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: to the 2013 Science Olympiad! This Rules Manual will help you prepare to compete in one
more than 350 invitational, regional, state and national tournaments held across the United States
Each Science Olympiad event has a corresponding page on the Science Olympiad national
~rebsite complete with free resources, training handouts and useful links.
Bookmark www.soinc.org today!
Division C (Grades 9-12) Membership Rules
A team may have up to fifteen (15) members. A maximum of seven (7) 12tu grade students is permitted
on a Division C team.
SCIENCE OLYMPIAD
DIVISION C RULES MANUAL
Table of Contents
Anat6my & Physiology .................................1
Forestry ..........................................................
16
Astronomy .....................................................
2
Gravity Vehicle ..............................................
17
Boomilever ...................................................
3
MagLev .........................................................
19
Chemistry Lab ................................................
5
Materials Science .........................................
21
6
Circuit Lab ..................................................
Remote Sensing .............................................
23
Students Below Grade Level Designations
Science Olympiad encourages students to participate in the Division that matches current Science
Olympiad grade level designations. However, to support the inclusion of students who wish to
participate in Science Olympiad, schools with grade levels lower than those stated in a Division are
permitted to invite members below the grade level designations. Participation is limited to ageappropriate events (as determined by a coach, principal or tournament director) and prohibited where
safety is a concern (such as the use of chemicals).
Designer Genes ............................................7
Robot Arm ........................i: ...........................
24
Disease Detectives ........................................8
Rocks and Minerals .......................................
26
Dynamic Planet .............................................
9
Technical Probtem Solving ............................
27
ELastic Launched Glider .............................10
Thermodynamics ...........................................
28
Experimental Design .....................................
12
Water Quality .................................................
30
Science Olympiad Team Membership
Science Olympiad requires that all secondary teams (up to 15 members) competing in any Science
Olympiad tournament (Invitational, Regional, State or National) must be a member of Science
Olympiad and pay the national fee (currently $60, paid as part of the state membership). There is no
exception t9 this requirement, regardless of what teams from the same school are called (Varsity,
Junior Varsity, Alternate Team, Extra Team, Team Two, Team B). No school, region or state Science
Olympiad organization is allowed to alter or amend these national membership requirements. Please
see the Science Olympiad Copyrights and Use statement outlining use of Science Olympiad Rules and
procedures at sanctioned tournaments.
Fermi Questions ............................................
13
Write It Do It ..................................................
31
Forensics .......................................................
14
General Rules/Tentative National Schedule ..32
Division B (Grades 6-9) Membership Rules
A team may have up to fifteen (15) members. A maximum of five (5) 9th grade students is permitted
on a Division B team. Because middle schools that do not have grades 7, 8 or 9 are at a slight
disadvantage, they may invite any combination of up to five (5) of their last year’s 6th, 7th or 8th grade
students to be part of the team. Possible examples/scenarios can be found on the Science Olympiad
website.
Find more Science Olympiad team information under the Policy section of the national website:
General Rules & Code of Ethics, Scoring Guidelines, Home & Virtual Schools, Small Schools, All
Stars, Copyrights and Use, Lasers, Building Policy, Eye Protection and Wristband Procedures.
CHECK OUT THE SCIENCE OLYMPIAD WEB STORE
FOR ALL YOUR SCIENCE OLYMPIAD NEEDS!
Please visit www.store.soinc.org to purchase manuals, DVDs, teaching materials, and CDs for
Division B, Division C and Elementary Science Olympiad. You’ll find new 2013 products,
multiple shipping and payment options and a handy email confirmation system.
Science Olympiad Store: 866-312-3999
ВЇ Please read the General Rules on the back inside cover - they apply to all events. Note: all changes are in bold.
ВЇ Coaches: Please remember to register early for the Science Olympiad Summer Institute - sold out last year]
ВЇ Please visit the Science Olympiad web site: http://www.soinc.org for News, Clarifications, FAQs, Membership
Information, Team Size Requirements, New Store Items and other valuable information, tips and resources.
C~ht В© 2013 Science
Science Olympiad, Inc. owns the intellectual property rights to the contents of this resource. It may not be
reproduced in any form for other individuals or teams. It is meant for the sole use of the school or team that
purchased it. Teams that have paid Science Olympiad National dues and are registered with Science Olympiad,
Inc. may use this resource for the purposes of preparing for and participating in events that are sanctioned by
Science Olympiad, Inc. This resource may not be placed on any website and no one may edit, post, republish, sell,
rent, or otherwise sub-license them. Use of these copyrighted materials by unregistered users is strictly forbidden.
ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
Understand the anatomy and physiology of the nervous, excretory and digestive system.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
’ APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 Minutes
EVENT PARAMETERS: Each team may bring only one 8.5" x ! 1" two-sided page of information in any
form from any source and up to 2 non-programmable, non-graphing calculators.
3. THE COMPETITION: Students should know the basic anatomy and physiology of the nervous, excretory
and digestive systems and how aging and specific diseases affect them. Process skills expected may include
data collection, making observations, inferences, predictions, calculations, analyses and conclusions. The test
may include various formats (e. g., timed stations, written test, PowerPoint slides, anatomical specimens,
etc.) limited to the following topics:
a. DIGESTIVE SYSTEM - All levels should know:
i. Functions of the digestive system
ii. Basic anatomy of the component parts of the alimentary canal and accessory
organs of digestion
iii. Anatomy of the four layers of the wall of the alimentary canal
iv. Comparison of the lining of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine and large
intestine
v. Compare and contrast mechanical and chemical digestion
vi. Physiology of chemical digestion of proteins, fats and carbohydrates
vii. The effects of exercise on the digestive system
viii. The diseases on each level from the cell to the whole person as listed: stomach & duodenal ulcers,
cancers of the digestive system, diarrhea, lactose intolerance, hepatitis, appendicitis
National Level Only:
ix. Additional diseases: diverticular disease, GERD, Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease
x. The function of the liver and pancreas in the digestive system. How Kupffer cells work
xi. Treatments and/or prevention for all conditions listed above (drugs, surgery, etc.)
EXCRETORY SYSTEM - All levels should know:
i. Basic anatomy of the urinary system including kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra
ii. Structure and function of the nephron
iii. Formation of urine, GFR calculation, and concepts of tubular secretion and absorption
iv. Understand the effects of ADH
v. Understand disorders: Obstructive disorders, UTI’s, Glomerular disorders, Renal failure
Nationa! Level Only:
vi. Additional diseases: incontinence, Prostatitis, and BPH (Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy)
vii. Treatments and/or prevention for all conditions listed above (drugs, surgery, etc.)
c. NERVOUS SYSTEM - All levels should know:
i. The Brain and Sense Organs - major regions and their functions
ii. Identification of simple encephalographic wave forms
iii. Neural Impulses - Cellular anatomy and physiology of glial and supporting cells, synapses and
neurotransmitters, action potential generation and propagation, ionic basis of the cellular membrane
potential, cellular anatomy and physiology of neurons
iv. Central Nervous System - organization of the spinal cord, purpose/functions of sleep
v. Peripheral Nervous System - neuroganglia, action of sensory and motor neurons, understand
differences in and purposes of parasympathetic, sympathetic, somatic, and sensory systems
vi. Disorders: Epilepsy, seizures, Alzheimer’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s Disease,
shingles (herpes zoster), cerebral palsy, glaucoma, pink eye (conjunctivitis)
vii. Effects of drugs: alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, and marijuana on the nervous system
National Level Only:
viii. The Brain - anatomy and physiology of brain function including function and
role of specific nuclei clusters and tracts, theories of dreaming, purpose and
principles of MRIs and EEGs, Neural Impulses - Retrograde signaling
ix. Treatments and/or prevention for all conditions listed above (drugs, surgery, etc.)
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the in-depth
Anatomy and Physiology CD (APCD) and the introductory Bio/Earth CD (BECD)
are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
THIS EVENT IS SPONSORED BY THE SOCIETY FOR NEUROSCIENCE (www.sfn.org)
В©2013-C1
ASTRONOMY
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of mathematics and
physics relating to stellar evolution and Type II Supernovas.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2 APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
EVENT PARAMETERS: Each team may bring either two laptop computers or .two 3-ring binders (any
size) containing information in any form from any source, or one binder and one laptop. The materials must
be 3-hole punched and inserted into the rings (notebook sleeves are allowable). Each team member is
permitted to bring a programmable calculator. No Internet access is allowed.
THE COMPETITION: Using information which may include Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, spectra,
ligl{t curves, motions, cosmological distance equations and relationships, stellar magnitudes and
classification, multi-wavelength images (X-ray, UV, optical, IR, radio), charts, graphs, animations and
DS9 imaging analysis software, participants will complete activities and answer questions related to:
Stellar evolution, including spectral features and chemical composition, luminosity, blackbody
radiation, color index (B-V), and H-R diagram transitions, stellar nurseries and star formation, protostars, main sequence stars, Cepheid variables, semiregular variables, red supergiants, neutron
stars, magnetars, pulsars, Wolf-Rayet stars, stellar mass black holes, x-ray binary systems, and
Type II supernovas.
Use Kepler’s laws, rotation and circular motion to determine answers
relatin~ to the orbital motions of binary and multiple star systems; use
parallax, spectroscopic parallax, and the distance modulus to calculate
distances to Type I and Type II Cepheids.
Identify, know the location and answer questions relating to the
content areas outlined above for the following Objects: Cas A, IGR
J17091, NGC 6888FvVR 136, PSR J0108-1431, Cygnus X-l, SXP
1062, M1, V838 Mon, Delta Cep, a Orionis, SN 2010JL, NGC 3582, LHall5-N19,
Antares/Rho Ophiuchi cloud complex and IC 1396.
4. SCORING: All questions will have been assigned a predetermined number of points. The highest score
wins. Selected questions having differentiated weights will be used to break ties.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Astronomy CD are available
on the Official Science Olympiad Store or on the Website at http://www.soinc.org Also:
http://www.aavso.org/ ; http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/index.htmt
http ://antwrp. gs fc. nasa. go v/apo d/astrop ix.htm 1
THIS EVENT IS SPONSORED BY: Chandra Education and Pablic Outreach Office for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory
В©2013-C2
BOOMILEVER
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. _DESCRIPTION: The objective of this event is to design and build the most efficient Boomilever meeting
the requirements specified in these roles. A Boomilever is a cantilevered wood and glue structure, mounted
to a vertical Testing Wall, carrying a load at a distance from the Wal!.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2 IMPOUND: NO EYE PROTECTION: #2 MAXIMUM TIME: 10 rain
2, EVENT PARAMETERS:
a. Each team is allowed to enter only one Boomilever, built prior to the competition.
b. Team members must wear proper eye protection during the set-up and testing of the Boomilever. Teams
without proper eye protection must be immediately informed and given a chance to obtain eye protection
if time allows. Teams without eye protection must not test and will be ranked in Tier 4.
c. The Event Supervisor must provide all assessment devices, testing apparatus, hardware, and clean, dry
sand or similar dry, free-flowing material (hereafter "sand").
3. CONSTRUCTION PARAMETERS:
a. The Boomflever must be a single structure designed to attach to one or more mounting hole(s) in the
Testing Wall (4.b.), support a Loading Block (4.a.), and test a load up to 15.0 kg at a distance from the
Wall.
b. The Boomilever must not contact the Testing Wall at any time more than 20.0 cm (Div. B) or 15.0 cm
(Div. C) below the centerline of the mounting holes.
c. The center of the Loading Block, measured horizontally from the face of the Testing Wall, must be
between 40.0 cm and 45.0 cm.
d. The Loading Block must be initially supported no more than 25 cm below the center of the mounting
holes.
e. The Boomilever must have an Attachment Base for attaching it to the Testing Wall as follows:
i. The Attachment Base may be one or more parts, made from any type or size of wood or wood products
(e.g., particleboard, wood composites, commercial plywood, sawdust, and glue, etc.). As long as it
does not violate role 3.b., it may be any size that can be accommodated by the Testing Wall.
ii. Mounting holes in the Attachment Base must align with the holes in the Testing Wall. ~
iii.When ready to test, any portion of the Attachment Base extending more than !.3 cm (V2") from the
face of the Testing Wall must meet the material requirements listed below for the Boomilever.
iv. The Attachment Base must be a permanent part of the Boomilever, and is included in its mass.
~i There is no limit to the height of the Boomilever or Loading Block above the Testing Wall.
g. The Boomilever must not be attached or hooked to any edge of the Testing Wall. All tensile and shear
connection to the Testing Wall must be through the mounting bolts.
h. All parts 9fthe Boomilever more than 1.3 cm (g2") from the face of the Testing Wall must be constructed
of wood and bonded by glue. No other materials are permitted (e.g., bamboo, grasses, or paper).
i. There are no limits on the cross section sizes or lengths of individual pieces of wood. Wood may be
laminated by the team without restriction.
j. Any commercially available bonding material (glue) may be used. Adhesive putty is not permitted.
a. The Loading Block must be a square block measuring 5.0 cm x 5.0 cmx approximately 2.0 cm with a
hole in the center of the square faces for a ’/4" threaded eyebolt.
b. The Testing Wall must be a vertical, solid, rigid surface as follows:
i. The Testing Wall must be at least 40.0 cm wide x 30.0 cm high, minimum 3/4" high grade plywood or
other suitable material, with a smooth, hard, low-friction surface, and must not bend noticeably when
loaded.
ii. The Testing Wall must have three mounting holes for Вј" bolts, horizontally aligned, and centered
approximately 5.0 cm below the top of the Testing Wall. The middle hole must be centered on the face
of the Testing Wall and the center of the other holes placed 10.0 cm from the center of the middle hole.
