close

Вход

Log in using OpenID

BEGINNING SCHOOL AT GLENROY WEST PRIMARY SCHOOL

embedDownload
Ta b l e o f C o n t e n t s
Letter from Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Biomedical Research at Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Noted Research Advocate’s Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Major Research Programs of 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Current NIH Program Grants and Center Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Major Research Centers Affiliated With OSUMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
School and Department-Based Research Programs
and 2006 Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Technology Commercialization & Partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
Medical Center Information Warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Translational Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Clinical Trials Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Faculty Serving on National Study Sections and Review Panels . . .131
Research Core Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
University Resources for Biomedical Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
Research Partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Educational Initiatives Promoting Biomedical Research . . . . . . . . .156
2006 Sponsored Research Grants by Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159
Selected High-Impact Publications by Department . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
Statistical Year in Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
Contact Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210
Commentary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
Letter from Leadership
2006 was a pivotal year for biomedical research at Ohio State University Medical Center and may have set
the course of our research for years to come.
All of our 2006 research activities culminated in a three-month span at the end of the year when we:
opened a 10-story biomedical research tower (BRT); hosted a major industry collaboration symposium that
attracted leaders from the worlds of science, industry, law and government; and conducted branding exercises
that gave us a new logo and affirmed our commitment to improving lives through personalized health care.
The BRT, which doubles the amount of biomedical research space at Ohio State, houses faculty from multiple
programs and will hasten the pace of scientific discovery that translates to innovative treatments for patients.
The symposium, held in the newly opened BRT, allowed participants to explore opportunities for
university/industry collaboration and to showcase emerging biomedical technologies needing commercial
partnerships. This daylong event included a “technology marketplace” where corporate, angel and venture
investors could take the first steps toward meeting directly with the inventors behind some of the Medical
Center’s newest products and discoveries.
After months of planning, we conducted highly visible branding exercises in a 24-hour celebration that symbolized our around-the-clock dedication to personalized health care – the integrative practice of medicine
and individual support based on a person’s unique biologic, behavioral and environmental characteristics.
The celebration emphasized that personalized health care is the next step in the Medical Center’s strategic
plan and is being incorporated in our mission areas of research, education and patient care.
We hope that message is apparent throughout our fourth annual Research Report, which chronicles some of
the many ways during 2006 that we guided scientific discovery toward medical advancement.
Fred Sanfilippo, MD, PhD
Senior Vice President and
Executive Dean for Health Sciences
CEO, Ohio State University
Medical Center
Wiley “Chip” Souba, MD, ScD
Dean, Ohio State University
College of Medicine
Caroline Whitacre, PhD
Associate Vice President for
Health Sciences Research
Vice Dean for Research
Director, School of Biomedical
Science, Ohio State University
College of Medicine
2007 Research Report 1
B i o m e d i c a l R e s e a r c h AT O H I O S TAT E
2006 saw continued growth in biomedical
research that enhances personalized health
care at Ohio State University Medical Center
(OSUMC), which in November took a giant step
forward by opening an eagerly awaited
Biomedical Research Tower (BRT) on West 12th
Avenue – the largest research facility on the
Ohio State campus. The year was also marked
by increased extramural funding for medical
researchers and publication of their significant
findings in high-profile scientific journals. The
next several pages spotlight the top biomedical
research stories of 2006 at the Medical Center,
starting with the BRT opening and what it
means to both the University and the community.
2 Ohio State University Medical Center
The tower has 10 stories and 264,000 square feet
of dedicated research space designed in open-lab
layouts to promote interdisciplinary interaction
among research teams.
BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH TOWER HELPS
ADVANCE PERSONALIZED HEALTH CARE
Hundreds of people attended the Nov. 3, 2006,
grand opening celebration for Ohio State University
Medical Center’s $160 million Biomedical Research
Tower (BRT), a symbol of the institution’s commitment to research that will benefit personalized
health care.
The BRT, under construction since 2003 on West
12th Avenue, opened its doors in December 2006 to
researchers pursuing discoveries that will dramatically advance patient care in many medical disciplines.
The celebration featured remarks from Mary
Woolley, a nationally recognized advocate for science and president of Research!America, a nonprofit alliance working to elevate health research among
the nation’s priorities (see related story, page 5).
“This structure allows for productive interactions
among faculty, students and postdoctoral
researchers. It’s a very powerful model,” says
Caroline Whitacre, PhD, vice dean and associate
vice president for Health Sciences Research at the
Medical Center. “The design allows for faster progression of research. We’re constantly looking to
progress faster, publish faster and be more successful at securing external grant funding. This will only
help that process along.”
About 60 faculty scientists and their teams, totaling
approximately 500 research staff, moved into the
five research floors that opened initially. The first
occupiers included research teams in cancer, cardiovascular disease, neuroscience and infectious diseases.
Three floors of the building remain shelled and will
be built out in a second phase of development over
the next several years.
“More scientists and students want to be here than
we have been able to accommodate,” says Fred
Sanfilippo, MD, PhD, senior vice president and executive dean of Health Sciences, and CEO of Ohio
State’s Medical Center. “Just having this building
under construction was a powerful recruitment tool
because it demonstrated our vision for the Medical
Center that resonates with biomedical scientists.
2007 Research Report 3
“More importantly,” he adds, “this building represents a major investment in biomedical research
that holds promise for identifying biological mechanisms of disease, which is at the crux of personalized health care. These scientific advances will aid
us in delivering preventive and diagnostic care and
treatments that match individuals’ unique characteristics and needs.”
Eventually, the tower will house more than 100 faculty scientists and their teams – a total of 800
researchers – specializing in cancer and cancer
genetics, cardiovascular and lung disease, and highfield imaging, as well as biology, biotechnology and
biomedical informatics programs. It will also expand
programs in such emerging fields as neurological
disorders, heart failure and heart imaging, pharmacogenomics and targeted molecular therapies,
microbial pathogenesis and biodefense, and tissue
engineering.
The tower is expected to bolster the state’s economy by generating approximately 17,000 new jobs in
4 Ohio State University Medical Center
biomedical technology-related fields and bringing
an estimated $3.7 billion to Ohio over the next
decade.
Among the building’s special features are linear
equipment corridors in which to locate large pieces
of equipment – such as freezers, refrigerators and
centrifuges – that generate noise and heat as well as
cause vibrations. The tower also features “green”
construction efforts, including locating offices on
one side of the building and labs on the other so
recirculated air in offices is separate from lab air
that is exhausted to the outside. Lights throughout
the building have auto-shutoff mechanisms and
motion activation.
Bonds were sold to finance most of the building and
will be repaid in large part by grant revenue earned
by researchers. Additional funding is provided
through private fundraising, federal grants, state
capital appropriations and University support.
Noted Research Advocate
The keynote speaker at the Nov. 3, 2006, dedication of Ohio State’s new Biomedical Research
Tower (BRT) was Mary Woolley, a nationally recognized advocate for research and president of
Research!America, a nonprofit alliance working to
elevate health research among the nation’s priorities. Her address appears below.
Thank you for having me here today on this historic
occasion to talk about the importance of research to
Ohio and to our nation.
It’s a fact that research changes history, including
the history of health and well-being. Many people
alive today do not know what an iron lung is; many
physicians have never seen a case of smallpox. Life
saving and quality of life-enhancing aspects of daily
living that we regard as common sense today were
not always so: consider childhood vaccinations,
screening for breast and prostate cancer, effective
antihypertensive medications, the use of seat belts,
putting babies on their backs to sleep, practicing
safe sex, screening the blood supply for toxic
agents, getting flu shots – the list goes on.
The fact is that today’s common sense is based on
yesterday’s research. Research will lead us to
tomorrow’s common sense and will in the process
help us save lives and money as we advance toward
the era of personalized medicine and put the products of research to work in evidence-based fashion.
SPEAKS AT BRT DEDICATION
Thinking back about things we didn’t used to take
for granted is a useful way to capture the ongoing
progress of medical research. At Research!America
we call this the “Then – Now – Imagine” framework – the perfect theme to capture the excitement and promise of medical research. The
accomplishments of medical research over the
past 60 years have taught us to think big about
what will come next, and then to take the “imagine” step aggressively.
For example, and in keeping with some of the
research that’s happening here at Ohio State,
think back:
Then … to the 1970s, when only one child in 10 survived cancer. Now … seven of 10 children who
develop cancer are alive five years after diagnosis.
Imagine … eliminating suffering and death due to
childhood cancer by the year 2015.
Then … heart disease killed quickly and without
warning. Now … deaths from heart disease have
dropped by 60 percent; it is no longer the No. 1
killer of Americans under the age of 85. Imagine …
eliminating preventable deaths due to heart disease.
“Then – Now – Imagine” has long been the driving
spirit of science. This theme expresses a commitment to discovery and its translation to better
health.
2007 Research Report 5
The United States, founded by leaders of the
Enlightenment, has always had high aspirations
realized through a commitment to science and innovation. Americans today – including the people of
Ohio – continue to be intrigued by the challenge to
innovate.
As we’ve heard, this new building promises to bolster the state’s economy by creating 17,000 new
jobs and bringing $3.7 billion to Ohio in the next 10
years. The combination of societal aspiration and
the record of return on investment in science would
seem to make investment in science almost irresistible.
Several years ago we held focus group sessions here
in Columbus, asking citizens what they thought
about research. In response to a question about
whether and why it is important to invest in basic
research, the proprietor of a dry-cleaning establishment memorably said, “I’ll tell you why basic
research is important to me – it’s because I believe
in possibilities.”
Yet, there is surprising resistance to increased
investment in research at the federal level to match
the aspirations of the people of Ohio and all across
the nation. You may be aware that funding for the
National Institutes of Health, which not too long ago
was doubled in anticipation of capturing the enormous promise of research at the beginning of this
century, has now been cut for the first time in 30
years.
“I believe in possibilities.” Doesn’t that say it all
about American values, the American spirit,
American determination and accomplishment?
The possibilities offered by research have never
been greater. We have never had as many
researchers at work unraveling the mysteries of disease and disability, and their cure, treatment and
prevention. This is an exciting moment of possibility
– possibilities we are on the cusp of realizing – leading to lives that will be saved and enhanced because
of research that will be conducted here in this magnificent new building.
The contributions to research and health that those
who will work here will make are worthy of our
admiration. These are the people who will be making groundbreaking discoveries to fight cancer and
to better understand neurological disorders, heart
failure and heart imaging, pharmacogenomics, targeted molecular therapies, microbial pathogenesis
and biodefense, and tissue engineering. These scientists will deliver for you on your investment –
Ohio’s investment – and these are the people who
will be on the front lines of realizing the aspirations
of Americans to put research to work – faster – to
produce new cures, treatments and preventions.
Public opinion data confirms the value citizens place
on innovation, as does everyday experience.
Research promises and delivers better products,
better jobs, better health and better quality of life.
6 Ohio State University Medical Center
Ohio State University has earned double-digit percentage increases in support from the NIH in the
past two years and has more than doubled its annual NIH funding over the past six years. But cuts and
a flat-funded NIH budget do not bode well for sustained robust federal support for the cutting-edge
science under way here at Ohio State. What can be
done to address and redress the declining NIH
budget?
Now, especially just a few days before the election,
all of us who are committed to putting research to
work must think and act politically. I don’t mean in a
partisan manner. Research is not a partisan issue.
There are and always have been champions for
research on both sides of the aisle.
From public opinion polls we know that seven in 10
potential voters say they would be more likely to
vote for a candidate who is a strong supporter of
federal spending for medical, health and scientific
research; 55 percent say that investing more in
medical research is important now even in the face
of competing budget demands; and 67 percent of
Americans say support for embryonic stem cell
research is an important issue in deciding how they
will vote in November.
These are potential voters’ views – but what about
the positions of candidates running for office?
Unless the people of Ohio are different from the rest
of the nation, most of us don’t know the positions
on medical research issues of most incumbents running for re-election, not to mention the positions of
their challengers.
Research!America and the Albert and Mary Lasker
Foundation have created a new voter guide, Your
Candidates–Your Health, to provide stakeholders in
research and the public at large with educational
information on candidates’ positions. The novelty
and value of this resource has earned attention from
PARADE magazine, which has alerted its enormous
national readership – 75 million strong – about the
importance of checking this guide before voting.
Let me challenge you to answer whether your federal representatives are strongly identified with medical research as a national priority? Congresswoman
Deborah Pryce most certainly is; we salute you,
Congresswoman, for your leadership on this issue
so critical to us all.
Unfortunately, the vast majority of Ohio’s
Congressional candidates have not said “yes” to
making medical research a much higher national
priority. You and people you know all over the state
can change that!
If candidates for Congress heard from their constituents about the importance of spending more than
1 percent of the federal budget on medical research
that seeks to gain an understanding and eventual conquest of every disease you can name, then they would
certainly take heed and act accordingly.
Our voter guide makes it easy not only for you to
find out where your candidates stand but also provides links to contact your candidates and urge
them to make medical research a higher priority in
their campaigns and, for the winners, in their legislative work on the Hill. You can find our voter guide on
the Web at: www.YourCandidatesYourHealth.org.
While I am speaking of the importance of contacting elected officials, I want to applaud the leaders of
Ohio State for the development of your Medical
Advocacy Program with a stated goal to have at
least one medical advocate representing each of the
88 counties in Ohio, as well as the officials Ohio
sends to Washington. These advocates are empowered to make contact with their elected representatives at the local, state and federal levels to make
the case for improving the level of quality in health
care and medical education, and for growth in
investment in medical and health research. To the
best of my knowledge, this is a unique program in
the nation, and one I hope will soon be emulated
from coast to coast.
I urge you to join me and Research!America in making the future bright for research and researchers,
and for the American public that wants research to
succeed. We must elect candidates who will heed
the call of Americans who not only imagine a
healthier future powered by research, but who are
increasingly demanding that their elected officials
heed that clarion call.
Imagine a Congress composed of a strong majority
who support investing more in medical research and
will assure a policy environment that enhances
rather than inhibits medical research. Imagine that
research is given a chance to succeed at the rate of
scientific opportunity, not stifled in short-sighted,
ill-advised budget cutting. Imagine that significantly
enhanced support for research becomes the No. 1
priority of Congress. And imagine that strengthened
federal investment in research is the first step in
assuring nonpartisan commitment to addressing
other ills facing our nation.
Daring to imagine is a hallmark of great science, great
leadership and great progress. As Ohio Pulitzer Prizewinning poet Rita Dove has said, “Without imagination we can go nowhere.” Dove is, like you who will
work in this research tower, unafraid to imagine the
possibilities. I salute her spirit, and I salute the spirit of
the research community.
I am proud to be an advocate for medical research
and privileged to be here today on this historic
occasion for the future of health, based on research.
I wish all of those who will be working in this glorious new home for research the greatest success.
I look forward to celebrating your accomplishments.
(A commentary by Mary Woolley appears on the
inside back cover of this report.)
2007 Research Report 7
13 ELECTED AS AAAS FELLOWS
The American Association for the Advancement of
Science (AAAS) in 2006 elected 18 more Ohio
State University faculty members as AAAS Fellows,
including 13 who are in Health Sciences colleges or
research institutes. Ohio State led the nation in new
AAAS fellows each year from 2003-05, and the
University’s 2006 total was the nation’s second
highest. The AAAS is the largest federation of scientists worldwide and among the most renowned.
In 2006 it elevated 449 members to Fellow for their
distinguished efforts to advance science and its
applications. The 13 new AAAS Fellows from Health
Sciences colleges or research institutes at Ohio
State are:
Sanford Barsky, MD, Pathology; Charles Capen,
DVM, PhD, Veterinary Biosciences; Patrick Green,
PhD, Veterinary Biosciences; Joanna Groden, PhD,
Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical
Genetics; Nyla Heerema, PhD, Pathology; Tim HuiMing Huang, PhD, Molecular Virology, Immunology
and Medical Genetics; Pravin Kaumaya, PhD,
Obstetrics and Gynecology; A. Douglas Kinghorn,
PhD, Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy;
Nina Mayr, MD, Radiation Medicine; Stephen
Osmani, PhD, Molecular Genetics; Deborah Parris,
PhD, Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical
Genetics; Christopher Walker, PhD, Pediatrics, and
Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical
Genetics; Mary Ellen Wewers, PhD, MPH, RN,
Health Behavior and Health Promotion.
SCIENTISTS TARGET EPIGENETIC
SILENCING OF GENES IN LEUKEMIA
WITH $11.84 MILLION GRANT
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) awarded
researchers at OSUMC a five-year, $11.84 million
grant to study chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)
and translate basic research findings into clinical trials for patients with CLL, one of the most common
forms of leukemia among adults in the Western
8 Ohio State University Medical Center
Hemisphere. The grant, titled “DNA methylation &
chromatin modifications: mechanisms & applications in cancer therapy,” was awarded to a team led
by Program Director and Principal Investigator
Samson Jacob, PhD, a professor of Molecular and
Cellular Biochemistry and co-leader of the
Experimental Therapeutics Program in Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center. Jacob says the longterm objective of the grant is to advance knowledge
of the epigenetic regulation of gene expression in
cancer cells and apply it to treatment (epigenetic
therapy). Epigenetic changes are alterations in gene
function that occur without a change in the genetic
sequence of a cell’s DNA.
CALCIUM + VITAMIN D
SUPPLEMENTATION DOES AN OLDER
BODY GOOD
The older the woman, the more likely that consistent use of calcium and vitamin D supplements will
help reduce her risk for osteoporosis, according to
results of a national clinical trial conducted as part
of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). In final
results answering the initiative’s questions about
women’s health, study leaders say that even the
slight benefits demonstrated by the trial, which
involved more than 36,000 participants, suggest
calcium and vitamin D supplementation provides a
health benefit to postmenopausal women. These
findings were published in the Feb. 16, 2006, issue
of the New England Journal of Medicine. “The value of
a study this large is that it shows, even if only on a
small scale, that this intervention can lower the risk
of osteoporosis within two to three years,” says
Rebecca Jackson, MD, lead author of the article and
principal investigator for the WHI at OSUMC.
STUDY SHOWS CELLS HAVE NATURAL
DEFENSE AGAINST HIV
Scientists at OSUMC discovered a mechanism that
cells use to fight off the human immunodeficiency
virus (HIV), the cause of AIDS. Their findings indicate that two proteins that normally help repair cellular DNA can also destroy the DNA made by HIV
after it enters a cell. This HIV DNA is essential for
the virus to survive and reproduce. The study, led by
Richard Fishel, PhD, professor of Molecular
Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, was
published in Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences. These findings could lead to a new strategy for treating HIV infection and AIDS, one that
might complement current therapies and would
probably be less susceptible to viral drug resistance
– an increasingly urgent dilemma for patients and
doctors. “Our findings identify a new potential drug
target, one that involves a natural host defense,”
Fishel says. “HIV treatments that target cellular
components should be far less likely to develop
resistance.”
MICRO RNA FINGERPRINT IDENTIFIED IN
PLATELET FORMATION
identified the miRNAs also say some of them, when
acting abnormally, may contribute to certain
leukemias. “We found that a specific set of miRNA
genes is turned off in normal platelet development,
but turned on in certain platelet-related leukemia
cells,” says lead author Ramiro Garzon, MD, clinical
instructor in the College of Medicine. The study was
published in Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences. MiRNA has only recently been acknowledged as an important force in biology. Carlo Croce,
MD, director of Ohio State’s Human Cancer
Genetics Program, was the first to discover a link
between miRNA and cancer. In this study, Croce
and Garzon, along with colleagues from M.D.
Anderson Cancer Center, examined miRNA activity
in the earliest phases of platelet development.
DIURETICS MAY NOT BE BEST WAY
TO REDUCE CHF WATER RETENTION
Researchers at OSUMC believe they may have identified a new agent to reduce excess fluid build-up in
patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). The
agent avoids the sodium-depleting effects of diuretics, now the most commonly used drugs for this
purpose. Though diuretics reduce excess fluid
buildup that is characteristic of CHF, they also can
cause the kidneys to excrete more sodium than
water, which can have damaging effects. The drug
under investigation, called lixivaptan, appears as
effective as a diuretic in helping patients get rid of
excess water and also retains proper sodium levels
in the body, says William Abraham, MD, director of
Cardiovascular Medicine and lead author of a study
published in the Journal of the American College of
Cardiology. Abraham also will serve as international
principal investigator of a multi-center phase III trial
to further evaluate the drug.
A few newly identified microRNAs (miRNAs)
appear to play a significant role in the development
of platelets – blood cells critical to the body’s ability
to form clots following an injury. The scientists who
2007 Research Report 9
MUTATED GENE PREDICTS RETURN OF
COMMON LEUKEMIA
A new study at OSUMC shows that mutations in a
cancer-related gene may help predict whether a
common subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML)
is more likely to return in patients. Researchers
found that patients with mutations in a gene called
KIT – which is already linked to this form of AML –
were associated with significantly higher recurrence
rates. The findings were presented at a plenary session during the annual meeting of the American
Society of Clinical Oncology by Peter Paschka, MD.
Paschka was completing a research fellowship
under the guidance of Clara D. Bloomfield, MD, a
Distinguished University Professor who also serves
as cancer scholar and senior adviser to Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer
Hospital and Solove Research Institute. “These findings could represent a significant advance in the
therapy of AML,” says Paschka, lead author for the
study. “They could lead to more effective targeted
therapies and improved cure rates for certain AML
patients.”
CPR DEVICE DOES NOT IMPROVE
SURVIVAL
Researchers seeking ways to improve survival from
cardiac arrest were surprised by results from a
study comparing manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compressions with those given by a
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved
mechanical device. The study, conducted in five
cities including Columbus, showed that victims of
sudden cardiac arrest were more likely to be discharged alive from the hospital if they received
manual CPR rather than CPR administered by the
mechanical device. Study results were published in
the Journal of the American Medical Association.
Michael Sayre, MD, of Emergency Medicine at
OSUMC, was principal investigator for the
Columbus study site. Lynn White, clinical
10 Ohio State University Medical Center
research manager in Emergency Medicine, coordinated the 34 medic crews involved in the Columbus
study. “Everyone thought the device was a great
idea and that its ability to provide compressions of
much higher quality than those administered by
humans would be lifesaving,” White says. “The
results are not what we anticipated.”
DEVICE ZAPS THE PAIN OUT OF
MIGRAINES
An electronic device designed to “zap” migraine
pain before it starts may be the next form of relief
for millions who suffer from the debilitating disease.
Results from a study led by researchers at OSUMC
found that the experimental device appears effective in eliminating headache when administered
during the onset of the migraine. The device, called
TMS, interrupts the aura phase of the migraine,
often described as electrical storms in the brain.
Auras are neural disturbances that signal the onset
of migraines. Yousef Mohammad, MD, principal
investigator for the study at Ohio State, says
patients reported a significant reduction in nausea,
noise and light sensitivity post-treatment. “Perhaps
the most significant effect of using the TMS device
was on the two-hour symptom assessment, with 84
percent of the episodes in patients using the TMS
occurring without noise sensitivity,” he says, noting
that their work functioning also improved and they
reported no side effects.
NEW MOUSE STRAIN MIMICS CHRONIC
LEUKEMIA
An OSUMC study shows that a new mouse strain
offers the first animal model for an incurable
leukemia and should aid drug development. The
TCL-1 transgenic mouse develops a malignancy that
closely mimics chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).
Lack of an animal model has hampered development of treatments for CLL as well as research into
its causes and the changes that drive drug resistance. “This strain shares many of the molecular and
genetic features of human CLL, responds to drugs
used to treat the disease and develops drug resistance that renders treatment ineffective, as often
happens in CLL patients,” says John Byrd, MD, professor of Internal Medicine and a specialist in CLL at
Ohio State’s Comprehensive Cancer Center – James
Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute. The
study was published in the journal Blood. The TCL-1
strain was originally developed by Ohio State cancer
researcher Carlo Croce, MD, and his lab team.
NEW BIOMARKER OF LIVER
DYSFUNCTION DURING SEPSIS
IDENTIFIED
OSUMC researchers have found that high levels of a
certain protein in the bloodstream during severe
infection is a biomarker for damage and metabolic
derangement in the liver. Their study, published in
the journal Critical Care Medicine, provides insight
into the mechanisms of sepsis-induced organ failure, the leading cause of death in medical intensive
care units. These findings indicate that changes in
organ function are explained by events in mitochondria, the primary source of cell energy. Led by Elliott
Crouser, MD, a pulmonologist and critical care
researcher, this study is the first to show how mitochondrial populations change during sepsis. “This
sheds light on the mechanism by which the function
of vital organs, such as the liver, becomes compromised during sepsis,” Crouser says. “We observed
an inverse relationship between blood levels of the
liver mitochondrial enzyme, carbamoyl phosphate
sythetase-1 (CPS-1), and mitochondrial respiratory
capacity in the liver during the subacute stages of
sepsis.”
VAGINAL BIRTH A SAFE OPTION AFTER
MULTIPLE C-SECTIONS
Mark Landon, MD, vice chair of Obstetrics and
Gynecology at OSUMC, evaluated the risk of complication and success of vaginal birth after cesarean
section (VBAC) in women who had had more than
one prior cesarean delivery. Published in the journal
Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study was conducted
through the National Institutes of Health. Data
included more than 45,000 patients with previous
cesarean section, including almost 18,000 undergoing a trial of labor or an attempt at VBAC. “This was
the first large study of VBAC in which certain outcomes, such as uterine rupture, were studied
prospectively,” says Landon. The study showed that
uterine rupture risk is not significantly increased in
women with multiple prior cesarean deliveries compared with those who have had a single prior operation.
VAMPIRE BAT SALIVA HELPS BATTLE
STROKES
Stroke victims will gain an improved drug treatment
if research involving a vampire bat saliva derivative
shows the results some health professionals are
anticipating. The study is testing the effectiveness
of a compound derived from bat saliva in reducing
the risk of brain damage after the onset of an acute
stroke. If approved, the drug will triple the window
of time for initiating emergency stroke treatment
and offer other advantages over medications currently in use, including T-PA (recombinant tissue
plasminogen activator), the only FDA-approved
drug for treating ischemic stroke. Andrew Slivka,
MD, a neurologist and principal investigator for the
study at OSUMC, says doctors have only a threehour period to initiate effective stroke treatment
with T-PA. But he says the new medication, called
rotundus salivary plasminogen activator, or
desmoteplase, extends the treatment window to
nine hours and appears to be much more effective
against clots than T-PA.
A study analyzing multi-center data collected over
four years confirmed that most women who have
had multiple prior cesarean deliveries can expect to
achieve a successful vaginal birth. The study, led by
2007 Research Report 11
FRONT-LINE IMMUNE CELLS MATURE IN
FOUR STAGES, STUDY SHOWS
STUDY EVALUATES EFFECTS OF
ANTIOXIDANTS, FISH OIL ON AMD
Researchers at OSUMC found that natural killer
(NK) cells, one of the body’s front-line defenses
against cancer and infections, mature from progenitor stem cells in four discrete stages and that this
happens in secondary lymphoid tissue, such as tonsils and lymph glands. Scientists have long known
that the other two major types of immune cells in
the body, T cells and B cells, develop respectively in
the thymus and bone marrow, but the site and
stages of human NK cell development had eluded
investigators. These new findings, published in the
Journal of Experimental Medicine, advance the understanding of NK cells, which help trigger broader
immune responses such as the body’s permanent
protection following vaccination. Principal
Investigator Michael Caligiuri, MD, director of Ohio
State’s Comprehensive Cancer Center, says understanding the secrets of NK cell development in
humans could lead to new therapies for cancer,
infection and for patients with immune deficiencies.
OSUMC researchers are among scientists nationally
trying to determine if certain nutrients can decrease
risk of vision loss. This multicenter, randomized
clinical trial builds on an earlier study that found
that antioxidant vitamins and minerals, including
vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, zinc and copper,
when taken orally, reduced progression of advanced
age-related macular degeneration by 25 percent
and moderate vision loss by 19 percent.
Approximately 4,000 participants will be recruited
to determine if a modified combination of vitamins,
minerals and fish oil can further slow vision loss
from age-related macular degeneration. “Previous
studies suggest other nutrients may protect vision
as well,” says Robert Chambers, MD, an ophthalmologist and the study’s principal investigator at
Ohio State. The trial will add lutein and zeaxanthin –
yellow pigments found in the macula, the area
responsible for central vision – along with the
omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which are
derived from fish and vegetable oils.
�GENE SCREEN’ MAY SHED LIGHT ON
WOUND HEALING
Emerging technology could help OSUMC
researchers learn why some wounds heal quickly
and others last months or years. Scientists are using
laser capture microdissection to pluck a single cell
from wound samples for use in examining the
genetics of healing. “Traditionally there’s been no
way to tell what’s going on in a wound except by
visualization and what a biopsy says – whether it’s
infected or cancerous. We’re advancing this knowledge,” says Gayle Gordillo, MD, director of the
Plastic Surgery Research Lab and principal investigator for the study, informally called the “Gene
Screen.” This analysis may demonstrate which
genes predict healing and which predict failure to
heal. Researchers hope to improve diagnostic
screening and identify genetic targets for new drugs
to stimulate healing. Seven U.S. centers are involved
with the study. “This is the first time screening is
being done like this in a wound clinic,” says
Chandan Sen, PhD, executive director of Ohio
State’s Comprehensive Wound Center.
12 Ohio State University Medical Center
UROLOGY DEPARTMENT ESTABLISHED
In November 2006, the Ohio State University Board
of Trustees changed the Division of Urology to a
Department of Urology in the College of Medicine
to improve the unit’s visibility and increase its ability
to attract academic urologists and physician scientists. Urology had been a division within the
Department of Surgery. Division Director Robert
Bahnson, MD, was chosen to chair the new department. Bahnson holds the Dave Longaberger Chair in
Urology at Ohio State, where he has been on the
medical faculty since 1996. A urologist at Ohio
State’s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research
Institute, Bahnson is a fellow of the American
College of Surgeons and a member of the American
Urologic Association. Last year he was elected to
the American Association of Genitourinary
Surgeons, a group of leading academic urologists
from around the world who study diseases of the
genitourinary system. Membership is limited to 75
physicians.
Major Research Programs OF 2006
In 2005, Ohio State University Medical Center identified
six “Signature Programs” to drive future success in
three mission areas: research, education and patient
care. The Signature Programs – Cancer, Critical Care,
Heart, Imaging, Neurosciences and Transplantation –
are characterized by demonstrated leadership, national reputation and potential for growth that can help
the Medical Center become a top-tier academic institution. The Medical Center also identified Behavioral
Medicine, Biomedical Informatics and Genetics as
“Support Programs” that are instrumental to continued
success of the Signature Programs and to the Medical
Center overall. This section of the Research Report
highlights 2006 accomplishments in each of the
Signature and Support programs, as well as in two
other “Programs of Interest”: Electrophysiology and
Microbial Pathogenesis/Biodefense.
2007 Research Report 13
The overall goal of the Cancer Signature Program,
led by Michael Caligiuri, MD, is to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality through basic,
clinical, prevention and population scientific
research that translates to improved patient
Samson Jacob, PhD, co-leader of
the Experimental Therapeutics
Progam in Ohio State’s Comprehensive Cancer Center (OSUCCC),
is principal investigator for an
$11.84 million program project
grant awarded by the National
Cancer Institute to help OSUCCC
scientists study chronic lymphocytc leukemia and translate basic
research findings into clinical trials
for patients with this disease.
care, thus advancing the mission of becoming
a world-class healthcare enterprise focused on
improving quality of life for patients with cancer in Ohio and beyond.
S I G N AT U R E P RO G R A M
Cancer
Cancer Signature Program Steering Team - (seated from left): David Schuller,
MD; Michael Caligiuri, MD; Clara D. Bloomfield, MD; and (standing from left):
Julian Bell; Dennis Smith; Chris Scarcello; William Carson III, MD; Michael
Lairmore, DVM, PhD. (not shown): Steven Clinton, MD, PhD; Carlo Croce, MD;
Electra Paskett, PhD, MSPH; David Williams, MD.
14 Ohio State University Medical Center
The National Cancer Institute has awarded $3 million to help Ohio State’s Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute (OSUCCCJames) conduct phase II clinical trials on the effectiveness of cancer drugs under
development. Principal investigator is Miguel Villalona, MD (left), shown here with
Catherine Balint of the OSUCCC-James’ Clinical Trials Office, and Gregory Otterson,
MD, of the OSUCCC’s Molecular Biology and Cancer Genetics Program.
Led by Michael Caligiuri, MD, the Cancer Signature Program is
embodied in the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer
Center (OSUCCC), one of only 39 National Cancer Institute
(NCI)-designated cancer centers in the nation. The patientcare component of the OSUCCC is the Arthur G. James
Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (The
James).
The OSUCCC, also directed by Caligiuri, is a network of seven
interdisciplinary cancer-related research programs that collectively comprise more than 265 faculty investigators representing 14 colleges at Ohio State. Their overall goal is to reduce
cancer morbidity and mortality through basic, clinical, prevention and population scientific research that translates to
improved patient care, thus advancing the Cancer Signature
Program’s mission of becoming a world-class healthcare
enterprise focused on improving quality of life for patients
with cancer in Ohio and beyond.
Cancer Signature Program highlights of 2006:
• The OSUCCC realized an increase in NCI funding for cancer
research to $39.6 million, up 12.5 percent from $35.2 million
in 2005. Total external grant funding for cancer research
exceeds $100 million.
• Twenty cancer researchers were recruited to the OSUCCCJames.
• The NCI awarded a five-year, $11.84 million program project
grant to principal investigator Samson Jacob, PhD, co-leader
of the OSUCCC’s Experimental Therapeutics Program, to
study chronic lymphocytic leukemia and translate basic
research findings into clinical trials.
• The NCI awarded the OSUCCC a $3 million contract to conduct phase II clinical trials to determine the effectiveness of
anticancer drugs under development. The contract adds to
the range of novel cancer therapies available to patients at
the OSUCCC-James, which is one of only five institutions in
the nation with NCI contracts for conducting both phase I
and phase II clinical trials. Miguel Villalona, MD, is principal
investigator for the new phase II contract.
• The American Cancer Society awarded a $960,000 grant
for a four-year study to determine whether freeze-dried
black raspberry lozenges can slow or stop the return of oral
cancer, which has one of the highest recurrence rates.
Christopher Weghorst, PhD, of the OSUCCC’s Molecular
Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention Program, is principal
investigator.
• In conjunction with Ohio State’s Department of Radiology,
the OSUCCC received a three-year, $738,813 NCI grant to
develop noninvasive imaging assessment methodologies
that reveal early biologic response to cancer treatment.
Michael Knopp, MD, PhD, chair of Radiology and a member
of the OSUCCC’s Experimental Therapeutics Program, is
project leader. The OSUCCC is one of only eight cancer centers nationwide to receive this grant.
• Nearly 240 clinical trials are open on new cancer therapies
and prevention strategies, some of which are available
nowhere else.
• U.S.News & World Report ranked The James Cancer Hospital
and Solove Research Institute 21st among “America’s Best
Hospitals” for cancer care in 2006.
2007 Research Report 15
Researchers in the Critical Care Signature
Program, led by Clay Marsh, MD, focus on the
biological variability of each patient to establish links between genetic abnormalities and
outcomes of patients in the Intensive Care
Unit (ICU). They want to understand how
From left are Anasuya Sarkar, PhD, and
Mark Wewers, MD, researchers in the
Critical Care Signature Program.
approaches in the ICU affect the long-term
outcomes of patients who survive their critical
care illness or injury.
S I G N AT U R E P R O G R A M
Critical Care
Critical Care Signature Program Steering Team – (from left): Elliott Crouser, MD;
Shiva Rahmanian, MD; Stephen Hoffmann, MD; and Clay Marsh, MD. (not
shown): Steven Steinberg, MD; Roy Essig, MD; Thomas Reilley, DO; Charles Cook,
MD; Naeem Ali, MD; Randy Smith, RN; Terri Gillenwater; and Kam Sigafoos.
16 Ohio State University Medical Center
Members of the Critical Care Signature Program’s ICU research team include: (standing from
left) Scott Aberegg, MD; Naeem Ali, MD; Dave Jarjoura, PhD; and (seated) Jyoti Kamal, PhD.
By studying and applying new paradigms of pathogenesis, the
Critical Care Signature Program provides novel multidisciplinary treatments for patients with acute, life-threatening illnesses or injuries. Program leader Clay Marsh, MD, says a
team of experts is needed to manage the most seriously ill or
injured patients. “We are building a unified program in
research, education, and clinical care that brings new solutions
to these patients through innovation and discovery,” says
Marsh, who also directs the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy,
Critical Care and Sleep Medicine.
Marsh says researchers in this program focus on the biological
variability of each patient to establish links between genetic
abnormalities and outcomes of patients in the Intensive Care
Unit (ICU). “We want to understand how approaches in the
ICU affect the long-term outcomes of patients who survive
their critical care illness or injury,” he explains. “Through this
platform of personalized and predictive medicine, we can not
only transform ICU care, but also the way medicine is practiced in other areas.”
Critical Care Signature Program highlights of 2006:
• The program recruited seven new faculty and acquired
$1.3 million in new grants.
• Program members developed the first Fundamentals of
Critical Care Support course approved by the Society of
Critical Care Medicine, an international multidisciplinary
organization, for all intensive care unit healthcare workers.
• James O’Brien, MD, Naeem Ali, MD, Scott Aberegg, MD,
MPH, Stephen Hoffmann, MD, John Mastronarde, MD,
MPH, Jyoti Kamal, PhD, and David Jarjoura, PhD, focused
on improving the quality and consistency of daily clinical
care on a number of fronts. With the Information
Warehouse (IW), they have built an Intensive Care Unit
(ICU) Minimum Dataset that collects information about all
ICU patients and the care they receive. They also focused on
the care of patients with sepsis, and they have another IW
application that is collecting information about patients
enrolled in a septic registry and blood bank.
• Susheela Tridandapani, PhD, and her group investigated
mechanisms of host response to infectious agents using a
combination of genomewide analyses of mRNA and miRNA
expression along with immunological, molecular and biochemical approaches. Their goal is to identify molecular targets for therapeutic intervention in inflammation-associated
disease states such as sepsis.
• Mark Wewers, MD, and Anasuya Sarkar, PhD, worked on
the role of caspase-1 in sepsis and outcomes. Sepsis is characterized by activation of a host of inflammatory pathways.
Recent studies by Sarkar and Wewers have revealed a strong
tie between the enzyme caspase-1 and the sepsis immune
response. Caspase-1 deficient mice are protected from death
caused by intraperitoneal bacteria. Importantly, the caspase1 effect appears to be due to its role in causing the programmed cell death of splenic lymphocytes. Thus, future
studies directed at inhibiting caspase-1 may provide novel
approaches to treating sepsis.
• The Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep
Medicine was ranked 24th in the nation in 2006 by U.S.News
& World Report.
2007 Research Report 17
Research within the Heart Signature Program,
which was led in 2006 by William Abraham,
MD, director of the Division of Cardiovascular
Medicine, focuses on many areas, including
heart failure, ischemic disease, transplantation,
In the prep room of the MR/CT Lab in Ohio State’s Ross
Heart Hospital are: (from left) research assistant Tam Tran;
Subha Raman, MD, medical director of Cardiovascular
Magnetic Resonance/Computed Tomography (CMR/CT);
radiologic technologist Anne Garcia; clinical research
specialist Beth McCarthy; Sarah Neff, RN; and research
nurse Michelle Ballinger, RN.
arrhythmias/electrophysiology and vascular
disease.
S I G N AT U R E P RO G R A M
Heart
Heart Signature Program Steering Team – (seated from left): William Abraham,
MD; Benjamin Sun, MD; Larry Anstine; (standing from left): Rich Davis, PhD;
Charles Bush, MD; Karen Jackson; Randy Allen; Judy Gilliam, RN; Randy Homan;
and Jay Zweier, MD. (not shown): Donna Cruz-Huffmaster; Michael Knopp, MD,
PhD; Vanessa Moses; Muthu Periasamy, PhD; Patrick Vaccaro, MD; and the program’s newest member, Thomas Ryan, MD.
18 Ohio State University Medical Center
Among researchers in the Heart Signature Program are members of the lab team of Sanjay Rajagopalan,
MD (third from right), including: (from left) Sutha Prasad, PhD; visiting scholar Thomas Kampfrath;
Qinghua Sun, MD, PhD; Ryan Williams; Britten Farrar, MD; and medical student Theodore Chang.
Translational research, or converting basic science discoveries
to clinical care, occurs across all aspects of the Heart Signature
Program, which was led in 2006 by William Abraham, MD,
director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and associate director for clinical and translational research at Ohio
State’s Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute. Research within this Signature Program focuses on heart failure, ischemic disease, transplantation, arrhythmias/electrophysiology and vascular disease.
Heart care is provided at Ohio State University Medical
Center’s Ross Heart Hospital, University Hospital, University
Hospital East, and at local and regional outpatient clinics associated with Ohio State. Educational opportunities within this
Signature Program include fellowship training in cardiovascular
medicine, cardiac surgery and vascular surgery, along with doctoral, postdoctoral and continuing medical education programs.
Heart Signature Program highlights of 2006:
• The program recruited 13 faculty members in cardiology and
two in cardiac surgery.
• The program continued work toward recruiting a nationally
renowned medical scientist to direct the Ohio State
University Heart Center, which includes cardiovascular medicine, vascular surgery and cardiothoracic surgery services
across the research, education and patient care mission
areas. The Heart Center primarily involves Ohio State’s Ross
Heart Hospital and the University’s Davis Heart and Lung
Research Institute. In 2007 the program recruited Thomas
Ryan, MD, formerly of the Duke Heart Center, to this position.
• The program increased its total National Institutes of Health
(NIH) research awards to $12.73 million in 2006.
• The Division of Cardiovascular Medicine has approximately
90 clinical research studies, including investigator-initiated
single-site studies, NIH-sponsored multisite trials, and
industry-sponsored trials. Deanna Golden-Kreutz, PhD,
clinical research manager, says studies span heart failure,
interventional cardiology, electrophysiology, imaging, genotyping, sports/prevention, sleep disorders, transplant/cardiothoracic surgery, emergency medicine and pulmonary hypertension. Of note is the Division’s national leadership in the
investigational use of hemodynamic monitors, ventricular
support devices and cardiac CT/MR.
• The research team of Subha Raman, MD, seeks discoveries
afforded by high-resolution, noninvasive imaging to improve
cardiovascular care. The group’s close integration with the
clinical mission ensures that successful research efforts can
be seamlessly translated into prevention, early diagnosis and
personalized treatment to improve cardiovascular health.
Results have delivered more accurate, less invasive detection
of cardiovascular disease that has improved outcomes.
• The lab team of Sanjay Rajagopalan, MD, furthered its study
of artherosclerosis-related complications and the role of risk
factors, including environmental determinants on the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic plaque. The lab, funded by four grants from the National Institutes of Health, has
focused on MRI imaging of plaque and high-resolution intravital techniques to understand early leukocyte endothelial
interactions in atherosclerosis.
• Periannan Kuppusamy, PhD, focuses on imaging research,
having published a landmark paper in the American Journal of
Physiology – Heart and Circulatory Physiology on the labeling
of stem cells with oxygen-sensing nanoprobes. Based largely
on this pioneering work, Kuppusamy has received a research
grant of $1.35 million for four years from the National
Institutes of Health for his study on stem cell therapy in the
heart. This will help him develop probes and imaging methods for noninvasive tracking and assessment of the stem cell
engraftment, repair and angiogenesis in damaged heart tissue. The technology will help physicians monitor cell therapy
and could open avenues for treating heart disease.
2007 Research Report 19
The research backbone of the Imaging
Signature Program, led by Michael Knopp, MD,
PhD, professor and chair of the Department of
Radiology, is the Wright Center of Innovation
in Biomedical Imaging, also known as the
Shown in the MRI control room for the 3 Tesla Magnet
at the Wright Center of Innovation are: (from left)
Robert McKenney, PhD, director of imaging research
and administrative services in the Department of
Radiology; research scientist Amir Abduljalil, PhD
(seated); and David Beversdorf, MD, assistant professor of Neurology.
Biomedical Structural, Functional and
Molecular Imaging Enterprise at Ohio State.
S I G N AT U R E P RO G R A M
Imaging
Imaging Signature Program Steering Team - (seated from left): Rich Davis, PhD;
Donna Cruz-Huffmaster; William Yuh, MD; Jean McCabe; Joseph Yu, MD; and
(standing from left): Philip Skinner; Marc Conselyea; Michael Knopp, MD, PhD;
Nathan Hall, MD, PhD; Robert McKenney, PhD; Steve Tumblin; Bruce Lauer. (not
shown): Kent Hess.
20 Ohio State University Medical Center
Shown in the treatment/preparation area of the animal facility at the Wright Center of
Innovation are: (from left) Yukihisa Takayama, MD, visiting scholar; Jonda Leser,
research nurse; PhD student Ananth Narayanan; and Petra Schmalbrovk, PhD, associate professor of Radiology.
Over the past 30 years, medical imaging has advanced beyond
mere projection to cross-sectional views at ever-higher speeds
and resolutions that enhance observation of medical problems
and provide more opportunities for minimally invasive therapeutics. Ohio State University Medical Center’s Department
of Radiology has been a pacesetter in biomedical imaging
research that translates to innovative clinical applications.
The research backbone of the Imaging Signature Program – led
by Michael Knopp, MD, PhD, professor and chair of the
Department of Radiology – is the Wright Center of Innovation
in Biomedical Imaging, also known as the Biomedical
Structural, Functional and Molecular Imaging Enterprise at
Ohio State. The Wright Center was launched in May 2003
with state funding from a $9.1 million Third Frontier Grant and
an $8 million Biomedical Research and Technology (BRTT)
award. Knopp is principal investigator for both. The Center is
designed to advance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),
positron emission tomography (PET) and mobile imaging
technologies while creating an extensive imaging and bioinformatics structure. It also supports other biomedical research
endeavors at Ohio State.
Imaging Signature Program highlights of 2006:
• The state of Ohio announced continued funding for the
Wright Center of nearly $8 million for three years starting in
May 2006. This initiative provides the foundation for the
next level of hybrid imaging at Ohio State.
• The National Cancer Institute awarded Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center (OSUCCC), in conjunction
with the Department of Radiology, a three-year grant of
$738,813 to continue developing noninvasive imaging
assessment methodologies to reveal early biologic response
to cancer treatment. Michael Knopp, MD, PhD, a member of
the OSUCCC, is project leader. The OSUCCC is one of only
eight cancer centers nationwide to receive this grant.
• As a result of a state grant application involving several
community partners for a large project proposal for imaging
research, the Department of Radiology realized an award of
$700,000 from one of the partners, Pfizer Inc., and gained
wider opportunities with state and industry partners for
imaging endeavors.
• The Department of Radiology’s budgeted research portfolio
exceeds $40 million, up from $1.2 million in 2002.
• Five faculty were recruited in 2006.
• Collaboration continues with Novartis Pharmaceuticals in
advanced imaging methodologies for clinical trials; 22 trials
are under way.
• The Department of Radiology is in its fourth year as a core
lab for the national Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)
in studying mechanisms of DNA damage and repair at the
molecular level.
• Molecular-level research is keeping pace with National
Institutes of Health awards in: characterizing mechanisms of
chemopreventive agents, cancer therapy in combination with
chemical and radiological agents, modulation of genes and
proteins regulating cellular proliferation and apoptosis, and
genetic damage and repair; studying anticancer topoisomerase poisons, including analysis of new drugs, proteomic
analysis of post-translational modifications of topoisomerases associated with drug exposure, and disruption of cancer
cell metabolism by anticancer drugs; and investigating
genomic instability in cancer pathogenesis with a focus on
the regulation of DNA damage in normal and cancerous cells
and on mechanisms of cross-talk among molecular pathways that control cellular homeostasis.
2007 Research Report 21
Technological advancement, innovative
research and an aging population are driving
an upswing in demand of treatment for neuroscience conditions. Research from multiple disciplines benefits the Neurosciences Signature
Researchers in the Neurosciences Signature Program
include: (from left) Amy Lovett-Racke, PhD;
Michael Racke, MD; Dana McTigue, PhD; and
Phillip Popovich, PhD.
Program, which is led by E. Antonio Chiocca,
MD, PhD, director of the Department of
Neurological Surgery.
S I G N AT U R E P R O G R A M
Neurosciences
Neurosciences Signature Program Steering Team - (seated from left): Anthony
Young, PhD; Kyle Sharp; E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD; Anand Satiani. (standing
from left): Allan Yates, MD, PhD; William Pease, MD; John Kissell, MD; Michael
Racke, MD; Wolfgang SadГ©e, PhD; David Sheppard; Sara Widing; Caroline
Whitacre, PhD. (not shown): Michael Beattie, PhD; Jacqueline Bresnahan, PhD;
Debbie Buonaiuto; Norton Neff, PhD; Radu Saveanu, MD; D. Bradly Welling, MD,
PhD; Todd Wheeler; William Yuh, MD.
22 Ohio State University Medical Center
Members of the Dardinger Laboratory for Neuro-Oncology and Neuroscience Research include: (seated from
left) Kazuhiko Kurozumi, MD, PhD; Nina Dmitrieva, PhD; Shigeru Tanaka, MD, PhD; and: (standing from left)
Balveen Kaur, PhD; Michal Oskar Nowicki, PhD; E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, director of the Department of
Neurological Surgery; Sean Lawler, PhD; Mariano Viapiano, PhD; and Suzanne Camilli, MSPH, lab manager. Not
shown are: Laboratory Chief Yoshinaga Saeki, MD, PhD; Masatake Suzuki, PhD; Akihiro Otsuki, MD, PhD; Kazue
Kasai, PhD; Hiroshi Nakashima, PhD; Jakub Godlewski, PhD; and Bin Hu, PhD.
Led by E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, the Neurosciences
Signature Program involves research from multiple disciplines,
including neurological surgery, neurology, neurosciences,
molecular neurobiology, pharmacology, psychiatry, psychology, ENT (ear, nose and throat), the Center for Brain and Spine
Injury, and others. The Neurosciences clinical program encompasses neuro-oncology/skull base, spine trauma, stroke/cerebrovascular, neuromuscular/multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders/dementia, and neuromodulation.
Clinical research within this program occurs in the Cognitive
Neuroscience Laboratory, the Dardinger Laboratory for NeuroOncology and Neuroscience Research, and in the departments
of Neurology, Neurological Surgery, and Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation, as well as in the School of Allied Medical
Professions. Basic research is conducted in the Neurobiology
of Disease Institute, the Center for Molecular Neurobiology,
the Department of Neuroscience, the Department of
Pharmacology and in the Division of Neuropathology.
Neurosciences Signature Program highlights of 2006:
• The program recruited 10 acclaimed faculty in Neurology,
Neurological Surgery and Psychiatry.
• The Department of Neurological Surgery and the
Department of Neurology were recognized by U.S.News &
World Report on the magazine’s annual listing of top-ranked
clinical programs for the third consecutive year.
• Department of Neurological Surgery faculty performed 1,439
neurosurgical procedures, including gamma knife radiosurgery, fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (FSRS),
endovascular obliteration of brain aneurysms and deep brain
stimulation.
• Inpatient volume throughout the Neurosciences Signature
Program increased from 2,925 in 2005 to 3,278 in 2006
(10.5 percent), while outpatient visits rose from 25,220 in
2005 to 29,480 in 2006 (16.9 percent).
• The Department of Neurological Surgery received outside
research funding exceeding $1.6 million. Total research
awards for all neuroscience PIs was $21.09 million in 2006
(this number is by principal investigator, or PI, not by department). Individual PIs include some from the departments of
Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Psychiatry and
Pharmacology, as well as the departments of Neurological
Surgery, Neurology and Neuroscience .
• The Dardinger Neuro-Oncology Center, co-directed by
E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, and Herbert Newton, MD,
participated in nine clinical trials and saw its outside
research funding – including grants from the National
Institutes of Health – top $1.75 million.
• Scientists within this Signature Program published several
articles in high-impact scientific journals such as Proceedings
of the National Academy of Sciences and Cancer Research.
• In one of the program’s largest collaborative research projects, medical scientists Herbert Newton, MD, Robert
Cavaliere, MD, Sean Lawler, PhD, E. Antonio Chiocca, MD,
PhD, and Yoshinaga Saeki, MD, PhD, are working with
Abhik Ray-Chaudhury, MD, of Neuropathology, and the laboratory team of Carlo Croce, MD, chair of the Department of
Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, to
investigate microRNA and its role in brain tumor transformation and pathogenesis.
2007 Research Report 23
Transplantation expertise at Ohio State
University Medical Center is consolidated in
the Comprehensive Transplant Center, which is
led by Ronald Ferguson, MD, PhD, and combines the Medical Center’s more than
35 years of experience in solid organ
Amer Rajab, MD, PhD, transplant surgeon
and director of Ohio State's Pancreas
and Islet Transplant Program, is shown
with Elizabeth Diakoff, MD, an endocrinologist who collaborated with Rajab
and his team to develop clinical protocols for islet cell transplant.
S I G N AT U R E P R O G R A M
transplantation with research advances that
translate to innovative patient care.
Tr a n s p l a n t a t i o n
Transplantation Signature Program Steering Team - (seated from left): Todd
Pesavento, MD; Amy Pope-Harman, MD; Susan Moffatt-Bruce, MD, PhD; Gregg
Hadley, PhD; (standing from left): Ronald Ferguson, MD, PhD; Mitchell Henry, MD.
24 Ohio State University Medical Center
Gregg Hadley, PhD, recently joined Ohio State's Comprehensive Transplant Center team
as deputy director of research. He focuses on the mechanisms of organ allograft
rejection and pancreatic islet allograft rejection in hopes of developing therapeutics
to prevent such rejection.
The Transplantation Signature Program, led by Ronald
Ferguson, MD, PhD, coordinates the clinical care of patients
needing kidney, liver, pancreas, heart or lung transplants. This
program also interfaces with the Medical Center’s Cancer
Signature Program (blood and marrow transplantation) and
the Cornea Transplant Program.
Transplantation expertise at the Medical Center is consolidated in Ohio State’s Comprehensive Transplant Center (CTC),
which was established in 2005 as the only comprehensive
adult transplant program in central Ohio. The CTC combines
the Medical Center’s more than 35 years of experience in solid
organ transplantation with research advances that translate to
innovative patient care. By creating a forum for collaboration
among experts from multiple transplantation disciplines, the
CTC team is able to transfer best clinical practices and
research expertise across specialties to enhance - and ultimately advance - patient care.
Transplantation Signature Program highlights of 2006:
• The CTC established a medical council to oversee patient
treatment strategies.
• The CTC developed multidisciplinary organ-specific patient
care teams for sophisticated pre- and post-transplant clinical
management.
• The CTC recruited five new faculty members, including
Gregg Hadley, PhD, as deputy director of research. Hadley is
a professor of Surgery whose research program is focused
on defining immunologic mechanisms underlying: 1) rejection of transplanted tissue and organs; and 2) graft-versushost disease elicited following bone marrow transplantation.
• In collaboration with other disciplines, the CTC increased
National Institutes of Health research funding to more than
$500,000 in total direct costs.
• The CTC hosted Ohio State’s first National Symposium on
Transplant Critical Care.
• CTC investigators initiated or maintained 16 separate clinical
trials of innovative immunosuppressive strategies in organ
transplant recipients.
• 346 patients received solid organ transplants at Ohio State’s
Medical Center. Based on volume, the Medical Center’s kidney transplant program is one of the top 10 in the nation,
and its kidney-pancreas transplant program ranks among
the top four.
2007 Research Report 25
Led by Ronald Glaser, PhD, the Institute for
Behavioral Medicine was established to stimulate and expand interdisciplinary collaboration
through experiments involving social and
behavioral influences, stress hormones and the
The Behavioral Medicine Support Program includes the
General Clinical Research Center Core Laboratory led by
William Malarkey, MD, who is shown here with: (from left)
lab manager Susan Mosely and clinical lab technologists
Marilyn Welt and Trina Wemlinger. Not shown is clinical
lab technologist Nancy Hughey.
S U P P O RT P RO G R A M
immune response on the health of human
subjects and animal models.
B e h av i o ra l M e d i c i n e
Behavioral Medicine Support Program Steering Team – (from left): John
Sheridan, PhD; William Malarkey, MD; Ronald Glaser, PhD.
26 Ohio State University Medical Center
The Behavioral Medicine Support Program includes the OSU Stress and Health Study
team led by Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD (third from right). Shown with her from left
are: Lindsay Mays; Nathan Deichert, PhD; Jean-Philippe Govin (seated); Cathie
Atkinson, PhD; and Alessa Smyth.
The Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research (IBMR) is the
unit in which Ohio State’s multidisciplinary program in psychoneuroimmunology is housed. Led by Ronald Glaser, PhD,
the IBMR was established to stimulate and expand interdisciplinary collaboration through experiments involving social and
behavioral influences, stress hormones and the immune
response on the health of human subjects and animal models.
•
Psychoneuroimmunology is an interdisciplinary program
involving four colleges (Medicine; Public Health; Dentistry;
and Social and Behavioral Sciences), including six academic
departments (Molecular Virology, Immunology & Medical
Genetics; Psychology; Psychiatry; Internal Medicine; Oral
Biology; and Biostatistics) and two other Health Sciences centers (the Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute and the
Comprehensive Cancer Center). This rapidly developing field
examines interactions among the nervous, endocrine and
immune systems, as well as implications of these connections
that will translate to healthcare practices.
•
Behavioral Medicine Support Program highlights of 2006:
•
• The laboratory of Virginia Sanders, PhD, was the first to
report on how CD86 (B7-2), a molecule that provides a
costimulatory signal necessary for T-cell activation and
survival, signals intracellularly.
• Daniel Ankeny, PhD, Virginia Sanders, PhD, Phillip
Popovich, PhD, and co-workers showed that experimental
spinal cord injury elicits chronic activation of a B cell-
•
•
dependent autoimmune response. In this novel study, high
levels of anti-DNA antibodies were detected in spinal cordinjured rats with a pattern that is similar to that seen in systemic lupus erythematosus.
Studies were published by Eric Yang, PhD, Clay Marsh, MD,
Ronald Glaser, PhD, and colleagues that show how stress
may affect tumor progression independent of the immune
response to a tumor.
The laboratory team of Ronald Glaser, PhD, explored the
role that psychological stress plays in modulating the
expression of latent Epstein-Barr virus, a human tumor virus.
Scientists in this program are addressing the interplay
between psychological factors and immune function as it
relates to basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of
human cancer.
They also performed studies addressing how interactions
between polyunsaturated fatty acid levels and depressive
symptoms were related to proinflammatory cytokine synthesis in older adults.
A further study in progress in the IBMR addresses the
immune and endocrine consequences of a yoga session.
Preliminary data from that study provided the basis for a
National Cancer Institute grant that will address fatigue and
inflammation in breast cancer survivors and show how a
yoga intervention may impact fatigue and inflammation.
2007 Research Report 27
The Department of Biomedical Informatics
(BMI), led by Joel Saltz, MD, PhD, is playing a
critical role in initiatives to translate, integrate,
share and analyze information that will
improve medical diagnosis, treatment and
patient outcomes.
Daniel Janies, PhD, of Biomedical Informatics,
reviews image data with student Victoria Best.
SUPPORT PROGRAM
Biomedical Informatics
Biomedical Informatics Steering Team – (standing from left): Tahsin Kurc, PhD;
Herb Smaltz, PhD; Metin Gurcan, PhD; Umit Catalyurek, PhD; and (seated from
left): Jeffrey Parvin, MD, PhD; Joel Saltz, MD, PhD; Philip Payne, PhD.
Inset: Jyoti Kamal, PhD
28 Ohio State University Medical Center
Members of the Biomedical Informatics Support Program lab team include: (standing from left) Scott
Oster; Tahsin Kurc, PhD; Justin Permar; Berkant Barla Cambazoglu, PhD; David Ervin; and (seated from
left): Stephen Langella; Joel Saltz, MD, PhD; Tony Pan; Shannon Hastings. Not shown are Metin Gurcan,
PhD, and Ashish Sharma, PhD.
In 21st-century medicine, decisions are data-driven. With scientists and clinicians generating data in unprecedented
amounts, health professionals must manage information to
make it meaningful. The Department of Biomedical Informatics
(BMI), led by Joel Saltz, MD, PhD, is playing a critical role in
initiatives to translate, integrate, share and analyze information that will improve medical diagnosis, treatment and patient
outcomes.
•
Biomedical Informatics Support Program highlights of 2006:
•
• BMI is shaping the development of cancer informatics technologies at the national and local levels. The goal of the
National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Biomedical Informatics
Grid (caBIGв„ў) is to develop applications and the underlying
systems architecture that connect data, tools, scientists and
organizations in an open federated environment. The BMI
middleware group developed caGrid, middleware that allows
sharing of data and analytical tools among cancer
researchers. caGrid has been adopted for imaging, clinical
trials, tissue banking and high-throughput molecular studies.
The in vivo imaging group has developed software for
reviewing and analyzing radiology and pathology images.
• BMI’s medical informatics team developed Quest, a database-independent application to support ad hoc query
development for Ohio State’s Integrated Cancer Biology
Program (ICBP) group. This application is integratable with
other software tools, such as Bioconductor, R, and GenePattern. BMI’s middleware group will deploy caGrid to the
national ICBP group to coordinate research among ICBP
centers.
• BMI is a leader in imaging informatics – creating tools, algorithms and technologies to share and analyze biomedical
image data. One emphasis is on algorithm development for
clinical image analysis and automated classification of different cancers. A second focus is on using image analysis to
•
•
quantitatively characterize the phenotypic features at molecular, cellular and tissue levels in 2-D and 3-D spaces in
breast cancer and the tumor microenvironment.
BMI’s work in systems biology/bioinformatics ranges from
mapping the spread of the avian flu virus to analyzing gene
regulation. Research to plot the course of H5N1, a dangerous
form of avian flu, used the online mapping program Google
Earth and has received international attention. Researchers
hope this information will help predict where the next outbreak of the virus may occur.
BMI is expanding the systems biology area through the joint
recruitment (with Ohio State’s Comprehensive Cancer
Center) of Jeffrey Parvin, MD, PhD, from Harvard University.
This expansion will focus on using many data sources to discover and analyze biochemical processes in such areas as
breast cancer. Computational and lab-based scientists will
collaborate to identify critical steps in carcinogenesis.
BMI initiated a program in Clinical and Translational
Research Informatics. Philip Payne, PhD, was recruited in a
joint appointment with Ohio State’s MedCenter IS group to
serve as both a BMI faculty member and in a new position
as translational research informatics architect for the
Medical Center. He will research knowledge engineeringbased approaches to the design of informatics platforms
supporting the discovery, integration and analysis of phenotypic, bio-molecular and research operations data. He will
also shape translational research information systems in the
context of his Medical Center duties.
BMI’s high-end computing group extended its work in combinatorial algorithms and parallel computing. Combinatorial
algorithms are an enabling technology for scientific computing, especially for large-scale problems and high performance. These techniques are improving computational performance in pathology image analysis and will be applied to
statistical genetics and detection of genetic interactions to
predict genetic risk.
2007 Research Report 29
The Human Cancer Genetics Program is
aligned with the Medical Center’s Department
of Molecular Virology, Immunology and
Medical Genetics (MVIMG), which has been
chaired by Carlo Croce, MD, since he arrived
Researchers in the Genetics Support
Program include: (from left) Carlo Croce,
MD; Huiling He, MD; Albert de la
Chapelle, MD, PhD; and Krystian
Jazdzewski, MD, PhD.
at Ohio State in 2004. Researchers in this
Department study the molecular genetics of
human disease and disease-causing organisms.
SUPPORT PROGRAM
Genetics
Genetics Support Program Steering Team – (from left): Chang-Gong Liu, PhD;
Kay Huebner, PhD; Hansjuerg Alder, PhD; Carlo Croce, MD.
30 Ohio State University Medical Center
The Genetics Support Program includes the lab team of Joanna Groden, PhD (standing, third from right),
who is shown here with: (seated from left) Kaylan Haizlip, graduate researcher; Patrick Grierson, graduate researcher; Sakmitri Bhattacharyya, PhD; and: (standing from left) Kiran Nadella, PhD; Cathy Ebert,
research consultant; Kyle Osterbrock, undergraduate researcher; Jeremy Keirsey, graduate researcher;
Qi Wang, research associate; Jiang Qian, PhD; Groden; Poorvi Dalal, student assistant; and Betty Russell,
graduate researcher.
Ohio State’s Human Cancer Genetics Program was already
world renowned when Carlo Croce, MD, was recruited in
2004 to assume leadership from program founder Albert de
la Chapelle, MD, PhD, who wanted to devote more time to
research. Since then, these two internationally acclaimed
geneticists and their colleagues have worked in tandem to
guide the program to even greater heights in the study of
genetics, which may hold the keys to curing cancer and other
diseases.
The Human Cancer Genetics Program is aligned with the
Medical Center’s Department of Molecular Virology,
Immunology and Medical Genetics (MVIMG), which has been
chaired by Croce since he arrived at Ohio State. Researchers in
this Department study the molecular genetics of human disease and disease-causing organisms. Their expertise ranges
from basic biophysical analysis to clinical translation in molecular genetics of cancer, immunology and immunogenetics, and
bacterial and viral pathogenesis.
• Faculty were awarded more than $8.9 million in research
funds; 46 percent of Department faculty salaries are covered
by research awards.
• In 2006, the Department recruited researcher Matthew
During, MD, PhD, an expert in neurobiology, gene therapy
and vector development.
• Carlo Croce, MD, Albert de la Chapelle, MD, PhD, and Kay
Huebner, PhD, identified specific microRNAs as causative
for solid and hematopoietic tumors.
• Richard Fishel, PhD, vice chair of research for MVIMG, discovered novel DNA repair-based cellular mechanisms for
defense against retroviral infection.
• Tim Huang, PhD, Christoph Plass, PhD, and Ramana
Davuluri, PhD, devised new combined bioinformatics methods for systems biology analysis.
• Christoph Plass, PhD, described epigenetic regulation of
tumor-suppressor genes in lung and head and neck tumors.
Genetics Support Program highlights of 2006:
• MVIMG has 34 tenure track faculty and 13 research track
faculty. More than 65 percent of faculty garner independent
research funds and nearly 65 percent maintain multiple
grant awards.
2007 Research Report 31
Investigators in Ohio State’s Center for Microbial
Interface Biology (CMIB) are leading the way
to new diagnostic strategies, therapies and
vaccines against a number of microscopic killers.
Internationally recognized scientists are per-
The Microbial Pathogenesis/Biodefense
Program includes the research lab of
Bradford McGuire, MD, PhD, shown here with
research associate Manjusha Kulkarni, PhD.
forming innovative bench and translational
science designed to improve the health of
the nation.
PROGRAM OF INTEREST
Microbial Pathogenesis/
Biodefense
Microbial Pathogenesis/Biodefense Steering Team – (from left): Robert
Munson, PhD; Joanne Turner, PhD; John Gunn, PhD; and Larry Schlesinger, MD.
32 Ohio State University Medical Center
Investigators in the Microbial
Pathogenesis/Biodefense
Program include the lab team
of Amal Amer, MD, PhD (left),
shown here with research
assistant Anwari Akhter
(center) and graduate
research associate
Laura Frantz.
The United States and other nations face a growing crisis
related to suffering and death from a variety of infections.
These include: ongoing pandemics of tuberculosis, AIDS and
malaria; emerging and re-emerging infectious agents such as
influenza and food-borne illnesses; multidrug-resistant
pathogens, recently highlighted by the case of XDR tuberculosis; community-associated staph infections; and infections in
immunocompromised individuals such as those with cancer,
transplants or illnesses requiring time in hospital critical care units.
Investigators in Ohio State’s Center for Microbial Interface
Biology (CMIB) are leading the way to new diagnostic strategies, therapies and vaccines against a number of these invisible killers. Internationally recognized scientists are performing
innovative bench and translational science designed to
improve the health of the nation. A focus on broad-based
interdisciplinary scientific platforms is enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of discoveries. This is exemplified by a significant growth in funded programs, publications and international visibility related to the Center’s activities. The CMIB also
is partnering with several Ohio State colleges, centers and
institutes as well as the Medical Center’s Signature Programs.
Program highlights of 2006:
• The CMIB was awarded University “Center” status by the
Ohio State Board of Trustees in December 2006
(http://cmib.osu.edu). The CMIB has seven core faculty
members. Five of them, along with their lab personnel and
the Center’s administrative leadership, have moved to the
10th floor of the Biomedical Research Tower. Membership
has grown to 58 faculty, representing units across the
Columbus and Wooster campuses and Columbus Children’s
Research Institute. Grant support for core faculty members
in 2006 totaled $11.16 million.
• A campus-wide Biosafety Level 3 (BSL 3) core facilities program was established under the governance of the CMIB. All
Ohio State investigators and off-campus partners have
access to these state-of-the-art facilities. This is one of the
most developed university biocontainment programs in the
country.
• Ohio State became a member of the National Institutes of
Health (NIH)-funded Great Lakes Regional Centers of
Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases
Research Program. CMIB faculty members have been awarded a program grant and a development project totaling
$1.15 million.
• The CMIB is part of a team of investigators from six colleges
(Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Biological Sciences,
Pharmacy, Public Health, and Food, Agricultural and
Environmental Sciences) that received a Provost Targeted
Investment in Excellence program totaling $4.79 million and
entitled “Public Health Preparedness for Infectious Diseases.”
• Two faculty members were recruited in a creative partnership with the Department of Microbiology in the College of
Biological Sciences: Chad Rappleye, PhD, from Washington
University (fungal pathogenesis), and Stephanie Seveau,
PhD, from the University of Michigan (Listeria pathogenesis).
• The CMIB “Host-Pathogen Seminar Series” brought six internationally recognized experts in microbe-host interactions to
campus during 2006.
2006 grant highlights include:
• Lung innate immune responses to Francisella tularensis: a
central role for the macrophage (National Institutes of
Health/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Region V Great Lakes Regional Center of Excellence for
Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Disease Research) Larry Schlesinger, MD, PI. This project studies the lung
innate immune response to Francisella tularensis, the
causative bacterium of tularemia and a targeted agent of
bioterrorism. This $1.05 million program project grant
includes investigators in both the CMIB and the Davis Heart
and Lung Research Institute.
• Salmonella antimicrobial peptide resistance (National
Institutes of Health/National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases) - John Gunn, PhD, PI. This study, funded at $1.16 million, focuses on the PmrA-PmrB regulon,
including the identification and characterization of PmrAPmrB-regulated genes necessary for antimicrobial peptide
resistance and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification.
2007 Research Report 33
Electrophysiologists (EPs) – cardiologists who
treat electrical malfunctions of the heart – use
sophisticated technology and equipment to
identify and destroy, or ablate, heart tissue
responsible for arrhythmias. Ohio State’s Ross
Heart Hospital team has nine EPs who are
experts in the various arrhythmia treatment
options, including the next generation of
Electrophysiologists at Ohio State's Ross
Heart Hospital use the new Stereotaxis
Magnetic Navigation System technology to
perform cardiac ablations. The system's
computer-guided functionality allows the
physician to better control the motion of
the catheter as it is navigated to the heart.
catheter-based care: Stereotaxis Magnetic
Navigation System, which uses magnet-guided
catheters to provide precise control not found
in other equipment for treating arrhythmias.
PROGRAM OF INTEREST
Electrophysiology
Electrophysiology Program Steering Team - (from left): Ashish Gangasani, MD;
Ralph Augostini, MD; Emile Daoud, MD; Mahmoud Houmsse, MD; Steven
Kalbfleisch, MD; Macy Smith, MD; Raul Weiss, MD; David Hart, MD; Doron
Menachemi, MD.
34 Ohio State University Medical Center
Shown in one of the state-of-the-art electrophysiology labs at Ohio State's Ross Heart Hospital are electrophysiologists Emile Daoud, MD (left), and Steven Kalbfleisch, MD (right).
