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Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
Lampeter-Strasburg High School
1007 Village Road
P.O. Box 428
Lampeter, PA 17537
Introductory Statement:
The information and course descriptions contained in this Course Selection Guide are presented
with the hope that parents and students will be better able to plan for the future.
Because formal education lays the foundation for subsequent life experiences, it is of great
importance that the planning of a high school program be done judiciously and realistically.
The first step in such a plan should include the careful, accurate and honest assessment of the
abilities, aptitudes, interests and educational and career goals of the student. This appraisal
should combine the thinking and consideration of parents, students, counselors and other staff
members.
Then in full view of this personal assessment, parents and students together should use this
program of studies booklet to arrive at a program that best meets the needs and goals of the
student.
If, at any time, questions arise relative to this important course selection process, the guidance
staff is ready to assist. It is our sincere intention to aid the student in the careful planning of his or
her future.
Equal Rights and Opportunities Policy:
Lampeter-Strasburg School District is an equal opportunity education institution and will not
discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, age, sex, marital status, or
handicaps and disabilities in its programs, services, activities or employment practices as
required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972,
and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
For information regarding civil rights or grievance procedures and information regarding services,
activities and facilities that are accessible to and useable by handicapped persons, contact Kevin
Peart, Ed.D., Assistant Superintendent, Title VI, Title IX and Section 504 Compliance Officer for
the Lampeter-Strasburg School District, at 1007 Village Road, P.O. Box 428, Lampeter PA
17537, (717) 464-3311.
Lampeter-Strasburg School District Mission Statement:
The Lampeter-Strasburg School District recognizes that each child has unique abilities, talents,
and needs. The district is committed to providing, in an accountable partnership with parents and
the community, opportunities for each learner to acquire the knowledge, skills, and values to
become a responsible, productive citizen.
Adopted – February 3, 1992
Page 1 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
Table of Contents:
Advanced Placement Courses .....................................................................................14
Agricultural Education...................................................................................................34
Art Education ................................................................................................................40
Business Education ......................................................................................................36
Calendar for College Admissions....................................................................................9
Career and Technology Education ...............................................................................16
Children with Disabilities.................................................................................................5
College Admissions ........................................................................................................7
College Admissions Testing ...........................................................................................8
Community Service.........................................................................................................5
Course Weights ............................................................................................................15
Culminating Project.........................................................................................................5
Early to College Option.................................................................................................13
Extracurricular Activities ...............................................................................................11
Family & Consumer Sciences.......................................................................................37
Failure Make-Up .............................................................................................................6
Fine Arts .......................................................................................................................40
Foreign Languages.......................................................................................................42
Grading Information .......................................................................................................7
Graduation Requirements...............................................................................................3
Guidance Services and Information................................................................................6
Health & Physical Education.........................................................................................46
Honor Roll.......................................................................................................................7
Language Arts ..............................................................................................................19
Mastery of the Academic Standards ...............................................................................3
Mathematics .................................................................................................................27
Music ............................................................................................................................44
National Honor Society ................................................................................................16
On-Line Advanced Placement Courses........................................................................14
Other Educational/School Program Offerings...............................................................11
Practical Arts.................................................................................................................34
Promotion Guidelines .....................................................................................................6
PSSA Remediation .........................................................................................................6
Procedure for Course Selection....................................................................................18
Required Courses...........................................................................................................3
Schedule Change Policy...............................................................................................18
Science .........................................................................................................................31
Social Studies ...............................................................................................................23
Specialized & Independent Studies ..............................................................................19
Technology Education ..................................................................................................37
Work Study ...................................................................................................................11
Page 2 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
In order to be eligible for graduation from the Lampeter-Strasburg School District, a student shall
meet the requirements of completing the required courses of instruction with proficiency scores,
complete a culminating project, and demonstrate mastery of the Pennsylvania Academic
Standards. The high school diploma requirements are further described below
I.
Required Courses
Subject
Language Arts
Mathematics
Science, Environment & Ecology
Social Studies
Health & Physical Education
Career Education/Microcomputers (2010)
Public Speaking
Family & Consumer Science
Electives *
TOTAL
Credits
2007
4.0 **
4.0 ***
3.0 (becomes 4.0 in 2010)
4.0 **
2.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
9.0
28.0
======
*
Students must be fully enrolled for eight school semesters while in grades 9 through 12. A
student may not accrue more than two failures in courses worth two credits in grades 9 through
12 and should attempt to remove failures whenever possible.
** Students who plan to attend the full day Career and Technology Center (CTC) programs during
their senior year need to complete only three credits each of Language Arts, Mathematics,
Science and Social Studies. CTC students are expected to fulfill all other graduation
requirements.
*** Algebra I taken prior to ninth grade will count as one of the four required math courses.
II.
Mastery of the Academic Standards
Students must demonstrate proficiency in writing, reading, and mathematics (and science
in 2007-2008) on the Pennsylvania State System of Assessment (PSSA) administered in
grade 11. Students not demonstrating proficiency in any area must retest in grade 12.
Students who attain proficiency or better on the PSSA will receive a certificate from the
Pennsylvania Department of Education.
Students who do not demonstrate proficiency in one or more required subject areas
(reading, writing and mathematics) will be evaluated for graduation based on the
alternative district assessment model. This model will involve the formation of a student
study team (district administrator(s) and guidance counselor) who will review the students’
performances in the deficient area(s).
To meet the Lampeter-Strasburg graduation requirement in lieu of one or more state
proficiency assessments, students must:
A.
Successfully pass the necessary number of credits (28.0) described above, and
B.
Attain a cumulative score of ten points on a multi-criteria performance assessment
(see below), which includes standardized test scores, un-weighted grade point
Page 3 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
average in subject, participation in remediation efforts, and improved score points
on the twelfth grade PSSA retest.
Multi-Criteria Performance Assessment
Points
4
The Greater
of the Number of
Credits in the
Content Area or
the Un-weighted
GPA in the
Content Area
Standardized
Test
Scores
th
th
th
th
* Scores in the 50 to 59
percentile on subject content
* Scores in the 40 to 49
th
percentile on subject content (8
grade reading level)
3
th
th
th
th
2
* Scores in the 30 to 39
percentile on subject content
1
* Scores in the 26 to 29
percentile on subject content
5 Credits
or
3.0-4.0
4 Credits
or
2.0-2.9
3 Credits
or
1.0-1.9
2 Credits
or
0.0-0.9
Grade
Achieved
In
Remediation
Course
A- to A
Twelfth Grade
PSSA Retest Score
Moved from below basic
to basic or increased
score by 100 points
B- to B+
Increased score by 50 to
99 points
C- to C+
Increased score by 25 to
49 points
D- to D+
Increased score by 1 to
24 points
The Pennsylvania Performance Index (PPI) provides for detecting, acknowledging,
encouraging, and rewarding changes across the full range and continuum of academic
achievement – not limited solely to the proficient level. Point values are established
annually by the Pennsylvania Department of Education by grade and content area for the
following performance levels: Advanced, Proficient, High Basic, Low Basic, High Below
Basic, and Low Below Basic. Lampeter-Strasburg School District will utilize the
Pennsylvania Performance Index Score Ranges/Levels to determine the number of points
necessary for individual students to demonstrate proficiency on the Lampeter-Strasburg
School District Alternative Rubric as follows:
Pennsylvania Performance Index (PPI) –
performance levels established by the
Pennsylvania Department of Education
Advanced/Proficient
High Basic
Low Basic
High Below Basic
Low Below Basic
*
Points needed to determine proficiency on the
Lampeter-Strasburg School District Alternative
Rubric (see below)
Proficiency established on the PSSA
Seven (7) points needed on the rubric
Eight (8) points needed on the rubric
Nine (9) points needed on the rubric
Ten (10) points needed on the rubric
If the student scores at the 65th percentile or better on a nationally standardized assessment or
achieves the minimum acceptable score on the SAT, PSAT, and/or ACT (or other identified
tests), proficiency is established, and it is not necessary to proceed further with the matrix.
As part of the registration process, students who transfer into the high school without any
standardized testing records for grades ten or above, must be tested with a district
approved, nationally normed, standardized test.
Page 4 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
III.
Culminating Project
Students must complete a project in one or more areas of concentrated study during their
sophomore, junior, or senior year of high school. The purpose of the project is to give the
students the opportunity to apply, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate knowledge and to
demonstrate that knowledge in a project. The project shall be completed under the
direction of a teacher through any course that provides the culminating project option. The
project will adhere to the following guidelines:
пЃ¶ Students must schedule a course that requires the culminating project option as a
course requirement.
пЃ¶ The student must demonstrate with his/her project, the ability to apply, analyze,
synthesize and evaluate information.
пЃ¶ Coaching on the project is allowed outside and inside the school with approval of the
course instructor. Acknowledgement and a description of any assistance must be
explained during the presentation of the project.
пЃ¶ The relationship of the project to the Pennsylvania Academic Standards shall be
described.
пЃ¶ The instructor shall determine the proficiency of the project using a school adopted
rubric. If a project is deemed “not yet satisfactory” at the evaluation, the student is
expected to act on the comments and recommendations provided by the instructor and
present for a second evaluation within a nine-week period.
IV.
Community Service
Students must complete 30 hours of voluntary community service. Information regarding
acceptable criteria for service can be obtained from the students' high school guidance
office. The community service hours may be completed from the summer preceding the
ninth grade year through the 90th day of the senior year. Forms and information regarding
the completion of this graduation requirement are available in the high school gui8dance
office or on the district web site.
The following guidelines must be followed: The service should directly benefit the local
community and/or its members. The local community is defined as South Central
Pennsylvania. Unpaid services that directly benefit or assist family members or their
businesses do not count as community service. Final approval or appeals regarding what
counts as service may be presented to the building administration who makes a final
determination.
V.
Children with Disabilities
Children with an Individual Education Plan (IEP) who do not attain proficiency on or above
the Pennsylvania System of School assessment (PSSA) in mathematics, writing or reading
in grade 11 or 12 will be evaluated for graduation based on the alternative district
assessment model or the individual student’s IEP. This evaluation will involve the
formation of a student study team (district administrator(s) and guidance counselor) who
will review the student’s performance in the deficient area(s). The student study team will
consist of the student’s IEP team. If the student has successfully met the goals and
objectives of their twelfth grade IEP, including transition plans, he/she will be deemed
proficient and eligible for graduation.
Page 5 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
Guidance Services and Information:
The Guidance Services at Lampeter-Strasburg provide students with information about
themselves, their school, and their future plans. The high school guidance program can be
described as a cluster of activities that have been designed to assist all students toward a better
self-understanding of capabilities and limitations, a broader use of this understanding in making
decisions, and more effective use of planning for the future.
The function of the guidance office is to concern itself with all aspects of the student’s well-being
and happiness. Therefore, the counseling of a student in his/her educational and vocational
development is one of the guidance department’s primary roles.
The guidance department is staffed with knowledgeable counselors available to confer with
students about present and future vocational and educational plans. Decisions should be reached
only after such factors as abilities, aptitudes, interests, and personalities of the student have been
considered. Students are encouraged to consult with their counselor for help in selecting high
school programs that will lead to their chosen post high school goals.
Promotion Guidelines:
The following minimum number of credits is required in order to advance in each class:
Freshman to Sophomore (9 to 10)
Sophomore to Junior (10 to 11)
Junior to Senior (11 to 12)
7 credits
14 credits
20 credits
Students not meeting minimum number of credits will be retained in their class. Transfer
students will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
Failure Make Up:
Lampeter-Strasburg High School provides options for students to make up failure and maintain
graduation eligibility. Students who meet the criteria established below may be permitted to
participate in school approved correspondence courses or approved courses offered at other
educational institutions. A student may not take more than four make-up courses outside the L-S
curriculum.
пЃ¶ Multiple make-up attempts for a single class will count against the maximum number of
make up courses.
пЃ¶ Students who fail a make-up course on two successive attempts will not be permitted a
third attempt. Subsequent attempts to make up the course must be completed at
Lampeter-Strasburg High School.
пЃ¶ Students who achieve a grade of less than 50 percent content mastery or who do not
complete course requirements will be required to make up that course at LampeterStrasburg High School.
пЃ¶ Students are responsible for all costs and time-lines associated with make-up courses.
PSSA Remediation:
Ninth Grade
If an incoming ninth grader has failed to meet proficiency level in his/her eighth grade PSSA
Reading test, that student will be assigned a full year of Language Arts. The first half will be
Practical Communication and the second half will be Applied Communications 9.
Page 6 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
If an incoming ninth grader has failed to meet the established proficiency level in his/her eighth
grade PSSA Mathematics test, that student will be assigned a full year of Mathematics. The first
half will be Pre-Algebra and the second will be Algebra I.
Eighth grade Learning Support students who have not met proficiency in any of the areas of the
PSSA will have their curriculum and instruction altered to meet their needs. These changes may
be done through an inclusion teacher in the mainstream classroom or pull-out for instruction in
the support classroom.
Twelfth Grade:
If an incoming twelfth grader has failed to meet proficiency level in his/her eleventh grade PSSA
Reading and/or Writing test, that student will be assigned a Language Arts course in the first
semester in order to receive remediation before being re-tested.
