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CATALOGUE - Daystar University

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2011
2015
C ATA L O G U E
Daystar University reserves the right to amend any section of this Catalogue without prior notification.
This Catalogue is produced by the Corporate Affairs Department.
Supervising Editors:
Julius O. Gogo, Jon Masso
Design and Layout:
Tony Okuku
Photography:
Sosnes Olindo, Sospeter Irumbi, Tony Okuku
“We have also a more sure word of prophesy; where unto ye do well that ye take heed,
as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn,
and the daystar arise in your hearts
(2 Peter 1:19 – KJV).”
It is inevitable that some changes in schools, programmes, curriculum or policy will occur before the next Catalogue is published.
You may visit our Websites: www.daystar.ac.ke or www.daystarus.org for Catalogue updates.
The Department of Admissions and Records is prepared, at all times, to answer queries and describe current regulations.
NAIROBI CAMPUS
VALLEY ROAD
P.O. BOX, 44400-00100
NAIROBI, KENYA
Phone: (020) 2723002/3/4
Fax: (020) 2728338
ii
www.daystar.ac.ke
UNIVERSITY CATALOGUE
ATHI RIVER CAMPUS
LUKENYA HILLS
P. O. BOX, 436 ATHI RIVER
Phone: (045) 22360,
22601/2/3,
Fax: 045 22420
TABLE OF CONTENTS
About Usvi
Our Visionvi
Our Mission vi
Academic Highlightsvi
Schools & Institutionsvii
Campus Life1
Doulos2
Student Counselling2
Students Sports & Recreation Office
2
FINANCIAL INFORMATION3
A) Fee Structure4
B) Student Financial Aid 6
Administration7
Academic Programmes9
Goals of Daystar’s Academic Programmes
13
Common Academic Regulations14
General Regulations for Postgraduate
22
PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAMME25
Pre-University Curriculum27
Postgraduate Programme63
Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE)
63
DEPARTMENT OF PEACE & INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 69
Undergraduate Programme69
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
77
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE78
Diploma Programme78ostess Air Hostess & Cabin Crew Studies
78
Air Travel Ticketing & Tourism
78
Business Administration & Management
81
Business Information Technology82
Entrepreneurship83
Finance84
Hospitality Management85
Human Resource Management86
Purchasing & Business Logistics
87
Sales & Marketing Management
89
Tours & Travel90
Undergraduate Programme105
Accounting106
Business Administration107
Marketing108
Management Information Systems
109
Purchasing & Business Logistics
110
Bachelor of Commerce - Law Option
112
SCHOOL OF ARTS & HUMANITIES
29
DEPARTMENT OF THEOLOGY & BIBLICAL STUDIES 30
Undergraduate Programme30
Bachelor of Arts in Biblical & Religious Studies 30
Minor in Bible31
Postgraduate Programme130
Christian Ministries Minor32
Master of Business Administration
130
Bachelor of Theology32
Postgraduate Programme43
Master of Arts in Christian Ministries
43
Master of Theology (M.Th) in African Christianity
47
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION52
Undergraduate Programme52
Bachelor of Education Degree (Arts/Science)
52
Computer Science59
Music
59
Religious Studies 59
Business Studies59
Economics60
Mathematics Major60
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
139
Undergraduate Programme139
Bachelor of Scienec in Economics
139
SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION, LANGUAGES & 147
PERFORMING ARTS
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION
148
Diploma Programme148
Communication148
Christian Music Communication
152
www.daystar.ac.ke
iii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Undergraduate Programme155
Communication Major155
Bachelor of Arts in Technical & Professional 163
Communication
Postgraduate Programme168
Master of Arts in Communication
168
Doctor of Philosophy in Communication
173
DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGE & PERFORMING ARTS 177
Certificate Courses
Graded Certificate Course in Music (GCCM)
177
Undergraduate Programme Shahada ya Kiswahili183
Bachelor of Arts in English
189
Bachelor of Arts in French
195
Bachelor of Arts Music201
SCHOOL OF HUMAN & SOCIAL SCIENCES
207
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY & COUNSELING 208
Diploma Programme208
Diploma in Counselling208
Undergraduate Programme211
Bachelor of Arts Degree - Psychology & Counseling
211
Postgraduate Programme216
Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology
216
Doctor Of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Clinical Psychology 220
INSTITUTE OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT
228
Master of Arts in Child Development
228
Postgraduate Diploma in Child Development (PGDCD) 233
DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
237
Diploma Programme237
Diploma in Community Development
237
iv
www.daystar.ac.ke
Undergraduate Programme240
Bachelor of Arts in Community Development
240
Bachelor of Arts in Social Work
244
Postgraduate Programme251
Master of Arts in Community Development
251
Master of Arts in Monitoring & Evaluation
257
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE, ENGINEERING & HEALTH 263
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE & ENGINEERING Undergraduate Programme264
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics264
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Health
270
Bachelor of Science in Physics
272
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING295
Undergraduate Programme295
Bachelor of Science in Nursing – Direct Entry
295
Bachelor of Science in Nursing - Upgrading Programme 300
COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 312
Diploma Programme312
Information Technology (IT)312
Undergraduate Programme315
Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science
315
Whatever you do, work at it with all your
heart, as working for the Lord, not for human
masters, since you know that you will receive
an inheritance from the Lord as a reward. It is
the Lord Christ you are serving.
Colossians 3:23-24.
Dr. Timothy Wachira
Vice-Chancellor
Daystar University
Welcome! To a University with a difference!
T
he changing nature of work, technology, and competition in the global
job market has far outpaced what the education system in many
universities provides for students, despite the ongoing efforts of educators
and communities to improve them. Priorities and goals set by educators at
all levels of academia are doing little to alleviate this problem. Assessment
is the one true measure of academic excellence but it slowly but surely limits
many young people’s chances of experiencing any semblance of the success
in life that we expect for them and that they believe school will provide
for them. The present and upcoming structure of the education system in
Daystar University does students a tremendous justice by delivering the quality
schooling that the job market requires today.
Globalization and rapid technological advancements are having dramatic
effects on the ways we communicate and conduct business as well as in
our personal lives. History teaches us that even as new technologies create
growth and new opportunity, they can heighten economic inequalities and
sharpen social divisions. As we move into the information age, we can reap
the growth that comes from revolutionary technologies. To further this quest to
achieve the millennium development goals and the vision 2030, I am glad
that modern state of the art structures are complete and this will ensure the
quest to achieve our goals is fulfilled. I am pleased that at Daystar University
we strive to give you a wholesome educational experience that enables you
to recognize these disparities and thus empowering you to address the same
through the biblical perspectives incorporated in our teaching programmes.
Education should increase students’ understanding of the world around them.
core. As students move from class to class and progress to the next grade,
they are exposed to content-specific knowledge. They are taught how what
they learn in one class relates to another or its application in the world outside
of school. Incorporating more rigorous and relevant instruction in classrooms
is what we as a university emphasize on. When students are engaged in the
learning process, real achievement takes place, and their chances to excel at
what they do increase.
My hope and prayer is that we can learn to embrace this and work towards
the gratification of God as it is He that we should all be serving. This should
be reflected through our day to day activities in teaching, learning and any
work within and away from this great Institution. Excellence cannot by any
means be achieved in a day or two. It is a continuing process that we should
all embrace. We should renew our commitment to excellence as a university
as we strive to continue offering the best university education there can be in
the country and ultimately, the world over.
Our objective is for Daystar University to become a one stop educational
institution of higher learning where the core programmes necessary for
meeting the development needs of this country are taught while retaining our
philosophy of instilling biblical values in those who pass through our hands.
For as you well know life is holistic in nature and it is therefore required of us
to always have a balance between the physical and spiritual, philosophy and
conscience, and individuality and communality. This can only be achieved
when we all embrace a biblical perspective to life.
Assessments play an important role in education, but a score on a test does
not usually help the student when he or she is competing for a job with
someone from around the globe. It is important that our students enter the
global economy with the ability to apply what they learned in the university
to a variety of ever-changing situations that they couldn’t foresee before
graduating. That is the mark of a quality education and a truer indication of
academic excellence. Daystar University provides opportunities for students
to work together to improve their understanding of concepts in the academic
www.daystar.ac.ke
v
Daystar University - Profile
About us
The University was founded in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, by S.E Motsoko-Pheko,
a political refugee from South Africa and Dr. Donald Smith & Mrs. Faye
Smith, an American missionary couple. The University relocated to Nairobi
Kenya in 1974 and was granted a charter as an accredited university in
1994. The name �Daystar’ is derived from the Bible (2nd Peter 1:19), which
is used to describe Jesus Christ. With this in mind, every member of Daystar
University is encouraged to emulate Jesus Christ in behaviour, lifestyle and
speech.
Our Vision
To be a distinguished, Christ-centered, African institution of higher learning for
the transformation of Church and society.
Our Mission
To develop managers, professionals, researchers and scholars to be effective,
Christian servant-leaders through the integration of Christian faith and holistic
learning for the transformation of church and society in Africa and the world.
Academic Highlights
The University combines impressive modern facilities and a dynamic
approach to teaching and research. Daystar University strives for excellence
in its teaching and research methods. The University is well known for quality
in teaching. Training is personalized and by highly qualified faculty.
I am thankful for the growth of the
institution and for the students and
leaders we have come to know. There
is now an increased burden to pray
for Daystar University.
Dr. Donald Smith.
vi
www.daystar.ac.ke
The Nairobi Campus is situated at the Valley road/Ngong road junction. The
campus offers daytime diploma courses, daytime pre-university programme,
day/evening undergraduate programmes and evening postgraduate
programme.
The Mombasa Campus, opened in August 2009, at Apollo House,
Moi Avenue offers day pre-university and evening undergraduate and
postgraduate programmes.
Built on 300 acres of land, the University’s Athi River Campus is 40 kilometers
from Nairobi situated on the edge of the Athi plains on the slopes of the
Lukenya Hills. It is home to about 2,000 students both local and international.
Pre-university and daytime undergraduate programmes are offered at the Athi
River Campus.
Schools & Institutions
The University comprises the following schools, institutes, centres, and other
academic services:
1.
School of Arts and Humanities
2.
School of Business and Economics
3.
School of Communication, Language, and Performing Arts
4.
School of Human and Social Sciences
5.
School of Science, Engineering and Health
6.
Institutes and Centers
7.
Library
8.
Admissions and Records
Diploma Programme (Valley Road, Nairobi - day only)
• Peace and Conflict Transformation
•
•
Diploma Programme (Valley Road, Nairobi - day only)
• Business Administration and Management
• Business Information Technology (BIT)
Undergraduate Programme
• Bachelor of Commerce with majors in;
– Accounting (Athi River, Valley Road, Nairobi day/evening & Mombasa)
– Business Administration (Athi River, Valley Road, Nairobi day/evening & Mombasa)
– Marketing (Athi River, Valley Road, Nairobi day/evening)
– Purchasing and Business Logistics (Athi River & Valley Road, Nairobi evening)
– Management Information Systems (Athi River only)
1. School of Arts & Humanities
Undergraduate Programmes
• Bachelor of Arts with concentrations in;
– Biblical & Religious Studies (Athi River & Mombasa evening)
– Peace & Conflict Transformation (Athi River & Valley Road, Nairobi
evening)
2. School of Business & Economics
Bachelor of Education in
– French (Athi River only)
– English Language and Literature (Athi River only)
– Business Studies (Athi River only)
– Mathematics (Athi River only)
– Computer Science (Athi River only)
– Economics (Athi River only)
– Early Childhood Development: Regular & School Based Programme
(Athi River & Valley Road, Nairobi - day) Bachelor of Theology (B.Th.) (Athi River & Mombasa evening)
•
Bachelor of Commerce Law Option (Valley Road, Nairobi only, day/
evening)
•
Bachelor of Science in Economics (Athi River only)
Postgraduate Programmes
• Master of Business Administration (MBA) with concentrations in
– Strategic Management
– Human Resources Management
– Finance
– Marketing
Postgraduate Programme
• Master of Arts in Christian Ministries (Valley Road, Nairobi evening)
•
Master of Theology in African Christianity (Valley Road, Nairobi day)
•
Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) offered during April, August
and December school holidays. (Day classes Valley Road, Nairobi only)
www.daystar.ac.ke
vii
3. School of Communication, Languages &
Performing Arts
Diploma Programme (Valley Road, Nairobi - day only)
• Communication
• Music
Undergraduate Programme
• Bachelor of Arts in Communication with concentrations in;
– Public Relations (Athi River, Valley Road, Nairobi day/evening &
Mombasa evening)
– Electronic Media (Athi River & Valley Road, Nairobi day)
– Print Media (Athi River & Valley Road, Nairobi day)
– Advertising (Athi River & Valley Road, Nairobi day)
•
Bachelor of Arts in
– Technical and Professional Communication (Valley Road, Nairobi day)
– French (Athi River only)
– English (Athi River only)
– Kiswahili (Athi River only)
– Literature (Athi River only)
– Music (Athi River only)
Postgraduate Programmes
• Master of Arts in Communication with concentrations in;
– Media Studies (Valley Road, Nairobi only)
– Corporate Communication (Valley Road, Nairobi & Mombasa)
– Development Communication (Valley Road, Nairobi only)
•
PhD in Communication (Valley Road, Nairobi only)
4. School of Human & Social Sciences
Diploma Programme (Valley Road, Nairobi - day only)
• Counseling
• Community Development
Undergraduate Programme
• Bachelor of Arts in
– Community Development, Integrated (Athi River, Valley Road, Nairobi day/evening & Mombasa evening))
– Psychology and Counseling (Athi River only)
– Social Work (Athi River only)
Postgraduate Programmes (Evening classes only)
• Master of Arts in
– Child Development (Valley Road, Nairobi evening)
– Counseling Psychology (Valley Road, Nairobi & Mombasa evening)
– Monitoring & Evaluation (Valley Road, Nairobi evening)
– Community Development (Valley Road, Nairobi evening)
•
•
viii
Postgraduate Diploma in Child Development (Valley Road, Nairobi
evening)
PhD in Clinical Psychology (Valley Road, Nairobi evening)
www.daystar.ac.ke
5. School of Science, Engineering & Health
Diploma Programme (Valley Road, Nairobi - day only)
• Information Technology
• Database Systems, Administration & Programming
• Computer Networking and Security
Undergraduate Programme
• Bachelor of Science with majors in;
– Nursing - Regular & Upgrade (Valley Road, Nairobi only)
– Applied Computer Science (Athi River only)
– Physics (Athi River only)
– Mathematics (Athi River only)
– Environmental Health (Athi River only)
– Acturial Science (Athi River only)
6. Institutes & Centres
a) Institute of Christian Ministries and Training (ICMT)
ICMT offers short courses and outpost training on and off campus. Sometimes
traveling expenses are too high for organizations outside Nairobi to send
more than one participant for training at a time. Instead of sending your
staff to Daystar, we can come and train your staff. Daystar staff also prepare
special training programmes to meet your specific ministry needs.The institute
is also offering a Diploma in Leadership.
b) Centre of Research, Publication, Consultancy &
Postgraduate Bureau (CRPC)
The University’s Research, Publications and Consultancy department
coordinates and facilitates the research carried out by members of the faculty,
publishes research results in the Daystar University interdisciplinary journal,
Perspectives, assists with publishing books and develops consultancy relationships
with churches, research organizations, and industries. The department also
evaluates and recommends for funding research proposals submitted by
faculty members and facilitates research related training.
c) Centre for Quality Assurance (CQA) and for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL)
The Centre for Quality Assurance and the collaboration for Excellence
in Teaching and Learning (CETL) ensure that the programmes at Daystar
University are of the highest quality and meet or exceed the requirements of
the Commission for University Education. CETL provides internal training for
teaching staff to assist them in developing high quality of teaching.
d) Collaborative Programme
Daystar maintains linkages for academic interaction and exchange with other
institutions such as, Kosin University in South Korea, Bethel University and
Northwestern College in the USA, and Makerere University, Uganda. Other
institutions that Daystar has collaborative programme with include, Alliance for
International Christian Business Education (AICB), Compassion International
Africa & Food for the Hungry and The Christian Organizations Research &
Advisory Trust for Africa CORAT.
www.daystar.ac.ke
ix
7. Facilities & Other Information
Leader in Information Communication Technology (ICT)
Daystar University has added to it’s array of impressive modern facilities,
a state of the art ICT Centre at the Athi River Campus. The Centre, which
is phase II of the Science and Engineering complex, will be a hub for the
University’s Computer services and is housing the University’s Science and
Engineering programme. The building has four lecture rooms, a 200
capacity theatre hall, computer science engineering labs, labs for biological
sciences, and a 75-station Business Processing Outsource centre and faculty
offices for the School of Science, Engineering and Health, offices for the
University’s ICT department and a snack shop for students and staff.
State-of-the-Art Communication Facilities
Here is exciting news for students aspiring to study Communication at
Daystar. The Communication department operates a radio station (Shine FM
103.1 MHz), sound, video, and television studios as well as the student
newspaper, Involvement, to provide hands-on experience. Students run these
studios and the newspaper.
Rich Cross-Cultural Mix
Daystar offers a rich cross-cultural experience. With over 40 nationalities
represented there is much to learn from the diverse cultures. Currently we
have students from United States of America, Asia, a host of West, Central
and South African countries as well as many students from neighboring East
African countries.
Alumni Association
Upon graduation, graduates automatically become members of Daystar
University Alumni Association (DUAA), which is solely run by the alumni
through an executive committee elected annually. Through Daylink, job
placement centre, the graduates place their CVs with the centre, thus creating
a link between the employers and Daystar graduates.
Daystar University Parents Association (DUPA)
Variety of Extra-Curricular Activities
Our numerous outreach evangelistic teams, choirs, drama, dance and singing
groups make up for any free time outside the classroom. Also, the Daystar
University Students Association (DUSA) organizes fun and learning activities
such as dinners, cultural week, trips and retreats. A host of clubs and activities
are in place, which involve academic, social and spiritual activities.
x
www.daystar.ac.ke
Daystar is the only local university with a parents association. The Association
exists to work with the administration to facilitate understanding and
cooperation amongst students and the university and also to promote and
facilitate socio-economic development of the university.
Leadership
The mission of Daystar University is steered by a group of 50 African
Christian leaders with a vision for leadership training for the African continent.
These comprise the Daystar Company, which is headed by Dr. (Hons) James
Mageria and the University Council, headed by the Chancellor, Dr. Florence
Muli-Musiime. The Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Timothy Wachira oversees the day to
day running of the university.
Calendar of Events
AUGUST 2011
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
August 8 - 13
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
August 15
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
August 22 - 23
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental moderation of June 2011 grades
August 31
Wednesday
September 1
Thursday
Prayer Day
September 5 - 8
Monday - Friday
Processing of grades
September 12 - 14
Monday - Wednesday
School Boards moderation of grades
September 15 - 16
Thursday - Friday
Correction of moderated grades
September 21
Wednesday
Academic Division meeting for grades
September 23
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of June 2011 grades
October 10 - 15
Monday - Saturday
Setting of examinations
October 17 - 22
Monday - Saturday
Moderation of examinations
October 20 - 21
Thursday - Friday
Mid - semester recess
October 22
Saturday
Classes resume for continuing education
October 24
Monday
Classes resume
October 24 - 26
Monday - Wednesday
Departmental review of examinations
October 31
Wednesday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
October 31 - November 25
Wednesday - Friday
November 2 - 9
Wednesday - Wednesday
November 28 - 29
Monday - Tuesday
November 3 - December 17
Wednesday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
December 7 - 9
Thursday - Saturday
Council and Company meeting
December 17
Saturday
End of semester
December 18 - January 8
Sunday - Sunday
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
January 4 - 6
Wednesday - Friday
Departmental moderation of exams
January 9 - 14
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
January 16
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
January 16
Monday
Final day to submit grades
January 17 - 20
Tuesday - Friday
Processing of grades
January 23 - 24
Monday - Tuesday
School moderation of grades
Final day to submit grades
Processing of examinations
Registration for January semester 2012
Study days
Christmas vacation
JANUARY 2012
www.daystar.ac.ke
xi
xii
January 25 - 27
Wednesday - Friday
Correction of moderated grades
January 30
Monday
Academic Division meeting for grades
February 2
Thursday
Prayer Day
February 3
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of August 2011 grades
March 12 - 17
Monday - Saturday
Setting of examinations
March 15 - 16
Thursday - Friday
March 17
Saturday
Classes resume for continuing education
March 19
Monday
Classes resume
March 19 - 23
Monday - Friday
March 26 - 27
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental review of examinations
March 28
Wednesday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
Mid - semester recess
Moderation of examinations
March 29 - April 18
Thursday - Wednesday
Processing of examinations
April 2 - 7
Monday - Saturday
Registration for June 2012 Semester
April 23 - 24
Monday - Tuesday
Study days
April 25 - May 12
Thursday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
May 12
Saturday
End of semester
May 24 - 25
Thursday - Friday
Departmental moderation of grades
May 28 - 29
Monday - Tuesday
May 30 - 31
Wednesday - Thursday
School Boards moderation of grades
June 6
Wednesday
Academic Division meeting on grades
June 8
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of January 2012 grades
June 29
Friday
Rehearsal
June 30
Saturday
Graduation
www.daystar.ac.ke
Corrections of moderated grades
JUNE 2012
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
May 21 - 26
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
May 28
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
June 25 - 27
Monday - Wednesday
Setting of examinations
June 28 - 29
Thursday - Friday
Moderation of examinations
July 2
Monday
Council Meeting
July 2 - 3
July 6
Monday - Tuesday
Friday
July 16 - 21
Monday - Saturday
July 9 - 20
Monday - Friday
Departmental review of examinations
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
Registration for August 2012 Semester
Processing of examinations
July 30 - August 4
Monday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
August 4
Saturday
End of semester
AUGUST 2012
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
August 13 - 18
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
August 20
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
August 27 - 28
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental moderation of June 2012 grades
August 29
Wednesday
Final day to submit grades
August 29
Wednesday
Prayer Day
August 30 - September 5
Thursday - Wednesday
Processing of grades
September 6 - 7
Thursday - Friday
School Boards moderation of grades
September 10 - 11
Monday - Tuesday
Correction of moderated grades
September 12
Wednesday
Academic Division meeting for grades
September 15
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of June 2012 grades
October 15 - 19
Monday - Friday
October 18 - 19
Thursday - Friday
Mid - semester recess
October 22
Monday
Classes resume
October 22 - 26
Monday - Friday
October 29 - 30
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental review of examinations
October 31
Wednesday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
October 31 - November 20
Wednesday - Tuesday
November 5 - 17
Monday - Saturday
December 3 - 4
Monday - Tuesday
Setting of examinations
Moderation of examinations
Processing of examinations
Registration for January semester 2013
Study days
December 5 - 19
Wednesday - Wednesday
End of semester examinations
December 7
Friday
Council Meeting
December 8
Saturday
Council AGM
December 19
Wednesday
End of semester
December 20 - January 6
Thursday - Sunday
Christmas vacation
www.daystar.ac.ke
xiii
JANUARY 2013
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
January 3 - 4
Thursday - Friday
Departmental moderation of exams
January 7 - 12
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
January 14
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
January 14
Monday
Final day to submit grades
January 15 - 18
Tuesday - Friday
Processing of grades
January 21 - 22
Monday - Tuesday
School moderation of grades
January 23 - 25
Wednesday - Friday
Correction of moderated grades
January 28
Monday
Academic Division meeting for grades
January 31
Thursday
Prayer Day
February 1
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of August 2012 grades
March 4 - 5
Monday - Tuesday
Mid - semester recess
March 11 - 15
Monday - Friday
Setting of examinations
March 13
Wednesday
March 18 - 22
Monday - Friday
Moderation of examinations
March 25 - 26
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental review of examinations
March 27
Wednesday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
March 28 - April 24
April 1 - 13
April 29 - 30
xiv
Thursday - Wednesday
Monday - Saturday
Monday - Tuesday
Classes resume
Processing of examinations
Registration for June 2013 Semester
Study days
May 2 - 15
Wednesday
End of semester examinations
May 15
Wednesday
End of semester
May 23 - 24
Thursday - Friday
Departmental moderation of grades
May 27
Monday
Finla submission of grades
May 28 - 29
Tuesday - Wednesday
Processing of grades
May 30 - 31
Thursday - Friday
School Boards moderation of grades
June 3 - 4
Monday - Tuesday
Corrections of moderated grades
June 5
Wednesday
Academic Division meeting on grades
June 7
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of January 2013 grades
June 28
Friday
Rehearsal
June 29
Saturday
Graduation
www.daystar.ac.ke
JUNE 2013
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
May 20 - 25
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
May 27
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
June 24 - 26
Monday - Wednesday
Setting of examinations
June 27 - 28
Thursday - Friday
Moderation of examinations
July 1
Monday
Council Meeting
July 1 - 2
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental review of examinations
July 5
Friday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
July 8 - 19
July 15 - 20
July 29 - August 3
Monday - Friday
Monday - Saturday
Monday - Saturday
Processing of examinations
Registration for August 2013 Semester
End of semester examinations
August 3
Saturday
End of semester
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
August 12 - 17
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
August 19
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
August 26 - 27
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental moderation of June 2013 grades
August 28
Wednesday
Final day to submit grades
August 29
Thursday
Prayer Day
September 2 - 4
Monday - Wednesday
Processing of grades
September 9 - 11
Monday - Wednesday
School Boards moderation of grades
September 12 - 13
Thursday - Friday
September 18
Wednesday
September 20
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of June 2013 grades
October 14 - 18
Monday - Friday
Setting of examinations
October 21 - 22
Monday - Tuesday
Mid - semester recess
October 22 - 25
Tuesday - Friday
Moderation of examinations
October 23
Wednesday
Classes resume
October 28 - 29
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental review of examinations
October 28 - November 9
Monday - Saturday
Registration for January 2014 semester
October 30
Wednesday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
October 31 - November 19
Thursday - Tuesday
Processing of examinations
November 25 - 26
Monday - Tuesday
Study days
November 27 - December 14
Wednesday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
December 6
Friday
Council Meeting
December 7
Saturday
Company AGM
December 14
Wednesday
December 15 - January 5
Thursday - Sunday
AUGUST 2013
Correction of moderated grades
Academic Division meeting for grades
End of semester
Christmas vacation
www.daystar.ac.ke
xv
JANUARY 2014
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
January 2 - 3
Thursday - Friday
Departmental moderation of exams
January 6 - 11
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
January 13
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
January 13
Monday
Final day to submit grades
January 14 - 17
Tuesday - Friday
Processing of grades
January 20 - 23
Monday - Wednesday
School moderation of grades
January 24 - 25
Thursday - Friday
Correction of moderated grades
January 27
Monday
Academic Division meeting for grades
January 30
Thursday
Prayer Day
January 31
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of August 2013 grades
March 10 - 11
Monday - Tuesday
Mid - semester recess
March 12
Wednesday
Classes resume
March 17 - 21
Monday - Friday
Setting of examinations
March 24 - 28
Monday - Friday
Moderation of examinations
March 31 - April 12
Monday - Saturday
Registration for June 2014 Semester
March 31 - April 1
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental review of examinations
April 2
Wednesday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
April 7 - 18
Monday - Friday
Processing of examinations
April 28 - 29
Monday - Tuesday
Study days
April 30 - May 17
Thursday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
May 17
Saturday
End of semester
May 26 - 27
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental moderation of grades
May 28 - 30
Wednesday - Friday
Corrections of moderated grades
June 3 - 5
xvi
Tuesday - Thursday
School Boards moderation of grades
June 11
Wednesday
Academic Division meeting on grades
June 13
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of January 2014 grades
June 27
Friday
June 28
Saturday
Graduation
June 30
Monday
Council Meeting
www.daystar.ac.ke
Rehearsal
JUNE 2014
DATES
May 26 - 31
DAYS
Monday - Saturday
ACTIVITIES
Orientation of new students
June 3
Tuesday
Registration queries/Classes begin
June 23 - 25
Monday - Wednesday
Setting of examinations
June 26 - 27
Thursday - Friday
Moderation of examinations
July 1 - 2
Tuesday - Wednesday
Departmental review of examinations
Friday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
July 4
July 7 - 18
July 14 - 19
Monday - Friday
Monday - Saturday
Processing of examinations
Registration for August 2014 Semester
July 28 - August 2
Monday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
August 2
Saturday
End of semester
AUGUST 2014
DATES
August 11 - 16
DAYS
Monday - Saturday
ACTIVITIES
Orientation of new students
August 18
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
August 25 - 26
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental moderation of June 2014 grades
August 27
Wednesday
Final day to submit grades
August 28
Thursday
Prayer Day
August 28 - September 5
Thursday - Friday
Processing of grades
September 8 - 10
Monday - Wednesday
School Boards moderation of grades
September 11 - 12
Thursday - Friday
Correction of moderated grades
September 17
Wednesday
Academic Division meeting for grades
September 19
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of June 2014 grades
October 20 - 21
Monday - Tuesday
Mid - semester recess
October 22
Wednesday
Classes resume
October 21 - 24
Tuesday - Friday
Setting of examinations
October 27 - 29
October 30 - 31
Monday - Wednesday
Moderation of examinations
Thursday - Friday
Departmental review of examinations
November 3
Monday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
November 3 - 19
Monday - Wednesday
Processing of examinations
November 10 - 15
Monday - Saturday
Registration for January semester 2015
December 1 - 2
Monday - Tuesday
Study days
December 3 - 19
Wednesday - Friday
End of semester examinations
December 5
Friday
Council Meeting
December 6
Saturday
Company AGM
December 19
Friday
December 20 - January 4
Saturday - Sunday
End of semester
Christmas vacation
www.daystar.ac.ke
xvii
JANUARY 2015
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
January 7 - 9
Wednesday - Friday
Departmental moderation of exams
January 12 - 17
xviii
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
January 19
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
January 12
Monday
Final day to submit grades
January 13 - 23
Tuesday - Friday
Processing of grades
January 26 - 27
Monday - Tuesday
School moderation of grades
January 28 - 30
Wednesday - Friday
Correction of moderated grades
January 29
Thursday
Prayer Day
February 2
Monday
Academic Division meeting for grades
February 6
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of August 2014 grades
March 16 - 19
Monday - Friday
Setting of examinations
March 19 - 20
Thursday - Friday
Mid - semester recess
March 21
Saturday
Classes resume for continuing education
March 20 - 24
Friday - Tuesday
Moderation of examinations
March 24
Monday
Classes resume
March 25 - 26
Wednesday - Thursday
Departmental review of examinations
March 27
Friday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
March 30 - April 22
Monday - Wednesday
Processing of examinations
April 6 - 11
Monday - Saturday
Registration for June 2015 Semester
April 30 - May 2
Thursday - Saturday
Study days
May 4 - 16
Monday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
May 16
Saturday
End of semester
May 21 - 22
Thursday - Friday
Departmental moderation of grades
May 25 - 26
Monday - Tuesday
Corrections of moderated grades
May 28 - 29
Thursday - Friday
School Boards moderation of grades
June 3
Wednesday
Academic Division meeting on grades
June 5
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of January 2015 grades
June 26
Friday
Rehearsal
June 27
Saturday
Graduation
June 29
Monday
Council Meeting
www.daystar.ac.ke
JUNE 2015
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
May 18 - 23
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
May 25
June 15 - 17
June 22 - 24
Monday - Wednesday
Monday - Wednesday
Setting of examinations
Moderation of examinations
July 1 - 2
Wednesday - Thursday
Departmental review of examinations
July 3
Friday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
July 6 - 11
Monday - Saturday
Registration for August 2015
July 6 - 17
Monday - Friday
Processing of examinations
July 27 - August 1
Monday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
August 1
Saturday
End of semester
AUGUST 2015
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
August 10 - 15
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
August 17
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
August 24 - 25
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental moderation of June 2015 grades
August 26
Wednesday
Final day to submit grades
August 28 - September 2
Thursday - Wednesday
Processing of grades
September 3
Thursday
Prayer Day
September 10 - 11
Thursday - Friday
School Boards moderation of grades
September 14 - 15
Monday - Tuesday
Correction of moderated grades
September 16
Wednesday
September 18
Friday
Academic Division meeting for grades
Senate meeting for Approval of June 2015 grades
October 12 - 16
Monday - Friday
Setting of examinations
October 19 - 20
Monday - Tuesday
Mid - semester recess
October 21
Wednesday
Classes resume
October 21 - 23
Wednesday - Friday
Moderation of examinations
October 26 - 27
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental review of examinations
October 28
Wednesday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
October 29 - November 20
Thursday - Friday
Processing of examinations
November 3 - 10
Monday - Monday
Registration for January semester 2016
November 26 - 28
Thursday - Saturday
Study days
November 30 - December 19
Monday - Friday
End of semester examinations
December 4
Friday
Council Meeting
December 5
Saturday
Company AGM
December 19
Friday
End of semester
December 20 - January 10
Saturday - Sunday
Christmas vacation
www.daystar.ac.ke
xix
JANUARY 2016
DATES
January 11 - 13
January 11 - 16
Monday - Wednesday
Monday - Saturday
ACTIVITIES
Departmental moderation of August 2015 grades
Orientation of new students
January 18
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
January 18
Monday
Final day to submit grades
January 18 - 22
Tuesday - Friday
Processing of grades
January 25 - 26
Monday - Tuesday
School moderation of grades
January 27 - 29
Wednesday - Friday
Correction of moderated grades
February 1
Monday
Academic Division meeting for grades
January 4
Thursday
Prayer Day
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of August 2015 grades
February 5
March 14 - 15
Monday - Tuesday
Mid - semester recess
March 14 - 18
Monday - Friday
Setting of examinations
March 16
Wednesday
Classes resume
March 21 - 25
Monday - Friday
March 28 - 29
Monday - Tuesday
March 30
March 30 - April 20
Wednesday
Thursday - Wednesday
Moderation of examinations
Departmental review of examinations
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
Processing of examinations
April 4 - 16
Monday - Saturday
Registration for June 2016 Semester
May 2 - 3
Monday - Tuesday
Study days
May 4 - 21
Wednesday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
May 21
Saturday
End of semester
May 30 - 31
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental moderation of grades
Thursday - Friday
Corrections of moderated grades
June 2 - 3
June 6 - 7
xx
DAYS
Monday - Tuesday
School Boards moderation of grades
June 8
Wednesday
Academic Division meeting on grades
June 10
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of January 2016 grades
June 24
Friday
Rehearsal
June 25
Saturday
Graduation
June 27
Monday
Council Meeting
www.daystar.ac.ke
JUNE 2016
DATES
DAYS
ACTIVITIES
May 23 - 28
Monday - Saturday
Orientation of new students
May 30
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
June 20 - 21
Monday - Wednesday
Setting of examinations
June 23 - 24
Thursday - Friday
Moderation of examinations
July 4 - 5
Monday - Tuesday
Departmental review of examinations
Monday - Saturday
Registration for August 2016 Semester
July 4 - 9
July 8
Friday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
July 11 - 22
Monday - Friday
Processing of examinations
August 1 - 6
Monday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
August 6
Saturday
End of semester
DATES
DAYS
AUGUST 2016
August 15 - 20
Monday - Saturday
ACTIVITIES
Orientation of new students
August 22
Monday
Registration queries/Classes begin
August 29 - 31
Monday - Wednesday
Departmental moderation of June 2016 grades
August 31
Thursday
Final day to submit grades
September 1
Thursday
Prayer Day
September 2 - 13
Thursday - Tuesday
Processing of grades
September 14 - 16
Wednesday - Friday
School Boards moderation of grades
September 19 - 20
Monday - Tuesday
Correction of moderated grades
September 21
Wednesday
Academic Division meeting for grades
September 23
Friday
Senate meeting for Approval of June 2016 grades
October 10 - 15
Monday - Friday
Setting of examinations
October 20 - 21
Thursday - Friday
Mid - semester recess
October 22
Saturday
Class resume for continuing education
October 24
Monday
Classes resume
October 24 - 26
Monday - Wednesday
Moderation of examinations
October 27 - 28
Thursday - Friday
Departmental review of examinations
October 31
Monday
Final day to submit exams to Examination office
November 1 - 18
Tuesday - Friday
Processing of examinations
November 7 - 12
Monday - Saturday
Registration for January semester 2017
November 28 - 29
Monday - Tuesday
Study days
November 30 - December 17
Wednesday - Saturday
End of semester examinations
December 2
Friday
Council Meeting
December 3
Saturday
Company AGM
December 17
Saturday
End of semester
December 18 - January 8
Sunday - Sunday
Christmas vacation
www.daystar.ac.ke
xxi
Daystar University provided a platform to
meet people with beautiful hearts. I have
been changed, molded through spiritual
and social aspects of life, and I have a
responsibility to appreciate everyone and
everything within Daystar University.
Millicent Gitaru
xxii
www.daystar.ac.ke
University Governance
THE UNIVERSITY MANAGEMENT BOARD
Dr. Timothy Wachira, Vice-Chancellor
Rev. Prof. James Kombo, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Academic Affairs
Mr. Jomo Gatundu, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Finance & Administration
Dr. Jon Masso, Deputy Vice- Chancellor, Institutional Advancement
Mrs. Phyllis Mutua, Finance Manager
Mr. Charles Kilonzo, Corporate Affairs Manager
Mr. John N. Wainaina, Internal Audit Manager
Rev. Steve Nduto, University Chaplain
Dr. Peter Ngure, Dean, School of Science, Engineering & Health
Dr. David Wachira, Dean, School of Business & Economics
Dr. Alice Munene, Dean, School of Human and Social Sciences
Mrs. Purity Kiambi, Dean, School of Arts & Humanities
Dr. Bernard Boyo, Dean of Community Life
Dr. Benjamin Musyoka, Director,ICMT
Dr. Rebecca Oladipo, Director, Centre for Research, Publication, Consultancy & Postgraduate Bureau
Prof. Mike Kuria, Director for Centre for Quality Assurance & Excellence in Teaching & Learning
COUNCIL MEMBERS
Prof. George Kinoti
Rev. Simeon Havyarimana
Mr. Erastus Mureithi
Dr. Yusuf Turaki
Dr. Peter Okaalet
Prof. Henry Thairu
Mrs. Nancy Oginde
Mrs. Deborah Ongewe
Rev. Dr. MacMillan Kiiru
EX-OFFICIO
Prof. James H. O. Kombo
Dr. Timothy M. Wachira
Mrs. Phyllis Mutua
Mr. John N. Wainaina
LIST OF ALL FULL-TIME ACADEMIC STAFF AND QUALIFICATIONS
DEPARTMENT/SCHOOL
QUALIFICATIONS
INSTITUTION
Doctor of Theology
Stellenbosch University
M.A. in Teaching English
University of Edinburgh
Prof. Peter Mageto
PhD Theology & Historical Studies
Garret Evangelical Theological Seminary
Dr. Paul Mutinda
Doctor of Ministry
Stellenbosch University
Dr. Joseph Muthiani Mbunga
Doctor of Ministry
Asbury Theological Seminary, U.S.A
Dr. Washington Kamau
Doctor of Missionology
School of World - U.S.A
Joseph Muutuki
Masters Religious Education & Administration
Lael College & Graduate School
Naomi Mbugua
Master of Education
Kenyatta University
Jemima Oluoch
Master of Theology
Africa International University
Dr. Daniel M’Mutungi
Doctor of Ministry
Boston University
DVC Academics
Rev. Prof. James Kombo
SCHOOL OF ARTS & HUMANITIES
Purity Kiambi
Theology & Pastoral Studies
www.daystar.ac.ke
xxiii
Abok Ager
Masters IRTI
I.R.T.I Amstardam
Wilson Chiko
M.A Theology and English
Simmons University U.S.A
Pheobe Muthami
M.A. Biblical Studies
Africa International University
Gladys Ondera
Masters Anthropology
University of Nairobi
Josephine Munyao
Master of Divinity
Africa International University
Dr. Samson Obwa
Doctor of Philosophy
Brunel University, UK
Patrick Musembi
M.A. Peace Studies & International Relations
Africa International University
Mercy Kathambi Kaburu
M.A. International Conflict Management
University of Nairobi
Beatrice Ndirangu
Master in Peace Studies & Inter. Relations
Catholic University
Dr. Harriet Njui
PhD in Education
Catholic University of Eastern Africa
Dr. Milcah Ajuaga
PhD Communication Studies
Maseno University
Scholastica Githinji
Masters of Education
Kenyatta University
Peace & International Studies
Education
SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION, LANGUAGE & PERFORMING ARTS
Prof. Levi Obonyo
Doctor of Philosophy
Temple University , Philadelphia
Dr. Rahab Nyaga
Doctor of Philosophy
Kenyatta University
Dr. Bertha Kaimenyi
Doctor of Education
Andrews University
Dr. Jane Awiti
Doctorate of Literature & Philosophy
University of South Africa
Jesica Kinya (on study leave)
M.A. Communication
Daystar University
Mary Kizito
M.A. Communication
Marquette University
Dr. Agnes Lando (Sis)
PhD Social Sciences
Gregorian University
Rebecca Nganga
M.A. Communication
Wheaton College USA
Helen Maleche
M.A. Communication
Daystar University
Lucy Bility
M.A. Journalism and Communication
Point Par College
Wambui Wamunyu
M.A. Journalism
Northeastern University - U.S.A
Dr. Rosemary Nyaole
PhD Theartre arts & Film Technology
Kenyatta University
Samuel Kochomay
M.A. Communication
Daystar University
Dr. Clayton Peel
Doctor of Philosophy
University of Wales, UK
Dr. Howard Makingu
PhD Creative Multimedia
Multimedia University, Malaysia
Dr. Paul Mbutu
PhD Communication
Texas A&M University
Dr. Wandia Njoya
Doctor of Philosophy
Pennsylvania State University
Dr. Regina Gachari
PhD Literature
Kenyatta University
Dr. Rebecca Oladipo
PhD Linguistics
Moi University
Caroline Nyaga-Rugendo
Mphil Linguistics
Moi University
Mary Githaiga (study leave)
Mphil Linguistics
Moi University
Brenda Mueni Wambua
M.A. Linguistics
Kenyatta University
Communication
Language & Performing Arts
xxiv
www.daystar.ac.ke
Larry Ndivo
M.A. Literature
University of Nairobi
Stephen Kindiki
M.A. Linguistics
University of Kwazulu- Natal
William Rowe
M.A.Church Music
Western Seminary-Portland
SCHOOL OF HUMAN & SOCIAL SCIENCES
Dr. Alice Munene
Doctor of Psychology
Biola University
Joab Esamwata (study leave)
M.A. Dev.Admin
Madurai Kamaraj
Mary Mogute
Master in Social Work
Nagpur University, India
Dr. Kennedy Ongaro
Doctor of Philosophy
Gandhigram Rural Institute Deemed University
Dominics Ayaa
M.A.(Sociology)
University of Nairobi
Daniel Mutunga
M.A Social Work/ Thelogy
Australia ( Monash)
Jane Kositany
M.A. in Child Development
Daystar
Mabel Ondima
M.A Thelogy
University of Nairobi
Solomon Nzyuko
M.A Socilogy
University of Nairobi
Dr. Kimani Chege
M.Sc. - Psychology/Doctor of Ministry
Osnabruck
Alice Mutua
M.A. in Counselling Psychology
USIU
Beatrice Murunga
M.A. in Counselling Psychology
George Fox Univ USA
Sylvia Tuikong
M.A. Counseling Psychology
Daystar
Evangeline M’Mutungi
M.A Thelogy
Boston Univ USA
Dr. Lincolin Khasakhala
PhD in Clinical Psychology
University of Nairobi
PhD Education & Cultural Science
Osnabruck
Development Studies
Psychology & counseling
Institute of Child Development
Dr. Harrahs Malinda
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Dr. David Wachira
Doctor of Business Administartion (Finance)
Edinburgh Business School
Mr. Thomas Koyier
M.Sc in Business Administration
Southern Oregon State University
Joseph Munyao
M.Sc Maths
Egerton University
Richard Maswili
MBA
Vikram University
Maurice Owino (study leave)
Master of Science in Urban Environmental Mgt
Wageningen Agricultural University, Rotterdam
John Theuri
M.Sc, Enterpreneurship
JKUAT
Dorcas Mwamba
M.Phil
Alagappa Univ
Molson Samuel Onchomba
Master of Commerce
Gujara University
Laban Kiptui Chesang (study leave)
M.A. Economics
Botswana Univ
Dorothy Muthoka Kagwaini (study leave)
MBA Finance
Daystar
Dancan Irungu
M.A. Project Planning & Management
University of Nairobi
Charles Orinda Dulo
M.A. Law
University of Nairobi
Samuel Muriithi
MBA
Seattle Pacific University
Commerce
www.daystar.ac.ke
xxv
Joshua Ochieng Okeyo
MBA Finance
Daystar
Moses Mitigoa Obusuburi
MBA
University of Nairobi
Mercy Juliet Kanini
Master of Commerce
Mohanlai India
Moriasi Maranga
MBA
Annamalai University
Celestine Ngila
MBA (Marketing Management)
Poona University, India
Evans Amata
M. of Finance & Control
Madurai Kamaraj University
James K. Kyongo
MBA
Kenyatta University
Dr. Abraham Waithima
PhD Economics
Cape Town Univ S.Africa
Jimnah Waweru
M.A Economics
Dar-es-Salaam Univ
James Ngondi Karau
M.A Economics
University of Nairobi
John Musau Maswili
M.A. (Applied Economics)
Bharathiar University
Economics
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE & ENGINEERING & HEALTH
Prof. Peter Ngure
PhD Medical Parasitology
JKUAT
Dr. Martha Kiarie
PhD in Health Sciences
Kosin University,Korea
John Nguu
Master of Science in Physics
Egerton Univ
Michael Kirumbu
Master of Science in Biometry
University of Nairobi
Geofrey Kinuthia
Master of Philosophy in Parasitology
Moi University
George Kimathi
Master of Science in Applied Mathematics
University of Nairobi
Faith Mburu
Msc. Applied Parasitology
Kenyatta University
Julia Thuo
Master of Public Health & Epidemiology
Kenyatta University
Susan Njuguna
Master of Science ( Health Systems Mgt)
University of London
Steraphine Nzuki
Higher Diploma ( Lab Tech)
KMTC
Serah Wachira
BSC Nursing
Baraton University
Bernard Ochieng Okuku
MSC Information Systems
University of Nairobi
Myra Ohaga
MSC ( IT)
University of Teeside, UK
Fredrick Ogore
MSC Compuer Science
Kurkushetra University India
Rev. Dr. Julius Otieno Gogo
Doctor of Education (Management)
University of South Africa
Grace Koome
MSc HR
JKUAT
Judith Wafula
Master of Education in Educational
Administration
University of Nairobi
Winnie Wachira
M.A. Communication
Daystar University
Science
Nursing
Computer Science
ADMISSIONS
xxvi
www.daystar.ac.ke
PRE- UNIVERISTY
Roseline Olumbe
M.A. in Christian Education
Africa International University
INSTITUTE OF CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES & TRAINING (ICMT)
Dr. Benjamin Musyoka
PhD (Christian Education)
Biola University, USA
Rosemary Gitachu
Master of Education (Library Studies)
Kenyatta University
Elizabeth Yegon
Masters of Education
Kenyatta University
Josephat Muthembwa
Master of Library & Information Science
Kenyatta University
Charity M. Kimencho
MSc Information & Library Management
Burmingham City University
LIBRARY
CENTRE OF RESEARCH, PUBLICATIONS, CONSULTANCY & POSTGRADUATE BUREAU (CRPC)
Dr. Rebecca Oladipo
PhD (Linguistics)
Leeds University, UK
Prof. Mike Kuria
PhD Literature
University of Leeds, UK
Prof. Michael Bowen
PhD in Environmental Economics
Moi University
CENTRE OF QUALITY ASSURANCE
CENTRE FOR EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING & LEARNING
Dr. Chip Kingsbury
PhD Adult Education
Florida State University
Peter Masindano
M.A. in Anthropology
University of Nairobi
Rose Mwangi
M.A Communication
Daystar University
Ann Njogu Wachira
Masters in Eng Language Teaching
University of Reading, UK
Joanes Kaleli Kyongo
Master of Business Administration
Kenyatta University
Daniel Rugut
M.A. in Theology & Religious Studies
University of Aberdeen
MOMBASA CAMPUS
www.daystar.ac.ke
xxvii
Daystar University bible study
“small groups” are an avenue
for interaction, mentorship
and spiritual growth for both
students and staff.
xxviii
www.daystar.ac.ke
Student Development Department
Campus Life
The student co-curricular activities are coordinated through the Student
Development Deparment headed by the Dean of Community Life. Others
include the Associate Dean for Students Affairs, the Chaplain, Assistant
Chaplains, the Sports and Recreation Officer, Student Counsellors and
the Resident Tutors. The Department coordinates and facilitates all aspects
of student life outside the classroom. The objective is that every student will
“grow up in every way into Him who is the head, that is Christ” (Ephesians
4:15), physically, spiritually, socially, ethically, and vocationally. Student life
at Daystar University is designed to complement the academic learning, so as
to produce Christian servant leaders who will make a difference at all levels of
society.
1. Chaplaincy
a) Chapels
Chapels are held twice a week. On Tuesdays, Students and Staff meet for
Chapel whereas on Thursdays they attend small group bible study. Evening
students have their chapel on fridays. The attendance is required of both
staff and students. It is an essential part of their regular weekly schedule
and includes a variety of worship styles, musical programmes, bible studies,
speakers, and drama. Chapel is the one activity in which the entire
community gathers together for worship and fellowship on a regular basis.
community, the Bible requires us to be our brother’s keeper. Therefore, every
member of the Daystar University Community is expected to be sensitive to the
needs of others around them.
2. Daystar University Students Association (DUSA)
Daystar University Students Association (DUSA) is the recognised student
organisation within the University. Every Daystar student is automatically
a member of DUSA. The DUSA Executive Committee, is democratically
elected by the student body during the month of April every year, which
is responsible for running DUSA affairs. DUSA has the following sub
committees: Academic Affairs, Social Welfare, Sports and Recreation, Clubs
and Associations, International Students Association and Post Graduate
Committee.
In addition, under the auspices of the DUSA, many students clubs and
associations offer opportunities for involvement. They include: AIESEC,
Drama, Environmental Conservation, French, Marketing, Accounting,
Communication, Community Development, Wildlife, Debating and Current
Affairs and Daystar University Students in Free Enterprise. The key link person
for DUSA activities is the Associate Dean for Students Affairs.
All staff and students of Daystar University are individually expected to be
members of a church in which they worship and fellowship regularly. As a
vital part of spiritual growth, they are also encouraged to serve the Lord in an
active way through the programmes of their respective churches. In addition,
the Daystar Christian Fellowship (DCF), sends out numerous student ministry
teams to reach out beyond the campuses with evangelistic outreaches,
ministry among street children, and many other ministry opportunities. In
addition to the above, the University organises weekly spiritual activities as
given here below:
b) Small Groups
The Chaplaincy organises small groups to which every staff and student is
assigned. The small groups meet once a week for prayer and Bible study.
The main goal of the small group meetings is to provide a forum for spiritual
growth.
c) Counselling
The University Chaplain, the Assistant Chaplains, the Student Counsellors
and other staff and faculty, are available to counsel students in such areas
as adjustment to life at Daystar University, spiritual development, resolving
personal problems, and making major life decisions. In addition a large
number of students have been trained as peer counsellors. As a Christian
www.daystar.ac.ke
1
3. Daystar Christian Fellowship (DCF)
5. Student Counselling
Daystar Christian Fellowship (DCF) is a student-led group under the University
Chaplaincy. The group has about 14 subcommittees where students develop
their talents and nourish their faith through various activities e.g. singing,
dancing, drama, missions among others.
Their main duty is counselling students on all issues. The Office exists in part
to advocate for special concerns of international students, raise and maintain
international awareness within Daystar University, and promote spiritual,
social and career development among international students. The Office also
oversees orientation programme for new students and works closely with the
International Students Association of Daystar University (ISADU).
4. Doulos
Doulos is a servant leadership programme at Daystar that derives its name
from Mark 10:45 and 2Cor 4:5, which means slave or servant in Greek.
The programme strives to help the university achieve its mission of training
servant leaders for Africa by using tools of adventure, service and community
in displaying the love of Christ for all mankind and with equiping the students
with a heart to serve as they become leaders in various sectors of their
careers.
2
www.daystar.ac.ke
6. Students Sports & Recreation Office
The Sports and Recreation Office coordinates intramural sports as well as
team sports and games throughout the academic year. Existing sports and
recreation activities include team sports, individual sports, board games and
other outdoor activities.
Daystar University teams compete in the Kenya Universities Sports Association
(KUSA), the Nairobi Fellowship of Theological Colleges (NFTC), Nairobi
Basketball Association and in other organized institutional sports.
Finance & Administration
1. Financial Information
Tuition Fees and Charges
Daystar University tuition and other charges are modest, especially when
compared to the costs at other universities in Africa, Europe and North
America offering similar programmes. The University keeps costs low through
gifts from individuals, churches and other Christian organizations, which assist
in the University’s capital development. The tuition income is used to meet the
annual operational budget.
Fees Payment
Refunds
In some cases for valid reasons acceptable to the University, a student who
drops a course may be refunded 100% in the first week; 90% in the second
week; and none thereafter. No refund is allowed for a course in the May
semester unless a claim for such a refund is made before the commencement
of the course. However, in cases of pressing personal emergencies or
illnesses which require such a drop of course, the student may petition to the
School Board, through its Dean, for a refund. Each case will be discussed
independently. Room and board charges are for the whole semester and no
refund will be made for a student leaving the hostel after the semester has
started.
All fees for each semester are payable in advance or before the date of
registration by bankers cheque or direct bank deposit. The University does
not accept cash payments or money orders. In order to assist sponsors who
cannot raise full fees, the University allows payment of tuition and hostel fees
in four equal monthly instalments from the first day of the semester. Sponsors
wishing to pay the fees by instalments must apply to the Finance Manager
before the semester begins.
Allowances
Parents or sponsors are advised to remit living costs and other allowances
for personal use directly to the students. Students from outside Kenya need to
secure funds for their entire study period at Daystar before coming to Nairobi.
This should include enough funds to pay for their return travel back to their
countries at the end of the study period.
Campus Accommodation
Students living in the University hostels are expected to provide their own
bedding (blankets, linens, bedcover, towels, pillowcases, etc.) as well as bath
and laundry items. Students living in the rented University self-catering hostels
are jointly responsible for the cleanliness of the entire facility and payments for
water, electricity and gas usage. They also have to provide cooking utensils
and cutlery.
Off-Campus Accommodation
Married students who wish to bring along their families are advised to locate
off-campus accommodation before bringing their families to Nairobi. The
cost of a one-bedroom apartment varies between Kshs. 4,000 and 12,000
per month, depending on location and the kind of house. Further, such
accommodation is available only in Athi River town or in Nairobi.
www.daystar.ac.ke
3
A) Fee Structure
These are the current rates but the University reserves the right to review the fees from time to time as necessary.
PRE-UNIVERSITY, DIPLOMA AND POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAMME
ATHI RIVER CAMPUS
Boarder
Tuition fee
DIPLOMA
POSTGRADUATE
PROGRAMME
PROGRAMME
NAIROBI CAMPUS
Day scholar
Day
Day
Evening
KSH
KSH
KSH
KSH
KSH
66,150.00
66,150.00
66,150.00
76,500.00
93,960.00
Exam fee
1,250.00
1,250.00
1,250.00
1,250.00
1,250.00
Technology fee
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
Student Activity fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
Library
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
DUPA Annual Subscription
500.00
500.00
500.00
500.00
-
Printing fee
200.00
200.00
200.00
200.00
200.00
-
-
-
-
1,200.00
74,100.00
74,100.00
74,100.00
84,450.00
102,610.00
500.00
500.00
500.00
500.00
-
Orientation fee
5,250.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
Registration fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
Caution Money
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
Development Fee
4,000.00
4,000.00
4,000.00
4,000.00
4,000.00
-
-
-
500.00
500.00
12,750.00
10,500.00
10,500.00
11,000.00
10,500.00
86,850.00
84,600.00
84,600.00
95,450.00
113,110.00
Research Fee
Sub-Total
One-off fees payable in first semester only
DUPA Registration
Alumni fee
Sub-Total
TOTAL
Daystar University has been my strong
pillar of training in faith, advancement
of my knowledge, skill and character
development. I have learnt to aim
ordinary while settling for excellence in
all aspects of life.
Sosnes Olindo
4
www.daystar.ac.ke
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMME
ATHI RIVER CAMPUS
NAIROBI CAMPUS
(Day classes only)
Boarder
Tuition fee
DayClasses
Day scholar
Evening Classes
Nursing Programme
KSH
KSH
KSH
KSH
KSH
90,400.00
90,400.00
102,560.00
102,560.00
80,715.00
Examination fee
1,250.00
1,250.00
1,250.00
1,250.00
1,250.00
Technology fee
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
Sutudent Activity fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
Library fee
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
Printing fee
200.00
200.00
200.00
200.00
200.00
-
-
-
-
1,835.00
Nursing charge
DUPA Annual Subscription
Sub-Total
500.00
500.00
500.00
-
500.00
98,350.00
98,350.00
110,510.00
110,010.00
90,500.00
One-off expenses payable in the first semester only
DUPA Registration fee
500.00
500.00
500.00
-
500.00
Orientation fee
5,250.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
Registration fee
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
Caution Money
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
Development fee
4,000.00
4,000.00
4,000.00
4,000.00
4,000.00
500.00
500.00
500.00
500.00
500.00
Sub-total
13,250.00
11,000.00
11,000.00
10,500.00
11,000.00
TOTAL
111,600.00
109,350.00
121,510.00
120,510.00
101,500.00
Alumni fee
Daystar University has provided many
platforms for me to share and explore
my talents, in written and oral, which
are mostly hidden treasures for lack of
platforms and opportunities like the ones
around Daystar University.
Margaret Muthee
www.daystar.ac.ke
5
B) Student Financial Aid
1) Work Study Programme
The University is keenly aware that there are many qualified deeply committed Christian students from poor families. It therefore deliberately raises
scholarship funds for needy students. The University has set up a Work Study programme to which it contributes a percentage of the tuition fees income
every year. The University also raises funds from churches, foundations and individuals in order to help the many poor students. In January semester
of the academic year, applications for Daystar Work Study scholarships are invited from needy students through the Financial Aid Office. Scholarship
awards are given according to the following guidelines:
1.
Daystar scholarships cover about one half (1/2) of the annual tuition fees. The student must procure additional funding from family, friends,
employer, church, or private sources.
2.
A student receiving Daystar scholarship is required to work ten (10) hours every week on jobs assigned by the University.
3.
Daystar scholarships are not available to first year students. Only in very exceptional cases will consideration be given to first year applicants.
4.
The following conditions are used to determine scholarship awards:
2)
i.
ii.
6
(a) assessed level of poverty;
(e) enrolment in a full-time study programme;
(b) depth of Christian commitment;
(f) nearness to completion of course;
(c) a clear Christian behavioural pattern;
(g) the spread of Christianity in home area;
(d) a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.50;
(h) the student must have applied for a HELB loan if eligible.
Other Scholarships and Awards
Work Study
A number of scholarships are available that cover 75% of the
tuition, room and board charges. These are based on demonstrated
need and the conditions for Work Study apply. In exceptional cases
a few 100% scholarships are available. Again the conditions for
Work Study apply.
Academic Merit Scholarship
Every year Daystar University offers an academic merit scholarship
to the best student admitted to the undergraduate programme with
the highest academic grade A or A- (minus) in KCSE or equivalent.
The scholarship covers tuition for four academic years if the student
maintains a Cum G.P.A of 3.50.
iii.
Edith Locklin Berry Memorial Scholarship
The Edith Locklin Berry Memorial Scholarship Fund was established
by the Berry Family to assist needy female Post-graduate students.
Edith Berry completed the M.A. degree and joined the faculty of
Daystar University shortly before she died in 1990. Applicants for
the scholarship must:
•
be full time female student in the Post-graduate programme or in the
third year and above of the undergraduate programme;
•
be of godly character and able to articulate her personal
relationship with Jesus Christ;
www.daystar.ac.ke
•
have proven financial need;
•
have achieved a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.30;
•
have a clearly articulated concern to help other women in her
home area by the application of her studies at Daystar University.
iv.
Book Award
This is awarded to six returning undergraduate students, two
representing each intake group, who attain the highest cumulative
GPA in an academic year. The award amounting to Kshs 20,000
covers the textbook allowance for that academic year. It only
applies to undergraduates.
v.
Non-Daystar Scholarships
A number of students come to Daystar University with their own
scholarships. Such students are advised to report to the Students
Revenue Accountant in the Finance Department. The students will
be required to provide the Revenue Accountant with details of their
scholarships through a commitment letter from their sponsors stating
what the scholarship covers and the duration of the scholarship.
Students with sponsors in the USA and Canada are advised to have
their funds sent through the Daystar offices in the USA. Money from
other parts of the world should be sent to the Daystar University
account by direct bank transfer. This ensures that money is not lost
in the international mail scam. The University does not recommend
cheques being sent by mail.
2. Administration
The Administration Section provides institutional support services in the
areas of food, health, transport, bookstore, security, and maintenance of the
physical facilities of the University.
Students are advised to give correct postal address to avoid misplacement
of mail. To avoid this, students should indicate their hostel of residence and
have letters addressed to them at the appropriate address as given on this
catalogue.
1. Bookshop Services
Although the University provides security for both campuses, students are
required to take care of their personal property. The Athi River campus
provides ample parking for staff and students with personal vehicles.
However, those studying at the Nairobi Campus or who wish to leave their
cars at Nairobi as they go to Athi River are informed that parking at the
Nairobi Campus is limited to staff and faculty only. Alternative parking is
available at the Nairobi Baptist Church behind the Nairobi Campus.
The University has an outsourced bookshop on each campus. The bookstore
provides stationery supplies, textbooks, photocopying and mail services. A
student can buy textbooks either by paying cash or charging the pre-paid
textbook allowance card. The Textbook allowance can be paid together
with other fees at the beginning of the semester and the student is issued with
a card by the Finance Department. Each time a student buys a book, it is
charged to the Textbook account. Lost textbook allowance cards must be
reported immediately to the bookstore.
2. Campus Services
The campus services department offers services in office and classroom
cleaning, security, grounds and utility maintenance, water and power
provision, sewerage and general environment, postal services and
telecommunications for the two campuses. Recently, a new PABX switch was
installed and radio mast constructed by Telkom Kenya to provide a reliable
telecommunications link with the outside world.
The University telephone numbers are as following:
3. Food Services
The Food Services Department caters for the total University community.
Resident students are however a priority for the department. Such students
who have paid the required fees receive meal cards from the caterer at the
beginning of the semester.
Non-resident students can buy semester meal cards for lunch and/or dinner.
The department has canteens on both campuses selling snacks and soft
drinks. These cater for dayscholar students, staff and faculty who may not
want to have a full lunch or dinner in the dining hall. More details on meal
times are posted in the dining halls and canteens.
Nairobi Campus: 020 2725472
020 2723003/4
020 2302275 (Wireless)
Athi River Campus: 045 6622601/2/3
Mombasa Campus: 041 2312777/8/9
Mobile lines: 0724 256408
0724 256409
0735 992991
0735 992993
Daystar University has been a
community of carring, loving and kind
members who are ready to listen and
accommodate one another.
Catherine Kandie
www.daystar.ac.ke
7
6. Transport Services
The University has outsourced bus transport for both staff and students.
Normally, Daystar University buses transport all staff and faculty to and from
the Athi River campus at scheduled times. These buses have strict departure
times and all are required to adhere to the shuttle programme to avoid being
left at the pick-up points. The buses follow three fixed routes and students are
required to stick to their pick-up points along their routes in order to avoid
overcrowding. Students are required to pay to the providers’ bank account
at the beginning of the semester after which they are issued with a Bus Pass.
The bus passes must always be produced when boarding the bus.
Athi River Campus resident students wishing to travel to Nairobi for various
reasons are required to make arrangements in advance with the Transport
Office, indicating the intended date and time of travel. They then buy
tickets at the Finance Office, or from the bus conductor (transport assistant)
which they must produce when boarding the bus. The last bus for boarders
returning to the Athi River campus on weekdays leaves the Nairobi Campus
at 5.00 pm everyday. Weekend travel is more flexible. A transport fee of
Kshs 120 is payable when boarding the bus.
Special organized groups like clubs and societies planning to make official
trips are required to make prior arrangements with the Transport Office two
weeks before the date of travel. Approval must be sought from the
Associate Dean for Student Affairs if the travel charges are to
be charged to the club’s account.
4. Health Services
Medical insurance for outpatient and inpatient medical cover is provided
at a cost of Kshs15,070 per year for the 2011/2012 academic year for
boarding and non-Kenyan students. Health charges are payable in full at the
time of registration for the first semester each year. Cover continues for a full
12 months whether or not a person remains enrolled in classes.
All except evening students are required to pay for the medical insurance
cover unless one has another cover and has to verify this with the Human
Resources office. An approved private health care provider runs a medical
clinic on Athi River campus and has a full time medical doctor and a number
of full time clinical staff. There are strict regulations governing the operation
of the clinics and making reimbursement claims from medical expenses.
Students are advised to familiarize themselves with the regulations. All
international students must be covered.
5. Information Communication Technology
The ICT Department offers user services to offices and students in the three
campuses. These sevices include networking/internet services, computer and
printer support, user support among others.
8
www.daystar.ac.ke
7. Human Resources
The Human Resource Department of Daystar University is involved in various
functions, including recruitment, selection, placement/deployment and
induction of staff/faculty; Drawing schemes of service; Co-ordination of
staff/faculty training and development; Labour and Industrial relation matters;
Resolving staff/faculty grievances; Staff/Faculty appraisals Compensation
and reward management; Handling Immigration matters; Managing staff
welfare and benefits such as health, safety, medical, benevolence fund and
remuneration; negotiating for the organization in several areas like medical
scheme, insurance policy, training and consultancy work; Managing the
University Work Study programme and students medical.
8. Procurement Services
The University has a centralized purchasing system with the Procurement
Department coordinating all purchasing and supplies. For more details on
procedures please see the Procurement Officer at Nairobi Campus.
Academic Division
Academic Programmes
The Academic programmes are offered under 5 schools, each headed by a Dean. The schools are:
1. School of Arts and Humanities
4. School of Human and Social Sciences
2. School of Business and Economics
5. School of Science, Engineering and Health
3. School of Communication, Language and Performing Arts
The programmes offered are as follows:
1. Certificate Courses
Daystar University offers Certificate courses to equip leaders and workers who
are already in ministry and who require additional training in specialized
areas of their work, but who are unable, for various reasons, to enroll in a
degree programme. These Certificate courses are offered in five ministry
areas, namely: Christian Ministries, Communication, Christian Music,
Management, and Development. More detailed information can be found
from the ICMT Department (Nairobi Campus).
2. The Pre-University Programme
This one-semester programme is meant for high school graduates who have
not obtained direct admission to the undergraduate degree programme. It
is intended to prepare such students for university admission. However, no
guarantee is given that students admitted to this programme will automatically
be admitted to the undergraduate degree programme unless they meet the
minimum requirements of a cumulative GPA of 2.50 at the end.
g. peace & Conflict Transformation
h.
Business Administartion & managemnet
i.
Business Information Technology
j.
Music
k.
Information technology
4. Undergraduate Programme
The undergraduate programme provides all students with a wide range of
academic curricula carefully planned to supply adequate basic knowledge
in the selected field. A major field of study is provided and the total
programme will teach the student to analyse and synthesize information from
different areas as a consequence of the planned coherence of the various
disciplines. The undergraduate programme offers various majors. These can
be taken either as day classes or classes in the evenings and on Saturdays.
Undergraduate degrees offered are:
a.
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with majors in Bible & Religious Studies,
Communication, Community Development, English, Social Work,
Psychology & Counselling, Peace & Conflict Transformation, French,
Kiswahili, Music and Technical & Professional Communication.
b.
Bachelor of Theology (BTh)
c.
Bachelor of Commerce (B.Com.) in Accounting, Marketing, Business
Administration and Management, Management Information Systems
(MIS), Purchasing and Business Logistics, and Business Law.
d.
Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) in Arts, Science or Social Science
e.
Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree with major in Economics,
Mathematics, Applied Computer Science, Nursing, Physics,
Environmental Health, and Acturial Science.
3. Diploma Programme
The Diploma programme is offered on a full-time basis lasting two years.
Courses on offer include the following:
a.
Community Development
b.
Counseling
c.
Computer Network & Security
d.
Database Administartion & Programming
e. Computer Network & Security Information Technology
f.
Communication
www.daystar.ac.ke
9
The University offers minors in most of the undergraduate courses listed above
in addition to Christian Ministries and Mathematics. In the near future, we
plan to launch majors in Electronic Engineering and others.
5. Continuing Education
This is an undergraduate programme designed for people
in full time employment who desire to pursue a university
education while working. The programme offers classes in the
evenings and on Saturdays. The requirements for admission are similar
to those for other undergraduate programmes as stated under �Common
Academic Regulations’).
6. Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Education is a one-year intensive programme
primarily designed to give untrained graduate teachers skills to carry out their
instruction with a Christian commitment. The programme will be conducted for
two separate groups:
•
Group 1 – teachers who will take the programme during the school
holiday periods of April, August, and December. (These months are
chosen because they are normally vacation months for schools in Kenya
and teachers from any part of the country will be able to attend the
course).
•
Group 2 – teachers within Nairobi who prefer to pursue their studies in
the evenings and on Saturdays. The programme will then spread over a
year and will be part of Daystar University Continuing Education.
7. Postgraduate Diploma in Child
Development (PGDCD)
The Postgraduate Diploma in Child Development is designed to equip
individuals who work or wish to work with children who have lived under
difficult circumstances with the requisite professional qualifications in Child
Development. In this respect, while some of the courses stipulated in this
programme may appear similar in content to those offered in teacher
training programmes, the clientele for this particular curriculum are essentially
managers of child rehabilitation programme in Africa. The course is offered in
the evenings and on Saturdays.
8. The Postgraduate Programme
The Postgraduate programme is geared towards assisting students in
acquiring skills and understanding at an advanced (postgraduate) level in
communication theory, communication arts, cross-cultural studies and Christian
ministries, business and psychology; and toward training them to do research
in these areas.
10
www.daystar.ac.ke
The purpose of such study is to prepare students for high leadership
responsibility in churches and other organizations. The programme offers are
in the following areas:
a. PhD in Communication
b.
PhD in Clinical Psychology
c.
MA Communication
d.
MA Christian Ministries
e.
Master of Business Administration (MBA)
f.
MA Counselling Psychology
g.
MA Child Development
h.
MA in Theology in African Christianity
i.
MA Monitoring and Evaluation
j.
MA in Community Development
9. Department of Research, Publication Consultancy & Postgraduate Bureau
The Daystar University Charter recognizes research as an integral part of the
University’s mission, objectives and functions. The University aims at providing
Christian-based higher education, training and research for the expansion of
God’s kingdom in Africa and the world.
The objectives of the Department are to:
• upgrade the level of research with a view to strengthening the academic
capacity of the University,
•
create and strengthen research network among University departments,
•
develop cooperation in research, training and activities with institutions
of higher learning worldwide,
•
develop literature on research methodology for the University as well as
coordinate research publications.
At Daystar University Research, Publication, Consultancy & Postgraduate
Bureau (RPC&PB) Department, we are well prepared to help you. Based at
Daystar University, Nairobi campus, the RPC department offers the following
services and products: Academic research, Publications and Reserach
consultancy. For more details please contact the director.
10. Student and Staff Exchange Programme
Daystar University is a member of the Council of Christian Churches and
Universities (CCCU). This American based organization has over 200
members, churches and universities world wide. This provides an avenue for
numerous opportunities for students and faculty exchange. To qualify, students
should be mature Christians with a GPA of 3.00 or above.
a) Student Exchange Programme
The Daystar student exchange programme is open to second and third year
students. Fourth year students can only participate during their first semester
of the final year. They are also required to pay full tuition and boarding
fees for a semester in Daystar, and be able to meet textbook and personal
expenses including a return air tickets. Students on Work Study must raise
fees in cash or have the credit equivalent to meet their full tuition and
boarding fees. Students must check with their respective H.O.D to ensure
that the courses they take in an exchange program college are transferable
to Daystar. All credits taken at those institutions will appear on
the student’s Daystar transcript as transfer credits, meaning
they will not affect the GPA. Students are required to return
to Daystar at the end of the specified semester of study. While
in the programme, students are required to conduct themselves according to
the Daystar Code of Conduct and abide by the regulations of the institution
attended. On return, students are required to submit a written report of their
experience while ithere. Applications must be accompanied by a parent’s,
guardian’s or sponsor’s written approval and commitment to participate in the
programme.
Those interested apply to the office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Academic
Affairs through the Coordinator of Collaborative Programme. The programme
provides exchange students with an opportunity to experience learning in
the host country context, build relationships, appreciate Africa’s rich cultural
values and develop a deeper faith in God. The day-to-day activities of
the student exchange are supervised by the Coordinator of Collaborative
Academic Programme.
c) Alliance for International Christian Business
Education (AICBE) Programme
Daystar is a member of the Alliance for International Christian Business
Education which enables students to do some courses online. Courses offered
online are advertised every semester. Students register for these courses in the
office of the Coordinator, Collaborative Programme.
d) Bethel University, St. Paul’s, USA
Daystar University has a vibrant partnership programme with Bethel University.
Daystar and Bethel students benefit from great academic and cultural
experiences. Bethel students, get to visit various parts of Kenya including
Masai Mara, Mt. Kenya and other great destinations to experience the
diverse cultures in Kenya. Daystar students also get great geographical and
cultural exposure in the USA.
e) Northwestern College, St. Paul’s, USA
Northwestern College and Daystar University are partnering in various
ventures including joint programmes, joint research initiatives, and faculty
and student exchanges and in opportunities of higher education at the
respective institutions. Besides the academic experiences, both Daystar and
Northwestern students get opportunity to experience diverse cultures.
f) Matongo Lutheran Theological College, Kenya
b) Kosin-Daystar Student Exchange Programme
Daystar operates a faculty and student exchange programme with Kosin
University, South Korea. Annually, five students and one Daystar lecturer
participate in the programme. This exchange programme is open to second
and third year students. They are also required to pay full tuition and
boarding fees for the year in Daystar, plus 10 percent administrative fee.
Daystar University and Matongo Lutheran Theological College (MLTC) are
collaborating in Bachelor of Theology programme. MLTC offers Daystar’s
Bachelor of Theology degree.
Daystar University provides
cross-cultural blending with both
local and international students
through student exchange
program that highlight on
excellent in transformation of
servant leadership.
www.daystar.ac.ke
11
g) Staff Exchange Programme
Visiting professors and senior administrative staff from reputable universities in
the USA and other parts of the world come to Daystar University for varying
periods of time. Such staff spend their sabbatical leave teaching or doing
research at Daystar. Senior administrative staff visit Daystar University and
spend time working alongside their counterparts in such areas as the Library
or in the Office of Admissions and Records. These professionals bring into
Daystar University experiences that enrich and enhance our institutional
programmes.
As opportunities arise, both academic and senior administrative staff from
Daystar University go to institutions in other parts of the world for similar
exposure in teaching, research, or other experiential engagements. The
experiences gained by our staff are seen as a very important aspect of their
professional development.
11. Library & Resource Centre Services
Daystar University has a library in each of its three campuses in Nairobi,
Athi River and Mombasa. The library is fully automated using Sirs Mandarin
Library Automation software, whose modules are integrated, thereby creating
a seamless interaction of services. The library is also fully networked.
Services
The
•
•
•
•
•
library offers the following services:
Lending of books, periodicals
Reference and referral services
Inter-library loans
Information Literacy Programmes
Services for students with special needs
Library Sections
Circulation is the central service point of the Daystar University libraries.
It facilitates customer care relations with students, staff and faculty in the
borrowing and returning of books, as well as inter-library loan between the
three libraries.
11. Computer Laboratories
The Computer Department within the Academic Division operates eight
computer laboratories in Athi River campus, Nairobi campus and Mombasa
campus All campuses have Internet access.
12
www.daystar.ac.ke
12. eLearning Centre
The eLearning Centre at Daystar University is responsible for spearheading a
spectrum of eLearning activities, in response to the dynamic learning needs
of today’s eGeneration students. These activities range from development
and deployment of eLearning resources for blended-learning mode (the
combination of face-to-face and eLearning practices), to fully-online eLearning
mode. The aim is to optimise the efficacy of the teaching-and-learning
process, in today’s digital era: (i) by providing flexible offerings of teachingand-learning modes; and (ii) by enabling online learning possibilities that
extend the learning process beyond conventional classroom-based teaching.
