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Debriefing Your Year

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Debriefing Your Year
“Get your students to reflect on their year
and their content with a neat activity that
uses smart phones, QR codes, and
movement!”
~ @Brian_ThomasTCI
© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute www.teachtci.com [email protected]
Debriefing Your Year Activity ‐ Instructions
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Prior to class, create and print out a placard for each major topic you covered in class during the year.
Make sure that each placard contains a visual/piece of info to go with it. (see example for High School US History attached).
Divide the class into pairs and give each pair one placard (topic).
Explain to students that in this activity they will be challenged to find one piece of information to go along with their topic that they felt helped them understand the topic better (on the web), they will copy/paste the URL to the resource into a QR code generator, and then print out a small copy of it and attach it to their placard.
Encourage students to use their online text, videos on YouTube or TeacherTube, images, etc.
Have students paste or tape their QR code onto their placard and place around the room.
Have pairs visit three‐four other placards different from theirs and follow the QR code via a reader on their smart phone or iPod touch.
8.
Have pairs stop at the last placard and be responsible for sharing up to 30 seconds to their classmates what the topic is and why it was important.
For this activity you will need the following:
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A placard (preferably on cardstock) for each topic you studied this year. Think major units. Create enough placards so that each pair can have one. It’s okay if you need to print a second set of placards.
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You will need to ask your students to bring in their smartphones (if they have cameras) or iPod Touch devices.
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Have the students download one of the following apps onto their device (each are free):
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Apple devices – Bakodo
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Android – Barcode Scanner
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Blackberry – Scanlife
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To generate a QR code, students will need to use this site: http://qrcode.kaywa.com/
© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute www.teachtci.com [email protected]
Debriefing Your Year Activity
Student Directions – Part 1
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Cut out this box and your QR code that you print out. Glue or tape your QR code inside the box and then tape your code next to your placard.
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With your partner, study the image and text on your placard. This was a topic we studied this year.
Using the web, find one resource – it could be a short video, an image, text, or even audio piece that helps you to remember and understand why this topic was important.
Share this resource with me to get my approval.
Once approved, copy the URL link into the computer clipboard.
Using this website, http://qrcode.kaywa.com/ paste the URL and click generate code.
Right click on the QR code and print it out.
Cut the QR code out and tape inside the box I have provided.
Cut out the box and attach to your placard.
You will have ____ minutes to complete these tasks.
© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute www.teachtci.com [email protected]
Debriefing Your Year Activity
Student Directions – Part 2
1.
With your partner, you must visit three to four other placards different from your own.
2.
Take your Smartphone or iPod touch with you.
3.
Study the placard image and accompanying text.
4.
Using the QR code app on your device (Bakodo on Apple, Scanlife on Blackberry, or Barcode Scanner on Android): scan the QR code and answer the following question – “Why did the pair who generated this code feel that the scanned resource helps them understand this topic?”
5.
Be prepared to share that answer with the whole class if asked.
6.
You will visit three to four placards depending on time.
© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute www.teachtci.com [email protected]
P l a c a r d
2 A
Getting Oriented
By 1673, when this map was drawn, European nations had established colonies in North America. They wanted colonies to increase
their wealth and power. The people who crossed the Atlantic
Ocean to settle the English colonies came for a wide range of
reasons—religious freedom, escape from debt, the opportunity to
own land, the chance to start a new life. Some, however, did not
come by choice.
1607
Colonial settlement begins in Jamestown, Virginia
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2 B
A Nation and Its Ideals Emerge
After defeating the French in North America in 1763, the British started
tightening control over their colonies. The colonists believed these actions
violated their rights. For example, Great Britain raised taxes, limited trade,
and forced colonists to house British soldiers in their homes. In 1770, a
crowd began taunting some of these soldiers with snowballs. The soldiers
fired on the mob and killed five colonists. Known as the Boston Massacre,
this event helped fuel the resistance to British rule that led to the American
Revolution.
1770
The Boston Massacre
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The Granger Collection, New York
The Growth of and Challenges to American Ideals
Less than a century after winning independence from Great Britain, the United
States almost split in two. The Civil War divided the nation because of questions
about states’ rights and equality. In the battle shown here, black Union soldiers
of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment attack Confederate troops at Fort Wagner,
South Carolina, in 1863.
