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MSS 419
Antebellum Letter Collection
1823 Jan. 14 - 1860 Dec. 15
Extent: 71 Items
Scope and content: This collection consists of letters written during the Antebellum
period. Topics covered in the various letters include prices and sales of cotton and sugar,
the Louisiana criminal code, yellow fever, the New Orleans and Nashville Railroad, a
bank mortgage, steamship rates, a land sale in Baton Rouge, the visit of General Persifer
F. Smith to New Orleans and military interests such as the defense of New Orleans, war
with Mexico, and the Cuban Revolution. Two of the letters give vivid travel accounts of
voyages to New Orleans. Letters written by Edward Livingston and Edward Douglas
White can be found within the collection, along with a letter by Andrew Jackson to Sam
Houston, and one written to John C. Calhoun by his son Patrick.
Cite as:
Arrangement:
Language:
Restrictions:
How to Order:
Accession number:
Subjects:
Antebellum Letter Collection, MSS 419, Williams Research
Center, The Historic New Orleans Collection.
Chronological, with later additions chronological within groups.
English.
Researchers may be limited to consulting one or two items at a
time, per the discretion of the Reading Room staff. Reproduction
of original documents, when permitted, must be performed by the
Williams Research Center staff.
Please provide the reference staff with the manuscript call number
and folder number.
70-43-L, 70-63-L.5, 75-226-L.8, 76-95-L, 76-99-L, 77-86-L, 78103-L, 78-88-L, 79-15-L, 80-30-L.4, 84-136-L.2, 84-61-L.3, 8461-L.5, 84-61-L.7, 86-54-L, 87-28-L.1, 87-31-L.5, 89-22-L.4, 8929-L.4, 89-3-L.1, 89-31-L, 89-38-L.1, 89-38-L.2, 89-9-L.3, 89-9L.4, 90-24-L, 90-3-L.1, 90-34-L, 91-15-L.7, 91-79-L, 2005.0104,
2008.0028, 2008.0306, 2009.0268.1, 2011.0312.1, 2011.0312.2,
2011.0312.3, 2011.0312.4, 2011.0312.5
Livingston, Edward, 1764-1836.
White, Edward Douglas, 1795-1847.
Calhoun, John C., 1782-1850.
Calhoun, Patrick.
Houston, Sam, 1793-1863.
Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845.
Smith, Persifor Frazer, 1798-1858.
New Orleans and Nashville Rail Road Company.
Railroads -- Louisiana.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 2
Subjects:
(continued)
Cotton trade -- Louisiana -- New Orleans.
Tobacco trade -- Louisiana -- New Orleans.
Politicians -- United States.
Sugar trade -- Louisiana -- New Orleans.
Criminal law -- Louisiana -- 19th century.
Legislators -- Louisiana.
Yellow fever -- Louisiana -- New Orleans.
Mexican War, 1847-1848 -- Social aspects.
Voyages and travels -- 19th century.
Politics and government.
Folder List
Folder 1
1823 Jan. 14
A Letter Relative to the Criminal Code, From
Edward Livingston, Esq. to the General
Assembly of the State of Louisiana. Livingston
gives the status of his work on the criminal code
and his hopes that the Assembly will allow him
to continue his work. Following Livingston's
letter is a Report by Elijah Clark, Chairman of
the Committee to which Edward Livingston's
report was referred. Acc. No. 76-95-L.
English. L, 7 pp., 1 item.
Folder 2
1824 July 5
Letter from Edward Livingston, Red Hook, New
York, to J.C. Calhoun, Secretary of War,
Washington, D.C.. Livingston writes
recommending Omer D. Gaillard, fifteen years
old, a native of New Orleans, for an
appointment in the Corps of Cadets. Gaillard
came highly recommended by the late Governor
Villere of Louisiana. Acc. No. 79-15-L.
English. ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
Folder 3
1834 Jan. 28
Letter from Edward Douglas White, House of
Representatives, to an unknown recipient.
White writes concerning the recent session of
the House of Representatives and the explosion
of his boat. Acc. No.77-86-L. English. ALS, 4
pp., 1 item.
Folder 4
1834 Mar. 7
Letter from George Endicott, New Orleans, to
his sister, Miss Eliza Endicott, care of Mr. H.