As such, Daystar’s eLearning Centre continues to make rapid progress in
terms of research and development of eLearning solutions in anticipation of
the dynamic learning needs of emerging eGeneration students. If we have to
attract and retain this genre of students in our university, we are challenged to
incorporate aspects of ICT and eLearning approach as the preferred medium
of teaching-and-learning; pertinent to communication behaviour of today’s
generation of students. Towards this end, we are committed towards working
with individual lecturers to develop and deploy viable eLearning resources
to enrich our students’ learning experience. Conceivably, this process is
intended to empower individual lecturers, as well as help them to acquire
vital eLearning skills necessary in the new field of development of eLearning
resources, as well as deployment of interactive, immersive and engaging
multimedia-based digital content; specifically, targeting an increasingly
technically-savvy eGeneration students.
13. Science Building
The new science building located just beyond the BCC building in Athi
River Campus was dedicated on 18 September 2006. It was opened for
use at the beginning of the August semester 2006. It includes the following
laboratories: chemistry, biology, physics, electronics, and two computer
laboratories. It is a state-of-the-art building equipped with: computer network
data points throughout, electrical power supply system for the electronic
and physics laboratories, gas and water supplies and fume cupboards in
the chemistry laboratories. Each lab is served by a central storage and
preparation room. The building also includes faculty offices for the heads of
the Science and Computer Science departments and four faculty offices. This
is the first phase of the proposed science complex. The second phase has
been completed and is operational.
14. Communication Studios
The Communication department operates a radio station, Shine FM 103.1,
sound, video and television studio and a student newspaper, Involvement, so
as to provide hands-on experience for students. The department also runs, in
collaboration with the department of Language & Perfoming Arts, a Language
Laboratory, a Resource Centre and a Speech & Writing Centre, all of which
add value to the learning process.
Goals of Daystar’s Academic Programmes
Characteristic of Daystar’s programmes is a continual striving for excellence in all things. The nine goals of Daystar’s academic programmes are as follows:
a. Spiritual development is predicated on faith in and commitment to Jesus
Christ. Full spiritual maturity is contingent upon a relation-ship to the
Christian community and adoption of a dynamic world and life view.
Such spiritual growth fosters a distinctive value system that covers the
spectrum of individual and social experiences. These commitments call
one to involvement in the world, in ways that affect wholeness in self
and others. These concerns find expression in Christian life-goals, in
accountable stewardship of talents and resources, and in responsible
care of the earth.
b.
c.
d.
Intellectual development begins with recognition of the importance and
worth of mental activity. Intellectual growth is marked by an appreciation
of clear and creative thinking and a capacity for theoretical thought.
Intellectually developed people have a broad understanding of ideas in
the world, an awareness of the contemporary situation and a deeper,
more detailed knowledge of one specific area of thought. They are
capable of making relationships between specific categories. Such
people are curious, engage in continuing research and form thoughtful
conclusions.
While the years of university study are important in and of themselves,
they must also provide preparation for later life. Career development
involves the investigation of career options and development of a
personal career plan. Staff members, along with other professionals
in career development, should provide such resources. The Daystar
University curriculum prepares students to enter a career after graduation
or to continue their education at postgraduate or professional levels.
The learner is at the centre of the education process. Ultimately, this
process must promote personal development which in essence is the
development of a mature and well-rounded individual who displays a
healthy sense of relationship to creation and the Creator.
e.
Daystar’s academic programmes are intended to offer to the increasing
number of qualified secondary school graduates and mature Christians,
a Christian alternative for higher education. Such education will have
a Christian foundation, a moral base and excellent quality, and is
intended for Christians who will become leaders whether in church,
government or industry.
f.
Daystar offers a programme that is broad based, but with clearly
defined majors and minors. A major represents a student’s main subject
of study, whereas a minor represents a secondary subject. The student’s
major will always carry more hours than the minor. A student in certain
majors can decide to take electives instead of a minor.
g.
Africa is a continent of many cultures and languages. It is therefore
absolutely essential that students are encouraged to develop a deep
understanding of traditional Africa and modern Africa if they are to play
an effective role in the spiritual, social and economic transformation of
the continent. Therefore, Daystar programmes are distinctly African in
context. At the same time, they provide a platform from which a student
can understand and relate to other cultures.
h.
Another positive feature of the programmes is the focus on Africa.
African cultures, traditions, nations and religions are studied in detail.
Western and Eastern cultures are also examined because contemporary
African society has been intertwined with them.
i.
The programmes are practical and oriented to field experience in
conditions very similar to those students will encounter at the conclusion
of the degree programme. For that reason, courses are focused on clear
application to the contemporary situation in Africa.
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13
Common Academic Regulations
A) Admission to the Undergraduate Programmes
The University shall admit for study for degrees, diplomas, certificates or
other awards of the University, such candidates as shall have been accepted
by the Senate as being academically qualified, and who accept the
University’s Christian mission and philosophy as provided under Sections 4
to 7 of the Charter, without regard or preference to gender, ethnic origin,
race, denomination or physical disability being imposed as a condition for
admission. Other conditions for admission are given here below.
e.
1. Direct Entry into the Undergraduate Programme
a.
Daystar University will accept Grade C or better for relevant courses
from recognized/accredited universities which offer bachelors level
courses.
b.
A student who transfers to Daystar University from another accredited
institution must take a minimum of 33 credit hours at Daystar University.
c.
A student must take a minimum of 17 credit hours in the major area of
study at Daystar University. In addition, 50% of all 300 and 400 level
major courses must be taken at Daystar University.
d.
Daystar University will consider transfering credits which come from
non-degree granting institutions but whose academic programmes
are approved by the Senate, if the courses are equivalent to Daystar
University’s 100 level and only 100 level courses. Each request will
be considered on an individual course basis. A comprehensive final
examination may be given to the student before credit is granted. No
grade will be assigned to these credits. The student will be charged
a fee for sitting for the examination equivalent to the cost of one
credit hour in case of challenging a course.
i)
2. Admission on Transfer from other Institutions
Minimum Entry Requirement
The minimum entry requirement shall be an overall grade of C+ for
candidates taking KCSE or two (2) Advanced Level Principal passes, or 5
credits in IGCE of at least a grade C, or their equivalents for candidates
coming from outside Kenya and those using different systems of education.
This is, however, a minimum entry requirement and meeting it may not
automatically entitle a candidate admission to the University. Those
candidates with low grade at KCSE but have successfully completed a 2 year
diploma at a recognized institution may be considered for admission to the
undergraduate programme.
ii) Language Requirements
a.
Applicants with grade B- in KCSE or 500 marks/points on TOEFL, 250
out of 300 TOEFL done electronically (results not more than two years
old), or at least Credit 6 under the old �O’ Level system, or a principal
pass at �A’ level in Literature in English, will be exempted from taking the
English pre-test.
b.
Applicants with English grades of C- to C+, in KCSE or Credits 7 and
8 under the old �O’ Level system, or 50-59% from English speaking
countries must take the English pre-test administered by the University.
Those who do not pass the test will be required to take an English
course (ENG 098) for no credit for one semester.
c.
d.
14
Applicants with English grades of D+ to E in KCSE or 9 in the old �O’
Level system, or less than 50% from any that these percentages, will be
required to take an English course (ENG 098) for one semester on a
pass or fail basis for no credit. They do not sit for the English pre-test.
Applicants from non-English speaking countries (where English is not
used as the medium of instruction), must include results of TOEFL (Test of
English as a Foreign Language) of not more than two years old, or the
British examination (International English Language Test) or its equivalent.
Acceptance score on the TOEFL test is as indicated above.
www.daystar.ac.ke
Applicants from non-English speaking countries coming without TOEFEL
results or with lower scores will be required to take a preliminary course
(ENG 096) for no credit. They will spend the first semester studying
English only.
3. Admission from Daystar Diploma Programme
a.
Only those students with at least a GPA of 2.50 in the diploma
programme will be considered.
b.
Transfer of credits will be allowed only for the undergraduate 100 level
equivalent courses where the applicant has attained at least a B- grade
in the diploma programme.
c.
A student from the diploma programme who challenges a 200 level
course successfully will be exempted from that course.
4. Special Students
Only persons who are eligible for admission into particular programmes can
enroll as special student. Such persons will be enrolled for a maximum of one
academic year only. Students who wish to continue beyond this period must
apply for admission into the regular programmes.
B) Admission into the Diploma Programme
1. Direct Entry into the Diploma Programme
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) for candidates
offering KSCE or Advanced Level Principal Pass or the equivalent for
candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is however a minimum entry
requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle a candidate
admission to the University.
2. Admission on Transfer from Other Diploma Granting Institutions
a.
b.
Daystar University will accept a grade of B (Plain) or better for relevant
courses from accredited universities and colleges which offer diploma
level courses.
A student who transfers to Daystar University from another accredited
institution must take a minimum of 33 credit hours of the Diploma. In
other words, a maximum of 27 credit hours with comparable course
content can be accepted for transfer.
3. Mature Age Entry Requirements
The university provides an avenue for students who do not have the minimum
entry requirement for admission into programmes of study to enter under the
mature age entry status. The students should have additional training in the
major they intend to pursue. The mature age entry grade to the diploma
programme is a minimum of a C- while that to the undergraduate programme
is C (Plain) or its equivalence in their final secondary school examination plus
a diploma of 2 years.
C) Exemptions
Daystar University recognizes training that students have had prior to entering
the university and exemptions may be offered for specific courses upon
application. Students are advised to apply for exemptions in writing through
the University Registrar upon admission. Transcripts and course syllabi,
application fee or other relevant documents must be provided with the
application.
1.Definitions
fulfilled the relevant course requirement toward the degree. The requirements
for exemption are specified within the relevant departments and for specific
programmes. Any grade assigned will not contribute to the GPA.
Challenge: to challenge a course is to take an exam for a course which one
feels has already completed the work elsewhere at a similar level but the
university is not convinced that one should be exempted. Such exam is taken
after paying for an equivalent of one credit hour and the student has passed
the course ( a P-grade is awarded).
The challenge exam for ACS 101 consists of two practicals and a theory
part. The student must achieve a B- (66%) or better overall and 60% or better
in two of the three sections.
2. General Guidelines for Exemptions.
Transfer of credits for the undergraduate programme are granted on the
following conditions:
i) Transfer to diploma from an accredited university – C or better
ii) Transfer from a recognised diploma – B- or better
iii) Transfer of credits from diploma to Daystar University diploma or Transfer
from a non-recognised institution – B or better
iv) Some �A’ – level courses (when one gets principals A to D) Principal
Pass
v) Specific courses from the Daystar Diploma and Pre-university programmes
that may qualify for exemption are listed within each department.
vii) Transferred or exempted credits from a course may be allowed for 100
and 200 level courses and practicum from Daystar University.
viii)From other institutions, the student will be required to provide a transcript
and course syllabus to the University Registrar. If the syllabus is equivalent
in content to the course offered at Daystar University, then the student may
be exempted.
A student may apply to challenge 300 and 400 level courses under
the following conditions:
i) The student has taken an equivalent course and achieved a grade of at
least B-.
ii) If the student challenges the course and receives a grade of B- or better
on the examination, exemption will be granted.
Exemption or transfer of credits: When a student is exempted from a
course the credit hours for the exempted course will be counted toward the
total hours for graduation. The exempted course will be counted as having
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15
C. Undergraduate and Diploma Programmes Regulations
1. Course Load
i.
The normal class load for undergraduate students is 15 to 18 credit
hours or 5 to 6 courses per semester. With permission, students having
a cumulative GPA of over 3.40 can take a load up to 21 credits during
the semester and 15 credits during the short semester. The maximum
load a student can take is 21 credit hours.
ii.
A credit hour is equal to 15 one hour lectures per semester.
iv.
All grades below D will carry no credit and will be calculated as zero
grade point.
v.
Students will be allowed to repeat failed required major courses only
twice except for the non-credit courses which can be repreated until
the student attains a pass. After that the student will be discontinued.
Repeated courses will receive whatever grade the student achieves.
If the course failed twice is a general education course the student is
allowed to take a course in his/ her major concentration or minor in its
place.
vi. A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 must be maintained
to continue studies in good standing.
2. Student Assessment
i.
Continuous assessment shall be part of a student’s assessment throughout
his/her programme. Tests, assignments, projects, term papers, practical
work, etc. will be included in the calculation of the student’s final mark
for a given course.
ii.
In addition to the continuous assessment, a final examination shall be
administered at the end of each semesters’ projects, and the marks will
be added to the continuous assessment in accordance with the special
departmental regulations.
iii. For each course the student is given a letter grade, which has the
following significance:
Marks
Letter Grade
Per Credit
91 – 100
A
4.0
81 – 90
A-
3.7
76 – 80
B+
3.3
71 – 75
B
3.0
66 – 70
B-
2.7
61 – 65
C+
2.3
56 – 60
C
2.0
Grade Points
51 – 55
C-
1.7
46 – 50
D+
1.3
41 – 45
D
1.0
40 and below
F
0.0
Significance
Superior
Average
vii. A student’s cumulative grade point average (Cum GPA) is obtained by
dividing the total number of semester credits attempted (those in which
grade points may be earned) into the total number of hours taken.
Credits transfered from other institutions do not carry grade points.
Furthermore, some courses which are required but carry no credit or
which are graded only on a simple “pass-fail” basis are not used in
calculating the grade point average.
viii. All degree and diploma candidates must achieve a cumulative GPA in
their major courses of at least 2.00 in addition to having a cumulative
GPA of 2.00 in all courses.
3.Incompletes
An “Incomplete” is given to a student who does not complete the semester’s
work. The letter �I’ may be awarded as a course grade, and it signifies that
the student’s work in that course is not complete and a regular grade will
not be assigned until it is completed. Incomplete grades are given only on
arrangement with the instructor and for valid, excusable reasons. A student
must make up any incomplete work within six weeks after the end of the
semester. If one does not do so, the incomplete grade will be changed to �F’.
4. Graduation Requirements
Below Average
i.
All undergraduate students must take and pass all the prescribed
General Education courses. The normal course combination would be:
General Education
Unacceptable
for Credit
Major
Minor (if any)
Free or General Electives
16
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ii.
Specific graduation requirements for each degree programme will
be spelled out separately by each department. Minimum graduation
requirements for candidates taking a Major and Minor or Electives will
be as specified by each department.
iii. A few students may opt to take a double major combination.
Graduation requirements for candidates taking double majors will be as
follows:
MAJORS
CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED
English
Communication
160 - 166
Integrated Community Development
170
Psychology & counseling
161
Rural Development
172
Applied Computer Science
Economics
180
Education
Teaching Subjects (2)
141 - 142
Accounting
Business Administration & Management
170
Marketing
170
Business Logistics
173
MIS
191 (-3)
Law
Business Administration & Management
Marketing
167
Business Logistics
170
MIS 182
187
Law
iv.
A total of 42 upper division (300, 400, 500 level) credits must be
earned.
v.
Graduation requirements for each major or minor are spelled out under
separate sections in the respective departments.
vi. Each course is given credits which indicate the number of hours in class
per week for a 15-week semester. Each course is evaluated according
to the number of credits assigned to it. To attain a degree, the student
must have accumulated the number of credit hours indicated for the
degree in the summary of one’s academic programme spelled out by
various departmental regulations.
vii. All diploma students must take and pass the prescribed course work and
the field project. The graduation requirement for each diploma major is
the completion of 60-65 credit hours under the following combinations:
Marketing
Business Logistics
170
MIS
188
Law
185
Credit Hours for Diploma
Common Core Courses
Required courses in the Major
30-35
Courses
24-44
Bible
Field Project
Integrated Community Development
165
Electives
Communication
160
TOTAL
English
152
Psychology & Counselling
157
Rural Development
165
Psychology
Rural Development
12
60-65
Credit Hours
178
163 - 169
178
Integrated Community Development
Psychology & counseling
6
A few students may opt to take a double concentration in COM. Graduation
requirements for candidates taking double major will be as follows:
Communication
Integrated Community Development
15
164
Common Core Courses
15
Required courses in the majors
44
Concentrations
12
Field project
06
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED
78
www.daystar.ac.ke
17
A student must apply for the double concentration during his/her second or
third semester and be approved by the respective department.
8. Academic Discontinuation
5. Graduation Honours
A diploma or undergraduate student who obtains a Cumulative GPA of less
than 2.00 four times will be discontinued from his/her programme of study
immediately.
Outstanding students are selected for graduation honours by a committee of
the heads of academic departments based on the following scales:
i) Class Attendance
At least a 3.50 G.P.A Cum Laude (with Honours)
At least a 3.70 G.P.A Magna Cum Laude (with High Honours)
At least a 3.90 G.P.A Summa Cum Laude (with Highest Honours)
6. Registration
All students are expected to pre-register for their next semester courses at
a period of time designated by the university. Each student should seek
clearance to take particular courses from their advisors before they can
pre-register.
On receiving an invoice of registration, students should ensure that they
take their invoices to the finance department for registration clearance.
Students should note that it is only when their invoices are stamped by
the finance department that they are considered to have been registered
for their courses. This should be done within the period of time designated
for registration by the university, failure to which the student will not be
considered registered for the semester.
Students who do not meet the registration requirements in the period
designated by the university should not go on attending classes and are
advised to register in the following semester. In addition, such a student
should not attempt to take the university’s examinations and will not receive
grades for any course that semester.
It is assumed that students will make the most of the educational opportunities
available to them by regularly and punctually attending all class sessions.
Students who miss 25% or more of class sessions will receive no credit (E
grade) for the course. If a student must be absent from classes
for a very good reason, he/she must fill absence-from-class
forms which are obtained from the Office of Admissions and
Records or University website, www.daystar.ac.ke.
ii) Auditing of Courses (AU)
A student may audit any course of his/her programme in this catalogue,
so long as his/her presence as an auditing student follows the rule on
pre-requisite and does not displace someone taking the course for credit.
Enrolling for audit permits one to attend lectures and to participate in various
class activities, though no academic credit is earned for the experience.
The lecturer may mark assignments submitted by the auditing student but is not
obligated to do so. Those not already admitted to the programme can only
audit courses if they satisfy the admission requirements. A half of the normal
fee for the course is paid for any course that is audited.
k) Course Numbering
•
Each course carries a three letter prefix and a three digit number. The
letter prefix indicates the subject area in which the course is taught.
NOTE: CHM indicates the course is a Christian Ministries course,
while the number indicates the level at which the course is taught.
Thus a 100 level course would be designated for first year students.
Some 500 level courses may appear for undergraduate programme
requiring a fifth year, or for courses limited to fourth or fifth year
undergraduate students. Courses at 600 level are for postgraduate
students only and 800 level are for PhD students only.
•
For Diploma, ICC indicates Core Courses; ICM indicates counselling;
ICO indicates Communication; MNG indicates Management; IMD
indicates Development and IMU indicates Music.
•
It is possible for a student to enroll in a course numbered for one’s own
year of study or for one year advanced if one does not have enough
load for his/her level, but no undergraduate student may
enroll in post-graduate or diploma courses to fulfill
graduation requirements for the undergraduate degree
programme. Likewise no Diploma student will enroll in
undergraduate or certificate courses to fulfil graduation
requirements for the diploma as no Postgraduate
student will enroll in undergraduate course to fulfil
graduation requirements for postgraduate degree.
Students are advised to follow the registration requirements in order to avoid
any embarrassment caused to themselves.
7. Registration Queries
Students are expected to register in person on a day and time designated
for a specific semester. A registration schedule is included in the University
calendar in this Catalogue. An add/drop period of two weeks is permitted
from the day returning students arrive, for the students who are attending
classes. However, during the June semester, add/drop is done in one week.
A late registration fee of Kshs 300 will be charged after the two days
of registration queries. An additional Kshs 50 will be charged for each
additional day late, till the last working day of the second week. That fee
must be paid in cash by the student. Students are responsible for seeing that
they complete their registration process for each semester, failure to which the
student will receive no credit hours for the semester. Classes will start on
the first Monday when returning students report.
18
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l) Withdrawal
•
•
•
AU �Audit’
If a student must, for some personal emergency, withdraw from a course
after the deadline as specified above for routine changes has expired,
he may do so only as long as two thirds (2/3) of the semester time
has not passed, but the student’s transcript will show their performance.
Withdrawals will be noted on the student’s transcript with �WP’
(Withdrawing Passing) or �WF’ (Withdrawing Failing), or �W’ where no
CAT has been done. depending on whether the student was passing
or failing at the time of withdrawal. A penalty fee will be charged as
indicated under �Refunds’ on page 3 of this Catalogue
After two-thirds (2/3) of the time has passed, the student may not
withdraw from any course, unless there is a pressing personal
emergency or illness which requires it. The student will write to the
department head who will table the case to the Academic Board. This
must be approved by the Academic Board.
Suspended students receive WS (withdrew for suspension)
m) Change of Academic Majors
•
Students who wish to change a major area of study must meet the
minimum entry requirements for the new major as specified in the
University Catalogue. Students from the Pre-University programme will
be required to have attained equivalent grades for specific subject entry
requirements of the new major.
Applications for change of major must be submitted to the Registrar, with
a copy to the Head of Department in which the student is registered,
during the first three academic years. The student must have
completed a minimum 16 credit hours. Applications must be signed by the
Head of Department for the major the student is transfering to, and must be
accompanied by a receipt for a non-refundable fee of Kshs 500. Approval of
change of major will be communicated to the applicant by the Registrar with
copies to the two heads of the concerned departments. Likewise adding a
second major will be charged at Ksh 500.
n) Transcripts
All grades for course work must be recorded on the transcript and averaged
into the grade point average. If a student fails a course (that is gets an F
grade) and retakes the course, the F grade will remain on the transcript but
will not carry any value. The student will be given the grade received after
re-taking the course. Other grades that a student may find in his/her transcript
include:
The student attends class but no grade is given.
I
�Incomplete’: when the lack of a grade is not the fault of
the student.
F
Grade �F’ is assigned when the student attempted all the
work but did not achieve satisfactory marks.
E
Failure due to attendance; the student did not attend
more than 75% of the classes.
R
Practicum results are not complete
S
The student missed the final exam due to sickness or
bereavement.
T
Thesis in progress.
W
Withdrew
WS
Withdrew for suspension
WP
Withdrew passing
WF
Withdrew failing
WT
Due to job transfer.
X
The student attended class throughout but did not sit the
final examination for an unknown reason
Y
The student did not sit for the final exam due to inability
to pay fees.
Z
There is no record of the student’s attendance
•
The codes E and Z will revert to an F if no action is taken by the student
or no explanation is forthcoming. X and Y will revert to W after two
semesters.
•
S and R are treated as an incomplete until the results of the special
examination or practicum are completed.
•
The reversion of the special codes will occur six weeks after the date
the grades are released. However, the counting of weeks will start in
August for January Semester grades.
•
WT - the student will register the courses at no fee.
o) University Examinations
University examinations shall be conducted at the end of every semester
in accordance with the University Statutes. Students are required to carry
their Student Exam cards and Identity cards to the examination room. No
examination will be administered outside the timetable.
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19
p) Academic Dishonesty
In the event of an alleged examination irregularity, the same shall be reported
to the Dean of the School, who will consult with the Vice- Chancellor through
DVC (Academic Affairs) and make an appropriate decision. Where the
matter will require investigation, the Senate shall appoint a committee which
shall investigate the alleged irregularity. Any person involved in the alleged
irregularity shall be required to appear before this committee. The Chairman of
the said committee shall then report the findings and recommendations of the
committee to the Vice-Chancellor who, on behalf of the Senate, shall decide
what further action may be necessary. Such action shall be reported to the
Senate at its next meeting for ratification. Such disciplinary action taken shall be
in accordance with the procedures and regulations established by the Senate.
Academic Offence
Penalty
1. Stealing examination papers.
Grade F for the course; One year suspension; Counseling by Daystar
counselor or Daystar approved counselor required. A second offence results
in discontinuation.
2. Academic dishonesty (cheating or attempting to cheat), including, but
not limited, to the following:
a. Copying from others during an examination including CATs or the
final examination.
b. Presenting papers or materials other than your own to fulfill class
requirements.
c. Giving your paper to someone else to submit as their own or
allowing someone to copy your work whether in an exam or other
assignment.
d. Using mobile phones or other unapproved technology during the
exam.
CAT: grade F for the course and withdraw from the course. Counseling by
Daystar counselor or Daystar approved counselor.
Final Exam: Grade F, and a suspension for one year; Counseling by Daystar
counselor or Daystar approved counselor.
A second offence results in discontinuation.
e. Bringing unauthorized books or notes into the exam room in any
form.
3. Academic dishonesty (plagiarism): Presenting material copied from
published literature (books, papers, newspapers, the Internet, etc.) without
acknowledging the source of information.
First offence: warning letter.
Second offence: Grade F for the course.
Postgraduate Thesis: Grade F for the thesis and start the thesis process over
on a new topic.
4. Attempting to attend classes or sitting for exams after being suspended
from Daystar University.
Refer to Student Discipline Committee
5. Assisting others or covering for others in their attempts to commit
academic offences e.g.
impersonating another student in a classroom or in an exam room.
Grade F for the course and a one-year suspension for both. A second
offence results in discontinuation.
6. Class attendance
a. Signing the attendance record for another student.
b. Signing the attendance record for a class that one did not attend.
Grade F, and a suspension for one year; Counseling by Daystar counselor
or Daystar approved counselor. A second offence results in discontinuation.
7. Bribing or attempting to bribe, threatening, or blackmailing faculty for
exams, good marks, or changes in marks.
If found guilty in Discipline Committee, Grade F, and a suspension for one
year; Counseling by Daystar
counselor or Daystar approved counselor. A second offence results in
discontinuation.
8. Attempting to sit for an exam without an exam card and student
identification card or another authenticated form of identification.
Students will not be allowed to sit for the exam without a
valid exam card and identification.
Attending classes or sitting for exams without having officially registered and paid for it, is a non-academic offence and will result in disciplinary action.
20
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q) Late Assignments and Examinations
Each academic staff is asked to state in the course outline his/her policy
concerning acceptance of late assignments and examinations in the course.
Normally, such work can be made up only for good reason (e.g. serious
illness, death in the immediate family, etc.) In no case will examinations be
given early.
r) Penalty Fee for Special Exams
A student who fails to sit for his/her final examinations as a result of fees
defaulting will be allowed to apply and sit for special examinations within
a period of one year, failure to which the student will receive a withdrawal
grade without the option of receiving a refund. Such a student will be
expected to seek clearance to sit for the examination from the department
head. In addition the student will also be expected to first clear his/her
balance for the semester and pay a penalty fee of KShs. 500/= per course
to qualify to sit for the examination which will be taken at the end of the
semester together with all other students who are taking the course in any
given semester.
A fees defaulter will not be allowed to register for the subsequent semesters
without clearing the fees for the semester in which they defaulted.
In cases where the course is not in offer in a particular semester, the student
will be expected to take the examination the next time the course is offered as
long as it does not exceed a one-year period.
s) Application for Special Examination
Students who miss their final examination with valid reasons will be expected
to apply for special examinations, through their head of departments, within
a period of one year. Such students will be expected to also attach evidence
of the reason they missed their examinations for presentation to the university
Senate. Students who have not met the 75% class attendance mark and those
whose reasons are not convincing enough to the university will not have their
applications approved and thus will be expected to retake the entire course if
it is a required course.
t) Remarking of Examinations
A student who is dissatisfied with a grade obtained in a particular
examination may apply for remarking of the examination paper to the Head
of the Department in which the course was offered. The application should
be made not later than two weeks after the release of the examination grades
by the Registrar’s Office, except for the January semester when the appeal
can be made within the first two weeks of the following August semester.
This application should give a valid justification for the request. The Head
of Department and members of Faculty will then review the case to see if
remarking is warranted. If the request is approved, the applicant should
present to the Head of Department a receipt for a non-refundable remarking
fee of Kshs 2000. An examiner other than the one who initially marked the
script will remark the paper. The grade awarded after remarking of the paper
will be final regardless of whether it is lower, higher or the same as the first
grade. The student may not request for a second remarking of the same
script. The grade will be communicated to the student by the Registrar.
u) Dean’s List
The Dean’s List seeks to encourage academic excellence among diploma,
undergraduate and postgraduate students in the University. Students who
obtain a GPA of 3.60 and above, based on at least 15 credit hours per
semester, and postgraduate 12 credit hours with GPA of 3.75, will be placed
on the Dean’s List for that semester.
v) Additional Information
Further information on each programme or course is found in the complete
filed syllabus in the Office of the Department Head.
v) Time Limit for Degree Work
Undergraduate programme must be completed within seven years from the
time of admission into the programme. Extensions of time maybe granted
by the senate only for good reason; upon application throught the dean of
respective school.
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21
D. General Regulations for Postgraduate
Rationale
relevant to the field they want to pursue at Daystar University.
Daystar University postgraduate programme is designed to prepare students
for leadership roles in church and society. It is expected that the graduates
whether counsellors, journalists, church leaders, educators, researchers,
or business people, will play an important role in helping the church to
effectively communicate the message of Jesus Christ to a rapidly changing
world. The Postgraduate programme operates eleven major goals:
1. To articulate a vision of excellence for the postgraduate community;
ii) Transfer from other Institutions
Daystar will accept credits of B or better for relevant masters level courses
from recognized accredited universities, up to a maximum of 25% of the total
course work required and 25% of the course work in the major area of study.
No credit for thesis may be transferred. Credits cannot be transferred for
courses that have already earned an academic qualification.
2.
To establish a set of policies which define good practice in the
postgraduate programme, high quality in curriculum, excellence
in student selection, retention and completion and rigor in faculty
appointments;
3.
To manage and coordinate an extensive and rigorous system of
academic program development and reviews;
4.
To ensure equity across all academic disciplines within the programme
in such areas as admission, teaching and completion requirements;
5.
To define what postgraduate education is and what it is not. In
particular, to clarify the difference between postgraduate and
undergraduate education;
6.
To bring an institution-wide perspective to all postgraduate endeavors
and provide a cross-university perspective;
7.
To enhance the intellectual community of scholars among both
postgraduate students and faculty;
8.
To serve as an advocate for issues and constituencies critical to
postgraduate education within and outside the university;
9.
To emphasize the institution-wide importance of training future university
teachers; this is particularly so in the case of PhD programs;
10. To develop ways for postgraduate education to contribute to and
enhance undergraduate education;
11. To support and further the non-academic interests of postgraduate
students.
b. Language Proficiency
Applicants must exhibit sufficient mastery of the English language to study in
classes taught in English, as demonstrated by a score of 500 or higher on the
Test of English as a Foreign Language, or an equivalent score on the British
English language examination (International English Language Test), or on an
examination set by the University. Students from Anglophone countries will be
exempted from the test, though the University may request any student to sit for
a diagnostic English examination if the academic staff believes the student’s
mastery of English may be insufficient. Students coming from non - English
speaking countries to do ENG 096 only for one semester.
c. Bible and Theology Proficiency
Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in basic knowledge of Bible and
theology, such as a Christian lay leader should have, as demonstrated either
by standardized written examination set by the University, with a pass mark of
60%, or by undergraduate credit in survey courses covering Old Testament,
New Testament, and theology. (Those lacking the required background in
Bible and theology may enroll in the necessary undergraduate courses at
Daystar, but without university credit for them.
d. Computer Proficiency
Applicants must possess at least basic computer competency in word
processing, able to type at least 20 words per minute and able to do
formatting of documents. If at admission the student lacks this competency,
he/she is expected to gain this competency within the first semester.
Common Regulations
2. Course Load
1. Admission Requirements
i.
The normal class load for full time postgraduate students is between
12 (MA) and 15 (MBA) credit hours per semester. No student will be
permitted to enroll for more than 15 credit hours (exclusive of thesis) of
course work in any semester.
ii.
A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.00
will be required to enroll for fewer credits than normal until his/her
cumulative grade point average rises to the minimum of 3.00.
1. i) Direct Entry:
Entry requirement to the postgraduate shall be possession of an
undergraduate degree from an accredited institution of higher learning, with
a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 (on a 4.00 scale), or a
degree awarded with first class or upper second class honours. Those with
GPA of 2.50 or lower second class honours and Higher National Diploma,
and have relevant experience may be considered if the degree or diploma is
22
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3. Probation and Discontinuation
i.
ii.
Each student working towards the M.A, MBA or MTh degree must
maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00 throughout
his/her programme. He/She must have achieved a final minimum
grade point average of 3.00 in order to graduate. This is also true for
PGDCD and PGDE.
A student is placed on academic probation at the conclusion of any
semester in which his or her cumulative grade point average falls below
3.00.
iii. Action will be initiated by the respective Dean’s office to help the student
on probation to overcome his/her academic problems, and will include
a restriction on total course load permitted in any given semester.
a.
A course receiving an F grade must be repeated in order to receive
credit.
b.
Students will be allowed to repeat failed courses only twice.
c.
Courses which are required but carry no credit are not used in
calculating the grade point average but the grade will be shown on the
transcript.
d.
The grade point average (GPA) for a student is obtained by dividing the
total number of credits attempted into the total number of grade points
obtained. The total grade points is the sum of the product of the course
grade point and the course credit hours.
6. Graduation Requirements
4. Special Students
Only persons who are eligible for admission into particular programmes can
enroll as special students (ie students taking courses but are not admitted
to the programme). Such students will be enrolled for a maximum of one
academic year only. Students who wish to continue beyond this period must
apply for admission into the regular programmes.
5. Student Assessment
i.
Continuous assessment shall be part of each student’s evaluation
throughout the degree programme. Tests, assignments, term papers,
practical work, etc., will be included in the calculation of each student’s
final mark for a given course.
ii.
In addition to the continuous assessment, a final examination shall be
administered at the end of each semester and the marks scored will
be added to the continuous assessment in accordance with the special
regulations for each major or concentration.
iii. For each course the student is given a letter grade, which has the
following significance:
Marks
Letter Grade
Grade Point
91 - 100
A
4.0
Significance
81 - 90
A-
3.7
76 - 80
B+
3.3
Superior
71 - 75
B
3.0
66 - 70
B-
2.7
61 - 65
C+
2.3
56 - 60
C
2.0
Below Average
55 & below
F
0.0
Fail
Average
Each student will satisfy the requirements specified in the departmental special
regulations for his/her degree programme.
7. Class Attendance
It is assumed that students will make the most of the educational opportunities
available to them by regularly and punctually attending all class sessions.
Students who miss more than 25% of class sessions will receive no credit for
the course. If a student must be absent from classes for a very good reason,
he/she must fill absence-from-class forms which are obtained from the office
of Admission and Records. These forms must be filled in triplicate and copies
filed with the lecturer, the HOD and the Dean.
8. Auditing of Courses
A student may audit any course in this catalogue, as long as his/her
presence as an auditor does not displace someone taking the course
for credit. Enrolling for audit permits him/her to attend lectures and to
participate in various class activities, but no academic credit is earned for the
experience. The instructor may mark assignments submitted by the auditor but
is not obligated to do so. For a person to audit a postgraduate course, he/
she must satisfy the requirements
for admission to postgraduate studies and the special pre-requisites of the
course. No student is allowed to audit required course in his/
her programme.
9. Course Numbering
Only courses carrying a number of 600 or above following the subject prefix
(e.g. GRA 611) gain postgraduate credits for the student completing them.
For PhD the number is 800.
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23
10. Adding or Dropping of Courses
a. Students may add or drop courses from their schedules without
financial penalty during the first week of a course that runs for a full
semester.
b. The last day to add a course is the last working day of the second week
after returning students have reported.
c. Such changes are not allowed during the June-August semester except
in cases of emergency approved by the School Board.
11. Withdrawal
a. If a student must, for some personal emergency, withdraw from a course
after the deadline for routine changes has expired, he/she may do so
only as long as two-thirds (2/3) of the course has not passed, but the
student’s transcript will show his/her performance.
Withdrawals will be noted by �WP’ (Withdrawing Passing) or �WF’
(Withdrawing Failing) depending on whether the student was passing or
failing at the time of withdrawal.
b. After 2/3 of the course has passed, the student may not withdraw from
any course, unless there is a pressing personal emergency or illness that
requires it. Then he/she must petition to the School Board to do so.
12.
Transcripts
All grades for course work must be recorded on the student’s transcript and
averaged into the grade point average (except those courses carrying no
credit are not calculated into the cumulative grade point average). If a
student fails a course and retakes the course, the F grade will remain on the
transcript, but the new grade, will be averaged in the grade point average
in place of the old one. A failed course can be retaken only twice.
13. University Examinations
15. Time Limit for Degree Work
Work for the Master of Arts or degree normally must be completed within
five (5) years from the time of admission into the programme. Extensions of
time may be granted by the Senate only for good reason, upon application
through the Dean of respective school. No extensions can be granted
beyond seven (7) years from the beginning of course work
for the degree. A student must be fully registered in the semester he/she
plans to graduate. A fee of one credit equivalent to be paid for continous
registration as they work on thesis.
16. Late Assignments
Each faculty member is asked to state in the course outline his/her policy
concerning acceptance of late assignments in the course. Normally, such
work can be made up only for good reasons (e.g. serious illness, death in the
immediate family, transfer out of job station at time of exam). IN NO CASE
WILL EXAMINATIONS BE GIVEN EARLY. If circumstances warrant, they may
be given late and the student may be charged a grade penalty and/or a late
examination fee.
17. Additional Information
More information on each programme or course is found in the complete
syllabus on file in the office of the Department Head. Core Course for MA
Communication, Christian Ministries, Counselling, Child Development.
BIL 615
Biblical Foundations
2
INS 612
Principles and Processes of Communication and
Culture
3*
GRW 611
Graduate Research & Writing I
2
14. Academic Dishonesty
GRW 613
Graduate Research & Writing II
2
In the event of an alleged examination irregularity, the same shall be reported
to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic Affairs) who will consult with the
Chairman of the Senate and make an appropriate decision. Where the
matter will require investigation, the Senate shall appoint a committee that
shall investigate the alleged irregularity. Any person involved in the alleged
irregularity shall be required to appear before this committee. The Chairman
SUBTOTAL
University examinations shall be conducted at the end of every semester over
course work taught in that semester.
24
of the said committee shall then report the findings and the recommendations
of the committee to the Vice-Chancellor who on behalf of the Senate shall
decide what further action may be necessary. Such action shall be reported
to the Senate at its next meeting for ratification. Such disciplinary action taken
shall be in accordance with the procedures and regulations established by
the Senate.
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9
Students who have obtained an undergraduate degree from
Daystar are not required to take INS 612 and should replace
it with a second optional course from their chosen or another
concentration.
PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAMME
A one-semester programme meant for, high school leavers who
achieved a KCSE grade C (plain) and thus do not have direct
admission to the undergraduate degree programme of Daystar
University.
It is intended to prepare students for admission to the
undergraduate degree programme. The aim is to help students
develop skills, knowledge, understanding and attitudes required
for further education at Daystar University.
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25
Admission Requirements
Financial Information
Students intending to join this programme can begin in August, May or
January in Nairobi and Athi River, Campuses. Applications are due at least
one month before the start date.
The cost of tuition for the programme is Kshs. 66,150 (refer to pg 4)
This is subject to change.
Academic Probation
Benefits of the Pre-University Programme
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Holistic Education – The Pre-university programme at Daystar moulds
students to be good servant-leaders by taking care of the academic,
spiritual, and moral character of its students.
Credit Transfer – Up to five credit-hours are transferred to the
undergraduate programme on admission
Students who have gone through the Pre-university programme
successfully are admitted into the degree programme of their choice in
Daystar University if they meet the departmental requirements.
The Pre-university graduates from Daystar University are also admitted
into other private universities and can also join parallel programmes of
the public universities.
Daystar pre-university graduates are admissible to overseas universities
especially in countries such as USA and Britain.
Admission to the Undergraduate Degree
Programme
On completion of the programme, the student may be admitted to the
undergraduate degree programme if he or she meets the following conditions.
1.
Commerce:
Average GPA of 2.50 for the two math courses
Communication:
Average GPA of 2.50 for the two language courses
2.
26
Obtained an overall (cumulative) GPA of 2.50 or better with the
following additional, minimum requirements:
Received a favourable recommendation from the University Chaplain
regarding spiritual growth and commitment.
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Any student who does not achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.50 at the end
of the semester will not secure admission to the undergraduate degree
programme. However, all students who complete the programme will receive
a certificate of attendance.
A student failing to achieve the required GPA of 2.50 after the semester may
choose to repeat the entire programme or move to Diploma programme if the
GPA is at least 1.80. It is not permitted to repeat individual courses.
Examination
Students are examined in all the courses taken during each semester.
Exemptions and Transfer of Credits
A student who is admitted to the undergraduate degree programme in
Daystar Universityand obtains a grade of C or better in BIO 092 will be
exempted from BIO 111 in the undergraduate degree programme.
Pre-university Course
Undergraduate Degree
Course
BIL-093 Bible Survey
BILL 111 OT Introduction &
Survey
3
BIO-092 Bioscience
BIO 111 Biology
2
TOTAL
Credit Hours
5
Pre-University Curriculum
The Pre-University program is a one semester program with three intakes in
a given year. All the students admitted in the program shall take a maximum
of 17 Credit Hours and must score a minimum GPA of 2.5 to enable them
transit to the undergraduate program. The courses offered in the programme
are listed below:
Course Code
Course Title
MAT-093
Algebra
3
BIL-093
Christian Religious Education
3
BIO-092
Bioscience
2
COM-092
Communication Skills
2
ENG-092
English Grammar
2
LIT-093
English Literature
3
TRI-092
Trigonometry
2
TOTAL
Credit Hours
17
Daystar University provides platforms
where talents are nurtured and minds
challenged to think beyond the ordinary,
where potential is planted and watered
in the fertile ground of education and
grows into transformative exploits.
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27
Course Descriptions
BIL 093Christian Religious Education
3 Credits
Biblical Understanding of self and others, Introduction to the Bible – (how it was
put together and major divisions of the Bible books); basic Bible study tools:
individual and group study; principles of Bible interpretation, principles and
procedures of Bible study.
BIO 092 Bioscience
2 Credits
Relationship between biology and our Christian faith; principles of nutrition;
types of nutrients, balanced diet, diet plans and demands; diet and health;
protein calorie, malnutrition, eating disorders, diabetes; food preservation,
food handling and food storage; human diseases (selected) control, prevention
and treatment; drug resistance by pathogens; types of immunity; vaccines and
their application; role of the immune system in the transplantation; introduction
to human genetics, DNA, RNA, genes, chromosomes; human reproduction;
gamesomeness, prenatal development, pregnancy, infertility, genetic, birth
defects, and introduction to biotechnology.
COM 092 Communication & Study Skills 2 Credits
Introduction to campus life; critical thinking skills; time management; listening
and note taking; understanding text; reading and studying strategies; library
and research skills; the communication process; the research paper; small
group discussion; pubic speaking; test preparation; memory techniques.
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ENG092 English Language 2 Credits
Intensive practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills; focus
on developing writing skills, sentence construction, paragraph development,
grammar composition and comprehension.
LIT093 English Literature 2 Credits
General introduction to literature, Definition of literature, Escapist and
Interpretative literature, Aesthetic and cognitive approaches to literature,
Characteristics of the genres and subgenres of literature (poetry, prose and
drama), Critical analysis of set texts: selected poems, The impact of literature on
different aspects of life e.g. conflict, love, human suffering, racism and gender
issues, Focus on the language of literature (style and stylistic devices).
MAT 093 Algebra
3 Credits
Basic Algebra, Factorization, Algebraic fractions, Linear Equations, Formulae,
Simultaneous Equations, Inequalities’, Quadratic equations
TRI092 Trigonometry 2 Credits
Trigonometric ratios: angle measurement, definition of trigonometric ratios
(sine, cosine, tangent), basic identities, special angles of ; applications: right
triangles, bearings; unit circle: trigonometric functions; sine rule, cosine rule.
SCHOOL OF ARTS & HUMANITIES
Introduction
The school of Arts and Humanities seeks to promote academic excellence and holistic transformation for the development of humanity and society. It fosters
critical thinking, transformative learning, research and creativity through relevant academic programs in a collegial environment. It comprises; the Department
of Theology and Biblical Studies, Education and Peace & International Studies.
Department of Theology & Biblical Studies
Undergraduate Programme
• Bachelor of Education in
- Biblical and Religious Studies
• Bachelor of Theology (B.Th.)
Postgraduate Programme
• Master of Arts in Christian Ministries
• Master of Theology in African Christianity
Department of Peace & International Studies
• Bachelor of Arts in
- Peace and Conflict Transformation
Department of Education
• Bachelor of Education in
– French
– English, Language & Literature
– Business Studies
– Kiswahili
– Computer Science
– Mathematics
– Physics Music
– Christian Religious Education
– Kiswahili
– Early Childhood Development:
Regular & School Based
Programme
Postgraduate Programme
• Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE)
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29
DEPARTMENT OF THEOLOGY & BIBLICAL STUDIES
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
Bachelor of Arts in Biblical &
Religious Studies
The growing number of of Christians in Africa has out paced the leadership
capacity in Churches and Christian Organizations. The Bible major exists to
meet that need by providing training, primarily in biblical studies, for those
involved in Christian ministry, for those preparing for further training at the
masters level, for those preparing to teach Christian Religious Education in
secondary schools, and for those preparing for work outside of professional
Christian ministry but who desire a firm biblical background. The programme
also requires studies in church history, world religions, and ethics so that
students may think intelligently about their faith in the context of its history,
the religious world around it, and its application to contemporary issues.
Specifically, the goals of the major are:
c. Marks for CHM 507 Christian Ministries Practicum and Senior Project
will be derived 60% from written assignments related to the project/
practicum and 40% from final assessment by an on-site supervisor
approved by the Department and the student’s teaching staff advisor at
the University.
Requirements for Graduation
A Biblical and Religious Studies major student must complete 48 credit
hours within the major. These hours (in addition to required credits in general
education, the minor and general electives) must be completed according to
the following schedule:
Credit Hours
General Education
51
30
1.
To equip students for involvement in full-time Christian ministry.
Bible courses: Required Courses
2.
To give students, who plan to work with non-Christian organizations,
a strong biblical background.
Bible Electives
To enable students to supplement other majors with a strong biblical
studies background.
Free Electives
12-8
TOTAL
129
3.
4.
To prepare students for further study in seminary or other types of
graduate schools. This degree may serve as a terminal programme.
5.
To prepare students to teach Christian Religious Education in
secondary schools.
Minor
18
18-22
*Bible Electives may be taken from any of the minors in the Department to fulfill
the requirements for graduation.
Bible Major Requirements
Admission Requirements
The department has no special requirements for entry other than the
University’s common entry requirements.
Student Assessment
a. Final marks for all courses in this department, except Senior Paper/
Project, Independent Study, and CHM 507 Christian Ministries
Practicum, will be derived 70% from marks on the final exam and 30%
from marks on continuous assessment items.
b. Marks for Senior Paper & Independent Study will be derived 90% from
the final exam/paper and 10% from continuous assessment items.
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www.daystar.ac.ke
Required Courses (30)
Credit Hours
BIL 332 Major Hebrew Prophets
3
BIL 342 Synoptic Gospels
3
BIL 432 Pentateuch
3
BIL 443 Romans
3
BIL 597 Senior Paper/Project
3
ETH 201 Introduction to Ethics
3
RET 231 Comparative World Religions
3
RET 333 History of Christianity upto 1500 C.E.
3
RET 334 History of Christianity from 1500 C.E.
3
COM 223 Public Speaking
3
Minor in Bible
Nine (9) Credit Hours from the following:
BIL 213 Wisdom Literature
3
BIL 216 General Epistles
3
BIL 217 Apocalyptic Literature
3
BIL 312 Hermeneutics
3
BIL 340 Gospel of John
3
BIL 408 Topics in Biblical Studies
3
GRE 341 Introduction to New Testament Greek
3
GRE 342 New Testament Greek
3
GRE 441 New Testament Greek Exegesis
3
Nine (9) Credit Hours from departmental offerings of courses not used to fulfill
the above requirements. In addition to those courses listed in the preceeding
section the following may also be used to fulfill this requirement:
BIL 496 Independent Study in Biblical Studies
3
CHM 325 Christian Social Ethics
3
ETH 408 Topics in Christian Ethics
3
ETH 496 Independent Study in Ethics
3
RET 317 History of Christian Expansion
3
RET 408 Topics in Religious Thought
3
RET 496 Independent Study in Religious Thought
3
A student majoring in Bible must have a minor course of study in a different
study area.
Bible Courses for Students in Education
BIL 312 Hermeneutics
3
BIL 332 Hebrew Projects
3
BIL 342 Synoptic Gospels
3
BIL 432 Pentateuch
3
BIL 443 Romans
3
RET 231 Comparative World Religions
3
RET 333 History of Christianity up to 1500
3
RET 334 History of Christianity After 1500
3
ETH 201 Introduction to Ethics
3
CHM 325 Christian Social Ethics
3
Rationale
The Bible minor exists to provide introductory training, primarily in Biblical
studies, for those involved in Christian ministry and for those preparing for
work outside of professional Christian ministry but who desire a firm biblical
background. Courses in BIL make up the core of the minor, but students may
take other courses in the department in order to fulfill the elective requirements.
Admission and Student Assessment
Regulations for Admission and Student Assessment are the same as those for
the Bible major.
Bible Minor Requirements for Graduation
A Bible minor student must complete 18 credit hours determined in the
following manner:
Required Courses
Elective Courses
TOTAL
Required Courses
12
6
18
Credit Hours
BIL 332 Hebrew Prophets
3
BIL 342 Synoptic Gospels
3
BIL 432 Pentateuch
3
BIL 443 Romans
TOTAL
3
12
The remaining 6 credit hours will be filled from either BIL, RET, ETH courses
offered by the department OR CHM 325.
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31
Christian Ministries Minor
BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY
Rationale
The Christian Ministries minor seeks to provide students with an introductory
understanding of the ministry needs and opportunities confronting the church
today. In addition, the programme provides opportunity for assessment of
individual gifts and abilities for ministry as well as introductory training for lay
ministry in the church.
Pastors in the 21st century need specialized training in order to be equipped
to minister in the contemporary African context because African societies
have experienced, and continue to experience, dramatic changes for which
pastors need to be prepared. These include, without being limited to:
1. The influence of urbanization.
Admission and Student Assessment
2.
The more educated and modernized church member.
Regulations for Admission and Student Assessment are the same as those for
the Bible major.
3.
The false teaching and doctrinal heresies propagated in some churches.
4.
The new phenomena of mega churches and their unique needs.
Requirements for Graduation
5.
The social political and social economic challenges that face Christians
today.
A Christian Ministries minor must complete 19 credit hours determined in the
following manner:
Required courses
Elective courses
TOTAL
Required Courses
10
9
19
Credit Hours
CHM 221 Introduction to Christian Ministries
4
CHM 323 Evangelism and Church Growth
3
CHM 324 Discipleship and Group Bible Study
Methods
3
TOTAL
Electives
32
Rationale
10
Credit Hours
CHM 222 Management in Christian Organizations
3
CHM 223 Introduction to Counselling
3
CHM 321 Theology of Missions
3
CHM 322 Worship in Africa
3
CHM 325 Christian Social Ethics
3
CHM 326 Homiletics
3
CHM 334 Curriculum Design and Instruction
3
CHM 408 Topics in Christian Ministry
3
CHM 411 Church Music
3
CHM 422 Christian Ministry in the Urban Setting
3
CHM 507 Practicum in Christian Ministries
3
www.daystar.ac.ke
There are more Christians and churches in Africa than ever before. The
existing churches are growing even larger in terms of membership. Yet many
of the pastors are not adequately trained to address such changes.
The Bachelor of Theology degree programme at Daystar University will
provide the specialized training needed for those preparing for pastoral
ministry for church related work (chaplains, counsellors, youth pastors), to be
scholars / theologians or for those preparing for further training in pastoral
ministry for example Master of Divinity degree.
Daystar University’s B.Th. Programme will be different from those of other
institutions that offer the same degree because the liberal arts programme
will provide students with a broad-based knowledge of the world around
them through the required General Education courses. The training will be
practical and interdenominational because most of the faculty in the Biblical &
Religious Studies department are either pastors or leaders in a variety of local
churches. The programme will also be unique because of the institution’s
accreditation status and because the programme is designed to train, not just
pastors, but also scholars / theologians.
As society moves into the post-modern age, Christianity in Africa is leading
the way in preserving the spiritual dimension of the human being, which
the North has nearly lost to the age of science and reason. God is still
very much alive in Africa. Most Christians in Africa believe the Bible is the
authoritative Word of God, respect it and follow it. In the last 100 years
the church has grown faster in Africa than anywhere else in the world. As
a consequence, the shift of the centre of gravity of Christianity seems to be
moving from North to South.
African theologians are now faced with the monumental task of carrying
the theological mantle and have only just begun to scratch the surface
in discovering their deep theological and philosophical roots. Trained
theologians are needed now, more than ever before, to fulfil this urgent
mission.
The B.Th. programme will contain a solid core of required courses in both
academic and professional subjects, as well as an internship supervised by a
full time pastor.
Admission Requirements
Applicants seeking admission into the programme must satisfy the following:
• be born-again Christians
Student Assessment Policy
Students will be assessed through continuous assessment tests accounting for
30% of the final grade. Students will take an End-of-Semester Examination
accounting for 70% of the final grade. Students will participate in field trips
and be required to write reflection papers whose grade will be in-built in the
continuous assessment tests (30%).
Students will also be required to undertake a supervised internship whose
grading will consist of 60% awarded for a written report and 40% for field
evaluation. Alternatively, a student may write a senior project paper and
submit three bound copies to be distributed as follows:
1. to the University Library,
2.
to the host department and;
3.
to the student respectively.
Requirements for Graduation
To graduate with a Bachelor of Theology a student must meet the following:
Credit Hour combinations
Hours
General Education Required Courses
34 Hours
Bachelor of Theology Required Courses
90 Hours
Electives in Bachelor of Theology
9 Hours
TOTAL
133 Hours
General Education Course Requirements
Course Code/ Course Title
Hours
Either ART 111, LIT 111 or MUS 111
Art in Africa or Music in Africa or Appreciation of
Literature
2
Direct entrants:
Be a holder of Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) with a minimum aggregate of C+ (Plus) or its equivalent Examination
Certificate. In addition, a prospective applicant must have obtained a
B-(minus) in either History or Christian Religious Education (CRE) in the
Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education or its Equivalent Examination
Certificate.
ACS 101 Basic Computer Knowledge
2
ACC 111 Financial Accounting
3
ENG 111 Advanced Reading
3
ENV 111 Environmental Science
2
ENG 112 Advanced Writing
3
HPE 113 Health and Physical Fitness
1
Mature entrants:
Must be 23 years of age on the 1st of January of the year in which admission is sought.
INS 111 Communication and Culture 1
3
INS 112 Communication and Culture 2
3
INS 212 African Societies and Traditional Religion
2
INS 313 Historical Foundations of the Modern World
3
INS 412 Development of Modern Africa and Christian
Values
3
PHL111 Introduction to Philosophy
3
POL 111 Introduction to Political Science
1
Total
46
•
be proficient in the English language, and
•
satisfy any of the following minimum requirements:
Graduates of Daystar
Diploma or Pre-University programme who have attained a GPA of 2.50 in a scale of 4.0
www.daystar.ac.ke
33
Electives (students to choose any 3 courses)
Bachelor of Theology Required Courses
Required Courses
Credit Hours
GRE 441 New Testament Greek Exegesis
3
BIL 213 Wisdom Literature
3
BIL 216 General Epistles
3
BIL 217 Apocalyptic Literature
3
BIL 340 Gospel of John
3
CHM 221 Introduction to Christian Ministries
3
CHM 321 Theology of Missions
3
CHM 324 Discipleship and Group Bible Study Methods
3
CHM 325 Christian Social Ethics
3
CHM 422 Christian Ministry in the Urban Setting
3
COM 223 Public Speaking
3
BIL 111 O.T Introduction and Survey
3
BIL 112 N.T Introduction and Survey
3
BIL 212 Introduction to Bible Doctrines
2
BIL 312 Hermeneutics
3
BIL 332 Hebrew Prophets
3
BIL 342 Synoptic Gospels
3
BIL 432 Pentateuch
3
BIL 443 Romans
3
CHM 223 Introduction to Counseling
3
CHM 322 Worship in Africa
3
CHM 326 Homiletics
3
CHM 327 Evangelism and Discipleship
3
CHM 328 Church Administration
3
CHM 432 Theology and Development
3
ETH 201 Introduction to Ethics
3
RET 221 Introduction to Pastoral Ministry
3
RET 231 Comparative World Religions
3
RET 240 Introduction to African Philosophy & Religion
3
RET 320 Christianity and Islam in Africa
2
ACS 101
2
POL 111
1
RET 321 Studying Theology in the African context
2
INS 111
3
BIL 112
3
RET 332 Research Methods in Theology
2
BIL 111
3
INS 112
3
RET 333 History of Christianity up to 1500 C.E
3
ACC 111
3
ENV 111
2
RET 334 History of Christianity from 1500 C.E
3
ENG 098 OR 111
3
ENG 112
3
RET 335 African Philosophy and Religion
3
ETH 201
3
3
ART 111 OR MUS
111 OR LIT 111
2
RET 409 Denominational History, Doctrine and Policy
RET 421 God and his Kingdom (Systematic Theology 1)
3
MAT 102
RET 422 Christ and Redemption (Systematic Theology 2)
3
TOTAL
RET 423 Holy Spirit and the Church (Systematic
Theology 3)
3
RET 507 Practicum in Christian Ministries (Internship)
4
GRE 341 Introduction to N.T Greek
3
INS 212
2
CHM 223
3
GRE 342 New Testament Greek
3
RET 221
3
BIL 213
3
Total
90
In addition to the course requirements and credit hour combination a student
in Bachelor of Theology shall be required to choose between writing a Senior
Project accounting for 3 hours and in accordance with Daystar requirements
for senior projects or to undergo a two-and-half month internship between the
months of May and August during their third year of study.
1st Year
First Semester
www.daystar.ac.ke
2
18
Second Semester
Hours
HPE 113
TOTAL
16
2nd Year
First Semester
Hours
Second Semester
Hours
CHM 221
3
BIL 312
3
BIL 212
2
RET 320
2
RET 231
3
CHM 322
3
RET 240
3
RET 321
2
TOTAL
34
Hours
16
TOTAL
16
Courses
General Education Courses
Credits
BIL 408 Topics in Biblical Studies
3
BIL 433 Biblical Theology of the Old Testament or
BIL 434 Biblical Theology of the New Testament
3
ENG 098 Basic English or ENG 111 Advanced Reading
3
BIL 520 Senior Paper
2
ICA 100 Study Skills
1
CHM 223 Introduction to Counselling
3
MAT 102 Basic Maths or MAT 111 Mathematics
3
CHM 322 Worship in Africa
3
ACS 111 Introduction to Programming
2
CHM 325 Christian Social Ethics
3
ART 111 Art in Africa or MUS 111 Music in Africa
3
CHM 326 Homiletics
3
BIO 111 Biology
2
CHM 327 Evangelism and Discipleship
3
BIL 111 Old Testament Introduction and Survey
3
CHM 328 Church Administration
3
ENV 111 Environmental Science
2
CHM 423n Applied Theology in the Local Community
3
INS 111 Communication and Culture I
3
CHM 432 The Church and Holistic Development
3
PHL 111 Introduction to Philosophy
3
ETH 201 Introduction to Ethics
3
POL 111 Introduction to Political Science
1
RET 221 Introduction to Pastoral Ministry
3
BIL 112 New Testament Introduction and Survey
3
RET 231 Comparative World Religions
3
ENG 112 Advanced Writing or
ENG 111 Advanced Reading
1
RET 240 Introduction to African Philosophy and Religion
3
RET 332 Research Methods in Theology
3
INS 112 Communication and Culture II
3
RET 333 History of Christianity up to 1500 C.E.
3
PHY 112 Physical Science
2
RET 334 History of Christianity from 1500 C.E.
3
HPE 113 Health and Physical Fitness
1
RET 408 Special Topics: Denominational History, Doctrine
and Polity
3
INS 212 African Traditional Societies
2
RET 421 God and His Kingdom (Systematic Theology I)
3
INS 313 Historical Foundations of the Modern World
3
RET 422 Christ and Redemption (Systematic Theology II)
3
RET 320 Christianity and Islam in Africa
2
RET 423 Holy Spirit and the Church (Systematic Theology III)
3
RET 321 Studying Theology in the African Context
2
RET 432 African Christian Theology and Theologians
3
INS 412 Development of Modern Africa & Christian Values
3
RET 507 Pastoral Internship
BIL 212 Introduction to Bible Doctrine 2
Total
52
Required Courses
Total
4
86
Requirements for Graduation
English Bible Emphasis
New Testament Greek Emphasis
BIL 332 Hebrew Prophets
GRE 341 Introduction to
N. T. Greek
3
BIL 342 Synoptic Gospels
GRE 342 New Testament
Greek
3
BIL 432 Pentateuch
GRE 441 N. T. Greek
Exegesis
3
BIL 443 Romans
BIL 332 Hebrew Prophets or
BIL 432 Pentateuch
3
BIL 222 History of Biblical Interpretation
3
BIL 312 Hermeneutics
3
A Bachelor of Theology degree student must complete 98 hours within the
programme. These hours (in addition to required credits in General Education
and general electives) must be completed according to the following schedule.
General Education
52
B. Th. Required Courses
Courses
82
Electives
8
Research Methods
4
TOTAL
146
www.daystar.ac.ke
35
Course Descriptions
BIL 222 HISTORY OF BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION
3 Credits
Interpretation of the Old and New Testaments within the Old Testament itself, in
the writings of early Judaism, in the New Testament and throughout the history
of the Church; The historical and philosophical context that gave rise to the
historical-critical method, recent criticisms of that approach, current methods of
interpretation including those emerging from non-Western contexts.
BIL 312 HERMENEUTICS
3 Credits
History of hermeneutics from ancient Judaism; beginnings of Targum (Nehemiah),
Rabbinic Judaism: Halaka, Harrgadah, Mishnah, Talmad; Hellenistic Judaism;
Philo, Allegory; Qumran Community; Hermeneutical principles used by New
Testament writers; Jesus as literal fulfilment of Old Testament, typology, literalcontextual, principle-application; Patristic period; Apostolic fathers, Alexandria
vs. Antioch, Church Councils, Vulgate; Middle Ages, four-level allegory,
authority of tradition; rise of Scholasticism; Reformation; Sola Scriptura,
appeal to original languages, rejection of allegory; Post-Reformation: Pietism,
Rationalism; Modern period: source criticism; Pietism into Missions, history
of religions/archaeology, Form Criticism, Bultmann (Quest for the historical
Jesus, Demythologizing Bible), Barth (Neo-orthodoxy), Biblical Theology
Movement, redaction criticism, Jesus Seminar. Contemporary Hermeneutics:
genres of biblical literature: OT narrative, law, prophets, poetry/wisdom,
epistles, gospels, parables, apocalyptic; semantics; exegesis (then and there);
historical/cultural context, literary context, reader’s context; hermeneutics
in narrow sense (here and now); contemporary issues: contextualization in
general and in Africa; liberation, cultural and feminist hermeneutics.
BIL 332 MAJOR HEBREW PROPHETS
3 Credits
The history of Israel and the Ancient Near East during the prophetic period with
specific attention to important individuals and events relevant for understanding
individual prophets; The various theories regarding the origin, function, selfunderstanding of prophecy in ancient Israel as well as its cessation in the
post-exilic period; The various forms of prophetic speech and their possible
functions within Israel; Methodology for interpreting prophetic literature; The
overall structure and content, especially theological themes, of each book
chosen for study.
BIL 342 SYNOPTIC GOSPELS
3 Credits
Principles of exegesis for epistolary literature applied to the content of selected
passages from the synoptics will comprise the major content of the course;
The content of this course will also include: the source (Quelle), the Historical
criticism, form criticism (Formsgeshichte) and literary criticism. Passages will
comprise the narrative, apocalyptic, parables, and didactic material; The
historical and ideological setting in which Jesus’ life and ministry takes place
and from which early Christianity (and its gospel writing) emerges; The history of
interpretation of the synoptics and the life of Jesus including major methodologies
and assumptions which guided these interpretations, major theological themes
(especially the Kingdom of God), important structural features, and distinctives
of each gospel, The relevance of the synoptic gospels’ witness to Jesus Christ
for contemporary issues.
36
www.daystar.ac.ke
BIL 408 TOPICS IN BIBLICAL STUDIES
3 Credits
Course content will be defined for each offering of the course as is appropriate
for the subject matter covered. Pre-requisite: Three credits of BIL at 300 levels.
BIL 432 PENTATEUCH
3 Credits
The Pentateuch as the foundation for understanding the rest of the Bible;
Exegetical work in each of the books of the Pentateuch; The details of the
content, structure, and purpose of each book; Major biblical themes found
in these writings; The significance and application of these books for today.
Prerequisite: Three credits in Old Testament at 300 levels.
BIL 443 ROMANS
3 Credits
Principles of exegesis for epistolary literature applied to the content of Romans
will comprise the major content of the course; Major epistolary features of
first century Greco-Roman letters reflected in Romans and their significance for
determining the letter’s purpose. Common Greco-Roman rhetorical methods
found in Romans and their significance for interpreting selected passages in the
book; Major scholarly proposals regarding the letter’s purpose and structure;
Major theological themes found in the letter; Major features of first century
Judaism which shape the ideological context of Paul and the early Christian
movement. Prerequisite: Three credits in New Testament at 300 level.
BIL 520 SENIOR PAPER
2 Credits
This course addresses relevant theological issues facing church leaders today
in the African context. Conducted in a seminar format, students will present
a minimum of three papers. At least two papers will examine contemporary
issues in African theology and the church utilizing skills and knowledge
gained through previous study in the programme. These papers will include
a description of the issue, analysis of its key components, and proposal for
practical Christian response. The final paper will consist of a personal theology
of ministry. Students will also be assigned to respond to papers presented. The
lecturer will act as the facilitator.
CHM 223 INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING
3 Credits
Basic concepts in the theology of man, including creation in God’s image,
the Fall and its consequences, redemption, and Christian maturity; Theories
of personality development; Evaluation of theories of personality development
from Scripture; Crabb’s model of counselling - cultural adaptation and
application; Counselling issues in the local church, including substance abuse,
depression, stress and burnout, polygamy, marital problems, demonization
and family issues; Practice counselling in dyads and triads with discussion;
Support systems available locally for referral; Counselling ethics, including
confidentiality, privileged information, transference, contracts, and the Mental
Health Act 1989.
CHM 325 CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS
3 Credits
Definition of Christian social ethics; The Christian, Biblical worldview; The
principle of transformation; professional ethics (e.g., medical practice, legal
system, journalism, business, etc.); women’s rights: female circumcision, wife
inheritance, polygamy, monogamy; marriage and family: family planning,
human sexuality; rites of passage; AIDS; corruption; crime; democracy; church
and state relations; electioneering; civil education; civil resistance; witchcraft;
war: peace, reconciliation, refugees; urbanization and street children.
Pre-requisite: ETH 201.
CHM 326 HOMILETICS
3 Credits
A theology of preaching; Preaching in the Bible, preaching in the history of the
church, preaching in the modern world; The role of preaching in the weekly
life of the Christian leader, Basic speech principles; vocal processes, volume,
grammar, figures of speech, sermon length, gestures, audience; methods of
presentation; Manuscript, memorization, impromptu, extemporaneous, outline,
without notes; Mechanics of preparation; importance of preparation, sources
for materials/ideas, planning, methods, files, illustrations, choosing a text,
pre-testing; Types of sermons; topical, topical textual, textual expository;
Components of a sermon; Introduction, body, illustrations, application;
conclusion; Contexts of a sermon: pastoral, didactic, evangelistic.
CHM 327 EVANGELISM AND DISCIPLESHIP
3 Credits
Definition of evangelism; Biblical basis for evangelism; methods and types of
evangelism, including mass, person-to-person, friendship, life-style, community,
etc; principles of effective evangelism; definition of disciple and discipleship;
contextualized discipleship methods applicable to the African context
(discipleship patterns of Jesus and the early church); principles and methods of
effective discipleship; design of an effective discipleship program for a local
church.
CHM 328 CHURCH ADMINISTRATION
3 Credits
The church as an organization: it’s uniqueness, theological basis for ministry;
personnel management: purpose, call to ministry, personal spiritual formation,
responsibility to ministry, time management; leadership: approaches and
theories to leadership, leadership styles, essential qualities of leadership,
the art of delegation; conflict management; the risks of leadership; church
management: church projects, planning, implementation, monitoring,
evaluation, goal setting, action plans, group planning techniques, planning
tools; personnel management: concepts of personnel management, job
analysis; financial management: book-keeping, report / proposal writing,
budgeting, fundraising, stewardship.
CHM 423 APPLIED THEOLOGY IN THE LOCAL COMMUNITY
3 Credits
The movements, trends and leaders of contemporary Christianity in Africa,
the needs within the society with special focus on urban communities.
Anthropological and sociological insights and tools for research are explored.
ETH 201 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
3 Credits
The course will cover various theories of ethics; religious ethical systems:
Hindu ethics, Islamic ethics, Buddhist ethics; philosophers of the classical
period: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicureans, Stoics; patristic and medieval
period of Christianity: early church, Augustine, Aquinas; modern period: British
hedonism, intuitionism, natural law, the categorical imperative, utilitarianism,
relativism; Christian ethics: Decalogue, Christ and the law, the new covenant,
the Sermon on the Mount, Christian liberty and the law of love.
GRE 341 INTRODUCTION TO NEW TESTAMENT GREEK
3 Credits
The course will cover basic introductory elements of New Testament Greek
including alphabet; present and imperfect tenses of regular and -ew eimi
verbs, including the verb eimi; noun cases; first and second noun declensions;
the definite article; the use of the adjectives and demonstratives; and basic
vocabulary.
GRE 342 NEW TESTAMENT GREEK
3 Credits
The present and imperfect middle and passive verbs, the present imperative
and infinitive, the uses of the infinitive, the future active, the future and aorist of
liquid verbs, and the active the middle first and second aorist; The relationship
of noun case and time, third declension nouns, and the use of prepositions with
specific cases; The relative, personal, reflexive, possessive, interrogative, and
indefinite pronouns; In addition, The uses of the conjunction/particle oti, and
the use of the verbs dunamai and ginomai; Basic vocabulary. Prerequisite:
GRE 341.
GRE 441 NEW TESTAMENT GREEK EXEGESIS
3 Credits
Adjectives and pronouns of the first and third declensions, comparative
adjectives, the formation of adverbs, the perfect and pluperfect tenses, aorist
and future passives, participles, the genitive absolute, the subjunctive mood,
and types of conditional sentences; Sight reading and prepared reading of
selected passages in the Greek New Testament; Basic tools of Greek exegesis;
Basic principles of exegesis including: the need for the principles of textual
criticism, diagramming sentences, principles of word study, and grammatical
study. Prerequisites: GRE 341 and GRE 342.
RET 221 INTRODUCTION TO PASTORAL MINISTRY
3 Credits
The theology of pastoral ministry; The pastor and spiritual life; Principles and
practices of pastoral administration; Spiritual gifts in the ministry; Mission of
the church; Goal-setting and planning; Leadership development: equipping
the lay people for ministry and mission; Worship: planning and leadership,
stewardship; The dynamics of small groups, compassion ministries of the
church; Music styles, Other practical matters of ministry (e.g., hospital and
home visits, naming ceremonies, fund raising functions, weddings, funerals).
RET 231 COMPARATIVE WORLD RELIGIONS
3 Credits
Definition of religion; The variety of religions and their followers in Africa; The
concept of God in various religious view-points; Basic beliefs of various religions
compared; Basic beliefs of various religions contrasted; Basic practices of
various religions contrasted; How to approach the study of religion; A Christian
perspective on other world religions; The effects science and secularism have
on world religions.
RET 240 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN 3 Credits
PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION
Introduction to African philosophy and religion shall include such themes
as contents of African philosophy; various types of African philosophy; the
development of African philosophy and religion; pre-colonial, colonial and
post-colonial; various tools of doing African philosophy; African philosophy
of religion; African socio-political thought systems; the problem of evil and
suffering.
RET 332 RESEARCH METHODS IN THEOLOGY
3 Credits
The course will include various research methods i.e. data collection, sampling,
hypothesis formation, data analysis and research report writing. Pre-requisites:
INS 112 and Eng 112.
RET 333 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY UP TO 1500 C.E.
3 Credits
Introduction to the study of Church History: what is Church history, major
schools of interpretation, why study Church History, the organization of the
www.daystar.ac.ke
37
study of Church History; Background to the Church: political, economic,
religious, Social; The five crises of the early church: leadership, the Gentile
question, heresy, persecutions, organization; Persecutions to 313; The Church
in Egypt and North Africa; Apologists, Church Fathers; Monasticism and the
papacy; Heresy: its rise, consequences and effects on the church; ChurchState relations: Church and Empire, Constantine, Byzantine Emperors, Goths;
Christian missions and the Crusades; The Medieval Church.
RET 334 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY FROM 1500 C.E.
3 Credits
Introduction to the study of Church History; What is Church History, major
schools of interpretation, Why study Church History, the organization of the
study of Church History; Backgrounds to the Reformation; The Medieval Church:
ripe for reform; The Reformation: Issues and thinkers; The Reformation: social
and political events and institutions; The Reformation and Christian mission; The
Counter Reformation; The Church and the new world; Revivals of the 18th and
19th centuries; The Church and Rationalism; The Church and colonialism; The
Church in nationalist Africa. Prerequisite: RET 333.
RET 408 SPECIAL TOPICS IN DENOMINATIONAL HISTORY,
3 Credits
DOCTRINE AND POLITY
Exploration of the rich heritage of the student’s own church denomination.
Visiting denominational leaders will supply the appropriate course descriptions.
Although topics offered under this course number will vary depending on
student need, topics will include, without being limited to, the following:
a. Anglican (ACK) Church history, doctrine and polity.
b. Presbyterian (PCEA) Church history, doctrine and polity.
c. Baptist Church history, doctrine and polity.
d. Methodist Church history, doctrine and polity.
e. Lutheran Church history, doctrine and polity.
f. Mennonite Church history, doctrine and polity.
g. African Inland Church (AIC) history, doctrine and polity.
h. Assemblies of God (PAG / KAG) Church history, doctrine and polity.
i. Redeemed Gospel Church history, doctrine and polity.
j. Deliverance Church history, doctrine and polity.
RET 421 GOD AND HIS KINGDOM
3 Credits
(SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY I)
Old Testament understanding of the Kingdom of God; The Kingdom agenda;
Jesus and the Kingdom; Kingdom ethics; The role of the Church in the Kingdom;
The present and future realities of the Kingdom; The parables of the Kingdom;
The millennial reign of Christ. Prerequisites: RET 318 and RET 319.
RET 422 CHRIST AND REDEMPTION 3 Credits
(SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY II)
The origin of humanity, sin and nature of sin; The person and work of Christ
as the Redeemer of fallen humanity, his birth, incarnation, two natures, death,
resurrection and exaltation; Atonement and related theories; Grace and
salvation, election, regeneration, conversion, faith, justification, sanctification
and glorification; Building a Christian world view appropriate to the
contemporary context. Prerequisites: RET 318 and RET 319.
RET423 HOLY SPIRIT AND THE CHURCH 38
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3 Credits
(SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY III)
The person and work of the Holy Spirit; The Holy Spirit and mission of the
church; The Holy Spirit in the first 20 centuries since Pentecost; The role
of the Holy Spirit in the various revivals (e.g. The East African revival, the
Great Awakening of America 18th C.); The role of the Holy Spirit in spiritual
disciplines (e.g. prayer, fasting); The Holy Spirit and his gifts to the Church; The
Holy Spirit and the ministry of deliverance; The 20th - 21st Century Pentecostal
movements; Cultic deviations and erroneous teachings about the Holy Spirit.
Prerequisites: RET 318 and RET 319.
RET 507 PASTORAL INTERNSHIP
3 Credits
To be taken during third year; The student will participate in the usual pastoral
responsibilities in a church: conducting church services, administration,
preaching, visiting, teaching, etc.; Visitation of the site: supervisor will visit the
student’s internship site (church) from time to time for the purpose of observation
and meeting with the on-site supervisor (pastor). At the end of the term the
student will submit a summary term paper of 35 pages which should encompass
an overview of the internship experience as well as a weaving in of selected
readings. The paper should focus on the consistencies between theory and
practice. Prerequisites: CHM 223, CHM 326 and CHM 423.