The centerlines of the hole~ must be visible on the face of the Testing Wall.
iii. Three sets of Вј" x 3" minimum length bolts with ~A" O.D. flat washers and wing nuts must be
provided to attach the Boomilever to the Testing Wall.
iv. The Contact Depth Line is a horizontal line that must be clearly visible below the centerline of the
mounting holes at 20.0 cm (Div. B) or 15.0 cm (Div. C).
c. A Вј" threaded eyebolt, chain and hook must be suspended from the Loading Block.
d. An approximately five gallon plastic bucket with a handle must be suspended frmn the chain or hook
with enough clearance above the floor to allow for Boomilever deflection.
В©2013-C3
BOOMILEVER (CONT.)
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
e. The Event Supervisor must verify that the combined mass of the Loading Block, chain, bucket, sand, and
attaching hardware is at least 15.000 kg and no more than 15.300 kg prior to testing.
f. At the Event supervisor’s discretion, more than one testing apparatus may be used to ensure all teams can
compete in a timely manner.
5. COMPETITION:
a. No alterations, substitutions, or repairs may be made to the Boomilever after check-in for competition.
Once teams enter the event area to compete, they must not leave or receive outside assistance, materials,
or communication until they are finished.
b. All Boomilevers must be assessed prior to testing for compliance with construction parameters.
c. Team members must place their Boomilever on the scale for the Event Supervisor to determine its mass in
grams to the nearest 0.01 g.
d. Team members must have a maximum of ten minutes to set up and test their Boomilever either to the
maximum load or failure.
e. Team members must attach their Boomilever to the Testing Wall using any one or more of the mounting
holes and may insert the bolts from either side of the wall. Teams must assemble the Loading Block,
eyebolt, chain and hook, and hang the bucket as required to load the Boomilever. Team members may
disassemble the block and eyebolt if necessary to set up the test.
f. Teams must adjust the Loading Block to be within the permitted distance fiom the Testing Wall.
g. Prior to the placement of the Loading Block and bucket assembly the Event Supervisor must measure the
Boomilever’s Clearance from the Contact Depth Line to the nearest 0.1 cm. Time used by the Event
Supervisor for this measurement must not count toward the 10 minute event time.
h. Team members must be allowed to adjust the Boomilever until they start loading sand. No adjustment
may be miide after loading of sand has begun.
i. Team members must be allowed to safely and effectively stabilize the bucket from movement caused by
loading of the sand.
j. Boomilevers that fail before supporting 15.000 kg must be scored according to the actual load supported
at time of failure, measured to the nearest gram or best precision available. Failure is defined as the
inability of the Boomilever to carry any additional load or any part of the load is supported by anything
other than the Boomilever. Loading must stop immediately when a failure occurs or when time expires.
The Event Supervisor must remove any sand and wood fragments added after tSilure.
k. Ifa Boomilever is removed after testing there can be no ihrther challenges for scoring or ranking.
6. SCORING:
a. The Load Scored will be the load supported or 15.000 kg if the load supported is greater than 15.000 kg.
This includes the mass of all the testing apparatus supported by the Boomilever. The least possible load
scored must be the mass of the Loading Block. Boomilevers that cannot support the Loading Block will
be ranked in Tier 4.
b. Boomilevers must be scored and ranked in the first 3 tiers by the highest Efficiency Score:
Efficiency Score = Load Scored (g)/Mass ofBoomilever (g)
c. Boomilevers will be scored in four tiers as follows:
i. Tier 1: Boomilevers meeting all the Construction Parameters and no Competition Violations.
ii. Tier 2: Boomilevers with one or more Competition Violations.
iii. Tier 3: Boomilevers with Construction Violations or both
Competition and Construction Violations.
iv. Tier 4: Boomilevers unable to be loaded for any reason (e.g., cannot
be mounted on testing Wall, cannot accommodate loading block, or
failure to wear eye protection) will only receive participation points.
d. Ties are broken by this sequence: i. Greatest Clearance from Contact
Depth Line; 2. Lowest Boomilever Mass.
SCORING EXAMPLES:
Mass = 14.27 g, load scored = 13,235 g, score = 927.47
Mass = 16.92 g, load scored = 15,000 g, score = 886.52
Mass = 10.30 g, load scored = 15,000 g, contact depth = 20.4 cm; score = 1456.31 (Tier 3)
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Boomilever DVD are
available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
В©2013-C4
CIRCUIT LAB
CHEMISTRY LAB
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.solnc.org as they apply to every event.
t. DESCRIPTION: Teams will complete one or more tasks and answer a series of questions involving the
science processes of chemistry focused in the areas of periodicity and equilibrium.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2 EYE PROTECTION: #4 APPROX. TIME: 50 min.
2. EVENT PARAMETERS:
a. Students: each student must bring goggles and a writing implement and may
bring a non- programmable, non-graphing calculator, and one 8.5" x 11" twosided page of notes containing information in any form from any source.
b. Supervisors: must provide whatever other reagents/glassware are appropriate for the tasks students are
asked to do (e.g., Periodic Table, table of standard reduction potentials, any constants needed, etc.)
c. Safety Requirements: Students must wear the following or they will not be allowed to participate:
closed-toed shoes, ANSIZ87 indirect vent chemical splash goggles (see http://soinc.org), pants or skirts
that cover the legs to the ankles, and additionally a long sleeved lab coat that reaches the wrists and the
knees or a long sleeved shirt that reaches the wrists with a chemical apron that reaches the knees.
Chemical gloves are optional. Students who unsafely remove their safety clothing/goggles or are
observed handling any of the material or equipment in a hazardous/unsafe manner (e.g., tasting or
touching chemicals or flushing solids down a drain and not rinsing them into a designated waste
container provided by the supervisor) will be disqualified from the event.
THE COMPETITION: The competition will consist of a series of tasks similar to those in first year high
school courses. These tasks could include hands-on activities, questions about each topic, intelpretation of
experimental data (graphs, diagrams, etc.), or observation of an experiment setup & running. Supervisors are
encouraged to use computers or calculators with sensors/probes. Students may be asked to collect data using
probe ware that has been setup & demonstrated by the Supervisor. Or the supervisor may provide students
with data sets collected by such sensors/probes following demonstration of the data collection. Data will be
presented in a tabular and/or graphic format & students will be expected to interpret the data. Students
should be aware that nomenclature, formula writing & Stoichiometry are essential tools of chemistry & may
always be included in the event. Stoichiometry includes mole conversions & percentage yield. For purposes
of nomenclature & formula writing, students are expected to know the symbols & charges for the following
ions: nitrate, carbonate, phosphate, acetate, sulfate, ammonium, bicarbonate & hydroxide. Students should
know how to use the "ite" form of anion (one less oxygen than the "ate" form) and should be able to use the
periodic table to obtain the cha~ge for monatomic ions (e.g., Na, S ).
SAMPLE QUESTIONS:
a. Periodicity: Students should understand the periodic nature of the elements. Kxlowiedge about periodicity
should be demonstrated conceptually (by predicting or explaining trends) or where possible
experitnentally (by collecting and/or accounting for data). Questions and activities will be chosen from
the following topics: 1. Physical properties (e.g., atomic & ionic radii, ionization energy, melting point,
electro-negativity, etc.) 2. Electronic structure and bonding formation (e.g., ionic vs. covalent, charges on
ions, etc.) 3. Chemical properties (e.g., precipitate formation, solubilities, reactions with acids, etc.).
b. Equilibrium: Students must be able to write equilibrium reactions, predict the direction of a reaction
using Le Ch~telier’s Principle, calculate an equilibrium constant, & use equilibrium constants to
determine concentrations. Tasks will be chosen from the fbllowing: 1) Use a titration/data of a weak
acid/base with a strong acid/base to calculate an equilibrium constant. 2) Investigate an equilibrium
reaction and determine what happens when it is stressed. 3) Stoichiometry of equilibrium reactions. 4)
Construct/use a standard absorption curve to determine an equilibrium constant. 5) Use a calorimeter to
predict a curve. 6) At state & national levels, knowledge/application of equilibrium to separate chemicals
may be included.
5. SCORING: Equilibrium: 50% & Periodicity: 50%. Time may be limited at each task, but will not be used
as a tiebreaker or for scoring. All ties will be broken by selected questions chosen by the supervisor that
may or may not be identified to the students.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Chem/Phy Sci CD (CPCD) are
available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
В©2013-C5
~\’,,x\ I /
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Students will compete in activities involving knowledge of direct current (DC) electrical
circuits.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
2. EVENT PARAMETERS:
a. Students are allowed to use any notes and!or calculators. Notes must be 3-hole punched and secured in a
3-ring binder of any size, so that regardless of orientation nothing falls out. Calculators must not have
external probes or sensors of any type attached to them.
b. The event supervisor must provide any needed measurement equipment such as muir!meters or probes.
Students may bring their own basic multimeters for use in place of event supervisor provided ones.
3. THE COMPETITION:
a. The competition must consist of both hands-on tasks and questions related to DC electrical circuits. 50%
of the score must be from the practical portion (hands-on tasks/applications), and 50% must be from the
theoretical portion (written questions).
b. Supervisors are encouraged to use measurement equipment (e.g., computer or calculator sensors/probes,
multimeters, etc.) wherever possible or provide students with data sets collected by equipment following
demonstration of the data collection. If used, data must be presented in a tabular and!or graphic format
and students will be expected to interpret the data.
c. The event supervisor may provide some mathematical relationships, but the students are expected to
know aiid understand the concepts outlined belo~v. The competition must consist of at least one
task/question from each of the following areas:
i. DC circuits concepts, definitions and principles (e.g., voltage and current sources, EMF, resistance,
applications of series and parallel circuits, voltage dividers, impedance matching)
ii. DC circuit analysis theory (e.g., Ohm’s Law, parallel and series resistors, Kirchhoff’s Laws, node
and mesh analysis, Norton and Thevenin equivalents)
iii. DC circuit analysis practice (e.g., the use of voltmeters, ammeters, ohmmeters and multimeters,
resistor color codes and their uses in series and parallel circuits, wheatstone bridges)
iv. Intermediate DC circuits concepts, definitions and principles (e.g., electrical SI base and derived
units, capacitance, ideal diodes, electron current, RC circuits)
d. Topics that must not be included in the competition are: semiconductors, AC circuit theory and devices,
inductors.
4. EXAMPLES OF CIRCUIT LAB STATIONS/QUESTIONS:
a. The Event Supervisor provides a pre-assembled circuit
consisting of resistors in parallel and/or series and one or more
DC voltage sources. Students will be asked to determine
electric potential diВЈference between specified locations within
the circuit, currents, resistance, and power dissipation in
different parts of" the circuit.
b. Given the adjacent circuit diagram, students are asked to
calculate the current, voltage and/or power in various labeled components.
5. SCORING:
a. Points will be awarded for correct answers and/or proper technique.
b. Ties will be broken using a designated task or question(s). The event supervisor will identify the tie
breaker question(s) or task(s) on the answer form provided to the students at the beginning of the
competition period. If more than one competition period is used, the tie breaker(s) will be the same for
all periods.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Chem/Phy Sci CD are available
on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Webs!re at http://www.soinc.org
В©2013-C6
DISEASE DETECTIVES
DESIGNER GENES
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Students will solve problems using their knowledge of Molecular Genetics and
Biotechnology.
APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
2. EVENT PARAMETERS: Each team may bring only one 8.5" x 11" two-sided
page of notes that contains information in any form from any source and up to 2
non-programmable, non-graphing calculators.
THE COMPETITION: This event may b~ run at stations and may include
observations, inferences, predictions, data analysis, and calculations. Every
attempt should be made to avoid over-emphasis on a particular area. At the
various levels, possible areas to be tested are limited to the basic principles
of genetics (see Heredity-B event training on SO website) plus the fullowing
topics:
Regional and State
DNA structure & function
DNA Semi-conservative
Replication
Gene expression (transcription and
translation)
Control and detection of gene
expression
Mutations
DNA Sequencing
Regional and State
Lac & Trp Operons
DNA Fingerprinting/RFLP
National (all topics)
DNA Sequencing
DNA Repair
Plasmid selection and isolation
PCR
Gene therapy
Restriction mapping
Mitochondrial DNA
Post- transcriptional
modification
Trinucleotide repeats
Epigenetics
EXAMPLES:
a. Which among several DNA sequences would result in a different amino acid sequence?
b. A cell’ biologist introduced radio-labeled thymine into the cell culture medium. After one round of
replication, what percent of the daughter ceils would be radioactive?
c. Describe how RNA is processed post-transcriptionally.
d. Explain why restriction digestion of DNA results in unique banding patterns after gel electrophoresis.
e. Describe the structure of the lac and trp operons and how metabolite levels affect their regulation.