Dodd, Milk St., Boston, Mass. Endicott writes
stating his impressions of New Orleans. Acc.
No.89-3-L.1. English. ALS, 3 pp., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 3
Folder 5
1836 Dec. 30
Letter from Grey Carroll, Isle of [Wight], to
Thomas Carroll, Warren, N.C. Carroll writes
stating he has sent a barrel of brandy and two
beds. Mention is also made of family members
being ill and deaths within the community. Acc.
No.86-54-L. English. ALS, 2 pp., 1 item.
Folder 6
1838 Aug. 2
Letter from L. Millaudon, New Orleans, to
Charles P. Leverich, New York. Millandon
writes concerning the sale and prices of sugar.
Acc. No.89-9-L.3. English. ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
Folder 7
1839 Feb. 22
Letter from H.C. de Rham, naturalist, to John
Kirk Townsend, Philadelphia. De Rham writes
asking for information on what it would take to
journey to the Columbia. De Rham mentions
that Victor Audubon informed him that
Townsend was putting off his crossing the
mountains. He also asks about bird specimens.
Acc. No. 78-88-L. English. ALS, 2 pp., 1 item.
Folder 8
1839 Aug. 30
Letter from W. Laurant, New Orleans, to Judge
Tessier, Baton Rouge. Laurant writes
concerning the possible sale of 1,500 arpents
behind Baton Rouge. Acc. No. 89-9-L.4.
English. ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
Folder 9
1840 Jan. 3
Letter from Andrew Jackson, Steamship
Clarksville, to Sam Houston, Texas. Jackson
writes an introduction for two friends of his who
plan to settle in Texas. Also in the folder is an
engraving of Jackson on a horse. Acc. No. 7043-L. English. ALS, 1 p., 2 items.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 4
Folder 10
1841 May 29
Copy of letter by Joseph Gilbert Totten, Colonel
of Engineers, to John Bell, Secretary of War.
Totten writes regarding his inspection of the
military works constructed for the defense of
New Orleans. He remarks on the inaccuracies
of existing maps and he notes that only
fishermen and hunters, most of whom are
Spaniards of the worst character who would
gladly guide the enemy, know the way. Totten
recommends that a complete military survey and
reconnaissance should be made of all the
country from the Southeastern shore of lake
Pontchartrain to the passes leading to the city by
the way of Barataria Bay and Ouacha Lake. He
notes that every canal, bayou, creek, river, road,
and pathway should be followed. Acc. No. 8938-L.2. English. ALS, 2 pp., 1 item.
Folder 11
1842 July 14
Letter from L. E. Pratt, Overton, to Nathaniel
Currier, New Hampshire. Pratt writes reporting
on his visit to New Orleans where he attempted
to collect money owed Currier by a certain
Livermore. Livermore died and Pratt tries to
explain Louisiana laws with regard to getting
the money from Livermore's wife. Pratt
mentions that Roberts is grossly neglecting
Currier's business. Acc. No.89-29-L.4.
English. ALS, 4 pp., 1 item.
Folder 12
1844 Jan. 13
Letter from Danl D. Avery, attorney, City Bank
New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to J. J.
Canuth, Greensburg, Louisiana. Daniel D.
Avery writes to J.J. Canuth concerning City
Bank’s judgment on a mortgage. Acc. No. 8461-L.7. English. ALS, 2 pp., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 5
Folder 13
[1845 Jan. 26-Feb. 3]
Letter from Mark Wendell, New Orleans, to his
father Jacob Wendell, Portsmouth, New
Hampshire. Mark Wendell writes describing his
journey up river, crossing the bar at the mouth,
taking on a pilot and the high rates charged for
their services, oyster fisherman in row boats
selling to sailors, and plantations along the river
fragrant with orange trees. He also comments
on the suffering of the negroes working on the
sugar plantations. On docking in New Orleans,
he notes the immense collection of ships in port,
his need to learn French, the secular activities
on Sunday, and his encounter with other
travelers to Woodville. He registers at the Saint
Charles Hotel, from which he will depart in the
morning. Acc. No. 89-38-L.1. English. ALS, 4
pp., 1 item.