If an incoming twelfth grader has failed to meet the established proficiency level in his/her
eleventh grade PSSA Mathematics test, that student will be assigned his/her next sequential
mathematics class or a remedial class, PSSA Math, in the first semester in order to receive
remediation before being re-tested.
Eleventh grade Learning Support students who have not met proficiency in any of the areas of
the PSSA will have their curriculum and instruction altered to meet their needs. These changes
may be done through an inclusion teacher in the mainstream classroom or pull-out for instruction
in the support classroom or at the CTC.
Seniors attending full day programs at the Career and Technology Centers will receive
remediation through a pull-out program at the CTC.
Honor Roll and Grading Information:
Students attaining a non-weighted grade point average of 3.5 to 3.9 each marking period will be
designated as “Honor Roll” students. Students receiving a non-weighted grade point average of
4.0 will be designated as “Distinguished Honor Roll” students. These students will have their
names displayed in a showcase outside the front office. To be eligible for such recognition, a
student may not acquire an “F” grade in any subject. All courses taken count toward honor roll
calculations. Below is an example of the calculation of non-weighted grade point average:
Algebra I
German II
Biology
Language Arts
Total
Grade
A
AB
B+
GPE
4.0
3.7
3.0
3.3
Credit
1
1
1
1
4
Honor Points
4.0
3.7
3.0
3.3
14.0
Non-Weighted GPA = Honor Points = 14.0 = 3.5
Credits
4
College Admissions:
Admission requirements to various institutions vary considerably. Counselors familiar with the
current college admission procedure are available to confer with students about future education
plans. It is recommended that parents, in addition to students, meet with the counselor during the
junior year to lay the groundwork for post high school planning.
Page 7 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
The guidance department maintains a library of catalogs from many colleges, nursing schools,
universities and technical schools. These catalogs are accessible to students who need
information regarding specific entrance requirements and programs of studies. In addition, the
guidance office has computer accessibility to many programs on the web and has a link on the
district web site, which contains many valuable references.
Students are encouraged to consider the schools in which they are interested as early as
possible and to work closely with their guidance counselor throughout the procedure of applying
for and securing admission.
There are several factors that generally influence acceptance to a given institution. The most
important is the high school record. This includes: subjects taken, grades earned, class rank,
extra-curricular activities, test scores, and teacher evaluations.
Another factor that plays a significant role in admissions is the score achieved on the entrance
examinations. The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude test is offered in-house in October of the junior
year and for practice in the sophomore year. Nearly all institutions of higher learning require
either the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test or the American College Testing examination. It
is recommended that these tests be taken in the spring of the junior year and again in the fall of
the senior year. Information about these testing programs follows.
Representatives from many different schools visit Lampeter-Strasburg High School throughout
the year. High School juniors and seniors are encouraged to meet with college representatives at
the posted times. Students are also encouraged to visit schools in which they have the greatest
interest before making a final decision. Three school days are approved for senior college
visitation.
College Admissions Testing:
Several college admissions testing programs are administered to interested students throughout
the year. These testing programs are primarily designed for students preparing to enter college. It
is important to consider participation in those that are significant. A fee, stipulated by the
publisher, is charged for each test. Fee waivers are available for students whose family income
qualifies them for the free or reduced lunch program. Contact a guidance counselor, if you believe
you qualify for a fee waiver.
To find out more information or register for any of the testing programs identified below, please
attend the large group guidance meetings for college bound students held in September. Actual
testing dates are listed on the school calendar and are mailed home in the Guidance Newsletter.
PSAT/NMSQT (Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test)
Is a two hour and ten minute test that is taken mostly by high school juniors. The College
Entrance Examination Board (College Board) and the National Merit Scholarship Corporation
administer the test once each year in October. Sophomores are also welcome to take the test
for practice. Students who wish to be considered for the National Merit Scholarship
competition must take this test in the junior year. The test is administered at L-S High School.
SAT I (Scholastic Aptitude Test I) (Reasoning)
The SAT is a standardized test that colleges use to evaluate candidates. The test measures a
student’s ability to understand and process elements of mathematical and verbal reasoning. SAT
Page 8 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
scores are calculated based on a student’s performance relative to other test-takers and have proven
to be an indicator of collegiate success.
The SAT consists of ten sections:
 Three writing sections – one 25 minute student-written essay, one 25 minute
grammar section and one 10 minute grammar section.
 Three math sections – two 25 minute sections and one 20 minute section.
 Three critical reading sections – two 25 minute sections and one 20 minute section.
 One “experimental” section – an additional 25 minute section (unscored).
SAT II (Scholastic Aptitude Test II) (Subject Test)
This test is a series of one-hour tests measuring achievement in 18 subject areas, such as
writing, math, science, languages, history and the arts. Not all colleges require the SAT II be
taken. Check with the colleges you are interested in before scheduling these tests.
ACT (American College Testing)
This program is made up of a test battery that includes four tests, a Student Profile section
and four high school grades that you report yourself. Both high school juniors and seniors
take the ACT Test Battery, which is given five times a year. Many colleges will use the scores
from ACT in place of SAT I.
Calendar for College Admissions:
Junior Year
SEPTEMBER
_____ Attend the Junior college-bound meeting
_____ Plan to meet with college reps that visit guidance all year
OCTOBER
_____ Take the PSAT
NOVEMBER
_____ Attend College Night at Conestoga Valley High School
DECEMBER
_____ Receive results of PSAT and review areas of strength and weakness
JANUARY
_____ Begin to think about which colleges you would like to explore
_____ Attend the second Junior college-bound meeting
_____ Register for a spring SAT I
FEBRUARY
_____ Select challenging senior year courses
MARCH
_____ Continue to evaluate colleges
APRIL
_____
Meet with counselor to discuss colleges
MAY
_____
_____
Attend a College Fair to get more information
Take SAT II, if necessary (check with colleges for requirements)
Page 9 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
JUNE
_____
Plan visits to college campuses over the summer
JULY
_____
Visit colleges; take tours and have interviews
AUGUST
_____ Continue to refine your list and check on-line for applications
Senior Year
SEPTEMBER
_____ Register for SAT I, SAT II (if necessary) or ACT
_____ Review your transcript with your counselor for accuracy
_____ Meet with appropriate college reps who visit the Guidance Office
_____ Begin to secure printed applications or begin on-line applications
OCTOBER
_____ Line up your teacher and/or advisor recommendations
_____ Take SAT I and have scores sent directly to colleges on your list
_____ If applying Early Decision, send in your application now
_____ Prepare applications for back-up schools
_____ Bring L-S Transcript Release Form to Guidance for each college
_____ Register for SAT II (if necessary) or ACT if desired
NOVEMBER
_____ Attend College Night at Conestoga Valley High School
_____ Be sure first quarter grades are good
DECEMBER
_____ Receive Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in mail
_____ Review scholarship information in Guidance as it is announced
_____ File your last college application
_____ Attend the Alumni Visit sponsored by the Guidance Department
JANUARY
_____ Keep working on your grades
_____ Send in your FAFSA form
_____ Inform Guidance Secretary if mid-year grades need to be sent to any college
FEBRUARY, MARCH & APRIL
_____
Monitor your applications
_____ Do not catch “senioritis”
_____ Decide on one college you will attend
By MAY 1
_____
_____
_____
_____
Do not catch “senioritis”
Send in tuition deposit
Notify other colleges that accepted you that you have selected another college
Request Guidance to send your final transcript to the college you have selected
JUNE
_____
Congratulations! Enjoy your graduation and look forward to college!
Page 10 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
Other Educational/School Program Offerings:
Extracurricular Activities:
According to their interests and abilities, all students are encouraged to participate in
extracurricular activities in the school, community, and/or church. Some activities are planned to
complement and strengthen classroom learning; others are designed to provide social, cultural,
and potential hobby experiences.
Colleges and employers are very much interested in the extracurricular activities in which the
student actively participates. However, success is not measured primarily by the number of
activities but rather by the quality of participation in each activity. It is also important that a student
not become involved in extracurricular activities to the extent that his/her academics suffer.
Work Study & Criteria:
The Work Study Program is designed to provide students with opportunities to investigate and
explore career interests and to gain employment experience. The program is considered to be an
extension of a student’s educational experience. Therefore, the principal and/or his/her designee
must approve program participation. Students must, during the scheduling process, select a full
complement (8 credits) of courses. In the event that a student’s Work Study Program
participation is approved, the student’s guidance counselor will contact the student to
acknowledge program approval and to discuss the courses to be dropped. Additionally, program
eligibility is predicated upon specific criteria that students must evidence for program
consideration and must maintain for program continuation. Program participants will not be
awarded credit or grades for Work Study Program participation nor will participation count for the
purpose of determining class rank.
A.
The following criteria must be met for Work Study Program consideration:
1. There must be a readily apparent direct connection between the student’s career area
of interest and the employment/volunteer experience.
a. The Work Study Program experience could be voluntary in nature or it could
involve the student receiving a salary. However, if the position is voluntary, hours
accumulated cannot be submitted by the student to fulfill the Lampeter-Strasburg
School District’s community service requirement for graduation.
b. While the development of people skills, timeliness, etc. are important aspects of
any employment/volunteer experience, these skills are considered to be general
rather than specific to a particular career, and therefore, will not be considered as
evidence of a direct connection.
c. In the event that a student’s request for Work Study Program participation is
denied due to the lack of a specific connection between the student’s career area
of interest and the employment/voluntary experience identified on the student’s
application, the student may reapply for consideration if he/she is able to identify
an employment/voluntary experience that does evidence a specific connection.
The student’s new application must be submitted within the established
submission timeframes for consideration. Changes to the student’s career area
of interest as part of the reapplication process will not be considered for
Work Study Program participation.
2. The applications and all supporting documentation must be submitted on time for Work
Study Program consideration.
a. Applications/reapplications for the first semester must be submitted no later than
the fifth day after the start of the first semester.
Page 11 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
b.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Applications/reapplications for the second semester must be submitted no later
than the fifth day after the start of the second semester.
The student’s transcript and/or schedule of courses must reflect the successful
completion or scheduling of classes specifically connected to the student’s career area
of interest.
a. If the student’s transcript and/or schedule of courses do not evidence the
successful completion or scheduling of courses specific to the student’s career
area of interest and related courses are available, the student will be
recommended to complete the identified courses.
Student must be a member of the senior class.
Student must be on track for graduation and have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better.
Student must evidence proficiency on the Pennsylvania State System of Assessment
(PSSA).
Student may not have any major or repeated violations of school rules.
Student may not have excessive unexcused/illegal absences or tardies.
Student must prove employment status.
a. The student must be employed an average of ten (10) hours per week for each
class period that he/she is scheduled for Work-Study.
Ex. 1: A student is scheduled for Work-Study during period four. The student
must work at his/her place of employment an average of ten (10) hours
each week. [10 hours x 1 period = 10 hours].
Ex. 2: A student is scheduled for work-study during periods three and four. The
student must work at his/her place of employment an average of twenty
(20) hours each week. [10 hours x 2 periods = 20 hours].
b. Only hours associated with employment/voluntary experiences specifically related
to the student’s career area of interest would be considered in the determination of
the hourly requirements necessary for Work Study Program participation.
Secondary employment/volunteer experiences that are unrelated to the student’s
career area of interest will not be considered.
B.
Violation of the aforementioned criteria may result in the following:
1. Probationary approval.
2. Partial program approval.
3. Denial of program participation.
C.
The following criteria must be maintained during Work Study Program experience:
1. Continue to meet established graduation requirements.
2. No major or repeated violation of school rules.
3. No excessive unexcused/illegal absences or tardies.
4. Enrolled in a minimum of 2.0 credits during Work Study Program experience.
5. Must complete remediation during the appropriate flex period(s) with the regular
education teacher(s) for each course that the student is failing as evidenced on weekly
ineligibility list.
6. Must maintain employment status throughout program experience.
a. A student who becomes unemployed for greater than two weeks may lose
program participation approval. Any new employment/volunteer experience must
meet all applicable program requirements and the student’s continuation in the
Work Study Program during the semester in progress is contingent upon the
approval of the principal and/or his/her designee.
Page 12 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
b.
D.
Termination or resignation from an approved employment/voluntary experience
during the first semester will result in the withdrawal of approval in participation in
the Work Study Program for the second semester.
Violation of the aforementioned criteria may result in the following:
1. Warning.
2. Meeting with parents and placement in ISSR for a period of one week during scheduled
Work Study and participation in remediation during flex period as detailed above in
criteria C-5.
3. Program removal and placement in ISSR for the remainder of the semester during
scheduled Work Study time. In the event that a student was scheduled to participate in
the Work Study Program both semesters and the removal occurs during the first
semester, the student will be required to select courses to create a full schedule for the
second semester.
Early-to-College Option:
The Early College Entrance Program (ECEP) provides students with opportunities to explore
college options and examine potential areas of interest for post-secondary study while accruing
college credits. The program is considered to be an extension of a student’s educational
experience; therefore, the principal must approve a student’s participation in the program.