SCORING: Highest number of correct solutions will determine the winner. Selected questions may be
used as tiebreakers.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Bio/Earth CD and the indepth Genetics CD are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at www.soinc.org
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
DESCRIPTION: Students will use their investigative skills in the scientific study of disease, injury, health,
and disability in populations or groups of people with a focus on Environmental Quality.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
EVENT PARAMETERS: Each team may bring only one 8.5" x 11" two-sided page of information in any
form from any source and up to 2 non-programmable, non-graphing calculators.
THE COMPETITION: Sample Problems and Resources may be found at http://w~vw.soinc.org
a. This event combines a basic understanding of biological and physical agents that cause disease with an
ability to analyze, interpret, evaluate and draw conclusions from simple data and communicate results to
peers. Students should be able to distinguish between infectious and non-infectious health burdens.
b. A broad definition of health will be used for this event. Potential topics include health as well as illness
(mental, physical, infectious, cttronic, environmental, societal, genetic, injuries and health behaviors).
c. This event will include questions based on:
i. Study design and data collection.
ii. Creating graphic displays of data.
iii. Interpreting trends and patterns of epidemiologic data.
iv. C Division only: Recognizing and accounting for potential sources of error
(e.g., random, systematic, confounding and various types of bias).
v. Communicating results.
d. Students will be presented with one or more descriptions of public health problems such as an outbreak
of food poisoning, a cluster of cases of West Nile encephalitis or state data on bicycle injuries.
e. Based on these descriptions, they will be expected to do the following:
i. Gerrerate hypotheses and recognize various fundamental study designs.
ft. Evaluate the data by calculating and comparing simple rates and proportions.
iii. Identify patterns, trends and possible modes of transmission, sources or risk factors.
iv. Recognize factors such as study design!biases that influence results (more for Div. C-less for Div. B).
v. Propose interventions based on promoting positive health behaviors, eliminating or reducing risks of
environmental exposures, or disrupting clearly identifiable chains of transmission.
vi. Translate results/findings into a public health/prevention message for identified populations at risk.
They will also be expected to:
i. Define basic epidemiological and public health temps (e.g., outbreak, epidemic, pandemic,
surveillance, risk, vector, fomite, zoonosis, etc.).
ii. Recognize various categories of disease causing agents & give examples of illnesses caused by each.
iii. Recognize and understand differences between the major groups of infectious agents (e.g., viruses,
bacteria, protistans, fimgi and animals).
iv. Recognize examples of various epidemiologic and public health phenomena such as types of
outbreaks and modes of transmission.
g. Calculations and mathematical manipulations should be part of the competition. Data may be contrived
or modified to make it more appropriate for this age group as long as it does not radically alter results or
interpretation.
h. Process skills may include hypothesis, observations, inferences, predictions, variable analysis, data
analysis, calculations, and conclusions.
i. The level of questioning for B/C competitions should reflect the age-appropriateness for the two groups.
j. The event format may be exam-based, station-based or a combination of both.
4. SCORING:
a. Points will be assigned to the various questions and problems. Both the nature of
the questions and scoring rubric should emphasize an understanding that is broad
and basic rather than detailed and advanced.
b. Depending on the problem, scoring may be based on a combination of answers, including graphs/charts,
explanations, analysis, calculations, and closed-ended responses to specific questions.
c. Points should be awarded for both quality and accuracy of answers, the quality of supporting reasoning,
and the use of proper scientific methods.
d. Highest number of points will determine the winner. Selected questions may be used as tiebreakers.
Recommended Resonrces: All reference and training resources including the Bio/Earth CD and the in-depth
Disease Detectives CD are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at www.soinc.org
THIS EVENT IS SPONSORED BY: The U.S. Centers For Disease Control And Prevention
В©2013-C7
В©2013-C8
~
DYNAMIC PLANET
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Students will use process skills to complete tasks related to glaciation and longterm climate change.
APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
EVENT PARAMETERS: Each team may bring four 8.5" x I1" double-sided pages of notes
containing information in any form from any source and bring up to two non-graphing calculators.
THE COMPETITION: Participants will be presented with one or more tasks, many requiring the use
of process skills (e.g., observing, classifying, measuring, inferring, predicting, communicating, and
using number relationships) from the following topics:
a. Glacial formation, mass-balance, and flow
b. Glacier and ice sheet types and forms (alpine and continental)
c. Glacial erosion, erosional landforms, and sediment transport
d. Glacial depositional landforms and sediments
e. Interpretation of glaciers and glacially altered landscape features shown
on USGS topographic maps
f. Periglacial environment processes and landforms
g. Glaciers in the hydrologic cycle: impacts on climate, streams, lakes, and
oceans, sub-glacial hydrology, isostatic effects on Earth’s crust
h. Pleistocene and pre-Pleistocene glacial history: evidence and
chronology
i. Theories explaining glacial and ice sheet advance and retreat (e.g.,
Milankovich cycles)
j. Glaciers as indicators of modern global climate change
4. REPRESENTATIVE TASKS:
a. Analyze and interpret features and actions of a mountain glacier appearing on a topographic map
including elevation, gradient, ablation and accumulation zones, direction of flow, medial moraines,
crevasses, valley shapes, erosional landscapes, and depositional features
b. Analyze a geologic map of glacial deposits to determine the sequence of events over the course of
several episodes of advance and melt-back
c. Interpret oxygen isotope data from a sediment core to identify changes in sea level caused by glacial
advance and melting
SCORING: High score wins. Points wil! be awarded for the quality and accuracy of responses. Ties
will be broken by the accuracy and/or quality of answers to pre-selected questions.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including tire Bio/Earth CD are available
on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org.
В©2013-C9
ELASTIC LAUNCHED GLIDER
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: The object of this event is to design, build and test two elastic-launched gliders
designed for the highest time aloft. This event challenges students to build and test gliders that must be
launched at floor level, ascend to a high point and then transition into a slow descending glide pattern.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2 EYE PROTECTION: #5 IMPOUND: No APPROX. TIME: 6 minutes
EVENT PARAMETERS:
a. Teams bring up to 2 gliders and flight log(s). Teams may bring any tools.
b. Competitors rnust wear eye protection rated ANSI Z87+ while in the cordoned area of the competition.
Teams without proper eye protection must be immediately informed and given a chance to obtain eye
protection if time allows, otherwise they will not be allowed to compete.
c. The Event Supervisor must provide all measurement tools and timing devices.
3. CONSTRUCTION PARAMETERS:
a. Each glider may be constructed from published plan(s), commercial kits and/or student designs.
b. The functional components of the glider (fuselage, tail assembly and wings) must only be constructed
from any kind of the following materials: wood, foam, paper, plastic film, carbon fiber, and/or glue.
Ballast may be any malleable non-metallic substance. The functional components may be attached to
each other using tape, thread or glue. Kits must not contain any pre-glue~l joints or pre-covered
surfaces.
c. The total mass of the glider throughout the flight must be less than 10.0 grams.
d. Each glRler must be labeled so that the event supervisor can easily identify to which team it belongs.
e. Wingspan may not exceed 30.0 cm at any time. The nose of the fuselage Legal
Illegal
must be blunt, such that if inserted into a lip balm cap with an inner depth
of-15.7mm and an inside diameter of-13.7mm it will not touch the end
of the cap.
f. The launch handle may be of any safe configuration.
4. THE COMPETITION:
a. The event must be held indoors. Tournament officials must announce the
room dimensions (approximate length, width and ceiling height) in
advance of the competition. Tournament officials and the Event Supervisor are urged to minimize the
effects of environmental factors such as air currents (e.g., doors, fans).
b. Once competitors enter the cordoned offcompetition area to trim, practice or compete, they must wear
goggles and not receive outside assistance, materials, or communication. Teams violating this rule will
be ranked below all other teams. There must be a separate area designated for spectators.
c. Each team must present a flight log of recorded data during inspection. Data must include at least 4
parameters (3 required and at least 1 additional) for at least 10 test flights prior to the competition. The
required parameters are: 1) estimated/recorded peak flight height after launch, 2) approximate length of
elastic launch loop (relaxed), and 3) Flight Time. The team must choose an additional parameter
beyond those required (e.g., orbit diameter, cross section of elastic launch loop, height at transition to
glide pattern, launch angle, etc.)
d. At the Supervisor’s discretion, test flights may occur throughout the contest but will yield to any
official flight. No test flights will occur in the last half-hour of the event.
e. Multiple gliders may fly at once according to Supervisor’s direction.
f. A self-check inspection station may be made available to competitors for checking their glider and
launch handle dimensions prior to being checked by the officials.
g. Team Members must present their event materials (glider, catapult and log) for inspection immediately
prior to a team’s flights. Event Officials are strongly urged to return flight logs after inspection. Timers
will follow teams as they prepare and launch their gliders.
h. Teams may make up to a tota! of 5 official flights using 1 or 2 gliders or launch handles.
В©2013-C10
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN
ELASTIC LAUNCHED GLIDER (CONT.)
/~S ~
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
i. Teams will be given a 6-minute "Flight Period", starting when their first flight after check-in (trim or
official) begins. Any flight beginning within the 6-minute period will be permitted to fly to
completion. Competitors may make any adjustments/repairs/trim flights and may switch gliders or
launch handles during their 6-minute Flight Period.
Teams must declare before any launches during their
Flight Period whether it is an official flight or trim
flight. If teams do not indicate the flight type before
the launch, it must be considered official. Teams
must not be given extra time to recover or repair their
gliders.
j. The team may select any previously and currently
approved glider or launch handle for each official
flight.
k. The timing official must measure and record the "Time Aloft" in hundredths of a second for each
flight. Time AloR for each flight starts when the glider leaves the competitor’s hand and stops when
any part of the glider touches the floor or stops moving due to an obstruction (such as a glider landing
on a girder, or basketball hoop).
I. Event supervisors are strongly encouraged to utilize 3 independent timers on all flights. The middle
value of the 3 timers will be the officially recorded time, to the nearest 0.01 s.
m. Gliders must only be launched while aimed at any point on the ceiling (competitors must not aim for
the wails, spectators, low obstructions, etc.).
n. The Event Supervisor may permit other official flights during the flight of another team’s glider.
Timers are allowed to delay a launch to avoid a possible obstruction.
o. Competitors must not steer their gliders during the flight. In the unlikely event of a collision with
another glider, a team may elect a re-flight. The decision to re-fly may be made after the glider lands.
The 6-minute period does not apply to such a flight.
5. SCORING: The base score is the sum of the team’s two longest flight times. Ties will be broken by the
!ongest non-scored flight time.
a. Teams with incomplete flight logs must have 10% of their flight time deducted from each flight.
b. Teams ~vithout flight logs must have 30% of their flight time deducted from each flight.
c. Teams with rule violations under "Construction" or "The Competition" must be ranked after all
teams that do not violate those rules.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Elastic Launched Glider
DVD are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
THIS EVENT IS SPONSORED BY THE ACADEMY OF MODEL AERONAUTICS
ВЇ http://www.modelaircraft.org/
DESCRIPTION: This event will determine a team’s ability to design, conduct, and report the findings of an
experiment actually conducted on site.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 3
EYE PROTECTION: #4
APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
EVENT PARAMETERS: Students must bring ANSI Z87 indirect vent chemical splash goggles and a
writing instrument(s). Students may also bring a timepiece, a ruler, and a non-programmable calculator.
Chemicals that require other safety clothing will not be used.
THE COMPETITION:
a. Supervisors must provide teams with identical sets of materials at a distribution center or in a container.
The materials wilt be listed on the board or placed on a card for each team. If provided, both the card
and the container will be considered part of the materials. The identity of the materials is to remain
unknown until the start of this event and will be the same for each team. The students must use at least
two of the provided materials to design and conduct an experiment.
b. The supervisor must assign a question/topic area that determines the nature of the experiment. The
assigned question/topic area should be the same for all teams and allow students to conduct experiments
involving relationships between independent and dependent variables (like height vs. distance).
c. The students will be given an outline (patterned after the scoring rubric) to follow when
recording/reporting their experiment with additional paper to record data, graphs and procedures.
d. When the teams are finished, all materials must be returned to the event superyisor along with all written
materials. The content of the report must be clearly stated and legible.
SC~ORING: Scoring of the event will be done nsing the scoring rubric at the bottom of this page. Zero points
will be given for an inappropriate or no response. Points will be awarded dependent upon the completeness
of the response. Ties will be broken by comparing the point totals in the scoring areas in the fbllowing order:
Total points for l-Variables, 2-Procedure, 3-Analysis of Results, 4-Graph, 5-Data Table. Any team not
following proper safety procedures will be asked to leave the room and will be disqualified from the event.