Course Descriptions of Elective Courses
BIL 213 WISDOM LITERATURE
3 Credits
General introduction and definitions of major terms and concepts for the study
of Wisdom Literature; The authorship, historical background, content, purpose,
of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, Ecclesiastes, and Lamentations;
Characteristics of Hebrew poetry; The history of interpretation of this literature,
including its setting and function in ancient Israel; Principles for interpreting this
literature, including application principles for each of the books studied.
BIL 216 GENERAL EPISTLES
3 Credits
For each letter studied, the course will cover the following material: Principles
of exegesis for epistolary literature applied to the contents of the letter will
comprise the major content of the course; Major Greco-Roman epistolary and
rhetorical features reflected in the letter and their significance for determining a
letter’s purpose and message; Major scholarly proposals regarding the purpose
and structure of each letter, and an evaluation of each; Major features of first
century Judaism which shape the ideological context of both the writers of
the letter and the early church, and the influence of this context on the key
theological themes in the letter.
BIL 217 APOCALYPIC LITERATURE
3 Credits
Principles of exegesis for apocalyptic literature and their application to the
content of such literature found in the Bible will comprise the major content
of the course; Scholarly discussion of: the origin, rise, and demise of
apocalyptic literature; The definition of apocalypse, apocalyptic eschatology,
and apocalyptic imagery; Possible social settings, functions, and purposes of
apocalyptic literature; The historical setting, major themes, purpose and function
of the biblical apocalyptic writings; The history of the interpretation of biblical
apocalyptic writings, with particular emphasis on contemporary interpretations
and an evaluation of the same.
BIL 280 WAR AND PEACE IN THE BIBLE
3 Credits
An historical survey of the biblical themes of war, “shalom”/peace, servanthood,
love of the enemy, justice, righteousness; Old Testament language and thought
about war and shalom; The underlying theology of Israel’s war stories; War
stories as confessions of faith in Yahweh and Yahweh’s universal rule; Jesus’
teaching on non-existence; The relationship between shalom of the Old
Testament and peace of the New Testament.
BIL 340 GOSPEL OF JOHN
3 Credits
Principles of exegesis applied to the content of the Gospel of John will comprise
the majority of the content of the course; The history of interpretation of the
Fourth Gospel, including various interpretative methodologies and proposals
for the historical/ideological setting of its origin; Major themes and structural
features in the gospel; The comparison of John with the Synoptic Gospels;
Application of the message of the Fourth Gospel to contemporary life.
BIL 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN THE BIBLE
3 Credits
The content for each study will vary depending upon the topics chosen. A
student must have written approval from the Department in order to enrol.
CHM 221 INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
3 Credits
The biblical foundations for the manifestation and ministry of the church;
The scope of Christian education (its definition and objectives); The biblical
basis for Christian education; The historical development of Christian
education; The theological and philosophical bases of Christian education;
The psychological bases of Christian education; The sociological bases of
Christian education; Principles of curriculum development; Methods and media
in Christian education; Christian education of children, youth and adults; The
organizational structure of Christian education; Educational administration and
supervision; Professional church leadership in Christian education; Teacher and
leadership training; Problems in the educational ministry of the African church;
Contemporary perspectives in Christian education; Para-church vocations in
Christian education.
CHM 321 THEOLOGY OF MISSIONS
3 Credits
O.T. Theology of missions; N.T. Theology of missions; Theologies of missions
as practiced in church history; Contemporary theologies of missions; Theology
of missions as primarily “evangelism”; Theology of missions as primarily
“fulfilment”; Theology of missions as “mutual assistance of local churches”; A
theology of mission for African churches reaching to other churches.
CHM 324 CURRICULUM DESIGN AND INSTRUCTION
3 Credits
Definition of curriculum, curriculum design, goals, objectives and related
concepts; Aims of church education; Schools of philosophical thought;
Psychological bases for curriculum decisions; Domains of learning; Organizing
subject content; Lesson planning; Selecting learning experiences; Assessment
and evaluation; Curriculum unit development.
CHM 411 CHURCH MUSIC
3 Credits
Introduction to course, logical fallacies, the infinite variety of music, meaning
in music; Philosophies of music ministry, foundations in worship, textual
considerations, matching of texts and tunes; Worship models, service planning
continuums in worship, hymns, congregational singing; Choir ministry, historical
overview of church music, psychological considerations in worship; Music for
evangelism, the Engel scale, history of witness music; Popular music styles, the
secular/sacred debate, music for discipleship; History and issues in African
church music, summary.
CHM 422 CHRISTIAN MINISTRY IN THE URBAN SETTING
3 Credits
Biblical foundations: Old Testament lessons— Jonah, Jeremiah, Nehemiah;
New Testament lessons— Barnabas, Paul; The nature of urbanization in
Africa: its growth and expansion, its patterns, implications for ministry; A case
study— Nairobi: the context of the church, an overview of the churches,
denominations, locations, attendance, characteristics of attendees, leaders,
church activity, church growth; The task: the need for new models; The Poor of
the City: housing, stratification, possessions, nutrition, employment, economics,
social dynamics, self-perception and class perception; Tools for evaluating
ministry: Evaluative research, research instruments, field methodologies; Models
of Ministry: evangelism and mission models, church-planting models—Western
mission, African evangelical, African independent; Church edification
models: discipleship, groups, Western patterns, church worship models,
service models.
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COM 221 PUBLIC SPEAKING
3 Credits
Theory and principles of communication; Listening; Research: topic choice
and message content; Message organization; Delivery: verbal, non-verbal;
Evaluation and feedback; Speaking to inform; Speaking to persuade;
Language and style; Visual aids; Interacting with your audience, audience
adaptation; Other forms of public speaking; Research of special topics;
Review, presentation of speeches.
ETH 408 TOPICS IN CHRISTIAN ETHICS
3 Credits
Course content will be defined for each offering of the course as is appropriate
for the subject matter covered. Pre-requisite: ETH 201.
ETH 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ETHICS
3 Credits
The content for each study will vary depending upon the topics chosen. A
student must have written approval from the department in order to enrol. Prerequisite: ETH 201.
RET 317 HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN EXPANSION
3 Credits
Beginnings of the spread of Christianity 4 B.C - 30 A.D.; Judaism and the
spread of Christianity 30 A.D - 48 A.D.; Greek-Romanism and spread of
Christianity 48 - 100 A.D.; Persecutions and spread of Christianity 100
- 313 A.D.; Imperialism and spread of Christianity 313 A.D - 476 A.D.;
Medievalism and spread of Christianity 1453 - 1517 A.D.; Protestantism
and spread of Christianity 1517 - 1648 A.D.; Revivalism and spread of
Christianity 1648 - 1793 A.D.; Societies and Christianity 1793 - 1914 A.D.;
Wars and spread of Christianity 1914 - 1945 A.D.; Contemporaries and
spread of Christianity 1990s; Challenges facing the spreading of Christianity
in the1990s; Unfinished task in spreading of Christianity in the 1990s.
RET 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT
3 Credits
The content for each study will vary depending upon the topics chosen. The
student must have written approval from the Department in order to enrol. Prerequisite: Three credits of RET at the 300 level.
BIL 312 HERMENEUTICS
3 Credits
History of hermeneutics from ancient Judaism; beginnings of Targum (Nehemiah),
Rabbinic Judaism: Halaka, Harrgadah, Mishnah, Talmad; Hellenistic Judaism;
Philo, Allegory; Qumran Community; Hermeneutical principles used by New
Testament writers; Jesus as literal fulfillment of Old Testament, typology, literalcontextual, principle-application; Patristic period; Apostolic fathers, Alexandria
vs. Antioch, Church Councils, Vulgate; Middle Ages, four-level allegory,
authority of tradition; rise of Scholasticism; Reformation; Sola Scriptura,
appeal to original languages, rejection of allegory; Post-Reformation: Pietism,
Rationalism; Modern period: source criticism; Pietism into Missions, history
of religions/archaeology, Form Criticism, Bultmann (Quest for the historical
Jesus, Demythologizing Bible), Barth (Neo-orthodoxy), Biblical Theology
Movement, redaction criticism, Jesus Seminar. Contemporary Hermeneutics:
genres of biblical literature: OT narrative, law, prophets, poetry/wisdom,
epistles, gospels, parables, apocalyptic; semantics; exegesis (then and there);
historical/cultural context, literary context, reader’s context; hermeneutics
in narrow sense (here and now); contemporary issues: contextualization in
general & in Africa; liberation, cultural and feminist hermeneutics.
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BIL 332 HEBREW PROPHETS
3 Credits
The history of Israel and the Ancient Near East during the prophetic period with
specific attention to important individuals and events relevant for understanding
individual prophets; The various theories regarding the origin, function, selfunderstanding of prophecy in ancient Israel as well as its cessation in the
post-exilic period; The various forms of prophetic speech and their possible
functions within Israel; Methodology for interpreting prophetic literature; The
overall structure and content, especially theological themes, of each book
chosen for study.
BIL 342 SYNOPTIC GOSPELS
3 Credits
Principles of exegesis for epistolary literature applied to the content of selected
passages from the synoptics will comprise the major content of the course;
Passages will comprise the narrative, apocalyptic, parables, and didactic
material; The historical and ideological setting in which Jesus’ life and ministry
takes place and from which early Christianity (and its gospel writing) emerges;
The history of interpretation of the synoptics and the life of Jesus including
major methodologies and assumptions which guided these interpretations,
major theological themes (especially the Kingdom of God), important structural
features, and distinctives of each gospel, The relevance of the synoptic gospels’
witness to Jesus Christ for contemporary issues.
BIL 408 SPECIAL TOPICS IN DEVEONINATIONAL 3 Credits
HISTORY, DOCTRINE & POLITY
Exploration of the rich heritage of the student’s own denominational affiliation;
Denominational leaders will supply the appropriate course descriptions.
Although topics offered under this course number will vary depending on
student need, topics will include, without being limited to, the following:
• Anglican (ACK) Church history, doctrine, and polity.
• Presbyterian (PCEA) Church history, doctrine and polity.
• Baptist Church history, doctrine and polity.
• Methodist Church history, doctrine and polity.
• Lutheran Church history, doctrine and polity.
• Mennonite Church history, doctrine and polity.
• African Inland Church (AIC) history, doctrine and polity.
• Assemblies of God (PAG / KAG) Church history, doctrine and polity.
• Redeemed Gospel Church history, doctrine and polity.
• Deliverance Church history, doctrine and polity.
BIL 432 PENTATEUCH
3 Credits
The Pentateuch as the foundation for understanding the rest of the Bible;
Exegetical work in each of the books of the Pentateuch; The details of the
content, structure, and purpose of each book; Major biblical themes found in
these writings; The significance and application of these books for today.
BIL 443 ROMANS
3 Credits
Principles of exegesis for epistolary literature applied to the content of Romans
will comprise the major content of the course; Major epistolary features of
first century Greco-Roman letters reflected in Romans and their significance for
determining the letter’s purpose. Common Greco-Roman rhetorical methods
found in Romans and their significance for interpreting selected passages in the
book; Major scholarly proposals regarding the letter’s purpose and structure;
Major theological themes found in the letter; Major features of first century
Judaism which shape the ideological context of Paul and the early Christian
movement.
BIL 520 SENIOR PAPER
2 Credits
Conducted in a seminar format, students will present a minimum of three
papers. At least two papers will examine contemporary issues utilizing skills
and knowledge gained through previous study in the programme. These
papers will include a description of the issue, analysis of its key components,
and proposal for practical Christian response. The final paper will consist of
a personal theology of ministry. Students will also be assigned to respond to
papers presented. The lecturer will act as the facilitator.
Student Evaluation
Senior papers will determine 90% of the final mark.
10% of the final mark will be determined by student participation in the seminar,
including the students’ response(s) to papers presented.
CHM 223 INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING
3 Credits
Basic concepts in the theology of man, including creation in God’s image,
the Fall and its consequences, redemption, and Christian maturity; Theories
of personality development; Evaluation of theories of personality development
from Scripture; Crabb’s model of counselling - cultural adaptation and
application; Counselling issues in the local church, including substance abuse,
depression, stress and burnout, polygamy, marital problems, demonization
and family issues; Practice counselling in dyads and triads with discussion;
Support systems available locally for referral; Counselling ethics, including
confidentiality, privileged information, transference, contracts, and the Mental
Health Act 1989.
CHM 325 CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS
3 Credits
Definition of Christian social ethics; The Christian, Biblical worldview; The
principle of transformation; professional ethics (e.g., medical practice, legal
system, journalism, business, etc.); women’s rights: female circumcision, wife
inheritance, polygamy, monogamy; marriage and family: family planning,
human sexuality; rites of passage; AIDS; corruption; crime; democracy; church
and state relations; electioneering; civil education; civil resistance; witchcraft;
war: peace, reconciliation, refugees; urbanization and street children. Prerequisite: ETH 201.
CHM 326 HOMILETICS
3 Credits
A theology of preaching; Preaching in the Bible, preaching in the history of the
church, preaching in the modern world; The role of preaching in the weekly
life of the Christian leader, Basic speech principles; vocal processes, volume,
grammar, figures of speech, sermon length, gestures, audience; methods of
presentation; Manuscript, memorization, impromptu, extemporaneous, outline,
without notes; Mechanics of preparation; importance of preparation, sources
for materials/ideas, planning, methods, files, illustrations, choosing a text,
pre-testing; Types of sermons; topical, topical textual, textual expository;
Components of a sermon; Introduction, body, illustrations, application;
conclusion; Contexts of a sermon: pastoral, didactic, evangelistic.
CHM 327 EVANGELISM AND DISCIPLESHIP
3 Credits
Definition of evangelism; Biblical basis for evangelism; methods and types of
evangelism, including mass, person-to-person, friendship, life-style, community,
etc; principles of effective evangelism; definition of disciple and discipleship;
contextualized discipleship methods applicable to the African context
(discipleship patterns of Jesus and the early church); principles and methods of
effective discipleship; design of an effective discipleship program for a local
church.
CHM 328 CHURCH ADMINISTRATION
3 Credits
The church as an organization: it’s uniqueness, theological basis for ministry;
personnel management: purpose, call to ministry, personal spiritual formation,
responsibility to ministry, time management; leadership: approaches and
theories to leadership, leadership styles, essential qualities of leadership,
the art of delegation; conflict management; the risks of leadership; church
management: church projects, planning, implementation, monitoring,
evaluation, goal setting, action plans, group planning techniques, planning
tools; personnel management: concepts of personnel management, job
analysis; financial management: book-keeping, report / proposal writing,
budgeting, fundraising, stewardship.
CHM 423 APPLIED THEOLOGY IN THE LOCAL COMMUNITY
3 Credits
The content covered in this course include; the church as a sociological
institution;
the social construction of reality; social and cultural dynamics
of change; applied transformational theology in the African context; socioeconomic, socio-political and socio-religious factors related to long term
transformation of the Christian Community.
CHM 325 THEOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT
2 Credits
Definition of Christian social ethics; The Christian, Biblical worldview; The
principle of transformation; professional ethics (e.g., medical practice, legal
system, journalism, business, etc.); women’s rights: female circumcision, wife
inheritance, polygamy, monogamy; marriage and family: family planning,
human sexuality; rites of passage; AIDS; corruption; crime; democracy; church
and state relations; electioneering; civil education; civil resistance; witchcraft;
war: peace, reconciliation, refugees; urbanization and street children. Prerequisite: ETH 201.
ETH 201 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
3 Credits
Various theories of ethics; religious ethical systems: Hindu ethics, Islamic ethics,
Buddhist ethics; philosophers of the classical period: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle,
Epicureans, Stoics; patristic and medieval period of Christianity: early church,
Augustine, Aquinas; modern period: British hedonism, intuitionism, natural
law, the categorical imperative, utilitarianism, relativism; Christian ethics:
Decalogue, Christ and the law, the new covenant, the Sermon on the Mount,
Christian liberty and the law of love.
GRE341 INTRODUCTION TO NEW TESTAMENT GREEK
3 Credits
The course will cover basic introductory elements of New Testament Greek
including alphabet; present and imperfect tenses of regular and -ew eimi
verbs, including the verb eimi; noun cases; first and second noun declensions;
the definite article; the use of the adjectives and demonstratives; and basic
vocabulary.
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GRE 342 NEW TESTAMENT GREEK
3 Credits
The present and imperfect middle and passive verbs, the present imperative
and infinitive, the uses of the infinitive, the future active, the future and aorist of
liquid verbs, and the active the middle first and second aorist; The relationship
of noun case and time, third declension nouns, and the use of prepositions with
specific cases; The relative, personal, reflexive, possessive, interrogative, and
indefinite pronouns; In addition, The uses of the conjunction/particle oti, and
the use of the verbs dunamai and ginomai; Basic vocabulary.
GRE 441 NEW TESTAMENT GREEK EXEGESIS
3 Credits
Adjectives and pronouns of the first and third declensions, comparative
adjectives, the formation of adverbs, the perfect and pluperfect tenses, aorist
and future passives, participles, the genitive absolute, the subjunctive mood,
and types of conditional sentences; Sight reading and prepared reading of
selected passages in the Greek New Testament; Basic tools of Greek exegesis;
Basic principles of exegesis including: the need for the principles of textual
criticism, diagramming sentences, principles of word study, and grammatical
study.
RET 221 INTRODUCTION TO PASTORAL MINISTRY
3 Credits
The theology of pastoral ministry; The pastor and spiritual life; Principles and
practices of pastoral administration; Spiritual gifts in the ministry; Mission of
the church; Goal-setting and planning; Leadership development: equipping
the lay people for ministry and mission; Worship: planning and leadership,
stewardship; The dynamics of small groups, compassion ministries of the
church; Music styles, Other practical matters of ministry (e.g., hospital and
home visits, naming ceremonies, fund raising functions, weddings, funerals,
etc.).
RET 333 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY TO 1500
3 Credits
Introduction to the study of Church History: what is Church history, major
schools of interpretation, why study Church History, the organization of the
study of Church History; Background to the Church: political, economic,
religious, social; The five crises of the early church: leadership, the Gentile
question, heresy, persecutions, organization; Persecutions to 313; The Church
in Egypt and North Africa; Apologists, Church Fathers; Monasticism and the
papacy; Heresy: its rise, consequences and effects on the church; ChurchState relations: Church and Empire, Constantine, Byzantine Emperors, Goths;
Christian missions and the Crusades; The Medieval Church.
RET 334 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY AFTER 1500
3 Credits
Introduction to the study of Church History; What is Church History, major
schools of interpretation, Why study Church History, the organization of the
study of Church History; Backgrounds to the Reformation; The Medieval Church:
ripe for reform; The Reformation: Issues and thinkers; The Reformation: social
and political events and institutions; The Reformation and Christian mission; The
Counter Reformation; The Church and the new world; Revivals of the 18th and
19th centuries; The Church and Rationalism; The Church and colonialism; The
Church in nationalist Africa.
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RET 412 HISTORY OF AFRICAN CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 3 Credits
A brief survey of the history of Christian missionary expansion of Christianity in
Africa; origins of early African Christian centres for Christian expansions; co
operations of early African Christian organizations; early African missionary
efforts and their contributions to the distinctions between African and Western
missionary.
INS 413 URBAN MINISTRY 3 Credits
The content of this course will cover such topics as the Biblical mandate for
urban ministry, the rural urban migration justice for the poor and oppressed, the
stratification of the urban society, the social economic and social political and
social religious issues in urban Ministry: evangelism and discipleship in the city;
and transformation of poverty in urban and rural areas.
RET 421 GOD AND HIS KINGDOM (THEOLOGY I)
3 Credits
Old Testament understanding of the Kingdom of God; The Kingdom agenda;
Jesus and the Kingdom; Kingdom ethics; The role of the Church in the Kingdom;
The present and future realities of the Kingdom; The parables of the Kingdom;
The millennial reign of Christ. Prerequisites: RET 318 and RET 319.
RET 422 CHRIST AND REDEMPTION (THEOLOGY II)
3 Credits
The course covers the origin of humanity, sin and nature of sin; The person and
work of Christ as the Redeemer of fallen humanity, his birth, incarnation, two
natures, death, resurrection and exaltation; Atonement and related theories;
Grace and salvation, election, regeneration, conversion, faith, justification,
sanctification and glorification; Building a Christian world view appropriate
to the contemporary context. Prerequisites: RET 318 and RET 319.
RET 423 THE HOLY SPIRIT AND THE CHURCH (THEOLOGY III)
3 Credits
The course is of the person and work of the Holy Spirit; The Holy Spirit and
mission of the church; The Holy Spirit in the first 20 centuries since Pentecost;
The role of the Holy Spirit in the various revivals (e.g., The East African Revival,
the Great Awakening of America 18th C.); The role of the Holy Spirit in spiritual
disciplines (e.g., prayer, fasting); The Holy Spirit and his gifts to the Church; The
Holy Spirit and the ministry of deliverance; The 20th - 21st Century Pentecostal
movements; Cultic deviations and erroneous teachings about the Holy Spirit.
Prerequisites: RET 318 and RET 319.
RET 507 PASTORAL INTERNSHIP
3 Credits
To be taken during third year; The student will participate in the usual pastoral
responsibilities in a church: conducting church services, administration,
preaching, visiting, teaching, etc.; Visitation of the site: supervisor will visit the
student’s internship site (church) from time to time for the purpose of observation
and meeting with the on-site supervisor (pastor); Selected readings: The student
will submit a list of ten articles or books relating directly to pastoral work (to
be read only); Term paper: at the end of the term the student will submit a
summary term paper which should encompass an overview of the internship
experience as well as a weaving in of selected readings; The readings can
be used to point out consistencies between theory and practice or suggest
areas of expanded / new ministries. Prerequisites: CHM 223, CHM 326 and
CHM 423.
POSTGRADUATE Programme
Master of Arts in Christian Ministries
The MA in Christian Ministries is a two year, 48 credit hour programme,
designed to train and equip Christian leaders for ministries both within and
beyond the church. Though many of our students are in full time ministry as
pastors or lay leaders, a number of students come from business, media and
administrative contexts. Recent Christian Ministries graduates are serving
as Deans of Universities, General Secretaries and Directors of NGOs,
Community Developers, Educators and Counsellors, as well as serving full
time in church or para-church ministries.
Rationale
It is the purpose of the postgraduate curriculum in Christian Ministries to
advance the Kingdom of God through training of effective leaders for church
outreach ministries of various kinds. Building on prior training and experience
of students in Bible, theology, practical ministry of various forms, and other
relevant disciplines, the programme prepares students for effective service as
Christian leaders in church, para-church organizations, and society at large.
The programme also prepares students for further academic training at higher
levels.
Special Regulations
Proposal on Non-Performing M.A. Students
All studentsof Postgraduate Studies at Daystar University are expected to
maintain a 3.00 cum GPA in order to remain on the programme. The current
policy on probation and discontinuation does not indicate at what point
students who are unable to attain this grade point should be discontinued.
The Faculty aims to provide timely assistance to such students so that they do
not remain in the University indefinitely but are helped to disengage from their
programmes of study as and when it is mandatory.
The Faculty of Postgraduate Studies proposes the following guidelines for
probation and discontinuation:
1.
2.
3.
Objectives
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
To equip African Christians, both clergy and lay leaders, for ministry
leadership and management, whether within the church or society at
large;
To equip Christian leaders with knowledge and skills to effectively serve
within the dynamics of the rural-urban field unique to the African setting;
To enable Christian leaders to think theologically and critically on issues
facing the African church, society and individual communities and
Christians;
To prepare Christian leaders to serve in holistic ministries within their
communities, addressing spiritual, physical and social realities.
To enable Christian leaders to work across ethnic and ecclesiastical
divides, to work towards reconciliation and cooperation among the
diversity within the national, regional and global Body of Christ,
towards the large purposes of God’s Kingdom, while at the same time,
appreciating uniqueness in the local church;
To enable Christian leaders to train others in discipleship and
leadership, to inculcate the holistic Kingdom world view transforming the
Church and the society;
To prepare Christian leaders to engage in relevant quality research
and publication from the African context contributing to local contextual
efforts as well as to global forums.
Postgraduate Diploma programs should be developed for students who
fail to attain 3.00 cum GPA for all the postgraduate programmes.
Postgraduate students who wish to improve their grades can retake four
courses.
The following should be the process of probation/discontinuation for
Faculty of Postgraduate Studies:
a. A warning letter (AW) should be issued to a student whose semester GPA is below 3.00 GPA.
b. A letter of first probation should be issued to a student who has received a warning letter and whose cum GPA is below 3.00 after he or she has attempted or earned 12 semester hours.
c. For (a) and (b), HODs should counsel the students and inform them of the consequences of their non-performance.
d. A second letter of probation should be issued by the Registrar’s office to a student whose cum GPA is below 3.00 and who has received a warning letter and a first letter of probation.
e. After a third letter of probation, a student will be issued a letter of discontinuation.
Student Assessment
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
In some courses, where development of skills is the objective, the
final examination and other assignments will include, or be limited to,
elements which require demonstration of the skills taught.
Final marks in postgraduate courses will be derived as follows,
depending on the type of course:
Grades for courses that are primarily conceptual in content are based
on 40% on the final examination score and 60% on combined score for
continuous assessment items.
Marks for courses that are both conceptual in content and require
development of skills are derived 60% from the final examination and
40% from continuous assessment items
Grades for Independent study courses and thesis are based entirely on
the final paper (and the oral examination with it, in the case of a thesis)
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43
Requirements for Graduation
To qualify for graduation, a student must successfully complete 48 credits
including 150 hours of practicum. In addition, the student must orally defend
his/her thesis before a panel appointed by the Dean of School of Arts &
Humanities, and pass with a minimum grade of B (GPA 3.00). An error free
copy of the thesis must be submitted to the department no more than 90 days
after a successful defense and final copies must be bound before the student
will be allowed to graduate.
Course Requirements
Postgraduate Core Courses
Christian Ministries Core Courses
9
33
Electives
6
TOTAL
48
Christian Ministries Core Courses
ANT 617
Urbanizations in Africa
3
BIL 617
Hermeneutics
3
CHM 661
Introduction to Counseling
3
CHM 665
Evangelism and Discipleship
3
RET 611
Christian Theology: God & Man
3
GRA 614
Leadership Development
3
RET 613
Christian Theology: Church & Mission
3
CHM 663
Counseling Young People
3
CHM 607
Practicum
3
CHM 698
Thesis
TOTAL
6
33
In addition, students must select from the following list, any two courses of
electives depending on the ministry for which the student is preparing and the
availability of courses:
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CHM 608
Seminar in Christian Ministries
3
CHM 611
Dynamics in Christian Ministries
3
CHM 625
Curriculum Design & Development
3
CHM 662
Marriage and Family Counseling
3
CHM 664
Christian Education as a Ministry
3
CHM68
The Local Church & Community Development
3
CHM 696
Independent Study in Ministries
3
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Course Descriptions
GRW 611, 613 Graduate Research & Writing I, II
2, 2 Credits
These courses are an introduction to attitudes, skills and knowledge necessary
to fulfill academic requirements for producing and evaluating postgraduate
communication research and writing. Through the courses, students gain
exposure to major steps in designing, implementing and reporting research.
CHM 611 Dynamics of Church Growth
3 Credits
Introduction to church growth; Foundational teachings; Church growth
principles; Statistics and church growth; Vital signs of a church; How to do
a church survey; Setting goals; Evangelism; How to grow a church; Spiritual
dynamics of growth.
ANT 617 Urbanization in Africa
3 Credits
The biblical basis for urban studies: the Old Testament, the New Testament;
Definitions: urban, urbanism, urbanization; The urban explosion; World-wide
data; Africa’s urbanization; History and trends of urbanization n Africa; Ancient
cities; The impact of colonization: Muslim, European; Patterns of urbanization
and implications for: Christian ministry, economic and technological patterns,
secularization, industrialization, housing, employment, social patterns, social
networks, deviancy, migration ethnicity, organizations, family, youth and
children; Christian strategies for the city; Ministry in the city, evangelism and
church growth; Shepherding in the city.
CHM 625 Curriculum Design & Development
3 Credits
Definition of models of curriculum design at various levels, philosophies of
educational curriculum design, andragogy vs pedagogy, models of education;
Steps of curriculum development from situational analysis, to aims, goals,
instructional objectives, selection of content, and learning experiences,
evaluation strategies for curricula; curriculum implementation documentation;
Principles to be applied to students’ fields of interests, whether communication,
Christian education, or related fields of training others.
BIL 615 Biblical Foundations of Christian Service
2 Credits
Introduction and definition of terms: Kingdom of God; Servanthood; Jesus’
teaching on the Kingdom of God; Parables of the Kingdom; The teaching of
the early church on the Kingdom of God; Various views on the Kingdom of
God; Ethics of the Kingdom; Implication of Kingdom teaching for believers;
Analysis of Christian service/servanthood; Biblical teaching on Christian
service; Christian serve and the contemporary world; Integration of Kingdom
ethics into Christian life.
BIL 617 Hermeneutics
3 Credits
Definition of hermeneutics as art of science, with historical overview of practices
of interpretation from Old Testament times to the present day; Basic issues of
historical and cultural context, semantics, including denotative and connotative
meanings; A survey of genres found in biblical literature with basic principles
of interpreting each; Introduction to exegetical methodology using sample
passages from Old and New Testaments; Introduction to contextualization here
and now; Introduction to important tools available to assist in interpreting the
Bible.
CHM 607 Practicum
3 Credits
An assigned task for which a student’s courses can be applied, and to which a
student’s faculty and employer agree. Minimum 150 hours with the employer,
either 10 hours per week for 15 weeks during the semester or 15 hours per
week for 10 weeks during the blocks or in other configurations approved by
the department. Assignment must require competence in areas relevant to the
student’s course of study, and which will enable growth in that area. Written
assessment will be part of the experience. Pre-requisite: completion of 36
credits within the MA programme.
CHM 608 Seminar in Christian Ministries
3 Credits
Course content will be defined for each offering of the course as is appropriate
for the subject matter covered. Possible topics include counseling substance
users, ministry to the aging, and homiletics. Pre-requisite depends on topic.
CHM 661 Introduction to Counseling
3 Credits
Basic concepts in the theology of man: creation in God’s image, fall and
its consequences, redemption, Christian maturity; Theories of personality
development: Piaget, Freud; Evaluation of theories of personality development
from Scripture; Lawrence Crabb’s model of counseling – cultural adaption
and application; Counseling issues in the local church: substance abuse,
depression, suicide and homicide, stress and burnout, marital problems and
divorce, polygamy, demonization; Basic Counseling skills: listening, guiding,
asking questions, empathy, accountability boundaries; Practice listening skills
and counseling in dyads and triads: Practice, discussion of practice; Support
systems available locally for referral; Counseling ethics: confidentiality,
privileged information, contracts, Mental Health Act (1989).
CHM 662 Marriage and Family Counseling
3 Credits
Key concepts defined; Family: parental and sibling units, family boundaries,
genogram; Family systems theory; Anatomy of the genogram; Structural
approach to family counseling; African family: nuclear, extended, effects
of modernity on nuclear and extended family; Premarital counseling issues;
traditional, contemporary, polygamy; Husband-wife relationship; Parent-child
relationship; Family and marriage: a biblical perspective.
CHM 663 Counseling Young People
3 Credits
Detailed exploration of normal development, physiologically, psychologically,
and socially, from birth to young adulthood; Selected theories of development,
including: Freud, Piaget, Erickson; Childhood and child rearing problems;
Understanding adolescence; Interpersonal issues: relating to the opposite
sex, Sex apart from marriage; Sex deviations and perversion; Peers and peer
pressure; Relating to parents; Quest for autonomy; Courtship and marriage;
Identity issues: development of self esteem, singleness, adolescent subculture(s);
special youth issues: substance abuse, delinquent behavior, stress and
depression.
CHM 664 Christian Education as a Ministry
3 Credits
Definition of Christian education; Theology of Christian education ; Means
of Christian nurture; Education in the church: the children’s ministry, the youth
ministry, the adults’ ministry, the women’s ministry, the singles’ ministry, the
physically challenged ministry; Education in para-church organizations;
Christian education in schools.
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CHM 665 Evangelism and Discipleship
3 Credits
Definition of evangelism and discipleship; Biblical basis for evangelism and
discipleship; Content of evangelism; Motives, methods and objectives for
evangelism; Types and levels of evangelism; Difference between evangelism
and discipleship; Principles and methods of effective discipleship; Design
of an effective discipleship programme; Biblical model of Jesus ministry of
discipleship and mandate to make disciples; Content of discipleship
CHM 668 Local Church & Community Development
3 Credits
Introduction and definition: community, development, church, community
work, work of the church; analysis of urban poverty, poverty and power,
the city and the city of God, systems, involvement of both poor and rich in
community development; the church’s role: the church to the city, the church
with the community, why local church should be involved, supportive task of
para-church, denomination, and mission agency, standard for local ministry;
community development activity: community organization vs community
development, urban work which empowers, networking, coalition building,
reflecting, acting, leadership empowerment, the pedagogy of action and
reflection, organizing and money; issues and leaders: gatekeepers, caretakers,
flak catchers, brokers, action and project, power analysis, confrontation; birth
of a community.
CHM 696 Independent Study in Ministries
3 Credits
Content will depend on the topic chosen and will be worked out in conference
with the assigned lecturer for the project. Examples of topics which might be
explored are curriculum development for non-literates, theological education
by extension, church relationships with people of a different religion, etc. Prerequisite: Departmental approval, based on adequacy of background course
work and availability of qualified instructor.
CHM 698 Thesis or Project
6 Credits
Content will depend on the topic chosen and will be worked out in conference
with the student’s thesis advisor.
GRA 614 Leadership Development and Management
3 Credits
Defining leadership vs. management (differentiating Christian leadership);
Introduction to and comparison and contrast of the basic models and
theories of leadership and their applications; Exposition of Clinton’s model of
leadership in the The Making of a Leader; Spiritual giftedness, Biblical models
of leadership – New Testament; The disciplines of leadership; The major tasks
of leadership; Guidelines for excellence in leadership; Building trust, vision,
teamwork, finishing well; Issues of leading in an African context.
RET 611 Christian Theology: God & Man
3 Credits
Introduction to fundamental aspects of Christian theology in contemporary
Africa; Historical context of Christianity in Africa, including the western
missionary inheritance and emergent African theology; the nature, task,
sources, and methods of theology; selected aspect of doctrine of God, Christ,
creation, humanity, the fall, sin, salvation, atonement sanctification, individual
and community, birth, life, and death. Exploration of theology in the context of
Africa with application for ministry.
RET 613 Christian Theology: Church & Mission
3 Credits
Overview of church and church growth in Africa; a biblical perspective of the
church; relationship of the church to the kingdom of God. Purpose and function
of the church. The mission task of church as seen in cosmic, community, and the
charismatic perspective; the church as ecumenical, missiological, academic,
and pastoral; evangelistic, prophetic and discipleship roles; the Holy Spirit,
the ministry of teaching, healing and guidance. Spiritual reality and power in
Africa, spiritual warfare; the priesthood of all believers, spiritual gifts and the
mission of the church. Role and practice of sacraments; church growth related to
kingdom growth; independent church movement in Africa; forms and structures
of the church as contrasted to those of para-church organization; church and
contemporary politics; church and responsibility in society, the church and the
poor; theology of suffering and healing; staffing; personnel administration; staff
development; evaluation; decision making, conflict resolution; authority; types
of power; delegation, motivation; building trust; mission; team-work; issues of
leading within an African context.
SUGGESTED TWO YEAR PROGRAMME
1ST YEAR
Semester 1
2ND YEAR
Credits
Semester II
Credits
Semester I
Credits
BIL 615
2
GRW 613
2
GRA 614
3
CHM (Elective)
3
GRW 611
2
CHM 668
3
RET 613
3
CHM (Elective)
3
INS 612
3
CHM 665
3
CHM
3
CHM 698
6
BIL 617
3
RET 611
3
Prepare MA Thesis
TOTAL
11
TOTAL
12
COM 302
0(3)
TOTAL
10
Proposal and Defend
(0)
TOTAL
9
June-July Blocks
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ANT 611
3
CHM 661
3
TOTAL
6
Semester II
Credits
Master OF THEOLOGY (M.Th) IN AFRICAN CHRISTIANITY
Rationale
The M.Th in African Christianity is a two-year, 48 credit hour programme that
is designed to provide relevant theological training for Christian leaders in
the African Church and society. Since Africa is now acknowledged to be a
heartland of the gospel and a central zone of theological activity in the world,
the program focuses on the serious study of African Christianity. In particular,
it examines theological issues arising in African contexts, and explores the
ongoing formulation of African theologies that address such issues. However,
given the local and the global dimensions of theology, the program examines
African Christianity in relation to the worldwide development of Christian
tradition, both past and present.
The program is therefore relevant for theological educators in formal and
informal (e.g., TEE) settings, for those in pastoral ministries within church and
para-church organizations, and those in Christian NGO and development
agencies.
Objectives
The objectives of the M.Th in African Christianity are to enable students:
1. To understand and express the substance of contemporary African
Christianity in relation to the historical and theological development of
Christian tradition worldwide
2.
To become thoroughly grounded in the history of Christianity in Africa,
including missionary proclamations of the gospel and African initiatives in
evangelism and church growth
3.
To identify, and discuss leading theologians in Africa (both ancient and
modern)
4.
To identify and evaluate major theological trends across the continent
5.
To discern and critique various theological methodologies employed in
African theologies
6.
Requirements for Graduation
Required Courses
30 Credits
Elective Course
12 Credits
Academic Thesis, or Practicum & Ministry Project
6 Credits
TOTAL
48 Credits
Required Courses 30 Credits
Course Title
Course Hours
BIL 618
Biblical Hermeneutics in Africa Today
2
BIL 619
Biblical Spirituality and Ethics in Africa
3
CUL 601
African Cultural Knowledge
3
PRW 601/602
Postgraduate Research and Writing
4
WCH 601
World Christianity – History from
Apostolic Origins to 1453 CE
3
WCT 602
World Christianity – History from
1453 CE to the present
3
WCT 611
World Christianity – Theology from
Apostolic Origins to 1453 CE
3
WCT 612
World Christianity – Theology from
1453 CE to the present
3
TEO 601
African Christianity Theology from the
20th Century to the present
3
TEO 602
Advanced Seminar in African
Christianity Theology
3
TOTAL
30 Credits
Elective Courses in12 Credits
Students select 4 of the following courses
To demonstrate serious engagement in contextual theology through one
of the following means:
GRA 614
Leadership Development & Management
3
TEO 617
Urban Ministry in Africa
3
6.1. Researching and writing a thesis of publishable quality, or
TEO 622
New Religious Movements
3
6.2. Completing a practicum and writing a ministry project
TEO 623
Christian Muslim Relations in Africa
3
TEO 624
Gospel and Culture
3
TEO 625
African Women’s Theology
3
Requirements for Admission
Applicants must hold a first degree in theology, or equivalent, from an
accredited university, with a minimum of 3.0 GPA (on a 4.0 scale), or the
degree awarded with first class or upper second class honours. Applicants
with a first degree other than in theology will be considered for admission on
the basis of their academic transcript, Christian ministry experience, and the
submission of an integrative, personal reflection paper on an assigned topic.
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TEO 631
A Theology of Healing in Africa, with
special reference to HIV/AIDS
3
TEO 632
African Theology and Justice, Peace, and
Reconciliation
3
TEO 633
African Theology and Social Transformation
3
TEO 608
Special Topics in African Christian Theology
3
TEO 696
Independent Study
3
Students must also complete one of the following:
TEO 698
Academic Thesis (6 Credits) or
TEO 607 Practicum (3 credits) and TEO 609 Ministry
Project (3 credits)
6
6
These two courses function together to equip students to integrate theological
reflection and praxis in a particular context within their area of ministry or
vocation.
Course Descriptions
BIL 618: Biblical Hermeneutics in Africa Today
2 Credits
Introduction to biblical hermeneutics; the Incarnation of Christ as a theological
foundation for biblical hermeneutics; historical overview of biblical interpretation,
including major trends (ancient Jewish, patristic, medieval, and reformation
interpretation,19th and 20th century historical-critical method, contemporary
hermeneutical approaches) and major theoretical models (author-centred, textcentred, reader centred); critical issues in interpreting the Bible in Africa today;
main approaches to biblical interpretation in Africa today (liberation, feminist,
reconstruction, inter-cultural, and popular readings of the Bible).
BIL 619: Biblical Spirituality and Ethics in Africa
3 Credits
Introduction to the contemporary context of studies in “spirituality” and ethics;
rationale for rooting spirituality and ethics in biblical revelation and examining
them in relation to African worldviews and contextual realities; the interface
between biblical concepts of life in the spirit and traditional African concepts of
ethics; Biblical spirituality and ethics in relation to contextual realities in Africa;
Personal reflections on biblical spirituality and ethics; Biblical Spirituality and
ethics in African contexts in dialogue with other global contexts.
CUL 601: African Cultural Knowledge
3 Credits
Definitions of culture; African worldviews; the historical and geographical study
of African cultures; ethnolinguistics and ethnoscience; African philosophy and
religion, including models of African traditional religions; Schools of thought
regarding the analysis of African cultures; central themes and domains of
African cultural knowledge; the integration of African cultural knowledge into
the understanding and experience of Christianity in Africa.
PRW 601/602: Postgraduate Research & Writing 4 Credits
Topics covered in these courses include: library research skills; summarizing,
synthesizing, and critical evaluation skills; academic writing and referencing
skills; literature review; introduction to social research and its relevance to
theological research; major steps in the research process: definition of the
research problem, research design, data collection and analysis, report writing
and presentation; Fundamental research paradigms and their philosophical
underpinnings; research design: fixed vs flexible, or quantitative vs. qualitative;
methods of data collection: surveys and questionnaires, interviews and focus
groups, observational methods; informed consent procedures; institutional
review boards; Pilot testing; methods of data analysis – quantitative and
qualitative – including exposure to computer software programs (e.g., SPSS 11
and NVivo 2); Writing and critiquing research proposals and reports
WCH 601: World Christianity – History from 3 Credits
Apostolic Origins to 1453 CE
Issues in Christian historiography: historical and contemporary trends; The rise
of key geographical centres in the expansion of Christianity: the great Church
Sees (Jerusalem, Antioch, Rome, Alexandria, Constantinople); Roman North
Africa; the rise of Latin Christianity; Egypt; Ethiopia and Nubia; Armenia; the
British Isles; Slavic Christianity; The split between western and eastern churches
in 1054 AD; The rise of scholasticism; religious orders; the crusades
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WCH 602: World Christianity – History FROM
3 Credits
1453 CE to the Present
Issues in Christian historiography: historical and contemporary trends; The
rise of key geographical centres in the ongoing expansion of Christianity:
corruption, reform, and counter-reform in the church; European expansion
(Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch) and the trans-Atlantic slave trade; the modern
missionary movement (Pietism, Evangelical Awakenings, Catholic initiatives);
the expansion of Christianity in sub-Saharan Africa (especially at the end of
the 19th century); Christianity and Islam in Africa; missions and colonialism;
African agency in the expansion of Christianity (African missionaries and EuroAmerican responses; Ethiopianism); prophetic and revival movements; African
instituted churches; church and state relations; The ecumenical movement of
the 20th Century (Edinburgh 1910 World Missionary Conference, subsequent
ecumenical organizations and assemblies, and their impact on global
Christianity)
WCT 611: World Christianity – Theology 3 Credits
from Apostolic Origins to 1453 CE
Issues in theological methodology; key geographical centres in the expansion
of Christianity, each with its peculiar emphases in theology: The great church
Sees (Jerusalem, Antioch, Rome, Alexandria, Constantinople); Roman North
Africa: second century apologists (Justin Martyr, Tertullian); the rise of Latin
Christianity (Cyprian, Augustine); Egypt: the Alexandrian School (Origen,
Clement); the Coptic Church; the rise of monasticism (Anthony); Ethiopia
and Nubia; Armenia: Christianity among the Goths; The British Isles: Celtic
Christianity (Columbia, Patrick); Slavic Christianity: (Cyril Methodius; Slavic
script).
Theological issues in the split between western and eastern churches in 1054
AD; the rise of scholasticism (Anselm, Abelard, Aquinas); Religious orders
(Cistercians, Franciscans, Dominicans); the crusades
Key themes throughout the course include: unity and diversity in the Jesus
movement; persecution and martyrdom; heresies and schisms; translating the
gospel into vernacular; Christianity and imperialism; spirituality and renewal;
the role of African theologians and monastics in shaping early Christian
doctrine and praxis.
WCT 612: World Christianity – Theology from
3 Credits
1453 C.E. to the Present
Issues in theological methodology; key movements in the ongoing expansion of
Christianity and their associated theological developments: corruption, reform,
and counter-reform in the church; European expansion (Portuguese, Spanish,
Dutch); the modern missionary movement (Pietism, Evangelical Awakenings,
Catholic initiatives); the anti-slavery movement; the expansion of Christianity in
sub-saharan Africa (especially at the end of the 19th Century); the ecumenical
movement of the 20th Century (Edinburg 1910 World missionary conference,
subsequent ecumenical organizations and assemblies, and their impact on
global Christianity)
Key themes introduced in WCT 611 will be developed further in relation to
the growth of Christianity from 1453 CE to the present: unity and diversity in
Christianity; persecution and martyrdom; heresies and schisms; translating the
gospel into vernacular; Christianity and imperialism; spirituality and renewal
TEO 601: African Christian Theology from the 3 Credits
20th Century to the Present
Issues in theological methodology; factors contributing to the rise of African
theology (e.g., colonialism, independence movements, nationalism, postcolonial developments, the ecumenical movement); The nature of theology
in Africa and theological terminologies employed (e.g., African theology,
Black theology, Ethiopianism, indigenization, inculturation, contextualization,
Skenosis); Currents in African theology (inculturation theologies, liberation
theologies such as Black theology and African women’s theologies,
reconstruction and transformation theologies); African initiatives in Christianity;
The theological import of ecumenical initiatives in Africa; Pentecostal/
charismatic churches in Africa; contemporary trends and challenges in the
ongoing development of African theology and its significance
TEO 602: Advanced Seminar in African 3 Credits
Christian Theology
In-depth analysis of writings of selected theologians from the following regions:
Anglophone West Africa; Francophone West Africa; Anglophone East Africa;
Central Africa; South Africa; Portuguese Africa; and the publications of transcontinental theological associations, particularly those emerging within the
ecumenical movement: All Africa Conference of Churches (AACC); Association
of Evangelicals of Africa and Madagascar (AEAM), including the Pan-African
Christian Women’s Alliance (PACWA); Ecumenical Association of Third World
Theologians (EATWOT); Symposium of Episcopal Conferences of Africa
and Madagascar (SECAM); Association of Member Episcopal Conferences
in Eastern Africa (AMECEA); The Circle of Concerned African Women
Theologians
TEO 617: Urban Ministry in Africa
3 Credits
Definitions of urban, urbanism, urbanization; Biblical references to the city:
Old and New Testaments; a theology of the city; current phenomena of global
urbanization: causes, challenges, benefits; Historical and current trends of
development in the city on urban Africa; forms of development and expansion;
types of African cities; impact of colonization: Muslim, European; sociological,
geographical, and cultural impact on urbanization; secularization; economics,
technology and infrastructure; social patterns: social networks, family structures,
deviancy; urban issues: poverty, unemployment, housing, transport, sanitation,
security, education, refugees, gender, disenfranchisement, tribalism/ethnicity,
health, HIV/AIDS; implications for Christian ministry: for children, youth,
families; Strategies for Christian ministry in the urban setting: evangelism,
discipleship, church planting, church growth, pasturing, equipping; local
church and community development.
GRA 614: Leadership Development & Management
3 Credits
Defining leadership vs. management; Differentiating Christian vs. secular
leadership; basic models and theories of leadership and their applications;
exposition of Clinton’s model of leadership development (in the making of a
leader): spiritual giftedness and leadership; servant leadership; biblical models
of leadership and management; Formal and informal organizations; functions
of management: planning, organizing, staffing, personnel administration, staff
development, evaluation, decision making, conflict resolution, authority, types
of power, delegation, motivating, building trust, vision, teamwork; issues of
leading within an African context.
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TEO 622: New Religious Movements in 3 Credits
African Christianity
Definition and analysis of the characteristics of new religious movements
(NRMs); A typology of NRMs; An analysis of factors behind their upsurge;
Pertinent themes within NRMs (e.g., liturgy, women’s roles, healing, community,
Christology, pneumatology, evangelism); An examination of the social,
political, cultural and theological impact of NRMs on African society; case
studies of selected NRMs across Africa, focusing on their history, theology,
and their impact on the society in which they were founded; A comparison
between NRMs in Africa and similar religious movements in the early history
of the church
TEO 623: Christian – Muslim Relations in Africa
3 Credits
An historical and regional overview of Islam in Africa, particularly in relation
to its encounters with Christianity: North Africa; Egypt; Nilotic Sudan; West
Africa; Ethiopia and the Horn; East Africa; Southern Africa; historical patterns
of Christian-Muslim relations, their causative factors and consequences; critical
issues in Christian-Muslim relations; contemporary models of inter-faith relations,
with special reference to Christian-Muslim relations; contributions of key African
thinkers and leaders regarding this subject, both Christian and Muslim;
various initiatives in promoting Christian-Muslim relations (e.g. study projects,
organizations, conferences, publications)
TEO 624: Gospel & Culture
3 Credits
Definitions: culture, gospel, indigenization, contextualization, inculturation,
syncretism; models of contextualization; Hermeneutic models: ATR and the
gospel, liberationist, feminist, AIC; critical issues of culture and the gospel in
Africa; gender, poverty, HIV/AIDS; affirmation of African cultural values and the
gospel (e.g. community, respect, hospitality, rites of passage, music empathy)
TEO 625: African Women’s Theology
3 Credits
Introduction to gender and theology; the historical development of women’s
theologies in world Christianity, with a focus on African women’s theology;
central issues in African women’s theology; the Bible, African culture,
Christology, ecclesiology, sin, eschatology, church polity and practice, and
women’s leadership in the church, home and society; The impact of African
women’s theology on the Church and society
TEO 631: Theology and Healing in Africa, 3 Credits
with special Reference to HIV & AIDS
Introduction: overview of the historical and theological context of health and
healing in Africa; African concepts of health and healing in relation to western
medicine; the impact of medical missions in Africa; the historical, socioeconomic and political dimensions of health care in Africa.
HIV/AIDS – A theological Perspective: human sexuality and HIV/AIDS
related issues; the Christian and Church’s response to HIV/AIDS; programme
development; institutional care, rehabilitation, development and sustainability;
cultural beliefs and practices; economic, social and political issues in relation
to HIV/AIDS; ethical and legal issues
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TEO 632: African Theology and Justice, 3 Credits
Peace & Reconciliation
Introductory definitions: Justice, Peace and Reconciliation; the interface
between these concepts in biblical and African traditions; major theories of
justice, peace and reconciliation, in relation to the mediatory role of elders in
African epistemology; approaches to social change in contemporary Africa;
cultures of peace; truth and reconciliation commissions; African theological
perspectives on justice, peace and reconciliation
TEO 633: African Theology & Social TransformatioN 3 Credits
Introduction: biblical and theological rationale for Christians to engage in
social transformation (selected biblical models: Moses, Esther, Nehemiah,
Jesus, Paul; key themes: personal formation, ecclesial reformation, and social
transformation); historical foundations: factors shaping social transformation in
Africa; contemporary contexts: Issues regarding Christian engagement in social
transformation in Africa (e.g., corruption, modernity in Africa, globalization,
conflict and reconciliation, gender relations, ecumenism and inter faith
relations); leading African theologians and emergent theological paradigms
of social transformation
TEO 608: Special Topics in African Christian Theology 3 Credits
This course is designed to expose students to theological experts on a range
of theological issues that are significant for the adequate articulation and
grounding of African Christian Theology. The expert will define the specific
course objectives as well as give recommended class readings
Academic Thesis, or Practicum & Ministry Project
3 Credits
Students must also complete either TEO 698: Academic Thesis, or TEO 607:
Practicum and TEO 609: Ministry Project. The student must orally defend the
research thesis or ministry project before a panel of at least three postgraduate
faculty appointed by the Chair of Postgraduate Studies, and pass with a grade
of B or above (grade to be determined by the committee). A copy of the thesis
or ministry project, with final corrections completed, must be deposited within
the department 90 days after a successful defence and before graduation.
TEO 698: Academic Thesis
6 Credits
The M.Th. thesis requires students to conduct in depth theological research,
normally integrating library and field research, on an issue related to their own
context of ministry or vocation. Students will carry out their research under the
supervision of a main faculty advisor and at least one or two thesis committee
members within Daystar University. The Chair of Postgraduate Studies may
assign an additional supervisor beyond the University, provided the relevant
qualifications and experience are demonstrated.
All aspects of the academic thesis, including the research proposal,
implementation and thesis writing, must be in accordance with the guidelines
set forth in the Daystar University Postgraduate Student Handbook. Any
students considering entrance into a doctoral program or an academic career
are strongly advised to complete the academic thesis.
TEO 607: Practicum
3 Credits
The precise content of the practicum will depend upon the student’s placement.
The student will spend 150 hours within one semester (or two blocks) working
and learning in a specific assignment on location, in an area of interest related
to theology. He or she will be actively involved in the tasks of theological
ministry, not merely observing the operations, nor merely in clerical tasks. The
ideal practicum will expose the student to daily tasks, organizational processes
and procedures, and overall philosophies of operation. The practicum is not
to be another classroom exercise, but is to be hands-on involvement, to apply
classroom learning and to gain practical knowledge and experience.
TEO 609: Ministry Project
3 Credits
Building upon TEO 607, the student will select on theological issue encountered
in the practicum experience. He or she will then design and complete a
ministry project that addresses the issue by integrating biblical and theological
reflection with experiential knowledge gained through the practicum. The
project may take the form of an in-depth research and reflection paper (5060 pages), or the production of ministry materials that will address a specific
need in relation to the theological issue (e.g. an educational curriculum, a
series of Bible studies, a sermon series, a small booklet). If the student chooses
the latter, he or she must submit the ministry materials and a scholarly report
(15-20 pages) outlining the background and nature of the theological issue,
the purpose, objectives and significance of the ministry materials, the methods
used to produce them and an evaluation of the materials according to the
objectives set.
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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
BACHELOR OF EDUCATION DEGREE (ARTS/SCIENCE)
Rationale of the Programme
Programme Learning Outcomes
The Kenya government spells out the major role of university education in
developing the relevant human capital to drive the counties, national, regional
and global educational sectors. Kenya National goals of education, Kenya
Vision 2030, University Council of East Africa and UNESCO emphasize
the great role of education in economic growth. This poses a challenge to
universities to train and equip teachers with relevant knowledge, skills, values
and attitudes that make them competent to teach at all levels of education
(national, regional and international) with a view to responding to the
demand for secondary education as evidenced by increase in enrolment
in schools and establishment of many secondary schools. In addition, the
need to upgrade oneself as a means of improving ones upward mobility has
stretched the demand for professionally trained teachers in secondary and
tertiary institutions locally, regionally and globally. The programme intends to
train teachers who are moral, ethical, creative, innovative, competent and
accountable. It also aims at providing an opportunity for self development in
relation to career and life-long learning.
By the end of the programme, the learner should be able to:
The B.Ed programme is committed to inculcating Christian values through
integration of faith and learning. This is in an effort to rid the African continent
of such evils as corruption, greed, crime, moral decadence and violence.
In addition, there is a growing number of Christian schools which require
teachers who can integrate their Christian faith with their profession.
Overall Goals of the Programme
The B.Ed aims at training professionally qualified teachers who are competent
and skilful enough to teach and provide effective servant leadership and
management at all levels of education in private, corporate and public
service. The programme focuses on building a broad foundation of theoretical
and professional knowledge in education while on the other hand, focusing
on concepts, skills and knowledge in specific disciplines. It is hoped that the
programme products can impact their students, communities and churches
with positive moral and spiritual values. Besides the core disciplines, the
learner can select a study area from a host of electives which may suit their
desired career pathways.
Further, the programme aspires to provide holistic quality education as well
as offer service to the student teacher. It also seeks to equip the student
teacher with relevant teaching skills needed in designing and implementation
of programmes that meet the individual, professional, institutional, county,
national and global educational needs today and in the near future.
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1.
Apply curriculum theory and the teaching pedagogy to design, develop,
implement and evaluate curricula for school classes, institutions and
nations
2.
Interpret, implement, and evaluate curriculum in the learning environment
for various levels of school systems
3.
Plan, utilize and manage resources in learning institutions.
4.
Develop and implement appropriate visions, missions, plans and
management strategies for schools
5.
Identify and evaluate the various foundations of Education.
6.
Use relevant and appropriate methodologies effectively to promote
learning.
7.
Plan and implement appropriate programmes for different categories of
learning.
8.
Discuss and apply principles in problem solution.
9.
Portray creativity and imagination in handling their areas of
specialisation.
Credit Transfer
Students who hold diplomas from recognized tertiary institutions and wish
to upgrade their academic qualifications may be admitted as transfer
candidates. Similarly, degree holders wishing to obtain a second degree may
be admitted as transfer candidates. Transfer students may apply to transfer
some credits from their former institutions. Such credit transfer should fulfil the
following conditions:
1. Have official academic transcripts to support the application. The
student must be a bona fide student of the University from which he/she
is transferring.
2. Have a minimum grade of C+ for the course to be transferred. A
transferring student will be allowed to transfer 100 level courses only.
Admission Requirements
Requirements for Graduation
1.
To be eligible for graduation, a student shall be required to take 142 (one
hundred and forty two) credit hours and attain a cumulative GPA of at least
2.00. The courses will be distributed as shown below:
All students admitted to the degree of Bachelor of Education must satisfy
the University minimum requirements of a mean grade of C+ in KCSE
or Equivalent
OR,
2.
3.
Credit Hours
Have a Diploma in Education from a recognized institution or its
equivalent S1
General Education
30
OR
Education
46
Have a Kenya Advanced Certificate of Education (A level) with a minimum
of two principal passes and a subsidiary or its equivalent
2 Teaching methods
OR,
TOTAL
4.
Have a Division III at KCE or EACE with a diploma in Education or
equivalent
5.
Have P1 Certificate with a minimum of a C plain in KCSE.
6
2 Teaching subjects
60
142
Core Courses Comprise the following:
Educational Foundations
Credit Hours
EDU 111 Historical of Education
2
EDU 112 Philosophical Foundations of Education
2
EDU 214 Sociology of Education & Contemporary Issues
3
Teaching Practice
EDU 323 Comparative Education
3
Field observation
60%
Educational Psychology
Preparation of schemes of work, lesson plans, record of
work and progress record
20%
EDU 220 Introduction to Educational Psychology
3
EDU 222 Human Growth and Development
3
Students and school’s reports
20%
EDU 226 Exceptional Children
3
EDU 310 Guidance and Counseling
3
EDU 322 Educational Tests and Measurements
3
Student Assessment
Final course grade will be calculated as follows:
Practical oriented courses: Educational Technology and Media, General
Teaching Methods and Subject Methods
Continous Assessment
60%
Final Examination
40%
TOTAL
100%
Marks for all other courses will be calculated as follows:
Teaching Strategies and Technology
EDU 223 General Teaching Methods
3
EDU 224 Educational Technology and Media
3
EDU 507 Teaching Practice (3 months)
6
Curriculum Development and Educational Administration
Continuous Assessment
30%
EDU 225 Curriculum Planning and Development
3
Final Examination
70%
EDU 315 Research Methods
3
EDU 431 Educational Administration and Planning
3
TOTAL
100%
TOTAL
46
www.daystar.ac.ke
53
A student is required to take 6 credit hours of teaching methods from the
following:
EDU 361 Teaching Methods: Language
3
EDU 362 Teaching Methods: Literature
3
EDU 365 Teaching Methods: Christian Rel. Edu
3
EDU 367 Teaching Methods: Music
3
EDU 368 Teaching Methods: Business Studies
3
EDU 370 Teaching Methods: Mathematics
3
EDU 371 Teaching Methods: Kiswahili
3
EDU 372 Teaching Methods: Computer Science
3
Teaching Subject I
30
Teaching Subject II
30
NB: The courses for each teaching subject are extracted from the existing
majors in various departments
General Education Courses
INS 111 Communication and Culture 1
3
INS 112 Communication and Culture 11
3
BIL 111 Old Testament Introduction and Survey
3
BIL 112 New Testament Introduction and Survey
3
BIL 212 Introduction to Bible Doctrine
2
ENV 112 Environmental Science
2
ART 111/MUS 111/LIT 111 Art/Music/Literature
2
ACS 101/2 Basic Computer Skills
2
ENG 111 Advanced Reading
3
ENG 112 Advanced Writing
3
RET 320 Christianity and Islam in Africa
2
BIO 111 Biology
2
TOTAL
30
When I think of Daystar, I think of
a solid foundation. I think of the
beginning of my passion and the
actualization of that dream when I
finally graduated.
Lillian Muli Kanene
54
www.daystar.ac.ke
Course Description
EDU 111 History of Education 2 Credits
Definition of history; definition of education; purpose of studying history of
education; historical development of historical ideas from antiquity to the
present: Egyptian, Hebrew, Sumerian, Chinese, Indian, Greek, Roman, Islamic
civilizations, the rise of medieval universities, the age of the Renaissance,
the Protestant reformation; meaning and impact of their influence on thought
towards the rise of modern science and technology; factors that influenced the
growth of education during the twentieth century with particular emphasis on
Africa; historical background on the trends and development of education in
Kenya from the pre-colonial era to the present.
EDU 112 Philosophical Foundations of Education
2 Credit
Definition of philosophy; meaning of philosophy of education; purpose of
studying philosophy of education; branches in philosophy; nature, meaning
and relevance of philosophy of education in teaching and learning; major
schools of thought in philosophy of education from antiquity to the contemporary
scene; the concept of education; criteria and aims of education; worldview
and nature of humankind; formulation of African philosophy of education;
theories of knowledge and their relevance in education; value of education in
contemporary Africa; education and value choices; education and scheme of
values; democracy and education; democracy in education; Christian view of
education in the context of the human quest for the application of knowledge
towards national development. Prerequisite EDU 111.
EDU 214 Sociology of EduCATION
3 Credits
and Contemporary Issues Meaning of sociology, definition and meaning of society; origin and
development; branches of sociology; relation of sociology to other social
sciences; theories and methods of sociology; family social position: socioeconomic status, race, religion, social system, family structure and interrelations;
effects of gender on personal abilities, personality traits, motivation and
socialization; Individual abilities: I.Q, its origin, cognitive style, creativity and
testing consequences; the school as a social system: principal, teachers, special
service personnel, the students; classroom role structure, student/teacher roles,
teacher structure, relationship; the effectiveness of the school: characteristics
of students, school size, social context, equality of educational opportunity;
school environment: school board, government role in education, centralized
vs. decentralized school system and policy, effects of external examination;
cross-cultural comparison of societies and schools: relations of societies and
schools, work ideologies, moral instruction, vocational training, cross cultural
difference in achievement; some social issues in education today: social,
marital and family problems, adolescents, juvenile delinquents; educational
problems, religious conflicts, poverty, inequality, unemployment; population
problems, birth rate, health, minority groups, class conflict; HIV/AIDS and drug
abuse. Prerequisite EDU 111.
EDU 220 Introduction to Educational Psychology 3 Credits
Definition of educational psychology; importance of educational psychology
in learning; Behavioral theories of learning and their educational implications;
Classical Conditioning, Operant conditioning, Social learning; Concepts and
theories of reinforcement and punishment in the classroom; Cognitive theories
of learning; Piaget’s theory of cognitive development; Chomsky’s theory of
language development; Kohler’s theory of emotional development; Individual
differences; I.Q., Ability grouping, Reading ability; Bloom’s taxonomy of
educational objectives and its relevance and effectiveness in teaching;
Cognitive processes; memory; Theories of motivation and their application to
classroom instruction; Approaches to classroom management.
EDU 222 Human Growth and Development 3 Credits
Introduction to developmental theories and exceptionalities in human growth
and development. The meaning of change and delayed change; principles of
development and history of child development and education; theories of human
development, cognitive, affective, social, physical, psychosocial, humanistic
etc. Pre-natal, neo-natal, postnatal development; birth process – African and
Western approaches – Lamase; Leboyer approaches; beliefs, taboos, of births,
motor, language, personality, social, emotional development; traditional child
– rearing practices – birth, naming and adolescents ceremonies meaning and
definitional children; historical background of special education in developed
world and Africa; types, characteristics and causes of exceptionalities, early
intervention; assessment screening, referrals and services of the handicapped
children; educational policies; advocacy and pressure groups for handicapped
children and youth. Prerequisite EDU 220.
EDU 223 General Teaching Methods 3 Credits
The concept of education; goals and objectives of education; agencies
of education; types of education; nature and components of teaching and
learning process; a systems approach to classroom instruction; educational
aims and instructional objectives; Blooms Taxonomy of educational objectives;
principles of teaching; teaching strategies (e.g. lecture, discussion, project, field
trip, debate); introduction to the range of media in learning; communication
in the classroom; planning for instruction (syllabus, scheme of work, lesson
plan, record of work); preparation and use of learning and teaching materials;
preparation and use of learning/teaching materials; measurement and
evaluation; motivation and reinforcement; individual differences.
EDU 224 Educational Technology and Media 3 Credits
Definition of terms; concept of educational technology: instructional design,
systems approach to instruction; communication process: communication
model and learning, communication interactions in the classroom, barriers to
communication and the way to overcome them, effective communication in the
class-room; visual communication in learning; verbal and non-verbal aspects of
communication in the classroom; non-projected media: chalkboard, graphics,
charts, posters, still pictures and three dimensional materials; display boards:
flannel, peg, magnetic, felt boards; projected media: overhead projector,
multimedia – projector, slides, films strips, TV, video, DVDs, CDs, VCDs; audio:
tape recording, educational radio and broadcasting to schools; audio-visual;
realia: dioramas, specimen, models (textbooks, magazines, newspapers),
community resources; computer: online instruction, computer based instruction;
duplication of materials (duplicating machine, photocopier).
www.daystar.ac.ke
55
EDU 225 Curriculum Development 3 Credits
Meaning of curriculum; curriculum goals and objectives; theories of curriculum;
development; social and cultural forces affecting curriculum; philosophical
and psychological bases for curriculum design; curriculum designs and
patterns; the curriculum development process with special emphasis on the
development of schools curriculum in Kenya; domains of learning; formulating
learning objectives; organizing subject content; selecting learning experiences;
curriculum interpretation, implementation and assessment; developing a
curriculum unit; curriculum evaluation. Prerequisite EDU 223.
EDU 226 Exceptional Children 3 Credits
Definition of key terms and concepts in exceptional children; categories of
exceptional children: gifted and talented, children with learning disabilities,
visually impaired, hearing impaired, physically challenged, mentally
challenged, aggressive children, withdrawn children, emotionally disturbed
children, children living under difficult circumstances – street children, refugee
children, slum children, children of prisoners, abused and neglected children,
child laborers, children affected by HIV and AIDS, children in rehabilitation
homes; factors contributing to exceptional children; assessment of exceptional
children; interventional strategies for exceptional children; institutions and
interventional programmes for exceptional children; current trends and
immerging issues with regard to exceptional children; advocacy for the rights
of exceptional children. Prerequisite EDU 220, EDU 222.
EDU 310 Guidance and Counselling 3 Credits
Definition of guidance and counseling; distinction between guidance and
counseling; significance of guidance and counseling in early childhood
development; theories and principles of guidance and counseling;
psychodynamics; ethics of counseling; qualities and skills of an effective
counselor; types of counseling; counseling procedures; behavioral problems in
early childhood education; skills in guiding and counseling children; challenges
of counseling. Prerequisites EDU 220, EDU 222, EDU 226.
EDU 322 Educational Tests and Measurements 3 Credits
Definitions of tests, measurements and evaluation; classifications of tests;
purposes of tests; test construction: taxonomies of educational objectives, table
of specification, test item types; administration and scoring of tests; item analysis;
distractor analysis, item difficulty and discrimination; scales of measurement:
nominal, ordinal, interval, ratio; frequency tables and graphs; measures of
central tendency; mode, median, mean, percentiles; measures of dispersion;
range, variance, standard deviation; distribution curves and converted scores:
skewness, z- and t-scores; correlations; Rank Difference and Pearson Product
Moment; reliability; test retest, parallel forms, internal consistency, standard
error of measurement; validity; content, construct, predictive and concurrent.
Prerequisite EDU 220, EDU 222, EDU 226.
EDU 323 Comparative Education 3 Credits
Definition of comparative education; the aim of schools, schools and the
community; the major contrasting educational systems; education in Britain
– goals, objectives, structure; education in USA and Canada; education in
Russia, Japan and South Korea. Education in France, Germany; education in
Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria and South Africa. Prerequisite EDU 111, EDU 112.
56
www.daystar.ac.ke
EDU 361 Subject Methods (English Language) 3 Credits
The development of skills necessary for the teaching of English as a second
language; Aims and objectives of English language; approaches to teaching
pronunciation, grammar, reading and writing; Evaluative and critical study of
books and other materials for language teaching; Development of instruments
to measure language skills; Recognition and identification of various purposes
for which English is used; Current issues and problems to the teaching of English
as a second language; The relationship between literature and language in
the curriculum; Construction of schemes of work, Lesson plans and Records of
work; Identification, selection, acquisition, development and use of resources;
Evaluation of English learning. Prerequisite EDU 223, EDU 224.
EDU 362 Subject Methods (Literature in English) 3 Credits
Aims and objectives of Literature in English; Approaches to teaching oral
literature, poetry, drama, novel and short stories; An evaluative and critical
study of books and other materials for the teaching of Literature in English;
The development of instruments to measure learning in Literature in English;
Recognition and identification of various purposes for which Literature in English
is used; Current issues and problems to the teaching of Literature in English in
secondary schools in Kenya; The relationship between Language and Literature
in English in the curriculum; Evaluation of learning in Literature in English.
Schemes of work, lesson plans, and records of work; Identification, selection,
acquisition, development and use of learning resources. Prerequisite EDU
223, EDU 224.
EDU 365 Subject Methods (Christian
3 Credits
Religious Education) The nature of Religious Education and its place in school: Its contribution to the
upbringing of upright and responsible citizens; Ethics: Spiritual development
in the adolescent, Character formation and the nature of religious experience;
The Education Act of 1968 and its implications to the teaching of Religious
Education; Approaches to the teaching of Religious Education; Organization
and planning for teaching: Syllabus, Schemes of work, Lesson plans,
Preparation of class work and Records of work, Development, Improvisation
and use of learning resources; Measurement and evaluation of Religious
Education. Prerequisite EDU 223, EDU 224.
EDU 367 Subject Methods (Music) 3 Credits
Development of principles of teaching Music skills and concepts; Philosophical,
psychological and sociological basis of teaching Music; Systems approach
to teaching and learning; Preparation for teaching – writing schemes of
work, lesson plans and records of work; Identification, selection, acquisition,
development and use of resources; Evaluation of Music Learning; Core
activities. Prerequisites EDU 223, EDU 224.
EDU 368 Subject Methods (Business) 3 Credits
The nature of business studies and its role in the school curriculum; the
business studies syllabus; instructional objectives for business studies; role
of mathematics in teaching business studies; strategies of teaching business
studies; preparation of schemes of work, lesson plans and records of work
covered; appropriate learning resources (identifying, selecting, acquiring and
developing resources); purpose of measurement and evaluation of business
studies; testing students’ learning in business studies (types of tests, examination
marking schemes); micro teaching (demonstrations in a simulated classroom;
evaluation of demonstrations). Prerequisite EDU 223, EDU 224.
EDU 370 SUBJECT Methods (Mathematics) 3 Credits
An introduction to Mathematics education – philosophy and foundation of
Mathematics; what is Mathematics; general goals and objectives of teaching
Mathematics; the secondary school Mathematics curriculum and syllabus;
psychology and teaching of Mathematics; learning and instructional theories
in teaching Mathematics lessons; techniques of teaching Mathematics;
models for teaching and learning the objects of Mathematics (arithmetic,
algebra, geometry); teaching/learning resources in Mathematics; planning to
teach Mathematics; testing students’ learning in Mathematics (types of tests,
examination marking schemes); micro teaching (demonstrations in a simulated
classroom; evaluation of demonstrations). Prerequisite EDU 223, EDU 224.
EDU 372 SUBJECT Methods (Computer Science)
3 Credits
Introduction to Computer Science education – philosophy and foundation of
Computer Science, general goals and objectives of Computer Science; the
secondary school Computer Science curriculum and syllabus; learning and
instructional principles in teaching Computer Science lessons; models for
teaching and learning Computer Science; teaching/learning resources.
EDU 371 SUBJECT Methods (KISWAHILI) 3 Credit
Grammar
The course focuses on the secondary school syllabus, schemes of work,
lesson plan, methods of teaching; phonology; speeches; debates. Methods
of teaching comprehension; methods of teaching writing skills (summary,
composition and letters),identifying grammatical errors, corrections; and peer
and instructor assessment.
Kiswahili Literature
The course focuses on history of literature teaching, approaches to literature
teaching; functional and interactive approach; planning a literature lesson for
teaching of various aspects; and teaching and application of various Kiswahili
literature teaching methods. Use of teaching/learning aids, student evaluation
and assessment; evaluation of teaching methods; and remedial teaching are
also covered.
EDU 431 Education Administration & Planning 3 Credits
An introduction to the theory and practice in organizational leadership,
management and planning with particular emphasis on education as an
organization; principles of organization; definition of major terms and concepts
such as organization, leadership management, administration, planning,
organizational theory, management and organizations; organizational planning,
span of control and levels of management; selected theories of management:
Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, McGregor’s X and Y theories that influence
educational administration: Herzberg’s theory of motivation, bureaucracy,
organizational leadership; communication as a tool of organizational
management; the school as an organization, school administration, basic
considerations in leadership management, education system as an organization;
the Kenya educational structure: the Education Act as legal instrument for
governance; organizational structure of the Ministry of Education, educational
planning; rationale for educational planning, policies in educational planning,
financing of education, the cost sharing policy.
EDU 315 RESEARCH METHODS 3 Credits
Introduction to social research; Simple observation; Uses of available data;
Participant observation; Experimental method; Survey research; Data analysis;
Special techniques; Report preparation; Ethical issues in research; Quantitative
and qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: All 100 level courses.
EDU 507 Teaching Practice 6 Credits
Demonstration of acquired knowledge and skills in a classroom situation; class
control and discipline; preparation of detailed and appropriate schemes of
work for the term; preparation and utilization of appropriate lesson plans in
the classroom as well as supportive teaching notes and teaching/learning
resources; updated records for every class taught; setting classroom tests and
other forms of assessments; preparation of schemes of work; administering tests,
scoring and grading of scores; effective evaluation of learning; participation in
various school activities as assigned to him/her by the school’s administration;
perfecting of teaching skills by integrating the assessors’ input after every
assessment; report on the teaching practice experience at the end of the school
term; strategies of teaching; handling exceptional learners.
English Language Required Courses
Language Courses
Credit Hours
ENG 210 History and Development of the English
Language
3
ENG 212 The Phonology of English
3
ENG 214 English Structure and Usage
3
ENG 317 Psycholinguistics
3
ENG 320 Second Language Learning
3
ENG 413 Discourse Analysis
3
ENG 414 Sociolinguistics
3
ENG 416 Advanced English syntax
3
ENG 597 Senior Project
TOTAL
3
27
English Electives
a. Language (choose one course)
Credit Hours
ENG 408 Special Topics
3
ENG 496 Independent Study
3
www.daystar.ac.ke
57
English Literature Required Courses
Literature Courses
Credit Hours
ENG 211 African Literature
3
ENG 213 Theory in Literature
3
ENG 215 Oral Literature
3
ENG 229 Introduction to Dramatic Art
3
ENG 314 Creative Writing
3
ENG 315 Major Trends in World Literature
3
ENG 325 Shakespeare
3
ENG 327 Modern African Poetry
3
ENG 411 Stylistics and Literary Criticism
3
TOTAL
b. Literature (All students must choose one (1) course)
27
Credit Hours
ENG 324 European Drama
3
ENG 326 Survey of English Literature
3
ENG 412 African-American and Caribbean Literature
3
ENG 421 The English Novel
3
Kozi Katika Lugha
Kozi Katika Lugha
58
Masaa
KIS 113 Historia ya lugha ya Kiswahili
3
KIS 114 Misingi ya Lugha
3
KIS 115 Fonetiki na Fonolojia
3
KIS 210 Mofolojia na Sintaksia
3
KIS 310 Isimu jamii
3
KIS 212 Utangulizi wa fasihi
3
KIS 213 Nadharia za fasihi
3
KIS 312 Riwaya ya Kiswahili
3
KIS 315 Ushairi wa Kiswahili
3
KIS 412 Tamthilia ya Kiswahili
3
TOTAL
30
www.daystar.ac.ke
As a committed christian and rugby
player, I was looking for a university
that would give me the best in
my sporting career and desired
profession. Daystar has given me that.