The Electrophysiology Program at Ohio State’s Ross Heart
Hospital offers a full range of medical and catheter-based
treatments for cardiac arrhythmia, an abnormal rhythm of the
heart that can cause it to pump less effectively and lead to
problems with heart chamber contractions. An arrhythmia
occurs when the heart beats too fast, beats too slowly or skips
beats because its electrical impulses become disjointed or disorganized. Some arrhythmias may barely cause symptoms,
but others can result in such complications as fainting, stroke
or cardiac arrest.
Electrophysiologists (EPs) – cardiologists who treat electrical
malfunctions of the heart – use sophisticated technology and
equipment to identify and destroy, or ablate, heart tissue
responsible for arrhythmias. The Ross Heart Hospital team
has nine EPs who are experts in the various arrhythmia treatment options, including the next generation of catheter-based
care: Stereotaxis Magnetic Navigation System, which uses
magnet-guided catheters to provide precise control not found
in other equipment for treating arrhythmias.
Electrophysiologist Emile Daoud, MD, says patients benefit
from this technique by having a quicker, safer procedure. And
afterward, he adds, many patients no longer require medication
for heart rhythm problems.
Program highlights of 2006:
• Five electrophysiologists were recruited to bolster arrhythmia
treatment capabilities.
• Approximately 120 new staff – including nurses, technicians,
researchers and administrators – were hired to support the
expanded team of electrophysiology physicians.
• Multidisciplinary specialty clinics were established for Atrial
Fibrillation and Genetic Arrhythmias.
• An electrophysiology research section was established in
Ohio State’s Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute with
the addition of five electrophysiology research nurses.
• The Electrophysiology Program has more than 25 research
protocols.
• The program structured an electrophysiology floor with specially trained staff to tend to the treatment of patients with
arrhythmias. It also designed a 24-hour consultative service.
• Two additional invasive electrophysiology labs were established along with the Stereotaxis Magnetic Navigation
System, thus providing a total of five invasive electrophysiology laboratories.
• The program extended its electrophysiology fellowship from
one to two years and from one to two trainees per year.
2007 Research Report 35
esearc
Current NIH PROGRAM PROJECT GRANTS, CENTER GRANTS
AND LARGE MULTIPROJECT GRANTS IN 2006
Program Project Grants (PPGs) and Center Grants
from the National Institutes of Health are among the
largest and most prestigious funding awards in
biomedical research. Headed by a lead investigator,
these multimillion dollar grants comprise several
individual projects, each equivalent to an NIH R01
grant and led by a co-investigator. This enables several
investigators to work together toward a common
mission. This section of the Research Report reviews
active PPGs, CGs and other large-scale grants at Ohio
State University Medical Center.
36 Ohio State University Medical Center
NIH Program Project Grants,
Center Grants and Large MultiProject Grants in 2006
Project 3: Chemokine regulation in human SLE
nephritis – Brad Rovin, MD
Project 4: Pathogenesis of SLE relapse in humans –
Lee Hebert, MD
PROGRAM PROJECT GRANTS
INNATE IMMUNITY: ELUCIDATION/
MODULATION CANCER THERAPY
Michael Caligiuri, MD, lead investigator –
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of
Hematology and Oncology. This PPG stresses innovative clinical cancer immunotherapy trials based
on current understanding of innate immunology, as
well as basic investigation into innate immune
effector cell function in preparation for subsequent,
more refined clinical cancer immunotherapy trials.
DNA METHYLATION AND CHROMATIN
MODIFICATIONS: MECHANISMS AND
APPLICATIONS IN CANCER
Samson Jacob, PhD, program director – Department
of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry. The longterm objective of this PPG is to advance basic
understanding of the epigenetic regulation of gene
expression in cancer cells and to rapidly translate
the basic discovery of the molecular mechanisms
into clinical trials in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).
Project 1: Innate immunity: elucidation/modulation cancer therapy – John Byrd, MD, and Pierluigi
Porcu, MD
Project 1: Clinical investigation of epigenetic therapy
– John Byrd, MD
Project 2: Homeostatic control of FcyR-triggered
macrophage function – Susheela Tridandapani, PhD
Project 2: Identification of methylated genes in
chronic lymphocytic leukemia – Christoph Plass, PhD
Project 3: Immune regulation of natural killer (NK)
cell subsets – Michael Caligiuri, MD, Sherif Farag,
MD, PhD, and Ramana Davuluri, PhD
Project 3: Altered expression of protein tyrosine
phosphatase by methylation: potential role in tumor
suppression – Samson Jacob, PhD
Project 4: Two signal requirements for NK immunity
– William Carson III, MD
Project 4: Histone modification and changes in
chromatin: silencing of tumor-suppressor genes –
Mark Parthun, PhD
GENETIC AND CLINICAL RISK FOR
HUMAN SLE NEPHRITIS
Project 5: Brg1 and hBrm-associated histone methyltransferase: target genes in cancer therapy – Saïd
Sif, PhD
Lee Hebert, MD, program director – Department of
Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology. This project is studying risk factors for systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) nephritis and its relapse in
humans.
GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE BREAST
TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT
Project 1: Genetic variants of CR1 and FcR in human
SLE nephritis – Daniel Birmingham, PhD
Michael Ostrowski, PhD, program director –
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.
This PPG uses human genetic approaches and
mouse genetic models to study how non-tumor
cells in direct contact with tumor
Project 2: Complement C4 and HLA class III genes
in human genes in human SLE – Chack-Yung Yu, PhD
2007 Research Report 37
cells help cancer progress. Research focuses on the
tumor microenvironment in breast cancer progression. Project findings may apply to any cancer of
epithelial tissue, including prostate, lung, colon and
liver.
Project 1: Genetic alterations in the epithelial and
stromal compartments of breast adenocarcinomas –
sub-grant with Cleveland Clinic Foundation – Charis
Eng, MD, PhD
and structural changes throughout the human
genome that appear linked to many types of cancer.
Primary goals are to: increase understanding of
complex epigenetic interactions in neoplasms; and
use high-end information for improved prognosis,
intervention and treatment of human female cancers.
Project 1: Dissecting hierarchies of epigenetic control in gene silencing – Tim Hui-Ming Huang, PhD
Project 2: Role of Rb and E2Fs in regulating stromal/epithelial interactions during mammary carcinogenesis – Gustavo Leone, PhD
Project 2: Integrating genomic and epigenomic
alterations in cancer and its microenvironment –
Shili Lin, PhD
Project 3: Role of the Ras/ets-2 pathway in breast
tumor progression – Michael Ostrowski, PhD
Project 3: Chromatin landscaping of TGF-P/SMAD
signaling targets – Ramana Davuluri, PhD
MECHANISMS OF CHRONIC PATHOBIOLOGY IN ALLOGRAFTS
Project 4: Predicting drug resistance in cancer
genomes by DNA methylation profiling – Tim HuiMing Huang, PhD
Arthur Strauch III, PhD, program director –
Department of Physiology and Cell Biology. This
project studies the alloimmune processes that generate TGFbeta and the mechanisms by which
TGFbeta promotes pathogenesis in allografts.
Project 1: Role of alloantibodies in allograft pathobiology – Ronald Pelletier, MD
Project 2: Role of macrophages in remodeling and
rejection of solid organ transplants – Clay Marsh, MD
Project 3: Myofibroblasts and fibrositis after cardiac
transplant – Arthur Strauch, PhD
INTEGRATED CANCER BIOLOGY PROGRAM (ICBP)
COLLABORATIVE AGREEMENT
INTERROGATING EPIGENETIC CHANGES
IN CANCER GENOMES
Tim Hui-Ming Huang, PhD, program director –
Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and
Medical Genetics. This project studies two chemical
38 Ohio State University Medical Center
SPECIALIZED CENTER GRANTS
SPECIALIZED CENTER OF RESEARCH:
EXPERIMENTAL THERAPEUTICS IN CLL
John Byrd, MD, program director – Division of
Hemotology and Oncology. This SCOR focuses on
chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), especially in
patients at high risk due to the presence of a genetic
abnormality. The central theme is the pursuit of preclinical (basic science) and clinical investigations of
multi-targeted therapies. The team consists of four
collaborating groups at Ohio State. The likely outcomes of the studies are: a better understanding of
the effectiveness of an existing drug (flavopiridol) in
treating CLL; development of better methods to use
the drugs depsipeptide and HDAC-42 in conjunction with immunotherapy to treat CLL; development of more potent forms of depsipeptide and
HDAC-42; and identification of targets (proteins)
that may form the basis for the discovery of drugs
to treat CLL. One notable aspect of this SCOR team
is the inclusion of a chemistry team capable of
changing existing drugs to improve their effectiveness and creating new drugs based on the results of
the research projects pursed by the SCOR.
Project 1: Pre-clinical and clinical development of
flavopiridol in CLL – Michael Grever, MD
Project 2: Chromatin remodeling as a therapeutic
target to enhance biolic therapies in CLL – Michael
Freitas, PhD
Project 3: Therapeutic targeting of novel kinases in
CLL – John Byrd, MD
through continued basic, translational and clinical
research. This grant finances the OSUCCC leadership and administration. It also funds several shared
resources that facilitate collaboration among
researchers. The OSUCCC comprises seven
research programs, including Cancer Control,
Experimental Therapeutics, Immunology, Molecular
Biology and Cancer Genetics, Molecular
Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, Pediatric
Oncology, and Viral Oncogenesis.
Project 4: Molecular target-based therapeutics for
CLL – Ching-Shih Chen, PhD
OSU NEUROSCIENCE CORE
REDUCING CERVICAL CANCER IN
APPALACHIA
Electra Paskett, PhD, MSPH, program director –
College of Public Health, Epidemiology Division and
Comprehensive Cancer Center member. The objective of this Center Grant is to conduct two interventions aimed at reducing cervical cancer rates and
also to examine strains of human papillomavirus
(HPV) among women in Appalachia.
Project 1: Cervical cancer screening among
Appalachian populations – Electra Paskett, PhD
Project 2: Tobacco use and cessation among
Appalachian women – Mary Ellen Wewers, PhD
Project 3: Correlates of abnormal pap smears in
Appalachia – Electra Paskett, PhD
John Oberdick, PhD, program director –
Department of Neuroscience – This core funding
enhances investigator access to a variety of animal
model systems at Ohio State. The aims are: to support current National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)-funded research
projects; to facilitate interactive projects among
principal investigators; and to facilitate interactions
among basic and translational researchers at Ohio
State.
Core A: Administration – PI, John Oberdick, PhD
Core B: Genetics (transgenic mouse & zebra fish) –
PI, Anthony Young, PhD
Core C: Rodent behavioral phenotyping – PI, Randy
Nelson, PhD
Core D: Electrophysiology – PI, Mike Xi Zhu, PhD
Reducing cervical cancer in Appalachia, diversity
training supplement – Kimberly Kelly, PhD
Core E: Confocal microscopy – PI, Anthony Brown,
PhD
CORE GRANTS
OSU COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER
SUPPORT GRANT (OSUCCC)
Michael Caligiuri, MD, program director –
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of
Hematology and Oncology. The overall goal of the
OSUCCC is to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality
2007 Research Report 39
esearc
Major Research Centers AFFILIATED WITH
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
Several interdisciplinary health sciences programs at
The Ohio State University have become so large and
prominent that they attract significant external funding
and merit their own administrative structure. These
major research centers, which also benefit from their
proximity to the main Ohio State campus with its
equally renowned colleges in other disciplines, are
highlighted in this section.
40 Ohio State University Medical Center
COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER
(OSUCCC)
Michael Caligiuri, MD, Director
The Cancer Centers Program of
the National Cancer Institute
supports specific academic and
research institutions throughout
the United States to sustain
broad-based, coordinated, interdisciplinary programs in cancer
research. In 1976 the National
Cancer Institute (NCI) designated The Ohio State
University as one of the nation’s first
Comprehensive Cancer Centers. The OSUCCC
focuses on all aspects of cancer care: prevention,
diagnosis, treatment, control, rehabilitation and
education. As one of only 39 NCI-designated
Comprehensive Cancer Centers, the OSUCCC’s top
priority is translating basic research findings into
clinical applications. The OSUCCC has approximately 215 cancer investigators representing 14 of
the 18 colleges at Ohio State, as well as another 60
cancer investigators at affiliated institutions, including Columbus Children’s Hospital (CCH) and the
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
(CCHMC). The OSUCCC comprises seven research
programs whose member investigators collectively
generate nearly $125 million annually in cancer-relevant research funding, more than three quarters of
which is peer-reviewed funding.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Cancer Control – Focuses on early detection, survivorship and behavioral strategies related to cancer prevention and control. Co-Leaders: Electra
Paskett, PhD, MsPH, and Mary Ellen Wewers,
PhD, MPH, RN
• Experimental Therapeutics – Evaluates novel therapeutics, imaging, cell therapeutics and drug targeting. Co-Leaders: Michael Grever, MD, and
Samson Jacob, PhD
• Immunology – Focuses on basic T-cell biology, with
applications in vaccine development, and on cellular innate immunity, with applications in antibody-
dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Leader: William
Carson III, MD
• Molecular Biology and Cancer Genetics – Seeks to
understand the control of gene expression as it
relates to cell proliferation, DNA replication, differentiation, developmental regulation and the
molecular basis of cancer. Co-Leaders: Albert de
la Chapelle, MD, PhD, and Michael Ostrowski,
PhD
• Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention –
Investigates effects of genetic alterations induced
by chemical toxins and infectious agents, identifies tumor-suppressor genes and studies other
aspects of multi-stage carcinogenesis. Leader:
Steven Clinton, MD, PhD
• Pediatric Oncology – Enhances the care of children
with blood diseases and cancer through innovative
research and facilitation of translational research
studies, and improves care for cancer survivors.
Co-Leaders: John Perentesis, MD (at CCHMC)
and Stephen Qualman, MD (at CCH)
• Viral Oncogenesis – Seeks to discover which retroviruses contribute to human cancer and to develop and implement gene-delivery strategies using
retroviral vectors. Co-Leaders: E. Antonio Chiocca,
MD, PhD, and Patrick Green, PhD
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• The OSUCCC – James Cancer Hospital and Solove
Research Institute received a five-year, $1.25 million Livestrong Survivorship Center of Excellence
grant from the Lance Armstrong Foundation
(LAF). The grant will provide operational support
for research, educational and patient support
services for cancer survivors. Charles Shapiro, MD,
is principal investigator of the grant and director
of the survivorship center, which is one of only
seven such centers funded by the LAF in the
United States.
• Led by principal investigator Samson Jacob, PhD,
co-leader of the Experimental Therapeutics
Program, the OSUCCC received a five-year, $11.84
million program project grant from the National
Cancer Institute (NCI) entitled “DNA Methylation
and Chromatin Modifications: Mechanisms &
2007 Research Report 41
Applications in Cancer Therapy.” This is the sixth
NCI programmatic grant awarded to OSUCCC
investigators in the past five years.
• The OSUCCC increased its level of research funding from the NCI by 12.5 percent, from $35.2 million in 2005 to $39.6 million in 2006.
• Through collaborations with multiple Ohio State
University colleges and departments, the
OSUCCC recruited 20 cancer faculty, physicians
and scientists.
• Former OSUCCC Director Clara Bloomfield, MD,
who now serves as cancer scholar and senior
adviser to the OSUCCC – James Cancer Hospital
and Solove Research Institute, was selected as a
Distinguished University Professor at Ohio State,
the University’s highest faculty award. Bloomfield
also received the prestigious Distinguished
Service Award for Scientific Achievement from the
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).
• Another 12 OSUCCC investigators were named
Fellows in the American Association for the
Advancement of Science (AAAS). In all, 45
OSUCCC members are now AAAS Fellows.
• Three OSUCCC members – Manisha Shah, MD;
Kimberly Kelly, PhD; and Vipul Patel, MD, were
recognized for their achievements by Business
First’s “Forty Under Forty” program.
• Carlo Croce, MD, who leads the Human Cancer
Genetics Program at Ohio State and is a member
of the OSUCCC’s Molecular Biology and Cancer
Genetics Program, led a team of investigators
from three colleges and five departments to a successful bid for a five-year, $6.1 million Targeted
Investment in Excellence (TIE) award from Ohio
State. The grant will focus on developing, validating and commercializing tests and microRNA
drugs for the diagnosis, monitoring, prognosis and
treatment of human malignancies.
• The OSUCCC – James Cancer Hospital and Solove
Research Institute moved from 29th in 2005 to
21st in 2006 in U.S.News & World Report’s annual
rankings of “America’s Best Hospitals” for cancer
care.
42 Ohio State University Medical Center
COMPREHENSIVE TRANSPLANT CENTER
Ronald Ferguson, MD, PhD, Director
Established in February 2005,
Ohio State’s Comprehensive
Transplant Center encompasses
all solid organ and cellular transplantation programs at OSUMC
and involves faculty from a wide
cross-section of clinical and
research programs. Thoracic,
abdominal and cellular transplant programs at Ohio
State formerly operated independently of one
another within their respective academic units.
These programs enjoyed many recognized successes, especially in the kidney, pancreas and bone marrow transplant programs – which are among the
best in the country – but University officials determined that even more could be accomplished by
working more closely together, particularly on
research projects.
“Ohio State and other top transplant programs
around the country have on-site research and education programs that serve as an engine to clinical
care,” says Ronald Ferguson, MD, PhD, director of
the Comprehensive Transplant Center. “The Center
is a common thread that weaves through each of
the programs and is a driver for enhancing collaboration.”
Each transplant program maintains direct links to its
respective academic department, but the
Comprehensive Transplant Center is closely
involved in support and operation of the programs,
including grant acquisition and faculty recruitment.
Within the Center, teams of researchers and clinicians from each of the transplant areas pursue projects of common interest in transplantation, including immunopharmacology, immune assessment
monitoring and engineering, building information
systems and biostatistic databases, and public policy and ethics. Among projects the Center is pursuing are an islet cell transplantation program and
expansion of the lung and liver transplantation programs.
DOROTHY M. DAVIS HEART AND LUNG
RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Jay Zweier, MD, Director
The Ohio State University’s
Dorothy M. Davis Heart and
Lung Research Institute (OSU
DHLRI) is one of the nation’s
few free-standing facilities
devoted entirely to the research
of diseases affecting the heart,
lungs and blood vessels. Its mission is to develop novel strategies to prevent and
cure heart and lung diseases. The Institute is an
internationally recognized center of excellence for
medical research that leads to findings with broadbased applications to other diseases and conditions.
Ongoing Research Programs
Four major thematic areas:
• Myocardial ischemia and metabolism
• Myocyte biology and disease
• Inflammation, fibrosis and immune function
• Regenerative medicine
Sub-areas of specialized focus:
• Cardiovascular and molecular imaging
• Cardiovascular genomics and pharmacogenomics
• Myocardial salvage and regeneration post myocardial infarction
• Molecular therapies and devices for the treatment
of heart failure
• Fibrosis, remodeling and lung injury
• Innate immune system function
• Mitochondria biology and critical care disease
• Control of lung inflammation to prevent lung fibrosis
• Environmental and smoking-induced heart and
lung disease
• Tissue engineering and stem cell biology
• Nitric oxide biology and signaling
• Redox biology and free-radical research
• Molecular and cellular therapies of tissue repair
and wound healing
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Demonstrated that sustained reverse left ventricular structural remodeling, at one year, can be
achieved with cardiac resynchronization, and that
this efficacy is a function of the etiology of heart
failure.
• Demonstrated that monocyte chemoattractant
protein-1 induces a novel transcription factor that
causes cardiac myocyte apoptosis and ventricular
dysfunction.
• Identified an aspirin derivative that donates nitric
oxide, is highly effective in myocardial protection
and shows potential to enhance cancer therapy.
• Determined the effects of platelet antigen polymorphism on platelet inhibition by aspirin, clopidogrel or their combination.
• Demonstrated that microRNA-155 regulates
human angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression.
• First identified that abnormal interactions of calsequestrin with the ryanodine receptor calcium
release channel are linked to exercise-induced
sudden cardiac death.
• Demonstrated that mitochondrial iPLA2 activity
modulates apoptosis through the release of
cytochrome c from mitochondria and influences
the permeability transition.
• Demonstrated that proteasome inhibition downregulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation and function.
• Characterized the mechanism by which nitric
oxide and nitrosothiol generation occurs from
organic nitrates.
• Performed the first transcriptome analysis of the
ischemia-reperfused remodeling myocardium,
which identified the temporal changes in inflammation and extracellular matrix.
• Collaboratively recruited key assistant professors
in the Department of Internal Medicine’s Division
of Cardiovascular Medicine and in the School of
Public Health.
• Collaboratively recruited key professors in the
Department of Internal Medicine’s Division of
Cardiovascular Medicine and in the Department
of Surgery’s Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery.
2007 Research Report 43
• Established an Intramural Thematic Grants
Program to encourage and support DHLRI investigators in developing programs and careers in the
four major thematic research areas. In autumn
2006, the program funded 12 investigators for a
total of $831,855.
• Identified three genetic mutations that predispose
young individuals to sudden cardiac death.
• Received two National Institutes of Health programmatic grants (PPGs) in ischemic heart disease and myocardial protection in partnership
with other institutions.
• Received approximately $4 million from the
National Institutes of Health and the National
Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering for establishing the nation’s first program for
proton electron hyperpolarization imaging.
• Received funding for the first redox proteomics
grant.
• Created the Ohio State University Vascular
Research and Imaging Center and recruited a
director.
• Continued growth of the Cardiac MRI and CT
program.
• Created the Clinical and Research Center for
Echocardiography and recruited a director.
• The Comprehensive Wound Center, established by
DHLRI investigators, became a University-recognized center.
GENERAL CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTER
(GCRC)
William Malarkey, MD, Director
2006 was an exciting year for
Ohio State University’s General
Clinical Research Center, which
has approximately 100 active
protocols from 39 departments
in 10 colleges. Much of the
research in this Center is interdisciplinary, and GCRC investigators continue to be supported via national funding
agencies such as the National Institutes of Health.
44 Ohio State University Medical Center
Ongoing Research Programs
• Agriculture – Testing the validity of a simulated
environment with dangerous farm equipment
using endocrine measures to validate stressful
simulations
• AIDS/HIV – Phase I clinical trials for HIV-infected
subjects requiring hemodialysis
• Autism – Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
symptoms in autism; Risperidone and behavior
therapy in children with pervasive developmental
disorders; oral human immunoglobulin in autism
• Behavioral Medicine – Olfactory sensitivity and
physiological responses; caregiver stress in parents of children with mood disorders; chronic
stress and immune function
• Cancer – Stress and immunity project for women
with breast cancer; oral cancer studies; prostate
cancer and lycopene supplementation
• Cardiology – Management of patients with heart
failure; chronic heart failure and survivors of an
acute myocardial infarction
• Community – Resource and education projects in
Appalachian areas involving smoking cessation;
cancer and health behavior; nutrition, cancer and
the Amish
• Critical Care Medicine – Obese critically ill: outcome and process disparities
• Diabetes – Prevention trials; hyperglycemia and
hyperinsulinemia; type 2 diabetes mellitus; natural
history in African-Americans; management of
type 2 diabetes mellitus by conjugated linoleic
acid (CLA)
• Economics – Understanding human response to
economic risk with MRI and genetic polymorphisms
• Endocrinology – Metabolic energy requirements
for normal menstrual function; insulin resistance;
adiponectin in people of West African ancestry
• Exercise – Exercise as therapy for asthma; yoga,
exercise, immune function and health; insulin
resistance in football players
• Neurology – New therapies for amyotrophic lateral
sclerosis; multiple sclerosis; spinal muscular atrophy; myasthenia gravis; muscular dystrophy;
effects of psychosocial stress and genetics on
cognition
• Nutrition – Lifestyle and body weight changes in
young females; breast cancer risk in overweight
and obese premenopausal women
• Obesity – Aging, stress and chronic inflammation
• Obstetrics and Gynecology – Gestational diabetes
and inflammatory markers; vaginal ultrasound cerclage trial; psychosocial factors associated with
inflammatory and antibody responses to influenza
vaccination in pregnancy
• Ophthalmology – Idiopathic intracranial hypertension
• Pediatrics – Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis
function in adolescent antisocial females; growth
hormone and endothelial function; natural history
study of the development of type 1 diabetes; childhood obesity; hypoglycemia and endothelial function; health consequences of sleep apnea in obese
children and its association with gastroesophageal
reflux
• Pulmonary – Alveolar macrophage proteomics in
HIV-associated emphysema; COPD in patients
with AIDS; pulmonary rehabilitation exercise on
biobehavioral outcomes in COPD
• Renal – Genetic and clinical risk factors for human
SLE nephritis; African-American study of kidney
disease and hypertension; influence of fenofibrate
therapy on kidney function in CKD patients
• Smoking Cessation Studies – Nicotine dependence; race and nicotine metabolism
• Stress – Stress and wound healing; chronic stress
and immune function; caregiver stress and chronic
inflammation; Omega-3 dietary supplementation,
immune function, and mood
• Surgery – Gene expression profiles in healing and
non-healing wounds
• Transplantation – Bone architecture in patients with
renal transplant; living unrelated kidney donor and
sibling follow-up
• Education – The GCRC Mentoring Program,
directed by Philip Diaz, MD, over the past year
has recruited young physicians interested in clinical research and is preparing them to implement
research proposals. In 2006, eight protocols were
submitted by GCRC mentees. A K23 application
prepared by Naeem Ali, MD, was funded. In addition, Dara Schuster, MD, associate program direc-
tor, has established an introductory course on
clinical research. Its objectives are to introduce
undergraduates to clinical research as a career
opportunity, to teach basic skills with didactic lectures and hands-on training, and to provide a
mentored experience in clinical research.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• The GCRC is an important partner of a 2005awarded T32 grant entitled “Eliminating Barriers
to Effective Training in Clinical Investigation,” a
grant directed by Philip Binkley, MD. Only 10 of
these grants were funded nationally. Funded
through August 2010, this training proposal in
predoctoral clinical research will propose solutions
to major barriers to effective training and present
a strategy for determining whether the curriculum
addresses a critical need for increasing numbers
of clinician scientists. Specifically, this program
provides predoctoral nursing, dental and medical
students with an innovative curriculum of biostatistics, study design and ethical conduct of
research in an interactive team-learning approach,
delivered as a core curriculum to all students in
these respective programs at Ohio State and at
outside institutions for whom videoconference
participation will be offered. These students can
enter a short course in clinical research and an
intensive year-long curriculum culminating in a
master of public health degree with emphasis in
clinical investigation.
• Nursing – Approximately 30 percent of GCRC protocols involve pediatric participants. As of this
year, 100 percent of RNs on the unit have completed or maintained their Pediatric Advanced Life
Support training. Also, the majority of nurses are
certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support as an
increasing number of protocols require exercise
testing.
2007 Research Report 45
• Bionutrition – The resources (diet assessment,
body composition and metabolism, and cardiovascular testing and human performance) of the
GCRC’s Bionutrition Core have been increasingly
used by investigators. The Center has developed
an ability to enter body composition data directly
into databases from a bedside tablet computer.
Bionutrition research training programs for nurses,
technicians and students are being developed.
• Core Laboratory – The Laboratory Core, composed of processing and analytical laboratories,
provides analytical support for investigators. The
present menu, which is expanding, contains
research assay panels in: endocrine and neuroendocrine; metabolism, diabetes, obesity; inflammatory; and bone assays.
• Informatics – The Informatics Core offers services
in database management, administrative computing and project management. A major piece of
software written in 2006 by Informatics personnel
makes research patient scheduling more efficient.
This application is written in mod_perl using a
PostgreSQL database and is released under the
GNU General Public License. Consequently, this
open-source program will be freely available to
GCRCs nationally.
• Research Subject Advocacy (RSA) – The Center’s
Research Subject Advocacy program, which began
in 2002, ensures that GCRC studies are designed,
implemented and conducted safely and ethically,
affording the highest priority to the protection of
human subjects. The RSA is a resource and adviser to GCRC personnel, prospective and current
researchers, human subjects/research participants, and the GCRC Advisory Committee (GAC).
• Emerging Clinical Programs – The GCRC is
strengthening its connection with new clinical programs, such as the Center in Chronic Wound
Healing. The GCRC is participating in the growth
of this Center, which will be a coordinating center
for 16 university wound-healing programs across
the country. One protocol has already been
received for evaluating microarrays and proteomics from wound biopsies obtained from
chronic wound patients to better understand the
pathogenesis of wounds. And one paper published
by this group and supported by GCRC resources is
46 Ohio State University Medical Center
entitled, “Wound site neutrophil transcriptome in
response to psychological stress in young men”
(Gene Expression, 2005).
• CTSA Development and Opportunities – GCRC
staff have been involved in the CTSA process,
which led to a grant submission in January 2007.
As part of this process, the GCRC will be incorporated into the Participant and Clinical Interactions
Resources (PCIR) Core, which provides a highquality, ethical, safe and cost-effective environment that fosters education and training while
encouraging participation by the community and
investigators in clinical and translational lifespan
research. To transform the GCRC structure, the
Center incorporated various Health Sciences and
community clinical and translational resources
into the PCIR, which will link to the other key
functions of the CTSA. Other areas to be integrated into the PCIR include:
- Columbus Children’s Hospital Clinical Studies
Center – This is a 3,000-square-foot facility on
the sixth floor of the Outpatient Care Center on
the Children’s Hospital campus. The facility is
staffed by eight clinical research nurse coordinators and a psychometrician trained in psychometric assessments. It is equipped to perform:
specimen sample collection, processing and
storage; research subject recruitment; and data
collection and management.
- Comprehensive Cancer Center Clinical
Treatment Unit (CTU) – Housed in the Medical
Center’s James Cancer Hospital and Solove
Research Institute, the CTU has 1,700 square
feet for outpatient studies involving phase I and
II chemotherapy protocols.
To enhance its community translational component,
the GCRC has incorporated two additional units as
“laboratories” to create a “research unit without
walls”:
• Primary Care Practice-Based Research Network
for Pediatric and Adult Patients (PBRN) – This is
a network of 24 primary care sites throughout
central Ohio that serves as a community-based
translational research laboratory for a research
faculty with members from nine colleges and 22
departments at Ohio State, including Pediatrics.
• Ohio Extension Service – The Ohio Extension
Service is part of the College of Food, Agriculture
and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State.
Extension supports operations in all 88 counties
of Ohio. A major focus involves linking local community needs with Ohio State researchers.
Community-based health-related research is a
major thrust of Extension.
CENTER FOR BIOSTATISTICS
Stanley Lemeshow, PhD, Director
The Center for Biostatistics provides expertise with which biomedical investigators within and
outside The Ohio State
University can collaborate in
study design, data management
and statistical analysis of clinical, epidemiological, public
health and laboratory research data. As a central
resource, the Center has more than 20 full-time
staff who respond to requests for support of biomedical investigations. The Center also involves
many faculty in the Division of Biostatistics and the
Department of Statistics in this collaborative effort.
David Jarjoura, PhD, is the Center’s managing director.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Current grant activity includes eight Biostatistics
Core-type grants funded by the National Institutes
of Health.
• The Center is also supported by 10 R01s, 11 R21s
and various other grants.
• The grants bring in more than $26 million per year
to Ohio State.
• The grants involve collaborations with the colleges
of Medicine, Public Health, Veterinary Medicine
and Nursing, and with Columbus Children’s
Hospital.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Center staff collaborated in writing more than 90
grant proposals and had 48 publications, with
another 45 in submission. The Center promotes
the development of long-term collaborative relationships between its staff and other investigators
to increase efficiency, optimize productivity and
enhance responsiveness. Center personnel include
a director, a managing director, an administrator, a
human resource professional, five PhD biostatistical scientists, nine MS biostatisticians, a systems
programmer, a systems specialist, four PhD graduate students and three undergraduate students.
CENTER FOR CRITICAL CARE
Clay Marsh, MD, Director
In the spring of 2006, Clay
Marsh, MD, professor of
Internal Medicine, was named
director of a newly established
Center for Critical Care at Ohio
State University Medical Center.
Marsh also directs the Division
of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical
Care, and Sleep Medicine and is associate director
for lung research at Ohio State’s Dorothy M. Davis
Heart and Lung Research Institute. Medical Center
CEO Fred Sanfilippo, MD, PhD, says Marsh is an
excellent choice to advance the mission of critical
care medicine, which also has been identified as
one of six Signature Programs at the Medical
Center. “Through his translational research leadership and national stature, we will be able to more
fully integrate critical and clinical care, research and
education between medicine, surgery and anesthesiology,” Sanfilippo says. “Research has shown that
implementing evidence-based practices improves
outcomes for patients in critical care centers.”
2007 Research Report 47
Ongoing Research Programs
• The Center for Critical Care provides innovative
solutions for patients undergoing critical care and
for those with lung disease. It focuses on personalized health care that defines illness and treatment for each patient and transitions care from
disease management to prevention.
• The Center has begun training professionals who
care for patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)
environment with the Society of Critical Care
Medicine-sponsored Fundamentals of Critical
Care Support course – the first effort for global
training in using this tool in the ICU.
• The Center’s focus on sepsis (organ failure from
infection) and personalized health care for
patients is moving forward with the establishment
of a registry of patients diagnosed with sepsis.
This resource will allow caregivers to define risk
factors leading to sepsis and identify new targets
for patients with this life-threatening disease.
• Clinically, the Center is leveraging the Medical
Center’s Information Warehouse to ensure that
the Center is executing evidence-based medicine
for all patients in the ICU environment. Caregivers
are tracking outcomes to define new pathways
that will more effectively treat patients in the ICU.
CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
JOHN A. PRIOR HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY
Susan Kroll, MLS, Director
Now in its second phase of
development, the Ohio State
University Center for
Knowledge Management
(CKM), housed in the John A.
Prior Health Sciences Library,
will become one of the nation’s
most comprehensive repositories for global biomedical knowledge and intellectual capital. The library provides cost-effective access
to biomedical knowledge, identifies and makes
available knowledge and key research findings,
expedites packaging of information content as
48 Ohio State University Medical Center
reusable and sharable resources, facilitates understanding and helps incorporate information
resources into work processes. The CKM offers: upto-date information and tools to support instructional technology; graphic, photographic and print
production; interactive multimedia; e-learning management; and an ability to meet the customized
Web needs of its customers.
Ongoing Research Programs
Center for Knowledge Management
• Tim Cain, PhD, is principal investigator for
OSU:pro, a phase 1 implementation of a campuswide data-integration tool for tracking faculty
and staff expertise at Ohio State. Funded by a
$480,000 grant, the project is sponsored by the
offices of Academic Affairs, Health Sciences
University CIO and University Libraries.
• In May 2006, Tim Cain, PhD, Chris Fish and
Elizabeth Sabatino filed a provisional patent application with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
for a data-integration tool for synthesizing the tacit
and explicit knowledge of University personnel.
• In July 2006, Daniel Sabatino, Dave Dipietro, Pam
Pierron and Tammy Thompson filed an invention
report with the Office of Technology Licensing and
Commercialization at Ohio State. T. MedSTAR:
Leveraging data services to manage, track and
contextualize the academic performance, records
and curricular activities of professional students.
Prior Health Sciences Library
• Pamela Bradigan, principal investigator, and Fern
Cheek, co-investigator, are working to determine
what type of academic medical center library support is provided to biomedical researchers conducting clinical trials.
• Jane Case-Smith, principal investigator, and Carol
Powell, co-investigator, are analyzing trends in
occupational therapy research for the past five
years by reviewing articles published in journals in
that field.
• Lynda Hartel, principal investigator, and Fern
Cheek, co-investigator, are examining electronic
book technology to assess how OSUMC faculty,
staff and students use this format for their information needs.
• After implementation of the National Institutes of
Health Public Access Policy in 2005, Lynda
Hartel, principal investigator, and Jan Maxwell,
co-investigator, are examining libraries’ and publishers’ commitments to this forum, assessing the
different mix of models, education of grant recipients to the policy and promotion of open access
publishing to faculty members.
• Eric Schnell, principal investigator, is researching
these questions related to library technology: Are
libraries structured or organized to innovate?
Which technologies will soon affect libraries?
How can Web site mashups and Web services be
used in libraries?
• The John A. Prior Health Sciences Library was
designated as an Outreach Library and awarded a
$2,000 grant (May 2006-April 2007) by the
Greater Midwest Region of the National Networks
of Libraries of Medicine. Marguerite Weibel is
principal investigator.
CENTER FOR MICROBIAL INTERFACE
BIOLOGY (CMIB)
Larry Schlesinger, MD, Director
The Center for Microbial
Interface Biology (CMIB), created by Larry Schlesinger, MD, in
2002, was awarded official
University center status by the
Ohio State University Board of
Trustees in December 2006.
The CMIB is a multidisciplinary
research center focused on microbe-host interactions that promotes and coordinates interdisciplinary
research and training opportunities in infectious diseases, microbial pathogenesis and biodefense. The
CMIB also manages the Columbus campus Biosafety
Level III core research facilities, which are available
to the University research community, University collaborating researchers and non-University
researchers. In 2006, the CMIB had six core faculty
members, and general membership grew to 50 faculty, representing units across the Columbus and
Wooster campuses. Research funding for core faculty totaled $5.55 million ($10.55 million in review).
These faculty had 20 papers published or in press
along with numerous published abstracts. They also
had several invited lectureships and review panel
appointments, both nationally and internationally.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Salmonella antimicrobial peptide resistance
(National Institutes of Health/National Institute of
Allergy and Infectious Diseases) – John Gunn,
PhD. The objective of this award is to further
characterize the role of the Salmonella PmrAB regulon, specifically the PmrAB-regulated
pmrHFIJKLM operon, in LPS modification, resistance to antimicrobial peptides, and in virulence.
• CD8 T cells and immunity to tuberculosis in old
mice (National Institutes of Health/National
Institute on Aging) – Joanne Turner, PhD. The
objective of this award is to understand how CD8
T cells contribute to protective immunity in the
elderly during infection with M. tuberculosis.
• TB and innate immune regulation of lung
macrophages (National Institutes of Health/
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious
Diseases) – Larry Schlesinger, MD. The objective
of this award is to determine the role of surfactant
components in regulating the early interactions
between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and
macrophages, the host cell niche for this intracellular pathogen.
• Characterization of the surface metalloproteases
of Trypanosoma cruzi (American Heart
Association) – Brad McGwire, MD, PhD. The
objective of this award is to better define the role
of a major surface metalloprotease, gp63, of
Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of South American
trypanosomiasis, in the pathogenesis of disease
and its contribution to heart failure.
2007 Research Report 49
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Lung innate immune responses to Francisella
tularensis: a central role for the macrophage
(National Institutes of Health/National Institute of
Allergy and Infectious Diseases Region V Great
Lakes Regional Center of Excellence for
Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Disease
Research) – Larry Schlesinger, MD. This project
studies lung innate immune response to Francisella
tularensis, the causative bacterium of tularemia
and a targeted agent of bioterrorism. The most
worrisome infectious agents of bioterrorism are
those that would be artificially disseminated as
aerosols to the lungs. Thus, a clearer understanding of lung immune response to these bacteria,
especially as they relate to interactions with
macrophages, is essential for identifying molecular targets for diagnostic strategies, as well as targeted immune therapies to enhance host immunity. This program project grant includes investigators in both the CMIB and Ohio State’s Davis
Heart and Lung Research Institute.
• Salmonella antimicrobial peptide resistance
(National Institutes of Health/National Institute of
Allergy and Infectious Diseases) – John Gunn,
PhD. Salmonellae encounter numerous anatomic
sites during infection, including the inhospitable
environment of the macrophage phagosome,
where they are able to survive and replicate.
Within host phagocytes and at mucosal surfaces
is a potent group of cytotoxic agents (i.e., antimicrobial peptides, or AP). The PmrA-PmrB twocomponent regulatory system is activated when
Salmonellae are within host macrophages, and this
system is necessary for resistance to AP, which
involves modifications of the lipopolysaccharide
(LPS) that decrease peptide binding. This study
focuses on the PmrA-PmrB regulon, including the
identification and characterization of PmrA-PmrBregulated genes necessary for AP resistance and
LPS modification, and the determination of the
role of PmrA-PmrB-mediated LPS modifications in
Salmonella virulence.
• In vitro predictors of susceptibility for reactivation
tuberculosis (American Lung Association) –
Joanne Turner, PhD. Approximately one third of
50 Ohio State University Medical Center
the world’s population is infected with M. tuberculosis; however, only a small portion will develop
active tuberculosis. Identifying individuals who are
predisposed to reactivate an infection with M.
tuberculosis would result in timely intervention and
reduce the opportunity for disease transmission.
Identifying immunological markers of susceptibility to reactivating an infection would provide such
a tool. This grant uses several well-characterized
mouse models that are resistant or susceptible to
reactivation of a chronic infection with M. tuberculosis to study immunity in the lung and peripheral
blood. Studies focus on the relationship between
increased IL-10 and a loss of IFN-О± production,
and on changes that occur at a period of infection
that precedes reactivation. Predicting when reactivation is likely to occur would help identify individuals who are progressing toward disease,
resulting in timely intervention and reduced disease transmission.
• After being awarded official University center status by the OSU Board of Trustees in December
2006, the CMIB moved into the 10th floor of the
recently completed Biomedical Research Tower.
• CMIB core faculty members had 20 papers published or in press in 2006.
• Total research funding for 2006 for CMIB core
faculty members was $5.55 million ($10.55 million
in review).
• Ohio State was established as a member of the
National Institutes of Health-funded Great Lakes
Regional Centers of Excellence (RCE) in
Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases
Research Program. CMIB faculty members were
awarded a program grant and a development project totaling $1.15 million.
• CMIB core faculty received the following awards:
- Larry Schlesinger, MD – Donald V. Unverferth
Department of Medicine Research Award,
Department of Medicine, Ohio State University
- Joanne Turner, PhD - American Association of
Immunologists Pfizer-Showell travel award
• CMIB 2006 awards for research grants included:
- Lung Innate Immune Responses to Francisella
tularensis: A Central Role For The Macrophage $1.05 million (includes investigators in both the
CMIB and DHLRI) to study lung innate immune
responses to Francisella tularensis, the causative
bacterium of tularemia and a targeted agent of
bioterrorism
- Altered M. tuberculosis Mannosylation and the
Macrophage - $1.8 million to study the surface
carbohydrates of M. tuberculosis that play a
central role in pathogenesis
CENTER FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE
SURGERY
W. Scott Melvin, MD, Director
The Center for Minimally
Invasive Surgery (CMIS) is a
multidisciplinary center dedicated to excellence in patient care,
clinical training, research and
outcomes studies pertaining to
the techniques and technology
of minimally invasive surgery.
The Center strives to expand the ever changing field
of surgery. 2006 brought further development of
the Center’s research endeavors.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• The Center has 21 active research protocols, 11 of
which were added during 2006; secured research
funding totals over $300,000 annually. Projects
include 17 human and four animal protocols. CMIS
faculty collaborated with other Ohio State departments and investigators on eight research protocols.
• Through collaboration between the CMIS and the
Department of Anesthesiology, the National
Institutes of Health awarded a grant entitled
“Neural control of large intestinal mucosal.”
Additionally, the National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Disease awarded funding to investigate “Purinergic regulation in enteric
neural reflexes (in IBD).” Tissue samples taken
during minimally invasive bariatric and colon surgery provide materials for these endeavors.
Continued work between the physicians is
planned and additional NIH funding opportunities
are being explored.
• The CMIS remains committed to cutting-edge
technology. One of the newest research topics is
the possibility of surgery using no external incisions. The expanding world of natural orifice
translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES)
requires a combination of endoscopic and laparoscopic surgical skills. The CMIS is working with
industry to develop safe and effective methods of
performing NOTES. It is the only institution in the
United States with approval for a human clinical
trial to evaluate the safety and feasibility of this
type of surgery. NOTES is being used at the
Medical Center as a diagnostic procedure for cancer patients prior to surgery. Upcoming phases of
NOTES research at Ohio State include developing
a standard of care for these procedures, continuing to identify instrumentation needs, and improving safety and efficiency. From basic data collection on bacterial contamination in transgastric
surgery to the development of necessary instrumentation, the CMIS is on the cutting edge of the
surgical future.
CENTER FOR ROBOTIC AND COMPUTERASSISTED SURGERY
Vipul Patel, MD, Director
An ever-expanding component
of minimally invasive surgery is
the use of robotic technology for
procedures that involve only
minor disruption to the body
compared with traditional open
surgery. The Center for Robotic
and Computer-Assisted Surgery
at Ohio State is widening the Medical Center's
international reputation in robotic surgery from both
a clinical and educational standpoint - providing
outstanding patient care and training surgeons from
around the world in this burgeoning discipline. The
Center is directed by Vipul Patel, MD, associate
clinical professor in the Department of Urology.
2007 Research Report 51
Patel, a specialist in prostate and kidney cancer, also
directs the Medical Center's Robotics and Minimally
Invasive Urologic Surgery Program. He was recruited to the Medical Center in 2005 to use the da
VinciВ® Surgical System for radical prostatectomy, or
surgical removal of the prostate gland. He has performed more than 1,500 robotic prostatectomies in
his career and is one of only two physicians in the
world who have performed more than 1,000 robotic
surgical procedures overall. Patel also plays a lead
role in teaching this discipline to surgeons from
around the globe who come to the new Center at
Ohio State for robotics training.
CENTER FOR MOLECULAR
NEUROBIOLOGY
Anthony Young, PhD, Director
The mission of the Center for
Molecular Neurobiology is to
reach the highest echelons of
scholarship by performing quality basic research and providing
superior training in developmental, cellular and molecular
neuroscience. Research
strengths include the use of three molecular genetic
model systems (mice, zebra fish and Drosophila) as
well as research directly applicable to humans. This
is an intercollegiate program whose faculty have
joint appointments in the Center as well as in
departmental tenure-initiating units. They can thus
contribute to the missions of their departmental
units and form bridges between the Center and
departments within separate colleges.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Christine Beattie, PhD, studies molecular mechanisms controlling vertebrate axon guidance during
development and motor neuron degeneration in
spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral
sclerosis using zebra fish as a model system.
• Anthony Brown, PhD, uses molecular, biochemical
and imaging approaches to study the assembly
and axonal transport of neurofilaments.
• Tsonwin Hai, PhD, studies the role of the stressinducible transcription factor ATF3 in diabetes and
cancer.
52 Ohio State University Medical Center
• Paul Henion, PhD, studies molecular regulation of
embryonic cell diversification and cell fate specification, proliferation, survival and differentiation in
the nervous system.
• Jeff Kuret, PhD, employs molecular, cellular and
pharmacological methods to investigate
Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. His work focuses
on biochemical mechanisms in the formation of
lesions that are the hallmarks of the disease, and
on development of inhibitors of lesion formation
as potential therapeutics.
• Sung Ok Yoon, PhD, studies molecular mechanisms of growth factor-mediated action in the
nervous system, with a focus on regulation of
cell survival and apoptosis under pathological
conditions.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• During cancer development, stress signals
designed to eliminate tumorigenic cells are
encountered. Cancer cells that survive this
process have managed to foil the hardwired stress
response. Studies by Tsonwin Hai, PhD, and associates have shed light on this process by showing
that ATF3, a gene that normally eliminates cells as
part of the stress response, is co-opted to become
an oncogene, and that this phenomenon may play
an important role in breast cancer progression. In
addition, they have found that ATF3 acts as a
mediator for cancer cells to respond to stromal
signals. Thus, ATF3 transmits the signals to the
transcriptional networks and elicits dichotomous
responses.
• James Jontes, PhD, has developed a novel cell
model to explain how connections among the trillions of synapses in the central nervous system
are formed. The model involves formation of nonspecific prosynaptic interactions followed by specific synapses through recruitment of bona fide
specific adhesion molecules via changes in intracellular trafficking to generate reproducible patterns of synaptic connectivity. His laboratory is
testing this hypothesis and the role of the cadherin family of adhesion molecules through analysis of the developing zebra fish nervous system.
• Through behavioral studies using “knock-out”
mice, John Oberdick, PhD, has found that
L7/PcP2, a protein expressed in cerebellar Purkinje
cells, plays an essential role in sensorimotor function. At the biochemical and physiological levels,
Oberdick and Michael Zhu, PhD, have found that
L7/PcP2 functions as a modulator of G protein
signaling, and that L7 fine-tunes the activity of
voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav 2.1) through
G proteins. Oberdick and Zhu postulate that disruption of L7 function may play a role in certain
behavioral disorders in humans.
DARDINGER NEURO-ONCOLOGY CENTER
E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, Co-Director (top)
Herbert Newton, MD, Co-Director (bottom)
The Dardinger Neuro-Oncology
Center is co-directed by E.
Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD,
chair of the Department of
Neurological Surgery, and
Herbert Newton, MD, director
of the Division of NeuroOncology in the Department of
Neurology. Dardinger Center
researchers and physicians
come from the Department of
Neurological Surgery and the
Division of Neuro-Oncology.
Research faculty include
Yoshinaga Saeki, MD, PhD,
administrative chief of the
Dardinger Laboratory for Neuro-Oncology and
Neurosciences, along with Balveen Kaur, PhD, Sean
Lawler, PhD, and Mariano Viapiano, PhD. Three
neurosurgeons – Mario Ammirati, MD, MBA, Ehud
Mendel, MD, FACS, and Atom Sarkar, MD, PhD –
joined the clinical and research staff in 2006.
Ammirati directs the Dardinger Skull Base
Microneurosurgery Laboratory, Mendel co-directs
the Spinal Biodynamics and Ergonomics Laboratory,
and Sarkar directs the Dardinger Nanotechnology in
Neuroscience Laboratory. Newton, Robert
Cavaliere, MD, Carol Volpi, RN, Myrna Bowler, RN,
and Jill Brown, MS, make up the Dardinger Center’s
neuro-oncology team. In 2006, the Center participated in nine clinical trials. Research funding,
including grants from the National Institutes of
Health, topped $1.75 million.
Ongoing Research Programs
• E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, oversees research
conducted within the Dardinger Laboratory for
Neuro-Oncology and Neurosciences by the various laboratory teams:
• Yoshinaga Saeki, MD, PhD, develops therapeutic
strategies for neurological, neoplastic and genetic
disorders.
• The laboratory group of Balveen Kaur, PhD, is
studying changes that occur in the microenvironment of gliomas in response to treatment so as to
learn how treatment strategies can be exploited to
maximum potential.
• Sean Lawler, PhD, and his laboratory team are
studying cell-signaling mechanisms in disorders of
the central nervous system (cancer and neurodegeneration) to develop novel therapies.
• Mariano Viapiano, PhD, and his lab team study
the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM)
of gliomas.
• The microneurosurgical skull base laboratory of
Mario Ammirati, MD, MBA, develops surgical
approaches to tumors at the base of the brain,
educates residents in these techniques, and partners with private and non-private organizations to
develop technology for clinical use.
• The spine and spine cancer laboratory of Ehud
Mendel, MD, FACS, evaluates physiologic forces
that impact spinal health and methods to optimize
surgical therapy of spinal disorders.
• Atom Sarkar, MD, PhD, and his nanotechnology
laboratory team study the relationship between
single-molecule mechanics and disease states, particularly the micromechanical mechanisms that
underlie the formation of pathologic fiber in
Parkinson’s disease and that regulate the migration
and spread of glioblastoma multiforme tumors.
• Herbert Newton, MD, Robert Cavaliere, MD,
Sean Lawler, PhD, E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD,
and Yoshinaga Saeki, MD, PhD, are working with
Abhik Ray-Chaudhury, MD, Neuropathology, and
the laboratory team of Carlo Croce, MD, chair of
the Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology
and Medical Genetics, to investigate microRNA
and its role in brain tumor transformation and
pathogenesis.
2007 Research Report 53
• Dardinger Center researchers are also teaming
with Rolf Barth, MD, Pathology, in a study of
carboranyl nucleosides as delivery agents for neutron capture therapy of gliomas.
• Phillip Popovich, PhD, of the Department of
Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical
Genetics, has been working on a spine model of cancer and will be collaborating with Ehud Mendel, MD,
FACS, who directs the Department of Neurological
Surgery’s Spine and Spine Cancer Program.
• Herbert Newton, MD, co-director of the
Dardinger Center, edited the Handbook of Brain
Tumor Chemotherapy, a guide for physicians, clinicians and basic researchers seeking better ways
to treat primary and metastatic brain tumors.
Newton also wrote or co-wrote eight of the book’s
35 chapters. Other contributing authors from
Ohio State include Dardinger Center Co-Director
E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD; Kaveh AsadiMoghaddam, MD, PhD, Neurological Surgery; and
Abhik Ray-Chaudhury, MD, Pathology.
For more detailed information about laboratory
team research within the Dardinger Center, as well
as a list of research accomplishments, see the
Department of Neurological Surgery section of this
annual report (page 84).
Ongoing Research Programs
• The Nisonger Center’s dual diagnosis program
studies the co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders
and mental retardation, especially methods of
assessment and motivational systems.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• The Social Security Administration awarded the
Association of University Centers on Disability a
five-year, annually renewable contract to further
the Social Security commissioner’s proposal to
improve timeliness and accuracy of childhood disability adjudications. In the second year of the
project expansion, The Nisonger Center has been
selected to participate in this initiative. The Center
will develop, test and operate prototype pediatric
medical units to provide clinical expertise for state
and federal adjudicators who make initial decisions or review claims on appeal regarding eligibility for Supplemental Security Income.
PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Larry Gabel, PhD, Director
THE NISONGER CENTER FOR MENTAL
RETARDATION AND DEVELOPMENTAL
DISABILITIES
Steven Reiss, PhD, Director
The Nisonger Center is a member of the national network of
University Centers for
Excellence in Developmental
Disabilities. In operation since
1972, the Center offers: services
that fill gaps in Ohio programs;
interdisciplinary training; technical assistance and consultation to Ohio mental
retardation and developmental disability agencies;
and applied research.
54 Ohio State University Medical Center
In September 2000, faculty
from the Department of Family
Medicine, the Division of
General Internal Medicine, the
Division of Ambulatory
Pediatrics and other academic
disciplines at Ohio State established the Ohio State Primary
Care Research Institute (PCRI). Funded initially by
the Health Resources and Services Administration
of the U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services, the PCRI completed its second three-year
period of infrastructure funding during 2006.
Continuing on a self-sustaining basis, the PCRI fosters, facilitates and reports collaborative interdisciplinary research to optimize health. It aims to be
recognized as a center of excellence for the quality,
quantity and impact of its research on the professional literature, the development of public policy
and health outcomes.
Ongoing Research Programs
• The PCRI’s collective laboratory is the 24-site
Ohio State Primary Care Practice-Based Research
Network (OSUPC-PBRN), which covers all of
Franklin County and serves some 107,000
patients annually. The OSUPC-PBRN consists of
10 clinical practice sites of the Ohio State Primary
Care Network, nine Close-to-Home Health Centers
of Children’s Hospital and five practices of the
Columbus Neighborhood Health Center, Inc. With
107 primary care physicians, these 24 practices
serve a diverse patient population and provide care
through nearly 308,000 patient visits a year.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Douglas Post, PhD, is principal investigator for a
clinical trial on Efficacy of Web-Based Training in
Skin Cancer. Melanoma is a major health problem
that affects more than 50,000 Americans each
year and continues to increase in incidence, unlike
most cancers. Although it is almost always visible
on the skin and almost always curable when
caught at an early stage, many still die from this
disease. Primary care physicians commonly fail to
look at key areas of the skin during examinations
and hence miss opportunities to save lives. There
is evidence that teaching basic skills related to
skin cancer may improve physician examination
and counseling. This project is testing efficacy of
the Skin Continuing Education Course (compared
to a course on weight control) via a randomized
trial in a sample of primary care physicians.
Methods include first developing a Basic Skin
Cancer Triage (BSCT) curriculum for the Webbased skin course and then developing a comparable Web-based course on obesity/overweight
assessment and counseling as a comparison intervention. Physicians will be randomly allocated to
one of the two courses. The primary endpoint will
be physician performance of skin examination
during routine visits at 12 months after the course,
and physician counseling around skin cancer issues.
This will be assessed by patient exit interviews and
physician self-assessment. Efficacy of the course
for improving physician skin cancer triage skills and
changing physician attitudes and knowledge
regarding skin cancer issues will be assessed.
• Kelly Kelleher, MD, MPH, is principal investigator
for a Trial of Automated Risk Appraisal in
Adolescents (TARAA). A partnership among
Columbus Children’s Hospital, the Close to Home
Primary Care Centers and www.flipsidemedia.com,
this project aims to improve services for problem
drug use/abuse and other risk-taking behavior for
youth in primary care settings through research
on early identification and monitoring. The study
compares an intervention that combines computerized risk assessment and telephone support to
usual care plus mailed screening results.
Investigators want to: compare the frequency of
problem drug use and abuse identified in the intervention group with use and abuse among youths in
the usual-care group; examine the frequency of
counseling, referral, psychotropic medication or
other interventions for youth who screen positive
for problem drug use and abuse on risk assessment; and evaluate the effect of the telephone support program on return to primary care, likelihood
of completing referrals, number of primary care visits, and satisfaction with services after four months.
• Mira Katz, PhD, is principal investigator for Patient
Activation to Increase Colon Cancer Screening, a
randomized, controlled clinical trial that focuses on
improving colorectal cancer screening rates by
“patient activation.” The study will test the effectiveness of patient communication skills training
coupled with colorectal cancer screening information and barriers to counseling to improve screening rates. Part of a partnership with the Columbus
Neighborhood Health Center, Inc., this research has
far-reaching potential because, if shown to be effective, this colorectal cancer-screening program can
be shared to improve screening among medically
underserved populations.
• Judy Groner, MD, is principal investigator for a clinical trial titled Can Changing How Mom Eats Prevent
Obesity in Toddlers? This project aims to reduce the
rising rate of obesity in very young children by helping mothers adopt focused eating patterns. Lowincome urban infants and mothers starting well-child
care in Children’s Hospital Primary Care Network
constitute the study population. The project contains
a controlled study of two interventions: an addition to
the nutritional anticipatory guidance offered during
well-child visits, which focuses on structuring maternal-eating behavior; and an augmentation of the
2007 Research Report 55
advice given in physician practices by providing
access to a six-week transition to parenting group,
which focuses on the eating advice given in the clinics. Participating mothers are randomized to either
receive an invitation to join a group or not.
Anticipated outcomes of the project include: achieving a 10-percent reduction in the percentage of overweight toddlers in the intervention/support group;
improving infant and toddler eating patterns in relation to accepted standards; increasing mothers’
readiness and recognition of a need to change family
eating habits; and increasing the structure of maternal eating patterns. If effective, this low-cost intervention would fit well into current pediatric practices.
• Doug Post, PhD, is principal investigator for a
$240,000 project funded by the National Cancer
Institute and titled Patient-Centered Communication
During Chemotherapy. Studies have indicated that
communication problems between cancer patients
and clinicians are a major barrier to managing
patients’ pain, depression and fatigue. This project
addresses this problem by developing and evaluating a personal digital assistant (PDA)-based patient
communication intervention for breast cancer
patients undergoing chemotherapy. Patients are
asked to complete fatigue, depression and pain
inventories on a PDA at the beginning of chemotherapy and once a week through completion of
treatment. On the day before each treatment, a
summary of fatigue, depression and pain scores is
integrated with a tailored patient communication
skills training program and displayed on the PDA.
Patients are taught through role modeling how to
effectively communicate their symptoms and are
encouraged to bring the PDA with their symptom
summaries to each chemotherapy treatment so
they can share the information with their clinician.
Effects of the intervention are assessed over the
course of treatment. Focus groups are then used
with study participants to assess their responses to
the intervention and their perceptions of the system’s value.
• Electra Paskett, PhD, MSPH, is principal investigator for a $1.4 million Ohio Patient Navigator
Research Project funded by the American Cancer
56 Ohio State University Medical Center
Society. This project, which aims to alleviate disparities in timely diagnosis and treatment of breast,
cervical and colorectal cancer, represents a partnership among the Ohio State University
Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Ohio State
Primary Care Practice-Based Research Network,
and community partners (e.g., the Ohio American
Cancer Society Division and the Ohio Commission
on Minority Health). Specific aims include: assessing baseline rates and barriers, as well as strategies
to overcome barriers to receiving timely diagnostic
and treatment services; developing the Ohio Patient
Navigator Research Program through a consortium
of institutions in Ohio; implementing and evaluating
the patient navigator program in 12 clinics/health
centers using a group-randomized, controlled
design to assess the efficacy of this intervention in
reducing time to delivery of cancer care and noncancer resolution, or reducing time to cancer diagnosis and treatment after an abnormal finding from
a detection procedure for breast, cervical or colorectal cancer; assessing barriers to implementing
the intervention program; conducting a cost-effectiveness evaluation of the program; and assessing
the impact of the program on community-level indicators. Study results are expected to reduce the burden
of cancer in underserved populations.
COMPREHENSIVE WOUND CENTER
Chandan Sen, PhD, FACN, FACSM, Executive Director
Every month roughly 1,000
patients with chronic, non-healing wounds receive advanced,
research-based care at Ohio
State's Comprehensive Wound
Center (CWC), which opened in
2005 at the Martha Morehouse
Medical Plaza on Kenny Road in
Columbus. Led by Executive Director Chandan Sen,
PhD, the CWC is a hub for wound sciences and
care, a place where National Institutes of Health
(NIH)-funded basic research meets clinical application as the fundamental principles of wound healing
— starting at the genetic level — are translated
from the lab to the bedside. The program is co-led
by highly recognized wound care physicians such as
Richard Schlanger, MD, PhD, clinical scientists such
as Gayle Gordillo, MD, and genomic experts such
as Sashwati Roy, PhD.
Ongoing Research Programs
• The CWC is an integral component of Ohio State’s
proposed National Institutes of Health Center for
Clinical and Translational Sciences (CCTS).
Chandan Sen, PhD, directs the Novel Clinical and
Translational Methodologies program of the CCTS.
Sen, a professor of Surgery and of Molecular and
Cellular Biochemistry, is a member of the board of
directors of the national Wound Healing Society. In
2007, the CWC started its first placebo-controlled,
randomized clinical trial addressing wound-healing
therapeutics. Through partnership with the Floridabased wound care management company National
Healing Corporation, the CWC is conducting multicenter clinical studies. These efforts are supported
by Ohio State's unique bioinformatics infrastructure, the Information Warehouse.
• CWC patient care is based on comprehensive treatment protocols that stem from research and
employ such techniques as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, topical oxygen therapy, transcutaneous oxygen
monitoring to determine vascular problems and
promote spontaneous healing, negative pressure
therapy for accelerated wound healing, and the use
of synthetic growth factors and tissue coverings. On
average, more than 50 wound care physicians from
throughout the country come to Ohio State every
month for advanced training and education. In
2009, the Mathematical Biosciences Institute of
Ohio State will host a conference on Mathematical
Modeling of Wound Healing. Supported by the
National Science Foundation, this conference will be
chaired by Sen and Professor Philip Maini of Oxford
University in London, United Kingdom.
INSTITUTE FOR BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE
RESEARCH (IBMR)
Ronald Glaser, PhD, Director
The Institute for Behavioral
Medicine Research (IBMR) was
established to stimulate and
expand interdisciplinary collaboration through experiments
involving social and behavioral
influences on the immune
response and health of human
subjects and animal models.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Human Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) Program –
This program involves: Barbara Andersen, PhD,
Psychology; Charles Emery, PhD, Psychology;
Ronald Glaser, PhD, Molecular Virology,
Immunology and Medical Genetics; Janice
Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD, Psychiatry; Stanley Lemeshow,
PhD, College of Public Health; William Malarkey,
MD, Internal Medicine; and Eric Yang, PhD,
Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical
Genetics. The program focuses on psychological
stressors and behavioral questions that could
affect health by modulating the immune and
endocrine systems. One recent focus is on how
chronic stressors, such as caregiving, and acute
stressors, such as marital conflict, substantially
enhance production of proinflammatory cytokines
linked with age-associated diseases, providing a
window on how stress contributes to morbidity
and mortality. A program exploring the role that
stress may play in skin cancer has developed into
a well-funded research program. These studies
will expand to include breast cancer survivors in
collaboration with the Cancer Control Program in
Ohio State’s Comprehensive Cancer Center.
2007 Research Report 57
• Biobehavioral Aspects of Stress and Cancer
Program – Cancer survivors are the focus of work
spearheaded by Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD,
Ronald Glaser, PhD, Electra Paskett, PhD, MSPH,
and William Malarkey, MD. One project funded
by the National Cancer Institute addresses the
role that proinflammatory cytokines play in combination with depression among breast cancer
survivors who experience debilitating fatigue, and
the ability of a yoga intervention to modulate
endocrine and immune responses. Barbara
Andersen, PhD, Psychology, has examined biobehavioral aspects of cancer to learn whether reducing stress and changing health habits have a significant impact on cancer recurrence and survival.
• Comparative Medicine/Animal Model Program –
This group involves Michael Bailey, PhD, David
Padgett, PhD, John Sheridan, PhD, Ning Quan,
PhD, all in the Oral Biology, as well as Jon
Godbout, PhD, Molecular Virology, Immunology
and Medical Genetics. They focus on developing
animal models for psychoneuroimmunology
research that models the studies with human
subjects.
• Behavioral Immunology and Stress Program – The
research group of Courtney DeVries, PhD, and
Randy Nelson, PhD, Psychology, studies the
effects of stressors on inflammation after stroke
or cardiac arrest, as well as seasonality in immune
function, disease and mortality.
• Neuroimmunology Program – Jon Godbout, PhD,
Phillip Popovich, PhD, Virginia Sanders, PhD, and
Caroline Whitacre, PhD, are investigators in
Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical
Genetics whose research focuses on diverse yet
interrelated areas of neuroimmunology.
• Neuroendocrinology Program – William Malarkey,
MD, and Jeanette Webster Marketon, PhD, are
investigators in Internal Medicine who focus on
neuroendocrinology in a clinical setting and at the
molecular level.
58 Ohio State University Medical Center
Research Highlights of 2006
• Comparative Medicine/Animal Model Program –
To study the effects of stress on the immune system, Michael Bailey, PhD, Jon Godbout, PhD,
David Padgett, PhD, John Sheridan, PhD, and
Ning Quan, PhD, develop animal models and use
them to examine mechanisms by which activation
of neuroendocrine pathways intersect and regulate inflammatory and immune responses. Rodent
models have been developed to examine the
effects of stress in three research areas: susceptibility to microbial infections; tissue repair/wound
healing; and immune system/cytokine signaling to
the central nervous system across the blood brain
barrier. These models are used in parallel with
human studies performed by other members of
the IBMR.
• Neuroimmunology Program – Phillip Popovich,
PhD, and Caroline Whitacre, PhD, use cellular
and molecular approaches to determine how
spinal cord injury (SCI) influences the ability of
immune cells to function both at the site of injury
and in tissues throughout the body. The work of
Virginia Sanders, PhD, has shown that lymphocyte activity is dramatically influenced by catecholamines – the chemical messengers of the
sympathetic nervous system (SNS). For example,
efficient production of antibodies by B cells
requires that catecholamines bind to the beta2adrenergic receptor found on B cells and a subset
of T cells. Studies between Sanders and Popovich
are determining whether antibody production in
SCI individuals is negatively affected due to disruption of SNS function. Sanders’ and Whitacre’s
work also has relevance for diseases such as multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease of the
brain and spinal cord caused by overactive T and
B lymphocytes. Recent work in Whitacre’s lab,
which focuses on multiple sclerosis, examines
how gender and pregnancy influence the neurodestructive capacity of autoreactive T cells. Sanders,
Popovich, Daniel Ankeny, PhD, and co-workers
have shown that experimental spinal cord injury
elicits chronic activation of a B cell-dependent
autoimmune response. In this study, high levels of
anti-DNA antibodies were detected in spinalcord-injured rats with a pattern that is similar to
that seen in systemic lupus erythematosus. This is
the first report that spinal cord injury can cause a
clear dysregulation of B-cell function.
• Behavioral Immunology and Stress Program –
Courtney DeVries, PhD, developed a mouse
model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary
resuscitation (CPR) and showed that cardiac
arrest with CPR increases subsequent anxiety-like
behavior and decreases social interaction. Her
group also reported sex differences in recovery
from focal ischemia, as well as social facilitation
of wound healing. The research group of Randy
Nelson, PhD, showed that prenatal day length
influences immune function in adulthood. These
findings might explain season of birth as a risk
factor in several diseases. His group also showed
the existence of trade-offs between cutaneous
immune responses. In addition, Nelson reported
that social environment modulates seasonal
immune responses in mice.
• Neuroendocrinology Program – William Malarkey,
MD, investigates toxic stress and the biology of
chronic inflammation, the precursor to chronic
pain and most of the diseases of aging, including
arthritis, cancer and cardiovascular disease. Work
in progress or soon to begin includes studies on
obesity, chronic stress and inflammation, and
stress-reduction strategies for treating chronic
inflammation. Jeanette Webster Marketon, PhD,
uses molecular approaches to determine how factors such as disease status or infection modulate
glucocorticoid receptor signaling. Glucocorticoid
receptors are essential for life, and impaired signaling through this receptor is involved in many
autoimmune/inflammatory diseases.
• Human Psychoneuroimmunology Program – A
recent study by Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD,
Ronald Glaser, PhD, Stanley Lemeshow, PhD, and
others showed that dietary intake of omega-3
fatty acids may interact with depression to fuel
inflammation. The cross-sectional study has provided the basis for two new funded omega-3 randomized controlled trials.
CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE
Glen Aukerman, MD, Director
The OSU Center for Integrative
Medicine incorporates the art
and science of caring for the
whole person – mind, body and
spirit – to treat and prevent disease while encouraging patients
to create a condition of optimal
health. The Center, located at
2000 Kenny Road, combines mainstream medicine
with complementary therapies for which there is
quality scientific evidence of safety and effectiveness. By offering complementary therapies ranging
from acupuncture and chiropractic to massage and
yoga in family medicine practice, the Center
embraces a growing and increasingly recognized
component of medicine. Services at the Center,
which is part of the OSU Primary Care Network,
include:
• Traditional Western Medicine
• Whole Alternative Medical Systems
• Mind-Body Medicine
SPORTS MEDICINE CENTER
Thomas Best, MD, PhD, Co-Director (top)
Christopher Kaeding, MD, Co-Director (bottom)
Medical and athletics experts at
The Ohio State University have
joined forces in a comprehensive sports medicine initiative
that unites clinical care for athletes with research and education programs to benefit the
entire Ohio State community.
This intensified emphasis goes
far beyond clinical treatment for
Ohio State athletes. Multidisciplinary research and education programs integrate many surgical and
medical specialties to aid students
and trainees in all segments of
sports medicine. The program
continues to expand and engage multiple disciplines.
2007 Research Report 59
Ongoing Research Programs
• Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes
Network/Knee – Supported by funding from the
National Institutes of Health, this multicenter collaborative program evaluates outcomes and predictors of outcomes following knee ligament surgery using validated clinical outcomes instruments. Members include Ohio State, Vanderbilt
University, the University of Iowa, the Cleveland
Clinic and the University of Colorado.
• Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes
Network/Shoulder – This multicenter collaborative program evaluates outcomes and predictors
of outcomes following shoulder surgery using validated clinical outcomes instruments. Members
include Ohio State, Vanderbilt University, the
Cleveland Clinic and University of Colorado.
• Sports Medicine/Imaging Research Group – This
collaborative group investigates innovative techniques to evaluate health and structure of articular
cartilage and ligaments.
• Biomechanics and Motion Capture Lab – This new
program resulted from the recruitment of its
leader, Ajit Chaudhari, PhD, from Stanford
University. Construction of his lab is under way.
Areas of initial study include identifying kinematic
and anatomic predictors of injuries to the knee
and shoulder.
• Sports Medicine Muscle Injury Lab – Led by
Thomas Best, MD, PhD, this multidisciplinary lab
receives extramural funding to study skeletal muscle injury and repair. Best’s lab collaborates with
other labs on the Ohio State campus, including
Sudha Agarwal, PhD, Oral Biology, and Denis
Guttridge, PhD, Molecular Virology, Immunology
and Medical Genetics.
• Sports Pulmonology Program – Led by John
Mastronarde, MD, and Jonathan Parsons, MD,
this program conducts research in asthma, sleep
apnea and vocal cord dysfunction issues in athletes. Their work has resulted in one funded proposal and two manuscripts.