To participate, applicants will be evaluated on the following criteria:
пЃ¶ Minimum PSAT score total of 165
пЃ¶ Minimum SAT score total of 1650.
пЃ¶ Cumulative un-weighted grade point average of 3.0.
пЃ¶ A senior or a qualified member of the gifted program.
пЃ¶ Courses may be taken in lieu of, or in addition to, required L-S courses.
пЃ¶ Evidence a pattern of regular school attendance and appropriate behavior.
Student responsibilities to participate in the ECEP:
пЃ¶ Must meet Lampeter-Strasburg graduation requirements.
пЃ¶ Must be enrolled full time and attending all pre-approved college courses.
пЃ¶ Must successfully maintain a GPA of 3.0 as evidenced on college transcripts to continue
program.
пЃ¶ Must apply to the college choice and coordinate the college schedule with the high school
schedule.
пЃ¶ Responsibility for all costs (application fees, tuition, books, etc.) and transportation.
пЃ¶ Must submit a copy of the college schedule no later than three weeks after the course(s)
begins.
пЃ¶ Must submit a copy of the college course transcripts no later than three weeks after the
course(s) ends.
Other program information:
пЃ¶ Grades from ECEP will not be included in GPA calculations for determination of class rank.
пЃ¶ Credit and course information from ECEP will be noted on high school transcripts upon
receiving official documentation from the college or university transcripts.
Page 13 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
Consequences for non-compliance:
пЃ¶ Removal from program participation.
пЃ¶ Placement back in the regular high school educational program.
 College course failure could jeopardize high school graduation as a result of the student’s
failure to meet established graduation requirements.
Advanced Placement Courses:
Courses in English Composition and Literature, U.S. Government and Politics, U.S. History,
European History, Calculus AB, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Computer Science, leading to
candidacy for the College Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement (AP) examination
are available for academically able students. AP tests, paid for by students, are administered by
L-S High School in May of each school year. Students may enroll in courses based upon
department standards of performance, recommendations of teachers, and approval of the
respective department chairperson. See each course description for details.
On-line Advanced Placement Courses:
Lampeter-Strasburg High School provides eligible students with the opportunity to complete
Advanced Placement course work through an approved on-line provider. On-line AP courses are
not a substitute for existing Advanced Placement courses of study at the high school; rather, they
are considered to be an extension of the Lampeter-Strasburg High School curriculum. Students
will only be permitted to participate in on-line AP courses that are not offered as part of the
regular curriculum during the school year.
Students are required to complete on-line AP course work during a scheduled period in the
regular school day. All on-line AP courses are designed to prepare students for successful
completion of the AP examinations offered in May. Costs associated with on-line AP course
participation will be paid by the Lampeter-Strasburg School District. Costs associated with the AP
examination will be the responsibility of the student. Grades and credits associated with on-line
AP courses will be noted on a student’s transcript; however, grades will not be used in the
formulation of a student’s Grade Point Average or class rank.
Eligibility Criteria:
Must be a senior and have a cumulative GPA of 3.3.
Must have completed all prerequisite courses with a grade of B+ or better.
Must have a written recommendation from the appropriate department head.
Must satisfactorily complete the appropriate AP placement test.
Must not have major or repeated violations of school rules or excessive unexcused/illegal
absences or tardiness.
пЃ¶ Must be able to work independently and have necessary computer skills.
пЃ¶ Must complete and submit On-line AP Program Application by the last regular day of the
school year and have been approved.
пЃ¶
пЃ¶
пЃ¶
пЃ¶
пЃ¶
Availability:
The AP On-line Program will be limited to six students each year. If more than six applications
are received in a single year, the following criteria in the order listed below will be used to
determine the top six applications:
Page 14 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
пЃ¶
пЃ¶
пЃ¶
пЃ¶
Grade Point Average.
Grades in prerequisite courses.
Attendance Record.
Disciplinary Record.
Prerequisite Courses:
AP Chemistry (Full Year)
ES, Bio, Chem Study and Physics (Concurrently)
AP Biology (Full Year)
Bio, Chem Study and Physics (Concurrently)
AP Physics B (Full Year)
ES, Bio and Chem Study (Concurrently)
AP Macroeconomics (One Semester)
Algebra II 341 and American Government/Economics 221
AP Microeconomics (One Semester)
Algebra II 341 and American Government/Economics 221
AP Psychology (One Semester)
Psychology 242 and Biology 411
AP U.S. History (Full Year)
20th Century American Cultures 201 and
American Government/Economics 221
AP Statistics (Full Year)
Probability and Statistics 358
AP Spanish (Full Year)
Spanish VI 634
AP French (Full Year) -Transfer students who successfully completed French IV or V at their
previous schools or students who can demonstrate fluency in the language.
Course Weights:
Course weights are used in calculating class rank and grade point average.
courses are weighted accordingly:
1.3
пѓ�
Advanced Placement
1.2
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
A.C.M.E.
All College Prep (LA, Sci,
Math, SS)
All Foreign Language
SAT Prep/Great Books
Business Ed.: Actg I & II &
Adv. Word Processing
Advanced Agriculture
Advanced Art
Anatomy & Physiology
Tech Ed, 472, 573, 576, 577,
581, 582 & 590
Vocal Rep & Music Theory
Java
The following
1.1
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
пѓ�
All Tech Prep (LA, Sci, Math,
SS)
All other Business courses
Computer Applications,
Computer Programming &
Computer Networking
Art, 601, 602, 603, 604, 612
& 613
Veterinary Science II
Athletic Training
Videography
Studio Production
All courses not listed here receive a value of 1.0 in weighted grade point equivalents.
1. The courses of transfer students will be given a weight of 1.0. Variation in this policy would be
evidence of a track level, in which case the L-S policy would prevail.
2. Class rank is determined by weighted G.P.A. only.
Page 15 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
3. Summer school make-up work or correspondence courses will not be calculated for class rank
purposes.
Career and Technology Education:
A number of occupationally oriented courses are available through the Lancaster County Career
and Technology Centers located in Mount Joy, Willow Street and Brownstown. Students desiring
such educational opportunities should confer with their guidance counselor for supplemental
information and materials.
All juniors have the opportunity to visit the schools before applying for senior admission.
Students with IEP’s may be eligible to attend cluster programs half days during their junior year
with the goal of attending full day during their senior year.
National Honor Society:
Selection Process:
Selection for membership in the National Honor Society is based on the four characteristics of
scholarship, character, leadership and service. Evaluation of qualified students is made by the
Awards and Honors Committee which is composed of faculty members appointed by the
principal.
The faculty committee considers all members of the junior and senior classes who have a regular
grade point average (non-weighted) of 3.5. Those who qualify under scholarship are then
evaluated according to the remaining three characteristics. Some of the criteria used for
selection are:
Character
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Takes criticism willingly and accepts recommendations graciously.
Constantly exemplifies desirable qualities of personality.
Upholds principles of morality and ethics.
Cooperates by complying with school regulations.
Shows courtesy, concern and respect for others.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Exercises influence on peers in upholding schools ideals.
Is able to delegate responsibilities.
Inspires positive behavior in others.
Successfully holds school offices or positions of responsibility.
Is reliable and dependable without prodding.
Demonstrates leadership in classroom, at work and in school activities.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Participates in outside activity.
Volunteers dependable and well-organized assistance.
Works well with others and is willing to take on difficult or inconspicuous responsibilities.
Willingness to do committee and staff work.
Readiness to show courtesy by assisting visitors, teachers and students.
Leadership
Service
Procedures for Selection:
1. At the end of the second semester, a listing of all eligible juniors and seniors is complied and
submitted to the faculty for review.
2. The Awards and Honors Committee meets to select inductees.
3. Nominations are submitted to the principal for approval.
4. Selected nominees are tagged during a morning homeroom period.
Page 16 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
5. Selected nominees are formally inducted at an evening ceremony.
Dismissal of Members:
The faculty council will use dismissal from National Honor Society sparingly. Alternative
disciplinary measures are sometimes more constructive and allow the student to learn from minor
mistakes. In the case of academic violations, the member will be given at least one semester to
raise his/her cumulative G.P.A. (For flagrant violations of criminal law or school rules, no warning
is necessary.) In all cases of possible dismissal, the adviser will always inform the errant member
in writing (a member is never automatically dismissed). If the faculty council determines that
dismissal is appropriate, the errant member will be allowed to present his/her case in person,
before the faculty council. If the member is dismissed, written notification will be given to the
student, parents and administration. The member must surrender any NHS emblem or
membership card to the adviser. The school principal is the final appeal in dismissal cases.
Page 17 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
COURSE SELECTION GUIDE
Procedure for Course Selection:
пЃ¶ The counselors will distribute course selection booklets and sheets and will instruct all
students in the course selection process.
пЃ¶ Students will then meet with their teachers for a preview of the Program of Studies and
individual course recommendations for the following year.
пЃ¶ Teachers will initial the recommended courses on the selection sheet.
пЃ¶ The course selection sheets will be taken home for completion and parental signatures. They
will be returned to the counselor for individually scheduled conferences.
 If course selection sheets are not returned, the counselor will make the following year’s
schedule for the student.
пЃ¶ Where students, counselor, and parents are not in agreement, a parental conference is
required. Please call 464-3311 to arrange an appointment.
пЃ¶ Due to conflicts, all students may not be able to schedule all classes requested; therefore, a
system of advanced selections of alternates will be used. The selection of course alternates
should be carefully considered.
пЃ¶ All students must schedule a minimum of 8 credits or 4 per semester.
Schedule Change Policy:
The student, parent(s) and school must mutually agree upon selection of courses. Schedule
changes are recognized by the high school as sometimes necessary. This statement is designed
to clarify school policy regarding schedule changes.
Generally, there will be no schedule changes once a semester begins.
requests for schedule changes will be considered for the following reasons:
However, certain
A. Educational needs have changed requiring the addition of an academic class.
B. A student is unable to perform course requirements as determined by the teacher, who
recommends the change to the counselor and principal.
Schedule changes (based on one of the two reasons stated above) must be done prior to
the last day of the 2006/07 school year. (Students will not be permitted to reschedule first
semester failures for the second semester.) Schedule changes always require counselor,
parent(s), teacher and administrator approval on the Schedule Change Form.
Page 18 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
SPECIALIZED AND INDEPENDENT STUDIES
015 Microcomputer & Software Applications
0.5 Credit
This course is a graduation requirement to be taken by all tenth grade students. Software
applications will include word processing, database, spreadsheets and telecommunications.
Information skills will encompass traditional and electronic information sources, computer use and
research.
030
A.C.M.E. Gifted Seminar
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Students must have a gifted I.E.P.
The goals of this class reflect Achievement, Creativity, Mastery of Problem Solving Skill and
Eclectic Learning. The themes of the core curriculum change each year to insure diversity.
Students who are interested in multicultural studies, language arts, foreign languages, fine arts,
creative writing, practical arts, social studies and sciences will benefit as they pursue teacher and
self-directed activities. Course expectations include oral, written and independent projects.
Marking period grades will be determined by cumulative points from the various projects.
050 Videography
1.0 Credit
The Videography course will provide the students with an introduction to the realm of video
production. The course is designed for the beginning video student. The students will learn how
to create videos, run various types of equipment and learn limited digital video techniques. The
students will work on planning, writing and creating various types of videos. The skills and
methodologies developed during the class will provide a foundation for future learning and
employment in the video field.
055 Studio Production
1.0 Credit
The studio production course will provide the students with an introduction to the realm of studio
production. The students will learn how to create studio oriented television shows, run various
types of equipment and learn pre- and post- production techniques. The students will be involved
in development, writing, set design and construction, acting, directing and producing original
works and projects. The skills and methodologies will provide a foundation for future learning and
employment in the television and video field.
LANGUAGE ARTS
Language Arts follows a required sequence to fulfill graduation requirements. Students must
pass one course (number of course listed) from either column at each level.
Grade 9
101
102
Grade 10
111
112
Grade 11
121
122
Grade 12
131
160 or 132
101 Language Arts 9
1.0 Credit
This course teaches and reviews various fundamentals of grammar in order to enhance students’
writing abilities. Additionally, a genre-based approach to literature incorporates classic and
modern literature as students analyze themes, discover vocabulary in context, and respond
Page 19 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
critically to various pieces of fiction and nonfiction. Highlights of the course include study of
Romeo and Juliet as part of the drama unit, an introduction to research methods, and special
preparation for writing skills required by the state in the PSSA narrative and persuasive modes.
Course expectations include all cumulative writing folder pieces and two independent novels.
125 Practical Communications
1.0 Credit
Practical Communications is the first 18 weeks of a 36-week remediation sequence for Language
Arts. Students who did not achieve the Proficient Level on the Reading section of the PSSA are
required to take this class. Students may not select this class. The units of study include
grammar through Daily Oral Language, ten writings in the informative, persuasive, and narrative
modes, reading comprehension, a research unit, a novel of choice, and an assigned novel.
Marking period grades will be determined by comprehension activities, completion of ten writings,
successful retesting of a sample PSSA, oral presentations and listening activities.