Collins Injera
Computer Science
Music
Required Courses for Graduation for B. ED with Computer Science as one
of the subjects. To graduate in Education with Applied Computer Science as
one of the teaching subjects, the student must have completed the following
required courses with a total of 30 credit hours:
Credit Hours
ACS 111: Introduction to Programming
3
ACS112: Introduction to Object Oriented
Programming
3
ACS 211: Data Structures and Algorithms
3
ACS223: Computer Organization, Design and
Architecture
3
ACS 231: Operating Systems
3
ACS 351: Computer Networks
3
ACS 353: Internet Technologies
3
ACS 361: Introduction to Database Systems
3
MIS 281: Systems Analysis and Design Methods I
3
MIS 282: Systems Analysis and Design Methods II
3
TOTAL
30
Business Studies Courses
The following are the required courses for a Bachelor of Education student
taking business studies as one of the teaching subjects.
Course Code
Title
ACC 111
Financial Accounting
3
BUS 111
Business Studies
3
BUS 211
Management and Organization
3
BUS 113
Professional Business Communications
3
BUS 309
Business Finance
3
ECO 211
Principals of Economics (Micro)
3
ECO 212
Principals of Economics (Macro)
3
MAK 212
Principals of Marketing
3
MAT 111
Mathematics for Economics and Mgt 1
3
STAT 211
Business Statistics
3
TOTAL
Course
Credit Hours
MUS 114 Africa music ensemble
1
MUS 116 Music Literacy in Theory, Harmony and
counterpoint (African and Western)
3
MUS 118 Practical Musicianship I (African and
Western)
2
MUS 119 Applied Private Instruction I A & B (African
and Western)
2
MUS 217 Western Music History and Analysis I
2
MUS 218 Practical Musicianship II (African and
Western)
2
MUS 219 Applied Private Instruction II A & B (African
and Western)
2
MUS 221 Resources and Approaches for Schools and
Churches
2
MUS 312 Choral Conducting/ singing
2
MUS 317 Western Music History and Analysis
2
MUS 318 Practical Musicianship III (African and
Western)
2
MUS 319 Applied Private Instruction III A&B (African
and Western)
2
MUS 321 Music Composition (African and Western)
and Ethics
3
MUS 412 Enthnomusicological Survey of World Music
3
TOTAL
30
Credit Hours
30
Religious Studies Courses
Course Code
Title
BIL 312
Hermeneutics
3
BIL 342
Synoptic Gospels
3
BIL 432
Pentateuch
3
Bil 443
Romans
3
RET 231
Comparative World Religions
3
RET 333
History of Christianity Up To 1500
3
RET 334
History of Christianity After 1500
3
ETH 201
Introduction To Ethics
3
CHM 325
Christian Social Ethics
3
BIL 332
Hebrew Projects
TOTAL
Credit Hours
3
30
www.daystar.ac.ke
59
Economics
Economics Courses
School Based Programme
1st Year
Credit Hours
ECO211Principles of Microeconomics
3
ECO212 Principles of Macroeconomics
3
BIL 111
3
INS 111
3
BIL 112
3
ECO308 International Economics
3
ACS 102(101)
2
EDU 112
2
ENG 112
3
ECO309 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
ECO310 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
ENG 098/111
3
EDU 112
2
EDU 214
3
ECO311 Money & Banking
3
BIO 111
2
EDU 220
ECO312 African Economic Problems
3
TOTAL
8
TOTAL
9
TOTAL
ECO313 Economic Development
3
ECO316 Econometrics I
3
MAT111 Mathematics for Economics & Management I
3
3
INS 112
3
EDU 226
3
MAT-112 Mathematics for Economics & Management II
3
Teaching
Subjects
TOTAL
33
BIL 212
2
EDU 223
3
EDU 224
3
EDU 222
3
Teaching Subject
3
EDU 225 3
April (3 weeks)
August (3 weeks)
December (4 Weeks)
3
12
2nd year
Teaching Subject
TOTAL
Mathematics Major
8
Title
9
TOTAL 12
3rd Year
Students taking B/Ed Mathematics will take the following courses
Course Code
TOTAL
Credit Hours
EDU 310
3
EDU 323
3
ENV 112
2
3
RET 320
2
Teaching Subject
3
MAT 120
College Algebra (For Science and
Mathematics Students)
3
EDU 322
Teaching Subject
3
Teaching Subject
3
MAT 121
Differential Calculus
3
TOTAL
9
TOTAL
8
TOTAL
MAT 125
Analytical Geometry
3
MAT 221
Integral Calculus
3
MAT 223
Discrete Mathematics
3
EDU 431
3
Subject Methods
MAT 312
Linear Algebra
3
Teaching Subject
6
Teaching Subject
MAT 313
Vector Analysis
3
9
TOTAL
MAT 322
Probability and Statistics
3
MAT 323
Ordinary Differential Equations
3
MAT 324
Complex Analysis
3
MAT 334
Differential Equations
3
TOTAL
3
30
11
4th Year
Teaching Subject
9
6
TOTAL
9
TOTAL
12
Teaching Subject
6
EDU 507
6
ART/MUS/
LIT111
2
EDU 432
3
Teaching Subject
3
Teaching Subject
6
TOTAL
9
TOTAL
9
TOTAL
8
5th Year
NB:
The EDU 507 course will be taken during the 2nd term and finalized
through compilation of reports during the August holiday of the final year
of study.
60
www.daystar.ac.ke
FOUR YEAR PROGRAM FOR BACHELOR OF EDUCATION
1st YEAR
3rd YEAR
AUGUST SEMESTER
JANUARY SEMESTER
Art 111/Mus111/
Lit111
Art /
Music/
Lititerature
2
EDU111
History of Education
2
EDU112
Philosophy of Education
2
INS111
Communication and Culture
3
BIL111
Old Testament Introduction and Survey
3
1 Course
1Teaching Subject
3
Total
18
JANUARY SEMESTER
Guidance and Counseling
3
EDU 322
Education Tests and Measurements
3
EDU 323
Comparative Education
3
ENG111
Advanced Writing
3
EDU /361/362/
365 / 367/
368/370/372
Subject Methods for (2) Teaching Subjects
6
1 Course
1Teaching Subject
3
Total Credit Hours EDU 214
Sociology of Education & Contemporary Issues
3
EDU 220
Introduction to Educational Psychology
3
EDU 223
General Teaching Methods
3
EDU 224
Educational Technology and Media
3
1 Course
1Teaching Subject
3
1 Course
1Teaching Subject
3
Total
EDU 310
MAY SEMESTER
EDU 507
Teaching Practice
6
2 Courses
Teaching Subject
12
Total
MAY SEMESTER
18
4th YEAR
18
2nd YEAR
18
AUGUST SEMESTER
ENG 112
Advanced Writing
3
RET 320
Christianity and Islam in Africa
2
1 Course
1Teaching Subject
6
1 Course
1Teaching Subject
ACS101/ 102-102
for Computer Science Basic Computer Skills
students
2
BIO 111
Biology
2
BIL 112
New Testament Introduction and Survey
3
EDU 315
Research Methods
3
INS 112
Communication and Culture II
3
EDU 431
Education Administration and Planning
3
ENV 112
Environmental Education
2
2 Courses
1Teaching Subject
6
1 Course
1Teaching Subject
3
2 Courses
1Teaching Subject
2 Course
1Teaching Subject
3
Total
Total
6
Total
17
JANUARY SEMESTER
6
18
18
AUGUST SEMESTER
EDU 222
Human Growth and Development
3
EDU 225
Curriculum Planning and Development
3
EDU 226
Education for Exceptional Children
3
1 Course
1Teaching Subject
3
1 Course
1Teaching Subject
3
BILL 212
Introduction to Bible Doctrine
2
Total
17
www.daystar.ac.ke
61
FOUR YEAR PROGRAM FOR BACHELOR OF EDUCATION - SCHOOL BASED
1st YEAR
AUGUST SESSION
3rd YEAR
Credit Hours
AUGUST SESSION
BIL 111
3
INS 112
3
EDU112
2
EDU 224
3
2 Teaching Subject Courses
6
2 Teaching Subject Courses
6
TOTAL
11
TOTAL
12
DECEMBER SEMESTER
DECEMBER SEMESTER
ACS101/102
2
ENG 111
3
EDU112
2
225
3
2 Teaching Subject Courses
6
2 Teaching Subject Courses
6
TOTAL
10
TOTAL
12
APRIL SEMESTER
APRIL SEMESTER
INS111
3
ENV 112
2
EDU214
3
226
3
2 Teaching Subject Courses
6
2 Subject Methods
6
TOTAL
12
TOTAL
11
2nd YEAR
AUGUST SESSION
4th YEAR
Credit Hours
AUGUST SESSION
Credit Hours
BIO 111
2
EDU 310
3
EDU220
3
EDU 322
3
2 Teaching Subject Courses
6
2 Teaching Subject Courses
6
TOTAL
11
TOTAL
12
BI L 112
3
EDU 323
3
EDU222
3
RET 320
2
2 Teaching Subject Courses
6
EDU 431
3
TOTAL
12
BIL 212
2
TOTAL
10
DECEMBER SEMESTER
DECEMBER SEMESTER
APRIL SEMESTER
62
Credit Hours
Art /Mus/ Lit 111
3
EDU223
3
ENG 112
3
2 Teaching Subject Courses
6
Research Methods
3
TOTAL
11
2 Teaching Subject Courses
6
TOTAL
12
www.daystar.ac.ke
APRIL SEMESTER
POSTGRADUATE Programme
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN EDUCATION (PGDE)
Rationale
Regulations
There is an increasing number of untrained graduate teachers teaching in
schools on temporary terms. These teachers work for less pay without pension
because they are not trained. Their need to acquire and be equipped with
effective skills to communicate knowledge underscores the importance of a
Postgraduate Diploma in Education.
Admission Requirements
The purpose of the Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) is to train
university graduates currently employed as untrained graduate teachers.
Such training will equip them with the needed professional qualifications and
expertise necessary to successfully carry out their responsibilities as teachers or
managers in various fields of education.
•
The Postgraduate Diploma in Education is a one-year intensive programme
primarily designed to give untrained graduate teachers skills to carry out their
instruction with a Christian commitment.
The programme will be conducted for two separate groups: The first group
consists of teachers who will take the programme during the school holiday
periods of April, August, and December. These months are chosen because
they are normally vacation months for schools in Kenya and teachers from
any part of the country will be able to attend the course. The second group
consists of teachers within Nairobi who prefer to pursue their studies in the
evenings and on weekends and on e-learning mode. The programme will then
spread over a year and will be part of Daystar University Continuing Education
programme.
Student’s Assessment
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of the course the learner should be able to:
1.
Use the acquired critical knowledge, skills and attitudes in order to function
as professional Christian teachers in contemporary African schools.
2.
Apply relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes to handle different aspects
of teaching/learning efficiently and effectively.
3.
Integrate their Christian faith with intellectual and professional capacity
in their teaching profession in the context of the diverse and transformed
African cultural heritage.
4.
Effectively apply principles of servant leadership at different managerial
levels of the education systems in contemporary Africa.
5.
Acquire professional qualifications for higher studies or responsibilities in
the field of education.
•
•
Applicants must be holders of at least a Bachelor’s degree from a
recognized University or its equivalent where English was the main
language of instruction. Applicants who earned their degrees using other
languages shall be required to take basic and remedial English (ENG
096 and ENG 098 respectively).
In the process of admission, exemptions will be given and credit transfers
allowed for any of the courses being offered if the applicant has taken an
equivalent course in any of the recognized Universities.
The student must have attained a minimum grade of C in the course to
qualify for exemption.
Daystar University student’s assessment is based on final written examinations
and continuous assessment of individual student’s work. These include: quizzes,
assignments, projects, scheduled tests, term papers, practical work and final
examination, all of which contribute to the student’s final grade.
Grading System
a) The grading system is ordered as follows
Marks
Letter Grade
Grade Point
Significance
91-100
A
4.0
Superior
81-90
A-
3.7
“
76-80
B+
3.3
“
71-75
B
3.0
Average
66-70
B-
2.7
��
61-65
C+
2.3
��
56-60
C
2.0
��
<56
F
0.0
Unacceptable
(b) For the PGDE programme, any grade below “C” shall carry no credit and
shall be calculated as “0” grade point and will automatically carry an “F”
rating.
(c) A student is allowed to repeat a failed course until he/she attains an
acceptable grade. Repeat is allowed twice.
(d) Course grades are made up of 40% from the continuous assessment items
and 60% from the final examination except for practical courses where the
continuous assessment accounts for 60% and the final examination 40%.
www.daystar.ac.ke
63
(e) Teaching Practice will be graded purely on field assessments. The practical
courses include the following: Education Media, Subject Methods and
Teaching Practice.
PGDE Course Distribution
To be eligible for graduation, a student will be required to take twenty-seven (27)
credit hours and attain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.50 from the following.
B. Electives
Each Student will choose any two of the courses indicated below:
ACS 501 Basic Computer Knowledge
0(1)
BUS 517 Entrepreneurship and Innovations
0(1)
ENV 509 Introduction to Environmental Studies
0(1)
EDU 524 Guidance & Counseling
0(1)
HPE 513 First Aid
0(1)
Postgraduate Diploma Requirements
A. Core Courses
Credit Hours
EDU 508 Teaching Practice (3 months)
2
EDU 511 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of
Education
3
EDU 514 Sociology of Education & Contemporary
Issues
2
EDU 520 Introduction to Educational Psychology,
Tests and Measurements
3
EDU 521 Comparative Education
2
EDU 522 Human Growth and Development
2
EDU 523 General Teaching Methods and
Educational Media
2
EDU 531 Educational Administration and Planning
2
BIL 615 Biblical Foundations of Christian Service
2
EDU 525 Curriculum Planning &Development
2
Choose two courses from these:
EDU 542 Subject Methods: Business Studies
2
EDU 543 Subject Methods: English and Literature
2
EDU 544 Subject Methods: Christian Religious
Education
2
EDU 545 Subject Methods: Mathematics
2
EDU 546 Subject Methods: Physics
2
EDU 547 Subject Methods: Geography
2
EDU 548 Subject Methods: Chemistry
2
EDU 549 Subject Methods: Biology
2
EDU 500 Subject Methods: Kiswahili and Fasihi
2
EDU 552 Subject Methods: Music
2
PGDE Programme of Studies
GROUP 1 - School Holiday Studies
Note during the holidays:
2 Credit hour courses will be taught for 2 hours 10mins, for 5 days a week
3 Credit hour courses will be taught for 3 hours 15mins, for 5 days a week
April Holiday (3 weeks)
EDU 511 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of
Educatio
3
EDU 514 Sociology of Education and Contemporary
Issues
2
EDU 522 Human Growth and Development
2
TOTAL
7
August Holiday (3 weeks)
3
EDU 523 General Teaching Methods and Educational
Media
3
EDU 531 Educational Administration & Planning
2
TOTAL
8
December Holiday (7 weeks)
Credit Hours
EDU 521 Comparative Education
2
EDU 525 Curriculum Planning and Development
2
EDU 615 Biblical Foundations of Christian Service
2
EDU 525 Curriculum Development
2
Special Methods (Students will be required to take 2
credit hours for Special Methods in the two teaching
subjects)
4
TOTAL
www.daystar.ac.ke
Credit Hours
EDU 520 Introduction to Educational Psychology, Tests
and Measurements
Students must take 2 courses from the Electives carrying
0 credit.
64
Credit Hours
2 (0 Credit)
12
January - April Term
EDU 508 Teaching Practice
Credit Hours
2
GROUP II - Evening/ Weekend Group
Note: 2 Credit hour courses will be taught for 2 hours once a week
3 Credit hour courses will be taught for 3 hours, once a week
First Semester
Credit Hours
EDU 511 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of
Educatio
3
EDU 514 Sociology of Education and Contemporary
Issues
2
EDU 523 General Teaching Methods and Educational
Media
3
EDU 522 Human Growth & Development
2
TOTAL
10
Second Semester
Third Semester
EDU 521 Comparative Education
Credit Hours
2
Special methods (Students will be required to take two
credit hours for Special Methods in the two teaching
subjects)
4C
Students will be required to take 2 courses from
the Electives carrying 0 credit.
0 (2 Credit)
TOTAL
EDU 508 Teaching Practice (MAY OR JANUARY
SCHOOL TERM).
6
2 Credit Hours
Credit Hours
EDU 520 Introduction to Educational Psychology, Tests
and Measurements
3
EDU 525 Curriculum Planning & Development
2
EDU 531 Educational Administration & Planning
2
EDU 615 Biblical Foundations of Christian Service
2
TOTAL
9
June Semester (Optional)
Note during the June Semester:
1 Credit hour courses will be taught for 2 hours 20mins, once a week
2 Credit hour courses will be taught for 2 hours 15mins, twice a week
First Block
Credit Hours
EDU 521 Comparative Education
2
TOTAL
2
Second Block - Fourth Semester
Credit Hours
Note: 2 Credit hour courses will be taught for 2 hours 10 minutes, for 3
days a week
Special Methods (Students will be required to take 2 credit hours for
Special Methods in the two teaching subjects) 4 Credit hours
Students should take 2 courses from the Electives carrying
0 credit.
2 Hours (0
Credit)
TOTAL
4 Credit Hours
www.daystar.ac.ke
65
Course Description
ACS 501 Computer Literacy 0 (1 Credit)
This course is intended to form a basic introduction to Personal Computers
(PC) hardware and software applications. Basic PC hardware and software
will be introduced and also the following currently, used operating systems and
application programs:
. MS Windows XP (Operating System)
. MS WORD
. MS ACCESS
BUS 517 Entrepreneurship & Innovations
0 (1Credit)
Definition and meaning of entrepreneurship and innovation, the needs for
innovations in the country and communities; merits and demerits of
entrepreneurship; business prospects; financial aid, managing a business:
small vs. big, organizations of interest: women, youth and NGOs; the
management process in small and big businesses, in individual businesses,
in groups, humanresources management; motivation; other complex business
types; marketing principles: an overview of marketing; the marketing
concept; marketing communication, new product development and pricing
objectives; wholesaling, retailing and physical distribution; production and
operations management: fundamentals of production, the production
process and computerization; management information and computers;
money and banking - a brief introduction to insurance.
EDU 508 Teaching Practice
2 Credits
Demonstration of acquired knowledge and skills in a classroom situation,
preparation of detailed and appropriate schemes of work for the term by the
student, preparation and utilization of appropriate lesson plans in the classroom
as well as supportive teaching notes and teaching/learning resources,
updated records for every class taught, setting classroom tests and other forms
of assessments, administering tests and grading of pupils scripts, effective
evaluation of learning by student, participation in various school activities as
assigned to him/her by the school’s administration, and report writing with
regard to his/her teaching practice experience, at the end of the school term.
EDU 509 Introduction to Environmental Studies
0 (1Credit)
Foundations and perspectives of environmental education; the earth: its
environmental systems and
resources; environmental management,
demography and the environment; human settlements; eco systems; society
– culture and environmental awareness; source of energy: renewable and
non-renewable resources; deforestation and desertification; water resource
policy; environmental conservation; environment and human health;
environmental economics; nuclear science and radiation; global warming
and loss of stratospheric ozone; weathering; soil erosion and earthquakes;
technology and settlement; development and environment; chemicals and
environment pesticides and pest control; legal aspects of environment; teaching
of environmental education in the secondary schools.
66
www.daystar.ac.ke
EDU 511 Historical & Philosophical Foundations 3 Credits
of Education
Historical development of educational ideas from antiquity to the present:
ancient foundations of education: education among ancient civilizations:
historical survey of education and ideas plus systems in antiquity including
Sumerian, Egyptian, Indian, Chinese, Greek and Roman civilizations. Medieval
and Islamic foundations of education during the renaissance and protestant
reformation; education during the rise of modern science and technology;
factors that influenced the growth of education during the twentieth century
with particular emphasis on Africa; background to the rise, trends and
development of education in Kenya from the pre colonial era to the present.
Definition of philosophy, branches of philosophy; philosophy of education;
nature, meaning, and relevance of philosophy in education; the meaning,
role and functions of educational philosophy in teaching and learning, the
concepts of education: criteria, meanings, role and aims of education; a
clear understanding of the worldview and nature of man in the development
of meaningful philosophy of education; major schools of thought in philosophy
of education; efforts made so far in the formulation and development of an
African philosophy of education; steps towards the formulation of a more
meaningful African philosophy of education, the nature and theories of
knowledge and their relevance in education; education and human values;
education and scheme of values; democracy and education; democracy in
education; Christian view of education in the context of national development
stirring up the human quest.
EDU 514 Sociology of Education 2 Credits
& Contemporary Issues Introduction:
meaning of sociology, definition of society; origin and
development; branches of sociology; relation of sociology to other social
sciences; theories and methods of sociology; family social position: socioeconomic status, race, religion, social system, family structure and interrelations;
effects of gender on personal abilities, personality traits, motivation and
socialization; Individual abilities: I.Q, its origin, cognitive style, creativity
and testing consequences; the school as a social system: principal,
teachers, special service personnel, the students; classroom role structure,
student/teacher roles, teacher structure, relationship; the effectiveness of the
school: characteristics of students, school size, social context, equality of
educational opportunity; school environment: school board, government
role in education, centralized vs. decentralized school system and policy,
effects of external examination; cross-cultural comparison of societies
and schools: relations of societies and schools, work ideologies, moral
instruction, vocational training, cross cultural difference in achievement; some
social issues in education today: social, marital and family problems,
adolescents, juvenile delinquents; educational problems, religious conflicts,
poverty, inequality, unemployment; population problems, birth rate, health,
minority groups, class conflict; HIV/AIDS and drug abuse.
EDU 520 Introduction to EduCaTIONAl , 3 Credits
PSYCHOLOGY, Tests & Measurements
Definition of educational psychology; importance of educational psychology
in learning; Behavioral theories of learning and their educational
implications-Pavlov, Skinner; types of learning; motivation; reinforcement and
punishment; cognitive development– Piaget’s theory of cognitive development;
individual differences, I.Q., ability grouping, reading ability; instructional
objectives and Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives and its
relevance to curriculum development and effective teaching, definitions of
tests, measurements and evaluation; classifications of tests; purposes of tests;
test construction- taxonomies of educational objectives, table of specification,
test item types; administration and scoring of tests; item analysis- distracter
analysis, item difficulty and discrimination; scales of measurement- nominal,
ordinal, interval, ratio; frequency tables and graphs; measures of central
tendency- mode, median, mean, percentiles; measures of dispersion- range,
variance, standard deviation; distribution curves and converted scores;
correlations- Rank Difference and Pearson Product Moment; reliability- test
retest, parallel forms, internal consistency, standard error of measurement and
validity- content, construct, predictive and concurrent.
EDU 521 Comparative Education
2 Credits
Definition of comparative education; development of comparative education
as a discipline, problems in comparative education; the major contrasting
educational systems; education in Britain, USA, Canada, Russia, Japan,
South Korea, France, Germany, Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria and South
Africa; Factors that have led to the particularisation of a particular
country’s education system, the following elements of each of the systems
the country’s system of education: goals, objectives, structure, administration
and control, financing, teacher training, curriculum development, supporting
services and future trends education.
EDU 522 Human Growth & Development 3 Credits
An introduction to developmental theories and exceptionalities in human growth
and development. The meaning of change and delayed change; principles
of development and history of child development and education; theories
of human development, cognitive, affective, social, physical, psychosocial,
humanistic etc.; pre-natal, neo-natal, postnatal development; birth process –
African and Western approaches to birth – Lamaz; Leboyer approaches;
beliefs, taboos, of births, motor, language, personality, social, emotional
development; traditional child – rearing practices – birth, naming and
adolescents ceremonies meaning and definitional children; historical
background of special education in developed world and Africa; types,
characteristics and causes of exceptionalities, early intervention; assessment
screening, referrals and services of the handicapped children; educational
policies; advocacy and pressure groups for handicapped children and youth.
EDU 523 General Teaching Methods 2 Credits
& Educational Media
Nature and components of teaching and learning processes, educational
aims & instructional objectives, Blooms Taxonomy of educational objectives,
principles of teaching, teaching strategies, effective communication in the
class-room, a systems approach to classroom instruction, preparation and
use of learning and teaching materials, non-projected media: chalkboard,
graphic materials: charts, posters; display boards, flannel, peg, felt; projected
media: overhead projector, computer – projector, slides and films strips.
Photographic – still pictures, slides, audio, visual media; tape recording,
educational radio and broadcasting to schools; television and video, computer
and instruction.
EDU 524: Guidance and Counselling
2 Credits
Theories, methods and techniques of counselling, the role of a teacher
counselor, teacher, counselor and colleagues, role conflicts, the place of the
family in guidance and counseling, function of the school in individual
and group counseling, peer counselling, assessment, screening, referrals
and mediation of counsellee, skills in counseling those affected and infected
by HIV/AIDS.
EDU 525 Curriculum Studies
2 Credits
Meaning of curriculum; curriculum goals and objectives; theories of curriculum
development; social and cultural forces affecting curriculum; philosophical
and psychological bases for curriculum design; curriculum designs and
patterns; the curriculum development process with special emphasis
on the development of school curriculum in Kenya; domains of learning;
formulating learning objectives; organizing subject content; selecting learning
experiences; curriculum interpretation: implementation and assessment;
developing a curriculum unit; curriculum monitoring and evaluation.
EDU 531 Educational Administration
2 Credits
& Planning An introduction to the theory and practice in organizational leadership,
management and planning with particular emphasis on education as an
organization; principles of organization; definition of major terms and
concepts such as organization, leadership management, administration,
planning, organizational theory,
management
and organizations;
organizational planning; span of control and levels of management; selected
theories of management: Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, McGregor’s X and
Y theories that influence educational administration: Herzberg’s theory
of motivation, bureaucracy, organizational leadership; communication as
a tool of organizational management; the school as an organization, school
administration, basic considerations in leadership management, education
system as an organization; the Kenya educational structure; the Education Act
as legal instrument for governance; organizational structure of the Ministry of
Education: educational planning; rationale for educational planning, policies
in educational planning, financing of education, the cost sharing policy.
EDU 542 Subject Methods (Business Studies)
2 Credits
The nature of business studies and its role in the school curriculum, the business
studies syllabus and the strategies of teaching business studies; preparation
of schemes of work, lesson plans and records of work covered; identifying,
selecting, acquiring resources and developing appropriate learning
resources; measurement and evaluation of business studies.
www.daystar.ac.ke
67
EDU 543 Subject Methods (English Language
2 Credits
& Literature in English)
The development of language skills necessary for teaching of English as
a second language; aims and objectives of English language and
literature; an evaluative and critical study of books and other materials for
language teaching; the development of instruments to measure linguistic skills;
recognition and identification of various purposes for which English is used;
current issues and problems in the teaching of English language in Kenyan
Secondary Schools; The relationship between literature and language in the
curriculum; current issues in teaching literature with reference to the secondary
schools; approaches to teaching oral literature, poetry, drama, novel and short
stories; construction of schemes of work, lesson plans and records of work
covered; identification, selection, acquisition and use of resources; tests and
measurements of English and Literature teaching/learning.
EDU 544 Subject Methods: Christian 2 Credits
Religious Education
Organization and planning; techniques of teaching CRE; planning for
instructional objectives, lesson plans, schemes of work, records of work
covered; identification, selection, acquisition and use of learning resources;
demonstration of teaching skills in a simulated classroom; evaluation of the
video recorded lessons.
EDU 545: Subject Methods (Mathematics)
2 Credits
Principles of teaching applied to Mathematics, teaching skills, curricula
issues, philosophy and foundations of mathematics, preparation of minilessons for teaching in a simulated classroom situation and evaluation of
the same on video. An introduction to mathematics education; philosophy
and foundation of mathematics; general goals and objectives of mathematics;
the secondary school mathematics curriculum and syllabus; learning and
instructional theories in teaching mathematics; models for teaching and learning
the objects of mathematics; teaching/learning resources.
EDU 546: Subject Methods (Physics)
2 Credits
The meaning of science education; science as a dynamic process; scientific
methods; brief history of physics; investigative techniques in physics: different
types of tests, statistical analysis of tests; project testing; physics teaching
in secondary schools: critical analysis of different Physics syllabi used
in secondary schools; schemes of work, lesson planning, records of work
covered; teaching strategies: class experiments, demonstrations, projects,
field trips; tests and measurement in physics: written exams, different
types of tests, practical assessments, project assessments with emphasis on
investigative and problem solving approach; laboratory facilities and teaching
materials; laboratory equipment procurement and storage, laboratory design,
safety and management; appropriate text books.
68
www.daystar.ac.ke
EDU 547 Subject Methods: Music
2 Credits
Development of principles of teaching Music skills and concepts; philosophical,
psychological and sociological basis of teaching music; systems approach
to teaching and learning; preparation for teaching – writing schemes of work,
lesson plans and records of work; identification, selection, acquisition,
development and use of resources; evaluation of music learning; core activities.
BIL 615: Biblical Foundations of Christian Service 2 Credits
Introduction and definition of terms: Kingdom of God; servanthood; Jesus
teaching on the Kingdom of God; parables of the Kingdom; the teaching of
the early church on the Kingdom of God; various views on the Kingdom of
God; ethics of the Kingdom; implication of Kingdom teaching for believers;
analysis of Christian service/ servant hood; Biblical teaching on Christian
service; Christian service and the contemporary world; integration of Kingdom
ethics into Christian life.
HPE 511 First Aid 2 Credits
Definition and meaning of terms such as CPR; Heimlich maneuver, artificial
respiration, and ABC of first aid; why and when first aid is administered;
when first aid is terminated; respiration and respiration disorders; circulation
and circulatory disorders; nervous system and unconsciousness; wounds and
bleeding; first aid for sports injuries; injuries to bones, splitting; Injuries
to muscles; ligaments and joints; burns and extremes of temperature;
aches, foreign bodies poisoning; fire drills and evacuation; R.I.C.E. - Rest, Ice,
compression, elevation, lifting and carrying
ENV 509 Introduction To Environmental Studies
1 Credits
The need to study the environment, introduction of concepts, environmental
pollution, impact of pests and pesticides on the environment, role of man
on the environment, population and resources of energy, deforestation and
desertification, environmental conservation, the environment and human health,
nuclear science and radiation, weathering, soil erosion and earthquakes.
DEPARTMENT OF PEACE & INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
Bachelor of Arts in Peace & Conflict Transformation
Rationale
The purpose of this program is to integrate theory and practice with a view to
preparing students to serve as change agents in war torn societies in Africa
and the world.
The Peace and Conflict Transformation (PCT) program recognizes conflict as
an inevitable phenomenon in human relationships.
It emphasizes on the transformation of conflicts and the development of nonviolent mechanisms of responding to conflicts.
In addition, the Programme is concerned with factors and conditions that
make peace and justice possible including the promotion and protection of
human rights, human security, and the causes of poverty and injustices in
Africa.
Admission Requirements for the programme
Applicants seeking admission into the programme must satisfy the following:
1. Be Born-Again Christians
2. Be proficient in the English language
3. One must satisfy any of the following minimum requirements:
Direct entrants:
Graduates of Daystar
Diploma or Pre-University programme who have attained a GPA of 2.50 in a
scale of 4.0
Student assessment policy
1.
Students will be assessed through continuous assessment tests accounting
for 30% of the final grade.
2.
Students will take an End-of-Semester Examination accounting for 70% of
the final grade
3.
Students will participate in field trips and be required to write reflection
papers whose grade will be in-built in the continuous assessment tests
(30%).
4.
Students will also be required to undertake a supervised internship
whose grading will consist of 60% awarded for a written report and
40% for field evaluation. Alternatively, a student may write a senior
project paper and submit three bound copies to be distributed as
follows: One for the University Library, the host department and the
student respectively.
Requirements for graduation
Be a holder of Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) with a minimum aggregate of C+ (Plus) or its equivalent Examination Certificate. In addition, a prospective applicant must have obtained a B-(minus) in either History or Geography in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education or its Equivalent Examination Certificate.
Credit Hour combinations
Mature entrants:
Electives in Peace and Conflict Transformation
Mature Age Entry to Undergraduate Programmes: There is a mature age
qualifying scheme for admission to the University, the conditions of which are:
Internship
•
Candidates who have attained a Diploma from a recognized institution
will be considered for admission to the undergraduate programme if the
overall grade is equivalent to C+ regardless of their secondary school
performance.
•
Admission based on the acquired Diploma performance should meet
individual subject requirement.
Credit Hours
General Education Required Courses
47
Peace and Conflict Transformation Required Courses
52
A minor of a students’ choice
21
Total
9
3
132
www.daystar.ac.ke
69
Required Courses
Courses inculcating values for Peacebuilding
ETH 202: Introduction to Ethics of War and Peace
3
PEA 301: African culture and Peacebuilding
3
CHM 224: Introduction to Christian Counseling
3
CHM 421: Christian – Muslim Relations
3
PEA 285: Biblical Theology of Peacebuilding
3
PEA 386: Advocacy: The Church’s Mission for a Just
Society
2
Skills: Applied & Experiential Courses
18 Credit Hours
PEA 312: Disaster Management
3
PEA 242: Communication and conflict transformation
3
PEA 345: Strategic Peacebuilding
3
PEA 365: Introduction to Refugee studies
3
PEA 410: Environmental conflict and Management
3
PEA 508: Internship in Peace and Conflict
Transformation
3
Knowledge: Theories of Conflict and Peacebuilding
18 Credit Hours
PEA 240: Conflict theory
3
PEA 141: Introduction to peace studies
3
POL 201: Political Science
3
POL 220: International Relations
3
POL 320: Diplomacy: Theory and Practice
3
PEA 407: Human Security
3
PEA 363: Peace and International Human Rights law
3
Courses recommended for electives
70
17 Credit Hours
9 Credit Hours
COM 223: Public Speaking
3
COM 226: Interpersonal and Group Communication
3
SWK 213: Social Work and the Church
3
SWK 412: Social Policy and Social Welfare
Administration
3
DEV 318 Human Resource Management
3
SWK 413: Gender and Development
3
PEA 405 Peace Education
3
PEA 406: Peace Missions and Peacekeeping
3
PEA 412: African Politics and Society
3
www.daystar.ac.ke
I am an alumnus of Daystar University,
Class of 2010. I was the chairman of
DCF- Daystar Christian Fellowship,
apart from class work i was in drama
and thats why i am where i am today.
For any young man out there, let me
tell you that i am the testimony that
Daystar creates STARS!
Eric Omondi
Suggested 4-year plan of study for B.A in Peace and Conflict Transformation
First Year
First Semester
PHL 111
INS 111
BIL 111
ENG 098 OR 111
ART 111 OR MUS 111
OR LIT 111
MAT 102/Economics 111
Total
Second Semester
3
3
3
3
2
2
16
ACS 101
BIL 112
INS 112
ENG 111 OR 112
PHY 112
2
3
3
3
2
BIO 111
Total
2
15
Second Year
First Semester
INS 212
HPE 113
POL 220
BIL 212
PEA 285
ETH 202
Minor
Total
Second Semester
2
1
3
2
3
3
3
17
CHM 224
POL 320
PEA 240*
PEA 301*
POL 201
Minor
3
3
3
2
3
3
17
Total
Third Year
First Semester
INS 313
RET 320
PEA 312
PEA 141
PCT Elective
Minor
Total
Second Semester
3
2
3
3
3
3
17
PEA 242
PEA 345
PEA 407
RET 321
Minor
Minor
Total
3
3
3
2
3
3
17
Fourth Year
First Semester
CHM 421
INS 412
PEA 386
PEA 410
PCT Elective
Minor
Total
Second Semester
3
3
2
3
3
3
17
PEA 363
PEA 365
PCT Elective
PCT Elective
Minor
Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
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71
To graduate with a minor in Peace and Conflict Transformation a student shall
be required to fulfill the following requirements.
Required courses
Credit Hours
PEA 240: Conflict theory
3
PEA 241: Introduction to peace studies
3
PEA 285: Biblical Theology of Peacebuilding
3
PEA 312: Disaster Management
3
PEA 345: Strategic Peacebuilding
3
TOTAL
15
Courses available for electives in PCT (Students to choose a total of only 6
hours)
ETH 202: Introduction to Ethics of War & Peace
3
POL 320: Diplomacy: Theory & Practice
3
PEA 242 Conflict communication & conciliation
3
PEA 363: Peace and International Human Rights law
3
PEA 365: Introduction to Refugee studies
3
PEA 405: Peace Education
3
PEA 406: Peace Missions and Peacekeeping
3
PEA 407: Human security
3
PEA 410: Environmental Conflict & Management
3
Any other with approval from the head of department
3
Course descriptions
CHM 224 Introduction to Christian Counseling
3 Credits
To provide students with an introduction to the principles and theories of
counseling and to develop basic skills for the practice of counseling based on
a Biblical theology of God, man, creation, the fall and redemption. The course
also provides opportunities for students to practice counseling, and to become
familiar with local counseling facilities
CHM 421 Christian – Muslim Relations
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to facilitate positive relationships between
Christians and Muslims. This will be accomplished by providing a foundational
understanding of the cause of conflicts between the two faith communities and
approaches toward interfaith peacebuilding.
COM 223 Public Speaking 3 Credits
The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to the theories and skills
of public speaking. The course helps the student understand and apply the
principles of effective speech preparation in order to be able to produce
creative, effective public speeches for formal and informal settings.
COM 226 Interpersonal & Small 3 Credits
Group Communication
The purpose of the course is to examine interpersonal and small group
communication processes including theories of interpersonal and group
communication, preparation and management of group interactions, group
formation and development, group leadership, interviewing, self-disclosure,
perception, relationships and interpersonal conflicts in everyday life.
COM 323 Communication Systems in Africa
3 Credits
This course uses the African experience to impart to the student a conceptual
and contextual knowledge of the link between mass communication and other
forces in society. In so doing, the course aims at sharpening the communication
skills of students as a tool for grasping a holistic picture of society and the place
of the information media in it. Prerequisites: INS 111, INS 112.
ETH 202 Introduction to Ethics of War & Peace
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to three broad ethical
questions. First, when, if ever, is recourse to arms legitimate? Second, what
constraints should apply to “just or/and unjust wars? And third, how should war
end in relation to peace and justice? These three questions will be systematically
discussed by critically examining a selection of writings by historical and
modern secular and religious thinkers. The empirical as well as the normative
premises of their thinking, and their line of reasoning, will be discussed.
PEA 285 Biblical Theology of Peace building 3 Credits
This course seeks to examine the theology of peace and peacebuilding from a
Biblical perspective, and to underline the role of the Church and Para-Church
organizations/civil society organizations in creating an authentic culture of
peace and a peaceful society. The course will expose students to Biblical
concepts of reconciliation, forgiveness, grace, mercy, justice, truth and love
with a view to promoting an ethic of non-violence and reconciliation work in a
wide variety of services both within and outside the church.
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PEA 312 Disaster Management
3 Credits
This course seeks to introduce students to the concept of disaster management
and to examine natural and man-made disasters with a view to seeking ways
of reducing the risk of disaster in communities.
PEA 405 Peace Education
3 Credits
This course seeks to develop attitudes and skills for living together, preventing
violence, and to develop constructive attributes and behavior that encourage
the practice of peace in everyday life.
PEA 240 Conflict Theory
3 Credits
The course aims at surveying and critically examining the theoretical
explanations on the causes and conditions of war, violence, and conflict with a
view to introducing students to the approaches used in the study of conflict and
seeking possible solutions to these problems.
PEA 406 Peace Missions and Peacekeeping
3 Credits
This course provides a foundation to the students of the principles, practices
and rationale of international peacekeeping operations.
PEA 141 Introduction to Peace Studies
3 Credits
The purpose of the course is to conscientize students towards non-violent
approaches to dealing with interpersonal relations and social justice/social
injustice and to understand and address the root causes of problems, and nonviolent ways to transform conflict and end inequity
PEA 242 Communication & Conflict Transformation 3 Credits
The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with approaches to
conflict transformation, conflict resolution, and negotiation and conciliation skills
from the perspective of transformative theory. Students will also be introduced
to the dynamics of intrapersonal, interpersonal, intragroup, and intergroup
conflict with a view to enabling them apply this knowledge in a wide variety of
settings in order to promote conflict transformation.
PEA 345 Strategic Peacebuilding
3 Credits
This course seeks to introduce students to the concepts, actors, approaches
and values of peacebuilding and to equip them with the appropriate skills
for purposes of evaluating the root causes of conflict, issues and interests in
a conflict, conflict ripeness and for implementing appropriate intervention
functions and mediation activities in any given conflict situation.
PEA 363 Peace and International Human Rights Law 3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to enable students understand the fundamental rights
and duties protected under international and domestic human rights instruments
and to relate them to the theory and practice of peace and peacebuilding.
PEA 386 Advocacy: The Church’s Mission 3 Credits
for a Just Society
This course explores the Old Testament prophetic Tradition and evaluates the
life, works, and ministry of Christ and other New Testament writers from the
perspective of social justice and underscores the role of the Church in promoting
peace and justice at all levels of the society.
PEA 301 African Culture And Peace Building 3 Credits
This course explores the concepts of conflict, peace and conflict resolution from
a traditional African perspective and assesses African indigenous mechanisms
of dispute settlement and conflict resolution vis-Г -vis Western theories of conflict
resolution with a view to encourage and challenge students to incorporate
lessons learned in contemporary conflict transformation.
PEA 407 Human Security
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to re-conceptualize security from the people’s
perspective vis-Г -vis the traditional understanding of security including regional
stability and territorial security of nation states with a view to influencing policy
formulation and decision making in Africa.
PEA 410 Environmental Conflict Management
3 Credits
The course will examine the relationship between environmental degradation
and intrastate and international conflicts, the dynamics of the world economy
and the ways in which it contributes to environmental degradation, and
the issue of environmental conflict resolution including various national and
international norms and regimes in place to help mitigate such conflicts.
PEA 412 African Politics and Society
3 Credits
This course will introduce the student the approaches to the study of African
politics and society, as well as presenting the main elements of an interactive
method for the investigation of political structures, processes and change. To
this end, the course will provide basic concepts, theoretical perspectives, and
essential information that are necessary to understand the dynamics of Africa
politics and society, as well as to establish in broad strokes the complexities
and diversities of African politics and society since independence.
This course will also seek to provide a basic knowledge of political events
and a deeper comprehension of major problems, processes and trends. This
course, therefore, constitutes a preliminary exploration into the multiple forces
that make up contemporary Africa.
PEA 508 Practicum in Peace & Conflict 3 Credits
Transformation
The purpose of the course is to provide students the opportunity to engage in
practical work in the field of peace and conflict transformation. Students must
be registered in the peace and transformation major, be in their final year of
study, and have completed all required courses for the major.
POL 201 Political Science
3 Credits
The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to political science as
the phenomenon of conflict and cooperation, the exercise of power, order,
authority and justice, the making of collective decisions, and the allocation of
scarce resources. The student will be able to better understand and analyze
the complex nature of conflict so that he/she can act as a peacemaker and
peacebuilder in a wide variety of reconciliation ministries both in the private
and the public realm.
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73
POL 220 International Relations
3 Credits
This course is to give the students a scientific perspective of the variables that
affect politics at the international level. This course will also introduce the
theories and paradigms of international relations, give overview of the history of
international history and important aspects of international relations; including
diplomacy and negotiation, foreign policy making, the concept national
security, international organization, and international political economy. Here,
the stress will be placed on the ability to use concepts, models, theory and
paradigm as tools to analyze current political issues, disputes, and trends.
POL 320 Diplomacy: Theory & Practice 3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the art and practices
of diplomacy and negotiation, as well as the role diplomacy plays and has
played in interstate conflict, cooperation and the peaceful conduct of relations
amongst nation-states. The course will also introduce students to various
negotiation strategies and communication skills through simulation exercises.
The knowledge and skills acquired from the course should enhance the students’
ability to analyze and transform conflicts in a peaceful manner.
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SWK 213 Social Work and the Church 3 Credits
Social work focuses on the ecological model and person in-situation. In this
course there is limited consideration of issues in social work. It explores the
relevance of spiritual ideas and thoughts to social work practice through the
socio-spiritual approach as it applies to social work theory and practice.
MINOR in Peace & Conflict Transformation
Courses recommended for free electives
Requirements for Graduation with a B.A. Minor in Peace &
Conflict Transformation
COM 223: Public Speaking
3
COM 226: Interpersonal and Group Communication
3
SWK 213: Social Work and the Church
3
SWK 412: Social Policy and Social Welfare
Administration
3
DEV 318 Human Resources Management
3
DEV 415 Participatory Development Techniques/
Methodology
3
SWK 413: Gender and Development
3
PEA 363: Peace and International Human Rights law
3
PEA 405 Peace Education
3
PEA 406: Peace Missions and Peacekeeping
3
PEA 412: African Politics and Society
3
PSY 411 Social Psychology
3
PSY 413 Group Dynamics in Psychology
3
To graduate with a B.A in Peace and Conflict Transformation a student must
meet the following:
Credit Hour combinations
Credit Hours
General Education (Required Courses)
46
Peace & Conflict Transformation (Required Courses)
52
A minor of a students’ choice
21
Electives in Peace and Conflict Transformation
9
Internship
3
Total
131
Required Courses
Courses inculcating values for Peacebuilding
Credit Hours
ETH 202: Introduction to Ethics of War and Peace
3
PEA 301: African culture and Peacebuilding
2
CHM 224: Introduction to Christian Counseling
3
CHM 421: Christian – Muslim Relations
3
PEA 285: Biblical Theology of Peacebuilding
3
PEA 386: Advocacy: The Church’s Mission for a Just
Society
2
Total
16
Skills: Applied & Experiential Courses
Credit Hours
PEA 312: Disaster Management
3
PEA 242*: Communication and conflict transformation
3
PEA 345: Strategic Peacebuilding
3
PEA 365: Introduction to Refugee studies
3
PEA 410: Environmental conflict and Management
3
PEA 508: Internship in Peace and Conflict
Transformation
3
Total 18
18
Knowledge: Theories of Conflict and Peacebuilding
9 Credit Hours
Credit Hours
PEA 240*: Conflict theory
3
PEA 141*: Introduction to peace studies
3
POL 201: Political Science
3
POL 220: International Relations
3
POL 320: Diplomacy: Theory and Practice
3
PEA 407: Human security
3
Total 18
18
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75
Suggested 4-year plan of study for B.A in Peace and Conflict Transformation including
the general education component
4th Year
1st Year
FIRST SEMESTER
SECOND SEMESTER
FIRST SEMESTER
SECOND SEMESTER
PHL 111
3
ACS 101
2
CHM 421
3
PEA 363
3
INS 111
3
BIL 112
3
INS 412
3
PEA 365
3
BIL 111
3
INS 112
3
PEA 386
2
PCT Elective
3
ENG 098 OR
111
3
ENG 111 OR
112
3
PEA 410
3
PCT Elective
3
PCT Elective
3
Minor
3
Total
15
ART 111 OR
MUS 111
OR LIT 111
2
PHY 112
2
MAT 102/
Economics 111
2
BIO 111
2
Total
16
Total
15
Minor
3
Total
17
To graduate with a minor in Peace and Conflict Transformation a student shall
be required to fulfill the following requirements.
Required courses
PEA 240: Conflict theory
3
PEA 141: Introduction to peace studies
3
3
PEA 285: Biblical Theology of Peacebuilding
3
3
2nd Year
FIRST SEMESTER
INS 212
SECOND SEMESTER
2
CHM 224
HPE 113
1
POL 320
3
PEA 312: Disaster Management
POL 220
3
PEA 240*
3
PEA 345: Strategic Peacebuilding
3
BIL 212
2
PEA 301*
2
Total
15
PEA 285
3
POL 201
3
ETH 202
3
PEA 141*
3
Total
17
Minor
3
Total
17
3rd Year
FIRST SEMESTER
76
Credit Hours
SECOND SEMESTER
INS 313
3
PEA 242*
3
RET 320
2
PEA 345
3
PEA 312
3
PEA 407
3
Minor
3
RET 321
2
PCT Elective
3
Minor
3
Minor
3
Minor
3
Total
17
Total
17
www.daystar.ac.ke
Courses available for electives in PCT minor (Students to choose a total of
only 6 hours)
ETH 202: Ethics of War and Peace
3
POL 320: Diplomacy: Theory and Practice
3
PEA 242 Conflict communication & conciliation
3
PEA 363: Peace and International Human Rights law
3
PEA 365: Introduction to Refugee studies
3
PEA 405: Peace Education
3
PEA 406: Peace Missions and Peacekeeping
3
PEA 407: Human security
3
PEA 410: Environmental conflict and Management
3
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Introduction
The School of Business and Economics aims at equipping business servant leaders for
Africa with a world-class business education. The school concerns itself with issues
ranging from servant-leadership, sustainable business management and ethical business
behavior. The school also aims to contribute to an advancement of governance, justice
and economic development through developing and increasing knowledge and skills.
The School degree programmes prepare students for the personnel needs of the
changing business environment and for participation in the global economy.
Objectives of the School
•
•
•
•
•
•
To enable the student acquire advanced knowledge in different management
disciplines.
To equip the student with knowledge and skills needed for playing an effective role
in running of organizations.
To enable the student to learn to obtain knowledge needed to keep for the ever
changing global environment.
To provide the student with opportunity to learn to be creative and innovative
manager.
To enable the student to adopt Christian values and ethics that will help in building
a just society within organizations and without.
To enable the student to learn to be socially responsive manager who has a desire
to respond positively to the social, economic and environmental problems affecting
the society.
Department of Commerce
Diploma programmes in
• Air Hostess and Cabin Crew Studies
• Air Travel Ticketing and Tourism
• Business Administration and
Management
• Business Information Technology
• Entrepreneurship
• Finance
• Hospitality Management
• Human Resource Management
• Purchasing and Business Logistics
• Sales and Marketing Management
• Tours and Travel
Undergraduate Programmes
•
Bachelor of Commerce in
- Accounting
- Business Administration
- Purchasing and Business Logistics
- Commerce Law Option,
- Management Information Systems
- Bachelor of Commerce - Law Option
Postgraduate Programmes
• Master of Business Administration
(MBA) (Strategic Management, Human
Resources Management, Finance or
Marketing).
Department of Economics
Undergraduate Programmes
• Bachelor of Science in Economics
www.daystar.ac.ke
77
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
About the Department
The Department of Commerce offers Diplomas in Business Administration and Management, Sales and Marketing Management, Purchasing and Business
Logistics, Business Information Technology, tours and Travel, Hospitality Management, Air Travel Ticketing and Tourism, Human Resource Management,
Entrepreneurship, Finance and Air Hostess and Cabin Crew Studies; Bachelor of Commerce degree with majors in Accounting, Business Administration and
Management, Marketing, Management Information Systems, Purchasing, Business Logistics and Business Law Option, besides a Bachelor of Science degree
in Economics. The Bachelor of Commerce degree programme is broadly based and aims at enabling the student to integrate knowledge and skills acquired in
various fields of commerce with the right relationship with God and people. Its objective is to produce a well rounded person, a worthy citizen of the nation and
the world at large, ready to face challenges and contribute fully to the development of society and the community they live in.
DIPLOMA PROGRAMMES
Diploma in Air Hostess and Cabin Crew
Studies
Rationale
Tourism is one of the world’s largest and fastest growing industries. In terms of
revenue and number of people involved, it has become world’s number two
industry next to petroleum industries.
It helps nations to earn a large sum of foreign exchange without exporting
any tangible product. Tourism helps to earn the much needed foreign
exchange for our country. Tourism ranks as one of the top foreign exchange
earning industries. The Government of Kenya is therefore taking special efforts
to increase foreign exchange earning through tourism such as preserving
national parks, beaches, and historical sites. The industry needs professionals
to handle the foreign tourists visiting the country.
Having the above need of trained personnel in mind, new courses have been
designed for two year diploma in tourism to enable individuals enter the field
of tourism including airlines, hotel industry and travel trade as junior level
executives.
The Air Hostess and Cabin Crew Studies Diploma is a broad market oriented
programme intended to provide managerial and operational orientation to
the emerging tourism industry. The programme is designed to develop well
rounded executives in air travel facilities.
Objectives of Diploma in Air Hostess and Cabin Crew Studies
The student will gain a broad understanding of cabin crew and air hostess
functions and also become familiar with related subject matters such as
customer services and industry regulations of dealing with people.
After successfully completion, the student will be able to:
1. learn ways of communicating with people in the internal and external
environment of an organization;
2. acquire and learn first aid, safety management skills and emergency
management techniques;
3. equip students with interpersonal skills of managing people,
communicating and handling customer and build lifelong;
4. relationships with consumers based on limited and complete
personalization.
Admission Requirements
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and
Mathematics C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass
or the equivalent for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however,
a minimum entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an
applicant admission to the University.
Additional Industry Requirements
Students wishing to pursue Diploma in Air Hostess and Cabin Crew Studies
will be required to meet the following additional requirements:
1. Height 5 �’2’’ (157.5 cm) to 5 �’9’’ (173.3 cm) for ladies. Men 5�’3’’
(160 cm) to 6 �’0’’ (182.9 cm)
2. Weight shall be proportional to the height. 50.8kg – 54kg Small frame
5 �’2’’ – 53kg – 58kg Medium frame 57kg – 64kg Large frame.
3. Attractive
Student Assessment
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers, project
work, and final examinations.
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www.daystar.ac.ke
Final examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at
the end of the semester. The relative weight of the continuous assessment to
the final examination will vary from course to course and will be specified
in the course syllabi. For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of
what is required is mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning,
assessment will be based on 70% for final examination and 30% for
continuous assessment. For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e.
courses that require the students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by
the particular content, assessment will be based on 60% for final exam and
40% for continuous assessment.
Practical: Students will be required to do class presentations and seminars.
They will be required to do an attachment in a business organization. A
University lecturer and the person directly in charge of the student in the
business organization will supervise and assess the student.
Credit Hours
AHC 023: Customer Care Service
3
AHC 024: Public Relations
3
AHC 025: First Aid and Safety Management
3
AHC 026: People Management
3
TSM 021: Tourism Principles and Practices
3
TSM 022: Hospitality Management
3
TSM 027: French
3
Total Concentration Courses
21
Total Credit Hours
64
Diploma in Air Travel Ticketing and Tourism
Requirements for Graduation
Core Courses
43
Concentration Courses
21
Total Credit Hours
64
Rationale
Requirements for the Diploma in Air Hostess and Cabin Crew
Studies
Required Core Courses
Concentration Courses
Credit hours
ICC 014: Old Testament Introduction and Survey
3
ICC 015: New Testament Introduction and Survey
3
MGT 009: Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 010: Professional Business Communication
3
MGT 011: Financial Accounting
3
MGT 012: Organization & Management
3
MGT 013: Principles of Marketing
3
MGT 014: Economics
3
MGT 015: Business Law
3
MGT 021: Managerial Accounting
3
MGT 022: Quantitative Techniques
3
MGT 023: Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 024: Entrepreneurship and Risk Management
3
MGT 098: Research Project; OR MGT 099: Practicum
4
Total Required Core Courses
43
Tourism is one of the world’s largest and fastest growing industry. In terms of
revenue and number of people involved, it has become world’s number two
industry next to petroleum industry. It helps nations to earn a large sum of
foreign exchange without exporting any tangible product. Tourism helps to
earn the muchneeded foreign exchange for our country. The Government of
Kenya is therefore taking special efforts to increase foreign exchange earning
through tourism such as preserving national parks, beaches, and historical
sites. The industry needs professionals to handle the foreign tourists visiting the
country.
The Air Travel Ticketing and Tourism Diploma is a broad Market oriented
programme intended to provide managerial and operational orientation to
the emerging tourism industry. The programme is designed to develop well
rounded executives in air travel facilities and tourism.
Objectives of Diploma in Air Travel Ticketing and Tourism
The students will gain a broad understanding of travel agency and airlines
operation and will be familiar with related subject matters such as industry
regulations, codes, worked geography, tour programmes, health requirements
and customer services.
After successful completion of the course the student will be able to:
1. understand the basic skills and knowledge of travel agency and airline
operations;
2. understand IATA/UFTAA procedures; give correct advice and
information to clients;
3. make appropriate travel arrangements and reservations;
4. calculate appropriate air fares;
5. complete international travel documents in accordance with applicable
IATA rules.
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79
Admission Requirements
Requirements for the Diploma in Air Travel Ticketing and
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and
Mathematics C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass
or equivalent for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however, a
minimum entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an
applicant admission to the University.
Tourism
Student Assessment
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers and
project work.
Final examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at
the end of the semester.
Credit hours
ICC 014: Old Testament Introduction and Survey
3
ICC 015: New Testament Introduction and Survey
3
MGT 009: Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 010: Professional Business Communication
3
MGT 011: Financial Accounting
3
MGT 012: Organization & Mgt.
3
MGT 013: Principles of Marketing
3
MGT 014: Economics
3
MGT 015: Business Law
3
The relative weight of the continuous assessment to the final examination will
vary from course to course and will be specified in the course syllabi.
MGT 02 : Managerial Accounting
3
MGT 022: Quantitative Techniques
3
For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of what is required is
mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning, assessment will be
based on 70% for final examination and 30% for continuous assessment.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e. courses that require the
students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by the particular content,
assessment will be based on 60% for final exam for 40% for continuous
assessment.
Practical: Students will be required to do class presentations and seminars.
They will be required to do an attachment in an business organizations.
A University lecturer and the person directly in charge of the student in the
business organization will supervise and assess the student.
MGT 023: Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 024: Entrepreneurship & Risk Management
3
Requirements for Graduation
80
Required Core Courses
MGT 098: Research Project; OR MGT 099: Practicum
4
TOTAL REQUIRED CORE COURSES
43
Concentration Courses
Credit hours
ATT 023: Transportation (Air Travel) & Communication
3
ATT 024: Marketing Management for Destinations
and Attractions
3
ATT 025: Air Fares and Ticketing
3
ATT 026: Selling Skills
3
Required General courses
43
TSM 021: Tourism Principles and Practices
3
Required courses
21
TSM 022: Hospitality Management
3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
64
TSM 027: French
www.daystar.ac.ke
3
Total Concentration Courses
21
Total Credit Hours
64
Diploma in Business Administration &
Management
Rationale
The Diploma program in Business Administration and Management is
designed to cater for the increased demand for basic management skills
among employees of different cadres and disciplines within various
organizations. It has now become essential for almost every worker to be
familiar with basic concepts of management so that they can improve the
efficiency of their organization. In today’s world you find that, for example,
an engineer is working for a firm and with the passage of time he or she is
promoted to the level of a manager. Such a person will be required to utilize
management skills. The Diploma in Business Administration and Management
is therefore growing from a need to service the business enterprises with
people who must be knowledgeable in basic management practices.
As business enterprises embrace more and more people who are multi
disciplinary this diploma will be of help in bridging management skills not
earlier learnt by the employee.
Objectives
The Diploma in Business Administration and Management seeks to:
a) train students to work in both public and private sectors;
b) equip students with management principles and skills that can enable them carry out research and to assist them in providing solutions to practical issues;
c) train the student to design and implement effective management
strategies;
d) ground the student in theoretical and practical foundations in management in an ever changing and dynamic environment;
e) help the student appreciate theories of management and their applications to contemporary issues;
f ) provide a solid base in business administration, management;
g) prepare students to be upright and responsible citizens who will apply Christian principles of honesty, morality, integrity and ethics in their profession, while appreciating the importance of nation building and national heritage.
Admission Requirements
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and Mathematics
C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass or equivalent
for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however, a minimum
entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an applicant
admission to the University.
syllabi. For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of what is required
is mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning, assessment will be
based on 70% for final examination and 30% for continuous assessment.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e. courses that require the
students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by the particular content,
assessment will be based on 60% for final exam and 40% for continuous
assessment.
Practical: Students will be required to do class presentations and seminars.
They will be required to do a compulsory attachment in business organizations.
A University lecturer and the person directly in charge of the student in the
business organization will supervise and assess the student.
Requirements for Graduation
Core Courses
46
Concentration Courses
18
Total Credit Hours
64
Requirements for a Diploma in Business Administration and
Management
Required Core courses
Credit Hours
ICC 014: Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
ICC 015: New Testament Introduction & Survey
3
MGT 009: Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 010: Professional Business Communication
3
MGT 011 : Financial Accounting
3
MGT 012: Organization & Management
3
MGT 013: Principles of Marketing
3
MGT 014: Economics
3
MGT 015: Business Law
3
MGT 021: Managerial Accounting
3
MGT 022: Quantitative Techniques
3
MGT 023: Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 024: Entrepreneurship & Risk Management
3
MGT 025: Business Research Methods
3
MGT 098: Research Project; OR MGT 099 : Practicum
4
Total Required Core Courses
46
Student Assessment
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers and
project work.
Final examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at the
end of the semester. The relative weight of the continuous assessment to the final
examination will vary from course to course and will be specified in the course
www.daystar.ac.ke
81
Concentration
Courses
MNG 030: Organizational Behavior
3
MNG 031: Company Law
3
MNG 032: Business Finance
3
MNG 033: Human Resource Management
3
MNG 034: International Business Management
3
MNG 035: Corporate Strategy
3
Total Concentration Courses
18
Total Credit Hours
64
Diploma in Business Information &
Technology
Rationale
The dynamism of the Internet and other telecommunication networks, and
the willingness of business organizations to adopt these technologies in their
business functions in both the strategic and middle levels of the organization,
calls for both business organizations and individuals to keep abreast of the
current information technology for effective business enterprise management.
Due to the effectiveness and efficiency of the information systems, their usage
has spread in all sectors of business from production to service delivery.
This wide spread use of information systems calls for well trained middle
level people who can design, develop, implement and maintain information
technology based systems. Therefore, the Business Information Systems
Diploma Programme would meet these growing business challenges and
demand.
Objectives of Diploma In Business Information Technology
This Programme is designed to prepare business information systems
graduates to:
a) be servant leaders and can be entrusted with the organization’s Information Technology Systems resources;
b) develop and implement information technology based system products for business organizations;
c) integrate information technology knowledge to business functions and processes;
d) understand and comprehend the business functions and processes and apply the acquired information technology knowledge to design innovative information systems product for such functions;
e) oversee proper functionality and maintenance of information systems in business organization;
f) enter and excel in any information systems degree Programme.
82
www.daystar.ac.ke
Admission Requirements
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and
Mathematics C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass
or equivalent for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however, a
minimum entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an
applicant admission to the University.
Student Assessment
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers and
project work.
Final examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at
the end of the semester. The relative weight of the continuous assessment to
the final examination will vary from course to course and will be specified
in the course syllabi. For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of
what is required is mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning,
assessment will be based on 70% for final examination and 30% for
continuous assessment.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e. courses that require the
students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by the particular content,
assessment will be based on 60% for final exam and 40% for continuous
assessment.
Practical: Students will be required to do class presentations and seminars.
They will be required to do a compulsory attachment in a business
organization. A University lecturer and the person directly in charge of the
student in the business organization will supervise and assess the student.
Requirements for Graduation
Core Courses
33
Concentration Courses
31
Total Credit Hours
64
Requirements for the Diploma in Business Information Technology
Required Core Courses
Credit Hours
ICC 014: Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
ICC 015: New Testament Introduction & Survey
3
MGT 009: Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 010: Professional Business Communication
3
MGT 011: Financial Accounting
3
MGT 012: Organization & Management
3
MGT 013: Principles of Marketing
3
MGT 014: Economics
3
MGT 022: Quantitative Techniques
3
MGT 023: Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 025: Business Research Methods
3
Total Credit Hours
33
Concentration Courses
BIT 012: Computing Mathematics
3
BIT 02: Database Management systems
3
BIT 022: Fundamentals of Computer Technology
3
BIT 023: Visual programming
3
BIT 031: Systems Analysis and Design
3
BIT 032: Computer Networks
3
BIT 033: Information Technology Project Management
3
BIT 034: Business Information Systems
3
BIT 041: Web Design and Development
3
BIT 098/099: Information Technology Project OR
Practicum
4
Total Concentration Courses
31
Total Credit Hours
64
Diploma in Entrepreneurship
Daystar University hopes to contribute to Africa’s development through
entrepreneurship training. Our Diploma in entrepreneurship graduates will
be ale to holistically to apply the management skills of traditional business
disciplines to the recognition and shaping of entrepreneurial opportunities.
They will develop business models that make use of those opportunities in
ways that create value, thereby becoming wealth and employment creators.
Objectives of Diploma in Entrepreneurship
The Diploma in entrepreneurship seeks to:
1.
enable students understand and apply Biblical perspectives, in
mobilizing African People to sustainable enterprise creation and
development;
2.
enable student to understand the African micro and small enterprise
environment and appreciate its attendant problems, challenges and
opportunities;
3.
develop responsible entrepreneurs who will apply Christian principles of
morality integrity, honesty and ethics in business;
4.
enable student to understand the genesis unemployment in Africa with a
view towards employment generation through entrepreneurial ventures;
5.
equip students with knowledge and skills in business creation,
development, counseling and management process through which
they will gain and understanding of what it takes to be successful
entrepreneur;
6.
challenge each student to recognize develop an act upon their innate
potential in the one’s self creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship.
Rationale
Africa has often been described as developments last frontier. This is
happening at particular Asia, is developing rapidly while many African
countries appear to be sliding back into forth World. Economic growths
as well as income per capital are quite low and majority of citizens still
live below the poverty line. Real earnings and purchasing power are low,
unemployment and underdevelopment are high, hunger and famine are
endemic causing many to depend on food aid. Despite the negative aspect
there is still hope that African countries can emulate Asia and develop. This
can be done in many ways such as good governance political stability and
empowerment economically.
The situation of unemployment in Kenya is very serious. Every year both the
public and private universities release about 13,000 graduates into the
labour market. Polytechnics and other tertiary institution, secondary schools
and primary school release some more into the same labour market as well.
According to the Government of Kenya Central Bureau of Statistics, more than
half a million young people each and every year join this large labour market
looking for jobs. The exact number of unemployed in this country remains
unknown. This figure of more than 500,000 young people pouring into the
labour market annually forms the formidable potential market for this diploma
in Entepreneurship.
The dismal performance of many African Economies for many years now
has resulted in massive unemployment amongst a majority of the population.
Worst hit have been the majority of the youth who despite good education
and training remain unemployed, dependant, miserable and hopeless. The
situation has been worsened by sudden and growing infux of retrenches who
despite having retrenchment benefits often do not know how or where to
invest viably.
Admission Requirements
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and
Mathematics C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass
or the equivalent for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however,
a minimum entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an
applicant admission to the University.
Student Assessment Policy
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers, project
work, and final examinations.
Final examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at
the end of the semester. The relative weight of the continuous assessment to
the final examination will vary from course to course and will be specified
in the course syllabi. For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of
what is required is mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning,
assessment will be based on 70% for final examination and 30% for
continuous assessment.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e. courses that require the
students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by the particular content,
assessment will be based on 60% for final exam for 40% for continuous
assessment.
www.daystar.ac.ke
83
Practical: Students will be required to do class presentations and
seminars. They will be required to do a compulsory attachment in business
organizations. A University lecturer and the person directly in charge of the
student in the business organization will supervise and assess the student.
Requirements for Graduation
Core Courses
46
Concentration Courses
18
Total Credit Hours
64
Requirements for Diploma in Entrepreneurship
Required Core Courses
ICC 01 : Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
ICC 015: New Testament Introduction & Survey
3
MGT 009: Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 01 : Professional Business Communication
3
MGT 011: Financial Accounting
3
MGT 012: Organization & Management
3
MGT 013: Principles of Marketing
3
MGT 014: Economics
3
MGT 015: Business Law
3
MGT 021: Managerial Accounting
3
MGT 022: Quantitative Techniques
3
MGT 023: Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 024: Entrepreneurship & Risk Management
3
MGT 098: Research Project; or
Rationale
Finance has traditionally been a major part of financial management. Every
organization is keen about its financial matters. Ordinary people have also
been intrigued with the area of finance. In Kenya there has been a growing
interest in finance and investments. It is true that a person cannot invest their
money well without first understanding how finance is handled and how the
finance and money markets operate. Organizations are now also involved
in investments in a bigger way than before. Large sums of capital are been
invested by organizations in capital projects while the individual investor is
interested in areas such as real estate and stock exchange and other money
markets. With this growing tendency to invest, it has now become imperative
that people be educated in finance. It is with this in mind that this new
diploma is being developed. The Finance diploma will equip the individual
to be more skilled in handling financial matters. Fraud is today at high levels
leading to the collapse of organizations. Anti money laundering and other
practices have created a crisis in financial management. Organizations
are in dire need of help to arrest these cases and the Finance Diploma will
appropriately equip the student to manage the financial resources of an
organization.
Objectives of Diploma in Finance
The diploma programs seek to:
1.
train students to work in the area of finance in both the public and
private sectors;
2.
equip students with sound financial management principles and skills
that can enable them carry out research and to assist them in providing
solutions to practical issues;
3
3.
train the student to design and implement effective financial strategies;
MGT 099: Practicum
4
4.
Total Required Core Courses
46
ground the student in theoretical and practical foundations in financial
management in an ever changing and dynamic world of financing;
5.
assist the student to appreciate financial theories and their application to
contemporary issues;
6.
provide a solid base in sound financial management that will help an
organization to gain competitive advantage;
7.
prepare students to be upright and responsible citizens who will apply
Christian principles of honesty, morality, integrity and ethics in their
profession, while appreciating the importance of nation building and
national heritage.
Concentration Courses
84
Credit Hours
Diploma in Finance
Credit Hours
ENT 011 : Introduction to Entrepreneurship
3
ENT 012 : Innovation and Entrepreneurship
3
ENT 013 : New Venture Creation
3
ENT 014 : New Product Mgt. & Sale of Knowledge
3
ENT 015 : Family Business Management
3
ENT 016 : Imagination, Entrepreneurship &
Creative Business Problem Solving
3
Total Concentration Courses
18
Total Credit Hours
64
www.daystar.ac.ke
Admission Requirements
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and
Mathematics C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass
or the equivalent for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however,
a minimum entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an
applicant admission to the University.
Student Assessment Policy
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers, project
work, and final examinations.
Final examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at
the end of the semester. The relative weight of the continuous assessment to
the final examination will vary from course to course and will be specified
in the course syllabi. For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of
what is required is mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning,
assessment will be based on 70% for final examination and 30% for
continuous assessment.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e. courses that require the
students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by the particular content,
assessment will be based on 60% for final exam for 40% for continuous
assessment.
Practical: Students will be required to do class presentations and seminars.
They will not be required to do a compulsory attachment (clinical) in law
courts or in business organizations. However, where they do so a University
lecturer and the person directly in charge of the student at the law courts or in
the business organization will supervise the student.
Requirements for Graduation Credit Hours
Required Core courses
46
Required Concentration courses
18
Total Credit Hours
64
Requirements for Diploma In Finance
Required Core courses
Concentration Courses
Credit Hours
FIN 011: Business Finance
3
FIN 012: Financial Institutions
3
FIN 013: Financial Analysis and Reporting
3
FIN 021: Financial Management
3
FIN 022: Portfolio Mgt & Investments
3
FIN 023: International Finance
3
Total Concentration Courses
18
Total
64
Diploma in Hospitality Management
Rationale
Tourism is one of the world’s largest and fastest growing industry. In terms of
revenue and number of people involved, it has become world’s number two
industry next to petroleum industry.
It helps nations to earn a large sum of foreign exchange without exporting
any tangible product. Tourism ranks as one of the top foreign exchange
earning industry. Government of Kenya is therefore taking special efforts
to increase foreign exchange earning through tourism such as preserving
national parks, beaches, and historical sites. The industry needs professionals
to handle the foreign tourists visiting the country.
The Diploma in Hospitality Management is a broad market oriented
programme intended to provide managerial and operational orientation to
the emerging tourism industry. The programme is designed to develop well
rounded professionals in the hospitality industry.
Credit Hours
ICC 014: Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
Objectives of Diploma in Hospitality Management
ICC 015: New Testament Introduction & Survey
3
MGT 009: Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 010: Professional Business Communication
3
The student will gain a broad understanding of hospitality management
and be familiar with related subject matters such as industry regulations, the
management and practices of hospitality services.
MGT 011: Financial Accounting
3
MGT 012: Organization & Mgt.
3
MGT 013: Marketing Principles
3
MGT 014: Economics
After successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:
1.
understand the basics of accommodation and catering services and
focus on the industry’s opportunities and future trends;
3
2.
understand the importance of management of hospitality services;
MGT 015: Business Law
3
3.
equip students with skills required in the industry.
MGT 021: Managerial Accounting
3
MGT 022: Quantitative Techniques
3
Admission Requirements
MGT 023: Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 024: Entrepreneurship & Risk Management
3
MGT 025: Business Research Methods
3
MGT 098: Research Project; or
MGT 099: Practicum
4
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and
Mathematics C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass
or equivalent for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however, a
minimum entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an
applicant admission to the University.
Total Credit Hours
46
www.daystar.ac.ke
85
Student Assessment
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers and
project work.
Final examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at
the end of the semester. The relative weight of the continuous assessment to
the final examination will vary from course to course and will be specified
in the course syllabi. For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of
what is required is mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning,
assessment will be based on 70% for final examination and 30% for
continuous assessment.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e. courses that require the
students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by the particular content,
assessment will be based on 60% for final exam for 40% for continuous
assessment.
Practical: Students will be required to do class presentations and seminars.
They will be required to do an attachment in business organization. A
University lecturer and the person directly in charge of the student in the
business organization will supervise and assess the student.
Requirements for Graduation Credit Hours
Required Core courses
43
Required Concentration courses
21
Total Credit Hours
64
86
Credit Hours
ICC 014: Old Testament Introduction and Survey
3
ICC 015: New Testament Introduction and Survey
3
MGT 009: Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 010: Professional Business Communication
3
MGT 011: Financial Accounting
3
MGT 012: Organization & Management
3
MGT 013: Principles of Marketing
3
MGT 014: Economics
3
MGT 015: Business Law
3
MGT 021: Managerial Accounting
3
MGT 022: Quantitative Techniques
3
MGT 023: Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 024: Fraud and Risk Management
3
MGT 098: Research Project; or
MGT 099: Practicum
4
Total Required Core Courses
43
www.daystar.ac.ke
Credit Hours
HOM 023 : Principle and Practices of Management
in the Hospitality Industry
3
HOM 024: Hospitality, Leisure and Tourism
3
HOM 025: Hospitality and Travel Marketing
3
HOM 026: Hospitality and Related Services
3
TSM 021: Tourism Principles and Practices
3
TSM 022: Hospitality Management
3
TSM 027: French
3
Total Concentration Courses
21
Total Credit Hours
64
Diploma in Human Resource Management
Rationale
The new concept of “People Management” has revolutionized the role and
function of human resource management within business organizations. The
Diploma in Human Resource Management will develop persons who will
contribute to the role and function of human resource management in an
organization. As organizational structures become more complex the human
resource management function is also changing. This diploma seeks to
disseminate knowledge and skills that are necessary for creating new human
resource functions within organizations.
Objectives
Requirements for the Diploma in Hospitality Management
Required Core Courses
Concentration Courses
The diploma programme seek to:
1. train student to work in both public and private sectors;
2. equip student with sound computer and management principles and
skills that can enable them carry out research and to assist them in
providing solutions to practical issues;
3. train the student to design and implement effective management
strategies;
4. ground the student in theoretical and practical foundations in
management and information systems in an ever changing and dynamic
environment;
5. help the student appreciate theories of management and information
systems and their applications to contemporary issues;
6. provide a solid base in business administration, management,
strategic planning, and policy formation and be prepared to assist
top management in purchasing and logistics into strategic and annual
planning efforts to reduce costs, improve customer service and
satisfaction, and gain competitive advantage;
7. develop skills in proper planning and implementation of modern,
cost effective organizations for purchasing, inventory management,
transportation, warehousing and stores, packing and materials handling,
customer service etc;
8.
prepare student to be upright and responsible citizen who will apply
Christian principles of honesty, morality, integrity and ethics in their
profession, while appreciating the importance of nation building and
national heritage.
MGT 012: Organization & Mgt.