60 Ohio State University Medical Center
OFFICE OF GERIATRICS AND
GERONTOLOGY
Linda Mauger, Interim Director and
Program Manager
The Office of Geriatrics and
Gerontology at the OSU Health
Sciences Center is a focus for
aging-related activities throughout
the University and is the only formally recognized unit on campus
that is devoted to aging. The mission of the Office is to foster –
through teaching, research and consultation – the costeffective delivery of high-quality health and social services to meet the needs of Ohio's older citizens.
Through the Transdisciplinary Program in Aging, the
Office provides coordinated education, research, practice and service opportunities in geriatrics and gerontology while enhancing and supporting the initiatives of
individual departments, schools and colleges. Through
this centralized unit for clinical gerontology, the
University's initiatives in aging are being reshaped to
meet the demographic imperatives of an aging society.
School and Department-Based RESEARCH
PROGRAMS AND 2006 HIGHLIGHTS
In addition to Ohio State University Medical Center’s
interdisciplinary research centers (described in the
previous section), programs of specialized medical
research are conducted and supervised within schools
and departments in Ohio State’s College of Medicine
and in facilities of the Ohio State University Health
System. This section highlights notable research
programs in these departments and schools.
2007 Research Report 61
DEPARTMENT OF ANESTHESIOLOGY
David Zvara, MD, Chair
Anesthesiology has 42 faculty
members with basic and
patient-oriented research interests aligned with the Medical
Center’s Neurosciences, Heart,
Imaging and Transplantation
Signature Programs.
Investigators use animal or
genomic models to study mechanisms of ischemic
spinal cord injury, neural plasticity, postoperative
ileus, mechanosensitivity, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome, chronic heart
failure, hypertension, wound healing, cell-signaling
and obesity surgery. These efforts are complemented by clinical studies for ischemic spinal cord injury
in thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm patients, IBD,
fMRI imaging of pain pathways and anesthesia,
neuroanesthesia, heart failure with 3-D echocardiography and finite element analysis, cardio/bioimpedance, computer modeling, transplant survival
and morbid obesity, weight loss and resolution of
type 2 diabetes. Studies are funded through the
National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National
Heart Foundation or industry grants. The
Department has 35 active and mostly investigatorinitiated clinical research studies. Its studies resulted in 15 peer-reviewed publications in 2006.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Cardiovascular Diseases:
– Heart failure: Mark Gerhardt, MD, PhD, is
developing a program on chronic ischemic heart
failure (CHF) with a focus on ОІ-adrenergic receptor dysfunction, molecular signaling and remodeling in a microinfarction-induced ovine model of
CHF with collaborations among investigators at
Ohio State and Children’s Heart Institute. Studies
were funded in part by a recent National Heart
Foundation (NHF) grant, a Foundation of
Anesthesia and Education (FAER) development
62 Ohio State University Medical Center
grant, and an earlier American Heart Association
(AHA) grant.
– Hypertension and vascular remodeling: Genomic
modeling is a powerful approach to studying
mechanisms of disease. Hamdy Hassanain,
PhD, in collaboration with Neurosciences investigators and Ohio State’s Davis Heart and Lung
Research Institute, is using transgenic mouse
models to study heart failure, hypertension,
physiological regulation of hypertension, vascular remodeling, wound healing, receptor function
or dysfunction, and diabetic vascular disease.
– 3-D echocardiography and finite element analysis: Nadia Nathan, MD, in collaboration with
Cardiovascular Medicine, is developing a system
for fully automated import of cardiac data (e.g.,
pressure, elasticity, geometry components)
to a finite element modeling tool (Abaqus) that
incorporates 3-D echocardiography geometry
data and provides cardiac data quantification for
potential use in managing cardiac interventions.
Individual simulation of interventions may be
suitable for surgical planning, training and education.
• Brain and Little-Brain Imaging – Anesthesiology is
developing expertise in state-of-the-art imaging
techniques for clinical (whole-brain imaging) and
cellular (neural networks) studies. In addition to
Dr. Nathan’s 3-D echocardiography, Robert Small,
MD, and interdisciplinary collaborators are applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
to study brain activation caused by pain and in
response to anesthesia. They first published this
in Anesthesiology in 2004. At the cellular level,
Jacqueline Wunderlich, MD, PhD, in collaboration
with GI surgery (Scott Melvin, MD, Brad
Needleman, MD, and Fievos Christofi, PhD), is
using Ca2+ imaging to study activation and function of the “little brain in the gut,” the human
enteric nervous system, in health and disease.
• Ischemic Spinal Cord Injury – Hamdy ElsayedAwad, MD, and an interdisciplinary team are
developing a program in ischemic spinal cord
injury for patients undergoing surgery to repair
thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA).
Spinal cord injury leading to paraplegia is a devas-
tating complication in TAAA. Studies in human,
large animal and genomic models are focused on
the cellular and molecular mechanisms of
ischemic spinal cord injury. The potential exists
for testing new therapeutic interventions to protect the spinal cord.
• Neuroanesthesia – Clinical studies by Sergio
Bergese, MD, and his investigative team – including residents and medical students – involve both
investigator-initiated trials and multi-center trials,
such as the National Awake Intubation Trial.
Studies include testing the noise in a new
MEDRAD Monitor during neurosurgery, pharmacologic influence of anesthetic agents on
somatosensory-evoked potential and MEPs, monitoring variations in cerebral state index, a new
drug for postoperative nausea and vomiting, and
clinical evaluation of a device to speed emergence
from inhaled anesthesia. The latter is in collaboration with Bachar Haschwa, MD, and Roger
Dzwonczyk.
• Enteric Neuroscience and Neurogastroenterology
– Studies supported by the National Institutes of
Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive
and Kidney Diseases (PIs: Fievos Christofi, PhD, and
Yun Xia, MD, PhD) are investigating the function,
neuroimmune communication and dysfunction of
the enteric nervous system or “little brain of the
gut.” It regulates motility, secretion and vasomotor functions of the gut and is strongly influenced
by immune/inflammatory responses. In disease,
dysfunction can cause or contribute to diarrhea,
constipation, dysmotility, obstruction, postoperative ileus, pain or irritable bowel syndrome.
Christofi’s research is focused on: gut purinergic
neural circuits and reflexes involved in the physiological regulation of motility and secretion; cell
signaling and neuroplasticity in inflammatory
bowel diseases, irritable bowel syndrome and
post-operative ileus; molecular mechanisms of
mechanosensitivity in gut sensory enterochromaffin cells; and the role of adenosine and nucleotide
receptors as therapeutic targets in gut inflammatory diseases.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• New Grants – Mark Gerhardt, MD, PhD, received
a grant from the National Heart Foundation on
PKA-Phosphorylation of B2-Adrenergic Receptors
in CHF. Fievos Christofi, PhD, received a five-year
competing-renewal grant from the National
Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, on Adenosine
Receptors as Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory
Bowel Diseases. He also was awarded an institutional RIF Award for related research. Sergio
Bergese, MD, received industry grants for clinical
studies or multicenter trials from Hospira, Baxter
HealthCare Corp., Medrad Inc. A number of other
grants are in preparation.
• Genomic Models of Hypertension – Studies led by
Hamdy Hassanain, PhD, and collaborators at
Ohio State’s Davis Heart and Lung Research
Institute, (directed by Jay Zweier, MD) and other
institutions resulted in a publication in Antioxidant
and Redox Signaling characterizing hypertension
caused by transgenic overexpression of the small
GTP-ase Rac 1 in a transgenic mouse model developed by Hassanain. Continuous Rac 1/NADPH
oxidase activation leads to superoxide radical production and hypertension. An NIH grant is pending.
• Heart Failure – Mark Gerhardt, MD, PhD, in collaboration with Gretel Monreal (PhD student),
characterized the acute changes in myocardial
electrolytes induced by left ventricular assist
device (LVAD) support in heart failure (ASAIO J
2006 Nov 28, e-pub ahead of print). Other studies, in collaboration with John Bauer, PhD, and
colleagues at the Children’s Heart Institute, are
providing insight into intracellular remodeling in
myocytes, ОІ-receptor function and acute stress
protein levels in an ovine model of chronic heart
failure. Nadia Nathan, MD, is using finite element
modeling software to quantify pre- and post-interventional cardiac reconstruction data based on
modeling data sets from surgical ventricular repair
therapy and cardiac resynchronization therapy.
This was published in BioMedical Engineering OnLine.
2007 Research Report 63
• Neurogastroenterology/Neuroscience – Studies in
the lab of Fievos Christofi, PhD, in collaboration
with investigators in Neuroscience (Helen Cooke,
PhD), at Ohio State’s Davis Heart and Lung
Research Institute (Arturo Cardounel, PhD) and
at Lakehead University in Canada (Zacharias
Suntres, PhD), showed that a drug targeting
ADOA3R is a potential therapy for experimental
inflammatory bowel disease. The findings were
published in IBD as “Mechanistic hypotheses generated in animal IBD models are being tested first
in ex vivo human surgical IBD gut neural tissues,
first-time analysis of data base gene abnormalities
in IBD patients.” These studies could pave the way
for human clinical trials. A second study published
in the Internat J Parasitology proved that hyperexcitability and neuroplasticity in gut sensory neurons are caused by amplification of the
Gs/AC/cAMP/PKA/pCREB signaling pathway in
gut infected with the human pathogen Trichinella
spiralis. The pathway is a general target for most
neuropeptide transmitters, a major gateway to gut
reflexes and a potential therapeutic target in irritable bowel syndrome. Yun Xia, MD, PhD, and collaborators in the Department of Physiology and
Cell Biology at Ohio State characterized the
effects of platelet-activating factor in the enteric
nervous system and published their findings in the
Am J Physiology. Xia is funded by a National
Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney
Disease Clinical Investigator Training Grant.
• Ischemic spinal cord injury – Hamdy ElsayedAwad, MD, is examining biochemical changes in
central and peripheral compartments of patients
undergoing surgical repair of an aortic aneurysm.
This clinical paradigm in a large number of
patients is expected to unravel mechanisms of
ischemic spinal cord injury and paraplegia in thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) patients.
Together, the TAAA human model, a large animal/clinical model of paraplegia and a mouse
model of paraplegia suitable for genomic/mechanistic studies should provide a path from lab
bench to bedside in testing new interventions to
protect against paraplegia in TAAA patients.
64 Ohio State University Medical Center
• Brain-Imaging – Functional magnetic resonance
imaging studies (fMRI) on pain stimulation are
contaminated with physiologic noise (e.g., cardiopulmonary parameters change significantly in
response to pain). Robert Small, MD, in collaboration with Biomedical Engineering, Radiology and
other departments at Ohio State, is identifying
and subtracting physiologic noise in fMRI imaging
of the brain from the response to a painful stimulation. They presented their data at the national
meeting of the International Society for Magnetic
Resonance in Medicine.
DEPARTMENT OF BIOMEDICAL
INFORMATICS
Joel Saltz, MD, PhD, Chair
The National Library of
Medicine defines biomedical
informatics as the intersection
of basic informational and computing sciences with an application domain in health care and
biomedicine. The Department of
Biomedical Informatics (BMI) is
a collaboration of computer scientists, image analysis/computer vision specialists, systems biologists/bioinformaticians and clinical informaticians
who apply their skills and interests to problems at
the interface between the physical/computational
sciences and the biological sciences. Departmental
researchers apply distributed and parallel computing techniques to data querying, retrieval and integration, imaging, simulation, medical informatics
and computational biology, and they develop middleware and optimizations to grid-enable projects in
the biological, medical and physical sciences. Over
the past year, the BMI received 15 awards from federal sponsors with total funding exceeding $2.2 million in addition to ongoing support of over $1 million.
Ongoing Research Programs:
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• High End, Data Intensive and Grid Computing
Research – Faculty and staff researchers in the
multiscale computing area work to develop middleware technology and techniques to enable
management, sharing and manipulation of data at
multiple scales across heterogeneous, dynamic
collections of storage and computation systems.
Some application areas include:
- Large-scale collaborative biomedical clinical
studies
- Analysis of gene expression and functional
imaging information
- Imaging, analysis and simulation of oil reservoirs
and data-driven control of oil production
- Analysis of satellite data
- Analysis of multiresolution, multiple-grid simulation datasets
• Image Analysis/Computer Vision – The imaging
research group focuses on in vivo imaging middleware, microscopic and radiologic image registration and analysis, computer vision, machine learning, medical imaging, generalized principal component analysis, geometric theories of computer
vision, and symmetry-based recognition and
matching.
• Systems Biology/Bioinformatics – The systems
biology/bioinformatics group focuses on bioinformatic analysis of gene regulation involving chromatin, transcription factor interactions with DNA,
promoter analysis and miRNA. Another line of
investigation is the development of computational
and evolutionary sciences in a comparative
genomics context, including the development of
novel phylogenetic methods to correlate genotypes and phenotypes, and to find diagnostic
polymorphisms among organisms. This group has
begun to study molecular changes associated
with zoonoses and pandemics from a wholegenome perspective with emphasis on corona
viruses (SARS) and influenza (avian and other
influenza strains).
• Grid Computing/Middleware Development
(caGrid 1.0 Release) – A national team of
researchers (led by Scott Oster, MS; Shannon
Hastings, MS; Steve Langella, MS; Tahsin Kurc,
PhD; and Joel Saltz, MD, PhD) from the
Multiscale Computing Laboratory in the BMI
released the second distribution of caGrid 1.0, a
suite of tools, resources and computer software
that enables researchers around the world to tap
into libraries of data and genetic information that,
until now, have been largely inaccessible. The BMI
group is the lead developer site for caGrid 1.0, an
integral part of the cancer Biomedical Informatics
Grid (caBIG) announced by the National Cancer
Institute (NCI) in 2004. The caBIG network will
allow scientists at cancer centers, medical centers
and research laboratories worldwide to share
information and analytic capabilities efficiently
and securely. To accomplish this, the caBIG program has developed common applications, tools,
data and analytical resources, information standards and grid software infrastructure to enable
programs and databases at remote institutions to
quickly interact. caGrid 1.0 is the unifying architecture and operating environment for systems
and applications in caBIG. The caGrid 1.0 release
contains such new features as: a tool for rapidly
developing caBIG-compatible data and analytical
grid services; tools for administering a security
infrastructure; and a portal providing a dynamic
view of services running on caGrid, along with
information about research institutions and service providers participating in caBIG. Other collaborators on the caGrid 1.0 project include the
National Cancer Institute Center for
Bioinformatics, University of Chicago/Argonne
National Laboratory, Duke Comprehensive Cancer
Center, ScenPro Inc., SemanticBits, LLC, Science
Application International Corp. and Booz Allen
Hamilton.
2007 Research Report 65
• In Vivo Imaging (IVI) Middleware Development
(GridImage) – The IVI Middleware group, led by
Joel Saltz, MD, PhD; Metin Gurcan, PhD; Tony
Pan, MS; and Ashish Sharma, PhD, developed a
Grid-aware image reviewing system (GridIMAGE)
that allows practitioners to: select images from
multiple geographically distributed DICOM
servers; send those images to a group of human
readers and computer-assisted detection (CAD)
algorithms; and compare interpretations from
human readers and CAD algorithms. GridImage
was developed leveraging the National Cancer
Institute caGrid infrastructure and is designed to
help identify lung nodules on thoracic computed
tomography. GridIMAGE enables researchers and
clinicians to share datasets and CAD analytical
resources. It also allows human readers to view
and specify regions of interest. The infrastructure
can support any type of distributed review. caGrid
data and analytical services are used to link
DICOM image databases and CAD systems, and
to interact with human readers. Moreover, the
service-oriented and distributed structure of the
GridIMAGE framework enables a flexible system
that can be deployed in an institution (linking
multiple DICOM servers and CAD algorithms) as
well as in a Grid environment (linking the
resources of collaborating research groups).
GridIMAGE allows practitioners to obtain interpretations from human readers or CAD algorithms. It also enables cooperative imaging groups
to perform image-interpretation tasks associated
with research. The system can be deployed within
an institution as an Enterprise system to facilitate
access to multiple DICOM servers and CAD systems.
The current implementation of GridIMAGE
carries out pulmonary nodule detection for thoracic computerized tomography (CT) images. The
practitioner queries a set of image databases and
selects studies, series or images to be interpreted.
For each image, the practitioner can specify one
or more radiologists and the CAD algorithms to
be used to identify candidate nodules. Pulmonary
nodule candidates are identified as three-dimensional structures and are defined using parameters that specify a boundary and/or centroid. A
66 Ohio State University Medical Center
graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed
to display CAD findings on CT images as overlays.
Using the GUI, the practitioner can: query, select
and preview subsets of distributed lung CT databases to be included in a study; select CAD algorithms and human readers for the analysis; and
visualize human annotations and markups along
with those produced by CAD algorithms.
• Bioinformatics/Systems Biology (Adapting Google
Earth to Track the Spread of Avian Influenza) –
Daniel Janies, PhD, and his group have designed
an interactive map of the spread of the avian flu
virus (H5N1) that for the first time incorporates
information from viral genomes, geography and
evolution to track the spread of the virus among
various hosts and will help predict where the next
outbreak is likely to occur. As part of the process,
the group tested hypotheses about key strains, or
genotypes, of the virus that appear to be heading
west and have the ability to infect humans.
The team used software to build an evolutionary map of the virus’s mutations. They projected their evolutionary map onto the globe using
Keyhole Markup Language (KML) available in
GoogleTM Earth. Similar to a legend found on a
road map, the evolutionary map uses colors and
symbols to indicate which types of hosts carry the
virus and the distribution of dangerous genotypes
that could infect humans. Designers used
TimeSpan, another function of GoogleTM Earth, to
animate the westward spread of the virus from
Asia to Europe and Africa over the past decade.
Clicking on a specific viral isolate or junction in
the interactive map generates a window revealing
diagnostic mutations in the virus that distinguish
one strain from another. All data in the map is
linked to other resources at the National Institute
of Health’s GenBank. This enables the comparison
of findings about viruses in the real world with
pre-existing laboratory hypotheses. With the evolutionary tree visualized in the globe, questions
can be asked about the virus’s geographics, host
and mutations that enable transmission from
birds to mammals.
The team studied genomic sequence data
from 351 isolates of the virus. They were especially interested in discovering if certain hosts were
carrying discrete forms of the virus and which
viruses carried mutations enabling transmission
to humans. The visualization was useful for generating hypotheses that were subsequently tested
by applying statistical tests to the evolutionary
tree. This allowed the investigators to ask whether
mutations were associated with hosts or certain
geographic regions by chance, or whether adaptations of the virus to new hosts and in new regions
were being tracked. Janies and colleagues found
no genotypes associated with mutations in
hemagglutinin (HA), nor in neuraminidase (NA)
that were significantly associated with any specific type of host. They did, however, find a strong
association between genotype Lysine-627 in an
internal protein, polymerase basic 2, that is linked
to increased replication and virulence of H5N1 in
laboratory mice.
• Nucleosome Positions Predicted Through
Comparative Genomics – DNA sequence has long
been recognized as an important contributor to
nucleosome positioning, which has the potential
to regulate access to genes. The extent to which
the nucleosomal architecture at promoters is
delineated by the underlying sequence is being
worked out. In collaboration with a group of investigators led by Dr. Franklin Pugh at Penn State, Ilya
Ioschikes, PhD, used comparative genomics to
report a genome-wide map of nucleosome positioning sequences (NPSs) located in the vicinity of
all Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes (Letters,
Nature Genetics 38(10)1210-1215). The group
found that the underlying DNA sequence provides
a very good predictor of nucleosome locations
that have been experimentally mapped to a small
fraction of the genome. Notably, distinct classes
of genes possess characteristic arrangements of
NPSs that may be important for their regulation.
In particular, genes that have a relatively compact
NPS arrangement over the promoter region tend
to have a TATA box buried in an NPS and tend to
be highly regulated by chromatin modifying and
remodeling factors. Ioschikhes conducted the
computational correlation searches.
• High Performance Computing – Umit Catalyurek,
PhD, extended his work in combinatorial algorithms and parallel computing. Combinatorial
algorithms are an enabling technology for scientific computing, especially for large-scale problems
and high-performance computing. Partitioning
and load balancing are important issues in parallel
scientific computing relating to performance and
efficiency of large-scale parallel computing clusters. His work involves developing computational
hypergraph models for applications with irregular
data dependencies. Hypergraphs provide more
generalized abstractions than graphs; hence, they
are more flexible in modeling complex problems.
Following Catalyurek’s early works, hypergraphs
are used today for workload partitioning in parallel
processing. The explosion of data in all scientific
fields, especially biomedical areas, necessitates
parallel computational systems with tens or hundreds of processors whose efficiency is vastly
improved by the types of models and algorithms
developed by Catalyurek and collaborators.
This work laid the foundation for
Catalyurek’s collaborative DoE SciDAC application, CSCAPES (Combinatorial Scientific
Computing and Petascale Simulations) Institute.
Only four SciDAC institutes were funded nationwide. Led by Old Dominion University (ODU), the
CSCAPES Institute is a collaboration among
researchers at ODU, Sandia National Laboratories,
Argonne National Laboratory, The Ohio State
University and Colorado State University. The era
of petascale computing is looming and has enormous potential for scientific simulation, but it also
presents challenges. Petascale machines are likely
to have hundreds of thousands of processors,
complex memory hierarchies and relatively poor
network performance. Scientific applications that
will run on these machines will involve complex
multiscale or multiphase physics, adaptive meshes and sophisticated numerical methods.
Harnessing the potential of high-end computers
to solve such complex problems is a challenge
that the CSCAPES Institute is addressing. The
Institute aims to develop and deploy fundamental
technologies in high-performance computing. It
will work with other SciDAC research groups to
integrate software tools into other codes.
2007 Research Report 67
Division of Anatomy
Kenneth Jones, PhD, Director
The Division of Anatomy has
nine full-time faculty who
served more than 2,300 undergraduates, graduate and professional students in 2005-06.
Required and elective courses
are offered in human anatomy,
embryology, histology, neuroanatomy and radiological anatomy. The Division
also provides Anatomy labs that are required in
both the Med 3 Surgical rotation and the Clinical
Skills Immersion Experience. The faculty’s scholarly
interests lie in three areas: biomechanical effects of
trauma; applied neuroanatomy; and the development and evaluation of medical education technologies.
Ongoing Research Programs
• John Bolte, PhD, and Kenneth Jones, PhD,
expanded the Division’s portfolio in biotrauma
with contracts from federal funding sources that
were awarded to support studies in the Division’s
Injury Biomechanics Research Laboratory.
• John Bolte, PhD, organized the second annual
Injury Biomechanics Symposium. Held in May
2006, it was attended by more than 85 representatives from 17 universities and two foreign countries. The third annual Biomechanics of Injury
Symposium was held in May 2007.
trauma that will help improve the biofidelity of
anthropomorphic test devices.
- A $19,959 contract from the U.S. Air Force to
John Bolte, PhD, for imaging that will accurately
measure human head and neck inertial
properties and lead to better-designed pilot
helmets.
• Anatomy’s major research accomplishment in
2006 was the growth of its Injury Biomechanics
Research Laboratory, which is gaining international notice. The lab’s overarching goal is to improve
the safety of pedestrians, as well as occupants of
motor vehicles and aircraft, by studying the biomechanical effects of trauma in controlled conditions to determine the type and magnitude of
forces that correlate with specific injuries. Safety
devices or protocols can then be designed to
reduce or eliminate injuries. The lab’s funded projects have increased consistently over the past few
years. Working there in 2006 were two PhD scientists, one MS scientist, six undergraduates, one
engineering co-op and one medical student. Bolte
and graduate students have been invited to present
their work at national and international meetings.
• The IBRL also has been the driving force behind
Ohio State’s Injury Biomechanics Symposium. The
third annual symposium, held in May 2007, drew
participants from universities, government agencies and industry from the United States, Canada
and several foreign countries.
DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Research Accomplishments of 2006
Douglas Rund, MD, Chair
• Research support for the Division of Anatomy
totaled approximately $1.29 million in 2006.
Projects included:
- Completion of a National Institutes of Health
grant awarded to David Clark, PhD, for trials on
stimulation of the vestibulocochlear nerve for
treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
- Five contracts from the National Highway and
Transportation Safety Administration that were
awarded to Kenneth Jones, PhD, and John Bolte,
PhD, for basic research in the biomechanics of
The Department of Emergency
Medicine includes 32 faculty,
37 residents, one research fellow, a research nurse coordinator, a research technician and
administrative support staff.
The Department’s threefold
mission includes: providing
24-hour clinical care for approximately 100,000
patients per year who present to the Emergency
Departments of Ohio State University Hospital and
68 Ohio State University Medical Center
Ohio State University Hospital East; educating
Emergency Medicine residents, medical students,
fellows and other residents/fellows learning emergency medicine; and developing research programs
relevant to Emergency Medicine. Department
research has focused on the laboratory and clinicalbased studies. Although a fairly new academic
department (established in 1990) with relatively
young faculty, Emergency Medicine’s research
efforts have shown steady growth. Leadership positions include chair, vice chair for clinical affairs, vice
chair for research, vice chair for development, residency directors and student education director.
Ongoing Research Programs
• The Laboratory Research Program, under the
direction of Mark Angelos, MD, is based in Ohio
State’s Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute
and focuses on cardiac reperfusion.
• Michael Sayre, MD’s Resuscitation Research
Program mission is to increase survival from sudden cardiac arrest in central Ohio and beyond by
researching and developing diagnostic treatment
strategies.
• Robert Guthrie, MD, operates a Clinical Trials
Research Program evaluating new drugs for the
long-term care of patients with hypertension, cholesterol disorders and diabetes.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• The Department presented six abstracts at the
Society of Academic Emergency Medicine’s
national scientific meeting May 18-21, 2006, in
San Francisco. At the American College of
Emergency Physicians national meeting held Oct.
15-16, 2006, in New Orleans, the Department presented five abstracts, three of which were presented by residents. In addition, one abstract was
presented at the American Heart Association’s
Scientific Sessions held November 12-15, 2006, in
Chicago, and one abstract was presented at the
Resuscitation Research Symposium on Nov 11,
2006.
• The Undergraduate Research Associate Program,
established in January 2005 in collaboration with
Volunteer Services, continues to thrive. Directed
by Jeff Caterino, MD, and coordinated by Carol
Schneider, RN, the program has increased the
numbers of enrolled subjects and given students
interested in medicine some experience interacting with patients, nurses and physicians. The program has boosted collaboration between
Emergency Medicine and other departments that
use volunteers’ services to screen patients for
their studies.
• At Emergency Medicine’s 3rd Annual Spring
Research Day on May 23, 2006, invited speaker
Carl Leier, MD, a professor in Cardiovascular
Medicine at Ohio State, presented “Inotropic
Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.” Department
senior residents also made presentations.
DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY MEDICINE
Mary Jo Welker, MD, Chair
The Department of Family
Medicine provides quality health
care based on a family practice
model, teaching and modeling
family medicine principles and
values, pursuing cutting-edge
research and scholarship, and
providing service through personal, professional and political efforts. The
Department fosters, facilitates and reports collaborative, interdisciplinary research directed toward
optimizing peoples’ health. Central to these efforts
is the Ohio State Primary Care Research Institute, a
collaboration including faculty from the Division of
General Internal Medicine and the Division of
Ambulatory Pediatrics plus numerous other departments at Ohio State. Family Medicine’s collective
laboratory is the 24-site Ohio State Primary Care
Practice-Based Research Network, which includes
all of Franklin County and serves some 107,000
patients. Numbers and funding amounts of research
projects are increasing annually.
2007 Research Report 69
Ongoing Research Programs
• Academic Administrative Units in Primary Care –
This three-year, federally funded grant project
supports the Ohio State Primary Care Research
Institute in expanding research in cancer, diabetes,
genetics and cardiopulmonary conditions.
• Patient-Centered Communication During
Chemotherapy – Funded by the National Institutes
of Health, this two-year project will develop a
patient-centered communication intervention for
breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy
treatment, examine patient reactions to the intervention and evaluate its effects on pain, depression and fatigue symptoms.
• Teaching to the CORE: Using Core Competencies
Without Losing Core Values – This three-year, federally funded grant project will enhance medical
school curriculum at Ohio State, focusing on core
competencies identified by the Accreditation
Council for Graduate Medical Education and creating a medical school environment allowing students to retain the values of altruism and service
values drawing students to primary care.
• Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Techniques and
Lifestyle Changes: Reducing Systolic Blood Pressure –
This study tests the hypothesis that patients can
be taught to implement Lifestyle Behavioral
Changes (LBCs - restricting dietary sodium,
engaging in aerobic physical activities and moderating alcohol intake) augmented by Cognitive
Behavioral Therapy-Techniques (CBT-T) in the
time frame of a routine primary care office visit.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Tom Best, MD, PhD, joined the Department in
2005-06 with four funded projects: Biomechanical
Effects of Eccentric Exertions in the Workplace, a
three-year project funded for $387,000 by the
National Institute for Occupational Safety and
Health; Modeling of Muscle Strains and Prediction of
Injury Risk Factors, a two-year study funded for
$100,000 by the AIRCAST Foundation; Effects of
a Previous Strain Injury on Hamstring Muscle
Mechanics During Springtime: Implications for
Preventing Re-Injury, a six-month project funded
70 Ohio State University Medical Center
for $125,000 by NFL Charities; and The Use of
Botulinum A Toxin to Reduce Muscle Contracture and
to Promote Myogenesis in a Rabbit Distraction
Osteogenesis Model, a two-year project funded for
$100,000 by the Orthopaedic Research and
Education Foundation. Best focuses on the pathophysiology of muscle-tendon injuries. Through
federal and industrial support, he has assembled a
team of post-docs, graduate students and medical
students who use animal models to examine the
biomechanics and pathophysiology of injury and
repair, with interest in the role of leukocytes. They
use immunological and molecular techniques to
dissect the role of NF-KB and other transcription
factors in the repair of stretch-injured skeletal
muscle. Best has collaborated with other scientists at Ohio State to understand more about the
role of exercise in cancer-induced cachexia. They
are using an animal model to explore optimal
methods of attenuating muscle wasting.
• Pat Fahey, MD, along with Mary Jo Welker, MD,
Tom Blincoe, Donna Cruz-Huffmaster and Chris
Welker, investigated downstream revenue that
the Ohio State University Primary Care Network
(OSU PCN) generates for Ohio State University
Medical Center (OSUMC). They assessed total
billings and collections in fiscal 2003-04 from five
revenue streams at OSUMC from the OSU PCN.
These streams – hospital billings, tests and procedures from network and specialty attending physicians, and specialist physician billings – were
compared with billings and collections from the
OSU PCN. The researchers used a novel weighting
system to capture the concept that not all admissions or referrals of OSU PCN patients were
ordered by OSU PCN physicians. Total downstream net revenue of nearly $115 million was
more than six times the net revenue to the network. A downstream direct contribution margin of
$52 million was 6.3 times the network loss. The
researchers concluded that a primary care network can generate significant financial support for
an academic medical center. Their manuscript,
“Analysis of Downstream Revenue to an
Academic Medical Center from a Primary Care
Network,” was published in the August 2006
issue of Academic Medicine.
• Larry Gabel, PhD, with support from Pat Fahey,
MD, Linda Stone, MD, and others from outside
the Department, completed two funded projects
investigating “telehealth”: Telehealth: A Unique
Solution for Health Needs of the Columbus
Empowerment Zone was a three-year project funded for $108,000 by the Columbus Compact
Corporation; and Ohio Telemedicine, Education, and
Linkage Program (Ohio TeleHelp): A Proof-ofConcept Study, a one-year project funded for
$150,000 by the Ohio Board of Regents.
These projects suggested that medical outcomes
via telemedicine are the same or better than outcomes of similar face-to-face medical services,
and that concomitant costs of service are the
same or less. A university-commercial partnership
was established to create and maintain a
statewide broadband network to link facilities
interested in participating in a proof-of-concept
study. Each facility was configured with at least a
video-teleconference unit connected to all others
through wired or wireless means. Networked facilities included: four nursing homes (two in
Columbus, one in Cleveland and one in Waverly);
a non-profit community mental health center, a
non-profit community primary healthcare center,
and a non-profit community refugee center, all in
Columbus; a non-profit county health department
in Portsmouth; a university-based hospital in
Columbus; and two university-based emergency
departments in Columbus and Chillicothe. A pilot
study of this network revealed satisfaction by consulting physicians at the Distant Site (university
hospital) and staff and patients at the Originating
Sites (nursing homes). Especially apparent were
savings in time, travel and staff resources that are
normally part of person-to-person healthcare
delivery. A later analysis suggested that using
telemedicine could save Medicaid about $98.5
million annually. But Ohio Medicaid does not
reimburse for care provided via telemedicine, and
nor does Medicare in metropolitan areas, so there
is reason to consider changing restrictive regulations.
DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE
Michael Grever, MD, Chair
The Department of Internal
Medicine comprises 12 divisions,
each dedicated to innovations in
research, education and patient
care. Following are division
descriptions and research highlights for 2006:
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
William Abraham, MD, Director
In partnership with patients,
researchers and healthcare professionals, Cardiovascular
Medicine conducts clinical trials
on new cardiovascular drugs,
devices and therapies. The
Division’s Cardiovascular
Clinical Research Unit (CCRU)
enables clinical researchers and basic scientists to
work together to improve patient care and outcomes. The CCRU manages more than 80 clinical
research projects, including investigator-initiated
single-site studies, multi-site trials sponsored by the
National Institutes of Health, and industry-sponsored trials. Studies span heart failure, interventional cardiology, electrophysiology, pulmonary hypertension, sleep disorders, emergency medicine, and
cardiac imaging and genotyping. By linking Ohio
State’s Ross Heart Hospital with the University’s
Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, faculty
members have advanced patient care through
research. Investigators and research staff identify
patients who may be candidates for specific protocols, then follow them closely throughout the studies, usually for several years. Results from these
studies form the basis for standard-of-care practices and identify additional questions for translational and basic research.
2007 Research Report 71
Ongoing Research Programs
• Heart failure and a controlled trial investigating
outcomes of exercise training
(HF-ACTION)
PI: William Abraham, MD
• Multicenter automatic defibrillator implantation
trial II (MADIT II)
PI: Charles Love, MD
• Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (Chronicle
ICD)
PI: Garrie Haas, MD
• The role of diagnosis and treatment of sleep
apnea in the acute exacerbation of heart failure
PIs: Rami Khayat, MD, and William Abraham, MD
• Trial to assess chelation therapy (TACT)
PI: Raymond Magorien, MD
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• One major accomplishment has been the development of the Cardiovascular Clinical Research Unit
(CCRU) as a model for clinical research at
OSUMC and as a national leader in investigating
new cardiovascular drug and device therapies.
CCRU leaders are working with hospital revenue
cycle management to formalize a billing process
for clinical research. They also are working with
the Medical Center’s Information Warehouse and
the Department of Biomedical Informatics to
design computer-based research-screening
processes.
• Physicians at Ohio State’s Ross Heart Hospital use
a minimally invasive cardiac catheterization procedure to implant the nation’s first permanent
device for monitoring and treating congestive
heart failure. This investigational device, called the
HeartPod (Savacor, Inc.), allows patients to monitor and change their treatment regimen, if needed,
based on specifications pre-set by their physician.
Ohio State was the first site in the United States
to implant the HeartPod, and it continues to be
72 Ohio State University Medical Center
the highest enrolling site with seven patients.
Garrie Haas, MD, is the local principal investigator; Charles Bush, MD, medical director of the
Ross Heart Hospital, and Charles Love, MD, director of CV Device Services, conduct the implants;
and William Abraham, MD, is the national principal investigator. In 2006, Love was selected as the
first electrophysiologist in the world to implant
the device using a subclavian approach that
allows for easier access through the chest as
opposed to implanting through the leg.
• The Sleep-Heart Program, a multidisciplinary clinical and research program led by William
Abraham, MD, was initiated. Leadership is also
provided by Philip Binkley, MD, and Garrie Haas,
MD, from Cardiovascular Medicine, and Rami
Khayat, MD, from the Division of Pulmonary,
Allergy, Critical and Sleep Medicine. The program
spans Ohio State’s Ross Heart Hospital, the Sleep
Disorders Center at University Hospital East, Ohio
State’s School of Public Health, and Ohio State’s
Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute. The
program examines translational and clinical questions that focus on the relation between respiratory disorders of sleep and cardiovascular diseases.
Research tracks include: sleep apnea and autonomic control in patients with heart failure; effects
of intermittent hypoxia on the heart; clinical outcomes of treatment of sleep apnea and heart failure; vascular consequences of oxidative stress in
sleep apnea; and lipid metabolism in sleep apnea.
The program is positioned to study questions
about cardiovascular consequences of sleep disorders.
• The Division’s Cardiovascular Clinical Research
Unit (CCRU) continued to grow through the
development of clinical research core lab facilities
in cardiac stress testing, cardiac MR/CT and noninvasive imaging. Additionally, the Division and
the CCRU experienced unprecedented growth in
electrophysiology by adding five physicians who
transferred approximately 20 clinical research
studies with hundreds of active research subjects.
This gives the Division one of the largest clinical
research groups at OSUMC.
Division of Dermatology
Division of Digestive Health
Mark Bechtel, MD, Director
Nicholas Verne, MD, Director
The Division of Dermatology
collaborates with the Division of
Hematology and Oncology in
clinical management, clinical trials and oncologic genetic
research focusing on cutaneous
lymphoma and cutaneous
oncology. Dermatology is also
collaborating in a new cutaneous oncology focus
group involving dermatology, hematology and
oncology, surgical oncology, dermatopathology and
cutaneous oncology researchers at Ohio State. A
new cutaneous oncology dermatologic surgical
facility provides more space for micrographic surgery on cutaneous malignancies. A complex medical dermatology clinic enables dermatology residents to evaluate and manage patients with autoimmune bullous diseases, collagen vascular disease
and severe psoriasis. Matthew Zirwas, MD, has
joined Dermatology and established the Contact
and Occupational Dermatitis Center. Mark Bechtel,
MD, was recognized in the 2005-2006 “Best
Doctors in America.” He also serves on the
American Academy of Dermatology’s Guidelines
and Standards of Care Task Force. Zirwas was elected to the board of directors of the American
Contact Dermatitis Society.
After a major recruiting effort
throughout 2006, the
Department of Internal
Medicine selected Nicholas
Verne, MD, to direct the
Division of Digestive Health.
Verne is a nationally known,
grant-funded physician scientist
who will be responsible for building a comprehensive research program in gastroenterology. Also in
this Division during 2006, Sumei Liu, PhD, continued her work with Jackie Wood, PhD, of the
Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, to
advance understanding of neurophysiologic control
of mammalian gastrointestinal functions in health
and disease states. John Fromkes, MD, continued
his research in conjunction with Gary Stoner, PhD,
of the Division of Hematology and Oncology, to
examine the cancer-inhibiting properties of black
raspberries in people at high risk for esophageal
cancer.
Ongoing Research Programs
• David Lambert, MD, is collaborating with Ronald
Glaser, PhD, director of the Institute for
Behavioral Medicine Research at Ohio State, in a
study funded by the National Institutes of Health
on the effects of stress on basal cell carcinoma.
• David Lambert, MD, is collaborating with Amanda
Tolland, PhD, of Molecular Virology, Immunology
and Medical Genetics, in the study of molecular
genetics of squamous cell carcinoma.
Division Accomplishments in 2006
• The most significant accomplishment was completing planning and starting construction of
office facilities and a state-of-the-art endoscopy
unit, both targeted for completion by the end of
fiscal year 2007. Additional planning was completed for construction of an outpatient clinic
within the new Digestive Health space. These
facilities will be a key to faculty recruitment and
the growth of a comprehensive research program
in gastroenterology.
2007 Research Report 73
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and
Metabolism
Kwame Osei, MD, Director
The Division of Endocrinology,
Diabetes and Metabolism continues to excel in research,
teaching and patient care.
Endocrinology at Ohio State
University Hospitals was cited
for the 13th time among the Best
Divisions in Hormonal Disorders
by U.S.News & World Report. The Division will
expand its accomplishments through research in
diabetes, islet cell transplantation, osteoporosis and
bone diseases, thyroid cancer and benign thyroidpituitary disorders.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Non-Human Primate Experimental Model of Islet
Cell Transplantation (ICTP) (Elizabeth Diakoff, MD)
• Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Osteoarthritis
Initiative (OAI) (Rebecca Jackson, MD)
• Diabetes Research Center (DRC) (Kwame Osei, MD)
• Thyroid Cancer Program at the Martha
Morehouse Medical Plaza (Matthew Ringel, MD)
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• In conjunction with the Department of Surgery’s
Division of Transplant Surgery, the Division of
Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism has
established a Non–Human Primate Experimental
Model of Islet Cell Transplantation (ICTP). The
success of this phase of the program has become
the backbone of the human ICTP initiative.
Objectives are to develop therapies to ensure
long-standing islet cell functional survival in
humans by immunoprotection and to promote
islet cell growth and anti-apoptosis.
• The Division supports two prestigious NIH
Centers: the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and
Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Given the strengths
of these centers, the Division has recruited new
faculty in bone epidemiology.
74 Ohio State University Medical Center
• The College of Medicine’s Executive Committee
approved a business plan to establish a Diabetes
Research Center, which will develop treatment
strategies for sustaining functional islet cell transplantation (ICTP) and pancreas allograft transplantation (PAT), diabetes and cardiovascular
disease, and prevention of type 2 diabetes. A
Community Diabetes Program also will be developed.
• In conjunction with Ohio State’s Comprehensive
Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and
Solove Research Institute, the Division has established a Thyroid Cancer Program at the Martha
Morehouse Medical Plaza. This program aims to:
define the molecular basis of thyroid cancer
growth and metastasis; develop chemotherapies
as an adjunct for radioiodine and thyroxine therapy; and develop a translational research program
in thyroid cancer.
Division of General Internal Medicine
Catherine Lucey, MD, Director
The Division of General Internal
Medicine provides comprehensive patient care to an increasingly complex community of
patients while educating the
next generation of physicians.
Division members have
achieved local and national
recognition for patient care and educational leadership roles. They are also involved in numerous
research projects. The Division is strongly focused
on medical education. Numerous faculty are recognized as educational leaders in department and college activities. Leadership positions assumed by
Division members include directorship of the new
Office for Scholarship in Medical Education, chair of
the College of Medicine Professionalism Education
and Evaluation Committee, co-directorship of the
Med 3/4 curriculum, and directorship of the new
Meaning in Medicine course for medical students.
Division physicians have authored multiple book
chapters on topics ranging from physical diagnosis
to clinical decision-making, perioperative issues and
the educational approach to dealing with problem
residents.
Ongoing Research Programs
Division of Hematology and Oncology
Michael Caligiuri, MD, Director
• Point of service testing in diabetes and anti-coagulation management – Mark Wurster, MD
• Faculty development of community-based primary
care preceptors in underserved communities –
Cynthia Ledford, MD
• Comparison of medical student and volunteer
senior partner expectation for a regional senior
partner experience in medical school – Robert
Murden, MD
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Cynthia Kreger, MD, continued production of
history-taking and physical exam cases for educational CDs. These are used in classes at Ohio
State and sold nationwide.
• The faculty development proposal by Cynthia
Ledford, MD, was funded for more than
$200,000, the largest grant ever obtained by a
principal investigator in the Division of General
Internal Medicine.
• Almost half of the faculty was involved in research
projects.
• Cynthia Ledford, MD, received a Health Resources
and Services Administration grant as principal
investigator for developing a virtual classroom to
help community-based faculty enhance their
teaching skills.
• Mitchell Medow, MD, was a core participant in a
T32 training grant to increase the number of
health professionals with formal education in clinical investigation. He also continued his work on
the use of decision-making aids by physicians.
• Harrison Weed, MD, co-edited a textbook on
perioperative medicine.
• Mark Wurster, MD, was involved with several
projects on point-of-service testing for management of chronic medical conditions.
• Cynthia Kreger, MD, Robert Murden, MD, and
Mark Wurster, MD, continued to participate in
Health Resources and Services Administration
grants with colleagues in the Department of
Family Medicine.
Research in the Division of
Hematology and Oncology
focuses on developing drug
therapies for treating solidtumor and hematologic malignancies, and on cancer prevention through nutrition and natural products. 2006 was productive for the Division as evidenced by the growth in
direct research funding. Most notably, Miguel
Villalona, MD, was awarded a $3 million phase II
clinical trials contract from the National Cancer
Institute (NCI), placing Ohio State in a group of
only five other cancer institutions in America that
have received NCI contracts for both phase I and
phase II clinical trials. In addition, Charles Shapiro,
MD, was awarded a $1.25 million grant from The
Lance Armstrong Foundation to establish a cancer
survivorship center at Ohio State that will work to
improve the care and quality of life of cancer survivors. These and other grant awards are highlighted
below in the Division’s 2006 research accomplishments.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Phase I Trials of Anticancer Agents – This program
seeks to perform early drug development in solid
and hematologic tumors with performance of
detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic
studies – Michael Grever, MD
• Early Therapeutics Development with Phase II
Emphasis – This program studies National Cancer
Institute-sponsored novel anticancer agents in
phase II clinical trials – Miguel Villalona, MD
• Comprehensive Program for the Prevention,
Detection and Treatment of Lung Cancer – This
program investigates inhalation programs for the
prevention and detection of cancer. Several novel
biomarkers for easy detection and innovative
imaging modalities have been tested and developed – Gregory Otterson, MD
2007 Research Report 75
• Experimental Therapeutics in Chronic
Lymphocytic Leukemia – This Specialized Center
of Research (SCOR) grant is being used to create
new and improve current therapies for chronic
lymphocytic leukemia – John Byrd, MD
• Epigenetic Targeted Therapy for Chronic
Lymphocytic Leukemia – This program is developing targeted therapies for chronic lymphocytic
leukemia and lymphoproliferative disorders – John
Byrd, MD
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Miguel Villalona, MD, received a $3 million phase
II contract in early therapeutics development from
the National Cancer Institute.
• Charles Shapiro, MD, was awarded a $1.25 million
grant from The Lance Armstrong Foundation to
establish a cancer survivors center at Ohio State
that will improve the care and quality of life of
cancer survivors.
• Michael Grever, MD, is co-principal investigator
(PI) for an $11.84 million program project grant
awarded by the National Cancer Institute for
“DNA methylation & chromatin modifications:
mechanisms & applications in cancer therapy.” PI
for this grant is Samson Jacob, PhD, of Molecular
and Cellular Biochemistry.
• Robert Baiocchi, MD, PhD, received a V
Foundation Scholar Award to study Epstein-Barr
virus-associated malignancies.
• Kristie Blum, MD, was awarded a National Cancer
Institute grant targeting transcriptional repression
in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
• William Blum, MD, received a National Cancer
Institute grant to help develop experimental therapeutics in adult leukemia.
• Steven Clinton, MD, PhD, landed a National
Cancer Institute grant to study the effects of
tomato-soy juice on prostate cancer.
• Thomas Lin, MD, PhD, was awarded a National
Cancer Institute grant to study the efficacy of
Flavopiridol in treating B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
76 Ohio State University Medical Center
• Guido Marcucci, MD, received a National Cancer
Institute grant to research the pharmacologic
modulation of chromatin remodeling in leukemia.
• Manisha Shah, MD, was awarded a National
Cancer Institute grant for focusing on targeting
RAF and VEGF signaling in thyroid cancer.
• Clara D. Bloomfield, MD, received the
Distinguished Service Award for Scientific
Achievement from the American Society of
Clinical Oncology. She also was elected president
of the Association for Patient Oriented Research
and was named a Distinguished University
Professor, Ohio State’s top faculty award.
• John Byrd, MD, was one of five researchers
selected to receive the Leukemia & Lymphoma
Society’s Stohlman Scholar Award for outstanding
contributions in blood cancer research.
Division of Human Genetics
Albert de la Chapelle, MD, PhD, Interim Director
The Division of Human Genetics
(HG) serves as a single platform
for translational and clinical
research, clinical activities, and
education and outreach. Its
goals are to enhance Ohio State
University Medical Center as a
leader in gene discovery/characterization and molecular epidemiology, to set standards for the clinical management of patients with
genetic predisposition, and to set guidelines for
society regarding the research and clinical usage of
genetic information. Its clinical responsibilities are
to provide genetic counseling to patients and families, and expert consultations to physicians and
other professionals. HG not only provides adult
medical genetics care to residents of central Ohio
and beyond, but it also gives patients and physicians in the community free access to HG research
protocols. HG coordinates clinical-genomic databases, specimen repositories and the use of both inhouse and referral diagnostic facilities to support
clinical research in human genetics.
Ongoing Research Programs
Division of Immunology
Ronald Whisler, MD, Director
• Columbus-area HNPCC (hereditary nonpolyposis
colon cancer) study – Albert de la Chapelle, MD, PhD
• Variants in high-risk breast cancer genes and contribution to cancer risk – Amanda Toland, PhD
• Frequency and clinical spectrum of germline PTEN
mutations in a population-based series of incident
breast cancer cases in central Ohio – Charles
Shapiro, MD
• Study to identify multiple human low penetrance
genes that control genetic susceptibility and
resistance to cancer – Kevin Sweet, MS, CGC, and
Amanda Toland, PhD
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Heather Hampel, MS, CGC, and Albert de la
Chapelle, MD, PhD, along with other members of
the Human Genetics (HG) staff, published the
findings of the Columbus-area HNPCC study with
regard to the screening of 543 newly diagnosed
endometrial cancer patients in the journal Cancer
Research in August 2006. As a result of this study,
the Ohio State University Pathology Department
and Gynecologic Oncology Division, in conjunction with the Division of HG, has begun performing immunohistochemistry staining for the
four mismatch repair proteins on all newly diagnosed
endometrial cancer patients at Ohio State University
Medical Center as a clinical billable service.
• Rebecca Nagy, MS, CGC, is collaborating with Gail
Herman, MD, PhD, (Columbus Children’s
Hospital) on her Ohio Department of Health
Services grant titled Regional Genetics Center at
Children’s Hospital. Nagy participates in a
statewide directory and speaker’s bureau giving
presentations on cancer genetics.
• Kimberly Kelly, PhD, received funding from the
Tzagournis Endowment Trust Fund to support a
Cancer Family History Public Health Campaign
($99,996). Judith Westman, MD, along with Amy
Sturm, MS, CGC, and Kevin Sweet, MS, CGC, are
also involved in this project. This campaign promotes awareness of the importance of family history of cancer and gives the public tools to gather,
evaluate and use family history to learn more
about their cancer risk.
The Division of Immunology
makes advances in academic
excellence and research while
serving the University and the
community in the clinical setting. The Division’s publications
and peer-reviewed grants
demonstrate considerable
strength, with Kevin Hackshaw, MD, and Clark
Anderson, MD, participating as co-investigators on
program project grants. Anderson furthered his
National Institutes of Health (NIH)-supported studies of Fc receptors. Kevin Hackshaw and Ronald
Whisler, MD, serve as co-principal investigators
with Rebecca Jackson, MD, on the Osteoarthritis
Initiative funded by NIH. Division members also
have been conducting clinical investigations into
more efficacious treatment regimens for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous,
fibromyalgia, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.
Ongoing Research Programs and
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• FcRn Binds and Transports Albumin – Clark
Anderson, MD
• Clinical Centers for the Osteoarthritis Initiative –
Kevin Hackshaw, MD and Ronald Whisler, MD
• Phase III randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study of retreatment with rituximab in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis
receiving background methotrexate – Kevin
Hackshaw, MD
• A randomized, phase 3, controlled, double-blind,
parallel group, multicenter study to evaluate the
safety and efficacy of rituximab in combination
with methotrexate (mtx) compared to mtx alone
in methotrexate-naive patients with active
rheumatoid arthritis - Ronald Whisler, MD and
Kevin Hackshaw, MD
2007 Research Report 77
Division of Infectious Diseases
Larry Schlesinger, MD, Director
Faculty in the Division of
Infectious Diseases (ID) continued their commitment to
research in 2006 by submitting
27 grants. Active funding
included $13.97 million from
the National Institutes of
Health (NIH), the Health
Resources and Services Administration (HRSA),
and the Department of Health and Human Services
to support research for patients with HIV/AIDS.
The Division’s NIH-awarded AIDS Clinical Trials
Unit (ACTU) ranked highly among research awards
across the University in 2006, and its HRSA AIDS
Education and Training Center continued to thrive.
The Center for Microbial Interface Biology (CMIB)
was awarded Center status by the Ohio State
University Board of Trustees. The CMIB’s multidisciplinary educational and research programs
explore fundamental questions about infectious
diseases, microbial pathogenesis, bioterrorism and
disaster preparedness. Research awards for core
CMIB members totaled $5.55 million. Major
research areas within the Division include
HIV/AIDS, fungal infections, infections in the
immunocompromised host, tuberculosis, parasitic
infections, epidemiology and food-borne infections.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Unit (ACTU) – Led by
Susan Koletar, MD, this unit is part of a national
and international multicenter group that conducts
clinical trials to increase knowledge about the
pathogenesis, prevention, course and treatment of
HIV infection and associated complications.
• Epi-Centers for Prevention of Healthcare Related
Infections, Ohio State Health Network Infection
Control Collaborative – Under the leadership of
Kurt Stevenson, MD, MPH, this collaborative
includes Ohio State and 14 outreach sites that
optimize electronic health information systems to
improve surveillance for healthcare-associated
78 Ohio State University Medical Center
infections, antimicrobial resistance and other
adverse biological events.
• Great Lakes Regional Center of Excellence in
Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Disease
Research – This program, funded by the National
Institutes of Health and the National Institute of
Allergy and Infectious Diseases, awarded Ohio
State a grant titled “Lung innate immune responses to Francisella tularensis: a central role for the
macrophage.” The grant, led by Larry Schlesinger,
MD, includes four projects conducted by investigators in the Center for Microbial Interface
Biology at Ohio State and by Ohio State’s Davis
Heart and Lung Research Institute. The
researchers are exploring lung immune responses
to these bacteria – especially as they relate to
interactions with macrophages – to identify
molecular targets for new diagnostic strategies as
well as targeted immune therapies aimed at
enhancing host immunity.
• CD8 T Cells and Immunity to Tuberculosis in Old
Mice – Joanne Turner, PhD. This study, funded by
the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious
Diseases, explores how the aging immune system
response differs from that of younger individuals
when it encounters a pathogen. This knowledge
will help design a vaccine or post-exposure therapy to protect the elderly from infectious disease.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• The AIDS Clinical Trials Unit (ACTU) at Ohio State
advances AIDS care via research on the pathogenesis, prevention, course and treatment of HIV
infection and associated complications through
affiliation with the national and international AIDS
Clinical Trials Group (ACTG). The ACTU was refunded in December 2006 for $11.9 million over
seven years. By playing leadership roles for protocol development and administration of the ACTG,
Ohio State participates in the design and implementation of clinical trials that seek to optimize
clinical management of HIV and related complications, evaluate agents with novel mechanisms or
improved toxicity profiles for treating HIV and/or
major co-pathogens (e.g., tuberculosis and hepatitis), evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of multiple candidate HIV vaccines
and adjuvants, develop means of reducing HIV
transmission, and minimize the risk of vertical
transmission by maximizing care of HIV-infected
women during child-bearing years.
• The national Centers for Disease Control designated Ohio State as one of five (in the country)
Epi-Centers for Prevention of Healthcare-Related
Infections, a five-year project funded at $1.97 million. This Ohio State Health Network Infection
Control Collaborative includes the University and
14 outreach sites that improve surveillance for
healthcare-associated infections, antimicrobial
resistance and other adverse biological events by
optimizing available electronic health information
systems. This enables facilities to focus less on
data collection and more on improving processes
and outcomes, particularly in small community
hospitals where staffing and other resources are
limited. Through the Ohio State University Health
System, the Ohio State Health Network and the
Ohio State University Information Warehouse,
health information will be surveyed for targeted
events, retrospective comparison of electronic
with traditional surveillance, and prospective validation of surveillance methodology for accuracy
and cost efficiency.
• OSU Center for Microbial Interface Biology
(CMIB) – In 2006 the CMIB (which includes leadership from the Division of Infectious Diseases)
grew to 55 faculty campuswide and nearly 50
core personnel in the Biomedical Research Tower
(BRT), and was awarded University Center status
by the Board of Trustees. Research funding for
core CMIB members in the BRT totaled $5.55 million, with $10.55 million in review. The CMIB is a
member of the Great Lakes Regional Center of
Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious
Disease Research. It also serves as a centerpiece
for collaborations in research and education with
units/departments across the University. A
Provost Targeted Investment in Excellence program was awarded in Public Health Preparedness
for Infectious Diseases to Larry Schlesinger, MD,
College of Medicine, in conjunction with the colleges of Public Health, Veterinary Medicine,
Biological Sciences, Pharmacy, and Food,
Agriculture and Environmental Sciences. The
award totals $979,068 to the College of
Medicine/Division of Infectious Diseases. Also in
2006, CMIB faculty in the BRT had 20 papers
published or in press, along with numerous published abstracts, invited lectureships and review
panel appointments, both nationally and internationally.
• Great Lakes Regional Center of Excellence
(GLRCE) in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious
Diseases Research – Investigators in Ohio State’s
Center for Microbial Interface Biology (CMIB) and
the Division of Infectious Diseases received a fiveyear grant totaling $546,877 from the GLRCE to
study lung innate immune responses to
Francisella tularensis, the causative bacterium of
tularemia and a targeted agent of bioterrorism.
The most worrisome infectious agents of bioterrorism would be artificially disseminated as
aerosols to the lungs. Thus, a clearer understanding of lung immune responses to these bacteria,
especially as they relate to interactions with
macrophages, is essential for identifying molecular targets for new diagnostic strategies and targeted immune therapies aimed at enhancing host
immunity. This project involves investigators in
both the CMIB and Ohio State’s Davis Heart and
Lung Research Institute.
• CD8 T Cells and Immunity to Tuberculosis in Old
Mice – The elderly are more susceptible to infectious diseases, but vaccinating them is less effective when using vaccines designed for young individuals. To design a vaccine or post-exposure
therapy that can protect the elderly, it is necessary to understand how the aging immune
response reacts to pathogens. Using an aging
mouse model of tuberculosis, researchers have
found that old mice express a transient early
resistance to infection that correlates with the
presence of CD8 T cells within the lungs – a previously unrecognized immune mechanism that is
absent from the lungs of young mice. Joanne
Turner, PhD, will use a low-dose aerosol infection
model of tuberculosis to further characterize this
CD8 T cell population and determine when CD8 T
cells become more active in the lungs of old mice,
as well as the mechanism by which CD8 T cells
mediate early resistance.
2007 Research Report 79
Division of Nephrology
Brad Rovin, MD, Director
Investigators collaborating on
the Nephrology Program Project
on SLE nephritis – Lee Hebert,
MD, Brad Rovin, MD, Dan
Birmingham, PhD, and ChackYung Yu, PhD – were invited to
resubmit a competitive renewal
to the National Institute of
Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. They
have now published more than 40 original papers
and review articles on lupus nephritis and placed
four abstracts at the 8th International Congress on
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) in Shanghai,
China. Rovin and Hebert are participating in four
clinical trials of novel therapeutic agents for the
treatment of SLE and are active members of the
Lupus Clinical Trials Consortium. Clinical trials run
by Anil Agarwal, MD, Nabil Haddad, MD, Hebert,
Dan Spetie, MD, Ganesh Shidham, MD, Rovin,
Todd Pesavento, MD, and Jon Von Visger, MD,
PhD, brought more than $1.5 million in research
funding to the Division.
Ongoing Research Programs
• SLE Program Project in Human Lupus Nephritis –
This work examines clinical, genetic and novel
biochemical risk factors for the onset, severity and
prognosis of lupus nephritis flare.
• The African-American Study of Kidney Disease
and Hypertension (AASK) – This is an NIH-sponsored clinical trial of risk factors for kidney disease
and hypertension in African-Americans.
• The Lupus Clinical Trials Consortium (LCTC):
Through this consortium, the Division of
Nephrology participates in multicenter, international trials of new therapeutics for lupus and
lupus nephritis.
• Clinical Research in Transplantation – The
Transplant Center has initiated two large prospective clinical trials. One looks at reducing complications of steroid therapy in renal transplant recipients, and the other examines homocysteine as a
cardiovascular risk factor for renal transplant
patients.
80 Ohio State University Medical Center
• Clinical Anemia Program: The Nephrology clinical
trials unit is involved in studies to define the best
approaches to anemia management in patients
with chronic kidney disease.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• The Program Project in Lupus Nephritis has provided novel insights into human SLE. Studies on
the role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of lupus have revealed four important
findings. First, variability in gene copy number of
the fourth complement component (C4) is an
important risk factor for onset of SLE. Specifically,
low C4 gene copy number predisposes to lupus
onset, while high copy number provides protection. Second, genetically determined low copy
number of erythrocyte complement receptor-1 (ECR1), which interacts with complement-coated
immune complexes in circulation, is associated
with onset of renal manifestations of lupus. Third,
E-CR1 function during SLE flare protects the kidney from damage mediated by immune complexes and complement. Fourth, the pattern of complement activation prior to and at the onset of SLE
flare suggests the involvement of two complement activation pathways: the classical pathway
during renal flare initiation, and the alternative
pathway driving actual renal tissue damage. These
data underscore the importance of the complement system, both in protecting against the onset
of SLE and its manifestations, and in driving the
tissue damage that defines the clinical presentation of SLE nephritis.
• Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine
thought to play a role in metabolic disorders such
as obesity and diabetes, has been identified as a
potential biomarker of lupus nephritis. To understand the relationship between this novel cytokine
and lupus, scientists launched studies to determine its potential as a modulator of inflammation.
Although existing literature suggests that
adiponectin may have anti-inflammatory properties, Ohio State scientists have shown that this
adipokine can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokines by endothelial cells and
monocytes. They also have shown that
adiponectin is present in the kidneys of patients
with lupus nephritis, and that its RNA expression
is upregulated compared with control renal tissue.
In addition, a known adiponectin receptor is present on glomerular podocytes. These findings
demonstrate that adiponectin can be made in
organs other than adipose tissue, and that the
expression of ligand and receptor in the glomerulus suggests a role for adiponectin in modulating
glomerular function. A potential effect of
adiponectin in lupus may be to augment inflammation through induction of proinflammatory
cytokines. This remains to be demonstrated and is
part of an ongoing effort to define the role of
adiponectin in lupus nephritis.
• Clinical studies of extended dosing of darbopoietin-α showed that it is possible to increase the
dosing interval of this drug to once a month. This
finding is likely to impact the care and quality of
life of patients with chronic kidney disease and
anemia who are not yet on dialysis. Darbopoietin-О±
was effective at extended dosing intervals in
adults and older patients with anemia of chronic
kidney disease. Less frequent dosing has the
potential to decrease resource utilization and
medication errors while enhancing patient comfort and convenience.
• The Transplant Center has initiated a prospective
trial to eliminate steroids as a chronic maintenance agent for renal transplant recipients. This
study could help minimize steroid complications,
which are a major source of morbidity in the renal
transplant population. The Transplant Center is
also one of the largest enrolling centers in a
National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical
trial to determine if homocysteine reduction will
attenuate cardiovascular events and improve the
survival of transplant recipients.
• The Interventional Nephrology Group examined
central vein stenosis in association with internal
jugular dialysis catheters and demonstrated a high
incidence of this problem. This finding has generally gone unrecognized but could change the
approach to temporary dialysis catheters in
patients with chronic kidney disease, because
central vein stenosis impairs the ability to successfully create permanent dialysis access.
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy,
Critical Care and Sleep Medicine
Clay Marsh, MD, Director
The Division has joined the
Center for Critical Care and continues building along specialtybased product lines and analytical programs to “create the
future of medicine to improve
people’s lives.” The goal is to be
a leader in personalized health
care focusing on translational research. Progress is
evidenced by recognition in U.S.News & World
Report as the 24th best respiratory program in the
country, and by having 10 faculty recognized among
the Best Doctors in America.В® New initiatives,
current research and ongoing projects include:
• Sepsis registry in the ICU with biobanking
capability
• Stress and depression in advanced lung disease
• Pulmonary interventional procedures
• Growth of the Asthma Research Center
• Mechanistic work in defining biomarkers in
patients with sepsis
• Mechanistic programs in antibody-directed therapies in cancer, sepsis, cell life and cell death, oxidant imaging and function, cell signaling, angiogenesis, mitochondrial biology, regulation of cystic
fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR),
glucocorticoid receptor biology, infectious disease
and inflammation
Ongoing Research Programs
• Translational research in critical care, asthma, ILD,
emphysema, lung cancer, sleep medicine, pulmonary hypertension, and allergy
• Translational research in acute lung injury in the
ICU that focuses on quality improvement, execution of evidence-based pathways and
structure/function relationships in clinical delivery
2007 Research Report 81
• Translational research in pulmonary hypertension
• Collaboration with Ohio State’s Davis Heart and
Lung Research Institute in lung remodeling and
repair, sepsis and mitochondrial biology
• Studying the role of inflammatory cells in lung
complications of bone marrow transplantation
• Studying tissue microenvironment and human disease, along with the role of genetics in lung and
critical care disease
• Fibrosis, remodeling, lung injury and cancer – Clay
Marsh, MD, Philip Diaz, MD, Jeanette Marketon,
PhD, Estelle Boyaka, PhD, John Mastronarde,
MD, Patrick Nana-Sinkam, MD, Karen Wood, MD
• Innate immune system function, sepsis and infectious disease – Mark Wewers, MD, Susheela
Tridandapani, PhD, Andrea Doseff, PhD, Daren
Knoell, PharmD, Karen Wood, MD, Amal Amer,
PhD
• Mitochondria biology and critical care disease –
Elliott Crouser, MD, Douglas Pfeiffer, PhD, Ruairi
Fahy, MD
• Process-based research and decision making –
James O’Brien, MD, Naeem Ali, MD, Scott
Aberegg, MD, Stephen Hoffmann, MD, Virginia
Nivar, PhD
• Redox biology of the lung and muscle and sleep
medicine – Thomas Clanton, PhD, Ulysses
Magalang, MD, Valery Khramtsov, PhD,
Narasimham Parinandi, PhD, Rami Khayat, MD
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Creation of a critical care and lung genetics program focusing on microRNA expression in health
and disease
• Creation of a sepsis registry and biobanking
program
• Named as a center for the National Institutes of
Health-sponsored LOTT (Long-term oxygen
treatment trial)
• Creation of a chronic stress and depression
program in advanced lung disease
82 Ohio State University Medical Center
DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR AND
CELLULAR BIOCHEMISTRY
Michael Ostrowski, PhD, Chair
Research in the Department of
Molecular and Cellular
Biochemistry advances basic
understanding of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms
underlying both normal cellular
processes and disease states in
humans. Through multidisciplinary collaborative work, scientists can translate
these basic findings into studies that will benefit
patients. This research focus is exemplified by two
translational National Cancer Institute program
project grants for which Department faculty members serve as principal investigators. These projects
include faculty members in both clinical and basic
science departments across the Medical Center. In
addition, all faculty in the Department of Molecular
and Cellular Biochemistry are associated with
Medical Center Signature Programs, including cancer, heart and neurosciences – representing the
highest level of faculty participation in these programs within the School of Biomedical Sciences.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms governing the
transcriptional regulation of gene expression
• Molecular mechanisms underlying neuromuscular
diseases
• Molecular genetics of the regulation of RNA processing, transport and stability
• Structural biology of homologous recombination
and cytokine signaling
• Molecular and cell biology of cardiovascular disease
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Samson Jacob, PhD, leads a multidisciplinary
team that received a five-year, $12 million program project grant from the National Cancer
Institute to study basic mechanisms and translational applications of epigenetic modifications of
DNA and chromatin in human leukemia. The project team includes Department faculty members
Mark Parthun, PhD, and SaГЇd Sif, PhD. This team
covers all aspects of epigenetic modifications,
including DNA methylation, histone modification
and chromatin remodeling.
• Tsonwin Hai, PhD, participated in a collaborative
study that used a systems biology approach to
identify an unexpected role for the transcription
factor ATF-4 in innate immunity (Nature 441:173178). Hai discovered ATF-4 in 1989 and has used
a variety of approaches, including mouse genetic
models, to study the role of this stress-activated
transcription factor in several biological processes,
including diabetes. In this study, her mouse genetic model demonstrated that ATF-4 can also
repress expression of proinflammatory genes in
immune cells, a necessary step for a normal
immune response. This work implicates ATF-4 as
an important factor to study in inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and cancer.
• Dan Schoenberg, PhD, director of the campuswide RNA Group, was on a team of Ohio State
investigators that identified a novel mechanism
that retroviruses use to increase translation of
viral genes. The virus uses a unique RNA structure
to recruit a cellular protein, RNA helicase A, to
increase translation of viral RNA to protein. This
group found that the same RNA structural element is found in many cellular RNAs, and that
RNA helicase A can also increase translation of
these cellular RNAs, including RNA that encode
for genes involved in cancer cell growth. The work
may help improve the design of vectors for gene
therapy and enhance understanding of how genes
are aberrantly expressed in cancer cells.
• Kamal Mehta, PhD, and his group made the unexpected finding that the small molecule inhibitor of
the JNK family of stress-inducible kinases,
SP600125, can also inhibit phosphorylation of
histone 3 at position ser10 (H2Ser10). Through
studies with this compound, researchers discovered that the low-density lipoprotein receptor,
involved in transporting cholesterol across cell
membranes, is negatively regulated by histone
H3-Ser10 phosphorylation. These studies will
guide development of more effective agents for
treating hypercholesterolemia and cancer.
• Charles Bell, PhD, led a study that used NMR
spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of PF1378
(Pfu Pop5), one of four protein subunits of
archaeal RNase P that shares a homolog in the
eukaryotic enzyme. RNase P is a ubiquitous and
essential enzyme in all domains of life. It is
responsible for cleaving the single-stranded 5’
leader sequence of precursor tRNA, a vital reaction in the maturation of tRNA. With the elucidation of the Pfu Pop5 structure, a functional role for
the protein can be hypothesized. These data provide clues about the role of Pop5 in the archaeal
and eukaryotic RNase P enzymes and will lend
insight into the structural and functional connections between the three domains of life of this
conserved yet compositionally variable enzyme.
DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR VIROLOGY,
IMMUNOLOGY AND MEDICAL GENETICS
Carlo Croce, MD, Chair
Scientists in the Molecular
Virology, Immunology and
Medical Genetics (MVIMG)
Department study molecular
genetics of human disease.
MVIMG was reorganized in
2004 with Carlo Croce, MD, as
chair. The Department then
recruited professors Richard Fishel, Joanna Groden
and Kay Huebner, all PhDs, and assistant professors Samir Acharya, Louise Fong, Jonathon
Godbout, Helen Pace, Yuri Pekarski, Christoph
Schmutte and Amanda Toland, all PhDs. Fishel,
Groden and Huebner are internationally recognized
leaders in DNA repair, cancer genetics and mouse
models of human cancer. The others are experts on
DNA repair and genomic instability in carcinogenesis, mouse models of cancer, neuroimmunology,
structural biology, tumor-suppressor gene identification and function, and functional genomics and
proteomics. In 2006, the Department added
Matthew During, MD, PhD, an expert in neurobiology, gene therapy and vector development. More
than 65 percent of MVIMG faculty garner independent research funds; nearly 65 percent maintain multiple grant awards. MVIMG is aligned with Ohio State’s
Human Cancer Genetics Program, also directed by
Croce.
2007 Research Report 83
Ongoing Research Programs
• Research programs within MVIMG are focused on
the molecular genetics of human disease and disease-causing organisms. Expertise ranges from
basic biophysical analysis to clinical translation in:
- Molecular genetics of cancer (Samir Acharya,
PhD; Carlo Croce, MD; Ramana Davuluri, PhD;
Albert de la Chapelle, MD, PhD; Matthew During,
MD, PhD; Richard Fishel, PhD; Joanna Groden,
PhD; Denis Guttridge, PhD; Tim Huang, PhD; Kay
Huebner, PhD; Kimberly Kelly, PhD; Gustavo
Leone, PhD; Michael Ostrowski, PhD; Yuri
Pekarski, PhD; Danilo Perrotti, MD, PhD;
Christoph Plass, PhD; Fredika Robertson, PhD;
Amanda Toland, PhD).