102
Applied Communications 9
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Completion of 125
Applied Communications 9 is the second 18 weeks of a 36-week remediation sequence for
Language Arts. Students must have completed the Practical Communications sequence in the
first semester in order to take this class. Students may not select this class. AC 9 studies
various forms of literature: poetry, novel, and drama (Romeo and Juliet). The course also
emphasizes introductory research methods and essential grammar skills in conjunction with
writing. Course expectations include all cumulative folder writings.
111
Language Arts 10
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 101 or 102
This course is designed as part of the college-bound sequence of courses and is recommended
to follow LA101. Students will read, discuss and study important works from American literature,
ranging from the Colonial to Post-Modern Periods. This course will emphasize grammar,
vocabulary development and sound research skills. Successful completion of two research
papers (both five pages and fewer) is a required component. Course expectations additionally
include a class study of The Crucible, two independent American novels and all other cumulative
writing folder assignments.
112
Applied Communications 10
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 101 or 102
This course is designed as part of the applied communications sequence and is recommended to
follow AC102. Integrated into the workplace, communication education units will continue
instruction in grammar and mechanics in order to enhance the quality of all written and spoken
communications. Students will read, discuss and study important works from American literature,
ranging from the Colonial to Post-Modern Periods. Successful completion of two research papers
(both five pages and fewer) is a required component. Other course expectations include a class
study of The Crucible, one American novel and all other cumulative writing folder assignments.
114
SAT Preparation - Great Books
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Sophomore or Junior status
Covering general test-taking skills, essay writing, sentence completions and critical reading skills,
this course is an intensive preparation in vocabulary, writing and reading for the Scholastic
Aptitude Test. The Great-Books aspect of the course is not separate from this purpose in that
vocabulary and reading skills from nine classic works of literature enhance and reinforce the
aforementioned SAT skills. Additionally, students analyze critically these nine works of
Page 20 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
distinguished literary merit. Course expectations include numerous writings and other creative
projects.
115
Public Speaking
0.5 Credit
Required course for Freshmen
This nine-week course, designed for ninth grade students, accelerates students’ public speaking
performance by immersing them in verbal activities. The course includes methods of developing
self-confidence, preparing speeches and analyzing communication of others. The instructor and
peers will evaluate the students in terms of delivery and content. Course expectations include
introductory, informative, persuasive and entertaining speeches, as well as a debate component.
121
Language Arts 11
1.0 Credit
Prerequisites: Successful completion of 101 or 102 and 111 or 112
This course is designed as part of the college-bound sequence of courses and is recommended
to follow LA111. Students read, discuss and study important works from British literature selected
for their representation of major literary periods and for their literary value. The semester
chronologically proceeds from the Anglo-Saxon works to the Romantics and contemporary
writers. Writing themes are derived from the content areas of the course, while essential
grammar skills are taught in conjunction with the writing, as well as Daily Oral Language.
Successful completion of a 5 to 7 page research paper is a required component. Course
expectations additionally include a class study of Hamlet, two independent British novels and all
other cumulative writing folder assignments.
122
Applied Communications 11
1.0 Credit
Prerequisites: Successful completion of 101 or 102 and 111 or 112
This course is designed for the applied communications student and is recommended to follow
AC 112. The literature is a chronological survey of British literature from its origins through the
twentieth century. Literary selections from mixed genres (novel, short story, drama, newspapers)
will be studied. Continued instruction in composition and grammar will be integrated into the
literary study and Daily Oral Language. PSSA practice skills will be included, and writing skills
will be taught through a variety of modes and technical writings (i.e. cover letter, resume, etc.).
Successful completion of a 5 to 7 page research paper is a required component. Course
expectations additionally include a class study of Hamlet, Lord of the Flies, one independent
British novel and all other cumulative writing folder assignments.
131
Language Arts 12
1.0 Credit
Prerequisites: Successful completion of 101 or 102 and 111 or 112
and 121 or 122
This course is designed as the final part of the college bound sequence of courses and is
recommended to follow LA121. World literature will be the focus of this course. The comprised
selections (novel, drama, poetry and short story) are all highly reflective of the historical and
cultural backgrounds of the authors. Successful completion of an 8 to 10 page literary analysis
research paper is a required component. Course expectations additionally include a class study
of Things Fall Apart, two independent novels and all other cumulative writing assignments.
132
Applied Communications 12
1.0 Credit
Prerequisites: Successful completion of 101 or 102 and 111 or 112
and 121 or 122
This course is designed as the final part of the applied communications sequence of courses and
is recommended to follow AC122. The literary offering of this course includes the study of four
major works from two genres - novel and drama. Students will work on weekly vocabulary lists
Page 21 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
and Daily Oral Language mini-lessons in order to prepare students for entering college or the
workplace. There is a heavy emphasis on PSSA writing prompts for students who are required to
retest. Successful completion of a 6 to 8 page literary analysis research paper is a required
component. Course expectations additionally include all other cumulative writing folder
assignments.
153
Journalism-Debate
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status
(Odd numbered years only)
The journalism segment comprises most of the course, covering both print (newspapers/
magazines) and electronic media (radio/television). Students will learn the principles of media
history, newsgathering and writing, broadcasting and communication law and ethics. The debate
portion of this course provides challenging instruction in the practical aspects of debating and
theories of argumentation. Students will learn how to develop/analyze propositions, speak
argumentatively and collect evidence via research. Course expectations include all cumulative
folder writings, a Limelight article submission, a video project, a radio drama and participation in
two formal debates.
155
Drama
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status
Students will acquire a foundation of the skills of acting and technical theatre through a balance of
hands-on activities and extensive study of theatre history. The class is comprised of the
following: Unit 1 (8 weeks): The History of Theatre through the Study of nine representative
plays; Unit 2 (4 weeks): Acting for the Stage; and Unit 3 (6 weeks): Technical Production and
Performance. Course expectations include responses to extensive readings, performances of
acting scenes, monologues, a one-act play and attendance of one live theatre production outside
of school.
158
Creative Writing
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status
This course will address the needs of those students who are highly motivated in creative and
written expression and who desire to write for self-improvement and publication in different
genres. Students of all writing levels are encouraged and will compose a variety of projects, such
as poetry, drama, short stories, science fiction, new journalism and others. Course expectations
include all cumulative writing folder assignments and participation in a class portfolio project (“A
Celebration of Writing”).
160
AP English: Composition & Literature
1.0 Credit
Prerequisites: Successful completion of three Language Arts credits
(LA9, 10, 11 or AC9, 10, 11) and successful performance on the qualifying test
A.P. English teaches the concepts prepared by the Development Committee of the College
Board. Students study challenging works of recognized literary merit. Assessment depends on
students’ written analysis of the works and effective classroom discussion through a seminar
approach. Course expectations include a 3 to 5 page analysis at the conclusion of each literary
work, participation in the Voice of Democracy Contest and completion of two expository essays
for either a college or scholarship application.
Page 22 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
SOCIAL STUDIES
Students must pass one course (course number listed below) from either column at each level as
well as one elective for a total of four (4) social studies credits.
201
202
211
212
221
222
Electives
240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 251, 260, 261, 262, 263
Students wishing to pursue Advanced Placement courses in the social studies department in their
junior and senior years are required to take the 201, 211, and 221 sequences.
Twentieth Century American Cultures traces the development of social, economic and political
factors, which affected American history from the turn of the century to the present. This course
helps students understand the relevance of history by showing them how people and events of
the past connect to the present. Units to be covered include: World War I, Roaring 20’s, the
Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, Politics
of the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s and most recent events.
201 American Cultures
1.0 Credit
This section is designed for students looking for an academic challenge or those students with a
strong interest in social studies. This course provides a more rigorous and in-depth look at the
topics covered. The instructor will stress higher-level thinking skills including synthesis, analysis
and evaluation of historical events with a greater emphasis on reading and writing. In addition,
students will be expected to prepare a project for various units covered throughout the semester.
Students wishing to pursue Advanced Placement courses in social studies in their junior and
senior years are required to take this course.
202 American Cultures
1.0 Credit
This is a basic history course designed for students looking to meet graduation requirements or
who do not want to pursue an emphasis on social studies. The outcome of this course is to
promote critical thinking and to teach students how to become informed decision-makers. The
teacher will use a variety of appropriate instructional techniques and assessments. In addition,
students will be expected to prepare a project for various units covered throughout the semester.
World Cultures:
Given comprehensive definitions for both geography and culture in the introductory unit, this
course examines the people, religions, ways of life, history and current events of cultures
throughout the world. This course is designed to present both an understanding and an
appreciation of the cultures studied. Major units of study include: Sub-Saharan Africa, South
Asia, East Asia, the Middle East and the former Soviet Union.
Page 23 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
211 World Cultures
1.0 Credit
This section is designed for students looking for an academic challenge or those students with a
strong interest in social studies. This course provides a more rigorous and in-depth look at the
topics covered. The instructor will stress higher-level thinking skills including synthesis, analysis,
and evaluation of geography and culture with a greater emphasis on reading and writing. In
addition, students will be expected to prepare a project for various units covered throughout the
semester. Students wishing to pursue Advanced Placement courses in social studies in their
junior and senior years are required to take this course.
212 World Cultures
1.0 Credit
This is a basic history course designed for students looking to meet graduation requirements or
who do not want to pursue an emphasis on social studies. The outcome of this course is to
promote critical thinking and to teach students how to become informed decision-makers. The
teacher will use a variety of appropriate instructional techniques and assessments. In addition,
students will be expected to prepare a project for various units covered throughout the semester.
Both American Cultures and World Cultures are prerequisites for all additional social
studies courses, therefore successful completion of 201 or 202 AND 211 or 212 is required
to sign up for any of the courses listed below.
American Government / Economics:
This course is designed to prepare the student for active participation in the American Democratic
process. Students will explore units including: the foundations of our government, the
Constitution, our political process, Congress, the executive branch of government, the courts and
the Bill of Rights and how foreign policy is formulated. The purpose of the economics segment of
the course is to have students gain an understanding of the basic economic concepts of scarcity
and supply and demand and to apply these concepts in contemporary situations. In addition,
students will study how government interacts with the economy by reviewing principles of
taxation, budget deficits and the national debt.
221 American Government/Economics
1.0 Credit
This section is designed for students looking for an academic challenge or those students with a
strong interest in social studies. This course provides a more rigorous and in-depth look at the
topics covered. The instructor will stress higher-level thinking skills including synthesis, analysis,
and evaluation of the Constitution and our government with a greater emphasis on reading and
writing. In addition, students will be expected to prepare a project for various units covered
throughout the semester. Students wishing to pursue Advanced Placement courses in social
studies in their junior and senior years are required to take this course.
222 American Government/Economics
1.0 Credit
This is a basic history course designed for students looking to meet graduation requirements or
who do not want to pursue an emphasis on social studies. The outcome of this course is to
promote critical thinking and to teach students how to become informed decision-makers. The
teacher will use a variety of appropriate instructional techniques and assessments. In addition,
students will be expected to prepare a project for various units covered throughout the semester.
240 Comparative Religions
1.0 Credit
This course will deal with the study of the various religions of the world. The studies will cover
religion through the ages and deal with the interactions and interrelationships of the religions of
Page 24 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
the world. The main religions covered in the course will be: oral religious societies, Hinduism,
Buddhism, Sikhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and
modern faiths. Through these diversified studies, the students will be exposed to the various
concepts, beliefs, traditions and practices of the religions and peoples of the world as well as its
impact on history and culture. The students will have to prepare a major project in each marking
period.
241 Sociology
1.0 Credit
Sociology is the study of human relationships. It is concerned with how people behave in groups
and how group interaction shapes individual behavior. Units of study will include: introduction to
sociology, research in sociology, culture, socialization, social structure, groups and formal
organizations, deviance and social control, social stratification, inequalities in race, ethnicity,
gender, and age, the family, education, political and economic institutions, religion, sport,
population and urbanization, and social change and collective behavior. The subject material will
be applied to real life situations to enhance the students understanding of sociology at work. The
students in this course will prepare projects for a variety of the units of study covered during the
course.
242 Psychology
1.0 Credit
Psychology deals with the study of the individual’s behavior. The course presents basic material
typical of an introductory college course. Units covered include: introduction and history, senses
and perceptions, the human brain, learning and conditioning, cognitive psychology, psychological
testing, developmental psychology, emotions/motivations and states of consciousness,
personality theory, stress, psychopathology, psychotherapy, and social psychology. In addition,
subject material is applied to everyday life situations, enhancing one’s self-understanding and
improving relationships with others. The students will be expected to complete various
experiments and major projects in each marking period.
243 Local History
1.0 Credit
This course is designed to provide students with an in depth study of Pennsylvania and Lancaster
County history from the origins of the regions up to the 21st Century. Units to be covered include:
geography of Pennsylvania and Lancaster, tourism and Lancaster County, Native Americans,
early settlement of the region and William Penn, the Germans and the Amish, colonial
Pennsylvania, the influences of wars – French and Indian, Revolutionary and Civil, industrial
growth, transportation growth, changes in the government, and local communities – Lancaster
County. The students in this course will prepare projects for a variety of the units of study
covered during the course.