3
MGT 013: Principles of Marketing
3
MGT 014: Economics
3
MGT 015: Business Law
3
Admission Requirements
MGT 021: Managerial Accounting
3
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and
Mathematics C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass
or equivalent for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however, a
minimum entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an
applicant admission to the University.
MGT 022: Quantitative Techniques
3
MGT 023: Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 024: Entrepreneurship & Risk Management
3
MGT 025: Business Research Methods
3
MGT 098: Research Project; or
MGT 099: Practicum
4
Total Required Core Courses
46
Student Assessment
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers and
project work.
Final examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at
the end of the semester. The relative weight of the continuous assessment to
the final examination will vary from course to course and will be specified
in the course syllabi. For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of
what is required is mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning,
assessment will be based on 70% for final examination and 30% for
continuous assessment.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e. courses that require the
students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by the particular content,
assessment will be based on 60% for final exam and 40% for continuous
assessment.
Practical: Students will be required to do class presentations and seminars.
They will not be required to do a attachment in law courts or in business
organizations. However, where they do so a University lecturer and the
person directly in charge of the student at the law courts or in the business
organization will supervise the student.
Requirements for Graduation Credit Hours
Required Core courses
46
Required Concentration courses
18
Total
64
Requirements for the Diploma in Human Resource Management
Required Core courses
Credit Hours
ICC 014: Old Test. introduction and survey
3
ICC 015: New Test. introduction and survey
3
MGT 009: Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 010: Professional Business Communication
3
MGT 011: Financial Accounting
3
Concentration Courses
Credit Hour
HRM 011: Human Resource Management
3
HRM 012: Organizational Behaviour
3
HRM 013: Employee Relations & Labour Law
3
HRM 014: Industrial Psychology
3
HRM 015: International Human Resource Mgt
3
HRM 016: Public Relations
3
Total Concentration Courses
18
Total Credit Hours
64
Diploma in Purchasing & Business Logistics
Rationale
The supply chain management concept is currently revolutionizing global
business. Modern business organizations are becoming more and more
aware that the management of logistics activities, also referred to as
supply chain management, has tremendous impact on sales and corporate
profitability. As African enterprises attempt to compete with foreign imports
or find a place for African products and services in world markets, there is a
growing demand for workers with the knowledge and skills necessary to use
the tools of modern supply chain management to create:
1. significant cost savings for the firm, it’s partners in the supply chain, and
the final customer.
2.
increased focus on the needs of the customer, improved customer
satisfaction, and, ultimately, increased sales and profits.
3.
marketing weapons that become major competitive advantages for the
firm.
The Diploma in Purchasing and Business Logistics is aimed at developing
students who are well trained and skilled in all aspects of creating value
for customers and for the firm by management of purchasing and other
www.daystar.ac.ke
87
logistics functions. The Diploma will give the students theoretical as well as
practical knowledge in areas such as purchasing, inventory management,
packing and materials handling, warehousing and stores management,
transportation, forecasting, production control, customer service management
etc. The curriculum focuses on developing the quantitative tools necessary for
application of computer based logistics management systems.
Objectives
The diploma programs seek to:
1. train student to work in both public and private sectors;
2.
equip student with sound computer and management principles and
skills that can enable them carry out research and to assist them in
providing solutions to practical issues;
3.
train the student to design and implement effective management
strategies;
4.
ground the student in theoretical and practical foundations in
management and information systems in an ever changing and dynamic
environment;
5.
help the student appreciate theories of management and information
systems and their applications to contemporary issues;
6.
provide a solid base in business administration, management,
strategic planning, and policy formation and be prepared to assist top
management in areas including; purchasing and logistics to strategic
and annual planning efforts to reduce costs, improve customer service
and satisfaction, and gain competitive advantage;
7.
8.
develop skills in proper planning and implementation of modern, cost
effective systems for purchasing, inventory management, transportation,
warehousing and stores, packing and materials handling, customer
service etc;
prepare student to be upright and responsible citizens who will apply
Christian principles of honesty, morality, integrity and ethics in their
profession, while appreciating the importance of nation building and
national heritage.
Admission Requirements
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and Mathematics
C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass or equivalent
for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however, a minimum
entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an applicant
admission to the University.
Student Assessment
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers and
project work.
Final examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at
the end of the semester. The relative weight of the continuous assessment to the
final examination will vary from course to course and will be specified in the
course syllabi.
For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of what is required is
88
www.daystar.ac.ke
mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning, assessment will be
based on 70% for final examination and 30% for continuous assessment.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e. courses that require the
students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by the particular content,
assessment will be based on 60% for final exam for 40% for continuous
assessment.
Requirements for Graduation
Required Core courses
46
Required Concentration courses
18
Total
64
Requirements for the Diploma in Purchasing and Business Logistics
Required Core courses
Credit Hours
ICC 014: Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
ICC 015: New Testament Introduction & Survey
3
MGT 009: Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 010: Professional Business Communication
3
MGT 011: Financial Accounting
3
MGT 012: Organization & Management
3
MGT 013: Principles of Marketing
3
MGT 014: Economics
3
MGT 015: Business Law
3
MGT 021: Managerial Accounting
3
MGT 022: Quantitative Techniques
3
MGT 023: Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 024: Entrepreneurship and Risk Management
3
MGT 025: Research Methods
3
MGT 098: Research Project; or
MGT 099: Practicum
4
Total Required Core Courses
46
Concentration Courses
LOG 011: Introduction to Business Logistics
3
LOG 012: Purchasing Principles & Management
3
LOG 021: Inventory Planning and Control
3
LOG 022: Warehousing & Stores Management
3
LOG 031: Management of Customer Service
3
LOG 032: Transportation Management
3
Total Concentration Courses
18
Total Credit Hours
64
Diploma in Sales & Marketing Management
Rationale
The arena of sales and marketing has become dynamic in the world. As
people move from markets dominated and commanded by the seller to
those dictated by the buyers, a lot of creativity is required from today’s
organizationsin trying to attract customers to buy their product. Organizations
in this dynamic world of marketing are constantly pushing their sales and
marketing personnel to achieve even higher target levels. Today business
organizations are looking for sales executives who can be used to make
sales and service delivery to create a competitive advantage. The art
of selling is distinguished from the art of marketing that involves more
persuasion. The Diploma in Sales and Marketing will enhance the skills of
the student and develop a versatile person who can open and close a sale
transaction successfully. As a result of effective sales and marketing skills the
organizations will begin to experience higher levels of sales and in turn the
profits will be maximized. The Diploma in Sales and Marketing will provide
the students with an appreciation of the theoretical aspects of marketing.
Ranges of practical skills are included in the program in order to enhance the
students’ value to the employer. The courses are designed so that they build
on one another moving from the basics right to the more strategic areas in
management.
Objectives
The Diploma in Sales and Marketing seek to:
1. equip student with sales and marketing management principles and
skills that can enable the student close a sale and provide solutions to
practical issues;
2. train and challenge the student to design and implement effective sales
and marketing strategies;
3. ground the student in theoretical and practical foundations in sales and
marketing in an ever changing and dynamic environment;
4. provide the student with an appreciation of theories and their
applications to contemporary issues;
5. prepare student to be upright and responsible citizen who will apply
Christian principles of honesty, morality, integrity and ethics in their
profession, while appreciating the importance of nation building and
national heritage.
Admission Requirements
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and
Mathematics C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass
or equivalent for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however, a
minimum entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an
applicant admission to the University.
Student Assessment
Final Examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at
the end of the semester. The relative weight of the continuous assessment to
the final examination will vary from course to course and will be specified
in the course syllabi. For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of
what is required is mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning,
assessment will be based on 70% for final examination and 30% for
continuous assessment.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e. courses that require the
students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by the particular content,
assessment will be based on 60% for final exam and 40% for continuous
assessment.
Practical: Students will be required to do class presentations and
seminars. They will be required to do a compulsory attachment in business
organizations. A University lecturer and the person directly in charge of the
student in the business organization will supervise and assess the student.
Requirements for Graduation
Required General courses
46
Required courses
18
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
64
Requirements for the Diploma in Sales and Marketing Management
Required Core courses
Credit Hours
ICC 014 : Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
ICC 015 : New Testament Introduction & Survey
3
MGT 009 : Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 010 : Professional Business Communication
3
MGT 011 : Financial Accounting
3
MGT 012 : Organization & Management
3
MGT 013 : Principles of Marketing
3
MGT 014 : Economics
3
MGT 015 : Business Law
3
MGT 021 : Managerial Accounting
3
MGT 022 : Quantitative Techniques
3
MGT 023 : Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 024 : Entrepreneurship & Risk Management
3
MGT 025 : Business Research Methods
3
MGT 099 : Practicum
4
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
64
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers and
project work.
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89
Concentration Courses
Credit Hours
Objectives of Diploma in Tours and Travel
MKT 011 : Consumer Behavior
3
MKT 012 : Advertising
3
MKT 013 : Sales Management
3
The students will be able to gain a broad understanding of Tours and Travel
and will be familiar with related subject matters such as transport systems,
the management of tourists, tour organizations, tourist behavior and tourist
transport; and other industry regulations.
MKT 021 : Marketing Management
3
After successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:
MKT 022 : Public Relations
3
1.
understand the growth, role and impact of transport system;
MKT 023 : International Marketing
3
2.
have a broad understanding of different travel organizations and
understanding of the relationship between travel and tourism;
3.
understand different types of tourists and factors motivating them to
travel;
4.
identify different travel operations.
Total Concentration Courses
18
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
64
Diploma in Tours & Travel
Rationale
Tourism is one of the world’s largest and fastest growing industry. In terms of
revenue and number of people involved, it has become world’s number two
industry next to petroleum industry.
It helps nations to earn a large sum of foreign exchange without exporting any
tangible product. Tourism ranks as one of the top foreign exchange earning
industries. Government of Kenya is therefore taking special efforts to increase
foreign exchange earning through tourism such as preserving national parcels,
beaches, and historical sites. The industry needs professionals to handle the
foreign tourists visiting the country.
Having the above need of trained personnel in mind, the diploma in tourism
will enable individuals to enter the field of tourism including airlines, hotel
industry and travel trade as junior Level executives.
The Tours and Travel Diploma is a broad market oriented programme intended
to provide managerial and operational orientation to the emerging tourism
industry. The programme is designed to develop well rounded tours and travel
executives.
Admission Requirements
The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) and Mathematics
C (plain) for those with KCSE; or Advanced Level Principal Pass or equivalent
for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however, a minimum
entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle an applicant
admission to the University.
Student Assessment
Continuous Assessment: This will be carried out continuously during the
semester and will include tests, assignments, term/ research papers and
project work.
Final Examinations: Each student will be required to do an examination at the
end of the semester. The relative weight of the continuous assessment to the final
examination will vary from course to course and will be specified in the course
syllabi. For courses that are essentially conceptual i.e. much of what is required
is mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning, assessment will be
based on 70% for final examination and 30% for continuous assessment.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented, i.e. courses that require the
students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by the particular content,
assessment will be based on 60% for final exam and 40% for continuous
assessment.
Practical: Students will be required to do class presentations and seminars.
They will be required to do a compulsory attachment in business organizations.
A University lecturer and the person directly in charge of the student in the
business organization will supervise and assess the student.
Requirements for Graduation
90
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Required General courses
43
Required courses
21
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
64
Requirements for the Diploma in Tours and Travel
Required Core Courses
Credit Hours
ICC 014: Old Testament Introduction and Survey
3
ICC 015: New Testament Introduction and Survey
3
MGT 009: Introduction to Information Technology
3
MGT 010: Professional Business Communication
3
MGT 011: Financial Accounting
3
MGT 012: Organization & Management
3
MGT 013: Principles of Marketing
3
MGT 014: Economics
3
MGT 015: Business Law
3
MGT 021: Managerial Accounting
3
MGT 022: Quantitative Techniques
3
MGT 023: Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
3
MGT 024: Entrepreneurship and Risk Management
3
MGT 098: Research Project; or
MGT 099: Practicum
4
TOTAL REQUIRED CORE COURSES
43
Concentration Courses
Credit Hours
TAT 023: Transport Systems
3
TAT 024: Travel Organization
3
TAT 025: Travel Behaviour and Management
3
TAT 026: Tour Operations Management
3
TSM 021: Tourism Principles and Practices
3
TSM 022: Hospitality Management
3
TSM 027: French
3
Total Concentration Courses
21
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
64
Course Descriptions
AHC 023 People Management/Managing Behaviour 3 Credits
Behavioural science: meaning and scope, origin of behavioural science,
contribution of behavioural science to people management, importance of
scientific methods of studying individual behaviours. Nature of management:
historical foundations, of management, theories of management, roles of
management. Individual system; personality and attitude, perception and
attribution, learning and reinforcement, managerial problem solving styles.
Group dynamics: group formation and development, characteristics of an
effective work groups, formal and informal groups, group decision making
model, individualism and collectivism, inter group dynamics. Team leadership
and motivation; working with peoples staff retention and turnover, staff
recruitment and selection, employee development, selection and training, labor
cost management. Pre requisite MGT 012.
AHC 024 First Aid & Safety Management 3 Credits
Introduction: meaning and scope of first aid, applications/instances,
importance of first aid, limitations of first aid. Assessment of the situation:
control of the situation, safety enhancement, locally available resources.
Diagnosis: listening, smelling, looking, touching. Treatment: urgent treatment,
importance treatment important treatment, after treatment. Common first aid
practices: respiration, asphyxia, circulatory and circulation disorders, wounds
and bleedings, nervous system and unconsciousness, bone injuries, aches,
poisoning, burns, etc. Safety management: safety precautionary measures.
AHC 025 Public Relations 3 Credits
History of public relations; Public relations defined and distinguished; definition,
characteristic and role of public relations. Public relations departments; The
public relations officer, press relations, gaining publicity, the familiarization
visit, handling the unfavourable publicity. Planning public relations programs;
Public of public relations; The news media; Press relations; Created private
media; Budgeting; Photography; The ethics of public relations; Management
and employee relations; Sponsorships; Export public relations; Marketing
research; Public relations in developing countries. Pre requisite: MGT 013.
AHC 026 Customer Care 3 Credits
Customer service skills: customer communication skills; listening skills;
demonstrating or positive attitude to customers; letter writing in a service
environment; dealing with customers by telephone; handling criticisms and
complaints; customer care and selling skills; importance of teamwork in
customer service; how to make a customer feel special. Putting customer service
into practice: introducing customer services and management change; service
mission statements; service actions plans; setting standards of service; service
chains – managing the service process; measuring customer service; the
internal customer; etiquette and grooming; relationship marketing. The role
of �positive impact’, methods of responding effectively to customer needs,
effective interpersonal kills for handling upset customers, recognizing sources of
stress and methods of coping with stress. Prerequisite; MGT 013.
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ATT 023: Transportation (Air Travel) and Comm’ 3 Credits
Modes of Transport: road, rail, sea and air; public, private and individual
modes of transport; their characteristics. Organization and management of
transport enterprises: economics of transport; need for regulation; customer
oriented policies. Types of aircrafts used in civil aviation: airports and runways;
Role and functions of ICAO; Department of Civil Aviation; domestic and
International Tariff, fares and schedules; Air cargo. Role and functions of IATA.
How supply of transport stimulates development of Tourism. How growth of
travel leads to improvement in air transport network. The transport component
in the traveler’s expenditure, his choice of carrier. Price elasticity, promotional
rates, group travel, scheduled and supplementary carriers. Charter rates and
IATA fares. Impact of technology on transport. Airlines in the hotel business.
ATT 024 Marketing Mgt for Destinations 3 Credits
& Attractions Tourism perspective, role of branding, marketing, research, statistics etc. a
range of case studies reviewing both success stories and worldwide failures
used to consider issues involved in destination management. Introduction to
marketing, marketing research, understanding needs and wants, product
policy, pricing, communication process (reaching the customer), distribution
channels, selling skills, Market segmentation, advertising and sales promotion,
marketing for destinations. Pre requisite: MGT 013.
ATT 025 Air Fares & Ticketing 3 Credits
History; Fare selection criteria, currency rules and rounding procedures, OW
fare component steps and checks, special mileage provisions, RT/CT/RW
Fare construction, exceptions the HIP and other checks, Add ons, journey
with surface sectors, normal fare open jaw construction, journey vs pricing
unit concept, lowest combination principle, limitations on indirect travel, �C’
construction, taxes, fees and other charges, PTA transactions, mixed class
travel, rerouting and reissuances, control and security of BSP Accountable
documents and special fares, NUCs and round resulting local currency fares,
endorsement procedures, reissue tickets with additional correction, voluntary
and involuntary rerouting, fare calculation techniques, pricing units and service
sectors, issue and honour NICO/MPD, normal one way, round trip, circle trip
and round the world fares in NVCs.
ATT 026 Selling Skills 3 Credits
Understanding the difference between sales and marketing, the changing
role of travel sales sand the new millennium. Understanding the sales process:
making initial contact with a prospect, identifying needs, demonstrating features
and benefits, getting a commitment, overcoming objections and making a
follow up. Understand selling by telephone versus selling in person the role
of travel sales and the new millennium. Recognizing the buying influences in
large account sales and difference between large – account and other account
sales. The use of social and personal skills, the sales sequence, the role of
the sales representative, managing sales representatives, selling through travel
agents, use of selling tools: advertising objectives, strategy, agencies, door to
door distribution; travel brochure, its role, preparing a brochure, distributing
a brochure; sales promotion; its nature, techniques, planning, its impact;
exhibitions and trade fares, planning and organizing consumer presentation.
Pre requisite: MGT 013.
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BIT 012: Computing Mathematics 3 Credits
Introduction to matrix, determinants, inverses and their applications. Introduction
to differentiation, definition of derivative, derivative of sum, product and quotient.
Application of differentiation in determining the maximum and minimum points
of function and curve sketching. Differentiation of logarithmic functions.
Introduction to integration as reverse of differentiation. Integration methods and
their application. Introduction to logical statements and constructing the truth
tables and their application to computing.
BIT 021 Database Management Systems 3 Credits
Introduction to Database: File systems and databases. Database design
methodology. The relational models. Entity Relationship (ER) modeling,
introduction to Structured Query Language (SQL). Design and development of
database tables, forms and reports. Conceptual database design & verification,
logical database design and implementation. Database Administration.
Limitation of relational database management systems such MS Access. Project
using MS Access. Pre requisite; MGT 009.
BIT 023 Fundamentals of Computer Technology 3 Credits
Computer structure, components their connectivity and their functions, computer
abstraction and technology, introduction to integrated circuits, language of
machines, arithmetic for computers, processors and peripherals, I/O devices
and multiprocessors, computer registers and counters.
BIT 024 Visual Programming 3 Credits
Over view of visual basic, an introduction to Visual Basic, Designing
Applications, Using Variable and constants. The selection and the Repetition
structure. Sequential Access file, menu and reports. Dialog boxes and Error
Trapping. Random Access files, Database access using visual data manager
and Variable arrays.
BIT 031 System Analysis & Design 3 Credits
The system development environment. System development process models,
e.g., waterfall, spiral and structured system analysis and development
methodology (SSADM): Systems study and requirement specification,
managing an information systems project, identifying and selecting systems
development projects, Initiating and planning system development projects,
determining systems requirements. System design: process modeling, logic
modeling, conceptual data modeling. Selecting the best alternative design
strategy. Pre requisite; BIS 024.
BIT 032 Computer Networks 3 Credits
Introduction to data communications. Network applications, architectures,
devices and circuits. Layers of networking technology. Local area network and
wide area network. Communication: wired and wireless, data, voice, and
video. Data communication protocols, carrier options. Broadband technologies
including their application, regulation, standards, and cost issues. Frame relay
and ATM. Project: Students will connect a small LAN comprising two or three
computers and set the protocols.
BIT 034 Business Information Systems 3 Credits
Introduction to information systems: Information system development, kinds
and types of information systems and the strategic role of information
systems. Information systems, organizations, and management, computers
and information processing. Information systems software. data resources
management. Telecommunications systems and networks. The Internet and
business applications. Redesigning the organization with information systems.
Approaches to system building. Ethical and social impact of information
systems. Information systems security and control.
BIT 041 Web Design and Development 3 Credits
Web fundamentals. Client/server architecture. Page design. Content design.
Site design. Intranet design. Web browsers. Accessibility for users with
disabilities. International (Global) Use of the internet and E commerce. The
trend and future of the Internet. Simplicity in web design. HTML and ASP
programming. Introduction to Dream weaver.
BIT 042 IT Project Management 4 Credits
Introduction to project management, IT project phases: IT project initiation, It
project planning, IT project scheduling – network diagrams: A map of the IT
project, Building an IT project Team, IT project assignment. Risk management:
Evaluation of Risks and Constraints in an IT project and their management. IT
project implementation Phase: starting an IT project, leadership, communication
protocols. Controlling phase: monitoring and control, conflict resolution,
change management, management of common project problems. Termination
phase: project conclusion, termination and evaluation.
BIT 045 Information Technology Systems Project 3 Credits
The student will be required to apply the acquired knowledge to develop
an information technology based system within an organization or business
function of his or her choice.
LOG 011 Introduction to Business Logistics 3 Credits
To introduce the role of logistics in the economy and the organization, customer
service management and logistics information systems. Inventory concepts and
the basics of inventory management. Managing materials flow in production
and operations. Transportation and traffic management. Warehousing,
materials handling, computerization, and packaging issues. Introduction to
global logistics. Organizing for effective logistics and controlling logistics
performance. Fundamentals of supply chain management. Developing and
implementing logistics strategy. Prerequisite; MGT 022.
ENT 011 Introduction to Enterpreneurship 3 Credits
In addition to definition of terminology this course gives an overview of a variety
of issues surrounding new venture creation, such as opportunity identification,
the business plan, the economics of the business, determining resource needs
an acquiring resources, marketing requirement , harvesting issues, among
others.
ENT 012 Innovation and Enterprenuership 3 Credits
This course will explore the following aspects of innovation: The nature
and process of innovation: Theories of innovation, Technological change,
Entrepreneurship and innovation, The changing nature of the innovation process.
Innovation Strategies: Innovations as a source of competitive advantage,
Specific strategies: defensive/offensive, imitative. The management of
Innovation: Networks, Collaboration and innovation, Organizational and
individual learning, Implementing innovations: risk assessment, project planning
and team coordination.
ENT 013 New Venture Creation 3 Credits
Students will work in teams to launch companies, working through issues of
market analysis, technology viability assessment, competitive positioning, team
building, product life cycle planning, marketing strategy, sales channel analysis,
and strong emphasis on the entrepreneurship as a sales person. They will map
the new company, and we’ll address the strategic considerations for creating
companies that can quickly define and dominate a new category of disruptive
technology. The course will feature a prestigious line up of guest speakers
and hands on mentors who have deep and recent experience starting and
building companies. Topics to be covered in this course include the process
of identifying and quantifying market opportunities, then conceptualizing,
planning, and starting a new venture. Topics include opportunity assessment,
value propositions, the entrepreneur, legal issues, entrepreneurial ethics, the
business plan, the founding team, and seeking funds. Also to be covered in this
course are issue relating to business risks analysis, strategic and operational
planning, financial planning and measuring and controlling performance;
managing innovation, marketing the entrepreneurial organization, managing
human resource in rapidly growing firms, and the exit strategies. Identifying
and evaluating the main sources of funding new ventures; including: venture
capital, informal investors, banks, investment bank, suppliers, buyers and the
government. Some of the topics for this course include valuation, “guerilla
financing,” joint ventures, strategic alliances, private placements, IPOs, ESOPs
and management buyouts. Prerequisite: ENT 011.
ENT 014 New Product Mgt. and Sale of Knowledge 3 Credits
This provides an extensive and detailed focus on the new product. It explores
in detail the process of converting ideas, technologies, and customer needs
into new products, services and processes, packaging, branding and labelling
decisions. It also examines the role of a new product in the sustainable
marketplace advantage. Attention is also paid to registration and protection
issues. Students will be required to identify an idea and develop it into a
product. Prerequisite: Also examines the history, development and components
of franchisee, licensee and distributorship systems, focussing particularly on
business format franchise networks. The perspectives of both franchise and
franchisor are considered, as are various management issues which may arise
within the network. Prerequisite: ENT 011 & MNG 022. ENT 011.
ENT 015 Family Business Management 3 Credits
Family businesses represent the interests of two distinct, yet overlapping
institutions: the firm and the family. It examines special problems of family
business and other closely held corporations. Attention is devoted to family
business planning, effective governance approaches in family businesses,
preparing heirs for entry into and management of family firms, tax and
compensation planning, and succession strategies. Actual family business case
studies will be used to examine these issues. Family business owners will serve
as invited speakers. Prerequisite: ENT 011.
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ENT 016 Imagination, Entrepreneurship and
3 Credits
Creative Business Problem Solving
This is a practical course that aims at stimulating students to apply the theories
and skills acquired from the other entrepreneurial courses on real life situations.
Prerequisites: ENT 011, ENT 012, ENT 013, ENT 014.
FIN 011 Business Finance 3 Credits
Sources of business finance: shares, loans, hire purchase, lease hire, trade
credit; ploughed back capital; financial institutions: specialized financial
institutions, ICDC, KIE, IDE, AFC, KTDC, HFCK, CDC, ADB; savings and
credit cooperative society; cooperative insurance; expected future financing of
cooperatives; the commercial banks, merchant banks, etc.; Other institutions:
the CBK; the banking system; problems of indigenous banks and possible
solutions; the stock exchange: functions, issuing of shares, purchase timing;
CMA, dealings, yield and P/E ratio; cost of capital; working capital
management; the capital budgeting decision; financial analysis: ratio analysis.
Prerequisites: MGT 011and MGT 014.
FIN 012 Financial Institutions 3 Credits
Overview of the financial system, theory of the financial system, mobilizing
savings, asset transformation, Central banking, the determinants of interest rates,
“modern” central banking, principles of banking, retail banking, wholesale
banking, building societies, regulation and the control of the financial system,
issues concerning the prudential controls of the financial system, the demand
for and supply of assets, models of the demand for assets, models of the supply
of assets.
FIN 013 Financial Analysis and Reporting 3 Credits
Income statement, balance sheet and cash flow statement review and the big
picture analysis, profitability and risk analysis, ratios analysis, common size
analysis, trend analysis, Percentage change analysis, cross sectional analysis,
time series analysis.
FIN 021 Financial Management 3 Credits
Capital budgeting cost of capital, portfolio analysis, capital structure, foreign
exchange, merger, and acquisitions. Prerequisite: FIN 011.
FIN 022 Portfolio Management & Investment 3 Credits
Nature and Scope of Investment Management. Risk and Returns. Security
Valuation. Alternative Forms of Investment. Investor and Interest Rates, Dividend
Policies and Tax Planning. Fundamental Analysis. Technical Analysis. Efficient
Market Theory. Portfolio Analysis. Prerequisites: BUS 314 and STA 211.
FIN 023 International Finance 3 Credits
International monetary system, balance of payments, foreign exchange markets,
parity conditions, derivatives, foreign exchange risk management, transaction
exposure, economic exposure, translation exposure, Global financial markets,
Capital structure, capital budgeting and cash management in the global
market.
LOG 012 Purchasing Principles & Management
3 Credits
Introduction to the purchasing profession, Christian ethics and professional
standards, the role of purchasing and supply management in business, and
purchasing objectives, policies and procedures. Computer based systems
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including EDI and purchasing on the Internet. Purchasing organization
and strategic role in the firm. Purchase descriptions, specifications and
standardization. Purchasing’s role in new product development. Outsourcing
and make or buy decisions. Finding, evaluating and selecting domestic and
international sources of supply. Price and cost analysis. Principles of contracting
and negotiation. Purchasing capital equipment and services. Contract
administration, managing for quality, and general management responsibilities
including value analysis, developing the buying plan, and appraisal and
control of the purchasing function. Pre requisite: LOG 013.
LOG 021 Inventory Planning and Control 3 Credits
Functions, types and uses of inventories. Nature and uses of forecasts in the
firm. Demand management, forecasting periods and accuracy. Forecasting
approaches including Box Jenkins, econometrics, Delphi method, market
surveys, statistical series, time series, moving average, exponential smoothing,
and Bayesian techniques. Adjusting for seasonality and cyclic patterns
around the trend. Monitoring and controlling forecasting systems by using
mean absolute deviation, mean absolute error, mean absolute percent error,
and tracking signals. The use of focus forecasting, pyramid forecasting, and
combination methods to improve forecast accuracy.
Vector smoothing for simple and multiple items. Percentage done estimating
method. Percent of aggregate demands method. Slow moving item forecasting
using exponential smoothing and vector smoothing. Measures of inventory
system performance including ROI and ROA. Inventory distribution by value
and Pareto (ABC) analysis. Trade offs between holding costs, set up costs,
ordering costs, costs of production down time, and cost of stock outs. Basic
order point/order quantity systems and calculation of EOQ/EPQ. EOQ
with quantity discounts and shortages. Annual, cycle count, and low point
inventory systems. Multi item joint replenishment inventory models including
Brown’s algorithm and Kaspi and Rosenblatt’s algorithm, Joint replenishment
production quantity models. Inventory systems under risk including calculation
of safety stocks. Interaction between service levels and safety stocks. Balancing
backorder or lost sales costs against inventory costs. Lead time adjustments and
variability. Impact of demand lumpiness and variability. Impact of anticipated
price changes on demand. Common inventory control systems in practice.
Aggregate inventory management including lot size inventory management
interpolation technique (LIMIT), exchange curves, LaGrange multipliers, unit
and situation stock out objectives. Facility location decisions including echelon
inventory and echelon holding costs. Types of distribution systems, distribution
requirements planning, and allocation systems. Outsourcing of distribution and
inventory storage. Pre requisites; BUL 011, MGT 025.
LOG 022 Warehousing and Stores Management 3 Credits
Nature and importance of warehousing. Types of warehousing. Three functions
of warehousing – movement, storage, and information transfer. Receiving,
transfer or put away, order picking, cross docking, and shipping functions.
Information transfer including computerization, EDI, and bar coding. Private
vs. public warehousing. Determining warehouse number, types size, and
location. Warehouse location models. Warehouse layout and design. Use of
randomized and dedicated storage locations. Product groupings in dedicated
storage. International dimensions of warehousing. Warehouse productivity
measurement and improvement. Financial dimensions of warehousing.
Activity based costing. Warehouse security, accounting and control. Materials
handling equipment types, uses and costs. Manual and automated storage
facilities. Warehousing for JIT environment. Packaging and its effects on costs,
customer service and satisfaction. Computers and technology in warehousing
and tracking operations. Warehouse activity profiling. Humanizing warehouse
operations. Prerequisite; BUL 011.
LOG 031 Management of Customer Service 3 Credits
Developing a customer orientation in all functions of the firm, especially those
that interface with the customer. Integrating customer service management with
other functions of the firm. The essential elements of great customer service.
Developing and implementing the customer service call path for telephone
customer service operations. Techniques for identifying how the company is
perceived and establishing action plans to maintain or enhance the reputation
of the business. Ethical standards in customer service to build credibility,
believability and professionalism. Empowering customer service providers to
improve their ability to serve the customer. The importance of communications
in customer service to include effective listening, appropriate word usage, and
proper voice inflection. Techniques for dealing with difficult or angry customers.
Selecting, training, monitoring and motivating customer service representatives
and first line managers. Building effective customer service operations on the
Internet. Dealing with communications barriers and prejudice in a multicultural
environment. Measuring customer satisfaction and customer churn, and
developing programs for continuous improvement. Financial implications of
customer service including cost vs. service level trade offs, measuring the value
of an existing customer, and controlling customer churn. Prerequisite; BUL 011,
MGT 013.
LOG 032 Transportation Management 3 Credits
Transportation’s interaction with the supply chain and the economy. Transportation
regulation and public policy. Motor carriers including truck load (TL), less than
truck load (LTL) and small package carriers. Freight documentation including
the bill of lading (B/L), carrier freight bill, and delivery receipt (D/R). Use of
railroads. Inland water carriers. Air carriers including air cargo, integrated
carriers, small package express delivery, freight forwarders, and next flight
out (NFO) services. Air transportation documentation. Use of pipelines. Use
of special modes of transportation including bulk carriers, heavy haul carriers,
and temperature controlled carriers. Ocean freight carriers including bulk,
container, and roll on/roll off (Ro Ro) ships. Intermodal transportation including
traileron flat car (TOFC), container on flat car (COFC) piggy back services.
Transportation tariffs and rate determination. Negotiating transportation pricing.
Use of private transportation and the economic and operational advantages
and disadvantages of private trucking vs., common carriers. Relationship
management and partnering between shippers and haulers. Information
systems in transportation and the growing importance of technology in the
transportation industry. Prerequisites; BUL 011, MGT 022.
ICC 014 Old Testament Introduction and Survey 3 Credits
The importance of the study of the Old Testament and its authority for the
Christian life; The divisions of the Old Testament; A survey of Old Testament
history and indispensable role it plays in understanding the Old Testament;
Selected issues of ancient Israel’s culture; The background, content, purposes,
and important themes of each Old Testament book; Key Old testament
theological themes.
ICC 015 New Testament Introduction Survey 3 Credits
The history of the Jewish people from the time of Ezra until the end of the New
Testament period, how this history shapes Judaism during the first century C. E.,
and how the New Testament church understood Jesus Christ as the fulfilment
of the hopes and longings of that Judaism and its Scriptures; Geography of
Palestine as well as the northern and eastern Mediterranean during the first
century C. E., and its significance for understanding the New Testament; its
purpose and key themes; a survey of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ; A
survey of the life and ministry of Paul, including an overview of the spread of
the church outside the boundaries of Palestine; An introduction to important
factors of the cultural background of the New Testament. Prerequisite: ICC 014.
HOM 023 Principles & Practices of Management
3 Credits
IN the Hospitality Industry
A perspective on the hospitality service industry; the hospitality service industries
– an overview; industry segments; types of food service operations; inns, hotels,
and motels. Management history development, theory and organization:
history of management; elements of management; definitions of management;
characteristics of management, the resources of management; roles and skills
of a manager; the functions of management; the environs of management; the
levels of management and the goals of management. Development of modern
management thought: classical scientific management; classical organization
theory; the human relations approach; management science; contingency
approach to management; the Japanese approach to management; systems
approach to hospitality management. Organization: the need for organization;
formal organization; classical principles of organization; organization structure;
the organization chart; types of formal organization; modern organization
theory; theory X & Y; factors in hospitality organization. Information, planning
and decision making. Special areas of management concern: control;
production management; labor relations and safety management; financial
management; marketing and sales management; legal aspects, insurance and
risk management; business ethics and professionalism.
HOM 024: Hospitality Leisure and Tourism 3 Credits
Travel and Tourism: Partnership in hospitality; Relating hospitality to travel
and tourism, marketing and promoting hospitality and tourism, destination
development, destination marketing, Tourism motives and destinations: Mass
market tourism, Man made environments: Theme parks, casinos, gaming.
Natural environments. The role of tourism in the hospitality industry. Effects
of hospitality, travel and tourism: economic and non economic, Leisure and
hospitality: Leisure defined, leisure vs. recreation, leisure segments in the
industry, managing leisure segments, purpose of leisure segments, recreation
management. Specific leisure segments: Novel lodging facilities, clubs (types
and ownership), Health and fitness facilities, casions (checks and balances,
legal aspects), The cruise industry, Recreation facilities (Theme parks, Resorts,
Resorts and tourism). The role of entertainment. Marketing in the different sectors
of leisure industry: 4Ps of marketing mix and leisure. The future of the hospitality
industry: demographics and cultural diversity.
HOM 025 Hospitality and Travel Marketing 3 Credits
Introduction to marketing: marketing defined; Differences between marketing
products and hospitality/travel services; The hospitality and travel marketing
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system. Planning: customer behavior in the hospitality and travel industry;
Analyzing marketing opportunities; Marketing research; Marketing strategy
– market segmentation and trends, marketing mix, Positioning and marketing
objectives; Marketing plan and the 8Ps of hospitality and travel marketing.
Implementing the marketing plan: The product/service mix and people:
Packaging and programming; The distribution mix and the travel trade;
Communications and the promotion mix; Advertising; Sales promotion and
merchandizing; Personal selling and sales management; Public relations and
publicity, Pricing. Controlling, measuring and evaluating the plan: Marketing
management, evaluation and control. Pre requisite: MGT 013.
HOM 026 Hospitality and Related Services 3 Credits
Introduction: An overview of the hospitality service industry, definition of
service, types of service, rendering personal service, management in service
transaction; How organizations organize for service, service strategy,
service culture, importance of people. General classifications of hospitality/
accommodation services, their distinctive features, Functional areas of hotel
organization. Classification criteria of hotels, reasons for classifications.
Hospitality services available in Kenya and East Africa. The main objectives of
hospitality services: sales, profits, guest satisfaction, boosting image of
accommodation facilities. Demand for hospitality services; Consumer
demographics, Educational impacts on hospital demand. Supply conditions;
Food and labor. The environment: competitive environment, physical
environment, Global issues, and technical environment. Service standards:
Factors promoting service standards; Other related services – Recreation,
Game viewing, Medical, etc. Planning and management of hospitality related
services.
HRM 011 Human Resource management 3 Credits
Human Resource Management in Perspective; History of Human Resource
Management; Human Resource Management and the Legal Environment;
Recruitment, Selection, and Human Resource Planning; Training and
Development; Compensation and Benefits; Employee and Labor Relations;
Safety, Health, and Security; Global Human Resource Management;
Human Resource Research; Electronic Human Resource Management; Future
Considerations and Issues for Human Resource Management. Pre-requisite:
MGT 012.
HRM 012 Organizational Behavior 3 Credits
Motivational perspectives; Managing conflict; Interpersonal communication,
Organization culture and change; Leadership; International aspects; Ethics;
Diversity management; Group dynamics; Decision making; Managing careers;
Organizational structure and design: Psychology at work; Social philosophy;
Work behavior. Pre-requisite: MGT 012.
HRM 013 Employee Relations & Labour Law 3 Credits
Labor history in Kenya; Major legal influences on labor law; Union structure
and strategy; Union organizing; Collective bargaining; Impasse resolution;
Contract administration; Arbitration and mediation; Employee discipline;
Management rights; Economic issues; Labor relations in the public sector; Labor
relations in multinational corporations. Pre-requisite: HRM 011.
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HRM 014 Industrial Psychology 3 Credits
Introduction: Definitions and history; Research methods in organizational
psychology; Job analysis; Employee selection; Evaluating employee
performance; Employee training and development; Job satisfaction and
positive employee attitudes and behaviour; Worker stress and negative
employee attitudes and behaviour; Communication in the workplace; Group
processes in the workplace; Influence, power, and politics; Organizational
culture and development; Human factors and occupational health psychology.
Pre-requisite; HRM 011.
HRM 015 International Human 3 Credits
Resource Management
Meaning of international human resource management; Contemporary issues
expatriate banking; Multinational corporations; Cultural dimensions; Human
resource management practices in foreign companies in Kenya; Human
resource management practices and environment in foreign countries; HR trends
and innovations – Expatriate development; Maintaining corporate identity
through corporate culture; Factors affecting human resource management in
the international market. Pre-requisite; HRM 011, HRM 012.
HRM 016 Public Relations 3 Credits
History of public relations; Public relations defined and distinguished; Public
relations departments; Planning public relations programs; Public of public
relations; The news media; Press relations; Created private media; Budgeting;
Photography; The ethics of Public relations; Management and employee
relations; Sponsorships; Export public relations; Marketing research; Public
relations in developing countries. Pre-requisite: MGT 013.
MGT 009 Introduction to Information 3 Credits
Technology History of computers and development information technology. Computer
hardware: Overview and definitions, input/output devices, processors,
memory, storage. Computer software: data/information. Operating systems:
overview and definitions; Examples: DOS, Windows 98/2000, Windows
NT, Unix, linux. Internet: definition, brief history, URL, search engines, searching
techniques.
MGT 010 Professional Business Communication 3 Credits
The communication process; business communication and management;
packaging and delivering effective messages, document layout, letters and
memos; reports; special topics in business communication cross cultural
communication, technology aided communication, public presentation,
persuasive communication, non verbal communication, working in teams,
receiving and answering telephone calls, job applications and networking.
MGT 011 Financial Accounting 3 Credits
The need for accounting records and accounts information. Parties who need
accounting information. Principles and concepts used in writing up accounts.
Terminologies used in accounting. Double entry book keeping. The accounting
equation. The golden rule of accounting. The ledger accounts of sole
proprietors. The day books; The journal proper. Balancing up ledger accounts.
The trial balance. The trading and profit and loss account. The balance sheet:
The presentation of fixed assets, current assets and the liabilities. The two
column cash book. The three column cash book. Cash discount accounts. Bank
reconciliation statement. The petty cash book. Errors in accounts. Suspense
accounts and the correction of errors. Year end adjustments: Prepayments and
accruals. The depreciation of fixed assets commonly used. Capital expenditure
and revenue expenditure. Manufacturing accounts. Reserve and provisions.
MGT 012 Organization & Management 3 Credits
Definition and nature of management; management and managers.
Management – a profession, a commitment. Efficient and effective managers.
Dimensions of management. The development of management and organization
theory. Planning and decision making: organizational goals, strategy and
strategic planning, developing and implementing plans, managerial decision
making: steps in decision making, quantitative techniques for decision making,
management by objectives. The organizing process: Concept and approaches
of organization theory, designing structures, span of control, departmentation,
delegation, centralization and decentralization, organization charts, line and
staff authority. Staffing: Its nature and purpose, manager and organization
development. Leading: motivation, leadership, communication and the
personnel factor. The controlling process: Steps in control, effective control,
resistance to controlling and strategic perspectives of controlling. Management
and society, ethical issues in management, social responsibility. Management
and Christianity. Coordination the essence of management. A manager’s
roles and skills.
MGT 013 Principles of Marketing 3 Credits
Marketing: the marketing concept, the role of marketing in an organization
and within an economy and the concept of marketing mix, Integration of
Christian faith and marketing, and the new marketing challenges. Marketing
opportunity analysis: Environmental analysis, opportunity identification,
market segmentation, market information systems, consumer behavior. Product
decisions: Definitions, classifications, product life cycle, consumer adoption
process, product development and management, packaging, branding and
labeling decisions. Price decisions: Price setting, objectives and approaches
and pricing policy. Promotion decisions: Tools of promotion. Distribution
decisions: Channel decisions, types of Middlemen and distribution systems.
MGT 014 Economics 3 Credits
Introduction: meaning of economics, nature and scope of economics, central
economic goals and problems, basic concepts, historical survey of economics;
economic system: free enterprise systems, salient features, merits and demerits,
centrally planned systems characteristics, advantages and limitations, mixed
economy; Introduction to price theory: law of demand, individual demand
and markets, determinants of demand, determinants of supply, market price
determination; Production: meaning and forms of production, factors of
production, combination of factors of production; introduction to market
structures; National income, Aggregate demand and aggregate supply:
meaning of national income and related concepts, the circular flow of income
and the methods of accounting, problems of measurement, importance of
national income accounting; Money and banking: the nature and functions
of money, the role of commercial banks, the role of central bank; Introduction
to international trade and balance of payments: Importance and limitations of
international trade, balance of payments accounts, current account, capital
account and monetary account; Economic growth and development: Classical
and neoclassical growth theory, endogenous growth theory, liberalization,
SAPs: IMF and World Bank.
MGT 015 Business Law 3 Credits
Nature and meaning of law. Sources of law in East Africa and law of persons.
The legal systems in Kenya. Law of contract. Tort law. Law of agency. Types
of business organizations in East Africa: Sole trader, partnership, company
corporation, the legal person. Negotiable instruments. Hire purchase. Banking
law. Insurance law. Sale of goods.
MGT 021 Managerial Accounting 3 Credits
Introduction: Definition of management accounting, Role of management
accounting, Difference between financial accounting, Cost accounting and
management accounting, Kind of decisions that need the use of management
accounting statements. An overview of management accounting: Planning
decisions, Control decisions, Organizing decisions, Production decisions,
Marketing decisions, Personnel decisions, Financial decisions, Forecasting
decisions. Cost volume profit analysis: Marginal costing: concept; cost
variations, Break even analysis, Relevant costs for decision making. Capital
expenditure decisions. Inventory control. Cost of holding stock. Stock re order
planning. Budgeting and budgetary control. Responsibility accounting. Pre
requisite: MGT 011
MGT 022 Quantitative Techniques 3 Credits
Collection, organization and presentation of data: Definition, scope and role
of statistics, Sources and types of data, Methods of collection, organization
and presentation of data. Descriptive statistics: Measures of central tendency,
Measures of dispersion. Correlation: Scatter diagram, Coefficient of correlation,
Coefficient of determination, Simple linear regression. Functions and graphical
representations: Functions and graphs, Linear functions and nonlinear functions,
Economic applications of linear functions and non linear functions. Differential
calculus: Rate of change, Concepts of limits and continuity, Derivative and
differentiation, Partial differentiation, Economic applications of differential
calculus. Integral calculus: Introduction, Rules of integration, Economic
applications of integral calculus. Matrix algebra: Introduction: Definitions
and basic concepts, Properties of matrices, Determinant of a matrix, Matrix
operations, Matrix inversion, Solution to linear simultaneous equations: matrix
approach, Economic applications of matrix algebra. Linear programming:
Formulation of linear program, Graphical and simplex methods, Duality theory,
Sensitivity analysis.
MGT 023 Business Ethics & Corporate Governance 3 Credits
Definition and significance of business ethics terms and ideas in ethics. The
corporate governance system, the legal obligation of directors, effective boards,
the board – CEO relationship the board’s role in management. Basic principles
and practices of corporate governance; development in the governance of
enterprise, duties and liabilities of stakeholders, corporate governance and
reporting, determining good governance, assessing board and Director’s
performance. Governance, leadership and management: competence of
board members, designing the governance process, leadership, monitoring
and evaluation. Christian ethics.
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MGT 024 Entrepreneurship and Risk Management 3 Credits
The Entrepreneur. Theoretical and conceptual base for entrepreneurship(myths
and origin). Entrepreneurship vs Intrapreneurship. The importance and
drawbacks of entrepreneurship. Types of entrepreneurship. Innovation, creativity
and entrepreneurship. Business idea generation Assessment and evaluation
of new ventures. Business plan and business proposal. Elements of fraud
related offences theft, obtaining property by deception, obtaining a financial
advantage, false accounting, Furnishing false information, falsification of
documents, fraudulently inducing a person to invest money, Secret commissions,
conspiracy; Computer crime computer crime law, Impact of computer crime,
internet based crime, hacking, computer security framework, the forensic
process as it applies to computers; Crime investigationsgeneral investigations,
evidence and its sources, crime scenes. Risk Management Fundamental
concepts; Types of risks and their management; Financial risks, Industry and
company risk, Regulators, sovereign and country risk, Operations risk.
MGT 025 Business Research Methods 3 Credits
Meaning and purpose of research, objectives of research, types of research,
significance of research, research methods and methodology, research and
scientific method, research process, characteristics of a good research,
problems encountered by researchers, selecting and defining of the research
Problems: what is research problem? Selecting the problem; Techniques
involved in defining a problem; Importance and scope of literature review;
Conceptual framework. Research design: Meaning of research design; Need
for research design; Features of a good research design; Important concepts
related to research design; Different types of research designs; Basic principles
of experimental designs; Important experimental designs. Case study: Develop
a research plan and a proposal; Sampling of research design: Sampling
need, Sampling definitions, Census and sample survey, Implication of
sample design, Steps in sampling design, Criteria for selecting a sampling
procedure, Characteristics of a good sample design, Different types of
sample designs, Determining the sample size. Measurement and scaling
techniques: Measurements in research; Measurement scale; Sources of error
in measurement; Tests of sound measurements; Techniques of developing
measurement tools; Meaning of scaling; Scale classification bases; Important
scaling techniques. Methods of data Collection: Methods of collecting primary
data; Methods of collecting secondary data; Construction of a questionnaire;
Case study method. Processing and analysis of data: Processing operations;
Types of data analysis; Measures of central tendency; Measures of dispersion;
Skewness; Regression analysis. Interpretation and report writing: Meaning
of interpretation; Techniques of interpretation; Precaution in interpretation;
Significance of report writing; Different steps in writing report; Layout of the
research report; Types of reports; Mechanics of writing a Research report.
Hypothesis; Definitions; characteristics. Issues in research: Validity; Reliability;
Objectivity; Research report. Pre-requisite: MGT 022.
MGT 098 Research Project 3 Credits
The student will be expected to choose a topic with the help of a lecturer. The
lecturer must be specialized in that area of study as he/she will be required to
give guidance to enable the student to write a report at the end of the course.
Pre requisite: Permission of Instructor.
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MGT 099 Practicum 4 Credits
The student is responsible for acquiring his/her own practicum site, which
meets the minimum requirement of the University undergraduate programme for
approval and which agrees with the employer’s need and student’s training.
He/she will do an average of 40 hours per week at the site over the course
of the ten week period after the last semester of course study for a minimum of
280 hours. He/she will be required to receive at least one hour per week of
individual supervision from his/her on site supervisor. The project report should
reflect an application of learnt theories and concepts to describe, diagnose,
prescribe and provide appropriate business solutions and strategies to
respective cases. The report should be at least 55 pages.
MKT 011 Consumer Behavior 3 Credits
The nature and diversity of consumer behavior: The 7 keys to consumer
behavior; Market segmentation; Consumer behavior influences and consumer
research; the consumer as an individual (internal influences): Consumer
motivation and personality, Consumer perception and attitude formation,
Learning and consumer involvement. The consumers in their social and cultural
settings (external influences): The concept of culture and its influence in
consumer behavior, Social stratification (social class), Families and households,
Group influences and consumer behavior, Cross cultural consumer behavior
(international perspective). The consumer decision process: choosing and
consuming: Situational influences, problem and need recognition, information
search, alternative evaluation and selection, outlet selection and purchase
decision, post purchase processes, customer satisfaction, repeat purchases and
customer commitment. Case studies and project presentation. Pre-requisite;
MGT 013.
MKT 012 Advertising 3 Credits
The foundations of advertising: advertising and society: ethics and regulation,
ethical issues in advertising. The marketing concept, The 4 Ps of marketing.
Advertising agencies: The consumer audience: Consumer behavior, Influences
on you as the consumer personal influences. Strategy and marketing planning.
The marketing plan, the advertising plan, creative plan and copy strategy. How
advertising works: Media strategy and planning: Print media: News papers,
magazines. Broadcast media: The structure of television, TV advertising, the TV
audience, advantages and disadvantages of TV, the structure of radio, radio
advertising, the radio audience, advantages and disadvantages of radio.
Media buying: Media buying functions, special skills and expert knowledge of
media opportunities, knowledge of media pricing, media vehicle selection and
negotiation, maintaining plan performance. The Creative side of advertising:
The creative concept, creative execution, and effective creativity. Creating
print advertising: Print advertising, writing for print, print production. Creating
broadcast advertising: Mastering TV commercials, the TV environment; nature of
commercials, planning and producing commercials. Sales promotion: defining
sales promotion, the size of the sales promotion, the role of sales promotion in
marketing, the relationship between sales promotion and advertising, types of
sales promotion, the future of sales promotion. Public relations: The challenge of
public relations, comparing public relations and advertising, The components
of public relations, public relations techniques. International advertising: The
global perspective, organization of international advertising agencies. Prerequisite: MGT 013.
MKT 013 Sales Management 3 Credits
Origin and development of salesmanship; overview of sales management;
strategic role of selling and sales management; knowledge of the buying
motives: the process of buying and selling; environmental influence on
sales programs and performance. Effective presentation and demonstration:
overcoming objections organizing sales force; demand estimation; sales
territories; motivation of salesmen; training of salesmen: remuneration of
salesmen; sales analysis. Pre-requisite; MGT 013.
MKT 021 Marketing Management
3 Credits
Definition of marketing management, adapting marketing management to new
economies; building customer satisfaction, value and retention, market oriented
strategic planning; information gathering and measurement of market demand;
environmental analysis; consumer markets and buyer behaviour; analyzing
business markets and business buying behaviour; dealing with competition;
market segmentation; product planning; new product development; global
marketing; branding strategies; service marketing; pricing strategies; placing
and promotion strategies. Pre-requisite; MGT 013.
MKT 022 Public Relations 3 Credits
History of public relations; Public relations defined and distinguished; Public
relations departments; Planning public relations programs; Planning of public
relations; The news media; Press relations; Created private media; Budgeting;
Photography; The ethics of public relations; Management and employee
relations; Sponsorships; Export public relations; Marketing research; Public
relations in developing countries. Pre-requisite: MGT 013.
MKT 023 International Marketing 3 Credits
Introduction: International marketing concept
International marketing,
basis for international trade. The international marketing environment: the
economic environment, the cultural and social environment, the political
and legal environment, the financial environment, international institutions.
Strategic decisions in international marketing; the market selection decision;
screening and segmentation; international market research: Research
strategy; desk research; field research; organizing for international market
research. International product decision I: Product standardization or product
modification, new product development; Product elimination. International
product decision II: Packaging, labeling, servicing and trade markets.
International distribution decisions: Channels between nations; channels within
nations. Direct vs. Indirect export. Joint ventures; Licensing; franchising; industrial
co op agreements; Contract manufacture; management contract; International
pricing: Pricing strategies, Export pricing, Devaluation; Government influences
on pricing. International communications: Media advertising, Sales promotion
and public relations; International sales management. Management of risk in
International marketing. Pre-requisite: MGT 013.
MNG 030 Organizational Behavior 3 Credits
Managers and organizational behavior, definition, fundamental concepts, the
emerging organizational: The role of information technology; benchmarking;
mimicking brains; electronic data interchange, reengineering; flattening and
downsizing of organizations. Behavior. personality: meaning, development
and major determinants of personality. Perception: nature and importance
of perception, perceptual selectivity, perceptual organization and social
perception. Attitudes and job satisfaction: nature and dimensions of attitudes,
importance of employee attitudes, job satisfaction sources, consequences of job
satisfaction/ dissatisfaction; Body language. Job stress: meaning, background
of stress, causes of stress, coping strategies for stress; the focus of organizational
behavior. Meaning of motivation, primary motives, work motivation
approaches. Motivation applied job design and goal setting. Interpersonal
and group behavior, dynamics and influence, the informal organization, group
dynamics, organizational conflicts and politics; leadership styles; adapting
organizations to changing conditions: Organizational culture nature, creating
and maintaining a culture; organization change, development and the future
of organization behavior.
MNG 031 Company Law 3 Credits
Historical background; the meaning of a company; fundamental concepts
of company law; legal personality, limited liability, veil of incorporation,
advantages and disadvantages of incorporation; memorandum of association
and concept of ultra vires; articles of association; variation of class rights:
variation of the rights clause; promoters of prospectuses; company’s organs
and officers; the rule in Turquand’s case and subsequent case law; directors’
duties; the law relating to auditors; minority protection; raising and maintaining
capital, reduction of capital; distribution of dividends; types of corporate
securities; shares and debentures; reconstructions, mergers and takeovers;
winding up process; promoters; prospectuses. Pre-requisite: MGT 015.
MNG 032 Business Finance 3 Credits
Sources of business finance: shares, loans, hire purchase, lease hire, trade
credit; ploughed back capital; financial institutions: specialized financial
institutions, ICDC, KIE, IDE, AFC, KTDC, HFCK, CDC, ADB; savings and
credit cooperative society; cooperative insurance; expected future financing of
cooperatives; the commercial banks, merchant banks, etc.; Other institutions:
the CBK; the banking system; problems of indigenous banks and possible
solutions; the stock exchange: functions, issuing of shares, purchase timing;
CMA, dealings, yield and P/E ratio; cost of capital; working capital
management; the capital budgeting decision; financial analysis: ratio analysis.
Pre-requisites: MGT 011, MGT 014.
MNG 033 Human Resource Management 3 Credits
An overview of HRM: The origins of human resource management [HRM];
Personnel management versus HRM – where is the difference; pressures behind
the rising interest in HRM; the nature and place of people (employees) in
creation; characteristics of a Christian human resource manager. Context of
human resource management: the environment of HRM; HRM a developing
country perspective; HRM in Kenya. Employee resourcing: human resource
planning; recruitment and selection; selection problems in Kenya; orientation
of new employees; employee layoffs; a biblical approach to employee
layoffs; dismissing employees – biblical principles. Employee Processes:
human resource policies; job analysis; job evaluations. Performance
Management: the performance management process; a biblical approach
to employee performance management. Salary and benefits administration:
salary administration; biblical principles for salary administration; benefits
administration; biblical principles for benefits administration. Training and
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Development: meaning of training and development (T&D); training and
development responsibility, the process; a biblical approach to training and
development. Managing promotions and employee Discipline: a biblical
approach to managing promotions; the promotion system; managing employee
discipline; a biblical approach to disciplining employees. Employee relations:
the context of industrial relations; healthy and safety; managing HIV/AIDS in
the workplace; selected Kenyan labour laws. Prerequisite: MGT 012.
MNG 034 International Business Management 3 Credits
The nature and scope of international management: definition of international
management, reasons for international management, risks of foreign trade and
investment ventures, international business environment. Corporate strategy:
motives for operating internationally, expansion and trading strategies, the vital
choice. Trade in goods and services: pre export, market selection, significant
obstacles, the options, the foreign agent, organization and staffing,
documentation procedures. Trade in knowledge and expertise: visible and
invisible trade, selling knowledge abroad, technology transfer, licensing
agreements, franchising agreement, management contracts, selecting and
control of contract partners, organization and management of the foreign
base. Foreign investment: the first steps, motives for direct investment, foreign
subsidiaries for manufacture and services, ownerships and joint ventures, the
parent company and subsidiary, disinvestment, time and reasons. International
marketing management: market research in a foreign country, product policies,
consumer identification and produce image, pricing policies, promotion and
sales, elements of marketing mix, counter trade, external affairs management,
international finance and control, international corporate planning. Human
resources and industrial relations: staffing policies, industrial relations, personnel
policies, and regulatory environment of labour. Purchasing and supplies
management: procurement, distribution, production, record research and
development. Decision making and organization in international management,
organizational structurechannels of decision making, centralization and
decentralizationprocess in decision making. The company and national state:
the types of country authority, power and politics of national state, basis of
conflict, investment policies of national states, power of the multi national
company. International trade organizations and the new international economic
order: Regional trade arrangements, the United Nations and its trade organs,
the World Bank, the IMF, GATT, UNCTAD. Regional organizations, international
financing, international trade order, regulatory bodies, ISO standardization
and ethical codes of conduct, doing business in industrialized countries the Less
Developed Countries (LDC’s). The command (controlled) economies (communist
and socialist), peace, war, reconciliation, economic embargoes; the “global
village” concept; the future of international management. Pre-requisite: MGT
013.
MNG 035 Corporate Strategy 3 Credits
Nature, scope and need for corporate strategy: importance of corporate
strategic planning, definitions, models, characteristics of corporate strategic
decision making, elements in development of corporate strategy. Application
of corporate strategy in different organizations, strategy development for small
businesses, manufacturing and service organizations, public sector, not for
profit organizations, patterns of strategy development – intended vs. realized
strategies, pre planned vs. emergent strategies, imposed strategy. Factors
affecting strategy development; challenges for strategy development. Analysis of
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corporate strategy: environmental analysis, PEST; steps, stages and techniques
for auditing the environment, strategic group analysis, competitor based
strategies – market leaders, market followers and market challengers; SWOT
analysis; identifying strategic options: mission, vision, objectives; Ansoff’s
Product Market matrix; mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures, strategic alliances;
competitive advantage strategies – cost and price based strategies, added
value strategies, differentiation strategies, focus and hybrid strategies. Strategy
evaluation and selection: concepts and techniques of evaluating and selecting
strategic options, concept of strategic fit and synergy, decision tree analysis,
risk analysis, financial analysis. Implementing and controlling strategies: factors
affecting implementation and control, determination of policies, procedures
and budgets, resource allocation and control. Techniques for corporate
strategies: BCG’s Growth Share Matrix, directional policy matrices, Porter
industry/market evolution matrix, A D Little’s competitive position/industry
maturity matrix, the parenting matrix, PIMS technique, the experience curve
concept and GAP analysis; Contemporary and future developments such as
Information Technology and Information systems, international and global
aspects of corporate strategic planning.
TAT 023 Transport Systems 3 Credits
Spatial interaction, movement of goods, materials and people; flow of
information, growth of transport network and its role in economic development;
modes of transport, road, rail, sea and air; private and individual modes of
transport; their characteristics. Organization and management of transport
enterprises; economics of transport; need for regulation; customer oriented
policies. How supply of transport stimulants development of tourism. Transport
demand, transport network, transport costs and pricing; transport planning
and economic development in the third world; transport problems in rural and
urban areas in the developing countries, price elasticity, promotional rates,
group travel, scheduled and supplementary carriers, impact of technology on
transport.
TAT 024 Travel Organization 3 Credits
Concepts related to leisure, recreation and tourism; intermediaries (travel
agents and operators). Travel agents: historical development and their present
status, organization and management of the travel agency i.e. ticketing and
reservations, information tours, transport administration, relationship between
tour operators and travel agents; transport undertakings and accommodation
unit fares, liability for travel agents. Tour operations: functions and roles.
Activities,aims and competence of national tourist organizations. Planning,
development and maintenance of travel and services. National and cultural
resources. Travel requirements (formalities): passport, visa, currency, customs,
health and taxes. Removal of travel barriers. Role of Kenya Tourism Board
and National Museums. Role and functions of international travel and travel
organizations.
TAT 025 Travel Behaviour and Management 3 Credits
Needs assessment among travelers; choice of places to be visited, optimizing
and satisfying behavior in individual and mass travel schedules, management
of travel; air, sea, road and rail travel; travel requirements including government
procedures, immigration procedures and regulations; operations of travel
agencies; travel law rights of travelers; liability of travel agents. Different types
of tours, bookings conditions, organization of tours, tour brochures, bookings
and reservations, the economic physical and social impacts of tourists at a
destination.
TAT 026 Tour Operations Management 3 Credits
Tour operations business in tourism; location of tourists circuits in Kenya and
neighborhood counties; detailed case students of the management geography
and facilities available in national parks and game reserves and other tourist
areas; conducting of tours: reservations, tour packages, accommodation,
reservations, travel and transport procedures including the airport; payment
and billing for services, budgeting and writing tour reports, preparation of
itineraries, office management relating to tours – communications, costing,
invoicing. Linkages between tours, travel and hotels. Components of the tourism
industry and their relationship with tour operations.
TSM 021 Tourism Principles and Practices 3 Credits
Tourism in perspective: the study of tourism principles and practices; economic
importance. Tourism through the ages: early beginnings; early and later tourism
attractions; the first travel agents; historic transportation; accommodations.
Tourism organization: international organization; development organizations
(international and national); regional international organizations; national
organizations; regional organizations. Passenger transportation: the airline
industry: the rail industry; the motor coach industry; automobile industry; cruise
industry. Hospitality and related services: the lodging industry; the food service
industry; meetings and conferences. Organizations in the distribution process:
travel agents; tour wholesalers; specialty channels. Attractions, recreation
entertainment and others: attractions; gaming; recreation; entertainment; festivals
and events; shopping; marketing and publicity organizations. Understanding
travel behavior: pleasure travel motivation; cultural and international tourism
for life enrichment. Sociology and tourism: life characteristics and travel;
group travel patterns; social tourism. Tourism safety, demand, planning and
development: tourism components and supply: infrastructure; transportation;
hospitality and cultural resources; matching supply with demand. Meaning
and forecasting demand: Measuring demand. Tourism economic impact:
generators of economic impact; number of visitors; economic multiples. Tourism
planning, development, and social considerations: the planning process;
goals of tourism development. Tourism and the environment: sustainable
development; current tourism industry practices. Tourism marketing: nature and
scope; marketing concept; marketing mix; risk segmentation. Future of tourism:
professional impacts of tourism; nature of future growth; future scope of tourism
marking; tourism and peace.
TSM 022 Hospitality Management 3 Credits
A perspective on the hospitality service industry; an overview and operational
structure, management history, development theory and organization; The
development of modern management thought, Systems approach to hospitality
management, Trends and development in the hospitality industry: globalization,
government policy, future prospects, etc. Areas of management concern in the
industry: Hotel management; Catering sectors and management; Front office
operations: Front office procedures: Front office management. Planning
in the hospitality industry: planning concepts, long range planning tools:
organization in hospitality management: line and staff, departmentation, issues
in organization. Staffing: human resource management in hospitality industry,
fitting people with jobs, staff planning and retention. Training: Tools for control
in hospitality industry.
TSM 027 French
3 Credits
This course is designed for students with no prior knowledge of French.
However, students with some basic knowledge of French could be allowed to
take the course. Introduction to the course syllabus. Introduction to the French
language. Study tips on how to learn French. Formal and informal greetings.
Use of French alphabet. Diacritical signs. French sounds (French phonetics).
Use of verbs etre (to be) and avoir (to have) in the present tense. Name things
in the classroom. Introduction to masculine and feminine. Use French numbers
up to 100. Learn how to ask questions in French (qui, quell, quand, ou...).
Talk about your family and your home. Talk about other people’s families and
homes. Talk about the days of the week. Use the definite article (le, la, l’) and
the indefinite article (une, une). Use possessive adjectives (mon, ma, mes, ton,
ta, tes…). Practice numbers up to 100 by listening to the audio tape. Days of
the week verb etre, masculine and feminine, etc. Talk about animals, especially
pets. Describe animals and other things (use colors and size). Talk about your
likes, dislikes and preferences. Use French adjectives and agreement between
adjectives and nouns. Ask for and give the date. Talk about public holidays in
France. Talk about some clothes. Talk about birthdays and present. Talk about
the weather. Talk about the four seasons in France. Talk about sports and other
leisure activities Say what you do at weekends. Use of regular verbs with er
(ler groupe). Use of regular verbs with ir (2eme groupe). Exercises on festivals
and seasons. Prepositions (a, a, la, au, aux). Using prepositions with countries
(au Kenya, en Ouganda…). Use some irregular verbs (aller, venire, mourir…)
Say where things are using prepositions. As what the time is. Talk about places
in town. Ask for, and give directions. Understand and tell the time in French.
Talk about school subjects. Learn some examples of reflexive verbs. Talk abou
the time of the day. Talk about a typical day. Talk about food and drinks. Talk
about means. Accept or refuse food and drinks. Talk about food and drinks you
like and dislike. Use the negative ne.. pas. Use the partitive article du, de la, l’,
des (some). Use the verb with re(3eme groupe). Practical learning activity: go
out for lunch. Exercises on time, prepositions, verbs. Talk about leisure activities.
Use and understand the 24 hour clock. Say what you do to help at home. Use
a verb and an infinitive. Use possessive adjective. Use the past and future of
the vers ettre and avoir.
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101
SUGGESTED TWO YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME
Diploma in Air Hostess and Cabin Crew Studies
Diploma in Business Administration and Management
FIRST YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
FIRST YEAR
2ND SEMESTER
1ST SEMESTER
ICC 014
3
AHC 023
3
ICC 014
3
ICC 015
3
MGT 009
3
AHC 024
3
MGT 009
3
MGT 013
3
MGT 010
3
ICC 015
3
MGT 010
3
MGT 014
3
MGT 011
3
MGT 013
3
MGT 011
3
MGT 015
3
MGT 012
3
MGT 014
3
MGT 012
3
MGT 021
3
3
MGT 015
3
MGT 022
3
MGT 023
MGT 022
Total
18
Total
18
Total
18
SECOND YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
Total
3
18
SECOND YEAR
2ND SEMESTER
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
AHC 023
3
AHC 026
3
MGT 021
3
MGT 099
3
AHC 024
3
MGT 098/098
4
MGT 024
3
MNG 034
4
AHC 025
3
TSM 027
3
MNG 030
3
MNG 035
3
MGT 024
3
MNG 032
3
TSM 021
3
MNG 033
3
TSM 022
3
Total
18
MNG 031
Total
10
3
Total
Diploma in Air Travel Ticketing and Tourism
18
Total
10
Diploma in Business Information Technology
FIRST YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
FIRST YEAR
2ND SEMESTER
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
ICC 014
3
ATT 023
3
ICC 014
3
BIT 012
3
MGT 009
3
ATT 024
3
MGT 009
3
BIT 021
3
MGT 010
3
ICC 015
3
MGT 010
3
BIT 022
3
MGT 011
3
MGT 013
3
MGT 011
3
ICC 015
3
MGT 012
3
MGT 014
3
MGT 012
3
MGT 013
3
MGT 022
3
MGT 015
3
MGT 022
3
MGT 014
3
Total
18
Total
18
Total
18
SECOND YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
Total
18
SECOND YEAR
2ND SEMESTER
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
ATT 024
3
ATT 026 3
3
BIT 023
3
BIT 032
3
ATT 025
3
MGT 098/099
4
BIT 031
3
BIT 041
3
TSM 021
3
TSM 027 3
3
BIT 033
3
BIT 098/099
4
TSM 022
3
BIT 034
3
MGT 021
3
MGT 023
3
MGT 024
3
MGT 025
3
Total
102
2ND SEMESTER
www.daystar.ac.ke
18
Total
10
Total
18
Total
10
Diploma in Hospitality Management
Diploma in Finance
FIRST YEAR
FIRST YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
ICC 014
3
ICC 015
3
ICC 014
3
ICC 015
3
MGT 009
3
MGT 013
3
MGT 009
3
MGT 013
3
MGT 010
3
MGT 014
3
MGT 010
3
MGT 014
3
MGT 011
3
MGT 015
3
MGT 011
3
MGT 015
3
MGT 012
3
MGT 021
3
MGT 012
3
MGT 021
3
3
MGT 023
3
MGT 022
3
MGT 023
MGT 022
Total
18
Total
18
Total
18
SECOND YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
3
Total
18
SECOND YEAR
2ND SEMESTER
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
HOM 023
3
HOM 026
3
FIN 011
3
FIN 022
3
HOM 024
3
MGT 099
4
FIN 012
3
FIN 023
3
HOM 025
3
TSM 027
3
FIN 013
3
MGT 098/099
4
MGT 024
3
FIN 021
3
TSM 021
3
MGT 024
3
TSM 022
3
Total
18
MGT 025
Total
10
3
Total
Diploma in Entrepreneurship
18
10
Diploma in Human Resource Management
FIRST YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
Total
FIRST YEAR
2ND SEMESTER
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
ICC 014
3
ICC 015
3
ICC 014
3
ICC 015
3
MGT 009
3
ENT 011
3
MGT 009
3
MGT 013 3
3
MGT 010
3
ENT 012
3
MGT 010
3
MGT 014
3
MGT 012
3
MGT 011
3
MGT 011
3
MGT 015
3
MGT 013
3
MGT 014
3
MGT 012
3
HRM 011
3
3
MGT 023
3
MGT 022
3
HRM 012
MGT 022
Total
18
Total
18
Total
18
SECOND YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
3
Total
18
SECOND YEAR
2ND SEMESTER
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
ENT 013
3
ENT 016
3
HRM 013
3
HRM 016
3
ENT 014
3
ENT 017
3
HRM 014
3
HRM 017
3
ENT 015
3
MGT 098/099
4
MGT 021
3
MGT 099
4
MGT 015
3
MGT 022
3
MGT 025
3
MGT 024
3
3
MGT 025
3
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Total
18
Total
10
Total
18
Total
10
www.daystar.ac.ke
103
Diploma in Purchasing and Business Logistics
Diploma in Tours and Travel
FIRST YEAR
FIRST YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
1ST SEMESTER
3
ICC 015
3
ICC-014
3
ICC-015
3
MGT 009
3
MGT 013
3
MGT-009
3
MGT-013
3
MGT 010
3
MGT 014
3
MGT-010
3
MGT-014
3
MGT 011
3
MGT 015
3
MGT-011
3
MGT-015
3
MGT 012
3
LOG 011
3
MGT-012
3
TAT-023
3
MGT 022
3
LOG 012
3
MGT-022
3
TAT-024
3
Total
18
Total
18
Total
18
SECOND YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
Total
18
SECOND YEAR
2ND SEMESTER
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
LOG 021
3
LOG 031
3
TAT-025
3
MGT-098/099
4
LOG 022
3
LOG 032
3
TSM-021
3
TAT-026
3
MGT 021
3
MGT 098/099
4
TSM-022
3
TSM-027
3
MGT 023
3
MGT-021
3
MGT 024
3
MGT-023
3
MGT 025
3
MGT-024
3
Total
18
Total
10
Diploma in Sales and Marketing Management
FIRST YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
ICC 014
3
ICC 015
3
MGT 009
3
MGT 013
3
MGT 010
3
MGT 014
3
MGT 011
3
MGT 015
3
MGT 012
3
MKT 011
3
3
MKT 012
MGT 022
Total
18
Total
3
18
SECOND YEAR
1ST SEMESTER
2ND SEMESTER
MKT 013
3
MGT 098/099
4
MKT 022
3
MKT 021
3
MGT 021
3
MKT 023
3
MGT 023
3
MGT 024
3
MGT 025
3
Total
104
2ND SEMESTER
ICC 014
www.daystar.ac.ke
18
Total
10
Total
18
Total
10
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
General Requirements
Admission Requirements
Applicants to the Bachelor of Commerce must fulfil entry requirements that
apply to all Daystar undergraduate students, i.e. An overall minimum grade
of C+ in KCSE or equivalent. In addition they must have obtained at least a
Grade of C (plain) in Mathematics.
Student Assessment
Grading will be based on continuous assessment and written examinations.
Student assessment will be based on class participation, class attendance,
continuous assessment such as assignment, group work and quizzes,
project work and a final examination. The relative weight of each of these
assessments will be specified in the course syllabi.
Practicum marks will be based on 60% in field reports and 40% in field
evaluations.
Independent study marks will be based on 60% in final examination/paper
and 40% in continuous assessment tests.
General Courses for Commerce General Courses
2
ART 111/MUS 111 or LIT 111
2
BIO 111: Biology
2
BIL 111: Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
BIL 112: New Testament Introduction & Survey
3
ENG 098/111: Remedial English/Advanced English
ENG 112: Advanced Writing
Exemptions from certain courses may be granted based on work done
in professional courses from recognized (accredited) institutions such as
CPA, ACCA, CFA, CIMA, CIPS etc., and Diplomas in areas of Business
Management, Marketing, Sales, Accounting, Finance, etc. Exemption will
only be granted for completed parts, levels or diplomas. No exemptions will
be granted for partial completion. Exemptions will not be granted
for foundational stages such as technical courses, KATC,
certificate level work etc. Only professional stages of the
examination will serve as a basis for exemption.
3
0(3)
ENV 112: Environmental Science
2
HPE 113: Health and Physical Fitness
1
INS 111: Communication & Culture I
3
INS 112: Communication & Culture II
3
PHY 112: Physical Science (MIS students only)
2
POL 111: Introduction to Political Science
1
RET 320: Christianity & Islam in Africa
2
TOTAL
Exemptions
Credit Hours
ACS 101: (ACS 102 for MIS majors) Basic Computer
Knowledge
30
Core Courses for Commerce
Accounting Major, Business Administartion & Management, Marketing,
Management Information System, Purchasing & Business Logistics, Business
Law.
Core Courses
Credit Hours
ACC 111: Financial Accounting
3
ACC 112: Managerial Accounting
3
BUS 113: Professional Business Communication
3
BUS 211: Organization and Management
3
BUS 213: Business Research Methods
3
BUS 309: Business Finance
3
BUS 313: Human Resource Management
3
BUS 314: Financial Management
3
BUS 321: Business Law I
3
BUS 323: Business Ethics
3
BUS 414: Strategic Management & Decision Making
3
ECO 211: Principles of Economics (Micro)
3
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105
ECO 212: Principles of Economics (Macro)
3
MAK 212: Marketing Principles
3
MAT 111: Mathematics for Economics & Management I
3
MAT 112: Mathematics for Economics & Management II
3
MIS 211: Management Information Systems
3
STA 211: Business Statistics I
3
STAT 212: Business Statistics II
3
Total
57
Accounting Major
Rationale
The purpose of the Accounting major programme is to prepare persons who
are serving or intend to serve as accountants in public and private sector
organizations, to handle their duties efficiently and with confidence. The
programme is designed to produce dependable, reliable, dedicated and
efficient executives and entrepreneurs capable of performing accounting
duties the way such duties should be performed, with undoubted honesty.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Students with a major in Accounting must fulfill the following course
requirements:
Requirements for Graduation
30
Commerce core courses
57
Accounting major required courses
43
Commerce electives
3
Total
Accounting Major
133
Credit Hours
3
ACC 311: Intermediate Accounting I
3
ACC 312: Intermediate Accounting II
3
ACC 313: Intermediate Accounting III
3
ACC 314: Cost Accounting
3
ACC 315: Taxation I
3
ACC 316: Auditing I
3
ACC 411: Advanced Accounting
3
to prepare the student to apply the principles learned in the performance
of accounting duties, upon completion of the course, and to apply
Christian principles of integrity, dependability and honesty in the
performance of such duties;
ACC 412: Auditing II
3
ACC 414: Management Accounting II
3
ACC 415: Taxation II
3
to enable the student to be in a position to take up any other alternative
job, such as the job of auditor, treasurer, tax assessor, supplies officer,
teacher of business subjects or development coordinator in a church or
a public or private sector organization;
ACC 416: Computerized Accounting
3
MAT 211: Operations Research
3
ACC 520: Practicum, or ACC 498: Senior Project
4
to develop in the student an understanding of the major areas of
accounting, economics, quantitative methods, management information
systems, computer applications, statistics, marketing, costing, auditing
and business law;
to prepare the student to be of service to voluntary organizations such
as churches and welfare organizations in the field of accounting in his/
her spare time; and
to prepare interested, capable students for post graduate studies in
business.