Four months after this battle, President Abraham Lincoln dedicated the military
cemetery at Gettysburg with a renewed commitment to American ideals:
Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new
nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created
equal . . . [W]e here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that
this nation shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by
the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.
—Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address, 1863
1861–1865
The Civil War
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P l a c a r d
2 D
Growing Pains and Gains
After the Civil War, tens of thousands of people streamed westward to settle the vast American heartland. Many believed it was
America’s “manifest destiny” to occupy North America from the
Atlantic to the Pacific. John Gast painted American Progress in
1872, capturing that spirit. Trains, wagons, farmers, miners, the
telegraph—all moved west in the late 19th century. What was
progress to these pioneers, however, meant the end of the
Indian way of life.
1872
John Gast paints American Progress
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2 E
The Progressive Era
In the late 19th century, American cities rapidly progressed with the growth of
industry. Needing more and more workers, factories hired immigrants, and
even children, at low wages. Child labor was one of the problems caused by
industrialization. Many people were outraged by these problems and called for
reform. This photograph shows two girls at work in a textile mill early in the
20th century. Lewis Hine, the social reformer who took this photograph, urged
American industry to change:
Perhaps you are weary of child labor pictures. Well, so are the rest of us, but
we propose to make you and the whole country so sick and tired of the whole
business, that when the time for action comes, child labor pictures will be records
of the past.
—Lewis Hine, 1911
1890–1920
The Progressive Era
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Building an Empire
In this cartoon, Uncle Sam is being fitted for a new suit of clothing. He has
grown very large and is getting larger—a reference to the new territories the
United States was acquiring in the late 19th century. Some Americans believed
the United States should acquire the new territories. Others disagreed. The
tailor is President William McKinley, who generally supported expansion abroad.
The figures on the left want Uncle Sam to go on diet medicine. They think
Uncle Sam is too large already. They are opposed to U.S. expansion.
1867: Alaska acquired
1898: Hawaii annexed; Philippines,
Guam, Puerto Rico acquired
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2 G
World War I
In 1914, Germany invaded neutral Belgium and attacked France. The
Allied powers of Europe fought back in what would become World
War I. The United States entered the war in 1917 to support its allies.
This recruiting poster echoes President Woodrow Wilson’s stirring
appeal to American ideals when he explained why the United States
chose to fight:
The world must be made safe for democracy. Its peace must be planted
upon the tested foundations of political liberty. We have no selfish ends
to serve . . . We are but one of the champions of the rights of mankind.
—Woodrow Wilson, Declaration of War Address to Congress, 1917
1917–1918
U.S. troops fight in World War I
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P l a c a r d
2 H
The Twenties
The 1920s are often referred to as the Roaring Twenties
because of the economic growth, social changes, and
cultural events that took place during this decade. New
styles of literature, music, dance, and clothing swept the
country. The 1920s also witnessed a flowering of black
culture called the Harlem Renaissance. Bessie Smith,
shown here in the stylish dress of 1923, was the most
famous blues singer of the decade. She was also the
highest paid black entertainer of her time.
1923
Bessie Smith gains national fame singing the blues
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2 I
The Great Depression and the New Deal
This woman and her children were impoverished by the
Great Depression, an economic collapse in the 1930s.
The photograph, called “Migrant Mother,” was taken by
Dorothea Lange. Sadly, the woman pictured here was not
alone. Millions of Americans suffered through years of
poverty during the 1930s.
1936
Dorothea Lange photographs “Migrant Mother”
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World War II
The United States entered World War II in 1941 to help defeat the
dictatorships of Germany, Italy, and Japan. The entire nation came
together to fight the war. Any smaller effort might have meant the
end of the American way of life. As part of this effort, American
industry was converted to manufacture weapons, supplies, ships,
tanks, and aircraft.
1941–1945
U.S. troops fight in World War II
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P l a c a r d
2 K
The Early Cold War
This photograph shows an American transport plane carrying food and supplies
to the war-torn city of Berlin, Germany, in 1948. After World War II, the communist armies of the Soviet Union attempted to take control of the city through a
blockade. American planes supplied Berlin’s citizens with supplies for more than
a year and broke the blockade. The Berlin Airlift was one of the first incidents in
the decades-long Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union.
President Harry Truman stated the reasons why the United States should fight
the Cold War:
I believe that it must be the policy of the United States to support free peoples
who are resisting attempted subjugation [takeover] by armed minorities or by
outside pressures.