- DNA repair and genomic stability (Samir
Acharya, PhD; Richard Fishel, PhD; Joanna
Groden, PhD; Kay Huebner, PhD; Helen Pace,
PhD; Deborah Parris, PhD; Christoph Plass, PhD;
Christoph Schmutte, PhD; Marshal Williams, PhD)
- Immunology and immunogenetics (Carlo Croce,
MD; Ronald Glaser, PhD; Jonathon Godbout,
PhD; Kay Huebner, PhD; Tim Huang, PhD; James
Lang, PhD; Danilo Perrotti, MD, PhD; Christoph
Plass, PhD; Phillip Popovich, PhD; Virginia
Sanders, PhD; Caroline Whitacre, PhD)
- Bacterial and viral pathogenesis (Richard Fishel,
PhD; Louise Fong, PhD; John Gunn, PhD; John
Hughes, PhD; Deborah Parris, PhD; William
Lafuse, PhD; James Shaw, PhD)
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGICAL
SURGERY
E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, Chair
Completing its second full year
in 2006, the Department of
Neurological Surgery was again
recognized in U.S.News & World
Report’s listing of top-ranked
clinical programs. Three neurosurgeons – Mario Ammirati,
MD, MBA, Ehud Mendel, MD,
FACS, and Atom Sarkar, MD, PhD – joined E.
Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, Louis Caragine Jr., MD,
PhD, John McGregor, MD, and Carole Miller, MD.
Department faculty performed 1,439 neurosurgical
procedures in 2006, including gamma knife radiosurgery, intensity-modulated fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (IMRT) using a Peacock system, and angiographic procedures (compared to
836 in 2005). In addition, Mariano Viapiano, PhD,
joined Yoshinaga Saeki, MD, PhD, Sean Lawler,
PhD, and Balveen Kaur, PhD, as research faculty in
the Dardinger Laboratory for Neuro-Oncology and
Neurosciences, sharing an appointment in the
Center for Molecular Neurobiology. Also in 2006,
the Department participated in three clinical trials,
received research funding exceeding $1.6 million
and authored 38 publications, double the number
from 2005.
Ongoing Research Programs
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Identification of specific microRNAs as causative
for solid and hematopoietic tumors
• Discovery of novel DNA repair-based cellular
mechanisms for defense against retroviral infection
• New combined bioinformatics methods for systems biology analysis
• Description of epigenetic regulation of tumor-suppressor genes in lung and head and neck tumors
84 Ohio State University Medical Center
Dardinger Laboratory for Neuro-Oncology and
Neurosciences – E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, codirects this laboratory along with Herbert Newton,
MD, of the Department of Neurology, and oversees
the research conducted within. Here are some highlights from 2006:
• The laboratory of Yoshinaga Saeki, MD, PhD,
develops therapeutic strategies for neurological,
neoplastic and genetic disorders. One ongoing
study involves the development and applications
of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based amplicon
vectors, which are high-capacity plasmid-based
vectors with full HSV infection machinery, for
gene therapy and neuroscience research. A sec-
ond research area involves the development and
applications of engineered oncolytic HSV vectors
for cancer therapy. A third project examines the
roles of G protein-coupled receptors that upregulate cAMP signaling in the axonal outgrowth of
neurons and neuronal differentiation of neural
progenitor cells.
• Balveen Kaur, PhD, and her lab team study
changes that occur in the microenvironment of
gliomas in response to treatment, hoping to learn
how treatment strategies can be exploited to
maximum potential. A major focus is investigating
novel mechanisms to disrupt the changes in vascular biology that result from tumors to develop
therapeutic strategies that may be used alone or
in combination with oncolytic viruses (OV) to
augment existing treatment modalities. Her team
also studies the extracellular matrix of tumors to
develop ways to enhance viral spread and infection to improve therapy. The Kaur lab is attempting to identify potential biomarkers in patient
serum that will reflect the ongoing replication of
OV in solid tumors.
• Sean Lawler, PhD, and his lab team study cell signaling mechanisms in central nervous system disorders (cancer and neurodegeneration) to develop
novel therapeutic approaches. Using a threedimensional cell culture system, they are investigating migration and invasion of glioma cells,
mechanisms that present a major challenge in
brain tumor therapy. They have identified a number of small-molecule drugs that block invasion
and are testing these in animal glioma models.
They also have identified genes that may be
important in migration and invasion. In addition,
Lawler’s team is examining the role of the microtubule-associated protein, tau, in neurodegeneration to explore a potential link between amyloid
and tau, which may be critical in Alzheimer’s disease progression.
• The lab team of Mariano Viapiano, PhD, studies
the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM)
of gliomas. The ECM presents a major barrier to
cell movement in the adult central nervous system, but invasive gliomas are impervious to
inhibitory signals from the neural ECM and produce altered versions of matrix molecules that
may help their invasive capacity. Viapiano’s team
focuses on two families of matrix proteins: lecticans and link proteins. They are characterizing
molecular events underlying the pro-invasive role
of these proteins in gliomas. They also are developing reagents to disrupt the interactions of these
proteins that promote glioma cell dispersion. By
inactivating pro-invasive molecules in the glioma
matrix, they can design strategies to limit disease
spread and make these brain tumors therapeutically accessible.
• Mario Ammirati, MD, MBA, and his microneurosurgical skull base laboratory develop surgical
approaches to tumors at the base of the brain,
educating residents in these techniques and partnering with private and non-private organizations
to develop clinical technology. New surgical
approaches that ask “What if?” in the operating
room (e.g., “What if this tumor were approached
from an angle rather than the conventional one?”)
are explored in the laboratory on anatomical specimens under simulated operating room conditions
and later translated to the clinical care of patients.
Two ongoing projects are the quantification of
exposure afforded by the endoscope and microscope in the endonasal-transphenoidal approach
to the sella and suprasellar region, and investigating a navigational system and endoscope to
remove the posterior wall of the internal auditory
canal without disrupting the labyrinth via a retrosigmoid approach.
• Ehud Mendel, MD, FACS, and his spine and spine
cancer laboratory are evaluating physiologic
forces that impact spinal health and methods to
optimize the surgical therapy of spinal disorders.
They are developing a patient-specific hybrid biomechanical model that uses a patient’s musclerecruitment pattern and spinal imaging to predict
forces on spinal structures, and they are examining the relationship between spinal load and
proinflammatory cytokine upregulation. In clinical
studies, researchers are using kinematic measures
of trunk motion and upright magnetic resonance
imaging to evaluate biomechanical compromise
under physiologic loading and thereby the extent
of disorders of the lower back. Studies quantifying
the relationship between physical and psychosocial occupational risk factors and low back disorders are also under way.
2007 Research Report 85
• The nanomedicine laboratory team of Atom
Sarkar, MD, PhD, is investigating the relationship
between single-molecule mechanics and disease
states, particularly the micromechanical mechanisms that underlie the formation of pathologic
fiber in Parkinson’s disease and that regulate the
migration and spread of glioblastoma multiforme
tumors. Both projects rely on atomic force
microscopy (AFM), which can identify single molecules, place them under mechanical stress, and
establish their mechanical stability. Such measurements are important to determine clinically
relevant correlations between cell stiffness/elasticity and “aggressive” behavior. Parkinson’s is a
disorder of the motor system involving genetic
and environmental factors. The root of the illness
is the formation and aggregation of О±-synuclein
fiber, a multi factorial process. Understanding the
single-molecule mechanics for the О±-synuclein
protein will shed light on the protein’s stability
and preventing fiber formation, guiding the design
of molecular therapeutics. As for neoplastic cells
in glioblastomas, cell motility is unpredictable.
The cellular cytoskeleton is a filamentous system
of “ropes, cables, and poles” that provides rigidity
to the cell and determines its mechanical properties and motility. Glial fibrillary acidic protein is an
important and abundant element of the intermediate filament network, one of three cytoskeletal
components in the malignant astrocytes of these
tumors. AFM data from experiments with single
molecules can be tailored into a macroscopic
model for investigating the role of force in the
invasiveness of glioblastoma multiforme.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
Department clinicians and researchers were active
in professional organizations and received various
institutional, regional and national awards for their
expertise and accomplishments:
- Louis Caragine, Jr., MD, PhD, received the residents’ annual Lawrence Mervis, MD, Teacher of
the Year Award and was recognized in Who’s Who
in Medicine & Health Care: Sixth Edition 2006-2007.
- E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, served in the
National Institutes of Health (NIH) Study Section
for Developmental Therapeutics and on the
National Cancer Institute (NCI) program project
86 Ohio State University Medical Center
cluster review subcommittees C and D. He also
was selected as one of the “Best Doctors in Ohio”
by Columbus Monthly Magazine and elected to the
American Society for Clinical Investigation, the
Society of Neurological Surgeons, and as a fellow
of the American Association for the Advancement
of Science.
- Clara Raquel Epstein, MD (second-year resident) was one of seven physicians nationally
appointed to the Steering Committee of the
American Medical Association’s (AMA) Minority
Actions Consortium Hispanic Physician Outreach
Initiative at the AMA’s annual meeting.
- Jakob Godlewski, PhD (postdoctoral fellow),
became the second recipient of the Jeffrey
Thomas Hayden Foundation Endowed Fellowship,
awarded as part of a $250,000 endowment to
Ohio State over three years: The Jeffrey Thomas
Hayden Foundation Endowed Fellowship Fund in
Pediatric Brain Tumor at Ohio State’s James
Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute.
- Chris Karas, MD (third-year resident) was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical
Society (AOA). The only national honor medical
society in the world, the AOA comprises members at any stage in their medical career, from students in medical schools through faculty.
- Balveen Kaur, PhD, received the first grant
award from the National Brain Tumor Foundation
for a project titled “Anti-angiogenic treatment for
enhancement of oncolytic virus efficacy.” Her article titled “Hypoxia and the hypoxia-inducible-factor pathway in glioma growth and angiogenesis,”
published with her colleagues at Emory in April
2005, was recognized as the most frequently read
article in the journal Neuro-oncology in May 2006.
- Kazuhiko Kurozumi, MD, PhD (postdoctoral
researcher), won first prize in the Therapeutic
Section of a poster contest staged by Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center at its eighth annual
Scientific Meeting for an entry titled “Anti-angiogenic treatment enhances antitumor effects of an
oncolytic virus in an experimental rat glioma model.”
- John McGregor, MD, served as president of the
Ohio State Neurological Society from 2004-06
and as Ohio representative, northwest quadrant,
on the Council of State Neurological Societies
since 1999.
- Ehud Mendel, MD, FACS, received a $150,000
spine fellowship donation from George Skestos
and a $75,000 spine fellowship donation from
SYNTHES Spine. He also was named clinical codirector of Ohio State’s Spinal Dynamics and
Ergonomics Laboratory.
- Carole Ann Miller, MD, received a 2006
Excellence in Teaching Award from Ohio State’s
College of Medicine.
- Yoshinaga Saeki, MD, PhD, served in the NIH
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and
Stroke (NINDS), Neurological Sciences and
Disorders B (NSD-B) Study Section.
- Atom Sarkar, MD, PhD, received a co-appointment as assistant professor in the Department of
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering.
- Joshua Shroll, American Brain Tumor
Association (ABTA) summer fellow in the laboratory of Balveen Kaur, PhD, won the ABTA’s Lucien
J. Rubinstein Award for identifying a secreted protein that can be used as a potential biomarker for
oncolytic viral therapy of brain tumors.
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY
Michael Racke, MD, Chair
The Department of Neurology
focuses on education, clinical
care and research of neurological diseases. The Department
teaches the neurology clerkship
in the College of Medicine and
stimulates medical students in
the neurosciences. Last year,
four students from the College of Medicine
matched in Neurology. In addition to the medical
students, Neurology also instructs the Neurology
house staff. Last year, six of eight returning
Neurology residents scored higher than 90 percent,
and seven of eight scored higher than 89 percent,
on the in-service exam. Relating to clinical service,
last year the Department of Neurology at University
Hospital East was ranked 40th and the Department
at University Hospital was ranked 44th in the nation
by U.S.News & World Report. As for research, the
Department participates in clinical trials in a number
of areas, including epilepsy, stroke, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases and multiple sclerosis.
Ongoing Research Programs
• The Department has a strong clinical and research
program in spinal muscular atrophy, collaborating
with Arthur Burghes, PhD, and Christine Beattie,
PhD, in the Department of Neurosciences.
• Department faculty are participating in four
National Institutes of Health-funded clinical trials
relating to stroke.
• Investigators in the Department’s neuroimmunology research group are studying basic disease
mechanisms in animal models and participating in
parallel studies examining samples from patients
with multiple sclerosis. The researchers are also
involved with clinical trials.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Yousef Mohammad, MD, led an effort in testing
transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of
migraine headache. The results of these studies
were presented at the 2006 American Headache
Society Meeting. This research attracted significant media attention and was featured in BBC
news, The New York Times, Discovery and the
London Times, plus other TV stations and magazines. A multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized study is under way to confirm the efficacy of
this novel therapy for aborting migraines.
• The neuromuscular research group participated in
a study examining the effects of etanercept on
inclusion body myositis, continuing the
Department’s long tradition of studying novel
therapies in neuromuscular diseases.
• The neuroimmunology research group spearheaded efforts to understand how the drug natalizumab increased the risk for multiple sclerosis
patients to develop the devastating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Studies
published in the Annals of Neurology and Archives
of Neurology showed that natalizumab resulted in
a dramatic reduction in immune surveillance of
the brain. The researchers further confirmed that,
after discontinuing natalizumab, the first patient
2007 Research Report 87
to experience an exacerbation of natalizumab was
the patient who experienced the greatest return of
immune cells in the cerebrospinal fluid, further
confirming that one mechanism of natalizumab is
to keep immune cells out of the central nervous
system.
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSCIENCE
James King, PhD, Interim Chair
The Department of
Neuroscience (DNS) was
formed in 1999 in a reorganization of the basic science departments that created the School
of Biomedical Science. The
Department has grown from 10
to 20 full-time faculty, with 12
joint/courtesy appointments by faculty in other
departments and colleges. Closely aligned with the
Center for Molecular Neurobiology and the
Neuroscience Graduate Studies Program, the DNS
features outstanding research and teaching in the
neurosciences. Research in the DNS is focused on
understanding how the brain functions and using
that knowledge to improve clinical treatment for
those who suffer from neurological disease.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Molecular genetic studies of nervous system
development
• Preclinical testing of neuroprotective agents and
neural transplantation
• Studying a model of spinal muscular atrophy in
the zebra fish
• Understanding the basic mechanisms of
cytoskeletal transport in axons
• Studying basic cellular signaling mechanisms in
the context of synaptic plasticity, aging and
epilepsy
• Probing the molecular basis for circadian rhythms
in the brain and retina
• Investigating the role of stem/progenitor cells in
repair of the spinal cord and retina
88 Ohio State University Medical Center
• Analyzing basic aspects of membrane channels
that control neural activity
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Two new junior DNS faculty members, James
Jontes, PhD, and Chen Gu, PhD, began work in
the Center for Molecular Neurobiology with funding from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and the
National Multiple Sclerosis Society.
• The spinal cord injury group continued its National
Institutes of Health-sponsored research-training
program and received excellent reviews. Dana
McTigue, PhD, has assumed the role of principal
investigator of this internationally recognized program.
• Department faculty have been awarded $7.8 million
in extramural funding for 2006 for basic research.
Several funded research programs have application to diseases of the nervous system: epilepsy
(Karl Obrietan, PhD); spinal muscular atrophy
(Christine Beattie, PhD); aging of the brain
(C. Glenn Lin, PhD); neuronal regeneration (Andy
Fischer, PhD); and multiple sclerosis (Chen Gu, PhD).
DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND
GYNECOLOGY
Larry Copeland, MD, Chair
Obstetrics and Gynecology has
several divisions that conduct
basic or clinical research. The
Division of General Obstetrics
and Gynecology focuses on clinical research, most of which is
industry-supported and concentrates on hormonal therapies for
pregnancy prevention and menopause management. The Division of Gynecologic Oncology is
involved with clinical trials, mainly through the
Gynecologic Oncology Group, as well as industrysupported drug-development trials. Most of these
are aimed at preventing and treating ovarian,
endometrial and cervical cancer. Basic researchers
in this Division identify molecular targets associated
with gynecologic malignancies. Scientists in the
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine predominantly
focus on clinical and basic research into preventing
pre-term labor. In conjunction with the National
Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units, this
Division also participates in clinical trials regarding
fetal growth, diabetes in pregnancy, and preventing
pre-eclampsia. Studies in the Division of
Reproductive Biology and Vaccine Research focus
primarily on developing and applying peptide vaccines.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• The Division of Gynecologic Oncology continued
as a leading participant in the Gynecologic
Oncology Group, the premier clinical trials group
in this field. The Division maintains patient accrual
within the top three study centers in the United
States. Advances in this past year included studies to improve survival in ovarian cancer with the
use of intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and preventing cervical cancer with vaccines.
• The Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine continued participation in clinical trials of the
Multicenter Network of the Maternal-Fetal
Medicine Units funded through the National
Institute of Child Health and Human
Development. Focus areas included evaluating
vaginal births after cesarean section (VBAC).
Additional research was directed at perinatal outcomes in women with preterm rupture of membranes.
• The Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine continued a basic research program directed by Douglas
Kniss, PhD, and William Ackerman, MD, in mechanisms of preterm labor and regulating the
cyclooxygenase cascade.
• The Division of Reproductive Biology and Vaccine
Research continued studies on the use of conformational peptides in developing vaccines to treat
ovarian cancer. This research is directed by
Pravin Kaumaya, PhD, in association with David
Cohn, MD.
• The Gynecologic Oncology Division continued to
conduct basic and clinical research in the management and prognostic factors associated with
endometrial adenocarcinoma.
DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY
Thomas Mauger, MD, Chair
The Department of
Ophthalmology sees more than
60,000 patients a year, mostly in
the William H. Havener Eye
Institute at the Ohio State
University Hospital Clinic in
Cramblett Hall. The Department
also has sites in Dublin and at
Ohio State University Hospital East. Faculty are
involved in multicenter clinical trials funded by the
National Eye Institute, as well as by industry. Basic science studies include investigation of the biomechanical properties of the cornea and sclera, and fundamental studies of cerebral spinal fluid outflow facility
and the impact on idiopathic intracranial hypertension.
In addition, the Department’s Molecular Genetics
Program studies uveal melanoma. Scientists are investigating the MET gene, which they believe is a crucial
factor for the high selectivity of eye melanomas and
other cancers that spread to the liver. They hope to
identify molecular markers to monitor for metastatic
disease. If they can identify at-risk patients, early
intervention should lead to a better prognosis.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Cornea:
- Optical profilometry and atomic force
microscopy analysis of corneal surface topography: the effect of lamellar keratoplasty, excimer
laser ablation and smoothing procedures
- Standard surface anterior surface topography
measurements quantify the discrepancy between
Scheimpflug and Placido-based topographers
- Evaluation of the utility of intra-operative topography to optimize corneal shape during penetrating keratoplasty: a clinical trial examining whether
topography-guided suture placement will improve
surgical outcomes in corneal transplant patients
- Corneal wound healing and artificial anterior
chamber cultures: femtosecond laser and longterm corneal cultures – examination of the effect
of state-of-the-art Femtosecond anterior and posterior Lamellar surgery techniques
2007 Research Report 89
- Biomechanical and structural response of the
cornea following Lamellar keratoplasty: an optical
coherence tomography and Scheimpflug image
analysis
- High-resolution X-ray scattering analysis of the
microfibril organization in cornea and optic nerve
and its relation to biomechanical response
- The study of central and peripheral corneal biomechanical response to swelling using topography, wave-front, viscoelastic properties and reflectivity coefficients in normal and LASIK populations
• Glaucoma
- The Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study
(OHTS) evaluates the efficacy of placing ocular
hypertensive patients on eye drops to delay or
perhaps prevent them from developing glaucoma.
- The OHTS Ancillary Genetic Study collects
blood from OHTS patients for a national database
that may help identify glaucoma genetic markers.
- The Memantine Study evaluates the effective-
ness and safety of oral Memantine in patients
with glaucoma who are at risk for progression of
optic nerve damage.
- Researchers are comparing the current standard
post-glaucoma filtration surgery antiproliferative
treatment, Mitomycin-c, to novel antiproliferative
drugs and determining their effect on fibroblast
and epithelial cell proliferation in an in vitro culture
model.
- To understand the mechanism of laser trabecu-
loplasty, which is wavelength independent and
dependent on the rapid rate of temperature
increase in the target tissue, with a total increase
of less than 1В°C, researchers are studying the irradiation-related functional relationships among the
aqueous outflow pathway components, including
the TM cells and the SCE cells using an in vitro
model of the outflow pathway.
• Neuro-Ophthalmology
- Scientists are studying a cerebral spinal fluid
outflow mechanism through human arachnoid
granulations using both in vitro and ex vivo models,
including postperfusion ultrastructural studies
using fluorescent microparticle perfusion, TEM
and immunohistochemistry.
90 Ohio State University Medical Center
- Scientists are working to understand the role of
vitamin A and its cerebral spinal fluid (CSF)
metabolites to support a novel mechanism of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), a well-controlled CSF and blood study of newly presenting
IIH subjects.
• Pediatrics
- In its sixth year of follow-up, the Early Treatment
for Retinopathy of Prematurity trial continues to
demonstrate the benefits of early treatment for
high-risk prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity.
- Corneal endothelium and ocular component
change after strabismus surgery in children – This
project investigates the influence of strabismus
surgery on the corneal endothelial cells and ocular
components in children.
- Corneal endothelium change in type I diabetic
children – This project investigates the influence
of type I diabetes on corneal endothelial cells in
children. It uses fMRI to explore normal and
abnormal oculomotor function, as well as the neural basis of amblyopia and effects of pharmacological interventions. It also uses NIR (near
infrared) to develop a test of visual function.
• Retina
- Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) –
This program evaluated treatment modalities for
patients suffering from AMD, the leading cause of
vision loss in the United States for people over
age 60. Scientists are involved in many new and
exciting National Institutes of Health- and industry-sponsored studies that investigate treatments
including anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth
factor) drugs. Another study will look at prevention of this disease using a combination of dietary
supplements and vitamin therapies. It will evaluate the potential for lutein and omega-3 fatty acid
nutritional supplements to impede the progression of AMD.
- Molecular Genetics – This program examines
uveal melanoma. Researchers are focusing on the
MET gene (also known as hepatocyte growth factor receptor), which they believe to be a crucial
factor for the high selectivity of eye melanomas
and other cancers that spread to the liver. They
hope to identify molecular markers to monitor for
metastatic disease. If they can identify at-risk
patients, early intervention should lead to a better
prognosis. We are collaborating with Cheryl
London, DVM, PhD, a veterinary oncologist who is
involved in target therapy using the MET gene.
- Diabetic Retinopathy – Three clinical trials are
ongoing in this program. One compares laser therapy and intravitreal drug therapy to determine
which is more effective in treating diabetic macular edema (DME), the leading cause of vision loss
in the ever-increasing diabetic population. A second trial evaluates the effect of panretinal laser
therapy for diabetic retinopathy on the development of DME. A third trial strives to determine
the effectiveness of optical coherence tomography
to detect DME at a stage at which clinical observation alone may not. This could allow new strategies for prevention of vision loss in this common
malady.
- Choroidal Melanoma MRI – In collaboration
with the Department of Radiology, Ophthalmology
is imaging its melanoma patients with a 1.5 tesla
MRI with dynamic contrast and surface coil imaging. This is a novel approach to evaluate the radiological perfusion characteristic of choroidal circulation. The goal is to discover predictive parameters of choroidal circulatory blood flow that may
correlate with tumor size, rate of growth, metastases and survival.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Glaucoma – The Ocular Hypertension Treatment
Study (OHTS) is entering its 14th year; a measurement of visual contrast sensitivity and additional
patient surveys have been included into the study.
Researchers also continued to enroll patients in
the OHTS ancillary genetic study and planned to
complete it by June 2007. The Memantine Study
concluded patient follow-up in summer 2006 and
is in the final phase of data collection. The
Glaucoma Division also initiated three studies:
“Autoimmune Mechanisms in Giant Cell
Arteritis”; “Autoimmune Mechanisms in
Glaucoma”; and “Autoimmune Mechanisms in
Graves’ Disease.” Each focuses on the discovery
of an antibody that could cause these diseases. If
identified, it could lead to earlier diagnosis and
better treatment.
• Pediatrics – Investigators clarified the differences
between look (voluntary) Optokinetic Nystagmus
(OKN) and stare (involuntary) OKN (ARVO
2006). Based on fMRI, they mapped brain areas
responsible for pursuit and saccadic eye movements. They also pursued IRB approval of the near
infrared multidisciplinary and multi-institutional
research project.
• Retina – The Department secured a role in the
National Institutes of Health- and National Eye
Institute-sponsored Age-Related Eye Disease
Study 2 (AREDS 2 Study). Ohio State site was
selected as one of nearly 100 centers to participate in the nationwide study to see if a modified
combination of vitamins, minerals and fish oil can
further slow the progression of vision loss from
age-related macular degeneration, the leading
cause of vision loss in the United States for people
over age 60. The Department also was selected
as one of 21 sites nationwide to participate in the
Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration
Treatments Trial (the CATT Study), which will
evaluate the relative efficacy and safety of treatment of subfoveal, neovascular AMD with lucentis
and avastin.
• Neuro-Ophthalmology – Researchers demonstrated that both the in vitro and ex vivo human models
of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) outflow pathway
through the arachnoid granulations mimic the
physiological unidirectional flow, in addition to the
bulk flow component, via vacuole transport. This
work was initially reported in the journal
Investigational Ophthalmology & Visual Science and
will be detailed in future publications. Scientists
also demonstrated that the en face probability-ofoccurrence maps of human arachnoid granulations (AG) are localized in a characteristic distribution with regions of high and low probability.
These measurements provide age-related surface
area quantification data in terms of absolute values as well as proportional area with respect to
total brain area. Total brain surface area declines
with age and must be considered when analyzing
proportional AG area. Race has a statistically significant effect on AG surface area, with
Caucasians having a smaller proportion of positive
area. Females have a smaller proportion of surface
area in most age groups. This data will be used as
input for an in vitro CSF perfusion model.
2007 Research Report 91
• Jennifer Lewis, PhD, a U.S.-U.K. Fulbright Scholar
in 2005-06, completed a research fellowship in
the Structural Biophysics Laboratory at the School
of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff
University, Cardiff Wales and Guys, and the
Department of Ophthalmology at St. Thomas’
Hospital in London. Her project was titled “Optical
and X-ray studies of human and porcine cornea
and the biomechanical response to Lamellar keratoplasty using femtosecond and mechanical
microkeratome.”
• Jennifer Wilding Bogucki, a third-year medical
student, won first place at the fifth annual Ohio
State University College of Medicine Graduate
and PostGraduate Research Day for a poster entitled “Topographic data for normal donated human
corneas.”
• Andrew Schrader, an Ohio State University firstyear veterinary student, won the Deans’
Undergraduate Research Award to support his
research. He also finished first in the Health
Professions/Clinical Category at the Richard J. &
Martha D. Denman Undergraduate Research
Forum for a poster titled “Surface topography of
the cornea following laser ablation with and without smoothing.”
DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS
Christopher Kaeding, MD, Interim Chair
The Department of
Orthopaedics has 15 full-time
faculty, 65 auxiliary staff and
nine adjunct faculty. Divisions in
the Department include: Foot
and Ankle; General
Orthopaedics; Musculoskeletal
Oncology; Spine; Sports
Medicine; Total Joint Replacement; Trauma; Upper
Extremity and Hand; and Research. Each Division is
responsible for research, education and patient care
related to its discipline. Each faculty member contributes by: providing high-quality patient care;
instructing medical students, residents in
Orthopaedics and/or Podiatry, and fellows in ortho-
92 Ohio State University Medical Center
pedic subspecialties; researching orthopedic problems to identify causes, treatments and possible
prevention; and providing public service in education, treatment and recovery options.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Basic science research in the Department of
Orthopaedics focuses on engineering aspects of
musculoskeletal conditions. The Orthopaedic
BioMaterials Laboratory investigates the development and application of engineering materials to
hard-tissue problems and the biomechanics of
implantable fixation devices. The Ergonomics
Laboratory explores the causes and prevention of
spinal and industrial injuries. Both of these
research thrusts are conducted in collaboration
with colleagues in the colleges of Dentistry,
Engineering, Medicine and Veterinary Medicine.
• Clinical research has expanded to include studies
in sports medicine, musculoskeletal trauma and
spine. With the continuing expansion of clinical
faculty, both in Orthopaedics and associated
departments, new avenues of research are being
developed.
• Biological basic research is being conducted by
Joel Mayerson, MD, of the Division of Oncology,
who collaborated last year with Carl Morrison,
MD, DVM, in the Department of Pathology, on
genetic identification of tumor markers as a tool
for predicting severity and prognosis.
• Steve Lavender, PhD, seeks to quantify and model
the biomechanics of the lumbar spine during
push-pull industrial tasks to better understand the
etiology of low back pain and thus give insight into
preventing it.
• Alan Litsky, MD, ScD, leads a biomaterials
research program that is developing and testing
new materials for orthopedic, dental and veterinary applications. They are developing and quantifying a technique to determine the source of polyethylene wear debris in total joint arthroplasties.
• Joel Mayerson, MD, is a pioneer in the application
of expandable total femoral implants designed to
keep up with the growth of pediatric bone tumor
patients.
• Christopher Kaeding, MD, is a co-investigator in
the first large, multi-institutional, prospective
study of the functional outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.
• Laura Pheiffer, MD, directs several projects quantifying the biomechanics of fracture fixation devices.
• Josue Gabriel, MD, leads a study exploring the
use of dynamic analysis modeling to predict injury
to spinal structures.
• Ajit Chaudhari, PhD, joined the faculty from
Stanford University and is establishing a laboratory for using motion analysis techniques to analyze
the causes and measure the effectiveness of treatment for sports medicine injuries.
DEPARTMENT OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY –
HEAD AND NECK SURGERY
D. Bradley Welling, MD, PhD, Chair
The Department of
Otolaryngology – Head and
Neck Surgery is nationally recognized in treating human communication disorders and head
and neck malignancy. In 2006 it
continued to expand, welcoming
four new faculty members and
opening two satellite offices to better serve the
community. In addition, Otolaryngology residents
continue the Department’s longstanding history of
excellence, ranking in the 98th percentile as a residency group on the in-service training exam. For the
14th consecutive year, the department has been
ranked by U.S.News & World Report among the top
20 Ear, Nose and Throat programs in the nation.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Molecular mechanisms of vestibular schwannoma
formation
• Virtual modeling of the temporal bone dissection
• Intensification regimens for advanced-stage squamous cell carcinoma and chemoprevention for
oral carcinoma
• Mechanisms of pneumococcal otitis media
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Gregory Wiet, MD, continued work on a $1.87 million grant-funded project to develop and test an otologic surgical simulator. His work, with collaborator
Don Stredney, PhD, was highlighted in a journal article titled “Multi-center testing of the virtual temporal bone dissector simulator.” The project is funded
by the National Institutes of Health/National
Institute on Deafness and Other Communication
Disorders. The potential for education of all otolaryngology residents and for preoperative simulation with this technology is encouraging.
• D. Bradley Welling, MD, PhD, continued work on
his $1.62 million grant-funded project on phenotypic determinants of vestibular schwannomas.
The project is funded by the National Institutes of
Health and is directed at deciphering the underlying molecular causes of vestibular schwannomas.
The work moved forward in 2006 in collaboration
with Long-Sheng Chang, PhD, and a host of
research colleagues.
• James Lang, PhD, and David Schuller, MD, have
secured funding through the Biomedical Research
Commercialization Program (BRCP) to investigate
head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Jeffrey
Chalmers, PhD, a professor of Chemical
Engineering and member of Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center, is the lead principal investigator for the $3.5 million BRCP grant.
DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY
Sanford Barsky, MD, Chair
Faculty in the Department of
Pathology are committed to furthering the understanding,
knowledge, diagnosis and treatment of disease. They do this by
educating students of all levels,
conducting clinical, translational
and basic research, and providing
service to patients, the University and the community.
Central tenets of this mission are mutual respect
and citizenship by its faculty and staff, and the concept that excellence denotes exemplary achievements and continuous improvement of quality.
2007 Research Report 93
Ongoing Research Programs
• The Department’s Experimental Pathology branch
is undergoing a major expansion in terms of faculty recruitment and space. Experimental pathology
is defined as disease-oriented hypothesis testing
or generating research. The progress of this discipline parallels Ohio State University Medical
Center’s Signature Programs in Cancer, Critical
Care, Heart, Imaging, Neurosciences and
Transplantation. In addition, within the
Experimental Pathology branch are unique programs in image analysis and tissue banking.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• To complement Ohio State’s interest in imaging
and informatics, the Department has a major
interest in digital pathology. Research initiatives
included developing an inexpensive scanner that
will revolutionize digital pathology, target motion
analysis (TMA) algorithms that will automate
TMA interpretation, and the creation of TMAker
that will automate TMA construction.
• Another research achievement has been maintaining the Human Tissue Resource Network (HTRN),
which collects, banks and distributes human tissue and fluid specimens for basic and translational research at Ohio State and associated clinical
research programs throughout the United States.
The HTRN consists of a prospective Tissue
Procurement Service, Tissue Archive Service of
diagnostic specimens, the Cancer and Leukemia
Group B Pathology Coordinating Office, a
Pathology Core Facility, the AIDS and Cancer
Specimen Resource (ACSR), and an Adenoma
Polyp Tissue Bank. HTRN services are funded by
federal, corporate and Department research programs. Space support is provided by Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center. More information
about each service can be obtained at
http://www.pathology.osu.edu/htrn/default.htm.
• Department investigators continued studying
tumor invasion and metastasis using a novel
human xenograft model of inflammatory breast
cancer and human cancer cell myoepithelial interactions.
94 Ohio State University Medical Center
• Ultraviolet (UV) carcinogenesis of squamous cell
carcinoma (SCS) of the skin has been another
area of research emphasis. Patients receiving solid
organ transplants must undergo immunosuppressive therapy necessary to prevent their body from
rejecting the new organ. Consequently, these
patients are at a substantially increased risk to
develop SCS. In fact, solid organ transplant recipients develop significantly more cases of SCC than
the general population, and their tumors are more
numerous and more aggressive. Pathology studies
using the Skh-1 hairless mouse model of UVBinduced carcinogenesis demonstrated the importance of the CD4+ T cell in modulating the
inflammatory response in the skin and in the
development of UV-induced tumors. This cell type
was chosen because immunosuppressive drugs
modify its function.
• The Department’s studies of bacterial pathogenesis strive to understand the biochemical, molecular and cellular basis of diseases caused by multidrug resistant emerging gram-positive pathogens
commonly encountered in hospital-acquired infection. The goal is to develop an antimicrobial therapy to counteract bacterial multi-drug resistance
problems, including those caused by their biofilm
formation on abiotic and host tissue surfaces.
DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS
Michael Brady, MD, Chair
Based at Children’s Hospital in
Columbus, the Department of
Pediatrics has 221 full-time faculty and 59 part-time faculty
representing 22 pediatric subspecialty disciplines. In affiliation with Children’s Hospital,
the Department has an
Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical
Education (ACGME)-accredited residency-training
program that accommodates 76 pediatric and 30
internal medicine/pediatric residents. In addition,
186 residents from other training programs (e.g.,
emergency medicine, family practice) in the
Columbus area completed pediatric rotations at
Columbus Children’s Hospital in 2006. Also last
year, all of the 206 third-year medical students and
153 fourth-year medical students at Ohio State
received their pediatric training at Columbus
Children’s Hospital. Research activities in the
Department are conducted under the auspices of
Columbus Children’s Research Institute.
Ongoing Research Programs
• The laboratory group led by Lauren Bakaletz, PhD,
is making progress toward understanding the
molecular microbiology of non-typeable
Hemophilus influenza. Her group has established
a robust infrastructure to conduct preclinical studies for developing an otitis media vaccine.
• In 2006, Jerry Mendell, MD, and colleagues in the
Center for Gene Therapy initiated the first-ever
phase I trial of AAV-based gene therapy for
Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy. Other innovative
molecular approaches for prevention and treatment of this fatal disorder are under way in the
Center.
• Keith Yeates, PhD, and colleagues continue their
multi-center clinical investigations of recovery and
outcome of pediatric traumatic brain injury.
• The laboratory of Christopher Walker, PhD, leads
a national effort to understand the immunobiology of hepatitis C using a variety of innovative
models.
• The Center for Injury Research and Policy under
Gary Smith, MD, is dedicated to understanding
the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and biomechanics of pediatric acute injury.
Much of the Center’s work impacts public policy.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Advancing gene and cell-based research from the
laboratory to potentially life-saving clinical use is
a key priority for the Center for Gene Therapy.
Using innovative molecular approaches, investigators including Center Director Jerry Mendell, MD,
are analyzing and translating genetic manipulations to prevent and treat devastating childhood
diseases such as the various forms of muscular
dystrophy. In 2006, the Mendell group initiated
the first-ever pediatric gene therapy trial for
Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy using an adenoassociated virus-based vector.
• A paper published in the journal Molecular
Microbiology by Lauren Bakaletz, PhD, and her lab
group identified for the first time a molecular
mechanism by which non-typeable Haemophilus
influenzae (NTHI) resists being destroyed by
antimicrobial peptides. The paper is titled “The
non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae Sap transporter provides a mechanism of antimicrobial
peptide resistance and SapD-dependent potassium acquisition.” The researchers determined how
NTHI requires a Sap (sensitive to antimicrobial
peptides) system to keep the bacterium from
being killed by antimicrobial peptides. Their findings also describe how a Sap transporter provides
the necessary function in NTHI to survive against
the body’s innate immune response.
• In a publication titled “MAP kinase phosphatase 1
controls innate immune responses and suppresses endotoxic shock,” Yusen Liu, PhD, and his team
from the Center for Perinatal Research explored
the role of MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1 in
animal models of inflammation. Liu compared
gene-targeted Mkp-1 mice with wild-type mice in
their response to LPS. The study, published in the
Jan. 23, 2006, edition of The Journal of
Experimental Medicine, showed that Mkp-1 knockout mice produced dramatically more proinflammatory cytokines and consequently developed
severe low blood pressure, multiple organ failure
and an increased chance of death. In addition to
increasing how Mkp-1 serves as a crucial downregulator of endotoxic shock and inflammation,
these findings may also provide a target for drug
therapy.
• Work in the laboratory of Rachel Altura, MD,
titled “Dissecting the role of endothelial survivin(delta)Ex3 in angiogenesis,” identified the splice
variant, Survivin xEx3, as a prominent regulator of
angiogenesis (blood vessel formation), which is
key to physiologic and pathophysiologic processes
such as wound healing, vascular disease and neoplasia. This was published in the journal Blood.
2007 Research Report 95
• Joan Durbin, MD, PhD, and colleagues published
“Protection against respiratory syncytial virus by a
recombinant Newcastle disease virus vector” in
the Journal of Virology. The team examined the
weak stimulation of innate immune responses to
RSV and explored the possibility of boosting the
immune response by delivering the virus through
an alternative viral vector system, notably the
Newcastle disease virus (NDV). NDV is an attractive vector because of the lack of pre-existing
immunity in the human population and, importantly, it has been proven safe in humans. Durbin’s
findings indicate that the RSV F protein is more
immunogenic when presented by NDV-F than by
RSV alone.
Ongoing Research Programs
DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY
• Laura Bohn, PhD, has identified regulatory pathways of opioid and serotonergic receptors that are
leading to novel opportunities for drug discovery –
including analgesics with low addiction potential.
• Howard Gu, PhD, has developed a mouse model
expressing a functional dopamine transporter
insensitive to cocaine – opening new approaches
to the discovery of effective therapies for cocaine
addiction.
• Wolfgang Sadée, Dr.rer.nat., and his group, along
with the Program of Pharmacogenomics, have discovered a series of functional polymorphisms in
key candidate genes affecting central nervous system disorders and treatment outcomes, leading
potentially to clinical biomarkers for guiding therapy of mental diseases.
Wolfgang SadГ©e, Dr.rer.nat., Chair
Research Accomplishments of 2006
The Department of
Pharmacology focuses on the
molecular pharmacology of central nervous system (CNS)
agents, cancer chemotherapy
and pharmacogenomics. One
group of investigators – Laura
Bohn, PhD, Howard Gu, PhD,
Norton Neff, PhD, Wolfgang SadГ©e, Dr.rer.nat., and
David Saffen, PhD – studies biochemical and genetic pathways contributing to drug addiction.
Understanding how signaling pathways are triggered by drugs of abuse can lead to new approaches for treating drug addiction – research strongly
supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.
The Department also houses the Program in
Pharmacogenomics, with a PGx Core laboratory
featuring genotyping methodologies and tools for
discovering functional genetic variants. This supports a series of basic and translational studies on
CNS disorders, cardiovascular diseases, cancer,
autoimmune disorders and attendant therapies. A
Division on Clinical Trials has been performing
industry-sponsored phase I and II drug trials. It is
also a training ground for scientists and clinicians
specializing in drug development – expertise of high
value to the pharmaceutical industry.
• Paul Blower, PhD, has developed a comprehensive
approach for linking chemical structures with
genomic data, including mRNA, microRNA and
protein tissue profiles. Use of the NCI-60 panel of
cell lines permits discovery of drug targets and
anticancer drugs, as well as mechanisms of
chemoresistance.
• Using transgenic mouse models, Laura Bohn, PhD,
addresses the regulation of opioid receptors with
respect to pain control and side effects such as
respiratory depression and gastrointestinal mobility. Her studies with the barrestin2 knockout
mouse line have shed light on critical opioid and
serotonin pathways. She has found that receptor
regulation differs substantially in different tissues
(central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract),
and that this differential regulation translates to
distinct action of opioid agonists. This has led to
the discovery of opioid agents with properties
suitable for developing analgesics with low
adverse effects.
• Roger Briesewitz, PhD, focuses on growth factor
signaling pathways, their role in leukemia (specifically acute myeloid leukemia, or AML), and drug
discovery targeting components of the growth
factor signaling cascade. The main thrust of his
96 Ohio State University Medical Center
work is to identify downstream factors mediating
aberrant growth factor signaling in cancer and
thus provide novel targets for anticancer drug discovery, including cyclin-dependent kinases (4 and
6). An inhibitor of CDK4,6 has shown exceptional
promise in AML animal models and could proceed
to clinical trials.
• Howard Gu, PhD, has generated a mutant
dopamine transporter (DAT) knockin mouse
model in which DAT functions normally in
dopamine transport but is highly insensitive to
cocaine. Unexpectedly, the mutant DAT knockin
mice are aversive to the actions of cocaine, indicating that the effects on norepinephrine transporter and serotonin transporter are opposite to
those in DAT knockouts. This suggests that selective inhibition of cocaine binding to DAT (without
affecting dopamine transport) is a viable strategy
for treating cocaine addiction, leading toward discovery of novel therapies in drug addiction.
• Working on Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS), Kirk
Mykytyn, PhD, has contributed to the understanding of monogenic disorders that have a
broad spectrum of phenotypic manifestations.
Therefore, Bardet-Biedl Syndrome is an excellent
model to develop approaches for exploring the
genetics of more complex disorders. His research
indicates that the BBS proteins play a role in cilia
development and function, potentially a main factor in the pathophysiology of several diseases. The
underlying mechanism appears to involve protein
trafficking into cilia.
• Wolfgang Sadée, Dr.rer.nat., has developed a program in pharmacogenomics with outreach to
diverse clinical areas, including central nervous
system disorders, cardiovascular disease and cancer. He has developed an approach to finding
functional polymorphisms that has been applied
to candidate genes in these disease areas and in
response to drug therapy. This approach has considerable promise for the development of clinically
useful biomarkers. He has also initiated the development of a chemogenomics group, led by Paul
Blower, PhD, for drug discovery and identification
of drug targets and markers of cancer chemoresistance.
• David Saffen, PhD, studies the genetics of central
nervous system (CNS) disorders and calcium sig-
naling of the M1 muscarinic receptor. His work
has clarified signaling pathways of the transient
receptor potential 6 (TRP6) channel, an important
mediator of calcium signaling in the CNS. He is
exploring TRPC6 as a potential drug target in the
treatment of depression. Moreover, he has discovered a frequent variant of tryptophan hydroxylase
2 (TPH2), encoding a key enzyme in the synthesis
of serotonin in the CNS. This functional variant
could serve as a predictive biomarker.
• Kirsten Raehal, a graduate student in the lab of
Laura Bohn, PhD, was chosen to attend a highly
competitive National Institute of General Medical
Sciences-sponsored short course in Integrative
Organ Systems Pharmacology at Michigan State
and has been awarded an National Institutes of
Health/National Institute on Drug Abuse F31grant.
• Nick Berbari and Erin Newburn, graduate students serving respectively in the labs of Kirk
Mykytyn, PhD, and Norton Neff, PhD, each
received a competitive Ohio State University
Presidential Scholarship award.
• Wolfgang Sadée, Dr.rer.nat., was the invited
keynote speaker at several scientific symposia in
the United States and abroad.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE
AND REHABILITATION
William Pease, MD, Chair
Dodd Hall, the Rehabilitation
Center for Ohio State University
Medical Center, also houses the
Department of Physical
Medicine & Rehabilitation,
which includes a Division of
Rehabilitation Psychology and a
Division of Pediatric
Rehabilitation Medicine that is located at Columbus
Children’s Hospital. Dodd Hall admitted 1,045
patients in 2006. The inpatient service is accredited
by the Commission on the Accreditation of
Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), with specialty
accreditation in rehabilitation of stroke, spinal cord
injury and brain injury. The Traumatic Brain Injury
2007 Research Report 97
Network, an outpatient program specializing in the
treatment of brain-injured patients with substance
abuse problems, is also accredited by CARF. The
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation residency program, directed by Daniel Clinchot, MD, is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate
Medical Education for six positions each year. More
than 230 graduates of the program are serving
throughout the United States, Japan and Puerto
Rico.
Ongoing Research Programs
• The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Model System
Program is part of a national network and database for brain injury treatment funded by the U.S.
Department of Education, and W. Jerry Mysiw,
MD, chairs the Health Committee for the national
program. Research in brain injury also includes
behavior and community reintegration and the
impact of substance abuse on outcome. A special
study of veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan
wars is under way in collaboration with Walter
Reed Medical Center.
• The Osteoporosis Prevention and Treatment
Center is studying new treatments for bone weakness, as well as the effect of osteoporosis as a
complication of disabling illnesses.
• Areas of spinal cord injury (SCI) research emphasis include both the prevention and treatment of
complications of SCI, including recovery of walking.
• Predictors of disability caused by knee
osteoarthritis are being studied through the
National Institutes of Health-funded
Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI).
• A database is being created from the Ohio-Indiana
Veterans’ Amputation Project in conjunction with
Ohio State’s School of Allied Medical Professions
and Indiana University.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• In the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems, Ohio
State is one of the most productive recruitment
and follow-up sites among the 16 centers funded
nationwide. John Corrigan, PhD, chairs the Model
Systems Program Executive Committee.
98 Ohio State University Medical Center
• The National Institutes of Health-funded multicenter clinical trial examining the effect of bodyweight supported treadmill training on recovery of
ambulation following spinal cord injury completed
subject enrollment under the direction of Lisa
Fugate, MD, at the Ohio State site. This novel
therapy is an important transfer of recent neuroscience research in activity-dependent plasticity
to recovery of function in humans following trauma. More clinical trials are planned.
• The Ohio State University site for the
Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) completed its
recruitment objectives in 2006 and represents the
largest contributor of subjects for the five-year
longitudinal study of knee osteoarthritis.
• A recent study by Sharon McDowell, MD, has
documented outcomes of rehabilitation of
patients after brain tumor treatment.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY AND
CELL BIOLOGY
Muthu Periasamy, PhD, Chair
Researchers in the Department
of Physiology and Cell Biology
work to understand cellular and
molecular mechanisms that
contribute to cancer, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and neurological disease. Taking a systematic approach, researchers
develop animal models to study human disease progression at the molecular level and its effect on
organ physiology. The goal is to understand disease
processes and identify molecular targets for clinical
intervention. Faculty teach at Ohio State’s College
of Medicine and colleges of Dentistry, Pharmacy,
Optometry and Allied Medical Professions. They
also participate in the Integrated Biomedical
Graduate Program and mentor graduate students
from five graduate programs at Ohio State.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Molecular mechanisms in heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia
• The role of enteric nervous system in gut function
• Breast and thyroid cancer therapy
• Neuronal control of temperature and pain sensation
• Molecular and cellular basis of spinal cord regeneration
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• The lab team of George Billman, PhD, demonstrated that endurance exercise training (aerobic
exercise, treadmill running) completely suppressed the induction of ventricular fibrillation in
animals previously shown to be susceptible to this
lethal cardiac arrhythmia. In contrast, the susceptibility to ventricular fibrillation was not altered in
sedentary (time control) animals. They further
demonstrated that exercise training improved
autonomic regulation of the heart by increasing
cardiac parasympathetic regulation and decreasing cardiac sympathetic activity. In particular,
exercise training restored a more normal betaadrenergic regulation (by reducing beta2-adrenergic receptor sensitivity) in animals susceptible to
ventricular fibrillation. It is likely that these
changes in neural control of the heart contribute
to the protection induced by exercise training.
These studies demonstrate that exercise training
could be used as a non pharmacological therapy
for the management of life-threatening arrhythmias in patients recovering from a heart attack.
Thus, exercise training could reduce the incidence
of sudden cardiac death in these high-risk
patients.
• In a recent study, the lab team of Sandor Gyorke,
PhD, identified a molecular defect in cardiac cells
that may be a fundamental cause of heart failure,
a progressive weakening of the heart that leaves
the organ unable to pump blood through the body.
Study results show that specialized proteins called
ryanodine receptors (RyRs) malfunction in the
failing heart. The RyRs are calcium channels that
provide calcium required for shortening of the
heart muscle. In heart failure, the RyRs become
leaky, leading to calcium imbalances that prevent
the heart from contracting effectively and relaxing
adequately. Discovery of this mechanism suggests
a potential target for treating heart failure.
• Paul Jannsen, PhD, and his lab team developed a
technique for assessing the relationship between
intracellular calcium concentration and force generation in the heart. At the start of a heartbeat,
calcium rapidly rises inside the myocytes, or muscle cells, of the heart and activates the molecular
motors that are responsible for heart contraction.
Using their new technique, in which they combine
iontophoretic loading of a calcium indicator with
potassium-induced contracture in isolated intact
contracting myocardium, the researchers can
investigate the sensitivity of the myofilaments for
calcium. They recently observed that, when the
heart beats faster, this relationship is altered so
that the calcium sensitivity of the myofilaments
decreases, allowing for faster relaxation of the
heart and at faster heart rates. These results lend
insight on how cardiac relaxation is governed and
how this relationship may be altered in cardiac
disease states.
• Using site-directed mutagenesis to vary the affinity of troponin for calcium, the lab team of Jack
Rall, PhD, determined that calcium controls the
rate of cardiac muscle contraction solely by varying the number of force-generating cross-bridges.
• Calsequestrin is a Ca2+ storage protein in the
cardiac muscle and is involved in Ca2+ release.
A naturally occurring mutation in cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) at amino acid 307 was discovered in a highly inbred family and hypothesized to
cause catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular
tachycardia (CPVT). The lab team of Muthu
Periasamy, PhD, developed a mouse model to
establish a causal link between CASQ2D307H and
the CPVT phenotype using an in vivo model. Their
findings demonstrate that expression of mutant
CASQ2D307H in the mouse heart results in abnormal myocyte Ca2+ handling and predisposes to
complex ventricular arrhythmias similar to the
CPVT phenotype seen in human patients.
• The localization of neurons that express corticotropin-releasing factor and the receptor for corticotropin factor was determined for neurons in
the “brain-in-the-gut.” Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a hormone of importance in the
enteric nervous system, and it acts on the gastrointestinal tract to evoke the pathophysiological
2007 Research Report 99
changes in gut function in response to stress.
Research by the lab team of Jackie Wood, PhD,
has identified neurons that express CRF and the
receptor (CRF1) using molecular and electrophysiological techniques. Their results show that CRF1
receptor mediates the excitatory actions of CRF
and is involved in stress response.
• Sissy Jhiang, PhD, and her lab team have developed a technique using the sodium iodide symporter gene (NIS) as an imaging reporter gene to
monitor transgene expression in gene therapy
clinical trials. Their goals are to improve targeted
radioiodine therapy for patients with advanced
thyroid cancer and to identify factors that selectively increase NIS expression and function to
facilitate targeted radionuclide imaging and therapy for patients with breast cancer.
• The lab team of Lyn Jakeman, PhD, has demonstrated that the inflammatory response to spinal
cord injury differs in various inbred mouse strains
and that different patterns of macrophage invasion are associated with either robust or failed
regeneration of injured axons. This will lead to the
use of genetic tools to identify genes associated
with successful regeneration and repair after
injury.
• A major achievement in the laboratory of Arthur
Strauch, PhD, was identifying a TGFbeta1 control
element that regulates human myofibroblast differentiation during chronic fibrotic disease. The
smooth muscle-like myofibroblast is the major
collagen-secreting cell type involved in granulation tissue formation; it mediates wound-healing
activity in the heart and lungs. TGFbeta1 controls
expression of genes encoding type I collagen subunits as well as the smooth muscle contractile
protein, alpha-actin. Chronic release of active
TGFbeta1 after heart and lung transplant is
responsible for dysfunctional remodeling of
accepted organ grafts. A DNA-binding complex
consisting of gene-activating proteins Sp1, SRF
and Smads, plus repressors YB-1 and Pur alpha, is
assembled at the TGFbeta control element in the
smooth muscle alpha-actin and type I collagen
promoters in myofibroblasts. In isolated human
myofibroblasts, the DNA-binding complex undergoes dynamic reorganization in response to
TGFbeta1. Significant changes in the association
of activator and repressor proteins with the
100 Ohio State University Medical Center
TGFbeta1 control element were observed after
cardiac transplant in the mouse.
• The lab teams of Dale Vandré, PhD, and John
Robinson, PhD, developed methodology for the
rapid isolation of highly enriched plasma membrane samples from human cells and tissue suitable for proteomics analysis of integral membrane
proteins. Using these techniques, they identified
dysferlin, a protein associated with limb girdle
muscular dystrophy, as a major component of the
apical plasma membrane of the placental syncytiotrophoblast. This plasma membrane forms the
interface for nutrient transport between maternal
blood and fetal blood. The researchers believe
that dysferlin plays an important role in the formation and maintenance of this critical plasma
membrane. They have submitted a manuscript to
the Journal of Biological Chemistry describing this
work. They were also preparing manuscripts
describing the techniques in greater detail as well
as the plasma membrane proteome of cultured
human leukemic cells and the apical membrane of
the syncytiotrophoblast.
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY AND OHIO
STATE UNIVERSITY HARDING HOSPITAL
Radu Saveanu, MD, Chair
The first academic Department
of Psychiatry at The Ohio State
University was established in
1951. Today, the Department is
one of the best in the nation,
attracting patients, faculty, students and researchers from
around the world. In 1996, the
University Hospitals Board of Trustees formed a
joint venture with Worthington’s Harding Hospital,
the area’s only private hospital serving psychiatric
patients. This integration allows clinicians to provide a comprehensive continuum of care in which
they can develop and test new treatments and
strategies to improve mental health. The
Department and Ohio State’s Harding Hospital are
in a $15 million psychiatric facility that houses clinical inpatient, outpatient, partial hospitalization and
research programs. Their mission is: to provide outstanding psychiatric care; train residents, fellows
and medical students in a spectrum of practice settings and patient populations; and conduct research
in neuroscience, psychiatry and psychology.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Schizophrenia – Current projects include: identifying candidate genes associated with susceptibility
for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, treatment
response and outcome, as well as disease phenotypes, such as risk factors and cognitive deficits;
and identifying genetic factors determining therapeutic response and side effects to second-generation antipsychotics in patients with acute psychotic episode.
• Anxiety disorders – Researchers completed a project with an investigational agent for generalized
anxiety disorder (GAD) and are engaged in negotiations for other projects with GAD.
• Child and adolescent psychiatry – Researchers
focus on child and adolescent disorders, including
attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, bipolar
disorder and other mood disorders.
• Pharmacogenetics – This program in psychiatric
genetics involves studying the role of opioids in
nicotine addiction and signaling mechanisms
involved in the neuroprotective/neurorestorative
action of gangliosides.
• Mood disorders – Researchers are investigating
aspects of the assessment and treatment of mood
disorders, particularly bipolar spectrum disorders,
in school-aged children.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• The Department of Psychiatry in 2006 took on all
aspects of clinical trials originally initiated with
Pediatric Clinical Trials, Inc., which began in 2005.
The Department’s new Clinical Trials Program has
completed or is participating in seven clinical
studies involving one phase II and six phase III trials, five of which will continue through 2007.
These projects have led to a major study involving
a new investigational antidepressant for major
depression, and six other trials are being negotiated in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major
depression and possibly generalized anxiety disorder. These include a greater number of phase II
trials.
• John Campo, MD, studies pediatric functional
abdominal pain, its relationship with anxiety and
depression, and its treatment using medication
and brief cognitive behavioral psychotherapy in
traditional medical settings. He also focuses on
improving psychopharmacologic management of
common pediatric mental disorders in specialty
and primary care settings.
• L. Eugene Arnold, MD, continued a clinical trial
using zinc to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity
disorder (ADHD) and furthered his work on the
National Institute of Mental Health’s multisite
Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (the
MTA). He also chaired the steering committee for
Research Units in the Pediatric Psychopharmacology
(RUPP) Autism Network, which is completing a
multisite study of adding parent training in behavior management to medication for irritability in
children with autism spectrum disorders.
• Mary Fristad, PhD, ABPP, is site-principal investigator for a four-site National Institute of Mental
Health (NIMH)-funded study to determine the
longitudinal course of manic symptoms and the
development of bipolar spectrum disorders in a
large cohort of children being treated in outpatient
clinics. She also has NIMH funding to write the
treatment manual and training materials for a psychosocial treatment that proved efficacious in a
recently completed NIMH clinical trial.
• Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD, has expanded her
interdisciplinary collaborations on psychological
influences of immune function to examine the role
that serotonin and cytokine genes may play in
interactions with stress and inflammation among
older adults – that is, how genes interact with
chronic stressors to enhance risk for adverse
mental and physical health changes. Her work is
supported by a new grant from the National
Institute on Aging. Another of her National
Institutes of Health-funded studies addresses
whether a restorative hatha yoga session can produce positive changes in endocrine and immune
function compared to a metabolically equivalent
control condition.
2007 Research Report 101
DEPARTMENT OF RADIATION MEDICINE
Research Accomplishments of 2006
Nina Mayr, MD, Chair
• Functional and anatomical imaging-based tumor
outcome prediction – Work has continued on this
National Institutes of Health-funded research that
focuses on developing an imaging-based predictive assay for cervical cancer (PI: Nina Mayr,
MD). Scientists made five presentations on the
subject in 2006, including three at the Annual
Scientific Meeting of the American Society of
Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Presenting
were Mayr, Jian Wang, PhD, John Grecula, MD,
and Hualin Zhang, PhD. Updated results were
presented in a Special Focus Session titled
“Cancer: Early Predictors of Tumor Responses” at
the 2006 Annual Scientific Meeting of the
Radiological Society of North America. This pioneering work, published in the American Journal of
Roentgenology, demonstrated for the first time that
tumor regression occurs in non-linear fashion and
supported the use of three-dimensional imagingbased tumor volumetry instead of simple diameter-based measurements for response assessment
and outcome prediction in cervical cancer.
• Radiation Medicine established further collaborations with the departments of Radiology,
Pathology, and Obstetrics and Gynecology, along
with the College of Public Health, to develop a
personalized multimodality algorithm for response
monitoring and prediction of tumor response to
cytotoxic therapy in patients with cervical cancer.
The Department also is expanding this concept
with other tumors. John Grecula, MD, has applied
for a grant to help develop imaging-based predictive paradigms in lung cancer therapy. The
research focuses on radiation therapy targeting
and includes the continuation of tumor target
delineation (Nilendu Gupta, PhD) with the development of an anatomical atlas for target delineation in radiation therapy. Manual and automated methods, as well as standardization of delineation techniques for tumor targets and normal
tissue volumes, are being intensively investigated
and developed in Radiation Medicine.
Radiation Medicine serves cancer patients through applied
medical research, education of
medical specialists and personalized use of the latest radiation
technology and treatments. The
73-member team includes five
attending physicians, five medical physicists, four radiation oncology residents,
two physics residents and a support staff of radiation dosimetrists, therapists, nurses and students.
They work in a 33,000-square-foot facility that is
housed in Ohio State’s James Cancer Hospital and
Solove Research Institute and includes a treatment
planning CT (computed tomography) simulator,
access to molecular imaging-based therapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed
tomography (PET/CT), and 3-dimensional treatment planning for conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery.
It also has two dual energy and two 6 MV linear
accelerators, one with single-fraction stereotactic
radiosurgery and fractionated central nervous system stereotactic radiotherapy capabilities, an intraoperative electron beam linear accelerator, and an
upgraded gamma knife. The Brachytherapy Program
offers permanent or temporary applications as well
as intraoperative procedures and novel radionuclide
therapies.
Ongoing Research Programs
• The Department’s research programs have
focused on the use of anatomical and functional
tumor imaging for radiation therapy planning and
therapy-response monitoring, and on radiation
therapy targeting delineation for radiation therapy
delivery, outcome prediction and tumor-response
modeling of radiation therapy and multimodality
cancer therapy.
102 Ohio State University Medical Center
• The team further concentrated on computational
methods of radiation therapy optimization, including more effective dose prescription in highly
focused radiation therapy for brain lesions treated
with the Gamma Knife (Simon Lo, MD, and
Joseph Montebello, MD) and other technologies
(Nina Mayr, MD). Work on novel methodologies
of Gamma Knife dosimetry planning, which can
reduce the dose to normal brain tissue, was presented at the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Society
of Neuro-Oncology. Results on the use of radiation grid therapy, a novel modality to improve
dose delivery in treating melanoma and debulking
large tumors, was presented at the Annual
Meeting of the American Society of Therapeutic
Radiology and Oncology by Hualin Zhang, PhD.
• Research by Jian Wang, PhD, on response modeling expanded after his initial pioneering work on
theoretical radiobiological modeling studies of
prostate cancer response. The model with parameters established by Wang provides the most consistent interpretation of clinical data available for
prostate cancer. It also provides a unifying
hypothesis for resolving longstanding controversies regarding radio sensitivity and extremely low
clonogen numbers in prostate cancer, with full
consideration of various clinical effects. The
Department has published two articles and presented several abstracts at national conferences
regarding this work, which has expanded to
include serial imaging-based tumor outcome
databases in cervical cancer to model biophysical
aspects of tumor response. High correlations have
been found between temporal tumor response
dynamics and ultimate tumor control and treatment outcome. A kinetic model has been developed to describe the tumor radiosensitivity and
regression process of cervical cancer during radiation therapy. Abstracts have been presented on
the subject at the American Society of
Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Annual
Biomedical Imaging Research Opportunity
Workshop, and the International Society for
Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Medicine.
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY
Michael Knopp, MD, PhD, Chair
The Department of Radiology’s
mission is to: achieve national
distinction in education, scholarship and public service; educate professionals in basic and
clinical medical imaging sciences as well as allied medical
professions; create and disseminate knowledge and technology; and provide solutions for improving health. Radiology has five divisions: Diagnostic Radiology (includes Interventional
Radiology, Neuroradiology, Breast Imaging,
Thoracic, Abdominal, Musculoskeletal, and NonVascular Interventional); Imaging Research; Nuclear
Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Radiobiology; and
Regional Radiology. In 2002, Radiology had eight
funded projects for a total of $1.2 million. By 2004,
it had 23 projects totaling $18.7 million. The
Department had obtained another $13.1 million in
funded awards/projects by 2006. As one of Ohio
State University Medical Center’s Signature
Programs, Imaging focuses on personalized health
screening/appraisal, disease detection and characterization, imaging-based therapies and therapeutic
response assessment.
Ongoing Research Programs
The Department’s technological advancements of
2006 impacted clinical care, the market and future
opportunities. Being able to leverage research and
training will strengthen global medical expertise.
Here is a sampling of successes from the past year:
• Biomedical Structural, Functional and Molecular
Imaging Enterprise – In 2003, the state of Ohio
awarded Michael Knopp, MD, PhD, a $9.1 million
Third Frontier Grant and $8 million in Biomedical
Research and Technology Transfer (BRTT) funding
to create the Wright Center of Innovation (WCI)
in Biomedical Imaging. The project (with funding
through 2008) is also known as the Biomedical
Structural, Functional and Molecular Imaging
2007 Research Report 103
Enterprise at Ohio State. It is designed to advance
biomedical imaging technology. In the spring of
2006, the state announced continued funding of
nearly $8 million for three years to lay the foundation for the next level of hybrid positron emission
tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging and imaging-based therapy.
• Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Core Lab
– Radiology is in its fourth year as a core lab for
the CALGB. The lab facilitates standardized data
acquisition, data transmission, quality control,
storage, post-processing and analysis for CALGB.
It also implements post-processing algorithms as
desired by the imaging committee and provides
technical infrastructure to enable rapid transfer
and storage of the studies. An additional submission for $1.4 million is under consideration.
Michael Knopp, MD, PhD, is principal investigator.
• Imaging Response Assessment Teams (IRAT) in
Cancer Centers – A National Cancer Institute
award of $738,813 for three years to Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center (OSUCCC), in conjunction with the Department of Radiology, supports development of imaging-assessment methods to reveal early biologic, noninvasive response
to cancer treatment. This award, announced in
2005, is helping develop, implement and validate
response-assessment imaging methodologies in
the OSUCCC in collaboration with Radiology’s
Division of Imaging Research, which includes the
Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical
Imaging. Ohio State is one of eight cancer centers
nationwide to receive this grant. Michael Knopp,
MD, PhD, is principal investigator.
• Core Lab for Imaging Post-Processing and
Analysis – The Department continues to work
with Novartis Pharmaceuticals as the imaging
core lab and to collaborate in advanced imaging
methodologies for clinical trials. Including
Novartis, 22 clinical trials with total funding of
about $1.2 million are under way within the
Department.
• Advancing Imaging Technology as a Credential
Biomarker for Clinical Drug Development – This
award from Pfizer, Inc. was announced at the end
of 2006 with Michael Knopp, MD, PhD, as principal investigator. The project includes all aspects of
imaging and drug development with a focus on
104 Ohio State University Medical Center
establishing imaging surrogates and biomarkers
for therapeutic response prediction and assessment.
• Molecular-Level Research – Scientists in the
Division of Radiobiology, which is directed by
Altaf Wani, PhD, study molecular mechanisms of
DNA damage and repair. The Division has more
than $1.5 million in research funding. Projects
include:
examining genomic instability in cancer
pathogenesis, with a focus on the regulation of
DNA damage processing in the native environment of normal and cancerous cells, and on delineating mechanisms of cross-talk between molecular pathways that control cellular homeostasis;
characterizing and quantifying, in human tissue and cell types, the mechanisms of chemopreventive agents, cancer therapy in combination
with chemical and radiological agents, modulation
of genes and proteins regulating cellular proliferation and apoptosis (cell death), and genetic damage repair;
studying anticancer topoisomerase poisons,
including analysis of potential new drugs, and proteomic analysis of post-translational modifications
of topoisomerases associated with drug exposure
and disruption of cancer-cell metabolism by anticancer drugs.
DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY
E. Christopher Ellison, MD, Chair
The Department of Surgery
delivers high-quality patient
care, contributes medical innovations through translational
research and clinical outcomes
studies, and educates medical
students and postgraduate
trainees. The Department interacts with all six Ohio State University Medical
Center Signature Programs – Cancer, Critical Care,
Heart, Imaging, Neurosciences and Transplantation –
and comprises eight surgical specialty divisions:
Cardiothoracic Surgery; Critical Care, Trauma and
Burns; General and Gastrointestinal Surgery;
General Vascular Surgery; Pediatric Surgery; Plastic
Surgery; Surgical Oncology; and Transplantation.
The Center for Minimally Invasive Surgery, a multidisciplinary entity within the Department, develops
and implements laparoscopic surgical technologies
and procedures. The Ohio State University
Comprehensive Wound Care Center provides for
interaction between basic scientists and clinicians,
enhancing translational research and patient care.
Research funding received from July 1, 2005,
through June 30, 2006 by Department scientists
through The Ohio State University Research
Foundation was more than $7.3 million.
Investigators received more than $4 million from
the National Institutes of Health.
Ongoing Research Programs
• Cancer – Basic and clinical studies are investigating cancer immunology and gene-nutrient interactions in breast cancer.
• Cardiovascular – Basic, preclinical and clinical
studies are focusing on heart failure, myocardial
infarction, stroke, atherosclerosis, antioxidant
nutrition and mitochondrial dysfunction.
• Critical Care – Cytomegalovirus infection and sepsis are key areas of investigation.
• Transplantation – Mechanistic studies of the
immune basis of organ allograft rejection, in combination with clinical trials, are evaluating the efficacy of novel immunosuppressive agents in organ
transplant recipients.
• Wound Healing – Molecular, preclinical and clinical studies are directed toward understanding the
fundamental mechanisms (focusing on oxygen)
underlying dermal wound healing and its impairment.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Cancer – William Carson III, MD, has reported on
a phase I trial of interferon and interleukin-12 in
patients with metastatic cancer, proving that it is
possible to enhance the responsiveness of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to interferons. His
group has also demonstrated the utility of a novel
flow cytometric assay to monitor the immune
response to exogenously administered cytokines
such as interleukin-2, which is used to treat
patients who have metastatic melanoma. Carson’s
group also demonstrated that natural killer cells in
the body’s immune system produce T cell-recruiting chemokines in response to antibody-coated
tumor cells, and that this response is enhanced by
stimulatory factors such as interleukin-21 and
CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. Pedram Ghafourifar,
PhD, reported that tamoxifen induces oxidative
stress and mitochondrial apoptosis by stimulating
mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase.
• Cardiovascular – Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD,
celebrated the Klassen Research Day with Nobel
laureate Louis Ignarro as guest scientist.
Parthasarathy reported on how salicylic acid
might be generated in plasma from aspirin. The
ability of long-term treatment with aspirin to
retard atherosclerosis might be dependent on the
generation of free salicylic acid, a scavenger of
free radicals. Pedram Ghafourifar, PhD, reported
on how mitochondrial cytochrome c reacts with
nitric oxide via S-nitrosation. Sashwati Roy, PhD,
developed a laser-capture-based technique to
study single myocytes from spatially resolved
regions of the infarcted myocardium. She and
Chandan Sen, PhD, also reported on a genomic
study performing transcriptome analysis of the
ischemia-reperfused remodeling myocardium.
Benjamin Sun, MD, developed a way to label
skeletal myoblasts with an oxygen-sensing spin
probe for non-invasive monitoring of in situ oxygenation and cell therapy in the heart. Sen also
reported on the beneficial effects of the lesser
known vitamin E a-tocotrienol against strokerelated neurodegeneration.
• Critical Care – Charles Cook, MD, and Ronald
Ferguson, MD, PhD, reported on a novel mechanism by which critically ill surgical patients develop fibroproliferative acute respiratory distress
syndrome. Cook’s work also identified carbamoyl
phosphate synthase-1 as a marker of mitochondrial damage and depletion in the liver during sepsis.
He reported on how lipopolysaccharide, tumor
necrosis factor alpha, or interleukin-1beta may
trigger reactivation of latent cytomegalovirus.