Total
Minor in Accounting
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43
Required Courses
Credit Hours
ACC 111: Financial Accounting I
3
ACC 112: Managerial Accounting
3
ACC 211: Financial Accounting II
3
ACC 311: Intermediate Accounting I
3
ACC 312: Intermediate Accounting II
3
ACC 314: Cost Accounting
3
ACC 315: Taxation I
3
Total
106
Credit Hours
General education courses
ACC 211: Financial Accounting II
Specifically, the goals of the major are:
1.
Requirements for Graduation
21
Business Administration and Management
Major
Rationale
The programme is broadly based and aims at developing the students into
mature people who have the right relationship with God and the people
around them, men and women who know themselves and who can use their
talents and opportunities available in the environment to serve mankind. They
will see the need to aim high and will want to improve their standards of
performance, and their lives.
Thus, while aiming at being executives in management, accounting and
other professional fields, they will be prepared through studying such subjects
as theology, communication and natural science, to have a world view
based on Christian principles and values. The courses will enable them to
understand the African cultural heritage and will develop in them valuable
attributes such as industry, diligence, dependability, integrity and faithfulness.
Specifically, the goals of the major are:
1. to encourage the student to consider a business profession or career as
a worthy means of serving God, country and self;
2. to challenge the student to practice Christian principles of integrity and
honesty in the church and market place as an expression of his/her
Christian commitment;
3. to prepare and equip the student to practice his vocation as a Christian
business person in church, para church organizations, government, and
private business;
4. to develop in the student a foundational understanding of the major
areas of business administration and management, in accounting,
management informatioin systems, computer applications, economics,
statistics, management, marketing, human resource management and
business law;
5. to provide the student with the necessary basic skills, knowledge, and
methods for the successful practice of a business vocation; and
6. to prepare the interested, capable student for post graduate studies in
business.
Required courses
Credit Hours
BUS 318: Organizational Behaviour
3
BUS 319: Insurance Practice
3
BUS 322: Business Law II
3
BUS 324: Investment
3
BUS 326: Industrial Psychology
3
BUS 330: Conflict Management
3
BUS 415: Project Planning and Management
3
BUS 419: Corporate Governance
3
BUS 421: Risk Management
3
BUS 425: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
3
BUS 520: Business Practicum, or BUS 498:
Senior Project
4
LOG 221: Purchasing Principles and Management
3
MAK 422: International Business Management
3
Total
Business Electives
40
Credit Hours
BUS 111 Business Studies
3
BUS 328 Small Business Management
3
BUS 329 Labour Relations and Labour Law
3
BUS 340 Cooperative Management
3
BUS 416 Special Topics in Business & Mgt
3
BUS 431 International Trade
3
BUS 496 Independent Study
3
Minor in Business Administration & Management
Requirements for Graduation
Students with a major in Business Administration must fulfill the following
course requirements:
Requirements for Graduation
Major in Business Administration & Management
Credit Hours
Required courses
Credit Hours
ACC 111: Financial Accounting I
3
BUS 211: Organization and Management
3
BUS 309: Business Finance
3
General Education courses
30
BUS 313: Human Resources Management
3
Required Commerce core courses
57
BUS 425: Entrepreneurship & Innovation
3
Business Administration & Management required courses
40
ECO 211: Principles of Economics (Micro)
3
Free Commerce Electives
Total
6
133
MAK 212: Marketing Principles
Total
3
21
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107
Marketing Major Required courses in Marketing
Rationale
Course
The Marketing major is a broad based globally oriented programme which is
intended to provide managerial orientation to marketing in a complex, rapidly
changing global environment. The programme is designed to develop well
rounded marketing executives with a sound working knowledge of activities
involved in developing marketing programmes and strategy to achieve
competitive advantages both locally and globally. A wide selection of topics
in related disciplines gives the student excellent tools and a firm ground in the
technicalities of marketing management. The treatment of various sectors
of the market and conceptual analytical tools are studied to enhance
understanding of the management of markets. The global and ethical
dimensions of the marketing decisions are emphasized.
MAK 315: Consumer Behaviour
3
MAK 316: Advertising
3
MAK 317: Marketing Research
3
MAK 335: Marketing Communication
3
MAK 336: Marketing of Service
3
MAK 337: Retailing Management
3
MAK 420: Sales Management
3
MAK 421: International Marketing
3
MAK 422: International Business Management
3
MAK 423: Customer Care and Public Relations
3
MAK 424: Marketing Management
3
MAK 426: Strategic Marketing
3
This course incorporates: analysis of markets, planning, research and project
synthesis which constitute the marketing major.
Specifically, the goals of the major are to:
1. encourage the student to consider a marketing profession or career as a
worthy means of serving God, country and self;
2. challenge the student to practice Christian principles of integrity and
honesty in serving customers as an expression of Christian commitment;
3. prepare students to practice their vocations as Christian business persons
in church, para church organizations, or government and private
businesses;
4. develop in students a foundational understanding of the major areas of
marketing, accounting, economics, management information systems,
statistics, management, human resource management, business law;
and
5. provide students with the necessary basic skills, knowledge, and
methods for success in the marketing effort.
Requirements for Graduation
Students with major in Marketing must fulfill the following course requirements:
Requirements for Graduation
Credit Hours
MAK 520: Practicum, or MAK 498: Senior Project
TOTAL
Marketing Electives
4
40
Credit Hours
MAK 330 Product Strategy and Planning
3
MAK 331 Financial Aspects of Marketing
3
MAK 333 Agricultural Marketing
3
MAK 334 Marketing for non Profit Organizations
3
MAK 337 Retailing Management
3
MAK 338 Export Marketing
3
MAK 416 Special Topics in Marketing
3
MAK 419 Business to Business Marketing
3
MAK 492 Independent Study in Marketing
3
Marketing Minor
General education courses
30
Commerce core courses
57
Required courses
Marketing Major required courses
40
MAK 212: Marketing Principles
3
6
MAK 315: Consumer Behaviour
3
MAK 316: Advertising
3
MAK 317: Marketing Research
3
MAK 421: International Marketing
3
MAK 422: International Business Management
3
MAK 426: Marketing Management and Strategy
3
Free Commerce electives
Total
133
Total
108
Credit Hours
www.daystar.ac.ke
Credit hours
21
Management Information System
MIS Courses
Rationale
As years go by, the world is becoming more and more an electronic global
village. This poses many challenges like privacy, confidentiality, availability,
and integrity of information held in individual/ organizational database. This
calls for both individual and organizations to keep abreast with the current
information technology for effective protection and efficient production by
optimizing the technology. There is a dire need of people who are well
literate in the usage of computers to assist in the production of data and
information that will go along way in helping managers to make good
decisions. Therefore, this program will seek to address this shortage/gap.
Specifically, the goals of the major are to:
a) prepare students to be servant leaders in a business environment or other organization to develop and implement information systems for business
management;
b) create an in depth understanding of performing a needs analysis and
the design development, and implementation of information systems in a
business environment including data base management;
c) prepare the student to have a broad general understanding of the latest
computer technology as it is applied to information systems within the
organization, including networking and programming;
d) provide the student with a solid base in business administration,
management, strategic planning, forecasting, and policy formulation;
e) develop in the student a foundational understanding of business
administration process such as accounting , human resource management,
marketing , inventory control, capacity planning and material requirement
planning and how these can be integrated into an information system;
f ) challenge the student to practice being a responsible citizen who will
apply Christian principles of morality, integrity, honesty and ethics in his or
her profession as an expression of his or her Christian commitment;
g) prepare the student to enter an advanced degree program in information
systems or other post graduate program. To prepare and equip the student
to practice his vocation as a Christian business person in church, church
organizations, government and private business.
Requirement for Graduation
A student will be required to complete 136 hours in order to be able to
graduate with a degree in B.COM in Management Information System. The
distribution of the hours is as shown below.
Particulars
Credit Hours
General Education
30
Business Courses
36
MIS Course
61
Required Electives
Total
9
136
Credit Hours
MIS 113 Introduction to System Programming
3
MIS 114 Object Oriented System Design and
Development
3
MIS 211 Management Information System
3
MIS 212 Business Systems Analysis and Design
3
MIS 220 Computer Organization & Design
3
MIS 221 Advanced Object Oriented System Design
and Development
3
MIS 222 System Algorithms and Data Structures
3
MIS 224 Business Database Management Systems
3
MIS 228 Operating Systems
3
MIS 320 Business System Networks and Data
Communication
3
MIS 311 Information Systems Management
3
MIS 312 Business System Development
3
MIS 313 Information Systems Research Methods
3
MIS 321 System Software Engineering
3
MIS 322 Business Network Design and Management
3
MIS 400 Information System Project
3
MIS 412 Business Systems Security
3
MIS 416 Web Site Development and Management
3
MIS 418 Information System Project Management
3
MIS 520 Information System Practicum or MIS 598
Senior Project
4
Total
61
Business Course
Credit Hours
ACC 111 Financial Accounting
3
BUS 113 Professional Business Communication
3
BUS 211 Organization and Management
3
BUS 309 Business Finance
3
BUS 313 Human Resource Management
3
ECO211 Principles of Economics (Micro)
3
ECO 212 Principles of Economics (Macro)
3
MAK 212 Principles of Marketing
3
MAT 111 Mathematics for Economics and
Management I
3
MAT 112 Mathematics for Economics and
Management II
3
STA 211 Business Statistics I
3
STA 212 Business Statistics II
3
Total
36
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109
Electives (Any three Courses)
Credit Hours
MIS 408 Special topics in Management Information
Systems
3
MIS 415 Electronic Commerce Systems
3
BUS 328 Small Business Management
3
BUS 417 Entrepreneurship and Leadership
3
ACS451 Data Communication Security and Networks
Controls
3
ACS 454 Distributed Systems
3
ACS462 Data and Database Administration
3
Total
9
Purchasing and Business Logistics Major
Rationale
The supply chain management concept is currently revolutionizing global
business. Modern business organizations are becoming more and more
aware that the management of logistics activities, also referred to as
supply chain management, has tremendous impact on sales and corporate
profitability. As African enterprises attempt to compete with foreign imports
or find a place for African products and services in world markets, there is a
growing demand for graduates with the knowledge and skills necessary to
use the tools of modern supply chain management to create:
a) significant cost savings for the firm, it’s partners in the supply chain, and
the final customer;
b) increased focus on the needs of the customer, improved customer
satisfaction, and, ultimately, increased sales and profits.
c) marketing tools that yield major competitive advantages for the firm.
The Purchasing and Business Logistics major at Daystar is a broad based
programme of study aimed at developing servant leaders and managers
who are well trained and skilled in all aspects of creating value for customers
and for the firm by management of purchasing and other logistics functions.
The programme is prepare students for careers in purchasing, inventory
management, packing and materials handling, warehousing and stores
management, transportation, forecasting, production control, customer service
management, project management, field service and support, international
logistics, logistics information systems, and management of integrated supply
chain functions.
The curriculum focuses on developing the quantitative tools necessary for
application of computer based logistics management systems, and for
integrating supply chain management principles and techniques with the other
functions of the firm. It also carefully combines specialized purchasing and
logistics courses with a solid foundation in the humanities and basic business
disciplines to give the student a world view based on Christian principles
and values as well as a complete understanding of the international business
environment. Graduates will be well prepared to undertake studies leading to
an MBA or a Masters in Supply Chain or Logistics Management.
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Whereas there are many colleges and universities in Africa offering
degree programs in Marketing, Business Administration and Management,
Economics, and Accounting; there are few universities in Kenya offering a
comprehensive and holistic study of managing both the supply and demand
fulfilment activities of a firm’s business.
The Daystar University program is unique in Africa in the breadth and
depth of preparation of its graduates to take on positions of responsibility
and leadership in managing supply chain functions in the modern business
environment.
Objectives of the Purchasing and Business Logistics Major
This course aims at:
1. Preparing servant leaders in a business, NGO, or other organization
to develop and implement modern purchasing and supply chain
management procedures appropriate to the African environment.
2. Explaining the role and functions of purchasing and business logistics
in the organization, and integrating the quantitative and general
management skills of these functions into the operations of the
organization.
3. Mastering purchasing and logistics resources and support systems and
how to access them for the benefit of the firm.
4. Providing a solid base in business administration, management, strategic
planning, and policy formation and being prepared to assist top
management in including purchasing and logistics into strategic and
annual planning efforts to reduce costs, improve customer service and
satisfaction, and gain competitive advantage.
5. Acquiring skills in proper planning and implementation of modern,
cost effective organizations for purchasing, inventory management,
transportation, warehousing and stores, packing and materials handling,
production planning and control, project management, management of
service operations, customer service, international logistics, and logistics
planning and control.
6. Developing a responsible citizen who will apply Christian principles of
morality, integrity, honesty and ethics in his/her profession.
7. Sensitizing the student to seek for further studies in Logistics or for an
MBA.
Admission Requirements
Applicants must fulfill entry requirements that apply to admission of all Daystar
University Undergraduate Students. In addition they must have obtained at
least a “C+” plus grade in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education or
its equivalent in Mathematics and English language.
Students’ Assessment
Student assessment will be based on class participation, class attendance,
continuous assessment such as assignments, group work and quizzes,
project work and a final examination. The relative weight of each of these
assessment items will vary from course to course depending on the nature of
the course and will be specified in the course syllabi. However, practicum
courses will be based on 60% field reports and 40% on field evaluation.
MIS 211 & MIS 413 will require project papers and will be scored on 40%
continuous assessment and 60% final examination. Independent courses will
be based 60% on final project/paper and 40% on continuous assessment
items.
For courses that are essentially conceptual (much of what is required is
mastery of information or cognitive aspect of learning), assessment will be
based on 70% for final examination and 30% from continuous assessment.
Such courses are: BUS 211, BUS 321, BUS 322, BUS 323, BUS 431,
ECO 211, ECO 212, MAK 212.
For courses that are essentially skills oriented (these are courses that will
require the students to demonstrate specific skills as demanded by, the
particular content. Assessment will be based on 50% for final examination
and 50% from continuous assessment. Such courses are: ACC 111, ACC
112, ACC 314, BUS 418, LOG 211, LOG 221, LOG 311, LOG 321,
LOG 331, LOG 341, LOG 351, LOG 361, LOG 411, LOG 421, LOG
431, LOG 441, LOG 451, MAK 426, MAT 112, MAT 211, STA 211 &
STA 212.
Purchasing and Business Logistics Minor Required courses
Credit Hours
LOG 211: Introduction to Business Logistics
3
LOG 221: Purchasing Principles and Management
3
LOG 311: Inventory Planning and Control
3
LOG 321: Warehousing and Stores Management
3
LOG 331: Production and Operations Management OR
LOG 341: Management of Customer Service
3
LOG 351: Logistics Financial Decision Analysis, or LOG
361: Transportation Management
3
TOTAL
18
Requirements for Graduation
Bachelor of Commerce Purchasing and Business Logistics major students must
fulfill the following requirements:
Requirements for Graduation
Credit Hours
General education courses
30
Commerce core courses
57
Purchasing and Business Logistics required courses
43
Free Commerce electives
TOTAL
6
136
Required Courses in Purchasing and Business Logistics
Required courses
Credit Hours
LOG 211: Introduction to Business Logistics
3
LOG 221: Purchasing Principles and Management
3
LOG 311: Inventory Planning and Control
3
LOG 321: Warehousing and Stores Management
3
LOG 331: Production and Operations Management
3
LOG 341: Management of Customer Service
3
LOG 351: Logistics Financial Decision Analysis
3
LOG 361: Transportation Management
3
LOG 411: Advanced Supply Chain Management
3
LOG 421: Logistics for e Commerce
3
LOG 431: Management of Service Operations
3
LOG 441: Advanced Modelling of Logistics Systems
3
LOG 451: International Transportation and Logistics
3
LOG 520: Practicum, or LOG 498: Senior Project
TOTAL
4
Daystar University creates an
environment for mentorship, consultation
and career advancement through student
lecturer interaction. Lecturers are ready
to guide and help students beyond class
scheduled times.
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111
BACHELOR OF COMMERCE - Law Option
Rationale
The Judicial systems in the world are today faced with accusations of corruption
and compromise in dispensation of justice. Daystar University hopes to breathe
a new breath into this tainted image. To achieve this, Daystar University is
offering a unique degree program that will eventually produce Christian
business men and women of integrity who may subsequently assume the role
of law makers. This program combines the fields of management and law, thus
providing an opportunity for critical and theoretical study. Daystar University
seeks to make a significant difference by impacting Africa and the world at
large.
This program seeks to develop competent, well trained and morally upright
businessmen and women who will serve as managers in various organizations
with the unique ability to interpret legal issues.
The management subjects are designed with a strong emphasis on social
science theory and practice relevant to student experiences and the local
environment. The law subjects have been selected to give the students the
opportunity to appreciate legal aspects of a business and for their relevance
to management. The management and law subjects studied will provide
the student with knowledge and understanding of a wide range of issues in
international management.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of the program, the graduates should be able to:
1. Demonstrate ability in logical reasoning in management and legal issues
as they work both in public and private sector and uphold Christian
values.
2. Carry out sound management and legal research in business using
management principles and skills.
3. Analyze and effectively communicate relevant legal and management
information
4. Exhibit social, theoretical and practical traits in management and law in
an ever changing and dynamic environment.
Admission Requirements
Besides meeting the academic requirements listed below, applicants must be
committed Christians.
• KCSE mean grade C+ (plus)
• Mathematics
C (plain)
• English
B (plain)
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Requirements for Graduation
General Education Courses
Credit Hours
General Courses
30
Commerce core courses
54
Law Option required courses
58
2 Law Option electives
TOTAL
Requirement Management Courses
6
148
Credit Hours
ACC 111: Financial Accounting
3
ACC 112: Managerial Accounting
3
BUS 113: Professional Business Communications
3
BUS 211: Organization and Management
3
BUS 213: Business Research Methods
3
BUS 309: Business Finance
3
BUS 313: Human Resource Management
3
BUS 314: Financial Management
3
BUS 323: Business Ethics
3
BUS 414: Strategic Management and Decisions
Making
3
ECO 211: Principles of Economics (Micro)
3
ECO 212: Principles of Economics (Macro)
3
MAK 212: Marketing Principles
3
MAT 111: Business Mathematics
3
MAT 112: Mathematics for Economics and
Management
3
MIS 211: Management Information Systems
3
STA 211: Business Statistics I
3
STA 212: Business Statistics II
3
TOTAL
54
Required Law Courses
Credit Hours
BCL 100: Legal Research & Writing
3
BCL 101: Social Foundations of Law
3
BCL 200: Constitutional Law
3
BCL 201: Elements of Contract Law
3
BCL 202: Principles of Tort Law
3
BCL 203: Constitutional Systems
3
BCL 204: Law of Evidence
3
BCL 300: Enforcement of Contract
3
BCL 301: Tort
3
BCL 302: Criminal Law
3
BCL 303: Commercial Law
3
BCL 304: Company Law
3
BCL 305: Law of Insolvency
3
BCL 306: Securities Regulation Law
3
BCL 401: International Economic Law
3
BCL 402: Principles of Environmental Law
3
BCL 403: Arbitration & Alternative Disputes Resolution
3
BCL 404: Labour Law
3
BCL 520: Legal Practicum
4
TOTAL
58
Law Electives (2 courses only)
Credit Hours
BCL 307: Competition Law
3
BCL 308: Taxation Law
3
BCL 309: Family Law
3
BCL 310: Law of Succession
3
BCL 405: Insurance Law
3
BCL 406: Banking Law
3
BCL 407: Property Law
3
BCL 408: Intellectual Property Law
3
BCL 409: Equity and Trusts
3
BCL 410: Public International Law
3
BCL 411: International Trade Law
3
BUS 425: Entrepreneurship & Innovation
3
Bachelor of Commerce (Law Option) Minor
Credit Hours
BCL 100: Legal Research & Writing
3
BCL 101: Social Foundations of Law
3
BCL 200: Constitutional Law
3
BCL 201: Elements of Contract Law
3
BCL 202: Principles of Tort Law
3
BCL 203: Constitutional Systems
3
BCL 204: Law of Evidence
3
BCL 303: Commercial Law
3
TOTAL
24
Course Descriptions
ACC 111 Financial Accounting I
3 Credits
Need for accounting and accounting information, parties who need
accounting information; Terminologies in accounting; Generally accepted
accounting principles; Principles and concepts in writing up accounts; Double
entry book keeping; The accounting equation; The golden rule for accounting;
The day books; The journal proper; The ledger accounts of sole proprietors;
Balancing up the ledger; The two column and three column cash books, cash
discounts; The petty cash book; The trial balance; Errors in accounts, suspense
accounts, correction of errors; The trading, profit and loss. The balance sheet;
Presentation of fixed assets, current assets and liabilities; Year end adjustments;
Prepayments and accruals; Reserves and provisions; Capital expenditure and
revenue expenditure; Bank reconciliation statement; Depreciation meaning,
methods and need for depreciation.
ACC 112 Managerial Accounting I 3 Credits
Purpose of managerial accounting: difference between financial accounting,
cost accounting and management accounting; Role and functions of
management accountant; Cost volume profit analysis: break even analysis
multiple products; Managerial costing vs absorption costing statements;
Application of marginal costing in analysing make or buy decisions, sell or
process further decisions, add or drop decisions, pricing standard products,
pricing special orders, choosing product mix; Capital expenditure decisions:
NPV, IRR, ARR, Payback Period Method; Profitability index; Inventory, Control:
cost of holding stock re order planning (stock levels & EOQ); Budgeting and
budgetary control: cash budget, flexible budget, master budget, administrative
budgets and functional budgets; Responsibility accounting. Pre requisite: ACC
111.
ACC 211 Financial Accounting II 3 Credits
Final accounts; double entry of end of year adjustments: depreciation,
provision for bad debts, accruals and prepayments, preparation of trading
profit & loss accounts & balance sheet of sole traders and partnerships,
preparation of receipts and payments accounts, income and expenditure
accounts and balance sheets of non trading organizations; Accounting
statements for incomplete records, control accounts; Financial statements for
farming enterprises including issues of livestock & produce valuation, Accounts
of professional firms such as advocates, architects, doctors and accountants.
Prerequisite: ACC 111.
ACC 311 Intermediate Accounting I
3 Credits
Accounting theory, Accounting framework, overview of accounting standards;
Introduction of company accounts; manufacturing accounts, financial & legal
framework of limited liability companies, quoted and unquoted companies
preparation of final accounts of companies, financial statements of banks and
financial institutions, insurance companies, building societies, accounting for
hospitals, published accounts, legal requirements; Balance sheet and profit
and loss account; Movement of fixed assets; Cash flow statements.
Prerequisite: ACC 211
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ACC 312 Intermediate Accounting II
3 Credits
Partnership accounts; admission, retirement/death, dissolution, Conversion of a
partnership to a limited company appropriation accounts; valuation of Goodwill
for partnership accounts; Bills of exchange; Consignment accounts; Issues of
shares and debentures; Share premium accounts; Over subscription; Forfeiture
of shares; Investment accounts; Purchase of shares; Purchase of debentures;
Income tax in accounts; Royalty accounts; Leases and Hire purchase accounts;
Instalment payments; Valuation of business and shares; Returnable containers;
Joint ventures. Pre requisite: ACC 311.
ACC 313 Intermediate Accounting III 3 Credits
Valuation of tangible assets; Revaluation; Estimated Useful life (EUL) extension;
Change in the depreciation method; Valuation of intangible assets; Good
will; Research and Development Expenditure; Long term contracts: percentage
of work completed; completed contract method; Accounting for stocks;
Departmental accounts; Branch accounts; Business combinations: absorption
amalgamation; Reconstruction: internal (capital re organization), external;
Bankruptcy and receivership; Public sector accounts, accounting for insurance
claims. Prerequisite: ACC 312.
ACC 314 Cost Accounting
3 Credits
Introduction to cost accounting: Definitions, Cost accounting Concepts,
Elements of cost: materials costing: material issues, material valuation, stock
taking; labour costing; labour remuneration method, labour recording, labour
turnover and labour over time costing; over heads costing analysis, overhead
allocation, apportionment, overhead reapportionment (service centres),
overhead absorption; cost estimation methods; Job costing; Process costing;
Contract costing; Standard costing; Variance analysis. Activity Based Costing.
Pre requisites: ACC 112.
ACC 315 Taxation I
3 Credits
Taxation theory, taxation of individuals; taxable of business income, taxation
of employment income: taxation of property income, pensions, taxation of
partnership income allocation of profits; withholding taxes, capital allowances,
investment deduction, wear and tear, balancing charge/allowance, Corporate
tax and shortfall distribution of income, payment of taxes, Tax reliefs, double
taxation relief, tax rates, introduction to VAT. Pre requisite: ACC 311.
ACC 316 Auditing I
3 Credits
The general audit environment: definition and nature of auditing, objects of an
audit, users of audit, reports, differences between auditing and accounting,
types of audit, internal auditing and external auditing, stages of an audit. The
legal and professional requirement for an auditor: appointment, remuneration,
qualities and qualifications of auditors, letter of engagement, rights and duties
of auditors, resignation and removal of auditors, professional ethics, auditor
independence; legal liability of auditors/negligence, auditing standards and
guidelines; audit evidence: definition of audit evidence, evidence and sources,
techniques of collecting audit evidence, sampling in audit. Audit programme,
audit files, audit working papers: vouching process, purposes and objectives,
cash transactions, trade transactions, bank reconciliation; internal control
systems: definition, types of internal control, qualities of a good internal control
system, evaluating the efficiency of internal control system (I.C.Q); auditing
report: contents, types, companies and auditing standards requirements,
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circumstances leading to unqualified/qualified reports.
Pre requisite: ACC 311.
ACC 408 Special Topics in Accounting & Finance 3 Credits
As faculty are available and as student demand is apparent, special topics
in finance and accounting will be offered as separate courses in a classroom
setting and may be repeated for credit if topics are different. For example:
personal finances of non profit organizations; Public finances and national
accounting; Fund raising and donor funding, etc.
Pre requisite: ACC 313
ACC 411 Advanced Accounting
3 Credits
Consolidated accounts: horizontal and vertical groups, complex groups,
associate companies and joint venture, acquisition and mergers, foreign
exchange; consolidated cash flow statement; Inflation accounting: current
purchasing power (CPP), current cost accounting (CCA); Value added
statements; Earnings per share: basic EPS and diluted EPS; Taxation in
accounts: current tax, deterred tax; Accounting for VAT.
Pre requisite: ACC 313.
ACC 412 Auditing II 3 Credits
Introduction: Framework of auditing, the agency problem and its costs, solution
to agency problem including the need for an audit, corporate governance, audit
committee. Verification process: verification of assets, verification of liabilities,
auditing profit and loss account. Errors, fraud and other irregularities: types of
errors, fraud and irregularities, detection, correction and prevention, role of the
auditor in respect to detection and prevention of errors and fraud; Special audit
consideration: social responsibility, environmental auditing, group accounts,
financial institutions, insurance companies, non governmental organizations,
building societies. Auditing computerized environment: impact of computers
in the audit, internal control in a computerized environment, approaches to
audit of computerized systems. Audited related services: reviews, agreed upon
procedures, complications. Concluding the audit: going concern, subsequent
events, management ,presentation, review of financial statement. Auditors
report: management letter, auditor’s report to shareholders, management letter
of representation. Introduction to audit investigations: lawyers, acquisitions,
fraud, lending, small enterprise, partnerships, profit forecasts, prospective
financial. Pre requisite: ACC 316.
ACC 414 Managerial Accounting II
3 Credits
Cost estimation and forecasting engineering, simulation methods and statistical
methods, simple and multiple regression, the statistical properties of regression,
time series models, smoothing and extrapolation, stochastic time series, linear
time series models, forecasting with time series models; short term planning
decisions; sequential decisions; resource allocation decisions; routing and
transportation decisions; strategic and transportation decisions; performance
evaluation decisions. Transfer pricing. Balance Score Card.
Pre requisite: ACC 314, STAT 212.
ACC 415 Taxation II 3 Credits
Taxation of specialized financial institutions; insurance companies, banks,
cooperative societies, clubs & non profit making organizations, incomplete
records, application of case law, tax planning , Ordinary manufacture,
manufacture under bond, mining investment deduction, Shipping investment
deduction; Farm work deduction; tax investigation: Tax evasion and avoidance,
back duty Investment, critical appraisal of Kenya tax System in relation to other
countries, double tax agreement/treaty, tax treaties through regional economic
integration e.g. COMESA, EAC, tax amnesty in Kenya and other countries,
�most favoured nations’ status concept. Tax administration in Kenya: PIN,
notice of assessment, tax set offs , types of assessments, local committee and
tribunals, tax returns, collection and recovery of tax, relief of errors, penalties &
interest including offences. VAT : accounting for VAT, rights and privileges of a
registered person, VAT records, VAT refund audit and certificate, offenses and
penalties. Customs and excise duty: dumping and anti dumping measures,
bond security, refund of duty, valuation of imports and exports.
Pre requisite: ACC 315.
ACC 416 Computerized Accounting
3 Credits
Introduction to systems: Definition and meaning of accounting information
system, different views of a system; contextual and control view, basic concepts
and strategies in the study of systems. Types of information systems: Accounting
application software: Sage Pastel, Quick books, access accounts horizons.
Prerequisites: ACC 313 & MIS 211.
BUS 111 Business Studies
3 Credits
Definition of commerce, commercial goods and services, production nature of
buying and selling, aids to trade occupation; Domestic and foreign commercial
activities, direct and indirect production, location of industry, specialization;
Types of business organizations, sole proprietors and partnerships; Incorporated
and non incorporated companies, legal limitation, mode of operation, the
legal’ person; Government, community cooperatives, Channels of distribution,
producers, stockists, wholesalers, middlemen, retailers, warehousing,
manufacturers’ representatives, commission agents, physical distribution, How
businesses buy and pay for goods and services, financing the business, short
term and Long term financing; credit societies, hire purchase.
BUS 112 Business from a Christian Perspective
3 Credits
Introduction: Business from a Christian perspective, personal goals and
business; Understanding the Biblical principles of business; God’s intention
and our response to work; Obligation and right management as means of
doing justice; Christian concept of leadership and use of power; Self control,
accountability, motivation and manipulation, human selfishness; Moral
responsibility of business, social control; Biblical principles of stewardship,
justice and wealth; Morality in business transactions; Biblical truth in world of
change, secularism, moral decadence, corruption, the Biblical role modelling
in business.
BUS 113 Professional Business Communication
3 Credits
Theoretical background of communication: Purpose of communication,
communication process, barriers of communication and how to overcome
them. Modes of communication: Letters, memos, reports, press releases, essays.
Techniques of oral communication: Telephone, effective listening. Strategic
visual communication: Graphical presentations, statistical presentations. Speech
delivery and presentation of self: Visual aids, stimulating audience response.
Non verbal communication: communication without words, non verbal skills.
Conducting effective meetings and interviews: The structural framework, panel
documentation layout. Business communication vs. information technology:
Application of I.T. in communication, job applications and networking and
proposal.
BUS 211 Organization and Management
3 Credits
Definition and nature of management; Management principles and early
theories of management:, management functions ; organizational culture;
organizational structure and design; managerial communication; planning
and decision making in organizations; strategic management; human resource
management a profession, a commitment; Efficient and effective managers;
Dimensions of management; The development of management and organization
theory; Planning and decision making: organizational goals, strategy and
strategic planning, developing and implementing plans, managerial decision
making: steps in decision making, quantitative techniques for decision making,
management by objectives; The organizing process: concept and approaches
of organization theory, designing structures, span of control, departmentation,
delegation, accountability, centralization and decentralization, organization
charts, line and staff authority; Staffing: its nature and purpose; Leading and
directing, motivation, leadership, Management and society, ethical issues in
management, social responsibility. Prerequisites: ENG 112.
BUS 213 Business Research Methods
3 Credits
Introduction: meaning and purpose of research, basic and applied research,
overview of the research process; selection and definition of the research
problem; importance and scope of literature review; developing the conceptual
framework; research designs: basic designs, exploratory research, descriptive
research, casual research, secondary designs, case studies, surveys,
experiments; developing a research plan or proposal; sample design: population
of interest, sample and census studies, sample units, sample size, sample
selection; data collection: secondary data, primary data, construction of data
collection instruments e.g. observation forms and questionnaires, measurement
scales, attitude measurement, attribute measurement, multidimensional scaling,
communicating with respondents and fieldwork, procedures andmanagement;
data analysis and interpretation: preliminary steps, summarizing techniques,
measuring differences, discriminate analysis, cluster analysis; issue in research:
validity, reliability, objectivity; research report. Pre requisites: STA 212.
BUS 309 Business Finance
3 Credits
Sources of finance; share capital: ordinary share capital, preference share
capital; debit finance: term loans, bonds and debentures; other sources of
finance: bills of exchange, trade credit, debtors factoring, lease finance and
hire purchase, venture capital etc; the capital and money market: money market
operations of banks in Kenya, financial instruments in money markets; capital
markets the stock market and the operations of CMA, specialized financial
institutions, the central bank; financial analysis (ratios): liquidity ratios, turnover
ratios, profitability ratios, gearing ratios, investment ratios; capital budgeting,
NPV, IRR, PI, PBP and DPBP, ARR; cost of capital: components cost of capital,
weighted average cost of capital, marginal average cost of capital: dividend
policy and theories; working capital management: management of cash,
management of debtors, management of inventories e.g. Economic Order
Quantity (EOQ). Pre requisites course is ACC 111 and ECO 211.
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BUS 313 Human Resources Management 3 Credits
Human resource management – An overview: The origins of human resource
management [HRM]; Personnel management versus HRM; Importance of HRM;
Goals of HRM; Pressures behind the rising interest in HRM; The environment
of HRM; Employee resourcing: Human resource planning [HRP]; Recruitment
and selection;; Orientation of new employees; Release from the organization
[redundancy, dismissals, resignations, etc.]. : Human resource [HR] policies;
Developing HR policies; Revising HR policies; Job analysis. Performance
management: Performance appraisals. Training and development: Reward
management: Pay and benefits; Job evaluation; Welfare services. Employee
relations: Industrial relations; HRM approach to employee relations; Kenyan
labour laws. Prerequisite; BUS 211
BUS 314 Financial Management
3 Credits
Capital budgeting: revision of investment appraisal techniques covered in BF,
Risk analysis in capital budgeting, capital rationing, complex capital budgeting
situations e.g. replacement of an asset; Valuation models; valuation of bonds
and shares, yield to maturity; Cost of capital: weighted average cost of capital,
marginal average cost of capital. CAPM: Introduction to portfolio theory:
systematic risk and unsystematic risk, CAPM, security market line, arbitrage
pricing theory; Capital structure theories: net income approach, net operating
income approach, traditional view of middle group, MM theories; Foreign
exchange: determination of foreign exchange i.e purchasing power parity and
interest parity, foreign exchange risk, hedging against foreign exchange e.g
use of options, futures or fowards, swaps; Introductory management.
Pre requisites: ACC 111, MAT 112, ECO 211, ECO 212, BUS 309.
BUS 318 Organizational Behaviour
3 Credits
Introduction to organizational behaviour: the subject, history, nature and scope
of organizational behaviour; managing people and organizations Individual
process in organizations: personality development and characteristics; stress,
perception, motivation learning; Interpersonal process in organizations,
communication in organizations, group dynamics and team management,
leadership in organizations, decision making in organizations, organizational
process; Organizational structure and behaviour: organizational design,
organizational culture, organizational change and development .
Pre requisite: BUS 211
BUS 319 Insurance Practice 3 Credits
Introduction: Risk definition of the concept of risk, principles of insurance
practice, contributions of insurance industry to the economy; current practices
and regulations in insurance industry types, measurement and hazards of risk;
Risk management: objectives and process of insurance claims; Insurance:
definition, history, mechanism, role and principles; Types of insurance;
Insurance administration; Reinsurance: definition, purpose, methods and types
of reinsurance; Government regulation of insurance: structure and registration;
The Christian faith and insurance. Prerequisite: BUS 211, BUS 314.
BUS 320 Career Development
3 Credits
Introduction to the study of career development; Environment for career
development; Home environment, learning institution and work place; Means
of career development, education, training and experience; Model of career
stage; challenges in career development; strategic career development in
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organizations, current trends and changes in career development; the role of
education in career development Career planning; The labour market; Training
and development in Organizations; International careers; career management
Prerequisite: BUS 211
BUS 321 Business Law I
3 Credits
Nature and meaning of law and its classifications; Sources of law in Kenya
and law of persons; The legal systems in East Africa; Law of contract; Tort
law; Law of agency; insurance law; Relations of the East Africa business
organizations to the economic systems: sole trader, partnership, company,
corporation; Negotiable instruments; Hire purchase; Banking law; Insurance
law; Sale of goods. Prerequisite Bus 113, Bus 211
BUS 322 Business Law II
3 Credits
The provisions of the Companies Act relating to the following: Nature of
registered company, registration/incorporation, certificate of incorporation,
effect of registration, registration of memorandum and articles of association;
types of companies. Company formation; promotion and floatation, prospectus
or statement in lieu, contents and registration of memorandum and articles of
association, membership: members, qualifications and cessation of membership,
lifting of the corporate veil. Share capital; classes of shares, variation of class
rights, alteration of capital (reduction), transfer and transmission, certificates
and warrants, calls, lieu, forfeiture and surrender, borrowing powers:
mortgages and debentures. Company management and powers; Directors
appointment, share qualification, vacation of office, remuneration powers and
duties, election, etc., company secretary duties and responsibilities of, auditor
duties and responsibilities, appointment, re election and removal, managing
director. Meetings; statutory meetings, annual general meeting, extraordinary
meetings, class meetings, general procedures, voting, rights, resolutions.
Dividends; Winding up; Members and creditors voluntary winding up, powers
and duties of liquidators and receivers. Pre requisite: BUS 321.
BUS 323 Business Ethics
3 Credits
Introduction to ethical theories, moral philosophies, personal organizational
ethics; Honesty in business; Christian perspectives of business ethics; morality
and the practices of ethics; ethical decision making and ethical leadership
in decisions; ethics of the environment; ethics of consumer production and
marketing; ethics from global perspective and fair competition; Justice and
love at the work place; Justice to shareholders; Justice to customers; Justice to
the public; Business and international morality; Morality in advertising; Work
ethics, time for leisure; Virtues and values; A Christian worker in the business
world. Prerequisite BUS 211
BUS 324 Investment
3 Credits
Overview of basic investment concepts identifying methods and techniques
for analyzing investment opportunities with emphasis placed on common stock
investments. Consider both traditional (descriptive) techniques and modern
portfolio theory (quantitative techniques). Pre-requisite: STA 211, ECO 211,
ECO 212, BUS 314 or 309.
BUS 326 Industrial Psychology 3 Credits
The origin, the nature, scope and significance of industrial psychology; The
domains of work psychology; development of industrial psychology in developed
and developing countries; Emergence of industrial and urbanization, changes
at the work place ; management of the employee stress ; career management,
fitting the man to the job and fitting the man to the job; organizational behavior
modification ; Attitudes at the work; employee recruitment and selection;
industrial psychology and work environment; psychological contract; industrial
psychology and organizational structure; emerging trends in work psychology
Why people work; the effects of work; Workers’ analysis; Work environment;
Formal and informal organizations; Quality of work life and balanced work life
Prerequisite: BUS 211, BUS 318.
goals, objectives, core values. Strategic management process; situational
analysis internal and external, strategic choice; industrial analysis; strategy
implementation ; monitoring and evaluation of strategies competitor analysis;
planning levels – corporate strategy, business strategy, functional/operational
strategy; planning models generic strategies, BCG, Ansoff, GE; decision
making; Strategy and organization building; strategic management of change;
strategy and social responsibility; strategic leadership. Prerequisite BUS 211,
BUS 314, MAK 212, BUS 313.
BUS 328 Small Business Management
3 Credits
Scope of small business management; the role of small business to an
economy; opportunities for small business management – new vs. existing
business franchising and licensing Small business in enterprise development;
management practices in small business marketing, human resource, finance,
operations, small business role; small business financing; stages of business
growth and business cycle ; business planning; analysis of management
practices in the on going small businesses; small business technology and
innovation; social cultural and ethical issues in small business; succession
planning in small business; Biblical Principles of Stewardship & Business
Management. Prerequisite: BUS 111, BUS 212, ACC 112.
BUS 415 Project Planning & Management
3 Credits
Introduction to project management; project cycle – project management
stages; project initiation; project management skills; project initiation –
identification and analysis; project planning and activity planning; Monitoring
and control; resource allocation and cost schedules; Network planning models
and critical path analysis; Project planning and managing people, Project
evaluation and risk management. Pre requisites: BUS 211, BUS 318.
BUS 329 Labour Relations & Labour Law
3 Credits
Definition, meaning and nature of labour relations and law; Historical
development of industrial law; basis of Kenya’s labour laws; The role of
the government, employer and employee; Individual relations; Principles of
negotiation; The role of trade unions; Collective bargaining agreement (CBA);
Trade disputes; Employment Act_Chapter 226, Wages Act_ Chapter 229,
Industrial Training Act_ Chapter 237, Workman’s Compensation Act_ Chapter
236, Factories Act_ Chapter 514; The law of master and servant; Control of
essential services. Pre requisites: BUS 313
BUS 330 Conflict Management 3 Credits
Definition: Nature and source(s) of conflict. The conflict process; stages in conflict
development. Types of conflicts; conflict situations in organizations. Functional
& dis functional conflicts, Levels of conflicts; intrapersonal, interpersonal,
intragroup, intergroup, and inter organizational conflicts. Consequences of
conflicts; functional and dysfunctional consequences, effects of conflicts at
the work place. Managing conflicts; strategies for managing intrapersonal,
interpersonal, intragroup, intergroup and inter conflict stress detection and
control, current trends and challenges in conflict management in organizations,
Implications of conflict management. Pre requisites: BUS 211.
BUS 340 Cooperative Management
3 Credits
Background of cooperative management; organization structures for co
operatives ; the roles of cooperatives in the economy; cooperative laws ;
Cooperative management; Cooperatives and members’ participation; The
government and cooperatives; Application of commercial knowledge in
cooperatives; Cooperative banking and finance; Cooperative act Cooperative
societies and their marketing strategies; merging issues in cooperative
development. Prerequisite BUS 211.
BUS 414 Strategic Management & Decision Making 3 Credits
The Scope of strategic management and decision making. The strategic
management theories; The role of strategic planning in organizations.
SWOT/TOWS profile; Developing Strategic statements – vision, mission,
BUS 416 Special Topics in 3 Credits
Business and Management
Course content will vary. The instructor will define the content for each course.
Examples of subjects which may be covered are: Industrial psychology;
Consumerism; The Green Movement and marketing; Consumer laws;
Employee motivation; Marketing for non profit organizations; Marketing of
agricultural products and the role of marketing boards especially in selected
African countries (Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana, Uganda, Tanzania and others),
Procurement and other management areas.
BUS 417 Entrepreneurship & INNOVATION
3 Credits
Introduction and scope of entrepreneurship; the role of entrepreneurship to an
economy; characteristic features of leadership; theoretical and conceptual base
for entrepreneurship (myths and origin); Entrepreneurship vs. intrapreneurship;
Characteristic features of entrepreneurship; Types and kinds of entrepreneurs;
entrepreneurship creativity and innovation; Business idea generation;
Assessment and evaluation of new ventures. Entrepreneurship and risk
management. Entrepreneurship and stress management; entrepreneurship and
time management; emerging issues in entrepreneurship; biblical perspective in
entrepreneurship. Pre requisite; BUS 211, BUS 323, BUS 314, ACC 112.
BUS 419 Corporate Governance
3 Credits
Corporate governance system: The legal obligation of directors, Election of
the board, the board – CEO relationship, the board’s role in management.
Basic principles and practices of corporate governance: Development in the
governance of state enterprise, duties and liabilities of directors of corporation,
corporate governance and reporting, determining good governance,
governance and good results, assessing board and director’s performance;
governance of state corporations in Kenya; OECD principles of governance;
leadership and management: competence of board members, designing
governance process, leadership, monitoring and evaluation; governance of
state corporations under state corporations act; Possible benefits from greater
monitoring, possible problems into greater monitoring and evaluation; legal
reforms, governance of public and private institutions; investors protection and
corporate governance. Prerequisite BUS 211,BUS 330.
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BUS 421 Risk Management 3 Credits
Introduction to risk management; the role of risk management in an economy;
types of risks; principles of risk management; risk management and insurance;
strategic approach towards risk management; risk aversion and risk
management; insurability of risks and contractual provisions; risk management
and shareholder wealth; tools and techniques used to measure risk; issues
in liability risk and its management; Elements of fraud related offences; risk
management and wealth creation. Prerequisite BUS 211, BUS 323, BUS
314.
BUS 431 International Trade 3 Credits
Introduction: Meaning of term international trade, forces in international trade
environment, importance of international trade, advantages and disadvantages
of international trade, problems of international trade; International trade and
foreign investment: direction of trade, major trading partners and foreign
investment; Theories of international trade, barriers to international trade,
arguments for and against protection; Exporting: how to enter foreign markets,
types of markets, procedure and documentation and prices in international
trade payments; Importing: procedure, documentation payments and
restricting imports; International organizations relevant to international trade:
examples, World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF), International
Finance Corporation (IFC), International Development Association (IDA), World
Trade Organization (incorporating GATT); International monetary system and
balance of payments: the gold standard, balance of payments, equilibrium and
disequilibrium experiments in floating money markets and foreign exchange;
Government involvement in international trade: functions of customs and excise
department, government aids to exports, commodity markets and international
cooperation. Pre requisite: ECO 211, ECO 212.
BUS 492 Independent Study in Business 3 Credits
Administration and Management
This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to explore
specialized and innovative topics in Business Administration and Management
through directed study. The student will choose a topic and will discuss it with
the lecturer responsible for the subject. The lecturer will study the student’s
proposal and make suggestions to ensure that sufficient ground will be
covered. The lecturer will then give the student a list of textbooks, newspapers
and magazines to read. He will set questions for the student and discuss his
answers with him not less than once a week. Pre requisite: BUS 213 and
completion 3/4 of course work.
BUS 520 Business Practicum
4 Credits
The student will be expected to do an assigned task in an employing business
organization, which agrees with the employer’s need and the student’s training.
As part of the assignment, the student will be expected to examine and report
on the relative effectiveness of the business functions to which he is assigned
and of his performance of his assigned functions. Specific reading will be
assigned that relates to the nature of the student’s task. The assignment will take
seven (7) Weeks or 270 hours. Pre requisite: BUS 213 and completion 3/4
of course work.
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BUS 598 Senior Project
4 Credits
The student will get involved with one or two companies in order to develop a
creative idea that may be of use to one or more of them. The student chooses,
with the help of a lecturer, a specialized and creative topic he/she would like
to explore. The lecturer must be specialized in that area of study, so as to give
all guidance necessary to enable the student to write a report for grading.
Pre requisite: Permission of Instructor.
BCL 100 Legal Research & Writing
3 Credits
Historical development of English common law: sources of law and its
classification, court structure and jurisdiction; application principles and statutes
in general; application in Kenyan legal system; the doctrine of precedent and
hierarchy of courts; stare decisis, obiter dicta; interpretation of statutes; case
law technique; research methodology construction rules.
BCL 101 Social Foundations of Law
3 Credits
Review of society and its social formulation; the place of law in social relations,
social dynamics and legal processes; issues in legal theory; religion and law;
elements of legal philosophy; law and political institutions.
BCL 200 Constitutional Law
3 Credits
Constitutional theory and introduction to jurisprudence; the foundations of the
constitution and its supremacy vis _ vis other legislative enactments, single
party & multi party states, constitutional values of safe guards and types of
constitutions; contents of a constitution legislature; judiciary and executive;
separation of powers; the executive: authority and powers, the presidency,
prerogative and related powers, extra juridical executive powers and the
cabinet, collective and individual responsibility, the civil service and political
neutrality; the legislature: theory and history, one or two chambers in Africa
and their composition, the Kenyan Parliament; the judiciary: judicial powers
and functions, justifiability, powers of subordinate public agencies and the
public administration.
BCL 201 Elements of Contract Law 3 Credits
English legal system and contract; reception of contract law into Kenya;
characteristics and formalities of contract: the essentials of a valid contract, terms
and types of contracts, characteristics and retraction, irrevocable offers, the
concept of unilateral contracts, acceptance, consideration, its consequences,
intention to create legal relations, contracts ubirrmae fidei; privity of contract
and court interpretation of case law; typical provisions of a contract: duties
and obligations, classification of contractual terms; conditions and warranties:
implied terms, express terms, parole evidence, vitiating factors, exclusion and
termination clauses, remedy clauses, mergers and arbitration clauses; estoppel.
BCL 202 PRINCIPLES OF TORT LAW
3 Credits
Nature, foundations and functions of law and the definition of a tort; sources
of the law of tort, tortuous liability; principles of tort and the system of tortuous
liability; general conditions of liability in tort; invasion of property and persons.
BCL 203 CONSTITUTIONAL SYSTEMS
3 Credits
Legislative control of executive powers; powers to confer sanctity of the
law; control, the courts and the electoral process; members of parliament;
independence and separation of powers; comparative analysis of the
constitutions of Kenya and those of Britain, U.S.A.; South Africa and regional
countries like Uganda, Tanzania and other African nations; current constitutional
developments in Kenya and participation in constitution making. Pre requisite:
BCL 200.
BCL 204: LAW OF EVIDENCE
3 Credits
The nature, philosophical and historical background of the law of evidence
and its place in judicial process; preliminary definitions and principals items of
judicial evidence, admissibility and relevance; similar facts evidence, character
evidence;matters established otherwise than by evidence, relevant facts which
may not be proved, estoppel, admissions,presumptions;burden and standard
of proof; public policy and privilege, illegally obtained evidence;documentary
evidence, confessions, corroboration;examination of witnesses, oaths and
affirmation; competence and compellability.
BCL 300 Enforcement OF Contract
3 Credits
Interpretation of contracts: intention of parties, background facts, consistencies,
inconsistencies, rectification; third party involvement in contracts, sub
contractors, assigning benefits to contracts, the right to sue upon death and
bankruptcy; quasi contracts: restitution, quantum meruit, discharge of contracts:
by performance, express agreement, operation of the doctrine of frustration,
by breach, partial performance, tender of performance, time performance;
remedies for breach of contract; repudiation or rescission, specific performance,
liquidated or unliquidated damages, assessment of compensatory damages;
defenses: justification, mistake, misrepresentation, non adherence to specification,
economic duress. Prerequisite: 201.
BCL 301 TORTS
3 Credits
Defamation; nuisance; liability torts; trespass; the concept of negligence;
causation; defences ; accidents and compensation; legislative intent ; remedies
and immunities. Prerequisite: BCL 202
BCL 302 Criminal Law
3 Credits
Definition of criminal law and its historical development; sources of criminal law;
constitution, penal code, customary law; socio legal concept of criminal law;
criminal law and legality: criminal liability, actus reus, the general presumption
of mens rea, voluntary conduct and consequences, causation and responsibility,
the statutory and judicial position in Kenya; strict liability, historical background,
exclusion of mens rea, stautory wording and context, provisions regarding
punishment; vicarious liability; social origins and development; the principle of
delegation; variations to avoidance of criminal liability: the McNaghten Rules,
burden of proof, other mental conditions; general defences and other defenses;
classification of and parties to conspiracy and incitement; assembly association
and public order; administration of lawful authority; life and health; liberty and
character; morality and sexual offences; unlawful taking of property; economic
crimes ; the criminal process and procedure.
BCL 303 COMMERCIAL Law
3 Credits
Nature and meaning of law and its classifications; Sources of law in Kenya
and law of persons; The legal systems in East Africa; Law of contract; Tort
law; Law of agency; insurance law; Relations of the East Africa business
organizations to the economic systems: sole trader, partnership, company,
corporation; Negotiable instruments; Hire purchase; Banking law; Insurance
law; Sale of goods. Prerequisite Bus 113, Bus 211
BCL 304 Company Law
3 Credits
Historical background; the meaning of a company; fundamental concepts
of company law; legal personality, limited liability, veil of incorporation,
advantages and disadvantages of incorporation; memorandum of association
and concept of ultra vires; articles of association; variation of class rights:
variation of the rights clause; promoters of prospectuses; company’s organs
and officers; the rule in Turquand’s case and subsequent case law; directors’
duties; the law relating to auditors; minority protection; raising and maintaining
capital, reduction of capital; distribution of dividends; types of corporate
securities; shares and debentures; reconstructions, mergers and takeovers;
winding up process; promoters; prospectuses. Prerequisite: BCL 303.
BCL 305 Law of Insolvency
3 Credits
The history of solvency law in England and Kenya; principles, policies and rules
governing financial failure of companies and individuals; the statutory, common
law and equitable rules; acts of bankruptcy; creditors; the bankruptcy petition;
proceedings after petition: administration of an estate; effect of bankruptcy
on transactions; realization of property; bankruptcy offences and remedies;
grounds for winding up: voluntary, by the court, indebtedness, just & equitable
provision, disappearance of substratum, minority protection; Consequences of
winding up; duties of directors to creditors; distribution of assets; alternatives to
winding up; discharge of bankrupt. Prerequisite: BCL 304.
BCL 306 Securities Regulation Law
3 Credits
History and development of securities regulation, definition and characteristics
of securities; origins and dimensions of disclosure; insider dealing or trading;
development and role of Nairobi Stock Exchange (NSE); role, objectives and
powers of the Capital Markets Authority; negotiable instruments. Prerequisite:
BCL 305.
BCL 307: Competition Law
3 Credits
The origin of competition law & policy; antitrust and unfair competition laws;
activities governed by law; monopoly, pricing limitations, predatory practices,
merger control, abuse of dominant position, cartels and price fixing: analysis
of case law from Kenya, USA and European Community.
BCL 308 Taxation Law
3 Credits
Taxation Theory Basic Concepts; Why governments levy taxes; Types of
taxes; Purpose of taxes; Principles/canons of taxation; Classification of taxes;
Incidence of a tax; Taxable capacity. Taxation of the Income of Persons
and Institutions: Taxable incomes; Non taxable incomes; Specified sources;
Allowable and non allowable deductions; Taxable and non taxable persons
and institutions; Tax rates, individuals, companies, withholding taxes; Individuals
sources of income, tax at source, personal relief, tax payable; Corporate
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bodies, taxable income, tax payable. Capital Deductions: Investment
deductions; Industrial building deductions; Wear and tear allowances.
Taxation of Partnerships: Subdivision of income from profits and legal
provisions; Adjustment of profits for tax purposes. Taxation of Companies and
Shortfall of Income: Legal provisions; Additional expenses to be deducted for
tax purposes. Administration of Taxes: Kenya Revenue Authority; Identification
of new taxpayers through: pin, investigators, public media and business
registrars; Assessments: Self assessments, additional assessments, estimated
assessments; Installment tax; Tax returns; Notices; Objections, appeals and
relief of mistake; Appellant bodies; Collection, recovery and re payment of
taxes; Offences, penalties and interest. Administration of Value Added Tax:
Introduction and development of V.A.T. in Kenya; VAT Act Cap (476); Taxation
of goods and services; Registration of taxable persons; De registration of
taxable persons; Accounting for VAT; Remission, rebate and refund of VAT
tax; Offences and penalties; Privileges and rights of a VAT registered person;
Appeals and objections requirements. Other Revenue Sources: Miscellaneous
revenue sources; road licenses, inspection charges, trade licenses, airport
taxes, cesses, stamp duties, royalties, property taxes, petroleum levy; New
taxes, levies and cheques.
BCL 309 Family Law
3 Credit
Sources of family law & systems of marriage under Kenyan law: customary,
Hindu, Islamic, Christian and statutory law; changing from one system to
another; judicial treatment of polygamy; creation of a marriage relationship;
requirements for a valid marriage: agreement to marry, consent, capacity,
dowry, foreign marriages; consequences of marriage; rights to consortium &
its limits, interference with consortium; termination of marriage under different
systems of law; bases of termination: death, annulment, divorce; grounds for
divorce: cruelty, adultery, desertion, unnatural offences; the process of divorce
decree nisi, decree absolute; property rights, custody and maintenance of
children, adoption, guardianship; nationality acquisition, renunciation of
citizenship, domicile, legitimacy.
BCL 310 Law of Succession
3 Credits
Foundation and history of the law of succession and the four modes of
succession under customary, Islamic, Hindu & statutory law and conflicts
of succession laws; nature and purpose of law of succession; Patterns of
succession; testate and intestate succession, provisions in the statutory law; wills
and their creation; privileged, unprivileged, validity, construction, attestation,
appointment of executor, trustee; lapse and revocation of a will; doctrine of
election; administration of estates; probate, dependency, African customary
law of succession, Islamic law of succession.
BCL 401 International Economic Law
3 Credits
Nature of international economic transactions; sources of international
economic law: trade transactions; regulation of international trade, investment
and international trade agreements; history, role and organization of World
Trade Organization (WTO) and regional bodies; principles on tariffs; non tariff
barriers; subsidies and trade practices; sovereignty over natural resources;
conflict of laws; nature and jurisdiction of contracts.
BCL 402 PRINCIPAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
3 Credits
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The theory of environmental management and history of environmental
law;defining environment, environmental degradation, environmental
consciousness and environmental law;concepts of standards and sustainable
development; national and international legal frameworks; physical
planning, environmental impact assessment, environmental media, water,
solid waste management, hazardous substances and chemicals, biodiversity
management;use of civil and criminal law in enforcement of environmental
management.
BCL 403 Arbitration & Alternative Dispute 3 Credits
Resolution
Types of conflicts; history and advantages of arbitration; nature of disputes;
jurisdiction of tribunals and the International Chamber of Commerce;
organization and jurisdiction of the International Center for Settlement of
Investment Disputes; basic principles of conflict prevention; diplomacy in dispute
settlement: negotiation; mediation, inquiry; conflict resolution and management
activities of International Organizations; role of the UN in regional instability
in Africa; role of the African Union in conflict management and other regional
organizations.
BCL 404 Labour Law
3 Credits
Introduction to labour law: definition, scope and functions; historical
development of labour; employment relationship: nature, problem of status,
status vs. contract; contract of employment: formation, terms and conditions;
sources of regulation, rights and duties, termination and remedies; relationship
between employment contract and collective agreement; special provisions
relating to women, disabled persons, juveniles, etc.; international labour
standards; collective bargaining and collective labour law: theory, functions,
role of law, legal status, arbitration; industrial disputes and the law; disputes
and conflict resolution procedure; strikes and the law; trade unions and the
law; the state as an employer.
BCL 405 Insurance Law
3 Credits
Introduction to nature and history of insurance law in England and Kenya;
good faith, full disclosure, insurable interest, indemnity, subrogation and its
effects on third party contracts, the concept of insurance risk; classification of
contracts according to the event, parties to insurance contracts; formation of
insurance contract, nature of the offer, when acceptance occurs, issuance of a
policy, the insurer’s conduct, the cover note and the legal effects of acceptance,
commencement of policy and its construction; insurable interest pecuniary and
proprietary interest, contractual policies, statutory policies, indemnity contracts
and re insurance schemes; termination of the contract, attachment of risk and
available remedies: reinstatement, salvage, arbitration, damages, contribution
and apportionment of loss; insurance claims: third party claims adjudication by
courts and arbitration.
BCL 406 Banking Law
3 Credits
Principle sources of banking law, evolution of banking business & law and
the early beginnings in Kenya; the role, functions and categories of banks:
commercial, investment, government lending agencies, central banks & joint
stock companies; services offered by banks: loans, securities, goods as
securities, warehouse warrants, guarantees and pledges; establishment and
regulation of banks; creation of the banker; customer and the debtor creditor
relationships; rights and liabilities of parties; types of accounts and the
accounting process; mistakes in favour of the customer and mistakes detrimental
to the customer; third party claims; trust money and tracing; electronic banking
law and policy; rights and liabilities of parties to electronic systems, laws
regulating electronic transfers and resolving legal problems; Bills of Exchange:
the cheque and its form, crossed and open cheques, bankers cheques,
letters of credit, money orders, issue, operation and alterations of cheques,
endorsements and dishonour of cheques; forged and unauthorized instruments;
other types of negotiable instruments: promissory notes, credit notes, banker’s
drafts; Garnishee proceedings; International finance, regional banks, IMF and
World Bank; commercial credits.
BCL 407 Property Law
3 Credits
Philosophic foundations of property rights in land, ownership and possession
under common law; sovereignty theory, the idea of property in land; definition
of tenure and the concept of property and property rights; the historical
perspective and philosophical foundations of private property rights under
English and customary law jurisprudence under Kenyan law; the colonial factor
and evolution of property law in Kenya; the pre and postcolonial period and
impact of colonial policies on indigenous tenure; regulation of transactions in
land; the statutory provisions, ascertainment and registration of rights, transfers
& transmissions, alienation of rights; the rights and liabilities of property owners
and customary and rules governing ownership of land; doctrine of eminent
domain; police powers and limitation; the concept of communal tenure and
feudal tenure; acquisition of control over land; case studies; voluntary & non
voluntary alienation of property rights; licenses; leases; assignment; easements;
proprietorship in common and joint proprietorship; encumbrances: mortgages
and charges and remedies for default; functions, duties and responsibilities of
the Registrar and the Commissioner of Lands.
BCL 408 Intellectual Property Law
3 Credits
History and rationale of intellectual property rights (IPR); the concept of invention,
protection of creativity and enhancement of scientific and literary research and
development; national IPR laws & institutions; theoretical and legal framework
and international aspects of intellectual property law; patents; ethical and
moral issues: Biotechnology innovations, pharmaceutical products, transfer of
technology, utility models; plant variety protection; copyrights; infringement &
defences; trademarks; confidential information/trade secrets; infringement &
remedies; industrial designs; contemporary issues in IPR law: IPR vs trade; IPR
vs Technology development: IPR vs Technology transfer; IPR in cyberspace; role
and relevance of World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).
BCL 409 Equity & Trusts
3 Credits
Nature and source of principles of equity; doctrines of Benami, election,
consideration and exclusion by statutes; equitable remedies; application
of equitable principles in Kenya; requirements for the creation of a trustee/
beneficiary relationship; classification of trusts; succession, wills, probate, letters
of administration, appointments, duties, powers and liabilities, testamentary
gifts, failure of gifts, intestate distribution and testate distribution; fiduciary
nature of the trustee’s obligations; appointment, retirement and removal of
trustees; breach of trust.
BCL 410 Public International Law
3 Credits
Nature of international law: role, character, historical development and
scope; sources of international law: treaties, custom, general principles of
law, judicial decisions, publicists. Relationship between International Law
and Municipal Law: dualist and monist theories, internal law in municipal
courts and municipal rules in international tribunals, concept of opposability;
international personality: locus standi, legal status of states, individuals and
international personality; recognition of governments, states and belligerency
and legal consequences; statehood; treaties; state immunity: distinction
between “jure imperii” and “jure gestionis”, sovereign immunity; diplomatic
and consular immunity; state responsibility: liability for breach of international
law, nationality of claims, local remedies rule and the calvo clause; settlement
of disputes: judicial and non judicial settlement of disputes, international
judicial tribunals; succession and self determination.
BCL 411 International Trade Law
3 Credits
Introduction to international trade law; sources, subjects and objects of
international trade and turnover; international trade transactions: international
trade representation; international payments and finance: bank guarantees and
cargo insurance, international financial leasing; international transportation
of goods; international franchising, international investments; international
contracts; international licensing and conflict resolution by international
arbitration; role and functions of World Trade Organization (WTO).
BCL 520 LEGAL PRACTICUM
3 Credits
Students will be attached to the bench where they will be exposed to the
handling of legal issues. The students will develop skills in time and court
management, court practice, trial techniques, civil procedure, criminal
procedure, and the taking of evidence, writing rulings and judgements.
Students will keep a short and concise daily journal on key learning for the
period. They will be evaluated by both the University Supervisor and the
External Supervisors.
LOG 211 Introduction to Business Logistics
3 Credits
The role of logistics in the economy and the organization. Customer service
management. Logistics information systems. Inventory concepts and the
basics of inventory management. Managing materials flow in production
and operations. Transportation and traffic management. Warehousing,
materials handling, computerization, and packaging issues. Introduction to
global logistics. Organizing for effective logistics and controlling logistics
performance. Fundamentals of supply chain management. Developing and
implementing logistics strategy. Pre requisite: ENG 112, MAT 111.
LOG 221 Purchasing Principles & Management 3 Credits
Introduction to the purchasing profession, Christian ethical and professional
standards, the role of purchasing and supply management in business, and
purchasing objectives, policies and procedures. Computer based systems
including EDI and purchasing on the Internet. Purchasing organization
and strategic role in the firm. Purchase descriptions, specifications and
standardization. Purchasing’s role in new product development. Outsourcing
and make or buy decisions. Finding, evaluating and selecting domestic and
international sources of supply. Price and cost analysis. Principles of contracting
and negotiation. Purchasing capital equipment and services. Contract
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administration, managing for quality, and general management responsibilities
including value analysis, developing the buying plan, and appraisal and
control of the purchasing function. Pre requisite: MAT 112.
LOG 311 Inventory Planning and Control 3 Credits
Functions, types and uses of inventories. Nature and uses of forecasts in the
firm. Demand management, forecasting periods and accuracy. Forecasting
approaches including Box Jenkins, econometrics, Delphi method, market
surveys, statistical series, time series, moving average, exponential smoothing,
and Bayesian techniques. Adjusting for seasonality and cyclic patterns
around the trend. Monitoring and controlling forecasting systems by using
mean absolute deviation, mean absolute error, mean absolute percent error,
and tracking signals. The use of focus forecasting, pyramid forecasting, and
combination methods to improve forecast accuracy. Vector smoothing for
simple and multiple items. Percentage done estimating method. Percent of
aggregate demands method. Slow moving item forecasting using exponential
smoothing and vector smoothing. Measures of inventory system performance
including ROI and ROA. Inventory distribution by value and Pareto (ABC)
analysis. Trade offs between holding costs, set up costs, ordering costs, costs of
production down time, and cost of stock outs. Basic order point/order quantity
systems and calculation of EOQ/EPQ. EOQ with quantity discounts and
shortages. Annual, cycle count, and low point inventory systems. Multi item
joint replenishment inventory models including Brown’s algorithm and Kaspi
and Rosenblatt’s algorithm, Joint replenishment production quantity models.
Inventory systems under risk including calculation of safety stocks. Interaction
between service levels and safety stocks. Balancing backorder or lost sales
costs against inventory costs. Lead time adjustments and variability. Impact
of demand lumpiness and variability. Impact of anticipated price changes on
demand. Common inventory control systems in practice. Aggregate inventory
management including lot size inventory management interpolation technique
(LIMIT), exchange curves, LaGrange multipliers, unit and situation stock out
objectives. Facility location decisions including echelon inventory and echelon
holding costs. Types of distribution systems, distribution requirements planning,
and allocation systems. Outsourcing of distribution and inventory storage.
Prerequisite: LOG 211, LOG 221.
LOG 321 Warehousing and Stores Management 3 Credits
Nature and importance of warehousing. Types of warehousing. Three functions
of warehousing – movement, storage, and information transfer. Receiving,
transfer or put away, order picking, cross docking, and shipping functions.
Information transfer including computerization, EDI, and bar coding. Private
vs. public warehousing. Determining warehouse number, types size, and
location. Warehouse location models. Warehouse layout and design. Use of
randomized and dedicated storage locations. Product groupings in dedicated
storage. International dimensions of warehousing. Warehouse productivity
measurement and improvement. Financial dimensions of warehousing.
Activity based costing. Warehouse security, accounting and control. Materials
handling equipment types, uses and costs. Manual and automated storage
facilities. Warehousing for JIT environment. Packaging and its effects on costs,
customer service and satisfaction. Computers and technology in warehousing
and tracking operations. Warehouse activity profiling. Humanizing warehouse
operations. Prerequisite: LOG 211, LOG 221.
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LOG 331 Production and Operations Management 3 Credits
Developing a customer orientation in the production environment. Integrating
operations management with other functions of the firm. Supply chain decisions
and configuration strategies to align the production process with customer
expectations and supplier processes. Product and service design process.
Process selection and capacity planning. Facilities layout, location, and design
of work systems. Total quality management, continuous improvement, quality
improvement tools, and six sigma quality programs. Aggregate planning,
master scheduling, and their interaction with inventory decisions. Materials
Requirement Planning (MRPII) systems including system logic, supply chain
impact, and detailed scheduling in an MRP environment. E commerce based
improvements to master scheduling and inventory management. Control
of work in process inventories. Planning and control of Just in Time systems.
Mathematical optimization techniques including linear programming, the
transportation model, and queuing analysis. Prerequisite: LOG 211, LOG
221, LOG 311.
LOG 341 Management of Customer Service 3 Credits
Developing a customer orientation in all functions of the firm, especially those
that interface with the customer. Integrating customer service management with
other functions of the firm. The essential elements of great customer service.
Developing and implementing the customer service call path for telephone
customer service operations. Techniques for identifying how the company is
perceived and establishing action plans to maintain or enhance the reputation
of the business. Ethical standards in customer service to build credibility,
believability and professionalism. Empowering customer service providers to
improve their ability to serve the customer. The importance of communications
in customer service to include effective listening, appropriate word usage, and
proper voice inflection. Techniques for dealing with difficult or angry customers.
Selecting, training, monitoring and motivating customer service representatives
and first line managers. Building effective customer service operations on the
Internet. Dealing with communications barriers and prejudice in a multicultural
environment. Measuring customer satisfaction and customer churn, and
developing programs for continuous improvement. Financial implications of
customer service including cost vs. service level trade offs, measuring the value
of an existing customer, and controlling customer churn. Prerequisite: LOG
211, LOG 221, LOG 331.
LOG 351 Logistics Financial Decision Analysis 3 Credits
Cost system concepts including committed and flexible costs, costs of resource
supply and usage, opportunity costs, theory of constraint, and cost of unused
capacity. Financial considerations in choosing an optimal product mix. Short
term budgeting and resource allocation. Identifying and quantifying support
and service department costs. Activity Based Costing including assigning
resource costs to activities, activity cost drivers, and cost hierarchy. Use of
regression analysis in cost estimation. Activity Based Management including
use of ABC for pricing analysis, life cycle product costing, target costing,
kaizen costing, and cost of quality. Decision making about products including
measuring product and customer profitability. Using the Balanced Scorecard
to measure total business unit performance. Linking scorecard measures to
corporate strategy decisions. Financial measures of performance including,
ROI, ROA, IRR, and economic value added (EVA). The nature of financial
control including measurement of sales, profitability and productivity variances.
Responsibility accounting and transfer pricing. Shortcomings of ROI measure
and adjustments to POI and EVA calculations. Measuring performance from
customer and internal business process perspectives. Total quality management
and continuous improvement. Cycle time management and time to market
measures. Investments in technology related to customer satisfaction, process
improvements, and internal capabilities and their impact on supply chain costs.
Computer modeling in financial decisions. Prerequisite: BUS 309, LOG 311,
LOG 341, LOG 351.
LOG 361 Transportation Management
3 Credits
Transportation’s interaction with the supply chain and the economy. Transportation
regulation and public policy. Motor carriers including truck load (TL), less than
truck load (LTL) and small package carriers. Freight documentation including
the bill of lading (B/L), carrier freight bill, and delivery receipt (D/R). Use of
railroads. Inland water carriers. Air carriers including air cargo, integrated
carriers, small package express delivery, freight forwarders, and next flight
out (NFO) services. Air transportation documentation. Use of pipelines. Use
of special modes of transportation including bulk carriers, heavy haul carriers,
and temperature controlled carriers. Ocean freight carriers including bulk,
container, and roll on/roll off (Ro Ro) ships. Intermodal transportation including
traileron flat car (TOFC), container on flat car (COFC) piggy back services.
Transportation tariffs and rate determination. Negotiating transportation pricing.
Use of private transportation and the economic and operational advantages
and disadvantages of private trucking vs., common carriers. Relationship
management and partnering between shippers and haulers. Information
systems in transportation and the growing importance of technology in the
transportation industry.
LOG 411 Advanced Supply Chain Management 3 Credits
Gaining competitive advantage through logistics. Creating the logistics vision
within the firm. Developing the logistics organization and using it as a vehicle for
change. Importance of information in an integrated supply chain management
environment. Inter organizational information systems (IOIS). Information
requirements determination for a supply chain IOIS. Information and technology
applications for supply chain management. Supply chain management impact
on customer service and customer retention. Setting customer service priorities
and standards. Total cost analysis and the principles of logistics costing.
Logistics and shareholder value. Benchmarking and mapping the logistics
process. Identifying key logistics performance indicators and reengineering
the supply chain. Time based competition– including lead time and logistics
pipeline management. Quick response and JIT logistics. Production strategies
for quick response. Vendor managed inventories. Conceptual model of alliance
development. Developing a trusting relationship with partners in the supply
chain. Resolving conflicts in a supply chain relationship. Sharing risks in inter
organizational relationships. Managing the global supply chain. Prerequisite:
LOG 311, LOG 321, LOG 351.
The vision of AFLEWO- Africa Let’s
Worship, events of worship, is to star up
hope in Jesus Christ across Africa. This
would not have been possible had we
not been part of Daystar University which
taught us how to be servant leaders and
gave us the opportunity to be part of the
Daystar Worship teams in the chapels.
Timothy Kaberia
www.daystar.ac.ke
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LOG 421 Logistics For E Commerce 3 Credits
Building e commerce logistics infrastructure including defining business
processes and resources. Protecting consumer privacy on line. Dealing with
children on line. Measuring e business financial costs and values. E business
cost reduction potential, including reductions in the cost of supply and the cost of
sales. Cost of acquiring customers vs. retaining them. On line payment methods
and processing. Internet fraud and taxation issues. Online customer service.
Multiple customer service contact points and customer selfservice. Evolving
from call centers to contact centers to commerce centers. Customer relationship
management systems. Shipping for e commerce and the importance of trace
ability. Online shipping tools for e commerce. Online vs. offline fulfillment
models. Efulfillment processes. Global logistics in e commerce. Databases and
data exchange standards. Reverse logistics in e commerce. Return policies
and the return merchandise authorization (RMA) process. Pros and cons of
outsourcing and drop shipping. Evaluating potential outsourcing partners. Third
party logistics providers. Prerequisite: MIS 211, LOG 321.
LOG 431 Management Of Service Operations 3 Credits
The role of services in the economy. The nature of services, service encounters,
and service quality. New service development and process design including
the design and location of service facilities. Customer attitudes and needs
for services. Risk perception in service purchases, and strategies for reducing
perceived risk. Forecasting demand for services, planning capacity, and
managing waiting lines. Queuing models and simulations. Service facilitating
goods and supply chain management. Process and information technologies in
service systems. Human resource planning, recruiting, training, and supervision
of service providers. Balancing service standardization and empowerment.
Teamwork and recognition. Focus on customer satisfaction and achieving
service quality. The gaps model of service quality. Benchmarking and continuous
improvement. The importance of good recovery and service guarantees.
Measuring and improving service productivity. Data envelopment analysis for
measurement of service efficiency. Routing and scheduling problems and
models for their solution. Use of linear and goal programming in managing
service operations. Special problems in managing provision of technical and
repair services including management of spare parts. Prerequisite: LOG 211,
LOG 221.
LOG 441 Advanced Modeling of Logistics Systems 3 Credits
Review of probability concepts, game theory, and decision theory models.
