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A COUPLE HEADING FOR A BREAKUP? - CSC

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PREMIUM
CSC’S MAGAZINE
NO. 015 / SPRING 2011 / WWW.CSC.COM/PT / SOUTH
CUSTOMER-COMPANY:
A COUPLE
HEADING
FOR A
BREAKUP?
CFO BAROMETER:
A TIME OF OPPORTUNITIES?
PAGE 20
“RETAIL BANKING IS THE REAL
ECONOMY”
INTERVIEW WITH YVES MARTRENCHAR,
CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER
OF BNP PARIBAS RETAIL BANKING.
PAGE 24
& WEST EUROPE
CONTENTS
NEWS
FEATURE
TRENDS
4 Partnership CSC within the SAP
Value Circle / Office move The new
world of work
8 Customer-company: a couple heading
for a breakup? Companies and their
customers are couples with a long history,
couples that have been through crises and
made up again, couples that have been
through both melodrama and romantic
comedy together. Premium takes
a look at marketing in the 2.0 era
and examines fragments of this new
customer-company dialogue.
20 CFO barometer: a time of
opportunities?
5 Recruitment Niko Demeester associate
partner for the public sector / Cloud
computing Cloud services achieve
SAP certification / Accreditation
CSC obtains the SAP® Value Management
certification / Volunteer work largest
blood drive programme in CSC’s history
6 IT outsourcing Three year extension
with Textron / Awards Best Belgian
e-gov project 2010
EXPERIENCE
7 Recruitment CSC awarded top
employer status in Belgium for the third
consecutive year / Challenging insights
Is the chemical industry sustainable?
16 French Post Office Financial information
system at the heart of business
transformation
14 Antalis Triple merger in the Netherlands
22 The Future of Healthcare: It’s Health,
then Care.
FACE-TO-FACE
24 “Retail banking is the real economy”
Interview with Yves Martrenchar,
chief operating officer of BNPВ Paribas
retail banking.
VIEWS
26 Governance, risk and compliance:
Is your organisation taking an approach
to mitigate risks long term?
18 VDAB Flemish agency for employment
and vocational training
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
5
2
14
24
FOR MORE INFORMATION: WWW.CSC.COM/PT
PREMIUM Silver Top Com 2008 in the “External Magazine” category – SPRING 2011, NO. 15 / CSC, COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT: 10, place des Vosges,
92072 Paris-laВ DГ©fense Cedex, www.csc.com. DIRECTOR OF THE PUBLICATION: Claude Czechowski. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Megan Shaw; REGIONAL CONTENT COMMITTEE:
Ute Blauth, GrГ©gory Cann, Stefania Di Cristofaro, Susana Garcia, Montserrat Martinez-Zacarias, Isabelle Wintmolders. CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS EDITION: Coralie Bonnet,
Jean-Michel Bouhours, Camilla Brazzelli, Jean-Baptiste Dupin, Luc Hanegreefs, FrГ©dГ©rique Jacobs, Pierre Kalfon, Agostino La Bella, Jean-Marc Lehu, Santo Lombardo,
Elodie Martinez, Jean-Pierre Montal, David Moschella, Sarah Motro, Erik Oosthuizen, Francesca Petrucci, FrГ©dГ©ric Pichard, Stefania Pompili, Michel RГ©billard, Guillaume Rivet,
Frederico Rossi, Paula Rua, Doris Rupprecht, Kate Taylor, Fran Turisco. PHOTOS: Robert Dale/Getty Images, DR, Getty Images, Manuel Lagos Cid, Flora Bonvicini,
Jacques Vannerum, La Poste, Antalis, Starwood, Recipharm, Aeroporti di Roma, G&P Net Spa, Eastnine Inc./Getty Images, Peter Crowther/Ikon Images/Getty Images,
Ikon Images/Aeriform & Maria Teijeiro/Getty Images.PRINTED BY: Drifosett Printing SA, avenue du Four Г Briques 3a, 1140, Brussels, Belgium. REGISTRATION: October 2008.
DESIGN-PRODUCTION:
. Opinions expressed by contributors are their own. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited.
EDITORIAL
CUSTOMER
INTIMACY 2.0
Every day we monitor the changes underway in the relationships between businesses
and their customers. The rise of social media has reinforced the position of consumers
versus brands. Having become more powerful, they are also becoming more vocal,
easily making themselves heard and aspiring to play a role in shaping the products and
services they consume. Better informed, customers are benefiting from technologies
that enable them to compare everything in real time and obtain highly focused
opinions in a global and ultracompetitive world.
All these changes indicate the central role that customer relationships will play in
corporate performance. The difference will be made by companies’ ability to integrate
customers’ need for mobility, and the ability to respond to their specific needs.
We could call this revolution in customer relationships “Customer Intimacy 2.0”.
CLAUDE CZECHOWSKI
PRESIDENT AND CEO SOUTH & WEST EUROPE
PRESIDENT, GLOBAL CONSULTING/
TECHNOLOGY/ERP PRACTICES
The goal of our п¬Ѓrst Customer Intimacy Barometer, which is at the heart of this
issue’s dossier, is to provide insight into how businesses are handling these changes,
the importance they place on customer relationships, and the main ways in which
they are differentiating themselves. One statistic seized my attention: despite their
differences, 53% of companies have integrated “customer intimacy” into their strategic
priorities. Improving the customer experience is becoming a key challenge – one
which implies profound transformation in both the culture and organisation of the
company. In this context, technology has a formidable contribution to make, in terms
of understanding customers, personalising the relationships with them, and measuring
their satisfaction.
These changes are a rich source of opportunities for businesses – but they need to be
approached with insight and pragmatism. Customer IntimacyВ 2.0 enables companies to
leverage the value of their brands, but can also make them more fragile. As they become
increasingly active, every customer can be an advocate of the brand, or a detractor: the
richer the relationship, the more interesting it is – and the more complex to manage.
ABOUT CSC
WITH APPROXIMATELY 94,000 EMPLOYEES, CSC IS A LEADING GLOBAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES COMPANY. CSC’S MISSION
IS TO PROVIDE CUSTOMERS IN INDUSTRY AND GOVERNMENT WITH SOLUTIONS CRAFTED TO MEET THEIR SPECIFIC CHALLENGES AND ENABLE
THEM TO PROFIT FROM THE ADVANCED USE OF TECHNOLOGY. CSC PROVIDES INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS FOR CUSTOMERS AROUND THE WORLD
BY APPLYING LEADING TECHNOLOGIES AND CSCS OWN ADVANCED CAPABILITIES. THESE INCLUDE SYSTEMS DESIGN AND INTEGRATION;
IT AND BUSINESS PROCESS OUTSOURCING; APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT; WEB AND APPLICATION HOSTING; AND MANAGEMENT
CONSULTING. CSC REPORTED REVENUE OF $16.1 BILLION FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 2 APRIL 2010.
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
Is the customer-company couple heading for a breakup? Or getting ready for a
second honeymoon? With the help of numerous experts, Premium tries to shed light
on the matter.
3
NEWS
CSC’s new office
in Belgium,
located at
Corporate Village
in Zaventem.
PARTNERSHIP
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
CSC WITHIN
THE SAP
VALUE CIRCLE
4
CSC in Belgium has become
one of the four Foundation
Partners of the SAP Value
Circle.
This strategic partnership
confirms CSC’s leadership
position in the SAP domain
and confirms the trust SAP
has in our long-standing
cooperation
The SAP Value Circle
is dedicated to bringing
SAP technology and business
together to share in-depth
information, experience,
knowledge and ideas. The
aim is to forge visionary new
paths in business modeling
that enable clients to
strengthen their market
position.
Within the SAP Value Circle,
CSC will focus on two main
themes:
• Financial Excellence (focus
on developing new п¬Ѓnancial
management solutions)
• Business Insight & Mobile
enablement.
CSC is dedicated to work
with SAP to make the
SAP Value Circle a successful
initiative for all parties.