2007 Research Report 105
• Transplantation – Ronald Pelletier, MD, and
Ronald Ferguson, MD, PhD, reported on how
steroid withdrawal in low-risk kidney transplant
recipients is safe and ameliorates many of the
unwanted side effects of steroid use. Their studies
also demonstrated that myoglobinuria with myoglobin cast formation can occur following
rapamycin administration and may aid development of unexpected severe acute renal dysfunction. Amer Rajab, MD, PhD, and Ferguson reported that excellent graft survival with a significantly
lower incidence of acute rejection can be achieved
using a steroid-free maintenance immunosuppressive protocol consisting of Neoral and
sirolimus. Lisa Yee, MD, and Anne VanBuskirk,
PhD, shed light on how memory cytotoxic T-lymphocytes are restimulated and function to prevent
disease, especially post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.
• Wound Healing – Sashwati Roy, PhD, and
Chandan Sen, PhD, produced the first in vivo evidence that strategies to influence the redox environment of the wound site may have a bearing on
healing outcomes. At low doses (endogenous as
well as therapeutic), oxidants stimulated wound
angiogenesis. Sen and Roy reported on the presence of a normoxic-setpoint in biological tissues
and have characterized the regulation of such setpoint. Their group also reported on the wound site
neutrophil transcriptome in response to psychological stress in young men. Stress tilted the
genomic balance toward genes encoding proteins
responsible for cell cycle arrest, death and inflammation. Additional reports by this group include
characterization of changes in the transcriptome
of the subcutaneous adipose of obese diabetic
mice in response to dietary supplements. In collaboration with the Mathematical Biosciences
Institute, this group provided insight on microarray analysis of gene expression and data mining.
106 Ohio State University Medical Center
DEPARTMENT OF UROLOGY
Robert Bahnson, MD, Director
The Department of Urology is
dedicated to achievement in
patient care, urologic education
and research. The goal of the
faculty is to provide state-ofthe-art care to patients in an
environment that fosters education of residents and medical
students. The Department is committed to research
that translates into more effective treatments for
patients with urologic disorders. Recent accomplishments include establishing an internationally
recognized robotic prostatectomy center, a voidingdisorders practice with a complete range of diagnostic capabilities, and a kidney stone management
program with ambulatory treatment using lithotripsy and ureteral endoscopy. A recent Accreditation
Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)
review of the Department’s residency program
resulted in a commendation, full accreditation with
a five-year review cycle (the longest period that can
be granted), and a permanent increase in resident
complement to three per year.
Research Accomplishments of 2006
• Biodistribution of Dietary Tomato and Soy
Phytochemicals in the Human Prostate –
Consumption of tomato-based products and soy
has been correlated with reduced risk for prostate
cancer in human epidemiologic studies. But
because human diets are complex, more evidence
is needed to prove that these foods can help prevent cancer. Work by Ohio State researchers
Steven Clinton, MD, PhD, Kamal Pohar, MD, and
Robert Bahnson, MD, has ranged from molecular
studies using cells grown in the laboratory to animal models for cancers, as well as human studies.
These studies demonstrated that soy and tomato
products contain many phytochemicals, or natural
compounds that affect several components of the
carcinogenic cascade.
• Tomato-Soy Drink Tested Against Prostate Cancer
– Using a $1.27 million federal grant, a team of
researchers developed a promising tomato juice
containing soy that has been favorably tested for
palatability. A new $1.2 million grant from the
National Cancer Institute is allowing the team to
test this product in men with prostate cancer.
The first study will focus on those planning to
undergo prostatectomy.
• Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer – Robert
Bahnson, MD, continues to work with Steven
Clinton, MD, PhD, on chemoprevention of
prostate cancer.
• MEAL Study – Robert Bahnson, MD, and Electra
Paskett, PhD, MSPH, a professor of Public Health,
are serving as co-chairs for the Men’s Eating and
Living (MEAL) study, a pilot trial of diet change
among prostate cancer patients.
SCHOOL OF ALLIED MEDICAL
PROFESSIONS
Deborah Larsen, PhD, Director
The School of Allied Medical
Professions (SAMP) has 33 regular faculty members (eight
clinical, 11 probationary tenuretrack and 14 tenured) and 14
auxiliary/staff appointments
with teaching/research responsibilities. Research ranges from
basic science to translational, examining health promotion and disease prevention, mechanisms of
injury and recovery, and long-term health-related
quality of life. Funding for SAMP research also
spans the spectrum from small foundational grants
to National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01s. The
School has seen an increase in research productivity
in the past few years, with $2.075 million in
research awards in new or ongoing grants during
2006. SAMP faculty were principal investigators
(PIs) on two R01s and one R21, participated in two
multi-centered, NIH-funded clinical trials as site PI,
were co-investigators on three additional R01s, and
were PIs on two nationally funded training grants.
Publications for SAMP faculty are consistent with
their diversity of scholarship and include basic science, clinical and educational arenas.
Ongoing Research Programs
• D. Michele Basso, PhD, an associate professor of
Physical Therapy, focuses on recovery of motor
function after central nervous system (CNS)
injury, including the ability to not only assess normal and aberrant behavior but also to analyze
structures within the CNS for response to injury
and contribution to recovery. She was funded on
four R01s during 2006, one as PI and three as
Co-PI.
• John Buford, PhD, associate professor of Physical
Therapy, is involved in multiple neuroscience
areas of inquiry, including: neural control of movement, specifically the neurophysiological basis of
reaching; model of carpal tunnel syndrome; neuroanatomy of the reticulospinal system; and innovative approaches to teaching neuroscience. He
received a renewal of his R01 in 2005 and was
Co-PI on a second NIH grant.
• Deborah Larsen, PhD, director of SAMP, focuses
on recovery of function after stroke and related
neural mechanisms. She was the site principal
investigator on two multicenter clinical trials
(described later) that were completed in 2005
with a no-cost extension into 2006, one with its
primary outcome paper published in the Journal of
the American Medical Association in 2006.
• Deborah Heiss, PhD, associate professor and
interim director of Physical Therapy, studies the
treatment of low back pain, for which she received
an R21 grant from the NIH in 2006.
2007 Research Report 107
Research Accomplishments of 2006
SCHOOL OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE
• Steve Wilson, PhD, associate professor emeritus
of Allied Medicine, in collaboration with Mark
Sothman, PhD, at Indiana University, was awarded
$1 million to establish the Ohio State UniversityIndiana University Center for Traumatic Amputee
Rehabilitation Research program to study the
needs of the Department of Defense and the
Department of Veterans Administration related to
the rehabilitation and health care of veterans and
amputee war-related injuries.
• EXCITE (Extremity Constraint Induced Therapy
Evaluation), the largest multi-centered clinical trial
of a rehabilitation technique for upper extremity
recovery after stroke, was completed in 2006 and
demonstrated significant improvement of upper
extremity function among patients using this
technique: Wolf et al, JAMA 2006;296(17):20952104. Ohio State was one of seven universities to
participate. Deborah Larsen, PhD, director of
SAMP, was site PI at Ohio State.
• John Borstad, PhD, assistant professor in Physical
Therapy, was awarded $168,739 from The Susan
G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation to study
Three-Dimensional Analysis of Shoulder Motion
Limitations Following Treatment for Breast Cancer.
Caroline Whitacre, PhD, Director
The School of Biomedical
Science (SBS) promotes
research to advance medical
knowledge and to educate the
next generation of biomedical
scientists and health professionals. The School’s academic
mission is to foster excellence
in education and research education. The School
encompasses six basic science departments in Ohio
State’s College of Medicine: Biomedical Informatics;
Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical
Genetics; Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry;
Neuroscience; Pharmacology; and Physiology and
Cell Biology. The School has been reorganized
to better integrate biomedical research activities
across the Medical Center in order to align with the
Medical Center’s six Signature Programs and
enhance the research and education missions.
Representatives of the Signature Programs have
been appointed to the School’s executive committee.
SBS FACULTY NUMBER
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
*2005
*2006
*2007
* Includes Research Track
108 Ohio State University Medical Center
TOTAL GRANT FUNDING
Integrated Biomedical Science Graduate Program
(IBGP)
In 2001 this program replaced the traditional
departmental PhD graduate programs at Ohio
State’s Medical Center. It is organized with a much
more interdisciplinary approach to investigate the
causes, biological mechanisms and cures of human
disease. Students prepare for careers in biomedical
research with an understanding of disease mechanisms that integrates information from several disciplines. This graduate program has a strong faculty
membership that is Medical Center-wide and from
23 departments at Ohio State. They bring research
and teaching expertise, along with research
resources available to graduate students. The IBGP
is recognized as one of the top PhD programs in the
nation by virtue of a training grant awarded by the
National Institutes of Health to support this program.
Graduate/Postgraduate Research Day
This is an annual event featuring biomedical
research conducted by students/trainees at the
Medical Center. Participation is open to students in
the College of Medicine, including graduate, medical and MD/PhD students, as well as postdoctoral
fellows and researchers, and clinical residents and
fellows. Held each spring, Research Day features a
poster display and awards presented for outstanding research, as well as presentations by worldrenowned researchers and experts in biomedical
science. The Research Day is intended for and
organized by Medical Center students/trainees.
Postdoctoral Research Office
Postdoctoral scholars contribute to the dynamic
research enterprise of the College of Medicine. The
office helps postdoctoral students maximize this
pivotal stage in their professional development. As
a resource for current and prospective postdoctoral
scholars, faculty advisors and administrative staff,
the office enhances the postdoctoral experience.
Undergraduate Biomedical Science Program
This exciting new undergraduate program has been
created for high-ability students who are eligible for
Ohio State’s honors program and who have an
interest in conducting medical research and studying human disease. The first class of Biomedical
Science students started in autumn quarter of
2005; approximately 20-25 freshmen enter the
major each year. The goal is to provide a strong science background and involve students in biomedical
research that will prepare them to enter a graduate
program in research, medical school, dental school
or other areas of health care.
SBS FACULTY FUNDING
45.0
Faculty Growth
More than 50 new faculty have been added to
the School since its inception in 2000. The
growth in faculty has more than doubled annual extramural funding from $18 million to $40
million. This extramural funding provides
resources to support the School’s fundamental
mission of improving health care by acquiring
scientific knowledge and translating it to clinical applications.
DOLLARS (MILLIONS)
40.0
35.0
30.0
25.0
20.0
15.0
10.0
5.0
0.0
FY
2000
FY
2001
FY
2002
FY
2003
FY
2004
FY
2005
FY
2006
TIU + Center Funding
2007 Research Report 109
esearc
Technology Commercialization and
Partnerships (TCP)
AT OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
110 Ohio State University Medical Center
DIRECTOR: HENRY ZHENG, PHD, MBA
The Technology Commercialization and Partnerships
(TCP) Council works to improve collaboration
between Ohio State University Medical Center faculty, researchers and inventors and the University’s
Technology Licensing and Commercialization (TLC)
team, as well as between the Medical Center and
industry. The overall goal is to accelerate commercialization of technologies created at the Medical
Center and to foster partnerships that bolster sponsored research, development and formation of startup companies or technology licensing.
TCP objectives are to create an entrepreneurial
organizational culture that promotes innovation and
economic development, and to enhance the
Medical Center’s status as a leader in medical innovation and discovery. Ohio State scientists who
believe they have technologies or capabilities with
strong commercial potential should work closely
with the TLC team, which will lead the development
of intellectual property from discovery through
commercialization activities that could take many
forms. Scientists are encouraged to connect early
and often with both the TLC and the TCP teams.
In 2006, the TCP Council included: Henry Zheng,
PhD, MBA, director; Caroline Whitacre, PhD;
Michael Bissell, MD, PhD, MPH; Jean Schelhorn,
PhD; Andrew Hansen, PhD; Tim Cain, PhD;
Jennifer Yucel, PhD; Kim Saunders; Darian
Torrance; and Wendy Philips.
Technology commercialization is important because
it makes the latest scientific and technological discoveries available to the public and improves lives,
objectives that are in line with Ohio State’s research
and public service missions. The Federal Bayh-Dole
Act of 1980 allows universities to elect title to
inventions stemming from federally supported
research and, through this, to jump-start commercialization.
The TCP also emphasizes the importance of internal
communications regarding TCP activities. The TCP
Web site (http://medicine.osu.edu/tcp/index.cfm)
includes helpful technology transfer-related infor-
mation and links – a place where major events and
tech transfer outcomes are frequently updated. In
addition, a Web-based newsletter highlights TCP
developments and major related events within and
outside the Medical Center. The TCP Council also
hosts seminars, workshops, colloquiums and roundtable discussions to provide personal interaction
among invited speakers and Ohio State
faculty/researchers.
On Dec. 4, 2006, TCP hosted the first Industry
Collaboration Symposium at Ohio State’s newly
opened Biomedical Research Tower. The symposium
attracted more than 300 attendees representing
almost 90 companies and organizations from as far
away as Germany, South Korea, England and India.
By showcasing faculty research, Medical Center
research capabilities and technologies available for
commercialization to industry partners, the symposium demonstrated a desire to work with industry
and other development organizations to promote
technology transfer and economic development. A
post-symposium survey of attendees suggests that
this was a highly successful event that will create
momentum for industry-academia collaboration in
technology development and commercialization.
Besides fostering closer collaboration with external
organizations, TCP also collaborates with TLC on
many activities, including workshops, panel discussions, the Industry Collaboration Symposium, marketing and technology cultivation. Members of the
TLC life sciences team play an important role in
helping faculty move their technologies from laboratory to commercialization. The TLC team is led by
Jean Schelhorn, PhD, associate vice president for
Commercialization, who joined Ohio State in early
2006.
The mission of TLC is to: foster a University-wide
entrepreneurial culture; catalyze faculty, staff and
student inventions; maximize the value of Ohio
State developments; and accelerate the transition of
new developments into products, services, and new
or expanded jobs. Schelhorn is Ohio State’s primary
spokesperson on commercialization and builds collaborations with public and private entities to com-
2007 Research Report 111
mercialize intellectual property and foster economic
growth. Before joining Ohio State, she was vice
president for intellectual property strategy and
development at Battelle, one of the premier technology development and commercialization companies in the world.
Through team efforts among faculty, researchers,
inventors, TLC and the Medical Center, more and
more technologies are being disclosed and protected each year, and more commercialization successes are being generated. The success stories span
new licensing activity, new technology-based startup company formation, and attraction of companies
to the region to be in proximity to the Medical
Center’s research capability and researchers.
Two major commercialization success stories at
Ohio State in 2006 are: achieving an institutional
Technology Commercialization score high enough to
merit a large monetary award from the state’s fiscal
2007 TCIA Fund; and earning national recognition
for a Columbus-based biopharmaceutical company,
OncoImmune Inc., an Ohio State University technology commercialization company that is developing
drugs for diseases with no effective treatment.
Using data supplied by universities, the Ohio Board
of Regents staff determined that Ohio State
University secured one of the three highest technology commercialization index scores in the state and
thus recommended that the University be awarded
$150,000 from the fiscal 2007 Technology
Commercialization Incentive Awards (TCIA) Fund, a
performance-based program under Economic Growth
Challenge in Ohio’s higher education budget.
The TCIA Fund rewards public and private universities for technology transfer to Ohio business and
industry that results in the commercialization of
new products, processes and services. Ohio’s Third
Frontier Commission, with counsel from the Third
Frontier Advisory Board, establishes eligibility criteria for colleges and universities applying for TCIA
incentive funding.
According to information reported by TLC,
OncoImmune, Inc. was spun out of Ohio State in
2000 and holds rights to proprietary technologies
from Ohio State and the University of Michigan.
Diseases for which the company is developing
potentially life-saving drugs include multiple sclerosis, tuberous sclerosis and cancer. The company
expected to start clinical trials for tuberous sclerosis
in 2007 and for multiple sclerosis in 2008.
OncoImmune, Inc.’s multiple sclerosis drug is based
on a novel patent-pending gene target and will treat
early- and late-stage patients while complementing
existing therapies. OncoImmune, Inc. discovered
that rapamycin, an FDA-approved cancer drug,
restores the function of a pair of faulty genes, offering a possible treatment for tuberous sclerosis and
cancer. The company expects to move the novel formulation to market for these indications.
For its innovative work in drug development,
OncoImmune, Inc. was nominated by Ohio
State and subsequently chosen to participate
in the 2006 University Start-Ups National
Showcase. The company has received funding
from the National Institutes of Health and the
state of Ohio, and it recently secured series-A
venture capital.
Technology Commercialization and Partnerships Team
in 2006 - (seated from left): Henry Zheng, PhD, MBA;
Caroline Whitacre, PhD; Jean Schelhorn, PhD; and
(standing from left): Wendy Philips; Tim Cain, PhD;
Darian Torrance; Andrew Hansen, PhD.
112 Ohio State University Medical Center
Medical Center Information
Warehouse: BRINGING ENTERPRISE-GRADE INFORMATICS
TO THE RESEARCH COMMUNITY
“The Information Warehouse at Ohio State is a critical
component of the infrastructure that enables establishment
of our wound human tissue bank for receiving tissues
from clinics nationwide. It is also pivotal in enabling
patient-based wound healing research involving
genome-wide screening.” – Chandan Sen, PhD,
professor and vice chairman (research) of Surgery,
and executive director of the Ohio State University
Wound Center.
2007 Research Report 113
DIRECTOR: JYOTI KAMAL, PHD
Information is the foundation of innovation. As valuable as any tangible facility or monetary asset, the
data that flows throughout an academic medical
center is an indispensable key to advancement.
At Ohio State University Medical Center, the
Information Warehouse (IW) curates data from
systems throughout the institution and provides a
broad array of informatics services to help
researchers turn that data into knowledge that will
become the future of medicine.
WHAT IS THE IW?
The IW is a comprehensive data-warehousing facility providing data-integration, data-management
and data-mining services to a diversity of customers across the clinical, education and research
sectors of the Medical Center. While the IW is a
shared service, in recent years leadership has
charged the IW with expanding support for the
research community by providing an informatics
environment that facilitates both translational
research and the development of personalized
medicine.
The IW maintains a scalable, multifaceted data
system spanning 14 years of clinical and financial
history. The IW also provides enterprise-grade
data-management services so that researchers who
use these services can free more time to focus on
science. The IW also helps investigators with the
informatics segments of their research proposals,
thereby saving time and enhancing credibility.
“The Information Warehouse is essentially an infrastructure service for the Medical Center,” says IW
Director Jyoti Kamal, PhD. “We are always looking
for ways to help our colleagues do their jobs better.
Over the past several years we have been working hard
to meet the special needs of our research colleagues.”
NEW DEVELOPMENTS
“Our Medical Center strategy is to use a centralized
imaging data repository that adheres to all the stringent requirements, from reliability to data safety.
With this new tool in the IW, imaging data can be
accessed by authorized users via specific criteria in a
Over the past year the IW developed many innovations and services to amplify research productivity
at the Medical Center. These include IW infrastructure developments targeting common research
community needs, deployment of several extensible
pilot projects, and the establishment of key partnerships within the Medical Center.
process that complies with HIPPA and other regulations. This is a major step forward in our quest to use
imaging data in clinical research and for advancing
personalized health care.” – Michael Knopp, MD,
PhD, chair of Radiology and leader of the Imaging
Signature Program.
114 Ohio State University Medical Center
TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH
INFORMATICS ARCHITECT
In partnership with the Department of Biomedical
Informatics (BMI), Chief Information Officer Herb
Smaltz, PhD, has created a joint position between
the IW and the BMI to help coordinate informatics
services offered to the research community. The
translational research informatics architect (TRA)
will help manage specific research efforts and will
help guide the strategic development of new informatics capabilities and services to better meet the
research community’s needs.
In January 2007, Philip Payne, PhD, was selected
for the role of TRA and is already making a substantial impact on research informatics at OSUMC. This
partnership with BMI will strengthen the Medical
Center’s ability to offer innovations and effective informatics services that will enhance research productivity.
HONEST BROKER PROTOCOL
In 2006 the IW’s Honest Broker Protocol was
approved by Ohio State’s Institutional Review Board.
Through this protocol, the IW is able to provide de-
identified clinical data for research purposes. This
mechanism can streamline the research process for
many kinds of retrospective work while still ensuring the privacy of patients. In fiscal year 2007 the
IW began processing many requests for data under
this protocol. In the coming year it will expand the
protocol to encompass new types of clinical information from its comprehensive repository and to
implement new mechanisms for access that will
enable investigators to explore the data more spontaneously, increasing opportunities for unanticipated discoveries.
Figure 1: The Information Warehouse takes in data from a vast array of Ohio State University Medical Center information sources (more than can be shown here), cleanses it, arranges it into efficient datamarts and provides access
to the data through a selection of presentation, mining and analysis tools. Through this integration, the IW helps to
establish a translational research environment at the Medical Center by electronically linking the bench to the bedside.
2007 Research Report 115
Figure 2: The Information Warehouse produces a broad spectrum of custom data-management and data-mining
applications. This capability is particularly valuable when commercial offerings do not provide the specialized functionality that research efforts often demand. The primary goal of these services is not only to help researchers manage their data, but also to help them turn that data into knowledge.
116 Ohio State University Medical Center
COMPREHENSIVE WOUND CENTER
PULMONARY PORTAL
Working with the Comprehensive Wound Center
(CWC) and CWC Executive Director Chandan Sen,
PhD, the IW has constructed a richly featured informatics pipeline to support wound- and tissue-based
research. Envisioned as a core service that would
support many projects (including efforts outside of
the Wound Center), the pipeline is a framework of
custom applications, automated multisite data-collection processes, open source tools and commercial products, all integrated into the IW’s comprehensive clinical data repository. The pipeline provides tools for managing tissue data, annotating the
samples with contextual information, analyzing
linked microarray expression data and performing
full-featured statistical analysis on all the encapsulated and linked information. The system also collects detailed wound-related data from more than
100 wound centers nationwide through a partnership with National Healing Corporation. In the
future the IW expects to extend the application of
such frameworks to support other research efforts
within the Medical Center.
In partnership with Clay Marsh, MD, and the
Pulmonary Translational Core Group, the IW has
developed a technology framework and a methodology that enables IW developers to rapidly produce
Web-based applications in support of clinical studies. Providing data collection, management and
reporting functionality, these applications give
research staff an efficient means to enroll and track
patients through even complex studies while reducing opportunities for error through many innovative
features. The IW plans to extend this technology to
support more groups within the Medical Center in
the coming year. In the future this technology will
be integrated with the commercial clinical trials
management system when that product is selected
and installed.
PACS IMAGE INTEGRATION
To make the Medical Center’s PACS image archives
more accessible for research, the IW has implemented an image integration server that enables
investigators to extract sets of images based on
clinical parameters stored in the IW’s comprehensive clinical repository. By integrating a standardized
ontology text search mechanism, images can also
be selected according to generalized medical concepts mentioned in the free-text of physicians’
reports. This mechanism provides an efficient
means to ensure that images extracted for a study
all share a common medical linkage.
PARTNERS IN RESEARCH
Recognizing that innovation and agility in medical
informatics are critical in today’s translational
research environment, Medical Center leaders support development of powerful informatics capabilities within the institution, and the IW is a cornerstone of that effort.
“Drawing information from the past, we strive in the
present to enable our research colleagues to create
the medicine of the future,” Kamal says. “Our job is
to help them do their jobs better.”
2007 Research Report 117
AT OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
118 Ohio State University Medical Center
esearc
Translational Research
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recognizes
translational research – converting basic science
discoveries into innovative clinical care – as a powerful medical resource that could be bolstered by a
stronger national research infrastructure.
An “NIH Roadmap for Medical Research” published
by the NIH’s Office of Portfolio Analysis and
Strategic Initiatives acknowledges that “growing
barriers between clinical and basic research, along
with the ever-increasing complexities involved in
conducting clinical research, are making it more difficult to translate new knowledge to the clinic – and
back to the lab bench” – thus limiting professional
interest in the field and “hampering the clinical
research enterprise.”
To counter this dilemma, the NIH in October 2006
launched a re-engineering effort to develop a new
discipline of clinical and translational research by
establishing a Clinical and Translational Science
Awards (CTSA) Consortium that began with 12 academic health centers around the country. More than
50 others, including The Ohio State University, are
applying for membership in the consortium, which
when fully implemented in 2012 will comprise some
60 institutions.
The NIH says Consortium members will “serve as a
magnet that concentrates basic, translational and
clinical investigators, community clinicians, clinical
practices, networks, professional societies and
industry to facilitate development of professional
interactions, programs and research projects.”
Although not yet funded by the NIH, the CCTS is an
inclusive and functioning entity that engages all faculty, staff and students from Ohio State’s seven
health sciences colleges and the University community in general who share a common vision about
clinical and translational science.
In the College of Medicine,
Rebecca Jackson, MD, and
Chandan Sen, PhD, associate
dean for translational and
applied research, have played
key roles alongside more than
50 faculty in establishing the
CCTS as a means of supporting
the national effort. Jackson and Sen note that Ohio
State offers many strengths for this endeavor,
including the close proximity of
multiple academic disciplines
geared toward research, a host
of shared resources that collectively enhance research capabilities, and approximately 1 million patient visits per year to the
Medical Center. The CCTS, they
say, will be the new academic
home for clinical and translational science at Ohio
State and is open to all in the community who are
interested or engaged in interdisciplinary research
that directly benefits the community by translating
science into better health care.
Ohio State has already taken a major step to support this cause. Planning efforts by multiple schools
and colleges at the University, along with Ohio
State’s Medical Center and Children’s Hospital in
Columbus, have led to the establishment of a
Center for Clinical and Translational Science
(CCTS) led by Rebecca Jackson, MD, associate
dean for clinical research. The Center’s mission is to
improve quality of health care for the community by
creating a transformative clinical and translational
science discipline that stands at the core of the
University’s academic culture.
2007 Research Report 119
Clinical Trials Research
Ohio State University Medical Center excels in clinical
trials because of collaborative relationships among
clinical and basic science faculty, and also through
relationships with research centers and institutes on
campus and around the world.
120 Ohio State University Medical Center
DEPARTMENT OF ANESTHESIOLOGY
All Ohio State University clinical trials are overseen by the
University’s Office of Responsible Research Practices (ORRP),
a unit of The Ohio State University Office of Research. ORRP
supports the University’s goals of promoting the ethical conduct of research involving human and animal subjects. The
ORRP provides administrative support for:
Neural bowel physiology and dysfunction in inflammatory
bowel disease
PI: Fievos Christofi, PhD
esearc
RESPONSIBLE RESEARCH PRACTICES
• Faculty, staff and student education on the responsible conduct of research
• Pre-review of protocol submissions for compliance with regulatory requirements
• The University’s research review boards
• Implementation of the University’s Conflict of
Interest Policy
• Conduct of the University’s classified research
and contract activities
For more information about ORRP, visit
www.orrp.ohio-state.edu.
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW
All clinical trials at Ohio State are carefully evaluated,
approved and monitored by an Institutional Review Board
(IRB) under the ORRP. Ohio State has three IRBs – one each
for biomedical sciences, cancer, and behavioral and social sciences. These boards are staffed by physicians, scientists,
patient advocates, clergy, community members and other
healthcare providers who are collectively responsible for overseeing the protection of human subjects in research.
In addition, the Clinical Trials Office (CTO) of Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center (OSUCCC) facilitates development and implementation of all OSUCCC clinical trials. By providing regulatory processing, subject recruitment, financial
development, data collection and protocol-management services, the CTO fosters a supportive environment conducive to
conducting clinical trials in a methodologically sound, expedient and cost-effective manner.
Correlation between cerebral spinal fluid and plasma biochemical markers with the clinical outcome due to spinal cord
ischemia during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurism repair: a
prospective analysis
PI: Hamdy Elsayed-Awad, MD
Destiny trial: effects of mitral valve annuloplasty with the geoform ring on left ventricular geometry and function in patients
with cardiomyopathy
PI: Nadia Nathan, MD
An investigation of the reproducibility of functional MRI of the
human brain during hand movement, tingling and pain stimulations
PI: Robert Small, MD
National Awake Intubation
PI: Sergio Bergese, MD
Clinical validation of the MEDRAD monitor
PI: Sergio Bergese, MD
A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the
dose-effects of neostigmine in spinal anesthesia
PI: Yun Xia, MD, PhD
DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Infected elders in the ED: outcomes and processes of care
PI: Jeffrey Caterino, MD
A randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, 4 X 4 factorial design trial to evaluate Telmisartan 20,
40 and 80 mg tablets in combination with Amlodipine 2.5, 5
and 10 mg capsules after eight weeks of treatment in patients
with stage I
PI: Robert Guthrie, MD
Although enrollment in clinical trials at Ohio State is 16 percent higher than the national average, the University is working
to increase patient participation.
Validation of a mortality prediction model for acutely decompensated heart failure patients
PI: Brian Hiestand, MD
ACTIVE CLINICAL TRIALS
Induction of mild hypothermia in rescued cardiac arrest
patients using traditional cooling techniques versus medivance
arctic sun temperature management system
PI: Michael Sayre, MD
Hundreds of researchers are involved in hundreds of active
clinical trials at Ohio State University Medical Center. Here are
some of the most significant current studies as reported by
clinical departments:
2007 Research Report 121
DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY MEDICINE
Multicenter, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate the
efficacy and safety of ezetimibe Simvastatin and niacin
(extended release tablet) co-administered in patients with
type IIa or type IIb hyperlipidemia
PI: Patrick Fahey, MD
Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled,
phase III trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Saxagliptin
(BMS-477118) in combination with Metformin in subjects with
type 2 diabetes who have inadequate glycemic control on
metformin alone
PI: William Miser, MD
Multicenter, randomized, double-blind study to compare the
effects of 24 weeks of treatment with LAF237 (50 mg qd, 50
mg bid or 100 mg qd) to placebo in drug naГЇve patients with
type 2 diabetes
PI: William Miser, MD
Double-Blind, randomized, controlled, multicenter study to
evaluate the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a refrigerator-stable formulation of Zoster Vaccine Live (Oka/Merck)
PI: William Miser, MD
Six-week, multicenter, randomized, parallel-group treatment
regimen study to evaluate the efficacy of initial high dose valsartan monotherapy (160 mg) or combination therapy (valsartan + hydrochlorothiazide 160/12.5 mg)
PI: Patrick Fahey, MD
DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
A CHF trial investigating outcomes of exercise (HF-ACTION)
PI: William Abraham, MD
Chronicle implantable cardioverter defibrillator (Reduce-HF)
PI: Garrie Haas, MD
Hemodynamically guided home self-therapy in severe heart
failure patients (Homeostasis II)
PI: Garrie Haas, MD
The role of diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea in the
acute exacerbation of heart failure
PI: Rami Khyat, MD
Multicenter automatic defibrillator implantation trial II
(MadditII)
PI: Charles Love, MD
Trial to assess chelation therapy (TACT)
PI: Raymond Magorien, MD
Reduction of infarct expansion and ventricular remodeling
with Erythropoietin after acute MI (REVEAL)
PI: Subha Raman, MD
Division of Digestive Health
Phase 1B pilot study evaluating oral administration of freezedried black raspberries in patients with Barrett esophagus
PI: Gary Stoner, PhD; Co-PI: John Fromkes, MD
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Group study comparing the efficacy and safety of intravenous
zoledronic acid, 5 mg once yearly, and oral risedronate, 5 mg
daily, in the prevention and treatment of corticosteroidinduced osteoporosis
PI: Rebecca Jackson, MD
Clinical center for clinical trials and observational study of the
Women’s Health Initiative
PI: Rebecca Jackson, MD
Protein kinase a and its role as a mediator of both nf1- and
nf2-associated schwann cell tumorigenesis
PI: Lawrence Kirschner, MD, PhD
Center for stress and wound healing - core D: Endocrinology
core.
PI: William Malarkey, MD
Prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus-clinical center network
PI: Kwame Osei, MD
BARI II: Revascularization and glycemic control in NIDDM
PI: Kwame Osei, MD
Exenatide in islet cell transplantation in non-human primate
model
PI: Kwame Osei, MD
122 Ohio State University Medical Center
Division of General Internal Medicine
Division of Immunology
A phase I/II open label, dose-escalation trial to explore the
safety and efficacy of ICL670 in patients with iron overload
resulting from hereditary hemochromatosis
PI: Mark Wurster, MD
A randomized, phase III, controlled, double-blind, parallel
group, multicenter study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of
rituximab in combination with methotrexate (mtx) compared
to mtx alone in methotrexate-naive patients with active
rheumatoid arthritis
Co-PIs: Ronald Whisler, MD, & Kevin Hackshaw, MD
Added effect of home blood pressure monitors in indigent
adults
PI: Robert Murden, MD
Warfain therapy using computer-assisted guidance
PI: Harrison Weed, MD
Division of Hematology and Oncology
Phase II study of efficacy and tolerability of GW572016 in
patients with advanced hepatocellular and biliary carcinomas
PI: Tony Bekaii-Saab, MD
Phase II CRC study of flavopiridol administered as 30-minute
loading dose followed by four-hour continuous infusion in
patients with previously treated B-cell chronic lymphocytic
leukemia (CLL) or prolymphocytic leukemia arising from CLL
PI: John Byrd, MD
Phase I study of decitabine in combination with valproic acid
in patients with selected hematologic malignancies
PI: Guido Marcucci, MD
Abatacept in rheumatoid arthritis
PI: Kevin Hackshaw, MD
Humira efficacy response optimization study in subjects with
active rheumatoid arthritis
PI: Kevin Hackshaw, MD
Efficacy and safety of GW406381, 5 mg, 10 mg, 25 mg and 50
mg administered orally once daily in adults with rheumatoid
arthritis
PI: Kevin Hackshaw, MD
Division of Infectious Diseases
Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Unit
PI: Susan Koletar, MD
Family-centered, community-based, coordinated HIV care program (FACES)
PI: Susan Koletar, MD
Phase I-II study of inhaled doxorubicin (doxorubicin HCl
inhalation solution, resmycin) plus IV docetaxel and cisplatin
in patients with locally advanced or metastatic unresectable
non-small cell lung cancer
PI: Gregory Otterson, MD
Phase II, dose-escalating, placebo-controlled, double-blind
parallel group study in HIV treatment-experiences in patients
to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of PA103001-04
PI: Susan Koletar, MD
Phase II study of histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA (vorinostat) in patients with metastatic thyroid carcinoma
PI: Manisha Shah, MD
A phase III, randomized, double-blind comparative study of
micafungin
PI: Julie Mangino, MD
Division of Human Genetics
AIDS Education and Training Center
PI: Michael Para, MD
Frequency and clinical spectrum of germline PTEN mutations
in a population-based series of incident breast cancer cases in
central Ohio
PI: Charles Shapiro, MD
Dose optimization trial of three doses of tipranvir boosted
with low-dose ritonavir in multiple antiretroviral drug-experienced subjects
PI: Michael Para, MD
Endocrine Neoplasia Repository
PI: Richard Kloos, MD
Vicriviroc (SCH417690) in combination treatment with optimized ART regimen in experienced subjects
PI: Michael Para, MD
The Columbus-area HNPCC (hereditary nonpolyposis colon
cancer) study
PI: Albert de la Chapelle, MD, PhD
Characterization of mutations in the PMS2 gene in samples
from the Human Cancer Genetics Sample Bank
PI: Albert de la Chapelle, MD, PhD
2007 Research Report 123
Division of Nephrology
African-American study of kidney disease and hypertension
(AASK) cohort study (2002-2007)
PI: Lee Hebert, MD
Prospective, multinational, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, active-controlled trial to compare the effects of lotrel
(amlodipine/benazepril) to benazepril and hydrochlorothiazide combined on the reduction of cardiovascular morbidity
and mortality in patients with high-risk hypertension
PI: Anil Agarwal, MD
Trial to reduce cardiovascular events with AranespВ® (darbepoetin alfa) therapy
PI: Anil Agarwal, MD
Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-arm parallel-group, multicenter, multinational safety and efficacy trial of
100 mg and 300 mg of LJP 394 in systemic lupus
PI: Lee Hebert, MD
Erythematosus (SLE) patients with a history of renal disease
(2004-2007)
PI: Lee Hebert, MD
Prospective, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, parallel group, multicenter trial to assess the efficacy and safety of
mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in inducing response and maintaining remission in subjects with lupus nephritis (2005-2009)
PI: Brad Rovin, MD
Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of rituximab in
subjects with ISN/RPS class III or IV Lupus (2006-2008)
PI: Brad Rovin, MD
Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of XL784
administered orally to subjects with albuminuria due to diabetic nephropathy (2206-2007)
PI: Christopher Valentine, MD
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep
Medicine
Study of acid reflux and asthma (multicenter trial)
PI: John Mastronarde, MD
Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in college athletes
Co-PIs: Jonathan Parsons, MD, & John Mastronarde, MD
BMI and ICU outcomes
PI: James O’Brien, MD
ICU-acquired paresis and clinical outcomes (multicenter
consortium)
PI: Naeem Ali, MD
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY
Phase III randomized evaluation of convection enhanced delivery of IL 13-PEQQR compared to gliadel wafer with survival
endpoint in gliobastoma multiforme patients at first recurrence
PI: E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD
Phase 1B study of ADV-tk + Valacyclovir gene therapy in combination with standard radiation therapy for malignant gliomas
PI: E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD
Phase II trial involving patients with recurrent PCNSL (primary
central nervous system lymphoma) treated with
carboplatin/BBBD (blood brain barrier disruption) by adding
rituxan (rituximab), an anti-CD-20 antibody, to the treatment
regimen
PI: John McGregor, MD
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY
Clinical trial of IGF-1 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
PI: Steven Nash, MD
Normal aged brains for the neurodegenerative disease brain
tissue repository - Buckeye Brain Bank
PI: Douglas Scharre, MD
Proteonomics of HIV-associated emphysema
PI: Philip Diaz, MD
A multicenter, double-blind, randomized study comparing the
combined use of interferon beta 1-a and glatiramer acetate to
either agent alone in patients with relapsing remitting multiple
sclerosis (CombiRx-Phase III)
PI: Kottil Rammohan, MD
Long-term oxygen therapy trial in COPD (multicenter trial)
PI: Philip Diaz, MD
SPS3 secondary prevention of small subcortical strokes
PI: Andrew Slivka, MD
Performance of CPAP and bi-Flex in treating SDB in a heart
failure population
PI: Rami Khayat, MD
Phase II trial of dose intensive Temozolomide in combination
with Erlotinib (Tarceva) for patients with recurrent malignant
astrocytomas
PI: Herbert Newton, MD
124 Ohio State University Medical Center
Phase III, multicenter, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of the daily treatment with MPC7869 on measures of cognitive and global function in subjects
with mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer’s type
PI: Douglas Scharre, MD
DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
Multicenter prospective clinical study to evaluate the performance and clinical predictive value of the Invader HPV HR
molecular assay and Invader HPV 16/18 molecular assay for
the defection of human papillomavirus in cervical cytology
samples
PI: Deborah Bartholomew, MD
Phase II study of gemcitabine/carboplatin/bevacizumab in
platinum sensitive recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube or primary
peritoneal cancer patients
PI: Larry Copeland, MD
Manipulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to
regulate reproductive efficiency
PI: Douglas Danforth, PhD
STTARS trial – supplental seventeen alpha hydroxy progesterone to prevent preterm
birth in twins and triplets
PI: Jay Iams, MD
Phase 1b active immunotherapy with HER-2 multi-epitope vaccine
PI: Pravin Kaumaya, PhD
Open label extension study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of ranibizumab in subjects with CNV secondary to AMD
who have completed previous treatment with ranibizumab
PI: Robert Chambers, DO
Open label, multicenter trial of maintenance intravitreous
injections of Macugen given every six weeks for 48 weeks in
subjects with subfoveal neovascular AMD initially treated with
a modality resulting in maculopathy improvement
PI: Alan Letson, MD
A 48-month, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled clinical study to evaluate the effectiveness and
safety of oral Memantine in daily doses of 20 mg and 10 mg in
patients with chronic open-angle glaucoma
PI: Paul Weber, MD
Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS)
PI: Paul Weber, MD
A study to evaluate the clinical and microbial efficacy of 0.6%
ISV-403 compared to vehicle in the treatment of bacterial
conjunctivitis
PI: Thomas Mauger, MD
DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS
Double-blind, multicenter, phase III study comparing the efficacy and safety of OMS 103HP with vehicle in patients undergoing allograft ACL reconstruction
Co-PI: Christopher Kaeding, MD
A prospective, multicenter, open-label study to evaluate the
safety and efficacy of the 28-day oral contraceptive DR-1021
PI: Lisa Keder, MD
Double-blind, multicenter, phase III study comparing the efficacy and safety of OMS 103HP with vehicle in patients undergoing autograft ACL reconstruction
Co-PI: Christopher Kaeding, MD
A placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel
group, at-home exploratory study to evaluate the efficacy and
safety of intranasally administered PT-141 in subjects with
female sexual arousal disorder
PI: Jonathan Schaffir, MD
Fixation methods using alternative implants for the treatment
of hip fractures (FAITH)
PI: Laura Phieffer
Hip fracture evaluation with alternatives of total hip arthroplasty versus hemi-arthroplasty (HEALTH)
PI: Cornel Van Gorp, MD
DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY
Multicenter, randomized trial of lutein, zeaxanthin and w-3
fatty acids in age-related macular degeneration
PI: Robert Chambers, DO
Embolic events detected with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and transcranial doppler (TCD) during total knee
arthoplasty with use of RIA: a blinded, randomized controlled
clinical trial
PI: Cornel Van Gorp, MD
Peribulbar triamcinolone for diabetic macular edema
PI: Frederick Davidorf, MD
2007 Research Report 125
DEPARTMENT OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY – HEAD
AND NECK SURGERY
Optimal unilateral otosclerosis treatment: hearing aid versus
stapedectomy
PI: Edward Dodson, MD; Co-PI: D. Bradley Welling, MD, PhD
Trial of lymphatic mapping and sentinel node lymphadecectomy for patients with T1 or T2 clinical N0 oral cavity squamous
cell carcinoma
PI: David Schuller, MD
Incorporation of intensity modulated radiotherapy and submandibular gland transfers to minimize treatment morbidity
PI: David Schuller, MD
Phase Ib pilot study evaluating oral administration of freezedried black raspberries in presurgical patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma
PI: Amit Agrawal, MD
Pilot study evaluating long-term oral administration of freezedried black raspberries in postsurgical Appalachian oral cancer
patients (pending)
PI: Amit Agrawal, MD
DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY
Validation of semi-automated digital imaging algorithms for
ER/PR and Her-2 immunoreactivity in human breast cancer
PI: Sanford Barsky, MD
Correlative FISH studies for a multicenter, double blind, randomized, parallel-group study of the efficacy and safety of two
lenalidomide dose regimens in subjects with relapsed or
refractory B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia
PI: Nyla Heerema, PhD
Quantitative CD42 flow analysis for CLL and ALL clinical
CALGB studies
PI: Gerard Lozanski, MD
Validation of the VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0 assay (bDNA)
using the VERSANT 440 molecular system
PI: Preeti Pancholi, PhD
Clinical evaluation of the XPERT SA/MRSA assay
PI: Preeti Pancholi, PhD
Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii synergy testing
PI: Preeti Pancholi, PhD
Evaluation and validation of SELDI-based diagnostic test
PI: Haifeng Wu, MD
126 Ohio State University Medical Center
DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS
Trial of automated risk appraisal for adolescents (TARAA)
PI: Kelly Kelleher, MD
Postconcussive symptoms in children with mild head injury
PI: Keith Yeates, PhD
Phase I clinical trial of rAAV2.5-CMV-mini-dystrophin gene
vector in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
PI: Jerry Mendell, MD
The stress response system, health risk behaviors and
decision-making in adolescent girls
PI: Kathy Pajer, MD
Growth hormone in cystic fibrosis
PI: Dana Hardin, MD
Changes in lung structure and function in children with cystic
fibrosis
PI: Robert Castille, MD
DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY
Phase I study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous dose of CBR-2092 in healthy
volunteers
PI: Glen Apseloff, MD
Ascending single dose study of the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of NRI-022 administered orally to healthy postmenopausal women.
PI: Glen Apseloff, MD
Study in healthy male and female subjects to assess the pharmacokinetic characteristics and relative bioavailability of
hydromorphone following administration of 3 new palladone
melt extrusion multiparticulate formulations in the fed and
fasted state.
PI: Glen Apseloff, MD
Double-blind, randomized, single and multiple ascending dose
study to determine the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of GSK232802
PI: Glen Apseloff, MD
Phase I study of the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics
of a single intravenous dose of ETI-204 and its potential interaction with ciprofloxacin
PI: Glen Apseloff, MD
Phase 1, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study
to evaluate the safety and tolerability of a single
subfascial/intramuscular injection of ALGRX 4975 in healthy
male subjects
PI: Glen Apseloff, MD
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND
REHABILITATION
Efficacy of the individual placement and support (IPS) model
for clients with disability and substance use disorders
PI: John Corrigan, PhD
Effectiveness of a brief educational intervention for reducing
substance abuse after TBI
PI: John Corrigan, PhD, & Jennifer Bogner, PhD
Thrust and meniscal lesions in knee OA in the OAI
PI: Rebecca Jackson, MD
Multinational, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebocontrolled, parallel group study comparing the efficacy of
intravenous zoledronic acid in preventing secondary osteoporotic fractures after a hip fracture
PI: Velimir Matkovic, MD, PhD
Self-regulation in co-occurring TBI and substance abuse
PI: Jennifer Bogner, PhD
Phase III, randomized, six-month, double-blind trial in subjects
with bipolar 1 disorder to evaluate the continued safety and
maintenance of effect of ziprasidone plus a mood stabilizer
(vs. placebo plus a mood stabilizer) following a minimum of two
months of response to open-label treatment with both agents
PI: Stephen Pariser, MD
Open-label, dose-titration, long-term safety study to evaluate
concerta at doses of 36 mg., 54 mg., 73 mg., 90 mg. and 108
mg per day in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, protocol #12-304 (the “Study”)
PI: Dan Martin, MD
Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter
study to evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerablity of licarbazepine in the treatment of manic episodes of bipolar 1 disorder over six weeks
PI: Radu Saveanu, MD
52-week, open-label extension study to evaluate the efficacy,
safety and tolerablity of licarbazepine in the treatment of
manic episodes of bipolar 1 disorder
PI: Radu Saveanu, MD
Noradrenergic modulation of cognition
PI: Sharon McDowell, MD
DEPARTMENT OF RADIATION MEDICINE
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY AND OHIO
STATE UNIVERSITY HARDING HOSPITAL
Phase II study of submandibular salivary gland transfer to the
submental space prior to start of radiation treatment for prevention of radiation-induced xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients
PI: John Grecula, MD
Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group
study of the efficacy, safety and tolerability of XBD173 in
patients with generalized anxiety disorder
PI: Radu Saveanu, MD
Phase III, randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, forced-dose titration, safety and efficacy study of NRP104 in adulkts with ADHD (one year)
PI: Radu Saveanu, MD
Long-term, open-label, single-arm study of NRP104 30 mg.,
50 mg. or 70 mg. per day in adults with ADHD (one year)
PI: Radu Saveanu, MD
Four-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial
evaluating the efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of flexible
doses of oral ziprasidone in children and adolescents with
bipolar 1 disorder (manic or mixed)
PI: Lacramioara Spetie, MD
26-week, open-label extension study evaluating the safety and
tolerability of flexible doses of oral ziprasidone in children and
adolescents with bibolar 1 disorder (manic or mixed)
PI: Lacramioara Spetie, MD
Phase II randomized trial of surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy plus 225 (cetuximab) for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck
PI: John Grecula, MD
Phase II/III randomized trial of two doses (phase III standard
vs. high) and two high-dose schedules (phase II-once vs. twice
daily) for delivering prophylactic cranial irradiation for patients
with limited disease small cell lung cancer
PI: John Grecula, MD
Phase II trial of motexafin gadolinium with whole brain radiation therapy followed by stereotactic radiosurgery boost in the
treatment of patients with brain metastases
PI: John Grecula, MD
Phase III randomized, open-labeled, comparative study of
standard whole brain radiation therapy with supplemental
oxygen, with or without concurrent RSR13 (efaproxiral), in
women with brain metastases from breast cancer
PI: John Grecula, MD
2007 Research Report 127
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY
Aside from many clinical trials within the Department,
Radiology supports a number of trials outside the
Department, including National Cancer Institute phase I and
II studies. Radiology’s Imaging Research Division has been
instrumental in researching contrast agents for patient care.
The Division is a core research lab for Novartis
Pharmaceuticals Corporation, the Cancer and Leukemia
Group B (CALGB) and others.
Development of an integrated dynamic breast imaging system
for the early detection of breast cancer
PI: Stephen Povoski, MD
Analysis of a novel strategy which suppresses aggressive
(CD4-independent) CD8+ T cell-initiated hepatocyte rejection
PI: Ginny Bumgardner, MD, PhD
DEPARTMENT OF UROLOGY
PI: Michael Knopp, MD, PhD
In regard to the CALGB, its “impact” in obtaining further outside funding has exceeded initial expectations of $500,000
to $800,000. Clinical trials in conjunction with Novartis
Pharmaceuticals Corporation total more than $1 million in
budgeted research. They support clinical studies, education
and training of post-docs and graduate research associates.
The Department’s imaging research team, led by Michael
Knopp, MD, PhD, will build on the work of the Wright Center
and Imaging Core Lab to expand services to Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center as part of the Imaging Response
Assessment Team (IRAT) award. IRAT provides resources for
advanced imaging response assessments of in-house trials. It
also supports investigator-initiated multicenter trials.
Neuroendocrine studies in intestitial cystitis
PI: Jason Gilleran, MD
A phase II trial combining tomato and soy products for men
with recurring prostate cancer and rising prostate specific
antigen.
PI: Robert Bahnson, MD
SCHOOL OF ALLIED MEDICAL PROFESSIONS
(Two clinical trials were completed in 2006 as no-cost extensions. Both were multi-institutional and NIH-funded, focusing
on stroke recovery.)
The Constraint Induced Therapy Evaluation
Site PI: Deborah Nichols-Larsen, PhD
DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY
Prevention of internal hernias during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y
gastric bypass with bioabsorbable Seamguard material
PI: Dean Mikami, MD
Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging,
multicenter study to evaluate the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular effects of MC-1 in patients undergoing high-risk
coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery
PI: Benjamin Sun, MD
Comparison of primary patency between Gore-Tex Propaten
vascular grafts and thin walled Gore-Tex stretch vascular
grafts
PI: Patrick Vaccaro, MD
Phase I trial of IL-21 in combination with weekly paclitaxel and
trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive malignancies
PI: William Carson, III, MD
128 Ohio State University Medical Center
Motor map plasticity in constraint therapy for stroke
Site PI: Deborah Nichols-Larsen, PhD
Here are some of the most significant current
clinical trials as reported by centers and institutes at Ohio State:
COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER
Phase II randomized trial of sequentially administered CPT-11
and mitomycin C in patients with advanced esophageal and
stomach cancer
PI: Miguel Villalona, MD
Phase III study of daunorubicin and cytarabine +/- G3139
(Genasense, Oblimersen Sodium, NSC # 683428, IND #
58842), a BCL2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide, in previously
untreated patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) >/=
60 years
PI: Guido Marcucci, MD
Dose-escalation study of flavopiridol (NSC 649890) administered as a 30-minute loading dose followed by a four-hour
infusion in patients with previously treated B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL)
PI: Thomas Lin, MD, PhD
Phase I study of decitabine in combination with valproic acid
in patients with selected hematologic malignancies
PI: Guido Marcucci, MD
Phase II study of efficacy and tolerability of GW572016 in
patients with advanced hepatocellular and biliary carcinomas
PI: Tony Bekaii-Saab, MD
Phase II study of bevacizumab and interferon-alpha-2b in
metastatic malignant melanoma
PI: William Carson III, MD
CENTER FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY
Novel repair techniques of gastrointestinal perforations
PI: Jeffrey Hazey, MD
Transgastric bacterial contamination
PI: Jeffrey Hazey, MD
Diagnostic translumenal endoscopic peritoneoscopy
PI: Jeffrey Hazey, MD
The evaluation of the Sightline ColonoSight System
PIs: W. Scott Melvin, MD; Dean Mikami, MD
Transgastric bacterial contamination
PI: W. Scott Melvin, MD
DOROTHY M. DAVIS HEART AND LUNG
RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Prevention of internal hernias during laparoscopic roux-en-y
gastric bypass with bioabsorable SEAMGUARD material
(BSG)
PI: Dean Mikami, MD
CHF trial investigating outcomes of exercise
PI: William Abraham, MD
Lap-band adjustable gastric banding system: a post-market
study proposal
PI: Bradey Needleman, MD
Chronicle implantable cardioverter defibrillator (Reduce-HF)
PI: Garrie Haas, MD
Hemodynamically guided home self-therapy in severe heart
failure patients (Homeostasis II)
PI: Garrie Haas, MD
Reduction of infarct expansion and ventricular remodeling
with Erythropoietin after acute MI (REVEAL)
PI: Subha Raman, MD
Study of acid reflux and asthma (multi-center trial)
PI: John Mastronarde, MD
Proteonomics of HIV-associated emphysema
PI: Philip Diaz, MD
Laparoscopic gastric bypass (EEA-LGB): a prospective randomized comparison of the 3.5 mm vs. 4.8 mm circular stapler for creation of the gastrojejunostomy in prevention of staple line hemorrhage during laparoscopic gastric bypass
PI: Bradley Needleman, MD
THE NISONGER CENTER FOR MENTAL RETARDATION AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled,
parallel-group study with three fixed doses of Aripiprazole in
the treatment of children and adolescents with autistic
disorder
PI: Michael Aman, PhD
Long-term oxygen therapy trial in COPD (multicenter trial)
PI: Philip Diaz, MD
Performance of CPAP and bi-Flex in treating SDB in a heart
failure population
PI: Rami Khayat, MD
2007 Research Report 129
DARDINGER NEURO-ONCOLOGY CENTER
Phase III randomized evaluation of convection enhanced delivery of IL 13-PEQQR compared to gliadel wafer with survival
endpoint in gliobastoma multiforme patients at first recurrence
PI: E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD
Phase Ib study of ADV-tk + Valacyclovir gene therapy in combination with standard radiation therapy for malignant gliomas
PI: E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD
Phase II trial involving patients with recurrent
primary central nervous system lymphoma treated with
carboplatin/blood brain barrier disruption, by adding Rituxan
(Rituximab), an anti-CD-20 antibody, to the treatment
regimen
PI: John McGregor, MD
Phase I/II study of intra-arterial carboplatin and oral temodar
for the treatment of metastatic brain tumors
PI: Herbert Newton, MD
Phase II trial of continuous dose temozolomide in patients
with newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglioma and mixed
oligoastrocytoma
PI (local): Herbert Newton, MD
130 Ohio State University Medical Center
Phase V gliasite radiation therapy system registry protocol for
the treatment of resectable malignant brain tumors
PI (local): Herbert Newton, MD
Phase III randomized, double-blind study comparing human
corticotropin-releasing factor (hCRF) to dexamethasone for
control of symptoms associated with peritumoral brain edema
in patients with primary malignant glioma
PI (local): Herbert Newton, MD
Phase III randomized, double-blind, dexamethasone-sparing
study comparing human corticotropin-releasing factor (hCRF)
to placebo for control of symptoms associated with peritumoral brain edema in patients with malignant brain tumor who
require chronic administration of high-dose dexamethasone
PI (local): Herbert Newton, MD
Open-label, extended-use study of human corticotropinreleasing factor (hCRF) intended for patients who participate
in the dexamethasone-sparing studies NTI 0302 or NTI 0303
PI (local): Herbert Newton, MD
Faculty Serving on NATIONAL STUDY SECTIONS
AND REVIEW PANELS
Ohio State Medical Expertise Tapped for Service
2007 Research Report 131
Many Ohio State University faculty members have been
invited to serve on National Institutes of Health (NIH) study
sections or national-level grant-review panels in the medical
sciences. Here is a listing:
Yong Xia, MD - Grant Reviewer
• American Heart Association
• American Diabetes Association
Jay Zweier, MD - Grant Reviewer
• NIH Study Section – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
DAVIS HEART AND LUNG RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(DHLRI)
Rita Alevriadou, PhD (see Internal Medicine – Cardiovascular
Medicine)
• NIH, NHLBI (National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) BTSS (Bioengineering, Technology and Surgical Sciences) –
Member
Estelle Cormet-Boyaka, PhD
• USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) National
Research Initiative – Ad Hoc Reviewer
Elliott Crouser, MD – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
• Burroughs Wellcome Foundation
• American Lung Association (Ohio Chapter)
• Society of Critical Care Medicine, Vision Grants
Sandor Gyorke, PhD (see Physiology & Cell Biology) – Ad Hoc
Grant Reviewer
• Electrical Signaling, Ion Transport Study Section
• NIH, CVA (Cardiovascular) Study Section
• NIH, NHLBI Study Section
Periannan Kuppusamy, PhD - Grant Reviewer
• NIH, Division of Research Resources Study Section
• NIH/NCI (National Cancer Institute) Study Section
• NIH, Reparative Medicine Study Section
• NIBIB (National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and
Bioengineering) Study Section
Clay Marsh, MD – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
• NIH, NHLBI, LCMI (Lung Cellular, Molecular and
Immunology) Study Section – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
• NIH, NHLBI, LIRR (Lung Injury, Repair and Remodeling) study
section – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
• NIH, NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious
Diseases), CORT (Center of Research Translation) review
panel – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
• NIH, NHLBI, P01 Review Panel
• Sarnoff Foundation for Cardiovascular Sciences
John Mastronarde, MD - Program Grant Reviewer for Clinical
Research Centers
• Wellcome Trust (UK)
Mark Wewers, MD - Grant Reviewer
• NIH, LCMI (Lung Cellular and Molecular Immunobiology)
study section – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
• NIH, NIGMS, Glue Grant Review Committee
• British Lung Foundation – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
• Alpha-1 Foundation, Grants Advisory Committee
132 Ohio State University Medical Center
INSTITUTE FOR BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE
RESEARCH (IBMR)
Charles Emery, PhD
• NIH Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel:
Risk, Prevention & Health Behavior Integrated Review Group
– Chair
• Scientific Advisory Council, American Association of
Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation
William Malarkey, MD
• National Academy of Science - Institute of Medicine Panel
on Stress Gulf Wars and Health Outcomes
Virginia Sanders, PhD
• NIH - ZRG1-F07 Review Panel for Pre- and Post-Doctoral
Fellowships and AREA grants – Member
• NIH - IMM-B (03) – Special Emphasis Panel – Ad Hoc
Committee
• NIH - NINDS Training grant (T32) Review Panel – Ad Hoc
Committee
Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD
• Ad Hoc NIA Panel for RFP on aging and inflammation
Randy Nelson, PhD
• Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council – Ad
Hoc Member
• NIH Chronic Fatigue Syndrome – Ad Hoc Member
• NINDS Interdisciplinary Center Core (P-30)/Neuroscience
Blueprint – Regular Member
• United States - Israel Binational Science Foundation – Ad
Hoc Member
Ning Quan, PhD
• Center for Scientific Review – Neuroendocrinology,
Neuroimmunology and Behavior Study Section – Permanent
Member
Ronald Glaser, PhD
• Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Military Research
• President – Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research,
Institute of Medicine Committee
• Member of National Space Biomedical Research Institute
(NSBRI), Immunology, Infection and Hematology Team,
Houston, Texas
NISONGER CENTER
L. Eugene Arnold, MD
• NIH Review Committee - Center Grant, and NIMH (National
Institute of Mental Health) Data and Safety Monitoring
Board – Ad Hoc Committee
INTERNAL MEDICINE
Cardiovascular Medicine
B. Rita Alevriadou, PhD
• NIH, National Heart, Lung and Blood, BTSS (Bioengineering,
Technology and Surgical Sciences) – Regular Reviewer
Subha Raman, MD, MS
• NIH, Grant Reviewer: Member of Special Emphasis Panel of
the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney
Diseases ZDK1 GRB-7 (01) – Ad Hoc Reviewer
• NIH NIDDK Grant Reviewer: PAR-04-065 – Research Grants
for Clinical Studies of Kidney Diseases – Ad Hoc Reviewer
• NIH NIDDK Grant Reviewer: Review of Revised Applications
for PAR-04-065 – Ad Hoc Reviewer
Sanjay Rajagopalan, MD
• NIH, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: (CCIS)
Clinical Cardiovascular and Integrative Sciences –
Permanent Member
• Special Emphasis Panel National Institute of Environmental
Sciences, Particle Center Grants Review Panel – Ad Hoc
Member
• Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute (FAMRI), Grants
Review – Panel Member
• American College of Cardiology Young Investigator Awards
Selection Panel – Permanent Member
Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism
Rebecca Jackson, MD
• NIH, Osteoarthritis Initiative Steering Committee
• NIH, Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), Case-Control
Analyte Working Group - Chair
• NIH, Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), Executive Committee
– Vice Chair
• NIH, WHI Executive Committee (MW PI Chair)
• NIH, WHI, Calcium and Vitamin D Committee, Co-Chair
Richard Kloos, MD
• Panel Member to develop ATA Guidelines for the
Management of Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid
Cancer
• ATA Clinical Affairs Committee Member
William Malarkey, MD
• NIH, CCAM (National Center for Complementary and
Alternative Medicine) – Review of Strategic Plan
• National Academy of Sciences – Institute of Medicine
Committee on Stress, Gulf War and Health
Kwame Osei, MD
• NIH, Scientific Study Section, Metabolism Subcommittee B
• National Medical Association of Black Physicians,
Endocrinology Section – Chair
• American Federation of Clinical Research, Endocrinology
Section – Chair
• International Society of Hypertension in Blacks, Obesity and
Metabolism Section – Chair
Matthew Ringel, MD
• ATA (American Thyroid Association) Executive Council
Member
• ATA Research Committee
• ATA Member Executive Steering Committee for Clinical
Research in Thyroid Cancer
• National Advisory Board for ThyCa, Thyroid Cancer
Survivors Organization
• Endocrine Society Membership Committee
Dara Schuster, MD
• NIH Loan Repayment Application Program – Ad Hoc
Reviewer
General Internal Medicine
Catherine Lucey, MD
• American Board of Internal Medicine Board of Directors,
Reviewer
• National ACP Associates Scientific Competition, Reviewer
Hematology & Oncology
Clara D. Bloomfield, MD
• CALBG (Cancer and Leukemia Group B), Correlative
Sciences Committee Member
• CALGB Board of Directors
• CALBG Leukemia Core Committee Member
• CALGB Nominating Committee for CALGB Group Statistician
Chair
John Byrd MD
• NCI (National Cancer Institute), RAID Grant Program – Ad
Hoc Reviewer
• CALGB Clinical Research & Jr. Faculty Awards Program
Review Committee
• CALGB Lymphoma Committee Member
• CALGB Faculty and Young Investigator Grants Review
Committee
• CALGB Young Investigator Grants Review Committee
• CALGB Leukemia Correlative Science Committee – ViceChair
• CALGB Leukemia Committee – Member
2007 Research Report 133
• NCI (National Cancer Institute) Subcommittee H-Clinical
Groups, – Member
• NCI Loan Repayment Special Interest Panel – Ad Hoc
Reviewer
Michael Caligiuri, MD
• NCI Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences –
Member
• NCI Adolescent & Young Adult Oncology Progress Review
Group – Co-Chair
• NCI Translational Research Working Group – Member
• CALGB Board of Directors – Member
• CALGB Leukemia Correlative Science – Committee Chair
Steven Clinton, MD, PhD
• CALGB Cancer Control and Health Outcomes Core –
Committee Member
• CALGB Prevention Subcommittee – Member
• CALGB GU Committee – Liaison
• National Institutes of Health – National Cancer Institute,
Oncological Sciences Integrated Review Group, Center for
Scientific Review, Chemoprevention and Dietary Prevention
Study Section – Member
Steven Devine, MD
• CALGB Transplant Committee – Member
Richard Love, MD
• National Institute of Oncology, International Advisory
Committee, Rabat, Morocco – Chair
Guido Marcucci, MD
• National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences – Special
Emphasis Panel Member
• NCI PO1 Clinical SEP Review Panel
• NCI Tumor Microenvironment Consortium – Grant
Application Reviewer
Charles Shapiro, MD
• CALGB Symptom Intervention Committee – Chair
• CALGB Breast Core Committee – Cadre Member
Miguel Villalona, MD
• NCI Investigational Drug Steering Committee – Member
• NCI Clinical Trial Design Task Force – Member
• NCI Conflict of Interest Task Force – Member
• NIH, NIAID Study Section, Host Interactions with Bacterial
Pathogens – Ad Hoc Reviewer
• Executive Advisory and Review Board, Great Lakes Regional
Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious
Diseases Research
Joanne Turner, PhD
• NIH NIA (National Institute on Aging) Special Emphasis
Panel ZAG1 ZIJ-5: Aging and Inflammation – Ad Hoc
Reviewer
• NIH NIA Cellular Mechanisms in Aging and Development
• (CMAD) – Ad Hoc Reviewer
John Gunn, PhD
• NIH, NIAID Bacterial Pathogenesis Study Section –
Permanent Member
Nephrology
Kevin Hackshaw, MD
• NIH, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Special Emphasis Panel –
Ad-Hoc Reviewer
Lee Hebert, MD
• NIH DSMB (Data and Safety Monitoring Board) for
Autoimmune Disease Trials – Permanent Reviewer
• Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) –
Permanent Reviewer
Brad Rovin, MD
• NIDDK (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases) Study Sections – Ad Hoc Reviewer
Anil Agarwal, MD
• American Society of Nephrology/NephSap Review Board
• NIH Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) for
Autoimmune Disease Trials – Permanent Reviewer
ANESTHESIOLOGY
Fedias Christofi, PhD
• VA Research and Development Awards CDA02 – Grant
Reviewer
Infectious Diseases
BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS
Larry Schlesinger, MD
• Chair, NIH, NIAID Study Section, ZAI1 DDS-M (C2),
Tuberculosis Research Unit – Member
• NIH Study Section, ZRG1 F13 20 L, Infectious Diseases and
Microbiology
Joel Saltz, MD, PhD
• National Library of Medicine (BLIRC) Biomedical Library and
Informatics Review Committee
134 Ohio State University Medical Center
EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Mark Angelos, MD
• NIH, Myocardial Ischemia and Metabolism Study Section –
Temporary Member
• Special Emphasis Panel ZRG1 SSS-W (10) Cardiovascular
Devices – Permanent Member
Michael Sayre, MD
• Special Emphasis Panel ZRG1 SSS-W (10) Cardiovascular
Devices – Temporary Member
FAMILY MEDICINE
Tom Best, MD, PhD
• Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Review Panel
• U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine,
Scientific Review Panel
Larry Gabel, PhD
• Department of Health and Human Services Standing Grant
Peer Review Panel - American Academy of Family Physicians
Foundation Research Grant – Peer Review Panel
W. Fred Miser, MD
• Department of Health and Human Services Standing Grant
Peer Review Panel - American Academy of Family Physicians
Foundation Research Grant – Peer Review Panel
Randell Wexler, MD, MPH, FAAFP
• Department of Health and Human Services Standing Grant
Peer Review Panel - American Academy of Family Physicians
Foundation Research Grant – Peer Review Panel
MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOCHEMISTRY
Charles Bell, PhD
• Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program in
Breast Cancer - Concept/Cell Biology I Panel
• U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
National Review Panel Department of Defense National
Review Panel
Arthur Burghes, PhD
• NIH Reviewer – Ad Hoc Member
• ALS Grant – Research Reviewer
Tsonwin Hai, PhD
• NIH Tumor Cell Biology Study Section – Permanent Member
• NIH Cellular Aspect of Diabetes and Obesity Study Section –
Ad Hoc Member
Jeff Kuret, PhD
• Alzheimer’s Association, Initial Review Board of the Medical
and Scientific Advisory Council, Research Grant Program
• NIH Center for Scientific Review, Synapses, Cytoskeleton and
Trafficking (SYN) Study Section – Ad Hoc Member
Jiyan Ma, PhD
• NIH Special Emphasis Panel, ZRG1 IDM-B (90) Studies of
Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy – Ad Hoc
Reviewer
Kamal Mehta, PhD
• NIH, Atherosclerosis and Inflammation of the Cardiovascular
System (AICS) Study Section – Permanent Member
Michael Ostrowski, PhD
• NCI Program Project Grant Reviews, Molecular and Cellular
Biology Programs – Ad Hoc Member
• NIH Skeletal Biology, Development and Disease (SBDD)
Study Section – Permanent Member
Mark Parthun, PhD
• NIH, Molecular Genetics A Study Section – Permanent
Member
• National Science Foundation – Ad Hoc Reviewer
MOLECULAR VIROLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND
MEDICAL GENETICS
Denis Guttridge, PhD
• NIH/NIAMS SMEP Study Section (Ad Hoc)
• DOD, Breast Cancer Research Program/Molecular Biology
and Genetics Panel
• NIH/NINDS ZNS1 SRB-E
• NIH/NIAMS SMEP Study Section (Ad Hoc)
Tim Hui-Ming Huang, PhD
• Reviewer, National Research Program for Genomic Medicine,
Taiwan
• Reviewer, NIH Study Section – Cancer Genetics
• Site Visit, NCI Intramural Program, Laboratory of Population
Genetics
• Reviewer, NIH Study Section – Cancer Genetics
• Reviewer, NIH Study Section – Cancer Genetics
Ramana Davuluri, PhD
• Ad Hoc Reviewer, NIH Study Section – ZCA1
• Ad Hoc Reviewer, National Science Foundation – DBI: Plant
Genome Research
• Program Committee Member, Interface 2007: the 39th
Symposium on the Interface of Statistics, Computing
Science and Applications, May 23-27, Philadelphia.