Any student not addressing the assigned question or topic area will be ranked behind those who do, because
not conducting an experiment is a violation of the spirit of the event.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN RUBRIC/REPORTING FORM
Statement of Problem: Experimental Question (2 Points)
Hypothesis: Including prior knowledge that contributed to hypothesis (4 Points)
Variables:
i. Constants: (Controlled Variables) Factors that am purposefully kept the
same (4 Points)
ii. Independent Variable: Factor being manipulated (3 Points)
iii. Dependent Variable: Factor being measured which responds (3 Points)
Experimental Control (where applicable): (Standard of Comparison) (2 Points)
Materials (3 Points)
Procedure: fucluding Diagrams (6 Points)
Qualitative Observations During Experiment &
Summary of Results: (4 Points)
Data Table: Including Use of Significant Figures for Division C (6 Points)
Graph(s): (6 Points)
Statistics: Div. B: Average (mean), median, mode, range, or drawn in line of best-fit (2 Points)
Div. C all orB: + standard deviation and any other relevant statistics that teams choose (4 Points)
Analysis of Results: Interpretation (4 Points)
Possible Experimental Errors including identified human errors (3 Points)
Conclusion: Include why your results did or did not support the hypothesis: (4 Points)
Recommendations for Further Experimentation Based on Your Data & Practical Applications: (4 Points)
Hints: a. Statement of problem should not have a yes or no answer. It should be specific to the experiment being
conducted and is not the same as the assigned topic area. b. Experiments should consist of repeated trials, c. Variables
should be operationally defined, d. Experiments should be simple and have only one independent and one dependent
variable.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Experimental Design Guide or
CD are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
~
В©2013-Cll
~
В©2013-C12
~
FORENSICS
FERMI QUESTIONS
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soine.org as they apply to every event.
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
DESCRIPTION: A "Fermi Question" is a science related question that seeks a fast, rough estimate of a
quantity, which is either difficult or impossible to measure directly. For example, the question "How
many drops of water are there in Lake Erie?" requires an estimate of the volume of a drop, the volume of
Lake Erie from its approximate dimensions and conversion of units to yield an answer. The answers
should be an estimate within an order of magnitude recorded in power(s) often.
APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
EVENT PARAMETERS: Calculators, computers, slide roles,
reference sheets, etc., are not allowed. Bring pencils. Teams are
allowed to finish before the allotted time: they should hand in their
answer sheet, have the time recorded by the event supervisor, and
exit the room quietly.
3. THE COMPETITION:
a. Each team will have the same amount of time to answer as many
questions as possible.
b. All Teams competing in a given time block will be quizzed together and will be given no feedback
during the contest.
c. One teammate will be designated to serve as the team captain and will indicate on the score sheet the
team’s answers.
All answers are to be written to the correct power of ten (exponent) as follows: For a number in the
form Cxl0E, the guide for rounding of the coefficient (C), is: ifC is 5 or greater (to 9.99...), round C
up to 10. IfC is below 5 (and greater than 1), round C down to 1. For example, if the number is 4.99
x 106, you record 6 as your answer. If it is 5.001 x 103, the correct power of ten is 4. Responses
recorded as 5.001 x 103 on the answer sheet will be marked as incorrect.
e. Positive exponents are the default. For negative exponents, the minus (-) sign must be included in the
answe’r. If the number is 1.5x 10"3, the correct power of ten is -3.
4. SCORING: High score wins. Ties are broken by counting the highest number of answers that receive
five (5) points. If the number of 5-point answers is the same, time is used as the second tiebreaker.
It earns:
5 points
3 points
1 point
If ~.g re~ponse is:
Equal to the accepted value
-+ l of the accepted value
_+2 of the accepted value
Scorin~_lg: If the accepted value is seven and the response given is 7; then five (5) points are
awarded. A response of 6 or 8 receives three (3) points and a response of 5 or 9 receives one (1) point.
Recomxnended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Problem Solving and
Technology CD are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
В©2013-C13
t. DESCRIPTION: Given a scenario and some possible suspects, students will perform a series of tests. These
tests, along with other evidence or test results will be used to solve a crime.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
EYE PROTECTION: #4
APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
2. EVENT PARAMETERS:
Students may bring only these items:
i. test tubes and test tube holders or any
devices in which they can perform the tests
ii. droppers
iii-. funnel(s) and filter paper
iv. pH or litmus paper
v. spatulas, plastic spoons, and/or stirring rods
vi. 9-volt conductivity tester (no testers will be
allowed that run on AC current)
vii. thermometer
viii. flame test equipment (nichrome wire, cobalt
blue glass, etc.)
ix. slides & cover slips
Supervisor will provide:
i. iodin~ reagent (I2 dissolved in KI solution)
ii. 2M HCI
iii. 2M NaOH
iv. Benedict’s solution
v. a hot water bath
vi. a Bunsen burner or equivalent BTU heat
source to perform flame tests
vii. a waste container
viii. chromatography materials (e.g., beakers,
Petri dishes, etc.)
ix. a wash bottle with distilled water
x. hand lens
xi. writing instruments
xii. a pencil and ruler (for chromatograms)
xiii. paper towels
xiv. metal tongs
xv. Each team may bring one 8.5" x 11" twosided page of notes containing information
in any form from any source
xvi. a non-programmable calculator
Note: Students not bringing these items will be
at a disadvantage. The event supervisor will not
provide them,
The supervisor may provide:
i. other equipment (e.g., amicroscope, probes,
etc.) or
ii. candle &rnatches if fibers given, or
iii. differential density solutions or other
method of determining density of polymers
if plastics given or
iv. reagents to perfbrm other tests
Safety Requirements: Students must wear the following or they will not be allowed to participate:
closed-toed shoes, ANSIZ87 indirect vent chemical splash goggles (see http://soinc.org), pants or skirts
that cover the legs to the ankles, and additionally a long sleeved lab coat that reaches the wrists and the
knees or a long sleeved shirt that reaches the wrists with a chemical apron that reaches the knees.
Chemical gloves are optional. Students who unsafely remove their safety clothing/goggles or are observed
handling any of the material or equipment in a hazardous/unsafe manner (e.g., tasting or touching
chemicals or flushing solids down a drain and not rinsing them into a designated waste container provided
by the supervisor) will be disqualified from the event.
3. THE COMPETITION:
Part a samples # Part b samples Part c chromatograms
Part d
Part e
Regional
3-8
5-9
1 type + Mass Spectra 1-2 topics Required
State
6-10
6-12
1-2 types + Mass Spectra 1-3 topics Required
National
8-12
10-18
1-3 types + Mass Spectra 3-5 topics Required
a. Qualitative Analysis: Substances to identify: sodium acetate, sodium chloride, sodium hydrogen
carbonate, sodium carbonate, lithium chloride, potassium chloride, calcium nitrate, calcium sulfate,
calcium carbonate, cornstarch, glucose, sucrose, magnesium sulfate, boric acid, and ammonium chloride
(there will be no mixtures). All teams will have the same set of solids to identify.
Level
В©2013-C14
FORESTRY
FORENSICS (CONT.)
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
b. Polymers: Students may be asked to identify:
i. Plastics: PETE, HDPE, non-expanded PS, LDPE, PP, PVC, PMMA, PC - students may not perform
any burn tests on these polymers, but the supervisor may provide burn test results on these plastics.
ii. Fibers: cotton, wool, silk, linen, nylon, spandex, polyester - burn tests will be permitted on the fibers.
iii. Hair: human, dog, cat, bat, and horse hair - students will need to know hair structure including
medulla, cortex, cuticle, and root.
c. Chromatography/Spectroscopy: Students will be expected to separate components using paper
chromatography, TLC, and/or analyze mass spectra. Students may be expected to measure Rfs.
d. Crime Scene Physical Evidence:
i. Fingerprint Analysis: Students may be expected to lcnow the 8 NCIC classifications (arch, tented
arch, radial loop, ulnar loop, plain whorl, central pocket whorl, accidental, and double loop). Students
should also be familiar with the common fingerprint development techniques of dusting, iodine
fuming, ninhydrin, and cyanoacrylate fuming. Students should understand terminology such as
bifurcation, ridges, island, enclosure, loop, whorl, and arch. Students should be able to answer
questions about skin layers and how fingerprints are formed. Students may be asked questions on the
different methods of detecting fingerprints and the chemistry behind each of these methods.
ii. DNA: Students may be asked to compare DNA chromatograms/electropherograms from materials
found at the scene to those of the suspects. Students will be expected to know how DNA is copied.
See http://nobelprize.org/educational_games/chemistry/pcr/index.html
iii. Glass analysis: Students may be asked to use index of refraction to determine the type of a glass
found broken at a crime scene. They may be asked to analyze which hole or fractures occurred before
others based on a piece of glass available for examination or a picture of a piece of glass.
iv. Entomology: Students may be asked to identify how long an animal has been dead based on the type
of insects found on the body at the scene.
v. Spatters: Students may be asked to analyze actual spatters or photographs of spatters to determine
the angle and velocity with which the liquid approached the solid object bearing the spatter & the
spatter origin direction.
vi. Seeds and Pollen: Students may be asked to compare pictures of seeds/pollen found at the scene with
either seeds/pollen found on the suspects or seeds/pollen from different country regions.
vii. Tracks and Soil: Students may be asked to match tire tracks or footprints found at the scene to tires
or shoes of the suspects. Students may be given the composition of soil found at the scene or on the
suspects and asked to determine if this implicates any of the suspects.
viii. Blood: Students may be asked to identify the ABO blood type using artificial blood (event supervisor
required to provide instructions on how the typing system works) or students may be asked to
identify if a blood sample, either prepared microscope slide or pictures of microscope slide is human,
avian, mammalian, or reptilian/amphibian.
ix. Bullet striations: Students may be asked to match the striations on bullets or casings found at the
crime scene and fired from a given gun.
e. Analysis of the Crime: Students will be asked to write an analysis of the crime scene explaining not only
which pieces of evidence implicate which suspect and why the suspect(s) was (were) chosen as the
culprit(s), but also why the other suspects were not chosen. They will also answer any
other crime scene analysis questions posed by the event supervisor.
f. The collected evidence and other data given could be used in a mock crime scene.
4. SCORING: Team with the highest score wins. Time will not be used for scoring. The
score will be composed of the following elements (percentages given are approximate):
a. Part 3.a. 20%, Part 3.b. 20%, Part 3.c.t5%, Part 3.d. 15%, and 3.e. 30%.
b. Tiebreaker: Ties will be broken by the highest score on the analysis of the crime scene,
which includes the reasons why cectain suspects have been eliminated or others remain
in the pool of possible criminals.
c. A 10% penalty may be given if the area is not cleaned up as designated by the event supervisor.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Forensics CD are available on the
Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
В©2013-C15
a
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www, soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: This event will test student knowledge of North American trees that are on the
Official National Tree List.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
2. EVENT PARAMETERS:
Each team may bring two 8.5" x 11" two-sided
pages of information in any form from any source
(e.g., notes, tree lists, etc.) and up to two
cqmmercially published resources that may be
annotated and tabbed (limit 3 words).
3, THE COMPETITION:
For the National Competition, all questions
will be restricted to specimens on the Official
Science Olympiad National Tree List. For
Regional and State Competitions, the State
Director may reduce the national list to local
or regional trees and add a few local species not on the National List. This State List should
be sent to competing teams as soon as possible so teams may gather specimens.
b. This event may be held either indoors or in a wood lot or both. Specimens (or pictures/slides if
necessary) will be lettered or numbered at stations. Each team will be given one answer sheet to
record the Genus and species name and the answers to the correlated questions.
Leaf specimens used for identification (compound leaves should be intact) may be live,
preserved, or color photographs depending on availability and may be accompanied by
twigs, cones, seeds, or other parts of the tree. For each specimen, students will be asked a
correlated question that pertains to the tree’s structure, ecology, or economic characteristics.
Structural characteristics may include leaf types, leaf shapes, leaf margins, leaf venation, leaf
arrangement on the stem, twigs, bark, flowers, cones, fruits, seeds, and tree shapes.
Ecological characteristics may include habitats, adaptations to the environment, biomes,
succession, and relationships (e.g., symbiosis and competition) with animals or other plants.
Economic characteristics may include beneficial or detrimental aspects of trees such as sources of
food, medicine, building materials, chemicals, fuel, fiber, and trees as nuisance species.
4. SCORING: The teams with the highest number of correct answers will be the winners. Selected
questions may be used as tiebreakers.
Recommended Resources: All specimens listed on the Official Science Olympiad National Tree
List are represented in the National Audubon Society Field Guide(s) to Trees (Eastern and
Western regions), which are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at
http://www.soinc.org as are all reference and training resources.
В©2013-C16
...
GRAVITY VEHICLE
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Teams design, build, and test one vehicle and ramp that uses gravitational potential energy
as the vehicle’s sole means of propulsion to reach a Target Point as quickly, as accurately, and as close to
their predicted time as possible.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2 IMPOUND: Yes EYE PROTECTION: No APPROXIMATE TIME: 8 minutes
2. EVENT PARAMETERS:
a. Teams must bring one vehicle and one ramp. Teams may bring any tools or calculation devices.
b. The Event Supervisor will provide all measurement tools, starting pencil and timers.