Decision trees with utility theory. Advanced forecasting and inventory control
models. Linear programming modeling applications using Excel and QM
for Windows. Transportation and assignment models. Integer programming,
goal programming, nonlinear programming, and branch and bound model
applications in logistics. Network models, waiting lines and queuing theory
models. Simulation modeling and Markov analysis. New models for material
requirement planning and Just In Time inventory. Quantitative models for
reverse logistics. The SAP R/3 Business Blueprint applications in supply chain
management. New advances in CRM and SCM software. Prerequisite: MAT
111, MAT 112, LOG 211, LOG 301.
LOG 451 International Transportation and Logistics 3 Credits
The evolution and design of global logistics operations. Formulation of global
logistics strategies and integrating them into the strategic planning of the firm.
Supplier network development, global supply chain management, and logistics
network design for global operations. Risk management in global operations.
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Current technology and information management systems in global logistics.
Organizational structures and performance measurements in global logistics.
Dealing with cultural and legal differences in global logistics. Logistics and
trade in different parts of the world. Government interests and regulation of
global transportation. Types of ocean ships and shipping, rate determination,
and charter processes. Land transport to and from ports. International air
transportation. International logistics intermediaries. Terms of sale and terms of
payment. Managing foreign exchange. Documentation and insurance. Foreign
trade zones, bonded warehousing and transportation. Advanced technologies
in international transportation and logistics management. Prerequisites: LOG
221:Purchasing Principles and Management, LOG 361: Transportation
Management.
MAK 212 Marketing Principles
3 Credits
Marketing: definition, historical development of marketing thought and practice,
the marketing concept, the role of marketing in an organization and within an
economy and the concept of marketing mix, the Christian faith and marketing
and the marketing philosophy; Marketing opportunity analysis: environmental
analysis, opportunity identification, market segmentation, market information
systems, consumer behaviour; Product decisions: definitions, classifications,
product life cycle, consumer adoption process, product planning and
management, packaging, branding and labelling decisions; Price decisions:
price setting, objectives and approaches and pricing policy; Promotion
decisions: tools of promotion; Distribution decisions: channel decisions,
types of middlemen and distribution systems; Marketing management: plan
components and development, profitability and introduction to international
marketing; Agricultural marketing: special problems, role of cooperative
societies and marketing boards; Marketing of services: characteristics of
services, problems in service marketing and role of service marketing; Non
profit oriented marketing: aims and objectives, classifications and expectations
of the consumers; Course review: careers in marketing and marketing problems
in developing countries. It is strongly recommended that the course is taken in
the second year of study. Pr requisite: ENG 211.
MAK 315 Consumer Behaviour 3 Credits
Introduction: diversity of consumer behaviour; What is consumer behaviour;
Consumer research; Market segmentation: bases for segmentation, criteria
for effective targeting of market segments; Consumer needs and motivation;
Dynamic nature of motivation types and systems of needs; Personality and
consumer behaviour: theories of personality, personality and understanding
consumer diversity; Self and self images; Consumer perception: what is
perception?, the dynamics of perception, consumer imagery; Consumer
learning and involvement: what is learning?, behavioural learning theories,
cognitive learning theory; Brand loyalty and brand equity; Consumer attitude
formation and change; Communication and persuasion: components
of communication, the communication process, designing persuasive
communication: Group dynamics and consumer reference groups: what is a
group; applications of reference group concept; The family: what is a family;
functions of the family, family decision making, the family life cycle; Social
class and consumer behaviour: what is culture; characteristics of culture, sub
culture; Aspects of consumer behaviour: what is sub culture; Personal influence
and opinion leadership process; Dynamics of the leadership process and
measurement of opinion. Pre requisite: MAK 212 BUS 213.
MAK 316 Advertising 3 Credits
Introduction: What makes great advertising players; Advertising and society;
Ethics and regulation; Advertising; The marketing mix; Advertising agencies;
How agencies are organized; Consumer audience; Strategy and planning: the
advertising plan, creative plan and copy strategy, psychology of advertising,
how brand image works; Media planning: media operation, setting objectives,
developing strategies, media selection, procedures, staging a media plan,
print media, broadcast media, media buying functions, special skills expert
knowledge on media opportunities; Creative side of advertising: creative
concept, execution and effective creativity; Creating print advertisements:
writing for print, print production; Creating broadcast advertising: mastering
television commercials, the television environment, the nature of commercials,
planning and producing commercials; Sales promotions: defining sales
promotions, the size of sales promotion, the future of sales promotion; Public
Relations: the challenge of public relations, comparing public relations and
advertising, international advertising, the global perspective, organization of
international advertising agencies. Prerequisite: MAK 212, MAK 315.
MAK 317 Marketing Research 3 Credits
Introduction to the course: definition of marketing research, process and
problem formulation, the Christian faith and marketing research; Problem
definition; Identification of information needs and formulating specific projects;
Research designs: types of research design, nature and functions of design;
Data collection: secondary data; Data collection: primary data; Levels of
measurements, validity and reliability; Processing and analyzing data; Writing
report. Prerequisite: MAK 212, MAK 316
MAK 330 Product Strategy and Planning 3 Credits
Product and marketing planning strategy focus on describing and demonstrating
how strategy is derived and put into action. The course uses simple planning
approach by helping students understand the current state of product or products
in the market, clarifying the mission and vision of the organization, synthesizing
data such as the resulting opportunities for products, product audience, product
message. Product research, production process, product strategy and strategic
options for product and markets. Prerequisite MAK 212.
MAK 331 Financial Aspects of Marketing 3 Credits
The emphasis here is on the need for financial literacy amongst marketing
practitioners. An analysis of the financial concepts and their relevance to
marketing, basic computations, interpretations and application of financial
principles to issues concerning the marketing mix elements (product, price,
promotion and place). Pre requisite: ACC 111, MAK 212.
MAK 333 Agricultural Marketing 3 Credits
Particular features and problems in agricultural marketing in developing
countries; The importance of supplies, prices and profits in farming and the
food sector; National policies for food and agriculture; Production, storage,
processing, pricing and distribution of food and farm products; Making the
best use of the resources to satisfy consumers’ needs against a background
of technical progress, innovation and the influence of culture. Pre requisite:
MAK 212.
MAK 334 Marketing for Non profit Organization 3 Credits
Historical selling problem for non profit organization, community awareness,
developing and maintaining a visible credible identity in the market. Non
profit organization and its definition of the intended audience, target message
to fit strategic plan that will best use limited resources to meet organization
goals, image building for non profit organization, marketing proposal plans to
communicate the results for program of non profit organization, marketing and
its role in financial partnership for non profit organization, multiple communication
tactics for non profit organization, select and use of appropriate media for non
profit organization. How to develop a strong, well known identity overtime for
non profit organization. Pre requisite: MAK 212.
MAK 335 Marketing Communication 3 Credits
Promotional management; Foundation: Promotion and marketing, Marketing
communication systems, Interpersonal communication process. Setting for
the promotional effort: Establishing promotional objectives, objectives and
the promotion lick. Advertising and advertising management: Importance of
advertising, advertising objectives, advertising media strategy, advertising
message. Personal selling and sales management: Personal selling roles,
activities and process, developing sales strategy, executing the sales strategy.
Sales promotion and publications: Managing sales promotion objectives,
activities, sales promotion to consumer, to dealer, sales personnel, public
relations process, role, publicity. Pre requisite: MAK 212, MAK 317
MAK 336 Marketing of Services 3 Credits
Development of services marketing: Marketing an Introduction, development
of marketing theory, environment, organizations. Marketing today. Green
marketing. Is service marketing different?: Marketing defined. The marketing
mix, special characteristics of services, nature of the service product, services
marketing. The scope and range of services marketing: The service economy,
service providers and manufacturers service, classification of services marketing,
technological developments in services marketing, international services
marketing, competition in services, future trends. Organization for services
marketing: The role of marketing in service organization, Functions of marketing.
Understanding the market for services: Marketing research applications for
service marketing, developing new services. Services marketing management:
Corporate mission and objectives, strategic growth options, strategic marketing
planning. Marketing planning for services: The marketing audit, the marketing
planning process. Roles and responsibilities. Internal marketing. relationship
marketing. Service quality. The services marketing mix: Packaging the service
product, pricing the service, promotion and communications in services
marketing, service distribution planning, people the fifth �P’, process and
physical evidence. Special aspects of services marketing. Not for profit services
marketing. Leisure services marketing. Tourism marketing. Industrial marketing.
charities marketing. Financial services marketing. Professional services and
marketing. The internationalization of services. The importance of after sales
service; consumer/industrial markets. Pre requisite: MAK 212.
MAK 337 Retailing Management 3 Credits
Introduction to retailing, nature and framework, retail strategy, owning or
managing a business, retail institutions, environment of retailing, consumer
behavior, marketing research in retailing, choosing store location, retail
organization and resource management, merchandise planning and
management, pricing and retailing, communicating with customers, promoting
strategy, service retailing, the virtue store and retail database marketing and
the changing environment of retailing. Pre requisite: MAK 212, MAK 315,
MAK 316, MAK 335,.
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MAK 338 Export Marketing
3 Credits
Problems of product, price, communication and distribution policies with special
reference to the exporting of semi processed industrial and consumer goods
from developing economies to other developing countries and to developed
countries. An analysis is made of export promotion strategies, export financing,
export documentation and the concept of export processing zones (EPZ). The
role of regional groupings and international organizations like PTA, COMESA,
GATT, UNCTAD etc is also examined. Pre requisite: MAK 212.
MAK 419 Business to Business Marketing 3 Credits
A business marketing perspective. Business and consumer market. The
business market: Perspectives on the organization, buyer. The organizational
buying behavior – new task, straight Rebuy, modified Rebuy. Forces shaping
organizational buying behavior. Relationship marketing/buyer seller
connection. Relationship marketing strategies. Supply chain management.
Logistics in supply chain management. Market driven organizations. The
marketing plan. The management of innovation. Managing services for
business markets. Managing services for business markets. Prerequisite:
MAK 212, MAK 317.
MAK 420 Sales Management 3 Credits
Salesmanship: Origin and development of salesmanship. Overview of sales
management, strategic role of selling and sales management, knowledge of
the buying motives: the process of buying and selling, environmental influence
on sales programs and performance, effective presentation and demonstration:
overcoming objectives organizing and sales force. Sales management:
Demand estimation, sales territories, motivation of salesmen, training of
salesmen: remuneration of salesmen, sales analysis. Pre requisite: MAK 212,
MAK 315, MAK 316, MAK 317.
MAK 421 International Marketing 3 Credits
Objective: To gain greater insight into the process of management at the
international level and to understand the role of the international marketing
manager in overseeing international operations. The importance of exports to
a developing country; The global approach; Comparative analysis of world
markets; World marketing infrastructures and intra community trade activities;
The international marketing planning and control; International market research,
marketing planning and control; International and multinational marketing
strategy; Exporting and international trade regulations. Pre requisites: MAK
212, MAK 315, MAK 316, MAK 317.
MAK 422 International BUSINESS Management 3 Credits
Objective: To gain greater insight into the process of management at the
international level and to understand the role of the international business
manager in overseeing international operations. Contents: The international
business environment; Alternative foreign involvement strategies (exporting,
licensing, franchising direct investment); International competition; Relations
between multinational firms and host nations; International transfer of technology;
position of developing countries in the international trade. Prerequisite:
MAK 212, MAK 315, MAK 316, MAK 317.
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MAK 423 Customer Care and Public Relations 3 Credits
Customer care is there a definition?: Building profitable business through
world class marketing using marketing to understand, create, communicate
and deliver value. Identifying opportunities and developing targeted value
offering; Developing value propositions and building brand equity. Competitive
strategies, acquiring, retaining and growing customers. Public relations
programs: New media, press relations, ethics of public relations, sponsorship.
Loyal for life – how to take unhappy customers from hell to heaven in 60
seconds or less (John Ischohl). The customer is boss: Practical ways of making a
difference when providing customer service, communicate with your customer,
build effective relationships with your customers, positive attitudes, be solution
focused – think of all your possibilities, be part of a winning team, keeping
promises, service recovery, one customer at a time, genuine care, it’s the little
things that count in customer care and the unpredictable factor in customer
care, “You don’t bring me flowers any more”. Public speaking: Fundamental
techniques in handling people, ways to win people to your way of thinking,
how to develop self confidence and influence people by public speaking,
steps in successful speaking, business executive branding i.e. self branding,
achieving excellence through customer service. Pre requisite: MAK 212,MAK
315, MAK 316, MAK 317.
MAK 424 Marketing Management 3 Credits
Defination of marketing management, Adapting marketing management to
new economies, Building customer satisfaction, value & retention, Market
oriented planning, Information gathering & measurement of market demand.
Environmental analysis, consumer markets and buyer behaviour, Analyzing
business markets and business buying behaviour, Dealing with competition,
Market segmentation, Product planning, New product development, Global
marketing, Branding strategies, Service Marketing, Pricing Strategies, Placing
& promotional strategies. Pre requisite: MAK 212, MAK 315, MAK 316, MAK
317.
MAK 426 STRATEGIC Marketing 3 Credits
Business and marketing strategies: The strategic role of marketing, dynamic
business arena, getting closer to the customer, product/ service Innovation,
developing strategies for competitive advantage, competing in global markets,
business strategy and competitive advantage, environmental turbulence,
competitive advantages, business strategy and strategic analysis and
strategy selection, marketing strategy, strategic marketing, situation analysis,
etc. Marketing situation analysis: Defining and analyzing markets, market
segmentation, analyzing competition, Michael Porter five forces driving industry
competition, marketing strategies for marker leader, challenger, followers and
nichers. Tools for competitive differentiation. Designing marketing strategy:
Market targeting and positioning strategies, marketing strategies for selected
situations, planning for new products. Marketing program development:
Product portfolio strategy, distribution strategy, price strategy, promotion
strategy. Implementing and managing marketing strategy: Designing effective
marketing organization, marketing strategy implementation and control.
The strategic role of information information and competitive advantage,
computerized information systems, artificial intelligence and expert systems,
issues in managing information, creating successful long term growth. Pre
requisite: MAK 212, MAK 315, MAK 316, MAK 317.
MAT 111 Mathematics for Economics and Mgt. I 3 Credits
Nature of management mathematics, role of mathematics in economics
analysis, applications of mathematics in business management, strengths
and limitations of mathematics in management. Set theory: Definitions and
concepts in set theory, set operations and laws, Venn diagrams. The real
number system; Types of numbers, Rules of algebraic operations, Permutations
and combinations binomial expansion. Equations and inequations: Equations,
definition and types of equations, linear and non linear equations, single
and simultaneous equations, solutions to equations (linear and non linear),
applications; inequations
definition and types of inequations, Solutions
to inequations. differential calculus: Rate of change, concepts of limits and
continuity, derivative and differentiation, partial differentiation, applications.
Integral calculus: Rules of integration, applications. Matrix algebra: Definitions
and basic concepts, properties of matrices, determinant of a matrix, matrix
operations, matrix inverse, solution to linear simultaneous equations: matrix
approach.
MAT 112 Mathematics for Economics and Mgt. II 3 Credits
Functional and graphical representations: Functions and graphs, linear functions
and their applications, non linear functions and functions with more than one
independent variables and their applications. Matrices: Matrix operations,
determinant of a matrix, inverse of a matrix. Matrix applications to business
problems: Solution of simultaneous equations, input output analysis, Markov
analysis. calculus: Concepts of limits, differentiation, Integration, maximum
and minimum points, lagrange multipliers and applications. Mathematics of
finance: Simple and compound interest, Present and future values, ordinary
annuities, capital investment appraisal methods. Linear programming model:
formation, graphical method of solution, simplex method of solution, duality
theory. Sensitivity analysis. Prerequisites: MAT 111, ECO 211.
MAT 211 Operations Research 3 Credits
Linear programming models: simplex method, dualily theory, sensitivity
analysis. Network analysis (CPM/CPA and PERT): construction of network
determination of critical path(s), time and resource analysis. Transportation
models: Formulation, solution, search methods. Assignment models:
Formulation, solution, search methods. Inventory models: Optimal levels
of inventory, deterministic and stochastic methods, materials requirement
planning, limitations of EOQ. Queuing models: Queues and queuing systems,
evaluating queuing systems, solution methods, nature of single channels
and multiple channels queues, economic implication of queues, limitations.
Integer and non linear programming. Dynamic programming models, goal
programming models, integer programming and heuristic programming.
Simultation models: simultation process, stochastic simultation, the Monte Carlo
simultation techniques, simultation languages. Prerequisites: MAT 111, 112;
ECO 211, 212.
MIS 113 Introduction to System Programming
3 Credits
Overview of programming, definition of a program and algorithm., steps to
writing a good program, design using flowchart and pseudocodes, modules,
hierarchy charts, structures: sequences, selection and loops, decision making
using Boolean, AND, OR logic, Looping using; While, For, DO Until, Nesting
loops; array, menus and debugging. The programming language will be a
current, simple, structured language such as Basic, C or Pascal.
Pre requisite MIS102.
MIS 114 Object Oriented System Design 3 Credits
AND Development
Introduction to solving real world cases in business using object oriented
programs. Design and development of event driven Object oriented programs.
Object Oriented Programming (OOP) concepts, Objects and classes,
inheritance, dynamic binding, message passing, polymorphism, abstraction
and information hiding, basic data types, elementary syntax, control
structures, testing, debugging and documentation, introduction to building
classes, pointers, virtual functions, templates and dynamics programming. The
programming language will be a current OOP language such as visual Basic,
Visual C+, Dephi o Java. Pre requisite MIS 113.
MIS 211 Management Information Systems 3 Credits
Information systems revolution; transforming business and management; the
strategic role of information systems; information systems; organization and
management; ethical and social impact of information systems; computers
and information processing; information systems software; managing data
resources; telecommunications and networks; the internet: electronic commerce
and electronic business; redesigning an organization with information
systems; approaches to systems building; managing knowledge; enhancing
management decision making; information systems security and control;
managing international information systems. Pre requisites: ACS 101, MIS 101
MIS 212 BUSINESS SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
3 Credits
The system development environment. System development process models,
e.g. waterfall, spiral, and structured system analysis and development
methodology (SSADM): systems study and requirement specifications,
managing an information systems project, identifying and selecting systems
development projects, initiating and planning system development projects,
determining systems requirements. System design: process modeling, logic
modeling, conceptual data modeling. Selecting the best alternative design
strategy. Prerequisite MIS 211.
MIS 220 Computer Organization & Design
3 Credits
Course involves study of fundamentals of current computer design, exposing
students to the basic understanding of the operation of computer components
and organization. Topics: Fundamentals of computer design; computer
abstraction and technology: integrated circuits and chips; CPU architecture
(ISA): RISK & CISC architectures: Principles and examples; role of performance
and measuring performance ; machine language: introduction to assembly
language; pipelining: introduction to, principles, enhancing performance;
system memory: introduction, semiconductors memory technology and
hierarchical memory organization; input/output sub systems: peripheral
devices, I/O module organization; secondary storage: the HDD, floppy
drive, CD/DVD, flash disks; introduction, physical organization, operational
overview , performance factors, quality and reliability; computer arithmetic:
signed and unsigned numbers , addition and substation, logical operands,
multiplication, division, floating points numbers; Student project assemble
a typical PC; physically assess memory modules and different processors.
Prerequisite MIS 114.
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MIS 221 Advanced Object Oriented System
3 Credits
Design and Development
Good experience and advanced features of object oriented are applied to
create compressive programs. Topics: Advanced abstraction, objects, classes,
methods, messages, inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation and information
hiding, input and output streams; working with files to process large qualities
of data; exception handling for making robust programs; templates and class
libraries; application programming interfaces (API); database applications;
creation of more responsive and interactive programs. Pre requisite MIS 114.
MIS 222 System Algorithms and Data Structures
3 Credits
A more advanced course that further develops programming skills in visual,
Object oriented application development and programming of real business
cases. Topics: Relationship between data structures and algorithms. Data
structures and processing such as arrays, lists stacks, queues, indexes, records,
files and database structures; hierarchy of data: bit, byte, fields, records, files
and databases; sorting and searching methods, modular design, cohesion and
coupling concepts, application of data structures and files processing techniques
: streams and files ; simulation and modeling. Student project demonstrating
user interface construction, simple file/database/object searches and updates,
and report generation. Software to be used will be current OOP language such
as C++, Visual Basic or Java. Pre requisite MIS 114.
MIS 224 Business Database Management System
3 Credits
The course focuses on the design, development and management of business
database. Topics: file systems and databases; database design methodology;
the relational database model; Entity relationship (ER) modeling; introduction
to structured Query language (SQL); normalization of database tables; models
for data databases: relational, hierarchical, networked and object oriented
designs; data directories, repositories, warehouses; conceptual design
verification, logical design and implementation; database administration,
limitation of relational database management systems. Student project: Design,
development and implementation of a business database using a selected
DBMS. Pre requisite MIS 114.
MIS 228 Operating Systems
3 Credits
The course explores the concepts and general survey of operating system
concepts. Topic: computer system overview, OS overview; functions of operating
systems (OS): I/O device drivers, files systems; process management: process,
CPU scheduling, process synchronization, deadlocks; storage management:
memory management, virtual memory, file system implementation, I/O
systems, secondary storage structure, tertiary storage structure; distributed
systems: networks structures, distributed file systems, distributed co ordination;
protection and security: protection , security; Case studies on : DOS, Unix or
Linus, windows (current version) .NIX, LINUX, WINDOWS. Pre requisite MIS
222.
MIS 311 INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
3 Credits
This course is a follow up of Management Information Systems courses and
is geared to equipping the students with the concept of information systems
planning and management. Topics: Systems concepts and challenges
facing IS management today; The interaction between information systems
and organizations; Information systems management: functions, levels and
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organizational structures; Information systems resources and the location of IS
within organizations; Acquiring software and hardware in organizations and
using an objective procurement process; Strategic planning for IS and change
management in information systems. Prerequisite MIS 212.
MIS 312 BUSINESS SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
3 Credits
This course is a follow up of Business system analysis and design; It involves
developing Business systems on a Visual software platform. Introduction to Visual
software, working with numbers/data, development of Menu and interface
designs, selection structures- If ..Else.. Then, select case, repetition loops-For
Next, Do-While, Do Until. Working with Arrays, Strings and procedures,
Database Design and link to Visual code, File Management, System security
issues in systems development. Prerequisite MIS 211.
MIS 313 INFORMATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH METHODS
3 Credits
Introduction: meaning and purpose of research, basic and applied research,
overview of the research process; selection and definition of the research
problem; importance and scope of literature review; developing the conceptual
framework; research designs: basic designs, exploratory research, descriptive
research, casual research, secondary designs, case studies, surveys,
experiments; developing a research plan or proposal; sample design: population
of interest, sample and census studies, sample units, sample size, sample
selection; data collection: secondary data, primary data, construction of data
collection instruments e.g. observation forms and questionnaires, measurement
scales, attitude measurement, attribute measurement, multidimensional scaling,
communicating with respondents and fieldwork, procedures and management;
data analysis and interpretation: preliminary steps, summarizing techniques,
measuring differences, discriminate analysis, cluster analysis; issue in research:
validity, reliability, objectivity; research report. Prerequisite MIS 212, STA 212.
MIS 320 Business System Networks 3 Credits
and Data Communication
The course introduces students to networking concepts. Topics: Introduction
to networking basic concepts: data communication and networks, impetus
for networked communications system, specific network applications, basic
communication models and components, classification of networks; transmission
media, and cabling ; structured cabling, campus backbones , WANs & links ,
transmission media and their characteristics, considerations in network installation;
data transfer and synchronization , the ISO/OSI model: communication modes:
simplex, half & full duplex , network protocols, packets switched and circuit
switched networks, carrier options, synchronization : synchronous , asynchronous,
frame relay, ATM, FDDI, SMID, etc.; communication and network standards :
wire and wireless data , voice and video etc. emerging data communication
technologies. Prerequisite MIS 228.
MIS 321 Software Engineering
3 Credits
Software engineering is an advanced course mainly focusing design and
implementation of software systems. Topics: Software design methodology
and engineering. Software life cycle; planning and managing the project,
requirement specifications, writing and testing the software program, testing
and delivering the system, verification and validation, software maintenance.
Code control, management of test and administration of bugs fixes. Decision
on developing or buying. Pre requisite MIS 212.
MIS 322 Business Network Design & Management
3 Credits
Topics: Networking concepts: Specification, designing a network; requesting
quotations; analysis of responses; contracting with suppliers; documentation;
regulations and legalities; installing and testing a network project; project
management; multiplexing; signal encoding; errors in communication systems.
Student project: Workings in a group student install the necessary hardware
and software to set up a LAN Network server, clients and configure it for WAN
application. Pre requisite MIS 320.
MIS 408 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT 3 Credits
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Topics offered under this course number will vary depending on faculty
availability and interest and student need. These topics will allow students to
go into greater depth in areas of special interest. Regular topics will include,
without being limited to the following: Internet,Intranet Application Development,
Multimedia Programming, Data & Database Administration and Management
of Global Information Systems. Prerequisite - 300 level work.
MIS 408AINTERNET/INTRANET APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT 3 Credits
Inter-networking applications and development with a focus on the internet
and corporate intranets. Topics include electronic data interchange; electronic
commerce (EC); information access; application development technologies and
techniques. Special emphasis is placed on planning, security, privacy, ethics
and management as related to developing a Website in a business. Impact of
the Internet on the disciplines of business, including information produces and
distribution channels, Internet focused marketing, operational transformation,
formation of electronic markets and digital economy. Fundamentals enabling
technologies, including World Wide Web, browsers, search engines, portals
andinternet service providers, HTML and web development tools, andWebsite
metering tools. Designing principals of EC applications in business process
contexts. Skills for simple WebPage development, WebPages development
with embedded spreadsheets and data base functionality. Software to be
used may include HTML (including frames, tables, forms, and image maps),
Microsoft’s Front Page, VB Script and JavaScript. Prerequisite - 300 level work.
MIS 408B MULTIMEDIA PROGRAMMING
3 Credits
Introduction to concepts of multimedia. It coves applications, tools, and design
of multimedia systems. Students will be expected to develop a multimedia
system or systems. Prerequisite - 300 level work.
MIS 408C DATA & DATABASE ADMINISTRATION
3 Credts
This course explores the planning and management of corporate data,
information and knowledge resource. Topics include data and database
administrator, strategic data planning, information resource management,
data quality, data security, global information architecture; advanced data
manipulation languages, comprehensive DBMS facilities and object –oriented
DBMS; analysis and data mining tools; deploying and managing databases
in a distributed environment. Data integrity and privacy. Technologies include
Oracle database server and Oracle enterprise (OEM) graphical DBA interface.
Prerequisite - 300 level work.
systems to fit global business strategies; managing Global systems; Technology
issues and opportunities for Global value chains. Prerequisite - 300 level work.
MIS 412 Business Systems Security 3 Credit
The course focuses on the threats and security of Business data, information and
systems. Topics: information security in computers & communication systems;
potential security threats and lapse in computer systems; security evaluation
in computer systems; identification and authentication; system access control;
security models; the security kernel; introduction to cryptography; application of
computer security in operating systems such as Unix security or Windows NT,
worldwide Web, database, networks security. Prerequisite - 300 level work.
MIS 415 ELECTRONIC COMMERCE SYSTEDMS
Business models and market; Effective content for electronic
Marketing for electronic commerce. Electronic commerce security;
security and payment technology; Business to business electronic
The outlook for E-Commerce. Prerequisite - 300 level work.
3 Credits
commerce;
Transaction
commerce.
MIS 416 WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT & MANAGEMENT
3 Credits
Web fundamentals. Client/server architecture; Page design. Content;
design. Site design. Intranet design. Web browsers. Accessibility; for users
with disabilities. International (Global) use of the Internet and E-commerce.
The trend and future of the Internet. Simplicity in web design. HTML and
ASP programming. Introduction to JAVA language. Writing JAVA applets.
Prerequisite - 300 level work.
MIS 418 INFORMATION SYSTEM PROJECT MANAGEMENT
3 Credits
Introduction to project management; Basic definition, project management
stages, advantages and disadvantages; Project initiation, Identification
and analysis; Project planning and activity planning; Project schedules,
network planning models and critical path analysis; Managing people and
organisational teams; Monitoring and control, Responsibility and change
control, Resource allocation; Identifying requirements and cost schedules;
Project evaluation, Risk management; The nature of risk, managing risk and
evaluation risks; Project termination. Prerequisite - 300 level work.
MIS 520 INFORMATION SYSTEM PRACTIUM
3 Credits
The student will be placed with any agency (Governmental or non-governmental),
involved in business developmental work; The student will be expected to
examine and report on the relative effectiveness of the organization, functions
to which he/she is assigned, performance of the duties assigned to him/her,
report on strengths, weakness, opportunities of the organization and make any
recommendation in relation to information systems usage in the organization.
Prerequisite - 300 level work.
MIS 598 SENIOR PROJECT IN INFORMATION SYSTEM
The student will choose a research topic of his/her choice in the area of
management information system and be supervised by a lecturer specialized
in that area. At the end of the study, the student will compile the findings and
present the written report for grading. Prerequisite - 300 level work.
MIS 408D MANAGEMENT OF GLOBAL
3 Credits
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
The growth of international information systems: Development and Global
environment; Organization of Global information systems: mapping of Global
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POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA)
Rationale
The 21st century organizations operate within an increasingly intricate
framework of interrelated environments, with disparate stakeholders
whose expectations of business include profit maximization, public policy
compliance, and ethical responsibility.
The Daystar Masters in Business Administration (MBA) degree is a broad
based, internationally oriented programme that aims at providing advanced
skills in selected business and management disciplines including practical
exposure in the application of those skills in a contextualized perspective.
The program also aims at giving opportunity to working executives
aiming at high standards of attainment so as to be able to understand the
organizational work environment and to enhance their ability to contribute
positively to the organizational welfare and development.
The course will also benefit those students completing first degrees and
intending to take careers in private, public and other organizations in the
areas of finance, marketing, strategic management and human resource
management.
Objectives
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
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To enable the student to acquire advanced knowledge in such areas as
finance; accounting; marketing; economics; social and ethical issues
in management; investment; human resource management and other
business disciplines;
To equip the student with knowledge and skills needed for playing an
effective role in the running of organizations in this age of diversity and
change;
To enable the student to learn how to obtain knowledge they will need
to keep abreast with new developments in the ever changing and
competitive global environment.
To assist the student to understand the need for economic
interdependence between the various countries in the world today.
To enable the student to understand the realities of global economic
problems and to acquire skills that will enable them to play an important
role in their organization’s efforts to cope with the problems.
To provide opportunity for the student to exchange knowledge with
students from other countries.
To provide the student with opportunity to learn to be creative and
innovative managers by gaining knowledge about what creative and
innovative managers are doing in the local and international business
scene.
To enable students to adopt firm Christian values and ethics that will
enable them to contribute to the building of a just society within the
organizations, in the countries, and in the world as a whole.
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9.
To provide the student with opportunity to learn to be a manager with an
international outlook by studying such subjects as general management,
advanced international management, advanced international marketing
and international finance.
10. To enable the student to learn to be a socially responsive manager
who has a desire to respond positively to the social, economic and
environmental problems in the world, both in the role of executive,
and as volunteer workers, giving assistance to the under privileged,
the suffering and those who assist in the effort to eliminate poverty and
improve people’s standards of living.
Students Assessment
Course grades for the MBA program generally are derived 60% from the
final examination and 40% from continuous assessment items, except for
Research Projects or Thesis courses and Independent Study. Thesis or Projects
will be based 90% on final paper and 10% on continuous assessment items.
However, for most courses the relative weight might vary from course to
course depending on its nature and would be specified in the course syllabi
by respective course instructors.
Grading
All grades below “C” will carry no graduate credit and will be calculated as
zero grade points. A GPA of 3.00 must be maintained by graduate students
to retain good academic standing and graduate. Undergraduate courses
taken as prerequisites or for other reasons are not calculated in the GPA for
determining good standing, nor do they receive graduate credit towards the
degrees.
Requirements for Graduation
To graduate a student must complete 58 (or 60) credit hours and obtain a GPA
of “B” average in all subjects’ studied. A student who fails in a required course
cannot graduate unless the deficiency is corrected. He/she will be allowed to
repeat the course only once.
Requirements for Graduation
Core courses
Credit Hours
42
Concentration courses
16(or 18)
TOTAL
58 (or 60)
Curriculum for the MBA Degree
The MBA programme consists of four specialized concentrations. The
programme is arranged in three parts: the core or required courses (compulsory
for all students), the concentration requirements and the general electives parts.
Students with business background will be exempted from the course BUS 530.
Core Courses
BIL 615: Biblical Foundations of Christian Service
BUS 530: Introduction to MBA
Credit Hours
2
0 (3)
Human Resource Management Concentration
Credit Hours
HRM 620: Integrative Project (4 hrs.) or Thesis (6 hrs.)
4 or 6
HRM 611: Human Resource Management Strategy
3
HRM 612: Labour Relations & Labour Laws
3
HRM 613: Employee Motivation and Productivity
3
HRM 617: Human Resource Management Seminar
3
TOTAL
16 or 18
BUS 610: Business Research Methods
3
BUS 611: Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
3
Strategic Management
ECO 610: Managerial Economics
3
BUS 620: Integrative Project (4 hrs.) or Thesis (6 hrs.)
FIN 610: Financial Accounting Theory
3
MGT 612: Strategic Policy Management
3
FIN 611: Financial Management and Control
3
3
FIN 612: Managerial Accounting
3
MGT 614: Management Change & Organization
Transformation
GRA 613: Introduction to Graduate Studies
1
MGT 617: Strategic Management Seminar
3
HRM 610: Human Resource Management
3
MGT 618: Organization Leadership & Management
3
MAK 610: Marketing Management
3
MAT 610: Quantitative Techniques
3
MGT 610: Cross Cultural Management
3
MGT 611: Strategic Management & Innovation
3
Course Title
MGT 616: Organizational Behaviour
3
BUS 612 Special Topics
3
MIS 610: Management Information Systems
3
BUS 613 Independent Study
3
TOTAL
42
BUS 614 Business Logistics and Management
3
ECO 611 Monetary Economics
3
ECO 612 Women in Economic Development
3
FIN 613 Corporate Finance
3
Finance Concentrations
BUS 620: Integrative Project (4 hrs.) or Thesis (6 hrs.)
Credit hours
4 or 6
Credit Hours
4 or 6
TOTAL
16 or 18
MBA - Elective Courses
Credit Hours
FIN 614: International Financial Management
3
HRM 614 Compensation and Employee Benefits
3
FIN 615: Investment Analysis & Portfolio Management
3
HRM 615 Public Relations for Managers
3
FIN 616: Financial Risk Management
3
INS 610 Christian Mission and Economic Justice
3
FIN 617: Finance Seminar
3
INS 700 Christian Mission and Social Transformation
3
MAK 615 Marketing Financial Services
3
MAK 614 Advertising Production and Consumption
3
MAK 616 Marketing Research
3
MGT 615 Management of Non-Business Organizations
3
TOTAL
Marketing Concentration
BUS 620: Integrative Project (4 hrs.) or Thesis (6 hrs.)
16 or 18
Credit Hours
4 or 6
MAK 611: Marketing Strategy and Management
3
MAK 612: Consumer Behavior
3
MAK 613: Global Marketing
3
MAK 617: Marketing Seminar
3
TOTAL
16 or 18
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Course Descriptions
BUS 530 Introduction to MBA 0(3) Credits
Introduction; collection, presentation, organization of data; measures of central
tendency; measures of dispersion; correlation; probability analysis; matrices;
calculus. Introduction to accounting, double entry bookkeeping; the accounting
equation and the balance sheet; double entry for income and expenses,
balancing off accounts, final accounts for sole traders.
BUS 610 Business Research Methods 3 Credits
Problem selection and formulation; Writing proposals that work; Project
definition; Research objectives and design; Sampling; Questionnaire design;
Fieldwork; Using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), Data
analysis using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Thesis writing;
Reporting results.
BUS 611 Ethics & Corporate Social Responsibility 3 Credits
Introduction to sources of law – Kenya and the East African Community (EAC);
The legal system in Kenya; the law of persons, law of torts, law of contracts;
legal principle on partnership and corporations; protection of business secrets;
company law company act, property law, protection of business secrets;
introduction to ethics concepts; businessmen’s attitudes towards ethical issues;
some ethical problem areas in business organizations; protecting consumers,
shareholders, employees, and the environment; Christian influence in ethical
decisions making in business; the gospel, business and the state. Prerequisite
GRA 613.
BUS 612 Special Topic 3 Credits
Course content will vary according to the subject. The instructor will define
the content for each course. Possible topics include: Africa development
policy, African business development, development consulting, development
of cooperatives, strategies for inner city ministry, housing in community and
economic development, restructuring, decontrol of prices, past present and
future role of the stock exchange, etc.
BUS 613 Independent Study 3 Credits
The student will discuss the topic chosen with the lecturer responsible for the
subject. The lecturer will make suggestions to ensure that sufficient ground
will be covered. The lecturer will give a list of textbooks, newspapers and
magazines to the student. He will set questions each week and discuss answers
with the student.
BUS 614 Business Logistics Management 3 Credits
The role of logistics in the economy and the organization; customer service;
logistics information systems; inventory concepts; inventory management;
management materials flow transportation; warehousing; materials handling,
computerization, and packaging issues; purchasing; global logistics;
organizing for effective logistics; methods to control logistics performance;
supply chain management; implementing logistics strategy.
BUS 620 MBA Thesis or Project 6 Credits
The third and final part of the MBA degree, is the preparation of a thesis or
a project that should commence after the two taught semesters. Thesis is more
theory based and often involves testing of hypothesis while projects are focused
more on providing solution(s) to practical problems in a firm or outside a firm.
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Students are encouraged to think about their topics from early in the second
semester so that they can begin work immediately the examination results are
available. Most students might find that the thesis or project represents three
to four months of full time work. Projects are of an academic nature fulfilling
the requirements of thesis writing i.e. they should include chapter 1, 2 and 3
similar to that of a thesis, with slight variation to suit the nature of the project.
Instead of Chapter 5 and 6 which traditionally have data analysis and
interpretation, the project should be a creative solution to a particular well
documented problem. Early in the second semester the MBA Coordinator will
circulate a list of possible supervisors and their areas of interest. Students should
then approach two appropriate supervisors to discuss their proposals. Students
wishing to undertake a project within a firm are responsible for organizing their
own placements. However, the Postgraduate Office will have a file of possible
leads from companies and other organizations. Prerequisite GRA 610.
ECO 610 Managerial Economics 3 Credits
Introduction: Factors influencing managerial decisions; scope of managerial
economics. Demand analysis; theory of production; the laws of return; returns
to scale; proportional change in inputs; economies of sale: internal and
external; optimal input combination; cost concepts; optimum size and long
run cost curves; break even analysis; pricing and market structure: monopoly,
monopolistic, competition; oligopoly. Prerequisite MAT 610.
ECO 611 Monetary Economics 3 Credits
Definition of money and banking; d0epositing institutions; central banks of
independent states; bonds, interest rates, discounting; commercial banks;
private, state and joint stock banks; financial markets with a view to their
impact on the national and world economy; monetary theory and policy; the
functioning of banks and other financial institutions; financial deregulation;
money and capital markets; simple share valuation relationships;iInterest rates
and foreign exchange rates; international finance and economy; third world
debt problems, aid financing and debt servicing.
ECO 612 Women in Economic Development 3 Credits
Introduction: concepts for the analysis of women; reproductive versus
production; the subordination of women’s female and nutrition; theories of
women in development; women in the rural areas; the economies of polygamy:
status of younger wives, work input and women status, influence of caste on
women’s work and wages; the impact of agricultural modernization on the
employment of women; urban women and development; women in a man’s
world; why employers prefer male workers to female, urban job opportunities
for women; the design of education; the new home economics; economics
and intra household relationship; policy implications; practical strategic needs;
aim at how to improve the current rates of return on investment in women and
female children; practical gender needs; protection of entitlement; changing
rights to land and common property resources; access to credit; gaining equal
opportunities to employment and equal wages, empowering women.
FIN 610 Financial Accounting Theory 3 Credits
Accounting theory: Objectives of financial statements, user groups, and
desirable characteristics of accounting reports, fundamental accounting
concepts I.A.S.I “presentation of financial statements”; the Companies Act:
legal framework, requirements of the Act in reporting. Regulatory framework:
accounting standards committee, standards setting process, standardization;
international accounting standards an overview of all international accounting
standards; cooperate governance; published accounts and annual reports
including income statements, balance sheet and cash flow, statements based
on I.A.S.7, I.A.S.1; Valuation of tangible and intangible assents I.A.S.38, IAS
36 and 16; Preparation of important financial statements from various accounts
books. Ratio analysis; introduction to auditing; environmental accounting and
auditing; introduction forensic accounting; creative accounting. Prerequisite
BUS 530, GRA 613.
FIN 611 Financial Management & Control 3 Credits
The role and environment of financial management; agency theory; sources
of finance and financial markets; risk and return; capital investment appraisal;
valuation of securities; cost of capital; capital structure; managing working
capital, dividend policies and theories, mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisite
FIN 610
FIN 612 Managerial Accounting 3 Credits
Evolution of management accounting; user decision models; information
economics and its relation to management accounting; the nature of
managerial decisions; short term planning decisions; basic C V P analysis,
C V P under uncertainty, real risks analysis with multiple products, selection of
product mix, analysis of special orders; performance evaluation decisions; cost
variance investigation models; materiality significance, statistical significance,
and control charts, cost benefit investigations. Inventory control decisions; stock
replenishment models; strategic and tactical decisions; and Game theory.
Transfer pricing in domestic and multi national organizations; performance
evaluation in domestic and multinational organizations; strategic management
accounting issues. Prerequisite FIN 611.
FIN 613 Financial Analysis & Reporting
3 Credits
Overview of financial reporting, financial analysis, and valuation; asset
and liability valuation and income measurement; income flows versus cash
flows; profitability analysis; risk analysis; bankruptcy risk; financial reporting
manipulation risk; quality of accounting information and adjustments;
accounting for effects of changing prices; accounting for investments and
business combinations; reconstruction of companies; valuation of business and
shares; different methods; financial analysis. Prerequisite FIN 610.
FIN 614 International Financial Management 3 Credits
International trade concepts; foreign currency accounts; international monetary
agreements and institutions; international trade finance; players in international
trade finance; international cash management; financial control in multi national
enterprises; financial policy in multi national enterprises. Capital budgeting for
multinationals; capital structure of multinationals. Prerequisite FIN 611.
FIN 615 Investment Analysis &
3 Credits
Portfolio Management
Introduction to investment; an overview of investment, differences between
investments, savings and speculation, risk and returns, types of investments:
fixed and variable return securities, shares and debentures, government
securities, real estates, certificate of deposit, investment in building societies
and other kinds of investments. Security markets; securities commissions, capital
markets, stock exchange operations, i.e. organization, members and dealings
of the stock exchange, listing requirements, regulation of the stock exchange
e.g. the capital market authority and retirement benefits authority acts. Security
analysis; valuation of securities, fundamental analysis, technical analysis and
random walk analysis. Portfolio management; portfolio risk and return, efficient
market hypothesis: forms and tests, portfolio construction models, capital asset
pricing model, arbitrage pricing theory, need for and problems of portfolio
revision. Introduction to derivatives; financial futures, options and warrants.
Prerequisite FIN 611.
FIN 616 Corporate Finance 3 Credits
Corporate governance and investor protection; portfolio theory; the capital
asset pricing model; capital budgeting under uncertainty; cost of capital;
gearing and corporate valuation; dividend policy; mergers, acquisitions,
restructuring and Sorporate control. Prerequisite FIN 611.
FIN 617 Finance Seminar 3 Credits
Overview of financial management concept of value; capital market efficiency;
Market risk return relationship and valuation of risky assets CAPM and APT;
capital structure and the cost of capital; portfolio selection decision; dividend
policy decision; theory of the firm agency theory; financial strategy and
analysis the discriminant analysis; understanding the stock exchange; Financial
risk management; topical issues in Kenya for example, interest rates control
level of investment and so on. Prerequisite FIN 613, 614, 615.
HRM 610 Human Resource Management 3 Credits
Introduction; a historical view of Human Resource Management (HRM), HRM
models, competitive challenges influencing HRM, meeting the competitive
challenges through HRM practices, a conceptual framework of HRM. Acquiring
human resources: the Human resource planning process; Job choice and
recruitment of human resources; employee selection and placement. Assessing
work and work outcomes: the analysis and design of work, performance
management. Compensating human resources: Pay structure decisions,
recognizing individual contributions with pay, employee benefits. Developing
human resources: training, employee development, and career management.
Increasing the effectiveness of human resource practices through technology.
Prerequisite GRA 613.
HRM 611 Human Resource Management Strategy 3 Credits
Corporate and Business Strategy; the Academic debate on human resource
management; The changing business environment; The contribution of
HRM to business strategy: the planning process, philosophies and policies;
Organization structure and the human resource function; Human resource
management models and roles. Prerequisite HRM 610.
HRM 613 Employee Motivation & Productivity 3 Credits
Introduction: The motivation process; Motivation theories; Intrinsic and extrinsic
motivation; The relationship between motivation and performance; The Nature
of work: the psychological contract; Motivational models for developing
countries; Bases of work; Motivation in developing countries; Designing work
in developing countries; The issue of culture fit; Reward management: Employee
benefits, pensions and allowances; The management of compensation
and Welfare services; Involvement and participation management; Work
alienation. Prerequisite HRM 610.
HRM 614 Compensation & Employee Benefits 3 Credits
Economic and psychological foundations related to compensation. Job analysis:
job description, job specification and person specification. Administration of
salaries and wages; Distinguish, factors influencing wage rates wage and
salary policy; Objectives of a sound policy; Wage structure, salary structure,
creating scales from job evaluation results; Discretional increments, overtime
payments; Salary planning, wage salary surveys, international comparison of
salaries. Pay related benefits, total benefits package; Conditions of service;
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Hours of work, holidays, shift working, Sickness pay, pension schemes, and
welfare policies. Pricing and updating performance appraisals; Incentives
management; Administration of fringe benefits. Prerequisite HRM 610.
HRM 615 Public Relations for Managers 3 Credits
Nature of Public Relations; Origin and development of Public Relations
function, The concept of �publics’, responsibility of the Public Relations
function, Theoretical underpinnings. Need for Public Relations; Public Relations
management process; Experiences of managing the PR activities in Kenya;
Strategic planning and organizing the Public Relations function; Social and
ethical issues in Public Relations; Social responsibility and the PR function;
Communication in Public Relations; Leading and control in Public Relations;
Managers as leaders of PR activities; Evaluating the PR Function; Interpreting
and using results of evaluation for control of PR activities.
HRM 617 Human Resource Management Seminar 3 Credits
The field of Human Resource Management; The external context of HRM;
Functions of Human Resources Management; The secular view of work; Christian
views of work; The internal context of HRM; Management of the employee
relationship; Christian principles of employee relations; The managing diversity
discourse; Outcomes of HRM. Prerequisite: HRM 611, 612, 613..
MAK 610 Marketing Management 3 Credits
The market objectives of successful organizations, the information input (MIS)
market research, market research, sales fore casting; product planning,
development, and management; promotion, planning and management of
sales advertising, sales promotion, publicity. distribution; understanding and
managing the distribution channels; customer service, framework for marketing
planning; control: profits and performance analysis, contribution analysis cash
flow analysis and net present value.
MAK 611 Marketing Strategy & Management 3 Credits
The strategic role of marketing; nature and value of strategic management;
business strategy and competitive advantage; formulating long term strategies
and grand market strategies; marketing strategy; Strategic analysis and choice
of markets; market segmentation; analyzing competition; designing marketing
strategy; marketing and program development; implementing and managing
marketing strategy. Prerequisite MAK 610.
MAK 612 Consumer Behaviour 3 Credits
Introduction; keys to consumer behavior; market segmentation and consumer
research; consumer needs and motivation; personality and consumer behavior;
consumer perception; learning and consumer involvement; the nature of
consumer attitudes; communication and persuasion; group dynamics and
consumer reference groups; the family; social class and consumer behavior; the
influence of culture and sub cultural aspects on consumer behavior; consumer
decision making process; diffusion of innovations; public policy and consumer
protection. Prerequisite HRM 610.
MAK 613 Global Marketing 3 Credits
A Conceptual Overview: introduction to global marketing; global marketing
planning. The global marketing environment: economic environment, social
and cultural environment, legal and regulatory environment, financial
environment. Targeting global markets: global marketing information systems
and research, global segmentation, targeting and positioning. Formulating
global marketing strategy; sourcing decisions and the value of chain, strategy
alternatives for global market entry and expansion, competitive analysis and
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strategy, cooperative strategies and global strategic partnership. The global
marketing mix: global product strategies, global pricing strategies, logistics.
Global business involvement: market entry strategies, global promotion
strategies. Exporting and importing. Leading, organizing and controlling the
marketing effort. Ethics and global marketing; the future of global marketing.
Prerequisite HRM 610.
MAK 614 Advertising Production & Consumption 3 Credits
History of advertising, advertising and the marketing mix, models of
communication, semiotics, targeting, advertising, media choices gender, race,
ethical issues, and the future of advertising. Prerequisite HRM 610.
MAK 615 Marketing Financial Services 3 Credits
Market segmentation; product development; pricing; branch location and
distribution; advertising; promotion and communications; control of marketing
programs; credit cards; insurance salespersons management.
MAK 616 Marketing Research 3 Credits
The Marketing research system; Role of marketing research; the marketing
system; gathering marketing intelligence; research process; the Christian
faith and marketing research; the marketing research business; practice
of marketing research, ethics and legal aspects; the problem setting, study
proposal and the research project; research designs; exploratory, descriptive
and causal; data collection methods; secondary and primary; marketing
decision support systems; sampling and data collection; measurement and
causality; measurement process, attitude measurement, causal design; data
analysis; data processing; reporting research findings; applications; demand
measurement and forecasting; product research and test marketing; advertising
research.
MAK 617 Marketing Seminar 3 Credits
Course introduction and overview of marketing management. Topics for
presentation and discussion in class; citing introduction, where appropriate,
discuss the relevance of “marketing management as demand management” in
Kenya’s market place environment. Briefly discuss the major market (customer)
characteristics in Kenya. Role and importance of market places and roadside
selling in Kenya. Critically review the promotion mix (advertising, personal
selling, sales promotion, and publicity) as it is currently used in Kenya.
Is marketing a catalyst (stimulus) or response to Kenya’s socioeconomic
development? The main objective of the structural adjustment programs (SAPS)
in Kenya has been to reduce the role of government in the production and
distribution of goods and services and to increase that of the private sector. To
what extent has this objective been achieved? Critically discuss the marketing
strategies followed by micro and small scale enterprises (SSEs) in Kenya. What
are the marketing implications of the Uruguay Round Agreement to Kenya?
Critically discuss marketing implications of the recent adoption of modern
information technology (IT) by financial and product distribution sectors in Kenya.
Problems and opportunities for transferring marketing know how from western
countries to Kenya and vice versa. Evaluate the marketing roles of regional
economic groupings with special reference to those in Africa. Marketing
cases and problem solving exercises will be given later. Time allowing, guest
speakers will also be invited. Prerequisite MAK 611, 612, 613.
MAT 610 Quantitative Techniques 3 Credits
Functions; Definitions; graphical representation; types of functions; polynomial;
exponential and logarithmic; multivariate; matrix algebra; matrix operations;
matrix applications; solutions to systems of equations; input output models,
markov analysis. calculus; integration and applications; linear programming;
descriptive statistics; probability; decision theory and decision trees. probability
distributions; inferential statistics; hypothesis testing: Z test, T test, X2 tests,
ANOVA tests, non parametric tests; correlation; regression Analysis; scatter
diagrams, parameter estimation; fitness of overall model – R2 and F tests;
significance of regression parameters.
MAT 611 Operations Research 3 Credits
Meaning and scope; linear programming; graphic, simplex and duality
methods; transportation; assignment and sequencing problems; replacement
decisions; queuing theory; inventory management; statistical quality control;
investment; PERT and CPM; forecasting techniques; work study; simulation.
MGT 610 Cross Cultural Mgt in a Global Society 3 Credits
Comparing culture; shifts in culture; organisational culture vs national culture;
culture and ethic; cross cultural management and communication; culture and
structure; motivating across cultures; conflict mediation across cultures; cross
cultural negotiations; culture’s influence on decision making and planning;
global staffing policies; managing cultural teams; training for an expatriate
assignment; doing business with: Europeans, Americans, Latin Americans,
Arabs, Asians and Africans. Prerequisite GRA 613.
MGT 611 Strategic Management & Innovation 3 Credits
The nature of strategic management: An introduction; models of strategic
management; competitive advantage; strategic planning for IT; organizational
learning as a competitive strategy; cross cultural transferability of management
strategies; IT outsourcing as a competitive strategy; managing technical change
in Japan; innovation and management of information systems; managing
business process re engineering; exploiting the World Wide Web for marketing
and business collaboration; The investment appraisal of innovative IT based
projects; managing the IT resource infrastructure. Prerequisite MAK 610.
MGT 612 Strategic Policy Management 3 Credits
Introduction to the course; methodological practices; practices of integrating
work groups; general strategies; strategic administration; types of strategies;
implementation of strategies; business missions; external evaluation; internal
forces; analysis and choosing strategies; annual policies and objectives;
aspects of marketing, finances, research and development and information
systems in the implementation, evaluation and control strategies; strategic
management in a globalized world. Prerequisite: MGT 611.
MGT 615 Mgt of Non Business Organizations 3 Credits
Meaning of non business organization: historical perspectives of non profit
organizations; mission, purpose and objectives of nonprofit organizations;
principles of management
the meaning of management; organizing in
the non profit organization; management and people; employment policy;
communication, co ordination, delegation and control; managing donor
relations and conflict resolution; financial management: mechanics of non profit
finance management, budgetary control, costing control; measurements of
performance; serving the consumer, the satisfaction of consumer’s needs. public
relations: dealing with interested parties; government, suppliers, associations,
staff, and organization.
MGT 617 Strategic Management Seminar 3 Credits
The management challenge; The formulation, implementation and control
of competitive strategy focusing on concepts like: key success factors, core
competencies, strategic business units, employee empowerment, reengineering,
organization restructuring and total quality management in an African context.
Prerequisite MGT 612, 614, 618.
MGT 618 Organizational Leadership 3 Credits
& management
The nature of leadership; Learning about leadership; leadership and
management; role of leader and manager; leadership theories, trait theory;
behavior theory; transformational theory; characteristics of leaders; Gender
and leadership; the development of leadership; leaders and risk.
MGT 619 MANAGING CHANGE AND ORGANIZATIONS
3 Credits
Conceptual, theoretical and practical perspectives on change management,
examining the change agent role and issues associated with change
management in the contemporary context. Individual, group and organizational
strategies for change and the role of HRM in the effective management of
change
MIS 610 Management Information Systems 3 Credits
Business systems fundamentals; transaction processing systems and
management reporting systems; decision support systems; expert systems &
executive information systems; data as a corporate resource; models of MIS;
the IT platform; the systems development lifecycle; Tools of structured systems
analysis; Controlling MIS; management issues arising from MIS and IT.
MGT 614 Mgt Design & Organisation 3 Credits
Transformation Introduction; different types of change; understanding change; organisation
vision and strategic planning; managing change; organisation development
and change; designing and developing organizations; organisation culture
as a vehicle of change; designing work centric organisations;; the learning
organisation; transformational processes/ models. Prerequisite: MGT 611,
MGT 612.
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135
Suggested 4-Year Study Programme
Business Administration and Management Major
Accounting Major
1st YEAR
1st YEAR
Semester I
Semester I
Semester II
ACC 111
3
ACC 112
3
INS 111
3
INS 112
3
ACS 101
2
ART/LIT/MUS
2
ENG 111/098
3
ART/LIT/MUS 111
2
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
ENG 111/098
3
BUS 113
3
MAT 111
3
MAT 112
3
INS 111
3
INS 112
3
ACC 111
3
ACC 112
3
MAT 111
3
MAT 112
3
ACS 101
2
BUS 113
3
HPE 113
1
HPE 113
1
18
Total
18
Total
17
17
2nd YEAR
2nd YEAR
Semester I
Semester I
Semester II
Semester II
ACC 211
3
BUS 211
3
BUS 211
3
ENV 112
2
ECO 211
3
ECO 212
3
POL 111
1
MAK 212
3
ENV 112
2
MAK 212
3
MIS 211
3
ENG 112
3
POL 111
1
MAT 211
3
STA 211
3
BUS 313
3
MIS 211
3
ENG 112
3
ECO 211
3
STA 212
3
STAT 211
3
STA 212
3
BIO 111
2
ECO 212
3
Total
15
18
Total
15
Semester I
17
3rd YEAR
3rd YEAR
Semester I
Semester II
Semester II
ACC 311
3
ACC 312
3
BUS 213
3
ACC 314
3
ACC 315
3
BUS 326
3
RET 320
2
BUS 213
3
ACC 316
3
BUS 309
3
BUS 314
3
BUS 309
3
BUS 318
3
BUS 314
3
BUS 323
3
BUS 321
3
BUS 314
3
BIO 111
2
RET 320
2
BUS 330
3
BUS 323
3
Total
17
General Electives
3
General Electives
Total
18
17
4th YEAR
Semester I
136
Semester II
6
17
4th YEAR
Semester II
Semester I
Semester II
ACC 313
3
ACC 411
3
ACC 314
3
ACC 412
3
BUS 414
3
BUS 415
3
3
BUS 417
3
ACC 414
3
ACC 416
3
BUS 319
ACC 415
3
ACC 416
3
BUS 324
3
BUS 419
3
BUS 313
3
Free Electives
3
BUS 322
3
BUS 420
3
Free Electives
3
General Electives
3
BUS 498/520
Total
18
Total
15
www.daystar.ac.ke
15
4
16
Marketing Major
MIS Major
1st YEAR
Semester I
1st YEAR
Semester II
Semester I
Semester II
ENG 111/098
3
BUS 113
3
INS 111
3
INS 112
3
INS 111
3
INS 112
3
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
ENG 098/111
3
BUS 113
3
ART/LIT/MUS111
2
ACS 111
3
ACS 112
3
MAT 111
3
ACC 112
3
ACC 111
3
MIS 211
3
ACC 111
3
BIO 111
2
ACS 102
2
MAT 111
3
ACS 101
2
ENV 112
2
HPE 113
1
Total
18
HPE 113
1
Total
18
17
18
2nd YEAR
2nd YEAR
Semester I
Semester I
Semester II
Semester II
ACS 211
3
ACS 212
3
BUS 211
3
BUS 321
3
PHY 112
2
MIS 282
3
POL 111
1
MAT 112
3
MIS 281
3
STA 212
3
MIS 211
3
MAK 212
3
ENV 112
2
MAK 212
3
ENG 112
3
STA 212
3
STA 211
3
BUS 213
3
STA 211
3
ECO 212
3
BUS 211
3
MAT 112
3
ECO 211
3
Total
16
Total
16
18
15
3rd YEAR
3rd YEAR
Semester I
Semester I
Semester II
Semester II
ACS 231
3
ACS 302
3
General Electives
3
BUS 314
3
ACS 351
3
ACS 352
3
BUS 213
3
RET 320
2
ECO 211
3
ECO 212
3
BUS 309
3
MAK 316
3
ENG 112
3
BUS 309
3
BUS 323
3
MAK 317
3
ACS 223
3
ART/LIT/MUS 111
2
MAK 330
3
MAK 335
3
BUS 313
3
POL 111
1
MAK 315
3
MAK 336
3
BIO 111
2
Total 18
18
17
Total
18
4th YEAR
4th YEAR
Semester I
BUS 414
Semester I
Semester II
3
17
BUS 498/520
Semester II
4
MIS 400
3
MIS Electives
9
3
MIS 418
3
BUS 498/520
4
MAK 418
3
MAK 420
3
MIS 451
BUS 313
3
MAK 422
3
MIS 311
3
MAK 421
3
MAK 423
3
ACS 431
3
MAK 424
3
RET 320
2
General Electives
3
ACS 361
3
Total
18
Total
17
13
16
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137
Purchasing and Business Logistics Major
1st YEAR
Semester I
Semester II
ACC 111
3
ACC 112
3
ACS 101
2
ART/LIT/MUSIC
2
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
ENG 111/098
3
BUS 113
3
INS 111
3
INS 112
3
MAT 111
3
MAT 11 2
3
HPE 113
1
Total
18
17
2nd YEAR
Semester I
Semester II
MAK 212
3
ENV 112
2
BUS 309
3
ECO 212
3
ECO 211
3
BUS 314
3
BUS 211
3
ENG 112
3
MIS 211
3
BUS 213
3
STAT 211
3
STA 212
3
Total 18
17
3rd YEAR
Semester I
Daystar gave me the opportunity as a
media student to have my first byline
as a journalist through the student run
newspaper (Involvement). I got hands
on training and experience as well from
the student run radio station (Shine FM).
I can attest to the fact that training at
Daystar University equals excellence,
transformation and servant leadership.
Larry Madowo
138
www.daystar.ac.ke
Semester II
LOG 211
3
LOG 421
3
LOG 311
3
RET 320
2
POL 111
1
LOG 321
3
BUS 321
3
LOG 331
3
BUS 313
3
LOG 221
3
BIO 111
2
LOG 431
Total
15
3
17
4th YEAR
Semester I
Semester II
BUS 323
3
BUS 414
3
LOG 341
3
LOG 411
3
LOG 351
3
LOG 361
3
LOG 441
3
LOG 451
3
MAT 211
3
Free Electives
6
Total
15
18
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
About the Department
The mission of the department of Economics is to train competent economic policy analysts and researchers with a Christian perspective. The department is currently
offering a Bachelor of Science degree in Economics. The department offers high quality program that integrate theory, applied data analysis and econometric
methodology that compares well with Economic programs offered in the leading universities in the region. The teaching and research of its faculty members span a
wide range of fields in Economics. The members are well published and are actively involved in research and consultancy. The department runs monthly seminars
in which faculty members present papers that are critically reviewed by colleagues. The department is in the process of developing other undergraduate and postgraduate programs which will be launched as soon as the necessary approvals are in place.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
Bachelor of Science in Economics
Rationale
The BSc Economics is a broad based globally oriented programme designed
to provide the student with sound knowledge of economic disciplines and
adequate tools for the understanding of economic variables, necessary
for effective decision making in a rapidly changing global economic
environment. The programme is also designed to equip the student with
adequate knowledge and skills in related disciplines. This will enhance
its application in problem solving in public, private and non-profit
making organizations, as well as in academic fields. It emphasizes
interrelationships with other disciplines and utilization of techniques that can
be applied in the allocation of the scarce resources available to mankind, in
an effort to create a better world to live in. In development, the expertise
of economists is in great demand, especially as regards economic
planning and development programmes. A wide selection of topics
provides the student with a firm ground and excellent tools to work with
in dealing with technicalities of economic management. Research and
conceptual analytical methods are studied to sharpen the student’s knowledge
in the real economic environment. Global and multi-disciplinary approaches
to problem solving are emphasized. The carefully selected topics, such as
analysis of economic variables, planning, research, project evaluation and
design, synthesize the many components of the economics major programme.
Specifically, the goals of a BSc in Economics are to:
1. Stimulate the student to consider a career in economics as a worthy
cause of serving God, country and mankind as a whole.
2. Challenge the student to practice the Christian principles of integrity
and honesty in performing his/her duties as an expression of Christian
commitment to the community and the nation as a whole.
3. Equip the student with core knowledge of economics and related
disciplines such as business management, accounting, finance,
marketing, information systems, business law, business ethics, and
human resource management.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Introduce the student to contemporary economic thought and economic
trends in an effort to control or eliminate hunger, disease, ignorance and
other human deprivations.
Provide the student with an adequate foundational base to proceed to
graduate courses in the field of economics, management, finance and
research.
Prepare the student to become a well-grounded future executive
in economics’ multi-disciplinary field, ready to assume career
responsibilities in the management of public and private Institutions.
Equip the student with necessary tools for economic analysis, policy
emulation, problem identification and problem solving.
Admission Requirements
Applicants to the Bachelor of Science in Economics must fulfill entry
requirements that apply to all Daystar undergraduate students, i.e. an overall
minimum grade of C+ in KCSE or equivalent. In addition they must have
obtained at least a Grade of C (plain) in Mathematics.
Student Assessment
Grading will be based on continuous assessment and written examinations.
Student assessment will be based on class participation, class attendance,
continuous assessment such as assignment, group work and quizzes,
project work and a final examination. The relative weight of each of these
assessments will be specified in the course syllabi. Practicum marks will be
based on 60% in field reports and 40% in field evaluations. Independent
study marks will be based on 60% in final examination Paper and 40% in
continuous assessment tests.
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139
Exemptions
Required Courses in Economic
Credit Hours
If a student has done a course similar to the ones they are required to take, they
are free to apply for exemption provided they can provide proof that they have
taken and passed the course. Under no circumstances will a student be given
exemption for third level and high level courses.
ACC 111 Financial Accounting
3
ACC 112 Managerial Accounting
3
BUS 113 Professional Business Communication
3
BUS 213 Research Methods
3
Requirements for Graduation
BUS 309 Business Finance
3
BUS 313 Human Resource Management
3
BUS 321 Business Law I
3
BUS 323 Business Ethics
3
BUS 414 Strategic Management and Decision Making
3
BUS 415 Project Planning & Management
3
MIS 211 Management Information Systems
3
ECO 211 Principles of Microeconomics
3
ECO 212 Principles of Macroeconomics
3
ECO 309 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
ECO 310 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
ECO 316 Econometrics I
3
ECO 320 Econometrics II
3
MAT 111 Mathematics for Economics & Management I
3
MAT 112 Mathematics for Economics & Management II
3
STA 211 Business Statistics I
3
STA 212 Business Statistics II
3
Total
63
Credit hours
General Education
30
Required Courses in Economic
63
Concentration in Economics
30
Economics Electives
Total
General Courses for Economics
6
129
Credit Hours
ACS 101 Basic Comp Knowledge
2
ART 111/MUS 111 or LIT 111
2
BIO 111 Biology
2
BIL 111 Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
BIL 112 New Testament Introduction & Survey
3
ENG 098/111 Basic English
0/3
ENG 112 Advanced Writing
3
ENV 112 Environmental Science
2
HPE 113 Health and Physical Fitness
1
INS 111 Communication & Culture I
3
INS 112 Communication & Culture II
3
POL 111 Introduction to Political Science
1
RET 320 Christianity and Islam in Africa
2
Total
30
Economics Concentration Courses
Credit Hours
ECO 308 International Economics
3
ECO 311 Money and Banking
3
ECO 312 African Economic Problems
3
ECO 313 Economic Development
3
ECO 314 Economics of Population
3
ECO 318 Environmental & Resource Economics
3
ECO 411 Public Finance
3
ECO 412 Economic Planning Techniques & Structural
Adjustment
3
ECO 418 Advanced Microeconomics
3
ECO 419 Advanced Macroeconomics
Total
140
www.daystar.ac.ke
3
30 hours
Course Descriptions
Economics Electives: A student should select two courses from the
following list:
Economics Electives
Credit Hours
BUS319 Insurance Practice
3
BUS324 Investment
3
BUS314 Financial Management
3
ECO 317 Comparative Economic System
3
ECO 319 Economics of Industry
3
ECO 322 Economics of Labour
3
ECO 408 Special Topics Game Theory
3
ECO 413 Economics of Tourism
3
ECO 414 Economics of Poverty & Income distribution
3
ECO 415 Gender & Economic Development
3
ECO 417 Economics of Rural Development
3
BUS 414 Strategic Management & Decision Making
3
ECO 520/598 Economics Practicum/Senior Project
4
Total
6
Minor in Economics
Economics minor for Non-Commerce students
Credit Hours
ECO 211Principles of Microeconomics
3
ECO 212 Principles of Macroeconomics
3
ECO 311 Money & Banking
3
ECO 312 African Economic Problems
3
MAT 112 Mathematics for Economics & Management I
3
ECO 313 Economic Development
3
One Economics elective
3
TOTAL
21
Economics minor for Commerce students
Credit Hours
ECO 309 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
ECO 310 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
ECO 311 Money & Banking
3
ECO316 Econometrics I
3
ECO 313 Economic Development
3
ECO 411 Public Finance
3
ECO 412 Economic Planning Techniques & Structural
Adjustment
3
TOTAL
21
ECO 211 Principles of Microeconomics
3 Credits
Introduction: Meaning, nature and scope of micro economics; Methodology;
Central economic problems; Basic economic concepts; Economic
systems; Types; Merits and demerits; Price theory; Theory of demand and
supply; Determinants; Demand and supply functions; market equilibrium;
Elasticity of demand and supply; Theory of consumer behaviour; Cardinal
and ordinal approaches; Income and substitution effects; Consumer and
producer surpluses; Theory of production; Demand and supply of factors of
production; Production function; Law of variable proportions; Combination of
factors of production. Theory of costs; short run and long run costs; profit
maximization. Theory of the firm and market structures: perfect competition,
imperfect competition – monopoly, Monopolistic competition, Oligopoly;
Price and output determination; profit maximization; Welfare economics and
microeconomic analysis: Free market; Government intervention and policy.
Prerequisite; MAT 112.
EC0 212 Principles of Macroeconomics
3 Credits
Definition and meaning of major terms; National incomes and national output;
Determination of employment theories; Inflation and unemployment; Money
and banking; The banking system; International trade and finance; Economic
problems of poverty; Markets for capital and natural resources; Integrated view
of monetary and fiscal policies; International economics; National debt; Donor
aid and economy. Pre-requisite: ECO 211.
ECO 308 International Economics
3 Credits
Introduction: Meaning and definition; Nature and scope; The classical theory
of comparative advantage, including Adam Smith, Ricardo; Application to
developing countries; Herbeler’s theory of opportunity cost. Terms of trade;
The modern theory of factor endowments i.e. Heckscher-Ohlin Theory (H.O.);
Its superiority over the classical theory; International trade and economic
growth; Terms of trade; Gains from trade; Commercial policy: free trade vs.
protection, tariffs, import quotas; Exchange control and custom union; Case
for integration in Africa; Balance of payments: meaning and components;
Balance of payment policy; Foreign exchange rate and policy; International
economic relations and organizations: i.e., foreign aid, multinationals and
economic development; International Monetary Fund (I.M.F.), The International
Bank for Reconstruction and Development (I.B.R.D.) and international liquidity;
World Trade Organization (W.T.O.). Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.
ECO 309 Intermediate Microeconomics
3 Credits
Consumer theory; Cardinal utility theory; Ordinal utility theory; Utility
maximization, a mathematical treatise; Derivation of consumers’ demand for
commodities; Income and substitution effects; Income and substitution effects:
a mathematical treatise; Consumer surplus; Application of ordinal utility
analysis; Theory of production; The firm profit-maximization assumption; The
law of diminishing marginal productivity; Returns to scale; Specific production
functions; Concepts for costs and revenue; Market structures; Definition of
a market; Perfect competition; Monopoly; Monopolistic competition and
oligopoly markets; Input/factor market structure; Price and employment of
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141
factors in competitive factor and product market; Price and employment of
factor inputs in competitive input markets and monopolistic product markets;
Bilateral monopoly. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.
ECO 310 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3 Credits
The analysis of the behaviour of economic aggregates; National accounting;
Consumption: Keynes and post-Keynesian theories of consumption (including
absolute, relative, permanent Income hypothesis, and life cycle hypothesis);
Investment: interest rates and acceleration principle. The production function
and the supply and demand for labour; Price levels and goods markets; Money
market; demand for and supply of money including major theories; General
macro-economic models: Classical model; Keynesian model including the
Multiplier IS-LM analysis; Inflation and trade cycles; Macro-economic policy.
Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.
ECO 311 Money and Banking
3 Credits
Definition of money, the nature of money and historical background of money;
The role of finance in the economy; Financial assets, securities, bonds, stocks;
The principal financial markets, capital markets, stock brokerage, relationship
of capital markets and economy; Concept of funds flow liquidity; Monetary
theory and policy, control of currency circulation, interest rates, re-valuation
and devaluation; Role of governments in the monetary and fiscal policy of
the nation; Regulatory control of banks and banking systems in Kenya, role
of the central bank, exchange control regulations, deposit protection fund;
Management of banks and financial institutions in liquidation; functions of
official receiver. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.
ECO 312 African Economic Problems
3 Credits
Meaning of economic growth and development. What is underdevelopment?
African development history. Problems and policies: Common characteristics of
African countries (poor countries), Poverty - meaning of poverty, vicious circles
of poverty, breaking out of vicious circles, unemployment issues in African
countries. Population and economic development: Population growth and
resource use in Africa, problems associated with high population growth rate,
the positive side of population growth, measures to control population growth,
Malthusian population theory: its relevance in Africa. Natural disasters,
management issues and democracy in relation to Africa’s development:
Famine, drought, floods, desertification and other natural disasters,
Governance, corruption and development, management issues - tribalism,
nepotism, clanism, racism, linguistic, racial, linguistic, religious problems and
differences, Civil wars, political disturbances and development. The West,
donor agencies and development in Africa: How is the west under developing
Africa? Donor agencies - role of World Bank, IMF and other International
donor agencies. Debt crisis and the new international economic order (NIEO);
Economic crisis in Africa; The nature and dimension of the third world debt
crisis - with special reference to Sub-Saharan Africa. Attempts at alleviation, The
new international economic order (NIEO), origins and the content of NIEO, the
future of Africa’s debt crisis. Future development in Africa: Regionalization and
trade arrangements viz: Preferential Trade Area (PTA), COMESA, East African
Economic Integration, ECOWAS, Strategic approach to development priorities
in Africa. Pre-requisites; ECO 211, ECO 212.
142
www.daystar.ac.ke
ECO 313 Economic Development
3 Credits
The meaning of development e.g. measuring development; Difference
between growth and development; The main characteristics of developing
countries; Dimensions of poverty; Concept of basic needs approach; Trade-off
between growth and distributions; Measuring poverty; Theories of economic
development: classical theories: Harrod-Domar, Solow-Swan, Rostow etc.
dependency and counter-revolution; Mobilization of domestic resources for
development; Savings; Cooperative; Micro-financing; Industrialization as a
development strategy; The role of agriculture in economic development; Human
resources in development; Population growth and development; Population
control, education and training; Health; Mobilization of foreign resources for
development: with particular emphasis on aid, foreign direct investment; Trade
and economic development; Regional economic cooperation; Development
planning: rationale for planning; Planning process and basic models: micro
and macro planning. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.
ECO 314 Economics of Population
3 Credits
Introduction: Meaning and nature of demography; Sources and users of
demographic data; History of population growth; Less developed versus
developed countries population growth; Population theories: Malthus and
non-Malthusian perspective; theory of optimum population; Theory of
demographic transition; Relative income theory; Population processes; Fertility;
Socio-economic effects of high/low fertility; Measurement: Policy measures;
Mortality; Determinants, measurement; Policy issues; Migration; Determinants;
Policy; Age and sex structures: Impacts of population processes; Population
and urbanization: demographic components; Impacts of population processes;
Labour supply; Population growth and economic growth and development;
Structural changes with economic development; Population and food supplies:
Population and capital formation: Population policies: Assessing the future;
Kenya’s population policy; Family planning programmes. Pre-requisites: ECO
211, ECO 212.
ECO 316 Econometrics I 3 Credits
Introduction: Definition of econometrics; Processes of econometric analysis;
Econometric models; Correlation; Regression; Two variable linear regression
models; Multivariable linear regression model; Evaluation of the statistical
reliability of the model; Non-linear relationships, estimates and regression
analysis of variance; Problems of econometrics; Regression of matrix algebra;
Simultaneous equation models. Students will be introduced to Econometric
tools of analysis such SPSS, STATA, Eviews. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO
212, STA 212, MAT 112 .
ECO 317 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS
3 Credits
Goal of an economic system; Growth, income distribution, employment,
efficiency, justice peace, freedom and community well-being; Capitalistic and
socialistic economies including the Marxian interpretation; Feminist model,
the green model, Soviet model, Chinese model, Mixed economies; Selective
aspects; Market socialist economies; Centrally planned economies; Other
topics include; Permanent employment systems in Japan, Industrial democracy
in Sweden, Indicative planning in France, Workers self-management in the
former Yugoslavia, Economic reforms in Hungary, Resource allocation in the
former Soviet Union; Centralization and decentralization of the economy;
Model for understanding transnational capitalism and new international order;
The permanent arms economy; The political economic question, ownership
of factors of production; Whether democracy promotes growth or vice versa;
African model, African Socialism, Planning in mixed economic systems, East
African recent reforms in political and economic spheres with special emphasis
on Kenya. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, ECO 309, ECO310, STAT
211 or Permission of Instructor.