CONTACT
ISABELLE WINTMOLDERS //
[email protected]
OFFICE MOVE
THE NEW WORLD OF WORK
T
imes are changing, and they’re
changing fast. Technologies
that enable increasing mobility, a
changing global socio-economic
environment, a multi-generational
workforce driven by the arrival
of “Generation-Y” – a twittering,
instant-messaging, individualistic
generation – these crucial factors
are changing the face of the
workplace for ever. And if the
way in which we work is changing
fundamentally, then the way
in which companies buy and use
office space will also change
significantly. When CSC in Belgium
recently had to renew the lease on
its office space, they saw it as the
perfect opportunity to bring
their workspace philosophy
in line with their employer brand
“Freedom Works Better”. In
February 2011, CSC moved to the
Corporate Village in Zaventem –
into an environmentally conscious
building. In collaboration
with AOS Studley, a leading real
estate planning and management
company, CSC took the
opportunity to use the move
to design the office of the future.
“The reasoning behind our
decision to create the office of the
future was simple,” says Philippe
Jaeken, managing director of
CSC in Belgium: “Happy employees
are productive employees. We’ve
always believed that you get the
most out of people by giving them
freedom, that belief is reflected in
our employer brand of �Freedom
Works Better’. This vision continues
to drive all our strategic decisions
and everything we do, also,
amongst others, the way we use
our office space. Our new office
reflects our culture: it promotes
flexibility, mobility and creativity as
well as offering a balance between
�me-time’ and �team-time’”.
CONTACT
ISABELLE WINTMOLDERS //
[email protected]
RECRUITMENT
NIKO DEMEESTER
ASSOCIATE PARTNER FOR
THE PUBLIC SECTOR
iko Demeester has
joined CSC in Belgium
as an associate partner
for the company’s public
sector business. Prior to
joining CSC, Niko Demeester
served as chief of staff to
Minister Van Quickenborne, who
is in charge of Economic Affairs
and Administrative Simplification.
He also held positions as the
general director of the General
Directorate for Economic Statistics
and Information, as a manager
at Cap Gemini and as an advisor
to the Verbond van Belgische
Ondernemingen (VBO)/
FГ©dГ©ration des Entreprises
de BelgiqueВ (FEB) (the nationwide
Belgian employers’ association).
Philippe Jaeken, managing director
for CSC in Belgium, said: “Niko has
a wealth of experience in the areas
of politics, public administration
and the world of trade and
industry that make him a perfect
п¬Ѓt for CSC. His deep industry
knowledge of these key areas will
further support our clients in the
Public Sector as they integrate
and modernise their business and
public administration processes.”
CONTACT
ISABELLE WINTMOLDERS //
[email protected]
ACCREDITATION
CSC OBTAINS SAPВ® VALUE
MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATION
CSC has completed the SAPВ®
Education training and certification
in the SAP® Value Management
methodology. CSC is one of the
few SAP partners to achieve this
certification. The company supports
clients by accelerating the time
it takes to derive value from
investments in SAP solutions.
The certification provides CSC with
SAP methodologies and resources,
including high-impact strategies
benchmarking, business case
development and value realisation
tools. CSC will leverage these
program benefits to enhance
its “Value Capture Approach”,
a systematic methodology based on
SAP Value Management tools. This
approach serves to deliver CSC clients
with the business benefits expected
from SAP solutions by strategically
targeting areas of business for ROI.
CLOUD COMPUTING
CLOUD SERVICES
ACHIEVE SAP
CERTIFICATION
C
SC is one of the п¬Ѓrst global providers of cloud services
to be certified by SAP AG for delivering SAP® solutions to
clients through its Trusted Cloud Services portfolio. As such,
CSC can deliver SAP applications via a cloud-based model,
enabling enterprises to realise the cost savings
and efficiencies provided by its entire suite of services.
CSC’s cloud services underwent extensive testing by SAP to
validate the operational integration of the cloud-computing
platform, assessment of the company’s infrastructure,
processes and technical staff. The audit also included a
technical review of the physical and logical security processes,
as well as portal and underlying infrastructure including servers,
software and storage capabilities. CSC has been a strategic
business partner of SAP for more than 30В years and this
certification follows a long list of achievements.
CONTACT
CONTACT
MEGAN SHAW// [email protected]
MEGAN SHAW // [email protected]
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
N
5
NEWS
Present in 25В countries,
the American Group
Textron is active within
the aeronautic and
the defence industry.
IT OUTSOURCING
THREE YEAR EXTENSION WITH TEXTRON
C
SC has signed a three-year
extension to its global
information technology
outsourcing agreement with
Textron Inc. The extension is
valued at 387 million dollars and
extends the original agreement
through January 2018.
As part of the agreement, CSC and
Textron will deploy a series of
innovative new technologies to drive
value and performance for Textron.
Under the extension, CSC will also
continue to provide IT infrastructure
services including management and
support of Textron’s global data
centres, technology help desk
and network operations, as well as
mainframe and midrange systems,
desktops and engineering
workstations. These services have
resulted in continued cost reductions
over the course of the partnership,
while delivering high quality
AWARDS
BEST BELGIAN E-GOV PROJECT 2010
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
T
6
he Belgian Federal Public
Service in charge of Economic
Affairs is the big winner of the
eighth e-Gov Awards organised by
Agoria in conjunction with TMAB
and Data News. The award for best
IT Project went to FPS Economy
in recognition of its renewed way
of working regarding the national
collection of “Statistical Surveys”.
To initiate this new way of
collecting data from companies,
FPS Economy, in conjunction
with the DAS (the Department
for Administrative Simplification),
chose to modernise the
Economic Structure Survey п¬Ѓrst
due to its solid business case: the
multi-stakeholder transformation
programme, coordinated by CSC,
was expected to yield rapid and
significant business results for all
parties. According to Frank De Saer,
CIO at the FPS Economy: “Our
new Websurvey is now over 90%
pre-п¬Ѓlled with information coming
from the National Bank, companies’
accounting systems, etc.
Our respondents were very keen
to work with the new solution. More
than 90% of companies responded
to the survey electronically whereas
the response rate was much lower
previously. This results in a yearly
cost saving for Belgian companies
of 2.17В million euros. The data
are available quicker and they
are automatically checked and
corrected, which is a great help for
our internal services: it’s a perfect
example of a win-win situation!”
CONTACT
ELS BULENS // [email protected]
IT services to Textron’s businesses.
The original 10-year agreement was
awarded to CSC in 2005, and since
then the partnership has continued
to expand globally.
CONTACT
MEGAN SHAW // [email protected]
RECRUITMENT
VOLUNTEER WORK
CSC AWARDED TOP
EMPLOYER STATUS IN
BELGIUM FOR THE THIRD
CONSECUTIVE YEAR
LARGEST BLOOD DRIVE
PROGRAMME IN CSC’S HISTORY
C
SC is one of only 43В Belgian
companies to receive the label
of “Top Employers 2011” in the
contest organised by the CRF
Institute (previously known as CRF).
Since 1991 the CRF Institute has been
collecting and publishing reliable
data on potential employers based
on objective research. Based on
the impartial study, the CRF Institute
examines which organisations
distinguish themselves in the п¬Ѓeld
of the п¬Ѓve HR criteria: primary and
secondary employment conditions,
education and training, career
On 1В January 2010, when CSC kicked
off its GiveBlood.GiveLife programme
to support organisations like
theRed Cross, it had set the goal
of collecting 10,000В units. One
year later, the people of CSC broke
the ceiling, altogether donating
11,048В units across 27В countries,
mostly on their own time. In the
United States, more than 90В CSC
sponsored blood drives were
organised across the country.
The programme will live on in 2011
with another goal of donating
10,000В units of blood worldwide.
And will undoubtedly be superseded…
opportunities, and company culture.
Only those companies that meet
the very strict selection criteria
are allowed to call themselves a
“Top Employer” for a whole year
and to use this exclusive registered
quality label to promote themselves
on the labour market. “We are
extremely pleased to receive this
quality label for the third consecutive
year,” said Lode Fiey, HR Director of
CSC’s Belgian operations.
CONTACT
CONTACT
ISABELLE WINTMOLDERS //
[email protected]
MEGAN SHAW // [email protected]
CHALLENGING INSIGHTS
IS THE CHEMICAL INDUSTRY
SUSTAINABLE?
or the second year,
Chemical Week has teamed
up with CSC for a survey on
sustainability and regulatory
challenges. Based on
200В responses and 15В top
executives interviews, the key
п¬Ѓndings relate to greenhouse
gas (GHG) reporting,
product stewardship, the
EU’s Registration, Authorization
and Evaluation of Chemicals
(Reach) law and the US Chemical
Facility Antiterrorism Standards
(CFATS). Results show that
corporate leaders are pursuing
a broad sustainability
and security agenda and
sustainability performance
management programmes
are being implemented at
the corporate and plant levels
to better understand how
GHG emissions and water are
being utilised. But some serious
challenges remain: while most
companies meet their product
stewardship goals, those goals
are often not fully integrated
into the product development
process; and less than half
of the п¬Ѓrms intend to launch
company-wide GHG reporting.
CONTACT
MEGAN SHAW // [email protected]
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
F
7
FEATURE
CUSTOMER-COMPANY:
A COUPLE
HEADING
FOR A
BREAKUP
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
COMPANIES AND THEIR CUSTOMERS ARE COUPLES WITH A LONG HISTORY,
COUPLES THAT HAVE BEEN THROUGH CRISES AND MADE UP AGAIN,
COUPLES THAT HAVE BEEN THROUGH BOTH MELODRAMA AND ROMANTIC
COMEDY TOGETHER. TODAY THEIR RELATIONSHIP IS UNDERGOING
PROFOUND CHANGE, YET REMAINS THE MAIN PREOCCUPATION OF
BUSINESSES. HOW WILL THIS “LOVE STORY” EVOLVE? WHAT ARE THE
NEW CODES AND NEW PITFALLS? HOW CAN THIS COUPLE MAKE IT
TOGETHER WHILE CUSTOMER SCEPTICISM AND MISTRUST CONTINUES TO
GROW? CSC’S CUSTOMER INTIMACY BAROMETER UNCOVERS THE RULES
OF SEDUCTION TO BE FOLLOWED IN ORDER TO MAKE THIS RELATIONSHIP
LAST LONGER THAN JUST A MEETING AND A PURCHASE. PREMIUM TAKES
A LOOK AT MARKETING IN THE 2.0 ERA AND EXAMINES FRAGMENTS OF
THIS NEW CUSTOMER-COMPANY DIALOGUE.
8
9
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
FEATURE
F
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
or a long time it has been companies that
have defined the relationship they want to
have with their customers, possibly giving
them the opportunity – if their operational
model allowed it – to express themselves. It
was only a possibility, almost a favour. Globalisation,
the rise of 2.0 and the intangible economy has changed all of this completely. Today customers can inform
themselves, compare offerings in real time, ask their
peers questions, speak their mind and criticise.
Customers have become more powerful, more expert,
more demanding, and correspondingly much less loyal
in a highly competitive world. The unilateral relationship
between companies and their customers that has until
recently prevailed is now changing completely. A new
balance of power is emerging: with greater autonomy,
customers aspire to play a more active role in defining
their expectations and the ways in which companies
respond to them. There is a shift toward an interactive
relationship more closely resembling a partnership.
“All the recent changes herald the central role that
the customer relationship will play in determining corporate performance,” concludes Claude Czechowski,
President and CEO, South and Western Europe, at CSC.
“The difference will be made by companies’ ability to
integrate customers’ need for mobility, and the ability to
respond to their specific needs. We’re moving to a personalised approach based on continuous dialogue.”
So there is a shift from customer relationship to “customer intimacy” – which is the focus of the latest Barometer
survey carried out by CSC among roughly one hundred
European corporations. What are the codes in this new
relationship? What has changed? Premium offers six
seduction tips for keeping the customer-company couple together.
10
C
ustomers are becoming
nomadic, mobile terminal
use is skyrocketing, and the
mobile phone is in the process of becoming the primary channel. In an ultracompetitive world
in which loyalty cannot be taken for granted, being everywhere your customers are
is of strategic importance if you don’t want
to be left behind. Being close to them
means offering information and services
that are accessible every time customers
need them. This means having a real
multichannel strategy, in particular for
mobile terminals (smartphones, tablets with
touch screens, etc.), which are currently not
being taken sufficiently into account.
To be as effective as possible, this strategy has to capitalise upon the complementarity of physical and dematerialised
networks, and also on their interoperability in order to simplify the customer experience as much as possible. Let customers
I
n this time of globalisation, brands
are tending to become more distant
from their target audiences. There
is a certain harmonisation in communication and products. A pitfall,
according to Michel Phan, marketing specialist and holder of the LVMH chair at
ESSEC, a leading business school based
in Paris : “Lost in the masses, customers
feel like they are only a number, resulting
VIEWPOINT
YVES DE BOHAN,
CEO OF LAURENT PERRIER BELGIUM
“For understanding the customer there
is one golden rule: п¬Ѓeld work. This is
a constant feature in the luxury sector:
the more upmarket the product, the more
knowledgeable you must be about all
topics – business-related or otherwise.
And this can go quite far! In a luxury
hotel, for example, you must identify
who is responsible for purchases, but
also where the “spheres of influence” are.
If the sommelier or the bartender has
no connection with your brand, they will
not serve it. This knowledge takes a long
time to develop.”
choose – the key aspect is to always be
there where they expect to п¬Ѓnd you. If you
stand the customer up, someone else will
be there to take your date.
in an increased need for differentiated
treatment and personalisation.” Seducing
the customer means offering personalised
products and services aligned with their
needs and aspirations. It also means sharing their values, a real strategic challenge
in a society which is looking for meaning
and points of reference. Although price is
still important, it is no longer the only
argument that will sway consumers.
S
haring values and offering
personalised services to customers assumes that you
know them well. The challenge is to gather and use
customer data efficiently in order to
understand their expectations. The development of tools for gathering information,
databases, and segmentation and behavioural techniques offers vast possibilities
for businesses to invest in. Significant
effort is still needed, however, in terms of
listening to messages coming from the
п¬Ѓeld. The vision of marketing departments
is often focused on their own activity, and
the channels for pulling in information are
still poorly managed. This is a real loss:
players in the п¬Ѓeld that are in direct and
regular contact with customers are fundamental information relays, vital for building
up relevant customer intimacy.
KRIS VERVAET,
VICE PRESIDENT MARKETING BELGACOM
“We invest a great deal in collecting
information that enables us to create
a dialogue that is as authentic as
possible, far removed from mass
marketing, slogans and undifferentiated
promotions. In fact, it’s been much
simpler since BelgacomTV was launched.
Our understanding of our customers’
habits and preferences is continuously
improving, and our customer intelligence
department analyses its data
methodically.”
F
lourishing relationships don’t
cope well with mood swings
and manic-depressive cycles.
What is the value to the customer of a store that gives a
royal welcome but fails to deliver on time?
Building a strong bond with the customer
depends on a constant preoccupation
with that customer, in every step of the
relationship. All the company’s departments,
staff and processes must be involved.
Operational models need to be overhauled
to embed this preoccupation with the customer throughout the business. The staff
needs to be imbued wit h a genuinely customer-centric culture, while still leaving
enough autonomy to those in direct physical or virtual contact with consumers.
VIEWPOINT
YANNICK GRÉCOURT,
DIRECTOR, STRATEGY AND MARKETING, DEUTSCHE BANK BELGIUM
“Reinforcing customer intimacy is not just about equipping yourself
with efficient analytical tools. Above all, you have to rethink all product,
commercial and marketing approaches, as well as the information systems
to support the offering. That takes time. It also requires the will to change,
because everything evolves much more quickly. Basically, don’t ask
customers what they want if you’re not willing to change your offering
and way of working.”
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
VIEWPOINT
11
VIEWPOINT
SOPHIE HELLER,
W
ith the explosion in
information technology, people have a
powerful desire for
freedom, commitment and participation. The emergence of
concepts of participative democracy, the
liveliness of the social community and even
the explosion of social media all illustrate
this. In this context, these media (in particular
blogs and forums) are powerful tools for
information, dialogue and interaction with
consumers. In certain sectors, businesses
are increasingly involving their customers
in the co-creation of their offerings and
services. They thus become contributors
to the business, cooperating to define
offerings aligned with their expectations, a
real partnership that ensures satisfaction
and stronger association with the brand.
VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION,
ING DIRECT
“We launched a blog to think about how to define
a mobile application. 70В clients took part in the
discussion. Their contribution influenced the choice
of terminal (iPhone) – but also the services offered,
the usability and the design. They also beta tested
the application. When it was released, it became
the number one п¬Ѓnancial application, with one
of the best ratings on the market. In parallel,
the clients that participated in the definition
of the product felt extremely highly valued.”
The responsiveness and smoothness
of interactions are becoming elements that
define the customer experience.
VIEWPOINT
PHILIPPE BERNARD,
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT SALES & CARE EUROPE,
ORANGE
12
T
ime is an increasingly scarce
resource, and in a complex
world, customers continue
to seek greater simplicity.
The responsiveness and
smoothness of interaction are becoming
elements that define the customer
experience. Today they are priority objectives for businesses. However, perceptions
differ significantly between the company
and its customers. You think your customers
are satisfied, but are they really? Measuring
satisfaction in real time is the preferred
tool for rapidly taking corrective action.
Responsiveness is essential; in the era of
social networks, your customer can rapidly
become your best ambassador or worst
detractor. Recall: 78% of customers trust
п¬Ѓrst and foremost the opinions of their
friends and peers.
“18 months ago, in an English-speaking country, the
ratio of promoters to detractors for Orange wasn’t
very good. According to the NPS, Net Promoter
Score, we were far behind the market leaders.
So we decided to measure the performance of our
agents on the front line of managing the customer
relationship. The questions were very simple: Have
I taken good care of you? Have I solved your
problem? And so on. Today Orange is back at the
same level as its competitors. This measure enabled
our staff to become aware of the need to improve
the customer relationship and also to understand
how to serve them better.”
CUSTOMER INTIMACY:
THE DASHBOARD
HOW ARE BUSINESSES APPROACHING CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP
MANAGEMENT IN THE ERA OF CONTINUOUS 2.0 DIALOGUE AND NOMADIC
CUSTOMERS? WHAT ARE THEIR PRIORITIES? BELOW IS AN OVERVIEW
OF THE MAIN INSIGHTS FROM CSC’S CUSTOMER INTIMACY BAROMETER.
3%
30%
Customer intimacy
53%
Operational excellence
Product superiority
Don’t know
WHAT IS THE COMPANY’S PRIMARY STRATEGIC
BASIS FOR DIFFERENTIATION?
53% of the companies surveyed consider customer intimacy as a
strategic basis for differentiation for their organisation. Three quarters
of companies claim they listen to their customers in order to improve
their offering; 30% go further and are counting on anticipation in
order to exceed customer expectations.
34%
OF COMPANIES CARRY OUT
REGULAR SATISFACTION
SURVEYS
Businesses have set up systems to gather feedback from
their customers in order to improve their offerings and the
customer experience. However, the pathways for moving this
information upwards have remained rather traditional, and
do not capitalise upon the channels that enable direct
contact with customers. Information originating from
physical networks, call centres, and mail is only used to a
limited extent, whereas these networks are the п¬Ѓrst point of
contact for customers
MULTICHANNEL
STRATEGY
PRIORITY
GIVEN TO
THE INTERNET:
AND
SOCIAL
NETWORKS:
48%
39%
Businesses have understood the need to develop
multichannel approaches in order to reach customers
that are both nomadic and п¬Ѓckle. Taking the increasingly
autonomous and proactive behaviour of consumers
into account has resulted in the development of tools for
automating tasks on the internet or via extranets, but also
in investments in social networks, blogs, forums and other
community spaces.
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
14%
13
EXPERIENCE
ANTALIS
TRIPLE MERGER IN THE NETHERLANDS
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
AFTER ACQUIRING ITS COMPETITOR MAP, ANTALIS MERGED ITS ACTIVITIES IN THE NETHERLANDS.
THIS BROUGHT TOGETHER THREE ENTITIES AND RESULTED IN THE CREATION OF A NEW ULTRAMODERN
WAREHOUSE AND THE MIGRATION TO A NEW ERP SYSTEM AND WMS (WAREHOUSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM).
ON THE BASIS OF A LONG-STANDING PARTNERSHIP, CSC WAS CHOSEN TO MANAGE THIS AMBITIOUS
PROJECT, IN PARTICULAR THE ERP AND WMS ASPECTS.
14
In 2007, the acquisition of
Map Merchant elevated Antalis
to the top ranks of European paper
and communication support materials
industry. This acquisition enabled
the French group to reinforce its
geographic coverage, in particular in
the Netherlands, where although it was
already present, Map had two major
subsidiaries. In order to further develop
the Antalis brand in the Netherlands and
fully exploit potential synergies, Antalis
brought together these three businesses
into a new legal and commercial entity,
AntalisВ BV. This merger, along with
that of п¬Ѓve warehouses, into a single
organisation on a single site was one
of the largest transformation projects
undertaken by the group. With the help
of CSC, a long-standing partner, Antalis
was able to successfully complete this
triple operation – consolidating business,
IT and logistics – within eighteen
months.
The cooperation between Antalis and
CSC dates back to 2005, when the
group entrusted CSC with the
standardisation and deployment of its
group information system and its
subsequent roll-out to all its subsidiaries.
In the course of these projects, the
relationship between the two partners
Antalis is the
number 1 in Europe
and number 4
worldwide in
the distribution
of communication
support materials.
was built up, and it was a natural choice
for Antalis to call upon CSC to support
it during the operational merger in the
Netherlands. “Today we can capitalise
upon our mutual trust and valuable
technical and business experience,”
explains Philippe Menillet, IT Director
at Antalis. Responsible for supporting,
implementing and managing this
ambitious project, the CSC team started
in July 2008 by launching a planning
phase that highlighted three major
activity areas: Bytes, Business and
Bricks. Firstly, the information system,
with the deployment of the group’s core
model (“Bytes”). Secondly, the business,
with change management and total
overhaul of all operational processes and
the formalisation thereof in the context
of an ISO certification (“Business”).
And lastly, the setting up from scratch
of a warehouse and corresponding
management system (“Bricks”).
EXCELLENCE IN LOGISTICS,
AВ STRATEGIC IMPERATIVE
This last area – “Bricks” – is crucial for
Antalis, which has placed excellence
in logistics, and its ability to deliver
to clients on a Day+1 basis, at the heart
of its strategy. To optimally serve the
KEY FIGURES
“Today we can
capitalise upon
our mutual trust
and valuable
technical
and business experience.”
PHILIPPE MÉNILLET, IT DIRECTOR, ANTALIS
2.8
30,000
6,900
2.3
billion euros in revenues
orders daily
employees
million tonnes of paper
delivered annually
230,000
clients
one, it is indispensable to create real
team spirit and customer intimacy
in order to be responsive,” emphasises
Guillaume Rivet, partner at CSC,
in charge of the programme.
THREE AREAS OF ACTIVITY,
THREE SUCCESSES
Each team went on to successfully
complete its mission. The information
system was deployed on the basis of the
best practices of the group and taking
into account the specificities of the
Dutch market. The documenting
of the ISO procedures enabled Antalis
to renew its certification before even
starting its activities – a rare
accomplishment. Lastly, the building
was delivered in mid-2009, despite the
double conceptual and technological
difficulty of configuring the management
processes for a warehouse that did not
yet exist. The teams were transferred in
October, and the solution was put in
production in early January 2010. “After
a period of adaptation of several months
due to the change of system, the users
went on to embrace the IT tool as a
means to drive operational optimisation,”
states Philippe MГ©nillet, who also
highlights the essential role played
FOCUS
ANTALIS
Antalis is the number 1 in Europe and number 4
worldwide in the distribution of communication support
materials. The activities of Antalis cover four domains:
Print, Office Paper, Packaging and Visual Communication.
Present in 51В countries worldwide and with a global
network of 3,000В representatives, Antalis places
the satisfaction of its customers – printers, resellers,
corporations and communication agencies – at the
heart of its strategy, and offers them an unequalled
range of products and delivery capabilities.
by CSC. “CSC was able to mobilise
the necessary competences which,
in addition to an excellent understanding
of our business and culture, enabled
us to always п¬Ѓnd solutions when we
encountered problems.” New premises,
new business processes, a new
organisation – Antalis BV used the
merger as an opportunity to reinvent
itself and is now well positioned to
realise the ambitious goals it has set
itself for the years ahead.
CONTACT
GUILLAUME RIVET // [email protected]
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
Dutch market, the solution chosen
was to create a single ultramodern
distribution platform to replace the
five regional warehouses. “This meant
building a 27,000 m2 warehouse capable
of handling the same order volumes
as the 45,000 m2 of warehouse
space we had previously,” summarises
StГ©phane Courtot, General Manager
Western Europe at Antalis. To achieve
this, the solution optimises internal
flows and makes use of the most
advanced functionalities of the
warehouse management module
SAP WM, namely the SAP TRM
(Task and Resource Management) tool.
In order to coordinate and carry out
the various tasks, CSC mobilised
competences all over Europe by calling
upon its different competence centres:
the specialists in the Antalis core model
came from France, the team in charge
of documenting the procedures for the
ISO certification in Dutch came from
Belgium, and the experts in the
warehouse management solution were
from Spain. In total, people of twelve
nationalities worked side by side on the
project team. “Competences however
are only one element of success. On an
ambitious international project like this
15
EXPERIENCE
FRENCH POST OFFICE
FINANCIAL INFORMATION SYSTEM AT THE HEART OF BUSINESS TRANSFORMATION
OF “L’ENSEIGNE LA POSTE”
LOOKING FORWARD TO THE OPENING UP OF THE POSTAL SERVICES TO COMPETITION ON 1 JANUARY 2011, AND
IN RESPONSE TO DEVELOPMENTS IN REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS, THE LAВ POSTE GROUP HAS BEEN COMMITTED
TO PROFOUND TRANSFORMATION FOR SEVERAL YEARS ALREADY.
This transformation involves in
particular greater autonomy for its
various businesses: Post, Packages,
LaВ Banque Postale real estate asset
management and, under the name
L’Enseigne La Poste (ELP), the network
of 17,000В post offices and contact
points in mainland France and its
overseas territories.
Since 2007, each business has had
all the management tools necessary
and is responsible for producing
its own п¬Ѓnancial statements. Following
the reorganisation into businesses,
the La Poste group instructed its
various divisions to restructure their
п¬Ѓnancial information system around
SAP. Responsible for the network
of post offices, L’Enseigne La Poste
has made this implementation
one of the key drivers of its strategic
transformation.
In the autumn of 2008, the п¬Ѓnancial
management team of L’Enseigne
launched its SAP project, with the help
of CSC. This programme, Sym onie,
will enable it to achieve a double
objective in within two years:
overhaul its processes and support the
strategic development of L’Enseigne.
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
ALIGNING THE FINANCE
FUNCTION WITH THE BUSINESS
STRATEGY
16
As a transverse business, L’Enseigne
ensures a uniform and reassuring
interface is maintained between the
vast number of individual and SME
customers of the group and the Post,
Packages and LaВ Banque Postale
activities. Contributing to overall
value creation on the basis of the
quality of the service provided,
L’Enseigne has a strategy based
on three main pillars: improvement
CÉCILE RÉVILLARD,
ACCOUNTING
MANAGER
AT L’ENSEIGNE
LA POSTE.
PIERRE SOUSSY,
PROGRAMME
DIRECTOR
FOR SYM ONIE.
of the customer relationship,
commercial development and
economic performance. By enabling
the implementation of a management
model and greater operational
efficiency, Sym onie is a key element
of the finance department’s
contribution to this strategy.
“The implementation of SAP was
essential, but technology should remain
a means to realise our transformation,”
emphasises StГ©phane Zakarian, CFO
of L’Enseigne. In the overall roadmap
for the programme, which continuously
guides its activities, the overhaul
of the system is only one of the targets,
along with further development of
the organisation, its processes and
its competences.
Having grasped the scope of this
project in terms of the business,
in particular by proposing the use
of the Retail version of SAP, was one
of the factors that drove the choice of
CSC as systems integrator.
“The group chose SAP for its functional
richness, guaranteed continuity and
FOCUS
THE SYM ONY PROGRAMME IN FIGURES
3,400В users, among which 1,400В staff in the п¬Ѓnance department
(general and analytic accounting, management control,
procurement and sales administration) and 2,000В requisitioners
of L’Enseigne (excluding the finance department).
Rolled out in 210В geographic locations (mainland France and
overseas territories).
30 months to define and put in place the solution (September
2008-March 2011).
150В active participants in the programme.
400 training sessions spread across 8В SAP modules (FI, CO, MM,
SD, BW, SIM, SRM, Solman).
robustness; but we also had to choose
the module, and CSC immediately
understood the nature of our
distribution network,” explains
Pierre Soussy, Programme Director
for Sym onie. Another aspect which
drew CSC’s attention was the enormous
scale of the project. With 17,000 offices
carrying out thousands of different
operations every day, an accounting
entry is generated every two seconds
which has to be handled by the system.
Ultimately it will be one of the largest
SAP data repositories in Europe.
Sym onie also encompasses six
business projects, linked to the major
п¬Ѓnance departments. On its own,
accounting involves roughly
1,000В users, and the procurement
process, entirely dematerialised,
encompasses no less than п¬Ѓfteen
categories of items, ranging
from furniture to fund transport.
“Despite the scale of the task, the
challenge has always been to
safeguard the overall coherence
of the solution and to reconcile needs
– without devaluing them – with the
standards of the software and volume
constraints,” stresses Michel Rebillard,
KEY FIGURES
“The implementation
of SAP was essential,
but technology
should remain
a means to realise
our transformation.”
17,000
contact points,
in mainland France and
its overseas territories
65,000
3.4
billion euros in revenues
2
million customers
served daily
employees
STÉPHANE ZAKARIAN, CFO, L’ENSEIGNE LA POSTE
partner at CSC, in charge of the
programme.
FRONT LINE: THE BUSINESS
Throughout the duration of the work,
the programme management ensured
a sustained pace and maintained the
interface between all parties involved,
in particular where transverse processes
were concerned. From the start,
the business was the front line for
translating the major goals of Sym onie
into operational terms. Ensuring the
cascade of information from the office
network on a daily basis, aligning
management and accounting cycles,
reducing the time needed for closing,
and improving productivity thanks
to standardisation of processes
and the adopting of best practices.
“The functional departments played
a key role in the management of
change, thanks to a very thorough
and participative approach, which made
it possible to improve processes and
working methods even before the new
IT system was put in place,” explains
CГ©cile RГ©villard, Accounting Manager
at L’Enseigne.
This meticulous organisation, under the
watchful eye of a п¬Ѓrm and attentive
sponsor, made it possible to deliver on
the promises of Sym onie: run in
parallel, and within the agreed deadline,
both operational transformation and
IT development. In the autumn of 2010,
the users immediately adopted the
new and particularly user-friendly tool,
designed to help L’Enseigne face the
challenges ahead of it in the coming
years. “This success was made possible
by the mobilisation of everybody
around strong guiding principles,
and – thanks to the competence and
availability of our partners at all levels
– CSC aligned itself perfectly with this
approach,” concludes Stéphane Zakarian.
CONTACT
ELS BULENS // [email protected]
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
A French state owned enterprise, La Poste is the second largest postal services provider
in Europe. It offers customers of all kinds services in three primary areas: Post, Packages
and La Banque Postale. Distribution and the providing of these services at local level is done
by the post office network, managed by l’Enseigne La Poste.
17
EXPERIENCE
VDAB
FLEMISH AGENCY FOR EMPLOYMENT AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING (VDAB – VLAAMSE
DIENST VOOR ARBEIDSBEMIDDELING EN BEROEPSOPLEIDING)
ADVANTAGES AND PITFALLS OF CLOUD COMPUTING. “CLOUD COMPUTING ENABLES COST SAVINGS
AND IMPROVED SERVICE,” STATES PAUL DANNEELS, CIO OF THE FLEMISH AGENCY FOR EMPLOYMENT
AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING (VDAB). BUT THAT DOESN’T MEAN THE NEW MODEL IS A PANACEA.
ONLY THOSE THAT MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICES GET THE MOST BENEFITS FROM IT.
Cloud computing is a new and
alternative delivery model for IT
services which goes far beyond classic
outsourcing. In this model, various
services linked to data, infrastructure
and applications are made available
in a network, the so-called “cloud”. The
user can select applications as needed,
and is charged on a pay-per-use basis.
The VDAB was the п¬Ѓrst major Belgian
public sector organisation to see the
opportunities cloud computing offered,
after a cloud adoption assessment
by CSC.
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
LOWER COSTS, GREATER
FLEXIBILITY
18
“The cloud is becoming a hype in the
IT world,” admits CIO Paul Danneels.
“Many suppliers are hosting their
services and products in the cloud,
but not always in an equally
well-considered out manner. The
principle of the cloud is not applicable
or advantageous for everything.”
Concretely, the cloud is a breakthrough
as regards the management of
infrastructure and licenses, and the
cooperation with suppliers. Software
licenses or CRM applications no longer
need to be installed on individual PCs.
They’re in the cloud, and the client only
pays when using them. Data no longer
needs to be stored locally, but is instead
accessible on a much more powerful
platform. The possibilities are endless.
“Our greatest expectations are related
to cost savings,” explains Paul Danneels.
“These are much greater with the cloud
than with classic shared services, thanks
to economies of scale. Everything
here is done for a large community.”
The new model is also advantageous
for providing services. As users are no
longer bound to their internal structures
VDAB (Flemish
Employment and
Vocational Training
Service) is the Belgian
public authority for
the co-ordination
of the labour market
in Flanders.
KEY FIGURES
jobseekers choose from
“That’s why the VDAB
п¬Ѓrst cooperated with CSC
to explore what the
opportunities were for us in
terms of the business and IT.
On the basis thereof we defined a clear
strategy, and translated it into a roadmap.”
employers choose from
98,608 22,064
job offerings
cv’s
provided
13
million training hours to
55,695 people per year
and procurement processes, flexibility
increases. “In addition, the quality
of the services delivered is just as high
as with the traditional way of working,”
comments Danneels.
A WELL-CONSIDERED
LONG-TERM PLAN
The VDAB is running an initial pilot
project involving the migration of the
group email solution to Google
Enterprise mail, in the course of 2011.
The “.vdab” in the e-mail address will
remain, and the storage capacity
of the mailboxes will become much
greater: 25В gigabytes as opposed
to 1-2В GB with shared services. And
above all, it’s two to three times
cheaper. The long-term plan includes
several other projects. The �Guide to the
Flemish Employment Market’ reporting
tool – which contains a wealth of data
on population, jobs and unemployment
– will be made available via the cloud.
The same will be done for training
courses, enriched with multimedia
applications. And these are just a few
examples. The benefits are always the
same: thanks to the enormous storage
capacity, information is rapidly available
and cheaper.
Working via the cloud does however
imply that organisations have to hand
certain data and applications over
to third parties. Potential users fear
that this may lead to lower security
levels and greater risks in terms of
confidentiality.
“It’s the typical fear of the unknown,”
asserts Danneels. “Cloud computing
clashes with the usual way of working,
and that creates resistance. It is of
course true that some components
have to be detached from the rest and
migrated to the larger platform. That’s
why you have to think carefully about
which strategic data and applications
you want to keep nearby in your own
data centre, and which can be hosted
further away. It would be wrong to just
shift everything blindly to the cloud.”
GOOD COMMUNICATION
“Think before you act” is thus the key
message that the CIO of the VDAB
wants to pass on to others that might be
interested. The CSC study with its data
classification was crucial for identifying
data and services that can be migrated
to the cloud, and whether that
is technically feasible within the
organisation’s IT architecture.
The detached data still needs to be
integrated into the internal data centre.
“In other words, don’t be too hasty;
think first about �what’s in it for me?’”
Responsibility is also an important point
for attention. Legally binding and robust
commitments need to be put in place
for services, service levels and support
models in all areas. In the area of
privacy, clear agreements with the
cloud supplier are a must.
Lastly, good internal communication
is crucial, bearing in mind that a major
change in the way of working is
involved. “Everyone in the organisation
needs to have a good understanding
of what we’re trying to achieve, and
what will change for them,” explains
Paul Danneels. “That’s why an internal
support organisation is so important.
For many people, the cloud is
something intangible, somewhere
far outside their trusted working
environment. There have to be people
that staff can always call upon for help.
These contacts are the real link between
the cloud and the earth.”
CONTACT
ELS BULENS // [email protected]
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
PAUL DANEELS, CIO OF THE FLEMISH AGENCY FOR EMPLOYMENT
AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING
19
TRENDS
CFO BAROMETER:
A
TIME
OF
OPPORTUNITIES?
AS THE CONSTANT GUARDIANS OF PROFITABILITY AND RISK MANAGEMENT, FINANCE DEPARTMENTS
NOW NEED TO DEVELOP THEIR VISION FOR THE FUTURE AS REGARDS GUIDING GENERAL MANAGEMENT
IN LONG-TERM STRATEGIC DECISION MAKING. THIS IS THE CONCLUSION OF THE LATEST CFO BAROMETER,
A SURVEY OF THE CFOS OF 80В MAJOR EUROPEAN CORPORATIONS CARRIED OUT BY CSC IN COOPERATION
WITH TNS SOFRES.
After having reduced their investments
and drastically cut costs and working
capital requirements, large European
groups have by and large recovered.
Profits have returned to close to historic
levels, and comfortable cash reserves
have been built up.
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
A STRONG DEMAND FOR
RESPONSIVENESS
20
This performance illustrates an admirable
ability to adapt to a deteriorating
environment with reduced visibility.
However, in certain sectors there are still
only two to three months of orders on
the books, as opposed to six to twelve
before the crisis. The cycles of the
business (R&D, production, sales, etc.)
have also been shortened
correspondingly, and time is currently the
key factor in decision making processes.
This holds true more or less everywhere,
and has been felt particularly strongly
in the automotive industry, which is
accustomed to long cycles and is now
having to adapt to shorter cycles, greater
variability in demand and high volatility
in raw materials prices.
Businesses need to be responsive in
order to revise their resource allocation
at a moment’s notice. And this
dominance of the short term of course
has an impact on п¬Ѓnance. CFOs are
expected to be able to respond to
requests for information in real time. In
general, they need to rethink and adapt
their management and forecasting
processes in order to boost their own
responsiveness and compensate for poor
long-term visibility. This results in an
increased need for management tools
that make it possible to take strategic
decisions in a very short time. In this
context, “organisation 2.0” seems
increasingly to be the solution that will
enable applications and reporting tools
to be connected via collaborative portals,
and make it possible to gather data while
at the same time responding to greater
demands for analysis, compliance with
standards and norms, and key
performance indicators.
THE NEED FOR LONG-TERM
STRATEGIC VISION
Finance departments must of course
master all the factors that influence
forecasting in order to provide top
management with the elements
necessary for decision making. But the
crisis has confirmed one fact: managing
on the basis of costs and margins is
insufficient. More than ever before, CFOs
need to be involved in the long-term
strategy of the company. Developing the
ability to redefine plans for growth and
investment is one of the major challenges
of the economic upturn. Now that cash
reserves have been spectacularly built up
again in 2010, they need to be invested in
line with the long-term strategic vision of
the company. For example, in emerging
markets where growth is still to be found.
The goal of п¬Ѓnance departments is not
only to manage treasury operations and
MASTERING THE TIME HORIZON
short-term survival, but rather to look
beyond the crisis and capitalise upon the
opportunities offered by the disruptions
currently underway. This implies a new
state of mind that could take shape in
the form of closer support of operational
departments, to help them act on growth
opportunities while giving them greater
responsibility thanks to a more
decentralised organisation.
DEVELOPING MANAGEMENT
FORECASTING
Here too п¬Ѓnance departments need to
equip themselves with appropriate tools.
In an environment with limited visibility,
marked by changes in the nature of
risk (increased volatility of currencies,
skyrocketing raw materials prices, lack
of confidence in banking counterparties,
the analytical complexities of hedging
operations, emergence of new
environmental risks, etc.) and changes
in regulatory frameworks, the demand
from top management for insight into
the future and alternative scenarios
is becoming ever stronger.
Although the demand for detailed
reporting is still present, it is
accompanied by the search for
forecasting tools that augment the
company’s strategic vision. In addition
to short-term management in response
to accelerating business cycles,
management forecasting must enable
the business to identify new
opportunities and steer an appropriate
course in function of п¬Ѓnancial and
operational factors. The goal is to
support the company in its strategic
decision making and judgement in terms
of investments, acquisitions and
divestments, enabling it to be selective
when evaluating projects and to
safeguard the return on capital
employed.
CONTACT
JEAN MICHEL BOUHOURS // [email protected]
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
72%
For
of the CFOs surveyed, mastering the time
horizon in management forecasting is a priority. They need to take into
account both short-term risks and long-term opportunities. Top management
needs ever greater insight into the future and to be able to evaluate
alternative scenarios. Although the demand for detailed reporting is still
present, it is accompanied by the search for forecasting tools that augment
the company’s strategic vision. It is thus no surprise that major corporations
such as SociГ©tГ© GГ©nГ©rale or ValГ©o have just unveiled 5-year strategic plans.
21
TRENDS
THE FUTURE
OF HEALTHCARE: IT’S
HEALTH,
THEN CARE
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
HOW CAN HEALTHCARE PROGRESS TO MEET THE PATIENT POPULATION AND ECONOMIC CHALLENGES
IT FACES? CSC’S LEADING EDGE FORUM TAKES A LOOK AT HOW TECHNOLOGY CAN SUPPORT MORE
PROACTIVE APPROACHES THAT PROMOTE WELLNESS AND STAYING HEALTHY.
22
Healthcare in the 21st century faces
serious challenges. Not only must it
cater to an aging population while
facing shortages of care providers,
an increase in chronic conditions
such as diabetes, and growing global
obesity; it is also beset by increasing
costs and п¬Ѓnancial constraints.
To address these major problems,
healthcare needs to make significant
disruptive changes, according
to “The Future of Healthcare: It’s
Health, then Care”, a new research
report by the Leading Edge Forum
(LEF). Traditionally, healthcare has
been delivered using a physiciancentric model. When people felt
unwell they saw their doctor, and
if necessary received further care
in a hospital setting. This model
worked when little was known
about prevention, there were
few diagnostic tests and limited
treatment options. However,
advances in medicine on all
fronts make this model outdated.
For the future, LEF says, the practice
of medicine follows a patient-centric
care team model with new
members and new roles. In addition,
healthcare’s reach expands to
include wellness monitoring,
prevention and earlier disease
detection. Of course, people will
still get sick and require medical
attention, and when they do there
are new advanced medical
treatments that speed healing,
with improved quality of life and
health outcomes.
This model relies on technology
to put medical knowledge and
tools into the hands of patients to
proactively monitor their own health
and wellness. New technologies
also improve interactions between
clinicians and patients and empower
changes in their roles, and are
enabling advances in detection
and treatment.
MAJOR HEALTHCARE
INDUSTRY TRENDS AND
DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGIES
Fortunately, changes are already
in progress. There are a myriad of
burgeoning efforts in laboratories,
in pilot studies, in clinical trials and in
practice. The changes these efforts
represent, and the implications of
the key technologies involved, are
presented in the context of п¬Ѓve major
trends that are disrupting healthcare,
as listed below. The trends focus п¬Ѓrst
on patient-centric initiatives, and then
on new developments, care providers,
and п¬Ѓnally on an emerging global
health system.
1. Empowering the patient –
E-power to the patient
Patients take on a larger, more active
role in managing their health. They are
in charge of their care management
on a daily basis, with a �shared care’
relationship with their provider.
BRAVE NEW HEALTHCARE: SMART STICKING PLASTERS
What if a person’s heart rate could be checked regularly by
simply wearing a plaster? The US Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) recently approved Proteus Biomedical’s wireless
adhesive sensor technology, called Raisin, which can track
and record a patient’s heart rate, physical activity, body
Patients are empowered through
the availability of health information,
new health and wellness applications
and support systems to encourage
and monitor progress, all available
using smartphones or other Internetenabled technologies (see box).
2. Earlier detection
Accelerating diagnosis is crucial
to successful treatment for, if not
prevention of, a health problem.
Supporting technologies range from
simple, inexpensive paper lab tests
to breath tests that detect cancer
and diabetes, to genetic testing
for variants aligned to known health
problems.
3. High-tech healing
New technology-based solutions
can improve care and the long-term
quality of life. Next-generation
implants and ingestibles use a number
of technologies to monitor disease
position and other biometrics. Raisin is worn like a plaster
and transmits the data via Bluetooth to a PC or mobile device.
This eliminates the need for medical visits to check heart rates,
and since they are monitored continuously, adverse events
can be spotted right away.
progress, dispense medications,
and assist and replace malfunctioning
organs and limbs.
4. Resources: more, but different
New care models optimize clinical
expertise and allow care delivery
to be spread across a number of
resources. Included in the care team
are physicians, nurse practitioners,
nurses, medical assistants, care
coaches, patients, and their families
– all connected by new technologies.
Care resources are also more
accessible through remote
technologies and online communities,
for direct care and consultation.
5. Global healthcare system
emerges
More is better. The increased baseline
of information about patient care,
outcomes, research study results,
adverse events, disease surveillance,
and population health will result in
better care, and better and faster
research. In the future, data are
shared among the care team
members anywhere they may be
located, allowing them to make
the best diagnostic and treatment
decisions. Through a network of
networks, different data sources
and larger populations are valuable
resources to support collaborative
research among care providers, life
science companies and researchers
to solve the toughest health problems.
Healthcare will always be local, but
with a global knowledge base to draw
from, the local care team is better
equipped to make the right decisions,
LEF believes. This global-local
dynamic will evolve to create a
healthcare system that promotes
health, well-being and better
health outcomes for all.
CONTACT
DOWNLOAD
FRANCES TURISCO // [email protected]
www.csc.com/lefreports
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
FOCUS
23
FACE-TO-FACE
BIOGRAPHY
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
Having joined BNP directly after his
studies at the Г‰cole polytechnique,
Yves Martrenchar has spent his entire
career in the retail banking division.
He set up the first “Products and
Markets” marketing department
and went on to lead the Retail entity
of the retail banking division in
France. Today he is responsible for
Distribution, Markets & Solutions, and
is COO of BNP Paribas Retail Banking.
24
“RETAIL BANKING IS
THE REAL ECONOMY”
Yves Martrenchar, Chief Operating Officer of BNP Paribas Retail Banking.
BANKS ARE AMONG THE LARGEST CORPORATIONS IN THE WORLD, BUT THEIR MARKETS,
PROTECTED BY CULTURAL AND REGULATORY BARRIERS, OFTEN REMAIN DOMESTIC.
HOW TO BECOME A GLOBAL PLAYER IN THIS CONTEXT? CAN THE SAME BUSINESS MODEL
REALLY BE IMPLEMENTED IN BRUSSELS, KIEV, ROME OR SAN FRANCISCO? PREMIUM ASKED
YVES MARTRENCHAR, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER OF BNP PARIBAS RETAIL BANKING.
YVES MARTRENCHAR: Very few European
banks are present in several Western European
countries: in addition to BNP Paribas, the other
main players are Santander, CrГ©ditВ Agricole,
Unicredit and HSBC. A sort of Champions
League, as it were.
Today BNP Paribas is the only bank with
a significant presence in retail banking in four
eurozone countries: France, Italy, Belgium and
Luxembourg. And our market penetration is
considerable: out of a population of 135 million
in those four countries, we have 14 million
private clients.
DO YOU EXPECT A TREND
TOWARDS CONSOLIDATION?
Y.M.: Since we acquired Fortis, which enabled
us to enter the Belgian market, there has
not been another major transaction and banks
are currently facing new capital constraints.
I don’t think that large scale consolidation
is very likely in the short term.
RETAIL BANKING IS STRONGLY LOCAL
IN CHARACTER. WHAT ADVANTAGES
DOES YOUR INTERNATIONAL
NETWORK GIVE YOU?
Y.M.: Having an international network makes
it possible to share knowhow and innovation.
We can also pool certain resources and
investments. For instance, we’re going
to standardise the processing of all card
operations, whereas we currently have
21В different systems!
The challenge is to maintain a balance between
horizontal integration – which yields synergies –
and the necessary closeness to our clients.
When we deploy our integrated model in a
country, our goal is to embed ourselves in
the local economy, and build rich and lasting
relationships with our clients, both corporate
and private.
IS THERE SUCH AS THING AS A GLOBAL
CLIENT? OR A EUROPEAN CLIENT?
Y.M.: Every country has its own particularities,
and its own banking culture. We can distinguish
between developed countries and emerging
countries, where the middle classes are
beginning to have access to the banking world.
However, the studies we have carried out
highlight many common elements. In all
countries, clients want an offering that is both
competitive and safe – and flexible, to respond
to the increasing demand for personalisation.
The relationship aspect is important: clients
value competence, responsiveness and
proactivity. They also want stability: they
don’t like it when their contact person changes
too often, and they expect their own customer
history to be taken into account.
These are the basic characteristics of a global
client, even if certain traits are more strongly
emphasised in any given country. For example,
the acceptance of banking costs varies
considerably from one country to another.
AND CORPORATE CLIENTS?
Y.M.: For companies, the model is centred
on business centres – we have 150 of them in
23 European countries. The initiative “One Bank
for Corporates in Europe” is the expression
of our determination to support them in all the
markets they’re present in, by building close
relationships around a complete range of
services: cash management, leasing, factoring,
credit, trade solutions, etc.
We also deploy personalised information systems
and sales support tools on the workstations
of our advisors and call centre advisors.
HAS THE ROLE OF ADVISOR CHANGED?
Y.M.: Today advisors are operating within an
increasingly directed environment, and using
leading edge decision support tools. That
said, initiative and commercial talent remain
determining factors. Being able to listen to
the client, and daring to ask the right questions
in order to propose a tailored response:
that’s the key competence!
Availability is another: you need to be able
to juggle leads, appointments and unexpected
calls from clients… And that’s a talent that
depends on more than just an information
system!
WILL THE BANK OF TOMORROW
BE VERY DIFFERENT?
Y.M.: Not fundamentally. In recent years the
internet has become important, and mobile
banking is accelerating – in terms of information
and services, but also in commercial terms.
However, this isn’t really a revolution for us.
Given that we have a genuinely integrated
multichannel model, the main challenge will
be to shift our offering in response to
market developments and customer needs.
Our ambition remains the same: we want to
be the best multichannel player, in particular
in online and mobile banking.
YOU OFTEN MENTION AN “INTEGRATED
MODEL”. HOW DO YOU DEFINE IT?
Y.M.: Our model for retail banking is that of
a multichannel bank, which manages all services
and customer contacts in an integrated manner.
In the physical branch, via telephone and via
the internet site – and clusters all the offerings
and specialised services of the group around
them. This requires high performance tools that
enable us to understand customers and contact
them at the right moment – and to respond
in an appropriate manner when they call us.
FOCUS
BNP PARIBAS
RETAIL BANKING
55 countries
7,300 branches (of which 6,500 in Europe
and around the Mediterranean basin)
148,000 employees
22 million clients (private and corporate)
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
BNP PARIBAS CHANGED SCALE
AFTER THE FORTIS ACQUISITION.
WHO EXACTLY ARE THE MAIN
RETAIL BANKING PLAYERS ON THE
EUROPEAN SCENE?
25
VIEWS
GOVERNANCE, RISK AND COMPLIANCE:
IS YOUR ORGANISATION
TAKING AN APPROACH
TO MITIGATE RISKS
LONG TERM?
T
he continuity of headlines
related to regulatory actions
and п¬Ѓnes, corporate fraud, and data
breaches highlight that significant
assurance gaps exist in most
corporations. To address these
shortcomings, integrated
governance, risk and compliance
(GRC) has emerged.
information, methodology, process
and technology. By taking this
interconnected approach
organisations can replicate
improvements in one GRC area
across other GRC areas with the
goal of competitive advantage
and maximising shareholder value.
and technology across all assurance
groups. This creates a seamless
body of knowledge about
regulations, policies, risks, controls
and issues throughout an
organisation. Integrated GRC
is about creating the environment
and system whereby GRC
professionals work.
Organisations that have been most
successful in GRC have benefited
from a strong “tone at the top” and
executive sponsorship in support
of the collaboration between
assurance groups. Successful GRC
projects also embrace the following:
1. define the organisation and
process context;
2. establish a common language for
policies, risks and controls;
3. implement consistent, reliable
methodology;
4. develop transparency, reporting
and monitoring;
5. leverage a common technology
platform.
THE CURRENT STATE
PREMIUM / CSC / SPRING 2011
WHAT IS GRC
26
Many definitions of GRC have
been published. Whilst every
organization needs to define
what GRC means in their own
organisational context, a great
start is the definition provided
by the Open Compliance and
Ethics Group (OCEG), “ … system of
people, processes, and technology
that enables an organisation to:
• understand and prioritise
stakeholder expectations;
• set business objectives that are
congruent with values and risks;
• achieve objectives while
optimising risk profile and
protecting value;
• operate within legal, contractual,
internal, social, and ethical
boundaries;
• provide relevant, reliable, and
timely information to appropriate
stakeholders;
• enable the measurement of the
performance and effectiveness
of the system.”
The definition highlights that
GRC activities are interconnected
and rely on a common set of
Due to increases in regulations and
п¬Ѓnancial reporting requirements,
companies have increased spending
in the areas of audit, risk and
compliance over the past ten years.
To honestly assess where your
organization is on the GRC maturity
curve, ask your company key
stakeholders if the following is true
of your organisation:
• a common, consistent language
to describe risks and controls exists;
• consistent processes are in place
to identify and assess all the issues
impacting business performance
or exposing us to unnecessary risk;
• management has identified the
levels where accountability for
GRC resides;
• an understanding of the significant
business processes that create value
in our organisation;
• adoption of a standard, and
consistent assurance methodology;
• internal audit department
evaluates and reports on the
reliability of our risk management
framework continuously and
it is maintained.
Few, if any, companies could
GRC INFORMATION
AND TECHNOLOGY
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
DEBORAH ROBERTS HAS BEEN
WORKING IN THE ENTERPRISE
SOFTWARE GOVERNANCE RISK
AND COMPLIANCE MARKETPLACE
FOR OVER 15В YEARS. SHE IS A
CHARTERED MANAGEMENT
ACCOUNTANT AND IS BASED IN
LONDON AT THE HEAD OFFICE OF
THOMSON REUTERS GRC DIVISION.
credibly prepare such a
representation. The barriers
to integrated GRC for most
organisations come down to
one or more of four activities:
working in silos, lack of executive
sponsorship, conflicting
methodologies and disparate
information and technology.
THE PURSUIT
OF INTEGRATED GRC
The discipline of integrated GRC
and the value proposition of GRC
information and technology must
combine best practices, skills,
intelligent information, methodology
Organisations on the leading
edge of integrated GRC rely on
comprehensive information
technology that addresses all
GRC stakeholders. GRC technology
enables organizations to break
down the walls between audit,
risk and compliance groups
and provides expanded value as
organizations deploy the software
across the enterprise. By unifying
the many GRC process owners, a
comprehensive software solution
can eliminate information silos,
redundant data entry and improve
information transparency and
communication.
SUMMARY
GRC represents one of the most
significant advances for audit,
compliance and risk professionals
in many years. However, unlike
most changes in these п¬Ѓelds, it
is not being driven by regulators
and professional standard setters,
but by leading-edge practitioners
and solution and service providers.
Article taken from BUILDING A BUSINESS CASE FOR GOVERNANCE, RISK AND COMPLIANCE originally prepared by Bruce McCuaig and Mike Rost and available
to download at www.grc.thomsonreuters.com
ABOUT CSC
The mission of CSC is to be a global leader in providing technology enabled business solutions and services.
With the broadest range of capabilities, CSC offers clients the solutions they need to manage complexity, focus on core businesses,
collaborate with partners and clients, and improve operations.
CSC makes a special point of understanding its clients and provides experts with real-world experience to work with them.
CSC is vendor-independent, delivering solutions that best meet each client’s unique requirements.
For more than 50В years, clients in industries and governments worldwide have trusted CSC with their business process and
information systems outsourcing, systems integration and consulting needs. The company trades on the New York Stock Exchange
under the symbol “CSC”.
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