3. CONSTRUCTION PARAMETERS:
a. Vehicles must be designed to travel between 5.000 and 10.000 meters, come to a complete stop, and be as
close as possible to their predicted time. The exact target distance (in 50.0 cm intervals for regional, 10.0
cm intervals for state and 1.0 cm intervals for nationaI tournaments) must be chosen by the Event
Supervisor after all vehicles and ramps have been impounded. The same target distance will be used for
all competitors.
b. All energy used to propel the vehicle must come from the gravitational potential energy derived from the
mass of the vehicle. The entire vehicle, including the wheels, must start from an elevated, non-horizontal
position on the team’s ramp. The ramp must include a release mechanism to hold the vehicle in place
without any contact by the competitors.
c. Transferring the vehicle’s gravitational potential energy into elastic devices (e.g., a metal spring) is
permissible as long as these devices start at their lowest energy state. Pre-loaded energy storage devices
may be used to operate other vehicle functions (e.g., braking system) as long as they do not provide
energy to propel the vehicle.
d. The vehicle’s total mass must not exceed 1.500 kg.
e. The vehicle must have the point of a single bent paper clip which serves as a Measurement Point on either
the leftmost or the rightmost edge/face of the vehicle between the front and rear axles of the vehicle and
extending down to within 1.0 cm of the track’s surface when the vehicle is on the track. The point of the
paper clip nearest the track surface is used as the reference point for distance measurements and must be
easily accessible to the Event Supervisor.
f. The vehicle and the ramp, including the release mechanism, together, in the ready to start position, must
fit within a rectangular box 50.0 cm wide x 75.0 cm deep x 200.0 cm high.
g. Competitors must release the vehicle by using any part of an unsharpened #2 pencil, with an unused
eraser (supplied by the Event Supervisor) to actuate the release mechanism on the ramp. Competitors
must not use the pencil to touch any part of the vehicle to start the run. Competitors must also not
touch the vehicle the release mechanism, or the ramp to start the run, except to prevent the ramp from
moving during launch.
h. Only the wheels of the vehicle and the ramp are allowed to contact the floor. If any piece falls offduring
the run, it is a construction violation.
i. Stopping mechanisms must work automatically. The vehicle must not be tethered or remotely controlled.
j. Electrical components must not be used on the vehicle, the ramp or any alignment devices.
4. THE TRACK:
a. The competition must be on a straight and level lane with a relatively smooth, hard, low-friction surface.
Space is needed on each side of the track’s center and beyond the finish line to allow for error in the
vehicle’s path, otherwise there is no defined track width.
b. One-inch tape must be used for the Start Line and the tape that contains the Target Point (finish point).
The inside edge of the tape must define the Start Line. The Start Line must be t50.0 cm long and the
Target Point tape must be at least 2.50 cm long. The Target Point must be marked at the center of this
tape. The center of the Start Line will be marked also. This center point and the Target Point will be
perpendicularly aligned. There is no Center Line.
c. At the Event Supervisor’s discretion, more than one track may be used. Teams must be given the option
to choose which track they will use. AI! runs by a team must be made on the same track.
5. THE COMPETITION:
a. The vehicle and ramp must be impounded before the start of the competition. Tools, data, and calculating
devices need not be impounded.
b. The Target Distance must not be announced until all vehicles and ramps have been impounded.
c. Only competitors being judged are allowed in the vehicle impound and track areas while teams are
competing.
d. The vehicle must not be rolled on the track surface (floor) anywhere at any time prior to or during the
competition except for the two otficial runs.
В©2013-C17
GRAVITY VEHICLE (CONT.)
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
e. All parts of the vehicle must move as a whole. The competitors must not hold, constrain, or give a push to
the vehicle. If any piece falls off during the ran, it is considered a construction violation. The vehicle must
be able to remain at the starting position without being touched until triggered.
f. Before the first run, the competitors must predict their vehicle’s Travel Time. They must not change the
prediction for the second run, but they may adjust the vehicle.
g. Competitors have 8 minutes of Event Time to set up, dry clean the track, make any changes to the
vehicle (including adjusting the Measurement Point) and/or ramp, take measurements, and start two runs.
If the second run has started before the 8-minute period has elapsed, it must be allowed to run to
completion. Time used by the Event Supervisor for run measurements does not count toward the 8
minutes Event Time.
h. Competitors must place their vehicle and ramp anywhere completely behind the Start Line.
i. Sighting and!or aligning devices are permitted on the track but must be removed before the vehicle runs.
Aligning and sighting devices mounted on the vehicle or ramp may be removed at the team’s discretion
prior to each run. Alignment devices left on the vehicle during its run must not cause the vehicle’s mass to
exceed the 1.500 kg maximum limit.
j. Run Time starts when the vehicle begins forward motion and ends when the vehicle comes to a complete
stop. If a vehicle does not move upon actuation of the release mechanism, it does not count as one of the
two runs and the competitors may request to set up for another ran, but the time must count toward their 8
minutes Event Time.
k. if the vehicle moves any distance after actuation of the switch, it must be considered a run.
1. Once the vehicle starts a run the competitors must not follow it and wait until called by the Event
Supervisor to retrieve their vehicle following measurement. Time used by the Event Supervisor for
assessment and measuring will uot be included in the Eveut Time.
m. Prior td" each official run, the Event Supervisor will measure the vehicle height, defined to be the
highest point of the vehicle in the ready to launch position. This height will be recorded in cm
rounded to the nearest whole cm.
n. Run Time will be recorded in seconds to the nearest 0.0I seconds.
o. The Event Supervisor is strongly encouraged to utilize 3 independent timers on all runs. The middle value
of the 3 timers must be the officially recorded time.
p. If the time and/or distance cannot be measured for a vehicle (e.g., the vehicle starts before the Event
Supervisor is ready, the Measurement Point is no longer within 1 cm of the track at the end of the
run, or the competitors pick up the vehicle before it is measured), it is a failed mn that counts as a run
with no score.
q. Teams who wish to file an appeal must leave their vehicle with the Event Supervisor.
6. SCORING: Teams are ranked using the single run that gives them the best overall rank.
a. The Run Score = Distance Score + Height Score + Time Score + Predicted Time Score. Low score wins.
b. The Distance Score is the distance from the Measurement Point to the Target Point in millimeters. This is
a point-to-point measurement.
c. The Height Score = 400 * Vehicle Height in cm / (300 cm - Vehicle Height in era)
d. The Time Score = 25 * (Run Time).
e. The Predicted Time Score : 50* l(Predicted Time - Travel Time)[.
f. Tiers:
i. Tier 1 : A run with no violations.
ii. Tier 2: A run with any competition violations.
iii. Tier 3: A run with construction violations or both competition and construction violations.
iv. Tier 4: A vehicle that cannot complete any runs receives only Participation Points.
g. Ties must be broken by this sequence: i. Better non-scored run; 2. Better Predicted Time Score of better
run; 3. Better distance score on better run.
SCORING EXAMPLE: At a competition, the highest point of the vehicle at ready to launch position was
134 cm and it stopped 286 mm from the Target Point. It made the run in 4.79 s, and the team’s predicted time
was 5.52 s.
Distance Score
286.00 points
Height Score
322.89 points (400 * 134 cm / (300cm -134 cm)
Time Score
119.75 points (25 * 4.79 s)
Predicted Time Score
36.50 points (50" [(5.52 s-4.79 s)l)
Run Score
765.14 points
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Problem Solving and
~ Technology CD are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
,
В©2013-C18
,
MAGLEV
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Competitors may construct np to two self-propelled magnetically-levitated vehicles with
battery-powered motors that turn up to two propellers to move the vehicle(s) down a magnetic track.
Competitors must also be tested on their knowledge of magnetism and related topics.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2 EYE PROTECTION: #1 IMPOUND: Yes APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
2. EVENT PARAMETERS:
a. The event has two parts: Part 1 - vehicle testing, and Part 2 - written test on magnetism concepts.
b. For Part 1, the vehicle(s) and any material needed to adjust the vehicle(s) (e.g., extra magnets, shims,
masses, batteries, etc.) must be impounded prior to the start of competition. Competitors may bring their
own maglev track to use during their ran. Teams may share tracks, but must have different vehicles.
Supervisors must check the track specifications before use. Tools and the track need not be impounded.
c. For both parts, al! reference materials must be secured in a 3-ring binder, must be 3-hole punched and
inserted in the binder so that regardless of orientation, none can fall out.
d. Competitors must wear eye protection during set-up and testing of their vehicle(s). Teams without proper
eye protection must be immediately informed and given a chance to obtain eye protection if time allows.
If not, teams are not allowed to compete in Part 1.
3. CONSTRUCTION:
a. Vehicles may be made of any material, but must meet all specifications and cannot damage the track.
b. The length of the vehicle must be between 15.0 and 22.0 cm and cannot vary during the ran. Vehicles,
excluding dowel (see 3.g), must be less than 20.0 cm tall with the propeller in motion when non-levitated.
c. The mass of the vehicle (including batteries and dowel) must be no less than 250.0 grams.
d. Ifa team does not provide their own track, their vehicle must fit on a standard track (width = 2 9/16").
e. Vehicles are recommended to have adjustable width to accommodate track variations (e.g. shims, tape).
f. The entire vehicle, except for the propeller(s), must not extend outside of the vertical planes defined by
the inside edge of the side rails of the track.
g. The vehicle must either have a 30.0 cm long 1/8" diameter dowel vertically attached to it within 5.0 cm of
its front edge or be able to accommodate an event supervisor-provided dowel of the same dimension.
h. Commercial batteries, not exceeding 9.0 V as labeled, may be used to energize the motor(s) on the
vehicle. Multiple batteries may be connected together as long as the expected voltage across any points
does not exceed 9.0 V as calculated by their labels. The vehicle must not have any other energy sources.
i. Vehicles may have up to two propellers and two motors. Motors must have a cross-sectional diameter or
diagonal _< 3.5 cm. Ducted motor/propeller combinations must have a diameter _< 6.0 cm.
j. Bmshless motors and integrated circuits are not permitted.
k. Any magnets, except rare earth magnets, may be used on the vehicle, but competitors must be able to
modify the placement of the magnets so that the vehicle can travel in either direction on the track.
1. The vehicle must be levitated as it moves down the track (inadvertent contact is permitted). Competitors
must demonstrate that their vehicle levitates by pushing the vehicle slightly down.
4. THE TRACK: More information is provided on the event page on www.soinc.org
a. The competitor-provided track must be a non-electrified track _> 4 feet long and have an inside width
between 2.0" and 3.0". On longer tracks, a 4-foot (1.22 m) segment must be marked for the competition.
b. Event supervisors must provide at least one track for teams who do not bring a track or whose track does
not meet specifications. This track must be a standard width track (2 9/16" between inner faces of rails).
c. The height of the inside edge of the side rails measured from the top of the magnets to the top of the
railing must be between 2.00 cm and 5.00 cm.
d. tn advance of the competition, supervisors are encouraged to provide details of their track.
e. Both commercially-produced tracks and hand-made tracks are allowed. Instructions for making various
tracks are available on the event page on www.soinc.org.
f: The track must be placed on a flat level surface with enough room to allow a cushioned barrier to be
placed at the end of the track and 25 cm beyond to prevent the vehicle from being damaged.
В©2013-C19
MAGLEV (CONT.)
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
5. THE COMPETITION:
a. Part 1: Vehicle Testing
i. The length of the timed portion of the track is between 50.0 and 95.0 cm, in 1.0 cm increments. The
event supervisor must announce the exact length after impound, which will be the same for all teams.
Supervisors must mark the distance on all tracks with both start and finish lines.
ii. Competitors must have a total of 8 minutes to first predict the run time of their vehicle(s) (only 1
prediction allowed), then orient their vehicle(s) appropriately, adjust and repair their vehicle(s), and
make two successful runs on the track (as described below). Vehicles that do not meet the
construction specs must not be allowed to mn until brought into spec.
iii. Competitors must place their vehicle on the track directly before the start line of the timed portion.
They must place a pencil in front of their vehicle to keep it from moving.
iv. When ready, competitors may turn on their motor(s) and indicate that their vehicle is ready.
v. Competitors must not touch their vehicle after they have turned on their motor(s).
vi. Supervisors are encouraged to use photogates for more precise timing and use at least one back-up
manual timer. If only manual timers are utilized, 3 independent timers are recommended on all runs.