Organized the invited session entitled “Integrative Systems
Biology in Cancer Research”
John Gunn, PhD
• NIAID BACP Study Section, Member
• NIAID BACP-B (09) F Special Emphasis Panel, Chair
2007 Research Report 135
Michael Freitas, PhD
• NIH-NCI, Innovative Technologies for Molecular Analysis of
Cancer
• NIH-NCI, Application of Emerging Technologies for Cancer
Research
• NIH-NCI, Exfoliated Cells and Circulating DNA in Cancer
Detection and Diagnosis
• NIH, Biological Chemistry and Macromolecular Biophysics
Small Business Activities [SBIR/STTR] Special Emphasis
Panel
• NIH-NCI, Innovations in Cancer Sample Preparation
Christoph Plass, PhD
• Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Career Development Grants
Review
Pearlly Yan, PhD
• DOD Breast Cancer Research Program Synergistic Idea
Award (Ad Hoc)
Gustavo Leone, PhD
• AACR Program Committee – Member of Cell Cycle
Subcommittee of the Cellular and Molecular Biology Section
• American Cancer Society, Cell Cycle & Growth Control Peer
Review Committee
Caroline Whitacre, PhD
• NIH - Hypersensitivity, Autoimmunity and ImmuneMediated Diseases Study Section
Virginia Sanders, PhD
• Member, Fellowship Study Section, NIH (ZRG1 F07)
• Special Emphasis Panel, ZRG1 IMM B (03)
• Special Emphasis Panel/Scientific Review Group, ZNS1 SRBM (39)
Amy Lovett-Racke, PhD
• NINDS "Clinical Neuroimmunology and Brain Tumor" study
section
Joanna Groden, PhD
• Cancer Genetics Study Section – Chair
• NIH Cancer Genetics Study Section – Chair
• DOD Ovarian Cancer Review Panel for Concept Awards
• DOD Breast Cancer Review Panel for Career Development
• DOE Committee of Visitors, Biological Sciences Review Panel
Deborah Parris, PhD
• Florida Biomedical Sciences Grant Review
• NIH - Postdoctoral Fellowship Study Section, Genomes and
Genomics, Ad Hoc
NEUROLOGY
John Kissel, MD
• American Academy of Neurology, Committee of Sections,
Executive Committee – Member
• CDC Care Considerations – Member
136 Ohio State University Medical Center
• NIH/FDA Symposium on SMA – Chair
• MDA Medical Advisory/Grant Review Panel
NEUROSCIENCE
Christine Beattie, PhD
• NIH, NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders
and Stroke) ZNS1 SRB-P – Ad Hoc Member
• NSF – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
Michael Beattie, PhD
• NIH ZRG1 BDCN-L (50)(R) Study Section – Ad Hoc Member
R. Thomas Boyd, PhD
• NIH, ZRG 1, FO3B – Study Section Member
Anthony Brown, PhD
• NIH, Study Section – Ad Hoc Member
• NSF (National Science Foundation) – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
Richard Burry, PhD
• NIH, CSR ZRG1 CDF-4 S10, SIG Microscopes – Study Section
Member
Jacqueline Bresnahan, PhD
• NIH Study Section – Ad Hoc Member
• Scientific Advisory Council, Christopher Reeve (Paralysis)
Foundation
Andrew Fischer, PhD
• NSF – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
Paul Henion, PhD
• NSF – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
• NIH, CSR DEV-2 Study Section – Ad Hoc Member
C. Glenn Lin, PhD
• Alzheimer’s Association Grant Review Committee
James Jontes, PhD
• NSF – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
Dana McTigue, PhD
• Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Brain
and Spinal Grant – Grant Reviewer
• NIH NSD-C (Neurological Sciences and Disorders – C) Grant
Reviewer – Ad Hoc Member
• Health Research Council of New Zealand – Grant Reviewer
John Oberdick, PhD
• NIH, NDPR (Neurodifferentiation, Plasticity & Regeneration)
Study Section Member
• MDCN-K 90 S, Special Emphasis Panel – Ad Hoc Member
• NSF – Ad Hoc Grant Reviewer
Karl Obrietan, PhD
• NIH Study Section – Ad Hoc Member
Michael Xi Zhu, PhD
• NIH Study Section ZRG1 MDCN-C – Ad Hoc Member
• NIH Study Section ZRG1 MDCN-B 02 – Ad Hoc Member
OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
Douglas Kniss, PhD
• NIH Pregnancy and Perinatology Study Section – Ad Hoc
Reviewer
OTOLARYNGOLOGY
D. Bradley Welling, MD, PhD
• Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program,
Department of Defense, Neurofibromatosis Research
Program – Ad Hoc Reviewer
James Lang, PhD
• NIH/NCI Special Emphasis Panel ZCA1 RTRB-A M2 – Ad
Hoc Reviewer
• NIH/NCI Special Emphasis Panel ZCA1 RTRB-A M1 – Ad
Hoc Reviewer
• NIH/NCI Special Emphasis Panel ZCA1 RTRB-A 01 – Ad Hoc
Reviewer
• NCI K99/R00 Review Committee – Ad Hoc Reviewer
• NIH National Center for Research Resources COBRE Awards
– Ad Hoc Reviewer
• NIH/NCI IRG Study Section NCI-F Institutional Training
Grant (T32) and “Pathway to Independence” K99/R00
Awards – Permanent Reviewer
Thomas Demaria, PhD
• NIH Auditory Systems (AUD) Study Section – Permanent
Member
PATHOLOGY
Sanford Barsky, MD
• California Breast Cancer Research Program – Regular Study
Section Member
• NIH, NCI – Ad Hoc Reviewer
• Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program –
Ad Hoc Reviewer
Tatiana Oberyszyn, PhD
• NIH/NCI Cancer Etiology Study Section – Permanent Member
PEDIATRICS
Rachel Altura, MD
• American Institute of Biological Sciences – Reviewer, Blood
and Cancer Panel for DoD (Department of Defense)
• American Institute of Biological Sciences – Reviewer,
Childhood Cancer Panel for DoD
John Barnard, MD
• Gastrointestinal Cell and Molecular Biology Study Section –
Permanent Member
Jeff Bartlett, MD
• NIH GTIE (Gene Therapy and Inborn Errors) Study Section –
Permanent Member
• ACGT (Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy) Review Panel –
Permanent Member
Carl Bates, MD
• NIH, Urologic and Kidney Development and Genitourinary
Diseases Study Section – Ad Hoc Reviewer
John Bauer, PhD
• NIH/NIHLBI, Cardiac Contractility and Heart Failure Study
Section – Regular Member
• NIH/NIHLBI, Metabolism and Myocardial Ischemia and
Metabolism Study Section – Ad Hoc Member
• American Heart Association, Committee 5B Study Section –
Regular Member
• National Heart Association Study Section – Regular Member
Michael Brady, MD
• American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious
Diseases (Red Book Committee)
John Campo, MD
• AACAP (American Academy of Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry) Grant Review Committee
Joan Durbin, MD, PhD
• Review Panel for the Virology B Study Section – Permanent
Member
Heithem El-Hodiri, PhD
• NIH, Special Emphasis Panel ZRG1 GGG-T52: Genomic and
Genetic Analysis in Xenopus
Ihuoma Eneli, MD, MS
• HRSA (Health Resources and Services Administration),
Innovative Approaches to Promoting Healthy Weight in
Women, Division of Independent Review – Ad Hoc Member
Vijay Pancholi, PhD
• Grant Agency of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech
Republic – Grant Reviewer
• European Research Area (ERA)-net PathoGenomics – Grant
Reviewer
Gerard Nuovo, MD
• NIH Study Section on HIV-1 Pathogenesis – Ad Hoc Reviewer
2007 Research Report 137
Timothy Feltes, MD
• NHLBI Pediatric Heart Disease Clinical Research Network –
Protocol Review Committee
Kim McBride, MD
• NIH, Clinical and Integrative Cardiovascular Sciences – Ad
Hoc Reviewer
William Gardner, PhD
• NIH Review Panel ZNS1 SRB-H 25 (Research on Research
Integrity Review) – Review Panel Chair
• NIMH Review Panel SNRS (Mental Health Services in NonStandard Settings) – Study Section Member
James Mulick, PhD
• Organization for Autism Research, Scientific Council –
Permanent Member
Judy Groner, MD
• NICHD (National Institute of Child Health and Human
Development) DC Initiative to Reduce Infant Mortality in
Minority Populations – Ad Hoc Grant Review
Thomas Gross, MD, PhD
• NIH, NAIAD - Immune Tolerance Network, EBV Review
Committee
Brett Hall, PhD
• Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs Breast
Cancer Con-CET-2 Panel (DoD Breast Cancer)
Gail Herman, MD, PhD
• NIH, Genetics of Health & Disease Study Section – Chair
Timothy Hoffman, MD
• NIH, Loan Repayment Program Pediatric and Clinical
Research Programs
• NIH, Pregnancy and Obesity Special Study Section
Sudarshan Jadcherla, MD, F.R.C.P.(I), DCH
• NIH, NIDDK, Study Section ZDK1-GRB8-M1, GI and
Nutrition Grants – Reviewer
Brian Kaspar, PhD
• Clinical Neuroplasticity and Neurotransplantation (CNNT) –
Ad Hoc Member
• International Motor Neuron Disease Association – Ad Hoc
Scientific Review Panel
• Kentucky Science and Technology State Foundation – Ad
Hoc Scientific Reviewer
Jiayuh Lin, PhD
• Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs
(CDMRP) Breast Cancer Research Program – Review
Committee (Ad Hoc)
Carlo diLorenzo, MD
• Thrasher Research Fund – Ad Hoc Reviewer
Joel Mayerson, MD
• National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Bone Cancer
National Committee, James Cancer Hospital Representative
• Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Bone
138 Ohio State University Medical Center
Robert Munson, PhD
• Canadian Institutes of Health Research – Ad Hoc Reviewer
• NIH, Vaccines Against Microbial Diseases (VMD) Study
Section – Ad Hoc Reviewer
• VA Merit Committee for Infectious Diseases-B – Ad Hoc
Reviewer
Leif Nelin, MD
• Cooperative Grants Program of the U.S. Civilian Research
and Development Foundation – Ad Hoc Scientific Reviewer
Stephen Qualman, MD
• Food and Drug Administration Center for Biologics
Evaluation and Research Office of Vaccines Research
• NIH, Review Site Visit, Laboratory of Immunobiochemistry,
Laboratory of Respiratory Viral Diseases
• NIH, NIDDK Special Emphasis Panel
Brady Reynolds, PhD
• NIH, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Imaging – Science
Track Award for Research Transition (I/START)
Steve Roach, MD
• Department of Defense Tuberous Sclerosis Complex
Research Program (TSCRP) FY 2007 Integration Panel –
Permanent Member
Phil Scribano, DO, MSCE
• Pediatric Emergency Medicine Collaborative Research
Committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics Scientific
Review Committee
Amanda Termuhlen, MD
• Coordinating Committee, ASBMT (American Society for
Blood and Marrow Transplantation), Pediatric Special
Interest Group, planning for ASBMT International Meeting
Veronica Vieland, PhD
• NIH, Center for Inherited Disease Research Access
Committee – Member
Christopher Walker, PhD
• NIH, Center for Scientific Review, Study Section Member,
Ancillary Studies for Clinical Trials
Keith Yeates, PhD, ABPP/CN
• Biobehavioral and Behavioral Sciences Subcommittee,
NICHD Initial Review Group – Permanent Member
• March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation – Special Reviewer
Chack-Yung Yu, D.Phil.
• NIH NIAMS (National Institute of Arthritis and
Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases) P30 Rheumatic
Disease Center Core Grants, ZAR1 EHB-D 01
• NIH NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious
Diseases), Special Emphasis Panel ZAI KS-I (M1) – Program
Grant (P01) Reviewer
• Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Candidate
for the Headship of the Department of Biology – External
Reviewer
Program Project Grant in Chronic DTH and IFN-Gamma in
Human Graft Arteriosclerosis
• NIH, NHLBI, Special Emphasis Panel, Boston Biomedical
Institute, Program Project Grant in Dynamics of the Vascular
Smooth Muscle Cytoskeleton – Member
• NIH/NHLBI, Atherosclerosis and Inflammation in the
Cardiovascular Sciences (AICS), NIH Study Section –
Permanent Member
Jackie Wood, PhD
• NIH Digestive Diseases Commission
PHARMACOLOGY
PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION
Laura Bohn, PhD
• NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse-NIDA-K Training and
Career Development Subcommittee – Permanent Member
• National Science Foundation, Signal Transduction and
Cellular Regulation Panel I: Apoptosis, G-Proteins & Kinases
– Permanent Member
• Burroughs-Wellcome Fund Grant Review (International; UK)
– Ad Hoc Reviewer
John Corrigan, PhD
• National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine’s
Committee on Traumatic Brain Injury – Member
Ernest Johnson, MD
• Warm Springs-Roosevelt Foundation – Permanent Member
Norton Neff, PhD
• NIH Study Section Special Emphasis Panel/Scientific Review
Group 01 ZAI1 BDP-A
• NIH Study Section Special Emphasis Panel/Scientific Review
Group 05 ZRG1 NCF-D
• Reviewer for Oak Ridge-Associated Universities
PSYCHIATRY
PHYSIOLOGY AND CELL BIOLOGY
L. Eugene Arnold, MD
• Loan Repayment Program Review Panel – Permanent
Member
• Special Emphasis Center Grant Application Review
Committee – Ad Hoc Member
Sandor Gyorke, PhD
• NIH NHLBI Member Special Review Committee
• Temporary Member, ESTA Study Section
Lyn Jakeman, PhD
• NINDS Specialized Neuroscience Research Program Review
Mary Fristad, PhD, ABPP
• NIH, NIMH, Special Emphasis Panel, IRG – Ad Hoc Member
Janice-Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD
• NIH, NIA Panel – Ad Hoc Reviewer
John Campo, MD
• Grants Oversight Committee for the Academy of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry
Sissy Jhiang, PhD
• NIH ICER Study Section
Beth Lee, PhD
• NIH Special Emphasis Panel on Bone Cell Biology, Skeletal
Biology Structure and Regeneration Study Section –
Permanent Member
Muthu Periasamy, PhD
• NIH, Cardiac Contracility, Hypertrophy and Heart Failure
Robert Stephens Jr., PhD
• NIH Somatosensory and Chemosensory Systems –
Permanent Member
Arthur Strauch, PhD
• National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes
of Health, Member Special Emphasis Panel, Yale University,
RADIOLOGY
Michael Knopp, MD, PhD
• ICMICS (In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center)
Study Section of the National Cancer Institute
Altaf Wani, PhD
• NIH NAEHS (National Advisory Environmental Health
Sciences) Council
Steven D’Ambrosio, PhD
• NIH, NIEHS Centers & Programs Review Committee – Ad
Hoc Member
2007 Research Report 139
Robert Snapka, PhD
• BMCT (Basic Mechanisms of Cancer Therapeutics) Study
Section – Ad Hoc Member
• NIH NINDS Roadmap HTS Assay Development – Permanent
Member
SCHOOL OF ALLIED MEDICAL PROFESSIONS
(SAMP)
Deborah Givens Heiss, DPT, PhD, OCS
• NIH MRS (Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Sciences) Study
Section – Invited Reviewer
• Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Research
Advisory Council, Toronto, Ontario, Canada – External Grant
Reviewer
D. Michele Basso, PT, EdD
• NIH Study Section, Brain Disorders and Clinical
Neuroscience Integrated Review Group – Ad Hoc Member
• Craig Neilsen Foundation – Grant Reviewer
Jane Case-Smith, EDD, OTR/L, FAOTA
• NIH Study Section Member, Motor Function, Speech and
Rehabilitation
SURGERY
Gail Besner, MD, Division of Pediatric Surgery
• NIH, Surgery, Anesthesiology and Trauma Study Section –
Permanent Member
Gayle Gordillo, MD, Division of Plastic Surgery
• Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation – Ad Hoc Member
• American Society of Plastic Surgery – Ad Hoc Member
Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, Division of Cardiothoracic
Surgery
• National VA Cardiovascular Review Section – Permanent
Member
Chandan Sen, PhD, Division of General and Gastrointestinal
Surgery
• SBTS-E Cardiovascular Devices Study Section – Ad Hoc
Member
• Surgery, Anesthesia and Trauma – Ad Hoc Member
• Vascular Cell Molecular Biology – Ad Hoc Member
Anne VanBuskirk, PhD, Division of Surgical Oncology
• American Heart Association Committee 4A
Microbiology/Immunology – Permanent Member
• American Society for Transplantation Grants/Awards
Committee – Permanent Member
• NIH/NIAID, Allergy Immunology, Transplantation Research
Committee – Ad Hoc Member
• Special Emphasis Panel on Innovative Grants in Immune
Tolerance – Ad Hoc Member
Lisa Yee, MD, Division of Surgical Oncology
• DOD BCRP Concept-Endocrinology – Ad Hoc Member
• Susan G. Komen Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship –
Permanent Member
Center for Molecular Neurobiology (CMN)
NIH Permanent Study Section Members
Ginny Bumgardner, MD, PhD, Division of Transplantation
• NIH, Special Emphasis Panel, Human Pancreatic Islet Cell
Resource Centers – Ad Hoc Member
• NIH, Transplantation, Tolerance and Tumor Immunology – Ad
Hoc Member
Tsonwin Hai, PhD (see Molecular & Cellular Biochemistry)
Jeff Kuret, PhD (see Molecular & Cellular Biochemistry)
Mark Seeger, PhD
Anthony Brown, PhD (see Neuroscience)
Charles Cook, MD, Division of Critical Care, Trauma and Burns
• NIH NIDCR (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial
Research) Special Emphasis Panel for PPG Review – Ad Hoc
Member
NIH Ad Hoc Reviewers
Christine Beattie, PhD (see Neuroscience)
Michael Zhu, PhD (see Neuroscience)
John Oberdick, PhD (see Neuroscience)
Paul Henion, PhD (see Neuroscience)
Anthony Young, PhD
Pedram Ghafourifar, PhD, Division of General Vascular
Surgery
• American Heart Association Peer-Review Committee –
Permanent Member
• Breast Cancer Foundation Review Panel – Ad Hoc Member
• Mitochondria and Neurodegeneration, Neurodegeneration
and Biology of Glia – Ad Hoc Member
• Neurodegeneration, Neuroinflammation, Oxidant Stress and
Mitochondria – Ad Hoc Member
140 Ohio State University Medical Center
NSF-Ad Hoc Reviewers
Paul Henion, PhD (see Neuroscience)
Harald Vaessin, PhD
Christine Beattie, PhD (see Neuroscience)
James Jontes, PhD (see Neurosciences)
Research Core Facilities
Ohio State University Medical Center offers more
than 20 core research laboratories for shared use by
health-sciences investigators. Clinical research faculty,
basic scientists and students all benefit from the
shared cost of these resources, and the research
environment at Ohio State benefits from the
economies of scale that enable timely acquisition
of new instrumentation and technologies.
2007 Research Report 141
Analytical Cytometry – This laboratory, directed by
Jeffrey Chalmers, PhD, is a joint venture between
Ohio State’s Comprehensive Cancer Center and the
Medical Center’s Davis Heart and Lung Research
Institute. It provides basic and clinical investigators
with flow cytometric hardware and software for cell
characterization and sorting. The laser-based technique is useful to quantitate intracellular and extracellular properties of cells, bacteria, chromosomes
and other biological particles.
http://heartlung.osu.edu/flowcytometry/index.cfm
Behavioral Measurement – This shared resource,
led by Barbara Andersen, PhD, assists in integrating
behavioral research into the broad research goals of
Ohio State’s Comprehensive Cancer Center. It also
provides researchers in cancer prevention and control with population-based data retrieval, consultation for patient accrual procedures and locations,
identification or adaptation of existing measures of
key behavioral constructs, and guidance with
behavioral data collection methodology and
personnel. http://www.behavioralm.osu.edu
Behavioral Phenotyping – This new facility in the
Biomedical Research Tower vivarium is led by Laura
Bohn, PhD, and Matthew During, MD, PhD. It offers
specialized equipment and collaborative expertise
for monitoring an array of behavioral responses. A
partial list of behaviors and monitoring equipment
includes a multifunction video system for digital
monitoring of operant and preference conditioning.
Monitoring of diurnal patterns, locomotion, feeding,
social interactions, learning and memory, anxiety
and depression is also available. Many of these
tasks can be accomplished through a newly purchased Clever Systems analysis suite. On-site training is available by appointment.
Biomedical Informatics – Computers play an everincreasing role in the analysis of biologically derived
data. Led by Joel Saltz, MD, PhD, the Biomedical
Informatics Core Laboratory applies distributed and
parallel computing techniques to data retrieval and
integration, imaging, simulation, medical informatics and computational biology. Its personnel also
develop middleware and optimizations to enable
142 Ohio State University Medical Center
Grid computing in the biological, medical and physical sciences. http://medicine.osu.edu/informatics/
Biostatistics Core – Led by Dave Jarjoura, PhD, this
resource helps researchers identify collaborators to
prepare grants, create and maintain databases, analyze data, develop methodologies and publish
results. It assists them in all aspects of grant proposal development, experimental design, sample
size determination, data management, statistical
analysis, development and application of statistical
methodologies, and manuscript preparation.
http://www-biostat.med.ohio-state.edu/
Campus Microscopy and Imaging Facility (CMIF) –
The Campus Microscopy and Imaging Facility
(CMIF), under director Richard Burry, PhD, serves
University faculty, staff and students as well as
researchers outside Ohio State. It offers a full range
of microscopes, and support instrumentation allows
cell and tissue preparation with immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, freeze-fracture, cryoultramicrotomy, scanning and transmission electron
microscopy. http://cmif.osu.edu
Center for Knowledge Management – Ohio State’s
Center for Knowledge Management (CKM), housed
in the John A. Prior Health Sciences Library, is one
of the nation’s most comprehensive repositories of
global biomedical knowledge and intellectual capital. The CKM provides cost-effective access to biomedical knowledge, identifies and makes available
knowledge and key research findings, expedites
packaging of information content as reusable and
sharable resources, facilitates understanding and
helps incorporate information resources into work
processes. The interim director for this resource is
Susan Kroll, MLS.
http://www.med.ohio-state.edu/knowledge/
Clinical Trials Office (CTO) – The CTO, under the
leadership of James Thomas, MD, PhD, facilitates
development and implementation of all Ohio State
University Comprehensive Cancer Center clinical
trials, including regulatory processing, subject
recruitment, data collection and protocol-management services. www.osuccc.osu/9178.cfm
The General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) program is funded by the National Center for Research
Resources in the National Institutes of Health. The
GCRC program provides indirect financial support
to principal investigators of components essential
to clinical research: hospitalization and ancillary
laboratory costs, and salaries of key personnel,
including nurses, research bionutritionists, administrators, core laboratory staff, biostatisticians and
computer personnel. The program enables flexibility
in the design, accessibility and scope of research.
This facilitates rapid initiation of novel protocols
and pilot studies. William Malarkey, MD, directs this
core. www.gcrc.osu.edu/
Microarray – The Microarray resource, led by
Chang-Gong Liu, PhD, offers genome-wide analysis
of multiple genes using Affymetrix GeneChips.
Services include mRNA transcriptional profiling,
microRNA/non-coding small RNA transcriptional
profiling, single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, genomic DNA gain/loss detection on BAC CGH
Array, microRNA genomic gain/loss on oligo CGH
array, consultation, RNA characterization, and
microarray processing and data analysis. A satellite
Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer
Center Affymetrix microarray facility is housed at
Columbus Children’s Research Institute.
www.dnaarrays.org
Laser Microdissection Pressure Catapulting
Molecular Analysis Facility – Led by Sashwati Roy,
PhD, this facility contains a robotized PALM
MicroLaser system containing PALM MicroBeam
and PALM RoboStage/RoboMover for high throughput sample collection. Procurement of another
device, specifically directed at community service, is
in process. The facility enables molecular analyses
of laser captured tissue material. Services include
standardization of novel techniques related to tissue
processing, staining, fixation and capture, with the
goal being to preserve nucleic acid and protein
integrity of the laser-captured tissue. Capture and
analysis of tissue down to the resolution of a single
cell population (cutting precision 0.6 micron) from
in vivo tissue sections are routinely performed. In
addition, the facility has developed a novel way to
rapidly identify and capture human blood vessels
from clinical samples in a manner that makes highdensity screening of the transcriptome possible.
MicroMD – A premier microfabrication facility for
developing bioMEMS devices (microelectromechanical systems), the Ohio MicroMD
Laboratory facilitates a broad range of research and
development activities and is the nation’s first technologically integrated facility dedicated to developing therapeutic applications for BioMEMS. This
core is led by Robert Davis, PhD.
www.micromd.ohio-state.edu/information/overview.html
Leukemia Tissue Bank – Directed by Clara D.
Bloomfield, MD, this resource provides central collection, processing and repository for samples collected from leukemia patients treated on Ohio State
University protocols. These samples are available to
investigators within Ohio State’s Comprehensive
Cancer Center and to outside collaborators who
examine cellular and molecular properties of
leukemia. http:www.osuccc.osu.edu/11167.cfm
Microscopy – The Microscopy Core Lab in Ohio
State’s Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute
provides technology to visualize minute details of
the subcellular organization of living cells and tissues. In addition to fluorescent microscopes fully
equipped for optimized magnification, time-lapse
video microscopy and multi-channel visualization,
the lab offers other instrumentation, including multiphoton confocal microscopy that allows investigators to probe delicate living cells or tissues longer
and deeper without damaging samples. This lab is
directed by Thomas Clanton, PhD.
http://heartlung.osu.edu/hlri/corelabs/microcore.jsp
Molecular Cytogenetics – Directed by Nyla
Heerema, PhD, the Molecular Cytogenetics Shared
Resource provides molecular cytogenetic technology and classical banded metaphase cytogenetics.
Services include metaphase karyotyping of human
and mouse tissue, fluorescence in situ hybridization
(FISH) using many different types of probes and tissues, and multicolor spectral karyotyping (SKY).
http://www.cytogenetics.osu.edu/
2007 Research Report 143
Mouse Phenotyping – Researchers using animal
models of human cancer receive pathology support
from this resource, which specializes in morphologic
characterization of newly produced lines of genetically engineered mice. Supervised by interim leader
Michael Lairmore, DVM, PhD, it also offers such
services as necroscopy, slide preparation, semiquantitative histopathology for experimental studies, morphometry, hematology, clinical chemistry,
consultation and referral.
http://www.osumc.osu.edu/mouse_phenotyping
Nucleic Acid – This resource, led by Hansjurg Alder,
PhD, provides instrumentation and expertise for
DNA sequencing, genotyping, real time polymerase
chain reaction (PCR), RNA/DNA extraction, imaging and DNA synthesis support. It also consults and
assists in experimental design, supports development of novel methodologies and applications relevant to cancer research, and functions as a training
and education center.
www.osuccc.osu.edu/9168.cfm
Pharmacoanalytical – This resource offers two
LC/MS systems for quantitation of analytes and
identification of metabolites in biological matrices.
This equipment is primarily used for quantitation of
parent drug and metabolites in clinical specimens.
This resource is led by James Dalton, PhD.
www.osuccc.osu.edu/psr/
Pharmacogenomics – Led by Wolfgang Sadée,
Dr.rer.nat., the Core Laboratory of Ohio State’s
Program in Pharmacogenomics supports intermediate scale genotyping for use in clinical association
studies. Genotyping panels covering nearly 1,000
polymorphisms are available, targeting genes implicated in cancer, cardiovascular and central nervous
system disorders, as well as drug metabolism and
transport. The Core Laboratory also has developed
a rapid approach for discovery of functional polymorphisms in candidate genes as potential markers
for assessing disease and therapy outcomes.
http://pharmacogenomics.osu.edu/section1.html
144 Ohio State University Medical Center
Proteomics – A shared resource of Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Medical
Center’s Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute,
the Proteomics lab provides researchers with instrumentation, expertise and services needed to identify proteins, protein modifications and protein biomarkers in biological samples. It can identify proteins from 1D and 2D gels using electrophoresis and
imaging equipment, robotic sample handlers and
mass spectrometers. The lab is directed by Kari
Green-Church, PhD, and Douglas Kniss, PhD.
http://heartlung.osu.edu/hlri/corelabs/proteomics.jsp
Tissue Procurement – Part of the Human Tissue
Resource Network at Ohio State, this resource procures and provides researchers with malignant and
normal tissues from solid tumors. Under the direction of Scott Jewell, PhD, Tissue Procurement staff
provide quality control of the research specimen
and interact with pathologists and investigators to
better assist in procurement of tissues and to foster
hypothesis-driven cancer research.
http://www.osuccc.osu.edu/97970.cfm
Transgenic Animal Facility – Led by Anthony
Young, PhD, and Akihira Otoshi, MD, PhD, this
facility provides transgenic and gene-targeted mice
and other related services to the Ohio State biomedical research community. Jointly operated by
the Center for Molecular Neurobiology, University
Laboratory Animal Resources and Columbus
Children’s Research Institute, the service includes
three animal vivariums, a DNA preparation laboratory, consultation and primary care of animals.
http://cmn.osu.edu/1521.cfm;
http://transgeniccore.ccri.ws/index.asp
X-ray Crystallography – This shared resource, led by
Charles Bell, PhD, houses equipment and computational resources for collecting single crystal macromolecular X-ray diffraction data for determining X-ray
crystal structures of proteins and other macromolecules at atomic resolution. Cryogenic devices are
available for low-temperature data collection.
Affiliated Cores
Cell Manipulations Laboratory (CML) – The CML is
a cleanroom for FDA GTP-compliant processing of
“more than minimally manipulated” human tissues.
The facility can accommodate two concurrent and
fully segregated projects. CML services may be tailored to researcher needs and range from “cleanroom use only” to “full service production.” Led by
Tom Leemhuis, PhD, the CML is located at The
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and is
a shared resource with Ohio State’s Comprehensive
Cancer Center and Columbus Children’s Hospital.
www.cincinnatichildren’s.org/research/div/exphematology/translational/cml/
Translational Trials Development and Support Lab
– The Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Translational Trials Development and Support Lab,
which collaborates with Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center and Columbus
Children’s Hospital, provides assays in support of
translational research. Molecular-based assays
include LAM and LM vector insertion, mycoplasma
and multiple PCR-based assays. Cellular-based
assays include clonogenicity, Fanconi Anemia complementation, endotoxin and tailored assays for protein function, as well as a normal donor cell repository for IRB-approved research. It is led by Lilith
Reeves, MS.
www.cincinnatichildren’s.org/research/div/exphematology/translational/ttdsl.htm
ed cleanroom for producing viral vectors for phase
I/II clinical studies. Led by Han van der Loo, PhD,
this core is a shared resource with Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center and Columbus
Children’s Hospital. www.cincinnatichildren’s.org/
research/div/exphematology/translational/vpf/vvc/
default.htm. The Viral Vector Core at Columbus
Children’s Research Institute supplies recombinant
adeno-associated virus (rAAV) and recombinant
adenovirus (rAd) vectors of uniform quality to individual research laboratories. The core is a full-service facility, capable of generating vectors beginning
with a cDNA sequence and ending with the synthesis and purification of gene transfers that have
passed rigorous quality assurance assays. The core
supports production of six novel rAAV vector
serotypes (rAAV1, rAAV2, rAAV4, rAAV5, rAAV8
and rAAV9). It is led by Reed Clark, PhD.
http://columbuschildrens.com/GD/Templates/Pages/
Childrens/Research/ResearchCenter.aspx?page=5060
Viral Vector Core – The Cincinnati Children’s
Hospital Medical Center Viral Vector Core produces
research-grade retroviral and lentiviral vectors, generates stable producer lines, and offers non-GMP
quality control testing, including vector titer by
functional assay or PCR, mycoplasma, sterility, RCR
and RCL testing. Retrovirus for clinical application is
produced in the Vector Production Facility, a validat-
2007 Research Report 145
University Resources
The Ohio State University is at the forefront of
biomedical technology and multidisciplinary research,
in large part due to the depth and breadth of
resources available on campus for basic and clinical
scientists. By sharing these esoteric resources, the
University can exploit economies of scale, decrease
dependency on outside resources and increase
opportunities for collaboration.
146 Ohio State University Medical Center
FOR BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH
esearc
The Ohio State University Research Foundation
(OSURF), led by Executive Director Robert Killoren,
promotes development, implementation and coordination of sponsored research at Ohio State by overseeing sponsored projects and personnel associated
with them, including financial resources, equipment
inventory and compliance issues. http://rf.osu.edu
The Technology Licensing and Commercialization
(TLC) team, led by Jean Schelhorn, PhD, oversees
protection of intellectual property via patent, copyright and/or trademark, marketing University technologies, negotiating license agreements, consulting
about intellectual property on sponsored research
projects, and ensuring compliance with federal regulations related to intellectual property.
http://otl.osu.edu
University Laboratory Animal Resources, led by
Director William Yonushonis, is a centralized program that supports the humane, legal, proper and
scientifically valid use of animals in scientific
research at Ohio State. http://ular.osu.edu
Biosafety Level 3 Facilities are located on Ohio
State’s main and west campuses. A Biosafety Level
3 Facility is located in the Biomedical Research
Tower to safely handle potentially infectious agents
with the intent to guarantee biocontainment of
pathogens under study.
Campus Chemical Instrument Center (CCIC), was
founded in 1981 as a unit of The Ohio State
University Office of Research. Under the direction of
Ming-Daw Tsai, PhD, the center focuses on providing state-of-the-art research facilities for the entire
campus in three areas: nuclear magnetic resonance,
mass spectrometry and proteomics.
Chemistry-Mass Spectrometry Facility, a CCICrelated unit, is able to analyze small organic molecules using either positive ion electrospray ionization or electron impact ionization analysis.
Chemistry NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance)
Laboratory, managed by Karl Vermillion, provides
access to four Bruker NMR spectrometers.
Plant-Microbe Genomics Facility serves the entire
campus, as well as researchers in the state of Ohio
and beyond, by providing resources to study genomes
– from DNA sequence to protein expression.
Microscopic and Chemical Analysis Research
Center (MARC) is a University wide instrument
service laboratory that supports research through
elemental chemical analysis capabilities ranging
from nanometer scale microscopic imaging to bulk
chemical composition.
Bio Medical Mass Spectrometry Facility, directed
by Kenneth Chan, PhD, performs pharmacoanalytical services and assists investigators in solving pharmacoanalytical problems. Based at the College of
Pharmacy. http://mass-spectrometrylab.osu.edu/facility.html
Center for Materials Research, led by David
Rigney, PhD, CMR associate director and professor
of Materials Science and Engineering, promotes
interdisciplinary scholarship among faculty, facilitates industrial partnerships, encourages interdisciplinary undergraduate and graduate education, provides a mechanism for major cooperative research
funding, and creates central multi user research
facilities for the study of familiar and new materials.
http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/cmr
Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC). Under executive director Stanley Ahalt, PhD, the OSC provides a
high-performance computing and communications
infrastructure for a diverse statewide community,
including members of educational, academic
research, industry and state government institutions. In collaboration with this community, OSC
evaluates, implements and supports new and
emerging information.
Within OSC, the Biomedical Applications Research
Group involves an interdisciplinary group of research
and computer scientists and clinicians whose goals
include applying high-performance computing to biomedicine and applying advanced interface technology for virtual exploration of complex computational
data. Don Stredney, research scientist and director,
interface lab, is also a member of the Experimental
Therapeutics Program at the OSUCCC.
2007 Research Report 147
Collaboration and cooperation are the watchwords for
research partnerships, not only within Ohio State,
but also extending into the national and international
scientific community. As partnerships are forged
among OSU divisions and departments and with
other academic institutions and corporations, the
opportunities for science to advance increase
exponentially. Over the past five years, external
biomedical research support at Ohio State increased
by 31.5 percent to reach $160.2 million in 2006.
148 Ohio State University Medical Center
esearc
Research Partnerships
INTERDISCIPLINARY UNIVERSITY
PROGRAMS
The OSU Mathematical Biosciences Institute
(MBI) – Based in the OSU Department of
Mathematics, and in collaboration with the
Department of Statistics, the MBI is the first center
of its kind created by the National Science
Foundation (NSF). A $10 million grant from the NSF
initiated the Institute.
The mission of the MBI, led by Avner Friedman,
PhD, is to: develop mathematical theories, statistical methods and computational algorithms for solving fundamental problems in the biosciences; to
involve mathematical scientists and bioscientists in
the solutions of these problems; and to nurture a
community of scholars through the education and
support of students and researchers in mathematical biosciences. Institute partners include the following universities: Arizona State, Case Western
Reserve, COSNet, Drexel, Florida State, Howard,
Indiana-Purdue, Iowa State, Michigan State, New
Jersey Institute of Technology, Ohio, California at
Irvine, Cincinnati, Georgia, Iowa, Maryland Baltimore
County, Michigan, Minnesota and Vanderbilt.
design of virtual bone dissection simulations, biomechanics of bone adaptation, magnetic resonance
imaging and spectroscopy, corneal topography, and
biocompatibility of novel implant materials are all
studied in the Department of Biomedical
Engineering. Fifteen departmental faculty members
in biomedical engineering, plus more than 60 participating faculty researchers, collaborate through
the Department, providing extensive resources for
research. Among these are researchers in Ohio
State’s Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute and
the Ohio Nanotech West Laboratory, with multiple
resources dedicated to bioMEMS. In addition to the
technical and clinical research facilities across campus and at the Medical Center, research is also conducted at Columbus Children’s Hospital.
OSU Bionutrition and Food Safety Research
Institute (BFSRI) – A one-of-a-kind research institute, the BFSRI integrates traditional nutrition study
with contemporary biology. Linking agriculture, food
systems and public health research programs, BFSRI
encourages the study of dietary nutrition and genetic interactions to define risks for disease and to
develop strategies for disease prevention.
EXTERNAL PARTNERSHIPS
BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT
“The discipline of biomedical engineering lies at the
forefront of the medical revolution. Advances in biomedical engineering are accomplished through interdisciplinary activities that integrate the physical, chemical,
mathematical and computational sciences with engineering principles to study biology, medicine and
behavior.” (National Institutes of Health working definition of Biomedical Engineering, July 1997).
Directed by Richard Hart, PhD, the Department of
Biomedical Engineering at Ohio State was established in 2005 following more than 30 years of biomedical engineering research housed in a multidisciplinary Center. Current studies include biomicroelectromechanical systems (bioMEMS), imaging,
biomechanics, biomaterials and tissue engineering
research directed primarily toward cardiovascular,
orthopedic and vision applications. Breakthroughs in
nanotechnology for cell transplants, microfabrication of biodegradable polymers for drug delivery,
Battelle Memorial Institute – Battelle Memorial
Institute is a global science and technology enterprise that develops and commercializes new products and processes for governmental and commercial applications. It has a vast science and technology reach and conducts $3 billion in annual research
and development. Battelle partners with OSU in a
number of ways. From collaboration on new therapy-delivery technologies to building the world’s
fastest supercomputer, OSU and Battelle have
joined forces for biomedical research and to create
commercial applications for new technology, including nanotechnology and biomedical informatics.
Battelle and OSU are founding partners of the
Columbus Business Technology Center.
Intuitive Surgical, Inc. – The Medical Center is one
of the two original sites in the world to study the
advanced surgical robotics systems developed by
Intuitive Surgical, including its daVinciВ® system. In
2007 Research Report 149
addition to the studies that led to FDA-approval of
robotics for heart surgery, Ohio State researchers
are perfecting tiny cameras with multiple lenses,
which when inserted into a patient’s chest, provide
a three-dimensional image of the heart.
General Electric Medical Systems – The Ohio State
University Medical Center and GE, in a unique corporate-academic partnership called the OSU
Advanced Biomedical Imaging Institute are developing new technologies that provide unprecedented
views into the inner workings of the human body
and make many invasive diagnostic techniques
obsolete.
iMEDD – The principal user of the Ohio MicroMD
Laboratory at OSU’s Science Village is iMEDD, an
emerging drug delivery company that employs
micro-engineering technology to develop improved
drug delivery through nanotechnology.
Philips Medical Systems – Ohio State and Case
Western Reserve University have teamed with
Philips to develop and commercialize one of the first
high-power (7-tesla) magnetic resonance imaging
systems in the world and to develop breakthrough
technologies in molecular imaging used for research
on cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease and other metabolic diseases of genetic origin.
Siemens - Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany,
along with Battelle Memorial Institute and the state
of Ohio, is part of a $15 million program to develop
innovative strategies and technologies to better prevent, detect and treat lung cancer. The effort is
designed to position Ohio as an international leader
in fighting the world’s deadliest malignancy. Led by
Michael Caligiuri, MD, director of Ohio State’s
Comprehensive Cancer Center, the project includes
a number of researchers at the University.
State of Ohio – Ohio’s Third Frontier Project aims to
establish a high-tech, knowledge economy in the
state by supporting leading-edge research and
development. As part of this project, the Biomedical
Research Commercialization Program (BRCP) (formerly called the Biomedical Research and
Partnership) funds innovative projects with commercial potential in biomedicine and biotechnology.
150 Ohio State University Medical Center
The BRCP has funded several Medical Center programs, including:
• a $6.5 million cardiovascular bioengineering
enterprise
• a $1.49 million study on the genetics of gastrointestinal cancer led by Albert de la Chapelle, MD,
PhD, and subcontracted from Case Western
Reserve University
• a $6 million biomedical informatics synthesis platform led by Joel Saltz, MD, PhD
• a $17.1 million biomedical structural, functional
and molecular imaging enterprise led by Michael
Knopp, MD, PhD
• a $7.9 million biomedical structural, functional and
molecular imaging enterprise (part 2) led by
Michael Knopp, MD, PhD
• an $8 million comprehensive program for the prevention, detection and treatment of lung cancer
led by Michael Caligiuri, MD
• a $4.25 million commercialization platform for
immunotherapeutic treatment of multiple sclerosis led by Caroline Whitacre, PhD
• a $556,834 stem cell and tissue engineering institute led by Larry Lasky, MD
United States Surgical Corporation – U.S. Surgical
established the Center for Minimally Invasive
Surgery at Ohio State in 1995 with a multimillion
dollar donation, which enabled OSU surgeons to
develop and teach the use of advanced laparoscopic
and robotic techniques to other health professionals.
In addition to the companies mentioned above,
Ohio State’s Medical Center gratefully acknowledges
the following companies that made significant research
awards to the Medical Center through The Ohio State
University Research Foundation during 2006:
Abbott Laboratories
Acorda Therapeutics
Alcon Labs, Inc.
Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Algorx Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
American Lung Association
Amgen, Inc.
Amylin Corp.
Astrazeneca, L.P.
Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Battellepharma, Inc.
Bausch & Lomb / Paragon Vision Sciences
Berlex Labs, Inc.
Biogen Idec, Inc.
Biomec, Inc.
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.
Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research
Institute
Britstol-Myers/Sanofi Pharmaceutical Partnership
Cancervax
Carotech Berhad
Celgene Corp.
Chiron Corp.
Ciba Vision
Ciphergen Biosystems, Inc.
Cogentech, Inc.
Covance, Inc.
Cumbre Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Eli Lilly & Co.
Elusys Therapeutics, Inc.
Farnam Companies, Inc.
Favrille, Inc.
Forest Labs, Inc.
Fondazione Adrioano Buzzati-Traverso
Fort Dodge Labs
Fujisawa Healthcare, Inc.
Genzyme Corp.
Glaxosmithkline
Human Genome Sciences, Inc.
Idec Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Immunex Corp.
Igenix Pharmaceutical Services, Inc.
Inspire Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
InterHealth Neutraceuticals, Inc.
Intermune, Inc.
Ivax Corp.
Janssen Pharmaceutical Products, L.P.
Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc.
Kosan Biosciences, Inc.
Lipsome/Rhone Poulenc Rorer Pharmaceutical
Lupus Clinical Trials Consortium, Inc.
MDS Pharma Services
Medtronic, Inc.
Merck & Co., Inc.
Merial, Ltd.
MGI Pharma, Inc.
Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Myogen, Inc.
Neopharm, Inc.
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Neurologix, Inc.
Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals
Omeros Vorp.
Ortho Biotech Products, L.P.
Peninsula Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Pfizer, Inc.
Pharmacia & Upjohn, Inc.
Pharmacia, Inc.
Pharmacyclics, Inc.
Pharmanet, Inc.
Phoenix Scientific, Inc.
PPD Development
PRA International
Purdue Pharma, L.P.
Quintiles Transnational Corp.
Respironics, Inc.
Roche Labs, Inc.
Ross Products Division
Sanofi Winthrop Pharmaceuticals
Sanofi-Aventis
Savacor, Inc.
Schwarz Biosciences, Inc.
Science Applications International Corp.
Serono, Inc.
Serono/Pfizer
Shire Pharmaceutical Development, Inc.
Siemens
Sigma-Tau Healthscience, SPA
Supergen, Inc.
Targacept, Inc.
Teva Neuroscience, Inc.
Thoratec Corp.
Ucb Pharma, Inc.
Vaxgen, Inc.
Warner-Lambert Co.
Worldwide Clinical Trials, Inc.
Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Wyeth-Ayerst, Res.
Zivena, Inc.
2007 Research Report 151
PHILANTHROPIC SUPPORT
Corporate Partners
Partnerships at the Medical Center can also encompass corporate and foundation philanthropy. Such
support from a company or its charitable foundation provides vital funds for supplies, equipment or
other new technology, research personnel and other
activities required for quality medical research.
Corporate contributors in 2006 include:
Abercrombie & Fitch Management Co.; Armor Fire
Protection, Inc.; Battelle Memorial Institute;
Cardinal Health; C.G. Therapeutics, Inc.; Cheryl &
Company; Cordis Corporation; EBI LP (division of
Biomet); Kroger Company; Lorillard Tobacco
Company; PGA Tour, Inc.; and Schnipke Engraving
Company, Inc., among many others.
Private Donations
During this reporting period, $36.9 million ($13.4
million in philanthropy and $23.5 million in private
grant support) was received through private gifts
and grants supporting medical research. These
funds include support for chair and professorship
positions, enhancing faculty recruitment and retention efforts of distinguished medical faculty who
spearhead medical research efforts. These private
donations come from grateful patients and their
families, from alumni and from other individual or
organization friends in the community, in addition to
this corporate support. Of these research dollars,
more than $2 million was raised by patients, their
families and friends, and by volunteers who are
mobilized to increase awareness about a disease
and raise funds toward medical research to eradicate it or improve treatments.
An individual or family can make a significant
impact by funding medical research on a particular
disease as recognized by Jay and Kathy Tolkan
Worly of Bexley, Ohio, who funded two endowments at $50,000 each for cancer research – one
for breast cancer and the other for lung cancer.
Another local individual, George A. Skestos, established The Justine Skestos Chair in Minimally
152 Ohio State University Medical Center
Invasive Neurological Spinal Surgery at $1.5 million
in honor of his wife and to advance a particular
medical specialty. Ohio residents from outside central Ohio often support Ohio State’s academic medical research, as did the many members of the
Fraternal Order of Eagles – Grand Aerie (through
their Ohio State Eagles Charity Fund). They supported $100,000 in medical research in diabetes,
cervical cancer, cardiovascular disease and spinal
cord injury. Some individuals accomplish their philanthropic goals through their personal estate planning, as did the late Leo H. Faust and Judge Grace
Heck Faust of Urbana, Ohio, who provided almost
$90,000 each to cardiology, psychiatry, cancer and
ophthalmology.
The Medical Center’s academic medical research
reputation has resulted in personal philanthropy in
support of research in cancer, ophthalmology, spinal
cord injuries, cardiology, neurological diseases, diabetes and orthopedics, to name a few.
ENDOWMENTS
Establishing a named endowment that can support
significant research year after year is often a motivating factor in philanthropy. The medical center
has more than 400 endowed funds for medical
research or chair and professorship positions established through philanthropy.
These unique endowments not only enhance our
quality of medical research and recognize the innovative research of the faculty recipient of the chair
or professorship, but they also honor the person for
which the endowment is named through the generosity of the donor.
CHAIRS AND PROFESSORSHIPS
Endowed or deignated chairs and professorships,
representing 51 percent of the Medical Center’s gift
endowment and valued at $118 million in gift principal, support research efforts at the Medical Center
and include the following:
Chair or Professorship Fund
Carl M. and Grace C. Baldwin Chair in
Ophthalmology (Ophthalmology )
Battelle Professorship in Inhalation Therapeutics
(Inhalation Therapeutics)
Barbara J. Bonner Chair in Lung Cancer Research
(Cancer)
John G. Boutselis M.D. Chair in Gynecology
(Gynecology)
Warren Brown Family Designated Professorship in
Leukemia Research (Cancer)
Dr. John D. and E. Olive Brumbaugh Chair in Brain
Research and Teaching (Neurosurgery)
H. William Clatworthy Jr. Professorship in Pediatric
Surgery (Pediatric Surgery)
Jeg Coughlin Chair in Childhood Cancer
Development Therapeutics (Pediatric Cancer)
Charles Austin Doan Chair of Medicine (MedicineUnrestricted)
George T. Harding III MD Endowed Chair in
Psychiatry (Psychiatry)
William H. Havener MD Chair in Ophthalmology
Research (Ophthalmology)
Irene D. Hirsch Chair in Ophthalmology
(Ophthalmology)
Fred A. Hitchcock Professorship in Environmental
Physiology (Physiology)
Leonard J. Immke Jr. and Charlotte L. Immke Chair
in Cancer Research (Cancer)
Jay J. Jacoby MD, PhD, Chair in Anesthesiology
(Anesthesiology)
Dr. Arthur G. and Mildred C. James – Richard J.
Solove Chair in Surgical Oncology
(Surgical Oncology)
Henry G. Cramblett Chair in Medicine (Pediatrics)
Dr. Ernest W. Johnson Professorship (Physical
Medicine & Rehabilitation)
Dardinger Family Endowed Chair in Oncological
Neurosurgery (Cancer-Oncological Neurosurgery)
Donald G. Jones MD and Patsy P. Jones Designated
Professorship in OB/Gynecology (Gynecology)
Esther Dardinger Endowed Chair in NeuroOncology
(Cancer-NeuroOncology)
Luther M. Keith Professorship in Surgery (Surgery)
Dorothy M. Davis Chair in Cancer Research
(Cancer)
William C. and Joan E. Davis Cancer Research
Professorship (Cancer)
Karl P. Klassen Chair of Thoracic Surgery (Thoracic
Surgery)
Frank J. Kloenne Chair in Orthopedic Surgery
(Orthopedic Surgery)
Klotz Chair in Cancer Research (Cancer)
S. Robert Davis Chair of Medicine (MedicineUnrestricted)
Richard J. and Martha D. Denman Professorship
(Epilepsy)
Department of Pathology Professorship
(Pathology)
Ralph W. and Helen Kurtz Chair in Hormonology
(Hormonology)
Helen C. Kurtz Chair in Neurology (Neurology)
Ralph W. Kurtz Chair in Pathology (Pathology)
2007 Research Report 153
Lois Levy Professorship for Cancer (Cancer)
Dave Longaberger Endowed Chair in Urology
(Urology with Cancer)
John H. and Mildred C. Lumley Medical Research
Chair (Heart, Cancer, Arthritis)
Torrence A. Makley Research Professorship
(Ophthalmology)
John L. Marakas Nationwide Insurance Enterprise
Foundation Chair in Cancer Research (Cancer)
Frank E. and Mary W. Pomerene Professorship in
the Prevention and Treatment of Infectious Diseases
(Infectious Disease)
Warner M. and Lora Kays Pomerene Chair in
Medicine (Primary Care)
Ray W. Poppleton Research Chair (Orthopedics &
Spinal Cord)
Harry C. and Mary Elizabeth Powelson
Professorship of Medicine (Medicine-Unrestricted)
John A. Prior Professorship (Pulmonary)
John G. and Jeanne Bonnet McCoy Chair in
The Ohio State University Heart Center
(Heart)
Richard L. Meiling Chair of Obstetrics and
Gynecology (Obstetrics/Gynecology)
Dr. Samuel T. and Lois Felts Mercer Professorship of
Medicine and Pharmacology
(Pharmacology)
Gilbert and Kathryn Mitchell Chair (Cancer, Heart,
Kidneys and Eyes)
Max Morehouse Chair in Cancer Research
(Cancer)
Martha Morehouse Chair in Immunology and
Rheumatology (Immunology/Rheumatology)
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation Chair for
Clinical Research (Clinical Research)
Marion Rowley Designated Chair (Cancer)
Joseph M. Ryan M.D. Chair in Cardiovascular
Medicine (Cardiology)
Samuel Saslaw Professorship in Infectious Diseases
(Infectious Disease)
Robert A. and Martha O. Schoenlaub Cancer
Research Chair (Cancer)
Donald A. Senhauser MD Professorship in
Pathology (Pathology)
Justine Skestos Chair in Minimally Invasive
Neurological Spinal Surgery (Neurological Surgery)
Sarah Ross Soter Endowed Chair in Women’s
Cardiovascular Health at OSU Heart Center
(Heart)
Stefanie Spielman Chair in Breast Imaging (Cancer)
James W. Overstreet Chair in Cardiology Fund
(Cardiology)
Martha G. and Milton Staub Chair for Research in
Ophthalmology (Ophthalmology)
William Greenville Pace III and Joanne Norris
Collins-Pace Chair for Cancer Research (Cancer)
Julius F. Stone Chair in Cancer Research (Cancer)
William Greenville Pace III Endowed Chair in Cancer
Research (Cancer)
University Pathology Services Anatomic Pathology
Professorship (Pathology – Anatomic)
154 Ohio State University Medical Center
University Pathology Services Clinical Pathology
Professorship (Pathology – Clinical)
Clayton C. Wagner Parkinson’s Disease
Professorship in Neurotherapeutics (Parkinson’s
Disease)
William D. and Jacqueline L. Wells Chair in Imaging
Research (H&L Imaging Research)
Bert C. Wiley M.D. Endowed Chair in Physical
Medicine and Rehabilitation (Physical Medicine &
Rehabilitation)
Judson D. Wilson Professorship in Orthopedic
Surgery (Orthopedics)
James Hay and Ruth Jansson Wilson Professorship
in Cardiology Fund (Cardiology)
Dr. Benjamin and Helen Wiltberger Memorial Chair
in Orthopaedic Surgery (Orthopedics)
Lucius A. Wing Chair of Cancer Research and
Therapy (Cancer)
John W. Wolfe Chair in Human Cancer Genetics
(Cancer)
John W. Wolfe Chair in Cancer Research (Cancer)
John W. Wolfe Professorship in Cardiovascular
Research (Cardiovascular Medicine)
Robert M. Zollinger Chair of Surgery (Surgery)
Frederick P. Zuspan Chair in Obstetrics and
Gynecology (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
2007 Research Report 155
Educational Initiatives
PROMOTING BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH
An essential component of Ohio State University
Medical Center’s mission is education – instructing
the students of today and training the biomedical
researchers of tomorrow. Academic medical centers
that promote research attract top medical students
who want to train in an environment where exemplary
research is conducted and applied to advancements
in patient care.
156 Ohio State University Medical Center
GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE
RESEARCH PROGRAMS
The Health Sciences Major is nationally recognized as
a leader in practice-based allied healthcare education. The School of Allied Medical Professions offers
undergraduate programs in athletic training, circulation technology, health information and management system, medical and radiological technology,
medical dietetics and respiratory therapy. Students
in all areas of study are involved in research. The
undergraduate health sciences major, the School’s
newest program, was established to prepare students for entry-level career opportunities in health
care or for entry into graduate and professional
programs.
Masters of Science Program
This program prepares registered, certified and/or
licensed health professionals for expanded roles in
research, teaching, administration and professional
practice. A flexible study program designed around
individual student needs offers five areas of emphasis: Advanced Professional Practice, Education,
Management, Health Informatics and Gerontology.
esearc
UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
PROGRAMS
The Biomedical Sciences Major prepares OSU honors
students for a career and/or further study in medicine or biomedical science. This program gives
these undergraduates early training in conducting
sound biomedical research, as well as an opportunity to participate in research projects at OSU
Medical Center.
MEDICAL STUDENT RESEARCH
PROGRAMS
Medical Scientist (MD/PhD)Program – The classic
combined degree for physician-scientists, the
MD/PhD program combines clinical training leading
to the MD degree with training in research culminating in the PhD degree. The OSU College of
Medicine’s Medical Scientist Program (MSP) allows
for a synchronized MD/PhD program over a sevenyear period. The curriculum minimizes redundancy
and optimizes students’ use of time without compromising educational quality in either area.
The Independent Study Program (ISP) – This is a flexible option for obtaining the medical degree that
allows students to arrange a study schedule best
suited for them. The broad faculty expertise provides a large range of research disciplines and projects for students to explore in laboratory rotations
early in their training.
Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID)
The Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate is a program of the Carnegie Foundation for the
Advancement of Teaching, a policy center devoted
to strengthening teaching and learning at America’s
colleges and schools. The Foundation began a
three-year examination of teaching and learning in
medical education and nursing education in July
2004. The CID is a multiyear research and action
project to support academic departments’ efforts to
more purposefully structure their doctoral programs, foster discipline-based conceptual work and
design experiments in a small number of selected
departments. Carnegie will collect, examine and
disseminate findings from this discussion and related experiments. This initiative recognizes outstanding graduate programs across the nation. It provides
funding in six areas: Chemistry, Education (educational psychology and curriculum and instruction),
English, History, Mathematics and Neuroscience.
OSU Medical Center received the top recognition
level of Partner for its neuroscience graduate program, and The Ohio State University received the
top recognition in the other five areas as well. OSU
was the only university in the country to receive the
top recognition in all six areas.
PHD PROGRAM IN HEALTH AND
REHABILITATION SCIENCES
This interdisciplinary program was approved to
begin classes in autumn 2005. Its purpose is to prepare healthcare professionals to enter academic
positions and contribute to the advancement of
knowledge in their fields within the allied health disciplines.
2007 Research Report 157
GRADUATE/POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH
DAY
INTERDISCIPLINARY GRADUATE
PROGRAMS
The Graduate and Postgraduate Research Day is an
annual forum in which graduate and postgraduate
trainees can offer poster presentations of their
research and interact with top national researchers.
OSU hosted its sixth annual Graduate and
Postgraduate Research Day on March 29, 2007. All
College of Medicine/Health Sciences faculty, staff
and students are invited to this event, which features posters representing the research contributions of Medical Center graduate, medical and
MD/PhD students, postdoctoral trainees, residents
and postdoctoral fellows. The 2007 event also featured presentations from world-renowned
researchers, including Judah Folkman, MD, professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School and
director of the Vascular Biology Program at
Children’s Hospital in Boston, and Sandra Porter,
PhD, director of Education and co-director of
Research at Geospiza, Inc. The research day is
organized by the Postdoctoral Research Scholars
Association, Bennett Society, Landacre Society, and
Medical Scientist Program.
With the comprehensive range of OSU colleges on
the same campus and a distinguished faculty that
interacts on numerous levels and within multiple
collaborative research initiatives, several OSU graduate-level programs are competitively sought by
students from around the world:
INTEGRATED BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE
GRADUATE PROGRAM
Led by Allan Yates, MD, PhD, Ohio State’s
Integrated Biomedical Science Graduate Program
(IBGP) guides students from understanding in the
basic sciences and the complex mechanisms of
human disease to medical applications of that
knowledge while preparing them as biomedical scientists. The program’s graduate faculty has more
than 200 members from 19 departments. The
course sequence focuses on grant writing and
mock-NIH review, a process that later serves as the
basis for the student’s doctoral candidacy examination. The IBGP has attained national prominence,
having been one of only five programs of its kind
profiled as “exemplary” in the Jan. 26, 2001, issue of
the journal Science.
158 Ohio State University Medical Center
The Neuroscience Graduate Studies Program emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach, with faculty from
traditional areas such as neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, neuropharmacology, neurophysiology,
neuropsychology and others.
The Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Interdisciplinary Graduate Program involves collaborative efforts of more than 125 faculty members
from 25 departments and colleges to offer a course
of study encompassing the molecular, cellular and
organismic levels of organisms.
The Ohio State Biochemistry Program is an interdisciplinary biochemistry program offering the PhD, with
faculty members from Biochemistry, Molecular &
Cellular Biochemistry and Chemistry. The faculty
includes more than 80 members from more than 20
departments across campus.
The Biophysics Graduate Program is an interdisciplinary program that prepares students for careers in
structural biology and molecular biophysics, biological spectroscopy and imaging, cellular and integrative biophysics and computational bioinformatics.
2006 Sponsored Research Grants
BY DEPARTMENT
Nearly $160.2 million in outside funding was awarded
in 2006 to scientists pursuing research projects within
Ohio State University Medical Center’s academic
departments. Included in this section of the research
report are grants received during 2006 for $100,000
or more. They are listed by academic department. A
complete list of grants, including those under $100,000,
is published at www.medicalcenter.osu.edu. This
funding reflects a growing confidence in the expertise
and ability of Ohio State University medical researchers
to advance the frontiers of health-science knowledge.
2007 Research Report 159
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Anesthesiology
Fedias Christofi
Purinergic regulation of enteric
neural reflexes
National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$511,425
Yun Xia
GDNF in the enteric nervous system
National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$130,113
Umit Catalyurek
Massive-scale semantic graphs (MSSG)
University of California
$158,417
Umit Catalyurek
SciDAC Institute: Combinatorial
scientific computing and
petascale simulations (CSCAPES)
US Department of Energy
$130,000
Joel Saltz
ARCH DEV - caGrid 1.0 design
and implementation
Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.
$735,075
Joel Saltz
caBIG architecture workspace
Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.
$776,355
Douglas Knutson
Pre-doctoral training in primary care
(Teaching to the CORE)
Health Resources & Services
Administration
$214,477
Douglas Post
Patient-centered communication
during chemotherapy
National Cancer Institute
$105,110
Gunjan Agarwal
Atomic force microscope
National Center for
Research Resources
$253,510
Philip Binkley
Eliminating barriers to effective
training in clinical investigation
National Center for
Research Resources
$669,785
Yeong-Renn Chen
Myocardial injury associated with
mitochondria-derived oxygen
free radical(s)
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$375,000
Glen Cooke
Pharmacogenetic antiplatelet
strategies in CHD patients
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$136,571
Curt Daniels
Registry to evaluate early and longterm pulmonary arterial hypertension
(PAH) disease management
(REVEAL Registry)
Anonymous
$108,750
Nicholas Flavahan
Alpha2C adrenergic receptors and
cutaneous circulation
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$328,471
Nicholas Flavahan
Mechanisms of vascular dysfunction
in vibration injury
National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health
$253,776
Guanglong He
In vivo EPR imaging of myocardial
oxygen consumption
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$328,471
Biomedical Informatics
Family Medicine
Internal Medicine
Cardiovascular Medicine
160 Ohio State University Medical Center
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Govindasamy Ilangovan
Heat shock proteins, nitric oxide and
oxygen consumption in the heart
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$361,375
Periannan Kuppusamy
Development of spin probes for
cell-tagging and oximetry
National Institute of Biomedical
Imaging and Bioengineering
$262,777
Periannan Kuppusamy
In vivo EPR imaging and redox status
and thiols in tumor
National Cancer Institute
$299,274
Periannan Kuppusamy
Novel methods for in vivo imaging
of tissue oxygenation
National Institute of Biomedical
Imaging and Bioengineering
$262,776
Yunbo Li
Induction of cellular antioxidants
and cardioprotection
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$291,974
Zhenguo Liu
Effects of nitric oxide on stem
cell differentiation
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$133,434
Subha Raman
Iron and atherosclerosis
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$164,236
Orlando Simonetti
Cardiovascular MRI and CT
application research
Siemens
$197,420
Yong Xia
Superoxide generation from
endothelial NO synthase
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$291,974
Jay Zweier
Inflammation and repair in cardiac
ischemia-reperfusion
Johns Hopkins University
Jay Zweier
Measurement of free radical
generation in the heart
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$641,734
Jay Zweier
Oxygen radicals and nitric oxide in
postischemic injury
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$481,354
Jay Zweier
Protection of ischemic myocardium
University of Louisville
$190,235
Jay Zweier
Proton electron double resonance
imaging (PEDRI) of free radicals
National Institute of Biomedical
Imaging and Bioengineering
$1,009,832
$448,500
Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Lawrence Kirschner
Carney complex: a model for
PKA-mediated tumorigenesis
National Cancer Institute
$269,346
Kwame Osei
Exenatide in islet cell transplantation
in non-human primate model
Eli Lilly and Company
$267,498
Kwame Osei
Prevention of cardiovascular disease in
diabetes mellitus - clinical center network
Case Western Reserve University
$248,457
Joseph Pinzone
BP1 and nuclear hormone signaling
in breast cancer
National Cancer Institute
$133,650
Matthew Ringel
Akt intracellular localization in
thyroid cancer
National Cancer Institute
$259,491
2007 Research Report 161
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Matthew Ringel
Anti-metastatic effect of MCIP1 in
thyroid cancer
National Cancer Institute
$125,549
Belinda Avalos-Copelan
The G-CSF receptor and ubiquitination
National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$182,483
Robert Baiocchi
Mechanism of resistance to histone
deaceylase inhibitor-induced apoptosis
in Epstein-Barr virus associated
malignancies
V Foundation
$100,000
Jeffrey Chalmers
Advanced biomedical devices for
disease diagnosis and therapy
Ohio Department of Development
$525,000
Jeffrey Chalmers
High performance magnetic cell sorting
National Cancer Institute
$338,825
Clara Bloomfield
CALGB Foundation protocol capitation
projects 1997
Cancer & Leukemia Group B
Foundation
$128,780
Clara Bloomfield
CALGB University of Chicago services
agreement
University of Chicago
$305,280
Clara Bloomfield
Cancer and Leukemia Group B The Ohio State University
National Cancer Institute
$374,894
Kristie Blum
Targeting transcriptional repression
in CLL
National Cancer Institute
$135,076
William Blum
Experimental therapeutics in acute
leukemias
National Cancer Institute
$129,720
John Byrd
B-CLL biology: impact of combination
chemotherapy
Mayo Foundation for Medical
Education and Research
John Byrd
Hu1D10 in CLL: clinical and laboratory
studies
National Cancer Institute
John Byrd
Targeting PDK1/AKT in CLL
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
$260,000
Michael Caligiuri
CALGB leukemia tissue bank supplement
University of Chicago
$224,740
Michael Caligiuri
Cancer and leukemia group B leukemia correlative science
National Cancer Institute
$1,012,609
Michael Caligiuri
IL-15 characterization through
experimental immunology
National Cancer Institute
$279,200
Michael Caligiuri
Innate immunity: Elucidation/
modulation - cancer therapy
National Cancer Institute
$1,921,456
Michael Caligiuri
Oncology training grant
National Cancer Institute
$437,284
Michael Caligiuri
The Ohio State University
comprehensive cancer support grant
National Cancer Institute
$3,825,067
Hematology and Oncology
162 Ohio State University Medical Center
$440,428
$305,171
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Tong Chen
Evaluation of the chemopreventive
effects of strawberries on esophageal
cancer development
California Strawberry Commission
Steven Clinton
Tomato-soy juice for prostate cancer
National Cancer Institute
Steven Clinton
Vitamin D status and prostate cancer
Purdue University
$225,233
Sherif Farag
QMS technology to deplete T-cell
alloreactivity
National Institute of Allergy
and Infectious Diseases
$347,343
Michael Grever
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia
research consortium
$159,500
$187,411
University of California at
San Diego
$662,237
Michael Grever
Phase I trials of anticancer agents
National Cancer Institute
$602,401
Thomas Lin
A novel dosing schedule of flavopiridol
in CLL
National Cancer Institute
$288,324
Thomas Lin
A phase 1 study of the AKT inhibitor
17-AAG in CLL
National Cancer Institute
$288,324
Thomas Lin
A phase I study of single agent
flavopiridol in B-NHL
National Cancer Institute
$257,065
Thomas Lin
Monoclonal antibody therapy in B-cell CLL
National Cancer Institute
$131,814
Richard Love
Adjuvant hormonal therapy in
Vietnamese breast cancer
National Cancer Institute
$263,370
Richard Love
Luteal adjuvant oophorectomy in
Vietnamese breast cancer
National Cancer Institute
$838,100
Guido Marcucci
Pharmacological modulation of
epigenetic changes in AML
National Cancer Institute
$299,274
Michael Pereira
Preclinical efficacy and intermediate
biomarker assays
National Cancer Institute
$2,117,529
Pierluigi Porcu
Combined cytokine-monoclonal
antibody therapy in lymphoma
National Cancer Institute
$135,513
Forrest Ravlin
Chemoprevention of GI tract cancers
with berries
Cooperative State Research,
Education and Extension Service
Laura Rush
Aberrant DNA methylation in acute
myeloid leukemia
National Cancer Institute
$120,148
Manisha Shah
Targeting RAF and VEGF signaling in
thyroid cancer
National Cancer Institute
$198,261
Gary Stoner
Prevention of esophageal cancer
with berries
National Cancer Institute
$497,266
$444,787
2007 Research Report 163
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Miguel Villalona
Early therapeutics development with
a phase II emphasis
National Cancer Institute
$653,131
Miguel Villalona
Phase I dose escalation trial to evaluate
the safety, pharmacokinetics and
pharmacodynamics of KOS-1584 in
patients with advanced solid tumors
Kosan Biosciences, Inc.
$139,530
Susan Whitman
FLT3 genotypes in acute myeloid leukemia
National Cancer Institute
$143,575
FcRn binds and transports albumin
National Institute of Allergy
and Infectious Diseases
$656,941
Adult AIDS clinical trials unit
National Institute of Allergy
and Infectious Diseases
Immunology
Clark Anderson
Infectious Diseases
Susan Koletar
$1,587,829
Michael Para
AIDS education and training center
University of Pittsburgh
$212,000
Larry Schlesinger
Altered M. tuberculosis mannosylation
and the macrophage
National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases
$385,521
Larry Schlesinger
Lung innate immune responses to F
tularensis: a central role for the macrophage
University of Chicago
$546,877
Kurt Stevenson
Ohio State health network infection control
collaborative: epi-centers for prevention
of healthcare-related infections
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention
$394,073
Joanne Turner
CD8 T cells and immunity to tuberculosis
in old mice
National Institute on Aging
General Clinical Research Center (GCRC)
National Center for Research
Resources
AASK cohort study
National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$318,291
General Internal Medicine
Fred Sanfilippo
William Malarkey
$2,955,771
Nephrology
Lee Hebert
$159,993
Lee Hebert
Genetic and clinical risk for human
SLE nephritis
National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$112,500
Todd Pesavento
A randomized, controlled trial of
homocysteine (FAVORIT)
Rhode Island Hospital
$146,961
Brad Rovin
Lupus clinical trials consortium
164 Ohio State University Medical Center
Lupus Clinical Trials
Consortium, Inc.
$100,000
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine
Naeem Ali
TSP-1: A mediator of sepsis-induced
lung injury
National Center for Research
Resources
$130,316
Thomas Clanton
Redox mechanisms of respiratory
muscle stress adaptation
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
Philip Diaz
Alveolar macrophage proteomics in
HIV-induced emphysema
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$381,390
Philip Diaz
Long-term oxygen treatment trial
(LOTT) regional clinical center
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$121,965
Andrea Doseff
Molecular mechanisms of apoptosis in
monocytes
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$239,200
Andrea Doseff
Regulation of apoptosis by the
interaction of Casp-3 with PKC and
small heat shock proteins
NSF Molecular & Cellular
Biosciences
$139,600
Rami Khayat
The role of diagnosis and treatment
of sleep apnea in the acute exacerbation
of heart failure
Respironics, Inc.
$167,250
Valery Khramtsov
In vivo imaging and spectroscopy of
pH and thiols status
National Institute of Biomedical
Imaging and Bioengineering
$156,448
John Mastronarde
Asthma clinical research center
American Lung Association
$164,914
John Mastronarde
Exercise as an anti-inflammatory
therapy for asthma
National Center for Research
Resources
$118,997
Patrick Nana-Sinkam
Regulation of prostacyclin in
pulmonary hypertension
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$131,490
Patrick Nana-Sinkam
The obese critical III: process and
outcome disparities
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$130,248
Mark Wewers
Macrophage inflammasome regulation
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$357,941
Karen Wood
Lung alloimmunity after bone marrow
transplantation
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$130,518
$343,555
Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry
Charles Bell
Structural studies of RecA-DNA complexes
National Institute of
General Medical Sciences
$252,060
Arthur Burghes
Survival motor neuron genes in spinal
muscular atrophy
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$334,780
Kalpana Ghoshal
The role of microRNA in
hepatocarcinogenesis
National Cancer Institute
$171,000
2007 Research Report 165
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
Tsonwin Hai
ATF3 and iNOS in islet destruction
and graft rejection
National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$254,918
Tsonwin Hai
ATF3 in beta cell signaling, gene
expression and destruction
National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$279,067
Tsonwin Hai
Beta cell transcriptional network in
stress response
American Diabetes Association, Inc.
$100,000
Russell Hille
Structure/activity studies of two
molybdenum enzymes
National Institute of General
Medical Sciences
$240,879
Russell Hille
Studies of environmentally relevant
molybdenum enzymes
National Institute of
Environmental Health Sciences
$312,047
Samson Jacob
A research proposal to test novel
nucleotide analogs in the DNA
methylation machinery
Supergen, Inc.
$150,000
Samson Jacob
Alcohol-induced epigenetic changes
in the liver genome
National Institute on Alcohol
Abuse and Alcoholism
$225,224
Samson Jacob
DNA methylation and chromatin
modifications: Mechanisms and
applications in cancer therapy
National Cancer Institute
$2,248,455
Samson Jacob
Molecular mechanisms of diet-induced
carcinogenesis
National Cancer Institute
$288,427
Jeffrey Kuret
Structure and genesis of tau filaments
National Institute on Aging
$269,345
Kamal Mehta
Role of protein kinase Cbeta in
diet-induced hypercholesterol mice
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$286,353
Type B histone acetyltransferases and
the assembly of chromatin structure
National Institutes of Health
$303,750
Jill Rafael-Fortney
DLG and CASK at the mammalian
neuromuscular junction
National Institute of Arthritis and
Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
$180,409
Daniel Schoenberg
Hormonal regulation of mRNA stability
National Institute of General
Medical Sciences
$365,954
SaГЇd Sif
Effects of human SWI/SNF-associated
PRMT5 on lymphomagenesis
National Cancer Institute
$236,250
Sung Ok Yoon
Mechanisms of crosstalk between
NGF receptors, TrkA and p75
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$337,595
Mark Parthun
AWARD
Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics
George Calin
Roles of microRN as in familial chronic
lymphocytic leukemia
CLL Global Research Foundation
$100,000
Jean-Leon Chong
Determine how action of PTEN in stromal
fibroblasts suppresses development of
mammary epithelial tumors
US Department of Defense
$605,342
166 Ohio State University Medical Center
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Carlo Croce
ALL fusion proteins: associated with multiprotein complexes and role in transcription
National Cancer Institute
$298,467
Carlo Croce
Role of Fhit in apoptosis and susceptibility
to therapy
Thomas Jefferson University
$317,040
Carlo Croce
The microRNA genes in hematopoietic/
mesenchimal/neural development and
neoplasias
Fondazione Adrioano
Buzzati-Traverso
$100,000
Ramana Davuluri
Genomewide discovery and analysis of
alternative promoters
National Human Genome
Research Institute
$325,000
Albert de la Chapelle
BAALC in neurogenesis and hematopoiesis
National Cancer Institute
$299,274
Matthew During
An immunological approach to alter
the function of neuronal genes
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$308,848
Matthew During
Gene therapy of neurological disorders
and viral vector development
Neurologix, Inc.
