cycling Medical Synchrotron
(RCMS) and for low-mass beam delivery gantries, viewed as technologies of choice for the next generation of
proton- and ion-based cancer therapy centers. BNL has established a CRADA with a commercial partner
interested in building such next-generation centers.
BNL has leading expertise in the application of ionizing radiation for the diagnostic and treatment of cancer.
As described above BLIP is a leading facility for the development of medical isotopes for diagnostic and
therapeutic purposes. The effects of ionizing radiation on living systems are being studied at the NSRL, a
flagship international user facility supported by NASA. The NSRL facility also provides the unique
capability to study the effectiveness of using carbon or other ion beams for cancer therapy. The Lab is
collaborating in developing corresponding research proposals to the National Cancer Institute. Finally BNL
is also developing the next generation hadron therapy facility using carbon or other ion beams for high
effective cancer treatment.
BNL has extensive expertise in nuclear nonproliferation and international nuclear safeguards that includes
management of the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) for the U.S. Government. ISPO is
responsible for coordinating all U.S. technical and personnel support to the International Atomic Energy
Agency’s (IAEA) Department of Safeguards. BNL also provides training on how to implement safeguards to
new IAEA inspectors and countries where IAEA safeguards are applied to assist in ensuring their effective
and efficient implementation.
The Lab’s nonproliferation and national security work includes materials and chemical sciences; nuclear
materials detection and measurement; nuclear materials protection, control, and accountability; advanced
radiation detector R&D; and scientific and technical participation in the Radiological Assistance Program
(RAP). BNL’s RAP experts supported the DOE’s response to the Fukushima incident and continue to assist
the U.S. government on radiological releases, as needed.
One of BNL’s world-class capabilities is the development of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) prototype
radiation detectors for nonproliferation and homeland security applications, starting from the
conceptualization and design phases to assembly, testing, and characterization of the prototypes. BNL grows
the CZT and other detector crystals in-house and uses the NSLS to determine ways to improve the crystal’s
performance in detectors.
BNL’s nuclear energy experts support the development of next generation reactors through research on
alternative fuel cycles, materials in extreme environments, and its assessment of the role of nuclear energy in
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our Nation’s energy future. BNL conducts research on materials in extreme environments for advanced
energy systems. As part of that effort, it utilizes synchrotron characterization techniques, such as diffraction,
spectroscopy, and imaging and is developing sample chambers for the in situ study of materials at the NSLS.
The 200 MeV proton beam of the BNL Linac and the BLIP target facility are being used extensively for
studies of irradiation damage in materials for fast fission and fusion reactors, as well as high-energy particle
accelerator elements, such as pion production targets for neutrino experiments. BNL also uses state-of-the-art
computer tools to analyze nuclear reactor and fuel cycle designs for DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission (NRC), and the National Institutes for Science and Technology (NIST).
9. Applied Materials Science and Engineering. This capability is an extension of BNL’s effort in condensed
matter physics and materials science that is concentrated on materials for energy technologies including
strongly correlated/complex materials and nanomaterials (including bio/soft/hybrid materials), which are at
the heart of renewable energy technologies. In order to understand the route to superconductors with
improved critical properties (e.g., critical temperature, critical current, critical field), BNL conducts
experimental and theoretical research to design, synthesize, understand, predict, and ultimately enhance the
properties of strongly correlated/complex materials, particularly for electrical energy transmission and
electrical energy storage applications. Among its tools for synthesis, BNL uses its state-of-the-art MBE
capability to prepare exceptionally high quality films of cuprates and other oxides. Typical methods of
characterization include neutron and X-ray scattering, electron spectroscopy, electron microscopy at BNL’s
Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, and scanning tunneling spectroscopy, supported by theory.
Similarly, BNL synthesizes and characterizes materials for energy storage and nanomaterials for enhanced
solar fuel production and solar electricity generation and for incorporating new functionalities. BNL supports
electrical energy storage technologies including General Electric’s sodium battery technology, through its
facilities and expertise in photon sciences and electron microscopy. BNL is a partner in the SBU-led Energy
Storage EFRC and in several successful battery proposals funded by the New York Battery and Energy
Storage (NYBEST) Consortium. In conjunction with theory and modeling, characterization methods include
electron microscopy, electron and X-ray diffraction, nanoprobes, and studies of nanoscale ordering and
assembly at the CFN. Based on a CRADA with Kenyon (the former BP Solar), BNL will monitor and
analyze performance data from the Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) and is building a solar research array at
BNL, which will have the capacity to field test innovative new solar and grid technologies.
10. Chemical Engineering. BNL has a small, but emerging effort in applied chemical research that translates
scientific discovery into deployable technologies. Basic research in surface electrochemistry and
electrocatalysis, using a variety of characterization techniques, including atomic-level surface characterization
with X-rays at NSLS, has matured into the design of efficient catalysts for fuel cells. BNL has developed
various innovative catalysts that have the potential to solve two main problems of existing technology: low
efficiency of energy conversion and high Pt loading. In the future, since the BNL-developed catalysts contain
smaller amounts of precious metal, they could be used in fuel cells that convert hydrogen to electricity in
electric vehicles. Scale-up of some of these materials is successfully underway with industry partners. The
Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) at NSLS offers the opportunity for advanced characterization and
testing of real world catalysts to universities, industry, and other National Laboratories.
11. Systems Engineering and Integration. BNL solves problems holistically and across multiple disciplines on
several levels in order to deliver Large-Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation. Individual facility
components (accelerators, detectors, beamlines, etc.) that are conceived, designed, and implemented at BNL
are complex entities, requiring broad integration for their successful performance and, in turn, for their
coupling with other systems. BNL’s approach applies not only to engineering at the various stages of a single
project, but also to developing cutting-edge technologies that fuel multiple large projects at the Laboratory.
One example is BNL’s development of noble liquid detectors from concept, through demonstration, to
implementation within enormous detectors at D0 at FNAL and ATLAS at LHC, and accompanied by
continuing R&D to develop the very large liquid argon time projection chambers that might serve a future
long baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE). A second example involves application of high-brightness
electron beam technology developed at BNL to NSLS-II and the proposed future electron-ion collider
(eRHIC). A third example involves collaboration between condensed matter physicists at BNL, the
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Superconducting Magnet Division, and commercial partners to develop high-temperature superconducting
materials and magnets for prototyping Superconducting Magnet Energy Storage systems.
Recently, BNL has been focusing its expertise in the engineering analysis of energy systems toward
developing an Advanced Electric Grid Innovation and Support (AEGIS) Center for electric network
monitoring, analysis, and modeling, primarily focused on the electric distribution system. This capability in
conjunction with the development of the BNL micro-grid as a research resource will serve East Coast utilities,
technology developers, research institutions, emergency management organizations, and the DOE and DHS.
The impact of Super Storm Sandy and winter storm Nemo have led to an emphasis on distribution system
reliability, resilience, and recovery. The development of a research array on site (~700 kW) will also allow
the testing of renewable integration strategies, including the use of storage. This Center will also reach-back
to BNL’s applied research efforts in materials and storage for grid applications, by providing analytical results
illustrating the role that storage can play on the grid (see CC 9).
12. Large-Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation. Since its creation as a National Laboratory, BNL
has promoted research in the physical, chemical, biological, and engineering aspects of the atomic sciences.
As a key part of its mission, it has also provided user facilities that individual institutions could not afford and
would not have the range of expertise required to develop on their own. In FY 2012, BNL served more than
4400 users at its DOE designated user facilities, i.e., NSLS, RHIC (including NSRL and the Tandems), and
CFN as well as those users at the ATF, RACF and US ATLAS Analysis Support Center. BNL is constructing
NSLS-II, the newest and brightest member of DOE’s suite of advanced light sources, which is expected to
serve more than 4000 users annually when fully operating. BNL envisions a future major upgrade of RHIC
(eRHIC) that will attract a new generation of users interested in using high-energy electron-ion collisions to
study cold nuclear matter at extreme gluon densities. BNL also makes important contributions to
international facilities – the LHC, Daya Bay, and such future facilities as an underground laboratory, LSST,
and a Muon Collider. This core capability is strongly tied to those in Accelerator Science and Technology,
Systems Engineering and Integration, Advanced Instrumentation (CC 3, 11, 12), and world-leading
computation efforts for data capture, storage and analysis, and is enhanced by infrastructure support to users.
The LISF is creating the largest data set (solar insolation, weather, power, and power quality) for a utilityscale solar plan in the U.S. This data set is a unique asset to study solar forecasting models, as well as the
impact of large solar plans on grid operations. BNL expects to pursue funding for the AEGIS Center.
BNL conceptualizes, designs, and constructs state-of-the-art optics, detectors and electronics that are used for
experiments at RHIC, NSLS, FNAL, LHC, LSST, the Spallation Neutron Source, and the Linear Coherent
Light Source, and in other accelerator- and reactor-based facilities around the world. The BNL
Instrumentation Division is especially noteworthy for its leadership in noble liquid detector technology, lownoise application-specific integrated circuit design, state-of-the-art silicon detector development, and R&D on
photocathodes and ultra-short pulse lasers. BNL also engages in pioneering development of gamma ray
spectrometers, neutron imaging and directional detectors, as well as long-range detection of special nuclear
materials for homeland and national security applications.
Science Strategy for the Future
BNL has identified five major initiatives that align with the DOE Strategic Themes in Energy Security, Scientific
Discovery and Innovation, and Nuclear Security and build on core strengths and capabilities of the Laboratory.
These are areas in which BNL envisions that it will substantially distinguish itself by delivering transformative
science, technology, and engineering (ST&E). In order to reap the potentially transformational benefits of these
initiatives, a key element of Brookhaven’s strategy is to pursue the evolution of its two largest user facilities –
NSLS and RHIC.
1. Photon sciences: NSLS, a pioneering user facility, is an accelerator-based light source for photon sciences.
The discovery potential of BNL photon sciences will be enormously expanded by replacing NSLS with
NSLS-II, a new light source, by 2015. It will deliver world-leading brightness and intensity, and extreme
stability to enable nanoscale imaging and exquisite sensitivity. The completion of the NSLS-II and its
transition to full operations over the next few years will afford many scientific disciplines the opportunity to
perform experiments that have never before been possible. Impactful early NSLS-II experiments and
beamline build out are a high priority.
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2. QCD Matter: RHIC, the most productive nuclear science facility in the U.S., has transformed mankind’s
understanding of the matter that forms the visible universe, reproducing the extreme temperatures reached a
tiny fraction of a second after the Big Bang. After a decade of discovery, RHIC has been upgraded to
increase the rate of nuclear collisions and the precision and reach of its giant detectors, allowing its
international community of scientific users to explore the properties of the quark gluon plasma in quantitative
detail and to search for fundamentally new phenomena in the extreme high energy density environment,
corresponding to conditions of the early universe. In the second part of the coming decade, BNL’s plan is to
transform RHIC into eRHIC, an electron-ion collider optimized to study the gluon component of nucleons
and nuclei, which constitutes approximately half of the mass of the visible universe, but whose structure at
high energies remains largely unknown.
3. Discovery to Deployment: Integrated Science Centers for 21st Century Energy Security: BNL is
uniquely positioned with the staff, facilities, and tools to advance the science and technology needed to find
solutions to some of the Nation’s most pressing energy problems. The coupling of NSLS-II, the CFN, and
other core capabilities provides a transformative opportunity for a stronger, more impactful, and broader
engagement with the research and industrial community through the establishment of a suite of Integrated
Centers for Energy Science (ICES), which can serve as a catalyst for the Energy Initiative’s Discovery to
Deployment strategy. AEGIS and the BNL micro-grid also bring the ICES Concept to systems applications.
4. Physics of the Universe: BNL scientists will continue to play leadership roles in the Energy Frontier with
work at ATLAS addressing the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking and searching for
supersymmetry, as well as in the LHC upgrade by applying their expertise in accelerator science and
technology. BNL will continue to provide intellectual leadership and expand its efforts at the Intensity
Frontier. The Lab will continue its work in the neutrino sector via the LBNE measurement of the CPviolating phase, δ. BNL’s role in the muon g-2 experiment at FNAL will continue to be enhanced by
expertise developed at the BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron; the Lab’s contribution to Mu2e at FNAL
will make direct use of BNL technology developed for ATLAS. In the Cosmic Frontier, BNL will play a
critical role in the LSST, supplying the sensors for the camera and focusing on understanding dark energy and
growing the cosmology effort more broadly.
5. Biosciences and Environmental Sciences: BNL has highly-regarded expertise in several aspects of
biological, climate, and environmental sciences. BNL will build on this foundation by adding a few critically
important capabilities, such as nano S&T and data-intensive and high performance computing. When
combined with NSLS-II, BNL will have dramatically increased its ability to synthesize, analyze, model, and
simulate plant and plant/microbe-symbiotic systems. The Lab will build upon past success by extending its
study of atmospheric processes that are particularly important for the modeling of climate and the earthatmosphere system.
The core capability in Accelerator Science & Technology (CC 3) underpins the expansion of the Laboratory’s
reach in both Photon Sciences and QCD Matter as well as other areas of national importance. Likewise, the longstanding expertise in scientific instrumentation underpins many facets of BNL’s ST&E efforts. Also, building on
the foundation laid by the RHIC/ATLAS computing facility and other efforts in data management, analytics and
computational science across its research portfolio, BNL is positioned to be a leading Lab in high-performance
computing for management, processing and analysis of large-scale scientific data relevant to the Lab’s core
science programs and facilities. BNL’s objective is to achieve core capability status in Computational Science
within the next three years. Finally, BNL’s long-standing nuclear energy and nonproliferation expertise, detector
technology capability, and scientific user facilities enable the Lab to contribute in unique ways to national security
challenges.
Full exploitation of BNL’s capabilities in addressing its scientific focus areas relies on synergies among its
science organizations and across the above major initiatives. Achieving and sustaining management and
operational excellence underpins all of BNL’s work.
Longer Term Strategy
In the longer term, after NSLS-II is completed and the Lab has implemented an integrated set of programs based
on beamline capabilities, BNL expects to pull together the Photon Sciences, Energy S&T, and Bio/Environmental
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Sciences Initiatives, described in detail below, into a broader Energy S&T Initiative, centered on NSLS-II, CFN,
and other Lab capabilities. This will be analogous to the Origins of Matter and Mass Initiative, which will be
centered on RHIC transitioning to eRHIC in the future. These initiatives will build on the Lab’s world-class
facilities and capabilities and will represent the two main pillars of BNL's science program looking a decade
ahead. The Lab’s portfolio going forward will also feature the high energy physics initiative, utilizing facilities
outside the Lab, and other activities that are still to be determined, e.g., accelerator science and technology and
nonproliferation and homeland security, which may become initiatives.
Mission Readiness/Facilities and Infrastructure
Overview of Site Facilities and Infrastructure. BNL is located in Upton New York in central Suffolk County
approximately 75 miles east of NYC. The BNL site, former Army Camp Upton, lies in both the Townships of
Brookhaven and Riverhead. BNL is situated on the western rim of the shallow Peconic River watershed. The
marshy areas in the site’s northern and eastern sections are part of the Peconic River headwaters. Approximately
35% of BNL’s 5,320 acre site is developed, which includes the recent construction of the LISF. At the end of FY
2012, there were 314 buildings totaling 4.57M square feet (sf). Of those, 302 buildings totaling 4.4M sf, 29 real
property trailers totaling 19k sf, and 126 other personal property portable structures, totaling 32k sf were DOE-SC
facilities. The average age of SC buildings is 43 years. Sixty buildings (693k sf) date back to World War II
(WW-II) and most major permanent science facilities, excluding those constructed for ISB, NSLS, NSLS-II,
RHIC and the CFN, are DOE-SC facilities built in the 1950s and 1960s. Excluding the areas covered under the
RSL-I/II SLI projects and minor work done under GPP- and laboratory-funded projects, these facilities have not
received any major renovation and many building systems are original. For BNL’s Environmental Management
(EM) program there are 12 buildings totaling 164k sf. and 2 real property trailers totaling 663 sf. The average age
of EM buildings is 51 years. EM groundwater treatment facilities and those (the Brookhaven Graphite Research
Reactor and High Flux Beam Reactor) in the Long Term Response Action Program (LTRA) are expected to be
transferred to SC in FY 2014. BNL has requested that several shutdown facilities, which are awaiting
decommissioning and decontamination, be transferred to EM for disposal, including the former Brookhaven
Medical Research Reactor in B490 and B650, the former Hot Laundry.
The current Land Use Plan can be found on the BNL intranet: http://intranet.bnl.gov/mp/im. Conventional
construction of ISB-I and NSLS-II is complete and will add an additional 307k sf in FY 2013. Table 2 provides
key infrastructure data for SC conventional real property only.
Table 1. SC Infrastructure Data Summary
Total Bldg, Trailer, and OSF RPV($)
(Less 3000 Series OSF’s)
Total OSF 3000 Series RPV($)
Total RPV($)
Total Deferred Maintenance($)
Total Owned Acreage
Site Wide ACI(B, S, T)
$2,494,898,391
$1,602,531,573
$4,097,429,964
$111,543
5,320
0.957
# Building
Assets
148
151
15
22
43
115
0
29
# Trailer # OSF
Assets Assets
0
86
29
19
2
1
14
12
2
0
0
# GSF
(Bldg)
3,410,606
1,068,301
87,204
606,251
141,340
2,795,960
0
178,018
0.957
Mission Critical
0.957
Mission Dependent
0.999
Not Mission Dependent
94.79
Office
93.18
Warehouse
Asset Utilization
91.31
Laboratory
2, 3
Index (B, T)
0.00
Hospital
90.43
Housing
B=Building; S=Structure; T=Trailers
1
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings, Trailers, and OSF’s (excludes series 3000 OSF’s).
2
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings and Trailers.
3
Only includes assets with usage codes that fall into these 5 FRPC categories. Other usage types are not included.
Asset Condition
Index (B, S, T) 1
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
# GSF
(Trailer)
0
14,627
1,330
8,604
4,530
701
0
0
59
Facilities and Infrastructure to Support Laboratory Missions. The major issue confronting BNL and the
mission readiness of its core capabilities is the need for capital renewal and new facilities where existing buildings
cannot meet the required functionality. Since many of BNL’s permanent science buildings are ~ 50 years old,
they require substantial investments in mechanical and electrical system upgrades. Typical upgrades to research
labs include new fume hoods and casework and creation of “clean rooms”, some of which cannot be achieved by
renovating existing facilities. In addition, many research labs need state-of-the-art upgrades, including stringent
environmental and vibration control. BNL has identified those “permanent” facilities that will form the platform
for current and future core capabilities. The RSL-I project was completed in FY 2012 and invested $18M in
renovation of facilities. The RSL-II project, completing this year, will invest an additional $50M in permanent
facilities that are well designed and structurally sound. With the planned investments indicated, their ability to
support world-class science can be extended significantly. Some capabilities of existing programs are hampered
by the lack of high-accuracy labs. The ISB-I and the proposed ISB-II and ISB-III projects will help address these
needs; however, delays in project funding for the latter two will require intermediate projects, putting additional
pressure on already oversubscribed operating funds to ensure program needs are met and anticipated growth
supported. BNL’s direct investment in conjunction with Line Item support through the SLI program will ensure
BNL’s leadership roles within the SC Laboratory Complex.
The mission readiness needs of BNL’s technical facilities and infrastructure now, in 5 years, and in 10 years and
the current mission readiness of support facilities and infrastructure are summarized in the tables contained in
Appendix C. Mission Critical facilities continue to be evaluated against Mission Readiness needs. An
infrastructure study completed in FY 2011 focused on near and mid-term IGPP- and operating-funded projects; it
concluded that waiting for the future SLI projects to be constructed is not a viable solution. As such, a
comprehensive plan was developed to evaluate alternatives including identification of smaller scale stopgap
projects that could be funded by operating funds to address the most immediate needs and to identify the need to
pursue alternative funding sources for some actions. The Lab will continue to work with NYS to maintain low
cost power for operation of its facilities. An overview of the infrastructure needed to support BNL’s mission,
broken down by core capability, follows.
•
Particle Physics: The Physics Department, Building 510 (B510), is a key facility for major activities in
particle physics at LHC-ATLAS, studies of neutrino properties, theory, and development of a program in
observational cosmology. The 51 year-old 200k sf building, comprised mainly of labs, offices, shops,
and high-bay assembly space, has major capital renewal needs. These needs will be addressed by the
RSL-II SLI Line Item, BNL IGPP, and operating funds. RSL-II provides needed clean room space and
clean power for detector development. At the conclusion of the line item project in FY 2014, most major
needs are expected to be addressed. The new Large Seminar Room and Lounge were completed in FY
2013 and are a huge improvement for the whole Laboratory. B515 houses the RACF and the US-ATLAS
Analysis Support Center, as well as BG/Q. A gap for B515 is the continuing need for additional power
and cooling as computing is expanded. Associated electrical infrastructure needs are being addressed
with IGPP over the planning period. The Instrumentation Division (B535), which builds detectors for
observational cosmology and low-noise electronics and other innovative detectors for particle physics,
nuclear physics, and photon sciences is 49 years-old and has issues with capital renewal and lack of clean
room and other dedicated lab space. These needs will be addressed during the ten-year planning period
with either IGPP or operating funds or possibly as a part of the proposed ISB-III project. Plans to provide
the needed clean room space in alternate locations continue to be evaluated. The areas of B901 housing
the advanced accelerator development group for next-generation facilities and B902 used for accelerator
upgrades to the LHC do not have major issues.
•
Nuclear Physics: B510, B515, and B535 are also key facilities for experimental and theoretical nuclear
physics research including relativistic heavy ion and polarized proton spin studies, developing the
scientific and technical case for eRHIC, and designing and constructing advanced detector
instrumentation and electronics. The RBRC is located in B510. The gaps and actions are the same as for
Particle Physics. The main experimental facilities are a series of buildings mostly in the buildings 9001000 series range, collectively known as RHIC, housing the accelerator and its support facilities that
include research dedicated toward RHIC improvements and eRHIC. The primary gap is operational
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
60
efficiencies that have begun to be addressed through consolidation of functions, which in turn, will result
in several run-down buildings becoming vacant for future demolition. Operating funds will be used to
renovate and upgrade existing facilities, such as B911, B912, and B924 in order that the consolidation can
occur. The NNDC is located in B197, which is a WW-II era wood building that is in need of
replacement.
•
Accelerator Science: R&D related to this capability in accelerator design, development and
implementation of high brightness guns, stochastic cooling, superconducting RF technology, advanced
beam cooling, energy recovery linacs, a possible Neutrino Factory/Muon Collider, and fabrication of high
Tc magnets occurs in several facilities previously discussed, such as B510, 535 and 901, 902, 911 & 912
(part of
C-AD). Other buildings including B703, 725, 830, 832, and 902 support NSLS-II R&D,
design, and construction. B820 houses the ATF, but room for expansion is needed. B912 is under
consideration as a new location for the ATF to allow it to grow as needed. Most of the labs in B703 have
been renovated and some major buildings systems have also been upgraded. Additional rehab of
remaining labs and buildings systems will need to be accomplished during the planning period. There are
no major gaps other than those previously described.
•
Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science (CMPMS): The current key facilities for CMPMS
research that focuses on new and improved materials for renewable energy, energy storage, and energy
efficiency are B480, 510, and 703 as well as at NSLS (B725), the CFN (B735), and BG/Q (B515). The
partial renovation of B480, part of the RSL-I project, was completed last year. This project has made
B480 fully capable. The CMPMS functions in B510 and B703 have begun to relocate to the new ISB-I.
This effort will complete in early FY 2014 and will provide the high quality/high accuracy space needed
to support the program. Most materials work will be relocated to the newly renovated labs by the end of
2013. The CFN and BG/Q do not have any major gaps or planned actions.
•
Chemical & Molecular Science: Laboratories for fundamental energy-related research, theory, and
computation in the chemical and molecular sciences are located in B555 (Chemistry). Approximately
40% of the building is being renovated under the RSL-II project. The remaining areas will be renovated
with operating funds. BNL has identified these needs and will propose a time-phased plan to address
them. Other key enabling facilities are NSLS, the CFN, and BG/Q. The CFN and BG/Q do not have any
major gaps or planned actions and NSLS experiments will transfer to NSLS-II, when completed.
•
Climate Change Science: Key facilities for research in clouds and aerosols, physics-based
representations of climate-related atmospheric processes, and the impacts of climate change on plant
systems and for developing and implementing ARM and BER global change experiments are B490 and
B815. Portions of B490, constructed in 1958, have been converted for this use. B490 needs major capital
renewal or replacement. Options will be explored in the later part of the ten-year planning period. In the
interim, capital renewal such as HVAC replacement will be accomplished, as needed, to keep the facility
operational. B815 was constructed in 1961 and expanded in 1995. Major capital renewal in B815 has
been funded over the years through GPP and was completed this year by the SLI Line Item, RSL-I,
making B815 essentially fully capable.
•
Biological Systems Science: B463 (Biology) is a key facility for structural analysis of biological systems,
monitoring and engineering metabolic processes in plants for biofuels and bio-based products, and
studying the effects of radiation on living systems. B901 (Radiochemistry Labs and Cyclotron), B490
(Medical), and B555 (Chemistry) are important for development of radiotracers and instrumentation used
for monitoring biological processes in plants. Radioisotope preparation takes place in B901. The areas in
all three facilities housing these functions have major capital renewal needs. B463 was constructed over a
period of 40 years with the initial phase going back to WW-II. Assessments of the laboratories in the
older phases found the condition to be “poor”, with excessive operations and maintenance cost and
unsuitable for major renewal. The space will need to be replaced or repurposed. The Plant Science
groups are slated to move to the ISB-II building, but funding delays will require intermediate
improvements of existing space or identification of alternate space. A study of options, including
renovating existing space, is ongoing. Replacement of some of the greenhouses was completed this year,
but additional greenhouses will be needed with ISB-II or before. The expansion of Plant Science can be
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
61
partially accommodated by consolidating research for NASA, currently conducted in the section of B463
where investment is warranted, into B490. B490 and B901 require major capital renewal of building
systems, which will be addressed through operating funds. B901 was built in the same time period
around 1950 and the space is in severe need of repair and refurbishment and HVAC is a particular
problem in these spaces. Imaging studies are performed in B906 (PET), which has no major
infrastructure gaps. However, the existing facilities to produce the associated short-lived isotopes for
these studies require refurbishment of a cyclotron, which is located in B901. The isotope processing labs
are inadequate; expanding and upgrading the facilities will be investigated. Instrumentation for
monitoring biological processes is also developed in B510 and B535 (discussed above). Supporting
experimental facilities are B725 (NSLS), B958 (NSRL), and B735 (CFN), none of which has major
infrastructure gaps impeding the science.
•
Applied Nuclear Science & Technology: Key office buildings are B197, which houses programs in
nonproliferation, global nuclear security, and detector development for national and homeland security
and B130, home to programs in nuclear energy and infrastructure systems. Both are WW-II era wood
buildings in need of replacement. Current plans are to pursue better space as part of an overall
consolidation effort resulting from the NSLS-II staff vacating space and moving into their new space.
Additionally, an office building, potentially alternate-financed, which could address this gap is being
considered. Other work is performed in small portions of several buildings including B750 Annex
(RAP), B815 (detectors), and B902 and B911 (applications of accelerator physics to medicine).
Radioisotopes for national needs are produced at the BLIP (B931), which could be replaced by the CIRC
(if built at BNL). All radioisotope research, processing, and assays are carried out in the 63-year old
B801. This building is solidly constructed, but most major building systems are original and becoming
unreliable. Capital renewal with IGPP will be necessary.
•
Applied Materials Science & Engineering: Key buildings supporting this work are described in the core
capability on Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science.
•
Chemical Engineering: Key buildings for this effort are discussed in the Chemical and Molecular
Science core capability.
•
Systems Engineering & Integration: This area encompasses many buildings that enable BNL to deliver
Large-Scale User Facilities and Advanced Instrumentation. All have been mentioned previously. They
include: B480, 510, 535, 703, 725, 817, 830, 832, 901, 902, 911, and 912. This area will benefit from
buildings in design and under construction, including NSLS-II. A new program funded by the Empire
State Development Corporation will allow the start of the development of the AEGIS facility for study of
grid problems.
•
Large-Scale User Facilities & Advanced Instrumentation: Facilities for this capability include those for
systems engineering and integration (above) as well as the user facilities themselves, and for development
of state-of-the art detectors and electronics. They include: B197, 515, 535, 725, 734, 735, 815, 820, 911,
the AGS, and RHIC, all of which have been discussed previously and also involve buildings in design and
under construction, including NSLS-II and potentially ISB-III. A study of the Collider-Accelerator
complex identified a series of projects to be implemented over the next several years that would improve
operational efficiency and right-size its space. Beginning with key mission critical buildings, additional
studies are being performed to refine the needs and develop time-phased implementation plans. A study
was performed to evaluate the use options for B725 after NSLS operations stop. Future use will be
greatly influenced by the B725 decontamination and decommissioning plan under development.
Significant IGPP investment to further build out the NSLS-II Laboratory Office Buildings is expected
over the planning period.
Support Facilities and Infrastructure. The most significant issue facing the support divisions is that many are
still located in WW-II era wood buildings. To address this, a project to construct modern office buildings
potentially using alternative financing or leased space is being explored. In addition, re-alignment of support
shops under the Integrated Facility Management model is helping to right-size these facilities by reducing
maintenance costs and increasing operational efficiency. While BNL’s utilities are fairly reliable, they are aging
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
62
and issues impacting reliability are likely to increase. BNL completed a study in FY 2011, which evaluated its
utilities and recommended strategies to address needs. The study identified significant short-term needs
confirming that the aging water, electric, and steam distribution system components need replacement and will
have to be addressed. These needs will be further prioritized and a strategy to address them will be developed.
A Mission Readiness Peer Review occurred in August 2009. The Peer Review team, consisting of members from
other SC National Labs, validated BNL’s planning processes as being robust and capable of identifying and
addressing Mission Readiness needs.
Strategic Site Investments. In order for the Laboratory to continue as a world leader in science and technology,
it will be necessary to address critical infrastructure concerns. Paramount to this objective is implementation of
infrastructure renewal, i.e., upgrades and enhancements needed to support the expanding scientific and
technological base, while providing reliable uninterrupted utility services with sufficient reserve capacities to
support future planned growth. In addition, the Laboratory must provide world-class facilities that will support
the recruitment and retention of a premier staff.
Many of the current buildings and laboratories are of 1950s and 1960s vintage, and can continue to support future
science needs when renewed. In other cases, the needed scientific capabilities (high accuracy temperature
controlled labs, vibration isolation, RF shielded spaces, etc.) cannot be developed within existing buildings and
new laboratory buildings will be needed. Some of this need is being met by the recently completed ISB-I.
To meet the infrastructure challenges, BNL has formulated the following strategies to address the mission needs
based on the constraints and strengths of the various funding sources:
•
DOE SLI funds: Use to construct new state-of-the-art research facilities (e.g., high-accuracy labs) that
facilitate collaboration and support interdisciplinary research teams, where existing buildings cannot be
retrofitted feasibly or economically. Where building retrofit is warranted, fund major renovation, and
upgrades to permanent mission critical buildings that can readily support current and future missions.
•
BNL Indirect Funds:
o
o
o
o
•
Continue to defer major investments in 70-year-old wood buildings, while performing minimum
maintenance to keep these buildings safe and operational. When opportunities arise, consolidate staff
from these old wood structures and demolish them. To address some recent program space
consolidation and other vacancies resulting from moves to the new ISB and NSLS-II facilities, BNL is
developing a Space Consolidation Plan. The goals of this plan are to right-size the facilities by
consolidating and vacating space, such that some buildings can be shut down for ultimate demolition and
to ensure that the best condition space is used. At the same time, some programs are looking for
additional space to meet their mission needs; this will be factored in the planning. Taking advantage of
past consolidation efforts, BNL has demolished approximately 300,000 sf of substandard space over the
past ten years.
Work with DOE, local, and state regulators to prioritize environmental liability issues.
Prioritize all proposed investments in infrastructure and ES&H and program them to maximize the value
of BNL’s infrastructure, reduce risk, and support the science and technological programs.
Use selective off-site leasing when needed.
Other Funding:
o
o
Where federal funding is not likely, pursue alternative financing for new buildings. BNL continues to
investigate alternative financing and/or leasing opportunities to relocate staff from the WW-II era wood
office buildings into a modern office building.
BNL is considering the development of a new collaborative science and technology campus located
within the site boundary. The objective of this campus (referred to as “Discovery Park”) is to promote
synergistic efforts with industrial, academic, and other government agency partners, consistent with the
Lab’s Discovery to Deployment agenda. Currently included for consideration are: enhancement of the
educational mission through creation of the Portal to Discovery; smart-grid research at AEGIS; housing;
and replacement of WW II-era wood office buildings.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
63
In response to the Laboratory’s scientific and technological priorities, infrastructure projects were formulated and
will be included in the Integrated Facilities and Infrastructure Crosscut in order to maintain and upgrade missionessential facilities and to provide new ones, where warranted. Completing these projects will enable BNL to
realize its mission and to meet the goals expressed in the Department of Energy’s Strategic Plan 2011. BNL
expects that these projects will be funded from the following sources:
•
SLI Line Items: Over the next ten years, as part of the SC Infrastructure Modernization Initiative, BNL has
proposed projects that will help to achieve mission needs identified as part of its Site Master Plan process.
The projects can be categorized as those providing new modern facilities where it is not cost effective to
rehabilitate and upgrade existing ones; those which will rehabilitate and upgrade permanent buildings where
the functional layout meets current and anticipated program needs; and those which will modernize utilities to
ensure continued high-reliability.
o
o
New facilities: BNL has proposed an ISB complex consisting of three buildings to be constructed in
phases. ISB-I was recently completed at a total estimated cost (TEC) of $66M; ISB-II, with a proposed
project FY 2016 design start, has a TEC of $70M; ISB-III, with a proposed project start in FY 2019, has a
TEC of $62M.
Rehabilitation and upgrade of BNL’s major lab/office buildings: BNL proposed phasing this work over
three projects (RSL-I, -II, and -III). RSL-I (TEC $18M) impacted portions of B480 and B815 and was
completed in FY 2012. For RSL-II ($50M), CD-3B was granted June 2011 and the construction contract
was awarded July 2011. The project impacts B510 and B555. Phase III (TEC $74M) is not scheduled to
start before FY 2020; current planning is to continue the upgrade of B510 and B555, but other needs will
also be explored, such as repurposing the NSLS building and relocating the Instrumentation Division.
•
Program Line Items: In addition to SLI-funded Line Items, BNL is constructing the BES program-funded
NSLS-II project. The conventional facilities portion ~$300M consisting of the ring and support building
completed in FY 2012; five Laboratory/Office buildings were completed in FY 2013, adding 619k sf. A
small beamline extension is under construction with completion expected in early FY 2014. The project
included funds to improve the associated infrastructure. Although adjusted downward consistent with overall
budget forecasts, IGPP projects will average $8.6M per year for the planning period (FY 2013 - FY 2022).
These projects will help meet the immediate needs of BNL’s core capabilities and reduce the backlog of nonline item capital construction needs.
•
Indirect Funding: This includes maintenance regular maintenance, maintenance projects, and Deferred
Maintenance Reduction (DMR) for FY 2013, which is $40.5M. This investment is expected to increase by ~
3% per year starting in FY 2015. In addition, direct program funded contributions to building maintenance
typically average several million dollars per year, further reducing backlogs. For FY 2013, so as not to
significantly impact the science programs, consistent with the overall Mission Readiness, ~ $1M was shifted
from various operating accounts into projects and some DMR funds were diverted to support the
extraordinary one-time costs to move staff and equipment into the newly created space of the ISB-I project
and the space renovated under the RSL-II project. In any given year, funds will be distributed among IGPP,
DMR and operating expense projects to meet the most urgent needs, while maintaining the overall level of
investment.
• Environmental Liabilities: EM has committed to incorporating several SC assets into its cleanup program
for disposition, but the timeline is uncertain. Included are B491, 650, 701, 810, & 811. Additional cleanup
work will be accomplished in B801 and 830. Operation of current EM facilities and LTRA actions are
planned to transfer to SC with BES funding in FY 2014.
•
Non-Federal Funding: This includes the Utilities Energy Savings Contract (UESC), which will be
implemented this year. It will provide funding for utilities and building system improvements. NYS has
committed some funding to begin the project planning for the SGRID3 project. Other opportunities will be
explored as needed and identified.
Attachment 2 contains the Site Master Plan vision at the end of the planning period.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
64
Trends and Metrics. BNL maintenance investment plans show a steady increase in the Asset Condition Index
(ACI) (Figure 1). Maintenance funds are focused mainly on Mission Critical assets (Table 2).
BNL expects to achieve a site wide ACI of 0.965, the long-term Federal Real Property Council target, by FY
2016 and maintain that level or higher. Mission needs are considered in the project prioritization process and
favor Mission Critical facilities in funding decisions. With the focus on Mission Critical Facilities, the ACI for
those facilities will be even higher. Using its mission readiness evaluations, BNL will determine if it makes sense
to direct some indirect funds normally used for DMR to IGPP to reduce rehab and improvement cost once the
ACI reaches the DOE target level. Current and projected future states of Mission Readiness are discussed above
in the Facilities and Infrastructure to Support Laboratory Missions section.
Table 2. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments ($M)
2012
Maintenance
DMR
EFD (Overhead)
IGPP
GPP
Line Items (SLI)
Total Investment
Estimated RPV
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
34.0
32.9
32.9
33.9
34.9
36.0
37.1
38.2
39.4
40.5
41.8
43.0
9.5
6.8
10.3
10.3
10.6
10.9
11.3
11.6
12.0
12.3
12.7
13.1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7.4
9.4
7.8
7.8
8.0
8.2
8.5
8.7
9.0
9.3
9.5
9.8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
15.5
14.5
0.0
0.0
5.0
20.0
20.0
32.0
58.0
57.0
19.0
22.0
66.4
63.6
51.0
52.0
58.5
75.1
76.9
90.5
118.4
119.1
83.0
87.9
2,574
2,854
2,945
3,033
3,135
3,229
3,419
3,522
3,632
3,741
3,853
Estimated DM
107.0
108.6
107.3
100.4
95.9
93.3
90.2
86.7
82.6
77.9
80.3
Site-Wide ACI
0.958
0.962
0.964
0.967
0.969
0.971
0.974
0.975
0.977
0.979
0.979
Figure 1. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments
140
1.000
0.990
120
0.980
100
0.970
80
0.960
0.950
60
0.940
40
0.930
0.920
20
0.910
0
0.900
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total Investment ($M)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Site-Wide ACI
65
Attachment 1. Mission Readiness Tables
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Now
In 5
years
Mission Ready
N
M
P
C
Key
Buildings
X
X
• 510
• 515,510
• 535
Particle
Physics
• 901,820
In 10
years
Key Core Capability
Objectives
• ISB-III
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
• Host institution for U.S.
particle physics with
ATLAS; neutrino oscillation
experiments; theory,
including lattice QCD;
observational cosmology
• RACF Computing Facility;
QCDCQ; and associated
software
• Detector development and
low-noise microelectronics
• AARD for next generation
facilities; ATF
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
• B510 capital renewal, such
as electrical & mechanical
system end-of-life
replacements, rehabilitation
and upgrades to labs, is
needed to meet program
needs. Clean rooms are
needed for detector R&D and
fabrication (Note 1)
• B515 expansion and an
associated infrastructure
upgrade were made to service
the anticipated increasing
demands on CPU power and
disk storage capacity for both
programs through ~2020.
Continuing power and cooling
infrastructure needs to support
increased computing capacity
throughout the coming decade
may well exceed BNL
infrastructure funding levels;
reliable alternate power feeder
also needed (Note 2)
• B535 facility upgrades or
replacement, such as clean
rooms and general capital
renewal, are needed to support
detector fabrication, etc. (Note
3)
• B820 ATF program
expansion is limited, move to
B912 being planned
• B901&902-no major gaps
Action Plan
Laboratory
IGPP
• Data Center
Improvements, B515
(FY15-18) (Note B)
• B535 HVAC
Improvements for
Clean Room (FY12)
(Note C)
• Upgrade Printed
Circuit Board Facility,
B535 (FY19+) (Note C)
• Semiconductor
Detector Develop Lab,
B535 (FY19+) (Note C)
• Sensor
Characterization &
Special Projects Lab,
B535 (FY19+) (Note C)
DOE
SLI
• RSL-II, B510
(FY10) (Note A)
• ISB-III (FY20+)
• RSL-III (FY20+)
• Central Computing
Building (FY20+)
(Note B)
Non-Cap Operating
• B510 Air Handler
AC-6 Replacement
(FY16) (Note A)
• B510 Move-In
Support (FY13-14)
(Note A)
66
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Now
Nuclear
Physics
Mission Ready
N
M
P
X
In 5
years
• 197
• 510,535
X
In 5
years
• 515,510
• 900&
1000
Bldgs.
In 10
years
Now
C
Key
Buildings
X
X
• 510,703,
725,832,
830,902
X
• 535,911,
912
• 820, 911
Accelerator
Science &
Technology
• 901
• 902
In 10
years
X • 930
• Various
• RHIC
(Various
Bldgs)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Key Core Capability
Objectives
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
• Relativistic heavy ion
physics & polarized proton
spin studies; scientific case
& R&D for EIC; nuclear
theory, including high
temperature lattice QCD;
RBRC
• High temperature lattice
QCD computing; RACF;
QCDCQ; and associated
software
• RHIC experimental
complex
• B510-Note 1
• B515-Note 2
• B535-Note 3
• B911-renovation of several
areas to improve operations
(Note 4)
• RHIC-consolidate older
facilities into upgraded &
more efficient facilities;
needed to improve operational
efficiency & reduce DM. New
facilities will be needed at
several locations (Note 6)
• Accelerator design,
including
RHIC, NSLS, and NSLS-II
• Superconducting RF
technology; energy recovery
linacs; innovative electron
cooling techniques;
stochastic cooling; and highintensity polarized electron
guns
• Advanced accelerator
concepts at the ATF &
research in high brightness
beams and novel free
electron sources;
development of next
generation hadron therapies
• R&D toward future muon
collider/neutrino factory
• High temperature
superconducting magnets
• Electron Beam Ion Source
• Joint BNL/SBU CASE
• B510-Note 1
• B535-Note 3
• B911-Note 4
• B912-Note 5
• B901,902 & 820-no major
gaps
• B703-No major gaps
• B725-no major gaps
• B817-No major gaps
• B820 ATF programs
expansion is limited, move to
B912 being planned
• B832-No major gaps
• B930 major capital renewal
needs
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
• B510-Note A
• B515-Note B
IGPP
• B924 Renovate for
Operational Efficiency
Ph II(FY16-17)
• Renovate Tech Shop
& Clean Room, B912
(FY12-14)
Non-Cap Operating
• B911 Renovation
(FY15-18) (Note D)
• B930 Chiller
Replacement (FY15)
• B510-Note A
• B535-Note C
• B911-Note D
SLI
• B510 -Note A
• RSL-III (FY20+)
• Central Computing
Building (FY20+)
(Note B)
Program Line Item
• eRHIC project
(TBD)
• B510-Note A
• B912-Note E
67
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Condensed
Matter
Physics &
Materials
Science
Time
Frame
Mission Ready
N
M
Now
X
In 5
years
X
• 480,510,
703 (ISB-I)
• 725
• 735
• 515
X • 480, CFN
• 480
• B740-747
In 10
years
X
In 5
years
• 555
• 725
• 735
• 515
• B740-747
X
In 10
years
Climate
Change
Science
C
• 480, 735
Now
Chemical
and
Molecular
Science
P
Key
Buildings
X
Now
X
• 490
In 5
years
X
• 490
In 10
years
X
• 490, 815
• 490,815
• 815, 725
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Key Core Capability
Objectives
• Fundamental studies of
complex materials through
materials synthesis, advanced
characterization, and theory;
research at the gap between
basic and applied science
• BNL-led Center for
Emerging Superconductivity
and EFRCs on excitonics and
photovoltaic efficiency
• NSLS
• CFN
• BG/Q
• Inst. for Adv. Electron
Microscopy
• PLD, MBE
• NSLS-II
• Fundamental experiments,
theory, and computation in
heterogeneous-, electro-, and
photo-catalysis,
electrochemistry, chemical
dynamics, and radiation
chemistry, ACER; applied
fuel cell electrocatalysis
• NSLS
• CFN
• BG/Q
• NSLS-II
• Partnership in the ARM
Climate Research Facilities,
designing and conducting
global change experiments
• Formation, growth, and
optical properties of clouds
and aerosols and 3-D cloud
reconstruction
• Physics-based
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
Action Plan
Laboratory
• B480-no major gaps
• B703-recent rehabs closed
gap
• B725-no major gaps
• B735-no major gaps
• B515-no gaps for BG/Q
• B734(ISB-I)-new bldg.,
construction started FY10
• B740-747(NSLS-II), new
bldg., conventional
construction complete in FY13
Non-Cap Operating
• Relocation Support
for CMPMS move to
ISB-I (FY13)
• B555-significant capital
renewal & fire protection
upgrades needed. Space to
consolidate computers and
swing office and lab space is
needed to facilitate the RSL-II
SLI project (Note 7)
• B725-no major gaps
• B735-no major gaps
• B515-no gaps for BG/Q
• B740-747(NSLS-II), new
bldg., conventional
construction complete in FY13
Non-Cap Operating
• B555-Move-In
Support Post RSL-II
(FY13)
• RSL-II Companion
Project, B555 (FY1012)
• B490-needs major capital
renewal (e.g. elect & mech.
systems). Need better
computing space.
• B815-most gaps being
addressed in RSL-I
• B725-no major gaps
• B515-no gaps for BG/Q
Non-Cap Operating
• Replace Roof “C”
Wing, B815 (FY14)
IGPP
• Computer Room
Upgrade, B490 (FY17)
DOE
SLI
SLI
• RSL-II, B555
(FY10) (Note F)
• RSL-III, B555
(FY20+)
SLI
• ISB-II (FY15)
68
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Mission Ready
N
M
P
C
Key
Buildings
• 515
• ISB-II
Biological
Systems
Science
Now
X
In 5
years
X
• 421,463,7
5,73B74047
• 490,555,9
01,906,560
,535
510
• 463,ISBII
In 10
years
X
• 463,958
• 463
Now
Applied
Nuclear
Science &
Technology
In 5
years
In 10
years
• 931,902,9
11,912
• 197
X
X
• 197,815
• 750,197
• 130
X • At SBU
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Key Core Capability
Objectives
representations of climaterelated atmospheric
processes
• Climate change impact on
plant systems
• Consequences of CO2
sequestration on molecular
scale geology at NSLS
• BG/Q
• Structure/function
relationships using molecular
biology & structural biology
and biological imaging
(NSLS, NSLS II, CFN, cryoEM)
• PET radiochemical tracers
and imaging technology for
monitoring biological
processes, including plant
metabolism
• Metabolic engineering of
plants for biofuels and biobased products
• Effects of radiation on
living systems, including
NSRL
• Computational Biology
• Medical applications:
BLIP, RCMS (conceptual),
possibly CIRC
• Nuclear safeguards &
security, nuclear
nonproliferation, materials
protection & control; NNDC
• Advanced radiation
detector R&D, including
CZT prototype detectors
• RAP
• Energy policy, next
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
• B421-69 years old, needs
replacement
• B463-needs major capital
renewal, including
replacement of greenhouses
• B555- Note 7
• B725–no major gaps
• B735-no major gaps
• B490-needs major capital
renewal
• B901-no major gaps
• B906-no major gaps
• B560-no major gaps
• B535-Note 3
• B510-Note 1
• B958-no major gaps
• B462- Conversion to high
bay labs needed
• B931-no major gaps, some
DMR needs
• B902-no major gaps, some
DMR needs
• B911-Note 4
• B197-69 year old wooden
bldg. needs replacement, move
staff to Alt. Financed Nat’l
Security Bldg.
• B421-68 years old, needs
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
• B535-Note C
• B510-Note A
IGPP
• Greenhouse
Replacement (Partial)
(FY12)
• B555 Lab/Office
Renovation, East Wings
(FY19+)
• B535-Note A
• B510-Note C
• B555-Note F
SLI
• ISB-II (FY15)
Operating
• B555-Note F
• B911-Note D
IGPP
• Solar Energy
Research Support Labs,
B526 (FY12-19)
Other
• Radiation Detector
Facility, B462 (FY1416)
• Alt Financed Office
Building (TBD)
69
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Mission Ready
N
M
P
Now
X
In 5
years
X
Applied
Materials
Science &
Engineering
In 10
years
Chemical
Engineering
Now
X
In 5
years
X
In 10
years
C
Key
Buildings
Key Core Capability
Objectives
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
generation reactors, materials
in extreme environments, and
assessment of nuclear energy
in the U.S. energy future
• NYEPI
replacement
• B815-gaps being addressed
in RSL-I
• B750-annex portion, no gaps
• B130-69 year old wooden
bldg. needs replacement.
Move staff to Alt Fin Office
building
• Strongly
correlated/complex materials
(including films grown by
MBE) and nanomaterials for
• 480,510
renewable energy
703,734
technologies; materials and
nanomaterials for energy
• 515,
storage and solar fuels
480,725
• Characterization by X-ray
735,740& neutron scattering at NSLS
747
& NSLS II, electron –
spectroscopy, -microscopy,
& -diffraction, scanning
tunneling spectroscopy, and
X
nanoprobes, supported by
theory and modeling, and
• 526,815
studies of nanoscale ordering
• LISF,
& assembly
research
• Solar energy generation &
array
electrical energy storage
(future)
technologies
• LISF, future solar research
array
• 526,555
• Design of efficient catalysts
for sustainable chemical
conversions
• 725
• Characterization at the
NSLS, including using the
• 740X 747,735,51 tools of the Synchrotron
Catalysis Consortium
5
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
• Alt Financed National
Security Building
(TBD)
Under Evaluation
• Cyclotron Isotope
Research Center site
prep (CIRC)
• See Condensed
Matter Physics &
Materials Science
• See Condensed Matter
Physics & Materials Science
• B526 –most labs need major
rehab
• B815 – select labs need
rehab
IGPP
• Solar Energy
Research Support Labs,
B526 (FY12-19)
• Upgrade Labs 114
and 114A for
microscope, B480
(FY13)
• See Condensed
Matter Physics &
Materials Science
Third party
• Research array
• See Chemical and Molecular
Science
• B526 –most labs need major
rehab
• See Chemical and
Molecular Science
IGPP
• Solar Energy
Research Support Labs,
B526 (FY12-19)
• See Chemical and
Molecular Science
70
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Mission Ready
N
M
P
C
Key
Buildings
Key Core Capability
Objectives
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
• NSLS-II, CFN, BG/Q
Now
X
In 5
years
X
Systems
Engineering
&
Integration
In 10
years
Now
LargeScale User
Facilities/
Advanced
Instrument
ation
In 5
years
In 10
years
X
X
• 725
• 735
• 820
• 703,725,8
17
830,832,90
2
• 510,535
902,911,
912
• 510,902
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Laboratory
DOE
• B555 Lab/Office
Renovation, East Wings
(FY19+)
• Components for NSLS
• CFN
• ATF
• NSLS-II
• See above for details
(Lab plans already
shown)
• Components for RHIC,
RHIC-II, eRHIC
• Components for
International Facilities
(LHC, Daya Bay)
• 480, 902 • Superconducting Magnet
Energy Storage systems
•
Components for Future
•
510,535,I
X
Facilities (LBNE, LSST)
SB-III
• Components for Muon
• 901
Collider/Neutrino Factory
• Site
under
• AEGIS Center
evaluation
• 725
• NSLS
• 735
• CFN
• 740-747 • NSLS-II
• 820
• ATF
• 900 &
• RHIC/AGS, RHIC-II,
1000
eRHIC future
Bldgs.
• 515
• RACF
• 958
• NSRL
• See systems engineering
• 535,197
and integration for
815,ISBobjectives related to Particle
X
I,ISB-III
Physics R&D & planning
• LISF
• State-of-the-art detectors &
electronics
Action Plan
• See above for details (gaps
for all buildings already listed)
Planning
Funds for design and
planning for SGRID3,
which includes the
Advanced Electrical
Grid Innovation &
Solution Center
(AEGIS) facility
committed by NYS
• See above for
details (DOE plans
already shown)
• See above for details
(Lab plans already
shown)
• See above for details (gaps
for all buildings already listed)
• Need for low cost power
IGPP
• Furnish B744 and 745
• Lab Office Upgrades,
B742 (FY14-17)
• Lab Upgrades, B745
(FY17)
• See above for
details (DOE plans
already shown)
Operating
• Rehab Motor Control
Centers (FY10-15)
71
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Mission Ready
N
M
P
C
Key
Buildings
Key Core Capability
Objectives
• LISF
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
• Replace Outdoor Dist
Panels (FY14-16)
• Rehab AGS Pwr. Dist
Sys Fan House A
(FY15-17)
• Rehab AGS Pwr. Dist
Sys Fan House B
(FY15-17)
• Rehab AGS Pwr. Dist
Sys Fan House C,D,E
(FY15-17)
3rd Party (NYS &
other sources)
• Alt. Financed Office
Bldg. (FY15)
• Continue to work
with NYS to maintain
low cost power
• LISF
Planning
Funds for design and
planning for SGRID3,
which includes the
Advanced Electrical
Grid Innovation &
Solution Center
(AEGIS) facility
committed by NYS
General Notes
N = Not
M = Marginal
P = Partial C= Capable
Capital renewal is replacement (like-in-kind) of bldg. systems such as roof, HVAC, electrical equipment, & interior finishes, including ceilings & flooring
Key Building Notes
ISB-I Interdisciplinary Science Building -I - B734
ISB-II Interdisciplinary Science Building-II - Will be B733
ISB-III Interdisciplinary Science Building -III - Will be B732
AGS
A series of buildings all in the 900s
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
72
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Mission Ready
N
M
P
C
Key
Buildings
Key Core Capability
Objectives
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
RHIC A series of buildings all in the 1000s & AGS & B901A
NSLS-II National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS)-II - B740-747
Gap Notes
1. 510 - Capital renewal, such as electrical & mechanical system end-of-life replacements & rehabilitation and upgrades to labs, is needed to meet program needs.
Clean rooms are needed for detector R&D and fabrication
2. 515 - Expansion and an associated infrastructure upgrade were made to service the anticipated increasing demands on CPU power and disk storage capacity for both
programs through ~2020. Continuing power and cooling infrastructure needs to support increased computing capacity throughout the coming decade may well
exceed BNL infrastructure funding levels; reliable alternate power feeder also needed
3. 535 - facility upgrades or replacement, such as clean rooms and general capital renewal, are needed to support detector fabrication, etc
4. 911 - renovation of several areas needed to improve operations
5. 912 – no major gaps, building being repurposed
6. RHIC - consolidation from older less desirable facilities into upgraded and more efficient facilities is needed to improve operational efficiency and reduce DM
7. 555 - significant capital renewal, part will be addressed in RSL II
Action Plan Notes
A
See Particle Physics for details of 510 projects
B
See Particle Physics for details of 515 projects
C
See Particle Physics for details of 535 projects
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
D
E
F
See Nuclear Physics for details of 911 projects
See Nuclear Physics for details of 912 projects
See Chemical and Molecular Science for details of 555 projects
73
Real Property Capability
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission Ready
Current
Facility and Infrastructure Gap
N
M
P
C
Laboratory
Action Plan
DOE
Work Environment
Post Office
1941 wood building, location of future ISBII
Many support groups remain in WWII-era
wood buildings
X
Offices
X
Cafeteria
X
General maintenance-related backlog
Recreational/Fitness
X
General maintenance-related backlog
IGPP: Upgrade B462 for Post
Office/Mail Room (FY15-16)
3rd Party: Alt. Financed Office
Building (FY15)
Operating: Asbestos Abatement,
B488 (FY17+)
Operating: Roof replacement,
Gym (FY12)
IGPP: Alt. Financed Office
Building (FY15)
IGPP: Eyewash & Safety Shower
Improvements ( (FY09-16)
None
None
None
None
X
With expanding staff and guests due to
NSLS-II and CFN, need more capacity
Safety & Health
X
Physical improvements needed for full
compliance and to meet Best Management
Practice
ADA Modification
X
Improvements to meet ADA standards in
public areas and as needed for specific
accommodation
Operating: Misc. modifications for
None
ADA (FY11-18)
X
WWII-era buildings with general
maintenance-related backlog. Right-size
housing by implementing the
recommendations of the Housing Study
which was part of the Infrastructure
Blueprint Project
Other: Looking for partnering
opportunities off-site (e.g.
Workforce Housing)
None
X
WWII-era building, annex in separate
location should be consolidated
3rd Party: Alt. Financed Office
Building (FY15)
None
Child Care
Operating: OSHA Corrective
Actions (FY11-18), Identification
of Asbestos Containing Material
(FY10-18), Electrical Panel
Labeling (FY09-18), Disposal of
Legacy Radioactive & Nuclear
Material (FY09-18)
None
None
User Accommodations
Visitor Housing
Site Services
Library
Medical
X
General maintenance-related backlog
No major projects
None
Examination & Testing
X
General maintenance-related backlog
No major projects
None
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
74
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission Ready
Action Plan
Current
Real Property Capability
Facility and Infrastructure Gap
N
M
P
C
Laboratory
DOE
General maintenance-related backlog and
Maintenance & Fabrication
X
No major projects
None
further consolidation needed
General maintenance-related backlog. Small
addition to provide better cleaning facilities
IGPP: B50 (Security) Replacement
for infection control. Security alarm station
Fire Station / Alarm Station
X
or possible consolidation with Fire None
building is a fifty-eight year-old wood
Station. Further evaluation needed
building operated 24/7 and will require
replacement.
IGPP: Warehouse Office
Storage
X
General maintenance-related backlog
None
Addition, B98 (FY10-12)
Conference and Collaboration Space
Auditorium/Theater
X
General maintenance-related backlog
No major projects
None
Facility upgrades and expansion of central
IGPP: Conference Center
Conference Facility
X
None
conferencing facility needed.
Addition, B488 (FY18+)
SLI: ISB-I (FY09) & ISB-II
Collaboration Space
X
X
No dedicated facilities
No major projects
(FY15) - spaces incorporated
Utilities
Capital Lease-to-Ownership: New
New telephone system needed to allow for
phone system (FY11-15)
Communications
X
expansion and obsolescence. Additional
None
IGPP: Fiber Network Upgrade
fiber-optic needed in several buildings
(FY09-18)
Equipment is beyond its normal service life.
Some, due to system changes, is also overOperating: Rehab 480V & M.V.
dutied based on recent system evaluation.
Equipment such as low and medium voltage Circuit Breakers (Various) (FY11circuit breakers have low operations and can 18), Remote Racking Equip,
Electrical
X
Substation 603, BUS 1&3
be maintained as long as trip units are
replaced. Remote tracking of these breakers (FY18+), Replace Over-Dutied
Electrical Equipment (Various)
in some locations is needed to reduce arc(FY11-18)
flash exposure operational risks. Some
underground 13.8kV distribution cable
beyond useful life.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
75
Real Property Capability
Water
Petroleum/Oil
Gases
Waste/Sewage Treatment
Storm Water
Chilled Water
Steam
Flood Control
Road & Grounds
Parking (surfaces and
structures)
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission Ready
Action Plan
Current
Facility and Infrastructure Gap
N
M
P
C
Laboratory
IGPP: Well 12 (FY14-15),
Some improvements to iron reduction system Replace Well 4 (FY16-17)
are needed at the Water Treatment Plan;
X
Operating: Paint 300,000 Gal
None
elevated water tanks require painting to
extend service life. In addition, some of the Elevated Water Tank, B49 (FY15),
Well 11 Emergency Generator
older iron water mains require replacement.
replacement (FY15)
X
No major gaps
No major projects
None
X
No major gaps
No major projects
None
Address new standards concerning metals
IGPP: New GW Recharge Basins,
X
None
removal in discharge
STP (FY11-14)
IGPP: Storm Water Improvements
X
Some areas flood in heavy rains
None
(FY18+)
IGPP: Central Chilled Water Phase II (FY10-12), Chilled Water
Tower Addition (FY12-13),
Additional capacity estimated at 2,000 tons is
Chiller Water Line Improvements,
needed to meet new planned loads. Existing
B515 (FY18+)
central plant equipment is nearing end of
X
None
service life. Distribution system can be
GPE: Chiller Addition, B600
expanded to additional buildings as an
(FY12)
alternative to chiller replacement as they
reach service life.
Operating: Replace Chillers, B600
(FY11-16), Replace CCWF
Cooling Tower (FY18+)
Some upgrades and repairs needed to BNL’s
IGPP: Convert Boiler 1A To
oldest boiler, 1A. Steam plant exterior shell
Natural Gas (FY18+)
needs rehabilitation. Sections of steam
X
distribution system and associated
Operating: Steam System Rehab
condensate return system are leaking and
Site wide (FY09-18+), Boiler 1A
need replacement. Some steam distribution
Retube Front Half (FY18+)
manholes need to be rehabilitated.
X
See Storm Water
See Storm Water
None
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
X
General maintenance-related backlog
Operating: Repaving (Various)
(FY11-18+)
DOE
None
76
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission Ready
Action Plan
Current
Real Property Capability
Facility and Infrastructure Gap
N
M
P
C
Laboratory
IGPP: Main Gate & Access
General maintenance-related backlog, some
Roadway (FY18+)
Roads & Sidewalks
additional sidewalks needed to improve
None
X
(improved & paved surfaces)
safety, new main entrance road, and
Operating: Repaving (Various)
associated Police Guard Stations
(FY11-18+)
Grounds
X
None
No major projects
None
Security Infrastructure(Baseline Level of Protection)
Current facility functionally capable, but
improvements needed, including improved
IGPP: Main Gate & Access
Main Gate
X
None
protection for guards, additional lighting, and Roadway (FY18+)
improved electrical service
Current facility is a trailer with temporary
IGPP: Main Gate Trailer
Visitors Center
X
None
toilet facilities.
Replacement (FY11-12)
Current facility is a WW-II era wood
Police Headquarters
X
IGPP: Security Building (FY18+) None
building.
IGPP: Hazardous Material
Protection Security Improvements
(FY11-15), Security Alarm &
Needed improvements to address potential
Site Security
X
Video At CSF (FY13-14), Alarms None
physical security vulnerabilities
at Electrical Distribution Centers
(FY14), Security Communications
Towers (FY15)
N = Not
M = Marginal
P = Partial
DOE
C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
77
Attachment 2. Laboratory Site Map
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
78
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
Mission and Overview
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is America’s
particle physics laboratory. Fermilab inspires the
world and enables its scientists to solve the mysteries
of matter, energy, space and time for the benefit of all.
The laboratory’s 1,750 employees and more than
4,000 scientific users drive discovery in particle
physics by building and operating world-leading
accelerator and detector facilities, performing
pioneering research with global partners, and
transforming technologies for science and industry.
Fermilab is the only Department of Energy national
laboratory that operates accelerator facilities for
particle physics research. The laboratory’s complex of
seven particle accelerators is one of the largest in the
world, producing intense particle beams used to
explore neutrinos and ultra-rare processes in nature.
Fermilab integrates U.S. universities and other
national laboratories into the global particle physics
enterprise, serving as a U.S. hub for research at the
Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland and leading
dark-matter and dark-energy experiments located in
the United States, Canada, Chile and Italy. The
laboratory’s R&D infrastructure and technical
expertise advance particle accelerator and detector
technology for use in science and society. Fermilab is
evolving its site and suite of facilities to meet the
needs of the next generation of researchers. In FY
2013 a Campus Master Plan will set 10-year goals for
site development, and the Technology Applications
Program and Illinois Accelerator Research Center will
embark on a program to transform particle physics
technologies for greater societal benefit.
The laboratory’s core skills include experimental and
theoretical particle physics, particle astrophysics and
accelerator science; R&D for accelerator and detector
technologies; the construction and operation of largescale facilities; and high-performance scientific
computing. The laboratory operates particle
accelerators and particle detectors; test beams for
detector development; test facilities for accelerator
research and development; and large-scale computing
facilities.
Fermi Research Alliance manages Fermilab for the
Department of Energy. FRA is an alliance of the
University of Chicago and the Universities Research
Association, a consortium of 86 universities.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Lab-at-a-Glance
Location: Batavia, Illinois
Type: Single-program laboratory
Contractor: Fermi Research Alliance, LLC
Responsible Site Office: Fermi Site Office
Website: www.fnal.gov
Physical Assets:
• 6,800 acres and 362 buildings
• 2.4 Million sf in buildings
• Replacement Plant Value: $1,755 million
• 0 sf in 0 Excess Facilities
• 0 sf in Leased Facilities
Human Capital:
• 1,757 FTEs
• 10 Joint faculty
• 56 Postdoctoral researchers
• 0 Undergraduate and 0 Graduate students
• 4,300 Facility users
• 32 Visiting scientists
FY 2012 Funding by Source (Costs in $M):
ASCR,
$0.6
Other
SC,
$4.319
WFO, DHS,
$5.7 $0.1
NP, $0.5
HEP,
$413.6
Total Lab Operating Costs (excluding ARRA):
$424.8 million
DOE/NNSA Costs: $ 419.1 million
WFO (Non-DOE/Non-DHS) Costs: $5.7 million
WFO as % Total Lab Operating Costs: 1.35%
FY 2012 Total DHS Costs: $0.0 million
ARRA Costed from DOE Sources in FY 2012:
$25.8 million
79
Fermilab’s 6,800-acre site, much of which is open to the public, is located 42 miles west of Chicago in
Batavia, Illinois.
Core Capabilities
Fermilab’s mission is to drive discovery in particle physics by:
•
•
•
building and operating world-leading accelerator and detector facilities
performing pioneering research with global partners
transforming technologies for science and industry
Fermilab’s three core capabilities—particle physics, accelerator science and large scale user facilities/advanced
instrumentation/computing—uniquely combine to support both the laboratory’s particle physics mission and the
DOE Office of Science’s mission to foster, formulate and support forefront basic research programs that advance
the fundamental understanding of matter and energy. The table below illustrates elements that support the three
core capabilities.
Table 1. Key elements that support Fermilab’s three core capabilities.
World-Leading Synergies
Particle
Physics
Accelerator
Science
Large Scale User
Facilities
Theory
X
X
X
X
X
Accelerator Technologies
Advanced Instrumentation
X
X
X
Simulation
X
X
X
Data Analysis & Distributed
Computing
X
X
X
Systems Integration & Operations
X
Project Management
X
The laboratory’s core capabilities integrate and leverage Fermilab’s scientific and engineering expertise and
leadership, particle accelerator, detector, and computing facilities and technology, and national and international
partnerships to answer deep and long-standing questions about the fundamental nature of matter, energy, space
and time. Fermilab deploys a range of sophisticated tools and techniques to answer these questions and to
discover new physics phenomena at three interrelated frontiers of particle physics:
•
The Intensity Frontier, where intense particle beams, such as those produced by Fermilab’s accelerator
complex, reveal new physics.
•
The Energy Frontier, where high-energy particle colliders are used to discover new particles and
directly probe the architecture of the fundamental forces of nature.
•
The Cosmic Frontier, where underground experiments and ground- and space-based telescopes are used
to uncover the natures of dark matter and dark energy, and high-energy particles from space are used to
investigate new physics phenomena.
Fermilab is also developing the competency and capacity necessary to become a leader in project development
and execution and to deliver a large portfolio of projects that enable its core capabilities.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
80
Global facilities for particle physics research are ever more challenging to design, build and operate. As the only
United States laboratory that operates facilities for particle physics research, Fermilab keeps the United States
scientifically competitive with other regions of the world and provides continuing opportunities for strong
international partnerships and contributions to the U.S. and global scientific programs.
1. Particle Physics. Fermilab’s scientific program uniquely supports the U.S. physics community by providing
world-leading research opportunities at the three frontiers of particle physics. Intensity Frontier experiments
with neutrinos and muons are the primary focus of the laboratory’s accelerator-based research program in this
decade. Experiments using neutrino and muon beams from Fermilab’s upgraded accelerator complex will
serve several thousands of users a year. These experiments can indirectly discover new physics phenomena at
very high energies and provide information crucial to interpreting discoveries made at the Large Hadron
Collider. At the Energy Frontier, Fermilab will use its scientific, computing and technical leadership to
maximize the discovery potential of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The laboratory will
continue to play key roles in Cosmic Frontier experiments that seek to understand the nature of dark matter
and dark energy.
Neutrino and muon research in this decade is a platform for a world-leading, broader research program at a
next-generation accelerator facility that Fermilab is developing for operation beginning in the 2020s. This
multi-megawatt proton accelerator, named Project X, would be the most powerful and flexible Intensity
Frontier accelerator facility anywhere in the world. It would provide intense beams of neutrinos, muons,
kaons and nuclei simultaneously to multiple forefront experiments.
Fermilab’s theoretical physics group makes essential contributions to the Fermilab mission by guiding and
performing high-caliber experiments and elucidating experimental results in particle physics and astrophysics,
emphasizing the connection between theory and experiment. In the course of addressing defining questions in
particle physics and delivering DOE’s high-energy physics mission, Fermilab educates future generations of
scientists. Every year laboratory facilities are used to train about 250 postdoctoral research associates and 540
graduate students from across the country and around the world, resulting in more than 100 Ph.D. degrees
awarded yearly. Fermilab also contributes to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)
education with a broad program for undergraduate university students and K-12 students and teachers.
Intensity Frontier - Neutrinos: Fermilab’s upgraded accelerator complex produces the world’s most
powerful high-energy and low-energy neutrino beams. These beams support a suite of neutrino experiments
on the Fermilab site and in Minnesota. The study of neutrinos has attracted much worldwide attention
following the revolutionary discovery 15 years ago that neutrinos spontaneously change type. This discovery
pointed to new physics phenomena at energies much higher than those that can be discovered at particle
colliders. It also raised challenging questions about the fundamental workings of the universe that Fermilab’s
intense beams and associated experiments are needed to answer:
•
Does the neutrino mass spectrum resemble the spectra of the quarks and the charged leptons, or is it
inverted? The answer to this question will shed light on the origin of the masses of all elementary
particles, and potentially on the evolution of the early universe. The NOvA experiment, which will start
taking data in 2013, will explore this question. NOvA will also independently confirm, using a different
approach, recent surprising results from an experiment using a Chinese nuclear reactor that point to a high
value for a parameter, Оё13, whose specific value strongly influences the rest of the worldwide neutrino
physics program.
•
Do the interactions of leptons, a category of particles that include neutrinos, violate charge-parity (CP)
symmetry? The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the universe could not have developed without
a violation of CP symmetry. CP symmetry violation has already been seen in quarks, but at a level
insufficient to explain the observed cosmic matter-antimatter asymmetry. Its violation in neutrinos may be
the missing ingredient. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE), currently being developed, is
designed to discover and study the neutrino mass spectrum and CP violation in neutrino oscillations.
LBNE will also provide a broader physics program that includes the search for proton decay, studies of
supernova neutrinos, and atmospheric neutrino physics.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
81
•
Do new neutrino-like particles exist that are not predicted by the Standard Model, the present theory that
describes the known elementary particles and their interactions? Do the known neutrinos participate in
new, non-Standard-Model interactions? Might the study of neutrinos yield other surprises? The completed
MiniBooNE experiment showed evidence that suggests that new neutrino-like particles, called sterile
neutrinos, may exist. Starting in 2014, MicroBooNE, now under construction, will explore this evidence
in a new way and help develop the liquid-argon technology on which LBNE will depend. MINOS+, the
next stage of the successful MINOS experiment that precisely measured the neutrinos’ mass differences,
will constrain or find evidence for non-Standard-Model physics.
•
What are the rates of interaction of neutrinos with various nuclei? The interaction rates of neutrinos with
the nuclei used in targets that produce them are currently poorly known. The operating MINERvA
experiment measures the rates that other experiments must know before they can deduce neutrino
oscillation probabilities.
Physics goal
2011
2013
2015
Search for CP violation
Determine mass hierarchy
NOvA
Sterile neutrino sector
Appearance
MiniBooNE
MicroBooNE
Disappearance
MINOS+
Establish framework
Precision mass difference
MINOS
Neutrino interaction rates with nuclei
MINERvA
Precision measurement of Оё13 through appearance
NOvA
2017
2019
2021
2023
LBNE
LBNE
Figure 1. Timelines and physics goals of Fermilab neutrino experiments.
Intensity Frontier – Muons: Muon experiments provide another path to discover new physics phenomena.
Portions of Fermilab’s accelerator complex are currently being reconfigured to create intense beams of muons
for two experiments that would operate late this decade. Mu2e will search for the conversion of muons to
electrons. This major experiment will be sensitive to new physics at energies several orders of magnitude
higher than those reachable by the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. The Muon g-2 experiment will
precisely measure a property of muons called the anomalous magnetic moment. This experiment will
investigate previous experiments’ hints that the muon’s magnetic moment may be different than that predicted
by the Standard Model. If true, that would be an indication of new physics.
Energy Frontier – Particle colliders: Over the next two decades, Fermilab will use its unique particle
physics capabilities to advance research at the Large Hadron Collider’s CMS experiment. The laboratory’s
Remote Operations Center and LHC Physics Center ensure highly effective participation and contributions of
U.S. institutions in the LHC and in CMS. Fermilab will play key roles in planned upgrades to the CMS
detector and LHC accelerator, with significant CMS upgrade activities being carried out at the Fermilab site.
The laboratory continues to support the full exploitation of the large datasets collected by the Tevatron
experiments over their 25-year lifetime. Fermilab’s accelerator and detector R&D programs create
technologies that will enable the next generation of particle colliders.
Cosmic Frontier – Dark matter and dark energy: Fermilab is a critical partner in a number of worldleading cosmic frontier experiments. The laboratory manages the construction and operation of the Cryogenic
Dark Matter Search (CDMS) and the Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics
(COUPP) that search for particles of dark matter. In 2013 Fermilab completed construction and deployment
of the camera for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) that investigates the properties of dark energy and will
begin its scientific mission later this year. The laboratory also leads the Pierre Auger Observatory that
studies the source and nature of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.
(This core capability enables the laboratory to support the DOE’s Scientific Discovery and Innovation
mission (SC 4, 5, 6, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28, 29, 33, 34, and 35) and is funded by the DOE Office of High
Energy Physics.)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
82
2. Accelerator Science. Fermilab’s extensive experience and expertise in accelerator science and technology
underpins accelerator-based particle physics research in the United States. Nearly half of Fermilab’s staff
members are directly engaged in the research, design, development, engineering and operations of particle
accelerators. The laboratory’s accelerator science activities, while focused on particle physics, are
increasingly being applied more broadly in the service of the goals of the DOE’s Office of Science, for
industry and for society.
Accelerator Technology. Fermilab performs world-leading research, design, development and engineering of
key technologies that form the basis for present and future particle accelerators: superconducting high-field
magnets that control and bend particle beams; the radio-frequency cavity technology to accelerate them; the
ionization cooling required for future muon-storage-ring-based accelerators; and advanced beammanipulation technologies. Accelerator technology R&D benefits from the laboratory’s comprehensive
infrastructure and superconducting magnet capabilities.
o
o
o
Fermilab is a leader in the development of high-field magnets based on superconducting materials. The
effort to develop these high-field magnets has been supported nationally by the LHC Accelerator
Research Program and at Fermilab by the High-Field Magnet Program. The breakthroughs achieved by
Fermilab in the construction of magnet coils made of Nb3Sn, a next-generation material, now form the
basis for multiple LHC accelerator upgrade programs planned for 2017-2021. Laboratory staff also now
develop materials and magnets capable of reaching the even higher fields required by future accelerators
and other magnet applications.
Fermilab provides U.S. leadership in the development of high-gradient superconducting radio-frequency
(SRF) technology. This next-generation technology to accelerate particle beams will underlie Project X,
Fermilab’s proposed multi-megawatt proton accelerator, as well future electron linear accelerators. SRF
technology, developed within the International Linear Collider R&D program, has the potential to benefit
U.S. science beyond particle physics. It is well suited to the needs of future high-repetition-rate x-ray
laser applications, such as the Next Generation Light Source.
Fermilab scientists and engineers lead U.S. technology development for the ionization cooling required
for muon-storage-ring-based facilities, supply integrated design concepts for a future Muon Collider and
neutrino factory, and use dedicated test facilities to advance the fundamental understanding of beams and
their manipulation. Fermilab provides leadership for the national Muon Accelerator Program, a
collaboration of 16 national laboratories and universities. MAP manages the development of future
facilities including the Muon Collider and a neutrino factory. This work features strong cooperation with
companies funded by the DOE’s Small Business Innovation Research program.
Accelerator Science. Fermilab thrusts in research and development in accelerator and beam physics include:
o
o
o
o
o
Advanced beam studies performed at Fermilab’s operating accelerators to optimize accelerator
performance.
Energy-deposition simulations, including the upgrade, maintenance and distribution of the MARS
simulation code that is a resource to the worldwide community.
Theory of beam instabilities in current and future accelerator facilities and the development of new
techniques for compensation of beam-beam effects.
Experimental studies of ground-motion effects in accelerators and electron-cloud effects in high-intensity
proton beams.
Theory development and experimentation on new collimation and cooling methods.
Starting in 2013, facilities built at Fermilab for the development of SRF technology will simultaneously be
used for tests of this technology and as an accelerator science user facility. This user facility will be a center
for advanced accelerator R&D activities including novel beam-manipulation techniques, high-performance
electron-source and diagnostics development, and advanced beam-cooling tests and test of novel, non-linear
accelerator lattices.
Fermilab leads the multi-program funded ComPASS (Community Petascale for Accelerator Science and
Simulation) collaboration that is developing a comprehensive computational infrastructure for accelerator
modeling and optimization. ComPASS advances accelerator computational capabilities to support DOE
priorities for the next decade and beyond.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
83
Accelerator Education and Training. Fermilab carries out a comprehensive program for training of the next
generation of accelerator scientists and engineers. The new Illinois Accelerator Research Center, to be
completed in early 2014 with funds from a State of Illinois grant, will significantly enhance the accelerator
science education program at Fermilab. The current program includes hosting the U.S. Particle Accelerator
School, a national consortium, which holds two sessions a year for undergraduate and graduate students.
Undergraduate students in the Lee Teng Internship program, graduate students in the joint universityFermilab accelerator Ph.D. program or the Bardeen Fellowship, and post-graduates in the Peoples Fellowship
program receive training in accelerator science, technology and engineering at one of the world’s forefront
accelerator laboratories.
(This core capability enables the laboratory to support the DOE’s Scientific Discovery and Innovation
mission (SC 4, 5, 6, 24, 25, 26, 33, 34, and 35) and is funded by the DOE Offices of High Energy Physics,
Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences and Advanced Scientific Computing Research.)
3. Large Scale User Facilities and Advanced Instrumentation.
Large Scale User Facilities. For more than four decades, Fermilab has designed, constructed and operated a
very-large-scale user facility and hosted international scientific collaborations for particle physics and particle
astrophysics. Research at Fermilab has led to many discoveries, including the top quark, bottom quark, tau
neutrino and detailed properties of charm and bottom quark systems, as well as numerous precision
measurements such as the world’s best determination of the W boson and top quark masses.
Today, Fermilab is home to one of the largest accelerator facilities in the world, including a complex of seven
particle accelerators and infrastructure for the development of accelerator technologies. More than 4,000 users
each year, including 540 graduate students, advance their research with Fermilab accelerator, experimental
and computing facilities. In 2012 laboratory facilities supported 4,300 users, 2,200 of whom visited the
Fermilab site for their research and 2,100 who used the laboratory’s computing infrastructure.
Fermilab’s user facility includes its extensive complex of particle accelerators and detectors. NuMI and the
Booster create the world’s highest-power neutrino beams that serve the MINOS and MINERvA neutrino
experiments and a beamline for detector R&D. NOvA, a second-generation long-baseline neutrino
experiment, and MicroBooNE, a second-generation short-baseline neutrino experiment are under
construction. A test beam supports the international particle physics community in developing advanced
detector technologies. Fermilab has established conceptual designs and begun technology development for
future projects that include Mu2e and Muon g-2, which will study rare processes using muon beams; LBNE, a
third-generation long-baseline neutrino experiment.; and Project X, a multi-megawatt proton accelerator for
an assortment of Intensity Frontier physics experiments.
Advanced Instrumentation. Fermilab develops cutting-edge particle detector technologies and applies them
to the construction of detectors for a variety of scientific disciplines. Past achievements include the
development of dedicated-readout integrated circuits and very low-mass silicon detectors for collider
experiments, and the development of scintillator detectors now used in a wide array of particle physics
experiments. The Fermilab silicon detector facility also played a major role in the development and assembly
of the CCD detector for the camera for the Dark Energy Survey. Fermilab also supports the international
particle physics community in developing detector technologies through its test-beam facility. Current
advanced instrumentation projects include:
o
o
o
o
o
three-dimensional vertical integrated silicon technology and silicon-based multi-pixel photon detectors for
future experiments;
an ultra-cold bolometric detector for dark-matter searches;
liquid-argon technology for neutrino and dark-matter detectors;
picosecond time-of-flight systems; and
versatile, integrated data acquisition systems.
Computing. Fermilab’s computing leadership and resources enable the particle physics community to deliver
world-class scientific results. Fermilab staff are internationally recognized experts in programming languages,
high-performance computing and networking, distributed-computing infrastructure, petascale scientific data
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
84
management, physics simulations and scientific visualization. Fermilab supports large-scale computing, datamanagement, and data-analysis facilities for the Tevatron experiments; the CMS experiment and the LHC
Physics Center; the Sloan Digital Sky Survey; the Dark Energy Survey; neutrino and rare-process
experiments; and computational cosmology. Fermilab is a leader in the Open Science Grid multi-disciplinary
distributed computing infrastructure. Fermilab also hosts the following major computing projects:
o
CMS Tier-1 Center – The scientific challenges of particle physics require data storage, networks and
processing power on an extreme scale. The CMS experiment uses a distributed computing model, in
which seven national Tier-1 centers and more than 40 university- and laboratory-based Tier-2 computing
and storage facilities distribute, process and serve data. Fermilab’s CMS Tier-1 center is the most
powerful Tier-1 center worldwide for the 3,000-member, 41-country CMS experiment.
o
Lattice QCD computing – Quantum Chromodynamics describes how quarks and gluons interact via the
strong force and predicts the properties of hadrons. Such predictions require the numerical simulation of
QCD on a lattice of space-time points, known as Lattice QCD, which uses massive computing resources.
Fermilab builds and operates large clusters of computers for Lattice QCD as part of the national
computational infrastructure for the Lattice QCD project established by DOE. Fermilab is also a
participant in a DOE SciDAC-2 program devoted to the improvement of software for lattice gauge
computing.
o
FermiGrid – Grid computing evolved as an extension of distributed computing to satisfy the growing
data needs of science, industry, government and commerce. Grid computing involves the distribution of
computing resources among geographically separated sites, thus creating a "grid" of computing resources.
Fermilab operates a large Grid Computing Facility with shared resources for data processing, storage and
analysis provided to the Fermilab experiments. The laboratory makes these computing facilities available
to other scientific organizations in a secure manner through the Open Science Grid.
(This core capability enables the laboratory to support the DOE’s Scientific Discovery and Innovation
mission (SC 4, 5, 6, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28, 29, 33, 34, and 35.) and is funded by the DOE Office of
High Energy Physics.)
Science Strategy for the Future
Fermilab’s focused scientific mission, coupled with its extensive accelerator and detector facilities and R&D
infrastructure, keep the United States a world leader in particle physics research. As the only DOE laboratory
operating large-scale facilities for particle physics, Fermilab’s program provides opportunities for international
partners to participate in and contribute to particle physics facilities in the United States. Fermilab operates worldleading user facilities based on intense beams of particles. The laboratory’s accelerator complex provides the
world’s most powerful high-energy and low-energy neutrino beams that support experiments in Illinois, in
Minnesota, and in the future in South Dakota. Fermilab played a scientific, computing and technical leadership
role in the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. Its leadership role at the LHC
continues, with support for the U.S. CMS community and leadership of the U.S. contribution to CMS detector and
LHC accelerator upgrades. Fermilab is also a critical partner in a number of dark matter and dark energy
experiments.
Fermilab’s strategy for the future sets the trajectory for the United States to lead the world in scientific research
with intense beams of particles. Building on Fermilab’s current world-class neutrino-beam facilities and
experiments, the plan will double neutrino-beam intensity, create muon beams and launch a new set of neutrino
and muon physics experiments in this decade. Continuation of the nation’s leadership role into the 2020s and
beyond requires a major investment in the construction of new user facilities at Fermilab, including the LongBaseline Neutrino Experiment and the Project X proton accelerator. A unique user facility at the Advanced
Superconducting Test Accelerator will push accelerator science and technology forward. The Technology
Applications Program and Illinois Accelerator Research Center will leverage laboratory resources and capabilities
toward application of particle physics technologies to problems of national importance in energy, medicine,
security and industry.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
85
Mission Readiness/Facilities and Infrastructure
Overview of Site Facilities & Infrastructure. Fermilab’s 6,800-acre site is located 42 miles west of Chicago in
Batavia, Illinois. Laboratory assets include 362 buildings and 70 real property trailers comprising 2.4 million
gross square feet and hundreds of miles of utility infrastructure including roads, electrical, natural gas, industrial
cooling water, potable water and sanitary systems. The total real property replacement plant value (RPV) is
$1.8B, including the laboratory’s programmatic accelerator and tunnel assets. All of the laboratory’s buildings
are used and owned by DOE; the usage is predominately divided among research and development space and
administrative areas. Detailed property information associated with all assets is maintained in the DOE’s
Facilities Information Management System real property database and available onsite through Fermilab’s
Geographic Information System.
Fermilab’s most significant infrastructure needs are improvements to its high-voltage electrical system and
underground piping systems, with their overall facility conditions both categorized as poor. Investments to
improve these systems over the next several years have been proposed through General Plant Projects (GPP),
Science Laboratory Infrastructure (SLI) and third-party investments. The delay of SLI funding for these utility
upgrades (initially slated to start in FY 2011) created a mission readiness status of “Partially Capable” for utility
infrastructure. This Utility Upgrade Project (UUP) was included for funding in DOE’s FY 2013 budget, but the
year-long continuing resolution further delayed the start of this project. It is proposed for full funding in the FY
2014 President’s Budget Request and the project team remains ready to execute the UUP. Based on the delay,
utility infrastructure is now rated as “Marginally Capable” in this plan due to the risk to the scientific program,
particularly to the Mu2e experiment, should further delays occur.
Table 1. SC Infrastructure Data Summary
Total Bldg, Trailer, and OSF RPV($)
(Less 3000 Series OSF’s)
Total OSF 3000 Series RPV($)
Total RPV($)
Total Deferred Maintenance($)
Total Owned Acreage
Total Leased Acreage
Site Wide ACI(B, S, T)
$842,402,829.94
$912,663,356.85
$1,755,066,186.
79
$45,773,183
6,800
0
0.946
# Building
Assets
92
# Trailer # OSF
Assets Assets
10
20
# GSF
(Bldg)
968,860
0.911
Mission Critical
Mission
Asset Condition Index (B,
0.988
270
59
17 1,383,105
Dependent
1
S, T)
Not Mission
0.99
0
1
0
0
Dependent
99.37
36
58
598,854
Office
99
87
9
372,102
Warehouse
Asset Utilization Index (B,
99.67
126
0
776,097
Laboratory
T) 2, 3
0
0
0
0
Hospital
99.21
62
0
138,462
Housing
B=Building; S=Structure; T=Trailers
1
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings, Trailers, and OSF’s (excludes series 3000 OSF’s).
2
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings and Trailers.
3
Only includes assets with usage codes that fall into these 5 FRPC categories. Other usage types are not included.
# GSF
(Trailer)
11,937
68,744
980
75,393
4,932
0
0
0
Facilities and Infrastructure to support Laboratory Missions. The size and scope of the major initiatives
discussed earlier in this document require considerable investment in new facilities and infrastructure as well as
improvements to existing infrastructure. Fermilab’s utility infrastructure is rated poor using real property criteria
and, as a result, places laboratory operations at risk. The laboratory’s current mission needs are being met with
existing buildings whose condition is excellent based on the same real property criteria, but which are inefficient
due to being geographically dispersed and serving functions for which they were not designed. Additionally and
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
86
while the current condition of buildings is rated as excellent as a function of deferred maintenance and
replacement plant value, the laboratory has not had sufficient funding to complete all necessary repairs and
maintenance on buildings.
Fermilab’s most critical infrastructure vulnerabilities are its high-voltage electrical and industrial cooling water
systems. SLI funding proposed as part of the Office of Science’s FY 2013 budget plan would address the most
critical improvements to these systems and ensure sound infrastructure for the laboratory’s future scientific
program. The full-year continuing resolution prevented the SLI Utility Upgrades Project from starting. Without
funding and a start in FY 2014 for the project, ongoing laboratory operations and the future scientific programs
are compromised and electrical safety improvements cannot be realized.
Additional investments in the laboratory’s utility infrastructure will be necessary to accommodate ongoing
operations and future mission needs. When siting future projects, Fermilab’s Facilities Engineering Services
Section (FESS) works closely with experimental planning groups, project teams, the laboratory’s Master Planning
Task Force and the Directorate’s Office of Integrated Planning and Performance Management to efficiently use
existing utilities capacity or expand such facilities. Deferred maintenance requirements of the laboratory’s utility
infrastructure (Other Structures and Facilities) currently comprises 87% of the site’s total FY 2012 Deferred
Maintenance backlog, or $40M of a total $45.6M.
The existing buildings meet the current operational and experimental needs of the laboratory, operating with an
Asset Utilization Index of 99.0% (Excellent). Repurposing efforts at several facilities continue to allow the lab to
meet programmatic needs without increasing the footprint through new construction. Coordinated management
efforts identify and meet building facility needs through re-assignment, modernization and construction of new
facilities using GPP. Construction of the Liquid Argon Test Facility in the Neutrino Campus is nearing
completion and will initially house the MicroBooNE detector. The Muon Campus’ MC-1 building is expected to
start construction later this spring, and, when complete, will support the Muon g-2 project and future muon
experiments.
The Industrial Facilities Consolidations SLI project, which would modernize and consolidate several machine
shops and crucial accelerator and detector technology activities and demolish legacy buildings, remains part of the
SLI funding program at some point in the future. Two additional SLI candidates have been identified during
development of the Campus Master Plan. These projects are part of the lab’s long-term development strategy and
would locate personnel and activities closer to the main-campus area. The projects would minimize investment in
our oldest facilities, lead to future disposition activities, and achieve cost savings and efficiency improvements by
reducing travel times.
Record flooding in April 2013 throughout northern Illinois forced the laboratory to close for a period of 17 hours.
During this time, around-the-clock efforts by critical lab personnel kept the two primary electrical substations and
industrial water pumping station from flooding and prevented prolonged closures and substantial impacts to
scientific operations. The single sanitary lift station on the east side of the lab was flooded for five days curtailing
use of the sanitary system in this area. Damage repair estimates are underway and flood recovery is expected to
last for several weeks as electrical equipment is repaired and replaced. As part of the ongoing master planning
efforts, technical facilities in the village that were flooded are proposed for consolidation and relocation to the
central campus area under future SLI projects.
Tables 4 and 5 depict the Mission Readiness status of Facilities and Infrastructure in support of the laboratory’s
core capabilities. The status reflects the overall results of the discussions with landlords and input from the
Directorate. Capability gaps are identified for management consideration and mitigation, as reflected in the table.
The mission readiness status of all core competencies is summarized as “Mission Capable” for the current period
and in five years based in part on construction completion of the Liquid Argon Test Facility, and the start of
construction for the Muon Campus. The capability to meet the mission at the 10-year horizon is rated as
“Partially Capable” due to the need for consolidation and centralization of dispersed and inefficient facilities
through the SLI program. Infrastructure readiness, however, has been adversely affected by the deferment of SLI
funding for the Utility Upgrades Project initially slated to start in FY 2011. The continued delay of this project
has resulted in a mission readiness status of “Marginally Capable” for utility infrastructure.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
87
Strategic Site Investments. Facilities and infrastructure needs are identified by a variety of mechanisms,
including the Integrated Condition Assessment program. The Directorate, as supported by the Facilities
Engineering Services Section, analyzes landlord input to create the mission readiness scores identified elsewhere
in this plan. Identified capability gaps are evaluated and programmed for accomplishment via appropriate funding
mechanisms including SLI, GPP, third-party investment or operating funds.
•
•
SLI Modernization Initiative. Two Fermilab projects to address infrastructure modernization needs are
to be funded by the Office of Science’s Science Laboratory Infrastructure (SLI) initiative. Each project
helps to satisfy urgent infrastructure requirements and ensures that Fermilab is prepared to meet current
and future mission capabilities.
o
Utility Upgrade Project (UUP) (Total project Cost [TPC] of $34.9million with FY 2014 start).
The high-voltage system work includes replacement of legacy oil switches with air switches and
replacement of the Master Substation. Unit substations may also be replaced since much of the
equipment is at the end of life and replacement parts are not available. Improvements are also
included for the industrial cooling water system (ICW), a critical system that provides fire water
supply for building sprinkler systems and hydrants and provides water for experimental cooling.
o
Industrial Facilities Consolidations (TPC of $33.8 million with undetermined start). This project
consolidates multiple machine shops into one state-of-the-art machine shop and demolishes
legacy Butler buildings that house the existing shops. This facility also allows modernization and
relocation of crucial accelerators and detector technology development activities.
GPP. Table 2 summarizes the laboratory’s best understanding of future year GPP funding levels based
on information from the Office of High Energy Physics (OHEP) and the laboratory's plan for
infrastructure improvements. Small programmatic enhancements continue to be funded through the GPP
program. Projects funded with FY 2012 and FY 2013 funds include the outfitting of the Office,
Technical & Education Building of the Illinois Accelerator Research Center; construction of the new
Muon Campus (MC- 1) building; the Master Substation Bypass project; and designs for the Domestic
Water Upgrades and CDF life safety upgrades.
Requests for GPP facilities and infrastructure alteration and improvement funding are submitted annually
through the Fermilab internal budgeting process and the annual GPP data call to
Divisions/Sections/Centers. Additional urgent requests are also considered throughout the year. Needs
are prioritized based on regulatory compliance and risk to safety, mission, environment and operational
efficiency.
Muon Campus development has been identified as an urgent laboratory priority to encourage the fasttracked Muon g-2 and Mu2e projects. General-purpose facilities to house muon detectors, provide highbay crane space, expand utilities, realign roadways and construct beamline enclosures are well into the
planning/design stage and proposed for funding in FY 2013, FY 2014 and FY 2015. Site prep is already
underway for the MC-1 building. Accelerator Improvement Projects (AIPs) are also being planned for
new beamlines and cryogenic facilities.
•
Third-Party Investments. As discussed in the Section 4 of this plan, Fermilab, in conjunction with
DOE, received a grant from the State of Illinois for construction and ownership of the Illinois Accelerator
Research Center (IARC). Located on the Fermilab site, IARC will bring together scientists and engineers
from Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois universities, and industry with the goal of making
northern Illinois a center for accelerator technology R&D and encouraging the development of
accelerator-based industry in Illinois. In collaboration with nearby universities, IARC will educate and
train a new generation of scientists, engineers, and technical staff in accelerator technology. Several
companies and university groups have already expressed their interest in IARC.
A $20M grant from the State funded a large portion of the costs of constructing the Office, Technical and
Education (OTE) building. In addition, Fermilab expects $13M of Federal funding from OHEP to be used
for project initialization, site preparation, project oversight and outfitting of the newly constructed state
building. Integral to IARC will be the refurbishment of an existing heavy assembly building (B0) that will
provide critical technical space and additional office space. The project is well aligned with both the
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
88
accelerator-based research mission of Fermilab as well as OHEP’s Accelerator Stewardship mission.
Risks include differences in state and federal requirements, coordination of Federal funding with State
funding, and the normal risks associated with the construction of any building. Construction of the OTE
building started in the fall of 2012 with completion scheduled for late 2013.
Fermilab has completed a preliminary assessment for its next Energy Savings Performance Contract
(ESPC) review. The assessment included energy audits of all buildings, tunnels, and enclosures, as
required by DOE every four years. This Preliminary Assessment resulted in the identification of several
energy and efficiency opportunities that are currently being evaluated. They range from the more
traditional energy conservation measures such as lighting, controls and HVAC to more site-specific
opportunities for pond water cooling systems and cryogenic compressors. The assessment also
considered measures needed to achieve the 20% energy reduction for the best candidates for Highly
Performing Sustainable Buildings but the payback period was not cost effective. There were several
transformational opportunities identified at a very high level, one of which may be further considered
during the next Investment Grade Audit phase. This measure could assist in expediting operations for the
Illinois Accelerator Research Center. In addition, this review provided an update of the lab’s assessment
of renewable energy viability on site that is also required every four years, and addressed retrocommissioning in major facilities.
Fermilab continues to investigate and pursue all available sources of funding for future development and
investment in support of capital projects that help fulfill the laboratory vision as described in the Campus
Master Plan. These include those described in the previous SLI Modernization Initiative section.
•
Maintenance. Facilities at Fermilab are assigned to a landlord who accepts responsibility for
maintenance, recapitalization and process operations. In a hybrid maintenance program, the Facilities
Engineering Services Section provides preventive and corrective maintenance for Fermilab’s
conventional electrical and mechanical equipment while the landlord organizations identify, fund and
accomplish the remainder of facility sustainment requirements. Centralized maintenance data scheduling
and tracking activity, end-of-life replacements and no-maintenance-zone identification ensure coordinated
and consistent application of lab maintenance.
Future maintenance expenditures may continue to range around 2% of conventional replacement plant
value and will be adjusted based on overall facility condition evaluations.
A valve identification and maintenance program for the underground water systems is well underway
with completion expected for the domestic water system in FY 2013. The Industrial Cooling Water
(ICW) program will commence in FY 2013 and carry into FY 2014.
•
Deferred Maintenance. Fermilab’s total deferred maintenance (DM) decreased by $2.2M from the
$48M reported in FY 2011 to $45.8M for FY 2012. Eighty percent of FY 2012 DM rests with Mission
Critical Other Structures and Facilities (OSF), and 62% of the total site DM, $28.5M, is in the electric and
industrial water distribution systems, validating the urgent need of the SLI Utility Upgrades Project. The
delay of the SLI UUP required some critical work to be accomplished via GPP. It is expected that
completion of the SLI UUP project will allow for a reduction of about $12M in utility DM .
Fermilab recognizes that continued additional reinvestment will be required to control DM growth. Many
of the GPP projects identified in the lab’s budget plan reflect the current goals for reinvestment, which
attempt to maintain the overall condition of building components and infrastructure systems. As a singleprogram laboratory with a single source of funding, Fermilab’s GPP infrastructure expenditures support
general-purpose assets.
Routine maintenance responsibilities for OSFs are assigned to specific system owners, typically the
Facilities Engineering Services Section. OSF assessments are periodically updated to represent their
current operating condition. This ongoing process considers system or component age, efficiency, safety,
environmental impacts, maintainability, failure history, locations and conditions found during repairs,
current mission needs and future requirements. Utility owners also use Fermilab’s Geographic
Information System to plan work and review system attributes. Utility system DM is due in large part to
end-of-life conditions identified during ongoing inspections that validate increased deterioration of these
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
89
systems. Requirements for DM are identified and scoped by the system owner, and, if appropriate,
prioritized for GPP funding based on risk levels associated with safety, mission, and environment and the
probability of operational impacts from deterioration of a particular system.
•
Excess Facilities and the end of Tevatron Operations. Accelerator systems have been secured and
stabilized following the end of Tevatron collider operations in September 2011. Various mechanical and
electrical components have been reused, preserved in place, or removed in a phased approach that doesn’t
affect possible reuse of the facilities. For example, possible future kaon experiments could use portions
of the former CDF detector at B0 and one sector of the Main Ring tunnel to rebuild a sector of the Main
Ring accelerator. Other areas of the Main Ring tunnel are being considered for long-term irradiated
equipment storage. The CDF garage area at B0 will become part of the Illinois Accelerator Research
Center, and the detector hall at D0 is being repurposed for construction of the MicroBooNE liquid-argon
detector. The service buildings around the Main Ring are still operating for fire protection and other
electronic purposes but have been listed in FIMs as mission dependent and are no longer mission critical.
Certain electric loads are necessarily being maintained for dehumidification of the tunnel for equipment
preservation, dewatering, and water circulation until such time as permanent disposition of all equipment
and tunnel sectors are determined. As plans develop further, they will be vetted within the lab, the Fermi
Site Office, OHEP, and the Office of Science and documented in future planning documents.
Trends and Metrics. Fermilab’s mission is evolving from a focus on operation of the Tevatron Collider to the
construction and operation of a suite of new projects at the frontiers of particle physics. With the mission
readiness initiative, Fermilab is integrating long-term facility planning with mission planning, both at the overall
laboratory level and the Division and Section level. As new mission elements are identified, this process will help
assure that facility and infrastructure needs are considered early in the process and satisfied when required.
The Mission Readiness Assessment Process was initiated at Fermilab during FY 2008. An initial overview
assessment was conducted with the Directorate to evaluate technical facilities and infrastructure capabilities
relative to the planned mission. The assessment results, reviewed annually to consider scientific priorities and
planned investments, are shown in Tables 4 and 5.
Building management responsibilities are assigned to landlord organizations at Fermilab, providing a costeffective and accurate means to insure that facility management investments are aligned well with mission needs
while fulfilling the stewardship responsibility of efficiently managing, using and preserving real property assets.
The projected trends for infrastructure investments and asset conditions are presented in Table 6 and Figure 13.
Most significant is the projected increased investment in FY 2014 from the SLI Utility Upgrades Project that
totals $34.9M to improve the reliability of high-voltage electric and industrial cooling water systems. Without the
UUP certain adverse mission impacts will occur, resulting in the “marginally capable” mission readiness status
for utilities. Additionally, as can be seen in the Deferred Maintenance (DM) row of Table 6 the DM is reduced
significantly from this investment that improves the Asset Condition Index (ACI).
Table 2. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments ($M)
Maintenance
DMR
EFD (Overhead)
IGPP
GPP
Line Items (SLI)
Third Party
Total Investment
Estimated RPV
Estimated DM
Site-Wide ACI
2012
16.3
2013
16.9
2014
17.3
2015
18.5
2016
19.4
2017
20.0
2018
20.6
2019
21.1
2020
21.5
2021
22.6
2022
23.4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2.8
0
20
39.1
14.1
0
0
31.0
923.4
49.4
0.947
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
14.9
21.3
15.8
15.2
15.5
15.5
15.5
15.5
15.5
34.9
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
67.1
39.8
35.2
35.2
36.1
36.6
37.0
38.1
38.9
969.6 1,001.3 1,029.4 1,053.0 1,077.3 1,131.0 1,170.1 1,197.0 1,244.5
52.8
53.5
57.3
51.5
52.1
49.7
51.7
53.8
26.0
0.946 0.947 0.944 0.951 0.952 0.956 0.956 0.955 0.955
90
Figure 1. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments
80
1.000
70
0.990
0.980
60
0.970
50
0.960
40
0.950
30
0.940
0.930
20
0.920
10
0.910
0
0.900
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Total Investment ($M)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
Site-Wide ACI
91
Attachment 1. Mission Readiness Tables
Core
Capabilities
Now
X
In 5
Years
X
In 10
Years
X
Now
X
In 5
Years
X
Particle Physics
Accelerator
Science
In 10
Years
Large Scale User
Facilities /
Advanced
Instrumentation
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Buildings
Objectives
Gap
Laboratory
Mission
Ready
N M P C
X
Now
X
In 5
Years
X
In 10
Years
X
B� Assembly
(ORKA), D�
Assembly (LAr
TPC), NM4
(Seaquest),MI6
5 & MINOS,
NOvA,
MiniBooNE,
LAr test
facilities,
Muon Campus
Meson
Detector
Building,
NML, CMTF,
Wide Band,
IARC
(including B�
building),
Industrial
Facilities
Accelerator
complex,
beamlines,
experimental
areas, SiDet
detector
development
facility,
Detector Test
Beam Facility,
FCC, GCC &
LCC
computing
facilities
DOE
The facilities and infrastructure
in support of this area are
considered adequate.
Additional investment in
supporting infrastructure (both
new and restoration or
expanded capacity of existing
systems) will be evaluated in
each new experiment’s project
scope.
As needed,
incremental
infrastructure
improvements and
facility upgrades will
continue to be
supported with GPP
investment.
Consolidation and
Centralization of dispersed
inefficient facilities
through the SLI program;
related facility and
infrastructure investments
as needed for future
experiments will be
included in future plans.
Develop the technology
and design for future
accelerators to expand
the research capacity of
high-energy physics,
other sciences and
industrial applications.
The facilities and infrastructure
in support of this area are
considered adequate.
Additional investment in
supporting infrastructure (both
new and restoration or
expanded capacity of existing
systems) will be evaluated in
each new project scope.
As needed,
incremental
infrastructure
improvements and
facility upgrades will
continue to be
supported with GPP
investment. Thirdparty investment by
the State of Illinois
will construct IARC’s
new building.
Industrial Facilities
Consolidation SLI will
solidify R&D capability.
Related facility and
infrastructure investments
as needed for future
experiments will be
included in future plans.
Establish world-class
scientific research
capacity to advance highenergy physics including
state of-the-art
accelerators and beam
lines. High-performance
computing facilities to
support particle physics
research.
Tevatron decommissioning and
development of Mu2e, LBNE
and Project X will usher in a
new era of accelerator
operations. Planning is
underway to assure support
facilities associated with
managing and maintaining the
accelerator complex are either
incorporated into each project,
or identified for other funding.
The real property assets are
considered adequate including
the conventional portions of the
underground asset.
As needed,
incremental
infrastructure
improvements and
facility upgrades will
continue to be
supported with GPP
investment.
Consolidation and
Centralization of dispersed
inefficient facilities
through the SLI program,
facility and infrastructure
investments as needed for
future projects and will be
included in future plans.
Establish world-class
scientific research
capacity to advance
particle physics.
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
92
Real Property Capability
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission Ready
Current
Facility and Infrastructure Capability Gap
N
M
P
C
User Accommodations
X
Site Services
X
Conference & Collaboration Space
X
Utilities
Laboratory
Master Substation, Industrial Cooling Water system
piping, valves & pumping capacity; Electrical oil
switches & unit substations; Domestic Water System GPP
piping & valve replacements; Sanitary distribution
system piping & lift stations
X
Action Plan
Roads & Grounds
X
Reconstruction & resurfacing
Security Infrastructure
X
Gate security improvements
DOE
Capability gaps closed by
completion of SLI Utility
Upgrades Project.
GPP
HSS
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
93
Attachment 2. Laboratory Site Map
Aerial view of the Fermilab site showing facilities proposed for construction and removal in the Fermilab Campus Master Plan.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
94
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Mission and Overview
With a strong foundation in fundamental physical,
chemical, biological, and mathematical sciences,
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has
built unmatched multidisciplinary research capabilities
that extend and integrate the scales of science to
benefit the nation and the world. LBNL creates
powerful research facilities to open and extend new
realms of scientific inquiry. Its researchers conduct
experiments in ultrafast soft X-ray science to engineer
systems at quantum, atomic, and molecular scales;
fabricate nanostructured materials and devices; and
gain new insight into particle physics, nuclear physics,
and cosmology. The Laboratory is harnessing the
biology revolution to improve sustainable energy and
environmental systems. It drives advances in
computing to deal with massive data sets for energy
science of scale. As a national laboratory with
international impact, LBNL strives to continually
strengthen its Core Capabilities, intellectual creativity,
and rigorous safety culture. LBNL applies these
strengths to our most pressing scientific and technical
challenges to transform the world energy economy and
to provide a sustainable future for humankind.
LBNL provides critical national scientific
infrastructure for university, industry, and government
researchers. Major facilities include the Advanced
Light Source (ALS), a world center for soft X-ray
synchrotron-based science; the Molecular Foundry, a
nanoscale-science user facility; the National Center for
Electron Microscopy (NCEM) for materials science;
the Joint Genome Institute (JGI); the National Energy
Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), with
high-performance computational science capabilities;
the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), the Office of
Science (SC) data and connectivity backbone; and the
88-Inch Cyclotron for nuclear science. LBNL also
hosts DOE sustainable-energy collaborative centers,
including the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) the
Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP), and
the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research
(JCESR).
LBNL fosters the creativity of outstanding individuals
working across disciplines to deliver solutions to DOE
challenges of scale and urgency. Founder Ernest
Lawrence was the Laboratory’s first Nobel laureate
and 12 other laureates have worked or are working at
LBNL, and many more have had significant research
associations. Seventy-eight current members of the
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and the
Institute of Medicine are affiliated with LBNL.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Lab-at-a-Glance
Location: Berkeley, California
Type: Multi-program laboratory
Contract Operator: University of California
Responsible Field Office: Berkeley Site Office
Web site: www.lbl.gov/
Physical Assets:
• 202 acres and 97 buildings
• 1.628M sf in active operational buildings
• Replacement plant value: $1.226 billion
• 56,166 sf in 8 excess facilities
• 345,397 sf in leased facilities
Human Capital:
• 3,395 FTEs
• 236 Joint faculty
• 499 Postdoctoral researchers
• 173 Undergraduate and 320 Graduate students
• 9,330 Facility users
• 1,524 Visiting scientists
FY 2012 Funding by Source (Costs in $M):
DHS, 5.1
WFO,
116.3
Other
DOE, 18
ASCR,
89.8
NNSA, 7
BER,
140.1
EERE,
64.3
NE, 3.1
Other
SC,
38.6
HEP,
59.2
BES,
167.4
FES, 5.1
Total Lab Operating Costs (excluding ARRA):
$742.1 million
DOE/NNSA Costs: $620.7 million
WFO (Non-DOE/Non-DHS) Costs: $116.3
million
WFO as % Total Lab Operating Costs: 16%
DHS Costs: $5.1 million
ARRA Costed from DOE Sources in FY 2012:
$62.5 million
95
Core Capabilities
Each of LBNL’s Core Capabilities involves a substantial combination of people, facilities, and equipment to
provide a unique or world-leading scientific ability to safely support DOE missions and national needs. Each is
executed safely, with minimal impact on the environment and surrounding community. The descriptions below
summarize the Core Capabilities, their targeted missions, and sources of funding. The Core Capabilities are
mutually supportive to allow an exceptional depth to LBNL’s research portfolio, while maintaining an integration
of efforts to better support DOE targeted outcomes. These Core Capabilities are grouped loosely into the
following categories: User Facilities and Accelerator Science; Basic Energy Research; Biological and Earth
Systems Sciences; High Energy and Nuclear Physics; Computing and Mathematics; and Applied Science and
Energy Technology.
1. Large-Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation. Since its inception, LBNL has had a Core
Capability of designing, constructing, and operating leading scientific facilities for large user communities,
both on the Berkeley site and elsewhere across the globe, including Antarctica — and even extending into
space. The Laboratory’s highly recognized and experienced managers continue a record of success in
handling $100-million-plus construction projects, and assembling experts in design and implementation of
systems to support large-scale capital acquisitions. LBNL has the largest population of users among the
national laboratories, and these users publish thousands of articles, many in high-impact journals.
Below is a list of the Laboratory’s large-scale user facilities at or near the main Berkeley site. Core
Capabilities in other sections, such as Basic Energy Research, Computing and Mathematical Sciences, and
Applied Science and Energy Technology are key to the success of LBNL advanced facilities and
instrumentation.
LBNL’s Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a world-leading source for high-brightness soft X-ray and
ultraviolet science, with additional excellent performance in the hard X-ray spectral region. The scientific
challenges investigated at the ALS involve the understanding, predicting, and ultimately controlling matter
and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. This underpins many DOE Core Capability areas,
including those involving chemical, material, and biological systems. The ALS has roughly 2,000 users per
year, with an annual budget of approximately $63 million and is funded primarily by DOE/Office of Basic
Energy Sciences (BES).
The Laboratory’s National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) houses, among other instruments, the
world’s two most powerful electron microscopes, each having the resolution of nearly 50 pm (roughly the
radius of a hydrogen atom). The NCEM conducts fundamental research relating microstructural and
microchemical characteristics to material properties and processing parameters, greatly advancing our
understanding of defects and deformation; mechanisms and kinetics of phase transformations; nanostructured
materials; surfaces, interfaces and thin films; and microelectronic materials and devices. The NCEM has
roughly 275 users per year, with an annual budget of approximately $6 million and is funded primarily by
DOE/BES.
The Molecular Foundry is a state-of-the-art user facility providing significant advances in materials synthesis,
simulation, fabrication, and characterization through leadership in nanoscience, with particular emphasis on
combinatorial nanoscience, nanointerfaces, multimodal in situ nanoimaging, and single-digit nanofabrication.
The Molecular Foundry has roughly 300 users per year, with an annual budget of approximately $20 million
and is funded primarily by DOE/BES.
LBNL’s DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is the world's largest producer of plant and microbial genomes,
with programs focused in three areas that include: the generation of DNA sequences, the development of
innovative DNA analysis algorithms, and a growing strategic focus on functional genomics. The DOE JGI is
a key element in providing the foundation for the Laboratory’s bioscience Core Capabilities, in particular in
areas of biofuels, bioremediation, and climate science. The DOE JGI has more than 900 users per year, with
an annual budget of approximately $69 million (FY2012) and is funded primarily by DOE’s Office of
Biological and Environmental Research (BER).
The National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center is the high-performance production
computing facility for SC, serving more than 4,000 researchers worldwide. The scientific impact of NERSC
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
96
computations is enormous, with multiple Nobel Prizes and more than 1,500 scientific publications per year.
NERSC’s most capable system has a peak performance over 1 petaflop/s and its storage infrastructure is
capable of holding of more than 200 petabytes of scientific data. This year, NERSC is installing a new highperformance system, NERSC-7. A new building under construction, the Computational Research and Theory
Building, will provide an energy-efficient facility for future systems. The total FY 2012 funding for NERSC
was $57.8 million. The sole funding organization for the NERSC Center is DOE/Advanced Scientific
Computing Research (ASCR). In addition to the Center, the NERSC Division at LBNL manages the dataanalysis systems and support staff for the DOE JGI, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), Daya Bay, and other
high-energy and nuclear physics experiments.
The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is a nationwide, high-speed network infrastructure optimized for very
large scientific data flows, and dedicated to the mission of accelerating DOE science. ESnet provides
connectivity for all major DOE sites, and interconnects them with more than140 research and commercial
networks around the world. Tens of thousands of DOE-funded researchers at national laboratories and in
universities depend on ESnet’s services every day. The network transports roughly 10 petabytes of traffic
each month. As a result of the Stimulus-funded Advanced Networking Initiative (ANI), ESnet deployed the
world’s first 100 gigabit-per-second continental-scale network. ESnet’s FY 2012 funding is approximately
$34.5 million (DOE/ASCR).
2. Accelerator Science. Born as an accelerator laboratory, LBNL has maintained a leading capability in
accelerator development for more than seven decades. The Laboratory has core expertise in the areas of
insertion devices, ion sources, superconducting magnet technology, linear accelerators, synchrotron radiation
sources, and linear accelerators. LBNL’s accelerator research efforts support revolutionary approaches to
energy and biological science, environment science, the structure of matter at the smallest scales, and
industrial research and product development.
LBNL core strengths in accelerator science and technology have played a key role toward developing a Next
Generation Light Source (NGLS), which will be a transformative tool for many fields of science. LBNL
achieved CD-0 for the NGLS in April 2011. The proposed facility will consist of a high-repetition-rate source
and a superconducting linac delivering high-brightness and high-average-power electron beams to an array of
X-ray lasers. The free-electron lasers (FELs) will provide temporally and spatially coherent pulses with
unprecedented soft X-ray average brightness, with individual lasers and beamlines optimized for specific
applications requiring, e.g., high repetition rates, time resolution to the attosecond regime, high spectral
resolution, tunability, and polarization control. LBNL programs in the development of high-repetition-rate
electron sources, advanced FEL design, superconducting undulators, high-brightness electron beam control
and manipulations, and laser systems for accelerator applications are critical to the NGLS and other light
sources, and are coordinated with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and other national laboratories.
LBNL’s Accelerator Science programs greatly enable the photon-production systems into the femtosecond
and attosecond regime and are being applied to large-scale facilities outside the Laboratory such as the Linac
Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. Other applications include a leadership role in the design of the
[email protected] FEL facility in Trieste, Italy, and novel storage-ring design has kept LBNL’s ALS at the
forefront of synchrotron light sources. In addition, the Laboratory’s undulator design capability has benefitted
the LCLS-II at SLAC, and developments in superconducting undulators have the potential to greatly extend
the performance of existing synchrotrons, thereby enabling a new suite of fourth-generation facilities that will
provide brighter sources at reduced capital and operating costs.
LBNL is the world leader in ultrahigh-gradient laser-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration technology, where
it is producing high-quality GeV electron beams with compact accelerators and is on the verge of creating a
new paradigm for high-energy particle accelerators. The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) project,
completed in 2012, is enabling laser-plasma acceleration technology in discrete 10 GeV modules. BELLA has
recently generated pulses of a quadrillion watts in 40 femtoseconds, a world record. This system is laying the
groundwork for a future in which laser-based accelerators will provide very short wavelengths and time
structures at nearly 1/100th of the physical size of existing particle accelerators. In addition to high-energy
physics applications, this technology will enable the scientific community to probe matter as well as chemical
and biological systems at their most fundamental levels.
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LBNL’s Ion Beam Technology (IBT) Group has significant expertise in developing both ion sources and lowenergy beam transport systems. The group is providing world-class accelerator front-end systems, such as that
in the recently built Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL, and the Laboratory plans to deliver front-end
systems for future SC projects such as the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State
University (MSU) and the proposed Project X at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The IBT
Group has developed novel, high-yield neutron generators recognized by R&D 100 Awards as well as
numerous patents, and has recently extended its research to include gamma-generating devices for national
security applications.
LBNL’s superconducting magnet program is a center of excellence, pioneering novel design and fabrication
techniques for high-field magnets employed in accelerator applications. The high-energy and nuclear-physics
communities depend on the Laboratory’s expertise in this area and a recent successful application includes the
first isolation of a significant mass of antimatter. Future applications will include neutrino science and the
proposed development of a muon collider. LBNL’s state-of-the-art superconducting magnet capability is well
integrated across all aspects of magnet development, including conductors, fabrication, and testing. This
expertise is being applied across SC programs, most notably in support of the U.S. elements of the ITER
Project.
LBNL has been a leading partner in the Heavy-Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL)
(with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL] and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory [PPPL]),
providing leadership expertise in high-current induction linac technology for inertial fusion energy research.
The HIFS-VNL Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX-II) facility, funded by the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, was completed in FY 2012. Should a subsequent
experimental program be funded, NDCX-II could explore beam and target interactions for warm dense matter
physics, however current plans close-out NDCX-II activities.
The Accelerator Science and Technology Core Capability at LBNL is supported primarily by the High Energy
Physics (HEP) and BES programs, with further sponsorship from the ASCR program, the Office of Nuclear
Energy (NE), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Department of Homeland Security
(DHS), the Department of Defense (DoD), and other federal agencies. Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) funded
NDCX-II to FY 2012. The research associated with Accelerator Science at LBNL primarily supports SC’s
missions to conceive, design, and construct scientific user facilities; to probe the properties and dynamic of
matter; to advance energy security; and to support DOE’s other scientific discovery and innovation missions.
3. Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science. LBNL focuses its world-class efforts in synthesis,
characterization, theory, and simulation to discover and understand novel forms of matter and harness new
properties. These efforts address global challenges in energy-related science such as solar energy conversion
and storage, and carbon capture and sequestration. In the past year, an important focus has been on batteries
for vehicular and grid applications. In this field, the Laboratory is developing new materials and increasing its
understanding of mechanisms underpinning electrical energy storage.
The Laboratory’s focus areas for this Core Capability include: (1) hard, soft, and bio-inspired nanostructures,
nanocomposites, metal-organic frameworks, nanoporous materials, and nanoscale assemblies; (2) strongly
correlated and other quantum and electronic materials; (3) time-resolved in situ structural studies and
spectroscopy; (4) nanoscale imaging; and (5) the development of new theory and computational tools for
understanding, predicting, and controlling complex materials at atomic- and electronic-length scales.
LBNL’s leading efforts in nanoscience include the development of nanocomposite ion conductors and
membranes; thermoelectrics to extract electrical energy from heat; combinatorial synthesis of nanocrystals;
biomimetic polymer design, catalysts, hybrid materials that convert solar energy (photovoltaics, artificial
photosynthesis, etc.), graphene nanoelectronics, nanowires, and nanotubes; molecular junctions; plasmonics;
and nanophotonics. Strongly correlated materials are subjects of spin transport, magnetism, and
superconductivity studies and include multiferroics and spin-polarized oxides, cuprates, pnictides, and other
materials. Soft/organic materials include organic semiconductors, biomimetic materials, and hybrid bio- and
polymer materials. The Laboratory’s focus includes the study of the physical and chemical properties of
surfaces and nanocrystals. New characterization tools include custom scanning probe tips etched with
plasmonic tips for near-field subwavelength imaging of heterogeneous materials at unprecedented length
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scales. LBNL has recently developed precise control over the spin polarization of light emitted from excited
topological insulators, holding promise for advanced spectroscopy and quantum computing. Theory and
computation includes methods for materials-specific studies of electronic structure; for charge transport; for
excited-state, strongly correlated, and time-dependent phenomena of novel materials, surfaces and interfaces,
and nanostructures; for large-scale atomistic simulations; and for capabilities to study self-assembly dynamics
of mesoscale assemblies.
LBNL’s user facilities such as the ALS, Molecular Foundry, NCEM, and NERSC have leading capabilities in
use-inspired basic research in advanced materials, including the development and characterization of novel
materials for solar-energy conversion, energy-efficient window coatings, carbon-neutral fuel production,
electrical energy storage, and carbon capture and sequestration.
This Core Capability is primarily supported by BES with important contributions by ASCR, Energy
Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), DHS, and DoD as well as other Work for Others (WFO)
sponsors. The capability supports DOE’s missions to discover and design new materials and molecular
assemblies with novel structures, functions, and properties through deterministic design of materials and
atom-by-atom and molecule-by-molecule control, as well as other scientific discovery and innovation
missions in energy technology and homeland security.
4. Chemical and Molecular Science. LBNL has world-leading capabilities in fundamental research in chemical
and molecular sciences that support DOE’s mission to achieve transformational discoveries for energy
technologies that benefit the nation while preserving human health and minimizing impact on the
environment. LBNL has integrated theoretical and experimental Core Capabilities and instrumentation to
enable the understanding, prediction, and ultimately the control of matter and energy flow at the electronic
and atomic levels, from the natural timescale of electron motion to the intrinsic timescale of chemical
transformations.
LBNL has Core Capabilities and instrumental expertise in gas-phase, condensed-phase, and interfacial
chemical physics in the form of laser systems; soft X-ray sources; photon and electron spectrometers;
spectromicroscopy and other capabilities for studying transformations under realistic conditions; and imaging
capabilities to advance understanding of key chemical reactions and reactive intermediates that govern
combustion processes in realistic environments such as flames and engines. LBNL is a world leader in
multicoincidence imaging instrumentation and theoretical methods that probe how photons and electrons
transfer energy to molecular frameworks and provide critical knowledge in atomic, molecular, and optical
sciences needed to understand and ultimately control energy flow in light-harvesting systems. LBNL is a
leader in ultrafast probes of molecular excitations and transformations, including attosecond chemistry,
enabling studies of electron motion that may lead to reaction engineering at the atomic scale.
The LBNL catalysis capabilities include basic research on use of catalysts to perform homogeneous and
heterogeneous chemical conversions with high efficiency and selectivity. This capability — combining
experimental, theoretical, and computational modeling components — seeks to establish fundamental
principles in catalysis and chemical transformations at the molecular level. Through research on both the
catalytic center and its environment, and use of principles from biology and physics, this capability will
advance the field from catalyst discovery to catalyst design.
LBNL is a world leader in actinide and heavy element chemistry. The Heavy Elements Research Laboratory
(HERL) has a unique capability in electronic structure, bonding, and reactivity of actinides, including the
transuranic elements. LBNL has a unique resource in its scientific personnel and instrumentation to
characterize, understand, and manipulate rare earth complexes for separation and discovery of alternative
elements and critical materials, including materials for energy storage, motors, solid-state lighting, and
batteries.
LBNL has exceptional capabilities in solar photochemistry, photosynthetic systems, and the physical
biosciences. Collectively, the photosynthesis and photochemistry capabilities elucidate the structure and
elementary mechanisms of biological and artificial photon-conversion systems through the development of
novel spectroscopies and imaging methods, ranging from X-rays to infrared at high temporal resolution. New
capabilities for understanding natural photosynthesis will form a basis for the design of efficiently engineered
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solar-conversion systems. Jointly with the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), LBNL leads the Joint
Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP), the only energy hub in the nation focused on using artificial,
environmentally benign, abundant materials for conversion of sunlight into carbon-neutral chemical fuels.
LBNL is also one of the leading participants in the newly established Joint Center for Energy Storage
Research (JCESR), which builds on LBNL expertise in electrochemistry, with a focus of electrolytes, and the
composition, stability, and performance of anodes, cathodes. In addition, LBNL leads the scientific
community in the control and manipulation of the interaction of living and nonliving molecular systems by
addressing the communication between live cells and organic/inorganic surfaces at the molecular level. The
Chemical Dynamics and Molecular Environmental Science Beamlines at the Laboratory’s ALS provide the
pioneering application of vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray synchrotron radiation to critical problems in
chemical dynamics and interfacial chemistry. The Ultrafast X-Ray Science Laboratory (UXSL) develops
laser-based ultrafast X-ray sources for chemical and atomic physics experiments and contributes to the
knowledge base for future powerful free-electron laser (FEL)-based attosecond light sources.
LBNL also has preeminent capabilities in molecular and isotopic geochemistry. Research focuses on
fundamental aspects of liquid-solid and liquid-liquid interactions, employing synchrotron X-ray and mass
spectrometric analysis, including molecular dynamics and ab initio computational approaches. Molecularscale studies are complemented by experimental and modeling studies of larger-scale systems, and include the
physics as well as the chemistry of Earth materials. The Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 is an
Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), managed by the Laboratory, in which research is directed
specifically at the molecular, nanoscale, and pore scales to reveal properties and processes that affect the
transport of supercritical CO2 in subsurface environments.
This Core Capability is supported primarily by BES, with important contributions from ASCR. Other DOE
contractors and WFO enable this Core Capability. This capability supports DOE’s mission to probe,
understand, and control the interactions of phonons, photons, electrons, and ions with matter; to direct and
control energy flow in materials and chemical systems; as well as other scientific discovery missions.
5. Chemical Engineering. At LBNL, this Core Capability links basic research in chemistry, biology, and
materials science to deployable technologies that support energy security, environmental stewardship, and
nanomanufacturing. Leading capabilities are provided in the fields of chemical kinetics; catalysis; molecular
dynamics; actinide chemistry; electronic, biomolecular, polymeric, composite, and nanoscale materials;
surface chemistry; ultrafast spectroscopy; crystal growth; mechanical properties of materials; metabolic and
cellular engineering applied to recombinant DNA techniques that create new chemical processes within cells;
and new methodologies for genomic and proteomic analysis in high-throughput production that enable gene
libraries that encode enzymes for metabolic engineering.
The Laboratory’s expertise in carbon cycling, reactive-flow transport in porous media, mineral kinetics, and
isotopic signatures is applied to programs in carbon capture, environmental remediation, geothermal energy,
and oil and gas production. Other components of the program provide the capability to translate fundamental
research in catalysis, chemical kinetics, combustion science, hydrodynamics, and nanomaterials into solutions
to technological challenges in energy storage and efficiency as well as environmental monitoring. LBNL has
expertise in chemical biology and radionuclide decorporation needed to characterize mammalian response and
develop sequestering agents for emergency chelation in humans in case of heavy-element or radioactive
contamination.
LBNL user facilities provide unique national assets to the chemical engineering community. The Molecular
Foundry enables synthesis, fabrication, characterization, assembly, and simulation of nanostructured
materials, linking knowledge discovery to the engineering of advanced manufacturing processes and device
development. The ALS provides spectroscopic characterization of materials and reactions that are highly
useful to design and engineering. The unparalleled imaging capabilities of NCEM are used to characterize the
impact of materials processing on structure, and the SofTEAM microscope will extend these capabilities to
both soft materials and soft-hard interfaces for high-value materials and device manufacturing. LBNL’s
expertise in applied mathematics and energy technologies has resulted in groundbreaking 3-D simulations of
laboratory-scale flames that closely match experiments. These simulations, with innovative mathematics, are
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unprecedented in the number of chemical species included, the number of chemical processes modeled, and
size of the flames.
This Core Capability is supported by BES, ASCR, BER, EERE, and WFO, including the National Institutes
of Health (NIH), DoD, universities, and industry. The capability supports DOE’s missions to foster the
integration of research with the work of other organizations in DOE and other agencies. This research applies
directly to DOE’s energy security and environmental protection mission, including solar energy, fossil
energy, biofuels, and carbon capture and storage.
6. Biological Systems Science. LBNL has pioneered and sustains leading capabilities in systems biology,
genomics, synthetic biology, structural biology, and imaging at all length scales (from protein structure to
terrestrial scales). LBNL is also a national leader in microbial biology, cell biology, plant biology, microbial
community biology, and computational biology. The Laboratory’s biological systems science capability is
further enhanced by instrumentation at the ALS, DOE JGI, Molecular Foundry, NERSC, JBEI, and smallerscale facilities for the study of metabolomics and proteomics. LBNL has the capability to characterize, in
detail, complex microbial community structure and function; to manage highly complex biological data; to
visualize biological structure; and to produce large-scale gene annotation.
These foundational capabilities enable biological systems science in bioenergy, global environmental
analysis, and environmental remediation. In bioenergy science, LBNL leads JBEI and is a partner in the
University of California (UC) at Berkeley-led Energy Biosciences Institute. These institutes provide
complementary work in the development of energy crops, enzyme and microbial discovery, and microbial
engineering for the production of transportation biofuels. The newly constructed Advanced Biofuels Process
Demonstration Unit (ABPDU), an EERE-funded user facility, provides the capability for scale-up of biofuels
pretreatment, saccharification, and fermentation methods. LBNL’s terrestrial carbon sequestration and
ecosystem modeling seeks to enhance models of carbon cycling for better predictions of soil carbon,
including the study of grasslands, from genomes to ecosystem function. The LBNL-led Scientific Focus Area
— Ecosystems and Networks Integrated with Genes and Molecular Assemblies (ENIGMA) — which is
funded by BER, targets the biological remediation of contaminated sites, and has developed numerous
methods for the analysis of biological systems, from molecules up to whole microbial communities, and via
the MicrobesOnline system provides computational genomic and metabolomic analysis for the greater
scientific community.
LBNL’s DOE JGI and Biological Data Management and Technology Center developed the Integrated
Microbial Genomes (IMG) data-management and data-analysis system, a community resource for
comparative analysis and annotation of genomes, along with the Integrated Microbial Genomes with
Microbiome (IMG/M). Additionally, DOE JGI continues to improve its main portal, which provides the
global user community easy access to all genomes that DOE JGI has sequenced. Other DOE JGI
bioinformatics assets include Phytozome, collaboration with the UC Berkeley Center for Integrative
Genomics, to facilitate comparative genomic studies among green plants; and MycoCosm, which integrates
fungal genomics data and analytical tools.
In partnership with Argonne, Oak Ridge and Brookhaven National Laboratories, the LBNL-led DOE Systems
Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) was recently formed as a resource for the biosciences research community.
This capability is designed to accelerate the understanding of microbes, microbial communities, and plants. It
is a community-driven, extensible, and scalable open-source software framework and application system.
KBase offers open access to data, models, and simulations, enabling scientists and researchers to build new
knowledge and share their findings. Apart from allowing integration of core resources such as
MicrobesOnline, SEED, ModelSEED, Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (RAST), and
Metagenomics RAST (MGRAST), it provides the facility for any user to integrate data or computational
resources into a common framework. KBase is building community ties to the DOE JGI, the Bioenergy
Research Centers, the major biological Scientific Focus Areas (SFAs), and to various biological user
communities to ensure it serves its users’ needs. The first public beta was released in 2012 and the first
production release occurred in early 2013.
LBNL radiochemistry and instrumentation competencies include radiochemistry, novel scintillators, probe
development, and data analysis. Radioisotope production makes use of the Biomedical Isotope Facility, and
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LBNL positron emission tomography (PET) radiochemists transform radioisotopes into forms used as
labeling agents and develop imagers for positron tracers in plants. LBNL low-dose radiation capabilities
integrate cell and molecular biology, genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, metabolomics, 4-D imaging, and
bioinformatics to determine responses to low-dose radiation. These include adaptive responses, nontargeted
responses, genomic instability, genetic susceptibility, and epigenetic regulation in relation to cancer.
BER is the primary sponsor of this Core Capability; other key sponsors include the NIH, DoD, industry, and
other WFO sponsors. This Core Capability supports DOE’s mission to: (1) obtain new molecular-level insight
into the functioning and regulation of plants, microbes, and biological communities for cost-effective
biofuels; (2) make fundamental discoveries at the interface of biology and physics to address DOE’s needs in
climate, bioenergy, and subsurface science; (3) develop advanced molecular- and systems-level mechanistic
understanding of the interaction of low doses of ionizing radiation with biological systems to provide a
scientific underpinning for future radiation-protection standards; (4) leverage DOE computational capabilities
across BER programs and coordinate bioenergy, climate, and environmental research across DOE’s applied
technology offices as well as other agencies; and (5) provide high-throughput genomic sequencing and
analysis for the DOE science community and collaborating agencies.
7. Environmental Subsurface Science. LBNL integrates world-recognized subsurface science and
microbiological expertise to quantify, monitor, simulate, and manipulate subsurface processes relevant to
DOE environmental and energy missions over a hierarchy of scales, ranging from nanometers to kilometers.
A hallmark of this Core Capability is the multidisciplinary and multiscale approach, where research is
performed along four key thrust areas: (1) quantification of coupled subsurface processes (hydrological,
microbiological, geochemical, thermal, geomechanical) using theoretical and laboratory- to field-scale
experimental approaches; (2) imaging and monitoring of subsurface processes using molecular, synchrotron,
geophysical, and isotopic methods; (3) developing, advancing, and implementing subsurface multiphysics,
high-performance computing flow, and transport simulation capabilities; and (4) developing advanced
approaches to manipulate subsurface fluids and reactions. Integration of research performed across these four
components enables LBNL to develop the scientific underpinnings that DOE needs to optimally manage
environmental and energy systems. Examples of research questions that require such integration include: How
does information in a genome influence contaminant stability and, in turn, how do soil and subsurface
characteristics (stratigraphy, fluids, minerals, groundwater fluxes, organic matter) impact smaller-scale
biological functioning? Can geomechanical and geophysical understandings guide the implementation of
pressure-enhanced production of geothermal energy or storage of CO2 with predictable seismicity?
SC supports several large, multidisciplinary environmental subsurface science projects. The BER-supported
Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge site at Rifle, Colorado, involves approximately 25
investigators and the BER-supported Subsurface Biogeochemistry SFA includes roughly 30 investigators; this
SFA is the second largest in the DOE complex. The overall mission of these BER projects is to improve the
predictive understanding of subsurface flow and transport of environmental contaminants from cell to plume
scales, with a recent consideration of using this unique subsurface expertise to improve systems-level
quantification of biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. LBNL has the largest BES Geosciences
program across the complex. BES Geosciences supports 21 LBNL investigators involved in three core efforts
that address fundamental challenges associated with subsurface geophysical imaging, isotope geochemistry,
and experimental/theoretical geochemistry. BES Geosciences also supports an EFRC at LBNL that focuses on
quantification and nanoscale control of CO2 in deep subsurface systems; about 34 scientists are involved in
this EFRC.
The DOE Energy offices also support several large, team-based LBNL subsurface environmental research
efforts. DOE Fossil Energy (FE) supports geologic carbon sequestration research at LBNL that focuses on
quantifying trapping mechanisms, CO2 leakage risk assessment and impacts, and demonstration projects. The
DOE Geothermal Technologies Program supports 17 (individual but linked) LBNL projects in which theory,
field, experimental, and numerical approaches are used to explore for and develop enhanced geothermal
systems. LBNL is one of three laboratories leading the development of the DOE Advanced Simulation
Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) platform, a high-performance subsurface flow and
transport simulator that can be consistently used across the DOE complex. The Nuclear Energy (NE) program
supports LBNL research focused on evaluating the behavior and long-term performance of waste forms and
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disposal systems using coupled experiments and multiphase numerical simulation capabilities. DOE FE also
supports several methane hydrate research projects at LBNL.
The DOE-sponsored research is complemented by several significant WFO projects, such as the Research
Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA) Unconventional Resources and Tight Gas Sands Program
(which is closely aligned with DOE FE). The BP-sponsored Energy Biosciences Institute supports LBNL’s
advancement of microbially enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, and several hydrocarbon exploration companies
support the advancement of geophysical reservoir imaging methodologies.
A variety of unique facilities are used to support research in the environmental subsurface capability,
including: the Center for Environmental Biotechnology, the ALS suite of environmental beamlines, the
Center for Isotope Geochemistry, the Geosciences Measurement Facility, the Center for Computational
Geophysics, the Environmental Applied Geophysics Laboratory, the Geochemical-Geophysical Computing
Cluster, the Molecular Foundry, NCEM, and NERSC.
8. Climate Change Science. LBNL has developed a highly integrated climate program to understand the
forcing and response of the Earth’s climate system. LBNL scientists collect comprehensive measurements of
CO2 and CH4, the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases, and employ these field data together
with observations from DOE’s Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program to accelerate the development
of DOE’s new Community Earth System Model (CESM). LBNL is also one of the primary science centers
studying terrestrial carbon cycling and is leading three current SFAs for BER: Atmospheric System Research,
Terrestrial Ecosystem Science, and Climate and Earth System Modeling. Since 2012, LBNL leads the
DOE/interagency AmeriFlux program, a network of more than 100 ecosystem-atmosphere carbon flux sites in
North and South America. Climate Change Science at LBNL is a lab-wide effort, uniting researchers from
nine scientific divisions and national user facilities at the Laboratory, including the Computational Research
Division, Earth Sciences Division, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Materials Sciences
Division, Life Sciences Division, ALS, and NERSC.
The Climate and Carbon Sciences Program at LBNL has a leading role in national and international scientific
assessments and programs. LBNL scientists have served as principal authors of the highly visible Fourth
Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which was awarded the Nobel Peace
Prize in 2007; the Fifth IPCC Assessment, which will be published in 2013; and two of the Synthesis and
Assessment Products commissioned by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP). LBNL scientists
served on science steering groups for the North American Carbon Program (NACP) under the Carbon Cycle
Interagency Working Group of the CCSP, and the National Soil Carbon Network. LBNL carbon cycle
observations and analyses are valuable components of national synthesis products and national carbon
inventories for NACP.
LBNL heads a multilaboratory consortium to advance DOE’s modeling of the mechanisms and risks of abrupt
and extreme climate change. The Laboratory and its partners are developing world-leading capabilities to
simulate the dynamics of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and to project the feedbacks among the
terrestrial and oceanic methane cycles and global climate change. In support of these projects, LBNL leads
the deployment of advanced numerical methods for ultra-high-resolution ice-sheet models and uses its
benchmark subsurface models for methane/climate studies. LBNL is leading the technical integration of
DOE’s flagship integrated assessment models and the new CESM1 model with the goal of creating the an
integrated Earth system model that can project the future of energy/climate interactions with state-of-thescience treatments of physical, chemical, and biogeochemical processes. The Laboratory’s research on soil
biogeochemistry, using the LBNL Center for Isotope Geochemistry, the ALS, and microbial genomics
laboratories, is supporting a leadership role in developing new soil carbon and methane modules for CESM1.
LBNL has ensured that CESM is the first model worldwide to adopt all of ASR’s internationally recognized
parameterizations of greenhouse-gas forcing and radiative processes to enable more accurate IPCC climatechange simulations. Finally, LBNL is advancing DOE’s measurement and modeling of interactions among
ecosystems, permafrost, and climate change. In addition to new leadership in AmeriFlux, LBNL is one of the
lead laboratories of the DOE Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) initiative on climateecosystem feedbacks in the Arctic. NGEE marshals LBNL expertise in geophysics, microbial ecology,
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biogeochemistry, biometeorology, and modeling in the Climate Change Science and Environmental
Subsurface Science Core Capabilities.
The primary support for this Core Capability at LBNL comes from DOE BER and ASCR. Additional
research in Earth observations from space is obtained through the National Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA).
9. Particle Physics. LBNL has a long record of leadership in projects at the three frontiers of particle physics:
the energy frontier, the intensity frontier, and the cosmic frontier. The Laboratory’s capabilities in cosmology,
collider physics, and detector innovation build on LBNL core competencies in computing and engineering.
LBNL maintains a world-leading research program in cosmology. In 2011, Saul Perlmutter shared the Nobel
Prize in physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of
distant supernovae.” The LBNL-led Supernova Cosmology Project pioneered the methods used in this
discovery of dark energy. While continuing to pursue research using distant supernovae, the Laboratory has
become a leader in the measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), a second technique to study dark
energy. In this area, LBNL leads the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) project, which will
obtain more than 1 million spectra of galaxies and quasars to map dark energy. LBNL is now managing the
design and construction of DOE’s Mid-Scale Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (MS-DESI) survey
(formerly BigBOSS/DESpec). MS-DESI will create the largest 3-D map of the universe, and has been has
been approved by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) for 500 nights of observations with
the Mayall 4-Meter Telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona, conditional on funding. LBNL has also been a leader in
the development of advanced instrumentation for cosmology research. LBNL-invented deep-depletion
charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are the technology of choice for a range of optical detectors for both spaceand ground-based astronomical imaging. LBNL also developed integrated detectors for cosmic microwave
background (CMB) measurements and provided integrated detectors to search for CMB polarization in the
POLARBEAR project, which was funded by NSF and commissioned in the spring of 2010.
In its contributions to the energy frontier research, LBNL provides significant support to the detector
hardware, computing and software systems, and physics analysis for the A Toroidal LHC Apparatus
(ATLAS) Experiment at CERN, where firm evidence for the Higgs Boson has been discovered. LBNL
pioneered the use of silicon tracking detectors at hadron colliders in the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)
and D0 experiments at FNAL, enabling the discovery of the top quark. LBNL contributed to the construction
of both the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) detectors and the pixel detectors at the ATLAS facility. The pixel
project is a critical new technology that provides precision tracking with radiation tolerance; LBNL pioneered
the pixel development and led the international ATLAS pixel project through construction, installation, and
commissioning. Working closely with computer scientists and software engineers in the LBNL Computing
Sciences directorate, the LBNL ATLAS group led the development of the software framework for that
experiment. LBNL scientists have more than 20 years of experience in theory, simulation, and data analysis
for collisions at high-energy hadron colliders and are taking leadership roles in all aspects of the ATLAS
experiment.
In neutrino physics, which is central to the intensity frontier program, the Laboratory provides scientific and
computing leadership and project management to the Daya Bay reactor-based neutrino oscillation experiment,
which in 2012 made the first high-significance non-zero measurement of the neutrino mixing angle Оё13.
Construction of this experiment was completed in early 2012, and first results indicating a large value of Оё13
have been published in March 2012 by the Daya Bay collaboration. In October, further published results
affirmed those findings and improved the precision of the data.
The LBNL Theoretical Physics Group, which is closely integrated with the UC Berkeley Center for
Theoretical Physics, plays a crucial role in the Laboratory’s particle physics program, working with
experimentalists to define future programs and develop strategies for data analysis. The LBNL Particle Data
Group provides a unique service to the international physics community through its compilation and analysis
of data on particle properties.
Data analysis at the Laboratory’s NERSC is critical to these capabilities, confirming the discovery of dark
energy from supernova data and the discovery of the flat geometry of the universe from CMB data. LBNL
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astrophysicists and computer scientists have automated both supernova discovery and analysis, and the
Laboratory’s computational scientists have made significant contributions to the simulation of supernova
explosions.
The DOE’s HEP program office is the primary sponsor of this Core Capability, with important contributions
from ASCR, NNSA, NASA, NSF, and DHS. This capability supports DOE’s missions to understand the
properties of elementary particles and fundamental forces at the highest energy accelerators, to understand the
symmetries that govern the interactions of matter, and to obtain new insight on matter and energy from
observations not requiring accelerators.
10. Nuclear Physics. Nuclear science has been an LBNL core competency since its inception. Current programs
provide world leadership in neutrino research, heavy-ion physics, nuclear structure, nuclear chemistry, and,
more broadly, nuclear instrumentation. Recent accomplishments involving neutrinos include a key role in the
Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) and KamLAND for the discovery and confirmation of neutrino
oscillations, observation of geoneutrinos with KamLAND, and measurements of high-energy neutrinos with
IceCube. Recent heavy-ion accomplishments include the discovery of jet quenching and almost perfect liquid
behavior in collisions of gold ions at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL’s) Relativistic Heavy Ion
Collider (RHIC) (the STAR detector at RHIC); observations of new forms of antimatter at RHIC (the antialpha particle and the antihypertriton) and early observation of heavy-ion collisions with the ALICE (A Large
Ion Collider Experiment) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC); and new insights into the chemical
and physical properties of the heaviest elements. In nuclear structure, six new heavy-element isotopes,
elements 104 through 114, were discovered.
This Core Capability includes innovations in instrumentation and experiments a new underground research
facilities. At the Sanford Lab in South Dakota, the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment has been
installed in its protective water tank, which is being filled early this year. The Majorana Demonstrator for
neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment is under way. DIANA, the Dual Ion Accelerator for Nuclear
Astrophysics, is an experimental facility being proposed in collaboration with other research centers. The
Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is also under way in Europe. LBNL also
provides leadership in next-generation instrumentation for nuclear structure (Gamma Ray Energy Tracking
In-Beam Nuclear Array [GRETINA] and Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Array [GRETA]). Other projects are
at the CERN ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal) project, and with the high-precision, pixel-based
STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT). Leadership in both detector technology and fabrication underpins all of
these contributions. The LBNL Semiconductor Detector Laboratory provides world-class instrumentation for
development of advanced germanium and CdZeTe detectors.
LBNL’s electron cyclotron resonance ion source and related technologies are also important for advanced
accelerator facilities. The success of the nuclear physics program draws heavily on the Core Capabilities of
the Laboratory in Computational Science, Advanced Instrumentation, Engineering, and Accelerator Science.
Theoretical physicists are crucial for experimental design and precise model testing. This includes a growing
competency in the use of high-performance computing to study nuclear physics, in particular in the subfields
of quantum chromodynamics and supernovae.
Support for this capability is primarily from the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) with contributions from
ASCR, NSF, DoD, and DHS. This capability supports DOE’s missions to understand how quarks and gluons
assemble into various forms of matter; how protons and neutrons combine to form atomic nuclei, the
fundamental properties of neutrons and neutrinos; and to advance scientific user facilities that reveal the
characteristics of nuclear matter.
11. Applied Mathematics. LBNL has world-leading capabilities for developing mathematical models,
algorithms, tools, and software for high-performance computing. These have resulted in breakthroughs in
several mathematics fields, with a strong impact in many computational science areas. LBNL has a large pool
of nationally and internationally recognized experts in applied mathematics, including members of the
National Academy of Sciences, members of the National Academy of Engineering, Society for Industrial and
Applied Mathematics (SIAM) Fellows, and many other professional society awardees. Recent awards include
Sloan Research Fellowships, the International Council for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM)
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Lagrange and Pioneer Prizes, the Cozzarelli Prize, U.S. Air Force Young Investigator Research Program, the
NSF Faculty Early Career Development Award, and the SIAM Junior Scientist Prize.
LBNL has unsurpassed expertise in algorithms for modeling and simulating compressible, incompressible,
and low-Mach-number flows in many applications, such as combustion and nuclear flames in supernovae. An
enabling technology for this capability is adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), recognized worldwide. LBNL’s
Chombo framework for block-structured local AMR has resulted in computational simulations that run 100
times faster than uniform mesh simulations. The Laboratory’s hierarchical, structured-grid finite difference
capabilities, coupled with AMR algorithms, can solve turbulent flow problems 10,000 times faster than
previous techniques. LBNL and UC Berkeley have developed fast-marching and level-set methods, numerical
techniques that can follow the evolution of moving interfaces and boundaries for problems in fluid mechanics,
combustion, computer-chip manufacturing, robotics, biomedical and seismic image processing, and tumor
modeling. LBNL’s expertise in partial-differential equations yields new algorithms to describe the evolving
wave front of seismic disturbances, resulting in improved 3-D seismic images. In numerical linear algebra,
LBNL has the only SC lab researchers with expertise in large-scale eigenvalue calculations and direct
solutions in sparse matrix computation.
These capabilities and their applications are sponsored primarily by ASCR, with support from other SC
program offices and WFO. These capabilities support DOE missions in fusion energy science, biological and
environmental research, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and basic energy sciences. They support
DOE’s missions to develop mathematical descriptions, models, and algorithms to understand the behavior of
climate, living cells, and complex systems for DOE missions in energy and environment; and to advance key
areas of computational science and discovery for SC science partnerships, DOE applied programs, and
interagency research and development.
12. Computational Science. LBNL is a leader in connecting applied mathematics and computer science with
research in many scientific disciplines, including biological systems science, chemistry, climate science,
materials science, particle and nuclear physics, subsurface science, and all Core Capability areas described in
this Plan.
LBNL has a well-proven record of effectively using high-performance computing resources to obtain
significant results in many areas of science and/or engineering. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative
(CCSI) is developing and will deploy state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to
accelerate the commercialization of carbon-capture technologies from discovery to development,
demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. By developing the
CCSI Toolset, a comprehensive, integrated suite of validated science-based computational models, this
initiative will provide simulation tools to increase confidence in designs, thereby reducing the risk associated
with incorporating multiple innovative technologies into new carbon-capture solutions. In addition, the
Laboratory is contributing to the development of the Advanced Simulation Capabilities for Environmental
Management (ASCEM) identified in Environmental Subsurface Science, above. The ASCEM program is
developing a state-of-the-art high-performance computing simulation code to enable new science-based
approaches for predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. This initiative
supports the reduction of risks associated with DOE Environmental Management’s (EM’s) environmental
cleanup and closure programs through a better understanding and quantification of uncertainties in the
subsurface flow and contaminant transport behavior in complex geological systems. The simulator will
provide a flexible computational engine to simulate the coupled processes and flow scenarios described by the
conceptual models, eventually coupling hydrological, biogeochemical, geomechanical, and thermal processes
within one framework.
Key projects connected with DOE's EFRCs and Hubs continue this year, targeting carbon capture and
sequestration, solar energy, batteries, and combustion efficiency. The mathematical methods and
computational tools developed here will also have applications in many other scientific domains, such as the
search for improved catalysts for hydrogen fuel cells and storage. Indeed, DOE’s new Joint Center for Energy
Storage (JCESR) will leverage the computational resources, tools, and expertise at NERSC to predict the
properties of electrolytes — liquid solutions that conduct ions between battery plates and aid in energy
storage. JCESR will be able work DOE’s Materials Project to get a complete scope of battery components for
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systematic and predictive approach to battery design. The effort is coordinated with DOE’s Center for
Functional Electronic Material Design (CFEMD) at LBNL which conducts large-scale data generation, datamining, and benchmarking for new materials. CFEMD has a dedicated computing environment, Mendel, at
NERSC which takes advantage of the global filesystem, the scientific data archive, the Science Gateway
infrastructure, and staff expertise.
Although a lead source of support for this Core Capability is ASCR, all SC offices sponsor computational
applications and software development for their respective areas of science. The notable examples above are
HEP and BES, but the development of theoretical, simulation, and analytical science applications occur
throughout SC and the technology programs; with other federal agencies such as NASA and DoD; and other
interagency partners. This Core Capability supports all of DOE’s science, energy, environmental, and security
missions. For SC’s discovery and innovation mission, it provides the mathematical descriptions, models,
methods, and algorithms to enable scientists to accurately describe and understand the behavior of the Earth’s
climate, living cells, and other complex systems involving processes that span a wide range of time and length
scales.
13. Advanced Computer Science, Visualization, and Data. LBNL is a leader in computer architecture research,
with expertise in low-power parallel processor design, optical interconnects, and memory systems — unique
within DOE. The design and deployment of a highly usable, energy-efficient exascale system has research
challenges in hardware, software, and algorithms. With its hardware emulation capabilities, co-design
experience from the Green Flash project, and roles as both a leader and participant in multiple co-design
centers, LBNL will play a critical role in an exascale program. LBNL is a leader in performance analysis and
modeling, with multiple award-winning papers on application performance analysis and use of emerging
computer architectures for scientific applications. LBNL and UC Berkeley established and continue to lead
the field of automatic performance tuning research.
LBNL is a global leader in programming languages and compilers for parallel machines and takes a
leadership role in programming models for exascale systems. The Laboratory’s Unified Parallel C (UPC)
compiler and its Global-Address Space Networking (GASNet) runtime system are broadly deployed by
computing-system vendors, government agencies, and academic institutions. The Berkeley Lab
Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR) project provides support for tolerating faults, which is increasingly important as
systems scale. LBNL is also a leader in developing software tools and libraries for easier programming of
high-performance scientific applications. The Laboratory is a pioneer in scientific data management,
including development of FastBit, an indexing method that won an R&D 100 Award for dramatically
speeding up scientific data searches. LBNL and the DOE JGI develop genome databases as community
resources for comparative analysis and genome annotation. NERSC provides shared storage resources for
several scientific communities. LBNL leads in the development of remote, distributed, and query-driven
visualization and collaborative visual analytics systems, while NERSC provides visualization systems and
support for its users. LBNL is a leader in troubleshooting and performance-analysis tools for complex,
distributed applications, such as the PERFormance Service Oriented Network monitoring ARchitecture
(perfSONAR) application. ESnet and LBNL computer scientists work with researchers around the globe to
meet the distributed computing and networking needs of the next generation of DOE science experiments.
ESnet’s Science Data Network operates like a dynamic expressway, creating uncongested paths between
endpoints.
ASCR is the primary source of support for this Core Capability, and the benefits accrue for all SC offices and
other elements of DOE. The capability supports SC’s mission to deliver computational and networking
capabilities that enable researchers to extend the frontiers of science and to develop networking and
collaboration tools and facilities that enable scientists worldwide to work together and share extreme-scale
scientific resources. In addition, this Core Capability contributes to all of the missions described in Applied
Mathematics, above.
14. Applied Materials Science and Engineering. LBNL’s research program in this area emphasizes the design
and synthesis of advanced materials for energy, electronic, structural, and other applications in a wide range
of physical environments. This capability provides a basis for the development of materials that improve the
efficiency, economy, environmental acceptability, and safety for applications including energy generation,
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conversion, transmission, and utilization. The capability is enabled through core investments in computing,
physical sciences, engineering, and environmental sciences. Areas of expertise include nanoscale phenomena,
advanced microscopy, physical and mechanical behavior of materials, materials chemistry, and bimolecular
materials.
LBNL is a leader in materials for advanced battery technology, focusing on the development of low-cost,
rechargeable, advanced electrochemical devices for both automotive and stationary applications. The basic
elements of this research include the collaborative JCESR program described above. The related field of fuelcell research is enabling the commercialization of polymer-electrolyte and solid-oxide fuel cells for similar
applications. Research involves advanced materials and nanotechnology for clean energy, including hydrogen
storage and nanostructured organic light-emitting diodes. LBNL has world-leading expertise in the tailoring
of the optical properties of window materials, including the characterization of glazing and shading systems,
the chromogenics of dynamic glazing materials, and low-emittance coatings for solar performance control.
LBNL also leads the scientific community in the development of plasma-deposition processes to enable
improved window coatings at minimized production costs and energy consumption.
LBNL’s development program for advanced sensors and sensor materials to control industrial processes is
intended to reduce the waste of raw materials on manufacturing lines, increase the energy efficiency of
manufacturing processes, and minimize waste products. The Laboratory’s studies of high-temperature
superconductors for electrical transmission cable could substantially reduce losses during transmission.
Capabilities in this area include analyzing the mechanical behavior of novel materials and designing novel
materials with enhanced mechanical properties. LBNL has extensive expertise in using waste heat for
electricity and was recently recognized with an R&D 100 Award in this area. Largely sponsored by industry,
LBNL also conducts next-generation lithography and supports the development of tools and metrology for
size reduction in the next generation of microelectronic chip manufacturing.
This Core Capability in Applied Materials Science and Engineering is sponsored by EERE, DHS, and WFO
programs, including DoD and industry, and the Capability is underpinned by basic chemistry, materials, and
computational research supported by DOE. The Core Capability contributes to DOE missions in energy,
environment, and national security. The applied research capabilities benefit from LBNL use-inspired basic
research in materials science, computing, and other capability areas. This work provides a benefit to the
DOE’s technology programs such as solar-energy conversion, electrical-energy storage and transmission,
solid-state lighting, energy efficiency, and the study of materials in extreme energy environments.
15. Applied Nuclear Science and Technology. LBNL’s capabilities in this area include fundamental nuclear
measurements; actinide chemistry; the irradiation of electronic components for industry and the government,
including post-irradiation and materials characterization; the design, development, and deployment of
advanced instrumentation; compact neutron and gamma-ray sources for active interrogation; nuclear data
management; and substantial modeling and simulation expertise. Work for DOE SC includes actinide
chemistry with application to chelating agents; work for DOE NNSA includes advanced detector materials,
compact gamma and neutron sources, detection systems and algorithms development, and background data
management and analysis; work for DOE NE through the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) includes
subsurface modeling and testing to evaluate and improve on the current technical bases for alternative
prospective geologic environments for high-level nuclear waste disposal.
LBNL is a world leader in the development of instrumentation for the detection and measurement of ionizing
radiation. It develops fundamental radiation-detection materials, including both scintillators and solid-state
detectors that combine high-density and excellent energy resolution, and high-performance electronics
(including custom integrated circuits) to read out the detectors; as well as complete detection and imaging
systems that are used for a variety of purposes including nuclear medical imaging, nonproliferation, homeland
security, and fundamental explorations of high-energy and nuclear physics. Unique materials-screening and
crystal-growth capabilities enable optimized high-throughput development and design of scintillation- and
semiconductor detector materials (supported by NNSA and DHS). Detector development work is performed
for DOE NP (e.g., MAJORANA, GRETA/GRETINA, SNO+), HEP, NNSA, DHS, and DoD. Core
competencies include large-volume germanium and CdZnTe detector development, with an emphasis on
position-sensitive and low-noise systems, and gamma-ray imaging using coded aperture masks, Compton
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scattering telescopes, as well as other methods. Detectors and detection concepts are being developed for a
wide variety of applications, including homeland security, nonproliferation, medical imaging, and nuclear
science.
The Air Force and the National Reconnaissance Office support the testing of critical space-based electronic
components by the National Security Space Community, using heavy-ion beams at the Laboratory’s 88-Inch
Cyclotron. The use of “cocktail beams” composed of a mixture of elements that mimic the composition of
cosmic rays encountered by satellites provides a unique national asset to greatly speed the testing of critical
space-based electronic components. The 88-Inch Cyclotron is also used to study surrogate reaction techniques
of interest to advanced fuel cycles for nuclear reactors. Other core facilities are the crystal growth facility,
BELLA (where compact tunable monochromatic gamma sources are under development for NNSA and
DoD), and the Semiconductor Detector Laboratory.
LBNL’s research in this area in support of SC includes the development of high-field ion sources for use by
nuclear accelerators, such as the Laboratory’s 88-inch Cyclotron and the FRIB at MSU. MSU is also a key
partner with LBNL in the UC Berkeley-based Nuclear Science and Security Consortium (NSSC), an NNSAfunded program to develop a pipeline into the national laboratory system for students of nuclear physics and
other topics.
LBNL is collecting high-quality gamma-ray background data in urban and suburban environments with
support from DHS. The Laboratory plans to fully characterize the gamma-ray background based on data
collected from detectors in conjunction with visual imagery, light detection and ranging (LIDAR), weather,
and other baseline geospatial data that may affect distribution of incident gamma rays. LBNL is also
obtaining and evaluating background gamma-ray data from aerial environments containing complex
topographical and isotopic variations. NNSA supports a feasibility study to explore an advanced system for
data storage, analysis, and dissemination of gamma-ray background data, including detailed annotation.
LBNL plans to use standardization and analysis frameworks developed at the Laboratory within the HEP and
cosmology communities to develop a platform to vastly increase the scope of the data being analyzed. This
activity will be closely aligned with the NSSC and will leverage significant nation-wide efforts in the
management of large sets of complex data led by LBNL.
This Core Capability is sponsored by SC (NP, HEP, and BES), NNSA, and NE as well as DHS, DoD, and the
Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Core Capability contributes to DOE missions to integrate the
basic research in SC programs with research in support of the NNSA and DOE technology office programs.
16. Systems Engineering and Integration. LBNL’s demonstrated abilities to engineer, construct, and integrate
complex systems underpin many of the core competencies described in this section, and those of major user
facilities described earlier. The breadth of large-scale user facilities designed, built, and operated at LBNL
would be impossible without the ability to address complex instrumentation challenges of scale. LBNL is
uniquely configured within SC with a centralized Engineering Division that makes engineering and technical
support available to all scientific endeavors at LBNL. This significantly strengthens LBNL systems
engineering and integration. Technical and engineering capabilities are unified and applied to problems from
a coordinated, disciplined approach. These engineering and technical capabilities are not restricted to a single
program; crosscutting solutions are standard and expected. The Laboratory’s internationally recognized skills
in advanced instrumentation (such as accelerating structures, detectors, lasers, magnets, and optics) enable
many scientific breakthroughs described in this Plan and are the direct result of the holistic coordination and
deployment of engineering and technical resources. Solutions and approaches developed for one application
are leveraged, adapted, and applied to other applications. For example, LBNL’s world-leading expertise in
integrated silicon detectors for high-energy physics detectors has been adapted and applied to the
development of massive scientific-grade CCD detectors for astronomical applications. This was subsequently
adapted and improved to provide radiation-resistant high-speed X-ray and electron detectors for state-of-theart defining synchrotron radiation beamlines and electron microscopes. This disciplined approach covers
concept through execution and is typified by major items of scientific equipment such as the ATLAS inner
detector, the Daya Bay neutrino reactor experiment, GRETINA, and ALICE nuclear physics detectors, and
the Transmission Electron Aberration-corrected Microscope (TEAM) electron microscope now used for
materials science research.
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In addition to LBNL’s demonstrated abilities to engineer and integrate complex systems (as described in
Large-Scale User Facilities and Advanced Instrumentation section earlier in this document), it is the
recognized leader in energy efficiency in commercial and residential buildings and industrial facilities. In this
capacity, LBNL develops and transfers new energy-efficient building and industrial technologies from the
laboratory to the real world, domestically and internationally, and stimulates the use of high-performance
technologies through innovative deployment programs. LBNL has a strong record of working with industry to
evaluate, develop, and implement new cost-effective technologies for buildings, including high-energyintensity buildings such as data centers that increase energy efficiency and improve the comfort, health, and
safety of their occupants. The Laboratory is designing and building a novel Facility for Low Energy
eXperiments in Buildings (FLEXLAB). This Facility comprises a set of “test beds” and simulation platforms
for the research, development, and demonstration of building technologies, control systems, and building
systems-integration strategies. Integrated commercial building systems explore ways to assimilate research in
building demand-response systems, windows, lighting, indoor air quality, and simulation tools to develop
coherent, innovative construction and design techniques. LBNL is also a leader in developing cool surface
materials for roofing, pavement, and architectural glazing, and in understanding large-scale urban heat-island
effects that impact energy consumption and smog formation.
LBNL also performs integrated research on domestic and international energy policies to help mitigate carbon
emissions and climate change. The Laboratory investigates and evaluates the economic impact of
implementing energy-efficiency performance standards in industrial systems and for a wide range of
consumer products. LBNL provides technical assistance to federal agencies to evaluate and deploy renewable,
distributed energy, and demand-side options to reduce energy costs, manage electric power grid stability, and
assess the impact of electricity market restructuring, e.g., employing large-scale electric-energy storage
systems. The Laboratory is a leader in the research and development of battery systems for automotive and
stationary applications and is a leading partner in the JCESR Hub collaboration. LBNL is also applying its
extensive experience in subsurface science to underground compressed-air energy storage. Battery-systems
research encompasses the development of new materials, theoretical modeling, and systems engineering,
while research in large-scale subsurface energy storage encompasses numerical simulation of coupled
processes in the porous reservoir.
In addition to the Office of Science, these efforts contribute significantly to several technology research
programs funded by EERE, FE, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (EDER), Advanced Research
Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), and the DHS Chemical and Biological Security program. LBNL
leverages DOE’s investment in systems engineering and integration efforts by working with California and
other states, and other federal and WFO sponsors, including the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the
California Energy Commission, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, the
Western Governors’ Association, energy utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the CO2
Capture Project, and programs within DoD’s Defense Threat Reduction Agency. LBNL works with standards
organizations such as the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers
(ASHRAE), and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to support the development of
technical standards.
Science Strategy for the Future
LBNL’s Science Strategy focuses on extending and integrating the spatial and temporal scales to solve the most
pressing and profound scientific challenges facing humankind, including providing sustainable long-term energy
supplies, protecting the global environment, and understanding the most abundant but largely unknown
constituents of the universe. Particular areas of emphasis are: providing the most powerful tools for scientific
inquiry; understanding and predicting the behavior of physical, chemical, and biological systems; conducting
basic science to enable a secure energy future; understanding biological and integrated Earth systems to improve
sustainable energy supplies and to protect the environment; advancing our fundamental understanding of the
nature of matter and energy in the universe; and providing the computational capabilities that will assure U.S
leadership in science into the future.
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There are five strategic science initiatives (and their primary funding sources) for the Laboratory’s future:
•
•
•
•
•
Photons for Science (BES)
Basic Science for Energy (BES)
Integrated Biological and Earth Systems Science (BER)
Matter and Energy in the Universe (HEP and NP)
Advanced Computing (ASCR)
The Laboratory’s portfolio of research in each of these areas is directed to advance DOE mission to ensure
America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through
transformative science and technology solutions. Some of this research is also sponsored by Work for Others.
Mission Readiness/Facilities and Infrastructure
Overview of Facilities and Infrastructure. The Mission Readiness Facilities and Infrastructure Strategy is based
on the need to support LBNL’s core capabilities in a safe and cost-efficient manner. The strategy develops a
construction, maintenance, and upgrade/replacement program based on cost effectiveness and mission
requirements. For the 2013 Annual Plan, the LBNL Mission Readiness Facilities and Infrastructure Strategy has
two primary near-term goals to meet DOE mission needs:
Meet mission goals for biological and environmental sciences in the key areas of genomics, bioenergy resources,
integrated biosciences, and environmental health research by consolidating all programs at a single location, such
as at the Richmond Bay Campus.
Upgrade or replace deficient DOE facilities at the LBNL Hill site, addressing identified seismic safety issues to
ensure the safety of staff, and provide for timely modernization of facilities and infrastructure in order to ensure
Mission Readiness.
These primary near-term goals are the foundation of LBNL’s recently DOE-validated Facilities Maintenance
Program that ensures that current DOE assets are well maintained and managed, and that earlier-era research
buildings that no longer meet the performance requirements of modern science are replaced to ensure continued
Mission Readiness. As it can take some time to replace earlier-era assets however, LBNL arranges for use of
leased space in order to meet all research mission assignments at the high performance standards that characterize
LBNLs scientific achievements.
The Laboratory’s first goal will address the research capability gap by fostering synergy among biosciences
researchers who will now be located in close proximity to one another. It will address operational efficiency by
ending the current use of various leased spaces and combining biosciences researchers into a new, cost-efficient
location
Current biosciences research leases comprise 245,344 square feet (sf) in Berkeley and surrounding cities.
Consolidating these programs into a single location will bring together the biosciences Core Capabilities currently
occupying this disjointed lease space. The total area of leases comprises 345,397 sf, including 100,053 sf of
nonbiosciences use, with the Oakland Scientific Facility (OSF, 40,179 sf), Office of the Chief Financial Officer
(OCFO, 30,770 sf), and the Joint Center For Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP, 23,500 sf) comprising 94,449 sf of
the 100,053 sf balance (small leased researcher support facilities at the Sanford Underground Research Facility
(SURF) in South Dakota and in Livermore make up the balance). The computing functions in the OSF will
consolidate at the main Hill site when the Computational Research and Theory (CRT, UC-funded) building is
completed in the next two years. The JCAP research group will consolidate to the main Hill site when the Solar
Energy Research Center (SERC, UC-funded) and General Purpose Laboratory (GPL-1) buildings are completed
in the next two years. Persuant to the UC-DOE Prime Contract, the Laboratory also has no-fee use of 46,056 sf of
UC space on the UC Berkeley campus adjacent to LBNL’s main Hill campus. Completion of SERC, CRT and
consolidation of Biosciences will significantly address any research capability impediments and inefficiencies
created by the current leased-property arrangements.
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In FYs 2012 and 2013, LBNL’s leased space was adjusted with two actions: (1) approximately 5,213 sf of space
was leased at Horton Street in Emeryville, California, to accommodate the Systems Biology Knowledgebase
(KBase) program; and (2) the lease for a 50,995 sf warehouse in Richmond, California, was terminated and
replaced with a pay-as-you-need model for commercial storage.
LBNL’s second goal focuses on facilities and infrastructure at the Hill site. Five DOE-SLI seismic safety projects
form the core of efforts to address this goal. The first two projects have been competed or are nearing completion.
The final three seismic safety projects will be implemented over the next 10 years. The DOE Environmental
Management (EM) demolition of the Old Town area and the development of the NGLS facility and infrastructure
are other major elements.
The LBNL Hill site is located on 202 acres of (UC) land (85.28 acres are leased to DOE). The LBNL Land Use
Plan can be viewed within the Berkeley Lab Long-Range Development Plan at
http://www.lbl.gov/Community/LRDP/index.html. The main site comprises approximately 1.65 million gross
square feet (gsf) in operational buildings (1.628M gsf) and temporary operational trailers (30.6K gsf). 56.166 gsf
are “excess,” and slated for demolition by EM; the EM Old Town project is expected to demolish a total of
~55,000 gsf of buildings over the next few years. 22,814 sf of main-site facilities are non-DOE facilities, and two
additional non-DOE facilities are under construction..
Seventy percent of the Laboratory’s active facilities were constructed more than 30 years ago, when LBNL was
primarily a high-energy physics, nuclear chemistry, and nuclear medicine laboratory. Approximately 30% of the
active Hill space had been identified as seismically deficient with seismic performance ratings of “Poor” or “Very
Poor,” according to the UC Seismic Policy, and given the probability of a major seismic event in the Bay Area,
this represents a major infrastructure rebuilding priority. Today, the seismically deficient space figure has been
reduced to approximately 13% (5 percentage points lower than in 2012) through continuing efforts to upgrade or
replace useable space, then vacate and demolish the deficient space. Significant progress has been made, but the
job is not yet complete.
LBNL’s Hill site utility infrastructure ranges from 8 to 53 years old. Infrastructure Fitness for Service Evaluations
and Capacity Assessments were conducted in July 2010. Overall, the surveyed utility systems were found to be in
relatively good shape. A few upgrades and replacements were recommended by the consulting engineers, and
major corrective items were completed in FY 2011 and 2012. Future upgrades to the electrical and compressed-air
utilities are summarized close of the section below. LBNL intends to continue to provide mission-ready functional
buildings for evolving DOE research missions.
Facilities and Infrastructure to Support Laboratory Missions. The Laboratory maintains a comprehensive
database for its DOE facilities. This data is maintained in the DOE Facilities Information Management System
(FIMS), which contains both LBNL’s current data and some DOE-controlled tables that generally reflect end-ofprior-year data. Table 1 presents the FIMS Summary Table for conditions at the close of FY 2012.
Table 2 shows a 0.964 Asset Condition Index (ACI) for mission-critical DOE assets at LBNL. LBNL’s asset
condition management planning conforms to DOE SC’s expectation that the ACI metric for mission-critical
facilities (approximately 90% of LBNL’s capital assets) will be a minimum of 0.970 within the 10-year planning
period. A summary of planned investments and their impact to ACI is provided in Table 3 and Figure 1.
The Asset Utilization Index (AUI) is 96.09 for office space and 99.62 for lab space; effectively 100%, allowing
for moves and renovations. LBNL’s AUI has been high for a number of years, and while most evolutionary
research program changes are accommodated on the main site, mission program growth in recent years has
required temporary solutions pending completion of the projects supporting the two major goals. LBNL has
established eight significant off-site leases: (1) the Joint Genome Institute (JGI); (2) the Joint BioEnergy Institute
(JBEI); (3) the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the supercomputer facility; (4)
the Advanced BioFuels Process Demonstration Unit (ABPDU); (5) the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis
(JCAP); (6) major portions of the Life Sciences Division (LSD); (7) the Systems Biology Knowledgebase
(KBase); and (8) the Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO). Significant numbers of staff from seven
divisions — Life Sciences, Physical Biosciences, Genomics, Computational Research, NERSC, Materials
Sciences, and Operations — are housed at off-site locations in four East Bay cities. Current occupancy at those
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locations accounts for over 10% of the Laboratory, counted either by full-time equivalents (FTEs) or
programmatic funding.
LBNL evaluated the structural seismic life safety of all occupied buildings and large trailers at the main Hill site.
The surveys were completed by nationally recognized structural engineers experienced in field investigations and
analyses of damage in earthquakes. These analyses were examined in terms of the standards for “Good,” “Fair,”
“Poor,” or “Very Poor” structures, consistent with UC Seismic Safety Policy. LBNL developed plans for
mitigating the risks in all structures rated either “Poor” or “Very Poor.” All “Very Poor” structures on the site
were vacated, and all but one has been demolished. All “Poor” structures will either be demolished or structurally
upgraded, either through the SLI program or using Institutional General Plant Project (IGPP) funds.
LBNL has worked with DOE and UC to develop a long-term solution to both eliminate lease capability gaps in
terms of research synergy and operational efficiency, and to fully address the seismic safety risks outlined in the
preceding section. A series of integrated investments to ensure that facilities and infrastructure are safe and meet
the needs of the Laboratory’s current Core Capabilities are being made. Table 4 identifies the facilities that house
research for each Core Capability, the condition of those facilities, and the planned investment to achieve seismic
safety and Mission Readiness. Most buildings and investments benefit multiple Core Capabilities; each
investment is detailed once and then cross-referenced in the core-capability sections that follow.
In addition, in support of Mission Readiness and Core Capabilities, future upgrades to the electrical and
compressed-air utilities are addressed in Table 5, and have been identified for design and funding. Some systems
in a few buildings will be approaching the end of their expected useful lives within the term of this Plan, including
some energy-management control systems, electrical transformers and service panels, and network and telephone
systems.
LBNL’s plan integrates actual and proposed investments by SC (SLI and program offices), DOE’s Office of
Environmental Management (OEM), DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), UC,
and LBNL using IGPP funds, as well as alterations and maintenance from the Laboratory’s funds. These
investments ensure Mission Readiness and support for the Core Capabilities, and fully address safety
commitments. Near-term investments (the next five years), and some related projects currently in the early stages
of planning for the subsequent five-year period, are summarized below. A map illustrating the planned 2013-2023
Hill-site projects is presented in Attachment 2.
Table 1. SC Infrastructure Data Summary
Total Bldg, Trailer, and OSF RPV($)
(Less 3000 Series OSF’s)
Total OSF 3000 Series RPV($)
Total RPV($)
Total Deferred Maintenance($)
Total Owned Acreage
Total Leased Acreage
Site Wide ACI(B, S, T)
$1,091,453,630
$137,960,190
$1229,419,820
$35,958,141
0
85
0.967
# Building
Assets
58
37
2
13
10
40
1
0
# Trailer # OSF
Assets Assets
12
53
14
275
9
1
30
0
2
0
0
# GSF
(Bldg)
1,497,387
130,370
4,674
310,447
7,076
1,117,203
10,547
0
0.964
Mission Critical
0.99
Mission Dependent
0.977
Not Mission Dependent
96.09
Office
100
Warehouse
Asset Utilization
99.62
Laboratory
Index (B, T) 2, 3
100
Hospital
Housing
B=Building; S=Structure; T=Trailers
1
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings, Trailers, and OSF’s (excludes series 3000 OSF’s).
2
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings and Trailers.
3
Only includes assets with usage codes that fall into these 5 FRPC categories. Other usage types are not included.
Asset Condition
Index (B, S, T) 1
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
# GSF
(Trailer)
9,595
18,739
14,290
39,674
0
2,007
0
0
113
Strategic Infrastructure Investments. LBNL’s plan integrates actual and proposed investments by SC (SLI and
program offices), DOE EM, UC, and IGPP, as well as alterations and maintenance from the Laboratory’s funds.
These investments ensure mission readiness and support for the core capabilities, and fully address safety
commitments. Near-term investments (the next five years), including some conceptual projects in the early stages
of planning, are summarized below.
•
•
Office of Science Investments (SLI and Program Offices). The SLI Modernization program at LBNL
corrects seismic deficiencies and modernizes facilities for mission readiness. New buildings and major
renovation projects are expected to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold
certification and exceed American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers
(ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2004 energy-efficiency requirements by approximately 30%.
o
Biosciences Integration Facility Project. This investment is a priority, as it will integrate major
biosciences activities currently in geographically dispersed off-site leased facilities. The dispersion of
existing biosciences has created a capability gap in terms of synergy among researchers and
operational efficiency in terms of facilities and infrastructure. An integrated facility would enable
continuous interaction among researchers who have complimentary interests, and enable creation of a
shared instrument “core” that will support multiple bioscience and other research programs. This
project includes the construction of an approximately 140,000 gsf general-purpose laboratory/office
building. The Laboratory has the capacity to and the missions would benefit from starting Project
Engineering Design (PED) in FY 2015. Existing leases for the DOE JGI, ABPDU, and KBase will be
terminated.
o
SLI Seismic Phase 3 Project. This investment is a priority for LBNL, as it will remedy serious
seismic life-safety deficiencies in DOE structures occupied by approximately 1,000 staff and visitors.
A number of seismically deficient structures that cannot be cost-effectively upgraded will be
demolished. This project includes the construction of two buildings: a general-purpose laboratory
building and 20,000-35,000 gsf research/support office building that will include a replacement
cafeteria/meeting facility. This project will also upgrade or replace the seismically poor-rated Health
Services building. The Laboratory has the capacity to and the missions would benefit from starting
PED in FY 2015. Productivity improvement will be greater than $2 million.
o
SLI Seismic Phase 4 Project (B70) Project. This investment will remedy seismic life-safety
deficiencies in DOE Building 70, occupied by 160 staff and visitors. This project will replace
Building 70 with a modern, approximately 55,000 gsf laboratory/office building. PED is projected for
FY 2017.
o
SLI Seismic Phase 5 Project. This investment will remedy serious seismic life-safety deficiencies in
the remaining seismically unsafe DOE facilities. This project also constructs an approximately
55,000-gsf general-purpose laboratory/office building to replace structures that are seismic and
operational liabilities and that cannot be cost-effectively upgraded. PED is projected for FY 2020.
o
SLI Seismic Phase 2 Project. This FY 2009 project start is remedying seismic life-safety
deficiencies in DOE buildings occupied by 250 staff and visitors. This project has modernized about
45,000 gsf of laboratory space in seismically upgraded Building 74. In addition, a modern, ~43,000gsf general-purpose laboratory/office building (GPL-1) with an adjacent 3,000-gsf utility center is
now being constructed to replace structures that are seismic and operational liabilities. Under this
project, seismic risks posed by an ancient landslide will be addressed in the Building 85 area. CD4A/B was approved in September 2012 and CD-4C approval is forecast for February 2014.
o
SLI ARRA General Plant Project (GPP). The Building 62 Phase 2 scope modernized additional
1960s-era general-purpose laboratory space as an extension of scope at Building 62. Phase 2 was
funded in 2011 with DOE’s permission using contingency funds released from five original ARRA
projects. The Building 62 Phase 2 scope was completed in March 2013.
Other DOE Office Investments
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
114
•
•
o
NGLS (BES). LBNL has been working with the scientific community to develop a Next Generation
Light Source (NGLS) that will be a transformative tool for many fields of science. More than 150
scientists, representing more than 40 research institutions from around the world, contributed to the
CD-0 proposal for the NGLS, which was approved in April 2011. Site planning and preconceptual
designs and estimates are in progress, as they will support a CD-1 review and enable the efficient
construction of the NGLS, including associated experimental and user facilities and utility
infrastructure.
o
Old Town Demolitions and Environmental Remediation (EM). This noncapital investment will
demolish approximately 55,000 gsf of old, outdated structures and remediate over 1 acre of legacy
soil and groundwater contamination under the structures. The estimated total project cost is $25
million to $30 million. Initial funding of $10 million has been received to deactivate and demolish
Buildings 5 and 16/16A down to their slabs. This work is now in progress. An additional $15 million
to $20 million is requested to complete the demolition of the Old Town project buildings and
remediate the site in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
Corrective Action program. Deferred maintenance will be reduced by approximately $0.5 million.
o
User Test Bed Facility (EERE). Construction on this ARRA investment is in progress. The User
Test Bed Facility (a.k.a. FLEXLAB) will contain a set of test beds for building systems integration. It
will be designed to address key technical challenges for low- and net-zero energy buildings and will
be located near and within Building 90.
Contractor Investments. The University of California has further demonstrated its commitment to
research and education by arranging over $190 million of funding for three significant facility
investments.
o
Berkeley Lab Guest House. This investment is a priority for visitors to LBNL’s national user
facilities, as it provides overnight accommodations for up to 70 guests. The roughly 20,000 sf project
was funded in 2007 and became operational in 2009.
o
Computational Research and Theory Facility. This investment is a priority, as it will provide a new,
approximately 128,000 sf computing science facility. The project is scheduled for occupancy in 2014.
o
Solar Energy Research Center. This investment is a priority, as it will provide a new, roughly 38,000
sf facility to support sustainable energy research. The project funding was authorized in FY 2007 and
this facility is scheduled for occupancy in 2014.
Laboratory Investments. LBNL focuses its direct investments, including maintenance funding of
approximately $20 million/year and IGPP funding in excess of $5 million/year, to ensure that facilities are
maintained effectively to serve the mission. Funding needs are identified annually in a lab-wide UniCall
process, and are reviewed by LBNL leadership to ensure funds are allocated to the highest overall priority
facility and infrastructure projects. Currently of particular note are two initiatives:
o
Old Town Move-out. The Laboratory is working to vacate the remaining legacy buildings in the Old
Town area in an orderly and coordinated manner prior to the demolition and restoration project
described above. Relocation projects for the first buildings are in progress.
o
New Construction. Research and office space, and supporting infrastructure projects that can address
some program evolutions using IGPP-funds, are in conceptual development. Similarly, opportunities
to use IGPP-funds to upgrade and modernize facilities and infrastructure are in conceptual
development. Concepts will be reviewed with DOE Berkeley Site Office (BSO) as they are developed
and considered for advancement.
Additional Excess Facilities and Plans to Achieve Asset Condition Index (ACI) Targets. Only about 0.31%
(5,160 gsf including 410 gsf of trailer space) of DOE building and trailer space at LBNL is nonoperational. The
5,160 gsf of nonoperational buildings (3) and trailers (1) will be excessed and demolished during the strategic
planning period, and as appropriate are included in the projects discussed in the preceding project summaries.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
115
LBNL’s plan conforms to DOE SC’s expectation that the ACI metric for mission-critical facilities (approximately
90% of LBNL’s capital assets) will be a minimum of 0.970 within the 10-year planning period. LBNL plans to
reduce deferred maintenance and achieve this objective with a combination of Deferred Maintenance Reduction
(DMR), IGPP, Non-Cap Alteration, and Line Item Project (LIP) funding and to meet the 0.980 ACI target for
Mission Critical Facilities. Decisions regarding funding type are made separately in each project case, based on
determination of the most appropriate size and type of replacement equipment to serve the current and future
mission requirements.
Trends and Metrics.
LBNL's annual infrastructure goals are defined in Contract Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan
(PEMP) Section 7: Sustain Excellence in Operating, Maintaining, and Renewing the Facility and Infrastructure
Portfolio to Meet Laboratory Needs. These goals measure UC’s overall effectiveness and performance in
planning for, delivering, and operating LBNL facilities and equipment to ensure that required capabilities are
present to meet today’s and tomorrow’s complex challenges. For FY 2012, UC scored 3.3 for Goal 7, which
translates to a letter grade of B+.
•
Noteworthy performance includes cost savings of $3.2 million in FY 2012 while improving service. Work
order lead time dropped by 35%. On-time work orders improved from 28.4% to 81%. The Bevatron
Demolition project was completed a month ahead of schedule while returning $2.4 million of unallocated
contingency back to the headquarters program office. The project also had 350,000 work hours with no
lost time due to accidents and was nominated for DOE Project of the Year. Also of note was the
implementation of the Project Portfolio Management (PPM) end-to-end business process. This process
enables the optimization of the mix and sequencing of projects utilizing the appropriate allocation of
resources in support of Mission Readiness.
•
LBNL's Facilities Division won the International Facility Management Association’s (IFMA’s) 2012
Sheila Sheridan Award for Sustainable Design and Energy Efficient Projects. This recognizes the
division's “total program approach” to institutional sustainability, including new-building construction,
sustainable operations, and maintenance practices; collaboration with surrounding communities; and active
involvement in educating similar national laboratories regarding LBNL methodology.
LBNL’s facilities and infrastructure maintenance program was successfully reviewed by DOE in early 2013. The
Laboratory’s overall Mission Readiness strategy was successfully peer reviewed in 2009, and the support
programs were found to include best-in-class programs. A summary of support facilities and infrastructure for
mission readiness is provided in Attachment 1.
Table 3. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments ($M)
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
15.3
13.8
14.1
14.3
14.6
14.9
15.2
15.4
15.7
16.0
16.3
16.7
1.4
1
2.6
2.6
2.9
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
IGPP
6.4
5.5
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
GPP
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Line Items (SLI)
13.0
0.0
0.0
48.0
82.9
102.5
35.5
35.6
30.0
27.0
55.0
45.0
Total Investment
36.1
21.8
22.9
70.8
104.0
123.9
57.2
57.5
52.0
49.3
77.3
67.7
1250
1286
1255
1281
1297
1324
1352
1381
1409
1384
1427
36.3
32.9
28.0
26.2
26.3
26.8
27.9
28.5
29.4
25.1
26.2
0.971 0.974 0.978 0.980 0.980 0.980 0.979 0.979 0.979 0.982
Site-Wide ACI
1 Does not include DMR resulting from line items, GPP, IGPP, excess facility disposition, or normal maintenance.
2 Per O85 Report
0.982
Maintenance
DMR
1
EFD (Overhead)
Estimated RPV
Estimated DM
2
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
116
Figure 1. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments
140.0
1.000
0.990
120.0
0.980
100.0
0.970
80.0
0.960
0.950
60.0
0.940
40.0
0.930
0.920
20.0
0.910
0.0
0.900
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total Investment ($M)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Site-Wide ACI
117
Attachment 1. Mission Readiness Tables
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Now
Accelerator
Science
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
Applied
Nuclear
Science and
Technology
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure
Facilities
Objectives
Capability Gap
Laboratory
DOE
High-energy, low-emittance
6, 15, 46, 47,
beam R&D, including highNGLS CD-0 has been
Seismic deficiencies;
Maintenance, DMR &
58/A (incl. NDX- repetition-rate photoinjectors,
authorized in FY 2011
IGPP capital renewal of
II),
71
(incl.
optical manipulation of beams, insufficient-quality
X
Old Town demolition
experimental program
general-purpose
BELLA), 77,
and superconducting
started
space
infrastructure
77A, 88, Old
technology. BELLA
Town
advancements.
Design and demonstration of
Maintenance, DMR &
Seismic deficiencies; some IGPP capital renewal of
NGLS construction
high-performance, lowinadequate space pending
including user facility.
emittance beams, including
general-purpose
6, 15, 46, 47,
seismic upgrade and
Complete Old Town
high-repetition-rate
infrastructure.
58/A, 71 , 77,
modernization
of
select
demolition.
photoinjectors, optical
Rehabilitate and add
X
77A, 88, Old
older
buildings.
UserSeismic Phs. 3 – Generalmanipulation for attosecond
sufficient high-bay and
Town relocation
facility demand outpaces
purpose replacement
photon beams; BELLA
high-ceiling space; Old
space
available resources.
Bldgs.
advancements, and advanced
Town staff and program
Limited
high-bay
space.
optical accelerators
relocations
Deploy the attosecond highComplete NGLS
intensity high-average-power
6, 15, 46, 47,
construction and start
Maintenance, DMR &
photon beams for the user
Some inadequate space
58/A, 71 , 77,
operation.
IGPP capital renewal of
community, develop highestpending completion of
X 77A, 88, Old
Seismic Phs. 5 – Seismic
general-purpose
energy, lowest-cost
projects in pipeline.
Town relocation
upgrade of Bldgs. 46 &
infrastructure
accelerators, BELLA
space, NGLS
58.
advancements
Develop detectors for
Inadequate space pending
Maintenance, DMR &
2, 15, 6, 50, 50C,
nuclear/security. Develop
seismic upgrade and
IGPP capital renewal of
55,
58/A,
64,
70,
models for seismic safety of
X
modernization of select
general-purpose
70A, 71, 71A, 77, reactors. Understand actinide
older buildings
infrastructure
88
behavior.
Develop and deploy detectors
Seismic Phs. 2 (in
for nuclear/security.
2, 6, 15, 50,
Inadequate space pending
Maintenance, DMR &
progress) – GeneralUnderstand radiation effects
50C,55 & 71Aseismic upgrade and
IGPP capital renewal of
purpose replacement Lab
on electronics. Perform 3-D
X
replacement,
modernization of select
general-purpose
Bldg. 1 (LBNL Building
seismic behavior of reactors.
58/A, 64, 70,
older buildings
infrastructure
33)
Simulate core flow and
70A, 71, 77, 88
dynamics.
Seismic Phs. 4 (B70) –
2, 6, 15, 50, 55Bldg. 70 replacement
replacement
bldg.
Deploy advanced models and
Maintenance, DMR &
space, 58/A, 64Some inadequate space
Seismic Phs. 5 – Generaldetectors for materials nuclear
IGPP capital renewal of
replacement
pending completion of
X
purpose replacement Lab
safety, including innovative
general-purpose
space, 70projects
in
pipeline.
Bldg. 3.
scintillation detection
infrastructure
replacement
Seismic Phs. 5 – Bldg. 58
space, 70A, 71,
upgrade.
77, 88
Mission
Ready
N M P C
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
118
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Now
Applied
Materials
Science and
Engineering
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
Applied Math
& Advanced
Computer
Science,
Visualization
and Data
In 5
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure
Facilities
Objectives
Capability Gap
Laboratory
DOE
NGLS CD-0 was
Develop nanodevices, highSERC. Maintenance,
authorized in FY 2011.
efficiency catalysis and energy
Limited wet lab and
DMR & IGPP capital
X
6, 15, 67, 72
Old Town demolition
conversion, storage and
assembly/high-bay space.
renewal of generalstarted.
transmission systems
purpose infrastructure.
NGLS construction
including user facility.
Develop new energy materials
Complete SERC.
Complete Old Town
at high efficiency through the
Maintenance, DMR &
demolition.
study of nano- and femtoscale
IGPP capital renewal of
Seismic Phs. 2 – Generalprocess. Pilot testing of
Limited wet lab and
general-purpose
X
6, 15, 67, 72
purpose replacement Lab
materials and engineered
assembly/high-bay space.
infrastructure.
Bldg. 1.
systems. Design integrated and
Rehabilitate and add
Seismic Phs. 3 – Generalmore efficient photovoltaic
sufficient high-bay and
purpose replacement
systems.
high-ceiling space.
bldgs.
Complete NGLS
Utilize attosecond and
construction and start
femtosecond probes to
Maintenance,
DMR
&
Some inadequate space
operation.
optimize the design of energy
IGPP
capital
renewal
of
6,
15,
67,
72,
pending completion of
X
Seismic Phs. 5 – Generalcapture and storage systems.
general-purpose
NGLS
projects in pipeline.
purpose replacement Lab
Deploy and further engineer
infrastructure
Bldg. 3.
advanced systems.
Algorithms and systems for
NGLS, some inadequate
CRT. Maintenance, DMR
next-generation modeling and
space
pending
completion
& IGPP capital renewal of NGLS CD-0 was
X
50-complex, OSF data; R&D on low-power
authorized in FY 2011
of
CRT
and
modernization
general-purpose
computing. Modeling and
of
select
older
buildings
infrastructure.
validation for ultrafast science.
Complete CRT.
Apply advanced modeling to
NGLS, some inadequate
Maintenance, DMR &
NGLS construction
sustainable-energy systems.
space pending completion
50-complex ,
IGPP capital renewal of
X
including user facility
Develop software and systems
of CRT and modernization general-purpose
OSF, CRT
for extreme computing.
of select older buildings
infrastructure.
Mission
Ready
N M P C
50-complex,
X NGLS, OSF,
CRT
In 10
Years
Biological
Systems
Science
Now
X
6, 15, 55/A, 56,
64, 67, 70A, 74,
83, 84, Donner
Lab, JBEI, JGI,
Potter (BWB)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Develop and deploy exascale
computing, including
multimillion processor
systems; provide advanced
visualization tools; develop
low-energy computation
systems
Some inadequate space
pending completion of
projects in pipeline.
User facilities to model
chemical and materials at
the attoscale for lowenergy computation
systems.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Complete NGLS
construction and start
operation.
Seismic Phs. 5 – Generalpurpose replacement Lab
Bldg. 3.
Conduct leading biofuels
research, develop
biosequestration, achieve
multiterabase genome
sequencing methods, conduct
metagenomics studies of entire
biological communities
Capability Gap due to
dispersal of research.
Inadequate space in both
number of on-site lab
spaces and the capabilities
of the older-standard labs,
seismically deficient
facilities. Need photon
user facilities.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
BIF approval.
Continue to support
advanced instrumentation
at the ALS, JGI,
Molecular Foundry, JBEI
and smaller-scale cuttingedge facilities.
119
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
In 5
Years
Mission
Ready
N M P C
X
Chemical and
Molecular
Science
In 5
Years
X
2, 6, 15, 62, 70,
70A, 80
X
2, 6, 15, 62, 70,
70A, 80, SERC
2, 6, 15, 62, 70X replacement,
70A, 80, SERC,
NGLS
In 10
Years
Now
Chemical
Engineering
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
55, 56A, 56, ,6,
15, 67, BIF
6, 15, 67, NGLS,
X 55 & 56 replment
space, BIF
In 10
Years
Now
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure
Facilities
Objectives
Capability Gap
X
2, 6, 15, 62, 67,
70, 70A, 90
X
2, 6, 15, 62, 70,
70A, 80, SERC
2, 6, 15, 62, 70X replacement,
70A, 80, SERC,
NGLS
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Develop comparative
metagenomics of entire
biological communities.
Engineer biofuel crops,
microbes, and synthetic
systems.
Develop and deploy molecules
that are currently being made
from petroleum, including
biofuels and commodity
chemicals. Develop plants that
do not need nitrogen-based
fertilizers.
Develop sustainable fuels
conversion and sequestration
systems; understand molecular
processes at nano, femto, and
attoscales
Develop hybrid chemical
conversion, artificial
photosynthesis, efficient and
affordable photovoltaics
Directly observe how electrons
move and control chemical
bonds. View electron movies,
design highly efficient
photosynthetic and chemical
conversion systems.
Develop advanced chemical
systems for sustainable energy
conversion & storage. Pilot
testing of chemical systems
and hybrid systems.
Pilot testing of chemical
systems and hybrid systems
Deploy and further engineer
advanced chemical systems for
DOE missions; provide NGLS
molecular engineering
capabilities
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
BIF constructed and
occupied.
Continue to support
advanced instrumentation
at ALS, JGI, Molecular
Foundry, JBEI, and
smaller-scale cutting edge
facilities.
NGLS construction
including user facility.
NGLS. Some inadequate
space in a couple of onsite seismically deficient
facilities.
Complete Biosciences
consolidation.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure.
Some inadequate space
pending completion of
projects in pipeline.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Complete NGLS
construction and start
operation
Inadequate number of
laboratory spaces, olderstandard labs; some
inadequate space pending
seismic replacement
SERC. Maintenance,
DMR & IGPP capital
renewal of generalpurpose infrastructure.
NGLS CD-0 was
authorized in FY 2011
Inadequate number of
laboratory & office spaces,
older-standard labs
Complete SERC.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure.
NGLS construction
including user facility
Some inadequate space
pending completion of
projects in pipeline.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Complete NGLS
construction and begin
operation.
Seismic Phs. 4 (B70) –
Bldg. 70 replacement
bldg.
Inadequate number of
laboratory spaces, olderstandard labs; some
inadequate space pending
seismic replacement
SERC. Maintenance,
DMR & IGPP capital
renewal of generalpurpose infrastructure.
NGLS CD-0 was
authorized in FY 2011
Inadequate number of
laboratory & office spaces,
older-standard labs
Complete SERC.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure.
NGLS construction
including user facility
Some inadequate space
pending completion of
projects in pipeline.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Complete NGLS
construction and begin
operation.
Seismic Phs. 4 (B70 ) –
Bldg. 70 replacement
bldg.
120
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Now
Climate
Change
Science
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
Computational
Science
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure
Facilities
Objectives
Capability Gap
Laboratory
DOE
Develop and communicate
Inadequate space pending
data, models, research, and
replacement of seismically Maintenance, DMR &
NGLS CD-0 has been
transformational solutions to
IGPP capital renewal of
50-complex, 70,
deficient older building.
X
authorized in FY 2011
understand the forcing
general-purpose
70A
Limited assembly/highresponse of the Earth’s climate bay space.
infrastructure
system
Develop and deploy data,
models, research, and
Inadequate space pending
Complete CRT.
transformational solutions to
replacement of seismically Maintenance, DMR &
NGLS construction
50-complex, 70,
understand and positively
deficient older building.
IGPP capital renewal of
X
including user facility
70A, 84
influence the forcing and
Limited assembly/highgeneral-purpose
response of the Earth’s climate bay space.
infrastructure
system
Complete NGLS
Develop, refine, and advance
construction and start
data models, research, and
Maintenance, DMR &
50-complex, 70Some
inadequate
space
operation.
transformational solutions to
IGPP capital renewal of
replacement,
pending completion of
X
Seismic Phs. 4 – Generalunderstand the forcing and
general-purpose
70A, 84, CRT,
purpose replacement Lab
response of the Earth’s climate projects in pipeline.
infrastructure
NGLS
Bldg. 70.
system
Develop high-performance
computing resources to obtain
significant results in many
Inadequate office space
CRT. Maintenance, DMR
areas of science and
pending completion of
& IGPP capital renewal of NGLS CD-0 was
CRT. Modernization of
X
50-complex, OSF engineering.
authorized in FY 2011
general-purpose
Develop software and model
older infrastructure and
infrastructure.
algorithms for transformational spaces needed
solutions in critical DOE
missions.
Mission
Ready
N M P C
X
50-complex,
OSF, CRT
Develop high-performance
computing resources to obtain
significant results in many
areas of science and
engineering.
Develop software and model
algorithms for transformational
solutions in critical DOE
missions.
Inadequate office space
pending completion of
CRT. Modernization of
older infrastructure and
spaces needed
Complete CRT.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure.
NGLS construction
including user facility
50-complex,
X NGLS, OSF,
CRT
Develop high-performance
computing resources to obtain
significant results in many
areas of science and
engineering.
Develop software and model
algorithms for transformational
solutions in critical DOE
missions.
Some inadequate space
pending completion of
projects in pipeline.
User facilities to model
chemical and materials at
the attoscale for lowenergy computation
systems.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Complete NGLS
construction and start
operation.
Seismic Phs. 5 – Generalpurpose replacement Lab
Bldg. #3.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
121
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Now
Condensed
Matter Physics
and Materials
Science
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
Environmental
Subsurface
Science
In 5
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure
Facilities
Objectives
Capability Gap
Laboratory
DOE
Discover and understand novel Inadequate number of
SERC. Maintenance,
NGLS CD-0 has been
laboratory and office
materials and batteries;
DMR & IGPP capital
2, 6, 15, 62, 66,
authorized in FY 2011.
spaces,
older-standard
X
develop atto- and femtoscale
renewal of general67, 72
Old Town demolition.
labs.
NGLS
user
science
purpose infrastructure.
capabilities needed.
Complete SERC.
NGLS construction
Maintenance, DMR &
including user facility.
Nanofabricate and characterize Inadequate number of
IGPP
capital
renewal
of
Complete Old Town
novel energy systems, probes
laboratory and office
general-purpose
2, 6, 15, 62, 66,
demolition.
for attoscale and femtoscale
spaces, older-standard
X
infrastructure; rehabilitate Seismic Phs. 3 – General67, 72
materials science, and energy
labs. User facilities for
and add sufficient highpurpose replacement
systems physics
ultrafast science (NGLS).
bay and high-ceiling
bldgs.
space.
Complete NGLS
Fully understand probe, and
construction and start
Maintenance, DMR &
manipulate materials systems
Some inadequate space
operation.
IGPP capital renewal of
2,
6,
15,
62,
66,
at electron orbital scales for
pending completion of
X
Seismic Phs. 5 – Seismic
general-purpose
67, 72, SERC
advanced materials; conduct
projects in pipeline.
upgrade of Bldgs. 46 &
infrastructure
advanced spin physics
58.
Research on carbon
Some seismically lowMaintenance, DMR &
NGLS CD-0 was
sequestration, geothermal
rated labs & olderIGPP capital renewal of
X
6, 15, 64, 70, 70A energy, isotope geochemistry,
authorized in FY 2011
standard labs. Limited
general-purpose
subsurface transport modeling
assembly/high-bay space.
infrastructure
Mission
Ready
N M P C
Pilot testing of enhanced
sequestration; development of
geothermal, advanced
simulation of subsurface
processes
Inadequate space pending
completion of relocations
and new buildings. .
Limited assembly/highbay space.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
NGLS construction
including user facility
Deployment of advanced
sequestration and remediation
technologies. Molecular-scale
studies of subsurface
environment.
Some inadequate space
pending completion of
projects in pipeline.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Complete NGLS
construction and begin
operation.
Seismic Phs. 4 (B70 ) –
Bldg. 70 replacement
bldg.
X
6, 15, 50complex, 58/A,
62, 67, 71, 72, 77,
77A, 88, ESNET,
JGI, JBEI
Develop the technology for
ultrafast soft X-ray science;
R&D needed on NGLS
systems components, including
high-repetition-rate
photocathodes
Inadequate space pending
seismic upgrade and
modernization of select
older buildings
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
NGLS CD-0 has been
authorized in FY 2011
X
6, 15, 50complex, 58/A,
62, 67, 71, 72, 77,
77A, 88, ESNET,
JGI, JBEI
Design the experimental
facilities for ultrafast science at
the NGLS and begin
construction; conduct nextgeneration high-energy density
physics research
Inadequate space pending
seismic upgrade and
modernization of select
older buildings
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure; rehabilitate
and add sufficient highbay and high-ceiling
space
NGLS construction
including user facility
X
6, 15, 50complex, 64X replacement
space, 70replacement
space, 70A
In 10
Years
Now
Large-Scale
User Facilities/
Advanced
Instrumentation
In 5
Years
6, 15, 50complex, 64, 70,
70A
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
122
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P C
6, 15, 50complex, 58/A,
X 62, 67, 71, 72, 77,
77A, 88, ESNET,
JGI, JBEI,
NGLS
In 10
Years
Now
Nuclear
Physics
In 5
Years
X
50-complex 50C,
70, 70A, 88,
ESNET
X
50-complex 50C,
70, 70A, 88,
ESNET
50-complex, 70X replacement
space, 70A, 88,
ESNET
In 10
Years
Now
Particle Physics
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure
Facilities
Objectives
Capability Gap
Complete and operate NGLS
and other facilities for ultrafast
science; develop the full array
of NGLS beamlines
Action Plan
Laboratory
Some inadequate space
pending completion of
projects in pipeline.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Seismic deficiencies;
insufficient-quality
experimental program
space
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Seismic deficiencies; some
inadequate space pending
seismic upgrade and
modernization of select
older buildings
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Conduct leading nuclear
physics experiments at the 88Inch Cyclotron, and at FRIB,
SURF, LHC, RHIC and other
new facilities
Some inadequate space
pending completion of
projects in pipeline.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Complete Seismic Phs. 4
(B70) – Bldg. 70
replacement bldg.
Some seismically lowrated labs & olderstandard labs. . Limited
assembly/high-bay space.
CRT. Maintenance, DMR
& IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
Old Town demolition
started
BELLA in operation.
Complete Old Town
demolition.
Seismic Phs. 3 –
Replacement Bldgs.
Develop nuclear physics
experiments for FRIB and
SURF. Conduct isotope
structure studies at the 88-Inch
Cyclotron, study cold and hot
nuclear matter at the LHC &
RHIC.
Fabricate and deploy detectors
for FRIB and SURF. Conduct
isotope structure studies at the
88-Inch Cyclotron, study cold
and hot nuclear matter at the
LHC & RHIC.
X
50-complex ,
70A, 71, 77/A,
Old Town
Design, build, and analyze data
from high-energy-physics
experiments, dark-energy and
dark-matter studies, and study
the properties of neutrinos;
develop highest-resolution
detectors, high-energy beams
X
50-complex, 70A,
71 (incl.
BELLA), 77,
77A, CRT, Old
Town relocation
space
Design and build detectors for
upgraded experiments at the
LHC. Develop new probes for
supernova observation.
Design, build, and commission
MS-DESI. Develop optical
accelerators.
Space & equipment to
achieve detector,
accelerator, and
cosmology advances &
other missions
Complete CRT.
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose facilities;
Old Town staff and
program relocations.
50-complex, 70A,
71 (incl.
X BELLA), 77,
77A, CRT, Old
Town relocation
space
Design and build detectors for
the highest-energy
accelerators. Collaborate on
neutrino experiments
worldwide. Operate the MSDESI experiment.
Safe, mission-ready
facilities
Maintenance, DMR &
IGPP capital renewal of
general-purpose
infrastructure
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
DOE
Complete NGLS
construction and begin
operation.
Seismic Phs. 5 – Generalpurpose replacement Lab
Bldg. 3.
Seismic Phs. 5 – Bldg. 58
upgrade.
123
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Now
Systems
Engineering
and
Integration
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure
Facilities
Objectives
Capability Gap
Laboratory
DOE
Develop integrated systems for No integrated buildings
SERC. Maintenance,
energy efficiency, storage,
systems testing facilities;
DMR & IGPP capital
25A, 46, 53, 60,
sustainable energy conversion. inadequate space; seismic
X
renewal of general77, 90
Integrated instrument
deficiencies
purpose infrastructure.
engineering.
Complete User Test-Bed
Modeling and testing of
Facility.
Complete SERC.
integrated systems for
Complete Old Town
Inadequate space pending
Maintenance, DMR &
efficiency, conversion and
25A, 46, 53, 60,
demolition.
relocations and completion IGPP capital renewal of
X
storage, and security;
77, 90, SERC
Seismic Phs. 3 – Generalof new buildings
general-purpose
engineering advanced
purpose replacement
infrastructure.
instrumentation of beamlines
bldgs.
Seismic Phs. 5 – GeneralDeploy and further engineer
Maintenance, DMR &
purpose replacement Lab
Some
inadequate
space
advanced chemical systems for
IGPP capital renewal of
Bldg. 3.
pending
completion
of
X 25A, 46, 53, 60,
DOE missions; NGLS
general-purpose
77, 90, SERC
Seismic Phs. 5 – Bldg. 46
projects in pipeline.
beamline engineering
infrastructure
upgrade.
Mission
Ready
N M P C
Notes: (1) N = Not Mission Ready; M = Marginal Mission Readiness; P = Partial Mission Readiness; C = Capable;; (2) "Replacement" = gross square foot replacement in one of three safe & modern research
buildings; excepting Buildings 70 and 45, which are replaced as individual, safe, modern buildings.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
124
Support Facilities and Infrastructure (Assumes TYSP Implemented)
Real Property Capability
Mission Ready Current
N
M
P
C
Work Environment
Post Office
X
Offices
X
Cafeteria
Recreational/Fitness
Child Care
User Accommodations
Visitor Housing
Visitor Center
Site Services
Library
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure Capability Gap
X
Bldg. 69
Various locations. Note: Some trailers slated for
replacement during term of plan
Bldg. 54 - Functional but seismic safety replacement
Bldg. 76 Multipurpose Room
X
X
Nonfederal facility completed in 2009
Bldg. 65
X
Bldg. 50
Bldg. 26 - Functional but seismic safety upgrade and
modernization needed
Bldgs. 77, 77A & 78
Bldgs 45 and.48 – Bldg. 48 is functional but not at
proper seismic safety standards for this type of
facility
X
Laboratory
DOE SLI
SLI LIP - Seismic Phs. 3
not applicable
Medical
X
X
Maintenance & Fabrication
Fire Station
X
SLI LIP - Seismic Phs. 3
IGPP Project – Bldg. 45 (the
Fire Apparatus Garage) was
upgraded in FY12/13.
Examination & Testing /Storage
not applicable
Conference and Collaboration Space
Auditorium/Theater
Bldg. 50
X
Conference Rooms
Various locations
X
Collaboration Space
Various locations
X
Utilities
Note: Spot repairs are included in annual budget
Upgrade initiated in FY10 has been completed.
Communications
X
Technology change may require future
modifications.
Electrical
X
Water
X
Gases
X
Some building transformers and related equipment in
1960s-era buildings are aging and will be replaced
during the term of this Plan. Substation capacity is
under review.
The Infrastructure Fitness-for-Service Evaluation
found the Water & Natural Gas systems in good
shape.
Waste/Sewer Treatment
X
Portions of the sewer system are over 40 years old.
The Sanitary Sewer System Management Plan is
being updated with annual inspections.
Storm Water
X
Portions of the storm-water piping systems including
hydraugers, above and below ground, are over 40
years old.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Replace building transformers
and related equipment when
building condition surveys find
a replacement must be
scheduled.
Pursuant to this report’s
findings, a modern Impressed
Current System was installed in
FY12.
Funding will be considered in
FY13 & FY14 per 2012
inspection results that show
minor repairs needed.
Multiyear management and
replacement plan is in
preparation.
125
Support Facilities and Infrastructure (Assumes TYSP Implemented)
Real Property Capability
Mission Ready Current
N
M
P
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure Capability Gap
C
X
Portions of the compressors and piping systems are over 40
years old. An Infrastructure Fitness-for-Service Evaluation
and a Capacity Assessment found the system in good shape.
Parking (surfaces and structures)
X
Engineering survey completed in 2009 identifies
opportunities to add parking as required.
Roads & Sid
X
Pedestrian and vehicular safety improvement
opportunities have been identified in a 2009
engineering survey.
Compressed Air
Steam & Flood Control
Laboratory
DOE SLI
Pursuant to this report finding, a
modern Impressed Current System
was installed in FY12.
not applicable
Roads & Grounds
Grounds
Implement new parking as
required during the term of this
plan.
Many improvements have been
completed. Additional
corrective actions will continue
to be implemented during the
term of this plan.
X
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
126
Attachment 2. Laboratory Site Map
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
127
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Mission and Overview
Lab-at-a-Glance
The mission of Oak Ridge National Laboratory
(ORNL) is to deliver scientific discoveries and
technical breakthroughs that will accelerate the
development and deployment of solutions in clean
energy and global security, and in doing so, create
economic opportunity for the nation. To execute this
mission, ORNL integrates and applies distinctive core
capabilities that provide it with signature strengths in
neutron science, advanced materials, highperformance computing (HPC), and nuclear science
and technology (S&T). The intended outcome is to
produce transformational innovations that will enable
a 21st century industrial revolution.
Location: Oak Ridge, Tennessee
Type: Multi-program laboratory
Contractor: UT-Battelle, LLC
Responsible Field Office: ORNL Site Office
Web site: www.ornl.gov/
Managed by UT-Battelle, a partnership of the
University of Tennessee (UT) and Battelle Memorial
Institute, ORNL was established in 1943 to support the
Manhattan Project. From an early focus on chemical
technology and reactor development, ORNL’s
research and development (R&D) portfolio broadened
to include programs supporting U.S. Department of
Energy (DOE) missions in scientific discovery and
innovation, clean energy, and nuclear security. Today,
as DOE’s largest science and energy laboratory,
ORNL is engaged in a wide range of programs and
partnerships that leverage major national investments
in critical research infrastructure, including the world’s
foremost resources for neutron science, the Spallation
Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope
Reactor (HFIR); the world’s most powerful computing
complex; and a suite of nuclear and radiological hot
cell facilities. ORNL also manages the U.S. ITER
project for DOE. Each year ORNL hosts thousands of
facility users and visiting scientists, many of whom
perform work at its nine user facilities, and supports
the development of the next generation of scientific
and technical talent.
Human Capital:
• 4,368 FTEs
• 138 Joint faculty
• 374 Postdoctoral researchers
• 411 Undergraduate and 109 Graduate students
• 3,115 Facility users
• 2,280 Visiting scientists
Core Capabilities
Of the 17 core capabilities distributed across DOE’s
national laboratories, ORNL possesses 15, indicating
the exceptional breadth of its scientific and
technological foundation. Each is a substantial
combination of people, equipment, and facilities,
having unique or world-leading components, and is
employed in mission delivery for DOE, the National
Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the U.S.
Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and other
customers. ORNL’s capabilities extend across the
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Physical Assets:
• 4,421 acres and 196 buildings
• 3.6M sf in active operational buildings
• Replacement Plant Value: $5.0B
• 131K sf in Excess Facilities
• 795K sf in Leased Facilities
FY 2012 Funding by Source (Costs in $M):
ASCR,
99.5
DHS,
39.6
BER,
77.8
WFO,
250
Other
DOE,
27.3
BES,
319.8
NNSA,
233.4
FES, 151
NE, 88.4
EM, 17.7
EERE,
170.4
Other
SC, 27.5
NP, 29.6
Total Lab Operating Costs (excluding ARRA):
$1,532.2 million
DOE/NNSA Costs: $1,242.7 million
WFO (Non-DOE/DHS) Costs: $250.0 million
WFO as % Total Lab Operating Costs: 16.3%
DHS Costs: $39.4 million
ARRA Costed from DOE Sources in FY 2012:
$77.5 million
128
continuum from basic to applied research. Synergies among these core capabilities enable ORNL to attack the
fundamental research challenges posed by DOE’s missions and to carry out the translational research required to
accelerate the delivery of solutions to the marketplace, with an emphasis on development, demonstration, and
deployment.
As discussed in more detail in Section 5 and Appendix A, the application of ORNL’s core capabilities to the
needs of non-DOE sponsors through Work for Others (WFO) and other mechanisms contributes to ensuring the
fullest use of the results of DOE’s investment in R&D. It is also synergistic in that WFO strengthens ORNL’s
core capabilities and sustains the Laboratory’s ability to deliver on DOE’s missions in scientific discovery and
innovation, clean energy, and global security.
1. Nuclear Physics. ORNL’s nuclear physics core capability spans theoretical and experimental research. The
ORNL nuclear theory program makes extensive use of the Laboratory’s computational facilities to investigate
the structure and reactions of both neutron-rich and proton-rich rare isotopes and nuclear astrophysical
processes. Of note is work on continuum effects and three-nucleon forces in neutron-rich calcium isotopes.2
Computational astrophysics efforts funded by the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) within DOE’s Office of
Science (SC) shed light on the death of massive stars and the consequent nucleosynthesis of heavy elements.
The ORNL Physics Division has developed a radical new design of HPGe gamma-ray detector, called the
“inverted coaxial point contact” detector. Compared to conventional Ge detectors, the new design has very
different charge-carrier drive and collection characteristics. When coupled with digital signal processing, it
enables the determination of the positions and energies of multiple gamma-ray interactions with
unprecedented precision, a factor of 3–4 better than existing crystals of the same size. A prototype segmented
detector, currently being characterized, exhibits excellent performance. Applications include nuclear structure
studies with rare isotope beams and Compton imaging.
The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FNPB) at SNS is exploiting the special characteristics of this
pulsed spallation source to study the detailed nature of the interactions of elementary particles. The first
experiment mounted on the FNPB, NPDgamma, began taking data in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and should have a
complete data set by mid-2015. It will be followed by the Nab experiment, which obtained funding in late FY
2012. Of particular interest is the study of fundamental symmetries such as parity and time reversal invariance
and the manner in which they are violated in elementary particle interactions. One of the key experiments at
the FNPB being led by ORNL is focused on the search for the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM). This
experiment will investigate the nEDM with significantly higher sensitivity than previous experiments and will
make precision tests of symmetry principles underlying the Standard Model of particle physics. ORNL also
leads a systematic development of light collection devices for this effort and is drawing on its expertise to
develop appropriate materials for the inner core of the experimental apparatus.
ORNL leads another important test of the Standard Model that comes from searches for the very rare
neutrinoless double-beta decay mode of nuclei, which is being pursued as part of the Majorana Demonstrator
project, a feasibility demonstration for the proposed ton-scale 76Ge Majorana experiment. The first set of
high-purity Ge detectors was recently delivered to the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South
Dakota. In addition, ORNL develops electronics and detectors and conducts relativistic heavy ion physics
experiments at both Brookhaven National Laboratory and CERN (European Organization for Nuclear
Research). ORNL also expects to be involved in developing and leading experimental programs and building
experimental detectors for future rare isotope facilities.
ORNL makes significant and unique contributions to nuclear physics research through generation of actinide
targets and sources. The unique isotope production and separation capabilities at HFIR and the Radiochemical
Engineering Development Center (REDC) that contributed to the discovery of element 117 are being applied
to expand international collaborations in superheavy element research, including experiments aimed at the
discovery of element 119 and at the discovery of new, and heavier, isotopes of element 117. 3 The capabilities
2
G. Hagen, M. Hjorth-Jensen, G. R. Jansen, R. Machleidt, and T. Papenbrock, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 242501 (2012);
http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.242501.
3
Yu. Ts. Oganessian, F. Sh. Abdullin, C. Alexander, J. Binder, R.A. Boll, S.N. Dmitriev, J. Ezold, K. Felker, J.M. Gostic,
R.K. Grzywacz, J.H. Hamilton, R.A. Henderson, M.G. Itkis, K. Miernik, D. Miller, K.J. Moody, A.N. Polyakov, A.V.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
129
at REDC were also applied in the production of a very high capacity 252Cf ion source (~ 500 mCi, 252Cf
electrodeposition) for the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) project at Argonne National
Laboratory (ANL). This facility will provide neutron-rich radioactive beams from the fission fragments of the
252
Cf source, which was installed on CARIBU in September 2012.
With the closure of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility in April 2012, ORNL is exploring the
possibility of repurposing the facility for a mission in isotope R&D by acquiring a dual-ported 70 MeV
cyclotron for research isotope production. The 25 MV tandem accelerator would be a valuable asset for
isotope and nuclear physics R&D as the new cyclotron is being built. The facility remains unique in its ability
to deliver post-accelerated beams of nuclei relevant to understanding heavy-element production in supernova
explosions, fission products associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and basic nuclear structure.
ORNL continues to achieve breakthroughs and to push the frontiers of discovery in nuclear physics, attacking
compelling questions about the nature of the nuclear many-body problem, the fundamental structure of the
neutron and the nature of the fundamental forces binding it together, and the origin and stability of the heavy
elements. Adding to this excitement is the realization that this nuclear physics capability is well matched to
nuclear energy mission goals and national security mission goals in nonproliferation. NP funds work in this
area [mission areas SC-22, 23, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, as listed in Appendix B]. NP also supports ORNL work on
isotope production and applications, as described in Section 3.11.
2.
Accelerator Science and Technology. ORNL’s core capability in accelerator S&T includes expertise in
both the basic physics of high-intensity beams and the supporting technology for production, acceleration,
accumulation, and utilization of high-intensity, high-power beams. The SNS accelerator complex, operating at
~1 MW (megawatt) of beam power on target, is the world’s most powerful pulsed proton accelerator. SNS is
recognized as a leading center for the investigation of the dynamics of high-intensity hadron beams and the
development of high-power proton targets. To enable SNS to realize its full potential, work is under way to
launch a project to design, build, install, test, and commission a second target station (STS) at SNS. Key
components include a new spallation target and supporting systems, an enhancement and extension of the
SNS accelerator systems, conventional support buildings, and initial neutron beam instruments.
ORNL’s strengths in computational science (see Section 3.9) have been applied to the development of
modeling tools that are employed at SNS and other high-intensity accelerator facilities; these tools are also
being used to design the next generation of spallation neutron sources, high-intensity linear accelerators
(linacs), and storage rings. The combination of state-of-the-art beam dynamics modeling tools and access to
experimental data on collective, halo-formation, and instability effects in high-intensity linacs and rings gives
SNS and ORNL a unique capability.
ORNL is also a recognized leader in the development of technologies to accelerate, characterize, manipulate,
and utilize high-intensity, high-power particle beams in accelerators and storage rings. ORNL’s core
capability in accelerator S&T includes expertise in ion sources and low-energy beam chopping and
manipulation, superconducting radio-frequency (rf) technology, high-power target systems, high-power and
low-level rf systems, pulsed-power technology, sophisticated control systems for the manipulation of highpower beams, beam-tuning algorithms and high-level real-time accelerator modeling and analysis, and
instrumentation to measure properties of high-intensity, high-power beams. Beam instrumentation systems
and manipulation techniques developed at ORNL are being incorporated into the next generation of highpower accelerators. A successful project to design, fabricate, and install a spare high-beta cryomodule for the
SNS linac demonstrates the application of this core capability and provides confidence in the accelerator
systems enhancement needed to support the STS.
The impact of the basic research carried out at ORNL in the fields of high-intensity beam dynamics and
technology spans all fields of science enabled by high-power hadron accelerators, including materials science,
high-energy physics, nuclear physics, nuclear materials irradiation, and other accelerator-driven systems. This
expertise is being applied to the analysis of options for a future neutron source that will expand capabilities
Ramayya, J.B. Roberto, M.A. Ryabinin, K.B. Rykaczewski, R.N. Sagaidak, D.A. Shaughnessy, I.V. Shirokovsky, M.V.
Shumelko, M.A. Stoyer, N.J. Stoyer, V.G. Subbotin, A.M. Sukhov, Yu. S. Tsyganov, V.K. Utyonokov, A.A. Voinov, and
G.K. Vostokin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 162501 (2012).
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for materials science and facilitate isotope production and materials irradiation. In addition, ORNL’s
distinctive capabilities in rare isotope beam production demonstrate sophistication and diversity in
applications of accelerator S&T, providing a unique capability for the production of rare proton-rich and
neutron-rich isotopes to explore the limits of nuclear stability and astrophysical processes involved in
nucleosynthesis. The SC Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program [mission area SC-10] and NP [mission areas
SC-25, 30] are the primary sources of funding for the ongoing accelerator S&T activities.
3. Plasma and Fusion Energy Sciences. ORNL’s core capability in plasma and fusion energy sciences,
coupled with its demonstrated abilities in large-scale high-technology project management and international
collaboration, is applied to the mission needs of the SC Fusion Energy Science (FES) program, with two
major thrusts:
•
leading the U.S. contributions to ITER, which is aimed at demonstrating the scientific and
technological feasibility of fusion power via a partnership between the United States, Europe, Japan,
Russian Federation, South Korea, China, and India; and
•
conducting research in experimental and theoretical plasma physics, plasma technology, and fusion
materials both increasing fundamental understanding and supporting ITER.
The U.S. ITER Project Office (USIPO), hosted by ORNL, manages the U.S. Contributions to ITER Major
Item of Equipment (MIE) project. With partners Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Savannah River
National Laboratory, ORNL is coordinating ITER-related project activities throughout the U.S. fusion
program and, as appropriately, internationally. As described in the FY 2014 Presidential Budget Request, U.S.
ITER activities will total $2.4B for the First Plasma scope at an annual budget of roughly $225M/year, to be
followed by the remaining scope leading to burning plasmas. As the pace of ITER construction has increased,
the USIPO has placed substantial procurement contracts with suppliers for component fabrication; US
hardware contributions include the central solenoid (the world’s most powerful pulsed magnet), a 1 GW
cooling-water system, high-power and long-pulse plasma heating systems, electrical power components, parts
of the tritium exhaust system, plasma instrumentation, and plasma fueling systems. The USIPO also works
with the ITER Organization and other Domestic Agencies to achieve the required integration of management,
design, and procurement activities.
ORNL researchers gain and offer insights into the integration of burning plasmas and associated large-scale
engineering systems relevant to ITER and future fusion reactors. Using HFIR, the nuclear hot cell facilities,
and potentially SNS, ORNL researchers study the effects of the interactions of neutrons with plasma-facing
and structural materials, thereby contributing to the establishment of a U.S. fusion nuclear science program.
ORNL also provides key leadership in plasma theory and advanced computation, atomic and plasma
boundary physics, plasma heating and fueling systems, and fusion materials science, utilizing broad
experimental and theoretical expertise in high-temperature plasma science and strong synergies with
programs focused on materials in extreme environments and computational science. By integrating and
applying these capabilities, ORNL enhances understanding of the science of the plasma core, plasma
boundary, and plasma–materials interactions, and develops materials and components that can meet the
demands of a burning plasma environment and enable fusion research facilities to meet their performance
objectives. ORNL’s plasma scientists lead experiments on several facilities, including the DIII-D National
Fusion Facility and the National Spherical Torus Experiment, to better characterize and control edge-localized
instabilities in existing fusion devices and to improve predictability for ITER. ORNL is DOE’s lead
laboratory for ion cyclotron heating and pellet fueling systems and is responsible for providing key enabling
technologies and components for ITER, including the pellet fueling system and rf transmission line
components for ITER’s plasma-heating systems. ORNL scientists make key contributions in computational
materials science and conduct fundamental experiments to provide the understanding needed to support
development of advanced alloys and silicon carbide composites. Among the outcomes of the alloy research
are dramatic advances in high-strength, low-activation steel with superior high-temperature strength. This
research has been leveraged to develop a suite of economical high-strength radiation-resistant steels that
derive their properties from a fine dispersion of engineered precipitate nanoclusters.
ORNL is investing discretionary funds to support the development of the technical basis for the Material
Plasma Exposure Experiment (MPEX) to simulate the divertor conditions for ITER and future fusion reactors
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and to serve as a contributing science facility for a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). A next step for
this area of research is for ORNL research leaders to work with the fusion scientific community to build the
collaboration teams that will focus and prioritize the U.S. research program for the crucial next decade,
including the era following completion of ITER construction.
The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) enhances ORNL’s extensive capabilities in plasma
theory and simulation by engaging computational scientists in fusion simulation development and
visualization. The teaming of ORNL fusion researchers and computational scientists enables key
contributions to the understanding of self-organization in plasmas, transport, and rf heating and current drive
and plays a significant role in several leading-edge computational activities. SC’s FES program funds work in
this area [mission areas SC-17, 18, 20].
4.
Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science. ORNL is among the nation’s most comprehensive
materials research centers, executing a broad range of basic and applied research related to DOE missions.
ORNL’s research program centers on understanding multiscale physical and chemical phenomena that
underpin the discovery of advanced materials. Our goal is to design materials from the atomic to the systems
level with functionalities that will enable new technologies for energy production, storage, and use. This
comprehensive program includes state-of-the-art capabilities for the synthesis and characterization of a wide
range of materials, including nanophase materials, controlled interfaces, single crystals, polymers, and
structural materials. Understanding the interplay between mechanisms at multiple length scales plays a central
role in the study of radiation-tolerant alloys, polymer-based multicomponent materials, and deterministically
synthesized nanostructures and oxide materials. Multiple length scales are also explored in the imaging of
functional properties. These synthesis and characterization capabilities are complemented and extended by
broad capabilities in theory and modeling, taking advantage of ORNL’s computational facilities. These
computational capabilities are focused on understanding materials properties and dynamics over broad lengthand time- scales and predicting new materials with designed functionalities. In addition, ORNL develops
advanced instrumentation (see Sect. 3.15) to provide unprecedented insight into the structure and function of
materials at the atomic level, with special emphasis on advanced aberration-corrected electron microscopy,
atom-probe tomography, advanced scanning probes, and neutron scattering techniques. For example, recent
work by ORNL experts in materials synthesis, molecular dynamics calculations, and scanning transmission
electron microscopy explained the origin of nanopores in graphene-based carbon materials in terms of atomicscale defects. 4 Similarly, materials research benefits from the use of SNS and HFIR, including ORNL’s
efforts in understanding structure and dynamics of polymers and the discovery of quasi-one-dimensional
magnons in an intermetallic semiconductor with strongly anisotropic thermal conductivity. 5
One area of emphasis in the ORNL materials program is understanding materials under extreme conditions,
including phenomena that limit the ultimate strength of structural and radiation-tolerant materials. ORNL is
home to the Center for Defect Physics in Structural Materials, a BES Energy Frontier Research Center
(EFRC), which takes advantage of the Laboratory’s broad range of characterization and computational tools
to understand the fundamental role of defects in materials under extreme conditions—e.g., radiation flux and
other stresses—with the goal of ultimately allowing materials to obtain unprecedented strength and function.
ORNL’s materials science program includes two BES user facilities, the Center for Nanophase Materials
Sciences (CNMS) and the Shared Research Equipment User Facility (ShaRE). These facilities annually
support hundreds of users from universities, national laboratories, and industry. In addition, they have strong
in-house research programs that develop next-generation synthesis approaches, characterization tools, and
computational capabilities, providing leading-edge scientific resources to the community. The CNMS
research program has three themes: electronic and ionic functionality on the nanoscale, functional polymer
and hybrid architectures, and collective phenomena in nanophases. In addition, CNMS has a unique
relationship with SNS and HFIR, providing resources such as deuteration and other synthesis techniques, as
well as characterization and theory resources, to the users of all three facilities. The ShaRE program centers
4
J. Guo, J. R. Morris, Y. Ihm, C. I. Contescu, N. C. Gallego, G. Duscher, S. J. Pennycook, and M. F. Chisholm, Small 8,
3283 (2012).
5
M. B. Stone, M. D. Lumsden, S. E. Nagler, D. J. Singh, J. He, B. C. Sales, and D. G. Mandrus, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167202
(2012).
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on developing state-of-the-art capabilities in electron microscopies and atom probe tomography. The
combination of these user facilities, ORNL’s neutron sources (SNS and HFIR), and the OLCF provides
ORNL’s core materials science programs with capabilities that facilitate the design of new materials through
control of atoms and defects to provide unprecedented functionality and performance under extreme
conditions and at interfaces. In implementing a BES recommendation to integrate the ShaRE program into
CNMS, we are strengthening our ability to deliver these advances.
ORNL’s basic materials science focuses on use-inspired research, including materials that are relevant to
electrochemical energy storage, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, nuclear energy, superconductivity, hydrogen
storage and use, and catalysis. This work is closely coupled with the Laboratory’s applied energy research and
the applied materials science and engineering program (see Sect. 3.12). BES is the principal sponsor of work
enabled by this core capability [mission areas SC-7, 8, 9, 10, 11].
5.
Chemical and Molecular Science. The chemical and molecular science core capability at ORNL is focused
on obtaining a molecular-level understanding of the chemical transformations and physical phenomena,
especially at interfaces, that underpin DOE’s science, energy, national security, and environmental missions.
Major efforts include:
•
precise synthesis of molecules, supramolecular assemblies, and nanostructured materials with tailored
properties
•
characterization and control of molecular transformations and interfacial processes in catalysis,
geosciences, corrosion, electrical energy storage, and separation science
•
spectroscopy and analytical techniques focused on characterization of interfaces, especially mass
spectrometry and chemical imaging techniques
•
theory and modeling of the structure, dynamics, energetics, and reactions of complex materials and
interfaces
Chemistry researchers make extensive use of the assets available at ORNL’s user facilities, including neutrons
from SNS and HFIR, the synthesis and characterization tools at CNMS and ShaRE, and the computational
resources of OLCF. For example, inelastic neutron scattering and in situ Raman spectroscopy were coupled
with density functional theory to probe the orientation and bonding of a quinone molecule adsorbed onto
onion-like carbon. This provides a model system for understanding proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET)
reactions that are crucially important in many energy-related reactions, such as CO2 reduction and water
oxidation. 6 ORNL researchers have also used self-assembly of simple molecular and ionic components to
construct elaborate ion-pair helical architectures that can bind a predetermined ion pair. This opens new
prospects for ion-pair separations, as metal sulfates could potentially be extracted selectively as selfassembled helicates from aqueous solutions, which is important in waste remediation and metallurgical
applications. 7
A particular strength of the chemical sciences portfolio at ORNL is understanding and controlling transport
and reactions at interfaces. The EFRC on Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures, and Transport (FIRST) Center
is focused on developing a fundamental understanding and validated predictive models of molecular-level
structure, dynamics, and transport at the fluid–solid interface relevant in catalysis and electrochemical energy
storage phenomena in batteries and capacitors. For example, ab initio molecular dynamics studies was used to
describe, for the first time, the spontaneous reduction of a Li-ion battery electrolyte salt (LiPF6) and the
formation of passivating LiF agglomerates and other products on a graphitic anode surface. This explains the
previous experimental results of finding LiF as the main component of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI)
and opens the possibility of creating an “artificial SEI” with high Li-ion transfer rates to overcome current
limitations in charging rate, capacity, and cycle life.8
6
M. Anjos, A. Kolesnikov, Z. Wu, Y. Cai, M. Neurock, G. M. Brown and S. H. Overbury, Carbon 52, 150–157 (2013).
R. Custelcean, P. Bonnesen, B. Roach, and N. Duncan, Chem. Commun. 48, 7438–7440 (2012).
8
P. Ganesh, P. R. C. Kent, and D. Jiang, J. Phys. Chem. C 116, 24476–24481 (2012).
7
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This program reflects a close coupling of basic research, including BES [mission areas SC-7, 8, 9, 11] and
Biological and Environmental Research (BER) programs, and applied research programs in energy and
national security. For example, the Next-Generation Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process brought a
fundamental discovery to the technology that is enabling the cleanup of more than 34 million gallons of highlevel tank waste at DOE’s Savannah River Site. This process could enable a 20% increase in throughput for
the Salt Waste Processing Facility and provide savings of $1 billion or more. Advanced separation techniques
are also being applied in the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) projects for isolation of uranium from seawater,
developing more efficient separation methods for americium and other minor actinides, and for improved
recovery of rare earth materials. Mass spectrometry techniques are being applied to a range of national
security projects for ultratrace detection; to BER, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and WFO projects for
proteomics; and to separation of stable isotopes for NP.
6.
Climate Change Science. ORNL addresses the implications of climate change at scales from local to global
and leads fundamental studies of climate change impacts on the terrestrial carbon cycle and other
biogeochemical cycles and their connections to other natural and human systems. The Laboratory is
advancing climate change science through forward-thinking investments in computational infrastructure and
methods, active partnerships in coupled climate modeling, and experimental programs focused on
biogeochemical cycles and terrestrial ecosystems. These investments are coordinated through ORNL’s
Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI), which facilitates the integration of modeling, observations, and
experiments to produce transparent and accessible quantitative scientific knowledge to address climate
change, while fostering and enhancing collaborations among scientists. A search for a full-time CCSI director
is in progress.
Many of the key questions in climate change science require the development of a new generation of
comprehensive climate models known as Earth system models (ESMs), which predict the coupled chemical,
biogeochemical, and physical evolution of the climate system. ORNL is leading a multilaboratory partnership
in the development, deployment, and use of ultrahigh-resolution Earth system modeling capabilities. Earth
system modeling at ORNL is backed by the Laboratory’s core capabilities in computational science and
advanced computer science, visualization, and data, which have enabled the development of exceptional
strength in computational climate science. ORNL has a significant role in a multilaboratory consortium to
improve model-based climate prediction for the BER program’s Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy
Future project, which will prepare numerical models for the next generation of high-end computing
architectures to better quantify uncertainties in climate predictions. Other complementary activities, including
exploration of regional simulation frameworks and the development of novel numerical methods through the
DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program, shore up a strong foundation in
computational climate science.
ORNL is at the forefront in determining how terrestrial ecosystems respond to changes in temperature,
atmospheric CO2, and precipitation because of its investments in experimental manipulations and carbon and
water cycle observational systems. Such studies provide data to enable improvements in integrated ESMs, and
evaluation of ESM model uncertainty suggests pathways for empirical studies in return. Two primary fieldbased projects draw on this core capability. Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and
Environmental Change (SPRUCE), an ecosystemscale manipulation study in northern Minnesota, will reveal
new insights about climate change effects on the structure and functioning of spruce and peatland areas. The
experiment warms whole-ecosystem footprints to a range of temperatures from 0 to +9 В°C and duplicates
these temperature treatments in atmospheres with CO2 levels more than twice those currently observed. Such
manipulations allow us to quantify ecosystem responses to projected changes in climate that cannot be
evaluated by observations of climate variability. The other major project is Next-Generation Ecosystem
Experiments (NGEE)–Arctic, BER’s innovative concept for coupling models with experimental and
observational campaigns in the Arctic with a focus on long-term ecosystem studies through model-inspired
research activities. In addition to the large field research efforts, ORNL conducts mechanistic studies (e.g.,
soil carbon cycle, allocation of carbon within plants) to better define processes within models essential for
predicting future conditions.
Climate change science at ORNL is supported by advanced networking capabilities and high-profile climate
data repositories and services [e.g., the Earth System Grid, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center,
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Archive, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
(NASA) Distributed Active Archive Center for Biogeochemical Dynamics]. ORNL is the premier source for
reliable global and national time series of the major anthropogenic source of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel
use. ORNL is a leader in the climate change community in the application of advanced cyber technologies to
the evaluation of climate change consequences, including decision support tools to deal with ever-increasing
data complexity. ORNL’s extensive work in energy technologies and their impacts and the strong
fundamental science base on which it draws provide insights into adaptation strategies, while the Laboratory’s
national security engagement yields insights into the impacts of societal adaptation to climate change and the
associated national security implications. BER [mission areas SC-13, 15] is the primary sponsor for work
enabled by this core capability, which also serves the needs of NNSA [NS-2], NASA, the U.S. Department of
Defense (DoD), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA).
7. Biological Systems Science. ORNL scientists in plant molecular biology and microbiology develop and
apply advanced integrated “-omics” capabilities to solve problems in bioenergy, climate change, carbon
sequestration, and the health effects of low-dose radiation, supported by BER. The BioEnergy Science Center
(BESC) is pioneering systems biology science leading to economical and sustainable production of biomass
material and its conversion to biofuel and other products. BESC integrates the efforts of researchers from
DOE laboratories, industry, and academia to provide a pipeline from the fundamental “-omics” to feedstock
development and pilot-scale demonstrations. ORNL is also developing and applying synthetic biology
approaches for improving biofuels production and in support of other DOE missions. Most recently, ORNL
has begun a major effort in engineering biofuels feedstocks for significantly improved water utilization
characteristics. ORNL also examines the societal implications of biosystems design research, especially in
biofuels.
ORNL’s strengths in proteomics, metabolomics, and protein interactions using mass spectrometry, and in
transcriptomics using designed microarrays, are being augmented with the ability to perform genomic
resequencing to determine changes in mutant organisms with improved properties and to apply and mRNA
sequencing to transcriptomics. These data-rich experimental efforts interface with leadership bioinformatics
expertise in microbial annotation and in construction and interpretation of complex systems biology data in
knowledgebases. Thus, ORNL is a partner in the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) project led by
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), which is developing a knowledgebase that will broadly
serve the genomics community. Application of neutron scattering techniques coupled with biophysics-based
computational science modeling is opening new vistas on the enzymatic reactions that break down
lignocellulose. In addition, BER supports the Center for Structural Molecular Biology (CSMB) and the
Biological Small-Angle Neutron Scattering instrument (BioSANS) at HFIR. The CSMB takes advantage of
specialized facilities for sample deuteration, neutron scattering, and HPC. All of these resources are focused
on current projects for BER and on DOE-related R&D for other customers. Research on plant-microbe
interactions seeks to understand and predict carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere and ecosystem
response to climate change. This emphasis on complex interactions between organisms at the molecular level
is also a focus for the ORNL effort in other BER projects, such as the LBNL-led Ecosystems and Networks
Integrated with Genes and Molecular Assemblies (ENIGMA) effort, which examines interactions in microbial
communities. Such studies are aided by advanced analytical and imaging capabilities being developed
through programs in bioenergy and radiochemistry. ORNL expertise in nuclear medicine and radioisotope
imaging has been applied to a collaborative research effort focused on understanding plant signaling through
radiochemical imaging of vascular protein traffic. This frontier research supports BER missions in the areas
of sustainable bioenergy and carbon sequestration. Principal funding for this area comes from BER [mission
areas SC-12, 15, 16], Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) [ES-3], NIH, DoD, and the
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
8.
Environmental Subsurface Science. ORNL capabilities in environmental subsurface science are advancing
the fundamental understanding of complex multiscale processes that control the transport and transformation
of contaminants (U, Tc, Hg, Cr, dense nonaqueous phase liquids, nitrate, etc.) in natural environments. These
advances are enabling the development of solutions to decades-old legacy contamination issues across the
DOE complex.
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ORNL’s field-scale facilities play a significant role in examining the transport and fate of uranium and nitrate.
The capability has been utilized to support other BER-sponsored programs (e.g., ENIGMA) and is
transferable to examining nutrient and element cycles in terrestrial ecosystems and the impact of various byproducts of energy production on environmental systems. Computational modeling of the subsurface process
has significantly enhanced ORNL’s capability to predict contaminant transport and fate and the behavior of
chemical elements of concern in the subsurface.
ORNL also directs one of the world’s largest ongoing efforts in mercury research. This program brings
together leading experts in mercury geochemistry, microbiology (microbial ecology and genetics),
biochemistry, computational molecular chemistry, and hydrology. This assembly of mercury researchers and
the Science Focus Area (SFA) research agenda is distinctive because of the combined diverse expertise and
the critical mass of researchers. Particular emphases include elucidation of the detailed molecular mechanisms
and microbial interactions in the relevant reducing environment of the stream bed for inorganic mercury
transformation to methylmercury, and vice versa. The program uses the state-of-the-art scientific tools
available at ORNL, such as neutron scattering techniques and advanced computational capabilities, and at
other DOE facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source, the Advanced Light Source, the Joint Genome
Institute, and the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Recently, through the use of chemical
principles, comparative genomics, and structural informatics, the research team pinpointed the genes involved
in mercury methylation by microbes, painstakingly verifying their work by genetic manipulation and
analytical assay experiments. Thus the program investigators cracked a more than 40 year old mystery of the
genetic basis of microbial mercury methylation.9
ORNL’s expertise in element and nutrient cycling in the environment is also relevant to DOE goals for carbon
sequestration. Research activities focus on understanding how carbon cycling is influenced by hydrological
and geochemical processes caused by warming-induced changes in the regional vadose and saturated zone
hydrology. The program actively uses a wide range of state-of-the-art facilities at ORNL, including SNS,
HFIR, OLCF, and CNMS.
ORNL programs in subsurface science apply an integrated systems approach that leads to new multiprocess,
multiscale predictive tools that inform and improve the technical basis for decision-making at contaminated
sites throughout the DOE complex. As DOE considers changes in emphasis (e.g., less emphasis on
contaminants), new opportunities will emerge that utilize ORNL’s capabilities in environmental subsurface
science to develop an improved watershed-scale understanding of nutrient and element cycles in terrestrial
ecosystems and to develop an understanding of the impact of energy-derived by-products on the subsurface
environment. Funds for this work are provided by BER [mission areas SC-14, 15], the DOE Office of
Environmental Management (EM) [EM-1, 2, 3], NNSA [NNSA-1], DoD, and NASA.
9.
Advanced Computer Science, Visualization, and Data. ORNL’s computational capability includes
experts in system software, component technologies, architecture-aware algorithms, runtime, resilient
computation, virtualization, computational steering, networking, real-time and large-scale data analytics, and
cyber security. ORNL’s scientists develop tools and software to make ORNL’s HPC capability more effective
and accessible for scientists and engineers working on problems of national importance. In addition, we
conduct research in core technologies for future generations of high-end computing architectures, including
experimental computing systems and predictive performance. Using measurement, modeling, and simulation,
ORNL investigates these technologies to improve the performance, efficiency, reliability, and usability of
extreme-scale architectures and applies the results to develop new algorithms and software systems to
effectively exploit the specific benefits of each technology. ORNL is home to a national center of excellence
in HPC architecture and software, the Extreme Scale Systems Center funded by DOE and DoD. All of these
R&D activities contribute to accelerating the HPC technology roadmap with a goal of delivering exascalecapable systems later this decade. ORNL develops key capabilities in knowledge discovery and data analytics
from dynamic, diverse data sources and applies advanced techniques for visual data understanding to
scientific data in order to find visualization methods that are more effective and better integrated with other
9
J. M. Parks, A. Johs, M. Podar, R. Bridou, R. A. Hurt Jr., S. D. Smith, S. J. Tomanicek, Y. Qian, S. D. Brown, C. C. Brandt,
A. V. Palumbo, J. C. Smith, J. D. Wall, D. A. Elias, and L. Liang, Science 339 (6125), 1332–1335 (2013), DOI:
10.1126/science.1230667.
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scientific discovery efforts within DOE. A specific resource to enable high-end data visualization is the
revitalized Exploratory Visualization Environment for REsearch in Science and Technology (EVEREST), a
scientific laboratory deployed and managed by the OLCF. EVEREST provides tools to be leveraged by
scientists for analysis and visualization of simulation data generated on the OLCF supercomputers. In 2013,
ORNL completed a total remodel of EVEREST, including a 33 megapixel wall designed for ease of use and
self-service by scientists.
In addition, ORNL develops advanced capabilities in data systems, data analytics, modeling and simulation
(M&S), cyber security, and quantum information S&T for national mission challenges in science, energy
assurance, national security, and health care. The Virtual Office Community and Computing (VOCC) Project,
part of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) led by ORNL, is designing,
developing, maintaining, and scaling collaboration environments to support CASL, with an emphasis on
distributed collaborative coding, computing, M&S, and agile communications and information management.
At SNS, experimental data is currently collected at a rate of ~1 terabyte (TB) per day, which will rise to ~2–3
TB/day as the full complement of instruments becomes available. ORNL has developed a streaming data
acquisition system for capturing data from the neutron detectors and the sample environment equipment. The
system provides real-time feedback to users and data collected is instantly available to the user and for
processing on a high-performance computing infrastructure. This streaming data infrastructure is up and
running on the HYSPEC (Hybrid Spectrometer) instrument and is scheduled for wider deployment through
FY 2013 and FY 2014. ORNL is extending this coupling of HPC and experiment data to provide theoretical
interpretation of the experimental data based on M&S and visualization, on the same time scale as the
experimental measurements themselves. This marriage of computational and experimental facilities will
create a powerful real-time feedback loop between theory and experiment, greatly enhancing the precious
experimental beam time and accelerating the process of scientific discovery.
Funding comes from SC’s Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program [mission area SC 2, 3],
BES [mission area SC-10], and WFO customers such as DHS [mission areas HS-1, 2, 3, 5], DoD, the
Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).
10. Computational Science. ORNL is the world’s most capable complex for computational science as a result
of its outstanding staff, infrastructure, and computers dedicated to a research portfolio that covers the full span
of the Laboratory’s interests. A distinctive feature of this core capability is the ability to build
multidisciplinary teams to execute breakthrough science through scalable algorithms and codes on massively
parallel hardware running >106 processes consuming petabytes of data. ORNL’s Cray Titan supercomputer
has peak performance of 27 petaflops (PFs).
As the flagship system of the OLCF, Titan offers sustained petascale performance on scientific applications
and unparalleled bandwidth to disks and networks. ORNL computational scientists are working closely with
science teams to make effective use of this power. A necessary component of ORNL’s computational science
capability is a healthy HPC ecosystem that provides (1) ubiquitous access to data and workstation-level
computing; (2) broad access to midrange cluster and large “capacity computing” supercomputer systems, and
(3) appropriate access to capability and leadership computing systems. This ecosystem is leveraged by
multiple sponsors. In particular, the National Science Foundation (NSF) fielded the 1.2 PF (peak) Cray XT5
Kraken at the National Institute for Computational Sciences (NICS), which is managed by a UT-ORNL
partnership. The UT-ORNL team recently responded to NSF’s solicitation for a follow-on system to Kraken
with a proposal that includes a $20M commitment by the state of Tennessee. In addition, NOAA is fielding
petascale capabilities within the ORNL computational science enterprise, leveraging the expertise and
infrastructure supported by DOE to address national needs and attracting talented computational scientists,
computer scientists, and applied mathematicians to ORNL’s computational science complex.
Ultrascale computing capability is required by almost all scientific disciplines of interest to DOE, including
materials science, chemistry, plasma physics, astrophysics, nuclear physics, biology, climate change impacts,
nuclear fission, knowledge discovery, and applied mathematics. In order to ensure accurate and reliable
scientific predictions, advanced uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodologies must be developed and
seamlessly included in the experiment design as well as in the analysis, verification, and validation processes.
ORNL is harnessing computational science and engineering for the discovery and development of new
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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materials and processes essential for maintaining leadership in energy technologies. Energy technology
program offices have demonstrated interest in developing predictive M&S capabilities for energy systems
such as electricity transmission, electrochemical energy storage, solar photovoltaic conversion, and light
water reactors (LWRs). Predictive simulation for nuclear reactors and for energy conversion, storage, and use
will increasingly be applied to improving the manufacturability, safety, and performance of these systems. In
fact, the vision of CASL is to predict, with confidence, the performance of nuclear reactors through
comprehensive, science-based M&S technology leading to new coupled, high-fidelity capabilities needed to
address LWR operational and safety performance-defining phenomena.
Over the past decade, these sponsors have become increasingly dependent on the ability to efficiently capture,
analyze, and steward large volumes of highly diverse data. In addition, data-centric discovery is one of the
new frontiers of science and technology. There is a growing need for data science resources on the scale of
the computational sciences resources supplied by ORNL today. ORNL has responded to this growing need by
establishing the Compute and Data Environment for Science (CADES) to provide an integrated data science
infrastructure supported over the long term to create a new environment for scientific discovery, enabling
scientists to free themselves from trying to manage, manipulate and process large data sets and concentrate on
extracting the scientific meaning of the theoretical, experimental, and observational data.
The confluence of growing mission requirements from SC, NE, NSF, NOAA, and other federal agencies has
created a thriving environment for computational science at ORNL. Funding for this work comes from ASCR
[mission areas SC-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6], other SC programs [mission areas SC-7, 8, 9, 13, 16, 18], and NE and
EERE [mission areas ES 2, ES-7]. ORNL also invests discretionary resources in development and application
of this core capability.
11. Applied Nuclear Science and Technology. ORNL’s core capability in applied nuclear S&T enables the
Laboratory to support DOE missions in nuclear fission and fusion energy; address challenges in nuclear
nonproliferation, national security, and environmental management; and carry out isotope production and
R&D.
ORNL’s extensive nuclear infrastructure includes HFIR, REDC, and other radiochemical and material
laboratories that are unique within the DOE complex and in some cases the world. ORNL’s ability to produce
heavy actinide isotopes such as 252Cf (with support from NP) is unmatched. HFIR, with the highest flux in the
world, is heavily utilized for isotope production, material irradiations for fission and fusion energy systems,
and neutron activation analysis (NAA) for ultra-trace science applications such as nuclear forensics. The
ORNL hot cells enable radiochemical separations, analyses, and nuclear material examinations needed to
solve problems in the management of nuclear material such as used fuel; the detection of nuclear signatures
important to nuclear fuel cycle management and security; the development of safer, more efficient nuclear
fuels; the design, sustainability, and reliability of nuclear reactors; the production of transcurium, medical,
and high specific activity isotopes; and the creation of engineered materials for fusion energy systems.
ORNL’s concentrated experience in the operation and utilization of these unique nuclear facilities is a
national asset in and of itself, comprising capabilities and expertise in irradiation experiment design,
fabrication, safety analysis, transportation, and post-irradiation examination.
ORNL staff have a long history of leadership in nuclear computational analysis, and the Laboratory’s
computing facilities provide a platform for M&S to advance our understanding of the fuel cycle and improve
the efficiency and utilization of nuclear systems and associated experimental facilities. ORNL’s hybrid
deterministic–Monte Carlo technology has transformed computational radiation transport and enabled highfidelity, reliable solutions to a variety of radiation transport problems, from full-scale fission and fusion
reactor facilities to prediction of expected dose resulting from detonation of an improvised nuclear device in
an urban area. The combination of this core capability with ORNL computing facilities and expertise is a
critical asset for CASL, which is applying M&S to understand challenging technology problems within LWR
system operations and propose solutions that can improve reactor performance.
ORNL also applies this core capability to advanced reactor concept development, including advanced small
modular reactor (SMR) applications, and to the development of tools and technologies for nuclear
nonproliferation, including nuclear forensics.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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ORNL’s extensive nuclear fuel cycle resources, which include both personnel and facilities, underpin
significant support to U.S. Government nuclear security efforts. ORNL performs research, development, and
deployment of technology to address nuclear security challenges. Additionally, coordinated forensics efforts
include sampling science, analysis, and evaluation with the integration of ORNL non-nuclear S&T expertise
for the development of advanced tools and techniques that advance nuclear materials analysis for forensic
applications.
Sustained interest and investment in nuclear power in the United States and throughout the world highlight
the value of these capabilities to DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other sponsors.
Funding in this area comes from several sources, including NE, SC, NNSA, DHS, Defense Threat Reduction
Agency (DTRA), NASA, NRC, and other government agencies [mission areas SC-3, 31, 32; ES-2; NNSA-1,
2, 3].
12. Applied Materials Science and Engineering. ORNL’s core capability in applied materials science and
engineering directly supports DOE’s missions in clean energy, national security, and industrial
competitiveness. Programs building on this core capability are focused on (1) innovations and improvements
in materials synthesis, processing, and design; (2) determination and manipulation of critical structure–
property relationships, and (3) materials performance and lifetime prediction in application-relevant, often
very extreme environments. Current R&D areas include energy-efficient and advanced manufacturing;
lightweight materials (e.g., carbon fibers and carbon fiber composites, magnesium, and titanium); replacement
and separation technologies for critical materials; advanced steels and coatings; nuclear fuels and structural
materials; batteries; lightweight materials for transportation; and long-lived alloys, ceramics, and carbons for
service in extreme environments (e.g., high temperature/pressure/stress) and radiation environments. Research
in these areas supports major DOE programs for FES, EERE, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy
Reliability (OE), NE, and Office of Fossil Energy (FE), as well as other federal agencies (DoD, NRC, NASA,
and others), and a number of nonfederal WFO customers.
A key strength of ORNL’s materials science program is the close coupling of basic and applied R&D. For
example, ORNL’s role in EERE’s new Energy Innovation Hub, the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) led by
Ames Laboratory, draws on separations and synthesis science developed with support from BES. ORNL
activities in support of CMI will focus on the life cycle of critical materials, including recycling and resource
recovery, and on the development of more efficient manufacturing techniques, strategies for improving
critical materials extraction, and substitute materials
This core capability is a fundamental resource for ORNL’s theme of materials under extremes, which brings
the Laboratory’s resources to bear on the development of new and improved materials for fission and fusion
energy, transportation, steam generation, and a broad array of industrial applications. Other elements of this
core capability include novel processing techniques for innovative manufacturing, materials joining, surface
engineering, mechanical and environmental testing, and physical property determinations. The integration of
experimental capabilities with state-of-the-art characterization and computational resources results in the
development of new materials and processes with transformational impacts on energy technologies. These
research programs also access, via peer-reviewed proposals, SC-supported user facilities at ORNL, including
resources in electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (ShaRE), neutron scattering (SNS and HFIR),
nanoscience (CNMS), and HPC.
The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF), supported by EERE’s Advanced Manufacturing Office
(AMO), provides ORNL with an additional tool for translating scientific discoveries into solutions for
rebuilding and revitalizing America’s manufacturing industries. MDF focuses on additive manufacturing and
production of low-cost carbon fiber and composites, taking advantage of ORNL core capabilities in materials,
chemistry, and computation. For example, neutron scattering is being used to understand stress in materials
produced by additive manufacturing. Similarly, researchers at MDF and CNMS are working together to
explore new directions in additive manufacturing based on polymer-based materials. The Carbon Fiber
Technology Facility (CFTF), funded by EERE, is designed to provide pilot-scale demonstration of
technologies for producing low-cost and/or high-performance carbon fiber. Activities include the evaluation
of new fiber precursors, such as lignin and novel synthetic polymers, and new fiber treatments. Partnerships
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
139
with industry are facilitated by the Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium, which has more than 40
industry members.
Funding from DOE’s applied energy programs, as well as other federal agencies and non-government
sources, supports strong industrial interactions and technology transfer. These relationships result in
considerable impact in materials production and utilization, with potential benefits for power production and
transmission, energy-efficient vehicles, and spacecraft power systems. Funding comes from EERE and NE
[mission areas ES-1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 13, 15], NNSA [NNSA-1,3], DHS [HS-9], and DoD and other WFO
customers.
13. Chemical Engineering. ORNL’s core capability in chemical engineering moves knowledge gained from
fundamental chemical research toward applications important to DOE’s missions. For example, this capability
supports the development of fuel reprocessing techniques for NE and enables radioisotope production, isotope
separation, and development of isotope applications for NP and other customers. Innovative chemical
processes being developed for recovery and recycle of non-nuclear materials from used nuclear fuel
assemblies have great potential for simplifying secure used fuel disposition pathways and reducing the mass
and volume of the waste stream. This capacity also contributes to advances in energy efficiency, renewable
energy, fossil energy, waste management and environmental remediation, and national security. For example,
physical and chemical techniques for carbon capture, with applications for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG)
emissions, are being examined using novel adsorbents; including nanostructured materials (see Sect. 3.5).
Chemical engineering efforts at ORNL make use of a variety of distinctive resources: radiological
laboratories and nuclear facilities, including REDC and Building 4501; biochemical laboratories for
investigating environmental and biofuels technologies; chemistry and materials characterization resources
(e.g., ShaRE, SNS, and CNMS); and specialized combustion and catalytic emission control research facilities
at the National Transportation Research Center (NTRC). Technology development through chemical
engineering often builds directly on fundamental research supported by SC in materials design, synthesis, and
processing; chemical separations and catalysis; and neutron scattering, computational science (leveraging the
HPC resources of OLCF), and nanoscience (leveraging CNMS). In many cases, ORNL researchers involved
in the original discovery science contribute ideas and advice for the further development of processes to
accelerate practical application and technology transfer. For example, special chelating compounds,
computationally designed and synthesized with BES support, are being applied to the capture of wastes at
Savannah River and Hanford in projects sponsored by EM and other DOE offices. The ability to isolate
radioactive cesium ions from waste at Savannah River affords estimated savings of more than $1B. Funding
in this area originates from several sources, including NP, NE, EM, NNSA, and EERE [mission areas ES-1,
ES-3].
14. Systems Engineering and Integration. ORNL’s core capability in systems engineering and integration is
critical to its ability to translate breakthrough science into robust technologies, systems, and methods that
address high-risk, high-complexity, multidisciplinary issues of national importance. This core capability is
manifested in a culture that effectively creates and manages complex systems by (1) developing detailed
analytical processes to establish requirements, (2) analyzing candidate system architectures, (3) engineering in
critical performance attributes, and (4) delivering systems that operate as expected from the outset and
maintain their performance over extended periods with little to no intervention.
Fundamental to the successful integration and reliable functioning of these complex systems are sensor
networks, measurements, and instrumentation that enable safe, optimum and sustainable operation. Thus,
while the facilities, teams, and equipment encompassed by this core capability are distributed across ORNL,
the Laboratory’s Measurement Science and Systems Engineering Division provides a focal point for the
translation of science to applications through the creation and application of foundational capabilities and
technologies in electronics, sensors, signals processing, and integrated systems R&D.
The ability to solve problems holistically is essential to virtually all major ORNL programs and activities.
Thus, this capability provides assistance to other core capabilities in delivering mission outcomes for a
diverse set of sponsors, as illustrated by the following examples.
In leading the U.S. ITER Project for DOE (see Sect. 3.3), ORNL not only coordinates the U.S. contributions
to ITER, which are being executed by more than 300 companies and universities, but also supports the ITER
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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International Organization in the integration of thousands of devices and systems contributed by all seven
ITER Domestic Agencies. In applying and extending its strengths in systems engineering and project
management to support this endeavor, ORNL is building resources for future large systems engineering
efforts and international partnerships.
ORNL programs deliver and integrate innovations for cost-effective improvements in the energy efficiency of
buildings, vehicles and engines, manufacturing, and electricity delivery. With the new Maximum Energy
Efficiency Buildings Research Laboratory (MAXLAB), ORNL offers unparalleled resources for assessing
new building technologies, systems, and processes; examining how these innovations interact in residential
and commercial buildings; and exploring whole-building and community integration. The integration of clean
buildings, renewable energy sources, and electric vehicles (EVs) is also advanced through ORNL’s operation
of its own electricity distribution system, which serves as a test bed for innovative electricity delivery
technologies, and management of a Power Delivery Research Center that includes facilities for testing
transmission lines, advanced conductors, power electronics, high-current cables, and distributed energy
communication and controls.
ORNL’s core capability in nuclear S&T, its decades of experience with nuclear operations, and its unique
expertise in nuclear materials management have been integrated to strengthen the nation’s nuclear forensic
science capability. High-precision chemical and isotope mass spectrometry expertise and instruments have
been brought together at the Ultra-trace Forensic Science Center, which also houses distinctive resources for
collection science and specialty sampling system development. By combining advanced analytical
capabilities, subject matter expertise, and nuclear processing operations, ORNL is meeting urgent needs in
national security and basic science.
This core capability also underpins the development and deployment of large-scale systems such as SNS, the
cold neutron source at HFIR, and the HPC systems and infrastructure of the OLCF. All of these activities
draw on ORNL’s multidisciplinary engineering expertise, its exceptional resources in measurement and
control systems, and its broad M&S and visualization capabilities. Funding comes from a number of sources,
including SC; EERE, OE, and NE [mission areas ES-2, 4, 5, 6, 7]; DHS [HS-1, 2, 3, 4]; NRC; DoD; and
EPRI.
15. Large-Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation. ORNL has a distinguished record in the design,
procurement, construction, and operation of major facilities for DOE and in the development of advanced
instrumentation for acquisition, management, analysis, and visualization of experimental data. Distinguishing
features of these facilities are innovative instrumentation and world-class research programs that serve to
motivate and attract users.
The DOE user facilities listed in Table 3.1 provide unmatched capabilities to ORNL staff and to a growing
user community from universities, industry, other national laboratories, and other research institutions.
Outreach efforts ensure that students and postdoctoral associates are well represented in the user population
and receive full access to conduct their research. These facilities offer a diverse set of tools for experiments
across DOE’s missions. Instrument development enables effective use of these and other research facilities at
ORNL and at other DOE laboratories.
SNS and HFIR together provide the world’s foremost
instrumentation for studying the structure and
dynamics of materials using neutron beams. SNS is
now, and will remain for at least a decade, the
world’s most powerful pulsed spallation neutron
source. For neutron scattering experiments that
require a steady-state source, HFIR offers thermal
and cold neutron beams that are unsurpassed
worldwide. Both facilities have achieved stable and
reliable operations: SNS is operating at ~1 MW and
annually delivering 4500 hours of neutron production
with >90% reliability, and HFIR is operating at close
to 100% predictability and annually delivering 3400
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Table 3.1. Large-scale user facilities at ORNL
• Building Technologies Research
and Integration Center
• Carbon Fiber Technology Facility
• Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences
• Center for Structural Molecular Biology
• High Flux Isotope Reactor
• Manufacturing Demonstration Facility
• National Transportation Research Center
• Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility
• Shared Research Equipment User Facility
• Spallation Neutron Source
141
operating hours. To enable effective use of these powerful facilities, ORNL develops unique experimental
systems involving detectors, sample environments, data acquisition systems, and optics systems. New
instruments at SNS and HFIR are developed with input from potential users to ensure that the scientific needs
of the various communities are met. BES funds the design and construction of most instruments; NSF funding
has supported the design of one instrument at SNS and the construction of another at HFIR. SNS has also
attracted funding from other nations to construct instruments: the Canadian government funded the
construction of an engineering diffractometer, and the German government funded the construction of a spin
echo spectrometer. As is the case for all instruments at SNS and HFIR, 75% of available beam time on these
instruments is available through the general user program. The neutron instrumentation is complemented by
world-class synthesis capabilities—including deuteration capabilities—and materials characterization
developed in ORNL’s research programs, some of which are available at CNMS and ShaRE. Such strong
synergy between ORNL’s user facilities is a hallmark of ORNL research. For example, CNMS and OLCF
have established a strong set of common users as a direct result of an integrated approach to the planning,
design, and operation of these facilities.
HFIR’s highly flexible design enables it to serve multiple missions. In addition to outstanding capabilities for
neutron scattering, it is also used for isotope production, materials irradiation, and NAA, an extremely
sensitive technique for determining the existence and quantities of major, minor, and trace elements in a
material sample. These activities have a far-reaching impact across disciplines comparable to that of the
neutron scattering research conducted using HFIR.
The HPC resources of OLCF, including the Cray XK7, Titan, are made available through DOE’s Innovative
and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program, which OLCF manages in
partnership with the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility; through discretionary allocations managed by
SC; and through discretionary allocations managed by the OLCF director. As a result, OLCF gives
computational researchers an opportunity to tackle problems that would be impossible to solve on other
systems. The facility welcomes investigators from universities, government agencies, and industry who are
prepared to perform breakthrough research in climate, materials, alternative energy sources and energy
storage, chemistry, nuclear physics, astrophysics, quantum mechanics, and the gamut of scientific inquiry.
Because it is a unique resource, OLCF focuses on the most ambitious research projects—projects that provide
new knowledge or enable new technologies. In partnership with UT, ORNL also manages NICS as a user
facility for NSF; most NICS resources are allocated through the NSF Extreme Science and Engineering
Discovery Experiment (XSEDE) allocation process.
Two new facilities sponsored by EERE, MDF and CFTF, provide expertise and advanced instrumentation that
is helping U.S. industry to develop cutting-edge solutions that use less energy, reduce waste, enable stronger
and lighter structural parts, and, in doing so, strengthen the nation’s manufacturing base (see Sect. 4.6.3 for
more detail). Near-term designation of these facilities as NTRC user centers will facilitate industry access to
their forefront capabilities.
ORNL staff with experience in measurement science, sensing, signals, communications, robotics, and
integrated systems contribute to the development of instruments for detection of rare isotopes, equipment for
advanced materials characterization, electron and scanning probe microscopy, mass spectrometry, chemical
imaging, and advanced optics for x-ray and neutron imaging and scattering. ORNL also has unique resources
for large-scale ecosystem research and has developed advanced tools for monitoring and analysis of
environmental contaminants. This core capability is fundamental to ORNL’s ability to deliver on its mission
assignments for DOE, DHS, and other customers. Work in this area is supported primarily by SC [mission
areas SC-10, 13, 14, 16, 30, 34, 35], with contributions from EERE [ES-5, 6, 7], NNSA [NS-1], and DoD.
Science Strategy for the Future
To achieve its intended outcome of producing transformational innovations that will drive a 21st century
industrial revolution, ORNL has established seven major initiatives through which it will develop and extend its
distinctive and enduring signature strengths and apply its capabilities to the delivery of advances in scientific
discovery and innovation, clean energy, and global security, while creating economic opportunity for the nation.
ORNL’s core capabilities enable it to claim leadership in four distinctive scientific leadership areas that are of
critical importance to DOE and the nation:
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
142
•
•
•
•
Neutron S&T
Computing and computational science
Materials science and engineering
Nuclear science and engineering
ORNL’s major initiatives, listed in Table 4.1, are designed to sustain these leadership positions and to provide the
scientific and technological focus required to deliver national-scale solutions in critical mission areas. For
example, ORNL’s extraordinary scientific expertise and tools for neutron S&T, computing, and research on
advanced materials are being leveraged to provide an expanded understanding of the myriad chemical and
physical changes that occur in materials, which is fundamental to improving essentially all energy technologies.
Predictive M&S is accelerating the design of new materials, speeding the development of future energy sources,
expanding the understanding of global climate change, advancing our understanding of the nuclear fuel cycle,
increasing the efficiency and utilization of nuclear systems, and improving methods for addressing the impacts of
energy use. ORNL’s unparalleled resources in nuclear S&T are being applied to extending the frontiers of nuclear
science; developing and delivering strategically important isotopes; expanding the options for fission and fusion
power; developing safe, long-term solutions for the management of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste; and
enhancing global security by protecting nuclear material.
Solving our nation’s most complex challenges requires an interdisciplinary approach. ORNL is well positioned to
integrate and apply its own capabilities and to partner with other laboratories, universities, and industry to deliver
on its mission objectives and to accelerate the deployment of technology advances. Additionally, the Laboratory
will continue to make its distinctive research facilities available to the scientific user community on a competitive
basis to foster innovation through synergistic partnerships.
Mission Readiness/Facilities and Infrastructure
Overview of Site Facilities and Infrastructure. ORNL is SC’s largest science and energy laboratory and one of
the oldest operating at its original site. Founded in 1943 to demonstrate the production and separation of
plutonium for the Manhattan Project, today ORNL manages an extensive array of facilities and infrastructure to
support its core capabilities and signature strengths in neutron scattering, advanced materials, HPC, and nuclear
science and engineering.
Substantial facility and infrastructure investments since 2000 have modernized significant portions of ORNL.
However, additional investment is required to ensure accomplishment of ORNL’s current and future mission
assignments for SC, other DOE offices, NNSA, and other federal and nonfederal sponsors.
Facilities at ORNL accommodate ~6,200 people on a daily basis, with the population comprising ~4,400 UTBattelle employees in addition to visiting scientists, facility users, postdoctoral researchers, graduate students,
other prime contractors, subcontractors, guests, and others. Because of its remote location in East Tennessee’s
Ridge and Valley Province, about 10 miles from the City of Oak Ridge, ORNL operates and maintains an
industrial utilities infrastructure equivalent to that of a small city. On-site services include 24/7 laboratory
protection with dedicated fire and emergency response capability, medical facilities, essential facility
maintenance, unique fabrication and assembly services, and on-site amenities. ORNL’s role as a nuclear R&D
facility creates legacy challenges that require maintenance of specialized infrastructure and facilities. ORNL’s
security posture, driven by its mission assignments and by the existence of legacy material such as 233U, demands
a comprehensive security program beyond that required for any other SC laboratory. ORNL also manages
approximately 4,421 acres of DOE’s Oak Ridge Reservation.
A summary of the Laboratory infrastructure in terms of value and condition of SC-owned real property assets is
provided in Table 6.1. In addition to this 3.8M sf of SC-owned assets, another 1.3M sf of real property resides on
site at ORNL. These assets are principally owned by EM or are on-site leased facilities. ORNL is also responsible
for another 1.5M sf of real property assets located off site, most notably 1M gross square feet (GSF) of legacy
structures located at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that have no future mission relevance to ORNL
and should be transferred to EM.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
143
Table 1. SC Infrastructure Data Summary
Total Bldg, Trailer, and OSF RPV($)
(Less 3000 Series OSF’s)
$2,310,053,779
Total OSF 3000 Series RPV($)
Total RPV($)
Total Deferred Maintenance($)
Total Owned Acreage
Total Leased Acreage
Site Wide ACI(B, S, T)
$2,,764,757,574
$5,074,811,353
$138,579,940
4,421
0
0.942
# Building
Assets
85
114
19
28
63
76
1
2
# Trailer # OSF
Assets Assets
1
148
18
136
0
35
10
5
0
0
0
# GSF
(Bldg)
2,914,345
808,175
135,961
302,849
229,236
2,916,071
4,726
30,194
0.955
Mission Critical
Asset Condition
0.968
Mission Dependent
Index (B, S, T) 1
0.327
Not Mission Dependent
89.46
Office
98.94
Warehouse
Asset
89.33
Utilization
Laboratory
Index (B, T) 2, 3 Hospital
100
100
Housing
B=Building; S=Structure; T=Trailers
1
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings, Trailers, and OSF’s (excludes series 3000 OSF’s).
2
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings and Trailers.
3
Only includes assets with usage codes that fall into these 5 FRPC categories. Other usage types are not included.
# GSF
(Trailer)
1,203
29,820
0
20,527
1,964
0
0
0
Facilities and Infrastructure to Support Laboratory Missions. The following summarizes significant
conclusions from the Mission Readiness (MR) assessment of ORNL facilities and infrastructure. Enclosure 5
provides additional insight into gaps for each core capability and proposed resolution thereof. Appendix C
provides maps of the future state of ORNL facilities.
In alignment with ASCR’s defined path to maintain leadership in HPC, facility and infrastructure investments are
planned to support ORNL’s core capabilities in computational science and advanced computing, visualization and
data and to advance the Laboratory’s initiative in scaleable computing, data infrastructure, and analytics for
science. To accommodate increasingly powerful leadership computing systems (20–250 PF over the next 3 to 5
years, leading to an exascale system), facility improvements are planned to support concurrent operation of two
leadership-class systems while bringing a third system on/off line. Medium voltage power supply and distribution
system improvements are under way to enhance power quality and reliability and to ensure that projected future
loads are met.
Within the next five years, facilities and infrastructure supporting applied materials science and engineering and
systems engineering and integration core capabilities are forecast to be marginally capable. A key strength of
ORNL’s materials science program is the close coupling of the applied materials science and engineering
programs supported by multiple DOE programs, other federal agencies, and nonfederal WFO customers, with the
fundamental materials program supported by SC’s BES program. Geographical consolidation of related activities
is a medium-term goal for more efficient resource use and impact on high yield of programmatic objectives. The
proposed FY 2018 Science Laboratories Infrastructure (SLI) line item project, the Translational Research
Building (TRB), will meet this goal by co-locating staff and capabilities that span the range of fundamental
science to applied science. This facility is key to the future translation of breakthrough science into robust
technologies, systems, and methods that address high-risk, high-complexity, multidisciplinary issues of national
importance.
Program investments are needed in support of the plasma and fusion energy science core capability. Infrastructure
improvements will support the development of integrated simulations and experimental databases needed for
design of future fusion power systems as well as testing and demonstration of material and component
performance under fusion power reactor conditions. Future installation of exascale computing capability will help
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
144
address simulation requirements. ORNL has invested discretionary resources to prepare for MPEX as a precursor
to the FNSF. Ongoing and planned improvements to the ORNL medium voltage power supply and distribution
system will enhance power quality and reliability and meet the increasing power needs of fusion R&D.
ORNL’s nuclear and radiological infrastructure is foundational to successful conduct of essential and unique
research within the core capabilities of materials science, applied nuclear S&T, chemical engineering, and nuclear
physics (isotope production). Capital investments span a broad range of funding categories and include programfunded research initiatives (SING III MIE) and SLI line item projects (to replace radioactive waste management
systems).
At HFIR, additional funding is required through FY 2017 to complete planned life extension activities, including
fabrication of reactor component spares. ORNL is preparing for DOE decisions on further lifetime extension
investments (beryllium reflector, HB-4 beam tube replacement) and conversion of HFIR to LEU fuel.
With regard to accelerator physics, institutionally sponsored site infrastructure improvements (Chestnut Ridge
Maintenance Shop and increasing the data transmission capacity) are under way and will continue in order to
facilitate mission-capable status and fully realize the scientific capabilities inherent to the SNS. The long-term
program investment required to maintain leadership in this field is STS, which will be developed to ensure that its
capabilities, in combination with those of the first target station and the instrument suite at HFIR, position ORNL
for sustained leadership in neutron sciences.
The MR process validated and focused the need for ongoing institutional capital and expense investments.
Priorities for institutional investment include facility refreshment and repurpose. A substantial amount of
chemical and materials research is still conducted in laboratories constructed in the 1950s and 1960s. Laboratory
space needs to be upgraded to meet today’s fire safety, design, and utility requirements, enabling safe and
efficient conduct of research, facilitating recruitment and retention, and improving space utilization.
Vulnerabilities associated with aging utility systems also need to be addressed. Many distribution systems and
their components were installed in the 1950s and 1960s with some dating back to the 1940s. Several projects to
address aging infrastructure have been recently completed and several more are in the planning stages.
Recognizing the inherent vulnerability of these systems and the negative impacts of their failure on the conduct of
science, ORNL maintains an intensive preventive, predictive, and corrective maintenance program for these
systems.
ORNL is also modernizing space in a manner that increases utilization as well as accommodation of future needs
and evolving industry trends. Guidelines ensure that workplace strategies contribute to the organizational mission;
optimized space allocation aligns with user needs; environments inspire talent and encourage interdisciplinary,
connected, collaborative science; and space is flexible and adaptable
Strategic Site Investments. Substantial investment in ORNL facilities and infrastructure (F&I) over the last
decade has strengthened SC’s ability to accomplish world-class science.
ORNL’s highest priority for a programmatic line item in direct support of its mission assignments is the STS at
SNS (BES). While not a line item, another essential site investment is programmatic support to continue the base
operation and maintenance of our applied research facilities. The most significant of these is our nuclear hot cells.
The absence of regular base operating support places a tremendous burden on the Laboratory’s indirect costs in
order to maintain this infrastructure in a compliant and mission-ready state. The laboratory received start-up
support for two new facilities supporting applied research in the EERE mission area, CFTF and MDF, but no base
support is currently programmed to ensure long-term sustainability.
Remaining near-term needs for R&D capabilities will largely be addressed through institutional funding.
Institutional General Plant Project (IGPP) funds are used to improve provision of essential support services and
facilitate research at ORNL. Typical IGPPs include utility upgrades, site improvements, and space
refresh/repurpose. Of note in this regard are the refurbishment of existing wet laboratory spaces in Building 4500
and Building 1505, which support core programs in materials and biological sciences. ORNL will continue
institutional capital investment with annual funding levels averaging $15M for the next 5 years.
The SC SLI program is of major importance to continued operations at ORNL, and three line item projects are
currently proposed.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
145
The FY 2015 Site Modernization project has two components. The first focuses on providing nuclear waste
infrastructure improvements that must be put in place to provide disposition alternatives before EM completes
cleanup activities. Currently, ORNL uses the waste management system operated by EM, but within the next
several years (around 2020), EM will stop accepting newly generated waste and deactivate and decommission the
existing waste collection and treatment systems, at which time ORNL must have a viable option for nuclear waste
management. The second component of this project will integrate and upgrade several inefficient and widely
dispersed emergency response facilities into one facility, thus enhancing productivity and coordination.
With nuclear-related programs presently accounting for some 40% of the ORNL budget, additional improvements
in the nuclear waste infrastructure are expected to be required to sustain existing programs. The Waste Handling
Systems SLI line item project is proposed to start in FY 2017.
The TRB is proposed as an FY 2018 SLI project.
The EM program has a significant mission on the Oak Ridge Reservation, including a substantial amount of work
that impacts ORNL. However, recent trends indicate that portions of the EM program critical to ORNL are being
overtaken by deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities elsewhere on the Reservation. We encourage
SC to be a strong advocate with EM in terms of its mission priorities in Oak Ridge. EM has the opportunity to
take several actions in the near future with significant benefit to ORNL. First, disposition of the 233U inventory in
Building 3019 will allow a significant reduction in baseline level of protection for ORNL. This will eliminate one
of the highest hazard materials on the campus and enable achievement of our end-state security vision. Second,
transferring excess legacy facilities at Y-12 to EM will enable a more cost-effective approach to EM’s effort to
address mercury contamination at Y-12. Finally, EM’s completion of building demolition and site remediation at
ORNL will eliminate radiological risk and free up space for scientific missions.
ORNL will continue to promote development of the Oak Ridge S&T Park. Created through brownfield
redevelopment, the S&T Park facilitates DOE’s technology transfer mission by creating opportunities for ORNL
staff to collaborate with university guests and industry researchers housed in facilities developed and managed by
the private sector.
Investment for SC facilities at ORNL is approximately $80M per year for the next 5 years, approaching 4% of the
replacement plant value, the higher end of the industry-recommended maintenance investment range (2–4%). In
all cases, assets will be maintained to assure worker safety and protection of the environment. Proactive
maintenance (e.g., preventive maintenance) will be done in buildings for which ORNL has a high confidence of
long-term programmatic continuity. Maintenance functions will be minimized where possible in buildings
approaching or at the end of their programmatic and functional life, with care exercised to prevent unsafe
conditions as a result of deterioration.
Trends and Metrics. ORNL has used the MR Assessment Process to move toward its goal of a vibrant campus
that supports its R&D portfolio. The results of the process are incorporated into an investment strategy that
leverages SLI, program investments, Laboratory overhead resources (IGPP, maintenance funds), and privatesector funds via alternative financing and Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs) to upgrade ORNL’s
infrastructure. American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funding was used to construct the Chemical
and Materials Sciences Building, support the development of CFTF and MAXLAB, expedite demolition of excess
facilities, and enable addition of new, on-site research and support facilities. Electrical and chilled water upgrades
were completed to meet the demands of expanded computational and computing capability. Planned investments
in ORNL F&I are summarized in Attachment 1.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
146
Table 2. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments ($M)
Maintenance
DMR
EFD (Overhead)
IGPP
GPP
Line Items (SLI)
Total Investment
Estimated RPV
Estimated DM
2012
74.8
0
1.5
8.5
0.0
0.0
84.8
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
73.9
75.4
76.9
78.4
80.0
81.6
83.2
85.1
87.1
89.1
91.1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
15.0
15.0
15.0
15.0
15.0
15.0
15.0
15.0
15.0
15.0
15.0
0.0
4.0
14.8
9.0
9.0
9.0
9.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
23.8
47.5
37.8
47.8
53.5
19.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
90.4
95.9 132.0 151.4 143.3 154.9 162.2 121.4 103.6 105.6 107.6
2,375 2,418 2,483 2,550 2,608 2,672 2,704 2,765 2,836 2,920 2,983
94.8
93.4
95.0
95.9
97.1
97.0
98.3
100.5
99.3
98.0
99.2
0.960
Site-Wide ACI
0.961
0.962
0.962
0.963
0.964
0.964
0.964
0.965
0.966
0.967
Figure 1. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments
180.0
1.000
160.0
0.990
140.0
0.980
0.970
120.0
0.960
100.0
0.950
80.0
0.940
60.0
0.930
40.0
0.920
20.0
0.910
0.0
0.900
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total Investment ($M)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Site-Wide ACI
147
Attachment 1. Mission Readiness Tables
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
Now
Nuclear
Physics
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
DOE
Holifield
Leverage ORNL’s and
Capability gap to be
Recent investments
Plans to utilize portions of
Radioactive Ion
other SC assets to conduct identified after ongoing
removed legacy material
the HRIBF infrastructure as
Beam Facility
a reformulated
nuclear physics mission is
and renovated HVAC
(1) a facility for isotope
(HRIBF) and
experimental nuclear
defined.
systems in vicinity of
R&D and (2) a
support buildings physics program. Plan is
Building 6010 Shield
reformulated experimental
in the 6000 Area,
under development with
Test Station, supporting
nuclear physics program is
X Fundamental
SC Nuclear Physics (NP)
its use for stable isotope
being developed in
Neutron Physics
program.
production.
conjunction with SC's NP
Beam line at the
program.
Spallation
Use HRIBF infrastructure
NP mission declaration
Neutron Source
components for isotope
for HRIBF will affect
Disposition activities
(SNS); High
research and development.
further actions.
underway at HRIBF
Performance
Computing
NP mission declaration for
(HPC) Building
HRIBF will affect further
5600.
actions.
X
In 5
Years
X
In 10
Years
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Capability gap to be
identified after ongoing
nuclear physics mission is
defined.
Capability gap to be
identified after ongoing
nuclear physics mission is
defined.
NP mission declaration for
HRIBF will affect further
actions.
NP mission declaration for
HRIBF will affect further
actions.
148
Core
Capability
Accelerator
Science and
Technology
Time
Frame
Now
Mission
Ready
N M P
X
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
DOE
Activated material storage
required for accelerator and
general conditioned storage
is necessary at SNS.
Sample environment
preparation space critical at
HFIR. Additional data
storage needed especially
as demand will increase
when instruments are
Produce pulsed
commissioned and the
neutrons/steady state
IGPPS: Chestnut Ridge
number of users increases.
neutron fluxes using
Maintenance Shops;
SNS and HFIR beam line
unique instrumentation and
Building 8600 5th Floor
networks require upgrading
sample environment to
Build-out
SNS Programmatic GPPs:
to at least 10 Gbit/s. To
SNS, HRIBF,
provide unprecedented
Medium voltage
Klystron Gallery Gap
adequately support NScD's
HFIR, HPC
capabilities for
distribution system
Build-out; Target Building
mission, ORNL's offFacilities
understanding the structure
improvements will address Sensible Chilled Water
campus networking system
and properties of materials,
HFIR Isolation
Header System
needs a 10 Gbit/s for users
macromolecular and
requirement. Building
to download data and use
biological systems, and
5600 will provide
ORNL computers for data
fundamental neutron
additional data storage.
processing. Electrical
physics.
feeder 294 is the primary
feeder for the Melton
Valley site. Electrical
13.8Kv feeder 234 for the
Melton Valley site is a
secondary feeder that has
experienced several
interruptions in the last
year; this feeder needs to be
more reliable.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
149
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
In 5
Years
X
In 10
Years
C
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
Laboratory
DOE
SNS additional power and
Institutional investments at Chestnut Ridge:
energy upgrade needed to
Chestnut Ridge will
•
Programmatic
enable the accelerator to
address basic
line item
achieve 3 MW.
infrastructure
(FY14): Second
Second target station
improvements and needs
Target Station
including: data, utility,
for SNS.
Chestnut Ridge site
storage, office, amenity,
•
Accelerator
infrastructure
parking, and site access.
Improvement
improvements needed to
Projects for
keep pace with science and
SNS.
user programs and site
population growth
including:
• space for storage, testing,
and maintenance of
operational equipment,
• increased data storage and
transmission capacity,
• laboratories for activated
sample preparation,
• warm storage area.
Chestnut Ridge:
• Additional energy and
power upgrade needed
for chestnut ridge
accelerator complex
along with conditioned
storage area.
• An addition of 10,000
sq. ft. to the
experimental hall with
High Bay area and
bridge crane is
necessary for the sample
environment.
Institutional investments at
Chestnut Ridge will
address basic
infrastructure
improvements to include
utility, amenity, and
parking.
Chestnut Ridge:
• Accelerator
Improvement Projects
for SNS.
150
Core
Capability
Plasma and
Fusion Energy
Sciences
Time
Frame
Now
Mission
Ready
N M P
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
DOE
Reconfigure power
Multi-Program
Deliver U.S.
Expand and enhance
Complete power supply
infrastructure in 7600
High Bay
commitments for ITER.
capabilities and power
and associated cooling
Area.
Facility, Building
supplies to the Plasma
capacity upgrades for the
7625; Power
Material Interface research Given DOE approval,
power delivery facility.
Display technological and
develop a CD-0 document
Supply Building,
as current power supply
scientific feasibility of
to acquire the program
Building 7627;
does not meet the need.
Support MPEX and
fusion.
funds necessary to install
Engineering
FMITS facilities projects.
Further the science of
FMITS at SNS and
Technology
Building 7625 lacks
burning plasma.
MPEX.
Facility, Building
adequate power to operate
Continue to operate HFIR
• A new Fusion Materials
5800; HPC
MPEX or its precursor
and related hot cell
Develop a prototype ion
Irradiation Test Station
Building 5600;
experiments along with
facilities for long-term
source in 7625 as a
(FMITS) at SNS can
U.S. ITER
other fusion systems for
fusion reactor material
precursor to Material
take advantage of highProject
basic fusion research and
irradiation for material
Plasma Exposure
energy spallation
Headquarters;
ITER enabling technology
degradation studies.
eXperiment (MPEX).
neutrons to perform
HFIR, SNS;
development.
fusion reactor materials
X LAMDA lab;
Develop a new Fusion
studies that are currently
PAL lab; 3025E,
Current 7625 facility has
Materials Irradiation Test
not feasible at any other
3525; & 7603
Station (FMITS) at SNS to inadequate space for fusion
facility worldwide.
remote handling
R&D and ITER enabling
take advantage of high•
The Material Plasma
systems lab.
technology development.
energy spallation neutrons
Exposure eXperiment
Additional storage space is
to perform fusion reactor
(MPEX) in 7625 will
needed
to
support
both.
materials studies that are
expose irradiated
currently not feasible at
candidate fusion reactor
There is currently no highany other facility
materials to a plasma
intensity fusion relevant
worldwide.
environment to allow
neutron source for fusion
reactor materials studies.
the study of degradation
and to develop best
materials.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
151
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
In 5
Years
Mission
Ready
N M P
C
X
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
Laboratory
DOE
Deliver U.S. commitments Current conditioned
Leverage use of ORNL
Provide additional
for ITER.
facility square footage is
computing infrastructure
conditioned High Bay
Complete and operate the
inadequate for fully
to aid design of fusion
square footage to
Material Plasma Exposure
developing and testing
power systems.
accommodate ITER
eXperiment (MPEX) to
integrated simulations for
experimental devices,
expose both unirradiated
design of MPEX and
Operate MPEX in 7625 to
accommodate MPEX, and
and irradiated candidate
future fusion power
deliver world-leading
co-locate associated highfusion reactor materials to systems. Additional
plasma-materialvoltage and high-power
a plasma environment to
conditioned square footage interaction data for
facilities.
allow the study of
in Building 7625 or
candidate fusion reactor
degradation and to
immediately adjacent is
materials.
Continue to fund FMITS
develop best materials.
critical for MPEX
project and associated
operations and continued
Operate the SNS/FMITS
fusion materials
Operate the SNS FMITS
fusion science and ITER
to deliver world-leading
irradiation program.
to expose irradiated
enabling technology
candidate fusion reactor
candidate fusion reactor
development.
materials irradiation
Continue to fund MPEX
materials to spallation
scientific results.
operations and related
energy neutrons.
R&D.
Continue to operate HFIR
and related hot cell
facilities for long-term
fusion reactor material
irradiation for material
degradation studies.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
152
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
In 10
Years
X
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
DOE
Fusion Nuclear
Develop Fusion Nuclear
Establish the following
Leverage local expertise
Proposed SC line item:
Science
Science Facility to test
under realistic fusion
(MPEX, FMITS, ITER
• Fusion Nuclear Science
Facility (future).
next-generation (postpower reactor conditions:
construction expertise,
Facility.
• science-based fusion
ITER) fusion reactor
ORNL fusion theory,
components in a burning
fusion enabling
Continue to fund FMITS
fuel self-sufficiency,
plasma environment.
technologies, and fusion
project and associated
• behavior of materials in
reactor materials
fusion materials irradiation
fusion environment
irradiation expertise), and program.
• tritium breeding
ORNL computing
• reliable and efficient
infrastructure to aid the
Continue to fund MPEX
power extraction
design of fusion power
operations and related
systems.
R&D.
Continue to operate HFIR
and related hot cell
facilities for long-term
fusion reactor material
irradiation for material
degradation studies.
Condensed
Matter Physics
and Materials
Science
Now
Chemical and
Materials Sciences
Building, 4100;
Buildings
4500N/S,
4508, 4515, 4517,
4508; SNS; HFIR;
Center for
Nanophase
X Materials Science
(CNMS); Shared
Research
Equipment
Facility (ShaRE).
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Understand multi-scale
chemical and physical
phenomena that sustain
discovery of advanced
materials. Enable new
technologies for energy
production, storage, and
use. Support new material
design by controlling
atoms and defects to
provide unprecedented
functionality and
performance under
extreme conditions.
Many active laboratories
reside in general chemistry
facilities that were built in
the1950s and 1960s. These
laboratories lack features
conducive to modern
research (abundant power,
cooling, ventilation; ability
to reconfigure).
Collaborative, updated
radiological laboratory
space is needed for Critical
Material Institute. Need for
process chill water capacity
is especially critical during
hot summer season.
Refresh/upgrade
laboratory and office
space in Buildings
4500N/S, 4501, 4505 and
4508. Upgrade fire
barriers in existing
buildings.
Conduct study for process
chill water loads for noncomputing facility to
identify improvements.
Plan site utility
improvements to meet
power, chilled water, and
other infrastructure
demand.
153
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Chemical and
Molecular
Science
Now
Mission
Ready
N M P
C
X
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
Laboratory
DOE
Existing lab space does not Refresh/upgrade
CNMS: Add ground floor
meet fire safety, utility, or
laboratory and office
labs.
design requirements for
space in Buildings
forecast research.
4500N/S, 4501, 4505 and
4508. Upgrade fire barriers
in existing buildings.
Expanded high-sensitivity
imaging capability is
Site utility improvements to
required for materials
meet power, chilled water,
synthesis (CNMS)
and other infrastructure
research.
demand.
X
Chemical and
Materials
Sciences
Building, 4100;
X
Building
4500N/S; SNS;
HFIR; CNMS;
SHaRE, NCCS
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Combine strengths in the
design, precise synthesis,
and characterization of the
structure and reactivity of
materials (especially at the
nanoscale) using theory,
modeling, and simulation
to gain a fundamental
understanding of material
structure-property-function
relationships.
Many active general
chemistry facilities date
back to the 1950s & 1960s
and do not have power,
cooling, ventilation and
other attributes needed to
support today's research
agenda. Continued focus
on battery work increases
the need for dry rooms and
space that supports use of
water and air reactive
materials. Dry rooms
available for large scale
testing but not available to
support smaller scale crosscutting initiatives. Lab
facilities not sufficient to
support low-background
analysis for forensic
capabilities in chemical
sciences and applicable to
several other capabilities.
Finalize Building 4500N/S
renovation plan. Identify
space for small scale dry
room installation and
expanding energy storage
capacity. Refresh
laboratory and office space
in 4500N/S, 4501, & 4508.
Continue repurpose of
Building 1005.
154
Core
Capability
Climate
Change
Science
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
In 5
Years
X
In 10
Years
X
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
Laboratory
DOE
Existing lab space does not
meet fire safety, utility or
design requirements to
accommodate forecast
Modernize 4508, 4500N/S
research. Dry room
Center for Nanophase
laboratory and office
capability not available.
Materials Sciences: Add
space. Prepare space for
Additional high sensitivity
ground floor labs
dry room installation.
imaging capability needed
to maintain progress in
materials synthesis
(CNMS)
C
Chemical and
Materials
Sciences
Building, 4100;
Buildings
4500N/S & 4501;
SNS; HFIR;
CNMS; ShaRE;
HPC Building
5600
Now
X
Merge advantages in
design, precise synthesis,
and characterization of the
structure and reactivity of
materials (especially at the
nanoscale). Use theory,
modeling, and simulation
to gain a fundamental
understanding of
relationships among
material structure,
property, and function.
Many active laboratories
reside in general chemistry
facilities that were built in
the1950s and 1960s. These
laboratories lack features
conducive to modern
research (abundant power,
cooling, ventilation; ability
to reconfigure).
Separations work increases
the need for a dedicated
collaborative space for
Critical Material Institute.
Refresh/upgrade
laboratory and office
space in Buildings
4500N/S, 4501, 4505 and
4508. Upgrade fire barriers
in existing buildings.
Site utility improvements to
meet power, chilled water,
and other infrastructure
demand.
Laboratory facilities are
inadequate to support lowbackground analysis for
forensic capabilities
founded in chemical
sciences and applicable to
various other capabilities.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
155
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
In 5
Years
X
In 10
Years
X
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
Laboratory
DOE
Existing lab space does not Refresh/upgrade
CNMS: Add ground floor
meet fire safety, utility, or
laboratory and office
labs.
design requirements for
space in Buildings
forecast research.
4500N/S and 4501.
Upgrade fire barriers in
existing buildings.
Expanded high-sensitivity
imaging capability
Site utility improvements to
required for materials
meet power, chilled water,
synthesis (CNMS)
and other infrastructure
research.
demand.
Refresh/upgrade
laboratory and office
space in Buildings
4500N/S and 4501.
Upgrade fire barriers in
existing buildings.
C
Site utility improvements to
meet power, chilled water,
and other infrastructure
demand.
Now
West Campus,
1000 series
buildings; JIBS;
SNS, HPC
X
Biological
Systems
Science
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
X
Develop and apply
advanced integrated
capabilities to solve
problems in bioenergy,
climate change, carbon
sequestration, and health
effects of low dose
radiation
BER's largest lab facility,
Building 1505, HVAC
systems do not possess
reliability needed for
prolonged operation.
Program growth has
resulted in need of an
additional greenhouse.
Improve Building 1505 to
address general laboratory
requirements
Building 1505 HVAC
systems do not possess
reliability needed for
prolonged operation.
Continue building and site
infrastructure
improvements to address
general lab, site lighting,
& circulation needs
Provide additional green
house
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
156
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Now
Mission
Ready
N M P
X
Environmental
Subsurface
Science
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
ORNL West
Foster and apply advanced HVAC in Building 1505
Increasing capacity of
Campus (1000
integrated capabilities to
(largest research
existing greenhouse.
series buildings);
resolve global issues in
laboratory for the Office of
Joint Institute for
bioenergy, health effects
Biological and
Renovate and refurbish
Biological
of low- dose radiation,
Environmental Research)
Building 1505.
Sciences (JIBS),
carbon sequestration, and
is unreliable for extended
1520; National
climate change.
operation.
Security
Engineering
Center, 2040;
Computational
Biology and
Bioinformatics,
1059.
HVAC in Building 1505 is
unreliable for extended
operation.
DOE
Continue building and site
infrastructure
improvements.
X
Additional greenhouse
capacity required to
support research forecast.
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
157
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
Now
X
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
DOE
Provided infrastructure to
Computational
Improve extreme-scale
Lack of fully capable
Upgrade data storage and
support implementation of transmission capability.
measurement, modeling,
Sciences
architecture performance,
upgraded tools.
and simulation tools to
Building 5600;
reliability, usability, and
Research Office
Building 5700;
Joint Institute for
Computational
Sciences (JICS)
5100.
efficiency.
Develop new algorithms
and software to exploit
technological benefits.
Develop key capabilities in
knowledge discovery and
data analytics.
support next-generation
HPC capability as well as
resolve issues across the
DOE and Work for Others
(WFO) research spectrum
including the Electric Grid
Hub.
Apply advanced visual
data to more effectively
integrate DOE
visualization methods.
Advanced
Computer
Science,
Visualization,
and Data
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
X
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Lack of fully capable
measurement, modeling,
and simulation tools to
support next-generation
HPC capability as well as
resolve issues across the
DOE and WFO research
spectrum including the
Electric Grid Hub.
Lack of fully capable
measurement, modeling,
and simulation tools to
support next-generation
HPC capability as well as
resolve issues across the
DOE and WFO research
spectrum including the
Electric Grid Hub.
Provide infrastructure to
support development and
deployment of next
generation tools.
Upgrade data storage,
transmission, and
visualization capability.
Provide infrastructure to
support development and
deployment of next
generation tools.
Upgrade data storage,
transmission, and
visualization capability.
158
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
Now
Computational
Science
In 5
Years
X
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
DOE
Host the fastest HPC
Lack of standardized
JICS, Building
Provide improvements to
systems for the next
operating environment
5100; HPC
efficiently operate data
decade and beyond to
within enterprise and
Building 5600,
centers and maximize use
address critical DOE and
unclassified WFO data
Building 5700;
of existing infrastructure.
national computational
centers.
Multiprogram
and data science
Research Facility
Supply adequate and
challenges that cross
Needed transition from
X Building 5300.
reliable utility
multiple disciplines
compute to compute and
infrastructure to ORNL
including energy,
data environment.
facilities including HPC.
materials, climate, and
national security.
Meet user requirements for
data storage and
transmission.
Space, power, and cooling
Provide improvements to
Provide equipment and
to implement Oak Ridge
efficiently operate data
associated infrastructure
Leadership Computing
centers and maximize use
modifications for
Facility-4 (OLCF-4).
of existing infrastructure.
leadership computing
(OLCF-4) and other
Standardized operating
Supply adequate and
systems.
environment within
reliable utility
enterprise and unclassified
infrastructure to ORNL
WFO data centers.
facilities including HPC.
Needed transition from
compute to compute and
data environment.
Space, power, and cooling
to implement exascale
computing.
In 10
Years
X
Meet user requirements for
data storage and
transmission.
Provide improvements to
efficiently operate data
centers and maximize use
of existing infrastructure.
Supply adequate and
reliable utility
infrastructure to ORNL
facilities including HPC.
Provide equipment and
associated infrastructure
modifications for
leadership computing
(exascale) and other
systems.
Meet user requirements for
data storage and
transmission.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
159
Core
Capability
Applied
Nuclear
Science and
Technology
Time
Frame
Now
Mission
Ready
N M P
X
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
DOE
The United States does
HFIR; REDC;
Advance the basic science
Institutional investments
Melton Valley:
not possess the capability will address Bethel Valley
High Rad
of radioisotopes in the
•
Accelerator
to produce stable
Materials
super-heavy elements.
and Melton Valley basic
Improvement
isotopes.
Examination
infrastructure
Projects for
Radiological labs in
Facility (Building Perform R&D of novel
improvements and needs
HFIR.
ORNL’s 3000 and 4000
3525);
radioisotope applications
to include: data, utility,
Areas are 50+ years old.
Irradiated
and restore economical
storage, office, amenity,
DOE Office of Nuclear
Renovations are needed
Materials
stable isotope enrichment
parking, and site access.
Energy (NE) and/or SC
to facilitate today’s
Examination &
in the United States.
direct support for
research, decrease
Test Lab
Produce strategic
Refurbish
and
continue
maintaining ORNL’s
maintenance
(Building
radioisotopes (Cf-252. Niconsolidation
of
Bethel
multiprogram nuclear
requirements, and
3025E);
63, Pu-238, etc.) for the
Valley non-reactor nuclear facilities in mission ready
improve energy
Materials testing
United States.
operations.
status.
efficiency.
labs in 4500S,
Current waste service
Plan for future disposition
4508 and 4515;
Manage national
DOE EM ownership and
provider DOEof ORNL’s radioactive
Nuclear Science
repository for enriched
timely demolition of
Environmental
waste.
and Analytical
stable isotopes and related
vacated nuclear and
Management (EM) is
terminating capability
Chemistry
technical services.
radiological facilities.
within 5 to 7 years.
facilities
Nuclear mission work
(Buildings 1005,
Explore and demonstrate
Program funding for
must have viable waste
4501,
the nuclear fuel cycle
research and development
outlet.
4505, 4500N
(advanced fuel enrichment
of stable isotope
Refurbishment of
Wing 1, 5500,
processes, extreme
separation technologies.
Category II nuclear
5510; and 6010
environment performance
facilities at REDC.
ORELA STS).
of nuclear fuels and
Add modular hot cells for
REDC needs stand-alone
materials, dynamic
materials and isotope
radiochemical analysis
chemical processes for
development. Improve
labs and expanded glove
fuel reprocessing and
shielded storage for
box capability. REDC
recycling, and advanced
radioactive materials at
labs, caves, and hot cells
waste forms for long-term
REDC for As Low As
are in need of renovation.
disposal).
Reasonably Achievable
Refurbishment of aging
infrastructure is needed
(ALARA) while
to support production of
preserving extremely
isotopes
valuable materials.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
160
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Core
Time
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Capability
Frame
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
DOE
HFIR needs beryllium
Institutional investments
Melton Valley:
Maintain scientific
reflector, HB-4 Beam Tube will address Bethel Valley
•
Accelerator
capabilities in
replacement, and possible
and Melton Valley basic
Improvement
radioisotope, fuel cycle,
installation of second cold
infrastructure
Projects for
and irradiated materials.
neutron source on HB-2.
improvements and needs
HFIR.
Provide the United States
to include: data, utility,
with new capabilities in
Melton Valley site
storage, office, amenity,
DOE-NE and/or SC direct
stable isotope enrichment.
infrastructure needs
parking, and site access.
support for maintaining
Continue to lead in
refurbishment to continue
ORNL’s multi-program
advanced reactor concept
mission:
nuclear facilities in
Refurbish and continue
development.
•
utilities,
mission ready status.
consolidation of Bethel
•
site access and
Valley non-reactor nuclear
FY 2015 Site
parking,
operations.
Modernization SLI Line
•
roof replacement
item to provide time
for Building
Continue planning for
critical nuclear waste
7900.
future disposition of
infrastructure, specifically
ORNL’s radioactive
direct packaging of
Radiological labs in
waste.
transuranic (TRU) debris
ORNL’s 3000 and 4000
waste; and liquid low level
Areas are 50+ years old.
Refresh the HFIR
waste collection and
Renovations are needed
Materials Irradiation
treatment.
to facilitate today’s
Facility with current
research, decrease
In 5
technology using ORNL
X
FY 2017 Waste Handling
maintenance
Years
discretionary funds.
Systems SLI is planned to
requirements, and
replace the balance of the
improve energy
essential radioactive waste
efficiency.
systems.
The United States does
DOE EM ownership and
not possess the capability
timely demolition of
to produce stable
vacated nuclear and
isotopes.
radiological facilities.
Current waste service
Program implementation
provider (EM) is
of production scale stable
terminating capability
isotope separation
within 5 to 7 years.
capability.
Nuclear mission work
must have viable waste
outlet.
Provide uranium nonproliferation and
safeguards demonstration
facility and a portal
monitoring laboratory for
successful safeguards 161
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
activities.
Mission
Ready
N M P
Core
Capability
Applied
Materials
Science and
Engineering
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
In 10
Years
X
Now
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
DOE
Current waste service
Institutional investments
DOE-NE and/or SC direct
Provide facilities and a
provider (EM) is
will address Bethel Valley support for maintaining
disposition path for
terminating capability.
and Melton Valley basic
ORNL’s multi-program
radioisotope production
Nuclear mission work
infrastructure
nuclear facilities in
and R&D capabilities.
must have viable waste
improvements and needs
mission ready status.
outlet.
to include: data, utility,
storage, office, amenity,
DOE EM ownership and
parking, and site access.
timely demolition of
vacated nuclear and
radiological facilities.
Continue oversight for
implementation ORNL’s
Provide uranium nonradioactive waste
proliferation and
disposition
safeguards demonstration
facility and a portal
monitoring laboratory for
successful safeguards
activities.
EE/RE ARRA line item,
Carbon Technology
Apply ORNL’s unique
Complex, awarded in
To support growth,
materials science and
FY09, provides capability
combined laboratory/high
engineering resources and
to manufacture low cost,
4500 Building
bay facility space is needed
facilities to support DOE
high quality carbon fiber
Complex
to co-locate and leverage
Refurbish existing labs as
applied missions and
as well as consolidation of
including the
multiple cross-cutting
available to accommodate
national needs including
on-site carbon fiber
HTML, ETF,
capabilities and thereby
new equipment (expense,
solving materials problems
composites research.
X Building 5500,
accelerate science through
IGPP). Upgrade Building
that limit the efficiency
Sponsor modification of
Building 3100
the development and
4508 Exhaust Fans and
and reliability of systems
existing facilities to
series, Oak Ridge
demonstration phases into
Housing (IGPP). Finalize
for power generation and
provide essential new
Science and
commercial markets to
4500N/S backfill plans.
energy conversion,
laboratory/high bay
Technology Park
expedite resolution of
distribution, and use.
facilities to enable the
urgent national and global
Commercialize key
translation of science to
priorities.
technologies.
applied technology and
spur national
competitiveness.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
162
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Chemical
Engineering
Now
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Combined lab/high bay
facility space is needed to
co-locate and leverage
multiple cross-cutting
capabilities and accelerate
science through the
development and
demonstration phases into
commercial markets.
X
Action Plan
Laboratory
Modernize 4500N/S
laboratory and office space
in accordance with backfill
plans (IGPP).
Combined lab/high bay
facility space is needed to
co-locate and leverage
multiple cross-cutting
capabilities and thereby
accelerate science through
the development and
demonstration phases into
commercial markets.
X
X
REDC and other
radiological
laboratories and
nuclear facilities;
Bioenergy
Sciences Center;
CNMS; HTML;
ShaRE; SNS;
National
Transportation
Research Center
(NTRC); HPC
Buildings 5600,
5300; 4500
Building
complex.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Become an innovator in
nuclear fuel cycle
development, alternative
energy systems, energyintensive industrial
processing, carbon
management, and waste
and environmental
management.
Use technology transfer to
put solutions into practice.
Portions of existing lab
space do not meet fire
safety, utility, or design
requirements for research in
areas including energy
storage. Gaps in the
radiological waste
infrastructure are expected
as EM pulls out of its
legacy mission in Oak
Ridge.
Institutional investments
will address basic
infrastructure
improvements and needs
to include: data, utility,
storage, office, amenity,
parking, and site access.
DOE
EE/RE sponsored
Translational Research
Building is essential to
provide consolidated
laboratory/high bay
facilities adjacent to
existing ORNL
competencies. RB will
enable translation of
science to applied
technology and spur
national competitiveness.
TRB is essential to provide
consolidated
laboratory/high bay
facilities adjacent to
existing ORNL
competencies. TRB will
enable translation of
science to applied
technology and spur
national competitiveness.
DOE-NE and/or SC direct
support for maintaining
ORNL’s multiprogram
nuclear facilities in
mission ready status.
Plan for future disposition
of ORNL’s radioactive
waste.
163
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
In 5
Years
X
C
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
Laboratory
DOE
Portions of existing lab
Institutional investments
DOE-NE and/or SC direct
space do not meet fire
will address basic
support for maintaining
safety, utility, or design
infrastructure
ORNL’s multiprogram
requirements for research in improvements and needs
nuclear facilities in
areas including energy
to include: data, utility,
mission ready status (e.g.,
storage. Radiological
storage, office, amenity,
REDC hot cell upgrades to
waste capabilities are
parking, and site access.
replace in cell equipment
dependent on the EM
Fire barrier upgrades.
in support of curium target
legacy program.
fabrication and Cf 252
encapsulation operations).
Continue planning for
future disposition of
FY 2015 Site
ORNL’s radioactive
Modernization SLI line
waste.
item to provide time
critical nuclear waste
infrastructure, specifically
direct packaging of
transuranic (TRU) debris
waste; and liquid low level
waste collection and
treatment.
FY 2017 Waste Handling
Systems SLI is planned to
replace the balance of the
essential radioactive waste
systems.
DOE EM ownership and
timely demolition of
vacated nuclear and
radiological facilities.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
164
Core
Capability
Systems
Engineering
and Integration
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
In 10
Years
X
Now
X
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
C
Laboratory
DOE
Portions of existing lab
Institutional investments
DOE-NE and/or SC direct
space do not meet fire
will address basic
support for maintaining
safety, utility, or design
infrastructure
ORNL’s multiprogram
requirements for research in improvements and needs
nuclear facilities in
areas including energy
to include: data, utility,
mission ready status (e.g.,
storage. Radiological
storage, office, amenity,
REDC hot cell upgrades to
waste capabilities are
parking, and site access.
replace in cell equipment
dependent on the EM
in support of curium target
legacy program.
fabrication and Cf 252
Continue oversight for
encapsulation operations).
implementation ORNL’s
radioactive waste
disposition.
DOE EM ownership and
timely demolition of
vacated nuclear and
radiological facilities.
Engineering
Translate breakthrough
Constraints from existing
Institutional investments
Technology
science into robust
facilities and infrastructure
will address basic
Facility, Building technologies and methods
affect the capacity to
infrastructure
5800;
to address highly
develop and integrate
improvements and needs
Instrumentation
complex, risky,
energy-efficient
to include: data, utility,
Research Facility, multidisciplinary national
technologies into
storage, office, amenity,
Building 3500;
issues. Focus on meeting
residential and commercial parking, and site access.
NTRC; MultiDOE and other federal
buildings, electricity
Program
mission needs. Emphasize delivery, and materials
Research
delivery of energy
processes for industrial
Facility; HPC
security, national security,
efficiency. Needs include a
Buildings 5600,
health, and economic
center for electric grid
5300; Robotics
competitiveness systems
modeling and analysis,
and Remote
to meet diverse national
computational and
Systems Highrequirements.
visualization equipment,
Bay (7603).
and technical testing.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
165
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
In 5
Years
X
In 10
Years
C
Institutional investments
will address basic
infrastructure
improvements and needs
to include: data, utility,
storage, office, amenity,
parking, and site access.
X
Now
X
Large Scale
User Facilities /
Advanced
Instrumentation
In 5
Years
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
Laboratory
DOE
Institutional investments
FY 2018 SLI line item,
Translational Research
will address basic
Building to enable
infrastructure
translation of science to
improvements and needs
applied technology and
to include: data, utility,
spur national
storage, office, amenity,
competitiveness.
parking, and site access.
Building
Technologies
Research and
Integration
Center (BTRIC);
CNMS; HFIR;
HTML; HRIBF;
Center for
Structural
Molecular
Biology; OLCF;
NTRC;
Safeguards
Laboratory (SL);
ShaRE; SNS.
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Conduct world-class
scientific research to deliver
technology innovations.
Provide full access to, and
adequate representation
for, students and
postdoctoral associates in
scientific research.
SNS and HFIR beam line
networks and off-campus
network must be upgraded
and integrated with other
ORNL computers to
establish streaming data
management and meet
increased number of
users/instruments.
Evaluate reuse of HRIBF.
Institutional investment to
address basic infrastructure
needs including: data
transmission capacity and
data storage.
Institutional investments
will address basic
infrastructure
improvements and needs
to include: data, utility,
storage, office, amenity,
parking, and site access.
Chestnut Ridge:
• Programmatic line item
(FY14): Second Target
Station for SNS.
• Accelerator
Improvement Projects
for SNS.
CNMS:
• Add ground floor labs.
166
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Mission
Ready
N M P
In 10
Years
X
C
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Action Plan
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
Laboratory
DOE
Institutional investments
Chestnut Ridge:
will address basic
• Accelerator
Improvement Projects
infrastructure
for SNS.
improvements and needs
to include: data, utility,
storage, office, amenity,
parking, and site access.
• N = Not Capable; M = Marginal; P = Partial; C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
167
Support Facilities and Infrastructure - Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property Capability
Work Environment
Mission Ready
Current
N M P C
X
Site Services
ORNL's off-campus networking system requires 10
Gbit/s for users to download data and perform data
processing on lab computers.
The existing ORNL Visitor Center is not open during
evening and weekend hours.
ORNL's 70-year-old fire station (built in 1943) has
remained in use significantly beyond its 30-year
design life. Because of lab growth, the station no
longer is centrally located on the ORNL campus,
resulting in increased emergency response time.
X
User Accommodations
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure Capability Gap
Laboratory
DOE SLI
Institutional expense and capital
will be used to implement
partial modernization of the
7000 Area.
FY 2015 Site Modernization
SLI line item project
includes replacement of first
responders' facility and
partial replacement of
obsolete radioactive waste
management infrastructure.
Onsite maintenance, fabrication, shipping, and
receiving facilities have an average age of 47 years,
an associate asset condition index of 0.77 (poor), and
a deferred maintenance backlog of more than $7M.
Work area configurations and process flow back
fitted into existing spaces have resulted in substantial
needs for improved efficiency.
X
FY 2017 Waste Handling
Systems SLI line item
project completes
replacement of obsolete
radioactive waste
management infrastructure.
Major infrastructure improvements to protect
radioactive waste operations are needed as EM
completes legacy cleanup missions.
X
Conference and Collaboration Space
Power: medium voltage (13.8 kV) reliability and
capacity will not meet forecast demand; portions of
Lab are still using 1940s-era 2.4 kV system.
Sanitary Sewage Plant: pump station and
digester/clarifier conditions are poor and
undersized for future forecast loading.
Utilities
X
Institutional GPPs scheduled to
address potable water, chilled
water, and portions of power
gaps.
Potable water: 1940s-era distribution system
piping is leaky.
Chilled water: a capacity increase with N+1
redundancy is needed to meet future demand.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
168
Support Facilities and Infrastructure - Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property Capability
Roads and Grounds
Mission Ready
Current
N M P C
X
Security Infrastructure (Baseline Level of
Protection)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
X
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure Capability Gap
ORNL must meet and sustain Baseline Level of
Protection as well as Cat I nuclear facility
requirements. ORNL has identified a $10M-plus
shortfall for life-cycle upgrades, including site
access controls and installation of a wireless
MESH communication network.
Laboratory
DOE SLI
Upgrade request articulated in
FS-10 Security budget
submission. FY 2020 Site
Modernization line item
project will replace and
consolidate first responder
and Laboratory protection
resources.
169
Attachment 2. Laboratory Site Map
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
170
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Mission and Overview
Lab-at-a-Glance
The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is
a multiprogram U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)
Office of Science (SC) laboratory located in Richland,
Washington (WA) with an enduring mission to
transform the world through courageous discovery and
innovation. Our vision is to inspire and enable the
delivery of world-leading science and technology
(S&T) in
Location: Richland, Washington
Type: Multi-program laboratory
Contractor: Battelle Memorial Institute
Responsible Site Office: Pacific Northwest Site
Office
Website: www.pnnl.gov
• chemical imaging of dynamic systems
• advanced computing
• biosystem dynamics and design
• mesoscale science through mastering molecular and
nanoscale complexity to achieve function by design
• climate and earth systems science
• efficient and secure electricity management
• disruption of illicit nuclear trafficking.
Established in 1965 with 2200 employees and facilities
supporting Hanford Site operations, PNNL focused on
expanding nuclear fuel cycle research, developing
advanced reactor designs and materials, fabricating
and testing novel reactor fuels, and monitoring and
protecting human health and the environment.
Today, PNNL is a leading multidisciplinary national
laboratory with a long-standing reputation for
advancing scientific frontiers through world-class
research and development (R&D). The Lab has two
national scientific user facilities: the Environmental
Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), which
provides integrated experimental and computational
resources for discovery and technological innovation;
and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate
Research Facility (ARM).
PNNL is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute
(BMI), a private, non-profit, S&T enterprise that
explores emerging areas of science, develops and
commercializes technology, and manages laboratories.
Total PNNL cost for fiscal year (FY) 2012 was
$859.2M. PNNL customers include DOE, the National
Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), U.S.
Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and other
federal agencies. Details on specific Work for Others
(WFO) agencies are provided in Appendix 1.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Physical Assets:
• 346 acres DOE, 324 acres Battelle
• 19 DOE Buildings, 95 Total buildings
• 830,776 sf DOE-owned, active operating buildings
• Replacement Plant Value: $410.4 million
• 1,074,015 sf in 36 leased facilities
• 509,012 sf in 44 Battelle facilities
Human Capital:
• 3,922 FTEs
• 3 Joint faculty
• 181 Postdoctoral researchers
• 200 Undergraduate and 166 Graduate students
• 2400 Facility users
• 49 Visiting scientists
FY 2012 Funding by Source (Costs in $M):
WFO,
$187.5
ASCR,
$6.2
BER,
$122.8
Other SC,
$15.6
DOE
Energy,
$94.7
DHS,
$63.3
Other
DOE,
$48.3
BES,
$27.4
EM, $5.7
NNSA,
$287.7
Total Lab Operating Costs (excluding ARRA):
$859.2 million
DOE/NNSA Costs: $608.4 million
WFO (Non-DOE/Non-DHS) Costs: $187.5 million
WFO % of Total Lab Operating Costs: 22%
DHS Costs: $63.3million
ARRA Costed from DOE Sources in FY 2012:
$18.2 million
171
Core Capabilities
PNNL has ten acknowledged core capabilities (Figure 1). Each is a powerful combination of people, equipment, and
facilities nurtured through programmatic and institutional investments. PNNL makes discretionary investments in
these core capabilities and other strategically important areas to respond to emerging and future national needs.
Current investments are designed to expand the Laboratory’s capabilities in multi-modal imaging, power grid S&T,
computational science, earth systems science, biology, and materials science.
Several PNNL core capabilities have matured into world-class research programs. For example, PNNL is widely
recognized as a world leader in proteomics, drawing on core capabilities in chemical and molecular sciences and
biological systems science. Other capabilities have led to world-class research in catalysis, climate research,
subsurface science, and radiation detection.
One of PNNL’s strengths is the ability to bring multiple capabilities to bear on complex scientific and technological
challenges. Combined with our focus on accelerating scientific discovery and innovation and deploying solutions, this
approach is evident in the core capability descriptions, primary funding sources, and supported missions that follow.
See Appendix 2 for the mission area key used in the core capability descriptions.
1. Chemical and Molecular Sciences. PNNL is an international leader in chemical and molecular sciences.
This core capability advances the understanding, prediction, and control of chemical and physical processes in
complex, multiphase environments. PNNL has domain expertise in chemical physics, catalysis science,
chemical analysis, geochemistry, computational chemistry and geochemistry, actinide science, self-assembled
nanomaterials, and defects in materials.
This capability is the basis for PNNL’s computational chemistry software application (NWChem), which is
used worldwide to solve large molecular science problems efficiently on computing resources ranging from
high performance parallel supercomputers to workstation clusters. The Laboratory has made significant
contributions in condensed phase and interfacial molecular science, fundamental catalysis science, and
geochemistry. PNNL has the largest fundamental research effort within the national laboratory system in
these areas, and this success has resulted in the establishment of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis and the
award of an Energy Frontier Research Center in Molecular Electrocatalysis from DOE’s Basic Energy
Sciences (BES) program. Emerging strengths in materials science, particularly self-assembled nanomaterials,
resulted in PNNL partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the Joint Center for Energy Storage
Research (JCESR), an Energy Innovation Hub.
The chemical and molecular science capability forms the basis for PNNL’s fundamental science programs in
catalysis science, condensed phase and interfacial molecular science, computational and theoretical chemistry,
geosciences, separations and analysis, synthesis and processing science, and mechanical behavior and
radiation effects. Applied programs include improved energy technologies, catalysis and reaction engineering,
hydrogen storage, biomass conversions, environmental remediation, and carbon capture and sequestration.
This capability supports 145 scientists and engineers housed in the Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL),
EMSL, Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL), and other facilities. We have identified a need for additional wet
chemistry space to support the core capability (Section 6.0).
This capability is funded through programs in SC (BES and Biological and Environmental Research [BER]),
DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM; environmental remediation), Office of Energy Efficiency
and Renewable Energy (EERE; geothermal, biomass; hydrogen, fuel cells, and infrastructure technology),
Office of Fossil Energy (FE; carbon- and co-sequestration), and NNSA (nonproliferation). This capability
enables PNNL to advance DOE’s missions in scientific discovery and innovation (SC 7, 8, 9, 11, 16), energy
security (ES 5, 8, 9), environmental management (EM 2, 3), national security (NNSA 2), and homeland
security ( HS 1, 2, 3, 5, 6).
2. Chemical Engineering. PNNL is recognized internationally for its chemical engineering core capability.
This capability applies chemical research and engineering across molecular to engineering-scale problems and
demonstrations, translating scientific discovery into innovative processes for advanced energy and
environmental systems. PNNL’s strength in chemical engineering is derived from its scientific foundations in
molecular, biological, nuclear, and material sciences and engineering. An important feature of this capability
is its ability to deliver continuous, high-throughput, efficient and cost-effective processing solutions with
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supporting equipment and controls, often incorporating several advanced individual processes and systems.
The Laboratory has domain expertise in applications of catalysis for biomass and fossil fuel conversion;
separations and waste immobilization for nuclear waste processing; online sensing of nuclear, chemical, and
biological materials; clean hydrocarbon processing and emissions; micro-technology-based chemical
engineering and micro-chemical reactor technology; fluid dynamics for complex fluids; electrochemistry; and
carbon capture.
In collaboration with Washington State University (WSU), PNNL established the Bioproducts, Sciences, and
Engineering Laboratory (BSEL), including state-of-the-art catalytic reactors and bio-processing laboratories
to convert biomass into viable products such as biofuels and chemicals. PNNL has more than 95 scientists and
engineers supporting this capability, along with facilities (some of which are unique) for radiochemical
processing and process engineering, including the BSEL, PSL, Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL),
and Applied Process Engineering Laboratory (APEL); see Section 6.0, mission readiness assessment for
details.
Chemical engineering forms the basis for PNNL’s programs in emission catalysis, hydrogen fuel safety and
storage, hydrogen storage and carbon capture, biomass conversion, clean coal technologies, fuel cell
development, tactical energy systems, used nuclear fuel and waste processing, and waste forms. It is funded
through programs in EERE (geothermal; biomass; hydrogen, fuel cells, and infrastructure technology; and
vehicles), FE (clean coal, hydrogen and other clean fuels, and carbon capture), DOE’s Office of Nuclear
Energy (NE; used fuel treatment), and the DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM; waste
processing). This capability enables PNNL to advance DOE’s missions in scientific discovery and innovation
(SC 11), energy security (ES 6, 7, 8, 9), environmental management (EM 2, 3), national security (NNSA 2),
and homeland security (HS 3, 6, 7, 8, 9).
3. Biological Systems Science. PNNL is recognized internationally for its biological systems sciences
capability, including leadership in proteomics, environmental microbiology, fungal biology and
biotechnology. PNNL’s multiple ’omic technologies are widely used in the broader BER Programs. PNNL’s
domain expertise also includes cell biology and biochemistry, radiation biology, computational biology and
bioinformatics, exposure science and systems toxicology, bioforensics, and biodetection.
The Laboratory has demonstrated international leadership in proteomics and environmental microbiology,
designing strategies for biorestoration of sites contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides, predicting
contaminant behavior and microbial ecology of the subsurface, quantifying effects of renewable energy
devices on aquatic ecosystems, and a systems biology approach to microbial and algal systems relevant to
DOE missions of bioenergy and climate change. PNNL’s expertise in fungal biology has generated an indepth understanding of the biological processes underlying efficient fungal bioprocesses that produce fuels
and other chemicals. Supporting this capability are more than 160 scientists and engineers housed in the
Biological Sciences Facility (BSF), Computational Sciences Facility (CSF), BSEL, MSL, Biological
Inhalation Lab (BIL), Life Sciences Laboratory-I (LSL-I), and EMSL. PNNL is also a partner in the Joint
Genome Institute, which provides large-scale genome sequencing and analysis for DOE missions.
The biological systems science capability enables PNNL to provide a systems-level understanding of
biological systems involved in capturing and transforming light and chemical energy, biomass conversion,
radiation biology, biology of oxidative stress and signaling, environmental sustainability, carbon cycling and
climate change, biogeochemistry of environmental contaminants and nutrients, environmental microbiology,
microbial ecology, and bioforensics and biodetection. The capability is funded through programs in SC
(BER), EM (waste processing), EERE (wind and water power technologies, biomass), DHS, National
Institutes of Health (NIH), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This capability advances
DOE’s missions in scientific discovery and innovation (SC 12, 14, 15, 16), energy security (ES 8, 9),
environmental management (EM 2), and homeland security (HS 3, 11).
4. Climate Change Science. PNNL is a national leader in climate change science, with expertise spanning the
full range of disciplines and tools required to comprehend complex interactions among the natural earth
system, energy production and use, and other natural processes and human activities. This core capability
includes activities ranging from measurements to multi-scale models to integrated analyses of climate impacts
and response options. PNNL has domain expertise in instrument development; cloud physics; atmospheric
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aerosol chemistry; cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions; laboratory studies, field campaigns, and other
measurement programs; modeling of atmospheric processes, integrated water cycles, and regional, global
climate, and earth systems; integrated assessment; and quantitative analyses of emissions, land use changes,
and mitigation and adaptation scenarios. Increasingly, these efforts are integrated to yield new insights into
coupled natural-human system dynamics. For example, PNNL’s state-of-the-art Platform for Regional
Integrated Modeling and Analysis joins high resolution representations of the atmosphere, oceans, land
surface hydrology, agriculture and land use, energy systems, and socioeconomics; includes a sophisticated
uncertainty characterization and quantification framework; maximizes advanced computing and data
management and visualization tools; and is being used to identify the regional impacts of climate change and
evaluate different adaptation and mitigation options.
PNNL is internationally recognized for improving our basic understanding of the causes and consequences of
climate change and for developing the data-driven regional and global modeling frameworks needed to
predict changes in climate as well as in related human and environmental systems. More than 70 scientists
and engineers support this core capability, including those housed in the Atmospheric Measurements
Laboratory (AML) and MSL, supporting the ARM Climate Research Facility, and those at the Joint Global
Change Research Institute (a partnership between PNNL and the University of Maryland that focuses on
understanding the interactions among climate, natural resources, energy production and use, economic
activity, and the environment). PNNL scientists have made major contributions to a number of national and
international assessments of climate change, including the ongoing U.S. National Climate Assessment.
The Climate Change Science capability provides the basis for PNNL’s programs in atmospheric process
research; earth system observations; integrated assessment of climate and related global changes; and climate
and earth system modeling and prediction. It is funded by programs in SC (BER and Advanced Scientific
Computing Research [ASCR]), EERE (wind and water power technologies), FE (carbon- and
co-sequestration), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), EPA, and the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This capability advances DOE’s missions in scientific
discovery and innovation (SC 1, 13, 15, 16), energy security (ES 16), and homeland security (HS 7, 9, 11).
5. Environmental Subsurface Science. PNNL is an international leader in environmental subsurface science.
This core capability focuses on developing and applying the basic understanding of biogeochemical reactions,
energy, and mass transfer to the prediction, assessment, mitigation, and design and operation of in situ
environmental processes. PNNL has domain expertise in molecular-to-field scale biogeochemistry and
reactive and multiphase transport modeling; laboratory-to-field scale geohydrology, surface water hydrology,
and multiphase flow modeling; ecological assessment, management, and monitoring; human health and
environmental risk assessment; and environmental systems technology development and deployment.
PNNL applies an iterative experimental and modeling approach to contaminant fate and transport at DOE
sites, demonstrating its leadership at the Integrated Field Research Challenges located within the Hanford Site
300 Area and research focused on molecular-scale biogeochemical processes, field relevant microsites, and
transition zones. The Laboratory applies this expertise toward the protection of regional water sources and
aquatic ecosystems affected by contaminated soils and groundwater, releases from waste disposal units,
climate change mitigation, energy development, water use, and hydropower systems operations. Our expertise
in environmental subsurface science has resulted in the Laboratory’s emergence as a national leader in
mitigating greenhouse gases (GHGs) through geologic sequestration science supporting the Midwest,
Southwest, and Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships, with major roles in the Wallula Carbon
Sequestration Demonstration and FutureGen projects. PNNL has more than 190 scientists and engineers
advancing this capability in MSL; LSL-I, PSL, Research Technology Laboratory (RTL), and EMSL.
The environmental subsurface science capability provides the basis for PNNL’s programs in environmental
restoration sciences; fate and transport of subsurface contaminants and legacy waste cleanup; GHG
co-sequestration and demonstration; environmental impact assessments for nuclear, geothermal, water/ocean,
and wind energy; ecological management; and marine science research. This capability is funded through
programs in SC (BER and BES), EM (waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, nuclear materials
disposition), FE (carbon- and co-sequestration), EERE (geothermal technologies, wind and water power
technologies), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This
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capability advances DOE’s missions in scientific discovery and innovation (SC 11, 12, 13, 14, 15), energy
security (ES 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 16), environmental management (EM 2, 3), national security (NNSA 2), and
homeland security (HS 3, 7, 11).
6. Applied Materials Science and Engineering. PNNL is recognized internationally for its capability in
applied materials science and engineering, with domain expertise in materials characterization; materials
theory, simulation, design, and synthesis; materials structural and chemical modification; the role of defects in
controlling material properties; and materials performance in hostile environments, including the effects of
radiation and corrosion. PNNL’s strength in this capability is derived from the Laboratory’s foundations in
chemical, molecular, biological, and subsurface science, and the ability to engineer enabling nano-structured
and self-assembled materials, tailored thin films, ceramics, glasses, alloys, composites, and biomolecular
materials.
The Laboratory is specifically known for its expertise in radiation effects on materials, solid oxide fuel cells
and energy storage materials, solid-state lighting, and organic electronic materials as well as its proficiency in
developing functionalized nanoporous ceramics for catalytic, sorbent, and sensing applications. PNNL has
more than 165 scientists and engineers who contribute to and use state-of-the-art material characterization and
imaging instrumentation at EMSL; high- and low-dose radiological facilities, including PSL and the Physical
Sciences Facility (PSF); and laboratories (APEL and RTL) for thin-film material synthesis and deposition.
We have identified a need for additional wet chemistry and imaging space supporting this core capability (see
Section 6.0).
The applied materials science and engineering capability forms the basis of PNNL’s programs in radiation
effects in materials; multi-scale behavior of structural materials; design and scalable synthesis of materials
and chemicals that bridge the mesoscale; fuel cells and energy storage; electric and lightweight vehicle
technology; nuclear reactor safety assessment, regulatory criteria, and life extension; and legacy waste forms.
It is funded through programs in SC (BES, Fusion Energy Science [FES]), NE (advanced fuel cycle
initiative), EERE (hydrogen storage and fuel cell technology), EM (waste processing), and the NRC. This
capability advances DOE’s missions in scientific discovery and innovation (SC 7, 8, 9, 10, 18), energy
security (ES 2, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16), environmental management (EM 3), national security (NNSA 2), and
homeland security (HS 3, 11).
7. Applied Nuclear Science and Technology. PNNL is a national leader in applied nuclear science and
technology. The depth and breadth of this capability enables the Laboratory to play pivotal roles in
fundamental scientific, nuclear nonproliferation, and nuclear energy efforts. PNNL has domain expertise in
ultra-trace detection and analysis, non-destructive evaluation, dosimetry and health physics, international
nuclear intelligence analysis, nuclear material security and interdiction systems, fuel cycle characterization,
nuclear fuels production and processing, nuclear safety analysis and risk assessment, nuclear detectors,
actinide chemistry, online monitoring techniques, and radiochemical process engineering.
PNNL is internationally recognized for capability in environmental sampling for nonproliferation and nuclear
detonation monitoring missions and is best known for leadership in developing new science, tools, and
techniques for monitoring and predicting materials and process performance for nuclear power applications,
performing nuclear safety and risk assessments that include human health exposure impacts, and identifying
trace environmental signatures for monitoring nuclear activities. More than 260 staff scientists and engineers
support this capability along with uniquely equipped high- and low-dose radiological and ultra-low
background counting facilities (PSF complex), 2400 Stevens, CAT II RPL, and Radiation Calibration
Laboratory (RCL) accredited by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program operated by the
National Institute of Standards and Technology. PNNL also has outdoor facilities for testing interdiction
systems designed for border security as part of the PSF complex.
The applied nuclear science and technology capability forms the basis for PNNL’s programs in isotope
production, nuclear nonproliferation, tritium target qualifications, health physics, nuclear fuel cycle R&D,
radiation portal monitoring, dosimetry, international nuclear intelligence analysis, and weak interaction
physics. This capability is funded through programs in NNSA (nonproliferation, defense programs), U.S.
Department of Defense (DoD), DHS, NE (fuel cycle), EM (waste processing, nuclear materials disposition),
NRC, the intelligence community, and SC (nuclear physics [NP] and high energy physics [HEP]). This
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capability advances DOE missions of scientific discovery and innovation (SC 21, 22, 23, 26, 29, 30, 31, 32),
energy security (ES 2, 16), environmental management (EM 2, 3), national security (NNSA 2), and homeland
security (HS 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10).
8. Advanced Computer Science, Visualization, and Data. PNNL is recognized internationally in advanced
computer science, visualization, and data management. PNNL uses its expertise in computing and
mathematics to develop scalable analysis algorithms, high performance computing tools, data-intensive
information systems, and secure computing infrastructures for scientific discovery, predictive modeling,
situational awareness, and decision support.
PNNL’s unique capabilities and leadership in data-intensive computing applications and architectures
is exemplified in four centers. The DoD-funded Center for Adaptive Supercomputing Software MultiThreaded Architectures conducts research in algorithms, systems software, and programming environments to
enable data-intensive applications with no spatial or temporal locality and will benefit from novel
architectures. Second, PNNL provides international leadership for information analytics through a portfolio of
projects support by the DHS and intelligence community, which delivers decision-making and analysis tools
to intelligence analysts, national and homeland security officials, and first responders and law enforcement
personnel. Third, the Cyber Innovation and Operations Center, a leader in integrating cyber
counterintelligence with research in analytics and operations, focuses on identifying and responding to current
and emerging threats to our nation’s defenses and critical infrastructure. Lastly, the Electricity Infrastructure
Operations Center (EIOC) merges real-time sensor data with advanced computing, bringing together industry
software, real-time grid data, and advanced computation into a functional control room for real-time
monitoring and management of the nation’s electric grid.
PNNL’s strengths in data management and informatics support EMSL, ARM, the BELLE II HEP
experiment, 10 and a broad portfolio of projects for DOE-SC and the national security sector. PNNL is a leader
in computational chemistry, subsurface transport simulation, and modeling and simulation for the power grid.
For 10 years, PNNL has led the nation in cyber security capabilities to detect and analyze DOE networks and
electricity infrastructure. Leading the DOE Cooperative Protection Program and Cyber Intelligence Center,
PNNL is responsible for the research of next generation cyber security sensors, standards for secure
communication protocols, design of analytic methods and tools, and operational analysis of the integrity and
security of cyber networks. Computer science capabilities include data analysis and visualization,
performance and power modeling, programming and execution models, and hardware and software
multithreading. Computational math capabilities include upscaling, stochastic partial differential equations,
and uncertainty quantification. PNNL has 355 staff scientists and engineers supporting this core capability
located in CSF, Systems Engineering Facility (SEF), Information Sciences Building (ISB)1, ISB2, and EMSL
facilities.
This capability underpins PNNL’s programs in data-intensive and high performance computing, scientific and
knowledge discovery frameworks, cyber security, information analytics, signature discovery, computational
chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and computational subsurface science. This capability
is funded through programs in SC (ASCR, BER, BES), Intelligence and Counterterrorism, Electricity
Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE), NNSA (nuclear nonproliferation), DHS, DoD, intelligence community,
NIH, and the National Science Foundation. This capability advances DOE’s missions of scientific discovery
and innovation (SC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 13, 14, 16, 26), energy security (ES 10), national security (NNSA 2),
and homeland security (HS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12).
9. Systems Engineering and Integration. PNNL is internationally recognized in systems engineering and
integration. This core capability focuses on solving complex problems by synthesizing and integrating
multiple disciplines to mature technologies and implementing efficient solutions. The Laboratory defines and
interprets complex technical requirements and translates them into fieldable solutions that address economic,
10
The U.S. Belle II project is delivering detector subsystems to the KEK Laboratory in Tsukuba, Japan for integration with the
Belle II detector and SuperKEKB accelerator. An international Belle II collaboration (450+ scientists, 70+ institutions, 20+
countries) aims to discover new physics beyond the “standard model” through observing rare or forbidden heavy quark and
lepton decays.
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social, and engineering considerations. Using a structured approach to understand complex systems
throughout their life cycle, PNNL uses its domain knowledge and experience in engineered systems
simulation and modeling; system architecture and design; test, evaluation, and optimization; technology
assessment, integration, and deployment; policy assessment and economic evaluation; and regulatory
analysis, risk assessment, and decision support.
PNNL applies a graded approach to our systems engineering discipline that enables us to deliver solutions in
a highly efficient, effective way. PNNL is known worldwide for field-deploying international nuclear
materials safeguards, security, and complex radiation detection systems. PNNL also leads in developing
integrated building energy technologies, advancing national power grid reliability and smart grid technology,
and conducting large-scale technology demonstrations. To support this capability, PNNL has approximately
430 scientists and engineers within key facilities that include the EIOC (Math Building), System Engineering
Facility, 2400 Stevens, Radiation Detection Laboratory, and the Large Detector Test Facility (part of the PSF
complex).
The systems engineering and integration capability is funded through programs in EERE (buildings), EM
(waste processing, nuclear materials disposition), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE;
infrastructure security and energy restoration), FE (carbon- and co-sequestration), SC (BER), NNSA
(nonproliferation), DHS, and the intelligence community. This capability advances DOE missions of
scientific discovery and innovation (SC 11, 16, 30), energy security (ES 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16),
environmental management (EM 2, 3), national security (NNSA 2), and homeland security (HS 1, 2, 3, 5, 6,
9).
10. Large-Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation. PNNL is recognized internationally for its ability
to conceive, design, build, operate, and manage world-class scientific user facilities. This capability focuses
on the design and development of transformational research tools and techniques that accelerate scientific
discovery and technical solutions. PNNL has demonstrated this ability in the design, construction, and
operation of the EMSL, DOE’s first user facility to deliver a suite of unique and state-of-the-art instruments
that accelerate scientific discovery and innovation to advance DOE’s missions. This capability also enables
PNNL’s contribution to the design and operation of the ARM Climate Research Facility.
EMSL boasts an unparalleled collection of state-of-the-art computational and experimental capabilities that is
focused around its three science themes of biological interactions and dynamics; geochemistry and
biogeochemistry in terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems; and the science of interfacial phenomena to address
critical challenges in DOE’s environmental and energy mission areas. Advanced instrumentation is integrated
with multidisciplinary teams of users collaborating with expert staff to resolve complex scientific problems.
EMSL provides access to instrumentation in high performance mass spectroscopy, high resolution
microscopy, high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging, surface and interface spectroscopies,
and high performance molecular science computing unmatched in sensitivity and resolution, sample
throughput, and variety of in situ sample environments.
ARM is the world’s premier ground-based observational facility for advancing climate change research. With
five permanent sites in diverse environments around the world (including the newest one in the Azores) and
three mobile facilities, the ARM Climate Research Facility is used by scientists worldwide to improve the
understanding and representation of clouds, aerosols, and other key processes in climate and earth system
models. This unique scientific user facility also includes an aerial facility with research aircraft that
complement and enhance ARM’s long-term ground-based measurements and a data archive that includes both
raw and value-added data from ARM sites and field campaigns.
EMSL and ARM provide unique opportunities to national and international scientific users to conduct worldclass research individually and in collaboration with PNNL staff. More than 80 personnel are dedicated to
designing, building, operating, and managing large-scale user facilities. The large-scale user facility and
advanced instrumentation capability is funded by SC (BER, BES) and NIH (National Center for Research
Resources). This capability advances DOE’s missions of scientific discovery and innovation (SC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 24, 26, 33, 34), energy security (ES 8, 9), environmental management
(EM 2, 3), national security (NNSA 2), and homeland security (HS 1, 3).
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Science Strategy for the Future
PNNL’s scientific vision is to develop a predictive understanding of complex systems enabling design,
manipulation, and control. Through the development and use of innovative imaging and analysis techniques, dataintensive and extreme-scale computing and analytics capabilities, PNNL’s scientific leadership is having
significant mission impact in energy, environment, and national and homeland security as described below.
•
Strengthen U.S. Scientific Foundations for Innovation. Progress in basic science is essential to America’s
continued prosperity and security. Breakthroughs in fundamental and computational science yield remarkable
discoveries and scientific tools that reveal nature’s deepest mysteries and advance our understanding of the
world around us. They also provide a foundation for delivering science-based solutions in energy, the
environment, and national security. Our focus is on the most important scientific challenges— fundamental
understanding of chemical and physical processes, understanding global climate system dynamics and
impacts, elucidating the dynamics of complex biological and biogeochemical systems, designing and
synthesizing functional and structural materials—and the new tools needed to address these challenges.
•
Increase U.S. Energy Capacity and Reduce Dependence on Imported Oil. Reliance on carbon-based fuels
has provided inexpensive power, economic growth and a pathway to U.S. energy security. At the same time,
the ever-increasing cost associated with the impact of climate change has driven an international race for new
low-carbon technologies. New technologies are leading to small, modular, and regionally dispersed
generation, which is more sustainable. Significant increases in domestic natural gas production and oil
recovery are fundamentally changing the energy market, reinforcing the need for a more flexible,
environmentally neutral energy system. These trends call for significant advances in complementary costcompetitive, sustainable energy technologies and a comprehensive modernization of the power grid. To
address these trends, PNNL is delivering innovations in energy efficiency, conversions, and materials, and is
leading a fundamental transformation in the design and operation of the future grid. These advances will help
propel the U.S. energy system toward a sustainable future.
•
Reduce Environmental Effects of Human Activity and Create Sustainable Systems. Significant
environmental challenges emerge from pursuing national economic, energy, and security goals. Managing
these issues is often costly in terms of jobs and economic security. Addressing these priorities requires the
ability to accurately represent complex environmental systems and develop options for managing them in the
context of competing national goals. PNNL is advancing innovative tools to resolve legacy waste challenges,
respond to extreme environmental events, evaluate sites for energy production, and predict tradeoffs of
policies and decisions. Our ability to do this faster and more effectively is key to balancing urgent needs for
energy and security with stewardship of our environmental resources.
•
Prevent and Counter Terrorism and Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Effect. Global terrorism and the
threats posed by the proliferation of nuclear materials and weapons will continue to evolve in complexity as
adversaries attempt to penetrate our defenses and evade detection. New security challenges are arising from
the confluence of global climate change, sharply rising energy demands, and geopolitical-social transitions in
areas that may threaten U.S. national security interests. Innovative strategies and technologies are essential to
counter these dynamic and emerging global threats. PNNL is enhancing America’s security by discovering,
assessing, and mitigating complex threats and responding effectively to disruptive events. Our focus is on
ultra-sensitive nuclear measurements, threat signature discovery, information analytics from multi-source
data, and critical cyber infrastructure protection.
Mission Readiness/Facilities and Infrastructure
Overview of Site Facilities and Infrastructure. PNNL’s campus is located in southeastern Washington State,
north of Richland, south of the DOE Hanford Site, and includes several satellite locations across the country. The
campus includes a mix of public and private land and facility ownerships, and comprises 95 structures including:
•
19 DOE-owned buildings (830,776 gsf; average age 24 years)
•
44 Battelle-owned buildings (509,012 gsf; average age 39 years)
•
32 buildings from third-party leases and agreements (1,074,015 gsf; average age 20 years).
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The site land use is described in PNNL’s Campus Master Plan. 11 Table 2 includes SC buildings and Hanford Site
EM buildings occupied and maintained by PNNL during FY 2012. 12 Asset Utilization Index values were
calculated from Facility Information Management System data validated in May 2012.
PNNL is examining all future space options. One option includes a DOE purchase of an existing facility. Other
options include leased space, which is used (as needed) in support of delivering on the Laboratory’s mission. An
Advanced Agreement incorporated into the FY 2013 PNNL contract allows DOE exclusive use of BMI facilities
through FY 2017 with an option to lease the buildings 5 years beyond. All leased space is examined and evaluated
annually for the potential consolidation and reduction of PNNL’s leased portfolio. A summary of lease actions
and expirations is provided in Appendix 5.
Utility infrastructure is owned, operated, and maintained by DOE and the City of Richland. The infrastructure
remains in fair to good condition. A campus utility development project to allow for the new federal acquisitions
described in Section 6.2.2 has been approved and will be implemented in
FY 2014. In support of a transfer of services to the City of Richland, electrical infrastructure owned and operated
by the City of Richland is being installed to the 300 Area and expected to be complete at the beginning of FY
2014.
Table 1. PNNL’s DOE (EM and SC) Currently Owned and Operated Facilities and Infrastructure
Total Bldg, Trailer, and OSF RPV($)
(Less 3000 Series OSF’s)
Total OSF 3000 Series RPV($)
Total RPV($)
Total Deferred Maintenance($)
Total Owned Acreage
Total Leased Acreage
Site Wide ACI(B, S, T)
$410,400,862
$0
$410,400,862
$2,610,350
346
0
0.994
# Building
Assets
10
2
4
1
3
9
0
0
# Trailer # OSF
Assets Assets
0
1
3
8
0
1
3
0
0
0
0
# GSF
(Bldg)
776,716
42,140
4,694
700
21,264
776,016
0
0
0.995
Mission Critical
0.971
Mission Dependent
1.000
Not Mission Dependent
89.26
Office
100
Warehouse
Asset Utilization
97.19
Laboratory
Index (B, T) 2, 3
0
Hospital
0
Housing
B=Building; S=Structure; T=Trailers
1
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings, Trailers, and OSF’s (excludes series 3000 OSF’s).
2
Criteria includes DOE Owned Buildings and Trailers.
3
Only includes assets with usage codes that fall into these 5 FRPC categories. Other usage types are not included.
Asset Condition
Index (B, S, T) 1
# GSF
(Trailer)
0
7,253
0
7,253
0
0
0
0
Facilities and Infrastructure to Support Laboratory Missions. The F&I strategy identifies key actions to
maintain mission-ready PNNL core capabilities, deliver space and facilities according to our guiding principles,
and support the achievement of our vision: to inspire and enable world-leading S&T in support of Laboratory
missions. Within 10 years, PNNL’s F&I strategy will result in a mission-ready PNNL campus with a lower
operating cost, a smaller campus footprint, and average age of facilities, while increasing federal control of assets.
In FY 2013, a series of DOE-driven, contractor-supported analyses were conducted that informed the F&I
strategy. The analyses were driven by three DOE strategic objectives and the PNNL Campus Master Plan guiding
principles. The strategic objectives include mission alignment, reasonable and achievable (i.e., practical and costeffective) investment scenarios, and campus continuity with increasing federal control of assets. The guiding
11
https://collaborate.pnl.gov/projects/facilitiescontent/SiteAssets/Home_Page/Campus_Master_Plan.pdf
The BMI PNNL campus facilities not included in Table 1 can be found in the Infrastructure/Mission Readiness
Supplemental Data document.
12
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179
principles include modern, collaborative, flexible, and sustainable space to support mission alignment. The
analyses took into account the Advanced Agreement (i.e., PNNL contract Appendix J) that includes the impacts
of remediating BMI facilities, and included additional types of space needed to support current and projected
mission work.
In the subsections below and summarized in Appendix 3, we address the analysis and the resulting 10-year F&I
Strategy and Investment Plan. As executed, this plan will deliver increased federal control of assets, modernized
facilities, and decreased operating costs while maintaining the mission readiness of our core capabilities as well as
ongoing program and strategic needs.
Gap Analysis (Surplus and Needs). A thorough gap analysis was conducted based on the types and quantities of
space required for the next 10 years (FY 2013–FY 2023). The analysis included needs aligned to PNNL’s
mission, remediation impacts, and the opportunity to optimize the campus. A summary of needs and analysis is
provided below.
•
Multi-purpose Programmatic – A systematic review of customer forecasts, current space usage, and surplus
space over a 10-year period identified gaps in wet chemistry and imaging spaces based on a relatively flat
customer forecast and were validated by DOE through an independent review. Current and projected needs
were defined by integrating existing data from space inventory, time charging, and project financial systems.
Merging the client forecasted needs over the 10-year period resulted in a comprehensive understanding of the
mission gaps to include types of needed and surplus spaces (Figure 2).
•
Strategic – Facility capabilities identified as strategic investments supporting PNNL’s major initiatives and
core capabilities were incorporated into the gap analysis. The Efficient and Secure Electricity Management
major initiative identified systems engineering and computational analytic space needs that are not currently
available within the existing F&I portfolio. Senior laboratory leadership also identified the need for flexible,
on-site S&T collaborative meeting space, services and amenities, and a prominent and centralized point of
entry into the laboratory which would support capabilities across PNNL (Appendix 4). These represent two
strategic priorities within the Laboratory that were identified in the gap analysis.
•
Remediation – PNNL’s contract requires remediation of the radiological contamination in BMI facilities. The
RTL complex at the south end of the campus is one of the contaminated facilities requiring remediation. A
preliminary assessment of the complex identified that the most effective and efficient remediation action
would be to demolish the RTL complex. Encroachment by the public, including apartment complexes across
the street from the facility, requires expediting those remediation plans.
Critical capabilities within the RTL complex include research related to systems engineering and integration,
environmental subsurface science, and applied materials science and engineering (see Section 3.0 for details).
The Laboratory is evaluating all potential options to absorb as much space into the existing F&I portfolio;
however, wet chemistry, instrumentation, and laboratory support space in the RTL add to and are included in
the gap.
•
Optimization – Planned facility exits are designed into the F&I strategy to reduce the projected surplus space.
Coupled with corresponding plans to build new facility space, our strategy will reduce operational costs
associated with operating older facilities. A building-by-building analysis was performed examining operating
costs and future maintenance relevance to mission and surplus space. This analysis provided data used to
evaluate long-term plans for each building. 13
The consolidated gap (needs and surplus space) will be addressed by a comprehensive set of investments and
divestments over the next 10 years.
Strategic Site Investments. The gap analysis described in the previous section identified needs and surplus
space that will be addressed by PNNL’s F&I strategy. Where possible, the plan leverages existing space and uses
capabilities already present on the campus. The F&I strategy incorporates options to resolve the gap and maintain
the campus capabilities. It includes options to transfer ownership of facilities to DOE, build additions/annex(es) to
13
Detailed information is available in the Infrastructure/Mission Readiness Supplemental Data document.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
180
existing federal facilities, build stand-alone facilities (through IGPP), and make investments to maintain existing
F&I assets.
As one of the initial investments, DOE is investigating the acquisition of a facility with 90,000 gsf that is partially
occupied by PNNL. This facility includes wet chemistry, instrument, high bay, and office space. Tenants other
than PNNL currently occupy approximately 50% of the facility. As these tenants vacate the facility, additional
instrument and high bay space would become available to DOE and PNNL. There is also the potential for future
building annex(es), which could add additional high bay and large instrument scale-up space to the building as the
need arises. The purchase of the facility is anticipated to be accomplished with FY 2013 IGPP.
Another element of our strategy addresses a space gap by acquiring new multipurpose space as annex(es) to
existing federal facilities. Planned acquisitions include expansion of EMSL or other federal facilities, providing
wet chemistry, imaging (quiet space), and office space. This approach may shorten the timeframe to address the
chemistry space needs compared to building new, stand-alone buildings. Annexes to existing federal facilities will
be accomplished with IGPP funds and considered when it is feasible, cost-effective, and the work is synergistic
with space capabilities.
Facility annexes will partially close the mission need gap. New stand-alone IGPP facility acquisitions, located on
federal land, will also be required to completely close the gap. One of the new planned IGPP acquisitions will
provide multipurpose space capability allowing amongst other functions the integration of modeling, monitoring,
and analysis of the U.S. electric grid supporting a broader spectrum of energy and national security research and
operation in ways not possible today (see Section 4.0). This space will also house the PNNL Building Operations
Control Center to centralize campus energy management and utility operations and provide a central location for
managing unplanned events or emergencies affecting the campus operations. The facility capabilities support the
Efficient and Secure Electricity Management major initiative and support integration of the Computational,
Visualization and Data Analysis and Systems Engineering and Integration core capabilities.
Other elements of PNNL’s F&I strategy include an SLI project that will be designed to deliver significant S&T
impact through the development of a modern, synergistic core campus that fosters a collaborative and innovative
environment (plans to be defined in the 2015 and 2016 Annual Laboratory Plans). We also have planned GPP
investments with a focus on modifying the existing EMSL facility footprint for user benefit with plans for an
additional mechanical support area in the next 5 years.
The final element of the strategy incorporates a divestment of surplus space and divestment of non-DOE facilities
identified to be costly or inefficient, which was included as part of the optimization analysis. In total, the strategy
exits approximately 31 leased and contractor-owned facilities outside the core campus, modernizing the campus
while eliminating the high operating costs of older facilities
Trends and Metrics. We have made significant progress during FY 2013 on identifying new and improved ways
to understand our space use and operational costs associated with our facilities (Table 3 and Figure 3). Central to
our space management effort, we established the standards and processes to manage space efficiently and
effectively. Standards for space types (e.g., chemistry, biology, instrumentation) have been modeled based on
industry standards and adapted for the scientific work at PNNL. Future metrics to inform decisions are under
consideration and may include an analysis of both business volume and full-time equivalent (FTE) staff per
square foot (sq ft). The Mission Readiness Assessment Process engages R&D and facilities and operations
management to make decisions collaboratively on facility actions aligned with the standards.
Partnership with DOE has enabled transparency in our process with regard to BMI building maintenance.
Increased collaboration in our processes resulting from notifications on our maintenance investments, encourage
more efficient and effective decisions that align to the campus strategy.
Utilization metrics associated with functionality, density, and adjacency – all elements of utilization performance
– were developed with existing data systems and are readily available to inform investment decisions.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
181
Table 2. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments (SC Owned)1 ($M)
Maintenance
DMR
EFD (Overhead)
IGPP2
GPP3
Line Item4
Total Investment
Estimated RPV
Estimated DM
Site Wide ACI
2012
8.8
0
0
8.2
1.5
18.5
2013
7.4
0
0
14.0
21.4
430
2
0.99
2014
9.2
0
0
16.1
25.3
440
2
1.00
2015
9.3
0
0
15.2
9.0
33.5
474
2
1.00
2016
9.8
0
0
15.7
25.5
493
1
1.00
2017
14.7
0
0
18.2
32.9
513
1
1.00
2018
12.1
0
0
19.5
31.6
541
1
1.00
2019
9.0
0
0
18.8
50.0
77.8
555
1
1.00
2020
16.3
0
0
16.0
32.3
576
1
1.00
2021
12.6
0
0
16.0
28.6
590
1
1.00
2022
14.5
0
0
16.0
30.5
649
1
1.00
2023
15.4
0
0
16.0
31.4
673
0
1.00
1
Does not include any leased facilities
IGPP includes planned investments in DOE leased facilities
3
GPP details represent EMSL programmatic investments. Planned investments consist of a central power plant in FY 2015, an office
pod in FY 2016, a computer room in FY 2019 and second office pod in FY 2020.
4
Line Item funding is reserved for CSIL pending decision.
2
Figure 1. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments
90.0
1.000
80.0
0.990
70.0
0.980
0.970
60.0
0.960
50.0
0.950
40.0
0.940
30.0
0.930
20.0
0.920
10.0
0.910
0.0
0.900
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total Investment ($M)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Site-Wide ACI
182
Attachment 1. Mission Readiness Tables.
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Now
Chemical and
Molecular
Sciences
In 5
Years
Mission Ready
N
M
P
X
Biological
Systems
Science
Environmental
Subsurface
Science
Advanced
Computer
Science,
Visualization
and Data
X
Now
In 5
Years
X
X
Now
In 5
Years
X
X
In 10
Years
X
X
X
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
AML,ARM
, JGCRI,
ETB, MSL
X
BSEL,
BSF, CSF,
LSL-I,
EMSL,
MSL
LSL-I,
MSL, RTL,
EMSL,
PSL
Action Plan
Laboratory
The EMSL large instrumentation and chemical synthesis
laboratory space is fully subscribed, and space less
aligned to EMSL user program should be relocated
outside EMSL. The existing campus facilities cannot
support additional need for hood-intensive, chemical
synthesis laboratories or vibration and EMF-isolated
imaging suites. Dated laboratory layouts and fixed
casework limit research productivity and make housing
analytical equipment a challenge. Additional modern,
flexible space to include wet chemistry hoods is needed to
support the Institute for Integrated Catalysis (IIC) and
Energy Frontier Research Center programs.
Near-term plan will focus on
relocating staff to support the
remediation project. Long-term new
chemistry space will be acquired
using IGPP to accommodate current
and future needs.
Projects: IGPP annex to federal
facility and/or wet chemistry IGPP
with accompanying office IGPP
facility.
Additional mid-scale computing resources are needed to
support regional and global climate and earth systems
modeling activities.
Requirements for additional midscale computing resources are
currently being evaluated and
incorporated into PNNL computing
strategy.
With the exception of off-campus MSL, all facilities are
newly constructed or fully functional. By agreement with
WSU, PNNL’s BSEL footprint is limited.
Project: Relocate and consolidate to
improve collaboration.
In general existing space meets functional needs, though
staff and equipment could be better located to enhance
collaboration. Near-term plans will relocate work to the
core campus.
Relocation projects due to
remediation and consolidation
efforts will improve collaboration on
the core campus.
FY2012 lease actions (SEF) and infrastructure upgrades
(FY2012 IGPP) partially addresses the needs associated
with classified and unclassified computer technology and
computation staff needs. Remaining needs associated
with classified computing (sensitive compartmented
information facility [SCIF] space) need to be addressed.
Campus computing consolidating
and high performance computing
SCIF will allow for full utilization
of computational space.
Projects: CSF SCIF, Systems
Engineering, and Computational
Analytics IGPP.
X
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
EMSL,
PSL, MSL
X
In 10
Years
Climate Change
Science
C
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Key
Buildings/
Facilities and Infrastructure Capability Gap
Facilities
DOE
X
X
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
CSF, SEF,
ISB1,
ISB2,
EMSL
183
Core
Capability
Time
Frame
Now
In 5
Years
Applied
Nuclear
Science and
Technology
Applied
Material
Science and
Engineering
Chemical
Engineering
Mission Ready
N
M
P
X
X
X
X
X
X
Large-Scale
User Facilities/
Advanced
Instrumentation
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
RCL, RPL,
PSF
Complex,
2400STV
3410, RTL,
APEL,
PSL,
EMSL
BSEL,
PSL, RPL,
APEL,
X
X
Now
Systems
Engineering
and Integration
X
X
PSF
Complex,
Math, SEF,
2400STV
Laboratory
DOE
The majority of existing facilities are functional with the
exception of the B-Cell window in RPL and ductwork in
several acidic wet chemistry hooded labs located in 3420
(PSF Complex). Temporary relocation to the 300 Area
may be needed to enable the ductwork to be addressed.
Additional radiochemistry and sensor development
laboratories are required to address anticipated rapid
growth in signature science. A small part of this core
capability is located in an off-campus leased office and
instrumentation development laboratory facility.
Efficiencies and collaborative opportunities can be gained
by locating this core capability on the PNNL campus.
Evaluation of options for life extension of the 300 Area
has commenced.
Limited availability to chemical materials space and
space in close proximity to applied and process scale-up
laboratories supporting this core capability. Remediation
project impacts the space holding, which may require
staff relocation.
Incubator facility remote from the PNNL campus had a
limited amount of chemistry, high ceiling process
development, and office space. Current chemistry space is
fully occupied and inflexible to process equipment
changes.
Ongoing IGPP project in RPL, “BCell replacement window.” Project
to address 3420 hooded duct work
issue in development. Ongoing
evaluation of life extension upgrades
to 300 Area facilities. Continue
efforts to improve scientific
collaboration on the core campus
and consolidate into surplus space.
Near-term DOE facility purchase is
under investigation. Projects:
Facility IGPP purchase, IGPP
facility on core campus.
Near-term, DOE facility purchase is
under investigation.
Projects: Remediation, additional
IGPP wet chemistry space and
facility IGPP purchase.
Multiple on- and off-campus leased facilities house
required instrument development laboratories, and
classified office and laboratory space. Efficiencies and
collaborative opportunities can be gained by locating this
core capability on the PNNL campus.
In the long-term, it will be necessary
to replace off-campus leased space,
2400 Stevens. Projects: IGPP Systems
Engineering and Computational
Analytics.
The EMSL unique large instrumentation and chemical
synthesis laboratory space is fully functional and fully
subscribed. Planned (beyond FY12) project expansion in
computational capacity will require increased electrical
power and cooling.
New multipurpose IGPP facilities
will relocate less aligned programs
outside the “EMSL User Program”
within the EMSL facility.
Evaluating additions of annex(es)
for wet chemistry and imaging
space.
X
X
X
EMSL,
ARM
In 10
Years
Action Plan
X
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
Now
In 5
Years
In 10
Years
C
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Key
Buildings/
Facilities and Infrastructure Capability Gap
Facilities
X
Projects: IGPP annex(es), additional
utility IGPP project.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
184
Facilities Acronyms
2400STV
AML
APEL
ARM
=
=
=
=
BSEL
BSF
C
CSF
DOE
EFRC
EMF
EMSL
ETB
IIC
ISB1
ISB2
JGCRI
LSL-I
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
2400 Stevens
Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory
Applied Process Engineering Laboratory
Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility.
ARM Climate Research Facility is a mobile User Program facility
Bioproducts, Sciences, and Engineering Laboratory
Biological Sciences Facility
capable
Computational Sciences Facility
U.S. Department of Energy
Energy Frontier Research Center
electromagnetic field
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory
Environmental Technology Building
Institute for Integrated Catalysis
Information Sciences Building 1
Information Sciences Building 2
Joint Global Change Research Institute
Life Sciences Laboratory I (331 Building)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
M
Math
MSL
N
P
PSF Complex
=
=
=
=
=
=
PSL
RCL
RPL
RTL
SCIF
SEF
TYSP
WSU
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
marginal
Math Building
Marine Sciences Laboratory
not
partial
Physical Sciences Facility Complex. Complex refers to five newly
constructed federal facilities north of Horn Rapids Road and includes:
3410 – Material Sciences & Technology Laboratory
3420 – Radiation Detection Laboratory
3425 – Ultra-low Background Counting Laboratory
3430 – Ultra-trace Laboratory
3440 – Large Detector Laboratory
Physical Sciences Laboratory
Radiochemical Calibration Laboratory (318 Building)
Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (325 Building)
Research Technology Laboratory
Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility
Systems Engineering Facility
Ten-Year Site Plan
Washington State University
185
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Mission Ready
Current
Real Property Capability
N
M
P
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure Capability Gap
C
Laboratory
X
Unmet need for flexible on-site S&T collaborative
meeting space and accessible amenities within
walking distance.
PNNL IGPP collaboration space
purposed within planning period
X
Various on-site amenities are inadequate, including
conferencing food center, visitor badging, and
central entrance to the campus. Minimal food
services within walking and/or driving distance.
PNNL IGPP collaboration space
purposed within planning period
Site Services
X
Maintenance and fabrication facilities are in a poor
condition and/or location. These facilities are oversubscribed. A lack of storage facilities result in notin-use materials and equipment stored in offices
and laboratories.
Central Operations Building,
Central Machine Shop identified
beyond the planning period
IGPP replacement of
warehouse/shop
Conference and Collaboration Space
X
Amount of collaboration space is below industry
standards. On-site conferencing space is less than
required.
PNNL IGPP collaboration space
purposed within planning period
Utilities
X
Back flow preventers are required for facilities. An
increase need for reliable electrical distribution
system to support computation data needs and
utilities for investments in federal assets are
needed.
BMI-funded backflow preventer
installation; EMSL Electrical
Infrastructure Upgrade (City of
Richland); 300 Area transition of
services to City of Richland. New
infrastructure distribution to
North Horn Rapids Road
Roads and Grounds
X
General end-of-life issues and safety concerns
along Innovation Blvd.
Various road and grounds
projects (BMI) and repaving of
Innovation Blvd (IGPP)
X
Security operations are transferring to PNNL from
an outside provider. To meet future needs, a new
security operation building or existing facility
modification is envisioned to house equipment and
operations.
Central Security Operations space
within existing footprint; camera
replacement project. No
additional direct funding is
needed. Camera replacement is
expense funding.
Work Environment
User Accommodations
Security Infrastructure
DOE
NOTE: Current plans address technical facilities and infrastructure ahead of the support facilities.
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
186
Attachment 2. PNNL Lease Actions and Expiration Portfolio
Near-Term Lease Actions
Contractor Leased
Planned Exit (Sig3, partial 2400 Stevens)
Additions (BMI)
Total
Leased Portfolio Expirations
Sigma III1
2400 Stevens3
Sigma I3
BIL (ILA)2
LSL-II (ILA)2
APEL
Seattle (ILA)3
Sigma II
Sigma V
Port of Pasco (Hanger)3
JGCRI (Maryland)
LSB
Sigma IV
Salk
SEF
ISB1
ISB2
CIC (Library)
ETB
NSB
UHF
FY 2012
FY 2012
1,074,000
1,074,000
FY 2013
FY 2013
1,074,000
(22,000)
1,052,000
FY 2014
1,052,000
(48,000)
1,004,000
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
30,000
30,000
30,000
30,000
FY 2018
20,000
102,000
20,000
16,000
14,000
30,000
52,000
30,000
20,000
48,000
10,000
10,000
18,000
84,000
21,000
10,000
48,000
50,000
60,000
30,000
Total (sq ft)
212,000
150,000
142,000
51,000
40,000
218,000
100,000
100,000
29,000
229,000
1
Two leases were terminated in FY13 (Sigma 3 & Lexington). PNNL is planning on terminating an additional 40,000 to 50,000 sq ft of leased space in FY14.
BIL and LSL-II, two BMI-owned buildings, were included in the PNNL facility portfolio as part of the Advanced Agreement. DOE was provided exclusive use of the buildings in FY13.
3
Leases were renewed.
2
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
187
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
Mission and Overview
Lab-at-a-Glance
The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is a
collaborative national center for plasma and fusion
energy sciences. It is the only Department of Energy
(DOE) Laboratory devoted to these areas, and it is
committed to being the leading U.S. institution
investigating the science of magnetic fusion energy.
Location: Princeton, New Jersey
Type: Single-program laboratory
Contract Operator: Princeton University
Responsible Field Office: Princeton Site Office
Website: www.pppl.gov/
PPPL has two coupled missions. First, PPPL develops
the scientific knowledge to realize fusion energy as a
clean, safe, and abundant energy source for all nations.
Plasma is a hot, ionized gas that under appropriate
conditions of temperature, density, and confinement
produces fusion energy. PPPL has been a leader in
developing the physics of high temperature plasmas
needed for fusion. PPPL will continue to solve plasma
physics problems crucial to fusion energy, as well as
contribute to solutions of key engineering science
challenges associated with the material structure that
surrounds the hot plasma. The second mission is to
develop plasma science over its broad range of physics
challenges and applications. Modern plasma physics
began with the advent of the world fusion program,
and continues to lead to new discoveries in the
nonlinear dynamics of this complex state of matter.
The vast applications range from scientific (e.g.,
plasmas in the cosmos) to technological (e.g., plasmaaided manufacturing).
Physical Assets:
• 88.5 acres; 34 buildings
• 754K sf in Active Operational Buildings
• Replacement Plant Value: $536.0 million
• 0 sf in leased facilities
For over five decades PPPL has been a leader in
magnetic confinement experiments and theory. PPPL
is a partner in the U.S. Contributions to the ITER
Project and leads multi-institutional collaborative work
on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. The
Laboratory hosts smaller experimental facilities used
by multi-institutional research teams and collaborates
strongly by sending scientists, engineers and
specialized equipment to other fusion research
facilities in the U.S. and abroad. To support these
activities, the Laboratory maintains nationally leading
programs in plasma theory and computation, plasma
science and technology, and graduate education.
Core Capabilities
PPPL has significant scientific and engineering
capabilities to support the DOE Office of Fusion
Energy Science’s mission to develop the knowledge
base for fusion energy and high temperature plasmas.
These capabilities are vital for the Princeton
University’s Graduate Program in Plasma Physics,
ranked one of the highest in the nation.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Human Capital:
• 414 FTEs
• 3 Joint faculty
• 20 Postdoctoral researchers
• 40 Graduate students
• ~300 Visiting scientists
FY 2012 Funding by Source (Costs in $M):
Other SC,
2.659
NNSA, 0
WFO,
3.227
HEP,
0.284
ASCR,
0.284
FES,
74.897
Total Lab Operating Costs (excluding ARRA):
$82.6 million
DOE/NNSA Costs: $79.4 million
WFO (Non-DOE/Non-DHS) Costs: $3.2 million
WFO % of Total Lab Operating Costs: 4.0%
DHS Costs: $0 million
ARRA Costed from DOE Sources in FY 2012:
$1.26 million
188
1. Plasma and Fusion Energy Sciences. PPPL has unique experimental and theoretical capabilities and
facilities to explore the physical processes that take place within the high-temperature, high-pressure plasmas
required for fusion energy. Areas of special strength include: the National Spherical Torus Experiment
(NSTX); the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX); high-resolution techniques to measure plasma properties
and processes at a wide range of space and time scales; extremely powerful capabilities for plasma heating
and current drive; capabilities for analysis of data from high-temperature plasmas used by experimental teams
around the world; expertise in a wide range of magnetic confinement configurations; world-leading basic
plasma experimental facilities such as the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX); and premier analytic
theory capabilities that are internationally recognized as a continuing source of seminal ideas and
mathematical foundations for plasma physics and fusion energy science.
PPPL also has unique computational capabilities to accelerate progress in understanding the physics of high
temperature and burning plasmas (e.g., ITER). This includes codes for modeling small-scale plasma
turbulence and associated plasma transport, nonlinear extended magnetohydrodynamics of larger scale plasma
equilibria and motions, and wave-plasma interactions with plasma heating and the fusion-product induced
instabilities possibly present in ITER. PPPL leads in advanced algorithmic development to enable efficient
utilization of DOE-SC’s leadership-class computing facilities for fusion research. This allows us to validate
physics-based predictive models against existing experiments, to investigate innovations to successfully
development fusion energy, and use the integrated models to guide ITER operations in the future.
Recently, PPPL with Princeton University’s Engineering Department has established two surface analysis
laboratories to study fusion-relevant material issues. In addition PPPL has established a nano-laboratory to
study the development of plasma produced carbon nanotubes.
2. Large Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation. PPPL has unique engineering capabilities in:
plasma measurement, heating, and current drive system design and construction; safe and environmentally
benign facility operation including the use of tritium fuel; and specialized fusion confinement facility design
and construction. These strengths together with an enormously capable site for fusion research (shielded test
cells, high-current power supplies, extensive cryogenic facilities, and high-speed broad-band network)
support the operation of NSTX, aid the development and testing of components for ITER, and enable
collaborations on major national and international fusion research facilities. PPPL is a partner with ORNL and
Savannah River in the U.S. ITER Program, and specifically manages the U.S. role in ITER diagnostics and
the ITER steady state electric network. These capabilities provide a flexible, capable location for possible
next-step U.S. fusion research facilities.
PPPL is internationally recognized as a pioneer in the development and implementation of fusion plasma
diagnostics. It has provided diagnostics as well as the supporting expertise to many fusion programs around
the world, often in collaboration with other U.S. institutions. PPPL’s seminal contributions have been
particularly strong in techniques to measure in detail the profile of the plasma parameters (density,
temperature, current density, and rotation), fluctuation diagnostics to measure the underlying instabilities and
turbulence responsible for plasma transport, and measurements of both the confined and lost alpha-particles
produced by fusion reactions. PPPL has a long-standing, active collaboration program providing diagnostics
to fusion programs around the world (JET, JT-60, LHD, W7X, C-Mod, DIII-D, EAST, and KSTAR).
Science Strategy for the Future
PPPL has a dual mission to enable fusion energy for the world and to lead discoveries across the broad frontier of
plasma science and technology. As evidenced by surging research in fusion abroad, there is a rapidly increasing
imperative to develop clean, plentiful, and safe fusion energy. PPPL plans to provide solutions to the key physics
and engineering challenges of fusion, in collaboration with laboratories worldwide. The understanding of plasma
has huge consequences to neighboring sciences (such as the visible cosmos, mostly composed of plasma) and to
technological applications (from plasma-based nanotechnology to plasma rocket thrusters).
PPPL focuses on fusion energy in which the hot fusion plasma is confined magnetically. PPPL is developing the
compact, high pressure (relative to magnetic pressure) approach known as the spherical tokamak (ST), through its
major collaborative facility, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The ST is a leading candidate for a
next step fusion nuclear facility in the U.S., and NSTX results are essential to establish the physics basis for this
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
189
next step. NSTX is also a leading facility worldwide to develop solutions for the plasma-material interface – a
major scientific challenge for fusion energy – and is providing information on the physics of toroidal magnetic
confinement important for ITER and beyond. ITER is an international fusion experiment, based on the standard
tokamak design, that will demonstrate net fusion power generation (of 500 MW) for the first time. A lab-wide
program is exploring the use of a liquid wall as the material that faces a fusion plasma – a potential breakthrough
solution if it is proven to be scientifically feasible. PPPL aims to enter the new era of integrated modeling using
the most advanced computers to understand the full fusion plasma system. New 3D designs for fusion systems are
under study – computation physicists can devise new, remarkable configurations that confine hot plasmas in
steady state with reliability. Beyond fusion, PPPL performs research to understand how plasma processes
determine the behavior of major astronomical objects. PPPL will enhance its contributions to plasma science and
applications generally, in areas such as plasma-based mass filters for nuclear waste remediation, plasma-based
nanotechnology for improved production of nanomaterials, plasma rocket thrusters for fine positioning of
satellites, development of new techniques for short-pulse and intense lasers, and more. In addition to a broad
program of national and international collaboration, new activities are being initiated between PPPL and other
units of Princeton University, particularly with material scientists and astrophysicists. PPPL conducts an
expansive education program, including operation of the Princeton University graduate program in plasma
physics, activities for middle and high school students, research activities for undergraduates, and research and
training experiences for middle and high school teachers.
Mission Readiness/Facilities and Infrastructure
Overview of Site Facilities and Infrastructure. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is located on 88.5 acres
within the Princeton University Forrestal Campus. The 1,750-acre campus is punctuated by dense woods, brooks
and nearby streams; almost 500 acres remain in their natural state in order to protect and enhance the character of
the campus. The Laboratory setting provides an attractive environment to conduct research, appropriately
separated from its neighbors. The PPPL Environmental Management System (ISO 14001 certified) provides a
comprehensive approach for controlling PPPL activities in a manner that minimizes negative impacts to the
environment.
The Laboratory utilizes 754,196 gross square feet of space in 33 Government-owned buildings located on “C” and
“D” sites [see Figure 1] and one offsite (pump house.) There are currently no leased buildings or facilities and no
plans to enter into any lease agreements. There were no real estate transactions during FY12 and none are
currently planned.
As Listed in the FIMS 200 FY12 report, the Total Replacement Value (RPV) of all PPPL facilities and
infrastructure was ~$536M. Non-Programmatic RPV (used for calculating indices) was ~$377M. The overall
Asset Utilization Index (AUI) is 100 (“excellent”) and the overall Asset Condition Index (ACI) is .98 (“good.”)
The PPPL maintenance budget for FY13 is approximately $6.46M.
Table 1. SC Infrastructure Data Summary
Total Bldg., Trailer, and OSF RPV
(less 3000 series OSF’s)
Total OSF 3000 Series RPV
Total RPV
Total Deferred Maintenance
Total Owned Acreage
Total Leased Acreage
Site Wide ACI (B, S, T,)
Asset
Condition
Index (B, S,
T) 1
Asset
Utilization
Mission Critical
Mission Dependent
Not Mission Dependent
Office
Warehouse
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
$376,518,554.18
$159,604,627.12
$536,123,181.30
$9,130,086
0
0.976
$376,518,554.18
# Building
Assets
# Trailer
Assets
# OSF
Assets
# GSF
(Bldg)
# GSF
(trailer)
12
0
18
505,801
0
21
2
1
246,863
1,344
1
6
0
2
1
1,532
176,757
0
1,344
5
0
44,803
0
190
Index (B,
T) 2, 3
Laboratory
9
0
307,761
Hospital
0
0
0
Housing
0
0
0
B= building, S= structure, T=trailer
1 Criteria includes DOE owned buildings, trailers and OSF’s (excludes series 3000 OSF’s)
2 Criteria includes DOE owned buildings and trailers
3 Only includes assets with usage codes that fall into these 5 RFPC categories. Other types not included.
0
0
0
Facilities and Infrastructure to Support Laboratory Missions. PPPL has a comprehensive plan to modernize
the Laboratory facilities to support world-class research. The goal of the plan is to cost-effectively improve the
capacity, maintenance, and operations of the Laboratory to provide first class facilities that enable world-leading
science and support the science initiatives. The plan aligns the priorities discussed above in the Science Strategy
section with the conduct of maintenance, facility modifications, closure of unneeded facilities, and construction of
new facilities. It addresses how real property assets will be used to support the objectives of the DOE Strategic
Plan, the Energy Policy Act, the American Competitiveness Initiative, and the DOE Office of Science report
“Facilities for the Future: A Twenty-Year Outlook.” Planning is developed in accordance with the Real Property
Asset Management Order, DOE 0430.1B and the DOE-SC objective of integrating land use, facilities and
infrastructure acquisition, maintenance, recapitalization, safety and security, and disposition plans into a
comprehensive site-wide management plan.