Folder 14
1845 Sept. 11
Letter from Patrick Calhoun, New Orleans, to
his father, John C. Calhoun, Pendleton, So.
Carolina. Patrick Calhoun reports that he does
not believe a war with Mexico is likely. Much
of the letter concerns the actions of General
Gaines, who has sent some volunteer troops
furnished by the Governor of Louisiana into
Texas, and the way in which Washington
officials are treating Gaines. Patrick Calhoun
notes that items mailed from this city get
miscarried, and that the Board of Health has
officially reported yellow fever to be in the city.
He comments that the yellow fever has hurt
business in New Orleans and that people are
leaving town. Acc. No. 89-31-L. English.
ALS, 3 pp., 1 item.
Folder 15
1846 Apr. 27
Letter from Edmond Jean Forstall, New Orleans
to Stillman, Allen, & Co., New York. Forstall
writes concerning their sugar refining apparatus.
He writes, "the eyes of all the upper parishes are
upon us." He also mentions that Governor
Roman and the Fortier Brothers are interested in
their machinery, and he mentions the Reilleus
and Desrines apparati as well as the Lizardi
sugar works. Acc. No. 75-226-L.8. English.
ALS, 2 pp., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 6
Folder 16
1846 May 22-June 29
Letter from Anthony Sinclair, New Orleans, to
George Kestner and Henry D. Warrington,
Penns Hacking Creek, near Moors Town, New
Jersey. Sinclair writes informing them of his
search for work in New Orleans. He complains
about various members of his family. One
member in particular enlisted in the army in
Natchez, but then deserted in New Orleans, got
a job, and went on a binge. Sinclair wishes that
the deserter had been sent on to Texas and the
fighting there. Acc. No. 87-28-L.1. English.
ALS, 3 pp., 1 item.
Folder 17
1846 June 3
Letter from Brander Williams & Co., New
Orleans, to Mr. Edward B. Hicks, Virginia.
Brander Williams & Company write concerning
cotton sales and prices. Mention is made of
General Taylor in Matamoras, Mexico, waiting
for reinforcements and that the high rate of
freight has affected the prices of ale and
produce. In a separate hand and labeled "copy"
are figures with the heading, “sales three
hundred ninety nine bales cotton received from
Steamer Kramicha per order for account of Paup
& Hicks” and on the reverse is a list of charges
signed and dated 1846 May 25, Brander
Williams & Co. Per J. H. Charles. Acc. No. 8922-L.4. English. ALS, 3 pp., 1 item.
Folder 18
1848 July 19
Letter from Chas. A. Salazar, New Orleans, to
William H. Wilder, New Orleans. Salazar
writes asking Wilder to serve on the welcoming
committee for the visit of General Persifer F.
Smith and informing him of a meeting which he
is requested to attend if the appointment is
accepted. Acc. No. 90-24-L. English. ALS, 1
p., 1 item.
Folder 19
1849 Feb. 13
Letter from [Ulards Co.?], New York, to Joseph
Fellows, Geneva, New York. The authors write
stating they received a letter dated the eighth
with an enclosure for Fellows’ account. They
also mention they do not know what the
steamship rate will be as the steamer does not
leave until the twenty-first. Acc. No. 84-61-L.5.
English. ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 7
Folder 20
1849 Nov. 3
Telegram from Robert & Williams of New York
to P.A. Giraud, New Orleans. Robert &
Williams report to P.A. Giraud that Brigham
Ashenwall Atkins has arrived safely "At
Andrews." Acc. No. 70-63-L. English. D, 1 p.,
1 item.
Folder 21
1850 Mar. 22
Letter from C. & G.B. Tate, New Orleans, to
Fisher & Co., Boston. C. & G.B. Tate write
informing Fisher & Company that seventy-three
bales of cotton are being shipped for sale and
asking them to obtain insurance for the
shipment at the rate of fifty-five dollars a bale.
Acc. No. 91-79-L. English. ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
Folder 22
1850 Dec. 9-1851 Jan. 4
Letter from an unknown author to Mr. Enoch I.
Dole, Rowley, Mass. The author gives a travel
account of a four week sea voyage from Boston
to New Orleans which describes passing
through a fierce storm and having sea sickness.