$250,000
Richard Fishel
Functional studies of the meiotic MutS
homologs hMSH4-hMSH5
National Institute of General
Medical Sciences
$267,488
Richard Fishel
Human mismatch repair proteins
and carcinogenesis
National Cancer Institute
$355,444
Richard Fishel
Recombination/repair complex in
human cells
National Institute of General
Medical Sciences
$373,259
Louise Fong
Cell proliferation and esophageal
carcinogenesis in zinc-deficient rats
American Institute for Cancer
Research
$143,565
Louise Fong
Chemoprevention of upper aerodigestive
tract cancer by dietary zinc
National Cancer Institute
$272,249
Ronald Glaser
Stress, the immune system and basal
cell carcinoma
National Cancer Institute
$809,342
Joanna Groden
Characterization of tumor suppression
by the APC gene
National Cancer Institute
$264,600
Joanna Groden
Genetics of gastrointestinal cancer
Case Western Reserve University
Joanna Groden
Mouse models of gastrointestinal cancer
National Cancer Institute
$1,405,108
Denis Guttridge
Cytokines and NF-kappaB regulation
of cancer cachexia
National Cancer Institute
$153,753
Denis Guttridge
NF-kappaB regulation of muscle wasting in
cancer cachexia
National Cancer Institute
$239,456
Tim Hui-Ming Huang
Interrogating epigenetic changes in
cancer genomes
National Cancer Institute
$1,451,281
Kay Huebner
Wwox as a critical signal mediator in
breast cancer
National Cancer Institute
$147,626
$190,217
2007 Research Report 167
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
Gustavo Leone
E2F3 and embryonic development
National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development
$324,077
Amy Elizabeth
Lovett-Racke
Characterizing therapeutic targets for
multiple sclerosis
National Multiple Sclerosis Society
$121,849
Amy Elizabeth
Lovett-Racke
Role of T-bet in immune-mediated
demyelinating disease
National Multiple Sclerosis Society
$110,790
Michael Ostrowski
Genetic analysis of the breast tumor
microenvironment
National Cancer Institute
Michael Ostrowski
Mi: Modulating osteoclast gene
expression and function
National Institute of Arthritis and
Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
$154,368
Michael Ostrowski
Molecular analysis of ras oncogene
activated gene expression
National Cancer Institute
$153,828
Deborah Parris
Coordination of HSV lagging strand
synthesis
National Institute of General
Medical Sciences
$299,408
Deborah Parris
Suppression of RNA interference by
herpes simplex virus
National Institute of Allergy
and Infectious Diseases
$164,235
Yuri Pekarsky
MicroRNAs targeting TCL1 as
therapeutic agents for B-CLL
CLL Global Research Foundation
$100,000
Danilo Perrotti
Role of RNA binding protein in
BCR/ABL leukemogenesis
National Cancer Institute
$239,456
Christoph Plass
DNA methylation as a diagnostic
marker in AML
National Cancer Institute
$288,427
Christoph Plass
DNA methylation as a therapeutic
target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
$117,000
Christoph Plass
DNA methylation in AML
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
$200,000
Phillip Popovich
Macrophage heterogeneity in spinal
cord injury
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$390,920
Phillip Popovich
T-cell functions in the injured spinal cord
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$403,961
Virginia Sanders
Neuromodulation of the antibody
response
National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases
$360,084
Virginia Sanders
Training program in integrative
immunobiology
National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases
$231,072
Amanda Toland
Identification of Aurora-A interacting
cancer susceptibility genes
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Caroline Whitacre
Effect of pregnancy on EAE and MS
National Institutes of Health
168 Ohio State University Medical Center
AWARD
$1,336,146
$180,000
$337,595
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Caroline Whitacre
Migration inhibitory factor in the
progression of EAE
National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases
$224,250
Nicola Zanesi
Mouse models of the most common
human cancers
Sidney Kimmel Foundation for
Cancer Research
$100,000
Antonio Chiocca
Biology of tauopathies studied with
HSV amplicons
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$277,728
Antonio Chiocca
Gene therapy of brain tumors
Massachusetts General Hospital
$274,160
Antonio Chiocca
Imaging transcriptional activation
of gliomas
National Cancer Institute
$145,987
Antonio Chiocca
Interdisciplinary tumor complexity
modeling
National Cancer Institute
$1,125,756
John Kissel
Six month (26 weeks) clinical trial of
gentamicin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
subjects with stop code mutations
Columbus Children’s Research
Institute
$108,400
Kottil Rammohan
Combination therapy using mycophenylate
mofetil (CellCept(R)) and human interfer
on beta 1a (Rebif (R)) in early treatment
of multiple sclerosis
Serono/Pfizer
$150,000
Kottil Rammohan
Study to evaluate the safety and efficacy
of rituximab in adults with primaryprogressive multiple sclerosis
Genentech, Inc.
$128,054
Douglas Scharre
A randomized, multicenter, double-blind,
placebo-controlled, 18-month study of the
efficacy of zaliproden in patients with
mild-to-moderate dementia of the
Alzheimer’s type
Sanofi Winthrop Pharmaceuticals
$117,626
Douglas Scharre
Study of the effect of daily treatment
with MPC-7869 on measures of
cognitive and global function in
subjects with mild to moderate
dementia of the Alzheimer’s type
PPD Development
$142,016
Candice Askwith
Molecular and functional analysis of
the acid-sensing ion channels
NSF Integrative Organismal Biology
Christine Beattie
Genetic and molecular regulation of
motor axon pathway formation
NSF Biological Sciences
Christine Beattie
Spinal muscular atrophy: is it a motor
axon disease?
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
Neurological Surgery
Neurology
Neuroscience
$137,181
$360,000
$337,595
2007 Research Report 169
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Christine Beattie
The generation of transgenic zebra fish
carrying mutations in the zebra fish
sod1 gene
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Association
$130,000
Michael Beattie
New York State SCI research program animal modeling
The Burke Medical Research
Institute
$695,516
Michael Beattie
Recovery of sacral spinal reflexes
after transplantation
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$333,079
Jacqueline Bresnahan
Mechanisms of secondary damage
after spinal cord injury
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$326,782
Anthony Brown
Axonal transport of neurofilaments
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$307,872
John Enyeart
Properties of ion channels that
control secretion
National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$274,455
Andrew Fischer
Muller glia and neuronal regeneration
in the retina
National Eye Institute
Chen Gu
Targeting and function of voltage-gated
potassium channel in myelinated axons
National Multiple Sclerosis Society
$137,500
Paul Henion
Development of distinct neural crest
and hematopoietic subpopulations
National Institute of General
Medical Sciences
$283,070
James Jontes
Role of protocadherins in neural
development studied in living zebra
fish embryos
Burroughs Wellcome Fund
$100,000
Chien-Liang
Glenn Lin
Consequence of RNA oxidation
National Institute on Aging
$190,613
Stuart Mangel
Chloride transporter function in the retina
National Eye Institute
$919,821
Stuart Mangel
Neuronal plasticity in the retina
National Eye Institute
$727,467
Dana McTigue
Facilities of research in spinal cord injury
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$510,004
Dana McTigue
Oligodendrocyte progenitors in spinal
cord injury repair
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$273,664
John Oberdick
Ohio State Neuroscience Center Core
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$492,412
Karl Obrietan
CREB and synaptic reorganization
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$273,878
Karl Obrietan
MAPK signaling and circadian timing
National Institute of Mental Health
$252,060
Michael Xi Zhu
High throughput screening of ligands
of TRP channels
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
170 Ohio State University Medical Center
$299,000
$185,625
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Nisonger Center
Michael Aman
The OSU RUPP-PI project
National Institute of Mental Health
$473,136
Margaretha Izzo
Access Tomorrow: using E-mentoring,
web-based and assistive technologies
for increasing achievement and
transition outcomes
US Department of Education
$199,463
Margaretha Izzo
Enhanced academic achievement and
transition outcomes through technology:
phase 2, stepping stones of technology
innovation
US Department of Education
$261,900
Obstetrics and Gynecology
William Ackerman
Lipid bodies and prostaglandin
production in labor
National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development
$122,472
Jeffrey Fowler
Clinical trials in gynecologic oncology
American College of Obstetricians
and Gynecologists
$313,991
Jay Iams
Multicenter network of maternal-fetal
medicine units
National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development
$758,949
Jay Iams
Vaginal ultrasound cerclage trial
University of Alabama at Birmingham
$144,632
Phenotypic determinants of
vestibular schwannomas
National Institute on Deafness
and Other Communication
Disorders
$314,697
Leona Ayers
Cooperative tissue bank of HIV
positive malignancies
National Cancer Institute
$538,481
Sanford Barsky
The bone marrow stem cell origin of human
breast cancer using transgenic mouse models
Army Medical Research
Acquisition Activity
$112,500
Sanford Barsky
The bone marrow stem cell origin of
lung BAC/PAC
Joan’s Legacy: The Joan
Scarangello Foundation
$100,000
Rolf Barth
Molecular targeting of EGFR for the
treatment of gliomas
National Cancer Institute
$288,428
Wendy Frankel
Cooperative human tissue network
National Cancer Institute
$866,397
Scott Jewell
A randomized, double-blinded, placebocontrolled, phase III trial comparing
docetaxel and prednisone with and without
bevacizumab (IND#7921, NSC#704865)
in men with hormone-refractory prostate
cancer
Cancer & Leukemia Group B
Foundation
$463,293
Scott Jewell
CALGB Pathology coordinating office
(PCO) base funding
University of Chicago
$684,229
Otolaryngology
D Bradley Welling
Pathology
2007 Research Report 171
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Scott Jewell
Cancer and Leukemia Group B Pathology
coordinating office
University of Chicago
$403,937
Larry Lasky
Commercialization of a 3D modular
perfusion bioreactor system for
laboratory use
Case Western Reserve University
$300,000
Larry Lasky
Engineered hematopoietic cell
self-renewal and death
National Heart, Lung,
and Blood Institute
Yang Liu
CD24 polymorphism and multiple sclerosis
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$258,260
Yang Liu
Hunting for novel x-linked breast cancersuppressor genes in mouse and human
Army Medical Research and
Materiel Command
$448,500
Yang Liu
Selective modulation of cancer immunity
and autoimmunity
National Cancer Institute
$265,363
Yang Liu
Tumor burden and T-cell immunity
National Cancer Institute
$270,783
Tatiana Oberyszyn
Role of the EP1 prostanoid receptor in
UV carcinogenesis
National Cancer Institute
$303,230
Tatiana Oberyszyn
Therapeutic immunosuppression,
inflammation and skin cancer
National Cancer Institute
$259,492
Vijay Pancholi
Role of eukaryotic-type STK and PPPL
in GAS pathogenesis
National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases
$259,073
Thomas Prior
Sen. Paul D. Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy
Cooperative Research Center: Seattle
University of Washington
$300,000
Haifeng Wu
Evaluation and validation of SELDI-based
diagnostic tests for thrombotic
thrombocytopenic purpura
Ciphergen Biosystems, Inc.
$149,500
Allan Yates
Integrative training in biomedical systems
National Institute of General
Medical Sciences
$157,167
Rachel Altura
Inhibition of beta-cell loss by surviving
gene targeting
Juvenile Diabetes Research
Foundation International
$100,210
Lauren Bakaletz
Antimicrobial peptides & innate
immunity in otitis media
National Institutes of Health
$352,096
Lauren Bakaletz
Assessment of the relative ability of
pediatric immune serum pools directed
against either the P.O.E.T. or STREPTORIX
formulations of GSK’S pneumococcal
polysaccharide-protein D conjugate
vaccine to protect against ascending
otitis media in a chinchilla
Anonymous
$214,476
Pediatrics
172 Ohio State University Medical Center
$152,010
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Lauren Bakaletz
Determinants of H. influenzae in otitis media
National Institutes of Health
$455,326
Lauren Bakaletz
Studies on the biology and immunogenicity
of NTHi
The University of Iowa
$236,529
John Barnard
TGF-beta regulation of intestinal epithelial
cells
National Institutes of Health
$305,059
Jeffrey Bartlett
AAV vector targeting strategies for gene
therapy
National Institutes of Health
$297,833
Carl Bates
Role of FGF receptors in the developing
kidney
National Institutes of Health
$313,652
Gail Besner
HB-EGF and protection of the intestines
from injury - 505005
Anonymous
Gail Besner
Role of NO and endothelin in human NEC
National Institutes of Health
$317,378
Katherine Blackmore
Women, Infant and Children’s Nutrition
Program (WIC)
Columbus Health Department
$427,335
Michael Brady
Family AIDS Clinic and Educational
Services (FACES)
Health Resources & Services
Administration
$662,634
Michael Brady
NICHD institutional training for pediatricians
National Institutes of Health
$229,922
Jeffrey Bridge
Quality of care for adolescent suicide
attempters
National Institutes of Health
$128,148
John Campo
Anxiety and recurrent abdominal pain
in children
National Institutes of Health
$495,372
John Campo
Brief CBT for pediatric abdominal pain
and anxiety
National Institutes of Health
$200,880
Paul Casamassimo
Northeast Center for Research to Reduce
Oral Health Disparities
Boston University
Marcel Casavant
Poison control bioterrorism preparedness
Ohio Department of Health
Long-Sheng Chang
Phenotypic determinants in vestibular
schwannomas
Ohio State University Research
Foundation
$101,556
Long-Sheng Chang
The role of drosophila merlin in the
control of mitosis exit and development
US Army Medical Research
$207,776
Reed Clark
Characterization of CNS-compartmentalized env genes
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
$132,328
Reed Clark
HIV vaccine design and development
teams
National Institutes of Health
Reed Clark
International AIDS Vaccine Initiative
Anonymous
$200,000
$155,164
$215,000
$6,792,629
$756,408
2007 Research Report 173
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
Reed Clark
Novel prophylactic HIV vaccines based
on rAAV vectors
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
$295,813
Daniel Coury
HMG hospital-based regional child
find grant
Ohio Department of Health
$128,000
Daniel Coury
Leadership education in neuro-developmental
and related disabilities program
Maternal & Child Health Bureau
Heithem El-Hodiri
The role of Rx in retinal progenitor cell
development
National Institutes of Health
$389,927
Emilio Flano
Gamma-herpesvirus infection of
dendritic cells
National Institutes of Health
$277,326
Roger Friedman
Angioedema study 2006
Anonymous
$103,932
Haiyan Fu
AAV-mediated gene therapy for
neurological disorders of MPS IIIB using
a knock-out mouse model
The Sanfilippo Research Foundation
$100,000
William Gardner
Authorship and conflict of interest in
clinical trials
National Institutes of Health
$263,656
Julie Gastier-Foster
St. Baldrick’s Acute Lymphoblastic
Leukemia Reference Laboratory
National Childhood Cancer
Foundation
$130,000
Cynthia Gerhardt
Sibling and parent bereavement from
childhood cancer
National Institutes of Health
$627,960
Judith Groner
Can changing how mom eats prevent
obesity in toddlers?
National Institutes of Health
$144,690
Judith Groner
Secondhand smoke and cardiovascular
dysfunction in children
Flight Attendant Medical
Research Institute
$108,500
Brett Hall
High throughput screening for a novel
class of anticancer agents that deregulate
tumor-stromal cell interactions
Elsa U. Pardee Foundation
$100,406
Mark Hall
Monocyte pyrin expression in human
sepsis - 500205
National Institutes of Health
$132,300
Dana Hardin
Increased gluconeogenesis is one
cause of CFRD
National Institutes of Health
$572,118
Gail Herman
Molecular studies of x-linked
chondrodysplasia punctata
National Institutes of Health
$278,010
Gail Herman
Regional Genetics Center at Children’s
Hospital
Ohio Department of Health
$325,000
Robert Hoffman
Major affiliates to support research
activities (TrialNet)
TrialNet - George Washington
University
174 Ohio State University Medical Center
AWARD
$400,000
$118,223
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Sudarshan Jadcherla
Pathophysiology of aerodigestive
reflexes in infants – 387105
National Institutes of Health
$275,163
Jane Jarboe
Early Childhood Education Program
Franklin County Board MR/DD
$367,470
Brian Kaspar
Engineering AAV for enhanced
retrograde transport
National Institutes of Health
$324,579
Brian Kaspar
Motor neurons from neural progenitors
Project A.L.S.
$100,000
Brian Kaspar
Therapeutic strategies for ALS
Anonymous
$200,000
Kelly Kelleher
Cross design synthesis: combining
evidence about antidepressants and
suicidality
National Institutes of Health
$301,058
Kelly Kelleher
Trial of automated risk assessment
for adolescents
National Institutes of Health
$416,450
Bryce Kerlin
Patient and family support group for
hemophilia clinic
Cascade Hemophilia Consortium
$123,540
Lawrence Leguire
Amblyopia Registry
Ohio Optometric Association
$143,959
Jiayuh Lin
Inhibition of constitutive Stat3 pathway
in breast cancer cells by a novel lowmolecular-weight compound
Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer
Foundation
$125,000
Jiayuh Lin
PDK-1/AKT pathway as a therapeutic
target using a novel small molecular
compound, OSU-03012, in childhood
rhabdomyosarcoma
Elsa U. Pardee Foundation
$100,000
Yusen Liu
MKP-1 in regulation of inflammatory
cytokine production
National Institutes of Health
$285,138
Paul Martin
Galgt2, dystroglycan and muscle extracellular
matrix
National Institutes of Health
$274,553
Paul Martin
Glycosyltransferase therapy for myopathies
National Institutes of Health
$312,400
Paul Martin
Identification of novel bioactive glycans
on dystroglycan
National Institutes of Health
$191,700
Kim McBride
Genetics of congenital left-sided heart
defects
National Institutes of Health
$132,343
Douglas McCarty
Recombinant AAV gene therapy vector
recombination, integration and genotoxicity
National Institutes of Health
$319,500
Richard McClead
Telemedicine in transport decisions
Ohio Board of Regents
$100,000
Karen McCoy
Asthma Clinical Research Center
Ohio State University Research
Foundation
$122,778
2007 Research Report 175
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Karen McCoy
CF Therapeutic Development Network
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
$108,000
Karen McCoy
Cystic Fibrosis Center
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
$173,467
Kirk McHugh
A genetic model of urogenital
development and obstruction
National Institutes of Health
$305,059
Kirk McHugh
Co-regulatory model of smooth muscle
myogenesis
National Institutes of Health
$269,910
Jerry Mendell
Clinical thresholds and gene transfer in
DMD and LGMD
University of Pittsburgh
$610,224
Jerry Mendell
Early screening and diagnosis of
Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention
$250,000
Jerry Mendell
Gentamicin trial in Duchenne and
limb girdle dystrophies (grant transfer)
National Institutes of Health
$428,558
Jerry Mendell
Immunogenicity of golden retriever and
normal dogs to rAAV vectors carrying
mini-dystrophin
Muscular Dystrophy Association,
Inc.
$194,962
Jerry Mendell
Phase I study of mini-dystrophin gene in AAV
Anonymous
$657,182
Jerry Mendell
Vascular approach to gene therapy for
muscular dystrophy
Children’s National Medical Center
James Mulick
The OSU RUPP-PI Project
Ohio State University Research
Foundation
$133,159
Robert Munson
NTHi Type IV pili: expression and
vaccine potential
National Institutes of Health
$451,937
Robert Munson
Protein glycosylation in haemophilus
ducreyi
National Institutes of Health
$180,000
Leif Nelin
Cationic amino acid transporters and
lung NO production
National Institutes of Health
$332,000
Akihira Otoshi
CCC Transgenic Facility
Ohio State University Research
Foundation
$127,837
Akihira Otoshi
Genetic analysis of the microenvironment in breast tumor progression
Ohio State University Research
Foundation
$218,333
Kathi Pajer
HPA axis function in adolescent
antisocial females
National Institutes of Health
$604,961
Mark Peeples
Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis
University of North Carolina
$198,172
Mark Peeples
Generation of a single-cycle virus to
study the pathogenesis of nipah virus
National Institutes of Health
$177,500
Mark Peeples
Translation regulation in sendai virus
National Institutes of Health
$278,735
176 Ohio State University Medical Center
$224,596
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Stephen Qualman
Acute Lymphocytic Leukemic
Reference Laboratory
National Childhood Cancer
Foundation
$416,780
Stephen Qualman
ALL – specimen banking
National Childhood Cancer
Foundation
$380,396
Stephen Qualman
BPC – specimen banking
National Childhood Cancer
Foundation
$415,553
Stephen Qualman
COG Neuroblastoma Reference
Laboratory
National Childhood Cancer
Foundation
$150,000
Stephen Qualman
COG studies of gene amplification
in rhabdomyosarcoma
University of Pennsylvania
$157,079
Stephen Qualman
COG – specimen banking
Anonymous
$573,350
Stephen Qualman
Pediatric CHTN: new scope/technology
aids cancer research
National Institutes of Health
$828,867
Mark Ranalli
Comprehensive Sickle Cell Treatment
Center
Ohio Department of Health
$143,704
Brady Reynolds
Impulsivity at different stages of
adolescent smoking
National Institutes of Health
$211,320
Gary Smith
Ohio CODES (Crash Outcome Data
Evaluation System)
Ohio Department of Public Safety
$194,848
Gary Smith
The medical and economic impact of
motorized recreational vehicle-related
traumatic brain injury in Ohio
Ohio Department of Public Safety
$110,000
Olivia Thomas
Wellness Block Grant I - pregnancy
prevention
Franklin County Children Services
$124,844
Veronica Vieland
Bayesian reanalysis of a multisite
gene-mapping study of cleft-lip/cleft palate
National Institutes of Health
$144,000
Christopher Walker
AAV vectors for prevention and therapy
of HCV infection
National Institutes of Health
$442,522
Christopher Walker
Dendritic cell mediated induction of
antiHCV immunity
New York University School of
Medicine
$258,513
Christopher Walker
HCV replication and immunity in
chimpanzees
National Institutes of Health
$915,804
Christopher Walker
HCV-specific T-cell responses in
chimpanzees
National Institutes of Health
$954,969
Christopher Walker
Immunological strategies for curing
chronic hepatitus virus infections
Emory University
$677,967
Stephen Welty
Clara cell function and CCSP in
hyperoxic lung injury
National Institutes of Health
$297,833
2007 Research Report 177
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Gregory Wiet
Validation/dissemination virtual
temporal bone dissection
National Institutes of Health
$315,480
Huiyun Xiang
Work-related injuries among
immigrant workers
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention
$162,754
Keith Yeates
A neurobehavioral late-effects in
pediatric brain tumors
Children’s Hospital Medical
Center Cincinnati
$106,687
Keith Yeates
Child and family sequelae of preschool
brain injury
Children’s Hospital Medical
Center Cincinnati
$167,466
Keith Yeates
Outcomes of traumatic brain injury
in children
National Institutes of Health
$105,451
Keith Yeates
Social outcomes in pediatric traumatic
brain injury
National Institutes of Health
$842,827
Chack-Yung Yu
Variations of complement in immunity
and disease
National Institutes of Health
$290,988
Glen Apseloff
A double-blind, randomized, single
and multiple ascending dose study to
determine the safety, tolerability and
pharmacokinetics of GSK232802
GlaxoSmithKline
Glen Apseloff
A randomized pilot study to assess
pharmacokinetic characteristics and
relative bioavailability of hydromorphone
following administration of 3 different
hydromorphone formulations
Covance, Inc.
Glen Apseloff
Ascending single dose study of the
safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics
and pharmacodynamics of NRI-022
administered orally to healthy
postmenopausal women
Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
$744,891
Glen Apseloff
Phase I study of the safety, tolerability
and pharmacokinetics of a single
intravenous dose of ETI-204 and its
potential interaction with ciprofloxacin
EluSys Therapeutics, Inc.
$330,978
Glen Apseloff
Phase I study to evaluate the safety,
tolerability and pharmacokinetics of a
single intravenous dose of CBR-2092 in
healthy volunteers
Cumbre Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
$410,766
Glen Apseloff
Study in healthy male and female
subjects to assess the pharmacokinetic
characteristics and relative
bioavailability of hydromorphone
Covance, Inc.
$238,126
Pharmacology
178 Ohio State University Medical Center
$110,303
$306,290
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Laura Bohn
Morphine tolerance in Barrestin-2KO
mice: beyond pain
National Institute on Drug Abuse
$163,906
Laura Bohn
Physiological implications of opioid
receptor regulation
National Institute on Drug Abuse
$255,476
Roger Briesewitz
Cooperation of Flt3 ITD and p15INK4b
inactivation in leukemogenesis
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
$235,445
Arturo Cardounel
Methylarginines and vascular injury
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$338,702
Howard Haogang Gu
Cocaine and monoamine transporters
National Institute on Drug Abuse
$328,950
Howard Haogang Gu
Mechanism of drug addiction
National Institute on Drug Abuse
$288,068
Wolfgang Sadee
Genetic and epigenetic regulation of
addiction genes
National Institute on Drug Abuse
$366,130
Wolfgang Sadee
Quantitative assessment of cis-acting
polymorphisms affecting CETP mRNA
expression
Pfizer, Inc.
$220,000
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
John Corrigan
Efficacy of the individual placement and
support (IPS) model for clients with
disability and substance use disorders
Wright State University
$113,474
John Corrigan
Ohio regional TBI model system
National Institute on Disability
and Rehabilitation Research
$364,957
John Corrigan
Reliability and predictive validity of the
OSU method of detecting prior TBI
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention
$164,916
Physiology and Cell Biology
George Billman
Effects of a novel compound on
susceptibility to ventricular fibrillation
induced by myocardial ischemia in a
conscious canine model of sudden death
Sanofi-Aventis
$250,000
Jack Boulant
Neural control of temperature regulation
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$342,081
Sandor Gyorke
Controlled and uncontrollable calcium
release in heart
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$358,683
Sandor Gyorke
Ryanodine receptor channels in
heart failure
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$360,133
Lyn Jakeman
Axons and the extracellular matrix in
spinal cord injury
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$270,076
Paul Janssen
Cardiac contraction-relaxation coupling
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$364,967
2007 Research Report 179
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Paul Janssen
Cardiac relaxation: frequency-dependent
relaxation and load-induced remodeling
American Heart Association
$100,000
Paul Janssen
Myofilament calcium sensitivity in
health and disease
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$102,708
Sissy Jhiang
Sodium iodide symporter as an imaging
reporter gene
National Institute of Biomedical
Imaging and Bioengineering
$324,077
Sissy Jhiang
X-SPECT(TM) for functional & anatomic
imaging in vivo
National Center for Research
Resources
$349,90
Beth Lee
Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in
osteoclasts
National Institute of Arthritis and
Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
$263,120
Beth Lee
Regulation of mRNA stability in kidney
epithelia
National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$314,304
Jack Rall
Myofibrillar determinants of striated
muscle relaxation
National Institute of Arthritis and
Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
$263,039
Jackie Wood
Function of the enteric nervous system
National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$306,973
Jackie Wood
Purinergic neurogenic mucosal secretion
National Institutes of Health
$291,974
Mark Ziolo
NOS1/NOS3 functional effects on
cardiac myocyte function
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$375,000
L. Eugene Arnold
Pilot explorations of zinc effects in ADHD
National Institute of Mental Health
$218,434
Mary Fristad
Longitudinal assessment of manic
symptoms (LAMS)
National Institute of Mental Health
$396,908
Janice Kiecolt-Glaser
Depression, stress, aging and
proinflammatory cytokines
National Institute on Aging
$184,500
Janice Kiecolt-Glaser
Psychoneuroimmunology and
mind-body interventions
National Center for
Complementary and
Alternative Medicine
$248,178
Electra Paskett
Appalachian Cancer Center Network
University of Kentucky
$237,077
Electra Paskett
Breast cancer prevention through
nutrition program
The Breast Cancer Research
Foundation
Electra Paskett
Cancer information service
Wayne State University
Electra Paskett
Ohio patient navigation program
American Cancer Society, Inc.
$480,000
Electra Paskett
Reducing cervical cancer in Appalachia
National Cancer Institute
$1,626,982
Christopher Weghorst
Chemoprevention of oral cancer in
Appalachia
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Psychiatry
Public Health
180 Ohio State University Medical Center
$250,000
$142,391
$249,600
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Radiology
Michael Knopp
Advancing imaging technology as a
credentialed biomarker for clinical
drug development
Pfizer, Inc.
$700,000
Michael Knopp
The biomedical structural, functional
and molecular imaging enterprise –
part two
Ohio Department of Development
Robert Snapka
Proteomics of topoisomerase-DNA
cleavage complexes
National Cancer Institute
$229,930
Altaf Wani
Cross-talking pre-incision events of
eukaryotic NER
National Institutes of Health
$346,719
Altaf Wani
DNA damage responses following
genotoxin exposure
National Institute of Environmental
Health Sciences
$343,306
$7,878,957
School of Allied Medical Professions
Michele Basso
Sparing and exercise training promote
recovery in SCI
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$283,920
John Borstad
Three-dimensional analysis of shoulder
motion limitation following treatment
for breast cancer
Susan G Komen Breast Cancer
Foundation
$168,739
John Buford
Reticulospinal control of reaching
National Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke
$283,715
Deborah Heiss
Efficacy of therapeutic exercise for
recurrent back pain
National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development
$204,142
Stephen Wilson
Creating an Indiana-Ohio Center
for Traumatic Amputation
Rehabilitation Research
Indiana University-Purdue
University Indianapolis
Benjamin Sun
Surgical treatment for ischemic heart
failure (STICH)
Duke University
$100,650
Ginny Bumgardner
Hypoxia pre-conditioning of pancreatic
islets for intrahepatic transplantation
National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
$218,980
William Carson III
A program of immune-based treatments
for cancer
National Cancer Institute
$163,858
William Carson III
Modulation of tumor CEA levels for an
antiCEA vaccine
National Cancer Institute
$288,324
William Carson III
Therapy of melanoma with bortexomib
and interferon-alpha
National Cancer Institute
$265,363
William Carson III
Tumor immunology
National Cancer Institute
$198,449
$200,000
Surgery
2007 Research Report 181
PI NAME
TITLE
SPONSOR
AWARD
Charles Cook
Bacterial sepsis and reactivity of latent
cytomegalovirus
National Institute of General
Medical Sciences
$285,187
Charles Cook
The immunobiology of murine allograft
acceptance
National Institute of Allergy
and Infectious Diseases
$282,522
Pedram Ghafourifar
Heart mitochondrial NOS and
hypoxia/reoxygenation
American Heart Association –
Ohio Valley Affiliate
Gayle Gordillo
Role of macrophages in
hemangioendothelioma development
National Institute of General
Medical Sciences
$126,588
Sampath Parthasarathy
Dietary oxidized lipids and
atherosclerosis
National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney
Diseases
$619,245
Sampath Parthasarathy
NGS: A services-oriented framework
for next generation data analysis
centers
NSF Computer & Information
Sciences & Engineering
$154,000
Sampath Parthasarathy
Oxidation hypothesis – paradoxes
and pitfalls
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$701,656
Amer Rajab
Rapid four-day steroid withdrawal with
thymoglobulin induction and maintenance
immunosuppression with sirolimus and
mycophenolate in primary cadaveric
renal transplantation
Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
$164,297
Sashwati Roy
Regulator of diabetic wound healing
InterHealth Nutraceuticals, Inc.
$165,000
Chandan Sen
Oxygen-sensitive signaling in primary
cardiac fibroblast
National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
$328,471
Chandan Sen
Redox control of wound healing
National Institute of General
Medical Sciences
$270,076
Anne VanBuskirk
IFN-gamma and TGF-beta interactions
in post-transplant lymphoproliferative
disorder (PTLD)
Roche Organ Transplantation
Research Foundation
$193,887
Lisa Yee
A dose-response study of omega 3
fatty acids supplements in women at
high risk for breast cancer
University of Chicago
$146,319
Lisa Yee
HER-2/neu and dietary fat: genenutrient interactions in breast cancer
National Cancer Institute
$156,936
TOTAL:
182 Ohio State University Medical Center
$114,121
$148,871,106
PROJECTS FUNDED THROUGH OHIO’S THIRD FRONTIER PROJECT
Launched in 2002, Ohio’s Third Frontier Project is a 10-year, $1.1 billion initiative to expand the state’s research capabilities, promote scientific innovation and create companies that will foster more jobs. The initiative funds various grants, including
Biomedical Research and Commercialization Partnership (BRCP) awards and Wright Center of Innovation (WCI) awards. Both
types support early research and proof of principle in projects that are usually public/private collaborations. Here is a list of BRCPor WCI-funded collaborations involving Ohio State University Medical Center and partners:
Wright Center of Innovation (WCI) and Biomedical Research and
Technology Transfer (BRTT) Partnership Awards
Researcher
Partners
Project Title
Award
Michael Knopp, MD, PhD
Philips Medical
Rexon
The Biomedical, Structural,
Functional and Molecular
Imaging Enterprise
$17.1 million
BRTT Partnership Awards
Caroline Whitacre, PhD
OncoImmune, Ltd.
Cleveland Clinic
Commercialization platform
of immunotherapeutics for
multiple sclerosis
$4.25 million
Michael Caligiuri, MD
Battelle
Zivena
The prevention, detection
and treatment of lung cancer
$8 million
Joel Saltz, MD, PhD
LabBook
Biomedical informatics
synthesis platform
$6 million
Mauro Ferrari, PhD
Battelle
iMeDD, Inc.
The cardiovascular
bioengineering enterprise
Albert de la Chapelle,MD, PhD,
and Charis Eng, MD, PhD
(subcontract with CWRU)
Athersys
Case Western
Reserve University
(sponsor)
Genetics of gastrointestinal
cancer
Larry Lasky, MD
Case Western
Reserve University
(subcontract)
Stem Cell and Tissue
Engineering Institute
(SCTEI)
$6.5 million
$1.49 million
$.56 million
Biomedical Research and Commercialization Program (BRCP) Award
Michael Knopp, MD, PhD
Phillips Medical
Systems of Cleveland
Cardinal Health, Inc.
The Biomedical, Structural,
Functional and
Molecular Imaging
Enterprise
$7.9 million
Total: $51.8 million
2007 Research Report 183
GRANTS FROM INTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES
The Davis/Bremer Medical Research Endowment
Davis/Bremer Grant Awards – 2006
Juan Crestanello, MD
Surgery
Effect of ischemic preconditioning on mitochondrial function and
on mitochondrial free oxygen radical production
Ulysses Magalang, MD
Internal Medicine
Adiponectin as an endogenous anti-inflammatory agent
David Feldman, MD, PhD
Internal Medicine
Adrenergic signaling and genomic perturbations in a nonischemic
cardiomyopathy
Zhenguo Liu, MD, PhD
Cardiovascular Medicine
Hyperglycemia may impair the differentiation of bone marrow
stem cells into endothelial cells: a novel mechanism for the development of cardiovascular dysfunction in diabetes mellitus
Peter Muscarella, MD
Surgery
Preclinical assessment of a novel PI3K/Akt inhibitor as therapy for
pancreatic cancer
Rulong Shen, MD
Pathology
The role of precancer stem cells in tumor angiogenesis
Karen Wood, MD
Internal Medicine
Heat shock protein 27: alloimmunity and apoptosis
2006 STRATEGIC INITIATIVE GRANTS
Ohio State University Medical Center Strategic Initiative Grants (SIGs) are competitive awards internally funded from a pool of
money contributed by four departments (Ophthalmology, Emergency Medicine, Pathology and Radiology) to support outcomes
research by their faculty. Four years ago the Ohio State University medical director’s office assumed the expenses for some house
staff in these departments. The practice dollars that had been underwriting some of these salaries were then redirected into the
SIG pool to support research. In 2006, the Medical Center awarded nine SIGs collectively totaling $697,129.
Strategic Initiative Grant Recipients in Calendar Year 2006
Principal Investigator
Department
Project Title
Carlos Alexandre
Andrade Torres, MD
Emergency Medicine
Unraveling the inotropic effect of Pyruvate
Michael Sayre, MD
Emergency Medicine
Pilot study using indirect calorimetry to describe resting metabolic rate of
resuscitated cardiac arrest patients during hypothermia therapy
Frederick Davidorf, MD
Ophthalmology
MET oncogene as therapeutic target for uveal melanoma
Jeffrey Caterino, MD
Emergency Medicine
Infected elders in the ED: outcome and processes of care
184 Ohio State University Medical Center
Mark Angelos, MD
Emergency Medicine
Cellular mechanisms of early reactive oxygen species formation in
myocardial reperfusion
Vijay Pancholi, PhD
Pathology
Targeting a eukaryotic-type signaling system in staphylococcus
aureus to harness the bacterial drug resistance and biofilm formation
Sanford Barsky, MD
Pathology
Clues to the stem cell origin of human cancers by studying a registry
of organ transplant recipients who later developed secondary solid cancers
Jian-Xin Gao, MD, PhD
Pathology
Identification of early diagnosis marker for cancer
Brian Hiestand, MD
Emergency Medicine
Comparison of multidetector coronary computed tomography and
conventional stress imaging in ED chest pain patients
RESEARCH INVESTMENT FUND (RIF) AWARDS
Ohio State University Medical Center’s Research Investment Fund (RIF) Advisory Committee is dedicated to the institution’s longterm research strategies and to supporting investment in research and research infrastructure. The Committee considers applications in the areas of new faculty start-up, faculty salary support, faculty bridge funding, faculty retention packages, equipment
purchase, core facility support and matching funds for grant proposals. Applicants are asked to provide a comprehensive description of the research and the proposed use of funds. The Committee, supported by Ohio State’s College of Medicine and led by the
vice dean for research, carefully considers each request.
Research Investment Fund Approved Funding
Cumulative through 12/31/2006
FY’04-FY’11
Amount
Percentage
of Total
$838,886
16.22%
175,000
3.38%
117,180
2.27%
2,317,662
44.82%
906,233
17.52%
176,651
3.42%
Faculty Retention
415,000
8.02%
Shared Equipment
224,987
4.35%
$5,171,599
100.00%
Type of Expense
Bridge Funds
Core Facility Support
Facilities Support Personnel
Faculty Recruitment & Start-Up
Matching Funds
Program Expansion
Totals
(see research investment funds pie chart, next page)
2007 Research Report 185
RESEARCH INVESTMENT FUNDS BY TYPE OF EXPENSE
Core Facility Support
3%
Facilities
Support Personnel
2%
Bridge Funds
16%
Shared Equipment
4%
Faculty
Recruitment & Start-up
45%
Faculty Retention
8%
Program Expansion
4%
Matching Funds
18%
CRISAFI-MONTE PRIMARY CARE CARDIOPULMONARY GRANT PROGRAM
The Crisafi-Monte Research Endowment supports physician investigators in Family Medicine and/or Primary Care, supporting
teaching, research and scholarship in diseases of the heart, lungs and related disorders. Grants are awarded for one or two years,
with a maximum total of $40,000.
During 2006, Patricia Schwirian, PhD, RN, Judith Groner, MD, and William Mizer, MD, were awarded $18,868 from the CrisafiMonte Fund to supplement a National Institutes of Health award of $247,500 (plus $41,915 from the Children’s Research
Institute) for a project titled Can changing how mom eats prevent obesity in toddlers?
186 Ohio State University Medical Center
Selected High-Impact
Publications BY DEPARTMENT, CENTER OR INSTITUTE
Publications listed in this section are considered the
most significant of the year by their departments,
centers or institutes at Ohio State, but they represent
only a portion of the thousands of publications by
Ohio State medical researchers that appeared in
scientific journals during 2006. For a complete list,
visit our Web site at www.medicalcenter.osu.edu.
2007 Research Report 187
(Note: In this listing, IF = impact factor)
Centers and Institutes
COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER
(of 643 publications)
Hajitou A, Trepel M, Lilley CE, Soghomonyan S, Alauddin MM,
Marini FC, Restel BH, Ozawa MG, Moya CA, Rangel R, Sun Y,
Zaoui K, Schmidt M, von Kalle C, Weitzman MD, Gelovani JG,
Pasqualini R, Arap W. A hybrid vector for ligand-directed
tumor targeting and molecular imaging. Cell 2006;125(2):385398. (IF: 29.431)
Horvath A, Boikos S, Giatzakis C, Robinson-White A, Groussin
L, Griffin KJ, Stein E, Levine E, Delimpasi G, Hsiao HP, Keil M,
Heyerdahl S, Matyakhina L, Libe R, Fratticci A, Kirschner LS,
Cramer K, Gaillard RC, Bertagna X, Carney JA, Bertherat J,
Bossis I, Stratakis CA. A genome-wide scan identifies mutations in the gene encoding phosphodiesterase 11A4 (PDE11A)
in individuals with adrenocortical hyperplasia. Nat Genet
2006;38(7):794-800. (IF: 25.797)
Prentice RL, Caan B, Chlebowski RT, Patterson R, Kullelr LH,
Ockene JK, Margolis KL, Limacher MC, Manson JE, Parker LM,
Paskett ED, Lawrence P, Robbins J, Rossouw JE, Sarto GE,
Shikany JM, Stafanick ML, Thomson CA, Van Horn L, Vitolins
MZ, Wactawski-Wende J, Wallace RB, Wassertheil-Smoller S,
Whitlock E, Yano K, Adams-Campbell L, Anderson GL, Assaf
AR, Beresford SAA, Black HR, Brunner RL, Brzyski RG, Ford L,
Gass M, Hays J, Heber D, Heiss G, Hendrix SL, Hsia J, Hubbell
FA, Jackson RD, Johnson KC, Kotchen JM, LaCroix AZ, Lane
DS, Langer RD, Lasser NL, Henderson MM. Low-fat eating pattern and risk of invasive breast cancer: The Women’s Health
Initiative randomized controlled dietary modification trial.
JAMA 2006;295(6):629-642. (IF: 23.332)
Fedele M, Visone R, De Martino I, Troncone G, Palmieri D, Arra
C, Melillo RM, Helin K, Croce CM, Fusco A. HMGA2 induces
pituitary tumorigenesis by enhancing E2F1 activity. Cancer Cell
2006;9(6):459-471. (IF: 18.725)
Porter PL, Barlow WE, Yeh IT, Lin MG, Yuan XP, Donato E,
Sledge GW, Shapiro CL, Ingle JN, Haskell CM, Albain KS,
Roberts JM, Livingston RB, Hayes DF. p27(Kip1) and cyclin E
expression and breast cancer survival after treatment with
adjuvant chemo therapy. J Natl Cancer Inst 2006;98(23):17231731. (IF: 15.171)
Yu J, Wei M, Becknell B, Trotta R, Liu S, Boyd Z, Jaung MS,
Blaser BW, Sun J, Benson DM, Jr., Mao H, Yokohama A, Bhatt
D, Shen L, Davuluri R, Weinstein M, Marcucci G, Caligiuri MA.
Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine signaling: reciprocal
antagonism regulates interferon-gamma production by human
natural killer cells. Immunity 2006;24(5):575-590. (IF: 15.156)
Dorrance AM, Liu S, Yuan W, Becknell B, Arnoczky KJ,
188 Ohio State University Medical Center
Guimond M, Strout MP, Nakamura T, Yu L, Rush LJ, Weinstein
M, Leone G, Wu L, Ferketich A, Whitman SP, Marcucci G,
Caligiuri MA. MII partial tandem duplication induces aberrant
Hox expression in vivo via specific epigenetic alterations. J Clin
Invest 2006;116(10):2707-26. (IF: 15.053)
Freud AG, Yokohama A, Becknell B, Lee MT, Mao HC, Ferketich
AK, Caligiuri MA. Evidence for discrete stages of human natural killer cell differentiation in vivo. J Exp Med
2006;203(4):1033-1043. (IF: 13.965)
Ollila S, Sarantaus L, Kariola R, Chan P, Hampel H, HolinskiFeder E, Macrae F, Kohonen-Corish M, Gerdes AM, Peltomaki
P, Mangold E, de la Chapelle A, Greenblatt M, Nystrom M.
Pathogenicity of MSH2 missense mutations is typically associated with impaired repair capability of the mutated protein.
Gastroenterology 2006;131 (5):1408-17. (IF: 12.386)
Hartman TR, Qian S, Bolinger C, Fernandez S, Schoenberg DR,
Boris-Lawrie K. RNA helicase A is necessary for translation of
selected messenger RNAs. Nat Struct Mol Biol
2006;13(6):509-516. (IF: 12.19)
Paschka P, Marcucci G, Ruppert AS, MrГіzek K, Chen H, Kittles
RA, Vukosavljevic T, Perrotti D, Vardiman JW, Carroll AJ, Kolitz
JE, Larson RA, Bloomfield CD. Adverse prognostic significance
of KIT mutations in adult myeloid leukemia with inv (16) and
t(8;21): a Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study. J Clin Oncol
2006;24(24):3904-3911. (IF: 11.81)
Monk JP, Phillips G, Waite R, Kuhn J, Schaaf LJ, Otterson GA,
Guttridge D, Rhoades C, Shah M, Criswell T, Caligiuri MA,
Villalona-Calero MA. Assessment of tumor necrosis factor
alpha blockade as an intervention to improve tolerability of
dose-intensive chemotherapy in cancer patients. J Clin Oncol
2006;24(12):1852-1859. (IF: 11.81)
CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
JOHN A. PRIOR HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY
Knutson D, Cain T, Hurtubise L and Kreger C. Lessons learned:
developing e-learning to teach physical examination. The
Clinical Teacher 2006;3(3)163-169.
DOROTHY M. DAVIS HEART AND LUNG
RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(of 678 publications)
Sutton MG, Plappert T, Hilpisch KE, Abraham WT, Hayes DL,
Chinchoy E. Sustained reverse left ventricular structural
remodeling with cardiac resynchronization at one year is a
function of etiology: quantitative Doppler echocardiographic
evidence from the Multicenter InSync Randomized Clinical
Evaluation (MIRACLE). Circulation 2006;113(2):266-72.
(IF: 11.632)
Wani MA, Haynes LD, Kim J, Bronson CL, Chaudhury C,
Mohanty S, WaldmannTA, Robinson JM, Anderson CL.
Familial hypercatabolic hypoproteinemia caused by FcRn deficiency due to mutant b2-microglobulin gene. Proc Natl Acad
Sci 2006;103:5084-5089. (IF: 10.231)
Zhou L, Azfer A, Niu J, Graham S, Choudhury M, Adamski FM,
Younce C, Binkley PF, Kolattukudy PE. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 induces a novel transcription factor that
causes cardiac myocyte apoptosis and ventricular dysfunction.
Circ Res 2006;98(9):1177-85. (IF: 9.408)
Wei Q, XiaY. Proteasome inhibition downregulates endothelial
nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation and function. J Biol Chem
2006;281:21652-21659. (IF: 5.854)
Roy S, Khanna S, Kuhn D, Rink C, Williams W, Zweier JL, Sen
C. Transcriptome analysis of the ischemia-reperfused remodeling myocardium: temporal changes in inflammation and
extracellular matrix. Physiological Genomics 2006;25(3):364374. (IF: 4.636)
Chen YR, Chen CL, Yeh A, Liu X, Zweier JL. Direct and indirect
roles of cytochrome b in the mediation of superoxide generation and NO catabolism by mitochondrial succinatecytochrome c reductase. J Biol Chem 2006;281(19):13159-68.
(IF: 5.854)
Cooke GE, Liu-Stratton Y, Ferketich AK, Moeschberger ML,
Frid DJ, Magorien RD, Bray PF, Binkley PF, GoldschmidtClermont PJ. Effect of platelet antigen polymorphism on
platelet inhibition by aspirin, clopidogrel or their combination.
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006;47(3):541-6. (IF: 9.200)
Montague CR, Hunter MG, Gavrilin MA, Phillips GS,
Goldschmidt-Clermont PJ, Marsh CB. Activation of estrogen
receptor-О± reduces aortic smooth muscle cell differentiation.
Circ Res 2006;99(5):477-84. (IF: 9.408)
Martin MM, Lee EJ, Buckenberger JA, Schmittgen TD, Elton
TS. MicroRNA-155 regulates human angiotensin II type 1
receptor expression in fibroblasts. J Biol Chem
2006;281:18277-18284. (IF: 5.854)
CENTER FOR MICROBIAL INTERFACE BIOLOGY
(CMIB)
Terentyev D, Nori A, Santoro M, Viatchenko-Karpinski S,
Kubalova Z, Gyorke I, Terentyeva R, Vedamoorthyrao S, Blom
NA, Valle G, Napolitano C, Williams SC, Volpe P, Priori SG,
Gyorke S. Abnormal interactions of calsequestrin with the
ryanodine receptor calcium release channel complex linked to
exercise-induced sudden cardiac death. Circ Res
2006;98(9):1151-8. (IF: 9.408)
(of 19 publications)
Bratasz A, Weir NM, Parinandi NL, Zweier JL, Sridhar R,
Ignarro LJ, Kuppusamy P. Reversal to cisplatin sensitivity in
recurrent human ovarian cancer cells by NCX-4016, a nitroderivative of aspirin. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2006;103,39143919. (IF: 10.231)
Kulkarni MM, McMaster WR, Kamysz E, Kamysz W, Engman
DM, McGwire BS. The surface-metalloprotease of the parasitic protozoan, Leishmania, protects against antimicrobial peptide-induced apoptotic killing. Molecular Microbiology
2006;62(5): 1484-1497. (IF: 6.203)
Li H, Liu X, Cui H, Chen YR, Cardounel AJ, Zweier JL.
Characterization of the mechanism of cytochrome P450
reductase-cytochrome P450-mediated nitric oxide and
nitrosothiol generation from organic nitrates. J Biol Chem
2006;281(18):12546-54. (IF: 5.854)
Seveau S, Tham TN, Payrastre B, Hoppe AD, Swanson JA,
Cossart P. A FRET analysis to unravel the role of cholesterol in
Rac1 and PI 3-kinase activation in the InlB/Met signaling pathway. Cellular Microbiology 2006, Nov 28. (IF: 6.333)
Babu GJ, Bhupathy P, Petrashevskaya NN, Wang H, Raman S,
Wheeler D, Jagatheesan G, Wieczorek D, Schwartz A, Janssen
PM, Ziolo MT, Periasamy M. Targeted overexpression of sarcolipin in the mouse heart decreases sarcoplasmic reticulum
calcium transport and cardiac contractility. J Biol Chem
2006;281(7):3972-9. (IF: 5.854)
Gadd ME, Broekemeier KM, Crouser ED, Kumar J, Graff G,
Pfeiffer DR. Mitochondrial iPLA2 activity modulates the
release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and influences the
permeability transition. J Biol Chem 2006;281(11):6931-9.
(IF: 5.854)
Flaherty DK, Vesosky B, Beamer GL, Stromberg P, Turner J.
Exposure to Mycobacterium avium can modulate established
immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection generated by Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination. Journal of
Leukocyte Biology 2006;80:1262-1271. (IF: 4.627)
Torrelles JB, Azad AK, Schlesinger LS. Fine discrimination in
the recognition of individual species of phosphatidyl-myoinositol mannosides from Mycobacterium tuberculosis by C-type
lectin pattern recognition receptors. Journal of Immunology
2006;177:1805-1816 (IF: 6.387)
Parsa KVL, Ganesan LP, Rajaram MVS, Gavrilin MA, Balagopal
A, Mohapatra NP, Wewers MD, Schlesinger LS, Gunn JS,
Tridandapani S. Macrophage proinflammatory response to
Francisella novicida infection is regulated by the SH2 domaincontaining inositol 5’ phosphatase SHIP. PLOS Pathogens
2006;2:0681-0690 (IF: 8.389)
2007 Research Report 189
Gavrilin MA, Bouakl I, Knatz M, Duncan MW, Hall JS, Gunn J,
Wewers MD. Internalization and phagosome escape required
for live Francisella to induce human monocyte IL-1ОІ processing
and release. PNAS 2006;103:141-146. (IF: 10.231)
Gu C*, Zhou W, Puthenveedu MA, Xu M, Jan YN, Jan LY*. The
microtubule plus-end tracking protein EB1 is required for Kv1
voltage-gated K+ channel axonal targeting. Neuron
2006;52:803-816 (* = co-corresponding author). (IF: 14.304)
Rappleye CA, Goldman WE. Defining virulence genes in the
dimorphic fungi. Annual Review of Microbiology 2006;60:281303. (IF: 13.412)
Massa SM, Xie Y, Yang T, Harringtion AW, Kim ML, Yoon SO,
Kraemer R, Moore LA, Hempstead BL, Longo FM. Small,
Nonpeptide p75NTR ligands induce survival signaling and
inhibit proNGF-induced death. Journal of Neuroscience 2006;
26:5288-5300. (IF: 7.506)
CENTER FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY
(of seven publications)
Lucas ME, Muller F, Rudiger R, Henion PD, Rohrer H. The
bHLH transcription factor Hand2 is essential for noradrenergic
differentiation of sympathetic neurons. Development 2006;133:
4015-4024. (IF: 7.603)
Dunkin BJ, Martinez J, Bejerano P, Smith CD, Chang K,
Livingstone AS, Melvin WS. Thin-layer ablation of human
esophageal epithelium using a bipolar radiofrequency balloon
device. Surgical Endoscopy 2006;20:125-130. (IF: 1.746)
Yin H, Laguna KA, Li G, Kuret J. Dysbindin homolog CKBP1 is
an isoform-selective binding partner of human casein kinase-1
isoforms. Biochemistry 2006;45:5297-5308. (IF: 3.848)
Li J, Zhu J, Melvin WS, Bekaii-Saab TS, Chen CS, and
Muscarella P. A structurally optimized celecoxib derivative
inhibits human pancreatic cancer cell growth. Journal of
Gastrointestinal Surgery 2006;10(2):207-214. (IF: 2.29)
INSTITUTE OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE
RESEARCH
Davis SS Jr., Goldblatt MI, Hazey JW, Melvin WS. Unexpected
gastrointestinal tract conditions. Current Problems in Surgery
2006; 43(2):77-118. (IF: 1.560)
Ellison EC, Sparks J, Verducci JS, Johnson JA, Muscarella P,
Melvin WS. Fifty-year appraisal of gastrinoma: recommendations for staging and treatment. Journal of American College of
Surgeons 2006;202:897-905. (IF: 2.621)
Smith CD, Bejarno P, Melvin WS, Patti M, Muthusamy R,
Dunkin BJ. Endoscopic ablation of intestinal metaplasia containing high-grade dysplasia in esophagectomy patients using
a balloon-based ablation system. Surgical Endoscopy 2006;
[Epub ahead of print] (IF: 1.746)
CENTER FOR MOLECULAR NEUROBIOLOGY
(of 23 publications)
Carrel TL, McWhorter ML, Workman E, Zhang H,
Wolstencroft EC, Lorson C, Bassell G, Burghes AHM, Beattie
CE. SMN function in motor axons is independent of functions
required for snRNP biogenesis. Journal of Neuroscience
2006;26:11014-11022. Highlighted in This Week in the Journal.
(IF: 7.506)
Jontes JD, Phillips GR. Selective stabilization and synaptic
specificity: a new cell-biological model. Trends in Neurosciences
2006;29:186-191. (IF: 14.325).
190 Ohio State University Medical Center
(of 61 publications)
Glaser R, Litsky M, Padgett D, Baiocchi R, Yang E, Chen M, Yeh
P-E, Green-Church KB, Caligiuri M, Williams MV. EBV-encoded dUTPase induces immune dysregulation: implications for
the pathophysiology of EBV-associated disease. Virology
2006;346(1):205-218. (IF: 3.08)
Yang EV, Sood AK, Chen M, Yang L, Eubank TD, Marsh CB,
Jewell S, Flavahan NA, Morrison C, Yeh P-E, Lemeshow S and
Glaser R. Norepinephrine upregulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase
(MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma tumor
cells. Cancer Research 2006;66(21):10357-10364. (IF: 7.6)
Kin N and Sanders VM. It takes nerve to tell T and B cells what
to do. J Leuk Biol, 2006;79:1093-1104. (IF: 4.6)
Kin N and Sanders VM. CD86 stimulation on a B cell activates
the PI3K/Akt and PLCgamma2/PKCalpha/beta signaling pathways. J Immunol 2006;176:6727-6735. (IF: 6.387)
Pongratz G, McAlees JW, Conrad DH, Erbe RS, Haas KM and
Sanders VM. The level of IgE produced by a B cell is regulated
by norepinephrine in a p38 MAPK- and CD23-dependent
manner. J Immunol 2006;177:2926-2938. (IF: 6.387)
Nelson RJ, Trainor BC, Chiavegatto S & Demas GE. Pleiotropic
contributions of nitric oxide to aggressive behavior.
Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 2006;30: 346-355.
(IF: 7.44)
Bailey MT, Engler H, Sheridan JF. Stress induces the translocation of cutaneous and gastrointestinal microflora to secondary
lymphoid organs of C57BL/6 mice. Journal of Neuroimmunology
2006;171(1-2):29-37. (IF: 4.6)
Huang AS, Beigneux A, Weil ZM, Kim PM, Molliver ME,
Blackshaw S, Nelson RJ, Young SG, & Snyder SH. D-aspartate
regulates melanocortin formation and function: behavioral
alterations in D-aspartate oxidase-deleted mice. Journal of
Neuroscience 2006;26:2814-2819. (IF: 7.5)
Weil ZM, Pyter LM, Martin LB & Nelson RJ. Perinatal photoperiod organizes adult immune responses in Siberian hamsters
(Phodopus sungorus). American Journal of Physiology
2006;290:R1714-R1719. (IF: 3.94)
Pyter LM, Trainor BC & Nelson RJ. Testosterone and photoperiod interact to affect spatial learning and memory in adult
male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). European
Journal of Neuroscience 2006;23:3056-3062. (IF: 3.94)
Rong Chen, Tilley MR, Hua W, Fuwen Z, Fu-Ming Z, San C,
Ning Q, Stephens RL, Hill ER, Nottoli T, Han DD, Gu HH.
Abolished cocaine reward in mice with a cocaine-insensitive
dopamine transporter. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2006;103:
9333-9338, 2006. (IF: 10.23)
Fulci G, Breymann L, Gianni D, Kurozumi K, Rhee SS, Yu J, Kaur
B, Louis DN, Weissleder R, Caligiuri MA, Chiocca EA.
Cyclophosphamide enhances glioma virotherapy by inhibiting
innate immune responses. Proceedings of the National Academy
of Sciences USA 2006;103(34):12873-12878. (IF:10.231)
Lamfers ML, Fulci G, Gianni D, Tang Y, Kurozumi K, Kaur B,
Moeniralm S, Saeki Y, Carette JE, Weissleder R, Vandertop
WP, van Beusechem VW, Dirven CMF, Chiocca EA.
Cyclophosphamide increases transgene expression mediated
by an oncolytic adenovirus in glioma-bearing mice monitored
by bioluminescence imaging. Molecular Therapy
2006;14(6):779-788. (IF: 5.443)
Newton HB, Figg GM, Slone W, Bourekas E. Incidence of infusion plan alterations after angiography in patients undergoing
intra-arterial chemotherapy for brain tumors. Journal of Neurooncology 2006;78(2):157-160. (IF: 1.581)
Sarkar A, Caamano S, Fernandez JM. The mechanical fingerprint of a parallel polyprotein dimer. Biophysical Journal E-publication December 2006. (IF: 4.507)
Suzuki M, Kasai K, Saeki Y. Plasmid DNA sequences present in
conventional HSV amplicon vectors cause rapid transgene
silencing by forming inactive chromatin. Journal of Virology
2006;80(7):3293-3300. (IF: 5.178)
DARDINGER NEURO-ONCOLOGY CENTER
(of 61 publications)
Aghi M, Cohen KS, Klein RJ, Scadden DT, Chiocca EA. Tumor
stromal-derived factor-1 recruits vascular progenitors to mitotic neovasculature, where microenvironment influences their
differentiated phenol types. Cancer Research
2006;66(18):9054-9064. (IF: 7.616)
Bourekas EC, Figg GM, Slone W, Newton HB. Incidence and
complication rate of incidental aneurysms discovered during
intra-arterial chemotherapy of brain tumors. AJNR American
Journal of Neuroradiology 2006;27(2):297-299. (IF: 2.463)
Chakrabarti I , Burton AW, Rhines L, Mendel E. Percutaneous
vertebroplasty of myelomatous kyphotic wedge fracture in the
presence of previous posterior instrumentation: case report.
Journal of Neurosurgery 2006;5(2):168-171. (IF: 2.446)
THE NISONGER CENTER FOR MENTAL RETARDATION AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
(of 20 publications)
Arnold LE, Aman MG, Cook AM, Witwer AN, Hall KL,
Thompson S, Ramadan Y. Atomoxetine for hyperactivity in
autism spectrum disorders: placebo-controlled crossover pilot
trial. J Amer Academy of Child & Adolesc Psychiatry
2006;45(10):1196-1205.
Lecavalier, L. Behavior and emotional problems in young people with pervasive developmental disorders: relative prevalence, effects of subject characteristics and empirical classification. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 2006;36,
101-1114. (IF: 2.375)
Friedman A, Tian JP, Fulci G, Chiocca EA, Wang J. Glioma
virotherapy: effects of innate immune suppression and
increased viral replication capacity. Cancer Research
2006;66(4):2314-2319. (IF: 7.616)
2007 Research Report 191
Lecavalier, L., et al. The validity of the Autism Diagnostic
Interview – Revised. American Journal on Mental Retardation
2006;111,199-215. (IF: 1.640)
Monreal G, Gerhardt MA. Left ventricular assist device support induces acute changes in myocardial electrolytes in heart
failure. ASAIO J 2006 (e-pub ahead of print). (IF: 1.15)
Martens, MA, Jones, L, Reiss, S. Organ transplantation, organ
donation and mental retardation. Pediatric Transplantation
2006;10,658-664. (IF: 1.424)
Verhey JF, Nathan NS. Utilizing FEM-software to quantify preand post-interventional cardiac reconstruction data based on
modeling data sets from surgical ventricular repair therapy
(SVRT) and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT).
BioMedical Engineering OnLine 2006;5:58. (IF: 1.17)
Departments and Schools
DEPARTMENT OF ANESTHESIOLOGY
Wang GD, Wang XY, Hu H-Z, Fang XC, Liu S, Gao N, Gao X,
and Xia Y. Platelet-activating factor in the enteric nervous system of guinea pig small intestine. Am J Physiol.
2006;291(5):G928-G937. (IF: 3.47)
Brewer AJ, Lane ES, Ross P, Hachwa B. Misdiagnosis of perioperative myocardial ischemia: the effects of electrocardiogram
filtering. Anesth Analg. 2006;103(6):1632-1634. (IF: 2.40)
DEPARTMENT OF BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS
Chen Z, Suntres Z, Palmer J, Guzman J, Javed A, Xue J, Yu JG,
Cooke HJ, Awad H, Hassanain HH, Cardounel AJ, Christofi FL.
Cyclic AMP signaling contributes to neural plasticity and
hyperexcitability in AH sensory neurons following intestinal
trichinella spiralis-induced inflammation. International Journal
of Parasitology 2006;(doi:10.1016/j.ijpara). (IF: 3.35)
Dzwonczyk R, del Rio CL, Sai-Sudhakar C, Sirak J, Michler R,
Sun B, Kelbick N, Howie M. Vacuum-assisted apical suction
devices induce passive electrical changes consistent with
myocardial ischemia during off-pump coronary artery bypass
graft surgery. European J Cardiothoracic Surg 2006; 30:873-876.
Goldman E, Fisher JL. Discrepancies in cancer mortality estimates. Archives of Medical Research 2006;37:548-551.
(IF: 1.38)
Guzman J, Yu JG, Suntres Z, Bozarov A, Cooke H, Javed N,
Auer H, Palatini J, Hassanain HH, Cardounel AJ, Javed A,
Grants I, Wunderlich JE, Christofi FL. ADOA3R as a therapeutic target in experimental colitis: proof by validated high-density oligonucleotide microarray analysis. Inflamm Bowel Dis
2006;12(8):766-789. (IF: 3.01)
Hassanain H, Gregg D, Marcelo Zweier, JL, Souza HP,
Selvakumar B, Ma Q, Moustafa-Bayumi M, Binkley PF, Zweier
J, Flavahan NA, Morris M, Dong C, and Goldschmidt-Clermont
P. Hypertension caused by transgenic overexpression of Rac 1.
Antioxidant and Redox Signaling 2006;9(1):91-100. (IF: 4.23)
Liu S, Gao N, Hu H-Z, Wang X, Wang G-D, Fang X, Xia Y,
Wood JD. Distribution and chemical coding of corticotropin
releasing factor-immunoreactive neurons in the guinea pig
enteric nervous system. J Comp Neurol 2006;494:63-74.
(IF: 3.86)
(of 40 publications)
Chen J, Yuan B. Detecting functional modules in the yeast protein-protein interaction network. Bioinformatics 2006;22:22832290. (IF: 6.019)
Devine KD, Boman EG, Heaphy R, Bisseling R, Catalyurek UV.
Parallel hypergraph partitioning for scientific computing.
Proceedings of 20th International Parallel and Distributed
Processing Symposium (IPDPS) 2006. Digital Object Identifier
10.1109/IPDPS.2006.1639359
Ioshikhes IP, Albert I, Zanton SJ, Pugh BF. Nucleosome positions predicted through comparative genomics. Nature
Genetics 2006;38(10):1210-1215. (IF: 25.707)
Kumar VS, Rutt B, Kurc TM, Catalyurek UV, Chow S, Lamont S,
Martone M, Saltz J. Large image correction and warping in a
cluster environment. Proceedings of the 2006 ACM/IEEE
Conference on Supercomputing (SC2006) Nov. 2006;
page(s):38 Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/SC.2006.39.
(Citeseer rating: 1.25, top 13.4%)
Kurc TM, Janies DA, Johnson A, Langella S, Oster S, Hastings
SL, Habib F, Camerlengo T, Ervin DW, Catalyurek UV, Saltz J.
An XML-based system for synthesis of data from disparate
databases. Journal of the American Medical Informatics
Association 2006;13:289-301. (IF: 4.339)
Saltz JH, Oster S, Hastings SL, Langella S, Sanchez W, Kher M,
Covitz P. CaGrid: design and implementation of the core architecture of the cancer biomedical informatics grid.
Bioinformatics 2006;22:1910-1916. (IF: 6.019)
Division of Anatomy
(of six publications)
Weichel J, Bolte IV JH. Response of reclined post-mortem
human subjects to frontal impact. Society of Automotive
Engineers 2006;01-0647.
192 Ohio State University Medical Center
Bartsch AJ, Bolte IV JH, Litsky AS, Herriot RG, McFadden JD.
Application of anthropomorphic test device crash test kinetics
to post-mortem human subject lower extremity testing.
Society of Automotive Engineers 2006;01-0251.
Tung K, Raman SV, King MA, DePhilip RD. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging with histopathology in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C).
Clinical Anatomy 2006;19:44-50.
DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY MEDICINE
(of 44 publications)
Coyle JD, Miser WF. Race determines appropriate weight to
use in Cockroft-Gault equation in diabetic patients (abstract).
American Journal of Kidney Disorders 2006; 47:A25. (IF: 4.412)
McDougle L, Gabel LL, Stone L. Future of family medicine
workforce in the United States. Family Practice 2006;23:8-9.
(IF: 1.167)
Pressler JM, Heiss DG, Buford JA, Chidley JV. Between-day
repeatability and symmetry of multifious cross-sectional area
measured using ultrasound imaging. Journal of Orthopaedic
and Sports Therapy 2006;36:10-18.
Fahey P, Cruz-Huffmaster D, Blincoe T, Welter C, Welker MJ.
Analysis of downstream revenue to an academic medical center from a primary care network. Academic Medicine 2006;
81(8):702-707. (IF: 1.94)
Shaw JM, Herriott RG, McFadden JD, Donnelly BR, Bolte IV JH.
Oblique and Lateral Impact Response of the PMHS Thorax.
Fiftieth Stapp Car Crash Conference Journal, November 2006.
Wexler RK, Feldman D. Antihypertensive drugs for CVD.
Journal of Family Practice October 2006;55:889-891
(IF: 1.327)
DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Toumi H, Best TM. The myotendinous junction: acute changes
and adaptation to stretch injury. Journal of Anatomy 2006;208:
459-470. (IF: 2.010)
(of 13 publications)
Hallstrom A, Rae TD, Sayre MR, Christenson J, Anton AR,
Mosesso Jr VN, Ottingham LV, Olsufka M, Pennington S,
White L, et al. Manual chest compressions vs. use of an automated chest compression device during resuscitation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Journal of the American
Medical Association 2006;295(22):2620-2628. (IF: 23.332)
Aufderheide T, Hazinski MF, Nichol G, Smith Steffens S,
Buroker A, McCune R, Stapleton E, Nadkarni V, Potts J,
Ramirez RR, Eigel B, Epstein A, Sayre M, Halperin H, Cummins
RO. Community lay rescuer automated external defibrillation
programs: key state legislative components and implementation strategies. Circulation 2006;113(9):1260-70. (IF: 12.563)
Angelos MG, Kutala VK, Torres CA, He G, Stoner J,
Mohammad M, Kuppusamy P. Hypoxic reperfusion of the
ischemic heart and oxygen radical generation. American
Journal Of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
2006;290:H341-H347. (IF: 3.56)
Wexler RK, Aukerman G. Non-pharmacologic treatment of
hypertension. American Family Physician 2006;73:1953-1958.
(IF: 1.251)
Toumi H, Hegge J, Subbotin V, Noble M, Herweijer H, Best TM,
Hagstrom JE. Rapid intravascular injection into skeletal muscle: a damage-assessment study. Molecular Therapy
2006;13(1):229-236. (IF: 5.443)
DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
(of 76 publications)
Abraham WT. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is important
for all patients with congestive heart failure and ventricular
dyssynchrony. Circulation 2006;114(24):2692-2698.
(IF: 11.632)
Stoner JD, Clanton TL, Aune SE, Angelos MG. O2 delivery and
redox state are determinants of compartment-specific reactive
oxygen species in myocardial reperfusion. American Journal of
Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology 2007 (Jan.)
292(1):H109-16. (IF: 3.56)
Baliga RR, Ranganna P, Pitt B, Koelling TM. Spironolactone
treatment and clinical outcomes in patients with systolic dysfunction and mild heart failure symptoms: a retrospective
analysis. Journal of Cardiac Failure 2006;12:250-256.
(IF: 2.935)
Diercks DB, Peacock FW, Hiestand BC, Chen AY, Pollack CV, et
al. Frequency and consequences of recording an electrocardiogram > 10 minutes after arrival in an emergency room in nonST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (from the
CRUSADE Quality Initiative). American Journal of Cardiology
2006;97(4):437-42. (IF: 3.14)
Cooke GE, Liu-Stratton Y, Ferketich AK, Moeschberger ML,
Frid DJ, Magorien RD, Bray PF, Binkley PF, GoldschmidtClermont PJ. Effect of platelet antigen polymorphism on
platelet inhibition by aspirin, clopidogrel or their combination.
Journal of American College of Cardiology 2006; 47(3): 541-546.
(IF: 9.2)
2007 Research Report 193
Daoud EG, Nademanee K, Fuenzalida C, Tomassoni GF,
Schuger C, Chisner M, Simones M, Schwartz M, Reeve H.