The middle value of the 3 timers must be the officially recorded time and times must be truncated to
the tenth of a second. If the stopwatch shows a hundredths digit, it must be ignored or dropped.
vii. The judge must give a countdown of "3, 2, 1, launch". The competitors must then release their
vehicle by removing the pencil and stepping away from the track. If beir~g manually timed, timing
will start when the dowel crosses the start line and stop when it crosses the finish line.
viii. Both runs may be done with one vehicle or competitors may use different vehicles for each of the two
runs: A run must count as long as it is started before the 8-minute period elapsed.
ix. If a vehicle fails to move after 3 seconds, or moves only part of the way down the track, competitors
must be allowed to restart their vehicle without penalty any number of times within the 8-minute
window until two successful runs have been completed. Additional successful runs are not allowed.
x. If, during a run, any part of the vehicle falls off, the run must not be counted and the team wil! be
allowed to repair and restart their vehicle or replace it with another impounded vehicle.
xi. Teams filing an appeal regarding Part 1 must leave their vehicle(s) and track in the competition area.
b. Part 2: Written Test
i. All answers must be provided in SI units with appropriate significant figures.
ii. Teams must be given a set amount of time (20 - 30 minutes is suggested) to complete a written test.
iii. Topics that may be included are: polarity, Earth’s magnetic field, electromagnetic principles,
magnetic vs. non-magnetic materials, common uses of magnets, the history of the theories of
magnetism and magnetic technology, superconducting maglev transportation technology, magnetic
force, electric motors/generators, solenoids, magnetic domains, permanent magnets, ferromagnetic
materials, medical uses of magnets, and superconductors.
6. SCORING: A scoring rubric is available on the event page on www.soinc.org
a. Vehicle Score (VS) = total mass of vehicle /mn time (RT) to travel the timed portion
b. Run Score (RS) = (team’s best VS / the highest VS at the competition) x 50 points
c. Teams whose vehicle(s) only move partially down the track get a RS = 0. Teams whose vehicle(s) do not
move past the start line or attempt any runs get a RS = -10. Teams that fail to impound get a RS = -20.
d. Time Score (TS) = (l-(abs(RT - predicted time) / RT)) x 10 points. The RT used must be from the run
with the best VS. The smallest possible TS is 0. Teams with no successful runs receive a TS of 0.
e. Exam Score (ES): The test used for Part 2 of this event must be worth 50 points.
f. Penalties: 2 points each time a Competition section requirement is violated; 10 points for each
Construction section requirement violation.
g. Final Score (FS) ~ RS + TS + ES - Penalties. The
maximum
possible
FS is 110 points. High score wins.
h
s
h. T’e
~ Brea
kes: ~l - Best
RS; 2 - n~
Best ES; 3 -rd Best TS;
4d - Best 2 VS (VS not used for RS
calculation); 5~h - specific test questions
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the MagLev DVD and the Problem
Solving/Technology CD are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at www.soinc.org
В©2013-C20
MATERIALS SCIENCE
ILYMPIAD
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
~
MATERIALS SCIENCE (CONT.)
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Teams will answer a series of questions or complete tasks involving the science
c. lntermolecular Forces and Surface Chemistry
i. Chemical tests
processes of chemistry focused in the areas of Materials Science.
I) Surface Chemistry, surface tension, contact angle
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
EYE PROTECTION: #4 APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
2) Thickness of a molecule
2. EVENT PARAMETERS:
ii. Crystal Strnctures
a. Teams may bring: a handheld nonprogmmmable calculator, a writing utensil and one 3-ring binder
3) Ionic, Covalent, Crystalline, Semi-Crystalline, Amorphous
4) Common atomic packing (FCC, BCC, HCP, Simple Cubic)
(any size) containing pages of information in any form fi:om any source that must be 3-hole punched
5) Atomic packing factor (Geometry only)
and inserted into the rings (sheet protectors are allowed).
b. Event Supervisors must provide: a Periodic Table, any materials needed for modeling and any
5. SAMPLE QUESTIONS:
constants needed.
a. Material Performance Relationships:
c. Safety Requirements: Students must wear the following or they will not be allowed to participate:
i. Using an apparatus provided by the event supervisor: generate a
closed-toed shoes, ANSI Z87 indirect vent chemical splash goggles (see http://soinc.org), pants or
stress vs. strain curve, and calculate Young’s modulus, identify the
skirts that cover the legs to the ankles, and additionally a long sleeved lab coat that reaches the wrists
yield strength and offset yield strength.
and the knees or a long sleeved shirt that reaches the wrists with a chemical apron that reaches the
ii.
For
a ceramic material, what types of bonds are generally formed, and how does this contribute to
knees. Chemical gloves are optional. Students who unsafely remove their safety clothing/goggles or
properties such as density, hardness, and brittleness.
are observed handling any of the material or equipment in a hazardous/unsafe manner (e.g., tasting or
iii. Students may be expected to answer questions or complete labs and activities such as: Using
touching chemicals or flushing solids down a drain and not rinsing them into a designated waste
materials supplied by the event supervisor to model packing ibr cubic or hexagonal crystal
container provided by the supervisor) will be disqualified from the event.
structures. Answer questions related to unit cell characteristics and properties such as formula,
density, and dimensions, packing factor, etc.
3. THE COMPETITION:
iv. Students may be asked to perform mechanical tests to identify an ideal material for a given
a. The competition will focus on students evaluating the properties of materials and answering questions
appli .c.ation.
related to the materials’ chemistry: 1) Evaluating the mechanical performance of materials; 2)
Evaluating the intermolecular forces of materials.
b. lntermolecular Forces and Surface Chemistry:
b. The event will consist of an activity or activities with supporting questions. The questions will be
i. Based on droplet characteristics, characterize the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the provided
scaffolded such that students are guided from the observed bulk properties to principal chemical
surfaces. For example, students may be asked to identify unknown surfaces or rank the
hydrophobicity of the provided surfaces.
properties; "macro" to "micro" scale. Supervisors are encouraged to use computers or calculators with
ii. Using the Wilhelmy plate apparatus and the provided equation, determine the surface tension of a
sensors/probes wherever possible. Students may be asked to collect data using probeware that has been
liquid. Evaluate changes in surface tension with the application of surfactants or other liquids.
set-up and demonstrated by the Supervisor. The supervisor may provide students with data sets
collected by such sensors and probes following demonstration of the data collection. Digital
iii. Students may be provided images to measure contact angles, evaluate boiling point of liquids,
perform polymer melt tests for crosslinking, and will answer question related to these
microscopes and cameras connected to computers are encouraged.
measurements.
c. Cleanup should occur after all materials have been returned or a penalty may be given.
iv.
Students may be asked to create a droplet/surface to meet the contact angle designated by the Event
d. Students will be expected to interpret data by preparing data tables and/or construction of graphs of the
data. Completeness, accuracy and quality of data tables and graphs will be taken into account.
Supervisor. Students may be asked to perform tests at surfaces (liquid or solid) and identify the
e. All measurements must be recorded with correct significant figures and units. All calculations must
ideal material for a given application.
also include correct significant figures and units.
6. SCORING: Intermolecular Forces section (lab and written exam) 50% and Material Per~brmance
section (lab and written exam) 50%. All ties will be broken by pre-selected questions chosen by the
4. LAB STATIONS: Material Per~brmance & Atomic/Molecular Structure Topics are limited to:
supervisor. These questions may or may not be identified to the students. Any graphs that are generated
a. General properties and characteristics of material classes (metals, ceramics, polymers, composites)
i. Physical characteristics (Density, strength, thermal properties, etc.)
will be evaluated on these basic parameters (partial credit may be given): Points should be given for a
correct title, and X and Y-axis labels including appropriate units and axis increments. Additionally,
ii. Manufacturing techniques and natural occurrences
students may be required to create a best-fit line for the data points, identify specific points on the graph
iii. Chemical Composition (elements, bonds, etc.)
such as yield strength, and/or others designated by the event supervisor that relate directly to the property
b. Material characterization techniques
being measured. Any calculations relating to generated graphs should have work clearly shown on a
i. Visual (Optical and electron microscopy)
provided page with proper units.
ii. Physical tests
1) Stiffness of material - Young’s Modulus
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Chem/Phy Science CD
2) Breaking strength of a material - Yield Strength
(CPCD) are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
3) Surface Area/Volume ratio
4) Permanent deformation of material under constant load - Creep Rate
5) Resistance to flow - Viscosity
6) Resistance to fracture - Fracture toughness (State and National tournaments)
7) Resistance to repetitive strain - Fatigue Limit (State and National tournaments)
8) Stiffness under shear load - Shear Modulus (State and National tournaments)
9) Transverse, inherent strain - Poisson’s Ratio (State and National tournaments)
iii. Material selection for specific applications - Choosing the best material for an application based off
of a list of materials and their properties
В©2013-C21
В©2013-C22
REMOTE SENSING
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
DESCRIPTION. Participants will use remote sensing imagery, science and mathematical process skills
to complete tasks related to an understanding of the Earth’s Hydrosphere.
APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 Minutes
IMPOUND: No
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
EVENT PARAMETERS: Each team may bring five 8.5" x 1 !" two-sided sheets of paper containing
information in any form and from any source. Each participant may bring a metric ruler, a protractor, a
triangle, a magnifying glass, any kind of(non-graphing) calculator, and other measuring devices.
THE COMPETITION: Students should understand concepts and terms related to how remote sensing
technologies are used to record data and monitor changes in the atmosphere and hydrosphere using
measurements of:
Atmospheric temperature and temperatures of oceans,
inland seas and bodies of fresh water
Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere including water
vapor, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide
Changes in vegetative cover
Changes in sea level and ice elevation
Other changes in geological, hydrological and in man-made features associated with bodies of water
portrayed on a remote sensing image
f. Students should also be familiar with principles of satellite imagery including the electromagnetic
spectrum, interactions between electromagnetic energy and the atmosphere/hydrosphere, and NASA
Earth Observation Missions related to monitoring of the atmosphere/hydrosphere.
4. SAMPLE ACTIVITIES:
a. Compare a remote sensing image of a g!acier with a similar image acquired earlier to determine
changes in the area and depth of ice that have taken place in the elapsed time.
b. Use a remote sensing image to evaluate damage to residential land use and transportation
infrastructure caused by flooding or reservoir impoundments.
c. Use time-lapsed remote sensing imagery to track the path of an oil spill and predict its effect on local
wetland regions.
SCORING: Teams with the highest number of correct responses will be the winners. Selected questions
or question sets may be used as Tiebreakers.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Remote Sensing CD are
available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
В©2013-C23
ROBOT ARM
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Prior to the cornpetition teams must design, build, document and test one robotic device to
move scoreable items.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2 IMPOUND: No EYE PROTECTION: #5 APPROX. TIME: 10 rain.
2. EVENT PARAMETERS: Teams must provide one Device. Teams without proper eye protection must be
immediately informed of that and given a chance to obtain eye protection if time allows, otherwise not be
allowed to compete and are scored as a no-show. The Supervisor provides the Competition Area and items.
3. CONSTRUCTION PARAMETERS: The Device includes the Arm(s), an optional permanently attached
Base, optional detachable passive Arm end effectors (parts that interact with the items on the Competition
Area), remote control box(es) (e.g., radio control; infrared; connector wires, tubes, hoses, etc.).
a. The Arm(s) may be attached to a Base. All parts (except the control box(es)/connections) in the ready to
run position must fit inside a 30.0cm x 30.0cm x 100.0cm high rectangular prism. The Arm(s) is not
restricted to these dimensions during the run and must be attached to the floor only by the force of
gravity. Control boxes may be contained within the base or arm and robots may be fully autonomous.
b. The Device may use modified kit parts and have any number of arms and joints.
c. Competitors must not impart energy directly onto the Arm(s) (i.e., all end effector movements must be
powered by stored energy in the device components).
d. Commercial batteries, not exceeding 14.4 volts as labeled, may be used to energize each of the Device’s
electrical circuits. Multiple batteries may be connected in series or parallel as long as the expected voltage
output across any points does not exceed 14.4 volts as calculated using their labeled voltage. All power
sources must be contained either in the robot square or as part of the control box.
e. While pneumatics are permitted, storage devices must not start with positive gauge pressure.
f. Arm functions may have independent circuits, sources of electrical energy and/or control mechanisms.
g. Radio control equipment used for this event must operate on frequencies designated by the FCC for
surface ~tevices. The frequency must be marked by the manufacturer on the transmitter. Allowable
frequencies are: 75 MHz band (75.41 - 75.99 MHz), 27 MHz band (26.995 - 27.255 MHz), 49 MHz band
(49.8302 - 49.890 MHz) or 2.4 GHz (Bluetonth is acceptable.) Devices using other frequencies must not
be al!owed to compete.
4. DOCUMENTS: In addition to the Device, teams must develop and submit at check-in (or as announced by
the tournament director) the following three technical documents-examples available at http://www.soinc.org
a. En ineerin Drawin s (hand-drawings are acceptable), either as 3-views or projected views, of the basic
structure of the Device that must show (with labels):
i. All motors and/or actuators on the Arm(s)
iv. Controls the competitors are using to interact
ii. All energy sources
with the Arm(s)
iii. All Arm(s) end effectors
b. Individual Component List for every component of the Arm(s), except fasteners, with the following
information. A preassembled component (one not assembled by the team) counts as one component:
i. Name and quantity of each component
ii. Location/vendor from which the component can be obtained
iii. Two or more key properties of the component (e.g., weight, dimensions, voltage rating, etc.)
iv. Energy source of the component (rda is an acceptable entry if the component is a voltage/current
source or if the component is not energized)
c. O_~tion
i. Device reaction to each control input; ii. Tentative/Proposed
plan of movement (i.e., which items in the Competition Area
will be moved; how the Device will move each item)
5. COMPETITION AREA: The Competition Area is a taped 70.0
cmx 70.0 cm square using the inside edge of tape to mark the area.
The Supervisor must designate each of the 4 sides as North, East,
South, and West. See www.soinc.org for expanded view of Area
a. A taped 30.0 cm x 30.0 cm square (the "Arm Square") is marked
inside of, centered on, and touching the South edge of the
Competition Area. The inside tape edge is used to mark the Arm Square.
b. Goal Boxes are labeled W, N, & E and placed inside the Competition Area centered on the W, N, & E
sides, touching the edges of the Competition Area. Goal boxes must be a bottom portion of a half-gallon
milk jug, cut to a height between 9.5 and 10.5 cm with the opening facing up. They must not be secured to
the surface.
c. The Competition Area is divided into North and South Zones along a 35.0 cm Center Line that is defined
by the northern edge of a piece of tape running from the East to West edges of the Competition Area.
d. At the beginning of each Competition Time, 5 "ВЅ inch nominal size" PVC pipes (9.5 - 10.5 cm long), 5
ferromagnetic nails (9.5 - 10.5 cm long), and 5 unsharpened #2 pencils are evenly spaced along the full
В©2013-C24 ~
ROBOT ARM (CONT.)
ROCKS AND MINERALS
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
length of the arm square and placed perpendicular to the edges of the Arm Square in a row. The head of
each nail, the eraser end of each pencil, and an end of each pipe touches the edges of the Arm Square, and
points away from it.
e. The pencils are placed along the West edge, the nails along the North edge and the pipes along the East
edge. 4 Ping-Pong Bails are centered, one each, between each pair of nails. Ping-Pong Balls must
remain undamaged.
f. One unmodified half-gallon jug with the cap removed (Bonus Box) is placed at one of the two North
comers of the Competition Area (must be the same for all teams). It must not be secured to the ground.
g. The Device may move any boxes anywhere inside or outside the Competition Area after Competition
Time begins.
6. COMPETITION: At check in, the Event Supervisor inspects and measures the device, selects 4 items from
the technical documentation, and has the competitors point them out on their device.
a. Teams have 3 minutes of Prep Time to set up and test their Device in the Competition Area.
b. Teams have 3 minutes of Competition Time to complete the task of moving the scoreable items, which
begins once the team notifies the Supervisor they are ready and initiate movement of the Device.
c. The run must stop if any of the following occur (This does not move the team to a lower tier.):
i. Three (3) minutes has elapsed; ii. The team says, "Stop"; iii. The team steps onto the Competition Area
a second time after being warned once; iv. Any end effectors are moved by anything besides stored
energy in the Device; v. Any part of the Device touching the Arm Square surface exits the Arm Square;
vi. The Device is physically moved by the connections to the control box(es); vii. The Arm(s) become
detached from the optional Base (not including optionally detachable passive end effeetors).
d. Teams who wish to file an appeal must leave their documentation and Device with the Supervisor.
7. SCORING: High score wins.
a. If the team or control box(es) connections move any of the scoreable items (pencils, nails, pipes,
batteries), or if any scoreable item touches the surface outside of the Competition Area, even if it is under
the control of the Arm(s), that item is out of play and must not be used to attain any points. The Goal and
Bonus Boxes may touch the surface outside the Competition Area.
b. Teams receive points for items completely supported by Goal Boxes (regardless of goal box location) at
the end of the Competition Time as listed below. Points attributed to an item in the Goal Box must only
be counted if that item was placed while the box was upright.
West Goal Box
North Goal Box
East Goa! Box
2
Pencil
2
3
Nail
2
2
3
PVC
2
2
3
c. Four points for each Goal Box that completely supports one or more ping-pong balls. (12 pts max.)
d. Bonus Points: Teams will be awarded 0.02 points for each 1 cm above the surface of the competition
area that a scorable ping pong ball is held by the arm. The part of the arm used to raise the ping-pong ball
must have been previously used to score at least 1 point. The measurement will be taken after time stops.
The lowest point of the ball must be visible from the ground; measurement will be taken from this point.
The ping-pong ball must be stable; if it is moving, the event supervisor must wait until the arm and ball
come to rest. Raising the ping-pong ball must be the team’s final task to receive the Bonus Points.
e. At the end of the run, any item that is completely within the North Zone and not completely supported by
one of the Goal or Bonus Boxes receives 1 point.
f. !0 points for each item type (except ping pong balls) completely in the Bonus Box. (30 points max.)
g. tf at least one item is fully in the North Zone or supported by a Goal Box when time is stopped 5 points
are awarded for each Goal Box that did not lie completely sideways at any time. (15 points max.)
h. Complete documents receive their full score. For each complete document missing (4a-c), teams receive a
10% penalty off of their final score (up to 30%). For each incomplete document (e.g., the Drawings do
not include a motor on the device) teams receive a 5% penalty off of their final score (up to 15%).
i. 1 point is subtracted for each missing or incorrectly identified item during the check-in inspection.
j. Ties are broken by: l) Shortest Competition Time; 2) Least number of electrical, hydraulic, or pneumatic
motors. Cooling fan motors used only to cool are not counted; 3) Lowest labeled circuit voltage.
k. Tiers:
i. Tier l : Devices that meet all requirements are ranked by highest score
ii. Tier 2: Devices that fail to meet a spec. under "Construction Parameter" are ranked by highest score.
iii. Tier 3: Devices with Competition violations are ranked by highest score.
iv. Tier 4: Participation Points only: Devices that violate the frequency rules; that have no capability, by
design or construction, to score points via moving objects; or are unable to compete.
Recommended Resources: All references, sample documents and training resources including the Robot Arm
DVD are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Teams will demonstrate their knowledge of rocks and minerals.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
APPROXIMATE TIME: 40-50 Minutes
EVENT PARAMETERS: Each team may bring only one magnifying glass; one commercially
pnblished resource that may be tabbed and written in and one 3-ring binder (any size) containing
pages of information in any form from any source. The pages must be 3-hole punched and inserted
into the rings (sheet protectors are allowed).
THE COMPETITION:
Equal time intervals, as determined by the supervisor, wil! be allotted for each station. When the
start signal is given, participants wi!l begin work at their initial station.
b. Participants may not move to the next station until prompted to do so, may not skip stations, or
return to any previously visited station.
c. Specimens and other materials placed at the various stations may not be taken to other stations.
d. HC! will not be provided, nor may it be brought to or be used during the competition. Written
descriptions as to how a specimen might react were it to be tested with HC1 may be provided.
e. Only those specimens appearing on the Official NSO List (see www.soine.org) will be used in the
competition with the following exception: Tournament Directors ma3~ include up to five
additional specimens important to their own state. If additional specimens are to be included, all
teams must be notified no later than three weeks prior to the competition.
4. Topics may include, but are not limited to:
The Rock Cycle
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Specimen identification
Rock cycle
Properties of minerals
Mineral groups
Economic importance
Formation and properties of igneous,
sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks
g. Clues to past environments
h. Composition and structure of minerals
i. Bowen’s reaction series
5. REPRESENTATIVE STATION ACTIVITIES:
a. Using the materials provided, fingernails included, determine the relative hardness of each of
these six minerals. List the specimens, by name and number, in order of increasing hardness.
b. Match each metamorphic rock with the type of rock from which it may have been formed.
6. SCORING: Total scores will determine rankings in this event. Ties will be broken by the accuracy
or quality of answers to selected questions.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Science Olympiad Rock
& Mineral Teaching Guide, the Bio/Earth CD and the National Audubon Society Field Guide to
North American Rocks and Minerals are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website
at http://www.soinc.org Also, Rocks and Minerals kits (*excluding only silver, gold, and diamond) may
be purchased by check or Schoo! Purchase Order from ESES, P.O. Box 503, Lee’s Summit, MO 64063
(No Credit Cards or Phone Orders-PH 816-524-5635; FAX 816-525-4263) item OLY01 at $85.00. Price
quoted includes shipping and handling.
В©2013-C26
TECHNICAL PROBLEM SOLVING
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Teams will gather and process data to solve problems.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
EYE PROTECTION: #4
APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 minutes
EVENT PARAMETERS: Each student may bring and use any kind of calculator. Where a station
reqnires a more advanced calculator, probes or other lab equipment, the event supervisor will provide
them. The event supervisor will provide a list of mathematical relationship, formulas or constants. Each
team may bring only one 8.5" X 11" two-sided page of information in any form from any source.
Students must bring and use chemical/splash protection goggles where required.
3. THE COMPETITION: The event will consist of two lab stations and up to 10 questions limited to the
two topic areas below.
Level
Probes
2012-2013 Topics
Regional microphone
gas pressure (or non-technical gas
measurement)
temperature
State
microphone
Harmonics-Open & closed tubes and strings
Enzymatic reactions (yeast catalase), decomposition
rates
gas pressure
temperature
National microphone
gas pressure
temperature
Regional + reaction types
ВЇ
Same as Regional
Same as Regional
Regmnal + State animal catalase, ideal gas law
Note: At the national level, Vernier probes and TI handhelds will be used at the two stations.
Students will apply scientific theories and principles related to the current topics in the solution of the
problems. Students will be asked to collect data, make measurements and determine specific values
to solve a problem using probeware that has been provided, set up, and demonstrated by the
supervisor. Intermediate measurements and calculations may be required.
b. At state and national tournaments, supervisors will use calculators and probes for the topics above.
Regionals are encouraged to use probes but may provide students with data sets collected by such
sensors/probes following a data collection demonstration.
4. SCORING: Teams will be ranked based on the highest total points as determined by the sum of the
scores of each individual station. Each station score will be a sum of the accuracy of the required task
answer (80%) and content test questions (20%). In case of ties, a tiebreaker will be announced prior to
the competition.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Problem Solving and
Technology CD are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at www.soinc.org
THIS EVENT IS SPONSORED BY TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
TEXAS
INSTRUMENTS
В©2013-C27
THERMODYNAMICS
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
1. DESCRIPTION: Teams must construct an insulated device prior to the tournament that is designed to
retain heat. Students must also complete a written test on thermodynamic concepts.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2 EYE PROTECTION: #4 IMPOUND: Yes APPROX. TIME: 50 Minutes
2. EVENT PARAMETERS:
a. Competitors must bring their insulating device, 2 identical 250 mL Pyrex (or similar brand name)
beakers, eye protection, plots and writing utensils and may bring any notes, parts/supplies, or type of
calculators for use during any part of the competition. Notes of any kind must be 3-hole punched and
secured in a 3-ring binder of any size, so that regardless of orientation nothing falls out.
b. Event supervisors must supply the hot water, devices for transferring measured volumes from the water
source to the team’s beakers, and thermometers or probes (recommended).
c. Prior to the day of the competition, the team must calibrate their devices by preparing plots (either on
separate graphs or overlaid on the same graph) showing the relationship between elapsed cooling time and
ending water temperature for various quantities of water and starting water temperatures. If hand drawn,
they must be on graph paper. All plots must be properly labeled and marked to identify the team.
i. Teams may submit up to 4 plots for scoring. Teams may be asked by the supervisor to submit
them prior to the tournament.
ii. Teams are encouraged to have a duplicate set to use, as those submitted may not be returned.
iii. Students must be prepared to answer questions about the data collection and how the plots are used.
iv. Example plots are available on the Thermodynamics Lab page on www.soinc.org
d. The team’s device, parts and any supplies (beakers, tools, notes, plots, etc.) must be impounded before the
event starts. Eye protection does not need to be impounded. Appeals by teams will not be processed after
they remove their device from the competition area unless the appeals committee has released it.
e. Competitors must wear splash rated eye protection during set up and while loading their devices with
water. They may remove it for Part 2 of the competition. Teams without proper eye protection must be
immediately informed and given a chance to obtain eye protection if time allows, otherwise they will not
be allowed to compete in Part 1.
3. CONSTRUCTION: The device must fit within a 15.0 cm x 15.0 cm x 15.0 cm cube.
a. Devices may be constructed of and contain any materials except for the following prohibited
materials: any type of foam (plastic, metal, expandable glue, etc.), bubbIewrap, commercial insulation.
b. Within the device, students must be able to easily insert and remove a 250 mL standard, unaltered, empty
Pyrex (or similar brand name) beaker that they supply (height -1.4 times the diameter).
c. The device must also easily accommodate the insertion and removal of a thermometer/probe into the
beaker via a hole at least 1.5 cm in diameter all the way through directly above the beaker. The top
surface of the hole must be less than 2.5 cm above the top lip of the beaker. The hole must remain open
and unobstructed during the competition.
d. Devices must be inspected to ensure that there are no energy sources (e.g., no electrical components,
small battery powered heaters, chemical reactions, etc.) to help keep the water warm. At the event
supervisor’s discretion, teams must disassemble their devices at the end of the testing period in order to
verify the materials used in construction.
e. All parts of the device must not be significantly different from room temperature at impound.