Once in New Orleans the author writes that he
likes the manners and customs of good society
here and tells of going to the country with a
friend he made at the boarding house. Acc. No.
90-34-L. English. AL, 5 pp., 1 item.
Folder 23
1851 Sept. 28
Letter from Henry Hinch, St. Francisville, to
Benjamin P. Hinch, Post Master, New Haven,
Ill. Henry Hinch writes to Benjamin P. Hinch
commenting on the young men from Louisiana
who went to fight in the Cuban Revolution of
1851. He explains that motives for participating
in the revolt ranged from virtue to financial
gain. Hinch also mentions the yellow fever
epidemic in St. Francisville and mentions family
news. Acc. No. 90-3-L.1. English. ALS, 3 pp.,
1 item.
Folder 24
1852 June 23
Letter from [Eugene Lafayett Spencer ?] to
James L. Tynes. The author writes with the
greeting, "Dear Brother James," relating the
story of how a relation has died of a snake bite.
Acc. No.84-61-L. English. ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 8
Folder 25
1852 Aug. 13
Letter from James H. Grant, Office of the
Pennsylvania Rail Road Company, Philadelphia,
to James Robb, President, New Orleans and
Nashville Rail Road Co. James H. Grant writes
to James Robb concerning the status of survey
work on the New Orleans and Nashville
Railroad. Acc. No. 91-15-L.7. English. ALS, 2
pp., 1 item.
Folder 26
1853 Apr. 9
Telegram from Charles Bass, New Orleans, to
Francis Courtney Wemyss. Charles Bass writes
to Francis Courtney Wemyss requesting that the
profits of any benefit in New Orleans go to the
American Dramatic Fund Association. Acc.
No.78-103-L. English. D, 1 p., 1 item.
Folder 27
1853 June 20
Letter from William Henry Hunt, New Orleans,
to Hon. Mr. Crossman, Mayor. William Henry
Hunt writes to Crossman asking that he furnish
John Jones, a free man of color, with the
document he desires. Hunt states that Jones is a
man of good character and responsibility, and
the owner of considerable property. Acc. No.
84-136-L.2. English. ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
Folder 28
1853 Aug. 29
Letter from an unknown author in New Orleans
to "Mon cher Cazelar." The author writes to
Cazelar authorizing him to transact business on
the author’s behalf with Mr. Boufford. The
author notes that the Dauphine St. property has
been repaired and rented while the Royal St.
location has not been rented. He also mentions
the burning of tar as a sanitary measure against
the latest pestilence. Acc. No. 82-30-L.4.
French. AL, 2 pp., 1 item.
Folder 29
1856 Jan. 1
Letter from [Felix] EugГЁne CouvertiГ©, New
Orleans, to his mother [Marie Claudine Nicolas
Couvertie]. [Felix] EugГЁne CouvertiГ©, a young
child, writes to his mother [Marie Claudine
Nicolas Couvertie] stating his duty to love and
obey her and wishing her a happy new year.
Acc. No. 87-31-L.5. French. ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 9
Folder 30
1857 Oct. 26
Letter from W. Hunter [William Hunter, Jr.],
Washington, to "Dear Sir." W. Hunter writes a
cover letter for a list of the Diplomatic and
Consular Officers of the United States. Note
that the list is no longer with the letter. Acc.
No. 76-99-L. English. ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
Folder 31
1836 Jan. 16
Letter from John Bostwick to Susan Bostwick.
John Bostwick writes to Susan Bostwick
discussing his “particular business,” a murder
that occurred during the last week, and the
continued preaching of a group of Baptist
ministers. Acc. No.2008.0306. English. ALS,
4 pp., 1 item.
Folder 32
1844 Feb. 16
Letter from L.B. Brewer to James M. Brewer.
L.B. Brewer discusses in depth the weather and
its effect on his medical practice. He also
discusses his partnership with a Dr. King. Acc.
No. 2008.0306. English. ALS, 4 pp., 1 item.
Folder 33
1844 Nov. 7
Letter from L.B. Brewer to James M. Brewer.
L.B. Brewer discusses his disgust with the
possibility of Polk winning the most recent
presidential election. He also discusses his
health and the sugar making that is currently
taking place. Acc. No. 2008.0306. English.
ALS, 4 pp., 1 item.
Folder 34
1837 Jan. 25
Letter from L. Colquhoun to Mess. Abm. Bell &
Co., New York. Colquhoun discusses business
dealings related to the cotton trade. The letter is
written on a blank leaf of the newsletter "The
Commercial Letter Sheet Prices Current," Vol.
1, No. 3, published at No. 6 Banks' Arcade,
New Orleans, by L. L. Chapman. Acc. No.
2005.0104. Acc. No. 2005.0104. English.
ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
Additions
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 10
Folder 35
1850 April 2
Letter from W. Thornton Thompson, New
Orleans, to William Wright, Newark, New
Jersey. Thompson writes to Wright about his
financial difficulties and asks for assistance.
Acc No. 2008.0028. English. ALS, 4 pp., 1
item.
Folder 36
1852 April 25
Letter from M.P. Kennedy, New Orleans, to her
son John A. Kennedy, Hartland, McHenry
County, Illinois. M.P. Kennedy writes to John
A. Kennedy about family matters. Acc. No.
2008.0028. English. ALS, 1 p., 1 item.
Folder 37
1854 March 27
Letter from Joseph Packard, New Orleans, to
A.J. Bird, Rockland, Maine. Packard writes to
Bird about repairs to a schooner in dry dock in
New Orleans and negotiations to sell the ship.
Acc. No. 2008.0028. English. ALS, 4 pp., 1
item.
Folder 38
1857 January 16
Folder 39
1858 February 13
Letter from J.L. Phipps and Company, New
Orleans, to J.L. Phipps and Company, New
York. The correspondent for J.L. Phipps and
Company writes about business dealings
involving the coffee and cotton trades. Acc No.
2008.0028. English. ALS, 2 pp., 1 item.
Letter from C.W. McLellan, New Orleans, to
his cousin Orris Howard, Warren, Maine.
McLellan writes to Howard discussing various
friends’ business activities in New Orleans, the
summer-like weather and flowers blooming in
February, and the lack of opportunities to go
hunting because there are so many swamps in
the area. He also sends greetings to family and
friends. Acc. No. 2008.0028. English. ALS, 2
pp., 1 item.
Folder 40
1834 February 2
Letter from W.A.C. Tate, New Orleans, to
Messrs. Gaines and Vaughan, Gransburg,
Kentucky. Tate writes to Gaines and Vaughan
about the tobacco trade, prices, and shipping
insurance. The letter is written on a blank page
within an issue of New Orleans Wholesale
Prices Current. Acc. No. 2008.0028. English.
ALS and D, 4 pp., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 11
Folder 41
1835 January 17
Letter from F. Ganahl and Company, New
Orleans, to Abm. Bell and Company, New
York. Ganahl writes to Bell and Company
giving details about cotton prices and sales. The
letter includes filled-in forms giving statistics
about the cotton and tobacco trades. Acc. No.
2008.0028. English. ALS, 2 pp, 1item.
Folder 42
1836 February 6
Letter from Brander, McKenna and Wright,
New Orleans, to Messrs. Abm. Bell and
Company, New York. Brander, McKenna and
Wright write to Abm. Bell and Company
discussing business markets. The letter is
written on a blank page within an issue of New
Orleans Wholesale Prices Current. Acc. No.
2008.0028. English. ALS and D, 4 pp., 1 item.
Folder 43
1836 February 9
Letter from Smith Hubbard and Company, New
Orleans, to “Messrs. Smith and Company” [T.
Smith and Company], Hartford, Connecticut.
Smith Hubbard and Company write to Smith
and Company about manufacturing trunks and
carriage harness equipment. Acc. No.
2008.0028. English. ALS, 3 pp., 1 item.
Folder 44
1836 March 19
Letter from Brander McKenna and Wright, New
Orleans, to Messrs. Abm. Bell and Company,
New York. Brander McKenna and Wright write
to Abm. Bell and Company about purchasing
cotton and the cotton trade. The letter is written
on a blank page within an issue of New Orleans
Wholesale Prices Current. Acc. No. 2008.0028.
English. ALS and D, 4 pp., 1 item.
Folder 45
1836 December 17
Letter from E. Hyde, Jr., New Orleans, to
Messrs. Abm. Bell and Company, New York.