Clinical experience with tiered atrial therapies and atrial
arrhythmia prevention algorithms in a dual chamber cardioverter defibrillator. Journal of Cardiovascular
Electrophysiology 2006;17(8):852-856. (IF: 3.285)
Gumina RJ, Murphy JG, Rihal CS, Lennon RJ, Wright RS. Longterm survival after right ventricular infarction. American
Journal of Cardiology 2006;98:1571-1573. (IF: 3.059)
Iyengar S, Feldman DS, Cooke GE, Leier CV, Raman SV.
Detection of coronary artery disease in orthotopic heart transplant recipients with 64-detector row computed tomography
angiography. The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
2006;25(11):1363-1366. (IF: 2.992)
Raman SV, Shah M, McCarthy B, Garcia A, Ferketich AK.
Multi-detector row cardiac CT accurately quantifies right and
left ventricular size and function compared to cardiac magnetic resonance. American Heart Journal 2006;151(3):736-744.
(IF: 3.552)
Division of Digestive Health
(of six publications)
Fang X, Hu HZ, Gao N, Liu S, Wang GD, Wang XY, Xia Y,
Wood JD. Neurogenic secretion mediated by the purinergic
P2Y1 receptor in guinea-pig small intestine. Eur J Pharmacol
2006;536(1-2):113-122. (IF: 2.477)
Gao N, Hu HZ, Zhu MX, Fang X, Liu S, Gao C, Wood JD. The
P2Y purinergic receptor expressed by enteric neurons in
guinea-pig intestine. Neurogastroenterol Motil 2006;18(4):316323. (IF: 2.566)
Gao N, Hu HZ, Liu S, Gao C, Xia Y, Wood JD. Stimulation of
adenosine A1 and A2A receptors by adenosine 5’-monophosphate (AMP) in the submucosal plexus of guinea-pig small
intestine. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2006; [Epub
ahead of print]. (IF: 3.472)
Kresty L, Frankel W, Hammond C, Baird M, Mele J, Stoner G and
Fromkes J. Transitioning from preclinical to clinical chemopreventive assessments of lyophilized black raspberries. Nutrition
and Cancer 2006;54(1):148-156. (IF: 2.426)
Liu S, Gao N, Hu HZ, Wang X, Wang GD, Fang X, Gao X, Xia Y,
Wood JD. Distribution and chemical coding of corticotropin
releasing factor-immunoreactive neurons in the guinea-pig
enteric nervous system. J Comp Neurol 2006;494(1):63-74.
(IF: 3.855)
Wang GD, Wang XY, Hu HZ, Fang XC, Liu S, Gao N, Xia Y.
Platelet-activating factor in the enteric nervous system of the
guinea-pig small intestine. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver
Physiol 2006;291(5):G928-937. (IF: 3.472)
194 Ohio State University Medical Center
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and
Metabolism
(of 25 publications)
Jackson RD, LaCroix AZ, Gass M, Wallace RB, Robbins J, Lewis
CE, Bassford T, Beresford SAA, Black HR, Blanchette P, Bonds
DE, Brunner RL, Brzyski RG, Caan B, Cauley JA, Chlebowski RT,
Cummings SR, Granek I, Hays J, Heiss G, Hendrix SL, Howard
BV, Hsia J, Hubbell FA, Johnson KC, Judd H, Kotchen JM,
Kuller LH, Langer RD, Lasser NL, Limacher MC, Ludlam S,
Manson JE, Margolis KL, McGowan J, Ockene JK, O’Sullivan
MJ, Phillips L, Prentice RL, Sarto GE, Stefanick ML, Van Horn L,
Wactawski-Wende J, Whitlock E, Anderson GL, Assaf AR,
Barad D. Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation on risk for
fractures. New Engl J Med 2006;354:669-683. (IF: 44.016)
Prentice RL, Caan B, Chlebowski RT, Patterson R, Kuller, LH,
Ockene JK, Margolis KL, Limacher MC, Manson JE, Parker LM,
Paskett E, Phillips L, Robbins J, Rossouw JE, Sarto GE, Shikany
JM, Stefanick ML, Thomson CA, Van Horn L, Vitolins MZ,
Wactawski-Wende J, Wallace RB, Wassertheil-Smoller S,
Whitlock E, Yano K, Adams-Campbell L, Anderson GL, Assaf
AR, Beresford SAA, Black HR, Brunner RL, Brzyski RG, Ford L,
Gass M, Hays J, Heber D, Heiss G, Hendrix SL, Hsia J, Hubbell
FA, Jackson RD, Johnson KC, Kotchen JM, LaCroix AZ, Lane
DS, Langer RD, Lasser NL, Henderson MM. Low-fat dietary
pattern and risk of invasive breast cancer: the Women’s
Health Initiative Randomized Controlled Dietary Modification
Trial. JAMA 2006;295:629-642. (IF: 23.494)
Horvath A, Boikos S, Giatzakis C, Robinson-White A, Groussin
L, Griffin KJ, Stein E, Levine E, Delimpasi G, Hsiao HP, Keil M,
Heyerdahl S, Matyakhina L, Libe R, Fratticci A, Kirschner LS,
Cramer K, Gaillard RC, Bertagna X, Carney JA, Bertherat J,
Bossis I, Stratakis CA. A genome-wide scan identifies mutations in the gene encoding phosphodiesterase 11A4 (PDE11A)
in individuals with adrenocortical hyperplasia. Nat Genet
2006;38:794-800. (IF: 25.797)
Pacini F, Ladenson PW, Schlumberger M, Driedger A, Luster
M, Kloos RT, Sherman S, Haugen B, Corone C, Molinaro E,
Elisei R, Ceccarelli C, Pinchera A, Wahl RL, Leboulleux S,
Ricard M, Yoo J, Busaidy NL, Delpassand E, Hanscheid H,
Felbinger R, Lassmann M, Reiners C. Radioiodine ablation of
thyroid remnants after preparation with recombinant human
thyrotropin in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: results of an
international, randomized, controlled study. JCEM
2006;91:926-932. (IF: 6.020)
Kirschner, LS. Emerging treatment strategies for adrenocortical
carcinoma: a new hope. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006;91:14-21.
(IF: 6.020)
Hänscheid H, Lassmann M, Luster M, Thomas SR, Pacini F,
Ceccarelli C, Ladenson PW, Wahl RL, Schlumberger M, Ricard
M, Driedger A, Kloos RT, Sherman SI, Haugen BR, Carriere V,
Corone C, Reiners C. Iodine biokinetics and dosimetry in
radioiodine therapy of thyroid cancer: procedures and results
of a prospective international controlled study of ablation after
rhTSH or hormone withdrawal. J Nucl Med 2006;47:648-654.
(IF: 4.684)
Shanafelt TD, Byrd JC, Call TG, Zent CS, Kay NE. Narrative
review: initial management of newly diagnosed, early-stage
chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Ann Intern Med
2006;145(6):435-447. (IF: 13.254)
MrГіzek E, Kloos RT, Ringel MD, Kresty L, Snider P, Arbogast D,
Kies M, Munden R, Busaidi N, Klein MJ, Sherman SI, Shah M.
Phase II study of celecoxib in metastatic differentiated thyroid
carcinoma. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006;Mar 7, [E-pub ahead
of print.] (IF: 6.020)
Monk JP, Phillips G, Waite R, Kuhn J, Schaaf LJ, Otterson GA,
Guttridge D, Rhoades C, Shah M, Criswell T, Caligiuri MA,
Villalona-Calero MA. Assessment of tumor necrosis factor
alpha blockade as an intervention to improve tolerability of
dose-intensive chemotherapy in cancer patients. J Clin Oncol
2006;24(12):1852-1859. (IF: 11.81)
Division of General Internal Medicine
Division of Human Genetics
(of seven publications)
(of 16 publications)
Ledford CH, Headley A, Hollein A, Houghton B, Picchioni M,
Pokala S, Speer A, Whelton, S. Journal Watch from the
Alliance of Clinical Education, Annual Review of Medical
Education Articles: 2004-2005. Teaching and Learning
Medicine 2006;18(3):273-277.
Division of Hematology and Oncology
(of 98 publications)
Porter PL, Barlow WE, Yeh IT, Lin MG, Yuan XP, Donato E,
Sledge GW, Shapiro CL, Ingle JN, Haskell CM, Albain KS,
Roberts JM, Livingston RB, Hayes DF. p27(Kip1) and cyclin E
expression and breast cancer survival after treatment with
adjuvant chemotherapy. J Natl Cancer Inst 2006;98(23):17231731. (IF: 15.171)
Tada Y, Brena RM, Hackanson B, Morrison C, Otterson GA,
Plass C. Epigenetic modulation of tumor suppressor
CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha activity in lung cancer.
J Natl Cancer Inst 2006;98(6):396-406. (IF: 15.171)
Yu J, Wei M, Becknell B, Trotta R, Liu S, Boyd Z, Jaung MS,
Blaser BW, Sun J, Benson DM Jr., Mao H, Yokohama A, Bhatt
D, Shen L, Davuluri R, Weinstein M, Marcucci G, Caligiuri MA.
Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine signaling: reciprocal
antagonism regulates interferon-gamma production by human
natural killer cells. Immunity 2006;24(5):575-590. (IF: 15.156)
Dorrance AM, Liu S, Yuan W, Becknell B, Arnoczky KJ,
Guimond M, Strout MP, Nakamura T, Yu L, Rush LJ, Weinstein
M, Leone G, Wu L, Ferketich A, Whitman SP, Marcucci G,
Caligiuri MA. MII partial tandem duplication induces aberrant
Hox expression in vivo via specific epigenetic alterations. J Clin
Invest 2006;116(10):2707-2726. (IF: 15.053)
Narod S, Lubinski J, Ghadirian P, Lynch HT, Moller P, Foulkes
W, Rosen B, Kim-Sing C, Isaacs C, Domchak S, Sun P,
Hereditary Breast Cancer Clinical Study Group (Wagner T,
Ainsworth P, Chudley A, Eisen A, Golcrist D, Lemire E,
Provencher D, Pasini B, Bellati C, Couch F, Daly M, Eng C,
Fishman D, Karlan B, McLennan J, McKinnon W, Merajver S,
Neuhasen S, Pasche B, Olopade O, Osborne M, Sweet K, Saal
H, Tung N, Weitzel J, Wood M). Screening mammography
and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation
carriers. Lancet Oncol 2006;7(5):402-406. (IF: 23.878)
Pezzolesi M, Li Y, Zhou XP, Pilarski R, Shen L, Eng C. Mutationpositive and mutation-negative patients with Cowden and
Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome associated with distinct
10q haplotypes. Am J Hum Genet 2006;79. (IF: 12.649)
Tekin M, Ozturk Hismi B, Fitoz S, Yalcinkaya F, Ekim
M, Kansu A, Ertem M, Deda G, Tutar E, Arsan S,
Zhou XP, Pilarski R, Eng C, Akar N. A germline PTEN
mutation with manifestations of prenatal onset and
verrucous epidermal nevus. Am J Med Genet
2006;PartA140A:1472-1475. (IF: 12.649)
Sarquis M, Agrawal S, Shen L, Pilarski R, Zhou XP, Eng C.
Distinct expression profiles for PTEN transcript and its splice
variants in Cowden syndrome and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba
syndrome. Am J Hum Genet 2006;79:23-30. (IF: 12.649)
Ollila S, Sarantaus L, Kariola R, Chan P, Hampel H, HolinskiFeder E, Macrae F, Kohonen-Corish M, Gerdes AM, Peltomaki
P, Mangold E, de la Chapelle A, Greenblatt M, Nystrom M.
Pathogenicity of MSH2 missense mutations is typically associated with impaired repair capability of the mutated protein.
Gastroenterology 2006;131(5):1408-1417. (IF: 12.386)
Freud AG, Yokohama A, Becknell B, Lee MT, Mao HC,
Ferketich AK, Caligiuri MA. Evidence for discrete stages of
human natural killer cell differentiation in vivo. J Exp Med
2006;203(4):1033-1043. (IF: 13.965)
2007 Research Report 195
(of three publications)
the parasitic protozoan, Leishmania, protects against antimicrobial peptide-induced apoptotic killing. Mol Micro 2006;
62(5):1484-97. (IF: 6.203)
Wu LC, Goettl VM, Madiai F, Hackshaw KV, Hussain SR.
Reciprocal regulation of nuclear factor kappa B and its
inhibitor ZAS3 after peripheral nerve injury. BMC Neurosci
2006;12,7(1):4. (IF: 2.733)
Vesosky B, Flaherty DK, Turner J. Th1 cytokines facilitate CD8
T cell-mediated early resistance to infection with
Mycobacterium tuberculosis in old mice. Infect Immun 2006;
74(6):3314-24. (IF: 3.933)
Emery CF, Keefe FJ, France CR, Affleck G, Waters S, Fondow
MD, McKee DC, France JL, Hackshaw KV, Caldwell DS,
Stainbrook D. Effects of a brief coping skills training intervention on nociceptive flexion reflex threshold in patients having
osteoarthritic knee pain: a preliminary laboratory study of sex
differences. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2006;31(3)262-269.
(IF: 2.309)
Division of Nephrology
Division of Immunology
Birmingham DF, Nagaraja HN, Rovin BH, Spetie L, Zhao Y, Li X,
Hackshaw KV, Yu CY, Malarkey WB, Hebert LA. Fluctuation in
self-perceived stress and increased risk of flare in patients
with lupus nephritis carrying the serotonin receptor 1A – 1019
G allele. Arth Rheum 2006;54:3291-3299. (IF: 7.421)
Division of Infectious Diseases
(of 13 publications)
Gulick RM, Ribaudo HJ, Shikuma CM, Lalama C, Schackman
BR, Meyer WA, Acosta EP, Schouten J, Squires KE, Pilcher CD,
Murphy RL, Koletar SL, Carlson M, Reichman RC, Bastow B,
Klingman KL, Kuritzkes DR, for the AIDS Clinical Trials Group
A5095 Study Team. Three- vs. four-drug antiretroviral regimens for the initial treatment of HIV-1 infection: a randomized
controlled trial. JAMA 2006; 296:769-81. (IF: 23.49)
Marion CL, Rappleye CA, Engle JT, Goldman WE. An alpha(1,4)-amylase is essential for alpha-(1,3)-glucan production
and virulence in the Histoplasma capsulatum. Mol Micro
2006;62:970-83. (IF: 6.203)
Rappleye CA, Goldman WE. Defining virulence genes in the
dimorphic fungi. Ann Rev Micro 2006;60:281-303. (IF: 13.412)
Torrelles JB, Azad AK, Schlesinger LS. Fine discrimination in
the recognition of individual species of phosphatidyl-myoinositol mannosides from Mycobacterium tuberculosis by C-type
lectin pattern recognition receptors. J Immunol 2006;177:180516. (IF: 8.389)
(of 20 publications)
Agarwal A, Silver M, Reed J. et al. An open-label study of darbepoetin alfa administered once monthly for the maintenance
of haemoglobin concentrations in patients with chronic kidney
disease not receiving dialysis. J Int Med 2006;260:577-585.
(IF: 4.040)
Birmingham D, Nagaraja H, Rovin B, Spetie L, Zhao Y, Li X,
Hackshaw K, Yu C, Marlarkey W, Hebert L. Fluctuation in selfperceived stress and increased risk of flare in patients with
lupus nephritis carrying the serotonin receptor 1A-1019 G
allele. Arthritis Rheum 2006;54:3291. (IF: 7.421)
Birmingham D, Gavit K, McCarty S, Yu C, Rovin B, Hagaraja H,
Hebert L. Consumption of erythrocyte CR1 (CD35) is associated with protection against systemic lupus erythematosus
renal flare. Clin Exp Immunol 2006;143:274. (IF: 2.805)
Nori U, Manoharan A, Yee J, Besarab A. Comparison of lowdose gentamicin with minocycline as catheter lock solutions in
the prevention of catheter-related bacteremia. Am J of Kidney
Diseases 2006;48:596-605. (IF: 4.412)
Rovin B, Song H. Chemokine induction by the adipocytederived cytokine adiponectin. Clin Immu 2006;120(1):99-105.
(IF: 2.805)
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and
Sleep Medicine
(of 81 publications)
Parsa KVL, Ganesan LP, Rajaram MVS, Gavrilin MA, Wewers
MD, Schlesinger LS, Gunn JS, Tridandapani S. Macrophage
proinflammatory response to Francisella novicida infection is
regulated by the SH2 domain-containing inositol 5’ phosphatase SHIP. PLOS Pathogens 2006;2:0681-90. (IF: 8.389)
Gavrilin MA, Bouakl IJ, Knatz NL, Duncan MD, Hall MW, Gunn
JS, Wewers MD. Internalization and phagosome escape
required for Francisella to induce human monocyte IL-1beta
processing and release. Proc Natl Acad Sci 2006;103(1):141146. (IF: 10.231)Bratasz A, Weir NM, Parinandi NL, Zweier JL,
Sridhar R, Ignarro LJ, Kuppusamy P. Reversal to cisplatin sensitivity in recurrent human ovarian cancer cells by NCX-4016, a
nitro derivative of aspirin. Proc Natl Acad Sci
2006;103(10):3914-3919. (IF: 10.231)
Kulkarni MM, McMaster WR, Kamysz E, Kamysz W, Engman
DM and McGwire BS. The major surface-metalloprotease of
Ganesan LP, Joshi T, Fang H, Kutala VK, Roda J, Trotta R,
Lehman A, Kuppusamy P, Byrd JC, Carson WE, Caligiuri MA,
196 Ohio State University Medical Center
Tridandapani S. FcgammaR-induced production of superoxide
and inflammatory cytokines is differentially regulated by SHIP
through its influence on PI3K and/or Ras/Erk pathways. Blood
2006;Jul 15;108(2):718-725. (IF: 10.131)
Wang X, Thomas B, Sachdeva R, Arterburn L, Frye L, Hatcher P
G, Cornwell DG, Ma J. Mechanism of quinone toxicity involving arylation and induction of ER stress. Proc Natl Acad Sci
USA 2006; 103:3604-3609. (IF: 10.231)
Montague CR, Hunter MG, Gavrilin MA, Phillips GS,
Goldschmidt-Clermont PJ, Marsh CB. Activation of estrogen
receptor-alpha reduces aortic smooth muscle differentiation.
Circ Res. 2006;99(5):477-484. (IF: 9.408)
Hanft LM, Rybakova IN, Patel JR, Rafael-Fortney JA, Ervasti
JM. 2006. Cytoplasmic gamma-actin contributes to a compensatory remodeling response in dystrophin-deficient muscle.
Proc Natl Acad Sci, USA 2006;103:5385-5390. (IF: 10.231)
Joshi MS, Julian MW, Huff JE, Bauer JA, Xia Y, Crouser ED.
Calcineurin regulates myocardial function during acute endotoxemia. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2006;173(9):999-1007.
(IF: 8.689)
Qin S, Parthun MR. Recruitment of the type B histone acetyltransferase Hat1p to chromatin linked to DNA double strand
breaks. Molecular Cellular Biology 2006;26:3649-3658.
(IF: 7.093)
Sarkar A, Hall MW, Exline M, Hart J, Knatz N, Gatson NT,
Wewers MD. Caspase-1 regulates Escherichia coli sepsis and
splenic B cell apoptosis independently of interleukin-1beta and
interleukin-18. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2006;174(9):10031010. (IF: 8.689)
Huang W, Batra S, Korrapati S, Mishra V, Mehta KD. Selective
repression of low-density lipoprotein receptor expression by
SP600125: coupling of histone H3-Ser10 phosphorylation and
Sp1 occupancy. Molecular Cellular Biology 2006;26(4):13071317. (IF: 7.093)
Magro CM, Pope-Harman AL, Abbas AE, Ross P Jr. Lung
transplantation: opportunities for research and clinical
advancement. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2006;173(4):466467. (IF: 8.689)
DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR VIROLOGY,
IMMUNOLOGY AND MEDICAL GENETICS
Parsa KV, Ganesan LP, Rajaram MV, Gaurilin MA, Balagopal A,
Mohapatra NP, Wewers MD, Schlesinger LS, Gunn JS,
Tridandapani S. Macrophage proinflammatory response to
Francisella novicida infection is regulated by SHIP. PLoS
Pathog;2006;2(7):e71. (IF: 8.389)
Yang EV, Sood AK, Chen M, Li Y, Eubank TD, Marsh CB, Jewell
S, Flavahan NA, Morrison C, Yeh PE, Lemeshow S, Glaser R.
Norepinephrine upregulates the expression of vascular
endothelial growth factor, Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-2,
and MMP-9 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma tumor cells. Cancer
Res. 2006;66(21):10357-10364. (IF: 7.616)
DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR AND
CELLULAR BIOCHEMISTRY
(of 154 publications)
He H, Jazdzewski K, Wei L, Liyanarachi S, Nagy R, Volinia S,
Calin G, Liu C-G, Franssila K, Suster S, Kloos RT, Croce CM, de
la Chapelle A. The role of microRNA genes in papillary thyroid
carcinoma. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 2005;102:19075-19080.
(IF: 10.231)
Costinean S, Zanesi N, Pekarsky Y, Esmerina T, Volinia S,
Heerema N and Croce CM. Pre B-cell proliferation and lymphoblastic leukemia/high grade lymphoma in EОј miR155
transgenic mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci, USA 2006;103:70247029. (IF: 10.231)
Yoder K, Sarasin A, Kraemer K, McIlhatton M, Bushman F,
Fishel R. The DNA repair genes XPB and XPD defend cells
from HIV integration. Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 2006; 103:46224627. (IF: 10.231)
(of 52 publications)
Gilchrist M, Thorsson V, Li B, Rust AG, Korb M, Kennedy K,
Hai T, Bolouri H, Aderem A. Systems biology approaches identify ATF3 as a negative regulator of innate immunity. Nature
2006;441:173-178. (IF: 29.273)
Hartman TR, Qian S, Bolinger C, Fernandez S, Schoenberg DR,
Boris-Lawrie K. RNA helicase A is necessary for translation of
selected messenger RNAs. Nature Structural and Molecular
Biology 2006;13:509-516. (IF: 12.19)
Cheng ASL, Jin VX, Yan PS, Fan M, Leu Y-W, Chan MWY, Plass
C, Nephew KP, Davuluri RV, Huang T H-M. Combinatorial
analysis of transcription factor partners reveals recruitment of
c-MYC to estrogen receptor-a responsive promoters. Mol Cell
2006;21:1-12. (IF: 14.971)
Smith LT, Lin M, Brena RM, Lang JC, Schuller DE, Otterson GA,
Morrison CD, Plass C. TCF21: Epigenetic regulation of the
tumor-suppressor gene TCF21 on 6q23-q24 in lung and head
and neck cancer. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 2006;103:982-987.
(IF: 10.231)
Wilson RC, Bohlen CJ, Foster MP, Bell CE. Structure of Pfu
Pop5, an archaeal RNase P protein. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
2006;103:873-878. (IF: 10.231)
2007 Research Report 197
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY
(of 38 publications)
Aghi M, Cohen KS, Klein RJ, Scadden DT, Chiocca EA. Tumor
stromal-derived factor-1 recruits vascular progenitors to mitotic neovasculature, where microenvironment influences their
differentiated phenol types. Cancer Research 2006;66(18):
9054-9064. (IF: 7.616)
Chakrabarti I, Burton AW, Rhines L, Mendel E. Percutaneous
vertebroplasty of myelomatous kyphotic wedge fracture in the
presence of previous posterior instrumentation: case report.
Journal of Neurosurgery 2006;5(2):168-171. (IF: 2.446)
Friedman A, Tian JP, Fulci G, Chiocca EA, Wang J. Glioma
virotherapy: effects of innate immune suppression and
increased viral replication capacity. Cancer Research
2006;66(4):2314-2319. (IF: 7.616)
Fulci G, Breymann L, Gianni D, Kurozumi K, Rhee SS, Yu J, Kaur
B, Louis DN, Weissleder R, Caligiuri MA, Chiocca EA.
Cyclophosphamide enhances glioma virotherapy by inhibiting
innate immune responses. Proc Natl Acad of Sci USA
2006;103(34):12873-12878. (IF: 10.231)
Lamfers ML, Fulci G, Gianni D, Tang Y, Kurozumi K, Kaur B,
Moeniralm S, Saeki Y, Carette JE, Weissleder R, Vandertop
WP, van Beusechem VW, Dirven CMF, Chiocca EA.
Cyclophosphamide increases transgene expression mediated
by an oncolytic adenovirus in glioma-bearing mice monitored
by bioluminescence imaging. Molecular Therapy
2006;14(6):779-788 (e-publication). (IF: 5.443)
Sarkar A, Caamano S, Fernandez JM. The mechanical fingerprint of a parallel polyprotein dimer. Biophysical Journal (e-publication 2006); Biophysical Journal 2007;92(4). (IF: 4.507)
Suzuki M, Kasai K, Saeki Y. Plasmid DNA sequences present
in conventional HSV amplicon vectors cause rapid transgene
silencing by forming inactive chromatin. Journal of Virology
2006;80(7):3293-3300. (IF: 5.178)
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY
(of 38 publications)
Barohn RJ, Herbelin L, Kissel JT, King W, McVey AL,
Saperstein DS, Mendell JR. Pilot trial of etanercept in the
treatment of inclusion body myositis. Neurology
2006;66:S123-124. (IF: 5.065)
198 Ohio State University Medical Center
Moore SA, Shilling CJ, Westra S, Wall C, Wicklund MP, Stolle
C, Brown CA, Michele DE, Piccolo F, Winder TL, Stence A,
Barresi R, King N, King W, Florence J, Campbell KP, Fenichel
GM, Stedman HH, Kissel JT, Griggs RC, Pandya S, Mathews
KD, Pestronk A, Serrano C, Darvish D, Mendell JR. Limb-Girdle
muscular dystrophy in the USA. Journal of Neuropathology and
Experimental Neurology 2006;65:995-1003. (IF: 4.471)
Blum D, Meador K, Biton V, Fakhoury T, Shneker B, Chung S, et
al. Cognitive effects of lamotrigine compared with topiramate
in patients with epilepsy. Neurology 2006;67:400-406.
(IF: 5.065)
StГјve O, Marra CM, Jerome KR, Cook L, Cravens PD, Cepok S,
Frohman EM, Phillips JT, Arendt G, Hemmer B, Monson NL,
Racke MK. Immune surveillance in multiple sclerosis patients
treated with natalizumab. Ann Neurol 2006;59:743-747.
(IF: 7.571)
Tennakoon DK, Mehta RS, Ortega SB, Bhoj V, Racke MK,
Karandikar NJ. Therapeutic induction of regulatory, cytotoxic
CD8+ T cells in multiple sclerosis. J Immunol 2006;176: 71197129. (IF: 6.387)
Frohman EM, Racke MK, Raine CS. Multiple sclerosis: The
plaque and its pathogenesis. New Engl J Med 2006;354:942955. (IF: 44.016)
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSCIENCE
(of 53 publications)
Jontes JD, Phillips GR. Selective stabilization and synaptic
specificity: a new cell-biological model. Trends in Neurosciences
2006;29.4:186-191. (IF: 14.32 )
Gavrikov KE, Nilson JE, Dmitriev AV, Zucker CL, Mangel SC.
Dendritic compartmentalization of chloride cotransporters
underlies directional responses of starburst amacrine cells in
retina. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2006;103.49:18793-18798. (IF:
10.231)
Carrel TL, McWhorter ML, Workman E, Zhang H,
Wolstencroft EC, Lorson C, Bassell GJ, Burghes AH, Beattie
CE. Survival motor neuron function in motor axons is independent of functions required for small nuclear ribonucleoprotein biogenesis. Journal of Neuroscience 2006;26(43):1101411022. (IF: 7.5)
Cheng HY, Obrietan K. Dexras1: Shaping the responsiveness of
the circadian clock. Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology.
2006;917.3:345-351. (IF: 6.49)
Tian G, Lai L, Guo H, Butchbach MR, Chang Y, Lin CL.
Translational regulation of glial glutamate transporter EAAT2
expression. Journal of Biological Chemistry 2006; Epub
(IF: 5.85)
Shan X, Lin C-L G. Quantification of oxidized Rnas in
Alzheimer’s disease. Neurobiology of Aging 2006;27.5:657-662.
(IF: 5.31)
McTigue DM, Tripathi R, Wei P. NG2 colocalizes with axons
and is expressed by a mixed cell population in spinal cord
lesions. Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
2006;65.4:406-420. (IF: 4.47)
Ackerman WE IV, Hughes LH, Robinson JM, Kniss DA. In situ
immunolabeling allows for detailed localization of
prostaglandin synthesizing enzymes within amnion epithelium. Placenta 2006;27:919-923. (IF: 2.883)
Schaffir J. Sexual intercourse at term and onset of labor. Obstet
Gynecol 2006;107(6):1310-1314. (IF: 4.170)
DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
(of 20 publications)
(of 42 publications)
Cohn DE, Valmadre S, Resnick KE, Eaton LE, Copeland LJ,
Fowler JM. Bevacizumab and weekly taxane chemotherapy
demonstrates activity in refractory ovarian cancer. Gynecol
Oncol 2006;102:134-139. (IF: 2.251)
Morrison C, Zanagnolo V, Ramirez N, Cohn DE, Kelbick N,
Copeland LJ, Maxwell LG, Fowler JM. HER-2 is an independent
prognostic factor in endometrial cancer: association with outcome in a large cohort of surgically staged cases. J Clin Oncol
2006;24:2376-2385. (IF: 11.810)
Hampel H, Frankel W, Panescu J, Lockman J, Sotamaa K, Fix D,
Comeras I, LaJeunesse J, Nakagawa H, Westman JA, Prior TW,
Clendenning M, Penzone P, Lombardi J, Dunn P, Cohn DE,
Copeland L, Eaton L, Fowler J, Lewandowski G, Vaccarello L,
Bell J, Reid G, de la Chapelle A. Screening for Lynch syndrome
(hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) among endometrial cancer patients. Cancer Res 2006;66(15):7810-7817.
(IF: 7.616)
Armstrong DK, Bundy B, Wenzel L, Huang HQ, Baergen R, Lele
S, Copeland LJ, Walker JL, Burger RA. Intraperitoneal cisplatin
and paclitaxel in ovarian cancer: a GOG study. N Engl J Med
2006;354:34-43. (IF: 44.016)
Durnwald CP, Rouse DJ, Leveno KJ, Spong CY, MacPherson C,
Varner MW, Moawad AH, Caritis SN, Harper M, Wapner RJ,
Sorokin Y, Miodovnik M, Carpenter M, Peaceman AM,
O’Sullivan MJ, Sibai B, Langer O, Thorp JM, Ramin S, Mercer
BM, Gabbe SG for the National Institute of Child Health and
Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network.
The Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Cesarean Registry: safety
and efficacy of a trial of labor in preterm pregnancy after a
prior cesarean delivery. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2006;195(4):11191126. (IF: 3.083)
Hundley AF, Yuan L, Visco AG. Skeletal muscle heavy-chain
polypeptide 3 and myosin binding protein H in the pubococcygeus muscle in patients with and without pelvic organ prolapse. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2006;194:1404-1410. (IF: 3.083)
Boyer KL, Herzog A, Roberts C. Automatic recovery of the
optic nervehead geometry in optical coherence tomography.”
IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging 2006;25(5):553-570.
(IF: 3.94)
Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network: Diurnal variation in retinal thickening measurement by optical coherence
tomography in center-involved diabetic macular edema.
Archives of Ophthalmology 2006;124:521-527. (IF: 3.27)
Grzybowski DM, Holman DW, Katz SE, Lubow M. In vitro
model of cerebrospinal fluid outflow through human arachnoid
granulations. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science
2006;47(8):3664-3672. (IF: 3.64)
Keltner JL, Johnson CA, Anderson DR, Levine RA, Fan J, Cello
KE, Quigley HA, Budenz DL, Parrish RK, Kass MA, Gordon
MO, and the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study Group.
The association between glaucomatous visual fields and optic
nerve head features in the OHTS. Ophthalmology
2006;113(9):1603-12. (IF: 3.66)
Kotecha A, Elsheikh A, Roberts C, Haogang Z, Garway-Heath
DF. Corneal thickness- and age-related biomechanical properties of the cornea measured with the Ocular Response
Analyzer. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science
2006;47(12):5337-5347. (IF: 3.64)
Levine RA, Demirel S, Fan J, Keltner JL, Johnson CA, Kass MA
and the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS) Group.
Asymmetries and visual field summaries as predictors of glaucoma in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science 2006;47:38963903. (IF: 3.64)
Warden SM, Pachydaki SI, Christoforidis JB, D’Amico DJ,
Loewenstein JI. Choroidal neovascularization after epiretinal
membrane removal. Archives of Ophthalmology 2006;124:521527. (IF: 3.27)
2007 Research Report 199
DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS
(of 24 publications)
phy and nasolaryngoscopy in children: a novel approach to
evaluate glottal status. Dysphagia 2006;(1):75-81. (IF: 0.877)
Bertone A, Lipson D, Kamei J, Litsky A, Weisbrode S. Effective
bone hemostasis and healing using radiofrequency and conductive fluid. Clin Orthop Rel Res 2006;446:278-285.
(IF: 1.528)
Ozer E, Grecula JC, Agrawal A, Rhoades CA, Young DC,
Schuller DE. Long-term results of a multimodal intensification
regimen for previously untreated advanced resectable squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity, oropharynx or hypopharynx. Laryngoscope 2006;116(4):607-612. (IF: 1.617)
Chaudhari AM, Lindenfeld TN, Andriacchi TP, Hewett TE,
Noyes FR. Knee and hip loading patterns at different phases in
the menstrual cycle: implications for the gender difference in
ACL injury rates. American Journal of Sports Medicine,
September 2006. (IF: 2.396)
Smith LT, Lin M, Brena RM, Lang JC, Schuller DE, Otterson GA,
Morrison CD, Smiraglia DJ, Plass C. Epigenetic regulation of
the tumor-suppressor gene TCF21 on 6q23-q24 in lung and
head and neck cancer. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2006;103:982987. (IF: 10.231)
Fleshman, RL, Mayerson JL, Wakely Jr. PA. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of high-grade sarcoma with emphasis on neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Mod Pathol 2006;19(Suppl 1):58A.
(IF: 3.426)
DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY
Oleske DM, Lavender SA, Andersson GBJ, Morrissey M, Hahn
JJ, Zold-Kilbourn P, Allen C, Taylor E. Risk factors for recurrent
episodes of work-related low back disorders in an industrial
population. Spine 2006;31(7):789-798. (IF: 2.187)
Barsky SH, Karlin NJ. Mechanisms of disease: breast tumor
pathogenesis and the role of the myoepithelial cell. Nature
Clinical Practice Oncology 2006;3(3):138-151. (IF: 10.0)
Phieffer LS, Goulet JA. Delayed unions of the tibia. J Bone & Jt
Surg 2006;88A:205-216. (IF: 2.339)
Shin CS, Chaudhari AM, Andriacchi TP. The influence of deceleration forces on ACL strain during single leg landing: a simulation study. Journal of Biomechanics, available online, June
2006. (IF: 2.364)
Smith LT, Mayerson J, et. al. 20q11.1 amplification in giant cell
tumor of bone: array CGH, FISH and association with outcome. Genes Chromosomes Cancer 2006;45(10):957-966.
(IF: 3.937)
DEPARTMENT OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY – HEAD
AND NECK SURGERY
(of 28 publications)
Akhmametyeva E, Mihaylova M, Luo H, Kharzai S, Welling DB,
Chang L-S. Regulation of the neurofibromatosis 2 gene promoter expression during embryonic development.
Developmental Dynamics 2006;235(10):2771-2785. (IF: 3.333)
Chang L-S, Jacob A, Lorenz M, Rock J, Akhmametyeva EM,
Mihai G, Schmalbrock P, Chaudhury AR, Lopez R, Yamate J,
John MR, Wickert H, Neff BA, Dodson EE, Welling DB. Growth
of benign and malignant schwannoma xenografts in SCID
mice. Laryngoscope 2006;116(11):2018-2026. (IF: 1.617)
Jadcheria SR, Gupta A, Stoner E, Coley BD, Wiet GJ, Shaker R.
Correlation of glottal closure using concurrent ultrasonogra-
200 Ohio State University Medical Center
(of 129 publications)
Byrd JC, Briggen JG, Peterson BL, Grever MR, Lozanski G,
Lucas DM, Lampson B, Larson RA, Caligiuri MA, Heerema NA.
Select high-risk genetic features predict earlier progression
following chemoimmunotherapy with fludarabine and rituximab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: justification for riskadapted therapy. Journal of Clinical Oncology 2006;24(3):437443. (IF: 11.810)
Jin H, Pancholi V. Identification and biochemical characterization of a eukaryotic-type serine/threonine kinase and its cognate phosphatase in streptococcus pyogenes: their biological
functions and substrate identification. Journal of Molecular
Biology 2006;357(5):1351-1372. (IF: 5.229)
Li O, Chang X, Zhang H, Kocak E, Ding C, Zheng P, Liu Y.
Massive and destructive T cell response to homeostatic cue in
CD24-deficient lymphopenic hosts. Journal of Experimental
Medicine 2006;203(7):1713-1720. (IF: 13.965)
Richards JO, Chang X, Blaser BW, Caligiuri MA, Zheng P, Liu Y.
Tumor growth impedes natural-killer-cell maturation in the
bone marrow. Blood 2006;108(1):246-252. (IF: 10.131)
Tober KL, Wilgus TA, Kusewitt DF, Thomas-Ahner JM,
Maruyama T, Oberyszyn TM. Importance of the EP(1) receptor in cutaneous UVB-induced inflammation and tumor development. Journal of Investigative Dermatology 2006;126(1):205211. (IF: 4.406)
Wang Y, Liu Y, Wu C, Zhang H, Zheng X, Zheng Z, Geiger TL,
Nuovo GJ, Liu Y, Zheng P. Epm2a suppresses tumor growth in
an immunocompromised host by inhibiting Wnt signaling.
Cancer Cell 2006;10(3):179-190. (IF: 18.725)
DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS
(of 348 publications)
Mason KM, Bruggeman ME, Munson Jr. RS, Bakaletz LO. The
nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Sap transporter provides
a mechanism of antimicrobial peptide resistance and SapDdependent potassium acquisition. Mol Micro 2006;62(5):13571372. (IF: 6.203)
Martinez-Sobrido L, Gitiban N, Fernandez-Sesma A, Cros J,
Mertz SE, Jewell NA, Hammond S, Flano E, Durbin RK, GarciaSastre A, Durbin JE. Protection against respiratory syncytial
virus by a recombinant Newcastle disease virus vector. Journal
of Virology 2006; 80(3):1130-1139. (IF: 5.178)
Miller TM, Kim SH, Yamanaka K, Hester M, Umapathi P,
Arnson H, Rizo L, Mendell JR, Gage FH, Cleveland DW, Kaspar
BK. Gene transfer demonstrates that muscle is not a primary
target for non-cell-autonomous toxicity in familial amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2006;103(51):1954619551. (IF: 10.2)
Zhao Q, Wang X, Nelin LD, Yao Y, Matta R, Manson ME,
Baliga RS, Meng X, Smith CV, Bauer JA, Chang CH, Liu Y. MAP
kinase phosphatase-1 controls innate immune responses and
suppresses endotoxic shock. The Journal of Experimental
Medicine 2006;203:131-140. (IF: 13.9)
Nwomeh BC, Chisolm DJ, Caniano DA, Kelleher KJ. Racial and
economic disparity in perforated appendicitis among children:
where is the problem? Pediatrics 2006;117: 870-875. (IF: 4.272)
Ballard RA, Truog WE, Cnann A, Martin RJ, Ballard PL, Merrill
JD, Walsh MC, Durand DJ, Mayock DE, Eichenwald EC, Null
DR, Hudak ML, Puri AR, Golombek SG, Courtney SE, Steward
DL, Welty SE, Phibbs RH, Hibbs AM, Luan X, Wadlinger SR,
Asselin JM, Coburn CE, NO CLD Study Group. Inhaled nitric
oxide in preterm infants undergoing mechanical ventilation.
New England Journal of Medicine 2006;355:343-353.
(IF: 44.016)
DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY
(of 34 publications)
Blower PE, Cross KP. Decision tree methods in pharmaceutical
research. Curr Top Med Chem 2006;6(1):31-39. Review.
(IF: 4.400)
Groer CE, Tidgewell K, Moyer RA, Harding WW, Rothman RB,
Prisinzano TE, Bohn LM. An opioid agonist that does not induce
mu opioid receptor - arrestin interactions or receptor internalization. Mol Pharmacol 2006; e-pub ahead of print. (IF: 4.612)
Li H, Liu X, Cui H, Chen YR, Cardounel AJ, Zweier JL.
Characterization of the mechanism of cytochrome P450
reductase-cytochrome P450-mediated nitric oxide and
nitrosothiol generation from organic nitrates. J Biol Chem
2006;281(18): 12546-12554 (also e-pub 2006). (IF: 5.854)
Besco JA, Hooft van Huijsduijnen R, Frostholm A, Rotter A.
Intracellular substrates of brain-enriched receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase rho (RPTPrho/PTPRT). Brain Res
2006;1116(1):50-57 (also e-pub 2006). (IF: 2.296)
Chen R, Tilley MR, Wei H, Zhou F, Zhou FM, Ching S, Quan N,
Stephens RL, Hill ER, Nottoli T, Han DD, Gu HH. Abolished
cocaine reward in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine
transporter. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2006;103(24):9333-9338.
(also e-pub 2006) (IF: 10.231)
Neff NH, Wemlinger TA, Duchemin AM, Hadjiconstantinou M.
Clozapine modulates aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase
activity in mouse striatum. J Pharmacol Exp Ther
2006;317(2):480-487 (also e-pub 2006). (IF: 4.098)
Pinsonneault JK, Papp AC, SadГ©e W. Allelic mRNA expression
of X-linked monoamine oxidase a (MAOA) in human brain:
dissection of epigenetic and genetic factors. Hum Mol Genet
2006;15(17): 2636-2649 (also e-pub 2006). (IF: 7.764)
Krejsa C, Rogge M, SadГ©e W. Protein therapeutics: new applications for pharmacogenetics. Nat Rev Drug Discov
2006;5(6):507-521. Review. (IF:18.775)
Lim J-E, Papp A, Pinsonneault J, SadГ©e W, Saffen D. Allelic
expression of serotonin transporter (SERT) mRNA in human
pons: lack of correlation with the polymorphism SERTPR.
Molecular Psychiatry 2006;11:649-662. (IF: 9.335)
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND
REHABILITATION
(of 25 publications)
Dobkin B, Apple D, Barbeau H, Basso M, Behrman A. Deforge
D, Ditunno J, Dudley G, Elashoff R, Fugate L, Harkema S,
Saulino M. Scott M. Weight-supported treadmill vs. overground training for walking after acute incomplete SCI.
Neurology 2006;66(4):484-493. (IF: 5.065)
Howard BV, Van Horn L, Hsia J, Manson JE, Stefanick ML,
Wassertheil-Smoller S, Kuller LH, LaCroix AZ, Langer RD,
Lasser NL, Lewis CE, Limacher MC, Margolis KL, Mysiw WJ,
Ockene JK, Parker LM, Perri MG, Phillips L, Prentice RL,
Robbins J, Rossouw JE, Sarto GE, Schatz IJ, Snetselaar LG,
Stevens VJ, Tinker LF, Trevisan M, Vitolins MZ, Anderson GL,
Assaf AR, Bassford T, Beresford SAA, Black HR, Brunner RL,
Brzyski RG, Caan B, Chlebowski RT, Gass M, Granek I,
Greenland P, Hays J, Heber D, Heiss G, Hendrix SL, Hubbell
FA, Johnson KC, Kotchen JM. Low-fat dietary pattern and risk
of cardiovascular disease: The Women’s Health Initiative randomized controlled dietary modification trial. JAMA
2006;295(6):655-666. (IF: 23.494)
2007 Research Report 201
Jackson RD, Wactawski-Wende J, LaCroix AZ, Pettinger M,
Mysiw WJ, et al. Effects of conjugated equine estrogen on risk
of fractures and BMD in postmenopausal women with hysterectomy: results from the Women’s Health Initiative randomized trial. J Bone Min Res 2006;21(6):817-828. (IF: 6.527)
Marras WS, Parakkat J, Chany AM, Yang G, Burr D, Lavender
SA. Spine loading as a function of lift frequency, exposure
duration and work experience. Clin Biomech 2006;21(4):345352. (IF: 1.501)
Mysiw WJ, Bogner JA, Corrigan JD, Fugate L, Clinchot DM,
Kadyan V. The impact of acute care medications on rehabilitation outcome after traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury
2006;20(9):905-911. (IF: 1.471)
Sherwin E, Whiteneck G, Corrigan J, Bedell G, Brown M, Abreu
B, DePompei R, Gordon W, Kreutzer J. Domains of a TBI minimal data set: community reintegration phase. Brain Injury
2006;20(4):383-389. (IF: 1.471)
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY AND
CELL BIOLOGY
(of 58 publications)
Di Barletta MR, Viatchenko-Karpinski S, Nori A, Memmi M,
Terentyev D, Turcato F, Valle G, Rizzi N, Napolitano C, Gyorke
S, Volpe P, Priori SG. Clinical phenotype and functional characterization of CASQ2 mutations associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. Circulation
2006;14(10):1012-1019. (IF: 11.632)
Terentyev D, Noria A, Santoro M, Viatchenko-Karpinski S,
Kubalova Z, Gyorke I, Terentyeva R, Vedamoorthyrao S, Blom
NA, Valle G, Napolitano C, Williams SC, Volpe P, Priori SG,
Gyorke S. Abnormal interactions of calsequestrin with the
ryanodine receptor calcium release channel complex linked to
exercise-induced sudden cardiac death. Circulation Research
2006;98(9):1151-1158. (IF: 9.408)
Billman GE. A comprehensive review and analysis of 25 years
of data from an in vivo canine model of sudden cardiac death:
implications for future anti-arrhythmic drug development.
Pharmacol & Therap 2006;111:808-835. (IF: 8.357)
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY
(of 71 publications)
Arnold LE. Research Units on Pediatric Psychopharmacology
(RUPP) Autism Network: a randomized, controlled crossover
trial of methylphenidate in pervasive developmental disorders
with hyperactivity. Archives of General Psychiatry 2006. (IF: 12.642)
McDougle CJ, Scahill L, Aman MG, McCracken JT, Tierney E,
Davies M, Arnold LE, Posey DJ, Martin A, Ghuman JK, Shah B,
Chuang SZ, Swiezy NB, Gonzalez NM, Hollway J, Koenig K,
McGough J, Ritz L, Vitiello B. Risperidone for the core symptom domains of autism: results from the RUPP autism network
study. American Journal of Psychiatry 2005;162:1142-1148.
(IF: 8.286)
Kowatch RA, Fristad MA, Birmaher B, Wagner KD, Findling RL,
Hellander M, and the Child Psychiatric Workgroup on Bipolar
Disorder. Treatment guidelines for children and adolescents
with bipolar disorder. Journal of the American Academy of Child
& Adolescent Psychiatry 2005;44(3):213-235. (IF: 4.113)
Han DD, Gu HH. Comparison of the monoamine transporters
from human and mouse in their sensitivities to psychostimulant drugs. Biomed Central Pharmacology 2006;6:(1)6.
McGuire L, Heffner K, Glaser R, Needleman B, Malarkey WB,
Dickinson S, Lemeshow S, Cook C, Muscarella P, Melvin WS,
Ellison EC, Kiecolt-Glaser J. Pain and wound healing in surgical
patients. Annals of Behavioral Medicine 2006;31,165-172.
Kim J-Y, Saffen D. Activation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine
receptors stimulates the formation of a multiprotein complex
centered on TRPC6 channels. Journal of Biological Chemistry
2006;280:32035-32047. (IF: 5.854)
Chan YC, Miller KM, Shaheen N, Votolati NA, Hankins MB.
Worsening of psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia with addition of Lamotrigine: a case report. Schizophrenia Research
2006;78(2-3):343-345. (IF: 4.231)
DEPARTMENT OF RADIATION MEDICINE
(of 21 publications)
Johnson BE, Crawford J, Downey RJ, Ettinger DS, Fossella F,
Grecula JC, Jahan T, Kalemkerian GP, Kessinger A, Koczywas
M, Langer CJ, Martins R, Marymont MH, Niell HB, Ramnath N,
Robert F, Williams CC Jr., National Comprehensive Cancer
Network (NCCN). Small cell lung cancer clinical practice
guidelines in oncology. Journal of the National Comprehensive
Cancer Network 2006;4(6):602-622. (IF: N/A)
202 Ohio State University Medical Center
Nag S, DeHaan M, Scruggs G, Mayr N, Martin EW. Long-term
follow-up of patients of intrahepatic malignancies treated with
iodine-125 brachytherapy. International Journal of Radiation
Oncology Biology and Physics 2006; 64:736-744. (IF: 4.556)
Ozer E, Grecula JC, Agrawal A, Rhoades CA, Young DC,
Schuller DE. Long-term results of a multimodal intensification
regimen for previously untreated advanced resectable squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity, oropharynx or hypopharynx. Laryngoscope 2006;116(4):607-612. (IF: 1.617)
Wang JZ, Li XA, Mayr NA. Dose escalation to combat hypoxia
in prostate cancer: a radiobiological study on clinical data.
British Journal of Radiology 2006;79(947):905-911. (IF: 1.394)
Zhang H, Johnson EL, Zwicker RD. Dosimetric validation of the
MCNPX Monte Carlo simulation for radiobiologic studies of
megavoltage grid radiotherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phy
2006;66(5):1576-1583. (IF: 4.556)
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY
(of 52 publications)
Eckstein F, Hudelmaier M, Wirth W et al. Double echo steadystate magnetic resonance imaging of knee articular cartilage
at 3 Tesla: a pilot study for the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Annals
of the Rheumatic Diseases 2006;65(4):433-441. (IF: 6.956)
Giesel F, Bischoff H, von Tengg-Kobligk H, Weber M,
Zechmann C, Kauczor H, Knopp MV. Dynamic contrast
enhanced MRI of malignant pleural mesothelioma: a feasibility
study of non-invasive assessment, therapeutic follow-up and
possible predictor of improved outcome. Chest
2006;129(6):1570-1576. (IF: 4.008)
Von Tengg-Kobligk H, Giesel F, Locklin J et al. Image fusion for
abdominal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). American Journal of
Roentgenology 2006. (IF: 2.209)
DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY
(of 57 publications)
Moss RL, Dimmitt RA, Barnhart DC, Sylvester KG, Brown RL,
Powell DM, Islam S, Langer JC, Sato TT, Brandt ML, Lee H,
Blakely ML, Lazar EL, Hirschl RB, Kenney BD, Hackman DJ,
Zelterman D, Silverman BL. Laparotomy versus peritoneal
drainage for necrotizing enterocolitis and perforation. N Engl J
Med 2006;354(21):2225-2234. (IF: 44.016)
Magro CM, Pope-Harman AL, Abbas AE, Ross P Jr. Lung
transplantation: opportunities for research and clinical
advancement. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2006;173(4):466467. (IF: 8.689)
Gao R, Brigstock DR. A novel integrin alpha5beta1 binding
domain in module 4 of connective tissue growth factor
(CCN2/CTGF) promotes adhesion and migration of activated
pancreatic stellate cells. Gut 2006;55(6):856-862. (IF: 7.692)
Bloomston M, Zhou JX, Rosemurgy AS, Frankel W, MuroCacho CA, Yeatman TJ. Fibrinogen gamma overexpression in
pancreatic cancer identified by large-scale proteomic analysis
of serum samples. Cancer Res 2006;66(5):2592-2599.
(IF: 7.616)
Roda JM, Parihar R, Magro C, Nuovo GJ, Tridandapani S,
Carson WE 3rd. Natural killer cells produce T cell-recruiting
chemokines in response to antibody-coated tumor cells.
Cancer Res 2006;66(1):517-526. (IF: 7.616)
Jia G, Heverhagen J, Polzer H et al. Dynamic contrast-enhanced
magnetic resonance imaging as a biological marker to noninvasively assess the effect of finasteride on prostatic suburethral
microcirculation. Journal of Urology 2006;176:2299-2304.
(IF: 3.592)
VanBuskirk AM, Lesinski GB, Nye KJ, Carson WE, Yee LD.
TGF-beta inhibition of CTL re-stimulation requires accessory
cells and induces peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptorgamma (PPAR-gamma). Am J Transplant 2006;6(8):1809–1819.
(IF: 6.002)
Knopp M, Balzer T, Esser M et al. Assessment of utilization
and pharmacovigilance based on spontaneous adverse event
reporting of gadopentetate dimeglumine as a magnetic resonance contrast agent after 45 million administrations and 15
years of clinical use. Investigative Radiology 2006;41(6).
(IF: 3.173)
Roy S, Khanna S, Nallu K, Hunt TK, Sen CK. Dermal wound
healing is subject to redox control. Mol Ther 2006;13(1):211220. (IF: 5.443)
Li J, Wang Q, Zhu Q, El-Mahdy MA, Wani G, Prætorius-Ibba
M and Wani AA. DNA damage binding component DDB1 participates in nucleotide excision repair through DDB2 DNA
binding and cullin 4A ubiquitin ligase activity. Cancer Res
2006;66:8590-8597. (IF: 7.616)
Cook CH, Trgovcich J, Zimmerman PD, Zhang Y, Sedmak DD.
Lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or interleukin-1beta triggers reactivation of latent cytomegalovirus in
immunocompetent mice. J Virol 2006;80(18):9151-9158.
(IF: 5.178)
2007 Research Report 203
DEPARTMENT OF UROLOGY
SCHOOL OF ALLIED MEDICAL
PROFESSIONS
(of nine publications)
(of 42 publications)
Gilleran JP, Thaly RK, Chernoff AM. Rapid communication:
bipolar PlasmaKinetic transurethral resection of the prostate:
reliable training vehicle for today's urology residents.
J Endourol 2006;20(9):683-687.
Knudsen BE, Matsumoto ED, Chew BH, Johnson B, Margulis V,
Cadeddu JA, Pearle MS, Pautler SE, Denstedt JD. A randomized, controlled, prospective study validating the acquisition of
percutaneous renal collecting system access skills using a
computer-based hybrid virtual reality surgical simulator: phase I.
J Urol 2006;176(5):2173-2178.
Patel V, Gosalbez R, Castelland M. A comparison between
ureteral replacements using a transverse tabularized colonic
tube or ileal ureter: experimental study in dogs. J Pediatric
Surgery 2006;41(4):799-803.
Montie JE, Abrahams NA, Bahnson RR, Eisenberger MA, ElGalley R, Herr HW, Hudes GR, Kuzel TM, Lange PH, Patterson
A, Pollack A, Richie JP, Sexton WJ, Shipley WU, Small EJ,
Trump DL, Walther PJ, Wilson TG. Bladder cancer: clinical
guidelines in oncology. J Natl Compr Canc Netw
2006;4(10):984-1014.
Motzer RJ, Bolger GB, Boston B, Carducci MA, Fishman M,
Hancock SL, Hauke RJ, Hudes GR, Jonasch E, Kantoff P, Kuzel
TM, Lange PH, Levine EG, Logothetis C, Margolin KA, Pohar K,
Redman BG, Robertson CN, Samlowski WE, Sheinfeld J.
Kidney cancer: clinical practice guidelines in oncology. J Natl
Compr Canc Netw 2006;4(10):1072-81.
Sahabbudin RM, Arni T, Ashani N, Arumuga K, Rajenthran S,
Murali S, Patel V, Hemal A, Menon M. Development of robotic program: an Asian experience. World Journal of Urology
2006;24(2):161-164.
204 Ohio State University Medical Center
Wolf SL, Winstein CJ, Miller JP, Taub E, Uswatte G, Morris D,
Guiliani C, Light KE, Nichols-Larsen D. Effect of constraintinduced movement therapy on upper extremity function 3 to 9
months after stroke. The EXCITE randomized clinical trial.
JAMA 2006;296(17);2095-2104. (IF: 23.494)
Basso DM, Fisher LC, Anderson AJ, Jakeman LB, McTigue DM,
Popovich PG. The Basso Mouse Scale for Locomotion (BMS)
detects differences in recovery after spinal cord injury in five
common mouse strains. J Neurotrauma 2006;23:635-659.
(IF: 2.574)
Cordova ML, Dorrough J, Kious K, Ingersoll CD, Merrick MA.
Prophylactic ankle bracing reduces rearfoot motion during
sudden inversion. Scand J Med Sci Sports 2006; e-print ahead
of publication, June 26. (IF: 2.151)
Davidson AG and Buford JA. Bilateral actions of the reticulospinal tract on arm and shoulder muscles in the monkey:
stimulus triggered averaging. Experimental Brain Research
2006;173:25-39. (IF: 2.118)
Kowalczyk N and Mazal J. Administrators’ perceptions of
advanced skills required for radiologic technologists. Radiologic
Technology 2006;77:4. Received Radiologic Technology
Distinguished Author award.
Statistical Year I N R E V I E W
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER RESEARCH AWARD DOLLARS
175
$163.3
D o l l a r s
( i n
M i l
$ )
$159.3
155
$160.2
$143.3
135
$121.8
115
$97.3
95
$79.6
$67.3
75
55
$48.1
$56.3
$56.7
1997
1998
35
1996
1999
2000
2001
2002
C a l e n d a r
Source(s): Ohio State University Research Foundation e-Activity Reports
2003
2004
2005
2006
y e a r
Notes: CY is Calendar Year (January 1 to December 31).
Total research award dollars include direct, indirect, new, renewal and continuation funding processed/money received during the period indicated.
The College of Medicine, the Office of Health Sciences, the School of Public Health, and Columbus Children’s Research Institute are reported.
Separate budgeted research through the University Ledger is not included.
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER NIH RESEARCH AWARD DOLLARS
D o l l a r s
( i n
M i l
$ )
120
$112.1
110
$104.8
100
$94.2
$89.4
90
80
$76.3
70
$65.0
60
50
$49.8
40
2000
2001
2002
2003
C a l e n d a r
2004
2005
2006
y e a r
Source(s): Ohio State University Research Foundation e-Activity Reports
Notes: CY is Calendar Year (January 1 to December 31).
NIH awards are the sum of the direct and indirect dollars awarded for the calendar year, not the life of the project. The College of Medicine, the
Office of Health Sciences, the School of Public Health, and Columbus Children’s Research Institute are reported. CY 2004 – CY 2006 NIH
research award dollars also include NIH awards from principal investigators who have joint appointments with other colleges and the College of
Medicine. Separate budgeted research through the University Ledger is not included.
2007 Research Report 205
Statistical Year I N R E V I E W
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER AWARD DOLLARS INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS
D o l l a r s
( i n
M i l
$ )
90
80
$85.8
$78.9
70
$74.6
60
$51.4
$68.1
$62.0
50
40
30
$33.8
$31.7
1997
1998
$39.8
$40.7
1999
2000
$26.2
20
1996
2001
C a l e n d a r
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
y e a r
Source(s): Ohio State University Research Foundation Notes: CY is Calendar Year (January 1 to December 31).
Total award dollars involving human subjects include direct, indirect, new, renewal and continuation awards funded/processed during the period
indicated. The College of Medicine, the Office of Health Sciences, and the School of Public Health are reported. Awards administered at Columbus
Children’s Research Institute are not included. Separate budgeted research through the University Ledger is not included.
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER RESEARCH AWARD DOLLARS/SQUARE FOOT
425
D o l l a r s
( i n
M i l
$ )
$382
$420
$394
375
325
$371
$368
$308
275
$255
$221
225
$253
$220
$186
175
125
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
C a l e n d a r
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
y e a r
Source(s): Ohio State University Research Foundation; Medical Space Inventory Notes: CY is Calendar Year (January 1 to December 31).
Total research award dollars include direct, indirect, new, renewal and continuation funding processed/money received during the period indicated.
The College of Medicine, the Office of Health Sciences, and the School of Public Health are reported. Awards administered at Columbus Children’s
Research Institute are not included. Separate budgeted research through the University Ledger is not included.
Calculation: Total Research Award Dollars/Total Assigned Research Square Feet = Total Research Dollars Awarded per Square Foot.
206 Ohio State University Medical Center
Contact Information
For more information about
projects or data in this report,
direct correspondence to:
Office of the Associate
Vice President for Health
Sciences Research
Ohio State University
Medical Center
260 Meiling Hall
370 W. 9th Ave.
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-2595
Fax: (614) 688-3427
www.medicalcenter.osu.edu
College of Medicine
Medicine Administration
Wiley “Chip” Souba, MD, ScD,
MBA, Dean
254 Meiling Hall
370 West 9th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-2600
Fax: (614) 292-4254
Departments
Anesthesiology
David Zvara, MD, Chair
N437 Doan Hall
410 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-5188
Fax: (614) 293-9643
Biomedical Informatics
Joel Saltz, MD, PhD, Chair
3184 Graves Hall
333 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-4778
Fax: (614) 688-6600
Emergency Medicine
Douglas Rund, MD, Chair
146 Means Hall
1654 Upham Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-8176
Fax: (614) 293-6570
Neurology
Michael Racke, MD, Chair
445 Means Hall
1654 Upham Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-4036
Fax: (614) 293-9029
Family Medicine
Mary Jo Welker, MD, Chair
Rardin Center
2231 North High Street
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-2653
Fax: (614) 293-2715
Neuroscience
James King, PhD, Interim Chair
4198 Graves Hall
333 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 688-8327
Fax: (614) 688-8742
Internal Medicine
Michael Grever, MD, Chair
215 Means Hall
1654 Upham Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-5661
Fax: (614) 293-6656
Obstetrics and Gynecology
Larry Copeland, MD, Chair
505 Means Hall
1654 Upham Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-8697
Fax: (614) 293-5877
Molecular and Cellular
Biochemistry
Michael Ostrowski, PhD, Chair
333 Hamilton Hall
1645 Neil Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-5451
Fax: (614) 292-4118
Ophthalmology
Thomas Mauger, MD, Chair
5835 Cramblett Hall
456 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-8116
Fax: (614) 293-5602
Molecular Virology, Immunology
and Medical Genetics
Carlo Croce, MD, Chair
455D Comprehensive Cancer
Center
410 W. 12th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-3063
Fax: (614) 292-4080
Neurological Surgery
E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, Chair
N1021 Doan Hall
410 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-5444
Fax: (614) 293-4281
Orthopaedics
Christopher Kaeding, MD,
Interim Chair
N1043 Doan Hall
410 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-2165
Fax: (614) 293-4755
Otolaryngology
D. Bradley Welling, MD, PhD, Chair
4A Cramblett Hall
456 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-8706
Fax: (614) 293-3193
2007 Research Report 207
Pathology
Sanford Barsky, MD, Chair
129 Hamilton Hall
1645 Neil Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-4692
Fax: (614) 688-5632
Psychiatry
Radu Saveanu, MD, Chair
130F Neuroscience Facility
1670 Upham Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-8283
Fax: (614) 293-2926
Pediatrics
Michael Brady, MD, Chair
Children’s Hospital
7th Floor Outpatient Care Center
700 Children’s Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43205
Phone: (614) 722-4561
Fax: (614) 722-4565
Radiation Medicine
Nina Mayr, MD, Chair
080 CHRI
300 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-0672
Fax: (614) 293-4044
Pharmacology
Wolfgang SadГ©e, Dr.rer.nat, Chair
5078 Graves Hall
333 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-8608
Fax; (614) 292-7232
Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation
William Pease, MD, Chair
1018 Dodd Hall
480 Medical Center Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-3801
Fax: (614) 293-3809
Physiology & Cell Biology
Muthu Periasamy, PhD, Chair
304 Hamilton Hall
1645 Neil Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-5448
Fax: (614) 292-4888
208 Ohio State University Medical Center
Radiology
Michael Knopp, MD, PhD, Chair
657 Means Hall
1654 Upham Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-9998
Fax: (614) 293-9275
Surgery
E. Christopher Ellison, MD, Chair
327 Means Hall
1654 Upham Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-8701
Fax: (614) 293-4063
Urology
Robert Bahnson, MD, Chair
4980 Cramblett Hall
456 W. 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-3648
Fax: (614) 293-5363
Schools
Allied Medical Professions
Deborah Larsen, PhD, Director
106 Atwell Hall
453 W. 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-5645
Fax: (614) 292-0210
Biomedical Science
Caroline Whitacre, PhD, Director
1190 Graves Hall
333 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-8725
Fax: (614) 292-6226
Health Sciences
Health Sciences Administration
Fred Sanfilippo, MD, PhD,
Senior Vice President and
Executive Dean for Health
Sciences
200 Meiling Hall
370 West 9th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone (614) 292-7755
Fax: (614) 688-8644
Center for Biostatistics
Stanley Lemeshow, PhD, Director
M200 Starling-Loving Hall
320 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-6901
Fax: (614) 293-6902
Center for Microbial
Interface Biology
Larry Schlesinger, MD, Director
1011 Biomedical Research Tower
460 West 12th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 247-1564
Fax: (614) 292-9616
Center for Minimally
Invasive Surgery
W. Scott Melvin, MD, Director
N729 Doan Hall
410 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-4499
Fax: (614) 293-7852
Center for Molecular
Neurobiology
Anthony Young, PhD, Director
206 Rightmire Hall
1060 Carmack Road
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-5670
Fax: (614) 292-5379
Comprehensive Cancer Center
Michael Caligiuri, MD, Director
A458 Starling-Loving Hall
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-7518
Fax: (614) 293-7520
Davis Heart and Lung Research
Institute
Jay Zweier, MD, Director
110 Heart and Lung Research
Institute
473 West 12th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 247-7766
Fax: (614) 247-7799
General Clinical Research Center
William Malarkey, MD, Director
Davis Medical Research Building
480 West 9th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-8750
Fax: (614) 247-7799
Prior Health Sciences Library
Susan Kroll, MLS, Director
280B Health Sciences Library
376 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-4851
Fax: (614) 292-1920
Institute for Behavioral Medicine
Research
Ronald Glaser, PhD, Director
2175 Graves Hall
333 West 10th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-2252
Fax: (614) 688-3110
Nisonger Center for Mental
Retardation and Developmental
Disabilities
Steven Reiss, PhD, Director
357 McCampbell Hall
1581 Dodd Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-6705
Fax: (614) 292-3727
Office of Geriatrics and
Gerontology
Linda Mauger, Interim Director
S2042 Davis Center
480 Medical Center Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-4815
Fax: (614) 293-5612
Primary Care Research Institute
Mary Jo Welker, MD, Director
2231 North High Street
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 293-2653
Fax: (614) 293-2715
2007 Research Report 209
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Thank you to the following individuals for help in producing this report:
LEADERSHIP:
Fred Sanfilippo, MD, PhD – Senior Vice President and Executive Dean for Health Sciences;
CEO, Ohio State University Medical Center
Wiley “Chip” Souba, Jr., MD, ScD – Dean, College of Medicine
Caroline Whitacre, PhD – Associate Vice President for Health Sciences Research;
Vice Dean for Research; Director, School of Biomedical Science,
Ohio State University College of Medicine
Darian Torrance, CRA – Grants Facilitator, The Ohio State University Medical Center
PRODUCTION TEAM:
Editorial Management – Bob Hecker, Ron Shaull
Graphic Design – Mary Jones Smith, Kathy Lillash
Photography – Jim Brown, Roman Sapecki, Will Shively
ADVISERS:
College of Medicine
Research Council
Caroline Whitacre, PhD – Chair
Michael Bissell, MD, PhD, MPH
Jacqueline Bresnahan, PhD
Melissa Briggs-Phillips, PhD
Brad Harris, MHA
Ron Henthorn
Rebecca Jackson, MD
James King, PhD
Nancy Miller, JD
Michael Para, MD
Wendy Philips
Kim Saunders, MHSA, LNHA
Melissa Slivanya, BSBA
Jill Springer, BSBA
Angela Street-Underwood, MSA
Darian Torrance, BA, CRA
Henry Zheng, PhD, MBA
210 Ohio State University Medical Center
This Time It IS Personal
When Time magazine selected “You” as “Person of the Year” for 2006, it was recognizing that individuals
armed with computers, cell phone cameras, iPods, personal digital assistants, personal blogs and a cornucopia of other communications mechanisms had taken control of information away from mass media and
self-appointed experts.
But that isn’t all the information explosion has wrought. Today, genetic information about each individual
“You” can be used to enhance our health care in important new ways. Combined with a person’s distinctive family, social and environmental profile, new “personalized medicine” tools hold the promise of predicting disease as well as the risk of a particular course of treatment
on a particular disease in a particular person.
Until now, deciding which treatments have the best chance of success has been based on years of physician experience, slowly but steadily
informed by research. But today, because of the convergence of genomics, nanotechnology and computational biology, what was once
“breast cancer,” for example, is now treated as “Miranda’s breast cancer,” “Lakeisha’s breast cancer” or “Susan’s breast cancer” – each
requiring different prevention strategies and therapies based on age, stage, lifestyle and, most significantly, genetic makeup.
New research tools have made it possible for disciplines such as molecular biology, genetics and computer science, to name just a few, to
work together more closely so diseases can be better understood by physicians as well as by basic and clinical researchers.
Personalized medicine holds promise for treating an array of illnesses. Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Human Genome Research
Institute, predicts that, by 2010, the science of pharmacogenetics will be put to work to treat and even conquer diabetes, heart disease,
Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia and many other diseases.
It’s good that the public seems to embrace the personalized medicine concept, albeit without much sense of specificity. We at
Research!America commissioned a national poll that found a good base of intuitive support for personalized medicine. But it’s not enough.
Now the research community must let more people know what they can do as individuals to help assure that this research moves forward
as rapidly as scientific opportunity warrants. And moving forward will require robust investment.
The relationship between money well spent and the development of therapies that improve and extend life is a direct one. As cancer survivor and television news personality Sam Donaldson puts it: “I think the biggest challenge we face now is how to energize the American
public to really get behind the effort to fund (medical) research.”
Why is it such a challenge to turn favorable public opinion into favorable public investment? As with so many other public policy issues, it
is a matter of more effectively spreading the word. In this case, the word is easy: Medical research saves lives and saves the government
money. In the past two years, The Ohio State University has earned double-digit percentage increases in support from the National
Institutes of Health, the federal agency responsible for funding most of the medical research paid for by taxpayers. Ohio State also has
more than doubled its annual funding from the NIH over the past six years. In addition, the University has opened a biomedical research
tower and recruited a number of acclaimed researchers. All it needs now is strong funding support to put a state-of-the-art facility and
21st-century brainpower to work.
But the NIH budget has now been cut for the first time in 30 years. It would be a terrible irony if the successes realized in that time somehow lead policymakers to believe they can retract support and expect progress to continue.
The promise of personalized medicine is within reach of patients and their families because of research conducted at academic institutions
such as Ohio State’s Medical Center. But it won’t happen if NIH budget stagnation eliminates all but the conventional research and starves
young investigators of opportunity. Flat or declining NIH budgets are not only bad for science but harmful to the economy, because medical
breakthroughs have the promise of reducing healthcare costs. In addition, medical research drives strong regional economies that stimulate
new biotech and information-technology businesses and keep locally educated young people from seeking better opportunities elsewhere.
To assure continuing, dynamic public support for medical research, many more people – patients, family members, physicians and scientists
– must participate in public policy. That means talking with community leaders and elected officials to make sure that researchers and their
institutions operate in a fiscal, policy and intellectual environment that makes faster progress against fearsome diseases a much higher
national priority. If more of us get involved, it won’t be long until that Time person of the year – “You” – will be healthier than ever before.
By Mary Woolley, president of Research!America
(Adapted from Frontiers magazine, Fall 2007)
2007 Research Report 211
Office of Health Sciences
Associate Vice President for Research
Ohio State University Medical Center
260 Meiling Hall
370 W. 9th Ave.
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone: (614) 292-2595 Fax: (614) 688-3427
www.medicalcenter.osu.edu
В©2007 Ohio State University Medical Center
Документ
Category
Infarction
Views
533
File Size
8 328 Кб
Tags
primary, beginning, glenroy, west, school
1/--pages
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа