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2013 FACT BOOK R11.indd - Macys, Inc.

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CONNECTING
WITH EVERY CUSTOMER
M ACY ’S , I N C . FAC T B O O K 2 0 1 3
FISCAL YEARS 2013 AND 2014
CALENDAR OF PUBLIC DISCLOSURES
NOTE: ALL DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
Quarterly Results
Contacts:
Fiscal 2013
MEDIA: Jim Sluzewski................................................ 1-513-579-7764
THREE MONTHS
ENDED
2013 EARNINGS
RELEASE DATES
10Q/10K
SEC FILING
5/4/13
5/15/13
6/10/13
INVESTOR: Matt Stautberg ....................................... 1-513-579-7028
Investor Relations e-mail..................................[email protected]
8/3/13
8/14/13
9/9/13
11/2/13
11/13/13
12/9/13
2/1/14
2/25/14
4/2/14
THREE MONTHS
ENDED
2014 EARNINGS
RELEASE DATES
10Q/10K
SEC FILING
Toll-Free Information Request Line .......................... 1-800-261-5385
5/3/14
5/14/14
6/9/14
Macy’s, Inc. Corporate Website ...................................macysinc.com
Fiscal 2014
8/2/14
8/13/14
9/8/14
11/1/14
11/12/14
12/8/14
1/31/15
2/24/15
4/1/15
2 • MACY’S, INC.
TRANSFER AGENT: Computershare
Inside the United States and Canada ...................... 1-866-337-3311
Outside the United States and Canada................... 1-201-680-6578
For the Hearing Impaired ...............................1-800-231-5469 (TDD)
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CALENDAR OF PUBLIC DISCLOSURES ................................... 2
MACY’S, INC. AT-A-GLANCE ..................................................... 4
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS .......................................................... 4
CORPORATE VISION, PHILOSOPHY AND
FINANCIAL OBJECTIVES ........................................................... 5
HIGHLIGHTS OF PROGRESS IN 2012 ....................................... 6
MACY’S ........................................................................................ 8
BLOOMINGDALE’S................................................................... 16
MACY’S, INC.: A DIVERSE AND
INCLUSIVE ORGANIZATION.................................................... 18
GIVING BACK TO OUR COMMUNITIES................................. 19
SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY ..................................................... 22
SUSTAINABILITY .............................................................. 24
FINANCIAL OVERVIEW .................................................. 27
STORE LISTINGS ..................................................... 34 – 55
MACY’S ................................................................. 34
BLOOMINGDALE’S ............................................ 54
COMPANY HISTORY ............................................... 56
MACY’S, INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS/
CORPORATE MANAGEMENT .................................. 62
SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION ........................ 65
STORES AND EMPLOYEES BY STATE..... 66
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 3
MACY’S, INC. AT-A-GLANCE
MACY’S, INC. IS ONE OF THE NATION’S PREMIER OMNICHANNEL RETAILERS, WITH
FISCAL 2012 SALES OF $27.7 BILLION. THE COMPANY OPERATES THE MACY’S AND
BLOOMINGDALE’S BRANDS WITH ABOUT 840 STORES IN 45 STATES, THE DISTRICT
OF COLUMBIA, GUAM AND PUERTO RICO UNDER THE NAMES OF MACY’S AND
BLOOMINGDALE’S; THE MACYS.COM AND BLOOMINGDALES.COM WEBSITES, AND
12 BLOOMINGDALE’S OUTLET STORES. BLOOMINGDALE’S IN DUBAI IS OPERATED
BY AL TAYER GROUP LLC UNDER A LICENSE AGREEMENT. MACY’S, INC.’S DIVERSE
WORKFORCE INCLUDES APPROXIMATELY 175,700 EMPLOYEES. PRIOR TO JUNE 1,
2007, MACY’S, INC. WAS KNOWN AS FEDERATED DEPARTMENT STORES, INC. THE
COMPANY’S SHARES ARE TRADED UNDER THE SYMBOL “M” ON THE NEW YORK
STOCK EXCHANGE.
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
2012
2011
Net Sales (in billions)..........................................................................................................
Change in comparable sales (Note 1) ...................................................................................
$ 27.686
3.7%
$ 26.405
5.3%
Operating Income (in billions) ...........................................................................................
% to sales . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................................................
$
2.661
9.6%
$
2.411
9.1%
Operating Income, Excluding Certain Items (in billions) (Note 2) ..........................................
% to sales . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................................................
$
2.666
9.6%
$
2.386
9.0%
Diluted Earnings Per Share
Net income . . . . . ................................................................................................................
Net income, excluding certain items (Note 2) ........................................................................
$
$
3.24
3.46
$
$
2.92
2.88
Net Income (in billions) ......................................................................................................
$
1,335
$ 1,256
Adjusted EBITDA (in billions) (Note 2) ....................................................................................
% to sales . . . . . . . . . ...............................................................................................................
$
3,715
13.4%
$ 3,471
13.1%
21.2%
19.7%
ROIC (Note 2). . . . . . . . . . ................................................................................................................
Notes:
(1)
Represents the year-to-year percentage change in net sales from Bloomingdale’s and Macy’s stores in operation throughout the year presented
and the immediately preceding year and all Internet sales, adjusting for the 53rd week in 2012.
(2)
Represents a non-GAAP measure of operating results. Supplemental Operating Results on pages 29 and 30 contain a reconciliation to the most
comparable GAAP measure.
The foregoing financial information, including non-GAAP measures that exclude certain items, should be read in conjunction with the audited
financial statements, including the related notes and other financial information contained in the company’s most recent Securities and Exchange
Commission filings.
4 • MACY’S, INC.
CORPORATE VISION, PHILOSOPHY
AND FINANCIAL OBJECTIVES
CORPORATE VISION
Macy’s, Inc. is a premier national omnichannel retailer
with iconic brands that each serve customers through
outstanding stores and dynamic online sites. Both Macy’s
and Bloomingdale’s are known worldwide, and each has
its own unique identity and customer focus.
CORPORATE PHILOSOPHY
Macy’s, Inc. clearly recognizes that the customer is paramount
and that all actions and strategies must be directed toward
providing a localized merchandise offering and shopping
experience to targeted consumers through dynamic
department stores and online sites.
Aggressive implementation of the company’s customercentric strategies by a talented, experienced organization will
provide Macy’s, Inc.’s department stores with an important
competitive edge.
Macy’s, Inc. is committed to open and honest
communications with employees, shareholders, vendors,
customers, financial analysts and the news media. The
company seeks to be proactive in sharing information and
in keeping these key stakeholder groups up-to-date on
important and material developments.
At Macy’s, Inc., our greatest strength lies in the skill,
judgment and talent of our people. Every day a production
of enormous magnitude takes place on our selling floors and
behind the scenes, where our people bring the company’s
strategic goals to life. Our priority of attracting, retaining and
growing the most talented people in the retail industry has
been and will continue to be our greatest advantage.
CORPORATE FINANCIAL OBJECTIVES
The objectives of Macy’s, Inc. are:
• To grow sales and earnings;
• To continue to increase the company’s profitability
levels (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation
and amortization) as a percent to sales;
• To improve return on invested capital;
• To maximize total shareholder return.
OUR GREATEST STRENGTH
LIES IN THE SKILL, JUDGMENT
AND TALENT OF OUR PEOPLE.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 5
HIGHLIGHTS OF PROGRESS IN 2012
OUR CULTURE OF GROWTH CONTINUES TO BUILD
Macy’s, Inc. is a company with momentum. We have gained market share from our competitors over the past several years, and
we remain fully dedicated to continuous improvement in 2013 and the years ahead. Our company is alive with activity, and we
are energized by the opportunity we see. The more we accomplish, the more we realize that there is so much more we can do.
The shopping patterns of our customers are rapidly changing. We operate in an increasingly omnichannel world where consumers
gravitate seamlessly between stores, computers and mobile devices. They shop whenever, wherever and however they prefer.
We were fortunate to have seen this shift coming five or more years ago, and we have invested strategically to prepare
our company for growth and success in an omnichannel world. Today, we consider ourselves to be America’s
Omnichannel Store and a company that places the customer at the center of all decisions.
Since the restructuring of our company in 2009, we have made fundamental changes in our business
to instill a culture of growth. Macy’s, Inc. has become a much stronger business over this period, and
we continue to reap the rewards.
Take a look at our results in 2012, which are presented and discussed in greater detail in the Company’s
2012 Form 10-K (including important information on pages 16 – 18 of the 2012 Form 10-K regarding
our non-GAAP financial measures):
• Topline sales rose by more than $1 billion for the third consecutive year. In fact, our total sales
in 2012, at $27.7 billion, were about $4.2 billion higher than in 2009.
• Comparable sales rose by 3.7 percent in 2012, on top of increases of 5.3 percent and
4.6 percent in 2011 and 2010, respectively. We ended 2012 with 12 consecutive quarters
of comparable sales growth of at least 3 percent.
• Adjusted EBITDA as a percent to sales grew to
13.4 percent in 2012, significant progress toward
our goal of 14 percent. (See Supplemental
Operating Results on pages 29 and 30 for a
reconciliation of this non-GAAP measure to the
most comparable GAAP measure.)
• Return On Invested Capital (ROIC), a key
measure of operating productivity, reached
21.2 percent in 2012, continuing an improvement
trend over the past four years. (See Supplemental
Operating Results on pages 29 and 30 for a
reconciliation of this non-GAAP measure to the
most comparable GAAP measure.)
• Diluted earnings per share (EPS) rose to $3.24 per
share in 2012. Excluding certain items, diluted
EPS grew to $3.46 in 2012. (See Supplemental
Operating Results on pages 29 and 30 for a
reconciliation of this non-GAAP measure
to the most comparable GAAP measure.)
• Improved cash flow has allowed us to enhance
shareholder value through repurchasing
shares and increasing the dividend, which was
doubled in 2012.
6 • MACY’S, INC.
WE HAVE INVESTED
STRATEGICALLY TO
PREPARE OUR COMPANY
FOR GROWTH AND
SUCCESS IN AN
OMNICHANNEL WORLD.
ENHANCING SHAREHOLDER RETURNS
The company has continued to enhance shareholder value.
Total Shareholder Return – a combination of stock price
appreciation and dividend – was 158.7 percent over the
past three years and placed in the top tier of leading
national retailers.
During fiscal 2012, the price of Macy’s, Inc. common stock
rose by more than 16.8 percent, and the share price has
grown nearly five-fold since the beginning of fiscal 2009.
The board of directors doubled the cash dividend on
Macy’s, Inc. common stock to an annualized 80 cents
per share, beginning with the quarterly payment on
April 2, 2012.
In fiscal 2012, the company repurchased approximately
35.6 million shares of its common stock for $1.350 billion as
part of an ongoing program using excess cash. Going into
fiscal 2013, the company had remaining authorization to
repurchase approximately $1.502 billion of common stock,
including a $1.5 billion increase in authorization approved
by the board of directors in December 2012.
STRATEGIC INVESTMENTS IN
OMNICHANNEL CAPABILITY
Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s have moved beyond the
meaning of “department store” in the traditional sense of
the word. Today, our brands are quickly earning the right
to be called “omnichannel stores.”
Today’s best customers are those who shop our stores ...
and online from home ... and from their tablet or mobile
device. Omnichannel means our stores, websites and
mobile devices are all working
in unison – and seamlessly
behind the scenes – to the
benefit of the customer.
We are driving store customers
online and online customers into
the stores. We are using mobile
to feed both stores and online. We at Macy’s have the best
of all worlds.
We made a big leap in 2012 when we equipped 292 Macy’s
stores to fulfill orders placed online or at other stores that
may have been sold out of a particular item. This was up from
just 23 fulfillment stores in 2011. We will be adding another
approximately 208 stores with fulfillment capability in 2013,
which will bring us to a total of 500 by the end of the year.
Meanwhile, Macy’s dedicated its largest online fulfillment
center – with a footprint of more than 1.3 million square
feet – in Martinsburg, WV, in July 2012. When it is fully
operational, the Martinsburg facility will employ a year-round
workforce of about 1,200 associates, with the addition of as
many as 700 temporary seasonal positions during the holiday
season. And in early 2013, the company announced it will
expand its Goodyear, AZ, fulfillment center, built in 2008 with
about 600,000 square feet, by an additional 360,000 square
feet to come on line in spring 2014.
By making our entire assortment available to every
customer – whether it is located in a dedicated fulfillment
center or one of the 500 Macy’s fulfillment-equipped stores,
we can drive incremental sales, increase inventory turns and
improve gross margins.
We will continue to test and roll out new technology of all
sorts so that we can continue to connect with customers
as their shopping habits and preferences change. You will
see more tablets used in selling in the stores. You will see
some very interesting new uses of mobile. You will see us
testing and learning as we find ways to get merchandise to
customers faster and easier when they want an item shipped.
We are part of an exciting new world. As
America’s Omnichannel Store, you can
expect that we will be an innovator on
multiple fronts. This is what the customer
expects from us, and it is what we will
deliver.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 7
MACY’S, ESTABLISHED IN 1858, IS AMERICA’S OMNICHANNEL STORE – AN ICONIC
RETAILING BRAND WITH ABOUT 800 STORES OPERATING COAST-TO-COAST
AND ONLINE AT MACYS.COM. MACY’S OFFERS POWERFUL ASSORTMENTS AND
THE BEST BRANDS, LOCALIZED TO EACH AND EVERY CUSTOMER BY UNIQUELY
TAILORING OUR PRODUCT SELECTIONS FOR INDIVIDUAL STORES WITH OBVIOUS
VALUE, ENGAGING SERVICE AND UNFORGETTABLE MOMENTS.
We see a growing number of our customers becoming omnichannel customers. They may research on their mobile device before
visiting one of our stores to touch the fabric on a jacket or converse with a beauty advisor in our cosmetics department. They
may make the purchase in the store or buy it online while at home or in the office. Our commitment is to meet or exceed the
expectations of every customer no matter when, where or how they prefer to shop with us.
Clearly, Macy’s is distinctly different from other major retailers. Macy’s embraces customers and strives to provide an experience
that transcends ordinary shopping. Our DNA includes special events that are magical – the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade,
Fourth of July Fireworks, flower shows, fashion extravaganzas, celebrity appearances, cooking demonstrations and holiday
traditions ranging from the arrival of Santa Claus to tree lightings and animated window displays. Beyond fantastic events, Macy’s
is delivering magical moments every day. We surprise and delight customers with unique and interesting fashion merchandise –
including exclusive brands that our customers won’t find elsewhere. We engage customers in stores, online and via
mobile devices by offering special experiences, as well as advice and options that bring fashion ideas to life.
Our looks set the tone in style magazines, videos, TV shows, movies, blogs and websites.
Our associates take the extra step to help a customer in need. Every year, we receive tens of thousands of
messages complimenting our people and saluting the shopping experience at Macy’s. It’s all part of the
excitement that we’ve been creating for 154 years.
In fiscal 2012, Macy’s opened two new stores and closed seven stores. Two Macy’s stores were opened
in Salt Lake City, UT, and Greendale, WI. Macy’s stores were closed in Pasadena, CA; Belmont, MA;
Honolulu, HI; St. Paul, MN; and Houston, TX. The company closed a Macy’s furniture clearance
center in Houston, TX, and a Macy’s men’s and home store in Santa Ana, CA, was closed and
consolidated into the main store in the same shopping center.
In March 2013, Macy’s opened a new store in Victorville, CA, as well as a new Macy’s Men’s
Store in Las Vegas, NV. In fall 2013, Macy’s is planning to open a new store in Gurnee, IL, as
well as a replacement store in Bay Shore, NY. Planned new Macy’s stores for 2014 include
locations in The Bronx, NY; Sarasota, FL; and Las Vegas, NV.
8 • MACY’S, INC.
FURTHER DEVELOPING OUR
M.O.M. STRATEGIES
Underpinning Macy’s outstanding results is a threepronged business strategy known by the acronym
of M.O.M. – My Macy’s, Omnichannel and MAGIC
Selling. We have benefited from unwavering
commitment to these strategies and to executing them
with creativity and passion. We are continually testing
and learning – using limited-scope pilots to see what
resonates with the customer, then aggressively rolling
out those elements and tactics that are successful.
WE WILL CONTINUE TO DRILL DOWN TO
UNDERSTAND THE CUSTOMER BETTER IN
EACH LOCATION.
My Macy’s is our formula for localization – in
merchandising, in marketing and in the shopping
experience. Even after our three consecutive years of
phenomenal success in bringing localization to life,
no other retailer has anything like My Macy’s. It is our
sustainable competitive advantage. No one has copied
it. No one is likely to copy it because of the investment
required in infrastructure, systems and talent.
But the truth is that we have not yet come close to making all of our stores as
truly local as they can be. Having improved our implementation processes for
localization in 2012, going forward we will continue to drill down to understand
the customer better in each location. Our goal is to drive incremental business
based on a well-tailored local shopping experience.
We are identifying and sharing the best examples of what’s working in one
place – for example, granularly honing the mix of sizes, colors and brands in
a store with a unique customer marketplace – so we can tailor a version of
that best practice in other stores with a different mix of customers. We are
cultivating a keener sense of entrepreneurism in each store. This applies to
the merchandise we sell, how we present and promote it, and how we engage
the community around us.
And we are intensifying discussions with some vendors about expanding
their products into doors where they were not previously carried. If enough
customers want a particular item in a particular Macy’s location, we will be
relentless in making that happen. Our Stores, Merchant and Planning teams
are committed to working very closely together with the goal of “putting the
customer at the center of all decisions.”
With Omnichannel (see more detailed description on page 7), customers can
browse online, then come to Macy’s to lay on the mattress or try on the shoes
before buying them in the store. These are customers who visit a store on their
lunch hour, then make the purchase later at home or from their office, after
they’ve thought about it for a while.
They find that the macys.com website is as exciting, engaging, efficient and
technologically effective as any in retailing. Omnichannel means our stores,
website and mobile devices are all working in unison – and seamlessly behind
the scenes – to the benefit of the customer. We are driving store customers
online and online customers into the stores. We are using mobile to feed both
stores and online.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 9
MAGIC Selling will continue to be the basis for how we
engage customers in Macy’s stores and how we coach our
associates for success. MAGIC is an acronym we use to drive
home to our associates the process to Meet and make a
connection ... Ask questions and listen ... Give options, give
advice ... Inspire to buy ... and Celebrate the purchase.
Bringing Magic to our customers is about treating people
right, taking the extra step with each customer, and bringing
a new measure of joy to shopping.
All of this has helped us to improve selling service in our
stores over the past couple of years, as reflected in the
scores calculated for each store based on direct customer
feedback after a shopping trip.
In 2013, we will be redoubling our efforts to encourage our
associates to sell from the heart and to take the extra step
to make every customer feel special. Our mantra is “Be the
magic.” And we’ll be providing new tools that our associates
can use to brighten the day of every customer.
NEW MILLENNIAL STRATEGY LAUNCHED
Macy’s in 2012 launched a new strategic approach to
customers in the Millennial generation. Millennials are the
segment of our customers who are ages 13 to 30. They are
now America’s largest generation. Millennials, who spend
more than $65 billion on the kind of merchandise sold by
Macy’s, represent a major opportunity for our company
today and down the road.
In 2012, we brought together the Millennial teams from
various disciplines – including Merchandising, Planning,
Marketing and Private Brands – into new open-concept
office space in New York City so they could work more
collaboratively, create new ideas and move quickly on key
projects. Their first order of business was to bring some
new and fresh merchandise into the Impulse (for older
Millennials) and Mstylelab (for younger Millennials) areas of
Macy’s stores and dotcom. In October, we announced that
13 new Millennial brands would be coming to Macy’s by the
end of 2013 and that we would be expanding 11 existing
Millennial brands.
Beyond the new and expanded merchandise assortments
in 2013, we are now working on a new Home strategy for
Millennials. And we are experimenting with floor moves
and adjacencies within the stores to create new destination
zones for our Millennial consumer. Marketing is focused on
new ways to reach out and attract these younger customers.
Social media obviously plays a big role, and we have aimed
a number of Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram
programs toward this audience. MBlog, our own blogging
site, is becoming more informative and will offer unique
perspectives for our 13- to 30-year-old users.
WE ARE STEPPING UP THE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE AND STORE ENVIRONMENTS.
10 • MACY’S, INC.
MACY’S HERALD SQUARE FLAGSHIP
REMODEL BEGUN
In early 2012, work began on one of the largest capital
investments in the history of our company – the top-tobottom renovation of Macy’s Herald Square flagship store
in New York City. This four-year, $400 million reinvention will
make Herald Square the world’s most exciting, interesting
and technologically-advanced department store.
In the course of the project, we will be restoring the
grandeur of the building’s exterior, creating dazzling updated
presentations of new and expanded merchandise space, and
significantly expanding the men’s store.
Completed portions of the remodeled first and second
floors opened in fall 2012. This included the world’s largest
women’s shoe department with 60,000 square feet of
space (retail and stock), 300,000 pairs of shoes available
to customers, and Macy’s first-ever coffee/champagne/
chocolate bar. Also opened was a new world of multi-level
luxury shops by Louis Vuitton, GUCCI, Burberry and
Longchamp, as well as a dazzling new fine jewelry department, including a special shop for wedding-related jewelry.
Spectacular new merchandise areas for cosmetics and men’s
are among the plans for 2013.
FINISH LINE TO PROVIDE ATHLETIC FOOTWEAR
Macy’s announced in 2012 that Finish Line-branded athletic
footwear shops will be opened in more than 450 Macy’s
department stores in the United States and online at
macys.com. The Finish Line, Inc. is a premium retailer of
athletic shoes, apparel and accessories.
The rollout process for the 450+ locations, which will be
operated by Finish Line as licensed departments, will start
in spring 2013 with completion expected by fall 2014. For
the remaining approximately 225 Macy’s stores that carry
footwear, Finish Line will manage the athletic footwear
assortment and inventory beginning in spring 2013, without
the staffing or branding provided in the licensed departments. Athletic shoe assortments selected by Finish Line also
will be available on macys.com, beginning in spring 2013.
Finish Line will be Macy’s exclusive partner
for men’s, women’s and children’s athletic
footwear, and Macy’s will be the exclusive
host for Finish Line-branded in-store shops.
Finish Line is a widely recognized expert
in athletic footwear for men, women
and children including the best brands,
newest technology and most current
styles. The enhanced footwear
assortment that Finish Line will bring
to customers at every full-line
Macy’s store nationwide, as well
as on macys.com, complements
our rapidly developing offering of
“activewear merchandise.”
BEST BRANDS, EXCLUSIVE
MERCHANDISE
Macy’s continues its legacy of
offering merchandise from the
best and most-wanted brands,
and in providing customers
genuine value – the right
combination of fashion and
quality at a good price. Much
of Macy’s merchandise assortment
is clearly unique. In 2013, about
45 percent of merchandise sold
at Macy’s was exclusive or in
limited distribution. This includes
Macy’s outstanding portfolio of
private brands, which account
for about 20 percent of sales.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 11
PRIVATE BRANDS
MACY’S IS RECOGNIZED AS A RETAIL INDUSTRY LEADER IN DEVELOPING PRIVATE
BRAND MERCHANDISE THAT DIFFERENTIATES THE ASSORTMENTS IN OUR
STORES AND DELIVERS EXCEPTIONAL VALUE TO THE CUSTOMER.
MERCHANDISE FOR EACH PRIVATE BRAND, AVAILABLE “ONLY AT MACY’S,”
IS DEVELOPED TO APPEAL TO A CERTAIN CUSTOMER LIFESTYLE AND IS
SUPPORTED WITH MARKETING PROGRAMS THAT CREATE A PRECISELY DEFINED
IMAGE. MACY’S ALSO DEVELOPS PRIVATE LABEL GOODS TO MEET SPECIFIC
CUSTOMER NEEDS AND TO FILL GAPS IN THE ASSORTMENT.
For women, Alfani offers modern separates with a clean,
feminine sensibility and a refined fit. The brand is designed to
be the stylish woman’s resource for wear-to-work clothes that
are both polished and versatile. Alfani for women includes
sportswear, intimate apparel, jewelry and shoes.
Alfani offers clothing for the man who wants to look
modern and professional. The collection is designed with an
emphasis on fabric, detail and performance. Alfani menswear
includes sportswear, tailored clothing, furnishings, shoes and
accessories. Alfani Red is a fit designation within the Alfani
line that indicates a slimmer, sleeker fit. Launched in fall 2012,
Alfani Spectrum provides even slimmer fitted dress shirts in a
wide array of colors.
American Rag is a young, fashion-forward line of apparel
and accessories that is targeted to Juniors, Plus and Young
Men. Inspired by classic rock and roll, the line blends
vintage-inspired colors and prints with classic denim and
the season’s trends.
Bar III is a collection of contemporary women’s and men’s
clothing, jewelry and bedding. The clothing and jewelry,
which are sold in Macy’s Impulse zone, feature design that is
versatile and fashion-forward. The brand speaks to a young,
style-savvy and technologically-sophisticated customer
looking for distinctive products that can be added to her or
his existing wardrobe and lifestyle to express personal style.
12 • MACY’S, INC.
В®
Belgique cookware is a versatile, high-performance line designed to provide
professional results and striking good looks. Belgique Stainless Steel is for the
cook who wants versatile, high-performance and long-lasting cookware with a
sleek, sophisticated look. Belgique Hard Anodized features a non-stick interior
ideal for low-fat cooking. The durable exterior is easy to care for and has a clean,
modern look.
Charter Club offers modern classic, all-American style in women’s apparel,
accessories and home collections. The ready-to-wear collection, designed for
the woman who appreciates both style and ease, features separates assorted for
all occasions. The home collection provides the essential elements to create an
elegant, traditional dГ©cor. The brand includes sportswear, intimate apparel, jewelry,
accessories, bedding and bath.
Club Room features classic American menswear for weekend or business casual
occasions and tailored suit separates for the career-oriented professional. The Club
Room brand includes sportswear, tailored clothing, furnishings and accessories.
Epic Threads is designed for tweens and kids who want cool, original clothing that
expresses their personality and is now available in all kids sizes from 2 to 20. Taking
a cue from popular skate and streetwear brands, Epic Threads is urban, imaginative
and edgy. The brand has a strong denim base, a high-energy color palette and an
individualistic sensibility.
First Impressions Play: Girl & Boy and Satin Hanger are fun,
colorful and trend-right clothing for newborns and infants.
The brand offers sets and mix-and-match separates for
boys and girls with an emphasis on occasion dressing.
Tracing a trajectory from quiet label to powerhouse brand, Giani Bernini has emerged as a
coveted name for handbags and small leather
goods at Macy’s. The brand’s fine materials
and classic design attract a traditional customer
who recognizes quality when she sees it.
Giani Bernini has an extensive assortment that
includes shoes and sterling silver bridge jewelry.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 13
This luxury collection for the home evokes the cool, cleanlined style of a world-class hotel, creating an oasis in the
modern world. Hotel Collection offers high thread-count
sheets and luxurious fabrics for the customer who appreciates
quality and modern design. The sophisticated collection
includes bedding, bath, tableware and mattresses. There is
an easy-care product line extension with a mix-and-match
design element. Hotel Collection recently launched its most
luxurious bedding collection, Hotel Collection Finest; where
sophisticated materials, rich embellishment and exquisite
dressmaker details combine to create an unsurpassed
experience of elegance and ease.
Ideology is an activewear brand designed for the active lifestyle and offers versatile, mix-and-match pieces that combine
fashion-forward style with technical features that maximize
performance and comfort.
I.N.C. for women delivers up-to-the-minute, trend-right
sportswear designed to add freshness and fun to the
fashionable woman’s wardrobe. Cutting edge, off-the-runway
trends are captured and delivered in high-profile, affordable
clothes, shoes and jewelry for the woman who wants to be
noticed. Handbags launched in early 2013.
I.N.C. Men offers fashion-forward clothing with a modern fit
and sharp styling. Cool, understated suit separates, a broad
range of style-conscious denim, sophisticated knits and
graphic T-shirts are designed to mix and match for maximum
versatility for the contemporary man.
I.N.C. Home is a bold new bedding collection that channels
the runway trends and international sensibility that inspires
I.N.C. ready-to-wear: a combination of vivid colors, sleek
neutrals and chic embellishments.
With fun colors and flirty prints, Jenni by Jennifer Moore
intimates stand out as the choice for the young, fashionable
customer, featuring a bright and cheerful selection of
pajamas, loungewear and lingerie. In the Juniors arena,
Jenni’s colorful, comfortable sensibility stands out in an
assortment that includes yoga bottoms, fashion tops, tees/
tanks, seamless bandeaus and bralettes, and other items.
14 • MACY’S, INC.
With a pretty, feminine sensibility and an emphasis on comfort,
JM Collection is designed for the woman who wants versatile,
work-to-weekend clothes at an affordable price. The collection
consists of easy, classic silhouettes updated each season in new
colors, prints and textures.
Designed for the busy woman with an
easy, modern sense of style, this brand
offers a versatile collection of fashionable
sportswear and stylish accessories
that transition from home to work to
weekend. The brand includes sportswear,
shoes, jewelry, handbags and accessories.
Elegant and refined, this brand of European-inspired classic
menswear is characterized by luxury fabrics and attention to detail.
It is designed for the more traditional customer, who expects the
best in investment dressing. The brand includes sportswear, tailored
clothing, furnishings and accessories. Greg Norman for Tasso Elba
is a broad assortment of golf-inspired menswear and accessories.
Shark by Greg Norman for Tasso Elba is the younger, more fitted
expression of this worldly golf lifestyle.
BRANDS AND LABELS
The difference between a brand and a label is subtle but
important. Our brands have fully developed brand profiles
targeted to specific consumers and are supported with
national advertising and branded in-store environments.
A label is just that: a name attached to a category of
merchandise that fills a niche in our assortments. Examples
of our labels include:
• Holiday Lane
• JA by John Ashford
• Karen Scott
• Morgan Taylor Intimates
• Studio Silver
• The Cellar
• Tools of the Trade
• Via Europa
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 15
BLOOMINGDALE’S, AMERICA’S ONLY NATIONWIDE, FULL-LINE, UPSCALE
DEPARTMENT STORE, IS RECOGNIZED FOR ITS ORIGINALITY, INNOVATION AND
FASHION LEADERSHIP. IT TRULY IS “LIKE NO OTHER STORE IN THE WORLD.”
IN FACT, BLOOMINGDALE’S IS A LEADING ATTRACTION FOR VISITORS AND
TOURISTS COMING TO THE UNITED STATES FROM AROUND THE GLOBE. THIS
BRAND INCLUDES 36 STORES, BLOOMINGDALES.COM AND 12 BLOOMINGDALE’S
OUTLET LOCATIONS. BLOOMINGDALE’S OPERATES IN DUBAI, UNITED ARAB
EMIRATES, UNDER A LICENSE AGREEMENT WITH AL TAYER INSIGNIA, A COMPANY
OF AL TAYER GROUP LLC.
Bloomingdale’s is separating itself from the mainstream
and reinforcing its position as an authority for upscale,
contemporary fashion. Customers are attracted by the latest
styles from the hottest brands, such as Armani, Burberry,
Chanel, Christian Dior, David Yurman, Jimmy Choo, John
Varvatos, Louis Vuitton, GUCCI, Miu Miu, Prada, Ralph
Lauren Black Label, Theory, Tory Burch, MaxMara, Sandro,
Mage, Zadig & Voltaire, The Kooples, Reiss and LK Bennett,
to name a few. Bloomingdale’s shoppers have come to
expect and savor variety – the newest looks from established
brands, as well as unique products from rising young
designers.
Supporting these fashion brands are exceptional customer
amenities – international visitors centers, personal shoppers,
outstanding fitting rooms and lounges – elegant events and
personalized, attentive service that strengthen customer
relationships and build loyalty.
BLOOMINGDALE’S IS SEPARATING ITSELF FROM THE
MAINSTREAM AND REINFORCING ITS POSITION AS AN
AUTHORITY FOR UPSCALE, CONTEMPORARY FASHION.
16 • MACY’S, INC.
NEW STORES PLANNED
Capitalizing on the strength of smaller, carefully edited
fashion stores opened in recent years in SoHo in New
York City and Santa Monica, CA, Bloomingdale’s will
open a new store in Glendale, CA, in fall 2013, as
well as a new replacement store in Palo Alto, CA, in
spring 2014.
Bloomingdale’s continues to test its outlet store concept
which launched in 2010. We added five new outlet
stores in 2012, bringing the current store count to 12,
with one scheduled to open in 2013.
A Bloomingdale’s Home Store in Las Vegas, NV, was
closed in 2012.
BLOOMINGDALE’S LAUNCHES
REWARDING LOYALTY PROGRAM
In 2012, Bloomingdale’s launched a new customer
loyalty program called Loyallist in all U.S. stores
and online. The new tender-neutral program
is streamlined and delivers benefits to any
customer shopping with a U.S. address at
Bloomingdale’s – regardless of how they pay.
Members of the loyalty program will accumulate
points each time they shop and for every 5,000
points will receive a Reward Card worth $25. The
Reward Card can be redeemed on all merchandise
(exclusive of gift cards) and is issued the moment
earned, in the store or overnight via e-mail if earned
online, for use the very next day.
Shoppers can earn points at three levels. Loyallists will
receive one point for every dollar spent in store, on
bloomingdales.com and at outlet locations. Shoppers
who use their Bloomingdale’s credit card will earn three
points per dollar. Those at the “Top of the List,” who
have spent $3,500 or more annually at Bloomingdale’s
on their Bloomingdale’s card earn four points per dollar
and are recognized by their black Bloomingdale’s
Reserve card. The program also includes various
additional bonuses, benefits and special promotions.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 17
MACY’S, INC.: A DIVERSE AND
INCLUSIVE ORGANIZATION
DIVERSITY IS AT THE CORE OF MACY’S, INC.’S APPROACH TO DOING BUSINESS.
IT TOUCHES ALL AREAS OF OUR COMPANY. WE EXPECT OUR ASSOCIATES,
OUR ADVERTISING AND IN-STORE PRESENTATIONS, AND THE COMPANIES
WITH WHICH WE DO BUSINESS TO MIRROR THE DIVERSE MULTICULTURAL
MARKETPLACE WE SERVE.
OUR ASSOCIATES
Macy’s believes that different perspectives are important to our
company, and we benefit greatly from the individual strengths of
each associate. To serve our diverse customers, we have to be a diverse
company. Women represent more than 75 percent of the workforce
across Macy’s, Inc., and more than 73 percent of management-level
executives are women. Racial minorities represent more than 52
percent of our associate team and represent more than
39 percent of our management team.
OUR MARKETING AND ADVERTISING
A crucial part of our diversity strategy is our multicultural
marketing. We use powerful and evocative images,
symbols and words to communicate our brand messages,
our special events and our merchandise selections to
our diverse core customers. And we deliver those
messages via targeted media channels to reach
customers where and when they want to receive our
messages. We also work with minority-owned and
women-owned agencies to ensure our concept
development and ad placements are in sync with
our multicultural customer.
OUR SUPPLIERS
Having a supplier base that reflects our diverse
customer base gives us a tremendous competitive
advantage, particularly because it enables us to
source distinctive merchandise to present in our stores.
It also helps us give meaningful support to businesses
that contribute to the economic health of our local
communities. Our Supplier Diversity Program helps us
identify and support emerging minority- and womenowned businesses. In 2012, our company’s purchases
from minority- and women-owned business enterprises totaled about $715.3 million.
The Workshop at Macy’s, our company’s first business development program, was
launched in 2011 to foster growth in the next generation of minority- and women-owned
merchandise suppliers.
GIVING BACK TO OUR COMMUNITIES
GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE WE WORK AND LIVE IS A DEEPLY
HELD VALUE AT MACY’S, INC. WE ARE PROUD THAT OUR CONTRIBUTIONS,
LEADERSHIP AND VOLUNTEER EFFORTS HELP CREATE STRONG COMMUNITIES –
PROVIDING A BETTER ENVIRONMENT FOR OUR STORES TO DO BUSINESS AND
FOR OUR EMPLOYEES AND CUSTOMERS TO LIVE AND WORK.
Collectively, contributions in 2012 from the company
and the Macy’s Foundation – as well as employee
contributions through workplace giving campaigns and
customer contributions through our signature giving
programs – totaled more than $70 million. Our associates
gave more than 125,000 hours of their personal time for
community service.
CORPORATE AND FOUNDATION GIVING
Through our gifts from Macy’s, Bloomingdale’s and the
Macy’s Foundation, more than $26 million was contributed
to approximately 4,500 nonprofit organizations in 2012. The
majority of our gifts were directed to our core focus areas
for funding: arts and culture, education, the environment,
HIV/AIDS awareness and research, and women’s issues –
particularly women’s health and domestic violence.
In 2012, Macy’s Foundation contributed more than $4 million
to charities across the country as a dollar-for-dollar match of
our associates’ personal charitable contributions to nearly
3,400 individual nonprofit organizations.
OUR ASSOCIATES GAVE MORE THAN
125,000 HOURS OF THEIR PERSONAL TIME.
Our giving program spearheaded by our local contributions
committees, My Macy’s District Grants, provided grants to
our local communities. More than 1,300 individual gifts were
made. The District Grants program features contributions
committees in each of the Macy’s operating districts who
make local funding decisions. Similar to our merchandise
localization, the District Grants program aids our local teams
in supporting the organizations and causes that are important
in their respective local communities.
A major gift during the year was a contribution of $1 million
to the American Red Cross for relief aid in response to
Hurricane Sandy, which devastated large sections of our
Northeast markets. The contribution was from Macy’s, Inc.
on behalf of our Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s employees and
from our customers.
Another major gift in 2012 was a grant of more than
$1.5 million to Make-A-Wish as part of our fifth annual Believe
campaign during the holidays. Macy’s donated $1 for every
letter to Santa dropped into our special in-store letterboxes,
up to a maximum of $1 million, and added a contribution of
more than $500,000 for letters posted on National Believe
Day and from other in-store events.
Across the country, support from Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s
giving programs helped sponsor free admission to museums
and exhibits, special musical performances, art exhibits,
and art and theatre workshops for children. In the area of
education, we funded scholarship programs, summer reading
programs, mentoring and tutoring, and early childhood
education initiatives. Grants in our HIV/AIDS focus area
included sponsorship of awareness walks and runs as well as
funding for meals and nutrition programs, housing programs,
and research and counseling initiatives. We contributed to
environmental programs covering both conservation and
preservation, including sponsorship of Earth Day activities,
plant programs for children at botanical gardens, and animal
preservation and awareness programs at zoos and aquariums.
In the women’s issues focus area, our grants supported
early detection and screening programs for heart disease,
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 19
CAUSE-RELATED PROGRAMS
Because Macy’s, Inc. believes in helping to create stronger,
more vibrant communities, we invited our customers
throughout the year to join us in making a difference and
“giving back.” In 2012, customers contributed more than
$30 million to nonprofit organizations nationwide through
our signature programs.
breast cancer and ovarian cancer; provided a wide range of
assistance to emergency shelters; sponsored programs to
raise awareness about domestic and dating violence; and
funded self-esteem and leadership programs for young girls
and teens.
ASSOCIATE GIVING
Associates of Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s are tremendously
generous with their support of nonprofit organizations – with
both monetary contributions and gifts of their time and
leadership. They make our “give back” value come alive
every day.
United Way: More than 700 United Way chapters across
the United States received contributions totaling nearly
$10.9 million from Macy’s, Inc. associates during 2012.
Combined with $3.4 million in contributions from Macy’s
and the Macy’s Foundation, our total contribution was
$14.3 million for 2012.
Earning for Learning: Earning for Learning (EFL) is an
initiative that provides grants to schools where Macy’s, Inc.
associates, their families or retirees volunteer their time for
education activities such as tutoring and mentoring. In 2012,
the Macy’s Foundation awarded more than 80 grants totaling
$28,750 through the EFL program, and EFL volunteers gave
nearly 4,200 hours of service to their local schools.
Bag Hunger: Macy’s, Inc. associates contributed food
and donations equivalent to $2.6 million in 2012 to our
companywide Bag Hunger campaign to help reduce hunger
in our local communities. (See Bag Hunger on page 21.)
20 • MACY’S, INC.
Go Red For Women: 2012 marked Macy’s ninth year as
national sponsor of Go Red For Women, the American
Heart Association’s campaign for awareness and prevention
of heart disease in women. Approximately $4.5 million
was contributed to the Go Red movement through our
Wear Red Day promotion, from our Thanks For Sharing
holiday rewards program, and from Macy’s, Inc. In nine years,
Go Red has received more than $33.5 million from Macy’s
and our customers.
Reading Is Fundamental: Customers supported Reading Is
Fundamental (RIF) with donations totaling nearly $5 million in
2012 through our Be Book Smart back-to-school effort and
other campaigns. More than $26 million has been raised for
RIF, the nation’s oldest and largest literacy organization, since
our partnership began in 2004.
Shop For A Cause: Shop For A Cause is our annual charity
shopping day event held in every Macy’s store across the
country. In 2012, Macy’s raised $3.1 million for the March of
Dimes. More than $42 million has been raised in the seven
years that Macy’s has held this signature “give back” event.
Thanks For Sharing: Thanks For Sharing is Macy’s holiday
rewards program. In 2012 for the fourth consecutive year,
$15 million was raised for charitable organizations across
the country. By enrolling in the rewards program during the
holiday season, customers are contributing to designated
nonprofit organizations located in communities across the
country. In 10 years, Thanks For Sharing has raised more than
$111 million.
Macy’s Passport Presents Glamorama: Over the past
30 years, the Macy’s Passport Presents Glamorama fashion
extravaganza has raised more than $50 million for charities
that help fight childhood illness, cancer and HIV/AIDS. In
2012, the events combined fun, fashion and philanthropy
in four cities to raise nearly $900,000.
EMPLOYEE VOLUNTEERISM PROGRAMS
Since the Macy’s, Inc. Partners
in Time employee volunteer
program was founded in 1989 in
Atlanta, thousands of volunteers
have given more than 2 million
hours of community service.
That’s valued at more than
$36 million to thousands of charities we’ve impacted
through nearly 25 years of community service.
BAG HUNGER PROVIDED 60 MILLION MEALS
FOR HUNGRY FAMILIES IN 15 YEARS
During the annual Partners in Time Bag Hunger food
campaign, Macy’s, Bloomingdale’s and our central office
locations band together to help alleviate summer hunger –
a time when food pantry shelves are often bare and
school meal programs are not offered. In 2012, a total
of 10.2 million pounds of food and equivalent monetary
contributions were given by our generous associates, spurred
on by a good-natured competition among locations.
Along the way, our Partners in Time program has been
nationally recognized, receiving the Points of Light/
Hands On Network “Award for Excellence in Workplace
Volunteerism,” among other honors. In 2012, more than
29,100 participants joined 2,333 community efforts.
Thousands of others were involved in “give back” initiatives
such as cause marketing and employee giving campaigns.
In addition, volunteerism for hunger-relief charities was a
special focus in 2012 and associates gave 59,955 hours of
community service for this cause. Throughout the country,
Macy’s, Inc. Partners in Time volunteers packed food at
pantry warehouses, assembled box lunches for hunger-relief
agencies, and served meals at soup kitchens, putting their
passion for giving back into action.
Partners in Time, Earning for Learning and other volunteers
gave more than 125,000 hours of service in 2012 alone.
Partners in Time projects made a strong impact for youth
with 15 percent of efforts benefiting children and education.
With the success of our Partners in Time Bag Hunger food
campaign, which celebrated its 15th anniversary in 2012,
hunger relief represented 43 percent of volunteerism.
Projects for health issues, including disabilities and AIDS,
were supported by 12 percent of projects, and 6 percent
supported breast cancer research, family violence awareness
and other issues of special interest to women.
In 2012, in celebration of the Bag Hunger 15th anniversary,
Macy’s, Inc. awarded a total of $15,000 in grants in the
names of the top store and central office departments to
their chosen hunger-relief charities.
Since 1998, Partners in Time has provided an equivalent
71.4 million pounds of food or 60 million meals, plus
volunteer service, for hungry families throughout the country,
many through affiliates of Feeding America, the largest
domestic hunger-relief organization in the United States.
+64A
2012 PARTNERS IN TIME EMPLOYEE
VOLUNTEER PROJECTS BY ISSUE AREA
43% Hunger
15% Children/School
partnerships
12% Health (including
disabilities and AIDS)
6% Women’s issues
6% Environment/
housing/disaster relief
4% Arts/civic/culture/
holiday
14% Other*
*Projects for diversity
initiatives and others.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 21
SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
THERE IS NO SHORTAGE OF TALK ABOUT THE OBLIGATION OF PUBLIC COMPANIES
TO BE SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE TO THE PEOPLE AND COMMUNITIES WHERE
THEY DO BUSINESS. AT MACY’S, INC., WE HOLD THOSE SAME BELIEFS – ALONG
WITH A BELIEF THAT ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS WHEN IT COMES
TO HELPING TACKLE SOME OF THE TOUGHEST PROBLEMS FACING US TODAY.
WE PRIDE OURSELVES ON BEING PART OF A COMPANY THAT OPERATES WITH
INTEGRITY, MAKES GOOD CHOICES AND DOES THE RIGHT THING IN EVERY ASPECT
OF OUR BUSINESS.
VENDOR & SUPPLIER CODE OF CONDUCT
Since 1995, Macy’s, Inc. has had a stringent Vendor & Supplier Code of Conduct that sets out specific standards and
requirements for any vendor doing business with Macy’s, Inc. and is designed to protect workers in this country and abroad. All
of the company’s vendors are required to agree in writing to comply with the company’s Code of Conduct. Among other things,
the Code requires that suppliers of Macy’s private brand merchandise allow unannounced factory inspections for contractual
compliance, as well as for compliance with laws and regulations dealing with child or forced labor, wages and hours, and unsafe
working conditions. Willful noncompliance with the Code has resulted in termination of certain suppliers.
Macy’s, Inc.’s policy on sweatshops and forced or child labor, as well as the company’s Vendor & Supplier Code of Conduct, is
posted at macysinc.com/vendorcodeofconduct. The Code also is available by calling 1-800-261-5385.
Macy’s, Inc. will not tolerate the involvement of its suppliers in human trafficking and slavery. We will quickly investigate any
reports alleging human trafficking and slavery in the supply chain and will take swift and decisive action against any supplier that
is found to act improperly in this regard. We have enhanced our Vendor & Supplier Code of Conduct and our audit tool used for
factory audits to emphasize our policies on human trafficking and slavery.
Our employee training features a three-tiered approach. We produce and distribute a formalized Vendor & Supplier Code of
Conduct. We provide video-based training on our requirements of vendors. And we conduct group training for all Private Brand
executives who visit overseas factories that produce goods for Macy’s.
SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE PRODUCTS AT MACY’S
Several exclusive merchandising initiatives at Macy’s involve products with
a focus on international social responsibility.
• Macy’s Path to Peace program includes colorful and symbolic baskets
and bowls handmade by Rwandan weavers who survived the country’s
civil war and genocide. The products are available on macys.com and
in selected Macy’s stores. Introduced in 2005, Path to Peace has
dramatically changed the lives of many Rwandans. From public
health initiatives and HIV/AIDS care to the spirit of hope and
reconciliation fostered by the weavers, the tangible and
intangible impact of the project is no longer measured
by individual weavers but by whole communities. More
information is available at macys.com/rwanda.
22 • MACY’S, INC.
• Macy’s Heart of Haiti program includes decorative pieces
(such as textiles, metalwork and housewares) made by artisans
struggling to recover from the tragic earthquake of 2010. The
products are available on macys.com and in selected Macy’s
stores. Purchasing one of these handcrafted masterpieces
directly benefits Haitian artisans by allowing them to support
their families with dignity and purpose. With steady income
comes better nutrition, improved education and access to
healthcare. Heart of Haiti also offers new opportunities for
artists to collaborate with U.S. designers, strengthening artisan
associations and inspiring and energizing their communities.
More information is available at macys.com/haiti.
• GoodWeave™ Rugs – In spring 2011, Macy’s introduced a
collection of decorative area rugs that have been certified
by GoodWeaveв„ў, an international organization that works to ensure rugs made by hand in
Nepal and India are free of child labor. The collection is carried in 10 Macy’s stores nationwide.
By buying a beautiful hand-crafted rug at Macy’s with the GoodWeave label, shoppers are
helping to support families and build sustainable communities in Nepal and India, nations
where poverty is widespread. GoodWeave-certified rugs are woven by skilled adult artisans,
permitting educational opportunities for children who otherwise might be required to work.
More information about GoodWeave is available at goodweave.org.
For more information regarding social responsibility, go to macysinc.com/socialresponsibility.
CONSUMER CHOICE
In a free society as eclectic and ethnically varied as ours,
customers expect and demand a range of choices that meet
their individual needs and fashion preferences. In our role as
retailers, we recognize that it is the consumer who ultimately
determines what products will continue to be viable retail
offerings. Those decisions are made daily at the point of sale
by individual consumers and function as a singularly effective
barometer for determining what will and will not be sold by
retailers in a free and open marketplace. Varied and conflicting
viewpoints about what should or should not be sold underscore
our belief that factors unrelated to the workings of a free
economy are inappropriate determinants of retail offerings.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 23
OUR ROAD TO SUSTAINABILITY:
DOING BETTER EVERY DAY
At Macy’s, Inc., we believe that contributing to a more
sustainable environment is good business practice and
the right thing to do for future generations. As a leading
national retailer with a significant workforce, we have the
opportunity to make a meaningful difference in improving
the environment. And we will do so by using resources more
efficiently, providing eco-friendly products that meet customer
expectations and striving to reduce our overall impact on the
environment. We must, however, operate within the bounds
of good business decision-making so that each action we
take is measurable, sustainable and enduring. Macy’s, Inc.’s
commitment to sustainability is multi-dimensional.
1. We will be aggressive in our drive to eliminate wasteful
behavior. In some cases, this requires consistent application
of very simple principles, such as reminding our associates
to turn off lights when rooms are not in use, to print fewer
hard copies of e-mails, to recycle waste, to optimize facility
performance and to use mass transit for commuting
to work. In other cases, we will be pursuing systematic
improvements to the way we do business, such as better
targeting customer mailing lists and shifting marketing to
electronic media so we are printing and sending fewer
printed advertisements.
2. We will reduce our use of scarce resources in a meaningful
way. Macy’s, Inc. will pursue ongoing programs to consume
less electricity and water, reduce our waste stream, and
source more of our power from renewable resources such
as solar energy. We will use fewer paper-related products,
recycle more and seek to use paper made with postconsumer waste. We will work to migrate more of our
output from paper to electronic/digital, including largescale projects such as monthly customer billing statements.
By doing so, we will reduce the company’s greenhouse gas
footprint, energy consumption and costs.
3. Whenever possible and sensible within the context of our
business requirements, Macy’s, Inc. will pursue the most
environmentally friendly solution. We will be as aggressive
as possible in changing for the better to preserve
endangered forests, wildlife, water quality and eco-systems.
We will explore ways to make our shopping bags, gift
boxes, wrapping tissue, merchandise hangers and other
24 • MACY’S, INC.
staples of retailing from recycled and/or certified paper
sources, with a preference for Forest Stewardship Council
(FSC) certification. The building materials used in our
stores will be environmentally certified whenever
reasonably possible.
4. We will take a comprehensive approach to sustainability,
involving everyone around us. Macy’s, Inc. will advocate
sustainability and renewability with our vendor partners,
associates and customers. This will include developing
supplier sustainability standards and promoting ecofriendly products to our customers. We will encourage
our associates and ask them to support our initiatives
with their ideas, energy, personal actions and volunteer
time. We will support efforts in our communities and
our nation to clean up the environment and reduce
consumption of scarce resources.
5. We will measure what we do and strive toward quantifiable
goals. Building on recent progress, Macy’s, Inc. has set the
following sustainability goals to guide our progress in the
years ahead. Specifically, Macy’s, Inc. will seek to:
• Reduce our energy consumption on a kWh-per-squarefoot basis by another 6 percent to 10 percent by 2015
(compared with 2012 levels), recognizing that we already
have reduced our energy consumption by about
37 percent over the past nine years (2003 to 2012).
• Install an additional 25 percent to 35 percent of solar
power systems from 2012 levels.
• By 2015, manage the amount of paper we use so the
annual rate of growth is at least 20 percent less than the
increase in the number of sales transactions in our stores
and online business. This is on top of an 11 percent
reduction in paper usage in the 2007 to 2012 period.
• Increase the percentage of recycled (10 percent PCW
or higher) and/or third-party certified paper we use in
marketing materials to 95 percent by 2015 from
43 percent in 2009 (up from 3 percent in 2006).
• Increase the use of sustainable building materials in all
major construction projects by 5 percent per year by
2015 (over 2012 levels).
SUSTAINABILITY IN ACTION
We have made significant progress and have taken dozens
of tangible steps to reduce our impact on the environment.
In part, we have:
• Offered customers paperless receipts by e-mailing
receipts. All Macy’s stores nationwide now offer paperless
receipts to customers.
• Reduced electric consumption by 37 percent in Macy’s
stores since 2002.
• Reduced 79 million pounds of CO2 in 2012, as well as
lowered freight costs, in transporting goods.
• Increased the percentage of certified or recycled paper
used in marketing materials to more than 93 percent in
2012 compared with 43 percent in 2009. More than
one-half of marketing paper used is FSC-certified.
• Increased solar energy with a total of 41 active
installations at Macy’s locations at year-end 2012, with
another six to 14 expected in 2013.
• Reduced store packaging with our Bag-It-Right program
during a period of increasing sales with shopping bag
use down 19 percent from 2009 levels and down
8.6 percent from 2010.
• Reduced paper consumption by about 11 percent
compared with the 2007 baseline.
• Developed initiatives to increase our paperless credit
card billing. At year-end 2012, nearly 16 percent of all
customer billing was paperless.
• Added LED lighting in about 800 Macy’s stores, with
new types of LED installations being piloted for rollout.
• Emphasized energy optimization as a vital part of the
Herald Square store’s current renovation.
• Acquired a 600 Kilowatt Bloom Energy server (a solid
oxide fuel cell) to replace most of the grid energy at the
company’s Cheshire, CT, fulfillment center. This technology
reduces CO2 emissions by about 35 percent.
CONTRIBUTING TO A MORE SUSTAINABLE
ENVIRONMENT IS GOOD BUSINESS PRACTICE AND
THE RIGHT THING TO DO FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 25
• Increased recycled corrugated cardboard, plastic, hangers,
office fiber, iron, pallets and other materials by 5.4 percent
in 2012 from 2010 levels.
• Increased to 39 million the number of miles driven by
sustainable modes of transportation including rail, vendorto-distribution center bypass, Empty Miles and backhaul –
an 11 percent increase from 2011.
• Recycled 124,000 pounds of zero balance or out-of-date gift
cards in 2012 with Earthworks, an organization that collects
the plastic and recycles it to produce other plastic products.
• Received LEED Existing Building Gold Certification for
two Macy’s stores in New Mexico. This certification is
acknowledgment of Macy’s leading practices in energy
management, recycling and purchasing decisions to
minimize environmental impact.
• Increased the use of sustainable building materials by
50 percent in 2012 compared with 2010.
• Introduced language in contracts to emphasize Macy’s
sustainability goals, which has heightened awareness with
our contractor and consultant partners.
• Developed a green restroom design, which includes energyefficient hand dryers, low-flow faucets and toilet fixtures,
sensors on faucets, and stall partitions and solid surface
countertops with high levels of recycled content.
Macy’s has been recognized by ForestEthics for reducing
paper consumption as well as for increased use of recycled
and certified paper. The EPA and the Solar Energy Industries
Association have ranked Macy’s as one of the top companies
for generating the most green electricity on site.
There is more to learn and more to do to reduce our overall
impact on the environment. Macy’s, Inc. aspires to be a leader
in the global effort to improve our climate, and we are moving
forward to that end with enthusiasm and commitment.
26 • MACY’S, INC.
FINANCIAL OVERVIEW
MACY’S, INC. SALES DATA
(DOLLARS IN MILLIONS)
2012
SALES
% CHANGE
COMPARABLE
SALES
MACY’S, INC. SALES BY
MERCHANDISE CATEGORIES
2012
2011
2010
1st QTR
$
6,143
4.4 %
Feminine Accessories, Intimate
Apparel, Shoes and Cosmetics
38%
37%
36%
2nd QTR
$
6,118
3.0 %
Feminine Apparel
23
25
26
3rd QTR
$
6,075
3.7 %
Men’s and Children’s
23
23
23
4th QTR
$
9,350
3.9 %
Home/Miscellaneous
16
15
15
TOTAL
$
27,686
3.7 %
MACY’S, INC. COMPARABLE SALES
2011
SALES
% CHANGE
COMPARABLE
SALES
1st QTR
$
5,889
5.4 %
2nd QTR
$
5,939
6.4 %
3rd QTR
$
5,853
4.0 %
4th QTR
$
8,724
5.2 %
TOTAL
$ 26,405
5.3 %
2010
SALES
$
5,574
5.5 %
2nd QTR
$
5,537
4.9 %
3rd QTR
$
5,623
3.9 %
4th QTR
$
8,269
4.3 %
TOTAL
$ 25,003
4.6 %
SALES
2005 ....... 1.3 %
2009 ...... (5.3) %
2002 ...... (3.0) %
2006 ....... 4.4 %
2010 ...... . 4.6 %
2003 ...... (0.9) %
2007 ...... (1.3) %
2011 ...... . 5.3 %
2004 ....... 2.6 %
2008 ...... (4.6) %
2012........3.7 %
% CHANGE
COMPARABLE
SALES
1st QTR
2009
2001 ...... (5.3) %
% CHANGE
COMPARABLE
SALES
1st QTR
$
5,199
(9.0) %
2nd QTR
$
5,164
(9.5) %
3rd QTR
$
5,277
(3.6) %
4th QTR
$
7,849
(0.8) %
TOTAL
$ 23,489
(5.3) %
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 27
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS
OF INCOME
(DOLLARS IN MILLIONS, EXCEPT PER SHARE DATA)
2012
$
Net sales ..............................................................................................................
2011
% TO NET
SALES
$ 27,686
$
% TO NET
SALES
$ 26,405
........................................................................................................
16,538
59.7 %
15,738
59.6 %
Gross margin .................................................................. ......................................
11,148
40.3 %
10,667
40.4 %
Selling, general and administrative expenses .......... ......................................
(8,482)
(30.7) %
Impairments, store closing costs and gain on sale of properties ................
(5)
Operating income ......................................................... ......................................
2,661
Interest expense — net ......................................................................................
(422)
(443)
Premium on early retirement of debt ........................ ......................................
(137)
—
Cost of sales
(8,281)
(31.4) %
%
25
0.1 %
9.6 %
2,411
9.1 %
—
Income before income taxes .............................................................................
2,102
1,968
Federal, state and local income tax expense ........... ......................................
(767)
(712)
Net income ..................................................................... ......................................
$
1,335
$
1,256
Basic earnings per share ....................................................................................
$
3.29
$
2.96
Diluted earnings per share .......................................... ......................................
$
3.24
$
2.92
The foregoing financial information should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements, including the related notes and other
information contained in the company’s most recent Securities and Exchange Commission filings.
28 • MACY’S, INC.
SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATING RESULTS
(DOLLARS IN MILLIONS, EXCEPT PER SHARE DATA)
2012
2011
Net sales ......................................................................... ..................................................... .........................
$ 27,686
$ 26,405
Operating income ......................................................... ..................................................................... .........
$ 2,661
$ 2,411
9.6 %
Percent to sales.............................................................................................................................. ........
9.1 %
Add back (deduct) impairments, store closing costs and gain on sale of leases..............................
5
(25)
Operating income, excluding certain items............................................................................................
$ 2,666
$ 2,386
9.6 %
Percent to sales.............................................................................................................................. ........
Net Income..................................................................... ..............................................................................
$ 1,335
9.0 %
$ 1,256
4.8%
Percent to sales.............................................................................................................................. ........
4.8%
Add back interest expense – net ................................ ..............................................................................
422
443
Add back premium on early retirement of debt ...... ..............................................................................
137
—
Add back federal, state and local income tax expense ........................................................................
767
712
Add back (deduct) impact of impairments, store closing costs and gain on sale of leases ............
5
(25)
Add back depreciation and amortization .................. ..............................................................................
1,049
1,085
Adjusted EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) .......................
3,715
3,471
13.4%
Percent to sales.............................................................................................................................. ........
Diluted earnings per share .......................................... ..............................................................................
$
3.24
13.1%
$
2.92
Add back (deduct) impact of impairments, store closing costs and gain on sale of leases ............
0.01
(0.04)
Add back premium on early retirement of debt ...... ..............................................................................
0.21
—
Diluted earnings per share, excluding certain items .............................................................................
$
3.46
$
2.88
The foregoing financial information, including non-GAAP measures that exclude certain items, should be read in conjunction with the audited
financial statements, including the related notes and other information contained in the company’s most recent Securities and Exchange
Commission filings.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 29
SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATING RESULTS
(DOLLARS IN MILLIONS)
2012
Operating income ......................................................... ..................................................................... .........
$ 2,661
Property and equipment – net ..................................................................................................................
8,308
Operating income as a percent to property and equipment – net ...............................................
2011
$
2,411
8,617
32.0 %
28.0%
Operating income ......................................................... ..................................................................... .........
$ 2,661
Add back (deduct) impairments, store closing costs and gain on sale of leases..............................
5
$
2,411
(25)
Add back depreciation and amortization .................. ..............................................................................
1,049
1,085
Real estate ................................................................ ..............................................................................
258
243
Personal Property .............................................................................................................................. ....
11
10
Deferred rent amortization .................................... ..............................................................................
7
8
Adjusted operating income ......................................... ..............................................................................
$ 3,991
$
Property and equipment – net ..................................................................................................................
$ 8,308
$
Add back accumulated depreciation and amortization ........................................................................
5,967
6,018
Add capitalized value of non-capitalized leases ....................................................................................
2,208
2,088
Add back rent expense – net
3,732
8,617
Add (deduct) other selected assets and liabilities
Receivables ............................................................... ............................................................... ...............
322
294
Merchandise inventories ......................................................................................................................
5,754
5,596
Prepaid expenses and other current assets ........ ..............................................................................
390
409
Other assets ...........................................................................................................................................
579
528
Merchandise accounts payable ............................. ..............................................................................
(2,362)
(2,314)
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities...........................................................................................
(2,333)
(2,309)
Total Average Invested Capital ................................... ..............................................................................
$ 18,833
$ 18,927
ROIC (Return On Invested Capital) ............................ ..............................................................................
21.2 %
19.7 %
Average invested capital is comprised of an annual two-point (i.e., end of the previous year and the immediately preceding year) average of gross
property and equipment, a capitalized value of non-capitalized leases equal to periodic annual reported net rent expense multiplied by a factor of
eight and a four-point (i.e., end of each quarter within the period presented) average of other selected assets and liabilities.
30 • MACY’S, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED
BALANCE SHEETS
(DOLLARS IN MILLIONS)
February 2,
2013
ASSETS
January 28,
2012
Current Assets:
Cash and cash equivalents
...............................................................................
$
Receivables ..........................................................................................................
1,836
$ 2,827
371
368
....................................... ...........................................
5,308
5,117
Prepaid expenses and other current assets ........ ...........................................
361
465
Total Current Assets ....................................... ...........................................
7,876
8,777
............................. ...........................................
8,196
8,420
Goodwill ...............................................................................................................
3,743
3,743
Other intangible assets – net................................. ...........................................
561
598
Other assets ........................................................................................................
615
557
Total Assets ..................................................................................................
$ 20,991
$ 22,095
$
$
Merchandise inventories
Property and equipment – net
LIABILITIES & SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Current Liabilities:
Short-term debt ....................................................... ...........................................
124
1,103
Merchandise accounts payable ............................. ...........................................
1,579
1,593
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities........................................................
2,610
2,788
Income taxes ............................................................ ...........................................
355
371
Deferred income taxes ......................................................................................
407
408
Total Current Liabilities.............................................................................
5,075
6,263
Long-term debt........................................................ ...........................................
6,806
6,655
Deferred income taxes
.....................................................................................
1,238
1,141
Other liabilities ......................................................... ...........................................
1,821
2,103
Shareholders’ equity ............................................... ...........................................
6,051
5,933
Total Liabilities & Shareholders’ Equity ...............................................
$ 20,991
$ 22,095
The foregoing financial information should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements, including the related
notes and other information contained in the company’s most recent Securities and Exchange Commission filings.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 31
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED
STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(DOLLARS IN MILLIONS)
2012
2011
Cash flows from operating activities:
Net income .......................................................................................................
$
1,335
$
1,256
Depreciation and amortization ............................. ........................................
1,049
1,085
Impairments, store closing costs and gain on sale of properties ............
5
(25)
Increase in working capital and other, net........... ........................................
(128)
(223)
Net cash provided by operating activities ......................................
$
2,261
$
2,093
Cash flows from investing activities:
Capital expenditures for property and equipment and
capitalized software........................................... ........................................
(942)
(764)
Disposition of property and equipment .............. ........................................
66
114
Other, net..........................................................................................................
13
33
Net cash used by investing activities ........ ........................................
(863)
(617)
Cash flows from financing activities:
Debt issued............................................................... ........................................
1,000
800
Debt repaid .............................................................. ........................................
(1,803)
(454)
Dividends paid ......................................................... ........................................
(324)
(148)
Acquisition of treasury stock..........................................................................
(1,397)
(502)
Issuance of common stock ..................................... ........................................
234
162
Other, net..........................................................................................................
(99)
29
Net cash used by financing activities ........ ........................................
(2,389)
(113)
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents.....................................
(991)
1,363
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period . ........................................
2,827
1,464
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period.....................................................
$
1,836
$
2,827
The foregoing financial information should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements, including the
related notes and other information contained in the company’s most recent Securities and Exchange Commission filings.
32 • MACY’S, INC.
FISCAL 2012 — RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
COMPARISON OF 2012 AND 2011
NET INCOME
Net income for 2012 increased
compared to 2011, reflecting the
benefits of the key strategies at Macy’s
and the continued strong performance
at Bloomingdale’s.
2012. Stores undergoing remodeling,
expansion or relocation remain in the
comparable sales calculation unless the
store is closed for a significant period
of time. Definitions and calculations
of comparable sales differ among
companies in the retail industry.
NET SALES
Net sales for 2012 increased $1,281
million or 4.9 percent compared to
2011. On a comparable basis, net
sales for 2012 were up 3.7 percent
compared to 2011. Sales from the
Company’s Internet businesses in 2012
increased 41 percent on a comparable
basis to 2011 and positively affected
the Company’s 2012 comparable
sales by 2.2 percent. The Company
continues to benefit from the successful
execution of the My Macy’s localization,
Omnichannel and MAGIC selling
strategies. Geographically, sales in 2012
were strongest in the southern regions
as well as some markets in other parts
of the country such as Western New
York, Oregon and Colorado. By family
of business, sales in 2012 were strongest
in watches, handbags, cosmetics,
textiles, furniture and mattresses. Sales
of the Company’s private label brands
continued to be strong with particular
growth coming from millennial, classic
apparel and home textile brands. Sales
of the Company’s private label brands
represented approximately 20 percent
of net sales in the Macy’s-branded
stores in 2012. Sales in 2012 were
less strong in juniors. The Company
calculates comparable sales as sales
from stores in operation throughout
2011 and 2012 and all net Internet
sales, adjusting for the 53rd week in
COST OF SALES
Cost of sales for 2012 increased $800
million from 2011. The cost of sales rate
as a percent to net sales was higher in
2012, as compared to 2011, primarily
due to growth of the omnichannel
businesses and the resulting impact of
free shipping. The application of the
last-in, first-out (LIFO) retail inventory
method did not result in the recognition
of any LIFO charges or credits affecting
cost of sales in either period.
SELLING, GENERAL AND
ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES
Selling, general and administrative
(“SG&A”) expenses for 2012 increased
$201 million from 2011. The SG&A
rate as a percent to net sales was
70 basis points lower in 2012, as
compared to 2011, reflecting increased
net sales. SG&A expenses in 2012
were impacted by higher selling costs
as a result of stronger sales, higher
retirement expenses (including Pension
Plan, SERP and 401(k) expenses), and
greater investments in the Company’s
omnichannel operations, partially offset
by higher income from credit operations
and lower depreciation and amortization
expense. Retirement expenses were
$232 million in 2012 as compared to
$160 million in 2011, primarily due to
the lower discount rate. Advertising
expense, net of cooperative advertising
allowances, was $1,181 million for
2012 compared to $1,136 million for
2011. Advertising expense, net of
cooperative advertising allowances, as a
percent to net sales was 4.3 percent for
both 2012 and 2011. Income from credit
operations was $663 million in 2012
as compared to $582 million in 2011.
Depreciation and amortization expense
was $1,049 million for 2012, compared
to $1,085 million for 2011.
PREMIUM ON EARLY
RETIREMENT OF DEBT
On November 28, 2012, the Company
repurchased $700 million aggregate
principal amount of its outstanding
senior unsecured notes, which had a
net book value of $706 million. The
repurchased senior unsecured notes
had stated interest rates ranging from
5.9 – 7.875 percent and maturities in
2015 and 2016. The Company recorded
the redemption premium and other
costs related to these repurchases as
additional interest expense of $133
million in 2012. On March 29, 2012,
the Company redeemed the $173
million of 8.0 percent senior debentures
due July 15, 2012, as allowed under
the terms of the indenture. The price
for the redemption was calculated
pursuant to the indenture and resulted
in the recognition of additional interest
expense of $4 million in 2012. The
additional interest expense resulting
from these transactions is presented as
premium on early retirement of debt on
the Consolidated Statements of Income.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 33
MACY’S STORE REGIONS
# DISTRICTS: 69
|
# STORES: 795
Northwest
# Districts 10
# Stores 125
North
Northeast
# Districts 8
# Stores 78
# Districts 10
# Stores 93
Midwest
# Districts 8
# Stores 94
Mid-Atlantic
# Districts 8
# Stores 96
Southwest
# Districts 8
# Stores 107
Southeast
# Districts 9
# Stores 101
South Central
# Districts 8
# Stores 101
34 • MACY’S, INC.
MACY’S MID-ATLANTIC REGION
# DISTRICTS: 8
|
# STORES: 96
New Jersey North
# Stores 9
Philadelphia
# Stores 11
New Jersey Central
# Stores 11
DelMarVa North
# Stores 13
DelMarVa Central
New Jersey South
# Stores 12
# Stores 11
DelMarVa South
# Stores 14
Richmond
# Stores 15
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 35
MACY’S MIDWEST REGION
# DISTRICTS: 8
|
# STORES: 94
New York West
# Stores 13
Pittsburgh North
# Stores 13
Cleveland
# Stores 11
Pittsburgh East
# Stores 13
Indiana
# Stores 9
Columbus
# Stores 13
Cincinnati
# Stores 13
Tennessee
# Stores 9
36 • MACY’S, INC.
MACY’S NORTH REGION
# DISTRICTS: 8
|
# STORES: 78
Minneapolis East
Michigan
# Stores 9
# Stores 11
Minneapolis West
# Stores 9
Detroit
# Stores 11
Chicago North
# Stores 10
Chicago South
# Stores 11
St. Louis North
# Stores 9
St. Louis South
# Stores 8
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 37
MACY’S NORTHEAST REGION
# DISTRICTS: 10
|
# STORES: 93
New England North
# Stores 13
New York East
# Stores 8
New England Central
# Stores 10
New England South
New York South
# Stores 13
# Stores 9
NYC Metro
Connecticut
# Stores 11
# Stores 13
Long Island East
Herald Square
# Stores 1
Long Island West
# Stores 9
38 • MACY’S, INC.
# Stores 6
MACY’S NORTHWEST REGION
# DISTRICTS: 10
|
# STORES: 125
North Seattle
# Stores 15
South Seattle
# Stores 16
Oregon
# Stores 12
Portland
# Stores 12
Salt Lake City
# Stores 12
Bay Area North
# Stores 12
Sacramento
# Stores 12
San Francisco
# Stores 6
Bay Area South
# Stores 16
Valley Fair
# Stores 12
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 39
MACY’S SOUTH CENTRAL REGION
# DISTRICTS: 8
|
# STORES: 101
Colorado
# Stores 14
Kansas
# Stores 12
Fort Worth/OK
# Stores 10
Dallas
# Stores 11
Houston/LA
# Stores 12
Arizona
# Stores 15
San Antonio/Austin
# Stores 15
South Houston
# Stores 12
40 • MACY’S, INC.
MACY’S SOUTHEAST REGION
# DISTRICTS: 9
|
# STORES: 101
Carolinas
# Stores 14
Atlanta East
# Stores 13
Atlanta West
# Stores 12
Northern Florida
# Stores 11
Tampa
# Stores 13
Sarasota
Ft. Lauderdale/Palm Beach
# Stores 9
# Stores 13
Miami North
Miami South
# Stores 10
# Stores 6
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 41
MACY’S SOUTHWEST REGION
# DISTRICTS: 8
|
# STORES: 107
LA North
# Stores 13
LA East
# Stores 11
Riverside
LA Valley
# Stores 16
# Stores 9
LA West
# Stores 13
Orange County
# Stores 12
San Diego
# Stores 14
Hawaii
# Stores 19
42 • MACY’S, INC.
MACY’S STORE LOCATIONS*
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
ALABAMA SOUTHEAST REGION
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
Birmingham
Brookwood Village
Birmingham
1974
244
CALIFORNIA
NORTHWEST REGION continued
Birmingham
Riverchase Galleria
Hoover
1986
226
San Francisco-Oakland
Serramonte
Daly City
1968
233
San Francisco-Oakland
Southland Mall
Hayward
1983
179
197
ARIZONA SOUTH CENTRAL REGION
San Francisco-Oakland
Stoneridge Shopping Center
Pleasanton
1980
Phoenix
Arrowhead Towne Center
Glendale
1993
200
San Francisco-Oakland
Stoneridge Shopping Center H/K/M
Pleasanton
1980
174
Phoenix
Biltmore Fashion Park
Phoenix
1968
213
San Francisco-Oakland
Stonestown Galleria
San Francisco
1952
280
Phoenix
Chandler Fashion Center
Chandler
2001
201
San Francisco-Oakland
Sunvalley Shopping Center
Concord
1967
206
Phoenix
Fiesta Mall
Mesa
1979
159
San Francisco-Oakland
Sunvalley Shopping Center H/M/F
Concord
1981
183
Phoenix
Metro Center
Phoenix
1973
107
San Francisco-Oakland
Union City Furniture Clearance
Union City
1997
63
Phoenix
Paradise Valley Mall
Phoenix
1980
153
San Francisco-Oakland
Union Square
San Francisco
1866
925
Phoenix
Santan Village
Gilbert
2009
122
San Francisco-Oakland
Union Square M
San Francisco
1866
248
Phoenix
Scottsdale Fashion Square
Scottsdale
2002
251
San Francisco-Oakland
Village at Corte Madera
Corte Madera
1985
117
Phoenix
Superstition Springs Center
Mesa
1994
155
San JosГ©
Cupertino Square Mall
Cupertino
1997
177
Tucson
Park Place
Tucson
1974
153
San JosГ©
Stanford Shopping Center
Palo Alto
1961
223
Tucson
Tucson Mall
Tucson
1991
146
San JosГ©
Stanford Shopping Center M
Palo Alto
1961
96
San JosГ©
Sunnyvale Town Center
Sunnyvale
1979
178
San JosГ©
Valley Fair
Santa Clara
1956
396
San JosГ©
Valley Fair F/H/M
Santa Clara
1957
316
CALIFORNIA
NORTHWEST REGION
Fairfield
Solano
Fairfield
1985
160
San JosГ©
Eastridge
San JosГ©
1971
187
Fresno
Fashion Fair
Fresno
Fashion Fair K/M
Fresno
1983
187
San JosГ©
Oakridge
San JosГ©
1978
236
Fresno
1970
76
Santa Cruz
Capitola Mall
Capitola
2002
Fresno
Fresno Furniture
102
Fresno
2000
73
Santa Rosa
Coddingtown Mall
Santa Rosa
1966
203
Fresno
Modesto
Shops at River Park
Fresno
2009
107
Santa Rosa
Santa Rosa Mall
Santa Rosa
1981
187
Vintage Faire
Modesto
1981
146
Stockton
Sherwood Mall
Stockton
1966
Modesto
168
Vintage Faire H/M/F
Modesto
1977
87
Stockton
West Valley Mall
Tracy
2010
101
Redding
Mt. Shasta Mall
Redding
2001
110
Visalia-Porterville
Visalia Mall
Visalia
2009
152
Sacramento
Arden Fair
Sacramento
1961
198
SOUTHWEST REGION
Sacramento
Country Club Plaza
Sacramento
1961
165
Bakersfield
Valley Plaza
Bakersfield
1967
150
Sacramento
Downtown Plaza
Sacramento
1963
343
El Centro
Imperial Valley Mall
El Centro
2005
140
Sacramento
Downtown Plaza F/M/H
Sacramento
1979
201
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Antelope Valley Mall
Palmdale
2010
120
Sacramento
Galleria at Roseville
Roseville
2000
224
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza
Los Angeles
1947
257
Sacramento
Roseville Furniture
Roseville
2001
50
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Beverly Center
Los Angeles
1982
158
Sacramento
Sunrise Mall
Citrus Heights
1972
178
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Beverly Center M
Los Angeles
1982
67
Citrus Heights
1972
160
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Brea Mall
Brea
1996
185
198
F/M/H
Sacramento
Sunrise Mall
Salinas
Del Monte Center
Monterey
1967
237
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Brea Mall F/H/K/M
Brea
2007
Salinas
Monterey Furniture
Monterey
1997
39
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Broadway Plaza
Los Angeles
1973
266
Salinas
Northridge Mall
Salinas
1972
177
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Burbank Town Center
Burbank
1992
278
San Francisco-Oakland
Bay Fair
San Leandro
1957
213
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Century City
Los Angeles
1976
136
San Francisco-Oakland
Broadway Plaza
Walnut Creek
1954
188
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Del Amo Fashion Center
Torrance
1966
289
San Francisco-Oakland
Broadway Plaza M
Walnut Creek
1995
72
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Del Amo Fashion Center H/K/M
Torrance
1981
177
San Francisco-Oakland
County East Mall
Antioch
2004
107
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Del Amo Fashion Center Home
Torrance
1966
165
San Francisco-Oakland
Hillsdale Furniture
San Mateo
1987
35
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Eagle Rock Plaza
Los Angeles
1973
150
San Francisco-Oakland
Hillsdale Shopping Center
San Mateo
1954
252
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Fashion Island
Newport Beach
1967
226
San Francisco-Oakland
Hilltop
Richmond
1976
201
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Fashion Square
Sherman Oaks
1962
312
San Francisco-Oakland
Mall at Northgate
San Rafael
1964
266
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Fox Hills
Culver City
1975
189
San Francisco-Oakland
NewPark Mall
Newark
1980
196
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Glendale Galleria
Glendale
1996
191
San Francisco-Oakland
Novato Furniture
Novato
1992
50
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Irvine Spectrum
Irvine
2002
140
San Francisco-Oakland
Pleasanton Furniture
Pleasanton
1994
48
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Laguna Hills
Laguna Hills
1975
161
*As of April 6, 2013
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 43
MACY’S STORE LOCATIONS*
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
CALIFORNIA
SOUTHWEST REGION continued
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
CALIFORNIA
SOUTHWEST REGION continued
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Lakewood Center
Lakewood
1952
348
San Diego
Plaza Camino Real
Carlsbad
1979
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Laurel Plaza
North Hollywood
1995
475
San Diego
Plaza Camino Real F/H/M
Carlsbad
1980
156
118
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Los Cerritos Center
Cerritos
1971
175
San Diego
University Town Center
San Diego
1977
155
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
MainPlace
Santa Ana
1958
334
Santa Barbara
La Cumbre Plaza
Santa Barbara
1967
150
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Manhattan Beach
Manhattan Beach
1982
111
Santa Barbara
Paseo Nuevo
Santa Barbara
1990
141
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Manhattan Beach H/M
Manhattan Beach
1982
66
Santa Barbara
Santa Maria Town Center
Santa Maria
1990
131
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Mission Viejo Mall
Mission Viejo
1980
197
Ventura County
Pacific View
Ventura
1963
181
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Mission Viejo Mall F/M
Mission Viejo
1979
237
Ventura County
Simi Valley Town Center
Simi Valley
2005
107
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Montebello Town Center
Montebello
2001
144
Ventura County
Simi Valley Town Center F/H/M
Simi Valley
2006
140
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Montebello Town Center Home Montebello
2007
89
Ventura County
The Oaks
Thousand Oaks
1983
137
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Northridge Fashion Center
Northridge
1995
207
Ventura County
The Oaks H/M/F
Thousand Oaks
1983
149
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Northridge Fashion Center F/H/M
Northridge
2007
191
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Pasadena
Pasadena
1947
301
COLORADO SOUTH CENTRAL REGION
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Promenade
Woodland Hills
1993
192
Boulder
Twenty Ninth Street Mall
Boulder
1983
153
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Promenade Furniture
Woodland Hills
1993
81
Colorado Springs
Chapel Hills Mall
Colorado Springs
1998
174
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Puente Hills Mall
City of Industry
1974
152
Denver
Cherry Creek Furniture
Denver
1990
21
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Santa Anita
Arcadia
1974
188
Denver
Cherry Creek Shopping Center
Denver
1990
189
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
South Bay Galleria
Redondo Beach
1959
361
Denver
Flat Iron Crossing
Broomfield
2000
205
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
South Coast Plaza
Costa Mesa
1973
276
Denver
Northfield Stapleton
Denver
2006
140
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
South Coast Plaza M
Costa Mesa
1973
79
Denver
Park Meadows
Lone Tree
1997
217
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
South Coast Plaza Home
Costa Mesa
1996
209
Denver
Southwest Plaza
Littleton
1982
141
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Stonewood Center
Downey
1990
154
Denver
Streets at SouthGlenn
Centennial
1974
160
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Stonewood Center Home
Downey
1990
34
Denver
Streets at SouthGlenn Furniture Centennial
2008
20
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Topanga
Canoga Park
1994
243
Denver
The Orchard Town Center
2008
140
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Valencia Town Center
Santa Clarita
1992
201
Denver
Town Center at Aurora
Aurora
1975
167
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
West Covina
West Covina
1993
182
Fort Collins
Foothills Fashion Mall
Ft. Collins
1974
129
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Westminster Mall
Westminster
1974
215
Fort Collins
Promenade Shops at Centerra
Loveland
2005
150
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Westside Pavilion
Los Angeles
1965
243
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Westside Pavilion Furniture
Los Angeles
2004
51
Riverside-San Bernardino
Galleria at Tyler
Riverside
1973
165
Riverside-San Bernardino
Inland Center
San Bernardino
1998
181
Riverside-San Bernardino
Mall of Victor Valley
Victorville
2013
103
Riverside-San Bernardino
Montclair Plaza
Montclair
1968
171
Riverside-San Bernardino
Moreno Valley Mall
Moreno Valley
1992
197
Riverside-San Bernardino
Palm Desert
Palm Desert
1982
202
Riverside-San Bernardino
Palm Desert Furniture
Palm Desert
1983
48
Riverside-San Bernardino
Promenade in Temecula
Temecula
1999
165
Riverside-San Bernardino
Promenade in Temecula F/H/K/M
Temecula
2008
208
Riverside-San Bernardino
Victoria Gardens
Rancho Cucamonga 2004
175
Riverside-San Bernardino
Victoria Gardens F/H/K/M
Rancho Cucamonga 2008
182
San Diego
Chula Vista Center
Chula Vista
1962
181
San Diego
Fashion Valley
San Diego
1969
204
San Diego
Grossmont Shopping Center
La Mesa
1961
151
San Diego
Horton Plaza
San Diego
1985
139
San Diego
Mission Valley
San Diego
1961
385
San Diego
Mission Valley Home
San Diego
1975
185
San Diego
North County Fair
Escondido
1986
151
San Diego
Otay Ranch Town Center
Chula Vista
2006
140
San Diego
Parkway
El Cajon
1972
120
San Diego
Plaza Bonita
San Diego
1981
156
44 • MACY’S, INC.
Westminster
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
CONNECTICUT NORTHEAST REGION
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
FLORIDA SOUTHEAST REGION continued
Fairfield County
Danbury Fair
Danbury
1987
241
Melbourne
Merritt Square
Merritt Island
1970
173
Fairfield County
Stamford Town Center
Stamford
1982
255
Miami-Palm Beach
Aventura Mall F/H/M
Aventura
1999
238
Fairfield County
Trumbull
Trumbull
1978
201
Miami-Palm Beach
Aventura Mall
Aventura
1983
275
Hartford
Enfield Square
Enfield
1971
166
Miami-Palm Beach
Boca Raton Furniture
Boca Raton
1999
50
Hartford
Enfield Square F/H/M
Enfield
1971
76
Miami-Palm Beach
Boynton Beach Mall
Boynton Beach
1985
227
Hartford
Shoppes at Buckland Hills
Manchester
1990
151
Miami-Palm Beach
Broward Mall
Plantation
1978
205
Hartford
Shoppes at Buckland Hills F/K/M/H Manchester
2004
106
Miami-Palm Beach
CityPlace
West Palm Beach
2000
108
Hartford
Westfarms
Farmington
1993
213
Miami-Palm Beach
Coral Square
Coral Springs
1984
111
Hartford
Westfarms F/H/M
Farmington
1993
80
Miami-Palm Beach
Coral Square H/K/M
Coral Springs
1985
142
New Haven
Brass Mill Center
Waterbury
1997
166
Miami-Palm Beach
Dadeland
Miami
1962
420
New Haven
Connecticut Post
Milford
1991
225
Miami-Palm Beach
Dadeland F/H/K
Miami
1992
210
New Haven
Meriden
Meriden
1971
179
Miami-Palm Beach
Ft. Lauderdale Furniture
Ft. Lauderdale
2002
45
Norwich
Crystal Mall
Waterford
1984
120
Miami-Palm Beach
Galleria
Ft. Lauderdale
2006
218
Miami-Palm Beach
Miami (Downtown)
Miami
1898
485
Miami-Palm Beach
Miami Beach
Miami Beach
1953
96
Miami
1982
205
145
DELAWARE MID-ATLANTIC REGION
Dover
Dover Mall
Dover
1997
140
Miami-Palm Beach
Miami International Mall
Philadelphia
Christiana Mall
Newark
1979
217
Miami-Palm Beach
Miami International Mall H/M
Miami
1982
Philadelphia
Concord Mall
Wilmington
1983
153
Miami-Palm Beach
Pembroke Furniture
Pembroke Pines
1997
51
Philadelphia
Concord Mall Home
Wilmington
1983
56
Miami-Palm Beach
Pembroke Lakes Mall
Pembroke Pines
1992
181
Miami-Palm Beach
Pembroke Lakes Mall H/M
Pembroke Pines
2006
83
Miami-Palm Beach
Pompano Beach
Pompano Beach
1969
151
FLORIDA SOUTHEAST REGION
Daytona Beach
Volusia Mall
Daytona Beach
1982
164
Miami-Palm Beach
South Dade Furniture Clearance
Miami
1979
57
Ft. Myers
Edison Mall
Ft. Myers
1965
129
Miami-Palm Beach
Southland Mall
Miami
1981
145
Ft. Myers
Edison Mall F/H/K/M
Ft. Myers
1979
168
Miami-Palm Beach
The Falls
Miami
2006
254
Gainesville
Oaks Mall
Gainesville
1984
104
Miami-Palm Beach
The Gardens Mall
Palm Beach Gardens 1988
341
Lakeland
Lakeland Square
Lakeland
1995
101
Miami-Palm Beach
Town Center at Boca Raton
Boca Raton
1979
311
Lakeland
Winter Haven
Winter Haven
1977
75
Miami-Palm Beach
Wellington Green
Wellington
2001
199
Melbourne
Melbourne Square
Melbourne
1983
104
Miami-Palm Beach
Westland Mall
Hialeah
1967
209
Naples
Coastland Center
Naples
1977
144
1980
85
Ocala
Paddock Mall
Ocala
Orlando
Altamonte Furniture
Altamonte Springs 2000
50
Orlando
Altamonte Mall
Altamonte Springs 1975
152
Orlando
Florida Mall
Orlando
1999
202
Orlando
Mall at Millenia
Orlando
2002
276
Orlando
Orlando Fashion Square
Orlando
1973
206
Orlando
Oviedo Marketplace
Oviedo
2000
195
Orlando
Seminole Towne Center
Sanford
1995
161
Punta Gorda
Port Charlotte Town Center
Port Charlotte
1994
85
Sarasota
DeSoto Square
Bradenton
1973
132
Sarasota
Sarasota Square
Sarasota
1977
143
Sarasota
Southgate
Sarasota
1976
152
Stuart
Treasure Coast Square
Jensen Beach
1987
140
Tallahassee
Governor’s Square
Tallahassee
1979
169
Tampa
Brandon Town Center
Brandon
1995
142
162
Tampa
Citrus Park
Tampa
1999
Tampa
Countryside Furniture
Clearwater
2000
50
Tampa
Countryside Mall
Clearwater
1975
213
Tampa
Gandy Furniture
Tampa
1954
61
Tampa
Gulf View Square
Port Richey
1981
84
Tampa
Shops at Wiregrass
Pasco County
2008
139
Tampa
Tyrone Square
St. Petersburg
1972
162
Tampa
University Square
Tampa
1974
140
Tampa
WestShore Plaza
Tampa
1966
236
Vero Beach
Indian River Mall
Vero Beach
1996
104
*As of April 6, 2013
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 45
MACY’S STORE LOCATIONS*
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
GEORGIA SOUTHEAST REGION
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
ILLINOIS NORTH REGION
Athens
Georgia Square
Athens
1981
121
Bloomington
Eastland Mall
Bloomington
1999
154
Atlanta
Arbor Place
Douglasville
2004
141
Carbondale
University Mall
Carbondale
1991
109
Atlanta
Cumberland Mall
Atlanta
1973
279
Champaign
Market Place Shopping Center
Champaign
1999
191
Atlanta
Gallery at South DeKalb
Decatur
1969
188
Chicago
Fox Valley
Aurora
1975
253
Atlanta
Greenbriar Mall
Atlanta
1965
200
Chicago
Hawthorn Center
Vernon Hills
1973
240
Atlanta
Gwinnett Furniture
Duluth
1998
51
Chicago
Louis Joliet
Joliet
1978
126
Atlanta
Gwinnett Place
Duluth
1984
245
Chicago
Northbrook Court
Northbrook
1995
286
Atlanta
Lenox Square
Atlanta
1959
433
Chicago
Oak Brook Furniture
Oak Brook
1996
106
Atlanta
Mall at Stonecrest
Lithonia
2001
160
Chicago
Oakbrook Center
Oak Brook
1962
378
Atlanta
Mall of Georgia
Buford
2000
245
Chicago
Old Orchard
Skokie
1956
461
Atlanta
North DeKalb
Decatur
1965
190
Chicago
Orland Square
Orland Park
1976
198
253
Atlanta
North Point Mall
Alpharetta
1993
250
Chicago
River Oaks Center
Calumet City
1966
Atlanta
Northlake Mall
Atlanta
1971
192
Chicago
Spring Hill Mall
West Dundee
1980
123
Atlanta
Northpoint Furniture
Alpharetta
2000
71
Chicago
State Street
Chicago
1868
2,048
Atlanta
Perimeter Furniture
Atlanta
1986
87
Chicago
Stratford Square Mall
Bloomingdale
1981
149
Atlanta
Perimeter Mall
Atlanta
1971
280
Chicago
The Promenade Bolingbrook
Bolingbrook
2007
207
Atlanta
Southlake Mall
Morrow
1976
233
Chicago
Water Tower Place
Chicago
1975
325
Atlanta
Town Center at Cobb
Kennesaw
1986
255
Chicago
Woodfield Furniture
Schaumburg
1996
104
Atlanta
Town Center at Cobb F/M
Kennesaw
2003
243
Chicago
Woodfield Mall
Schaumburg
1971
316
Augusta
Augusta Mall
Augusta
1978
166
Peoria
Northwoods Mall
Peoria
1985
165
Columbus
Peachtree Mall
Columbus
2002
139
Rockford
CherryVale Mall
Rockford
1973
154
Macon
Macon Mall
Macon
1975
158
Springfield
White Oaks Mall
Springfield
1977
161
Savannah
Oglethorpe Mall
Savannah
1992
143
St. Louis
Alton Square Mall
Alton
1978
180
St. Louis
St. Clair Square
Fairview Heights
1973
248
HAWAII SOUTHWEST REGION
INDIANA
MIDWEST REGION
Honolulu
Ala Moana
Honolulu
1966
325
Honolulu
Ala Moana Jewel Gallery
Honolulu
1986
2
Honolulu
Kahala
Honolulu
1958
91
Bloomington
College Mall
Bloomington
1982
90
Honolulu
Kahala M
Honolulu
1958
15
Fort Wayne
Glenbrook Square
Fort Wayne
1966
251
Honolulu
Kailua
Kailua
1946
59
Indianapolis
Castleton Square
Indianapolis
1973
310
Honolulu
Pearlridge
Aiae
1971
166
Indianapolis
Glendale Mall
Indianapolis
1958
235
Honolulu
Waikiki
Honolulu
1937
37
Indianapolis
Greenwood Park Mall
Greenwood
1980
160
Honolulu
Windward
Kaneohe
1982
87
Lafayette
Tippecanoe Mall
Lafayette
1994
140
Island of Hawaii
Kings Shops
Waikoloa
1992
10
Muncie
Muncie Mall
Muncie
1996
120
Island of Hawaii
Makalapua
Kailua-Kona
1997
52
South Bend
University Park Mall
Mishawaka
1979
169
Island of Hawaii
Prince Kuhio Plaza
Hilo
1985
50
Terre Haute
Honey Creek Mall
Terre Haute
1998
177
Island of Hawaii
Prince Kuhio Plaza H/K/M
Hilo
2003
62
NORTH REGION
Kauai
Kukui Grove
Lihue
1992
50
Chicago
Southlake
Merrillville
1978
165
Kauai
Kukui Grove H/M
Lihue
2003
25
Evansville
Eastland Mall
Evansville
1982
171
Maui
Hyatt Regency
Kaanapali
1983
7
Maui
Queen Kaahumanu Center
Kahulu
1972
80
KANSAS SOUTH CENTRAL REGION
Maui
Queen Kaahumanu Center H/K/M Kahulu
2003
86
Kansas City
Metcalf South Shopping Center Overland Park
1967
216
Kansas City
Oak Park Furniture
Overland Park
2002
25
Kansas City
Oak Park Mall
Overland Park
2002
165
IDAHO NORTHWEST REGION
Boise
Boise Town Square
Boise
1988
180
Kansas City
Prairie Village
Prairie Village
1958
133
Boise
Nampa Gateway Center
Nampa
1905
104
Kansas City
Town Center Plaza
Leawood
2004
124
Coeur d’Alene
Silver Lake Mall
Coeur d’Alene
2002
52
Idaho Falls
Grand Teton Mall
Idaho Falls
1984
60
Lewiston
Lewiston Center
Lewiston
1978
49
Moscow
Palouse Mall
Moscow
1979
41
Twin Falls
Magic Valley Mall
Twin Falls
1987
61
46 • MACY’S, INC.
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
KENTUCKY
MIDWEST REGION
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
MASSACHUSETTS NORTHEAST REGION continued
Boston
Independence Mall
Kingston
1989
Bowling Green
Greenwood Mall
Bowling Green
1980
124
Boston
Natick Collection
Natick
1965
210
Cincinnati
Florence Mall
Florence
1977
147
Boston
Northshore Mall
Peabody
1993
216
Cincinnati
Florence Mall Home
Florence
1994
112
Boston
Northshore Mall F/M/H
Peabody
2007
115
Lexington
Fayette Mall
Lexington
1971
279
Boston
South Shore Plaza
Braintree
1961
255
Louisville
Jefferson Mall
Louisville
1979
157
Boston
Square One Mall
Saugus
1994
179
Louisville
Oxmoor Center
Louisville
1970
278
Boston
Westgate Mall
Brockton
2003
144
Cape Cod
Cape Cod Mall
Hyannis
1978
81
Cape Cod
Cape Cod Mall F/H/K/M
Hyannis
2007
119
Pittsfield
Berkshire Mall
Lanesborough
1994
111
Providence
Dartmouth Mall
Dartmouth
2004
141
NORTH REGION
Owensboro
Towne Square Mall
Owensboro
1998
102
LOUISIANA SOUTH CENTRAL REGION
149
Baton Rouge
Cortana
Baton Rouge
1976
243
Providence
Emerald Square
North Attleboro
1989
185
Baton Rouge
Mall of Louisiana
Baton Rouge
1997
220
Providence
Emerald Square F/H/M
North Attleboro
1989
120
Lafayette
Acadiana Mall
Lafayette
1979
186
Providence
Silver City Galleria
Taunton
1992
152
New Orleans
Esplanade
Kenner
2008
188
Providence
Swansea Mall
Swansea
1988
102
New Orleans
Lakeside
New Orleans
2008
229
Springfield
Eastfield Mall
Springfield
1994
127
Springfield
Holyoke Mall at Ingleside
Holyoke
1995
202
Worcester
Auburn Home
Auburn
1997
88
Auburn
1997
167
MAINE NORTHEAST REGION
Bangor
Bangor Mall
Bangor
1998
143
Worcester
Auburn Mall
Portland
Maine Mall
South Portland
1969
194
Worcester
Mall at Whitney Field
Leominster
2002
140
Worcester
Solomon Pond Mall
Marlborough
1996
200
MARYLAND MID-ATLANTIC REGION
Baltimore
Annapolis Mall
Annapolis
1979
202
Baltimore
Harford Mall
Bel Air
1981
141
Baltimore
Harford Mall Furniture
Bel Air
1981
25
Baltimore
Mall in Columbia
Columbia
1975
228
Baltimore
Marley Station
Glen Burnie
1987
164
Baltimore
Owings Mills Mall
Owings Mills
1986
164
Baltimore
Security Square
Baltimore
1979
155
204
Baltimore
Towson Town Center
Towson
1982
Baltimore
White Marsh Home
Baltimore
2006
59
Baltimore
White Marsh Mall
Baltimore
1991
165
Hagerstown
Valley Mall
Hagerstown
1999
120
Salisbury
Centre at Salisbury
Salisbury
1991
138
Washington, D.C.
Bowie Town Center
Bowie
2001
160
Washington, D.C.
Francis Scott Key Mall
Frederick
1993
141
Washington, D.C.
Lakeforest Mall
Gaithersburg
1978
170
Washington, D.C.
Mall at Prince Georges
Hyattsville
1958
177
Washington, D.C.
Marlow Heights Shopping Center
Marlow Heights
1960
160
Washington, D.C.
Montgomery
Bethesda
1968
213
Washington, D.C.
Montgomery Home
Bethesda
1968
76
Washington, D.C.
St. Charles Towne Center
Waldorf
1990
179
Washington, D.C.
St. Charles Towne Home
Waldorf
1990
54
Washington, D.C.
Wheaton
Wheaton
2005
174
MASSACHUSETTS NORTHEAST REGION
Boston
Boston (Downtown)
Boston
2007
385
Boston
Burlington Mall
Burlington
1968
255
Boston
Cambridgeside Galleria
Cambridge
1990
91
Boston
Cambridgeside Galleria H/K
Cambridge
1990
40
Boston
Framingham Furniture
Framingham
1994
41
Boston
Hanover Furniture
Hanover
1972
13
Boston
Hanover Mall
Hanover
1972
110
*As of April 6, 2013
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 47
MACY’S STORE LOCATIONS*
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
MICHIGAN NORTH REGION
Ann Arbor
Briarwood Mall
METROPOLITAN AREA
Ann Arbor
1974
189
MISSOURI
NORTH REGION
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
Battle Creek
Lakeview Square Mall
Battle Creek
1983
102
Cape Girardeau
West Park Mall
Cape Girardeau
1981
108
Detroit
Birchwood Mall
Ft. Gratiot
1997
103
St. Louis
Chesterfield Mall
Chesterfield
1995
269
Detroit
Eastland Center
Harper Woods
1957
433
St. Louis
Jamestown Mall
Florissant
1994
200
Detroit
Fairlane Town Center
Dearborn
1976
241
St. Louis
Mid Rivers Mall
St. Peters
1981
211
Detroit
Lakeside Mall
Sterling Heights
1978
207
St. Louis
South County Mall
St. Louis
1963
205
Detroit
Lakeside Mall H/M
Sterling Heights
1978
119
St. Louis
St. Louis (Downtown)
St. Louis
1924
189
Detroit
Northland Center
Southfield
1954
504
St. Louis
St. Louis Galleria
St. Louis
1991
277
Detroit
Oakland Mall
Troy
1968
442
St. Louis
West County Mall
Des Peres
2001
275
Detroit
Somerset Collection
Troy
1996
316
SOUTH CENTRAL REGION
Detroit
Southland
Taylor
1970
283
Columbia
The Shoppes at Stadium
Columbia
2003
140
Detroit
Twelve Oaks
Novi
1977
300
Joplin
Northpark Mall
Joplin
1987
85
Detroit
Westland Shopping Center
Westland
1965
334
Joplin
Northpark Mall H/M
Joplin
1994
55
Flint
Genesee Valley Center
Flint
1970
266
Kansas City
Independence Center
Independence
1986
198
Grand Rapids
RiverTown Crossings
Grandville
1999
171
Kansas City
Lee’s Summit
Kansas City
2009
122
Grand Rapids
Woodland Shopping Center
Grand Rapids
1975
162
Kansas City
Metro North Mall
Kansas City
1976
222
Kalamazoo
The Crossroads
Portage
1980
122
Springfield
Battlefield Mall
Springfield
1982
135
Lansing
Lansing Mall
Lansing
1979
103
Lansing
Meridian Mall
Okemos
1982
154
MONTANA NORTHWEST REGION
Saginaw
Fashion Square
Saginaw
1976
123
Bozeman
Gallatin Valley Mall
Bozeman
1980
51
Traverse City
Grand Traverse Mall
Traverse City
1992
103
Helena
Northside Center
Helena
2001
65
MINNESOTA NORTH REGION
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Burnsville Center
Burnsville
1977
224
NEVADA
NORTHWEST REGION
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Mall of America
Bloomington
1992
320
Reno
Meadowood Mall
Reno
1978
167
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Maplewood Mall
Maplewood
1996
230
Reno
Meadowood Mall H/M
Reno
1979
102
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Minneapolis (Downtown)
Minneapolis
1902
1,276
Reno
Reno Furniture
Reno
1994
52
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Ridgedale
Minnetonka
1974
202
SOUTHWEST REGION
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Ridgedale H/M
Minnetonka
1974
129
Las Vegas
Boulevard
Las Vegas
1966
178
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Rosedale Center
Roseville
1969
270
Las Vegas
Fashion Show
Las Vegas
1981
201
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Rosedale Furniture
Roseville
1976
53
Las Vegas
Fashion Show M
Las Vegas
2013
105
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Southdale Center
Edina
1956
426
Las Vegas
Galleria at Sunset
Henderson
1996
229
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Southdale Furniture
Edina
1978
93
Las Vegas
Las Vegas Home
Las Vegas
1994
111
Rochester
Apache Mall
Rochester
1972
163
Las Vegas
Meadows Mall
Las Vegas
1978
165
St. Cloud
Crossroads Center
St. Cloud
1976
101
NEW HAMPSHIRE NORTHEAST REGION
Boston
Fox Run Mall H/K/M
Newington
1983
78
Boston
Fox Run Mall
Newington
1983
60
Boston
Mall at Rockingham Park
Salem
1991
166
Manchester
Bedford
Bedford
1966
180
Manchester
Mall of New Hampshire
Manchester
1996
166
Manchester
Pheasant Lane Mall
Nashua
1993
150
NEW JERSEY
MID-ATLANTIC REGION
48 • MACY’S, INC.
Atlantic City
Hamilton Mall
Mays Landing
1987
259
New York
Bridgewater Commons
Bridgewater
1988
259
New York
Brunswick Square
East Brunswick
1970
244
New York
Essex Green Shopping Center
West Orange
1975
93
New York
Freehold Raceway Mall
Freehold
1998
244
New York
Ledgewood Mall
Ledgewood
1994
73
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
NEW JERSEY
MID-ATLANTIC REGION continued
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
NEW YORK
NORTHEAST REGION continued
New York
Livingston Mall
Livingston
1971
266
New York
Palisades Center
West Nyack
1998
New York
Menlo Park Mall
Edison
1959
351
New York
Parkchester
Bronx
1941
204
171
New York
Middlesex Mall
South Plainfield
1976
81
New York
Queens Center
Elmhurst
1995
373
New York
Monmouth Mall
Eatontown
1960
290
New York
Queens Furniture
Elmhurst
2001
64
New York
Newport Centre
Jersey City
2002
230
New York
Roosevelt Field
Garden City
1956
461
New York
Ocean County Mall
Toms River
1977
170
New York
Smith Haven
Lake Grove
1969
326
New York
Preakness Shopping Center
Wayne
1963
81
New York
Smith Haven Furniture
Lake Grove
2007
51
New York
Rockaway Townsquare
Rockaway
1977
262
New York
Staten Island Furniture
Staten Island
2003
51
New York
Rte. 1 Furniture
North Brunswick
1995
38
New York
Staten Island Mall
Staten Island
1965
272
New York
Rte. 22 Furniture
Springfield
1962
40
New York
Sunrise Mall
Massapequa
1973
213
New York
Rte. 35 Furniture
Eatontown
1980
37
New York
Walt Whitman Mall
Huntington Station 1962
308
New York
Rte. 46 Furniture
Wayne
1972
63
New York
White Plains Galleria
White Plains
1980
315
New York
Short Hills
Short Hills
1981
279
Poughkeepsie
Galleria at Crystal Run
Middletown
1992
181
New York
Willowbrook
Wayne
1967
380
Poughkeepsie
Poughkeepsie Galleria
Poughkeepsie
1987
165
New York
Woodbridge Center
Woodbridge
1971
278
Syracuse
Destiny USA
Syracuse
1990
165
Philadelphia
Cherry Hill Furniture
Maple Shade
2001
61
Syracuse
Great Northern Mall
Clay
1989
88
Philadelphia
Cherry Hill Mall
Cherry Hill
1962
334
Syracuse
ShoppingTown Mall
DeWitt
1993
120
Sangertown Square
New Hartford
1995
140
Philadelphia
Deptford Mall
Deptford
1975
208
Utica
Philadelphia
Moorestown Mall
Moorestown
1999
200
MIDWEST REGION
Philadelphia
Voorhees Town Center
Voorhees
1970
224
Binghamton
Oakdale Mall
Johnson City
2000
140
Trenton
Quaker Bridge Mall
Lawrenceville
1976
215
Buffalo
Boulevard Mall
Amherst
1983
181
Buffalo
Boulevard Mall M
Amherst
1983
41
485
Buffalo
Eastern Hills Mall
Williamsville
1971
127
88
NORTHEAST REGION
New York
Garden State Plaza
Paramus
1957
New York
Paramus Furniture
Paramus
2000
77
Buffalo
McKinley Mall
Buffalo
1989
New York
Paramus Park
Paramus
1974
303
Buffalo
McKinley Mall Home
Buffalo
1989
31
Buffalo
Walden Galleria
Cheektowanga
1988
190
NEW MEXICO SOUTH CENTRAL REGION
Elmira
Arnot Mall
Horsehead
1995
120
Albuquerque
Coronado Center
Albuquerque
1976
157
Rochester
Eastview
Victor
1971
175
Albuquerque
Cottonwood Mall
Albuquerque
1996
173
Rochester
Mall at Greece Ridge
Greece
1995
122
Rochester
Mall at Greece Ridge Home
Greece
1995
42
Rochester
Medley Centre
Rochester
1990
129
Rochester
The Marketplace
Rochester
1982
149
NEW YORK
NORTHEAST REGION
Albany
Colonie Center
Albany
1990
341
Albany
Crossgates Mall
Albany
1985
202
NORTH CAROLINA SOUTHEAST REGION
Albany
Rotterdam Square
Schenectady
1995
120
Charlotte
Carolina Place
Pineville
1993
151
Kingston
Hudson Valley Mall
Kingston
1995
121
Charlotte
Northlake Mall
Charlotte
2005
165
New York
Broadway Mall
Hicksville
1956
309
Charlotte
SouthPark Mall
Charlotte
1988
201
New York
Brooklyn
Brooklyn
1865
1,012
Durham
Northgate Mall
Durham
1994
187
New York
Carle Place Furniture
Carle Place
1971
86
Durham
Streets at Southpoint
Durham
2001
180
New York
Carle Place Furniture Clearance Carle Place
1971
51
Fayetteville
Cross Creek Mall
Fayetteville
1975
133
New York
Commack Shopping Center
Commack
1981
208
Greensboro
Friendly Center
Greensboro
1958
147
New York
Cross County Shopping Center
Yonkers
1987
355
Greensboro
Wendover
Greensboro
2002
141
New York
Douglaston
Douglaston
1981
158
Raleigh
Cary Towne Center
Cary
1991
107
New York
Flushing
Flushing
1951
277
Raleigh
Crabtree Valley Mall
Raleigh
1995
175
New York
Green Acres Mall
Valley Stream
1986
274
Raleigh
Triangle Town Center
Raleigh
2002
180
New York
Green Acres Mall F/M/H
Valley Stream
2004
116
Winston-Salem
Hanes Mall
Winston-Salem
1990
155
New York
Hampton Bays
Hampton Bays
1981
50
New York
Herald Square
New York
1902
2,172
New York
Jefferson Valley Mall
Yorktown Heights
1987
121
Fargo
West Acres
Fargo
1973
118
New York
Kings Plaza Shopping Center
Brooklyn
1970
339
Grand Forks
Columbia Mall
Grand Forks
1978
99
New York
Manhasset
Manhasset
1965
331
New York
Nanuet Mall
Nanuet
1969
227
NORTH DAKOTA NORTH REGION
*As of April 6, 2013
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 49
MACY’S STORE LOCATIONS*
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
OHIO
MIDWEST REGION
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
OHIO
MIDWEST REGION CONTINUED
Akron
Chapel Hill Shopping Center
Akron
1967
169
Springfield
Upper Valley Mall
Springfield
1971
156
Akron
Stow-Kent Plaza
Stow
1965
82
Steubenville
Fort Steuben Mall
Steubenville
1974
132
Akron
Summit Mall
Akron
1965
195
Wheeling
Ohio Valley Mall
St. Clairsville
1979
101
Canton
Belden Village
Canton
1971
133
Youngstown
Eastwood Mall
Niles
1969
157
Cincinnati
Anderson Towne Center
Cincinnati
1969
162
Youngstown
Southern Park Mall
Youngstown
1970
189
Cincinnati
Fountain Place
Cincinnati
1997
186
NORTH REGION
Cincinnati
Kenwood Furniture
Cincinnati
1989
71
Westfield Franklin Park
Toledo
1971
187
Cincinnati
Kenwood Towne Centre
Cincinnati
1988
269
Cincinnati
Northgate Mall
Cincinnati
1993
191
OKLAHOMA SOUTH CENTRAL REGION
Cincinnati
Tri-County Mall
Cincinnati
1960
235
Oklahoma City
Penn Square Mall
Oklahoma City
1988
161
Cleveland
Great Lakes Mall
Mentor
1964
190
Oklahoma City
Quail Springs Mall
Oklahoma City
1986
146
Cleveland
Great Northern
North Olmsted
1965
231
Tulsa
Tulsa Promenade
Tulsa
1996
180
Cleveland
Midway Mall
Elyria
1990
105
Tulsa
Woodland Hills
Tulsa
1982
160
Cleveland
Richmond Town Square
Richmond Heights 1998
165
Cleveland
SouthPark
Strongsville
1996
186
OREGON NORTHWEST REGION
Cleveland
University Square
University Heights
2002
165
Bend
Bend River Mall
Bend
1980
103
Columbus
Eastland Furniture Clearance
Columbus
1972
72
Coos Bay
Pony Village Mall
North Bend
1980
41
Columbus
Eastland Mall
Columbus
2006
121
Eugene
Valley River Center
Eugene
1990
188
Columbus
Easton Town Center
Columbus
2001
245
Medford
Rogue Valley Mall
Medford
1986
111
Columbus
Kingsdale Shopping Center
Columbus
1970
108
Medford
Rogue Valley Mall Home
Medford
1986
45
Columbus
Mall at Tuttle Crossing
Dublin
1997
225
Portland
Clackamas Town Center
Portland
1980
199
Columbus
Mall at Tuttle Crossing F/H/K/M
Dublin
2003
227
Portland
Clackamas Town Center Home
Portland
1980
169
Columbus
Polaris Fashion Place
Columbus
2001
182
Portland
Lloyd Center
Portland
1966
298
Columbus
Tuttle Furniture
Dublin
1996
41
Portland
Portland (Downtown)
Portland
2007
246
Toledo
Dayton
Dayton Mall
Dayton
1969
263
Portland
Streets of Tanasbourne
Hillsboro
2004
172
Dayton
Fairfield Commons
Dayton
1994
152
Portland
Washington Square
Portland
1973
260
Lima
Lima Mall
Lima
1971
195
Portland
Washington Square Furniture
Portland
2008
76
Mansfield
Richland Mall
Mansfield
1969
140
Roseburg
Roseburg Valley Mall
Roseburg
1980
40
Sandusky
Sandusky Mall
Sandusky
1979
133
Salem
Lancaster Mall
Salem
1980
67
Salem
Salem Center
Salem
1966
188
50 • MACY’S, INC.
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
PENNSYLVANIA
MID-ATLANTIC REGION
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
TENNESSEE MIDWEST REGION
Allentown
Lehigh Valley Mall
Whitehall
Harrisburg
Capital City Mall
Camp Hill
Harrisburg
Harrisburg Mall
Harrisburg
Philadelphia
Exton Square Mall
Exton
Philadelphia
King of Prussia
King of Prussia
Philadelphia
Montgomery Mall
North Wales
Philadelphia
Neshaminy Mall
Bensalem
Jackson
Old Hickory Mall
Jackson
1981
160
218
Memphis
Oak Court
Memphis
1961
399
1995
120
Memphis
Southland Mall
Memphis
1966
150
1995
191
Memphis
The Avenue Carriage Crossing
Collierville
2007
130
1973
184
Memphis
Wolfchase Galleria
Memphis
1997
266
1991
256
Nashville
Cool Springs Galleria
Franklin
1991
270
1978
220
Nashville
Mall at Green Hills
Nashville
2004
179
1968
211
Nashville
Rivergate Mall
Goodlettsville
1971
204
225
1976
Philadelphia
Oxford Valley Mall
Langhorne
1973
197
Philadelphia
Philadelphia City Center
Philadelphia
1911
386
TEXAS SOUTH CENTRAL REGION
Philadelphia
Plymouth Meeting Mall
Plymouth Meeting 1966
214
Austin
Barton Creek Square
Austin
1982
Philadelphia
Roosevelt Mall
Philadelphia
1995
311
Austin
Lakeline Mall
Cedar Park
1995
180
Philadelphia
Springfield Mall
Springfield
1974
192
Austin
The Domain
Austin
2007
140
Philadelphia
Suburban Square
Ardmore
1930
102
Beaumont
Parkdale Mall
Beaumont
2002
171
Philadelphia
Willow Grove Park
Willow Grove
2001
226
College Station
Post Oak Mall
College Station
1984
105
York
West Manchester Mall
York
1995
120
Corpus Christi
Padre Staples Mall
Corpus Christi
1987
218
Dallas-Fort Worth
Collin Creek Mall
Plano
1980
199
Altoona
Logan Valley Mall
Altoona
1995
150
Dallas-Fort Worth
Dallas Galleria
Dallas
1985
268
Erie
Millcreek Mall
Erie
1975
163
Dallas-Fort Worth
Fairview
Fairview
2009
122
Pittsburgh
Beaver Valley Mall
Monaca
1987
203
Dallas-Fort Worth
Firewheel Town Center
Garland
2005
141
Pittsburgh
Century III Mall
West Mifflin
1979
173
Dallas-Fort Worth
Golden Triangle
Denton
2003
114
Pittsburgh
Galleria at Pittsburgh Mills
Tarentum
2005
173
MIDWEST REGION
Pittsburgh
Monroeville Mall
Monroeville
1969
263
Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh (Downtown)
Pittsburgh
1946
1,158
Pittsburgh
Ross Park Furniture
Pittsburgh
1997
48
Pittsburgh
Ross Park Mall
Pittsburgh
1986
229
Pittsburgh
South Hills Village
Bethel Park
1965
260
Pittsburgh
South Hills Village Furniture
Bethel Park
1993
21
Pittsburgh
The Mall at Robinson
Pittsburgh
1998
205
Pittsburgh
The Waterfront
Homestead
2003
142
Pittsburgh
Washington Crown Center
Washington
1999
148
Pittsburgh
Westmoreland Furniture
Greensburg
1976
24
Pittsburgh
Westmoreland Mall
Greensburg
1976
168
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre
Viewmont Mall
Scranton
1995
140
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre
Wyoming Valley Mall
Wilkes-Barre
1995
96
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre
Wyoming Valley Mall H/M
Wilkes-Barre
1995
51
State College
Nittany Mall
State College
1999
98
Williamsport
Lycoming Mall
Muncy
1995
120
Youngstown
Shenango Valley Mall
Hermitage
1976
106
RHODE ISLAND NORTHEAST REGION
Providence
Providence Place
Providence
1999
201
Providence
Warwick Mall
Warwick
1970
186
SOUTH CAROLINA SOUTHEAST REGION
Columbia
Columbia Mall
Columbia
1978
186
Greenville
Haywood Mall
Greenville
1980
152
Sioux Falls
1971
101
SOUTH DAKOTA NORTH REGION
Sioux Falls
Empire Mall
*As of April 6, 2013
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 51
MACY’S STORE LOCATIONS*
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
TEXAS SOUTH CENTRAL REGION continued
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
VERMONT NORTHEAST REGION
Dallas-Fort Worth
Hulen Mall
Ft. Worth
1977
215
Dallas-Fort Worth
Irving Mall
Irving
1989
188
Burlington
Burlington Town Center
Burlington
1999
152
Dallas-Fort Worth
North East Mall
Hurst
2001
240
VIRGINIA MID-ATLANTIC REGION
Dallas-Fort Worth
NorthPark Center
Dallas
2000
250
Lynchburg
River Ridge Mall
Lynchburg
1980
144
Dallas-Fort Worth
Parks at Arlington
Arlington
1990
201
Richmond
Chesterfield Towne Center
Richmond
1990
143
Dallas-Fort Worth
Ridgmar Mall
Ft. Worth
1998
181
Richmond
Regency Square
Richmond
1990
100
Dallas-Fort Worth
Shops at Willow Bend
Plano
2001
239
Richmond
Regency Square F/H/K/M
Richmond
1990
124
Dallas-Fort Worth
Southwest Center Mall
Dallas
1975
148
Richmond
Short Pump Town Center
Richmond
2003
202
Dallas-Fort Worth
Stonebriar Centre
Frisco
2000
201
Richmond
Southpark Mall
Colonial Heights
1989
104
Dallas-Fort Worth
Town East Mall
Mesquite
1972
196
Richmond
Virginia Center Commons
Glen Allen
1993
110
Dallas-Fort Worth
Vista Ridge Mall
Lewisville
1991
181
Roanoke
Valley View Mall
Roanoke
1985
101
El Paso
Cielo Vista Mall
El Paso
2002
187
Roanoke
Valley View Mall H/K
Roanoke
2001
47
El Paso
Sunland Park Mall
El Paso
2004
105
Virginia Beach-Norfolk
Chesapeake Square
Chesapeake
1999
95
Houston
Almeda
Houston
1966
147
Virginia Beach-Norfolk
Peninsula Town Center
Hampton
1977
173
Houston
Baybrook Mall
Friendswood
2004
244
Virginia Beach-Norfolk
Greenbrier Mall
Chesapeake
1990
145
Houston
Deerbrook
Humble
1984
204
Virginia Beach-Norfolk
Lynnhaven Mall
Virginia Beach
1998
200
Houston
First Colony Mall
Sugar Land
1996
202
Virginia Beach-Norfolk
Military Circle Shopping Center
Norfolk
1976
153
Houston
Galleria
Houston
1986
256
Virginia Beach-Norfolk
Patrick Henry
Newport News
1998
141
Houston
Galleria H/K/M
Houston
2003
248
Washington, D.C.
Ballston Common Furniture
Arlington
1959
103
Houston
Greenspoint Mall
Houston
1976
314
Washington, D.C.
Ballston Common Mall
Arlington
1959
352
Houston
Memorial City Mall
Houston
2001
300
Washington, D.C.
Dulles Town Center
Dulles
1998
181
Houston
Pasadena Town Square
Pasadena
1962
209
Washington, D.C.
Fair Oaks Mall
Fairfax
1980
220
Houston
Pearland
Houston
2008
140
Washington, D.C.
Fair Oaks Mall F/H/K/M
Fairfax
2000
254
Houston
San Jacinto Mall
Baytown
1980
157
Washington, D.C.
Fashion Centre at Pentagon City
Arlington
1989
307
Houston
West Oaks Mall
Houston
1982
243
Washington, D.C.
Landmark Mall
Alexandria
1965
201
Houston
Willowbrook Mall
Houston
1981
248
Washington, D.C.
Manassas Mall
Manassas
1996
139
Houston
Willowbrook Mall F/M/H
Houston
2002
91
Washington, D.C.
Spotsylvania Towne Centre
Fredericksburg
1993
146
Houston
Woodlands Mall
The Woodlands
1994
201
Washington, D.C.
Springfield Mall
Springfield
1991
287
Houston
Woodlands Mall K/H
The Woodlands
2001
18
Washington, D.C.
Tysons Corner Center
McLean
1968
243
Houston
Woodlands Mall Furniture
The Woodlands
2002
19
Washington, D.C.
Tysons Galleria
McLean
1988
265
Killeen-Temple
Temple Mall
Temple
1995
111
Laredo
Mall Del Norte
Laredo
1996
113
Laredo
Mall Del Norte Home
Laredo
1996
33
Bellingham
Bellingham Home
Bellingham
1991
40
McAllen
La Plaza Mall
McAllen
1997
181
Bellingham
Bellis Fair
Bellingham
1988
120
McAllen
La Plaza Mall H/K
McAllen
1997
50
Bremerton
Kitsap Mall
Silverdale
1985
120
San Antonio
Ingram Park Mall
San Antonio
1983
150
Bremerton
Siverdale Home
Silverdale
1995
40
San Antonio
North Star Mall
San Antonio
1981
278
Longview
Three Rivers Mall
Kelso
1987
51
San Antonio
Rivercenter
San Antonio
1989
96
Olympia
Capital Mall
Olympia
1978
113
San Antonio
Rolling Oaks Shopping Center
San Antonio
1992
179
Olympia
Olympia Furniture
Olympia
1996
40
San Antonio
Shops at La Cantera
San Antonio
2005
166
Portland
Vancouver Mall
Vancouver
1977
180
San Antonio
South Park Mall
San Antonio
2000
120
Seattle-Tacoma
Alderwood Furniture
Lynnwood
1985
40
Tyler
Broadway Square
Tyler
1981
100
Seattle-Tacoma
Alderwood Mall
Lynnwood
1979
248
Seattle-Tacoma
Bellevue Square
Bellevue
1984
248
Seattle-Tacoma
Bellevue Square Home
Bellevue
1984
51
UTAH NORTHWEST REGION
WASHINGTON NORTHWEST REGION
Ogden
Layton Hills Mall
Layton
1980
162
Seattle-Tacoma
Budget House Furniture Clearance Tukwila
1974
33
Provo
University Mall
Orem
1972
208
Seattle-Tacoma
Commons at Federal Way
Federal Way
1977
141
Salt Lake City
Cottonwood Mall
Salt Lake City
1962
200
Seattle-Tacoma
Everett Mall
Everett
1977
133
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City (Downtown)
Salt Lake City
2012
150
Seattle-Tacoma
Northgate Mall
Seattle
1950
319
Salt Lake City
Fashion Place Mall
Murray
1988
26
Seattle-Tacoma
Redmond Home
Redmond
1987
40
Salt Lake City
South Towne Center
Sandy
1986
201
Seattle-Tacoma
Redmond Town Center
Redmond
2003
112
Salt Lake City
Valley Fair Mall
West Valley City
1970
106
Seattle-Tacoma
Seattle
Seattle
1929
864
52 • MACY’S, INC.
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
METROPOLITAN AREA
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
WASHINGTON NORTHWEST REGION continued
Seattle-Tacoma
South Hill Mall
Puyallup
1994
115
Seattle-Tacoma
Southcenter
Seattle
1968
265
Seattle-Tacoma
Tacoma Home
Tacoma
2003
53
Seattle-Tacoma
Tacoma Mall
Tacoma
1964
257
Seattle-Tacoma
Tukwila Home
Tukwila
1981
49
Skagit County
Cascade Mall
Burlington
1989
62
Skagit County
Cascade Mall H/K/M
Burlington
2004
51
Spokane
NorthTown
Spokane
1993
106
Spokane
Spokane
Spokane
1947
374
Spokane
Spokane Valley Mall
Spokane Valley
1997
122
Tri-Cities
Columbia Center
Kennewick
1969
122
Tri-Cities
Columbia Center K/M
Kennewick
2002
40
Tri-Cities
Columbia Home
Kennewick
2004
40
Walla Walla
Walla Walla
Walla Walla
1944
69
Wenatchee
Wenatchee Valley Mall
East Wenatchee
2001
87
Yakima
Valley Mall
Union Gap
2002
119
WEST VIRGINIA MIDWEST REGION
Charleston
Charleston Town Center
Charleston
1983
147
Huntington
Huntington Mall
Barboursville
1981
162
WISCONSIN NORTH REGION
Appleton
Fox River Mall
Appleton
1991
168
Eau Claire
Oakwood Mall
Eau Claire
1991
104
La Crosse
Valley View Mall
La Crosse
1980
101
Madison
Hilldale Shopping Center
Madison
1962
172
Milwaukee
Mayfair
Wauwatosa
1959
284
Milwaukee
Southridge
Greendale
2012
150
Casper
1983
61
1985
272
WYOMING NORTHWEST REGION
Casper
Eastridge Mall
WASHINGTON, D.C. MID-ATLANTIC REGION
Washington, D.C.
Metro Center
Washington, D.C.
GUAM SOUTHWEST REGION
Guam
Micronesia Mall
Dededo
1994
88
Guam
Micronesia Mall H/K/M
Dededo
2009
69
San Juan
2000
254
PUERTO RICO SOUTHEAST REGION
San Juan
Plaza Las Americas
ANNOUNCED MACY’S STORE OPENINGS
Chicago
Gurnee Mills
Gurnee, IL
2013
140
Las Vegas
Shops at Summerlin
Las Vegas, NV
2014
180
New York
Mall at Bay Plaza
Bronx, NY
2014
160
New York
Westfield South Shore
Bay Shore, NY
2013
200
Sarasota
University Town Center
Sarasota, FL
2014
160
*As of April 6, 2013
Includes: F – Furniture • H – Home • K – Kids • M – Men’s
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 53
BLOOMINGDALE’S STORE LOCATIONS*
# STATES: 10
|
# STORES: 36
Northeast United States
2 Manhattan Stores
7 Metro New York Stores
2 Metro New York Furniture/
Furniture Clearance Stores
2 Metro Philadelphia Stores
Metro Chicago
2 Metro Washington, D.C. Stores
2 Stores
1 Boston Store
1 Home Store
1 Boston Home/Men’s Store
California
Southeast United States
7 Southern California Stores
4 South Florida Stores
1 Southern California Home Store
1 Orlando Store
2 Northern California Stores
1 Atlanta Store
54 • MACY’S, INC.
METROPOLITAN AREA
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
CITY
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Beverly Center
Los Angeles
1997
163
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Century City
Los Angeles
1996
235
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Fashion Island
Newport Beach
1996
172
Dubai, UAE, stores are operated by Al Tayer Group LLC under a license agreement
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Fashion Island Home
Newport Beach
1996
68
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Santa Monica Place
Santa Monica
2010
101
ANNOUNCED BLOOMINGDALE’S STORE OPENINGS
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Sherman Oaks
Sherman Oaks
1996
229
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
Glendale Galleria
Glendale, CA
2013
120
Los Angeles-Orange Co.
South Coast Plaza
Costa Mesa
2007
291
San JosГ©
Stanford Shopping Center
Palo Alto, CA
2014
120
San Diego
Fashion Valley
San Diego
2006
226
San Francisco-Oakland
San Francisco Centre
San Francisco
2006
335
BLOOMINGDALE’S OUTLET STORES
San Jose
Stanford Shopping Center
Palo Alto
1996
229
Boston
Wrentham Village
Wrentham, MA
2011
24
Chicago
Woodfield Village Green
Schaumburg, IL
2011
24
25
CALIFORNIA
METROPOLITAN AREA
GROSS
YEAR SQ. FT
OPENED (in 000s)
MALL/LOCATION
MALL/LOCATION
CITY
Dubai
Dubai Mall
Dubai, UAE
2010
146
Dubai
Dubai Mall H
Dubai, UAE
2010
54
DUBAI
FLORIDA
Dallas-Forth Worth
Paragon Outlets Grand Prairie
Grand Prairie, TX
2012
Miami-Palm Beach
Aventura Mall
Aventura
1997
252
Dallas-Forth Worth
The Shops at Park Lane
Dallas, TX
2012
24
Miami-Palm Beach
The Falls
Miami
1984
229
Ft. Myers
Miromar Outlets
Estero, FL
2011
25
Miami-Palm Beach
The Gardens Mall
Palm Beach Gardens 1990
235
Manchester
Merrimack Premium Outlets
Merrimack, NH
2012
24
Miami-Palm Beach
Town Center at Boca Raton
Boca Raton
1986
270
Miami-Palm Beach
Dolphin Mall
Miami, FL
2010
25
Orlando
Mall at Millenia
Orlando
2002
237
Miami-Palm Beach
Sawgrass Mills
Sunrise, FL
2010
24
New York
Bergen Town Center
Paramus, NJ
2010
25
New York
The Gallery at Westbury Plaza
Westbury, NY
2012
26
San Francisco-Oakland
Paragon Outlets Livermore Valley Livermore, CA
2012
26
Washington, D.C.
Potomac Mills
2010
26
GEORGIA
Atlanta
Lenox Square
Atlanta
2003
281
Woodbridge, VA
ILLINOIS
Chicago
Medinah Home
Chicago
2003
130
ANNOUNCED BLOOMINGDALE’S OUTLET STORE OPENINGS
Chicago
North Michigan Ave.
Chicago
1988
256
Chicago
Chicago
Old Orchard
Skokie
1995
206
Wisconsin Place
Chevy Chase
2007
190
Fashion Outlets Chicago
Rosemont, IL
2013
25
MARYLAND
Washington, D.C.
MASSACHUSETTS
Boston
Mall at Chestnut Hill
Chestnut Hill
2006
186
Boston
Mall at Chestnut Hill H/M
Chestnut Hill
1973
124
New York
Bridgewater Commons
Bridgewater
2002
161
New York
Shops at Riverside
Hackensack
1959
293
New York
Short Hills
Short Hills
1967
246
New York
Willowbrook
Wayne
2002
274
NEW JERSEY
NEW YORK
New York
59th Street
New York City
1886
859
New York
Roosevelt Field
Garden City
1995
309
New York
Roosevelt Field Furniture
Garden City
2004
69
New York
SoHo
New York City
2004
122
New York
Walt Whitman Mall
Huntington
1998
231
New York
Westchester Furniture Clearance
Mt. Pleasant
2004
64
New York
White Plains
White Plains
1975
300
PENNSYLVANIA
Philadelphia
King of Prussia (The Court)
King of Prussia
1981
248
Philadelphia
Willow Grove Park
Willow Grove
1982
239
Tysons Corner Center
McLean
1976
268
VIRGINIA
Washington, D.C.
*As of April 6, 2013
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 55
A COMPANY HISTORY
MACY’S: A HISTORY
No one would have guessed that the
small, fancy dry goods store that opened
on the corner of 14th Street and 6th
Avenue in New York City in 1858 would
grow to be one of the largest retailers in
the world.
But after several failed retail ventures,
Rowland Hussey Macy’s determination
and ingenuity paid off at the age of
36 with the launch of R.H. Macy & Co.
He adopted a red star as his symbol
of success, dating back to his days as a
sailor. First-day sales totaled $11.06 but
by the end of the first full year, sales
grossed almost $90,000. By 1877, R.H.
Macy & Co. had become a full-fledged
department store occupying the ground
space of 11 adjacent buildings.
Always the innovator, Macy’s is known
for several firsts that changed the retail
industry. Macy’s was the first retailer to
promote a woman, Margaret Getchell,
to an executive position, making
business history. Macy’s pioneered such
revolutionary business practices as the
one-price system, in which the same
item was sold to every customer at
one price, and quoting specific prices
for goods in newspaper advertising.
Known for its creative merchandising,
Macy’s was the first to introduce such
products as the tea bag, the Idaho
baked potato and colored bath towels.
Macy’s also was the first retailer to hold
a New York City liquor license.
By November 1902, the store had
outgrown its modest storefront and
moved uptown to its present Herald
Square location on Broadway and 34th
Street, establishing an attraction for
shoppers from around the world. With
the store’s 7th Avenue expansion
completed in 1924, Macy’s Herald
Square became the “World’s Largest
Store,” with more than 1 million square
56 • MACY’S, INC.
feet of retail space. (Note that Macy’s
Herald Square will be expanding to
1.1 million square feet of retail space in
the current renovation project described
on page 11.)
By 1918, R.H. Macy & Co. was
generating $36 million in annual sales.
Yet, the prosperity of the retailer was
never more apparent than when the
company went public in 1922 and began
to open regional stores and take over
competing retailers. In 1923, the Toledobased department store Lasalle & Koch
was acquired; the next year, DavisonPaxton in Atlanta was acquired; and in
1936, the Newark-based Bamberger’s
was purchased.
To help celebrate their new American
heritage, Macy’s immigrant employees
organized the first Christmas Parade in
1924. The procession featured floats,
bands, animals from the zoo and 10,000
onlookers, beginning a time-honored
tradition now known as the annual
Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.
In 1945, the company expanded west
and purchased O’Connor Moffatt &
Company in San Francisco. Two years
later, O’Connor Moffatt stores, including
the landmark Union Square store that
opened in 1866, were converted to
Macy’s after a survey indicated that San
Franciscans would welcome the name.
Macy’s California broke new ground
with the first department store flower
show in 1946. What began as a fragrance
promotion in the cosmetics department
now annually welcomes the spring
season, treating visitors to a botanical,
cultural and community spectacle and
is held in New York City, Chicago,
Minneapolis, Philadelphia and
Washington, D.C., in addition to
San Francisco. In 1971, Macy’s Union
Square store’s lower level, once
cluttered with bargains, was transformed
into “The Cellar,” changing the way
customers shop for housewares. Due
to its success, the Herald Square store
followed suit five years later.
On December 19, 1994, Federated
Department Stores, Inc. (now known
as Macy’s, Inc.) acquired R.H. Macy &
Co., creating the world’s largest premier
department store company. Federated
Department Stores operated over
400 department stores and more than
157 specialty stores in 37 states.
A&S Department Stores were converted
to the Macy’s nameplate in May 1995.
Also in 1995, Federated acquired
The Broadway Department Stores,
bringing Broadway, Emporium and
Weinstocks to the Macy’s family, as well
as six former I. Magnin stores. Some 46
stores were converted to the Macy’s
nameplate. Following the model of
A&S, Jordan Marsh Department Stores
of Boston, already owned by Federated,
was converted to Macy’s in March 1996.
In January 2001, Macy’s absorbed 17
Stern’s Department Stores located in
New York and New Jersey. In June 2001,
Federated purchased the Liberty House
operations in Hawaii and Guam, bringing
the proud Macy’s tradition and heritage
to the Pacific.
Macy’s entered 2005 with about
240 locations, primarily on the East and
West Coasts. With the conversion of all
Federated’s regional store nameplates
in March 2005, Macy’s grew to about
425 locations across the country. In
September 2006, with the conversion
of stores acquired from The May
Department Stores Company, Macy’s
now serves customers through approximately 800 stores in virtually every major
geographic market in the United States,
as well as the macys.com website.
BLOOMINGDALE’S: A HISTORY
Bloomingdale’s began with a 19th
century fad and the extraordinary
vision of two brothers. Lyman and
Joseph Bloomingdale pioneered nearly
every major change in the evolution
of department stores – if they weren’t
the first with an idea, they simply did it
bigger and better than anyone else. Their
innovative retailing philosophy guided
Bloomingdale’s in its beginning and
that strategy continues today, justifiably
earning Bloomingdale’s the reference
“Like No Other Store in the World.”
The first retail endeavor of the
Bloomingdale brothers was a Ladies’
Notion Shop in New York. In 1872,
Bloomingdale’s opened and
expanded their East Side Bazaar,
selling a variety of women’s fashions.
This was a bold move in the era of
specialty shops; the Bazaar became
a harbinger of the true “department
store.” By 1929, Bloomingdale’s
covered an entire city block.
Two years later, the glamorous Art Deco
edifice that still graces Lexington Avenue
was completed. In 1949, Bloomingdale’s
began its real expansion, opening its
first satellite store in Fresh Meadows,
Queens, and by 1959, Bloomingdale’s
had created a complete circle of stores
around the flagship in New Jersey,
Westchester County and Long Island.
This dramatic growth continued in the
1970s and 1980s with the opening of
stores in the Northeast, Florida and
Chicago. Bloomingdale’s was on its way
to becoming a true national entity. That
vision culminated in 1996 with the addition
of its first four stores in California, the most
ambitious expansion in the company’s
history, followed by Bloomingdale’s entry
into the Atlanta market in 2003.
From the beginning, the Bloomingdale
brothers catered to America’s love of
international goods, and by the 1880s,
their European selection was dazzling.
A buying office in Paris in 1886 was the
beginning of a network that now spans
the globe. The 1960s brought promotions
resulting from Bloomingdale’s fascination
with the foreign market: the first was a
small affair called “Casa Bella,” featuring
merchandise for the home from Italy.
Over the next 30 years, the promotions
took on a grand scale – including unique
merchandise and cultural exhibits
that would touch every department in
Bloomingdale’s. Major transformation
of the Bloomingdale’s image came in
the 1960s and 1970s. The promotions
were so exciting that the term “Retailing
as Theater” was coined to describe
Bloomingdale’s “happenings.” It was the
era of pet rocks and glacial ice cubes,
of visits by movie stars and royalty from
Elizabeth Taylor to Queen Elizabeth II.
The new direction in merchandising
was both to seek and to create. Buyers
covered the world to find exclusive,
one-of-a-kind items. When they couldn’t
find what they wanted, they had it made.
In fashion, Bloomingdale’s launched
new designers and created boutiques
for already-famous names. Among the
discoveries: Ralph Lauren, Perry Ellis and
Norma Kamali – and for the first time in
America: Sonia Rykiel, Kenzo and Fendi
ready-to-wear. Designers opening their
first in-store boutiques at Bloomingdale’s
include Yves St. Laurent, Calvin Klein,
Claude Montana and Thierry Mugler.
In 1961, Bloomingdale’s made retail
history in yet another area by introducing
the first designer shopping bag. Artist
Joseph Kinigstein was commissioned to
create a bag for the “Esprit de France”
promotion. Rather than doing the
obvious – ladylike flowers in pastel
colors – he reproduced antique French
tarot cards in bold red, black and white.
Most daring of all, the bag omitted the
store name. Even so, it was unmistakably
Bloomingdale’s, and the collector’s
shopping bag was launched. Since
then, both famous and fledgling artists,
architects and ad designers have created
Bloomingdale’s bags. Their designs
have been featured in art museums all
over the world.
In 1971 “model rooms,” a highlight
of Bloomingdale’s since 1947, gained
worldwide attention. “The Cave,” an
intricate multi-level frame sprayed
entirely in white polyurethane, was a
spectacular example of the lengths to
which Bloomingdale’s would go to make
a statement of style. Over the years, the
model rooms have been showcases for
the talents of everyone from architect
Frank Gehry to filmmaker Federico Fellini.
During the 1970s, Bloomingdale’s was
a favorite stop of the international
avant-garde, epitomized locally by the
“Young East Sider” who lived right in
the neighborhood. In 1973, the store
wanted to stamp the Bloomingdale’s
name on panties to launch an intimate
apparel promotion; they chose the
company nickname as a nod to the
young, trendy crowd, and the “Bloomie’s”
logo was born. Soon, New Yorkers were
affectionately referring to the city’s second
most popular tourist attraction after the
Statue of Liberty as “Bloomie’s” and the
hottest souvenir in town was anything
emblazoned with “Bloomie’s.” From the
late 1980s to the present, the economy
and retailing has changed – thus changing
the buying habits of consumers. As usual,
Bloomingdale’s kept up with the times and
prepared for the future. Today, there is an
increased emphasis on building customer
services and relationships, while continuing
the unique and exclusive aspects that
made Bloomingdale’s world famous.
With a reputation for quality, creativity
and uniqueness, Bloomingdale’s has
remained at the forefront of retailing
worldwide. Bloomingdale’s speaks to its
customers in a language they understand:
service, selection and fashion, making
Bloomingdale’s “Like No Other Store in
the World.”
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 57
MACY’S, INC. HISTORY —
CHRONOLOGY
1830 Shillito’s founded in Cincinnati by
John Shillito.
1841 Eben Jordan and Benjamin L.
Marsh open Jordan Marsh in
Boston.
1851 F&R Lazarus & Company founded
in Columbus, OH, by Simon
Lazarus.
1858 Rowland H. Macy opens R.H.
Macy & Co. as a dry goods store
in New York City. First-day sales
totaled $11.06.
1859 Macy’s first-year sales were
approximately $85,000 with an
advertising budget of $2,800.
1865 Wechsler & Abraham (later
Abraham & Straus) founded
in Brooklyn, NY, by Abraham
Abraham and Joseph Wechsler.
1867 Rich’s founded in Atlanta by
Morris Rich.
Stern Brothers (later Stern’s)
founded in Manhattan.
1877 David May opens the first store
of what was to become The May
Department Stores Company
in Leadville, CO, a silver-mining
boom town.
1888 The Straus family acquires a
general partnership with Macy’s.
1890 The Bon MarchГ© founded in
Seattle.
1893 The Straus family buys out Joseph
Wechsler’s interest in Wechsler
& Abraham, changing the store’s
name to Abraham & Straus.
While A&S did not become part
of Macy’s, the two stores kept a
close association, even sharing
overseas offices.
1898 Burdines founded in Miami.
1902 Macy’s moves to Herald Square in
New York City.
1905 David May moves the
headquarters of his growing retail
organization to St. Louis.
1870 Goldsmith’s founded in Memphis.
1907 Bullock’s founded by John Bullock
and P.G. Winnett in Los Angeles.
1872 Bloomingdale Brothers, Inc.
founded in New York City by
Lyman and Joseph Bloomingdale.
First-day sales totaled $3.68.
1910 The May Department Stores
Company is incorporated.
1911 The May Department Stores
Company is listed on the New
York Stock Exchange and opens
Famous-Barr in St. Louis.
1923 May Company acquires a
department store company in Los
Angeles, adding to its growing
regional coverage in Akron and
Cleveland, OH, and St. Louis.
1924 Macy’s Herald Square location
becomes the largest store in the
world, following completion of
the 7th Avenue addition. Also,
10,000 people watch Macy’s first
parade, now known as Macy’s
Thanksgiving Day Parade.
58 • MACY’S, INC.
1925 Macy’s acquires Davison-Paxon
of Atlanta.
1929 Federated Department Stores,
Inc. (now known as Macy’s, Inc.) is
formed as a holding company by
several family-owned department
stores, including Abraham &
Straus and F&R Lazarus (along
with its Cincinnati-based
subsidiary, Shillito’s) and Filene’s
of Boston. Corporate offices
established in Columbus, OH.
1930 Bloomingdale’s joins Federated.
First-year sales for Federated
were $112 million.
1934 A modern merchandising
standard is set when Fred Lazarus
(son of Simon) arranges garments
in groups of a single size with a
range of style, color and price in
that size, rather than the other
way around. Lazarus based this
technique upon observations
made in Paris.
1935 Boston’s Jordan Marsh is one of
the founders of New York Citybased Allied Stores Corporation,
a successor to Hahn Department
Stores, Inc. A holding company
founded in 1928, Hahn brought
chain store advantages to
independent, family-owned
department stores.
1939 Fred Lazarus Jr. convinces
President Franklin Roosevelt
that changing the Thanksgiving
holiday from the last Thursday
of November to the fourth
Thursday, extending the
Christmas shopping season,
would be good for the nation’s
business. A 1941 Act of Congress
perpetuated the arrangement.
Federated and Allied stores
make shopping easier during
difficult economic times by
offering credit, a “pay when
you can” policy and developing
a reputation for community
involvement in times of crisis.
1945 Federated moves its offices
to Cincinnati. Macy’s acquires
O’Connor Moffat & Company of
San Francisco.
1946 In several ways, Shillito’s becomes
the first department store to
embrace the African-American
community. It is the nation’s first
department store to give credit
to African-Americans, as well as
employ them as salespeople and
executives. The store’s restaurant
is the first in downtown Cincinnati
to serve African-American
customers.
May Company acquires
Kaufmann’s in Pittsburgh.
1947 O’Connor Moffat becomes
Macy’s California.
1951 Allied acquires New Jersey’s
Stern Brothers, later known as
Stern’s.
1956 Miami-based Burdines becomes
a division of Federated.
May Company begins operating
May D&F in Denver.
1957 Seventeen-year-old designer-tobe Ralph Lauren sells sweaters at
Bloomingdale’s over Christmas
week. The following year, he
joins Allied Stores as assistant
menswear buyer.
1959 Federated acquires Dayton,
Ohio-based Rike’s and Memphisbased Goldsmith’s.
May Company acquires Hecht’s in
Washington, D.C., and Baltimore.
1962 Allied acquires the William H.
Block Company of Indianapolis.
1964 Federated breaks the 10-figure
barrier for the first time, netting
annual sales of $1.215 billion.
Federated acquires Los Angeles’
Bullock’s and I. Magnin.
1966 May Company acquires Meier &
Frank in Portland, OR.
1967 Allied also passes the billion
dollar mark, with annual sales of
$1.024 billion.
1968 Black Retail Action Group
(BRAG), founded in part by
Abraham & Straus executives,
gives technical assistance to
minority-owned businesses
and scholarships to retailing
students. This furthers the
A&S commitment to AfricanAmericans. The company was
the country’s first major retailer
to sign up for Plans for Progress,
President Kennedy’s commission
on job opportunities for AfricanAmericans.
1976 Through an exchange of
common stock, Federated
acquires Atlanta-based Rich’s.
1980 To help meet the civic, health
and welfare, educational and
cultural needs of the communities
Federated serves, the company
invests $15 million to establish
a foundation.
1982 The merger of Rike’s of Dayton
and Shillito’s of Cincinnati results
in Shillito-Rikes.
1985 The newly formed Federated
Systems Group (then known
as The SABRE Group) begins
the conversion of all Federated
divisions to a common electronic
data processing system. (The
group is now known as Macy’s
Systems and Technology.)
Davison’s of Atlanta changes its
name to Macy’s.
1986 A single, billion-dollar
organization is formed with
the merger of Federated’s
Shillito-Rikes of Cincinnati and
Columbus-based Lazarus. With
headquarters in Cincinnati, the
division operates under the
Lazarus name.
Campeau Corporation acquires
Allied Stores Corporation, which
is reorganized under the merger
agreement.
In what was then retail’s largest
acquisition, May Company
acquires Associated Dry Goods
and adds Lord & Taylor, J.W.
Robinson’s and L.S. Ayres, among
others, to its collection of regional
department stores.
1987 Federated buys Allied’s
Indianapolis-based Block’s
division, incorporating it into
Lazarus.
1988 Campeau Corporation acquires
Federated. Several Federated
divisions are sold to other
retailers. May Company
purchases Foley’s and Filene’s.
Macy’s purchases Bullock’s and
I. Magnin from Campeau. To
consolidate with Federated,
Allied’s New York City headquarters moves to Cincinnati.
Allied – operating in tandem
with Federated – is comprised
of The Bon MarchГ©, Jordan
Marsh, Maas Brothers and
Stern’s. Goldsmith’s merges into
Rich’s, although the Goldsmith’s
nameplate is maintained in the
Memphis market.
1989 Federated forms its Financial,
Administrative and Credit
Services operation (The FACS
Group) in suburban Cincinnati to
centralize credit services for all
department store divisions. (The
group is now known as Macy’s
Credit and Customer Services.)
Federated’s employee volunteer
program, Partners in Time, is
founded at Rich’s/Goldsmith’s
as a way to give back to the
community.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 59
1990 In January, saddled by debt
resulting from the highly
leveraged Campeau takeover
of Federated, both Federated
and Allied file for bankruptcy
reorganization. The reorganizing
of more than $8 billion of debt
begins. Allen Questrom becomes
chairman and chief executive
officer, joining James M.
Zimmerman, president and chief
operating officer, to form the
senior management team that
would resurrect the company.
1991 Divisional consolidations begin.
The company’s Florida
operations, including all former
Maas Brothers/Jordan Marsh
stores, operate under the
Burdines name, and division
headquarters are consolidated
in Miami.
1992 A new public company –
Federated Department Stores,
Inc. – emerges from bankruptcy
in February with 220 department
stores in 26 states and annual
sales of approximately $7
billion. The former Allied Stores
Corporation is merged into
Federated. A consolidation of the
A&S and Jordan Marsh divisions
results in the A&S/Jordan Marsh
division, headquartered in
Brooklyn, NY. Early in the new
year, Macy’s files for protection
under Chapter 11.
1993 Federated announces the
centralization of divisional
accounting and accounts
payable functions in Cincinnati.
In addition, a management
realignment reconfigures
merchandise distribution for its
northeastern divisions.
1994 Federated acquires the Joseph
Horne Co. of Pittsburgh, adding
10 Pennsylvania stores to its
Lazarus division. In December,
Federated acquires R.H. Macy
& Co., creating the largest
department store retailer in the
nation. Acquisition approval,
granted by U.S. Bankruptcy Court
in December, culminates Macy’s
three-year reorganization plan.
60 • MACY’S, INC.
1994 Macy’s East, headquartered in
New York City, merges with A&S/
Jordan Marsh to form a $4 billion
retailing division of Federated.
In San Francisco, Macy’s West
continues to operate all West
Coast Macy’s and Bullock’s
stores, as Federated restores its
presence in California and Texas.
1996 May Company acquires
Strawbridge’s in Philadelphia.
The Federated Department
Stores Foundation is reactivated
as the company’s primary vehicle
for charitable giving. Total
contributions by Federated, its
divisions and the Foundation
were $7.8 million in fiscal 1996.
Federated announces the
discontinuation of the I. Magnin
chain and 13 I. Magnin stores
are sold or converted to Macy’s
or Bullock’s.
Bloomingdale’s opens its
first California stores with
four locations – three in the
Los Angeles area and one in
Palo Alto.
Federated Logistics (now
known as Macy’s Logistics
and Operations) is formed
to coordinate the company’s
distribution facilities and functions
in the northeastern United States.
Macys.com is launched.
1995 Rich’s/Goldsmith’s and Lazarus
are consolidated into one
division – Rich’s/Lazarus/
Goldsmith’s, based in Atlanta
and operating stores in nine
southeastern and midwestern
states.
Federated acquires Broadway
Stores, Inc., based in Los Angeles.
Initially, this added 82 Broadway,
Emporium and Weinstock’s
department stores in California
and four other southwestern
states with annual sales of
more than $2 billion. Federated
announces that 56 of these
stores will be converted to the
Macy’s nameplate. Five others
will become Bloomingdale’s,
while other locations will be
sold or closed.
1997 In May, James M. Zimmerman
succeeds Allen Questrom as
chairman and chief executive
officer of Federated. Terry J.
Lundgren becomes president and
chief merchandising officer.
1998 For the first time since 1988,
Federated’s debt is rated by
major agencies as investment
grade. In the fall, the company
launches a new Macy’s By
Mail catalog and re-launches
macys.com.
The May Company acquires The
Jones Store in Kansas City, MO.
1999 Fingerhut Companies, Inc. of
Minnetonka, MN, a leading
direct-marketing company, is
acquired by Federated in March.
May Company acquires Zions
Co-operative Mercantile
Institution (ZCMI) department
stores in Utah and Idaho.
Federated Logistics is expanded
to handle distribution, logistics
functions and vendor technology
for all Federated divisions
nationwide.
2000 A new private brand of apparel
and accessories for children,
called Greendog, debuts at stores
across the country.
A&S stores, already a part
of the Macy’s East division,
are converted to the Macy’s
nameplate.
2001 In February, Federated announces
that its Stern’s division will be
closed, with most locations being
converted to the Bloomingdale’s
or Macy’s nameplates.
1996 Jordan Marsh stores in the northeastern United States, already
part of the Macy’s East division,
are converted to the Macy’s
nameplate. Meanwhile, Bullock’s
stores in Southern California,
already part of the Macy’s West
division, are renamed Macy’s.
In July, Federated acquires
Liberty House, Hawaii’s largest
retailer and only conventional
department store group. It
becomes part of Macy’s West.
2002 Federated disposes of Fingerhut.
Terry J. Lundgren becomes
chief operating officer in
addition to president and chief
merchandising officer.
2003 Federated integrates the Macy’s
nameplates with its regional
department stores – creating
Bon-Macy’s, Burdines-Macy’s,
Goldsmith’s-Macy’s, LazarusMacy’s and Rich’s-Macy’s.
Macy’s Corporate Marketing is
developed.
Bloomingdale’s enters the
Atlanta market for the first time
with two stores.
Terry J. Lundgren becomes
president and chief executive
officer. James M. Zimmerman
remains chairman of the board.
Federated board initiates
quarterly dividends.
2004 Terry J. Lundgren becomes
chairman, president and chief
executive officer as James M.
Zimmerman retires as chairman
of the company.
Macy’s Home Store division
is formed.
May Company acquires
Marshall Field’s.
2005 Federated begins operating
nationwide under two store
nameplates – Macy’s and
Bloomingdale’s – as all regional
department store names are
converted to the Macy’s brand.
Macy’s launches a new customer
loyalty program, with escalating
benefits for its largest customers,
as it issues new credit cards for
about 14 million accounts.
Federated acquires The May
Department Stores Company.
The acquisition creates a stronger,
more resourceful company with
more stores nationwide.
2006 More than 400 former May
Company stores convert to
Macy’s, creating a nationwide
store focused on delivering
fashion and affordable luxury to
customers from coast-to-coast.
Macy’s launches its first-ever
national advertising campaign.
Federated divests Lord & Taylor,
David’s Bridal and Priscilla of
Boston, which were acquired as
part of May Company.
2007 Federated sells its 507-store
After Hours Formalwear business,
which was acquired as part of
May Company, to Houston-based
Men’s Wearhouse.
Shareholders vote to change
the corporate name from
Federated Department Stores,
Inc. to Macy’s, Inc.
2008 Macy’s begins piloting a new
localization initiative called My
Macy’s in 20 local markets as it
consolidates three divisions –
Macy’s North into Macy’s East,
Macy’s Northwest into Macy’s
West, and Macy’s Midwest into
Macy’s South (creating a new
Macy’s Central division).
2009 Macy’s rolls out its My Macy’s
localization initiative nationwide,
creating 49 new local stores
districts (for a total of 69), while
adopting a unified national
operating structure.
Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s
launched social media programs
to reach customers in new ways.
2010 After several years of significant
changes to the company’s
structure and organization, a
culture of growth develops at
Macy’s, Inc.
Bloomingdale’s opens in Dubai,
the company’s first international
presence.
Macy’s ends the year with more
than 1.2 million Facebook friends.
2011 Macy’s, Inc. announces one of the
largest capital investments in the
company’s history – a four-year,
$400 million renovation of Macy’s
Herald Square flagship store in
New York City, with work to begin
in early spring 2012.
Macys.com and bloomingdales.com
begin international shipping to more
than 100 countries.
Macy’s ends the year with more
than 4.5 million Facebook friends.
2012 At year end, 292 Macy’s stores
are equipped to fill and ship
orders to customers as part of the
company’s Omnichannel strategy.
Macy’s launches a major new
initiative to serve customers in
the Millennial generation (ages
13 to 30).
Macy’s ends the year with more
than 10 million Facebook friends.
The company celebrates Macy’s
150th birthday on October 28.
Macy’s, Inc. launches a
corporatewide sustainability
initiative to guide a wide
variety of efforts to protect the
environment.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 61
MACY’S, INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Stephen F. Bollenbach
Deirdre P. Connelly
Meyer Feldberg
Sara Levinson
Non-Executive Chairman
of the Board of Directors
President, North American
Pharmaceuticals
Dean Emeritus and Professor
of Leadership and Ethics
KB Home
GlaxoSmithKline
Columbia Business School
Former Chairman and
Chief Executive
Officer
ClubMom, Inc.
Terry J. Lundgren
Joseph Neubauer
Joyce M. RochГ©
Paul C. Varga
Chairman, President and
Chief Executive Officer
Chairman
Former President and
Chief Executive Officer
Chairman and Chief
Executive Officer
Girls Incorporated
Brown-Forman
Corporation
Macy’s, Inc.
ARAMARK Holdings
Corporation
Craig E. Weatherup
Marna C. Whittington
Former Chief
Executive Officer
Former Chief
Executive Officer
The Pepsi-Cola
Company
Allianz Global
Investors Capital
62 • MACY’S, INC.
EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT TEAM
Timothy M. Adams
William S. Allen
Jeffrey Gennette
Michael Gould
Chief Private
Brand Officer
Chief Human
Resources Officer
Chief Merchandising
Officer
Chairman and Chief
Executive Officer,
Bloomingdale’s
Julie Greiner
Robert B. Harrison
Karen M. Hoguet
Jeffrey Kantor
Chief Merchandise
Planning Officer
Chief Omnichannel
Officer
Chief Financial Officer
Chairman, macys.com
Terry J. Lundgren
Martine Reardon
Peter Sachse
Tony Spring
Chairman, President
and Chief
Executive Officer
Chief Marketing
Officer
Chief Stores Officer
President and Chief
Operating Officer,
Bloomingdale’s
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 63
OTHER MACY’S, INC.
CORPORATE OFFICERS
Joel A. Belsky
Dennis J. Broderick
David W. Clark
Amy Hanson
Controller
General Counsel
and Secretary
Human Resources
and Diversity
Credit, Real Estate
and Financial Services
William L. Hawthorne III
Bradley R. Mays
James A. Sluzewski
Ann Munson Steines
Diversity Strategies
and Legal Affairs
Tax
Corporate
Communications
and External Affairs
Deputy General
Counsel and
Assistant Secretary
Felicia Williams
Shirley H. Yoshida
Michael Zorn
Risk and Financial
Services
Internal Audit
Associate and
Labor Relations
64 • MACY’S, INC.
SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION
MACY’S, INC. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
Macy’s, Inc. believes strongly in good corporate governance and transparency in financial reporting. If you would like to know
more, please visit the Corporate Governance section of our corporate website at macysinc.com/investors/governance.
COMMON STOCK
Shares of Macy’s, Inc. common stock are traded on the New York Stock Exchange. The company’s trading symbol is M. The
approximate number of Macy’s, Inc. shareholders of record, as of Feb. 2, 2013, was 20,000. As of that date, there were
approximately 387.7 million shares of Macy’s, Inc. common stock outstanding, excluding shares held by Macy’s, Inc.
Shares
Average
Traded
Daily Volume
Low
High
Dividends
First Quarter ...................................... 354,650,500
5,629,400
33.18
41.50
0.2000
Second Quarter................................. 427,551,400
6,786,500
32.31
42.17
0.2000
Third Quarter..................................... 320,190,300
5,003,000
34.89
41.24
0.2000
Fourth Quarter .................................. 361,981,700
5,656,000
36.30
41.98
0.2000
First Quarter ...................................... 553,343,200
8,783,200
21.69
25.99
0.0500
Second Quarter................................. 557,687,400
8,852,200
23.98
30.62
0.1000
Third Quarter..................................... 637,438,200
9,960,000
22.66
32.35
0.1000
Fourth Quarter .................................. 438,862,600
7,194,500
28.69
35.92
0.1000
2012
Prices
2011
TO REACH US
WRITE
macysinc.com/ir
Macy’s, Inc.
Investor Relations Department
7 West Seventh Street
Cincinnati, OH 45202
E-mail: [email protected]
• Sign up to have Macy’s, Inc.’s news
releases sent to you via e-mail by
subscribing to News Direct.
• Get the latest stock price and chart,
or take advantage of the historical
price look-up feature.
CALL
Macy’s, Inc.
Investor Relations Department
Monday-Friday,
8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. (ET)
1-513-579-7028
Macy’s, Inc. News and Information
Request Hotline: 1-800-261-5385
TRANSFER AGENT FOR
MACY’S, INC. SHARES
Macy’s, Inc.
c/o Computershare
Shareowner Services
P.O. Box 43006
Providence, RI 02940-3006
For the hearing impaired
1-800-231-5469 (TDD)
www.computershare.com/investor
VISIT US ON THE INTERNET
macysinc.com
macys.com
macysJOBS.com
bloomingdales.com
bloomingdalesJOBS.com
Inside the United States and Canada
1-866-337-3311
Outside the United States and Canada
1-201-680-6578
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 65
MACY’S, INC.
OPERATES STORES IN:*
Alabama:
400 Employees
Macy’s (2)
Kansas:
600 Employees
Macy’s (5)
Arizona:
3,600 Employees
Macy’s (11)
Kentucky:
1,200 Employees
Macy’s (7)
California:
30,600 Employees
Bloomingdale’s (10)
Bloomingdale’s Outlet (1)
Macy’s (137)
Louisiana:
900 Employees
Macy’s (5)
Colorado:
1,800 Employees
Macy’s (14)
Connecticut:
3,100 Employees
Macy’s (13)
Delaware:
600 Employees
Macy’s (4)
Florida:
14,500 Employees
Bloomingdale’s (5)
Bloomingdale’s Outlet (3)
Macy’s (61)
Georgia:
6,200 Employees
Bloomingdale’s (1)
Macy’s (23)
Hawaii:
2,100 Employees
Macy’s (17)
Idaho:
700 Employees
Macy’s (7)
Illinois:
6,600 Employees
Bloomingdale’s (3)
Bloomingdale’s Outlet (1)
Macy’s (24)
Indiana:
2,000 Employees
Macy’s (11)
Maine:
300 Employees
Macy’s (2)
Maryland:
3,900 Employees
Bloomingdale’s (1)
Macy’s (22)
Massachusetts:
5,100 Employees
Bloomingdale’s (2)
Bloomingdale’s Outlet (1)
Macy’s (28)
Michigan:
4,300 Employees
Macy’s (21)
Minnesota:
3,100 Employees
Macy’s (12)
Missouri:
3,200 Employees
Macy’s (15)
Montana:
200 Employees
Macy’s (2)
Nevada:
1,500 Employees
Macy’s (9)
New Hampshire:
900 Employees
Bloomingdale’s Outlet (1)
Macy’s (6)
New Jersey:
7,400 Employees
Bloomingdale’s (4)
Bloomingdale’s Outlet (1)
Macy’s (30)
New Mexico:
300 Employees
Macy’s (2)
New York:
24,500 Employees
Bloomingdale’s (7)
Bloomingdale’s Outlet (1)
Macy’s (51)
North Carolina:
1,500 Employees
Macy’s (12)
North Dakota:
300 Employees
Macy’s (2)
Ohio:
8,700 Employees
Macy’s (35)
Oklahoma:
500 Employees
Macy’s (4)
Oregon:
2,100 Employees
Macy’s (15)
Pennsylvania:
6,400 Employees
Bloomingdale’s (2)
Macy’s (37)
Rhode Island:
500 Employees
Macy’s (2)
South Carolina:
300 Employees
Macy’s (2)
South Dakota:
100 Employees
Macy’s (1)
*Information as of April 6, 2013, except for number of employees, which is as of February 2, 2013.
66 • MACY’S, INC.
Tennessee:
2,500 Employees
Macy’s (8)
Texas:
9,600 Employees
Bloomingdale’s Outlet (2)
Macy’s (53)
Utah:
800 Employees
Macy’s (7)
Vermont:
100 Employees
Macy’s (1)
Virginia:
4,600 Employees
Bloomingdale’s (1)
Bloomingdale’s Outlet (1)
Macy’s (27)
Washington:
4,700 Employees
Macy’s (35)
West Virginia:
1,100 Employees
Macy’s (2)
Wisconsin:
1,000 Employees
Macy’s (6)
Wyoming:
100 Employees
Macy’s (1)
Washington, D.C.:
400 Employees
Macy’s (1)
Guam:
300 Employees
Macy’s (2)
Puerto Rico:
500 Employees
Macy’s (1)
Number of Stores ............................................................................ 843
Store Gross Square Feet
..................................................... 150,770,000
Total States ....................................................................................... 45
plus the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico
Total Number of Employees ....................................................... 175,700
Information as of April 6, 2013, except for number of employees, which is
as of February 2, 2013.
2013 CORPORATE FACT BOOK • 67
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