Hyde writes to Abm. Bell and Company to
discuss their cotton market and the lack of
enough ships to take their cotton. The letter is
written on a blank page within an issue of New
Orleans Wholesale Prices Current. Acc. No.
2008.0028. English. ALS and D, 4 pp., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 12
Folder 46
1837 March 28
Letter from Benjamin Brown, New Orleans, to
his brother and sister, addressed to Revd. Jonas
Colebourn, Stoneham, Massachusetts. Brown
writes to his brother and sister about friends in
Canada and discusses family. He also mentions
economic difficulties regarding the cotton trade
and the collapse of local businesses. ALS, 4
pp., 1 item.
Folder 47
1841 January 7
Letter from Ch. [Charles] Choisy, New Orleans,
to Messrs. Abm. Bell and Company, New York.
Choisy writes to Abm. Bell and Company about
the cotton trade. The letter is written on a blank
page within an issue of Merchants’ Transcript
and New Orleans Prices Current. Acc. No.
2008.0028. English. ALS and D, 4 pp., 1 item.
Folder 48
1845 June 25
Letter from John Dreyer, New Orleans, to
Messrs. [Thatcher] Magoun and Son, Boston,
Massachusetts. Dreyer writes to [Thatcher]
Magoun and Son about ship building and an
account for the ship Timoleon. Acc. No.
2008.0028. English. ALS, 4 pp., 1 item.
Folder 49
1845 September 8
Letter from Harriet Raymond Plummer Alsbury,
New Orleans, to her aunt Eunice Goodrich,
Richmond, Massachusetts. Mrs. Alsbury writes
to her aunt Eunice Goodrich about her family
and her pleasant impression of New Orleans.
Signed by H.R.P. Alsbury. Acc. No.
2008.0028. English. ALS, 4 pp., 1 item.
Folder 50
1848 September 3
Letter from D. Randall, New Orleans, to his
sister Eliza H. Randall, Annapolis, Maryland.
Daniel Randall writes to Eliza H. Randall about
family and friends. Signed by D. Randall. Acc.
No. 2008.0028. English. ALS, 3 pp., 1 item.
Folder 51
1850 January 7
Letter from R.B. Campbell, New Orleans, to his
son R.M. Campbell, Sullivan, Ashland County,
Ohio. R.B. Campbell writes to Richard M.
Campbell about family matters. The envelope is
included with the letter. Acc. No. 2008.0028.
English. ALS, 4 pp. with envelope, 2 items.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 13
Folder 52
1857 February 21
Letter from Wm. H. Crafts and Company, New
Orleans, to C. McMoran, Louisville, Kentucky.
Wm. H. Crafts and Company write to Charles
McMoran about the tobacco trade. The letter is
written on a blank page within an issue of New
Orleans Prices Current, Commercial
Intelligencer and Merchants’ Transcript. Acc.
No. 2008.0028. English. ALS and D, 4 pp., 1
item.
Folder 53
1847 May 17
Letter from Winsor and Soule to Daniel L.
Winsor. Winsor and Soule, Boston, write to
Daniel L. Winsor, care of Levi H. Gale, New
Orleans, about a shipment of four boats for
Winsor to sell in New Orleans. The letter
includes details and descriptions of the boat
sizes and costs. Numerical calculations are
written on the letter. Acc. No. 2009.0268.1.
English. ALS, 2 pp., 1 item.
Folder 54
1848 May 4
Letter from Nahum B. Bigelow to “Dear
Sisters.” Bigelow, New Orleans, addresses the
letter to Franklin Childs, Weston,
Massachusetts, but begins, “Dear Sisters.”
Bigelow writes about his recent trip to New
Orleans and mentions his business plans. He
requests his mail be directed to him in care of
“J.B. Ehrhardt, Millnebery, New Orleans.” He
also mentions the costs of shirts and “taters.” A
list of initials on the letter indicates the people
to whom Bigelow is writing. The initials and
the people represented are: “F.C.” (Franklin
Childs, Bigelow’s brother-in-law), “A.A.C.”
(Adeline T.A. Bigelow Childs, Franklin’s wife
and Nahum Bigelow’s sister), “A.M.C.”