While the size of the PPPL site is adequate for current and anticipated future needs, present facilities are
marginally adequate and impede rapid progress. In the near term, the number of PPPL employees is expected to
remain unchanged, while the number of onsite collaborators is expected to grow modestly with funding for the
new initiatives and ITER work under mentioned in the Science Strategy. The focus, therefore, is on modernizing
and replacing laboratory and collaborative spaces as well as installed utility systems in existing buildings to
provide the capabilities needed for current and planned R&D activities. An example of a contemplated facility
investment is the of D-Site second motor generator repair (~$1M) to provide increased capability in future years
in support of expanded NSTX experimental operations. Other examples include possible upgrades to a health
physics laboratory as well as materials research facilities.
In recent years, additional funding had been directed toward reducing maintenance backlogs with substantial
success. However, the budget profiles going forward indicate reduced funding in GPP and maintenance line
items. This approach is affecting the advances that have previously been made and may impact the development
of infrastructure that is needed to support the world-leading initiatives of the Laboratory including those to attract
scientists and engineers.
A key Science Laboratory Infrastructure (SLI) project has been approved and will allow PPPL to modernize its
facilities to support mission lines. This project is expected to begin in FY14 and be completed in FY18. Funding
of the SLI is a critical component of our plan to modernize facilities to enable the planned science missions. The
costs of each scope item of the plan are being developed to evaluate how best to accomplish the project with the
funding levels originally established over five years ago (costs have not been adjusted for inflation or the
changing economic horizon).
To prioritize the allocation of limited infrastructure funding, PPPL uses the Mission Readiness Process. The
Laboratory uses the Capitol Asset Management Process (CAMP) developed by DOE to rank both capital and
operationally funded improvements. This process ensures that a systematic approach is used in the allocation of
funds and execution of projects. Projects are ranked based on their risk and the benefit they provide to the
Laboratory Mission. A key component of the PPPL Mission Readiness Process is the use of the Technical Review
Committee (TRC) to review the rankings, which ensures complete laboratory representation in Facility project
planning. The “Mission Readiness” Table (Attachment 1) provides a list of PPPL’s core capabilities, broken down
into major categories of research and development activities, along with the facility and infrastructure plans that
will appropriately support those capabilities. This table summarizes a process that assesses building and facility
conditions and links the results to the critical business lines and determines the mission readiness of those
facilities. The facility improvement plans, which include the SLI project mentioned above, are designed to ensure
the mission readiness is attained to fully support the core capabilities as needed.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
191
Strategic Site Investments. The scope and priority of the PPPL site investment strategy is consistent with the
Integrated Facilities and Infrastructure (IFI) crosscut budget submission and the Twenty Year Outlook.
The highest priority facilities and infrastructure project is the SLI Project for Construction of Science and
Technology Support Infrastructure. This project consists of: construction of a new Science and Technology
building; conversion of the Lab Building into modern offices; conversion of the C-Site MG building into a
machine shop; and demolition of the Theory Building, Modular Building 6, and a portion of the Administration
Building. These objectives will be carefully staged in the most efficient manner so that work disruptions and
moves will be minimized.
•
•
Programmatic Justification for the Science and Technology Support Infrastructure. PPPL requires
modern facilities to maintain leadership in fusion science and technology and support the science strategy
initiatives in the following areas.
o Fusion materials – Molten metal experiments
o
Laboratory plasma astrophysics – Magnetic reconnection/accretion physics
o
High energy density plasma physics – Heavy ion beams
o
Plasma processing of materials – Nano-phase materials
o
Plasma Science and related applications – plasma filters and advanced centrifuge
SLI Project. The new PPPL Science and Technology Center will be a modern laboratory structure that
will house the research devices (current and future) operated by the Plasma Science and Technology
Division, which will be relocated from the outdated, crowded, and inefficient 50 year-old Laboratory
Building. The building will provide experimental areas as well as research, laboratory, office, classroom
and collaboration space. Flexible experimental research bays will be provided with adequate power,
ventilation, an overhead crane and necessary amenities to facilitate safe and efficient operation,
maintenance, repairs, and modifications to research devices. Researchers, post-doctoral students, and
graduate students will be located in offices that have close and safe proximity to their research devices.
The building configuration and area layouts are designed to stimulate active collaboration and encourage
sharing of ideas among experimentalists working on different devices.
The total estimated cost of the SLI project (combined CD 0 approved by the Office of Science in FY10) is
$59 million, excluding upfront concept funding of $750K invested from FY12 and FY13. This was based
upon costs submitted in 2007. Cost-estimates in present-day dollars are being re-estimated. There are
multiple GPP Projects that are ranked lower in priority with the expectation that the new SLI project will
obviate their need. If the SLI project baseline is not adjusted to accommodate the delay in starting the
project, there would need to be significant scope reduction in the project, which would mean that some
aspects would still require GPP funding:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
$750K Upgrade MG High Roof
$225K Installation of New Window Assemblies for Lab wing 2nd floor
Others can be removed from the list:
$320K Upgrade Theory Wing HVAC
$420K L-Wing Electrical Upgrades
Other projects may be partially funded by SLI funding
$245K New Switchgear for Subs 1,2, and 4
$140K ESAT, MG annex and C-Site MG Fire Alarm System work
This project will modernize nearly 20% of the PPPL facility and will reduce maintenance, deferred
maintenance and operating costs. The average age of PPPL facilities will be reduced by 8 years, and the
deferred maintenance backlog will be reduced by $1.85 million. In addition, the PPPL energy use profile
will be reduced by 12%; over 100,000 gsf will be rehabilitated; and ongoing maintenance costs will be
reduced by 4.2% ($269,000/year.) The cumulative savings in overhead costs due to the reduction in
energy and maintenance costs over a ten-year period is estimated at $580,000/year. The cumulative effect
will be to reduce deferred maintenance to meet and exceed DOE-SC goals, resulting in a PPPL ACI of
.99.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
192
The project is being planned in accordance with the project management requirements of DOE O413.3B,
Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. New construction and major
renovations will be performed in accordance with the Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High
Performance and Sustainable Buildings set forth in the Federal Leadership in High Performance and
Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding (2006.)
A site map is attached depicting the laboratory at the end of the five-year planning period and identifying
new, refurbished, and demolished facilities that will result from SLI Line Item funding (Attachment 2.)
The impact of the SLI Project will be to modernize the Laboratory’s facilities and provide the building
infrastructure to support the scientific initiatives described above in the Science Strategy. Presently, there
are three projects in the Plasma Science and Technology Department housed in a 50-year-old building
that cannot grow because of their limited space and low ceilings: Magnetic Reconnection Experiment,
Lithium Tokamak Experiment, and Field Reverse Configuration/Rotating Magnetic Field Experiments.
The low ceiling prevents the use of a crane to move large experimental components. The rooms’ small
space prevents the expansion of the existing projects and the start of new larger scale projects. All three of
these projects as well as a few smaller projects are key elements in the PPPL Science Strategy for the near
and mid-term, and the modernization of the infrastructure will enable the anticipated upgrades of the
facilities to be completed efficiently.
SLI Projects Schedule - Proposed
2010 – Approve Mission Need (CD-0) – COMPLETED
2013 – Approve Alternative Selection & Cost Range (CD-1)
2015 – Approve Performance Baseline (CD-2)
2015 – Approve Start of Construction (CD-3)
2018 – Approve Project Completion (CD-4)
Requested Funding Profile
FY11 $0.44M
FY12 $0.31M
FY14 $5.0M
FY15 $9.0M
FY16 $15.0M
FY17 $16.0M
FY18 $14.0M
The estimated cost (Other Project Cost) to support programmatic strategic planning, complete conceptual
design, and prepare the project documentation to proceed from CD- 0 to CD-1 is $750K.
It should be noted that compliance with DOE order 420.1.C, a new update, requires Fire Hazard
Assessments and Building Assessments for the real assets at PPPL. The budget for the SLI does not
currently reflect these new requirements. The marginal risk involved in not performing these analyses is
not believed to be large but the Facilities Division is undertaking the tasks to gather cost data and propose
the course of action for this additional requirement.
Trends and Metrics. PPPL continues to be a world-leading facility for the research of plasma physics, able to
meet all of its key core capability objectives by implementing its Mission Readiness Program. Using the
principles of the Mission Readiness model, PPPL has improved cross-functional communications and identified
infrastructure gaps along with improving action plans that will allow the Laboratory to bridge those gaps and
remain mission capable for the foreseeable future.
The overall condition of the Laboratory's facilities continues to be good. PPPL has demonstrated an effective
management system for planning, delivering, and operating Laboratory facilities and equipment.
Maintenance of active conventional facilities with respect to DOE corporate maintenance investment goals was
excellent in FY12. In a facility that is over 50 years old, all facility support systems were maintained in an
operational state ensuring no impact to experimental operations and though deferred maintenance slightly
increased from the FY12 report, the maintenance investment index goal was met. Infrastructure system reliability,
as measured by a reliability index of 1.0, indicates total system reliability for electrical and building support
systems. Notably, despite the extreme events associated with Hurricane Sandy, there were no situations in FY12
that resulted in a building or facility being without critical services (or being unusable) during times that the
normal population for those buildings was present. Also, Emergency Generator systems operated as designed and
the facility had power after the storm. PPPL has also exceeded all energy reduction goals established by
Presidential Executive Orders.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
193
Deferred Maintenance per the FIMS 200 - FY12 Owned Infrastructure Data Snapshot is listed at $9.2M. DOE
guidance is to reduce the deferred maintenance backlog so that the average ACI for all buildings is above 0.98 by
FY18. The current PPPL ACI is 0.98. PPPL funding plans, depicted in the table, show that the Laboratory
exceeded the DOE guidance timeline by reaching the 0.98 ACI goal in FY10 and will reach 0.99 in FY19 and
sustain that level thereafter. It should be noted that if funding is not provided at a minimum per the projections in
the table, achieving or maintaining the ACI goals may not be possible or will suffer delays. Most notably, the SLI
project scheduled to begin in FY14 is a key component not only to the Laboratory’s modernization plans, but also
to the plans to reduce deferred maintenance. Without funding for this project, the Laboratory will not be able to
contribute the planned additional funding from the resultant energy and maintenance savings, toward increasing
GPP funding aimed at reducing deferred maintenance.
Table 2. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments ($M)
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
6.3
6.5
6.7
6.9
7.0
7.2
7.3
7.5
7.6
7.8
7.9
Maintenance
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
DMR*
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
EFD (overhead)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
IGPP
2.7
0.5
0.5
0.5
2.0
2.0
2.1
2.1
2.2
2.2
2.3
GPP
0.4
0.3
5.0
9.0
15.0
16.0
14.0
0
0
0
0
Line Items
9.4
7.3
12.2
16.4
24.0
25.2
23.4
9.6
9.8
10.0
10.2
Total Investment
384
392
400
408
416
424
492
501
511
522
Estimated RPV
9.2
9.3
9.3
9.4
8.7
7.8
6.2
6.2
6.3
6.4
Estimated DM
0.98
0.98
0.98
0.98
0.98
0.98
0.99
0.99
0.99
0.99
Site-Wide ACI
* Focused DMR program funded from overhead to help reduce DM to acceptable levels based on the ACI
2023
8.1
0
0
0
2.3
0
10.4
532
6.6
0.99
The following chart shows how the planned investments listed in the table will positively affect the sitewide Asset Condition Index over the eleven years timeline.
Figure 1. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments
30.0
1.000
0.990
25.0
0.980
0.970
20.0
0.960
15.0
0.950
0.940
10.0
0.930
0.920
5.0
0.910
0.0
0.900
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total Investment ($M)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Site-Wide ACI
194
Attachment 1. Mission Readiness Tables
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Facilities and
Core
Time
Key Buildings/
Key Core Capability
Infrastructure Capability
Capability
Frame
Facilities
Objectives
Gap
ITER/Burning plasmas.
Obsolete Lab Space, No
Collaborations: DIII-D, CHigh Bay Space To support
C22 -LAB BLDG, C23-C
Mod, Jet, MAST, EAST,
Now
X
small experiments,
SITE THEORY, C01-LSB
KSTAR, LHD, W7X.
Overhead Crane needed for
Prototype ITER remote
assembly and disassembly
control room
Theory and Modeling:
Fusion Simulation Project,
computation and
In 5
C22 -LAB BLDG, C23-C
simulation projects.
X
Years
SITE THEORY, C01-LSB
Strategic Planning for
Plasma and
Fusion Initiatives: Next
Fusion Energy
Step Options / potential
Sciences
next generation machines
C21-C SITE L WING, C22
-LAB BLDG, C32-C SITE
SHOP, C40-C SITE RF,
Plasma Science and
C41-C SITE CS BLDG,
Technology; Basic Plasma
C42-C SITE COB, C50Science liquid walls,
In 10
X ESAT, C51-C SITE MG,
magnetic configurations,
Years
C90-RESA, C91-CAS,
basic plasma physics,
D72-MG, P1-OFF SITE
astrophysics, high energy
C21-C SITE L -WING,
density plasma
C22 -LAB BLDG, C40-C
SITE RF
C21-C SITE L WING, C22
Obsolete Electrical Utilities
Toroidal Confinement
-LAB BLDG, C32-C SITE
are no longer supported by
Now
X
Experiments, NSTX,
SHOP
manufacturers and spare
NSTX upgrades
C40-C SITE RF, C41-C
parts are not available.
SITE CS BLDG, C42-C
In 5
X
SITE COB
Years
Large Scale
C50-ESAT, C51-C SITE
User Facilities /
MG, C52-PLT PWR BLDG
Advanced
C60-CSITE COOLING
Instrumentation
TWR
C90-RESA, C91-CAS,
In 10
X
D34-LEC
Years
D42-EXP.AREA, D-70D
Site Pump House (total),
D72-MG
P1-OFF SITE
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
Mission
Ready
N M P C
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
SLI funding
GPP Funding
ARRA Project
Funding
195
Support Facilities and Infrastructure
Real Property Capability
Mission
Ready
Current
N M P C
Work Environment
Post Office
Offices
Cafeteria
Recreational/Fitness
Child Care
User Accommodations
Visitor Housing
Visitor Center
Site Services
Library
Medical
Examination & Testing
Maintenance & Fabrication
Fire Station
Storage
Conference and Collaboration Space
Auditorium/Theater
Conference Rooms
Collaboration Space
Utilities
Communications
Electrical
Steam
Flood Control
Road & Grounds
Parking (surfaces and structures)
Roads & Sidewalks
Grounds
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Laboratory
DOE
X
X
X
X
N/A
N/A
N/A
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Water
Petroleum/Oil
Gases
Waste/Sewage Treatment
Storm Water
Chilled Water
Action Plan
Facility and Infrastructure
Gap
Equipment is near its end of life
and no longer supported by
manufacturer.
Assigned to the sites GPP list and
work scheduled using ARRA funds.
Underground Lines at end of life
and require replacement.
Assigned to GPP List
Additional requirements / upgrades addressed by
SLI project - will upgrade Critical Utility
Infrastructure (begin in FY17; completed FY19)
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
196
Attachment 2. Laboratory Site Map
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
197
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
Mission and Overview
Lab-at-a-Glance
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory’s cutting-edge
technologies allow researchers to acquire scientific
insights pertinent to national and international
challenges within the Department of Energy (DOE)
mission.
Location: Menlo Park, California
Type: Multi-program laboratory
Contractor: Stanford University
Responsible Site Office: SLAC Site Office
Website: www.slac.stanford.edu
Founded in 1962 with a two-mile linear accelerator
used for revolutionary high-energy physics
experiments, SLAC has evolved into a multi-program
laboratory and a leader in selected areas of materials,
chemical and energy science, structural biology, and
particle physics and astrophysics. SLAC’s mission is
three-fold: to be an internationally leading photon
science laboratory; to maintain its position as one of
the world’s premier accelerator laboratories; and to
excel in strategic particle physics and particle
astrophysics programs.
Physical Assets:
• 426 acres; 151 buildings and 39 trailers
• 1.653M sf in buildings
• Replacement Plant Value: $1,236 million
• 2,772 sf in 2 Excess Facilities
• 0 sf in Leased Facilities
More than 3,400 researchers from around the world
use SLAC’s facilities each year. The Laboratory
operates two leading X-ray scientific facilities—the
Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), and the
Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource
(SSRL)—as well as the Facility for Advanced
Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET), a unique
research and development (R&D) facility for advanced
accelerator concepts, which opened for research in
2012. SLAC also runs the Instrument Science and
Operations Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space
Telescope (FGST), a joint DOE-NASA mission that
launched in 2008.
The LCLS, which began operations in 2009, has
redefined the frontiers of X-ray science with its
ultrashort, ultrabright laser pulses of hard X-rays, and
with the recent demonstration of hard X-ray selfseeding. Breakthrough scientific results achieved at the
LCLS have garnered worldwide attention and work
has begun on an upgrade, LCLS-II, which will triple
the number of experiments run each year and provide
an expanded range of X-ray wavelengths. The LCLSII is slated for completion in 2019.
SLAC is operated by Stanford University (Stanford)
for DOE’s Office of Science (SC). To date, six
scientists have been awarded the Nobel Prize for work
carried out at SLAC.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Human Capital:
• 1,684 FTEs
• 22 Joint faculty
• 90 Postdoctoral researchers
• 0 Undergraduate and 124 Graduate students
• 3,411 Facility users
• 31 Visiting scientists
FY 2012 Funding by Source (Costs in $M):
Other
DOE,
$0.1
EM,
$1.0
Other
SC,
$35.0
HEP,
$93.0
WFO,
$9.0
BER,
$5.0
BES,
$219.0
Total Lab Operating Costs (excluding ARRA):
$352.4 million
DOE/NNSA Costs: $354.2 million
WFO (Non-DOE/Non-DHS) Costs: $8.8 million
WFO as % Total Lab Operating Costs: 2.4%
DHS Costs: $0 million
ARRA Costed from DOE Sources in FY 2012:
$9.5 million
198
Core Capabilities
SLAC’s five Core Capabilities are: 1) Accelerator Science and Technology, 2) Large-Scale User Facilities and
Advanced Instrumentation, 3) Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, 4) Chemical and Molecular
Science, and 5) Particle Physics.
1. Accelerator Science and Technology. Accelerator science and technology are vital to the operations and
future development of light source and particle physics facilities serving the research missions of the DOE-SC
and SLAC over the coming decades. SLAC has the intellectual capital in accelerator physics and engineering,
research instrumentation, accelerator test facilities, and physical infrastructure to enable breakthrough R&D in
accelerator science and technology in support of forefront light source development and to explore compact
acceleration schemes of the future. With the LCLS, SLAC has the most advanced operational hard X-ray Free
Electron Laser (X-ray FEL) in the world today, and the associated R&D impacts how other U.S. and
international projects are being designed, constructed and operated. In addition, SLAC delivers new
technology for compact and high-gradient accelerators, which are both relevant for SLAC’s increasing Work
for Others (WFO) activities. SLAC leads the development of advanced acceleration techniques employing
Direct Laser Acceleration (DLA) in dielectric structures and electron-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration
(PWFA), collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in PWFA and Berkeley’s Laser
Plasma Acceleration program. These efforts, coupled with laser development, will open the field for a new
generation of accelerators in the future. With the operation of FACET, SLAC supports not only newgeneration accelerator developments, but also a wide range of experiments in materials science, terahertz
generation, and general accelerator R&D. FACET-II, its proposed follow-on facility, would build on and
further grow the wide range of high-energy electron beam applications that are unique at SLAC.
SLAC applies these capabilities to optimize exploitation of existing facilities in the near term, develop the
next generation of accelerators in the mid term, and conduct long-term frontier research on the next
generation of acceleration techniques. LCLS-II, which has a projected completion date of 2019, will enable an
increase in both capability and capacity by approximately 300% for a broadly based X-ray FEL-based
program for SLAC and for the nation. SLAC will also make its technology and infrastructure more available
to outside customers, as reflected in the increased WFO program (see Section 5.0). This includes providing an
essential service to DOE-SC by using SLAC’s unique capabilities in designing and industrializing high-power
radio frequency (RF) sources and associated systems. Based on SLAC’s three mission objectives introduced
in Section 1.0, the SLAC Accelerator Directorate (AD) has defined and is pursuing the following strategic
R&D objectives:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Maintain the world-leading X-ray FEL program through innovation and new concepts as well as costefficient implementation of upgrades to sustain world leadership in the face of growing competition.
Maintain world leadership in linear accelerator design, with a unique technology base for high-power RF
systems, high-gradient structures, and normal-conducting RF linacs. Applications include highperformance X-ray FEL drivers and compact and high-brightness accelerators for various discovery
science, medical,industrial, and homeland security applications.
Be the world leader in advanced storage ring design for light sources, High Energy Physics (HEP), and
other applications.
Be the world leader in advanced accelerator R&D with a goal of recapturing the energy frontier.
Support the accelerator-based program at SLAC and contribute to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and
future initiatives.
Maintain a renowned accelerator education program in conjunction with Stanford, training future leaders
in the field.
Taken together, these elements will strengthen SLAC’s leadership position as one of the world’s
premier accelerator laboratories, enabling its science mission objectives in photon science, particle
physics, and astrophysics.
Funding for this core capability comes from Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and HEP, with support from WFO
customers and internal Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) investments. The core
capability supports the DOE-SC mission in scientific discovery and innovation (SC 10, 21, 24, 25, 26).
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2. Large-Scale User Facilities and Advanced Instrumentation. SLAC has the intellectual capital,
infrastructure and experience to conceive, design, construct, maintain, and effectively operate large-scale
scientific user facilities, delivering discoveries relevant to DOE-SC and SLAC missions. SLAC has also
developed the tools and means to support large international scientific user communities and collaborations,
and operates three DOE-SC user facilities—LCLS, SSRL, and FACET—as well as FGST.
SLAC currently hosts two major DOE BES scientific user facilities: LCLS and SSRL. The LCLS user
program started in October 2009, and all six experimental stations are now in full user operation. LCLS is
continuing to serve users with 95% beam uptime, and more than 50% of the users rate their LCLS scientific
experience as “excellent.” To date, LCLS has received 888 proposals for beam time and on average only
about 25% of the proposals have been scheduled for beam time. In 2012, more than 600 unique users
participated in LCLS experiments. The scientific productivity of LCLS has continued to increase steeply, with
65 publications in FY2012. Remarkably, more than 50% of the publications were in high-impact journals.
Through an aggressive R&D program, LCLS is continuing to provide users with new capabilities such as
seeded X-ray beams, laser/X-ray timing down to 10 fs (femtoseconds) and beam splitting between two
simultaneously operating instruments. LCLS is producing breakthrough science in many disciplines and its
strategic plan is designed to keep it at the international forefront for years to come.
SSRL provides synchrotron X-rays from its third-generation Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring
(SPEAR3) storage ring and associated beamlines and instrumentation, serving the research needs of more
than 1,500 users annually across many areas of science, engineering, and technology. Upgrades continue to
enhance the performance of SPEAR3; high-current (500 mA) operation with top-off injections every five
minutes is now the standard operating mode, along with the ability to run in the low-О± mode allowing for
picosecond time-resolved experiments. Ongoing R&D programs are aimed at further reducing the SPEAR3
emittance to 5 nm-rad, keeping SPEAR3 competitive with other third-generation sources. Near-term beamline
construction projects will provide advanced spectroscopy capabilities to address energy research, as well as a
calibration beamline to support DOE mission needs. The high-average-brightness X-ray beams from SPEAR3
complement the extreme-peak-brightness femtosecond X-ray pulses from LCLS. Research at SSRL supports
DOE-SC and SLAC mission research, including materials science, catalysis, alternative energy, structure
determination of biological molecular machines, and Biopharma drug-discovery programs. In addition,
SSRL’s capabilities in chemical speciation and spectromicroscopy focus on understanding the nature of
contaminants and waste streams, informing and accelerating remediation programs at DOE-SC national
laboratories and in industry.
Associated with LCLS and SSRL are coordinated R&D programs focused on new methodologies and
instrumentation and their scientific applications, to maximize the impact of the light sources on innovation
and scientific discovery. The different X-ray properties of beams from LCLS and SPEAR3 allow the design
of complementary types of experiments; for example, LCLS accesses the structural dynamics of individual
atoms with femtosecond time resolution, while SSRL is suited for studying motions of large assemblies in the
microsecond domain or materials processes at the picosecond time scale. SSRL also offers an R&D test bed
for new instrumentation and techniques prior to deployment on LCLS, thus allowing more optimal use of
limited LCLS beam time. Deployment of these new technologies, and the capability of supporting the outside
user communities in their applications, is a key element of the successful operation of SLAC’s scientific user
facilities. The R&D programs also provide for a vital engagement of scientific staff with forefront research
problems that strongly couple to SLAC’s research programs. Education and training are also integral elements
of the LCLS and SSRL programs, with extensive use by graduate students and postdoctoral researchers.
Training workshops and summer schools are tailored to bring in young scientists from new scientific areas.
In addition, SLAC operates FACET as an HEP accelerator science user facility. FACET uses the first twothirds of the SLAC linac to generate a very intense bunch of electrons or positrons, which can then be used for
a variety of science experiments ranging from plasma wakefield acceleration to probing ultrafast magnetic
domain switching times or studies of intense terahertz and channeling radiation. The FACET facility was
commissioned in FY2011, and 11 proposals were accepted for the first user run that began in April 2012.
Results from FACET are expected to advance SLAC’s and the nation’s core capabilities in accelerator science
and technology.
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In the Particle Physics and Astrophysics (PPA) area, SLAC has significant capability for constructing and
operating major facilities. An example is the design, development, construction, and operation of the Fermi
Large Area Telescope (LAT) that was launched in June 2008 on the FGST, a major space observatory that is
revolutionizing the understanding of high-energy processes in the universe. The experience gained from these
programs is being applied to future facilities that will be located offsite: the wide-field Large Synoptic Survey
Telescope (LSST) in northern Chile; upgrades to the A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS) detector at the
LHC; a next-generation experiment for direct detection of relic dark matter; and possible involvement in a
future neutrino program with the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at the Fermi National
Accelerator Laboratory. SLAC is playing a lead role in designing and developing specific elements of these
large international projects.
In support of its large-scale facilities and science programs, SLAC has developed and maintains a number of
capabilities in advanced instrumentation and computational tools driven by the needs of existing and future
experiments. These capabilities include system design for state-of-the-art, high-bandwidth data acquisition
systems, from detector front-ends to data storage and distributed access; advanced instrumentation and
diagnostics for characterization and control of micron-scale photon beams; and highly automated, roboticenabled, computer-based instrument control and remote access. Applications include highly integrated X-ray
beamlines and instrumentation for photon science experiments enabled by advanced robotics for sample
handling, as well as computational resources for automated and optimized data acquisition strategies, data
collection, and data analysis. SLAC has significant expertise and capability in managing very large sets of
experimental data, and is actively developing strategies for data acquisition and management for LCLS and
for future opportunities with LSST and ATLAS.
BES and HEP are the major sources of funding for this core capability at SLAC. Other sources include Basic
Energy Research (BER) and WFO from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). SLAC’s efforts support the
SC mission in scientific discovery and innovation (SC 2, 10, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26).
3. Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science. The SLAC Materials Science (MS) Division is engaged
in multidisciplinary research activities in selected areas of materials science, including correlated and
superconducting materials, diamondoids, bio-inspired materials, topological insulators, and atomically
engineered heterostructures. The research is relevant to BES mission needs and selected Grand Challenge
basic energy science questions in condensed matter, materials physics, and nanomaterials science. The
mission need consists of the development of future energy technologies, including methods for storing and
transmitting electrical energy, improving the efficiency of energy conversion processes, and producing energy
in ways that minimize greenhouse gas emissions.
Research programs both use and help drive the development of forefront techniques and methodologies at
LCLS and SSRL. They push the state of the art in tools for the study and characterization of the electronic
and structural properties of new materials on the nanoscale, at increasingly high levels of energy and spatial
and time resolution. LCLS’s unique experimental opportunities allow development of a strong leadership
position in the field of ultrafast materials science, where processes such as ultrafast charge and spin dynamics
become accessible for direct study. Two specific themes of near-term focus are ultrafast materials science
using LCLS and advanced spectroscopy, nanobeams, and high-throughput in situ and in operando
characterization using SSRL.
Research within the MS Division is coordinated under a joint institute between SLAC and Stanford called the
Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES), and supports the BES mission. SIMES
provides a link between SLAC and Stanford in which the basic science aligns with and informs initiatives at
Stanford that focus on energy technology and policy in sustainable energy, such as the Global Climate and
Energy Project (GCEP) and the Precourt Institute for Energy (PIE). SIMES is also involved in collaborations
with larger consortia focused on the DOE-SC mission and Grand Challenges, including the BES Energy
Frontier Research Centers, the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (Battery Hub), and the Bay Area
Photovoltaics (PV) Consortium. Further, SIMES engages in outreach activities for energy science education
and training, helping to develop the next generation of talent.
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Funding for this core capability comes from BES, with support from other DOE offices such as the Office of
Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and internal LDRD investments, and serves the SC
mission in scientific discovery and innovation (SC 7, 8, 9).
4. Chemical and Molecular Science. With funding from BES, the SLAC Chemical Sciences Division is
engaged in multidisciplinary research activities in selected areas of chemical and molecular science that
involve the interface between ultrafast physics, chemistry, materials, theory and simulations, and x-ray
science. R&D in the CS Division develops capabilities for advancing science, especially using the LCLS, and
for carrying out catalytic-related energy science.
In one thrust area that is unified by ultrafast science, research programs focus on attosecond atomic and
molecular experiments and theory; femtosecond atomic-scale imaging of physical, chemical, and biological
processes using ultrafast x-rays, strong-field laser-matter interactions, and materials science; and ultrafast
magnetic phenomena. A strong theory program in excited-state dynamics complements the experimental
studies. Areas of exploration include understanding how nature uses femtosecond time scales to convert
energy from light into other useful forms of energy, and understanding chemical catalysis by directly using
ultrafast and short- wavelength coherent radiation to probe the ultrafast processes that initiate and control
these phenomena.
A second thrust area in the CS Division addresses the fundamental challenges associated with the atomicscale design of catalysts of broad interest in energy conversion and storage and chemical production. The goal
is to combine experimental and theoretical methods to understand the electronic and structural factors
determining the catalytic properties of solid surfaces, and to use this insight to design new catalysts. The
research focus is on catalysts that are important in energy transformation and storage – for instance, those
involved in transforming syngas made from biomass or other feedstocks into fuels, or carrying out electrode
processes in new types of batteries. Electronic structure methods and kinetic models are being developed to
treat reactions on the surfaces of solids and nanoparticles, with an emphasis on developing general concepts
for understanding surface chemical reactivity. The research links closely to experimental activities at SSRL
and LCLS.
Ultrafast science has synergies more broadly in the Photon Science Directorate (study of ultrafast processes in
catalytic reactions and of dynamic behavior of materials in the MS Division) and across directorates (using
SSRL and LCLS for studies in complementary time domains from milliseconds down to femtoseconds).
Research within the CS Division is organized within the framework of two multidisciplinary units: the
Ultrafast Chemical Sciences program and the SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis
(SUNCAT). The research aligns with and supports the BES mission objectives.
This core capability supports the SC mission in scientific discovery and innovation (SC 7, 8, 9).
5. Particle Physics. SLAC has a significant scientific and technical workforce focused on using a unique
combination of ground- and space-based experiments to explore the frontiers of particle physics and
cosmology. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is exploring the energy frontier at teraelectron volt (TeV)
mass scales and beyond, with prospects for elucidating the properties of the Higgs boson, and discovering
supersymmetry and its possible dark matter candidate, the neutralino; new spatial dimensions suggested by
quantum gravity theories; or even mini black holes, as constituents of a new understanding of the universe.
SLAC plays a significant role in pixel systems, simulations, and operations of ATLAS as well as in upgrade
R&D for the next phase of LHC operations. SLAC is also a leading contributor to detector R&D for future
energy frontier lepton colliders, and participates in plans for upgrades to ATLAS for the high-luminosity
phase of the LHC.
The LSST is designed to probe the properties of dark energy with high precision, enabling a better
understanding of this dominant component of the universe. SLAC is the lead DOE laboratory for constructing
the LSST’s 3.2 gigapixel camera, expected to be the world’s largest digital camera with five times the number
of pixels as the recently completed Dark Energy Camera built for the Dark Energy Survey project. The LSST
will survey the entire visible sky every week, creating an unprecedented public archive of data – about 6
million gigabytes per year, the equivalent of shooting roughly 800,000 images with a regular 8-megapixel
digital camera every night, but of much higher quality and scientific value. The FGST has embarked on a
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decade-long program of space-based gamma-ray observations, which will transform our understanding of the
high-energy universe and allow searches for dark matter. SLAC was the lead laboratory for construction and
integration of the LAT and now supports instrument operations. The Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search
(CDMS) will allow direct searches for relic dark matter candidates at unprecedented levels of sensitivity.
SLAC is pursuing R&D to optimize the design and production of large germanium sensors for the nextgeneration version of CDMS. The now-operational Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) is continuing the
search for evidence of whether or not the neutrino is its own antiparticle, in order to gain insight into the mass
scale for the ephemeral neutrino content of the universe.
In support of these efforts, SLAC has developed capabilities in detector systems design, end-to-end electronic
systems design and implementation, state-of-the-art systems design for data acquisition and controls, largescale data management, and specialized capabilities for space and low-background applications.
Since its inception in 2002, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), jointly
hosted by SLAC and Stanford’s Physics Department, has become a world-leading center for particle
astrophysics and cosmology. It plays a unique role in the present and future core program in experimental and
theoretical particle astrophysics by bringing together expertise across the many relevant disciplines. Also
supporting SLAC’s core experimental capabilities is a particle physics theory effort pursuing a broad
spectrum of forefront theoretical research across all areas of fundamental physics, from inflationary
cosmology to computational Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) to string theory. The SLAC theory effort
plays a major role in developing and promoting the future directions of particle physics, such as the energy
frontier physics enabled by the LHC and a possible future linear collider. The combination of expertise in the
SLAC and KIPAC theory groups with that of the theory groups in the Stanford Physics Department and
Institute for Theoretical Physics has made the SLAC-Stanford community a leading international center of
theoretical physics.
Funding for this core capability comes from HEP, as well as WFO (NSF and NASA) and internal LDRD
investments. SLAC’s efforts serve the SC mission in scientific discovery and innovation (SC 21, 22, 23, 24,
26, 29).
Science Strategy for the Future
SLAC has three objectives that will define and distinguish the Laboratory in the decade to come:
•
•
•
To be the premier photon science laboratory.
To be the premier electron accelerator laboratory.
To pursue strategic programs in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology.
These objectives build on SLAC’s core capabilities, described in Section 3.0, and are supported by its
future/major initiatives in light sources, accelerator R&D, particle astrophysics, and materials and
chemical science. The future of SLAC builds strongly upon the LCLS and the opening of a new frontier
of dynamics at the atomic scale. SLAC is beginning to capitalize on the initial suite of operational
instruments on LCLS and to fully engage the growing user community, enabling them to perform
discovery-class, breakthrough science. Because of LCLS’s rapid turn-on and the excellent early
performance of the X-ray laser, a major upgrade (LCLS-II) is already underway to increase capability
and capacity. However, delivery of outstanding facilities to users is not sufficient for SLAC to achieve
its objective as a leading photon science laboratory. SLAC must also drive the science, and so the
initiative on energy science and the initiative on particle astrophysics and cosmology are both part of a
broader program to grow SLAC’s portfolio.
Key to the future of SLAC is accelerator research that drives SLAC’s ability to develop, design, build,
operate, and utilize large-scale accelerator-based facilities. SLAC accelerator research focuses on
advancing operating facilities around the world, as well as contributing to the next generations of HEP
and BES accelerators. The accelerator R&D initiative supports all of SLAC’s major laboratory-wide
objectives and goes beyond, using an increased WFO strategy (see Section 5.0) to maintain and
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eventually further develop SLAC’s high-tech infrastructure. Close collaboration with other funding
agencies and with industry will enable an increased dissemination of SLAC-developed technology, and
provide a motivation to develop advanced technology.
SLAC’s goal is to evolve new initiatives in biosciences and matter under extreme conditions, under the
stewardship of the Photon Sciences Directorate. The biosciences initiative will exploit unique
features of the LCLS, be relevant to the BER mission involving bioenergy, and align with the BER
genome science program. The matter under extreme conditions initiative will provide detailed
measurements of such states, and will align with the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science (FES).
SLAC anticipates that these may become future/major initiatives for the Laboratory.
Mission Readiness/Facilities and Infrastructure
Overview of Site Facilities and Infrastructure. SLAC’s 426-acre campus is located in Silicon Valley, 30 miles
southeast of San Francisco, California, on the Stanford University campus. The SLAC campus is divided into
publicly accessible and restricted access areas. The two-mile linear accelerator has been operational since 1966.
The power to SLAC is provided by a DOE-owned 230 kV tap line that runs from the public utility 230 kV circuit
to the SLAC Master Substation, a distance of about 7.5 miles. Other major utility systems include domestic water,
sewer, storm drain, electricity, gas, and chilled and hot water.
Many of SLAC’s conventional facilities and infrastructures are operating past their expected life, creating an
increasing challenge to maintain with a flat budget. Table 2 shows key infrastructure data for SLAC’s DOE-SC
facilities.
The current site master plan entitled SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Long Range Development Plan is
located at:
https://www-internal.slac.stanford.edu/do/longrangeplan/slac%20plan%20final.pdf.
Table 1: SC Infrastructure Data Summary
Total Bldg., Trailer, and OSF RPV($)
(Less 3000 Series OSFs)
Total OSF 3000 Series RPV($)
Total RPV($)
Total Deferred Maintenance($)
Total Owned Acreage
Total Leased Acreage
Site-Wide ACI(B, S, T)
Mission Critical
Mission Dependent
Not Mission Dependent
Office
Warehouse
Asset
Utilization
Laboratory
Index (B,T)2,3
Hospital
Housing
B=Building; S=Structure; T=Trailers
Asset Condition
Index (B, S, T)1
$991,918,089
$243,895,247
$1,235,813,337
$23,947,688
0.00
0.977
0.986
0.953
1
0.965
0.999
0.976
0
0
#Building
Assets
58
93
0
19
35
44
0
0
#Trailer
Assets
1
37
1
27
2
5
0
0
#OSF
Assets
36
29
0
GSF
(Bldg)
1,001,506
611,357
0
342,713
159,551
723,446
0
0
GSF
(Trailer)
320
39,683
305
31,611
1,735
4,242
0
0
1Criteria includes DOE-Owned Buildings, Trailers, and OSFs (excludes series 3000 OSFs)
2Criteria includes DOE-Owned Buildings and Trailers.
3Only includes assets with usage codes that fall into these 5 FRPC categories. Other usage types are not included.
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Facilities and Infrastructure to Support Laboratory Missions. SLAC categorizes its mission-critical
infrastructure into three major areas: power systems, process systems, and general infrastructure (seismic and fire
protection). They require a large amount of maintenance and many systems are at or past their expected useful
life. Revitalization of these systems is critical to maintain the high reliability for the international users of SLAC
programmatic facilities.
SLAC’s Facilities Division works closely with the scientific programs to assess current and future needs and
identify gaps in the current capabilities. A summary of these needs and gaps is listed in the tables below.
In order to extend the operations of the aging critical infrastructure, the maintenance budget is used to assess
current functionality and institute reliability-centered maintenance plans, including predictive and preventive
maintenance. In many cases, projects are needed to reduce deferred maintenance. When funding is available,
projects are initiated per a prioritized project list that is approved by SLAC’s Executive Council.
Strategic Site Investments. Attachment 2, Laboratory Site Map, provides graphical information about SLAC’s
infrastructure, mission readiness, and facility funding sources.
Projects with Funding
•
FACET. The FACET program is located between Sectors 1 and 20 of the Klystron Gallery. Minor
infrastructure construction is required in Sectors 19 and 20 and some utility modifications are required
throughout the Klystron Gallery. Revitalization of support infrastructure in the accelerator is also required
to support FACET as shown in Table 3. Funding is through the Accelerator Improvement Project (AIP)
and programmatic General Plant Projects (GPP) - HEP.
•
SLAC Site Security Systems. SLAC is continuing implementation of the site security improvements,
including automation of Alpine Gate, allowing for 24/7 employee access to the site from Alpine Road.
Card-key access control has also been implemented for critical locations such as the main computer
server rooms, certain laboratories, and storage locations of security sensitive equipment. SLAC’s two
interior gates will be automated in FY2013, allowing 24/7 access with proper credentials. The long-term
site security vision includes further opening up the campus to expand the General Access Area around
PEP Ring Road. Lastly, SLAC has begun to fit card-key access control on all new construction. This
allows automation to secure buildings and improves security and forensics. This has been completed for
new construction such as Buildings 28 and 52 and the Arrillaga Recreation Center.
•
LCLS-II. The LCLS-II conventional facilities design uses existing infrastructure and recent construction
at SLAC, but will need new facilities and infrastructure to be constructed. The injector tunnel at Sector
10 will require some modifications to bring it to current safety standards and to accommodate the specific
requirements of the LCLS-II Injector. The magnets and vacuum chambers for the two pulse compressors
will need distribution systems for power and water. A new beam transport segment will require
modifications to existing facilities, including an extension of the recently completed Beam Transport Hall
head house to the beginning of a new Undulator Hall tunnel. This tunnel will traverse under an existing
hill and terminate at a new experimental hall. An Electron Beam Dump and Front End Enclosure will be
constructed between the end of the undulator magnet devices and the new experimental hall. The
experimental (lowest) floor of the experimental hall will provide sufficient space for up to four
experiments and the associated control cabins. Electrical/mechanical areas and user space will be located
on a second floor above the experimental floor. An auxiliary utility plant is necessary to augment the
existing LCLS-I Central Utility Plant. Funding is through BES.
•
LSST. SLAC will assemble and test key components of the LSST in Building 033 (clean room). This
requires modifications to the existing floor plan to upgrade the clean room, and a ceiling adjustment to
accommodate the LSST camera assembly fixture. The clean room upgrade requires significant
modifications to the existing HVAC, electrical, and fire alarm systems. Provisions are also being made to
provide clean room capabilities for instrumentation development by the PPA instrumentation group.
Funding is through HEP.
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Projects with Funding to be Proposed
•
Scientific User Facilities. Buildings 100, 120 and 131 will require modernization of SSRL user
facilities. New alcoves will be needed for future experiments. Funding is proposed through BES.
•
Power Distribution to Mission Critical Equipment. In order to maximize availability and reliability of
critical LCLS support systems and infrastructure, the aging K Substations and downstream power
distribution equipment and underrated electrical equipment in the Klystron Gallery require upgrade or
replacement. Related, SLAC plans to upgrade the protective relay system in the Master Substation.
Funding is proposed to be through IGPP.
Investments Funded or Proposed to be Funded by SLI. Building upon nearly 50 years of successful research
in high-energy physics and basic energy sciences, SLAC is expanding the frontier of ultrafast nanoscience with
the LCLS and new areas of energy-related basic science. To ensure that the research conducted by SLAC
scientific staff and users is supported by modern, mission-ready facilities, SLAC is upgrading its central campus
infrastructure and proposing future upgrades. These new facilities are consistent with SLAC’s Long Range
Development Plan and support the Laboratory’s scientific research by interconnecting multi-program research,
improving visitor facilities, and upgrading general-purpose infrastructure to support the mission.
•
Research Support Building (RSB) and Infrastructure Modernization Initiative As part of the
Science Laboratories Infrastructure (SLI) Modernization proposal, the RSB and Infrastructure
Modernization project achieved the CD-2/3A milestone in December 2010. This project will construct
approximately 64,000 square feet of modern office space to house accelerator science and technology
staff currently dispersed throughout the site in aging trailers and other decentralized, inefficient locations.
The RSB will meet LEEDВ® Gold certification and the guiding principles in Executive Order 13423 for
high performance and sustainable buildings.
This project will also construct approximately 12,000 square feet of modern general laboratory and office
space to address SLAC’s very near-term need for research laboratory space.
This project also modernizes office space (64,000 square feet) in two major buildings; Building 28
(Operations Support Building), completed in 2012, and Building 41 (Administration and Engineering).
The modernization will bring the buildings into compliance with current building codes and the American
Disabilities Act.
•
Science and User Support Building (SUSB) With the success of the LCLS, SLAC is experiencing a
major influx of visitors and users to its campus. SLAC expects this trend to continue with LCLS-II
offering a broader capability for experiments and multiplexed beamlines. The proposed SUSB, located on
a hilltop at the entrance to the Laboratory, will be the first stop for all visitors and users. This structure
will bring together many of the Laboratory's visitor, user, and administrative services, building on the
“One Lab” concept to enhance productivity and collaboration. This building will also serve as the major
architectural icon of the SLAC campus, synonymous with the Laboratory's cutting-edge discoveries and
exceptional user research program. The SUSB will:
o
o
o
o
o
Bring researchers, users, and visitors from across the Laboratory together in one facility.
House a centrally located administration hub to concentrate SLAC support personnel for all SLAC
scientific users.
Offer members of the public the chance to experience SLAC science in a progressive visitor's center.
Offer a fitting location for presentations of SLAC research in a state-of-the-art auditorium and
conference spaces.
Be a High Performance Sustainable Building (HPSB) that is a national showcase for energy
efficiency through sustainable high-performance design.
The four-story, 58,000–72,000 square foot SUSB has an estimated total project cost of $65M. It
will replace the aging structures that currently house the Panofsky Auditorium and the cafeteria,
both built in 1962—the same year SLAC was founded. The SUSB achieved its CD-0 milestone
in September 2010 and its CD-1 milestone in May 2012.
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•
Future Initiative – Photon Sciences Laboratory Building (PSLB) Growth in SLAC's photon science
research program is outpacing its existing laboratory space. In alignment with BER and BES mission
objectives, as well as potential future stakeholders including FES and Advanced Scientific Computing
Research (ASCR), the PSLB is proposed with the following scientific goals:
o
o
o
o
Create a hub of discovery and innovation with a focus on energy conversion and storage,
heterogeneous catalysis, and photo-electrochemical processes.
House an innovative research cluster built around theory, modeling, and simulation, and co-locate
preeminent theorists in condensed matter, chemical and excited state dynamics, and chemical and
interfacial science.
House contemporary laboratory facilities for the synthesis of new materials and characterization tools.
Complement and leverage investments by Stanford in energy and sustainability facilities and
programs including the PIE/GCEP, nanoscience and nanotechnology (including a DOE Energy
Frontier Research Center), and other “use-inspired” research.
The three-story, 55,000-square-foot PSLB is estimated at $55M and will be located between the new
SUSB and SLAC's existing Central Lab Building (Building 40), which houses the current PULSE/SIMES
research centers. After the new building is complete, the Central Lab Building will provide additional
office space.
PSLB achieved its CD-0 milestone in May 2011. Preliminary planning for the PSLB calls for FY2015
funds to develop the conceptual design to meet the CD-1 milestone.
•
Facilities Renewal Plan In an effort to effectively plan for future needs, SLAC’s Facilities Division is
developing a set of laboratory facility and infrastructure plans to define the campus infrastructure
standards, existing conditions of each infrastructure system, future demands, and implementation
priorities based on risk and available funding for the physical infrastructure elements. This will include
individual plans and integrates various systems, such as utility systems (storm water, sanitary sewer,
electrical, underground utilities, domestic water, etc.), circulation systems (roads, pedestrian paths and
emergency routes), security systems, parking lots, and outdoor elements such as signs, furniture, and
lighting.
In cooperation with the Facilities Division, SLAC’s Accelerator Directorate assessed the aging
accelerator infrastructure and will coordinate with other directorates to prioritize the necessary
replacements in the next five to 10 years that would allow the accelerator to operate for another 25 years.
These plans tie into SLAC’s Long Range Development Plan to develop the facilities renewal plan, which
is an integral element of the mission readiness model and forms the basis for consideration of deferred
maintenance (DM) reduction when prioritizing infrastructure investments. This plan guides the strategy
for future facilities capital renewal and infrastructure upgrades. The goal is to ensure mission readiness,
reduce the current DM, and minimize future DM.
•
Excess Facility Needs The BaBar Disassembly and Disposal (D&D) program, which began in FY2009
and has a scope of work spanning four and a half years, consists of five parts: program management;
engineering and tooling refurbishment; peripherals disassembly; core detector disassembly; and
subsystem disassembly. Some items of the detectors can potentially be reused, such as the ElectroMagnetic Current (EMC) barrel, Detector of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) bars, and
superconducting solenoid. The DIRC bars have been requested for experiments at Thomas Jefferson
National Accelerator Laboratory. Final disposition of the EMC barrel and the solenoid have not been
settled. Some of the detector items are located in accelerator housing, subjecting them to beamline
radiation. Therefore, these materials may be subject to the DOE Metals Suspension Directive. SLAC will
catalog these materials and survey them for activation, and either store them for potential future use or
dispose of them in accordance with recently approved protocols discussed below. The funding stream
from HEP will end at the close of FY2013. Funds from materials salvage will be used to continue
disposing of materials.
DOE-SC conducted a review of SLAC's property and material clearance processes in December 2009,
and reviewed the status of excess concrete shield blocks in the Boneyard and metals from the PEP-II
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
207
accelerator and PEP-II detector. DOE-SC found that SLAC complies with the applicable occupational,
public, and environmental radiation protection regulations, and DOE Orders and Secretarial mandates. In
accordance with commitments made in SLAC’s letter to the DOE dated September 30, 2010 (regarding
the Multi-year Strategy for Disposition of Concrete Shield Blocks and BaBar Detector and PEP-II
Metals), protocols have been developed and 367 large blocks have been moved offsite. Funding is
through Laboratory indirect when available. SLAC continues to lead the DOE-SC laboratory complex
with this approach and is providing support to DOE for an associated standard based on the intellectual
work at SLAC.
From 2009 through 2013, HEP has provided the funding for SLAC to disassemble and dispose of the
PEP-II accelerator. Some of the accelerator items were located in accelerator housing subjecting them to
beamline radiation, and therefore these materials were subject to the DOE Metals Suspension Directive.
Starting in 2011, SLAC completed its uniquely developed procedure using Process Knowledge to allow
recycling of suspended materials. DOE and the SLAC Site Office concurred with this procedure. From
September 2011 through March 2013, the PEP D&D project has recycled 450 tons of metal materials.
HEP has decided to suspend PEP D&D efforts at the end of FY2013.
Trends and Metrics. SLAC’s site-wide Asset Condition Index (ACI) shows a decrease over the reporting
period. The funded maintenance efforts focus on ensuring the short-term reliability of mission-critical facilities;
many aging utility and support systems need significant revitalization. Traditional funding mechanisms for
projects that reduce deferred maintenance are not sufficient to make meaningful improvements in ACI. As
outlined in SLAC’s growth strategy, a portion of the indirect recovery increase generated by expected growth will
be allocated to infrastructure improvements.
Conventional facilities maintained site systems to support a 96% beam up-time. However, there was minimal
funding in FY2013 for conventional facility revitalization projects that would reduce deferred maintenance. The
next three years are projected to be similarly funded. The available funds will be focused on mission-critical
facilities to maintain mission readiness. Without significant investments, the risks of system failures that may
cause a significant impact to science will continue to increase as more facilities come online using the same aging
framework of utilities.
Table 2. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments (BA in $M) – Sample Impact to Asset Condition Index
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
14.2
11.6
11.8
11.9
12.3
15.1
15.3
15.7
15.7
15.7
15.7
15.7
DMR*
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
EFD (overhead)
-
-
0 .1
1.5
2.9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5.5
4.3
4.3
3.7
6.8
9.1
9.0
4.5
4.5
4.5
4.5
4.5
Maintenance
IGPP
7.2
4.3
4.0
1.2
1.0
2.5
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Line Items
49.5
104.5
146.7
197.8
154.4
46.3
10.0
-
-
-
-
-
Total Investment
76.3
124.7
166.8
216.1
177.3
73.0
36.3
22.2
23.2
23.2
23.2
23.2
Estimated RPV
1318
1373
1436
1606
1670
1737
1853
1927
2004
2085
2168
Estimated DM
29.7
46.1
62.5
71.3
83.7
86.9
89.5
92.1
94.9
97.8
100.7
0.97
0.96
0.96
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
GPP
Site-Wide ACI
0.98
1This line is for those sites that have a focused Deferred Maintenance Reduction program (DMR) to help reduce DM to
acceptable levels based on the Asset Condition Index (e.g. 0.975 for Mission Critical facilities). This line does not include
DMR resulting from line items, GPP, IGPP, excess facility disposition or normal maintenance.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
208
Figure 1. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments
250.0
1.000
0.990
200.0
0.980
0.970
150.0
0.960
0.950
100.0
0.940
0.930
50.0
0.920
0.910
0.0
0.900
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total Investment ($M)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Site-Wide ACI
209
Attachment 1. Mission Readiness Tables
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Mission Ready
Current
N
M
P
C
Key
Buildings
Key Core Capability
Objectives
FACET
X
B002
LCLS
FACET
X
B002
X
B002
LCLS
FACET
LCLS
X
Accelerator
Science and
Technology
Now
B002
Laboratory
To be funded by Office of
Science.
Replace old and obsolete
electrical equipment with new
equipment in critical areas in
Klystron Gallery. To be
funded by GPP.
Seismic upgrades of the roof
structure, racks anchorage and
other experimental equipment.
To be funded by BES.
Equipment fails to operate on
a regular basis. Lack of parts
for medium voltage switches,
and low voltage panel boards.
They have a very high
probability of failure. To be
funded by Office of Science.
Injector Building requires
seismic upgrade.
B002
LCLS and FACET
Replace Variable Voltage
Substations (VVS) and KSubstations (S0 to 30)
with new technology and
configuration.
B002 S1020
LCLS-II
AC Power availability for
new power supply racks,
panel boards, instrument/
control racks, and PPS
racks.
New electrical panels. To be
funded by IGPP.
B002
LCLS-II
Substation upgrade to
support S10 and linac.
Upgrade K-5 Substation. To
be funded by BES.
X
DOE
Modify and upgrade existing
utilities. To be funded by
Office of Science.
To be funded by Office of
Science.
SSRL
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
FACET requires
modifications to existing
utility support systems.
Replace deficient and
electrical equipment with
inadequate short circuit
interrupting capacity,
Sectors 0 to 30.
Lead shielded 12KV cable
along the linac.
Aging cable feeders pose a
reliability issue.
Klystron Gallery Battery
Banks, Motor Control
Centers (MCC), bus ducts
and panel boards.
Action Plan
B140
X
X
Facility and
Infrastructure
Capability Gap
Power from electrical
panels to racks. Funding to
be requested from DOE.
210
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Mission Ready
Current
N
M
P
C
X
In 5
years
Key
Buildings
B002
LCLS
LCLS-II
FACET
B002
LCLS
LCLS-II
FACET
B002
LCLS
LCLS-II
FACET
B001
LCLS
LCLS-II
B750
LCLS
New
SSRL
B406
LCLS-II
B910
B770
B750A
B100
B62
LCLS
SSRL
NLCTA
X
X
In 10
Years
Key Core Capability
Objectives
X
X
X
Large-Scale
User Facilities
and Advanced
Instrumentation
Now
X
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Facility and
Infrastructure
Capability Gap
Action Plan
Laboratory
Old and unreliable
distribution, main piping,
valves, motors, pumps,
and controls for Cooling
Towers (CT) 1201 and
1202.
Old and unreliable LCW
(ACS, WCS and KCS)
system distribution and
main piping, motors,
pumps, heat exchangers,
and controls.
Old and unreliable MCCs,
bus ducts, panel boards.
Replace equipment. To be
funded by Office of Science.
Repair water intrusion
issues. The Klystron
penetrations are seeping
moisture that drips onto
wave guides and can
degrade them.
User space for experiment
set-up is required in close
proximity to NEH and
FEH.
Additional beamlines
(BL16 and 10S alcove)
needed for future
experiments.
Building rehabilitation
(electrical, mechanical and
envelope) to house racks.
CT1701, above ground
piping and Heat
Exchangers (LCW) are
reaching end of life.
Execute the remediation. To
be funded by BES.
DOE
Replace old equipment. To be
funded by Office of Science.
Replace old equipment- lack
of spare parts. To be funded
by Office of Science.
Remodel first floor space to
support experiments. To be
funded by BES.
Build new alcoves. Upgrade
existing facilities (utilities).
To be funded by BES.
To be funded by IGPP.
To be funded by IGPP.
211
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Mission Ready
Current
N
M
P
C
X
Key
Buildings
Key Core Capability
Objectives
B120 and
B131
New
SSRL
Soil erosion mitigation.
LCLS-II
B950
(NEH),
B999
(FEH)
CT1701
LCLS
New
LCLS-II
As part of LCLS-II
project, a new tunnel is
required to house the
undulators.
A new experimental hall is
needed to accommodate
four experiment stations.
User setup areas for
experiments are required
to support developing user
program.
Lack of cooling water
capacity to support new
central utility plant.
New 12 kV substation.
X
X
LCLS-II
X
In 5
Years
X
LCLS-II
X
X
B100
SSRL
B100,
B120 and
B131
SSRL
B131
SSRL
B600,
B620,
B621,
B680
PEP-X
X
X
In 10
Years
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Facility and
Infrastructure
Capability Gap
Office, collaboration and
laboratory space needed.
Requires seismic
upgrades.
Requires additional
modernized user facilities.
Additional beamlines are
needed for future
experiments.
Infrastructure upgrades to
support new beamlines.
CT404 piping needs to be
upgraded from 4” to 6” to
meet additional
requirements.
Requires expansion of
existing buildings, and
construction of new
buildings and alcoves to
house equipment and staff
for PEP-X. Requires F&I
additions to support. Also
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
To be funded by IGPP.
Build a new tunnel to house
the undulators.
Build Experimental Hall-II.
To be funded by BES.
Remodel to support user
program. To be funded by
BES.
Add capacity to cooling
tower. To be funded by BES.
New substation. Funding to
be requested from DOE.
To be funded by BES.
To be funded by BES.
Build new alcoves. Upgrade
existing facilities (utilities).
To be funded by BES.
Build new alcoves.
Upgrade existing facilities
(utilities).
To be funded by BES.
Upgrade cooling tower piping.
To be funded by BES.
Fund upgrades, expansions,
construction, demolition
and disposal of buildings.
Funding to be requested
from DOE.
212
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Mission Ready
Current
N
M
P
C
Key
Buildings
Key Core Capability
Objectives
Facility and
Infrastructure
Capability Gap
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
requires demolition and
disposal of existing
equipment in PEP tunnels.
SSRL
X
Condensed
Matter Physics
and Materials
Science
Now
B040
Photon Science
X
In 5
Years
X
New
Facility
Photon Science
and
Chemical and
Molecular
Science
In 10
Years
New
Facility
Photon Science
X
B003
LSST
B033
LSST
Fully build out remaining
beamlines of SSRL.
Provide seismic upgrade
to B040A complex to
maintain science
operations.
Build new facility to meet
the future lab space needs
of Photon Science.
To be funded by IGPP.
New PSLB. Funding to be
requested as next SLI.
(Obtain CD-0.)
Build new facility to meet
the future lab space needs
of Photon Science.
Office space needed.
PSLB-II. Funding to be raised
through fundraising by
Stanford.
To be funded by Laboratory
indirect.
Building modifications
required to upgrade the
existing clean room.
To be funded by HEP.
X
Particle Physics
Funding to be requested
from DOE.
Now
X
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
213
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property
Capability
Mission Ready
Current
N
M
P
C
Facility and Infrastructure Capability
Gap
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
Work Environment
X
Offices
Cafeteria
X
Lack of infrastructure needed to integrate
the accelerator physics community
across SLAC.
A modern, integrating facility to support
users and provide opportunities to gather
to promote intellectual exchange.
New RSB (B052) and modernization of
B041. Funded by SLI. (CD-2/3A
achieved.)
A proposed new SUSB will provide
modernized user support including
offices auditorium, conference rooms and
cafeteria. Funded by SLI. (CD1achieved.)
User Accommodations
X
Stanford Guest House
Visitor Center
X
Expansion to support a growing shortterm user and visitor community.
An adequate visitor center to enhance
community outreach programs.
Negotiate funding with Stanford.
The existing SLAC underground
communications infrastructure (access
holes, duct banks, conduits, and their
cable utilization) is poorly documented,
and in some cases lacks the capacity to
support growth to add needed cables to
some areas.
Existing Sun Modular Data Center
will reach end-of-life in 2014.
Develop plan to survey and document
SLAC's underground communications
infrastructure.
To be funded by IGPP.
A proposed new SUSB will include a
visitor center. Funded by SLI. (CD-1
achieved.)
Site Services
X
X
B050 improvements needed to support
science and operating needs.
Computing
X
Communications
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Cell phone and Wi-Fi coverage is not
available site wide. Coverage is limited
in underground tunnels and/or
shielded from the outside carriers'
signals.
Partner with Stanford on new
Scientific Research Computing
Facility (SRCF) Data Center.
Multiple projects are in progress or
proposed:
• New power distribution units (PDU)
• Water-cooled cabinets
• Server row replacement
• Raised floor installation
• CRAC units
• Row 40 upgrade
• Additional standby generator
• UPS (3,4 and 5) replacement
To be funded by Laboratory indirect.
Where needed in-building cell phone
coverage is installed on a building basis.
It is funded based on the occupant of the
building.
Wi-Fi building coverage is being
214
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property
Capability
Mission Ready
Current
N
M
P
C
Radioactive materials are currently
stored in an unsheltered structure.
X
Storage
X
Environmental
X
Site Industrial Support
Facility and Infrastructure Capability
Gap
Continue site-wide Advanced Metering
project.
Chilled and Heating water Central Utility
Plant (CUP) expansion to support
SLAC’s growth.
Action Plan
Laboratory
considered as an alternative. To be
funded by Laboratory indirect.
RP has issued a memo detailing
inside storage requirements for
radioactive materials. To be funded
by IGPP.
To be funded by Laboratory indirect.
DOE
Build a new Central Utility Plant (CUP)
to support new buildings and Lab growth.
To be funded by IGPP.
Conference and Collaboration Space
X
Collaboration Space
Utilities
12KV feeds, Cooling
Tower, Domestic Water
and LCW
Insufficient infrastructure exists to
facilitate increased communications and
cross-functional activities.
Relocation of existing utilities to allow
the construction of new tunnel for LCLSII.
Some documentation of critical systems
is incomplete or inaccurate.
X
Site Utility System
X
Site Domestic Water
X
High Voltage Power
Distribution
X
Lack of adequate domestic water and fire
protection water piping along the linac.
Corroded valves and corroded
underground piping.
Power supply reliability risk.
X
Medium Voltage Power
Distribution
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Site electrical system protection is not
fully coordinated or designed in an
integrated manner. Short circuits and
faults on the system could create lifesafety and property damage hazards due
to lack of documentation and incorrect
design.
Transformer (T-2) protective relays,
transfer trip and removal of OS2 and
A new SUSB will increase
communications and cross-functional
activities. Funded by SLI. (CD-1
achieved.)