244 Introduction to Law
1.0 Credit
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to various aspects of law and the legal system
in the United States. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles and
practices associated with the field of law. Units to be covered include: the history of American
law, state and federal court systems, constitutional law, civil and criminal judicial procedures,
juvenile law, family and housing law, contracts and torts. The teacher will use a variety of
appropriate instructional techniques and assessments. In addition, every student will prepare a
variety of projects using multi media and technology for various units covered in the course.
251 European History
1.0 Credit
The European History course provides the student with an in-depth look at the major events of
world history thematically from the development of modern Europe from the Renaissance to the
Age of Napoleon. Emphasis will be on the development of critical thinking and analysis skills to
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understand the concepts of history through the study of modern Europe and its impact on the
world today. Units covered include: the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the wars of
religion, development of nations, Absolutism, the Enlightenment and Age of Reason, democratic
revolutions, the Industrial Revolution and the Age of Napoleon. A variety of appropriate
instructional techniques, strategies and assessments will be used along with several major
multimedia projects for each marking period.
Social Studies AP courses are open to eleventh and twelfth grade students who have
successfully completed 201 American Cultures and 211 World Cultures.
260 AP American Government and Politics
2.0 Credits
This year-long course is designed to give students a critical perspective on government and
politics in the United States. The course will prepare students to take the Advanced Placement
test. Students who score well on this test may receive college credit. The course will involve the
study of general concepts used to interpret American politics and the analysis of specific case
studies. Major content areas include: constitutional foundations of American democracy, political
beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, institutions and policy processes of
national government and civil rights and civil liberties. The ability to craft thoughts in wellreasoned essays is an integral part of the A.P. test and the course. Class size is limited by the
recommendation of the College Board. Previous grades and teacher recommendations will be
considered for admission to the class.
261 AP European History
2.0 Credits
In addition to providing a basic exposure to the factual narrative, the goals of this year-long A.P.
European History course are to develop: 1) an understanding of the principal themes in modern
European history, 2) the ability to analyze historical evidence, and 3) the ability to express that
understanding and analysis effectively in writing. Students in this course are expected to
demonstrate knowledge of basic chronology and major events and trends from the High
Renaissance of approximately 1450 to the present. The broad themes of intellectual-cultural,
political-diplomatic, and social-economic history form the basis of the course within that
chronology. The focus of this course will be to use critical thinking, analysis and problem-solving
skills to understand the complex nature of the inter-relationship shown in modern European
development. Students will be expected to complete a mastery project that reflects their
understanding of the inter-relationships of historical issues. This course includes history both as
content and as methodology. Emphasis is placed on students developing intellectual and
academic skills, including: 1) effective analysis of such primary sources as documents, maps,
statistics and pictorial and graphic evidence, 2) effective note-taking, 3) clear and precise written
expression, and 4) the ability to weigh evidence and reach conclusions on the basis of facts. By
recommendation of the College Board, class size may be limited and admission will be based on
class rank, Verbal PSAT and/or SAT scores, teacher recommendation and a qualifying exam.
262 AP U.S. History
2.0 Credits
AP U.S. History is a challenging course that is meant to be the equivalent of a freshman college
course. It is a year-long survey of American history from the age of exploration and discovery to
the present. The analytical thinking, writing and reading skills that students develop in AP U.S.
History will equip students for college and lifelong learning. Because this course is similar to a
first-year college course, students should expect that the workload would be heavier then most
regular high school history courses. Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills,
essay writing, interpretation of original documents and histography. A student may earn up to
three college credits by scoring well on the AP U.S. History exam. By recommendation of the
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College Board, class size may be limited, and students will be admitted based on previous grades
and teacher recommendations.
263 AP Psychology
1.0 Credit
The AP psychology course will provide the student with an in-depth study of the major elements
of psychology. The course will cover historical, biological, cognitive, developmental and social
psychologies; as well as, psychopathology, psychotherapy, personality theory, psychological
testing, consciousness, learning theory, motivation and emotions and research methodologies.
These units will be completed to prepare the student to take the AP exam and future college
course work. Critical thinking, analysis, source reading and writing, among other skills, will be
emphasized as means of assessment. Class size will be limited based on the recommendation
of the College Board. Admission to the class may be based on previous grades, teacher
recommendations, PSAT or SAT scores or a qualifying exam.
MATHEMATICS
Students must pass four courses in mathematics in order to qualify for graduation. The following
sequential diagram indicates the primary routes a student may follow in pursuing the Mathematics
program. However, alternate sequences are available to students, if deemed necessary.
Math/Science
Majors Sequence
College-Bound
Sequence
Technical
Sequence
Algebra I 301
Pre-Algebra 303
Pre-Algebra 303
Algebra I 302
Algebra I 302
Algebra II 341
Geometry 321
Probability &
Statistics 358
Intermediate Algebra 312
Trigonometry &
Integrated Math 356
Geometry 322
Geometry 322
Electives
Pre-Calculus 361
Basic Algebra II 342
Calculus 362
Tech Alg & Geo 343
Computer
Programming 325
AP Calculus 370
Trig & Integ
Math 356
Prob & Stats
Math 358
Programming in
Java 326
AP Computer
Science 327
Note: It is strongly recommended that freshmen not take an additional course beyond 341.
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301
Algebra I
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 8th grade teacher recommendation
This course provides the foundation for the study of operations and properties of the real number
system. The emphasis is on the solution of and the graphs of linear equations and inequalities.
Other topics include solving systems of equations, solving quadratic equations, using powers and
exponents, working with polynomials, and factoring.
302
Algebra I
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra or 8th grade teacher recommendation
This course also provides the foundation for the study of operations and properties of the real
number system but moves at a slower pace. The emphasis is on the solution of and the graphs
of linear equations and inequalities. Other topics include solving systems of equations, using
powers and exponents, and working with absolute value equations. It is recommended that a
student should have attained a grade of B or better in Pre-Algebra.
303 Pre-Algebra
1.0 Credit
Pre-algebra is designed for those students who need a review of the basic skills of mathematics
before enrolling in Algebra I. The major emphasis of this course will be on the solution of
equations and inequalities in the integer number system. Ratios, proportions, percents, the
graphing of linear equations and an introduction to basic geometry will also be included in the
curriculum.
312
Intermediate Algebra
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 301 or 302
The purpose of the course is to continue the development of algebraic skills begun in Algebra I, to
introduce the students to basic geometric concepts and to help students bridge the gap between
algebra and geometry. Some of the topics covered in this course are: quadratic equations,
rational equations, functions, radicals, coordinate geometry, and statistics and probability. It is
recommended that a student should have attained a grade of C or better in Algebra I.
321
Geometry
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 301, but 341 preferred
This course involves the study of the relationships among one, two and three-dimensional
geometric figures. The following topics will be covered: the coordinate plane, angles, triangles,
quadrilaterals, geometric inequalities, perpendicular and parallel lines, planes, polygons,
similarity, congruence, circles, probability, area and volume. Both inductive and deductive
methods of reasoning will be emphasized in the problem solving process. Further, many
chapters include the application of definitions, postulates and theorems in paragraph and twocolumn proofs. It is recommended that a student should have attained a grade of B or better in
Algebra II 341.
322
Geometry
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 301 or 312
The material in this course will be similar to that of Geometry 321 except that the emphasis is not
placed on rigorous proofs, but instead upon intuitive investigations and applications of geometric
concepts. The following topics will be covered: sets of points, segment and angle measure,
parallel lines, congruent triangles, polygons, quadrilaterals, similar triangles, circles, area,
volume, probability and coordinate geometry. It is recommended that a student should have
attained a grade of C or better in Intermediate Algebra.
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325
Computer Programming
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 301 or 302
This course is designed to introduce fundamental concepts and skills in computer programming.
Students learn to program by completing a series of increasingly complex programming projects
using the Visual Basic programming language. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and
creative use of programming tools. The course includes a major programming project in the
second marking period. It is recommended that the student should have attained a grade of B or
better in Algebra I.
326
Programming In Java I
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 325 or permission from instructor
This is the second in a series of three programming courses. Students learn to program in the
Java programming language with primary emphasis placed upon the concepts and skills needed
for object-oriented programming. There is also a brief introduction to fundamental algorithms and
data structures. Emphasis is placed on learning by doing and assessment by performance. Note:
This in NOT “JavaScript.”
327
AP Computer Science
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 326 or permission from instructor
This is the last in a series of three programming courses. Students improve object-oriented
programming skills and formally study computer science topics. The course is the equivalent of a
first year course in computer programming at a college level. Students will be prepared for the
AP examination in spring.
330 PSSA Math
1.0 Credit
Students who do not achieve a proficient or advanced score on the math PSSA and who are not
scheduled to have a math class in their senior year, will be placed into PSSA Math to acquire the
knowledge necessary to reach proficiency. During the first half of the semester, students will
review topics from algebra, geometry, trigonometry, statistics and probability. During the second
semester, students will learn topics from Consumer Math, such as banking, loan credit, budgeting
and taxes.
341
Algebra II
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 301
The basic content of this course is a more in-depth study of the topics introduced in Algebra I. In
addition, the new concepts to be taught include: imaginary and complex numbers, quadratic and
polynomial functions, rational functions and equations, logarithms, powers, roots and radicals.
Emphasis will be placed on the connection of all concepts to real life situations. It is
recommended that a student should have attained a grade of B or better in Algebra I 301.
342
Basic Algebra II
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 321 or 322
This course is similar to Algebra II 341 except that the students will proceed at a slower pace.
The course is designed for those students planning to continue their work beyond high school in
fields not closely related to mathematics. Topics that will be studied include: imaginary and
complex numbers, quadratic and polynomial functions, powers, roots and radicals. It is
recommended that a student should have a grade of C or better in Intermediate Algebra and
Geometry.
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343
Technical Algebra and Geometry
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I
This course is designed to give students increased background in the mathematics of the
“working world.” Topics are developed informally with an emphasis on applications to business
and industry. Topics will be chosen from the following: factoring, patterns and functions,
quadratics, systems of equations, inequalities, geometry in the workplace, spatial visualization,
coordinate geometry and transformations.
356
Trigonometry and Integrated Math
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 341 or 342
This course is designed primarily for those students with an interest in trigonometry and its
applications. The six trigonometric functions, their inverses, their graphs, solving trigonometric
equations and the solution of triangles will be studied. Radical functions, logarithms, sequences
and series will also be studied. It is recommended that the student should have a grade of B or
better in Algebra II.
358
Probability and Statistics
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 341 or 342
This course is designed to give college-bound students a firm background in probability and
statistics. It will help the student develop an understanding of the concepts and problems of
descriptive and inferential statistics. Some of the topics included are: frequency distribution,
central tendency, standard deviation, the counting principle, binomial distribution, normal
distribution, sampling distribution, estimating, hypothesis testing and regression/correlation. It is
recommended that a student should have attained a grade of B or better in Algebra II 341 or 342.
A graphing calculator is required for this course.
361
Pre-Calculus
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 321 and 341. Students must have the signature
of the department head to register
This course is designed to prepare college-bound students for a first course in calculus.
Advanced algebra, analytic geometry and trigonometry are integrated with other topics by an
approach that emphasizes functions. Concepts presented include: polynomial functions,
transcendental functions, quadratic functions, and possibly sequences and series. It is
recommended that the student should have attained a grade of B or better in Algebra II 341. A
graphing calculator is required for this course.
362
Calculus
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: 361. Students must have the signature of the
department head to register
This introductory Calculus course is designed to provide students with strong math ability
exposure to the fundamentals of Calculus. The course includes the study of algebraic and
trigonometric functions. The topics emphasized will be limits, continuity, derivatives and their
applications, and integration. It is recommended that the student attain a grade of B or better in
Pre-Calculus. Students taking this course may NOT take AP Calculus. A graphing
calculator is required for this course.
370
AP Calculus AB
2.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Students must have the signature of the department head
This is a full year course and is designed to provide students with exceptional math ability, an
opportunity to determine their college placement and/or earn credit in mathematics. The course
includes the study of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. The topics
emphasized will be limits, derivatives and their applications and integration and the applications
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of it. In addition, each student will be asked to complete an independent project. Students may
enroll in this course, if they attain a grade of B or better in Pre-Calculus and are recommended by
the teacher. A graphing calculator is required for this course.
SCIENCE
Requirements for graduating classes 2008 and 2009:
Students must pass
- 401 or 402
- 411 or 412
- 1 more science course
Requirements for graduating classes 2010 and beyond:
Students must pass - 4 sciences from below sequence
ES 401 or ES 402
Bio 411 or Bio 412
Chem or Chem Study
Integrated Science
Physics or AP Physics*
Electives
Anatomy
Geology
AP Biology*
AP Chemistry*
Electives
Chemistry
Chemistry Study
Anatomy
Geology
Biotopics
*Note: All AP science courses are full year courses.