(Adeline Maria Childs, daughter of Franklin and
Adeline, and Bigelow’s niece), “A.M.L.R.”
(Anna M.L. Bigelow Ruggs, Nahum Bigelow’s
other sister), and “E.F.C.” (Edward Franklin
Childs, Franklin and Adeline’s son, and
Bigelow’s nephew). Acc. No. 2009.0268.1.
English. ALS, 3 pp., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 14
Folder 55
1849 February 14
Letter from E. and E. Davis to George Howe.
E. and E. Davis, New Orleans, write to Howe,
Boston, discussing the cotton trade and current
prices. Acc. No. 2009.0268.1. English. ALS, 2
pp., 1 item.
Folder 56
1849 April 22
Letter from N.B. Bigelow to “Dear Sister.”
Bigelow, New Orleans, addresses the letter to
his brother-in-law Franklin Childs, Weston,
Massachusetts, but begins, “Dear Sister.”
Bigelow writes about making a good living
fishing and notes the dollar amounts of his
income. He mentions that cholera has returned
and describes the strange manner of birds near
the coast dying. He mentions the cost of new
sails on his boat and the magnolias blooming.
Bigelow describes how to use a remedy made
from lemonade and sulphuric acid to find out if
someone is sick because of bad water
contaminated by the lead pipes. A name written
at the end of the letter indicates it is written to
A.A. Childs (Adeline T.A. Bigelow Childs).
Acc. No. 2009.0268.1. English. ALS, 3 pp., 1
item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 15
Folder 57
1849 August 17
Letter from N.B. Bigelow to “Dear Sister.”
Bigelow, New Orleans, addresses the letter to
his brother-in-law Franklin Childs, Weston,
Massachusetts, but begins, “Dear Sister,”
apparently addressing Adeline T.A. Bigelow
Childs. Bigelow discusses delays in the mail,
noting that letters take only ten days from
Boston to New Orleans, and instructing his
sister to direct his mail to him at “Box C 120”
and to leave Captain Church’s name off the
address. He discusses the Mississippi River
flooding the city and a lack of cholera cases.
Bigelow again mentions sulphuric acid for
improving the health of “Brother Franklin.” He
discusses the travel times for sailing ships and
steam ships to go from New York to New
Orleans. He mentions a fire destroying “the
whole village of Milneburgh.” Another letter on
the same paper begins, “My Dear Niece,”
apparently addressing Adeline Maria Childs.
Bigelow expresses condolences over the death
of “my other niece Cora,” but later indicates that
he is referring to the death of a cat. Acc. No.
2009.0268.1. English. ALS, 4 pp., 1 item.
Folder 58
1851 February 19
Letter from N.B. Bigelow to “Dear Sister.”
Bigelow, New Orleans, writes to Mrs. A.A.
Childs [Adeline T.A. Bigelow Childs], Weston,
Massachusetts. Bigelow discusses his plan of
making a few trips on a ship before taking up
residence in Nicaragua. He discusses writing
letters to other relatives. He mentions being
“flat broke” and his desire for 100 dollars to buy
a piano for “Ad.” (possibly referring to his
niece, Adeline Maria Childs). The notation
“Last letter” is written in a different hand
beneath the postal address. Acc. No.
2009.0268.1. English. ALS, 3 pp., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 16
Folder 59
1852 January 16
Letter from J.H. Teunisson to Watt and De
Saulles. Teunisson, Monticello [Mississippi],
writes to Watt and De Saulles, New Orleans,
discussing various agricultural businesses. He
mentions prices and markets relating to corn,
cotton, molasses, potatoes, and salt. Acc. No.
2009.0268.1. English. ALS, 3 pp., 1 item.
Folder 60
1853 January
Letter from Joseph H. Palmer and Company to
John Bopp. Joseph H. Palmer and Company,
New Orleans, write in a printed form letter to
Bopp, Flat Lick, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana,
advertising their dry goods and dress goods.
Acc. No. 2009.0268.1. English. L, 1 p., 1 item.
Folder 61
1853 December 10
Letter from Paraclete Holmes to Joseph Holmes.