I believe that we must assist free peoples to work out their own destinies in their
own way.
—Harry Truman, March 12, 1947
1948–1949
The Berlin Airlift
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The Fifties
The growth of suburbs like this one symbolized the economic boom that
the United States experienced after World War II. During the war, Americans
had saved more than $100 billion. In the 1950s, they spent that money on
new homes, cars, and televisions. The boom created jobs and opportunities
for millions.
1950s
Economic Boom
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The Civil Rights Movement
This photograph was taken in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1963, at the
height of the African American civil rights movement for equal rights.
Images like this one alerted the nation to racial injustice in the United
States. Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. was jailed in
Birmingham for nonviolent protest. Below is an excerpt from a letter he
wrote while in jail.
Oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever. The yearning for
freedom eventually manifests itself, and that is what has happened to the
American Negro. Something within has reminded him of his birthright of
freedom, and something without has reminded him that it can be gained.
—Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from a Birmingham Jail, 1963
1963
Birmingham demonstrations
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The Sixties
During the 1960s, some American youth had a very free-spirited
attitude. These young people expressed their disappointment in the
traditional ways of life through their clothing, music, food, and even
transportation, such as the painted bus shown here.
1969
Woodstock music festival held
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P l a c a r d
2 O
The Vietnam War
Etched on the polished black granite of the Vietnam War Memorial in
Washington, D.C., are the names of the more than 58,000 Americans who
died or went missing during the war. The Vietnam War divided the nation more
than any war since the Civil War. Some Americans believed the United States
had to block the spread of communism in South Vietnam. Others believed the
United States was propping up an undemocratic government to protect its own
power and reputation. Lyndon Johnson, one of six presidents to deal with
armed conflict in Vietnam, explained why he was committed to the war:
We fight because we must fight if we are to live in a world where every country
can shape its own destiny. And only in such a world will our own freedom be
finally secure.
—Lyndon Johnson, Address at Johns Hopkins University, 1965
1973
U.S. signs peace treaty
1965
First U.S. combat troops land at Da Nang
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The Seventies
The Fourth of July had special meaning in 1976. Not only was it the bicentennial (200th anniversary) of the signing of the Declaration of Independence,
but it was also a time to celebrate the wisdom of the Founding Fathers in
building a democratic government that could withstand the massive challenges the nation endured in the 1970s—political scandal, military defeat,
and an energy crisis. In this photograph, a float of patriotic symbols takes
part in the Bicentennial Parade in Washington, D.C.
In his Bicentennial Address at Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, President
Gerald Ford explained the importance of that day:
Each generation of Americans . . . must strive to achieve these aspirations
anew. Liberty is a living flame to be fed, not dead ashes to be revered . . .
It is fitting that we ask ourselves hard questions even on a glorious day like
today. Are the institutions under which we live working the way they should?
Are the foundations laid in 1776 and 1789 still strong enough and sound enough
to resist the tremors of our times? Are our God-given rights secure, our hardwon liberties protected?
—Gerald Ford, Bicentennial Address, July 4, 1976
1776
Declaration of Independence
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Bicentennial
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2 Q
The Reagan Revolution
Ronald Reagan became president in 1981 and set out to make
government smaller by cutting taxes and encouraging individual
responsibility. A former actor, President Reagan was an inspiring
speaker.
History is a ribbon, always unfurling . . . Now we hear . . . the
echoes of our past: a general falls to his knees in the hard snow of
Valley Forge; a lonely president paces the darkened halls, and ponders his struggle to preserve the Union; the men of the Alamo call
out encouragement to each other; a settler pushes west and sings
a song, and the song echoes out forever and fills the unknowing air.
It is the American sound. It is hopeful, big-hearted, idealistic,
daring, decent, and fair. That’s our heritage; that is our song.
—Ronald Reagan, Second Inaugural Address, 1985
1981–1989
Ronald Reagan’s presidency
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Framing the Present
This view of the New York City skyline includes the Statue of
Liberty and two bright pillars of light representing the World Trade
Center buildings, which terrorists destroyed in 2001. On the day
of the attack, President George W. Bush spoke to the nation:
Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our biggest
buildings, but they cannot touch the foundation of America.
America was targeted for attack because we’re the brightest
beacon for freedom and opportunity in the world. And no one
will keep that light from shining.
—George W. Bush, Address to the Nation, September 11, 2001
2001
Terrorist attacks destroy the World Trade Center
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