4. THE COMPETITION:
a. Part 1: Device Testing
i. After all devices are impounded, the event supervisors must announce the temperature of the source
water bath (60 to 90В°C), the volume of water to be used (50 to 150 mL, in 25 mL increments at
Regional competitions, 10 mL at State competitions, l mL at the National competition) and the
amount of cooling time allowed (20 to 40 mins). These variables must be the same for all teams.
ii. The event supervisor must also announce the current room temperature.
iii. Teams must be given 5 minutes to setup/modify their devices at the start of the competition. Devices
that do not meet the c~
~ecs must not be
pec.
В©2013-C28
THERMODYNAMICS (CONT.)
WATER QUALITY
Read the General Rales in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
iv. Each team, in a staggered sequence, must have the set amount of water poured into each of their 2
beakers, one of which they must then insert into their device, the other must be placed on an open
surface next to the device. Nothing must be placed under or immediately around the external
beaker. Teams may secure and/or close access panels with fastening materials after inserting the
beaker. Event supervisors must record the time each team receives their water. Teams may utilize
their own thermometers to measure the starting water temperature in their beakers.
v. Teams may elect to add up to 50 mL of water from an ice bath to their internal beaker immediately
after receiving the hot water for bonus points. Each team may choose their own volume.
vi. Teams must use their plots to calculate the temperature of the water in their beaker at the end of the
cooling time. They must provide the event supervisors with their estimate prior to beginning part 2.
vii. At the end of the cooling period, the event supervisor must record the temperature in each beaker to
the best precision of the available instrument. Supervisors may leave thermometers/probes in the
devices and the un-insulated beakers for the entire cooling period, but must announce if they will do
so before impound. Otherwise they must first insert a thermometer/probe into the un-insulated beaker,
wait at least 20 seconds, and record the resulting temperature. The event supervisor must then wipe
any residual water off the thermometer/probe and repeat the same process with the beaker inside of
the students’ device. Multiple thermometers/probes may be used at the supervisor’s discretion.
b. Part 2: Written Test
i. Students must take a test on themmdynamic concepts during the remaining time after all devices have
been loaded with water. All teams must have the same amount of time to take the test.
ii. The test must be worth 50 points.
iii. Topics may include: temperature conversions, definitions of heat units, thermal conductivity, heat
capacity, specific heat, the laws of thermodynamics, the history of thermodynamics and
thermodynamic processes.
SCORING:
High score wins.
5.
a. All scoring calculations are to be done in degrees Celsius.
b. Penalties: 4 points each time a Competition section requirement is violated; 10 points for each
Construction section requirement violation; 25 points for missing impound.
c. One of the submitted plots, selected by the event supervisor, must be scored as follows:
i. Partial credit may be given. The max Plot Score possible is 10 points.
ii. 2 points if labeled with school and student’s names.
iii. 2 points for appropriate title of plot and X and Y-axis labels.
iv. 2 points for appropriate units and axis increments.
v. 1 point for each data plot on a graph or graphs turned in (up to 4 total).
d. The final score is the sum of five components minus penalties (a scoring spreadsheet is at soinc.org):
i. Test Score = max of 50 points
ii. Plot Score = max of 10 points
iii. tleat Retention Score = ((internal beaker water temp / external beaker water temp) - t) x 25 points
iv. Prediction Score = (1-(abs (final internal beaker water temp - predicted internal beaker water temp) /
final internal beaker water temp)) x 50 points
v. Ice Water Bonus = (volume of ice water in ml / 4) points
vi. If the heat retention score is negative, it must be set to zero for scoring purposes.
e. Scoring Example: A team gets 22 out of 25 questions on the test correct, submits 4 accurately labeled
plots, predicts a final internal beaker temp of 35.0 degrees C, and adds 40 mL of ice water. The actual
final internal beaker temp was 32.1 degrees C and the external beaker had a final temp of 27.0 degrees C.
Heat Retention Score = ((32.1 / 27.0)-1) x 25 = 4.7;
Test Score = (22 / 25) x 50 = 44;
Prediction Score = (1-(abs (32.1-35)/32.1)) x 50 = 45.5;
Plot Score = 10;
Ice Water Bonus = 40 / 4 = 10 points; Total Score = 44 + !0 + 4.7 + 45.5+10 = 114.2.
Recommended Resources: All reference and training resources including the Chem/Phy Sci CD are available
on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
В©2013-C29
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
DESCRIPTION: The event will focus on evaluating aquatic environments.
A TEAM OF UP TO: 2
EYE PROTECTION: #4 APPROXIMATE TIME: 50 Minutes
EVENT PARAMETERS: Each team may bring only one 8.5" x 11" two-sided page of notes that contains
information in any form from any source, one student built salinometer/hydrometer for testing and up to
2 non-programmable, non-graphing calculators. Each participant must bring Z87 chemical splash goggles.
THE COMPETITION: This event will be composed of three sections of approximately equal point value.
This may include analysis, interpretation or use of charts, graphs and sample data. Supervisors are expected
to utilize freshwater "lakes, ponds, or rivers" and estuary scenarios and have students analyze and evaluate
comparative macroinvertebrates, and water quality data. In subsequent years this event will cover estuarine
and ocean ecology. Process skills may include equipment use, collecting and interpreting data, measuring,
calculating, classifying, and making inferences.
This section will use multiple choice, matching, fill-in-the-blank and/or short answers in areas such as:
aquatic ecology, water cycle, nutrient cycling, aquatic chemistry and its implications for life, potable
water treatment, waste water treatment, aquatic food chains and webs, community interactions,
population dynamics, watershed resource management issues, sedimentation pollution and harmful
species.
Macro-flora and thuna Section will include the identification (common name only) of immature and
adult rfiacroinvertebrates and aquatic nuisance organisms, their importance as indicators of water and
wetland quality. In addition Division C will also be expected to know the general ecology, life cycles,
and feeding habits of all listed organisms.
Class I-pollution sensitive Class 2-moderately sen. Class 3-moderately tolerant Class 4-pollution tol.
Mayfly
Caddisfly
Stonefly
[ Dobsonfly
I Gilled Snails
, Water Penny
~ Riffle Beetle
I Water Scorpion
Aquatic Sowbug
Damselfly
Dragonfly
Scuds
Crane Fly
Water Mite
Midge
Blackfly
Flatworm
Leeches
Air Breathing Snail
Deer/Horse Fly
Tubifex
Blood Midge
Class 5 Air Breath.
Whirligig Beetle
Water Strider
Mosquito
Giant Water Bug
Back Swimmer
Water Boatman
Predacious Diving Beetle
Aquatic Nuisance Plants: Purple Loosestrife, Eurasian Water Milfoil and Water Hyacinth
Aquatic Nuisance Animals: Zebra Mussel; Spiny Water Flea, Asian Tiger Mosquito and Carp
c. Water Monitoring and Analysis Section - Students are expected to understand and interpret data related
to testing procedures and purposes for collecting data related to salinity, pH, phosphates, turbidity
dissolved oxygen, temperature, nitrates, fecal coliform, total solids and biochemical oxygen demand an
their relationship to one another. Actual testing will be limited to salinity. Teams must build, calibra
bring and demonstrate a salinometer/hydrometer capable of measuring saltwater (most likely NaC
concentrations between 1-10% (mass/volume). All types of salinometers are permitted but may
not use commercially made meters or their parts. Teams should be able to estimate percent to the
nearest tenth. Full credit will most likely be given В±1 at Regionals and =k0.5 at State/Nationals:
Points for salinity testing should be approximately 5% of the total score.
4. SCORING: Questions will be assigned point values. Students will be ranked from highest to lowest score.
Ties will be broken by pre-deterrnined tiebreaker questions.
_Recommended Resources: All reference and training resonrces including the in-depth Water Quality CD and
the Bio/Earth CDs are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at http://www.soinc.org
В©2013-C30
"~
GENERAL RULES
WRITE IT/DO IT
Read the General RuLes in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
Read the General Rules in the manuals and on www.soinc.org as they apply to every event.
GENERAL RULES, CODE OF ETHICS AND SPIRIT OF THE PROBLEM
DESCRIPTION: One student will write a description of an object and how to build it, and then the
other student will attempt to construct the object from this description.
APPROXIMATE TIME: 55 Minutes
A TEAM OF: 2
2. THE COMPETITION:
A student is shown an object (which may be abstract and is the same for all teams) built from, but
not limited to, such items as science materials, inexpensive materials (e.g., straws, push pins,
Styrofbam balls, paper cups, Popsicle sticks, etc.) or commercial sets (e.g., Googoplex, K’nex,
Tinker Toys, Lego, Lincoln Logs, etc.).
The student has twenty-five (25) minutes to write a description
of the object and how to build it. There will be no advantage to
finishing early. Only numerals, words and single letters may
be used. Symbols, drawings and diagrams are not al!owed,
with the exception of common punctuation and editing
symbols. Printable punctuation marks/editing symbols that can
be produced on a PC standard 101 key keyboard by pressing a
single key or a single key in combination with the shift key
may be used. These must be used in their normal context and
not as symbols to form a key/code. All abbreviations (not
symbols) must be defined either at the beginning or when the
abbreviation is first used. No prepared abbreviations on labels
will be permitted.
The supervisor of the event will pass the description to the remaining team member who will take
the description and attempt to recreate (build) the original object in twenty (20) minutes.
d. Supervisors will attempt to use different materials than the materials that were used last year.
3. SCORING:
Students, coaches, supervisors, parents, and guests are expected to follow current Science Olympiad Rules and
Policies. The goal of competition is to give one’s best effort while displaying honesty, integrity, and
sportsmanship, and not violate the spirit of the problem. All are expected to display courtesy and respect toward
one another. Our collective example, as stated in the Science Olympiad Pledges, will promote the spirit of
cooperation among all participants. Therefore:
1. Teams may not interpret the rules so that they have an unfair advantage over the rales or another team.
2. Unless otherwise stated, if writing utensils, notes, resources, calculators, actions, etc., are not excluded,
they are permitted unless they violate the spirit of the problem.
3. All non-permitted electronic devices must be turned off and if so directed, left in a designated spot.
4. Once students have entered the event area to compete, they must not communicate with any outside
resources, by any means, unless permitted by event rules and they must not leave until they are finished or
have permission from the event supervisor.
5. If a student does not follow accepted safety procedures, they will be penalized or disqualified. Students
must not bring unsafe items to a tournament.
6. Students, coaches and other adults are responsible for ensuring that any applicable School or Science
Olympiad policy, law, or regulation is not broken.
7. One or more of the 15 current team members must have constructed all pre-built devices presented for
judging. Any of the current team members may demonstrate or operate the device at the competition
unless stated otherwise in the rules. Any student designated by the coach may impound devices.
8. At the supervisor’s and tournament director’s discretion, a student or team may l?e penalized, disqualified
or removed from an event or the tournament, depending upon the level of the infraction.
9. A participant, coach, or guest who fails to show honesty or courtesy may cause mx individual or the team
to be assessed penalty points or disqualified from the event, the tournament or future tournaments.
10. All Science Olympiad Policies (e.g., requirements, clarifications, FAQs, etc.) provided on the website
www.soinc.org apply to all teams and must be treated as if they were included in the printed rules.
Tentative Schedule for the 2013 National Tournament at Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio
Anatomy and Physiology
41 -60
Boomilever
a. The tqarn that builds the object nearest to the original and has properly written instructions is
declared the winner.
b. Points will be given for each piece of material placed in the proper connection and location
compared to the mode!.
c. Pieces that are connected correctly beyond the incorrect connection will be counted in the score.
No penalty will be assessed fbr parts that were not used.
Scoring Violations: Use of diagrams or drawings will result in disqualification. A one percent
(1%) penalty will be assessed for each minor infraction (e.g., unlabeled abbreviations or improper
use of editing symbols or codes). Scoring Example: If a team has seven infractions and the total
possible score is 50, then the team score would be 46.5 = 50-[7(50x.01)].
e. Time for the construction phase will be used as a tiebreaker.
Recommended Resources: Allreference and training resources including the Problem Solving and
Technology CD are available on the Official Science Olympiad Store or Website at www.soinc.org
O1 -20
21 -40
Self-schedule online at www.wright,edu/scieneeoIympiad!
01 -20
Circuit Lab
Disease Detectives
Self-schedule online at www.wright.edu/scienceolympiad/
41 -60
Fermi Questions
01 -20
21 -40
4! -60
Forestry
01 -20
21 -40
Self-schedule online at www.wright.edu!scienceolympiad/
Impound
Remote Sensing
ROCks and Minerals
41 -60
Ol -20
Ol -20
21 -40
41 - 60 01 - 20
21 - 40
21 -40
01 -20
21 -40
Impound
В©2013-C31
41 -60
All Teams
Elastic Launch Glider
MagLev
2! -40
4l -60
41 -60
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