401 Earth Science
1.0 Credit
Earth science utilizes chemistry, physics and biology to explore processes both on Earth and in
the solar system. Students will study minerals and rocks, weathering and landforms, paleontology
and geologic time, geophysics, hydrogeology and the water cycle, oceanography, meteorology
and astronomy. Students will sharpen map reading and interpretations skills while examining
surface processes such as erosion, earthquakes and drainage systems. The faster pace and
increased rigor will prepare students for more advanced science classes. Students best suited for
this class should have excelled in previous science classes.
402 Earth Science
1.0 Credit
Earth science utilizes chemistry, physics and biology to explore processes both on Earth and in
the solar system. Students will study minerals and rocks, weathering and landforms, paleontology
and geologic time, geophysics, hydrogeology and the water cycle, oceanography, meteorology
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and astronomy. Students will sharpen map reading and interpretations skills while examining
surface processes such as erosion, earthquakes and drainage systems.
403 Applied Geology
1.0 Credit
This is an advanced geology course that allows students the opportunity to examine the geology
of the United States. The course will focus on physical geology and explore the origin of
prominent landforms both locally and throughout the country. Topics such as the mountain
ranges, environmental geology, glacial geology, caves and karsts, barrier islands, volcanic
eruptions, earthquakes and exploration geology will be covered.
411 Biology
1.0 Credit
This course introduces biology from an ecological point of view. Students will gain an
understanding of biological topics including: cellular structure, function and division; genetics
using probability; microorganism study of viruses, bacteria and protists; plants - identification and
structure; and animals - systems and classification. Laboratory activities, using a wide variety of
specimens, play an extensive role in the course. The faster pace and increased rigor will prepare
students for more advanced science classes. Students best suited for this class should have
excelled in previous science classes.
412 Biology
1.0 Credit
This course introduces biology from an ecological point of view. Students will gain an
understanding of biological topics including: cellular structure, function and division; genetics
using probability; microorganism study of viruses, bacteria and protists; plants - identification and
structure; and animals - systems and classification. Laboratory activities, using a wide variety of
specimens, play an extensive role in the course.
421 Biotopics
1.0 Credit
This is a project-based course designed to give students a better understanding of the interaction
occurring between organisms in various ecosystems. Specific organisms, such as insects or
plants and birds, are looked at in more detail. Students will also study population growth and its
effect on our planet. This is a taxonomy course, which involves many labs that are project-based.
422 Anatomy and Physiology
1.0 Credit
This course is a combination of two biological topics: anatomy and physiology. The anatomy and
physiology units describe levels of biological organization, support and movement, control and
regulation, body fluids and transport, environmental exchange and continuity of life. A three-week
dissection studying the organ systems will also be conducted.
432 AP Biology
2.0 Credit
This Advanced Placement course in Biology is designed for students who would like to test out of
an introductory biology class at college or those who would like to take an in-depth look at
biology. The course will cover the topics of molecules, cells, genetics, ecology and organisms as
recommended by the College Board. Students will be admitted to this class based upon the
following criteria: previous science grades, teacher recommendations and a qualifying exam
when class size is limited.
441 Chem Study
1.0 Credit
This is a course for college-bound students interested in a science field with a strong background
in math. A clear picture of the way scientists proceed to do their work is presented and
repeatedly followed in the development of this course. Students draw from extensive laboratory
experience to formulate chemical principles such as the atomic theory, nature of matter and mole
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concept. Chemical principles considered include energy, characteristics of chemical reactions,
chemical periodicity and chemical bonding.
442 Chemistry
1.0 Credit
This is a course for college-bound students interested in areas other than math or science. The
presentation is a descriptive and theoretical approach, which follows a more traditional format
than Chem Study. The relationship between chemical structure and properties are explored.
Laboratories, an important component of the course, are both qualitative and quantitative. The
dimensional analysis, the nature of matter and the mole concept are developed.
446 AP Chemistry
2.0 Credit
This Advanced Placement course in Chemistry is designed to provide students with exceptional
science ability an opportunity to determine their college placement and/or earn credit in
chemistry. This course will include advanced studies in inorganic and organic chemistry. Students
will be admitted to this class based upon the following criteria: previous science grades, teacher
recommendations and a qualifying exam when class size is limited.
451 Integrated Science
1.0 Credit
Integrated Science introduces high school students to a variety of topics in the physical sciences.
The course is mainly concerned with changes in matter and energy within naturally occurring
systems. Topics include: states of matter, chemical reactions, acids and bases, motion, forces,
water systems and natural resources.
460 Physics
1.0 Credit
This course focuses on concepts of motion and projectiles, matter and energy, momentum and
collisions, electricity and magnetism, waves and sound and light and optics. Students build and
analyze cable systems and rockets. Students measure and analyze the motion of elevators and
roller coasters. Students work with lasers, speakers, microphones, lenses, air track gliders, force
probes, motion probes and numerous other technical instruments and equipment.
461 AP Physics
2.0 Credit
The AP Physics B course provides a systematic introduction to the main principles of physics and
emphasizes the development of problem-solving ability. It is assumed that the student is familiar
with algebra and trigonometry. In most colleges, this is a one-year terminal course with a
laboratory component. Students will be admitted to this class based upon the following criteria:
previous science grades, teacher recommendations and a qualifying exam when class size is
limited. This is a full year course.
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PRACTICAL ARTS
Agricultural Education:
Recommended Course Sequences
Veterinary
Science I
Veterinary
Science II
Landscape &
Plant Design
Agriculture
Science I
Small Gas
Engines
Agriculture
Mechanics I
Agriculture
Science II
Tractors &
Machinery
Welding &
Electricity
Advanced
Agriculture
Advanced
Mechanics
500 Agriculture Science I
1.0 Credit
Agriculture Science I offer students an introduction to the study of animal science, horticulture,
mechanics, and plant science. Students will explore career areas in veterinary science, wildlife,
conservation, and mechanics; leadership and community development is also a part of the
course. The completion of course requirements (all major assigned projects) is necessary for
course credit. Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE) is made available in this course.
501 Agriculture Science II
1.0 Credit
Agriculture Science II is designed for students with plans or interests in some phase of the animal
industry or plant production field. Areas to be covered include large animal care and
management, meat judging, and slaughter techniques. Also, part of the course is parliamentary
procedure, public speaking, plant production, fertilization, and conservation. Leadership and
community development will be part of the course. The completion of course requirements (all
major assigned projects) is necessary for course credit. Supervised Agriculture Experience
(SAE) is made available in this course.
502 Advanced Agriculture
1.0 Credit
This course is designed to teach the student the basic types of agriculture businesses and proper
management skills. Students will learn marketing, financing, decision-making and business
management. Skills learned in this course will provide the student with the skills needed for future
employment in one of Pennsylvania’s leading industries - Agriculture. The completion of course
requirements (all major assigned projects) is necessary for course credit. Supervised Agriculture
Experience (SAE) is made available in this course.
503 Agriculture Mechanics I
1.0 Credit
The design of this course is to give students an introduction to training in the following areas: tool
fitting, plumbing, machine safety, small engine maintenance, drywall construction, electric motors,
shop safety and farm carpentry. The completion of course requirements (all major assigned
projects) is necessary for course credit. Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE) is made
available in this course.
504 Veterinary Science I
1.0 Credit
This course will examine the practical aspects of animal science as it relates to animal ownership,
handling and health. Both large and small animals will be incorporated into this course. Areas to
be covered include introductions to reproduction, pet care and management, animal CPR, meat
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evaluation, animal communication/behavior, and animal breeds. Leadership and community
development will also be a part of this course. This course is recommended for any student
interested in animals. The completion of course requirements (all major assigned projects) is
necessary for course credit. Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE) is made available in this
course.
505 Small Gas Engines
1.0 Credit
This course is designed to give students learning in small engine repair and maintenance.
Students will do work on 2 and 4 cycle engines. The course deals with information an owner and
operator of a small engine should know. Much of this course is hands-on training. Students must
supply an engine for repair. The completion of course requirements (all major assigned projects)
is necessary for course credit. Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE) is made available in this
course.
506 Welding and Electricity
1.0 Credit
This course is an intensive study of electricity and welding. Students will learn electric principles
and demonstrate common wiring used in the electrical industry. Students will develop skills in
both electric arc and mig welding. In addition, plasma arc cutting and oxy-acetylene welding will
be learned. The completion of course requirements (all major assigned projects) is necessary for
course credit. Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE) is made available in this course.
507
Advanced Mechanics
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Agriculture Mechanics I or Welding and Electricity
Students in this course may work on projects from the training they received in Agriculture
Mechanics I. Students will have advanced training in construction, surveying, welding, engines,
concrete and masonry. Training in diesel engine maintenance will be included. The completion of
course requirements (all major assigned projects) is necessary for course credit. Supervised
Agriculture Experience (SAE) is made available in this course.
508
Tractors and Machinery
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Small Gas Engines, Ag Mechanics I, Welding and
Electricity
This course is designed to give students further knowledge and skill in the repair of small engine
systems. Students will work with advanced overhaul and repair, starters, electrical systems,
transmissions, and replacement of bearings and seals. Students will work with engine systems
used on mid-sized lawn tractors and rototillers, and farm sized tractors. The completion of course
requirements (all major assigned projects) is necessary for course credit. Supervised Agriculture
Experience (SAE) is made available in this course.
509 Landscape and Plant Design
1.0 Credit
This course is designed as an introduction to landscaping and landscaping designing techniques.
Units of study include pruning, plant identification, chemical usage and fertilizers, soils and
erosion, plant design techniques, turf-grass management, and more. This course is intended to
be very hands-on oriented. Frequent labs and outdoor activities encompass a large portion of this
course of study. The completion of course requirements (all major assigned projects) is
necessary for course credit. Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE) is made available in this
course.
510 Veterinary Science II
1.0 Credit
This course will examine an in depth study of animal management techniques, animal nutrition,
domestication and wildlife, animal birthing and medical techniques. This course targets both large
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and small animal species. Areas to be covered include animal judging techniques, task force
animals and training, animal welfare issues, advanced CPR techniques, genetic trends and
breeding systems, horse-care and advanced animal behavior. Leadership and community
development will also be a part of this course. This course is offered to those students who have
successfully completed Veterinary Science I. The completion of course requirements (all major
assigned projects) is necessary for course credit. Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE) is
made available in this course.
Business Education:
520 Introduction to Business
1.0 Credit
The world of business is exciting, challenging, attainable and fun! Introduction to Business is a
basic course that draws students into the world of business and the jobs and careers associated
with the business world. Completion of Marketing and Business plans are course requirements.
522
Advanced Word Processing
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in Microcomputer and
Software Applications (015)
In the world of work, IBM and IBM compatible software and hardware are prevalent. By learning
Microsoft Word, students will be able to make an easy transition from school to work or the
college lab. Students are required to complete projects at the end of each lesson.
525
Accounting I
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Accounting I is open to students who have successfully completed Algebra I. This course
stresses the fundamental concepts of double-entry accounting, the theory of debits and credits,
the use of journals, ledgers, financial statements, and other related business forms. Emphasis is
placed on understanding the steps in the accounting cycle. Completion of major application
activities is a course requirement.
526
Accounting II
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Accounting I
Following textbook introductions in advanced methods of accounting for assets, liabilities and
equity, students will receive an introduction to computerized accounting. This course lays a
foundation for career accountants or college majors in any field of business. Completion of major
application activities is a course requirement.
527
Computer Concepts-IBM Computers
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: PC Keyboarding
Using Microsoft Office, students will learn Microsoft Word, Access, Excel, and PowerPoint
techniques. Understanding Microsoft Office techniques will enable students to have a variety of
resources to use in projects in school and in business. Completion of individual application
projects is a course requirement.
528 Career Search & Selection
1.0 Credit
A follow-up course to Career/Study Skills, students continue to do research on career paths,
technical training and college selection. Students will research their own career paths, do a jobshadowing project, and hear presentations from local business people as well as representatives
from colleges and technical schools. Completion of personal and career evaluations is a course
requirement.
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540
Introduction to Marketing/Sales (Even numbered years)
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Introduction to Business or American Cultures
Marketing takes students through the steps of developing, promoting and distributing a product.
Targeting the market for a product through successful advertising is a major thrust of the course.
Students’ creative efforts will be put to use in exploring various marketing approaches. This
course will help students develop critical thinking skills in evaluating marketing techniques in our
economy. The completion of major projects and tests is a course requirement.
541
Personal Finance/Management (Odd numbered years)
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Introduction to Business or American Cultures
Designed for all students, Personal Finance/Management will explore the students’ roles and
financial responsibility as student, citizen, family member, consumer and employee. It will cover
current research, laws, technology and personal investment strategies as they relate to an
individual’s finances. Topics include career strategies, money management, financial security,
credit management and consumer rights and responsibilities. Completion of major projects is a
course requirement.
Family and Consumer Science:
553 Family and Consumer Science (Grade 10)
0.5 Credit
The Family and Consumer Science program is designed to enable individuals to actively
participate in the improvement of family life. This Family and Consumer Science course focuses
on the following areas: food and nutrition, child development and family life. The completion of
course requirements (all major assigned projects) is necessary for course credit.