Funded by IGPP.
Continue with program to field-verify asbuilt drawings and document existing
electrical and mechanical systems.
Establish configuration management
processes to ensure that documentation is
kept current. To be funded by Laboratory
indirect.
To be funded by IGPP.
Installation of gas insulated breakers, GIS
substation. To be funded by IGPP.
Conduct 12kV and 480 volts relay
coordination, short circuit, and arc flash
study. This is required by NFPA and
OSHA and reduces risk to personnel and
property. To be funded by Laboratory
indirect.
To be funded by IGPP.
215
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property
Capability
Mission Ready
Current
N
M
P
C
OS3 at master substation.
Obsolete equipment with no available
spare parts. Failure will affect SPEAR,
LCLS and other experiments in Research
Yard.
Inadequate seismic anchorage for
medium voltage equipment in
Substations.
Obsolete MCCs, distribution panels and
low voltage switchgear. Lack of spare
parts and short circuit capacity problems.
Site electrical system protection is not
fully coordinated and designed in an
integrated manner.
Some panel circuit directories for low
voltage distribution systems have not
been updated for many years due to lack
of as-built documentation.
Obsolete fire alarm panels in B081,
B104, B137, B140, B750, and B233
create nuisance alarms and increase the
risk of fire damage to property. Repair
parts for these systems are no longer
available.
Building system controls for chilled and
heating water are obsolete and not
working properly and there is a lack of
replacement parts.
X
X
X
Low Voltage
Distribution
X
Fire Alarm System
HVAC
X
X
Compressed Air
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
Replace switchgears 3A and 3B in
Substation RA. To be funded by IGPP.
To be funded by Infrastructure indirect.
To be funded by Laboratory indirect.
Update documentation and integrate
electrical system. This is required by
National Electrical Code to reduce risk to
personnel. To be funded by Laboratory
indirect.
Replace obsolete fire alarm panels in
B081, B104, B137, B140, B750, and
B233. To be funded by Laboratory
indirect.
To be funded by Laboratory indirect.
X
Low Conductivity Water
Distribution System
X
Cooling Tower Water
Distribution System
X
Domestic Water and
Fire Protection
Facility and Infrastructure Capability
Gap
X
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Pumps and control valves on pump pad
1801/1802 are obsolete and need to be
replaced.
Pumps, above and underground piping
components, and valves are beyond their
life expectancy and with high probability
of failure due to leaks.
New underground domestic and fire
protection piping to support growth of
the Lab. Corroded underground piping
and valves.
IR06 DW Piping and road repair IR12
DW Pipe and Asphalt repair. Domestic
Replace pumps and control valves on
pump pad 1801/1802. To be funded by
Laboratory indirect.
Replace all pumps, underground valves
and metal components. To be funded by
Laboratory indirect.
To be funded by IGPP.
216
Support Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property
Capability
Mission Ready
Current
N
M
P
C
Sanitary Sewer and
Storm Drain Systems
X
Facility and Infrastructure Capability
Gap
and fire water piping upgrades along the
linac.
Corroded underground piping, especially
under the linac.
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
To be funded by IGPP.
Roads and Grounds
Pathways
Hillside Erosion
X
X
Inadequate pathways in high-traffic areas
of the Laboratory.
Soil erosion on hillsides creates a
potential hazard to personnel and
property.
Build pathways in high-traffic areas. To
be funded by Laboratory indirect.
Create a comprehensive plan to stabilize
eroding hillsides. To be funded by
Laboratory indirect.
Limited security surveillance or control
systems to effectively and efficiently
monitor and control access and, when
necessary, provide forensic information.
Funded by Laboratory indirect.
Security Infrastructure
Site Access
Control
X
The Office of Health, Safety, and
Security (HSS) and SC has provided
funding for hardware and installation for
Phases I and II.
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
217
Attachment 2. Laboratory Site Map
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
218
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility
Mission and Overview
Lab-at-a-Glance
The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility
(TJNAF), located in Newport News, Virginia, is a
laboratory operated by Jefferson Science Associates,
LLC for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of
Science (SC). The primary mission of the laboratory is
to explore the fundamental nature of confined states of
quarks and gluons, including the nucleons that
comprise the mass of the visible universe. TJNAF also
is a world-leader in the development of the
superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) technology
utilized for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator
Facility (CEBAF). This technology is the basis for an
increasing array of applications at TJNAF, other DOE
labs, and in the international scientific community. At
TJNAF, the advancement of SRF technology has
enabled the 12 GeV Upgrade Project, which is
presently underway to double the energy of CEBAF.
In addition, it facilitated the development of TJNAF’s
Free Electron Laser (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linac
(ERL), key future state-of–the–art techniques to
support Office of Science projects. TJNAF’s present
core capabilities are: experimental, theoretical and
computational Nuclear Physics; Accelerator Science;
Applied Nuclear Science and Technology; and Large
Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation.
Location: Newport News, Virginia
Type: Single-program laboratory
Contract Operator: Jefferson Science Associates,
LLC (JSA)
Responsible Site Office: Thomas Jefferson Site
Office
Website: www.jlab.org
The Lab has an international scientific user community
of 1,385 researchers whose work has resulted in
scientific data from 178 full and 10 partial experiments
to date, 338 Physics Letters and Physical Review
Letters publications and 1,056 publications in other
refereed journals by the end of FY 2012. Collectively,
there have been more than 74,000 citations for work
done at TJNAF.
Research at TJNAF and CEBAF also contributes to
thesis research material for about one-third of all U.S.
Ph.D.s awarded annually in Nuclear Physics (38 in FY
2012; 444 to-date; 186 more in progress). The Lab's
outstanding science education programs for K-12
students, undergraduates and teachers build critical
knowledge and skills in the physical sciences that are
needed to solve many of the nation's future challenges
Core Capabilities
The following core capabilities distinguish TJNAF and
provide a basis for effective teaming and partnering
with other DOE laboratories, universities, and private
sector partners in pursuit of the laboratory mission.
These distinguishing core capabilities provide a
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Physical Assets:
• 169 acres in SC buildings and trailers
• 748,888 sf in 83 SC buildings and trailers
• Replacement Plant Value: $384 million
• 0 sf in 0 Excess Facilities
• 107,768 sf in Leased Facilities
Human Capital:
• 759 FTEs
• 22 Joint faculty
• 25 Postdoctoral researchers
• 10 Undergraduate and 33 Graduate students
• 1,385 Facility users
• 1,200 Visiting scientists
FY 2012 Funding by Source (Costs in $M)
WFO, BES,
$11.4 $1.0
HEP,
$2.2
Other SC,
$24.1
NP,
$134.9
Total Lab Operating Costs (excluding ARRA):
$173.5 million
DOE/NNSA Costs: $ 162.1 million
WFO (Non-DOE/Non-DHS): $11.4 million
WFO as % Total Lab Operating Costs: 6.6%
DHS Costs: $0 million
ARRA Costed from DOE Sources in FY 2012:
$5.9 million
219
window into the mission focus and unique contributions and strengths of TJNAF and its role within the Office of
Science laboratory complex. Descriptions of these facilities can be found at the website noted in the Lab-at-aGlance section of this Plan.
Each of the laboratory’s core capabilities involves a substantial combination of facilities and/or teams of people
and/or equipment, has a unique and/or world-leading component, and serves DOE/DHS missions and national
needs. Specifically, TJNAF’s four major core capabilities meeting these criteria are described below in detail:
1. Nuclear Physics. TJNAF is a unique world-leading user facility for studies of the structure of nuclear and
hadronic matter using continuous beams of high-energy, polarized electrons. The CEBAF electron beam can
be simultaneously delivered to three experimental halls at different energies (currently) up to 6 GeV. Each
experimental hall is instrumented with specialized experimental equipment designed to exploit the CEBAF
beam. The detector and data acquisition capabilities at TJNAF, when coupled with the high-energy electron
beams, provide the highest luminosity (1039/eN/cm2/s) capability in the world. The TJNAF staff designs,
constructs, and operates the complete set of equipment to enable this world-class experimental nuclear
physics program. With nearly 1,400 users, TJNAF supports one of the largest nuclear physics user
communities in the world.
The experimental nuclear physics program at TJNAF provides unique access to fundamental aspects of
hadronic structure, the structure of complex nuclei, hadron formation from colored states, and tests of the
standard model of nuclear and particle physics. Thus, the nuclear physics program at TJNAF should be
viewed as an integral component of the field of nuclear physics, with important contributions to all major
thrusts identified in the 2007 NSAC Long Range Plan, and also the Intensity Frontier of particle physics.
TJNAF’s completed 6 GeV program utilizing the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility has given
the United States leadership in addressing the structure and interactions of nucleons and nuclei in terms of the
quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). That research program will enable the TJNAF to
complete the 8 of 13 OMB/SC milestones for progress in Hadronic Physics. The Nuclear Physics community
in the US has acknowledged this leadership and its potential, and indeed the 2007 NSAC Long Range Plan
recommends completion of a doubling of the energy reach of CEBAF, the 12 GeV Upgrade, as its highest
priority. The science program at 12 GeV represents the realization of major scientific opportunities
associated with this priority NSAC recommendation and will enable the completion of 2 of 10 OMB/SC
milestones that are part of the initial research program.
The last decade has seen the development of new theoretical and experimental tools designed to address the
nature of confinement and the structure of hadrons comprised of light quarks and gluons in a quantitative
way. Together, these will allow both the spectrum and the structure of hadrons to be elucidated in
unprecedented detail. New program directions include higher-resolution maps of the nucleon’s charge and
magnetization distributions and a measurement of the electron’s weak charge. New phenomenological tools
have been developed that produce multidimensional images of hadrons with great promise to reveal the
dynamics of the key underlying degrees of freedom. Computational techniques in Lattice QCD now promise
to provide insightful and quantitative predictions that can be meaningfully confronted with and elucidated by
forthcoming experimental data. Moreover, the relation between nuclear structure at short distance scales and
the underlying dynamics of quarks can be uncovered. Going forward, the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will
enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address these and other important
topics in nuclear and hadron physics.
As in all scientific fields, the advancement of experimental nuclear physics requires the development of new
experimental tools and techniques. The staff and users of TJNAF have demonstrated exceptional capability to
realize scientific progress through new instrumentation and methods. Large acceptance spectrometer systems
capable of operation at high luminosity have opened new opportunities to explore the structure of nucleons
and test our knowledge of QCD. This program will continue into the future with the upgraded
instrumentation associated with the 12 GeV Upgrade project. Another major area of expertise that has been
developed is the measurement of exceptionally small parity-violating asymmetries with high precision. This
method has enabled major advances in hadronic structure, the structure of heavy nuclei (through measurement
of the neutron distribution radius), and precision tests of the standard model of particle physics. Again, these
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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advances have led to new proposals in all these areas during the upcoming era of 12 GeV operation of
CEBAF.
The construction of the 12 GeV CEBAF and associated experimental facilities is currently underway and will
be commissioned in 2014-2015. The increased complexity of the accelerator and experimental equipment,
including the introduction of a fourth experimental Hall D with its discovery-class program to search for
exotic hadronic states of QCD, represent a substantial expansion of the scale of the operations.
A comprehensive theoretical effort and leadership across nuclear physics is the mission of the Jefferson Lab
Theory Center. The research program is an essential part of the national strategy for understanding the
structure of hadronic matter and the worldwide effort to explore the nature of quark and gluon confinement.
This contributes to all thirteen current Office of Science milestones for hadronic physics. This broad program
encompasses investigations of the hadron spectrum, hadron structure and hadron dynamics using a range of
state-of-the art theoretical, phenomenological and computational approaches. These cover ab initio
calculations both in the continuum and on the lattice of the properties of light nuclei, analyses of the nucleonnucleon interaction, predictions for and analyses of the structure of the nucleon and its excitations, the
determination of the spectrum of mesons with emphasis on their underlying quark and gluon structure, and
explorations of the internal landscape of hadrons in terms of momentum, spin and spatial distributions. This
internal dynamics is investigated in parallel studies using the methods of both lattice and perturbative QCD. A
recent emphasis here has been on the issue of how to define and then compute the internal orbital motion of
quarks and gluons. A particular strength of the theory group is the capability to meld the appropriate
theoretical tools with cutting edge computational technology.
The synthesis of the latest technology with innovative theoretical tools is particularly notable in the area of
High Performance Computing. TJNAF deploys cost-optimized computing for lattice QCD calculations as a
national facility for the U.S. lattice gauge theory community. Such computing capitalizes on the DOE’s
investment in leadership-class computing to facilitate the calculations needed to advance the understanding of
nuclear and high-energy physics. To make best use of these facilities, innovative development of novel
software tools (Chroma) has allowed the calculation of observables of direct relevance to the TJNAF
experimental program from the spectroscopy of baryons and mesons, including exotics, to form factors and
generalized parton distributions. When combined with the power and speed of the dedicated Graphical
Processing Unit (GPU) infrastructure, results of unrivaled precision for the hadron spectrum have been
produced. An increasingly important part of this lattice effort is the computation of hadronic scattering
amplitudes, with emphasis on providing the decay couplings of well-established mesons as a benchmark for
extension to hybrid states, where the decay couplings will aid the experimental search of GlueX and CLAS12.
A third of the Theory Center members is also engaged in phenomenological studies of the physics to be
accessed at a future Electron Ion Collider, and were major contributors to the whitepaper that sets out its
physics case. In all aspects, the Theory Center works closely with the experimental community, whether in
performing crucial radiative corrections for parity-violating experiments, or in studies to constrain transverse
momentum-dependent and generalized parton distribution functions from the full kinematic range of results
that TJNAF will produce.
A key component of the support Theory will provide to the 12 GeV experimental program is the JLab
Physics Analysis Center (JPAC). The JPAC project draws on world theoretical expertise in developing
appropriate phenomenological tools and computational framework required for extracting the details of quark
and gluon dynamics from experimental data of unprecedented precision and scope. Definitive answers to the
basic questions of “do there exist hadrons for which the excitation of gluons is essential to their quantum
numbers” and “what is the detailed internal flavor, momentum, angular momentum and spatial distribution of
nucleons” require continuing engagement and collaboration between experimentalists and theorists both at
Jefferson Lab, at US universities and the wider hadron physics community.
This program addresses scientific milestones HP 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14 and 15 identified as essential for
progress in hadronic physics. The Nuclear Physics Core Capability serves DOE Scientific Discovery and
Innovation (SC) mission numbers 2, 4, 22, 24, 26, 27, 28, 30, 33, 34, 35 and 36 from “Enclosure 1: List of
DOE/NNSA/DHS Missions.”
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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2. Accelerator Science. The focus of TJNAF’s Accelerator Science is on superconducting, high current,
continuous wave, multi-pass linear accelerators (linacs), including energy recovering linacs. Past
achievements and future plans involve the lab’s expertise in three areas, namely, SRF niobium-based
accelerating technology, liquid helium refrigeration, and high current, low emittance electron injectors. In
particular, TJNAF has extensive expertise in high current photoemission sources, especially polarized
sources. This broad suite of capabilities is complemented by world-class expertise in accelerator design and
modeling. These strengths support the TJNAF Accelerator Science priorities: the operation and upgrade of
the accelerator facilities, the preparation of the future evolution of nuclear physics experimentation at TJNAF,
the extension of the accelerator core capabilities and the education of the next generation of accelerator
physicists and engineers.
With CEBAF, TJNAF has more integrated operating experience of superconducting linacs (>35%) than any
other institution in the world. TJNAF SRF facilities have processed more multi-cell superconducting cavities
of multiple types and designs, to consistently higher performance levels than any other facility in the world.
TJNAF electron sources and injectors have produced in operations continuous wave electron beams with
currents of 180 ВµA and 89% polarization and unpolarized beams of 9 mA. TJNAF technical infrastructure and
staff position us uniquely to design and apply advances in SRF, FEL and injectors, at TJNAF, at other DOE
laboratories and at laboratories around the world.
Discussions are presently in progress with all Office of Science projects requiring SRF expertise to enable
TJNAF to support these efforts. The SRF Institute at TJNAF can be a cost-effective R&D partner because of
its experience and facilities. Past partnerships include jointly funded R&D and digital RF conductivity with
the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams’ (FRIB) predecessor, Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), high efficiency
cryogenics jointly funded by NASA, high-current cavities funded by ONR, high-voltage electron guns funded
by International Linear Collider (ILC), crab cavities funded by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and R&D
on high gradient cavities for future accelerator technologies funded by BES. Office of Nuclear Physics
projects for which partnerships are envisioned are FRIB and for all designs of an electron ion collider (EIC).
TJNAF will be processing the half-wave cavities for FRIB and is negotiating the responsibility of assembling
the half-wave cryomodules as well. Support for other Office of Science projects would include the 650 MHz
cavities for Project X at Fermilab, crab cavities and cryostats for the SPX at Argonne National Lab (ANL),
and nine-cell cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Potential for international collaboration exist
with the European Spallation Neutron Source (ESS, Sweden) and the MYRRHA Project in Belgium, although
Europe tends to support European industry ahead of the US.
The Accelerator Division, in partnership with the Physics Division and collaborators at other national
laboratories, has been developing a design concept for a Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider. This has
expanded the accelerator science activities at TJNAF to include high luminosity collider technology,
polarized stored ion beams, electron cooling, and crab cavity implementation.
The Accelerator Science Core Capability serves DOE Scientific Discovery and Innovation mission numbers
25, 26, and 30 from “Enclosure 1: List of DOE/NNSA/DHS Missions.”
3. Applied Nuclear Science and Technology. The development of key technologies in accelerator, photon,
and detector science at TJNAF established a key skill base enabling the development of other advanced
instruments and research tools, namely the Free Electron Laser Facility. Originally commissioned in 1995, it
is currently the most powerful Free Electron Laser in the world. Producing up to 14 kW of CW average power
in the near infrared regime, the coherent pulses of light have been used for research on such varied topics as
the development of a treatment for adult acne, energy loss in semiconductors due to interstitial hydrogen,
terahertz imaging for homeland security purposes, and a search for dark matter. The primary funding source
for the Infrared (IR) FEL has been the ONR in support of its program to develop a high average power laser
for shipboard defense against cruise missiles. That program will continue in an R&D phase for the next
several years. TJNAF continues to be involved through Work for Others.
Under separate $12M United States Air Force (AF) funding, a ultraviolet (UV) FEL system has provided 20
microjoule pulses of 300 nm light at 4.7 MHz repetition rates in 120 fs pulse length trains. The harmonics of
that UV FEL at 10 to 13 eV provide fully coherent beams with higher average brightness by a factor of 100
than any 3rd generation storage ring and have the added capability to provide ultra-short pulses to address
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
222
systems dynamically. The use of narrow-line laser photons in many cases eliminates the requirement for a
monochromator giving further advantage over relatively broadband synchrotron sources. The TJNAF UV
FEL leads the world in its capability. TJNAF is performing work providing measurements on materials
using UV, infrared and THz light, funded by the Commonwealth of Virginia in cooperation with Virginia
universities and other national laboratories.
This program has operated synergistically with the Nuclear Physics activities at TJNAF, benefitting from core
capabilities such as SRF accelerators (developing high gradient cryomodules partially under BES funding and
providing valuable experience in high average current DC injector guns (extending voltage standoff from 320
kV to 500 kV), rf control systems (developing a new digital control system), and beam diagnostics (studying
effects which degrade beam brightness such as coherent synchrotron radiation. The advantages of such a high
current low energy machine are being studied for possible application to nuclear and high energy physics
studies such as the search for massive neutral vector gauge bosons. The FEL Linac recently engaged in a
demonstration for a High Energy Physics Experiment called DarkLight in a search for Dark Matter. The FEL
Linac provided 8 hours of 450 kW beam power on a 2 mm diameter by 10 cm long aperture with only 5W of
intercepted beam. The FEL effort also developed a new technology deemed critical for one of the two major
branches of next generation light sources for DOE: the energy recovery linac (ERL). In the ERL, the electron
beam is re-cycled back through the accelerator out of phase with the accelerating field so the beam’s energy is
extracted back into RF power. This power, which would normally be dumped, can represent 90% of the beam
power in a high power linear accelerator. TJNAF was the pioneer in developing this technology and its FEL
remains the highest power system extant. A number of other laboratories are adopting this technology and
NSF is considering the development at Cornell of a very high power system based on such experience. ERL
technology is likely to become an important contribution to sustainability initiatives at DOE labs. TJNAF is
also working with other national laboratories to develop accelerator technology and perform beam physics
studies relevant to next generation light sources. An MOU has been signed with LBNL, FNAL and SLAC
regarding cooperative activities to prepare for CD-1 of the NGLS.
TJNAF is home to and developer of modern radiation detection, data analysis and imaging techniques, fast
electronics and data-acquisition, and data storage capabilities. These capabilities are crucial to the state-ofthe-art and to the anticipated experimental nuclear physics program, and underpin the bio-medical
applications described below. Scientists and engineers have also developed advanced radiation shielding
solutions as part of the Lab’s 12 GeV program, including recently-invented and cost-effective hydrogen and
boron-enhanced products, particularly well-suited for absorbing neutrons.
The TJNAF Radiation Detector and Imaging Group develops, constructs and tests a variety of novel high
performance (high resolution and high sensitivity) 2D and 3D radioisotope imaging systems which include
single photon, emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and optical
and x-ray computed tomography (CT) systems. These are used for a broad variety of applications (beyond
nuclear physics research) including: medical preclinical and clinical application, studies of biological function
in plants and small animals including motion tracking and imaging; and the potential for non-destructive
evaluation and homeland security applications.
A new compact detector technology called a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a focus at TJNAF. They are
planned for nuclear physics detector systems because of their immunity to magnetic fields. Their low profile
in terms of compactness and low-voltage requirements gives them tremendous potential as photo-sensors for
biomedical applications. For instance, a round hand-held camera was designed as an imaging aid to cancer
surgeons during surgical processes, based on these SiPMs.
TJNAF is using nuclear physics detector technology to develop optimized systems for radioisotope imaging.
TJNAF’s Radiation Detector and Imaging Group has developed and advanced a SPECT-CT system that has
been used in brain studies on awake, unrestrained mice and is being upgraded to improve its utilization and
accommodate rats. Recent results of an imaging study using the new system showed it can obtain detailed
functional brain images of a conscious mouse moving freely and for the first time, documented the effects of a
particular anesthesia on the absorption patterns of a brain specific imaging compound on anesthetized vs.
awake mice. TJNAF has also built PhytoPET, a PET imaging methodology for plant research. The PhytoPET
system is being used to conduct photosynthesis and sugar transport (carbohydrate translocation) studies in
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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plants under different conditions. This technology has attracted interest from biologists involved in
agricultural, bio-fuel and carbon sequestration research.
The Applied Nuclear Science and Technology Core Capability serves DOE Scientific Discovery and
Innovation mission numbers 9, 14, 26, and 30 from “Enclosure 1: List of DOE/NNSA/DHS Missions.”
4. Large Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation. TJNAF is the world’s leading user facility for
studies of the quark structure of matter using continuous beams of high-energy, polarized electrons. The
Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator is housed in a 7/8 mile racetrack and can deliver precise electron
beams with energies up to 6 GeV to three experimental End Stations or Halls simultaneously. Hall A houses
two high-resolution magnetic spectrometers of some 100 feet length and a plethora of auxiliary detector
systems. Hall B has been the home of the CEBAF large-acceptance spectrometer with multiple detector
systems and some 40,000 readout channels. Hall C boasts an 80 feet long high-momentum magnetic
spectrometer and houses many unique large-installation experiments. Maintenance, operations and
improvements of the accelerator beam enclosure and beam quality, and the cavernous experimental Halls and
the multiple devices in them, are conducted by the Jefferson Lab staff, to facilitate user experiments.
The expertise developed in building and operating CEBAF has led to the design of an upgrade that will
double the energy (to 12 GeV) and provide a unique facility for nuclear physics research that will ensure
continued world leadership in this field for several decades. This upgrade will add one new experimental
facility, Hall D, dedicated to the operation of a hermetic large-acceptance detector for photon-beam
experiments. The upgrade will add a new magnetic spectrometer in Hall C, and convert the Hall B apparatus
to allow for the higher-energy and higher luminosity operations. Unique opportunities exist in Hall A with the
Super BigBite Spectrometer (SBS) and possible, additional dedicated apparatus for one-of-a-kind
experiments.
Jefferson Lab staff has developed a substantial ability to conceive and design large accelerator facilities,
building upon 6 GeV CEBAF operations and augmented with the ongoing 12 GeV Upgrade. In partnership
with BNL and scientists and engineers world-wide, TJNAF scientists and engineers are thus leading the
conceptual design of a powerful electron-ion collider that has been identified as a major opportunity to
advance the field beyond the 12 GeV Upgrade. With the completion of the 12 GeV Upgrade and the foreseen
electron-ion collider, TJNAF will continue its role of the world’s premier experimental QCD facility. The
ability to use the existing FEL as an accelerator R&D test-bed for energy-recovery linacs, and techniques
required to establish cooling of proton/ion beams, for example, provides a mutual beneficial cross-fertilization
between the FEL and Nuclear Physics.
TJNAF has developed state-of-the-art instrumentation for R&D, design, fabrication, chemical processing, and
testing of superconducting RF cavities. This complete concept-to-delivery capability is unique in the world.
All of these capabilities have been essential to the development, deployment, commissioning and operation of
the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade. The addition of TJNAF’s Technology and Engineering Development Facility
(TEDF), currently nearing completion, will provide 100,000 additional square feet that will enhance and
collocate all SRF operations elements and will provide additional experimental assembly space. It will also
provide configurable space that can be adapted to work on different kinds of SRF cavities as TJNAF’s
portfolio of projects expands.
TJNAF’s renowned cryogenics staff operates and improves the laboratory’s three large 2K cryogenic plants
that support CEBAF operations and SRF production. This plant count will soon increase to five plants as the
12 GeV upgrade becomes operational. These plants utilize patented cryogenic cycles developed by TJNAF
that increase efficiencies by up to 30% more than what was traditionally available from industry. Extensive
operational experience has allowed the group to develop controls technologies and techniques that permit year
round, unattended operations that drastically decrease staffing needs traditionally required for operations of
this magnitude.
These control and cycle technologies have been applied to other DOE facilities, notably to RHIC at
Brookhaven and NASA’s Johnson Space Center where the technology is being applied to a 12.5kW
refrigerator at 20K for a space effects chamber to test the James Webb telescope. Recently, the group was
asked to help guide the design, procurement and commissioning of the refrigerator supporting the FRIB
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
224
machine at Michigan State University. The Lab also has responsibilities for cryogenic system design for the
NGLS. Nationwide, this group is the premier source of cryogenic engineering and design for large helium
refrigerators, filling a void in commercially available services. TJNAF’s cryogenics group is consulted when
project needs for a large helium refrigerator system arise (>2kW @ 4K or equivalent capacity) to ensure
effective design results and highly efficient operation.
The Large Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation Core Capability serves DOE Scientific Discovery
and Innovation mission numbers 24, 26 and 30 from Enclosure 1: List of DOE/DHS Missions.
Science Strategy for the Future
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is located on a 169 acre federal reservation. North of the
DOE-owned land is an eight acre parcel referred to as the Virginia Associated Research Campus (VARC) which
is owned by the Commonwealth of Virginia and leased to SURA which, in turn, sub-leases this property for $1
dollar per year to DOE for use in support of the Lab. SURA owns 37 acres, adjacent to the TJNAF site, where it
operates a 42-room Residence Facility at no cost to DOE.
TJNAF consists of 73 DOE owned buildings (876,105 SF), two state leased buildings (37,643 SF), and 15 real
property trailers (23,237 SF) totaling 936,985 SF, plus roads and utilities. Additionally, the Lab leases office and
lab space (42,480 SF) from the City of Newport News located in the Applied Research Center (ARC), which was
constructed by the City of Newport News and adjacent to the TJNAF campus. In addition to these facilities,
TJNAF has 1 leased trailer (1,415 SF), 71 shipping containers (22,240 SF) used for storage, and 26,230 SF of offsite leased storage space. The Lab will continue efforts to consolidate leased and trailer office space with the
elimination of 14,200 SF of leased office space in FY13 and 15,850 SF of trailers by FY15. In addition, the Lab
plans to eliminate 7,000 SF of off-site leased warehouse space in FY13 and 20,000 SF of on-site shipping
containers used for storage by FY16. There were no real estate actions in FY 2012 or planned for FY 2013
involving leases of more than 10,000 SF. At the close of FY 2012, ~819 employees were employed and
occupying site facilities. Each day, TJNAF hosts on average, ~100 users from the United States and around the
world.
The Lab recently moved into the new 74,000 SF Technology and Engineering Development (TED) Building and
47,000 SF Test Lab Addition constructed under the Science Lab Infrastructure (SLI) program. The Test Lab, a 48
year old NASA facility has the largest amount of deferred maintenance of any Lab building, the majority of which
will be corrected as part of the Test Lab Rehabilitation (SLI) project currently underway. This project scheduled
for completion in 2013 will resolve the majority of the technical and administrative space shortage. The major
remaining space shortage is specialty technical and storage space. Site electrical distribution and cooling towers
have reached the end of their service life. Communications, computing air conditioning and power, and the
Cryogenics Test Facility serving the Test Lab have reached their capacity and need to be expanded to meet the
Lab’s mission. The Utilities Infrastructure Modernization (SLI) project planned for FY14 funding will correct
these deficiencies. The UIM project was granted CD-1 on October 14, 2010. Funding has been identified in the
FY14 budget.
A current copy of the near term Land Use Plan can be can be found on the TJNAF Facilities Management
website. Table 1 reflects an Asset Condition Index that meets the current goal established by DOE SC for Mission
Critical Facilities. Mission Dependent Facilities are below the established goal due to aging real property trailers.
Through GPP and SLI investments, TJNAF will achieve the SC goal for Mission Dependent Facilities by FY
2015. The site wide Asset Utilization Index is ~ 100%
Mission Readiness/Facilities and Infrastructure
Overview of Site Facilities and Infrastructure. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is
located on a 169 acre federal reservation. North of the DOE-owned land is an eight acre parcel referred to as the
Virginia Associated Research Campus (VARC) which is owned by the Commonwealth of Virginia and leased to
SURA which, in turn, sub-leases this property for $1 dollar per year to DOE for use in support of the Lab. SURA
owns 37 acres, adjacent to the TJNAF site, where it operates a 42-room Residence Facility at no cost to DOE.
TJNAF consists of 73 DOE owned buildings (876,105 SF), two state leased buildings (37,643 SF), and 15 real
property trailers (23,237 SF) totaling 936,985 SF, plus roads and utilities. Additionally, the Lab leases office and
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
225
lab space (42,480 SF) from the City of Newport News located in the Applied Research Center (ARC), which was
constructed by the City of Newport News and adjacent to the TJNAF campus. In addition to these facilities,
TJNAF has 1 leased trailer (1,415 SF), 71 shipping containers (22,240 SF) used for storage, and 26,230 SF of offsite leased storage space. The Lab will continue efforts to consolidate leased and trailer office space with the
elimination of 14,200 SF of leased office space in FY13 and 15,850 SF of trailers by FY15. In addition, the Lab
plans to eliminate 7,000 SF of off-site leased warehouse space in FY13 and 20,000 SF of on-site shipping
containers used for storage by FY16. There were no real estate actions in FY 2012 or planned for FY 2013
involving leases of more than 10,000 SF. At the close of FY 2012, ~819 employees were employed and
occupying site facilities. Each day, TJNAF hosts on average, ~100 users from the United States and around the
world.
The Lab recently moved into the new 74,000 SF Technology and Engineering Development (TED) Building and
47,000 SF Test Lab Addition constructed under the Science Lab Infrastructure (SLI) program. The Test Lab, a 48
year old NASA facility has the largest amount of deferred maintenance of any Lab building, the majority of which
will be corrected as part of the Test Lab Rehabilitation (SLI) project currently underway. This project scheduled
for completion in 2013 will resolve the majority of the technical and administrative space shortage. The major
remaining space shortage is specialty technical and storage space. Site electrical distribution and cooling towers
have reached the end of their service life. Communications, computing air conditioning and power, and the
Cryogenics Test Facility serving the Test Lab have reached their capacity and need to be expanded to meet the
Lab’s mission. The Utilities Infrastructure Modernization (SLI) project planned for FY14 funding will correct
these deficiencies. The UIM project was granted CD-1 on October 14, 2010. Funding has been identified in the
FY14 budget.
A current copy of the near term Land Use Plan can be can be found on the TJNAF Facilities Management
website. Table 1 reflects an Asset Condition Index that meets the current goal established by DOE SC for Mission
Critical Facilities. Mission Dependent Facilities are below the established goal due to aging real property trailers.
Through GPP and SLI investments, TJNAF will achieve the SC goal for Mission Dependent Facilities by FY
2015. The site wide Asset Utilization Index is ~ 100%.
Table 1. SC Infrastructure Data Summary
Total Bldg., Trailer, and OSF RPV($)
(Less 3000 Series OSFs)
Total OSF 3000 Series RPV($)
Total RPV($)
Total Deferred Maintenance($)
Total Owned Acreage
Site-Wide ACI(B, S, T)
Mission Critical
Mission Dependent
Not Mission Dependent
Office
Warehouse
Asset
Utilization
Laboratory
Index (B,T)2,3
Hospital
Housing
B=Building; S=Structure; T=Trailers
Asset Condition
Index (B, S, T)1
$384,165,023
$367,754,730
$751,919,753
$8,584,826
169.43
0.978
0.983
0.876
99.46
100
100
-
#Building
Assets
47
26
5
15
41
-
#Trailer
Assets
15
15
-
#OSF
Assets
19
3
-
GSF
(Bldg)
800,592
76,928
152,489
71,295
605,261
-
GSF
(Trailer)
21,822
-
1Criteria includes DOE-Owned Buildings, Trailers, and OSFs (excludes series 3000 OSFs)
2Criteria includes DOE-Owned Buildings and Trailers.
3Only includes assets with usage codes that fall into these 5 FRPC categories. Other usage types are not included.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
226
Facilities and Infrastructure to Support Laboratory Missions. The completion of the 12 GeV Upgrade, adds
a fourth experimental hall (Hall D) along with upgrades to the three existing halls and will provide TJNAF users
with state-of-the-art facilities necessary to advance science in support of the DOE SC mission. Additionally,
completion of the Technology and Engineering Development Facility (TEDF), scheduled for completion in July
2013, provides a first rate facility for the advancement of research and development in superconducting radio
frequency (SRF) technology as well as modern office space to allow consolidation of some staff from trailers and
leased space. Upgrades in electrical distribution, process cooling, and communications through completion of the
Utilities Infrastructure Modernization SLI project in 2016 will bring site utilities to mission ready status.
TJNAF assesses the condition of its facilities on a four year cycle using a software package called "VFA Facility"
that is offered by Vanderweil Facility Advisors (VFA). Overall, the condition of site facilities is good.
Mechanical systems in two major buildings, CEBAF Center and the Experimental Equipment Lab (EEL), have
reached the end of their service life. The Lab is considering a Utility Energy Services Contract to address system
deficiencies. The Research and User Support Facility project (SLI) will renovate the existing CEBAF Center by
upgrade the existing building mechanical and lighting systems to high energy performance standards as well as
add additional square footage to support the new Hall D staff and allow the completion of the consolidation
process from trailers and leased space. This energy efficiency upgrade is an important element in meeting DOE
sustainability goals. Additional GPP projects have been identified in the Lab’s Ten Year Site Plan to make
improvement in water infrastructure, facility modifications to support the science program, and to provide
additional storage to support experimental equipment needs as well as eliminate over 22,400 SF of containers
used for storage. This list represents an investment of $25M ($2.5M per year) over the ten year period to provide
sufficient new space. The Mission Readiness assessment of technical and support facilities and infrastructure is
summarized in Enclosure 2. TJNAF is seeking DOE support for two SLI projects; the Utilities Infrastructure
Modernization Project, currently in the SLI funding profile for a 2014 start and the Research and User Support
Facility which is needed to start in FY 2015 to upgrade the existing building aging mechanical equipment.
Completion of these projects will upgrade critical site support utilities, greatly contribute to meeting sustainability
goals, allow consolidation of staff currently in leased space, provide additional conference space and bring the
buildings up to desired aesthetic standards. The Lab is also exploring a Utility Energy Services Contract to
complete other mechanical and lighting improvements.
Strategic Site Investments.
•
12 GeV Conventional Facilities (Line Item) Conventional facilities required for construction, preoperation, and some operations of CEBAF at 12 GeV are included as part of the 12 GeV CEBAF
Upgrade project. The conventional construction includes 36,400 SF of new space including an
extension to the tunnel, and a fourth experimental hall. The project is scheduled for completion in
FY 2016.
•
Technology & Engineering Development Facility (SLI) (CD-4A) The project renovates the
current Test Lab (about 95,000 square feet), removes over 10,000 SF of inadequate and obsolete
work space in and adjacent to the Test Lab, and removes 12,000 SF of dilapidated trailers that do not
meet current commercial standards. The project includes construction of a new building and a
building addition which will add over 121,000 SF of needed workspace for critical technical support
functions, including mechanical and electrical engineering, cryogenics engineering and fabrication,
and environment, safety, and health. The project has been awarded a Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design (LEED) Gold (second highest designation) for the Technology and
Engineering Development building. A second LEED Gold achievement for the Test Lab
Addition/Rehab is being submitted. Energy savings from the Test Lab Renovation are estimated at
762,570 kWh/yr of electricity and 7,437 therms of natural gas for a total utility cost savings of
$52,000/year. The project is scheduled for completion in July 2013, approximately 8 months ahead
of schedule.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
227
•
Utilities Infrastructure Modernization Project (SLI) (CD-1) This project replaces or upgrades the
following utility systems:
o Electrical Distribution: Replace accelerator site primary and secondary electric feeders.
o Process Cooling: Replace/upgrade 20 to 40 year old site cooling towers serving the Accelerator
Site Low Conductivity Water (LCW) systems and provide additional computer center cooling
and uninterruptable power.
o Cryogenics: Upgrade Cryogenics Test Facility adjacent to the Test Lab (TEDF) to fully support
SRF R&D and experimental hall operations.
o Communications: Replace 20 to 40 year old underground communications and data cabling and
equipment.
The project is programmed for funding in FY14.
•
Research and User Support Facility (SLI)
This project funds the modernization of, and addition to the current CEBAF Center, which is the hub
of the Lab. Construction includes two additional wings (95,000 SF) and the rehabilitation of 67,300
SF of space in the current center. The building mechanical systems have reached the end of their
service life and are experiencing frequent failures. Correction of this portion of the project scope is
needed now. The project alleviates overcrowding of personnel, relocates staff and users currently
occupying leased space, accommodates planned staff growth needed for the additional 12 GeV
experimental hall and reduces leased space in the Applied Research Center by 24,599 SF. The
project will be designed and constructed to meet guiding sustainable principles and reduce energy
consumption of the existing building by 30%. Funding is needed in FY 2015 in order to replace the
existing aging mechanical equipment and upgrade the existing building to help meet DOE
sustainability goals.
•
Maintenance Strategy
TJNAF utilizes small business subcontractors to perform the majority of facility maintenance tasks.
Maintenance investment will continue at a level sufficient to maintain the facilities in a mission
ready state. The Lab has developed SLI or GPP projects to significantly reduce deferred
maintenance. The TEDF project has already eliminated over $6.5 million in deferred maintenance
with more than another $1 million to be eliminated prior to project completion. The UIM project
along with planned trailer demolition will eliminate more than $3 million of the Lab’s deferred
maintenance. The Lab has a trailer disposal plan to replace the 16 trailers and 74 shipping containers
with permanent building space by 2018.
Excess Facility/Material/Environmental
TJNAF does not have any excess facilities or environmental issues. TJNAF recycled over 240 tons
of scrap metal and overall recycled over 85% of construction materials and 87% of non-construction
materials in 2012.
Trends and Metrics. Table 2 shows the Lab’s planned infrastructure investment and the positive impact on the
Asset Condition Index (ACI) and level of deferred maintenance (DM). Figure 1 depicts site wide ACI and
infrastructure investments. Planned projects would allow the Lab to reach and sustain a DOE performance rating
of “Excellent” in FY 2013. Continued support of SLI and GPP funding is essential if the Lab is to meet its goals.
Alternates to SLI and GPP include alternate financing provided through a Utility Energy Services Contract.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
228
Table 2. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments ($M)
Maintenance
DMR*
EFD (overhead)
IGPP
GPP
Line Items
Total Investment
Estimated RPV
Estimated DM
2012
5.5
0
2013
5.5
0
2014
5.6
0
2015
5.7
0
2016
5.8
0
2017
6.0
0
2018
6.1
0
2019
6.2
0
2020
6.3
0
2021
6.4
0
2022
6.6
0
2023
6.7
0
0
0
1.1
20.8
27.4
0
0
3.4
8.9
17.8
397
0
0
2.5
29.2
37.3
408
0
0
2.5
31
39.2
445
0
0
2.5
30
38.3
491
0
0
2.5
0
8.5
509
0
0
2.5
0
8.6
527
0
0
2.5
0
8.7
545
0
0
2.5
0
8.8
562
0
0
2.5
0
8.9
579
0
0
2.5
0
9.1
597
0
0
2.5
0
9.2
615
7
6
6
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
0.98
0.98
0.99
0.99
0.99
0.99
0.99
0.99
0.99
0.99
0.98
Site-Wide ACI
1This line is for those sites that have a focused DMR to help reduce DM to acceptable levels based on the Asset Condition
Index (e.g. 0.975 for Mission Critical facilities). This line does not include DMR resulting from line items, GPP, IGPP,
excess facility disposition or normal maintenance.
Figure 1. Facilities and Infrastructure Investments
45.0
1.000
40.0
0.990
35.0
0.980
0.970
30.0
0.960
25.0
0.950
20.0
0.940
15.0
0.930
10.0
0.920
5.0
0.910
0.0
0.900
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total Investment ($M)
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
Site-Wide ACI
229
Attachment 1. Mission Readiness Tables
Technical Facilities and Infrastructure – Assumes TYSP Implemented
Core
Capabilities
Time
Frame
Now
In 5 Years
Mission
Ready
Key Buildings
N M P C
X
X
Nuclear
Physics
In 10
Years
Now
Accelerator
Science
Applied
Nuclear
Science &
Technology
Large Scale
User Facilities Advanced
Instrumentation
X
Action Plan
Laboratory
DOE
Central Helium Liquefier
• Inadequate: Technical &
Experimental Assembly
Space
Counting House Sustain.
Improve. (FY12-15)
12 GeV Conventional Facilities
(LI) (FY08-15)
Access Bldgs
Inadequate Service Bdgs
Service Bldg 68 Addition
(FY13)
Technology & Eng.
Development Facility (SLI)
(FY09-12)
Test Lab
Deferred Maintenance
Experimental Equipment
Laboratory Rehab (FY2122)
• Counting House
• Experimental Equipment
Laboratory (EEL)
• End Station Refrigerator
• Accelerator Tunnel
Building Code Deficiencies
X
In 5 Years
X Test Lab
In 10
Years
X Cryogenics Test Facility
Now
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
X
In 5 Years
X
In 10
Years
X
Injector Test Facility
(FY14-15)
• Aging Facilities
• Inadequate Utility Capacity
(cooling, electrical, data)
Free Electron Laser
Inadequate Technical Space
Experimental Equipment
Laboratory (EEL)
Experimental Assembly
Technology & Engineering
Development Facility (SLI)
(FY09-12)
Utilities Infrastructure
Modernization (SLI) (FY14)
Experimental Equipment
Laboratory Rehab (FY2122)
Experimental Staging
Now
X
Experimental Halls
In 5 Years
X
Experimental Equipment
Laboratory (EEL)
In 10
Years
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C =
Capable
Inadequate Work Space
X CEBAF Center
Inadequate experimental halls for
program
Inadequate experimental work
support and space
Inadequate work space for
scientists & users
12 GeV Conventional
Facilities(LI) (FY08-15)
Technology & Eng.
Development Facility (SLI)
(FY09-12)
Research and User Support
Facility (SLI) (FY15-16)
S= Stimulus GPP, LI=Line Item, SLI= Science Lab Infrastructure, UIM=Utilities Infrastructure Modernization
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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Support Facilities and Infrastructure - Assumes TYSP Implemented
Real Property Capability
Mission
Ready
Current
N M P C
Work Environment
X
User Accommodations
X
Site Services
X
Conference and Collaboration Space
X
Utilities
X
Roads & Grounds
X
Facility and Infrastructure
Capability Gap
Action Plan
Laboratory
• Insufficient Offices
• CEBAF Center Bldg systems at end of service life
• No recreational/fitness facilities
• Cafeteria undersized
No visitor center
• Poor location of RADCON Calibration Facility
• Limited computer center cooling
• Facility storage for research equipment
• Inadequate site lay down area
• Insufficient conference/collaboration space
• Auditorium too small
• Aging electrical distribution
• Aging cooling water systems
• Aging/inadequate comms/data
• Insufficient cryogenics
• Inadequate water pressure
• Stormwater management shortfalls
• Poor road conditions
• Parking shortage
• Sustainability Imp Bldg 87
(FY13-14)
• Bldg 89 (FY19-20)
Visitor Center (FY-22+)
• RADCON Calibration Facility
(FY20)
• Shipping & Receiving
(FY16-17)
DOE
• TEDF (SLI) (FY09-12)
• Research and User Support
Facility (SLI) (FY15-16)
UIM (SLI) (FY14)
Research and User Support
Facility (SLI) (FY15-16)
• 40 MVA Substation (FY13-14)
• Fire Protection Pump (FY14)
UIM (SLI) (FY14)
• Storm water (FY15)
• Road Improvements (FY22-23)
N = Not, M = Marginal, P = Partial, C = Capable
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
231
Attachment 2. Laboratory Site Map
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
232
Appendix 1. SC Laboratory Core Capabilities
SC has identified seventeen categories of core capabilities that comprise the scientific and technological
foundation of its national laboratories. SC uses three criteria to define core capabilities. They must:
•
•
•
Encompass a substantial combination of facilities and/or teams of people and/or equipment;
Have a unique and/or world-leading component; and
Be relevant to a discussion of DOE/NNSA/DHS missions.
Figure 1 shows the distribution of the core capabilities across the ten SC laboratories, and the pages that follow
provide the definitions of each capability category.
Figure 1. Distribution of Core Capabilities Across the SC Laboratories
ANL
BNL
FNAL
LBNL
Particle Physics
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Nuclear Physics
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Accelerator Science
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Categories of Core Capabilities
AMES
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ORNL
PNNL
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Chemical and M olecular Science
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Climate Change Science
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Biological Systems Science
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Applied M athematics
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Advanced Computer Science, Visualization, and Data
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Chemical Engineering
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Systems Engineering and Integration
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Large Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation
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Applied Nuclear Science and Technology
Applied M aterials Science and Engineering
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Condensed M atter Physics and M aterials Science
Computational Science
TJNAF
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Environmental Subsurface Science
S LAC
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Plasma and Fusion Energy Sciences
PPPL
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1. Particle Physics: The ability to carry out experimental and theoretical research to provide new insights and
advance our knowledge on the nature of matter and energy, and the basic nature of space and time itself. This
includes the design, operation and analysis of experiments to discover the elementary constituents of matter
and energy and probe the interactions between them and the development of models and theories to
understand their properties and behaviors.
2. Nuclear Physics: The ability to carry out experimental and theoretical research to provide new insights and
advance our knowledge on the nature of matter and energy. This includes the design, operation and analysis
of experiments to establish the basic properties of hadrons, atomic nuclei, and other particles, and the
development of models and theories to understand these properties and behaviors in terms of the fundamental
forces of nature.
3. Accelerator Science and Technology: The ability to conduct experimental, computational, and theoretical
research on the physics of particle beams and to develop technologies to accelerate, characterize, and
manipulate particle beams in accelerators and storage rings. The research seeks to achieve fundamental
understanding beyond current accelerator and detector science and technologies to develop new concepts and
systems for the design of advanced scientific user facilities.
4. Plasma and Fusion Energy Sciences: The ability to conduct world-leading plasma research that can range
from low-temperature to high temperature/high pressure plasmas. This ability can be in operation of the stateof-the-art experimental fusion facilities to carry out world-leading research on the fundamental physics of
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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plasmas, in theory and computations, which is critical to the full understanding of the plasma phenomena
being studied or to enable technologies that allow experiments to reach and in many cases exceed their
performance goals.
5. Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science: The ability to conduct experimental, theoretical, and
computational research to fundamentally understand condensed matter physics and materials sciences that
provide a basis for the development of materials that improve the efficiency, economy, environmental
acceptability, and safety in energy generation, conversion, transmission, and utilization. Areas of research
include experimental and theoretical condensed matter physics, x-ray and neutron scattering, electron and
scanning probe microscopies, ultrafast materials science, physical and mechanical behavior of materials,
radiation effects in materials, materials chemistry, and bimolecular materials.
6. Chemical and Molecular Science: The ability to conduct experimental, theoretical, and computational
research to fundamentally understand chemical change and energy flow in molecular systems that provide a
basis for the development of new processes for the generation, storage, and use of energy and for mitigation
of the environmental impacts of energy use. Areas of research include atomic, molecular and optical
sciences; gas-phase chemical physics; condensed phase and interfacial molecular science; solar
photochemistry; photosynthetic systems; physical biosciences; catalysis science; separations and analytical
science; actinide chemistry; and geosciences.
7. Climate Change Science: The ability to address critical scientific questions on the causes, impacts, and
predictability of climate change via the integration of laboratory-specific research facilities, instrumentation
and/or leadership-class computational systems, and individuals with expertise in climate change research and
related disciplines. This unique combination of tools and people is the foundation for research of scale and
breadth unmatched by other facilities, world-wide, for example, on 1) atmospheric-process research and
modeling, including clouds, aerosols, and the terrestrial carbon cycle; 2) climate change modeling at global to
regional scales; 3) research on the effects of climate change on ecosystems; and 4) integrated analyses of
climate change, from causes to impacts, including impacts on energy production, use, and other human
systems.
8. Biological Systems Science: The ability to address critical scientific questions in understanding complex
biological systems via the integration of laboratory-specific research facilities, instrumentation and/or
leadership-class computational systems, and individuals with expertise in biological systems research and
related disciplines to advance DOE missions in energy, climate, and the environment. This unique
combination of tools and people is the foundation for research of scale and breadth unmatched by other
facilities world-wide, for example, on research that employs systems and synthetic biology and computational
modeling approaches enabled by genome sequencing and functional characterization of microbes, plants, and
biological communities relevant to 1) bioenergy production, 2) environmental contaminants processing, and
3) global carbon cycling and biosequestration and 4) fundamental research on radiochemistry tracers and the
effects of low dose radiation exposure to the interactions between biological systems and the environment.
9. Environmental Subsurface Science: The ability to understand, predict and mitigate the impacts of
environmental contamination from past nuclear weapons production and provide a scientific basis for the
long-term stewardship of nuclear waste disposal via the integration of laboratory-specific research facilities,
instrumentation and/or leadership-class computational systems, and multidisciplinary teams of individuals
with expertise in environmental subsurface science and related disciplines. This unique combination of tools
and expertise is the foundation for research of scale and integration unmatched by other environmental
subsurface science activities world-wide, for example, on 1) linking research across scales from the molecular
to field scale, 2) integration of advanced computer models into the research, and 3) multidisciplinary, iterative
experimentation to understand and predict contaminant transport in complex subsurface environments.
10. Applied Mathematics: The ability to support basic research in the development of the mathematical models,
computational algorithms and analytical techniques needed to enable science and engineering-based solutions
of national problems in energy, the environment and national security, often through the application of highperformance computing. Laboratory Core Competencies in this area would involve a critical mass of worldFY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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leading researchers with recognized expertise and publications in such areas as linear algebra and nonlinear
solvers, discretization and meshing, multi-scale mathematics, optimization, modeling of complex systems,
and analysis methods (e.g., analysis of large-scale data, uncertainty quantification, and error analysis).
11. Advanced Computer Science, Visualization, and Data: The ability to have a widely-recognized role in
advances in all applications in computational science and engineering. A core competency in these areas
would involve a large pool of nationally and internationally recognized experts in areas such as programming
languages, high-performance computing tools, peta- to exascale scientific data management and scientific
visualization, distributed computing infrastructure, programming models for novel computer architectures,
and automatic tuning for improving code performance, with unique and/or world-leading components in one
or more of these areas. A core competency would also require access to (note: these resources do not need to
be co-located) a high end computational facility with the resources to test and develop new tools, libraries,
languages, etc. In addition, linkages to application teams in computational science and/or engineering of
interest to the Department of Energy and/or the Department of Homeland Security would be beneficial to
promptly address needs and requirements of those teams.
12. Computational Science: The ability to connect applied mathematics and computer science with research in
scientific disciplines (e.g., biological sciences, chemistry, materials, physics, etc.). A core competency in this
area would involve a large pool of nationally and internationally recognized experts in applied mathematics,
computer science and in scientific domains with a proven record of effectively and efficiently utilizing high
performance computing resources to obtain significant results in areas of science and/or engineering of
interest to the Department of Energy and/or the Department of Homeland Security. The individual strengths
in applied mathematics, computer science and in scientific domains in concert with the strength of the synergy
between them is the critical element of this core competency.
13. Applied Nuclear Science and Technology: The ability to use a broad range of facilities, instrumentation,
equipment and, often, interdisciplinary teams that apply the knowledge, data, methods, and techniques of
nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, and related accelerator physics to missions of the Departments of Energy
and Homeland Security. The elements of this capability are often brought together in unique combinations
with those of other disciplines to address high priority needs such as new and improved energy sources and
systems; radioisotope production and advanced instrumentation for nuclear medicine; development of
methods and systems to assure nonproliferation and combat terrorism; and environmental studies, monitoring,
and remediation.
14. Applied Materials Science & Engineering: The ability to conduct theoretical, experimental, and
computational research to fundamentally understand the science of materials with focus on the design,
synthesis, prediction and measurement of structure/property relationships, the role of defects in controlling
properties, and the performance of materials in hostile environments. The strong linkages with molecular
science, engineering, and environmental science provides a basis for the development of materials that
improve the efficiency, economy, environmental acceptability, and safety in energy generation, conversion,
transmission, and utilization. Areas of research include nanoscale phenomena, x-ray and neutron scattering,
electron and scanning probe microscopies, ultrafast materials science, physical and mechanical behavior of
materials, radiation effects in materials, materials chemistry, and bimolecular materials.
15. Chemical Engineering: The ability to conduct applied chemical research that spans multiple scales from the
molecular to macroscopic and from picoseconds, to years. Chemical engineering translates scientific
discovery into transformational solutions for advanced energy systems and other U.S. needs related to
environment, security, and national competitiveness. The strong linkages between molecular, biological, and
materials sciences, engineering science, and separations, catalysis and other chemical conversions provide a
basis for the development of chemical processes that improve the efficiency, economy, competitiveness,
environmental acceptability, and safety in energy generation, conversion, and utilization. A core capability in
chemical engineering would underpin R&D in various areas such as nanomanufacturing, process
intensification, biomass utilization, radiochemical processing, high-efficiency clean combustion, and would
generate innovative solutions in alternative energy systems, carbon management, energy-intensive industrial
processing, nuclear fuel cycle development, and waste and environmental management.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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16. Systems Engineering and Integration: The ability to solve problems holistically from the concept and design
phase to ultimate deliverable and completion phase, by synthesizing multiple disciplines, and to develop and
implement optimal solutions. The ability to develop solutions that address issues of national energy and
environmental security. Areas of application of this capability include development of programs in energy
supply, storage, transportation, and efficiency; and deployment of novel solutions to materials and sensor
problems in fields of interest to the Department of Energy and/or the Department of Homeland Security.
17. Large-Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation: The ability to conceive, design, construct and
operate leading-edge specialty research user facilities. This includes the ability to manage effectively
construction of $100 million or greater one-of-a-kind scientific facilities, and to host hundreds to thousands of
U.S. and international users in addition to carrying out world-class research at the facility itself. The ability to
conceive, design, build, operate and use first-in-class technical instruments intended for a particular research
purpose, often requiring the material expertise of multiple scientific disciplines. Instrumentation that can be
created by a small number of individuals or that would sit on a laboratory bench-top is not considered part of
this core capability.
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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Appendix 2. List of DOE/NNSA/DHS Missions
Scientific Discovery and Innovation (SC)
1. To develop mathematical descriptions, models, methods, and algorithms to accurately describe and
understand the behavior of complex systems involving processes that span vastly different time and/or length
scales.
2. To develop the underlying understanding and software to make effective use of computers at extreme scales.
3. To transform extreme scale data from experiments and simulations into scientific insight.
4. To advance key areas of computational science and discovery that further advance the missions of the Office
of Science through mutually beneficial partnerships.
5. To deliver the forefront computational and networking capabilities to extend the frontiers of science.
6. To develop networking and collaboration tools and facilities that enable scientists worldwide to work
together.
7. Discover and design new materials and molecular assemblies with novel structures, functions, and properties,
and to create a new paradigm for the deterministic design of materials through achievement of atom-by-atom
and molecule-by-molecule control
8. Conceptualize, calculate, and predict processes underlying physical and chemical transformations, tackling
challenging real-world systems – for example, materials with many atomic constituents, with complex
architectures, or that contain defects; systems that exhibit correlated emergent behavior; systems that are far
from equilibrium; and chemistry in complex heterogeneous environments such as those occurring in
combustion or the subsurface
9. Probe, understand, and control the interactions of phonons, photons, electrons, and ions with matter to direct
and control energy flow in materials and chemical systems
10. Conceive, plan, design, construct, and operate scientific user facilities to probe the most fundamental
electronic and atomic properties of materials at extreme limits of time, space, and energy resolution through
x-ray, neutron, and electron beam scattering and through coherent x-ray scattering. Properties of anticipated
new x-ray sources include the ability to reach to the frontier of ultrafast timescales of electron motion around
an atom, the spatial scale of the atomic bond, and the energy scale of the bond that holds electrons in
correlated motion with near neighbors
11. Foster integration of the basic research conducted in the program with research in NNSA and the DOE
technology programs, the latter particularly in areas addressed by Basic Research Needs workshops supported
by BES in the areas of the hydrogen economy, solar energy utilization, superconductivity, solid-state lighting,
advanced nuclear energy systems, combustion of 21st century transportation fuels, electrical-energy storage,
geosciences as it relates to the storage of energy wastes (the long-term storage of both nuclear waste and
carbon dioxide), materials under extreme environments, and catalysis for energy applications.
12. Obtain new molecular-level insight into the functioning and regulation of plants, microbes, and biological
communities to provide the science base for cost-effective production of next generation biofuels as a major
secure national energy resource
13. Understand the relationships between climate change and Earth’s ecosystems, develop and assess options for
carbon sequestration, and provide science to underpin a fully predictive understanding of the complex Earth
system and the potential impacts of climate change on ecosystems
14. Understand the molecular behavior of contaminants in subsurface environments, enabling prediction of their
fate and transport in support of long term environmental stewardship and development of new, science-based
remediation strategies Understanding the role that biogeochemical processes play in controlling the cycling
and mobility of materials in the subsurface and across key surface-subsurface interfaces in the environment
enabling the prediction of their fate and transport.
15. Make fundamental discoveries at the interface of biology and physics by developing and using new, enabling
technologies and resources for DOE’s needs in climate, bioenergy, and subsurface science
16. Operate scientific user facilities that provide high-throughput genomic sequencing and analysis; provide
experimental and computational resources for the environmental molecular sciences; and resolve critical
uncertainties about the role of clouds and aerosols in the prediction of climatic process
17. Advance the fundamental science of magnetically confined plasmas to develop the predictive capability
needed for a sustainable fusion energy source
FY 2013 Office of Science Laboratory Plans
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18. Support the development of the scientific understanding required to design and deploy the materials needed to
support a burning plasma environment
19. Pursue scientific opportunities and grand challenges in high energy density plasma science to explore the
feasibility of the inertial confinement approach as a fusion energy source, to better understand our universe,
and to enhance national security and economic competitiveness
20. Increase the fundamental understanding of basic plasma science, including both burning plasma and low
temperature plasma science and engineering, to enhance economic competitiveness, and to create
opportunities for a broader range of science-based applications
21. Understand the properties and interactions of the elementary particles and fundamental forces of nature from
studies at the highest energies available with particle accelerators
22. Understand the fundamental symmetries that govern the interactions of elementary particles from studies of
rare or very subtle processes, requiring high intensity particle beams, and/or high precision, ultra-sensitive
detectors.
23. Obtain new insight and new information about elementary particles and fundamental forces from observations
of naturally occurring processes -- those which do not require particle accelerators
24. Conceive, plan, design, construct, and operate forefront scientific user facilities to advance the mission of the
program and deliver significant results.
25. Steward a national accelerator science program with a strategy that is drawn from an inclusive perspective of
the field; involves stakeholders in industry, medicine and other branches of science; aims to maintain core
competencies and a trained workforce in this field; and meets the science needs of the SC community
26. Foster integration of the research with the work of other organizations in DOE, in other agencies and in other
nations to optimize the use of the resources available in achieving scientific goals
27. To search for yet undiscovered forms of nuclear matter and to understand the existence and properties of
nuclear matter under extreme conditions, including that which existed at the beginning of the universe
28. Understand how protons and neutrons combine to form atomic nuclei and how these nuclei have emerged
during the 13.7 billion years since the origin of the cosmos.
29. Understand the fundamental properties of the neutron and the neutrino, and how these illuminate the matterantimatter asymmetry of the universe and physics beyond the Standard Model.
30. Conceive, plan, design, construct, and operate forefront national scientific user facilities for scientific and
technical advances which advance the understanding of nuclear matter and result in new competencies and
innovation. To develop new detector and accelerator technologies that will advance NP mission priorities
31. Provide stewardship of isotope production and technologies to advance important applications, research and
tools for the nation.
32. Foster integration of the research with the work of other organizations in DOE, such as in next generation
nuclear reactors and nuclear forensics, and in other agencies and nations to optimize the use of the resources
available in achieving scientific goals.
33. Increase the pipeline of talent pursuing research important to the Office of Science
34. Leveraging the unique opportunities at DOE national laboratories to provide mentored research experiences to
undergraduate students and faculty)
35. Increase participation of under-represented students and faculty in STEM programs
36. Improve methods of evaluation of effectiveness of programs and impact on STEM workforce
Energy Security (ES)
1. Supply - Solar
2. Supply - Nuclear
3. Supply - Hydro
4. Supply - Wind
5. Supply - Geothermal
6. Supply - Natural gas
7. Supply - Coal
8. Supply - Bioenergy/Biofuels
9. Supply - Carbon capture and storage
10. Distribution - Electric Grid
11. Distribution - Hydrogen and Gas Infrastructure
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238
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
Distribution - Liquid Fuels
Use - Industrial Technologies (including efficiency and conservation)
Use - Advanced Building Systems (including efficiency and conservation)
Use - Vehicle Technologies (including efficiency and conservation)
Energy Systems Assessment/Optimization
Environmental Management (EM)
1. Facility D&D
2. Groundwater and Soil Remediation
3. Waste Processing
National Security (NNSA)
1. Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Weapons Infrastructure
2. Nonproliferation
3. Nuclear Propulsion
Homeland Security (HS)
1. Border Security
2. Cargo Security
3. Chemical/Biological Defense
4. Cyber Security
5. Transportation Security
6. Counter-IED
7. Incident Management
8. Information Sharing
9. Infrastructure Protection
10. Interoperability
11. Maritime Security
12. Human Factors
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