Captain Paraclete Holmes, New Orleans, writes
to his father, Joseph Holmes, Kingston,
Massachusetts, discussing shipping a cargo of
cotton aboard their ship, the Joseph Holmes, and
mentioning various prices and shipping costs.
Acc. No. 2009.0268.1. English. ALS, 2 pp., 1
item.
Folder 62
1854 May 15
Power of attorney document from Paraclete
Holmes to Joseph Holmes. Paraclete Holmes,
New Orleans, writes a legal document giving
Joseph Holmes, Kingston, Massachusetts,
power of attorney to sell ships in his name. The
document is signed by Paraclete Holmes and
attested with two other signatures. Acc. No.
2009.0268.1. English. DS, 2 pp., 1 item.
Folder 63
1860 December 15
Letter from Castillo and Harispe to Moses
Taylor and Company. Castillo and Harispe,
New Orleans, write to Moses Taylor and
Company, New York, discussing a shipment of
tobacco to New York that they might re-ship to
Europe. They also mention markets relating to
molasses and cotton. Acc. No. 2009.0268.1.
English. ALS, 2 pp., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 17
Folder 64
1828 Mar. 6
Letter from Boyd Smith to James S. Gregory.
Smith writes from New Orleans to Gregory in
Washington, D.C. (forwarded to New York)
describing business prospects in New Orleans
and other locations. He mentions possibilities
for establishing business in Memphis, Florida,
Mexico, and Mobile. Acc. No. 2011.0312.1.
English. ALS, 3 pp., 1 item.
Folder 65
1836 Jan. 23
Letter from Thomas Barrett & Co. to Jackson
Riddle & Co. Thomas Barrett & Co., in New
Orleans, write to Jackson Riddle & Co., in
Philadelphia, discussing financial concerns over
Pennsylvania granting a new state charter to a
successor to the Bank of the United States.
They also mention other business dealings and
prices for cotton and sugar. Acc. No.
2011.0312.2. English. LS, 2 pp., 1 item.
Folder 66
1852 Mar. 22
Letters from George F. Mustard to Franklin T.
Yeaton and George F. Mustard, Jr. Mustard, a
ship captain traveling through New Orleans,
writes to Yeaton, his son’s school teacher in
New Gloucester, Maine, discussing his planned
voyage to Europe, the drunkenness and
immorality of his ship’s crew, the habituation to
drunkenness of the people in New Orleans, his
desire to have the benefit of Yeaton’s
knowledge of Europe on his voyage, and his
hope that Yeaton will teach his son well. On the
same paper Mustard writes to his son, George,
Jr., giving him fatherly advice to behave at
Yeaton’s school and to assist his mother and his
brother Charly. Acc. No. 2011.0312.3. English.
ALS, 4 pp., 1 item.
MSS 419, Williams Research Center, page 18
Folder 67
1860 Oct. 25
Letter from Edward Smith to Mrs. Isaac P.
Smith. Edward Smith, in New Orleans, writes
to his mother [Abby Halstead Campbell Smith],
in New Albany, Indiana, discussing his arrival
in the city and news he has received from other
family members. Smith mentions his brother
Jim’s studies at O. V. Tousley’s Grammar
School [in New Albany], his brother Sam’s
observation of the visit of the Prince of Wales to
New York and the activities of the political
party called the Wide Awakes [in New York], a
speech to be given by William L. Yancey in
New Orleans, his romantic interests concerning
Bettie Pennington, and portrait photography by
Carl Pfetsch [in New Albany]. He also
discusses his job as a clerk on the steamer
Golden Age, the cost of buying shirts, and
troublesome mosquitoes. Acc. No.
2011.0312.4. English. ALS with envelope, 3
pp., 2 items.
Folder 68
1860 Nov. 24
Letter from Castillo and Harispe to Moses
Taylor and Company. Castillo and Harispe, in
New Orleans, write to Moses Taylor and
Company, in New York, discussing the serious
effect on tobacco business that the political
crisis is causing. They mention particular
shipments of quantities of tobacco, money
markets, prices for sugar and molasses, the
weather, the financial troubles of cotton factors
in New Orleans, problems of public confidence,
favorable telegraphic news reports from New
York about financial matters, and uncertainties
regarding the political situation. Acc. No.
2011.0312.5. English. LS, 2 pp., 1 item.
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