Technology Education:
570 Introduction to Technology
1.0 Credit
Introduction to Technology is a beginning hands-on course in technology for students in grades 9
through 12 to attract students who enjoy a non-traditional class. This course provides an overview
of the systems areas of communication, construction, manufacturing and transportation
technology. Students, working alone or in groups, will build a foundation for technological
problems and will analyze impacts of technology. This course will have a research component.
571 Graphic Communication I
1.0 Credit
Graphic Communications is designed to familiarize students with graphic design, photo-offset and
screen processes. Students will have hands-on experience in screen-printing, binding,
composition, process photography, plate making and press operation. Also, students will have an
introduction to desktop publishing and type design. The completion of course requirements (all
major assigned projects) is necessary for course credit. Students are expected to pay for
materials used in class that exceed the cost of required projects.
572
Graphic Communication II
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Graphic Communication I
This course is designed to further develop skills acquired in the Graphic Communication I class
by successfully completing advanced project work, multicolor work and advanced darkroom
techniques, including halftone photography. A greater emphasis on computer skills in desktop
publishing, type design and scanning will be stressed. The completion of course requirements
(all major assigned projects) is necessary for course credit. Students are expected to pay for
materials used in class that exceed the cost of required projects.
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Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
573
Graphic Communication III
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Graphic Communication II
This course is designed for the student with a strong interest in graphic arts and is considering
pursuing it in depth or as a possible career. Emphasis will be placed upon advanced offset
lithography and advanced desktop publishing techniques through individual and production
printing and multicolor work. Students will also have the opportunity to work on multicolor screen
process printing projects. The completion of course requirements (all major assigned projects) is
necessary for course credit. Students are expected to pay for materials used in class that exceed
the cost of required projects.
574 Photography (Grades 10 through 12)
1.0 Credit
This course is designed for students who have interest in exploring the field of black and white
photography. Designed for the beginner, the focus will be on the study of different cameras,
types of film and developing techniques. Students will develop film, make black and white prints
and experience creative photographic techniques such as toning, vignetting and the Sabattier
process. Digital photographic imaging will also be addressed. The completion of course
requirements (all major assigned projects) is necessary for course credit. Students are required
to have a camera with adjustable lens and shutter settings.
575 Wood Technology I
1.0 Credit
Wood technology is designed to educate students in basic woodworking skills with a major focus
on safety and the correct usage of hand tools, portable electric tools and power machinery. The
technological system method in conjunction with problem solving and construction skills will be
emphasized throughout this course. Emphasis will be placed on accurate measurement, adding
and subtracting fractions and basic drafting skills. Students will be required to work in teams and
individually on various activities and projects. It is not recommended that students take both
Material Processing and Wood Technology I. These two courses have overlapping content.
576
Wood Technology II
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in Wood Tech I or Material Processing
This course is designed to further develop and utilize skills acquired in Wood Technology I by
selecting and planning more difficult projects. Special attention is given to additional machine
setups for specialty cuts. Students will be required to design a project and then construct it in the
lab. Students will also be required to complete non-traditional research assignments as well as
work in teams and individually on various activities and projects. Students will participate in mass
production projects as well as choosing and constructing individual projects. Students are
expected to pay for materials used in class that exceed the cost of required projects ($30).
577
Wood Technology III – (OFFERED EVERY OTHER YEAR 07-08)
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in Wood Tech. II
This course is designed for those students interested in developing advanced woodworking skills.
The course offers an increased emphasis on selecting, designing and constructing more
advanced pieces of furniture. A major percentage of class time will be spent on project
construction. In addition, students will be required to complete non-traditional research
assignments as well as work in teams and individually on various activities and projects.
However, students will receive special instruction and demonstrations on advanced drawing
techniques, machine setups, special cuts and mass production activities. Students are expected
to pay for materials used in class that exceed the cost of required projects ($30).
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578 Construction Systems (Grades 9 through 12)
1.0 Credit
Students will develop a basic understanding of construction systems by studying architectural
design, structural engineering and construction principles. This “hands on” course will incorporate
problem solving activities where students will develop, produce, use and assess structures
ranging from houses, buildings, dams, bridges, roads, etc. Students will be required to design,
plan and construct small-scale models and full scale building structures. Emphasis will be on
computer aided drawing systems (CADD), research and development techniques, material
testing, construction processes, financial considerations and basic renovation projects. The
completion of course requirements (all major assigned projects) is necessary for course credit.
579 Desktop Publishing (Grades 10 through 12)
1.0 Credit
This course is designed for students who have an interest in developing skills in presentation
graphics and looking more in depth at the potential and possibilities available in the software
package of Adobe Creative Suites (Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop)
and Power Point. As the course progresses, the possibility of adding other software to the course
such as Print Artist and Painter would be investigated. Students would design various projects in
Creative Suites including stationery, business cards, greeting cards, package design, newsletters,
brochures and other presentation-type projects. PowerPoint would give students experience in
developing their skills in graphic presentations that they could incorporate into their classes or
even as a way to submit their senior project.
580 Introduction to CADD/Drafting (Grades 9-12)
1.0 Credit
This course will allow students to learn basic skills in sketching, drafting and architectural drawing
on the drawing board and on AutoCAD, a computer aided drafting & design software program
(CADD). The first part of the class will be devoted to mechanical drawing where students will
learn skills in lettering, measuring, dimensioning, geometric construction and reading drawings.
Students will apply these skills in drawing several one view and multi-view drawings. The second
part of the class will introduce the field of architectural drawing where students will draw a set of
floor plans, foundation plans, plot plans, window and door schedules and elevation drawings for a
small ranch style house. The completion of course requirements (all major assigned projects) is
necessary for course credit.
581
Engineering Drawing & Technical Sketching
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to CADD/
Drafting with a recommended grade of a C or better
This course will allow students to learn advanced engineering drafting and design skills utilizing a
drawing board and AutoCAD, a computer aided drafting and design software program (CADD). It
will also allow students to explore different forms of technical sketching such as pencil, ink, and
multicolor renderings as well as stippling drawings. Basic skills from the introduction class will be
reviewed and new areas will be explained including such topics as sectional and auxiliary views,
isometric drawings, and sheet metal developments. This information will then be applied in the
design process as students work individually and in groups on a number of engineering design
activities to solve problems. The completion of course requirements (all major assigned projects)
is necessary for course credit.
582
Architectural Drawing
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to CADD/
Drafting with a recommended grade of a C or better
This course is designed for students who have an interest in architectural drawing and design.
Basic skills of drawing on the board and using the CADD system from the introduction class will
be reviewed and new areas will be presented. Students will plan and draw an advanced set of
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Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
house plans to include floor, foundation, elevation, electrical and plot plans, window and door
schedule, detail drawings, perspective drawing, and architecture model. Other topics that will be
studied include: architectural styles, construction materials and techniques, construction costs
and financing and energy conservation. The completion of course requirements (all major
assigned projects) is necessary for course credit.
583 Material Processing
1.0 Credit
Material Processing examines the integration and interrelationships of various nonmetallic and
limited metallic materials, products and impacts. This course includes production activities in
polymers, ceramics, wood, composites and metal. It is designed to educate students in the
correct usage of hand tools, portable electric tools and power machinery with a major focus on
safety. This course also examines the application of math and scientific principles, drafting and
design and the technological impacts on industry and society. It is not recommended that
students take both Material Processing and Wood Technology I. These two courses have
overlapping content.)
590 Design Engineering (Grades 10 through 12)
1.0 Credit
In Design Engineering, students will explore engineering principles and develop critical thinking
and problem solving skills. The engineering principles that will be covered will consist of electrical,
structural, mechanical and fluid systems. Other content areas will be drawn from topics such as
lasers, fiber optics, robotics, CADD, drafting, and sketching. Students will integrate these
principles with their knowledge of science, mathematics, technology, communications and other
disciplines to solve real life problems. Students will have the opportunity to work with small hand
tools for wood, metal, electronic and simple chemical projects as well as computers for
researching, collecting and processing data, drawing and designing. The completion of course
requirements (all major assigned projects) is necessary for course credit.
FINE ARTS
Art Education:
600 Art Survey
1.0 Credit
This course is a basic art-studio orientation course which offers a broad range of visual art
experiences based on the elements and principles of art using various art media and techniques.
The concepts of aesthetics, art criticism, art history and art production will be applied and
reinforced. In this class, students will work to improve drawing skills and their awareness of three
dimensional forms. Perspective, composition, proportion, line, value, art history and more will be
examined. Bring a willingness to work hard on your ideas and art work, and you will develop a
sense of design as well as an increased ability in drawing, clay work, sculpture and painting.
Each student will be expected to purchase and maintain a sketch book/journal for the class.
601
Fine Art
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Recommended grade of C or better in Art Survey
or by permission
This course is for the student who would enjoy working with as many different materials and
techniques as possible in two dimensional art. Students will use and improve drawing and
painting skills as well as the way they look at their work and the work of other student artists and
professional artists. This course is also designed to add breadth, depth and quality to the work of
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Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
students who have already learned the basic elements of drawing and color. Students are
encouraged to further develop visual skills through a series of in-depth exercises and projects.
Problems in painting, drawing and design will be assigned. Students will study the history of
Western art and Eastern civilizations around the 1400’s, concentrating on the Renaissance
period. Each student will be expected to purchase and maintain a sketch book/journal for the
class.
602
Design and Illustration
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Recommended grade of C or better in Art Survey
or by permission of instructor
In this course students will learn basic commercial art, graphic design and illustration skills. The
class will help the student to continue to develop and improve the concepts of design and visual
communication. Students should have knowledgeable skills in drawing and painting before taking
this course. Students will study late 19th century through Modern (Contemporary) art. Each
student will be expected to purchase and maintain a sketch book/journal for the class.
603 Clay and Sculpture I
1.0 Credit
This course is designed for students with an interest in three-dimensional artwork. Students will
explore the techniques used to create three-dimensional forms in clay and other mediums.
These forms may be functional or non functional. Students will be encouraged to explore new
ways of thinking in creating three-dimensional forms and will study the history of threedimensional forms and techniques used to create them. Each student will be expected to
maintain a sketch book/journal for the class.
604 Jewelry and Metals I
1.0 Credit
This course is designed for students with an interest in the craft aspect of art. Construction of
original jewelry and metal pieces using basic hand metal skills will be presented. Construction
techniques explored include hand-wrought metal techniques using brass (nu-gold), nickel-silver
and copper. Students will be encouraged to explore new ways of thinking in creating metal forms
and will study the history and techniques used to create them. Each student will be expected to
purchase and maintain a sketch book/journal for the class.
610
Advanced Art
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Recommended grade of B or better in Fine Art
or by permission of instructor
This course is designed for the student who by extensive prior study, accomplishment,
commitment or artistic achievements warrants recommendation to the program by the instructor.
Class time will be devoted to course projects in drawing and painting techniques, use of materials
and approaches to organizing visual information. Studio projects will include the analysis of still
life, landscape and figurative subjects while using drawing and painting tools and media.
Additional emphasis will be placed on the understanding of the elements of art and their use to
express visual ideas. In addition to studio time, students can expect to spend time outside of
class working on independent projects. Lectures, group critiques and demonstrations will be
included. Students may want to purchase some of their own materials for the class according to
personal need.
612
Jewelry and Metals II
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Recommended grade of B in Jewelry and Metals I
This course is designed for students with an interest in the craft aspect of art who wish to
enhance and expand upon techniques and materials used in Jewelry and Metals I. Construction
of original jewelry and metal pieces using basic hand metal skills will be presented. Construction
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Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
techniques explored will include die forming, using matrix dies, hollow form construction,
enameling, stone setting and loop in loop chain making. Students will be using copper, brass,
nickel, fine and sterling silver in the construction of their pieces. Students will be encouraged to
further explore new ways of thinking in creating forms and research. In depth investigation of
subject matter will be expected. Each student will be expected to purchase and maintain a
sketch book/journal for the class. Students may wish to budget money to purchase additional
materials for class.
613
Clay and Sculpture II
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Recommended grade of B in Clay and Sculpture I
This course is designed for the student who has an interest in 3-Dimensional art and who wishes
to enhance and expand upon techniques and materials learned in Clay and Sculpture I. Students
will explore the techniques used to create three dimensional forms in clay and other mediums
such as plaster and paper Mache. Wheel throwing will be expanded upon- all forms created
could be functional or nonfunctional. Exploration using clay as a medium will be stressed as well
as learning about artists from different cultures/time periods and various types of sculpture.
Each student will be expected to purchase and maintain a sketch book/journal for the class.
605
Portfolio Preparation
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Instructor permission only
This course is designed for the student who by extensive prior study, accomplishment,
commitment or artistic achievement warrants recommendation to the program by the instructor.
This course will show students how to assemble a portfolio for art school/college admission.
Students will learn to visually and verbally develop and present their artwork. A variety of
portfolio styles will be discussed and samples will be available for examination. Students will build
their portfolio while at the same time producing art that is relevant to their individual abilities and
needs. This class is meant for the student that has possible interest in a college education in the
visual arts. Each student will be expected to purchase and maintain a sketchbook/journal for the
class.
Foreign Languages:
620 German I
1.0 Credit
German I is a full credit course in which students will acquire basic foundations of the language
and culture of German-speaking countries. The course will use a variety of activities, focusing on
the four skills, listening, speaking, reading and writing using the text, “Komm mit!” (Level One).
Course work will consist of, but not be limited to, cooperative learning activities, role-plays,
Internet activities, projects, oral conversations, homework, agendas, quizzes and tests. Each
student is expected to participate actively in all classroom activities and complete all projects.
621
German II
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: German I
Students who have successfully completed German I will continue to expand their knowledge of
German using the text, “Komm mit!” (Level One). Coursework will again consist of, but not be
limited to, cooperative learning activities, role-plays, Internet activities, projects, oral
conversations, homework, agendas, quizzes and tests. In German II, however, students will be
expected to recall and apply their knowledge of German I in order to both speak and understand
at a higher level. A stronger emphasis will also be placed on reading and writing skills.
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Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
622
German III
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: German II
Students who have successfully completed German II will continue to expand their knowledge of
German using the text, “Komm mit!” (Level Two). Coursework will again consist of, but not be
limited to, cooperative learning activities, role-plays, Internet activities, projects, oral
conversations, homework, agendas, quizzes and tests. In German III, students will be expected
to both speak and understand German at a level, where they can communicate their basic needs
orally and in written form. While continuing to focus on spoken language and listening skills, a
stronger emphasis will also be placed on grammar concepts.
623
German IV
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: German III
Students who have successfully completed German III will continue to expand their knowledge of
German using the text, “Komm mit!” (Level Two). Coursework will again consist of, but not be
limited to, cooperative learning activities, role-plays, Internet activities, projects, oral
conversations, homework, agendas, quizzes and tests. Students, at this level, will be expected to
communicate almost entirely in the target language. Knowledge and application of previous
vocabulary and grammar structures will intensify as students begin to operate solely in the
language. A deeper understanding of the language and culture will be acquired through
numerous simulation activities.
630 Spanish I
1.0 Credit
This course is designed to cover the first three chapters in the textbook, “Accion I,” by Galloway,
Joba and Labarca. Students will learn and practice the sounds of the Spanish language through
oral repetition. They will also learn vocabulary that deals with specific topics, as well as basic
grammatical concepts. Student must be active participants in all classroom activities in order to
acquire verbal skills in the target language. Listening, speaking, reading and writing skills will be
implemented with a stronger emphasis on the oral and listening aspects of the language. Cultural
practices of the Hispanic world will be explored through readings and discussions. A variety of
assessment tools will be implemented, including video projects compositions, skits and oral
conversations.
631
Spanish II
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Spanish I
This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the Spanish I course and
it covers chapters 4 and 5 in the textbook, “Accion I,” by Galloway, Joba and Labarca. Students
will be required to apply previously learned grammatical concepts in combination with old and
new vocabulary to express themselves in oral and written forms. Students will also learn how to
properly implement more complex grammatical concepts such as verbs in the past tense. Once
again, all four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing will be implemented. A
more in-depth look at cultural practices of the Hispanic world will also be explored. Video
projects, skits, compositions and conversations will be used as assessment tools along with more
traditional methods.
632
Spanish III
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Spanish II
This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the Spanish II course. The
course uses “Accion I” and “Accion II,” by Galloway, Joba, and Labarca, as its basic text.
Students will expand their vocabulary and ability to communicate by being subjected to classroom
directions given mostly in Spanish. They will also be required to speak in Spanish to address
basic classroom needs. Students will show a deeper understanding of Spanish grammatical
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Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
concepts by incorporating them correctly in oral and written forms. Video projects, skits,
compositions, and conversations will be used as assessment tools along with more traditional
methods.
633
Spanish IV
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Spanish III
This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the Spanish III course.
The course uses “Accion II,” by Galloway, Joba and Labarca, as its basic text. Students will
tackle complex grammatical concepts including the use of the Spanish subjunctive. They will be
required to improve their oral communication skills by conversing regularly with peers and
instructors in the target language. Video projects, skits, audio recording, compositions and
conversations will be used as assessment tools along with more traditional methods.
634
Spanish V
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Spanish IV
This course is designed for students that have successfully completed the Spanish IV course.
The course uses “Accion II,” by Galloway, Joba and Labarca, as its basic text along with many
teacher created materials. Spanish will be used whenever possible for all classroom interactions,
with the exception of grammatical explanations. Students will read poems of renounced Spanish
poets as well as write and recite their own. They will also produce a yearbook of their class in
Spanish. Video projects, skits, audio recording, compositions and conversations will be used as
assessment tools along with more traditional methods.
635
Spanish VI
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Spanish V
This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the Spanish V course. The
course uses “Accion II,” by Galloway, Joba and Labarca, as its basic text. Students will
concentrate on developing the ability to express thoughts in different tenses in written and oral
form. They will read and understand a variety of short stories and how they relate to the country’s
customs and history. They will be exposed to Miguel Cervantes’ Don Quixote and the importance
this work holds in the world of Spanish literature. The students will also be exposed to basic
geographical and historical facts about the country of Spain. Spanish will be used whenever
possible for all classroom interactions. Video projects, skits, compositions and conversations
may be used as additional assessment tools along with more traditional methods.
Music:
640 Concert Choir (Meets all year, every other day)
0.3 Credit
Concert Choir is designed to provide singers with a great variety of performance options and
styles; techniques for singing and life-long appreciation of music and performance. Concerts are
held several times a year and special engagements are programmed. Students study vocal
techniques, sight reading and choral style. Performance attendance is expected of all members.
641 Vocal Repertoire
1.0 Credit
This course is available to any singer with the approval of the instructor. The focus of the course
is on training the individual’s singing voice through frequent performance and evaluation by the
class and instructor. The course aims are to develop correct breathing, tone quality, resonance,
placement, diction, stage presence and interpretation through a wide variety of solo literature.
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Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
642 Music Theory and Skills
1.0 Credit
This weighted course is designed primarily, but not exclusively, for the student considering further
study in music. The student becomes more proficient in listening to, performing and writing music
through a study of melody, rhythm, harmony, form and style. Activities include dictation (writing
what one hears), ear training, sight-singing, melodic and harmonic analysis, harmonization and
original composition.
644 Musical Theater
1.0 Credit
Designed for students with an interest in Musical Theater, this course will deal with learning and
applying the fundamentals of acting and staging to scenes from various shows. The students will
also be introduced to the development of the American Musical Theater, set building, directing,
auditioning and voice projection. Students will view live and taped musicals, analyze them and
critique. Students will create their own mini-musical and perform it for the elementary students.
645
Applied Ensemble/Beginner Guitar
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Must be a beginner guitar player who has never
played before
Experience in reading music is helpful but not necessary. Students will need to provide their own
guitar. An acoustic guitar is preferred. Subjects covered will be holding the guitar, and tuning it;
chords and strumming patterns, melody and note reading; tablature; bar chords and bass lines.
Students will be given the opportunity to perform by themselves and in small ensembles. This
class is designed for the beginner.
646 Applied/Ensemble (Grade 10 through 12)
1.0 Credit
This course will allow the instrumentalist or vocalist with strong interest in performance to
participate in solo and ensemble experiences. Students will develop individual and group
performance techniques and musicianship. Students will be expected to perform for each other
and the community. Students will critically analyze and write reviews of performances.
647
Applied/Ensemble II (Grade 11 through 12)
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Applied Ensemble I, music teacher approval
based upon student interest and ability level
Students will rehearse primary or secondary instruments daily, with frequent recital/concert
opportunities. These students will be required to obtain and complete out-of-class performances
as soloists or in ensembles. Instructors will share various higher-level foci for performers. (A
specific purpose must be defined by student to warrant this extended study.)
650
Concert Band (Meets all year, every other day)
0.3 Credit
Membership is by audition when the student first enrolls in the high school program. Continued
membership will be determined by successful participation. The band participates in several
concerts per year, and attendance at all performances is a requirement for all members.
Students will explore and master both individual and ensemble performance skills through
performance of music of various time periods, composers and styles.
Orchestra (Meets all year, two times per week)
0.3 Credit
Orchestra is designed to provide capable string players the opportunity to rehearse and perform a
variety of musical styles including classical, folk and contemporary literature. The high school
orchestral experience will be unique in that winds and percussion are added to make a full
orchestra. Concerts are held several times a year with required attendance for both rehearsals
and performances. Students explore and master individual and ensemble performance skills.
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Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
Health and Physical Education:
710 Health/Physical Education (Grade 9)
0.5 Credit
Students in this required co-ed course will participate in both health and physical education in an
every-other-day rotation. In the physical education portion of class, students will have units in
tennis and weight training. In the health portion of class, students will explore how health issues
affect their bodies and their minds through units in decision-making skills, physical fitness
concepts, self-esteem, weight management/eating disorders, stress and conflict resolution. They
will also explore how topics covered in both health and physical education is important to their
overall wellness.
715
Health/Physical Education (Grade 10)
1.0 Credit
Students in this required co-ed course will participate in both health and physical education. They
will engage in experiential challenge activities and the elements on the L-S low challenge course.
Units in tobacco, alcohol, sexuality, social relationships, communicable diseases
(AIDS/HIV/STDs), drug use and CPR/basic first aid will be covered during the health portion of
the course. In the physical education portion, units in weight training, volleyball and aerobic
fitness will be taught.
730 Fitness and Recreational Activities (Grades 11 through 12)
1.0 Credit
This is a core course that will fulfill the required physical education credit for grades 11 or 12.
Students electing this co-ed course will be exploring fitness and recreational activities through
units in walking/jogging, resistance training, aerobics/dance, racquetball, beginning golf and
bowling. The course emphasis will be on understanding how to safely participate in the activities
at a recreational level of play. This course can be taken in either the junior or senior year,
but may NOT be taken after completing 731 or 732. This course may not be taken at the
same time as 731 or 732.
731 Lifetime Team & Individual Sports (Grades 11 through 12)
1.0 Credit
This is a core course that will fulfill the required physical education credit for grades 11 or 12.
Students electing this co-ed course will be exploring sport activities through units in tennis,
advanced golf, racquetball, slow-pitch softball, volleyball, touch football and basketball. The
course emphasis will be on safe play, skill development and sport strategies at an advanced level
of play. A student who completes this course may then take another course or a P.E.
elective, but may NOT then take course 730. This course may not be taken at the same
time as 730.
732 Personal Fitness & Weight Training (Grades 11 through 12)
1.0 Credit
This is a core course that will fulfill the required physical education credit for grades 11 and 12.
Students electing this co-ed course will be exploring personal fitness concepts and weight training
activities through the five components of physical fitness: muscle strength and endurance,
aerobic fitness, flexibility and body composition. Students will be utilizing the fitness center and
other health related activities to develop and implement their own personal fitness program. The
course emphasis will be on improving the individual’s physical fitness through varied types of
resistance exercises and training principles. A student who completes this course may then
take another course or a P.E. elective, but may NOT then take course 730. This course
may not be taken at the same time as 730.
Page 46 of 47
Course Selection Guide 2007-2008
740
Athletic Training (Grades 10 through 12)
1.0 Credit
(FALL SEMESTER ONLY)
In this elective course, students will be introduced to athletic training through units on Initial Care
and Evaluation of athletic injuries, Injuries and Healing, Athletic Trauma and Athletic Illness.
Students will also be required to learn basic musculoskeletal anatomy through the “Anatomy Guy”
project, anatomical terminology and principles of taping and wrapping. Practical experience in
stabilizing, wrapping and taping techniques for the most common athletic injuries will also be
learned
in
the
following
areas:
foot/ankle/lower
leg;
knee/thigh/hip;
and
shoulder/elbow/wrist/hand. Spending five hours assisting the L-S trainer in the training room is
also a requirement of the course. Course Requirements – Athletic Training Room
Experience (five hours); Anatomy Guy project.
741
Sports Officiating (Grades 11 through 12)
1.0 Credit
(ODD NUMBERED YEARS ONLY)
In this elective course, students will participate in sports activities, but emphasis will be on
learning the rules for the sports, officiating techniques and the responsibilities of officials. Time
will be spent in the classroom as well as the playing field, with the goal of becoming a qualified
official in either youth or scholastic sports. Sports covered will include football, field hockey,
soccer, volleyball, basketball, softball, lacrosse and baseball. Students will have the opportunity
to become certified as a P.I.A.A. official in a sport of their choice.
750 Adaptive Physical Education
Students who are physically unable to participate fully in regularly scheduled physical education
classes will be referred by a physician and/or the physical education staff to receive individualized
instruction through an adapted program.
GUIDELINES:
Each grade level has different requirements. Hence, important guidelines for selecting
appropriate Health and/or Physical Education courses are listed below:
Grade 9
HPE 710
Grade 10
HPE 715
Grade 11 and 12
Required 730, 731 or 732 in junior or senior year.
Elective 740
Elective 740 or 741 in either junior or senior year,
but 730, 731 or 732 must be taken.
Reminder: 730 cannot be taken after 731 or 732
are completed, but either 731 or 732 can follow
730.
Note: Juniors considering attending the career and technology center or college in their senior year are
required to complete the HPE requirements in their junior year.
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