ECO 318 Environmental & Resource Economics
3 Credits
Definition of major concepts relating to environment, population and pollution
abatement externalities and environment public choice; Emissions and pollution;
Methods of pollution concept of optimum pollution; Pollution control measures;
Social cost of pollution; Estimating the cost and benefits of pollution control;
Negative externalities, efficient pollution control; Pollution abatement policies;
Regulation, command and control, emission charges, pollution tax permits,
excise duty on manufacture of pollutants, tax rebates, recent EPA policies,
lobby groups; Coping with negative externalities; Wood stoves improvement,
appropriate technology on renewable resources, rehabilitation and recycling;
Political reality of environmental economics; Economics of exhaustible
resources; Markets for depletable natural resources; Renewable resources,
property rights and laws; Interest groups and economics of environment;
World environmentalism, the Green movements, public awareness, consumer
education and environmental matters mobilizing public awareness on economic
changes of pollution use of dangerous chemicals and application in Agriculture
and livestock. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, STA 211, MAT 112.
ECO 319 Economics of Industry 3 Credits
Introduction: Firms, objectives and industrial structure, conduct and performance
approach; Cost conditions and pricing behaviour; Game theory: players,
objectives, payoffs and strategies, normal form representation of a game,
N-player game theory, prisoner/s dilemma, Nash equilibrium, introduction
to simultaneous-move games, Market structure and concentration including
product differentiation, monopolies and barriers to entry; Role of advertising in
individual growth; Vertical integration and diversification; Invention, innovation
and diffusion; Industrial location; State or private control; De-industrialization;
Public policy and industrial structure in Kenya and the East African cooperation
region. Prerequisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.
methods of price stabilization; The farm firm; Profit vs. satisfaction;
Maximization principles of production; Resource-product relationship; Factors
of farm production and the determination of their efficiency and return; Risk
and uncertainty in agriculture; Agricultural development policy in Kenya:
characteristics of Kenya’s rural economy, obstacles to Kenya’s agricultural
development, structural, institutional and technological; Kenya’s agricultural
development policy and strategy pre and post 1963— problem of land size
e.g. land reforms, problems of labour and wages and working conditions,
price fluctuation and stabilization; Agricultural credit and finance; Adequacy
and need; Institutional structure of rural credit e.g. cooperatives and commercial
banks. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.
ECO 322 Economics of Labour 3 Credits
The theory of labour: labour market, labour productivity, human resource
management, labour as a factor of production; Equilibrium allocation of time
of work: marginal analysis, income and substitution effect of wage changes,
backward (kinked) labour supply curves; Market demand for supply of
labour: market supply of labour services, population effects on wages; Wage
differentials: reasons for wage differentials, compensating wage differential;
Motivating workers: human resource development, signing, screening and
recruitment of personnel, human resource development; The economics of
labour unions, organizational problems of labour unions, economic theories
of employment; efficiency wage, search and march, insider-outsider models,
labour unions in developed countries of Europe and America, labour unions
in less developed countries (LDCS), labour union movement in Kenya, labour
shop stewards and membership, labour union and productivity; Collective
bargaining and employment: impact of unions on wages; Monopoly of
labour marginal input cost for monopsony firms, monopsony power; Bilateral
monopoly: effects of labour unions on wages and employment in dealing with
monopsony; Conflict between labour unions and modern technology, place of
computers, robots, electronic impact, competition and future of labour unions.
Prerequisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.
ECO 320 Econometrics II
3 Credits
Matrix algebra: Solving linear simultaneous equations using matrix algebra;
Classical linear regression: Assumptions of the linear regression, the K-variable
model estimation (OLS); Hypothesis testing and dummy variables; Simultaneous
equation systems: instrumental variable estimation, indirect least squares
estimation, two-stage least squares estimation, identification problem; Time
series analysis: Characteristics of time series data, Stationary and non-stationary
series, Unit roots; Limited dependent variable models: Linear probability model;
Probit and logit models. Using econometrics software such as SPSS and STATA.
Pre-requisite: ECO 316.
ECO 411 Public Finance
3 Credits
Introduction: Meaning and scope of public finance; Functions of public finance;
Role of government; Public Choice Evaluating public policy; Theory of public
goods: Private versus public sector provisions; Characteristics of public goods;
Free rider problem; Efficiency output of public goods; Principles of taxation:
Characteristics of a good tax system; Theories of taxation; Patterns of taxation;
direct and indirect taxation; Taxable capacity and tax burden; Theory of tax
incidence; Taxation for development; Tax structure and development in LDCs;
Tax policy and international trade; Economic effects of income taxation; Public
expenditure systems and fiscal policy: Theories of expenditures; Composition
of Kenya’s public expenditures; Kenya’s fiscal policy and economic growth;
National budget: Importance and functions; Budget process in Kenya; Types
of budgets; Medium term expenditure framework; Balanced budgeting and
issues of public debt; Structure of national debt; burden of national debts; debt
management. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, MAT 112.
ECO 321 Economics of Agriculture
3 Credits
Production analysis: nature and scope of agriculture; Demand for agriculture;
Marketing farm products; Agricultural prices fluctuation, objectives and
ECO 412 Economics of Planning Techniques & 3 Credits
Structural Adjustment Introduction: Meaning and rationale for development planning in LDCs; The
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143
planning process and types of planning; Economic planning and relevance
to Kenya; Case Study – the current development plan; Project appraisal and
evaluation: Rationale for project planning; Project evaluation techniques;
Discounted and non-discounted case flow methods; Merits and demerits;
Transition from financial to socio-economic evaluation: Structural adjustment
programmes; Meaning and basis of SAPS and LDCs; Nature of adjustment;
Expenditure reducing versus expenditure switching policies; Impacts of SAPs
on development of LDCs; Role of IMF and World Bank; funding; Economic
role of developed countries; Monitoring the SAPs process. Pre-requisites: ECO
211, ECO 212.
ECO 413 Economics of Tourism 3 Credits
Tourism as an invisible industry; Introduction and the dynamics of the industry;
Tourism as a national asset and liability; Cost benefit analysis of the tourism
industry; National and international influences on tourism industry: political
influences; Revenue; Tariffs and taxes; The effects of macro-economics policies
on tourism; Effects of exchange rate on fluctuations; Supply and demand
economies with regard to tourism: tourism products, the pricing of tourism
products; Tourism investment: Financing tourism; Investment policies in the
tourism sector— Investment incentives; Kenya tourism strategy; Marketing;
The competitiveness of Kenya as a tourist destination in comparison with
other countries in the region; Role of multinational corporations in tourism.
Prerequisites: ECO 211 and ECO 212.
ECO 414 Economics of Poverty
3 Credits
& Income Distribution
Definition of poverty and economic inequality; Distribution curves, income
entitlement approach; Indicators of poverty, Lorenz Curve; Factors determining
distribution of income: human capital, vicious cycle of poverty, theories of
poverty, dynamics of input markets and income distribution; Technology and
productivity change; Personal distributions of income in developed countries
and developing countries including Kenya; The role of the government in
income distributions, taxation, development of social capital, health care,
social welfare (NSSF, Pensions, Provident Funds, old age & child welfare
programmes); Fighting poverty and human deprivation; The new economic
order; South/North divide. Poverty gap. Prerequisite: ECO 212.
ECO 415 Gender & Economic Development
3 Credits
Basic concepts of division of labour by gender, time allocation, gender
oppression and subjection; Basic models: feminist, technological and welfare
models; The new household economics: intra-household relationships,
cooperation and conflict; Feminization of poverty; Rights of women, property
ownership, and the girl child; Bridging the gender inequality gap, gender
policies, eradicating gender under-privileges; Role of United Nations bodies
in fostering gender sensitivity and equitable income distribution. Prerequisites:
ECO 211, ECO 212.
ECO 416 Research Methods in Economics
3 Cedits
Foundational issues; definition of research methods in scientific research
and exploration, kinds of research, criteria for research, goals of research,
application in economic exploration; Research planning and strategies; Ethical
144
www.daystar.ac.ke
issues in research study, problem identification and statements; Secondary
information hypothesis, research design, experimental versus non-experimental
methods; Sampling project proposed; Data collection, measurement, ranking
methods, field techniques; evaluation and interpretation, econometrics
computer software usage, ethnographic analysis, statistical analysis; Role of
statistics, data coding; Report writing and presentation. Pre-requisites: ECO
316, ECO 320.
ECO 417 Economics of Rural Development
3 Credits
The nature of rural development (definition of peasant societies); Measurement
and dynamics of rural poverty; Operational strategies for rural development;
Policies and programmes for rural development; Rural population and
rural poverty in developing countries, impact of Agricultural development;
Migration and its effects on rural development; Population, landlessness and
rural development; Nutrition levels in rural areas and effects in productivity;
Government and non-government intervention in rural development; Education
levels and rural development; Resource distribution acquired human capital,
breaking the vicious cycle of rural poverty; Informal sector development in rural
areas; The new home economics, farm size, and technical change; the green
movement of rural development. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.
ECO 418 Advanced Micro-Economics
3 Credits
Introduction: A brief overview of micro-economic analysis, basic concepts and
techniques of micro-economic theory; Partial equilibrium analysis of markets:
Marshallian supply-demand synthesis; Neoclassical theories of consumption
and production including uncertainty i.e. choice under uncertainty; Optimal
risk sharing and implicit contracts; Input/output and linear programming
analysis; Further treatment of perfect and imperfect competition: perfect
competition, monopolistic competition, monopoly, oligopoly, duopoly; General
equilibrium and welfare theory: general equilibrium and macro-economic
equilibrium, equilibrium in exchange and production, criteria of social welfare,
maximization of social welfare; Game theory: players, objectives, payoffs
and strategies, normal form representation of a game, N-player game theory,
prisoner/s dilemma, Nash equilibrium, introduction to simultaneous-move
games. Prerequisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, ECO 309, MAT 112.
ECO 419 Advanced Macro-Economics 3 Credits
Introduction: basic concepts of macro-economic theory, varieties of macroeconomic theory; Keynesian model of Income determination in a closed
economy: Keynes vs. classical economists; Extension of the Keynesian model
of income determination in an open economy: the foreign trade multiplier and
changes in the level of income; Critique and relevance of Keynesian system;
Supply-side macro-economics: the aggregate supply function: Keynesian
and classical; Rational expectations; Trade (real business) cycles: phases of
a trade cycle; Theories of trade cycle; Theories of growth: Harold’s growth
model, Domar’s growth model, the link between Harrod’s and Domar’s models
(Harrod-Domar model), Neoclassical growth theories. Prerequisites: ECO 211,
ECO 212, ECO 310, MAT 112.
ECO 520 Economics Practicum
4 Credits
The student will be placed with any agency (Governmental or non-governmental),
involved in business developmental work. The student will be expected to
examine and report on the relative effectiveness of the organization, functions
to which he/she is assigned, performance of the duties assigned to him/her,
report on strengths, weakness, and opportunities of the organization and make
any recommendation. Prerequisite: To be done in the final semester.
ECO 598 Senior Project
4 Credits
The student will choose a research topic of his/her choice and be supervised
by a lecturer specialized in that area. At the end of the study, the student will
compile the findings and present the written report for grading. Prerequisite: To
be done in the final semester.
MAT 111 Mathematics for Economics 3 Credits
& Management I
Nature of management mathematics, role of mathematics in economics
analysis, applications of mathematics in business management, strengths
and limitations of mathematics in management. Set theory: Definitions and
concepts in set theory, set operations and laws, Venn diagrams. The real
number system; Types of numbers, Rules of algebraic operations, Permutations
and combinations binomial expansion. Equations and inequations: Equations,
definition and types of equations, linear and non-linear equations, single
and simultaneous equations, solutions to equations (linear and non-linear),
applications; inequations - definition and types of inequations, Solutions to
inequations. Differential calculus: Rate of change, concepts of limits and
continuity, derivative and differentiation, partial differentiation, applications.
Integral calculus: Rules of integration, applications. Matrix algebra: Definitions
and basic concepts, properties of matrices, determinant of a matrix, matrix
operations, matrix inverse, solution to linear simultaneous equations: matrix
approach.
MAT 112 Mathematics for Economics
3 Credits
& Management I
Functional and graphical representations: Functions and graphs, linear
functions and their applications, non-linear functions and functions with more
than one independent variables and their applications. Matrices: Matrix
operations, determinant of a matrix, inverse of a matrix. Matrix applications
to business problems: Solution of simultaneous equations, input-output analysis,
Markov analysis. Calculus: Concepts of limits, differentiation, Integration,
maximum and minimum points, Lagrange multipliers and applications. Game
theory: players, objectives, payoffs and strategies, normal form representation
of a game, N-player game theory, prisoner/s dilemma, Nash equilibrium,
introduction to
Simultaneous-move games; Mathematics of finance: Simple and compound
interest, Present and future values, ordinary annuities, capital investment
appraisal methods. Linear programming model: formation, graphical method
of solution, simplex method of solution, duality theory. Sensitivity analysis.
Prerequisites: MAT 111.
MAT 211 Operations Research
3 Credits
Meaning and scope, Linear programming models: simplex method, duality
theory, sensitivity analysis. Network analysis (CPM/CPA and PERT): construction
of network determination of critical path(s), time and resource analysis.
Transportation models: Formulation, solution, search methods. Assignment
models: Formulation, solution, search methods. Inventory models: Optimal
levels of inventory, deterministic and stochastic methods, materials requirement
planning, limitations of EOQ. Queuing models: Queues and queuing systems,
evaluating queuing systems, solution methods, nature of single channels
and multiple channels queues, economic implication of queues, limitations.
Integer and non-linear programming. Dynamic programming models, goal
programming models, integer programming and heuristic programming.
Simulation models: simulation process, stochastic simulation, the Monte Carlo
simulation techniques, simulation languages. Prerequisites: MAT 112.
STA 211 Business Statistics I
3 Credits
Introduction: Meaning of statistics, role of statistics in decision making process;
Sampling: statistical inquiry, samples and proportion, reasons for sampling,
sampling methods; Data collection: sources of business data, methods of
collecting data, design of questionnaire; Organizing and summarizing data;
Tabular and graphical representation, frequency, distribution and its measures
of location, charts and diagram; Measures of central tendency; Measures
of variation or dispersion: range, average, deviation, variance, standard
deviation, relative measures, coefficient of variation, Lorenz curves and their
significance; Linear regression and correlation; Index numbers; Introduction to
probability. Pre-requisite: MAT 111.
STA 212 Business Statistics II
3 Credits
Probability and sampling distribution: theory of probability, binomial,
normal distribution; Sampling distribution; Mean and proportions; Statistical
inference; Estimation and hypothesis testing; Chi-square distribution; Test for
independence; Goodness of fit test; Analysis of variance; Non-parametric
tests; Mann-Whitney U rank test, Kruskal -Wallis rank test; Time series analysis,
forecasting. Prerequisite: STA 211.
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145
Suggested 4-Year Study Programme Bachelor of Science in Economics
1st Year
Semester I
3rd Year
Semester II
Course
Credit hours
Course
Credit hours
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
ACS 101
2
A R T / L I T /
MUS111
2
0/3
INS 112
3
INS 111
3
ACC 112
3
ACC 111
3
MAT 112
3
MAT 111
3
BUS 113
3
HPE 113
1
Total
18
Total
17
ENG 111/098
Course
146
Course
Credit hours
MIS 211
3
ECO 212
3
POL 111
1
STA 212
2
ECO 211
3
ENV 112
2
STA 211
3
BIO 111
3
BUS 313
3
ECO 312
3
ENG 112
3
Total
16
Total
13
www.daystar.ac.ke
Course
Credit hours
ECO 308
3
RET 320
3
BUS 309
3
BUS 323
3
ECO 310
3
ECO 316
3
ECO 309
3
ECO 313
3
BUS 321
3
ECO 314
3
3
ECO 311
BUS 213
18
Total
3
18
Total
4th Year
Course
Semester II
Credit hours
Semester II
Credit hours
Semester I
2nd Year
Semester I
Semester I
Course
Semester II
Credit hours
Course
Credit hours
ECO 320
3
ECO 411
3
ECO 318
3
ECO 412
3
BUS 414
3
ECO 419
3
BUS 415
3
ECO electives
6
ECO 418
3
Total
15
Total
15
SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION,
LANGUAGES & PERFORMING ARTS
Introduction
The School houses the Departments of Language and Performing
Arts and the Department of Communication. We take pride in
preparing students for leadership careers in Communications,
Media, and in Teaching and the Performing arts. This preparation
is grounded in solid scholarship and an all rounded approach to
education anchored in our philosophy derived from our Christian
orientation and biblical teachings.
Diploma Programme
Postgraduate Programme
• Communication
• Christian Music Communication
• Master of Arts in Communication – Media Studies
– Corporate Communication
– Development Communication
Undergraduate Programme
• Bachelor of Arts in Communication
– Public Relations,
– Electronic Media
– Print Media
– Advertising
– Technical and Professional Communication
– French
– English
– Kiswahili
– Literature
– Music
• PhD in Communication
www.daystar.ac.ke
147
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION
DIPLOMA PROGRAMME
DIPLOMA IN COMMUNICATION
Rationale
The Diploma in Communication Arts offers specialized training in print and
electronic media and provides a broad understanding of the principles
and concepts of effective communication. The programme is designed for
aspiring media and communication professionals. In addition to the general
communication courses, the learner may specialize in either print or electronic
media and will be trained to apply these skills to improve his or her service to
the Church and community.
The department prepares students to assess communication needs, develop
strategies to achieve communication goals, prepare audience-centered
communication programmes and products, and work with others to create
understanding among various publics.
Credit Hours
Common Core Courses
15
Required Courses in Communication
44
Concentration: Print or Electronic Media
TOTAL
General Courses
6
65
Credit Hours
ICC 012 Communication & Culture I
3
ICC 013 Communication & Culture II
3
ICC 014 Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
ICC 015 New Testamnet Introduction & Survey
3
Admission Requirements
ICC 016 Introduction to Bible Doctrines
2
Applicants must meet the general admission requirements for the Diploma
programme of Daystar University.
ICC 092 Communucation Skilss
1
TOTAL
In addition, applicants for a Diploma in Communication must possess a
minimum of grade B- (minus) in English in KCSE, or 500 marks on TOEFL
done not more than five years previously, or at least Credit 6 under the old
�O’ Level system, 60% with systems that use percentages, or Principle Pass at
�A’ Level in English. Those who do not meet these requirements must take an
English pre-test administered by the Department of Humanities. Those who do
not pass the test will be required to take an English course for no credit until
they have reached a level where they are able to pass the English pre-test.
Applicants with no proficiency in typing will be required to take a typing
course for which no academic credit will be given.
Student Assessment
The Diploma in Communication programme places emphasis on the
development and improvement of communication skills. Letter grades are
given for each course on the basis of continuous assessment and the final
examination.
In addition, each student will be required to complete a Communication field
study.
Requirements for Graduation
To graduate with a Diploma in Communication, a student must meet the
following criteria of course requirements and credit hour combinations:
148
Course
Required Courses in Communication
Credit Hours
ICS 010 Introduction to Computers
2
ICO 016 Introduction to Mass Communication
3
ICO 018 Interpersonal & Group Communication
3
ICO 022 Introduction to Communication Ethics, Law and
Human Rights
3
ICO 026 Introduction to Public Relations and Fundraising
3
ICO 031 Writing and Editing skills
3
ICO 032 Introduction to Graphic Design and Desktop
Publishing
3
ICO 033 Introduction to Media Management
2
ICO 034 Writing & Reporting for Print Media
3
ICO 036 Introduction to Communication Research Methods
1
ICO 049 Introduction to Photography and Photojournalism
3
ICO 056 Communication by Radio
3
ICO 065 Script writing for Electronic Media
3
ICO 066 Introduction to Video Production
3
ICO 094 Keyboarding
ICO 099 Communication Field study
TOTAL
www.daystar.ac.ke
15
0(3)
6
44
Electives (Take any 6 hrs from the concentration)
Credit Hours
Print Media
ICO 013 Special Topics in Communication
3
ICO 035 Writing for Children
3
ICO 041 Book Publishing
3
ICO 047 Magazine Editing and Production
3
Electronic Media
ICO 013 Special Topics in Communication
3
ICO 050 Visual Communication (Electronic and Print)
3
ICO 067 Script Writing for Electronic Media II
3
ICO 068 Video Production and Editing II
3
Course Descriptions
ICO 013 Special Topics in Communication
3 Credits
(Print or Electronic)
Students may, with relevant approval and availability of faculty, study specific
areas of communication and media which are not in the regular diploma
curriculum. The content will vary with specific course offerings. Topics may
include news reporting and writing; fiction writing; broadcast drama; newsletter
production;communication research and design, among others.
ICO 016 Introduction to Mass Communication
3 Credits
The course aims at introducing students to the structures and functions of the
communication media: creation, distribution, and exhibition of mass media
content; and legal and ethical considerations. It includes all forms of mass
communication e.g., newspapers, magazines, radio, television, book
publishing, public relations, advertising, and new media. It will discuss
the strengths and weaknesses of each medium, as well as media career
opportunities.
ICO 018 Interpersonal & Group Communication
3 Credits
The course explores self as communicator, attraction, friendships, self disclosure,
competence, trust, power and signification; it also examines organizational
systems, group types, structure, group thought, group decision making, roles,
leadership, action and conflict resolution.
ICO 022 Communication Ethics, 3 Credits
Law & Human Rights
This course provides an introduction to the ethical questions involved in
interpersonal, public and mediated communication to enable the student to
internalize a Christian ethic of communication. Topics include: definition of
ethics, ethical bases, and Christian communication ethics. It explores laws
related to journalism and communication such as copyright laws, sedition and
defamation. It further exposes students to the relationship between human rights
and communication and the role played by media in protecting human rights.
Winning the CNN award was
definitely a highlight in my career.
People may think this was a lone
effort, but it was actually a joint effort
between my workmates, my lecturers
& classmates at Daystar.
Waihiga Mwaura
www.daystar.ac.ke
149
ICO 026 Public Relations & Fundraising 3 Credits
This course introduces students to the principles and practice of public relations
and fundraising. Topics will include public relations theory and practice, the
public relations environment, internal and external publics and communication
strategies, producing Public Realations materials, fundraising skills and donor
relations.
ICO 031 Writing & Editing Skills
3 Credits
This course exposes the student to the use of words i.e. nouns, adjectives
etc; sentence construction, punctuation, conventions, paragraphs, transitions;
writing a narrative, descriptive, personal experience, interviews and personal
profile; how-to-do-it and devotional articles; the editing process and symbols.
ICO 032 Introduction to Graphic Design & 3 Credits
Desktop Publishing
This is an introduction to the principles of graphic design with emphasis on
magazine page layout and practices in desktop publishing. Topics include:
principles of design and layout, typography, layout techniques, using
photographs and illustrations, use of colors, magazine design and introductory
skills, using a desktop publishing
computer package. Pre-requisite: ICS 010.
ICO 033 Introduction to Media Management 2 Credits
The course explores basic management principles and their application to
the media. It discusses different management theories and how they affect
a worker’s morals and production. Case studies will be introduced to help
students deal with ethical work dilemmas. It will also discuss history, theory
and practice of management, media ownership patterns, characteristics of
organizations, newsroom organizations, leadership styles in media, staff
management, budgeting, management of finances, advertising and distribution.
Pre-requisite: ICO 016.
ICO 034 Writing and Reporting for the Print Media 3 Credits
The course is designed to teach students the principles of reporting and writing
for newspapers and magazines. Students will also learn how to write and
prepare publishable copy on deadline. The course will examine definitions of
news and various structures of new stories and other journalistic forms.
150
ICO O41 Book Publishing 3 Credits
An introduction to the editorial, management and commercial aspects of
book publishing. Topics will include major categories of publishing: structure
and functions of the book trade, editorial department and roles of the book
editor, acquisition and processing of manuscripts, editing process, elements
of book design, book production, book costing, marketing and distribution.
Pre-requisite: ICO 031.
ICO 047 Magazine Editing & Production 3 Credits
An introduction to the principles and procedures of magazine publishing.
Topics will include: the print media industry, magazine publishing, types
of magazines, editorial concepts, editorial formula, production planning,
financing the magazine, magazine editing skills, costing and magazine
production process. Pre-requisite: ICO 034.
ICO 049 Photography & Photojournalism 3 Credits
An introduction to the basic knowledge and skills necessary to produce
photographs and photojournalistic work. Topics include operational functions
of a 35mm SLR camera, communication properties of light, types of film, types
and functions of lenses and filters, composition and special effects, basic
dark-room procedures for black & white film and print processing, ethics and
etiquette in photography, photojournalism. The course will also cover digital
photography and computer-assited image processing as well as the use of
photographs to write a story. NB: Students will provide their own cameras.
ICO 050 Visual Communication 3 Credits
An introduction to the selection, production and use of appropriate visual aids.
Topics will include: definition of terms, role of visual aids in communication,
drawing materials and basic skills, types of visual aids, effective use and
production of paper pictures, sequence pictures, chalkboard, posters and
charts, display boards, adhesive aids, demonstrations, tours and visits, exhibits,
models, drama, slides, overhead projectors, use of multimedia and evaluation
of visual aids.
ICO 035 Writing for Children 3 Credits
This course introduces students to the specialized nature of writing for young
audiences. It involves the study of: child development, child and society
in Africa, the child as a special audience, process of writing for children,
choosing themes, plot development, characterization, dialogue and conflict,
principles of writing, words and tools, proper use of language, emotion in the
story, publishing children’s stories. Pre-requisite: ICO 031.
ICO 056 Communication by Radio 3 Credits
This course introduces students to the basic principles, approaches and practical
skills necessary for planning, producing and evaluating programmes for radio
broadcast. Topics will include: cross-cultural and aural-oral communication
theory; understanding the role and function of a producer; the audience;
alternative programme formats: devotional, documentaries, news, interviews,
features, magazine, music; planning for production research; preparing an
outline; specifying objectives and target audience; basic script writing and
layout; interviewing; music and radio; exposure to basic studio equipment and
production techniques; evaluation of programmes and follow-up techniques.
Pre-requisite: ICO 016.
ICO 036 Introduction to Communication
1 Credits
Research Methods
The course is aimed at introducing students to basic concepts and process of
communication. It will expose students to the techniques of using interviews,
content analysis, questionnaires, and panel discussions (focus groups) to collect
data, how to analyze data and prepare research report.
ICO 065 Scripting for Video Production I 3 Credits
This course trains students in writing effective video scripts for various programme
formats and audiences. It provides an overview of communication principles
and basic technology underlying the production of an audio and video signal,
challenges in writing, mechanics and language of script writing, writing nondramatic material including commercials, public service announcements,
www.daystar.ac.ke
interviews, talks, documentaries, magazines, educational materials, news,
music and special events, writing dramatic material including drama, plot,
characterization and comedy, ethics and evaluation of scripts. Prerequisite:
ICO 016.
ICO 066 Introduction to Video Production
3 Credits
An introduction to the principles and skills of video production. The course
provides exposure to basic video equipment and production techniques. Topics
include: overview of video as a medium of Christian communication, video
camera, basic camera, shots and frames, pictorial composition, use of lights,
pre-production planning: audience issues, goals; scheduling; writing a treatment
and scene script; logging; production; crew functions; location scouting and
post production (audio, editing); legal issues; evaluation. Prerequisites:
ICO 016, ICO 065.
ICO 067 Scripting for Electronic Media II 3 Credits
The course is designed to help the student acquire advanced skills in scripting
for the dramatic formats. Emphasis is on the story, story treatment, synopsis,
plot, characterisation and internal logic in story development, scripting feature
film script, serials and series comedy. Prerequisite. ICO 066.
ICO 068 Video Production and Editing II 3 Credits
This is an advanced course in video production designed to refine the practical
skills acquired by the student in ICO 065. It focuses on the aesthetic aspects of
video production in regards to the feature film and similar genres. The course
focuses on preproduction, production, and post production processes, and
seeks to develop group dynamics of the production team. Special emphasis is
laid on producing, directing camera, lighting, sound management and editing.
Pre-requisite: ICO 065, ICO 066
ICO 094 Keyboarding 0(3) Credits
An introduction to keyboarding, the course enables students to master basic
care and maintenance of the computer and standard keyboard touch typing.
Students become familiar with setting and layout of various documents as well
as word processing tools.
ICO 099 Communication Field Study
6 Credits
This practicum enables the student to apply the knowledge and skills acquired
in the classroom to a practical communication ministry situation that is related
to the concentration taken. Content will be based on assigned tasks related to
course work as proposed and agreed upon by the student, the faculty and,
where applicable, the employer. A minimum of eight weeks (320 clock hours)
or a communication project or research project and an accompanying paper
of at least 30 pages typed in double spacing will be required. Students should
do their Project /Practicum during the last semester of study as stipulated by
the study programme. Pre-requisite: Complete 56 credits and GPA of at least
2.00 be maintained.
SUGGESTED TWO YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME
1 ST YEAR
Semester I
2ND YEAR
Semester II
Semester I
Semester II
ICC 012
3
ICC 013
3
ICO 032
3
ICC 014
3
ICC 015
3
ICO 049
3
ICC 092
1
ICO 034
3
ICO 066
3
ICC 016
2
ICO 031
3
Electives for Print
ICS 010
2
ICO 056
3
ICO 016
3
ICO 065
3
or Electronic
Media
ICO 018
3
ICO 094
Total
Total
6
6
15
6
(Also take ICO 018 if did not do first semester)
0 (3)
17
ICO 099
18
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151
DIPLOMA IN CHRISTIAN MUSIC COMMUNICATION
Music is a key form of communication which can profitably be used to
promote Christian faith and conduct. On the other hand, traditionally, music
is studied in terms of its aesthetic and artistic forms, not from the perspective
of its being a vehicle of communication. There is, therefore, the need for
specialized training in the areas of musical skills as applied to a broadened
understanding of Christian communication for ministry. Thus, the diploma in
Christian Music Communication focuses on equipping Christian workers for
evangelism, spiritual formation and worship- church ministry that is relevant to
the needs of contemporary Africa.
Admission Requirements
In addition to the general requirements for admission to Daystar University
and the Institute of Christian Ministries and Training, the applicant for the
diploma in Christian Music Communication must demonstrate a high aptitude
for applied music by enrolling in and passing the Christian Music Ministry
certificate course with a minimum of grade ofB- (Minus), This pre-requisite
course is offered only in July before the semester begins in August.
Student Assessment
The diploma in Christian Music Communication is based on the development
and improvement of practical musical skills. Thus, a letter grade will be given
for each course on the basis of continuous assessment and a final exam
grade. The continuous assessment will constitute 70% of the total mark given
whereas the final examination will constitute 30% of the total mark.
The field project will be graded differently with 20% of the marks being
assigned to periodical reporting and 80% to project evaluation.
Common core courses
ICC 012 Communication & Culture
3
ICC 013 Communication & Culture II
3
ICC 014 Old testament Introduction & Survey
3
ICC 015 New testament Introduction & Survey
3
ICC 016 Introduction to Bible Doctrine
2
ICC 092 Communication Skills
1
TOTAL
15
Required Courses
Credit Hours
Core courses
15
Required courses
30
Concentration
Field Project
152
24
6
Electives
12
Total
57
www.daystar.ac.ke
Credit Hours
IMU 011 Christian Communication Through Music
3
IMU 021 Basic Music Theory I
3
IMU 022 Basic Music Theory II
3
IMU 023 Composing Songs for the Church
3
IMU 031 Foundations in African Church Music
3
IMU 041 Choral Conducting & Choir Ministries
3
IMU 051 Basic Instrumental Skills I
3
IMU 061 Leading Worship
3
IMU 099 Field Project in Christian Music
Communication
6
TOTAL
30
Elective Courses (for 4 courses)
Requirements for graduation
Credit Hours
Credit Hours
IMU 031 African Songs & Drama in the Church
3
IMU 052 Basic Instrumental Skills II
3
IMU 062 Music & the Media
3
IMU 071 Teaching Music
3
IMU 076 Music Cassette Production & Distribution
3
IMU 091 Special Topics in Christian Music
Communication
3
Courses taken in other departments may also count as electives.
Course Descriptions
IMU 011 Communication Through Music 3 Credits
Course introduction; What is music; The roles and functions of music in
culture; the role, use and function of music in biblical cultures; Communication
principles applied to music; Using the twelve signal systems as a guide
to developing effective worship services and communication events;
Ethnomusicology: definitions, directions, and problems as they relate to the
Christian communicator; The study of song texts in shaping a people’s working
theology and maturity in the Christian faith; Issues in organology; Basic analysis
of varying musical systems; History of the misuse in world missions; Case
studies of culturally appropriate music employed in Christian ministry; Strategies:
urban, town, and rural settings. Pre-requisite: None.
IMU 021 Basic Music Theory I
3 Credits
Feeling for the main pulse; Performing various rhythm patterns; Singing various
intervals; Dictation of intervals, rhythm patterns, and melodies; Singing the
pentatonic and major scales; Sightsinging from staff and tonic sol-fa notations;
Knowledge and use of Kodaly’s sol-fa hand signs; Understanding the grand
staff, note names, ledger lines, note and rest values, accidentals, key and time
signatures; Major scales in all keys; Intervals up to one octave; Primary triads
with inversions; Analysis of simple four-part harmony in major keys using Roman
numerals or popular chord symbols. Pre-requisite: Christian Music Ministry or
by Entrance Exam.
IMU 022 Basic Music Theory II 3 Credits
Sightsinging in four-parts from hyrnnbooks; Sightsinging in minor keys;
Identification and singing of intervals up to one octave; Identification by ear
of the natural, harmonic and melodic scales; Identifying and notating modern
Western rhythms based on African roots- rock, pop, rhythm and blues, jazz
and country rhythms; Collecting, identifying, and notating rhythms found in
East Africa; Composing 4-bar rhythms, 8-bar melodies, and setting words
to rhythms; Minor and chromatic scales; Introduction to compound intervals;
Irregular time signatures and beat divisions; Sol- fa rhythm and notation
for four-part harmony; Voices in score; Harmonic analysis; Introduction to
cadences and voice leading; How to harmonize a melody; Common chord
progressions; Basic principles in choral arranging in Western and Eastern
styles. Pre-requisite: IMU 021.
IMU 023 Composing Songs 3 Credits
Writing appropriate song texts; Identifying needed song texts; The relationship of
language to melody and rhythm; Four-part harmonic patterns; Identification and
analysis of various melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic structures for composition;
Composing in various song forms--choruses, hymns, choral works, varying
call-and-response forms, and African-based songs; Building songs on spoken
words; Composing with instrumental resources; Working with traditional and/
or naturally gifted musicians. Pre-requisite: IMU 021.
IMU 031 Foundations in African Church Music 3 Credits
A panorama of African Music; Roles and functions of music in African societies;
Sources and origins of African music; Musicians; Introduction to organology;
Instrument construction and playing techniques; Issues in performance
ensembles; Vocal music and their forms; Songtexts and W orldview; Dance
and dance drama; Musical acculturation; Music of urban centers and village
settings; Historical factors for African music in the church; Determining culturally
appropriate music for the church; Issues in musical contextualization; Strategies
for using African music in the church for worship, evangelism and discipleship.
Pre-requisite: None.
IMU 032 African Songs and Drama 3 Credits
Creating and composing African-style Christian songs; Writing in African
story telling style with accompanying songs; Developing and using drama in
worship services and evangelism; Creating and producing Christian dance
drama; Introducing African songs into the church; Developing composers
for Christian Music Communication; Planning special occasion services (e.g
Easter and Christmas); New ways of using oral art forms in Christian ministries.
Prerequisite: None.
IMU 041 Choral Conducting and Choir Ministries 3 Credits
Maintaining meter, rhythm and tempo; Controlling dynamics; English
singing diction; Choral voice training; Phrasing and melody singing; Choral
intonation; Historic style and performance practice; Planning and conducting
the rehearsal; Conducting motions and techniques; Choir competitions;
Composing and performing African choral works; techniques for arranging
choral music; spiritual development in a church choir; The role of the choir in
worship services; Guidelines for organizing a choir. Pre-requisite: IMU 021.
IMU 051 Basic Instrumental Skills I 3 Credits
Introduction to maintaining instruments; Introduction to the guitar; Playing
techniques for the guitar; Three basic chord progressions; Three basic strumming
and picking styles for guitar; The role of the guitar in ministry; Worship and
evangelism; Introduction to the keyboard; Keyboard playing techniques; Three
basic chord progressions; Working with set rhythms and instrumental sounds;
The role of the keyboard in ministry, worship and evangelism. Pre-requisite:
None.
IMU 052 Basic Instrumental Skills II 3 Credits
The content will vary depending on the instrument chosen and the student’s
previous study of the instrument. Students will train to perform from staff notation
as well as to play “by ear” (using aural skills with no notation to read). Good
techniques, musicianship, musical expression, musical interpretation and
development of a repertoire will be the main focus. Pre-requisite: IMU 051.
IMU 061 Leading Worship 3 Credits
Definition of worship; Biblical patterns of worship; Music in worship; Liturgical,
Baptist and Pentecostal worship in Africa; Patterns for personal worship; Biblical
teaching on corporate worship; Congregational worship; Team leadership in
worship; Practical guide to leading worship. Pre-requisite: None.
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153
IMU 062 Music and the Media 3 Credits
Small and big media; Mini communication and music; Employing music in
mass communication products; Music and drama; The song in storytelling;
Music cassette ministries; Music on radio; Primary and secondary music for
television, video, and film; Developing dance drama; Using traditional folk
media forms; Using foreign music: integrating folk media with extending media;
Communication principles for selecting music for any medium; Composing
music for various media. Pre-requisite: None.
IMU 091 Special Topics in Christian 3 Credits
Music Communication
Students may, with relevant approval and availability of faculty, study specific
areas of Christian music communication which are not in the regular diploma
curriculum. The content will vary with specific course offerings. Topics may
include the Study and performance of African instruments; Ethnomusicology;
and Contemporary African church music, among others. Pre-requisite:
Departmental Approval.
IMU 065 Music Cassette Production and Distribution 3 Credits
The cassette at work; The mobility of music cassettes; Research and strategies
for Christian music cassettes; Organizing a cassette project; The distribution
system; Knowing your audience’s musical tastes; Selecting musical styles; Music
cassettes for Christians; Music cassettes for non-Christians; Music cassettes for
oral communication; Programming music cassettes for evangelism; Production
facilities; Purchasing equipment; Management in Christian music cassette
ministry. Pre-requisite: None.
IMU 099 Field Project in Christian 6 Credits
Music Communication
Assigned tasks related to the course work done as agreed upon by the student,
the assigned faculty, and where applicable, the employer. A minimum of 10
weeks (400 clock hours) or a music product and an accompanying paper of
at least 10 pages.
IMU 071 Teaching Music 3 Credits
Principles for managing the learning environment; Writing schemes of work;
Writing records of work; Writing lesson plans; Defining goals and objectives;
Organizing the music classroom; Concept development through a series of
lessons; Teaching vocal production; Teaching a song at age levels; Teaching
song composition; Utilizing beginning instruments for musical performance
development; Training in listening skills; Principles for developing reading staff
notation and sightsinging abilities; Using visual aids; Historical overview of
music education methods appropriate for the African context; The Kodaly and
Orff methods of music education; Creating a musical resource and materials
collection. Pre-requisite: IMU 021.
SUGGESTED TWO YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME
2nd YEAR
1st YEAR
SEMESTER I
154
SEMESTER I
SEMESTER II
SEMESTER II
ICC 012
3
ICC 014
3
ICC 016
2
ELECTIVE
3
ICC 013
3
ICC 015
3
ICC 092
1
ELECTIVE
3
IMU 021
3
IMU 022
3
IMU 031
3
ELECTIVE
3
IMU 051
3
IMU 052
3
IMU 041
3
ELECTIVE
3
IMU 011
3
IMU 065
3
IMU 061
3
TOTAL
15
15
IMU 023
3
TOTAL
15
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12
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
COMMUNICATION MAJOR
Rationale
The Communication major curriculum is designed to equip students with
foundational knowledge of concepts and practice of communication to
enable graduates of the programme to effectively serve society in a variety of
roles.
The curriculum emphasizes, without limitation, communication through the
mass media as well as interpersonal and group communication. Students are
presented with a menu of courses which could lead to careers in electronic
media (radio, television, film, etc.), or print media (newspapers, magazines,
book publishing) or advertising or public relations. Specifically, the goals of
the Communication major are to:
1.
give students a foundational and biblically-derived understanding of
theory and practice in communication study at interpersonal, group,
intercultural and mass communication levels;
2.
provide students with a menu of courses which leads to a guided focus
and in-depth study of at least one area of communication;
3.
prepare students to apply communication principles and skills in church,
business, government and social settings;
4.
prepare students to assist others in various church and community
settings to recognize and apply the principles and concepts of effective
communication to address specific problems be they individual,
communal, institutional or organizational; and
5.
prepare students for further study in communication.
Admission Requirements
Applicants for a major in Communication must have a pass in Mathematics
and a minimum grade of B (plain) in English in KCSE or its equivalent.
Applicants with a B- in English will be admitted on condition that they take
a remedial course, ENG 214. Applicants with no proficiency in typing
will be required to take a course in keyboarding, COM 099, for which no
academic credit will be given.
Exemption from COM 099 can be given to students who produce a
certificate in keyboarding from a reputable examining body and have
attained a speed of at least 25 wpm.
If you are looking for a University
that is not boring, where your talent
will be nurtured, alongside your
academics, Daystar is the place to
be. Daystar gave me the chance to
be part of the 2011 - USA Afrizo
singing team tour
Ruth Matete
www.daystar.ac.ke
155
Students Assessment
Concentration Courses in Communication
Grades for courses offered by the department are computed as follows with
minor variations, depending on the type of course:
1. Grades for courses that are concerned only with skill development (like
COM 099) depend entirely on the final examination.
2. Grades for courses that involve both conceptual understanding
and acquisition of skills are generally computed at 70% from final
examination and 30% from continuous assessment.
3. Grades for Independent Study and Senior Projects are computed at
90% from the final paper and 10% from continuous assessment.
4. Grades for Field Study, are derived from 60% field report and 40% from
field evaluation.
Each student will choose, based on his or her instructor’s advice, a narrowed
area of Communication in which to concentrate additional studies. These
areas are Print Media, Electronic Media, Advertising and Public Relations.
Credit Hours
COM 247 News Writing & Reporting
3
COM 344 Photography
3
COM 349 Feature & Magazine Writing
3
COM 430 Business & Economic Journalism
3
COM 436 Editorial & Opinion Writing
3
Requirements for Graduation
COM 445 Editing Skills
3
To graduate with a major in Communication, a student must meet the
following criteria of course requirements and credit hour combination from
various disciplines:
COM 459 Electronic Publishing & Design
3
COM 474 Media Management
3
Credit Hours
General Education
Communication Courses
Required Courses in Communication
Concentration Courses
Choose One Course from the Following:
COM 408 T Reporting Transitional Justice
3
51
COM 408 C Issues Reporting
3
61
COM 408 D Publishing
3
COM 408 E Photojournalism
3
34
27
Minor/Electives
TOTAL
Required Courses
COM 099 Keyboarding
17-22
129-134
Credit Hours
0 (3)
Electronic Media Required Courses
Credit Hours
COM 263 Broadcast Writing
3
COM 264 Broadcast Techniques
3
COM 361 Audio Production
3
COM 364 Writing for the Screen
3
COM 223 Public Speaking
3
COM 466 Video Production
3
COM 226 Interpersonal & Small Group Communication
3
COM 467 Broadcast Journalism
3
COM 231 Introduction to Mass Media
3
COM 474 Media Management
3
COM 243 Writing for Business
3
COM 468 Broadcast Presentation
3
COM 302 Communication Statistics
3
OR
COM 321 Communication Research & Design
3
COM 323 Communication Systems in Africa
3
COM 469 Broadcast Programming, Promotion &
Strategy
COM 419 Communication Ethics & Law
3
Choose One Course from the Following:
COM 421 Strategies of Communication
3
COM 365 Broadcast Drama
3
COM 422 Media and Christianity
3
COM 408 Advanced Audio Production
3
COM 497 Senior Project OR
4
COM 408 F Introduction to TV Production & Directing
3
COM 499 Communication Field Study
4
COM 468 Broadcast Presentation
3
COM 469 Broadcast Programming Promotion &
Stratrgy
3
TOTAL
156
Print Media Required Coureses
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34
3
Public Relations Required Courses
Credit Hours
Students wishing to minor in a particular specialization in Communication
should choose as follows:
COM 247 News Writing & Reporting
3
COM 263 Writing for Broadcast
3
Print Media
COM 322 Persuasion
3
COM 426 Public Relations
3
COM 247 News Writing & Reporting
3
COM 427 Public Relations Writing
3
COM 349 Feature & Magazine Writing
3
COM 445 Editing Skills
3
COM 445 Editing Skills
3
COM 459 Electronic Publishing & Design
3
COM 459 Electronic Publishing & Design
3
COM 475 Management & Research in Public
Relations & Advertising
3
Choose One Course from the Following:
COM 264 Broadcast Techniques
3
COM 344 Photography
3
COM 349 Feature & Magazine Writing
3
COM 361 Audio Production
3
COM 466 Video Production
3
Advertising Required Courses
Credit Hours
COM 263 Writing for Broadcast
3
COM 322 Persuasion
3
COM 344 Photography
3
COM 346 Creative Graphic Arts
3
COM 448 Advertising
3
COM 449 Advertising Copy Writing
3
COM 459 Electronic Publishing & Design
3
COM 475 Management & Research in Public
Relations & Advertising
3
Credit Hours
Electronic Media
COM 263 Broadcast Writing
3
COM 361 Audio Production
3
COM 466 Video Production
3
COM 467 Broadcast Journalism
3
Public Relations
COM 247 News Writing & Reporting
3
COM 426 Public Relations
3
COM 427 PR Writing
3
COM 459 Electronic Publishing & Design
3
Advertising
COM 322 Persuasion
3
COM 346 Creative Graphic Arts
3
COM 448 Advertising
3
COM 459 Electronic Publishing & Design
3
Choose one course from the following:
COM 450 Advertising Creative Strategy & Execution
3
COM 451 Advertising Media Strategy & Tactics
3
COM 461 Advertising Campaigns
3
*Advertising students must take ART 111
Minor in Communication
Students with a minor in communication must have a B (plain) in English at
KCSE and fulfill the following requirements:
Required Courses in Communication
Credit Hours
COM 231 Introduction to Mass Media
3
COM 323 Communication Systems in Africa
3
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157
Course Descriptions
ART 111 Art in Africa 2 Credits
A survey of art in traditional and contemporary African societies. The
course develops in students an appreciation of art form and content and an
understanding of how African culture and society relate to African art.
COM 099 Keyboarding 0(3) Credits
An introduction to keyboarding designed to enable students to master basic
care and maintenance of the computer and standard keyboard touch typing.
Students become familiar with setting and layout of various documents as well
as word processing tools.
COM 223 Public Speaking 3 Credits
An introduction to theory and skills in public speaking. Topics include topic
choice, organization, delivery, speech types, language and style, visual aids
and audience analysis. A substantial component of the course is devoted to
student speeches and critiques.
COM 226 Interpersonal & Group Communication 3 Credits
An overview of interpersonal and small group communication processes
including theories of interpersonal and group communication, preparation
and management of group interactions, group formation and development,
group leadership, interviewing, self-disclosure, perception, relationships, and
interpersonal conflicts. Prerequisite; INS 112.
COM 231 Introduction to Mass Media 3 Credits
An overview of the mass media covering basic definitions, concepts
terminologies and history of print and electronic media, media literacy, ethical
considerations in media and an overview of career opportunities in the media
field. The course includes all forms of mediated communication: newspapers,
magazines, radio, television, film, books, PR and advertising. Pre-requisites:
INS 112, ENG112.
COM 243 Writing for Business 3 Credits
An examination of principles of written and oral communication in business
settings. Students will develop skills in writing in a variety of business formats
including letters, memos and emails as well as employment and interviewing
skills. Special attention is paid to grammar and expression. Pre-requisites:
COM 099, ENG 112.
COM 247 News Reporting and Writing 3 Credits
An introduction to the concept and nature of news reporting and writing,
including characteristics and determinants of news, elements of good news
writing, interviewing and gathering information, media trends and ethical
issues in the newsroom. Significant emphasis is placed on reporting and writing
news stories. Pre-requisites: COM 099, COM 231.
158
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COM 263 Writing for Broadcast 3 Credits
An introduction to writing for the broadcast media. The course covers basic
elements of radio and television script formats and introduces students to
writing for different types of programming including documentaries, talk shows,
features, newscasts, and radio and television commercials. Pre-requisites:
COM 231.
COM 264 Broadcast Techniques 3 Credits
An introduction to basic principles and terminologies associated with television,
radio and film production. Content includes studio experience, demonstrations
of the workings of the studio, and production process including technical and
creative aspects of the electronic media.
COM 302 Statistics for Communication Research 3 Credits
A basic course in the use of statistics in communication research. The course
is designed to give students a foundational knowledge of the most common
statistical procedures so that they become informed consumers of research
reports and can, with little additional training, apply basic statistical procedures
to quantitative data. Pre-requisite: MAT 102.
COM 321 Communication Research & Design 3Credits
A course designed to develop students’ understanding of the process and
terminology of communication research including elements of research, various
research methods, sampling techniques, hypothesis formulation and testing,
data analysis techniques, and research report writing. Pre-requisites: COM
302, ENG 112, INS 112.
COM 322 Persuasion 3 Credits
An exploration of the historical, classical and modern foundations of persuasion
theory. The course considers persuasion in interpersonal, group, and mass
mediated contexts and introduces students to related theory in each area.
Emphasis is placed on application of persuasive principles to current social
and media contexts. Prerequisites: ENG 112, INS 112.
COM 323 Communication Systems in Africa 3 Credits
A survey of problems, promises, and features of transition from traditional to
modern communication systems in Africa. The course examines the interactive
influence of Africa’s socio-economic, technological and political conditions on
the development and form of communication systems on the continent. Prerequisites: ENG 112, INS 112, POL 111.
COM 344 Photography 3 Credits
A basic introduction to photography covering operational functions of a 35mm
SLR camera, digital cameras and principles of the photographic process.
Students get hands on experience on dark room procedures. The course also
covers types of photography and film, composition, editing, legal and ethical
considerations. Students are required to bring their own manual camera. Prerequisites: ENG 112, INS 112. NB: All students are expected to have their
own cameras. The University will not provide students with cameras.
COM 346 Creative Graphic Arts 3 Credits
An introduction to graphic design as the visual communication of print media
including typography, uses of photographs and illustrations, color publication
layout and techniques, print production processes, computer graphics,
exhibition and display, and use of graphics in various media. Pre-requisites:
ART 111, COM 344.
COM 349 Feature & Magazine Writing 3 Credits
A course focused on developing writing skills appropriate for magazine and
newspaper feature sections. Significant emphasis is placed on assessing trends
in the industry and in the development of different types of feature articles
including the first-person narrative, the how-to-do-it article, the personality
profile, the column, and the critical review. Pre-requisite: COM 247.
COM 361 Audio Production 3 Credits
An introduction to basic theoretical and practical skills for planning, producing
and evaluating radio programmes. Students gain experience in professional
handling and operating of radio studio facilities, conducting effective radio
interviews, writing radio scripts for particular target audiences, and creating
various radio formats. Emphasis is placed on use of radio as a tool for
development and behaviour change in the African setting. Pre-requisite: COM
264.
COM 364 Writing for the Screen 3 Credits
A theoretical and practical explanation of writing for the visual media which
covers elements of good script writing, script writing for specific television
and video genres, and introduction to the production process. Pre-requisites:
COM 264.
COM 365 Broadcast Drama 3 Credits
A theoretical and applied study of drama in the electronic media. The course
aims at assisting students in acquiring skills in planning, designing, scripting,
adapting and producing a radio play. Prerequisite: COM 361.
COM 408 Special Topics in Communication 3 Credits
Although topics offered under this course number will vary depending on
faculty availability and student need, regular topics will include without
being limited to the following: reporting transitional justice, photojournalism,
advanced audio production, advanced video production, introduction to
television production and directing. Pre-requisites vary.
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159
COM 415 Advanced Writing & 3 Credits
Speech Consultation A limited enrollment course that trains selected students in advanced writing
and speaking pedagogy as well as consultation methodology. Course contents
include English grammar and syntax, bibliographic and reference formats,
techniques and philosophies of tutoring, and advanced public speaking
instruction. Pre-requisite: Invitation by instructor.
COM 419 Communication Ethics & Law 3 Credits
An examination of ethics and law in the various areas of the field of
communication including interpersonal, public speaking, and mass media
contexts. Students are introduced to major theories of ethics and examine
related case studies as well as the laws and statutes that govern media in
Kenya. Pre-requisites: ENG 112, INS 112, COM 247 or COM 349 or
Com 263.
COM 421 Strategies of Communication 3 Credits
An exploration of the different definitions of communication and the impact of
these definitions on the approach to communication situations including the
biblical foundation for communication. Topics include different elements of
communication: the communicator, the audience, the channel, the message,
feedback, noise, and the environment of communication; an in depth
analysis of the characteristics of mass media; the process of setting goals of
communication; and analysis of the different strategies for communication. Prerequisite: Must be a senior student to take this course.
COM 422 Media & Christianity 3 Credits
This course provides communication majors with opportunities to study,
discuss, defend and integrate a Christ-centered worldview in the field
of communications, electronic media and emerging technologies. The
course entails a comprehensive analysis of fundamentalist and evangelical
Christianity’s appropriation of media in a comparative context, giving attention
to similarities and differences in various religious traditions. Students examine
how to integrate their faith into their careers and give practical responses
to cultural and historical shifts in worldviews. Pre-requisite: Must be senior
student to take this course.
COM 426 Public Relations 3 Credits
An overview of the theory and practice of PR as a profession in the modern
organizational context. Contents include specific tasks of PR within an
organization, PR tactics for dealing with media, crisis, fund raising, and various
stakeholders. The course also examines PR as it is practiced in various contexts
such as Christian ministries, NGOs, governmental organizations, corporations,
and other enterprises. Pre-requisites: COM 243, COM 247, COM 223.
COM 427 Public Relations Writing 3 Credits
An advanced level writing course for students who are familiar with concepts
and principles of PR. The course involves planning, organizing, writing and
editing various organizational communication materials. It helps to shape,
refine and strengthen students’ written communication skills with particular
emphasis on communicating on behalf of the organization or clients to diverse
publics. Pre-requisites: COM 426.
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COM 430 BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS JOURNALISM
3 Credits
The course is designed to provide the student with skills to cover professionally
business and economics stories. It offers a doorway to the understanding
of the market forces that shape and affect the quality of daily lives for
societies and individuals. It introduces the student to the concepts of finance,
investment, marketing, corporate management, micro and macroeconomics,
entreupneurship. It equips them to gauge and understand what is going on
in companies big and small, and be able to report and write compelling
stories about them. It facilitates the student to discover the deeper business
and economics elements in stories that may be viewed as politics, sports,
environment or science. Pre-requisite COM 247, 349.
COM 436 Editorial and Opinion Writing 3 Credits
This course aims at developing thoughtful contributors to commentary pages
in print and online publications. It involves a theoretical and applied study of
the opinion piece and examines several types of commentary, including the
editorial, the column and the blog. A significant portion of the course is devoted
to the practice of opinion writing. Pre-requisites: COM 247.
COM 445 Editing 3 Credits
A course designed to develop students’ editing abilities through considering
definition and functions of the editor and the editing process. Students gain
skills in writing various types of news stories, magazine stories, textbooks,
and children’s books. A strong emphasis is placed on practical application of
editing skills. Pre-requisite: COM 247 or COM 349.
COM 448 Advertising 3 Credits
An exploration into the history and theory of advertising and advertising
agencies. The course considers a range of types of advertising, advertising
design, art and photography, advertising campaigns, advertising in various
contexts, and measures of effectiveness in advertising. Pre-requisites: COM
099, COM 322, COM 346.
COM 449 Advertising Copy Writing 3 Credits
A study of the language of advertising including writing campaigns, headlines,
taglines, body copy, and use of typefaces for various types of publications.
Focus is on application of knowledge to advertising procedures. Pre-requisite:
COM 448.
COM 450 Advertising Creative Strategy
3 Credits
and Execution An in-depth practical study of the creative side of advertising including
examination of branding, direct response advertising, out-of-home advertising
and broadcasting. Pre-requisite: COM 449.
COM 451 Advertising Media Strategy & Tactics 3 Credits
An advanced exploration of the media used in advertising. The course examines
the functions of media planning in advertising, media planning operations and
tactics, setting objectives, developing strategies, and staging a media plan.
Pre-requisite: COM 448.
COM 459 Electronic Publishing & Design 3 Credits
This course covers the publishing and designing of various print materials
using computer software. Through completing assigned exercises and projects
students learn how to use appropriate software, editing, image sourcing
and acquisition, scanning, computer based design, typography, color and
production. Pre-requisites: ACS 101.
COM 461 Advertising Campaigns 3 Credits
In this course basic skills acquired in previous advertising courses are utilized
and refined. Students examine creation and presentation of a full campaign for
a new product including marketing concepts, objectives, product positioning,
goals, layouts, media and actual commercial presentation. Pre-requisite:
COM 449.
COM 466 Video Production 3 Credits
An examination of and training in the tools of video production. Topics include
use of the cameras, camera shots, angles and movements, composition;,
lighting, scripting, editing, and postproduction work. Pre-requisite: COM 264.
COM 467 Broadcast Journalism 3 Credits
An advanced exploration of the essentials of broadcast news writing, reporting,
and production. The course emphasizes skills in copy writing, good grammar,
techniques of field reporting, interviewing and news editing for radio and
TV news. The course also examines the ethical/professional dimension of
broadcsat journalism from a Christian perspective. Pre-requisites: COM 361,
COM 466.
COM 468 Broadcast Presentation 3 Credits
An introduction to the art, discipline, and business of radio and television
presentation skills. The course gives the student both a theoretical and practical
experience in performing for broadcast. Pre-requisites: COM 223, COM
361, COM 466.
COM 469 Broadcast Progamming, 3 Credits
Promotion & Strategy
An exploration of broadcast programming and promotion strategies and
practices for radio, television and the web. The course focuses on audience
and programme research, promotion and marketing, programme acquisition,
selection, promotion, scheduling and evaluation. Pre-requisites: COM 361,
COM 466.
COM 474 MEDIA Management 3 Credits
An overview of the principles and theories of media management. Course
content includes the philosophy of media organizations, management
structures of various types of media, management of circulation, readership,
audience, programs, human resources, technical issues in broadcast, sales and
advertising, and budgeting. Pre-requisite: Either COM 445 or COMM 466.
COM 475 Management AND Research IN 3 Credits
PUBLIC RELATIONS & ADVERTISING
The course examines the rise of management as related to the public relations
and advertising industry as well as practical application of organizational
planning. Topics include: creative directorship, account supervision, agency/
client relationship, personnel management, budgeting, crisis management,
media, events. Pre-requisite: Either COM 448 or COMM 426.
COM 496 Independent Study 3 Credits
There are times when a student may be interested in an area of study but
which for varied reasons the department may not be able to offer. In such case
a student may, in consultation with either a member of faculty or the head of
department, design a programme of study to satisfy that interest. Pre-requisite
vary.
COM 497 Senior Project 4 Credits
In special cases students may substitute a senior project for the communication
field study. Students will turn in a 3-4 page proposal containing enough
information about the project for the faculty advisor to assess. The paper should
be an original piece of research which includes a review of relevant literature,
statement of the problem, description of method, presentation of research
findings, interpretation of findings, and conclusions and recommendation, or
a radio or video production of a specified length. Pre-requisite: COM 321.
COM 499 Communication Field Study 4 Credits
An assigned task for which the student’s course work has prepared him/her
and to which the student, faculty, and employer agree. The minimum timeperiod for the field study is seven weeks of full time work with the employer, or
270 clock hours. The assignment must require competence in areas relevant
to the student’s chosen sequence of study and stimulate growth in those areas
of competence. Under special circumstances to be determined in consultation
with the head of department a student may replace COM 499 with Senior
Project COM 497, for example when a student has a cumulative GPA of less
than 2.5. Pre-requisite: Completion of third year and all or most courses in
the concentration area.
INS 111 Communication and Culture I 3 Credits
A course that introduces students to foundational concepts in communication
and anthropology as well as intercultural communication. The course is built
around principles of communication as articulated by Donald Smith with
amplification by other communication theorists. The course is considered to be
the foundation of student experience in Daystar.
INS 112 Communication and Culture II 3 Credits
A continuation of INS 111 that introduces students to additional communication
and anthropological concepts and theories. Emphasis is placed on integrating
course material into student understanding of contemporary events and issues
in society from a biblical viewpoint. Prerequisites: INS 111.
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161
SUGGESTED FOUR YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME
ELECTRONIC MEDIA CONCENTRATION
1 ST YEAR
Semester I
2ND YEAR
Semester II
Semester I
Semester II
INS 111
3
INS 112
3
ACS 101
2
COM 226
3
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
ECO 111
2
COM 263
3
ENG 111
3
ENG 112
3
INS 212
2
INS 313
3
PHY 112
2
PHL 111
3
COM 223
3
Minor or Elective
6
ENV 112
3
BIO 111
2
BIL 212
2
MAT 102
3
HPE 113
1
COM 231
3
ART/LIT/ MUS 111
3
COM 099
POL 111
1
0 (3)
15
14 (17)
15
3RD YEAR
Semester I
6
18
4TH YEAR
Semester II
Semester I
Semester II
RET 320
2
COM 361
3
INS 412
3
COM 419
3
COM 302
3
COM 364
3
COM 468/469
3
COM 422
3
COM 243
3
COM 466
3
COM 467
3
COM 474
3
COM 264
3
COM 321
3
COM 421
3
Minor or Elective
6
COM 323
3
Minor or Elective
3
Minor or Elective
4
Minor or Elective
3
17
15
16
June/August COM 507
15
4
PRINT MEDIA CONCENTRATION
1 ST YEAR
Semester I
2ND YEAR
Semester II
Semester I
Semester II
INS 111
3
INS 112
3
PHY 112
2
RET 320
2
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
ART/LIT/MUS111
2
BIO 111
2
ENG 111
3
ENG 112
3
BIL 212
2
INS 212
2
ENV 112
2
PHY 112
2
COM 226
3
COM 263
3
ACS 101
2
HPE 113 1
1
COM 243
3
COM 323
3
ART/LIT/ MUS 111
2
COM 099
0 (3)
COM 223
3
COM 247
3
MAT 102
2
COM 231
3
15
14 (17)
16
3RD YEAR
Semester I
4TH YEAR
Semester II
Semester I
Semester II
INS 313
3
COM 321
2
COM 459
3
INS 412
3
RET 320
2
COM 323 3
3
COM 430
3
COM 419
3
COM 302
3
COM 436
3
COM 421
3
COM 422
3
COM 349
3
COM 445
3
COM 474
3
Minor or Electives
6
COM 344
3
Minor or Elective
3
Minor or Electives
4
17
15
June/August
162
15
www.daystar.ac.ke
COM 507
16
4
15
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN TECHNICAL & PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION
Requirement For Graduation
Daystar University allows students to graduate with a single major, a double
major, or a major and a minor. It will therefore be possible for student to
graduate with either a Major in Technical and Professional communication
and a minor in another field; or a minor in Technical and Professional
communication and a Major in another program.
To graduate with a Major in Technical and Professional Communication, a
student must meet the following criteria of course requirement and credit hour
combination from various disciplines besides meeting the general university
regulations stipulated in chapter 1 of this document.
Technical and Professional Communication Elective Courses (Choose 8 for a
total of 24 credit hours.)
Course
Credit Hours
TPC 426 Speech Writing
3
TPC 457 Designing Online Information
3
TPC 458 Instructional Design
3
TPC 459 Project Management
3
TPC 408 Special Topics
3
COM 322 Persuasion
3
MAK 316 Advertising
3
TPC 496 Independent Study
3
General Education Courses
39
COM 499 Advertising Copywriting
3
Technical and Professional Communication required
courses
51
DEV 213 Communication for Development
3
TPC Course Electives
24
Free Electives
15
TOTAL
129
Required Courses
Credit Hours
TPC101 Introduction to Technical and Professional
Communication
3
TPC102 Technical and Professional Communication
Style
3
TPC 201 Technical and Professional Communication
Editing
3
TPC 202 Designing Technical Report
3
ACS 111 Introduction to Programming
3
ACS 361 Introduction to Database Systems
3
MIS 451 Designing and Building Web Pages
3
MAK 212 Marketing Principles
3
COM 302 Statistics for Communication Research
3
COM 321 Communication Research and Design
3
MAK 335 Marketing Communication
3
TPC 340 Communication in a Corporate Culture
3
COM 346 Creative Graphic Arts
3
TPC414 Ethics in Technical and Professional
Communication
3
TPC 507 Internship
6
TPC 597 Senior Project
3
TOTAL
51
Requirements for Graduation with a TPC (Minor)
To graduate with a minor in TPC, the student must fulfill the following requirements:
Courses
Credit Hours
Required courses in TPC
15
Elective courses in TPC
6
Total
21
Required Courses
Credit Hours
TPC 101
Introduction to Technical Communication
3
TPC 102
Technical Communication Style
3
TPC 201
Technical Editing
3
TPC 202
Designing Technical Reports
3
COM 346 Creative Graphic Arts
3
TOTAL
15
TPC Elective Courses (choose two for a total of 6 credit hours)
Credit Hours
COM 302 Statistics for Communication Research
3
COM 321 Communication Research Design
3
MAK 335 Marketing Communication
3
TPC 340 Communication in Corporate Culture
3
TPC 408 Special Topics
3
TPC 426 Writing Speeches
3
MIS 451 Designing and Building Web Pages
3
TPC 458 Instructional Design
3
TPC 459 Publications and Project Management
3
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163
Students who have done COM 346, Creative Graphic Arts must take an extra
elective to meet their graduation requirement for the minor.
General Education Course Requirements for the TPC Major
COURSE
COURSE NAME
ACS 101
Basic Computer Skills
2
A R T / L I T /
MUS111
Art in Africa or Music in Africa or
Appreciation of Literature
2
BIL 111
Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
BIL 112
New Testament Introduction &
Survey
3
BIL 212
Introduction to Bible Doctrine
2
BIO 111
Biology
2
ECO 111
Introduction to Economics
2
ENG 111
Advanced Reading
3
ENG 112
Advanced Writing
3
ENV 112
Environmental Science
HPE
Communication and Culture 1
3
INS 112
Communication and Culture 2
3
PHL111
Introduction to Philosophy
3
PHY 112
Physical Science
2
POL 111
Introduction to Political Science
1
RET 320
Christianity and Islam in Africa
Daystar introduced me to three core
pillars that have impacted my life as a
student. A sense of purpose, excellence
- rising above mediocrity, and the sense
of eternity. I am truly transformed and
set to transform my world!”
164
www.daystar.ac.ke
1
INS 111
TOTAL
Johnson Mwakazi
HOURS
2
38
FOUR-YEAR PROGRAMME OF STUDY TECHNICAL & PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION
Programme Structure
Like other undergraduate programmes at Daystar, the programme is planned to extend over a period of four academic years. TPC 597 must be taken in the JuneJuly semester of the third year of the students’ progress in the programme. The proposed 4 year structure is as stipulated in the table below:
1st YEAR
First Semester
INS 111
3rd YEAR
Second Semester
3
INS 112
First Semester
3
PHY 112
Second Semester
2
TPC 414
3
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
ENG 111
3
ENG 112
3
TPC 340
3
MIS 451
3
COM 346
3
TPC ELECTIVE
3
ENV 112
2
ACS 111
3
ART/MUS/LIT 111
2
TPC 102
3
TPC ELECTIVE
3
TPC ELECTIVE
3
2
TPC ELECTIVE
3
Free electve
3
TOTAL
14
TPC 101
3
ACS 101
2
TOTAL
18
BIO 111
TOTAL
TOTAL
15
17
JUNE-JULY BLOCKS
TPC 597
2nd YEAR
First Semester
PHL 111
3
Second Semester
3
ACS 361
4th YEAR
3
First Semester
Second Semester
MAK 212
3
RET 320
2
ECO 111
2
MAK 335
3
TPC Elective
3
TPC 507
3
TPC Elective
3
3
TPC Elective
3
Free Elective
3
TOTAL
12
BIL 212
2
COM 302
3
TPC Elective
POL 111
1
COM 321
3
Free Elective
TPC 201
3
TPC 202
3
TPC 202
3
TOTAL
18
HPE
FRE 111
1
Free Elective
3
3
Free Elective
3
TOTAL
15
-- 6
15
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165
Course Descriptions
TPC101 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL &
3 Credit hours
PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION
This course will focus on what is technical communication; importance of writing
in the work place; characteristics of technical and professional communication;
measures of excellence in technical and professional communication;
writing collaboratively; audience analysis and purpose; developing textual
elements: descriptions, definition, argument; writing instructions; designing
documents; developing visual elements; drafting the front and back matter; oral
presentation; application letters, memos and e- mails, minute writing, report
writing, proposal writing.
TPC102 TECHNICAL & PROFESSIONAL 3 Credit hours
COMMUNICATION STYLE
What is technical style, choice of an appropriate style, persuading through
style, ensuring coherence and cohesion in writing, establishing a consistent
and clear point of view, being concise, choosing an appropriate tone,
stylistic issues at word, sentence, paragraph and text levels; style and gender,
mechanics of writing.
TPC 201 TECHNICAL & PROFESSIONAL 3 Credit hours
COMMUNICATION EDITING
The course deals with what is editing; functions of an editor; editing for
specific audience; collaborative editing; copy-marking hard copy, soft copy;
electronic editing; copyediting for accuracy; consistency; grammar and
usage; punctuation and mechanics; proofreading; comprehensive editing for
style; organization; visual design; illustrations; global contents; editing online
documents; legal and ethical issues in editing.
TPC 202 DESIGNING TECHNICAL & 3 Credit hours
PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION REPORTS Importance of reports; defining the audience; planning the document; drafting
the document; research, using visual aids, methods of documentation and
application, preparing and using the different types of reports and proposals.
MAK 212 MARKETING PRINCIPLES
3 Credit hours
Definition of marketing; role of marketing in an organization/economy;
the marketing mix; Integration of Christian faith and marketing; marketing
opportunity analysis; consumer markets and consumer/buyer behavior;
product decisions; price decisions; promotion decisions; distribution decisions;
managing marketing efforts; competitive advantages; international marketing;
marketing of services; industrial marketing and non-profit oriented marketing;
social responsibility and marketing ethics.
DEV 213 COMMUNICATION FOR 3 Credit hours
DEVELOPMENT
This is an intensive study of communication in community based development
with an emphasis on understanding the community, the role of the change
agent, the use of appropriate media, and strategies for introducing change.
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COM 302 STATISTICS FOR COMMUNICATION 3 Credit hours
RESEARCH
Use of statistics in communication research; functions of statistics; graphic
presentations; measures of central tendency; measures of spread; normal
distribution; probability and sampling; hypothesis testing; confidence intervals;
chi-square tests and analysis of variance; regression and correlation; non
parametric statistics analysis.
COM 321 COMMUNICATION RESEARCH 3 Credit hours
DESIGN AND STRATEGY
Research process – research and science; elements of research dependent
and independent variables; sampling techniques; different approaches to
research content analysis; laboratory research and experimental design;
survey research research methods case studies; field experiments; focus
groups; observation research; statistics in research; hypothesis formulation
and testing; inferential statistics; applied communication research electronic
media print media; research in PR organizations; research in media effects;
data analysis techniques uses of computers in mass research; ethical issues in
research; financial considerations.
COM 322 PERSUASION
3 Credit hours
The course will deal with historical foundations of persuasion theory; persuasion
as a special case of communication; persuasive effects; persuasive ethics
attitudes and beliefs; prediction of response; group influence; influence of the
message source; message; variables in persuasion; non-verbal codes; message
structure and appeals; communication channels; interpretational persuasion;
negotiation; persuasion in small groups; persuasion in formal organizations;
social action.
COM 346 GRAPHICS ARTS
3 Credit hours
Introduction to graphic design as visual communication in print media;
understanding typography the value of type sizes and styles, the effective
treatment of type on a page, typesetting; handling photographs and illustrations
on a page for effective communication; effective use of white space; handling
color creatively and dynamically; publication layout and techniques; magazine
design cover and inside pages; graphic design in advertising; graphic design
in packaging; print production process; computer graphics role of computers
in contemporary graphic design; exhibition display
MAK 335 MARKETING COMMUNICATION
3 Credit hours
The course introduces students to the concept of market communication; the
communication mix; communication planning for marketing organizations;
creating marketing objectives and strategies; implementation of marketing
communication strategies, external issues in marketing communication;
designing information for web-marketing.
TPC 340 TECHNICAL & PROFESSIONAL 3 Credit hours
COMMUNICATIONIN IN A CORPORATE CULTURE
The course includes the following organization culture and definition of
culture; the significance of a corporate culture its creation, dissemination and
maintenance with an emphasis on the place of language; the dimensions of
culture; the leadership role in culture building; basics of business communications
audience and purpose awareness; correspondence; corporate intranet;
conflict resolution in business communication; conducting meetings and time
management.
TPC 408 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 Credit hours
The content will be derived from any area of technical and professional
communication that is not covered in the technical and professional
communication major or already chosen electives in any department at
Daystar University. The course will be taught on the basis of availability of
faculty with interest and expertise in that area and a complete course outline
approved by the department. Examples of proposed areas of study include
gender bias in technical and professional communication/ women in technical
and professional communication, rhetorical styles in technical and professional
communication.
TPC 414 ETHICS IN TECHNICAL &
3 Credit hours
PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION
The course will focus on what is ethics; business ethics; ethical dilemmas;
resolving ethical conflicts values, interests and ethics; codes of ethics; legal
obligations; privacy; striving for perfection; working in teams; conflict of interest;
sensitivity to culture; principles of ethical communication; social responsibility;
professional growth; advancing professionalism.
TPC 426 WRITING SPEECHES 3 Credit hours
Topics in the course include fundamentals in speech writing, ethics in
speech writing, the rhetorical situation, speech criticism, professional speech
writing; historic speechwriters and their speeches; contemporary theories
of speechwriting, speechwriting workshops; cooperative writing as part of
an organizational team, revision and critical analysis in preparing effective
speeches; use of the internet to discover and utilize resources for preparing
speech texts.
MAK 316 ADVERTISING
3 Credit hours
What is advertising; advertising and the economy; advertising players/
agencies; the relationship between advertising and marketing; product branding
and images; advertising and media planning; advertisement strategies and
types; international advertising; creating and designing advertisements.
MIS 451 DESIGNING AND BUILDING
3 Credit hours
WEB SITES
Web fundamentals; client/server architecture, page design;
content
design; site design; Intranet design; web browsers; accessibility for users
with disabilities; international (Global) use of the internet and E-commerce;
the trend and future of the Internet; simplicity in web design; HTML and ASP
programming; introduction to JAVA language; writing JAVA applets.
TPC 457 DESIGNING ON-LINE INFORMATION 3 Credit hours
To create an understanding of information design, the relationship between the
client and the technical communicator, the place of content and appearance
in information design, approaches to document design e.g. writing as a
problem solving activity, minimalism, use-centered design etc; frameworks for
information design, application through the design and development of on-line
help systems.
TPC 458 INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN
3 Credit hours
This course will focus on needs assessment, audience analysis, writing
instructional objectives, development of a learner profile, development
of instructional frameworks, instructional media, instructional assessment
tools, impediments to effective instruction, designing tutorials and job aids
programme evaluation.
TPC 459 PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 Credit hours
This course includes an introduction to project management, the role of a
project manager; needs analysis; writing project proposals; and the project
development phases i.e. planning, designing, implementing, completing, and
maintaining projects in a corporate team environment.
TPC 496 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 Credit hours
The content will depend on the area of study chosen by the student. Students
are free to choose study areas from technical and professional communication
as long as the study area does not have the same content as a required course
of a chosen elective. The student should write a proposal from which the course
outline is drawn.
TPC 597 SENIOR PROJECT
3 Credit hours
The student will choose a topic that meets departmental requirements. The
student will submit a 3-4 page proposal stating; the problem, objectives of
study, method of study, preliminary outline of study, expected results and,
tentative bibliography. The writing of the paper will not commence until the
student submits an acceptable proposal. The paper will be reviewed weekly
by the student’s supervisor. The final project will be submitted in a diskette or
CD and a hard copy.
TPC 507 TECHNICAL & PROFESSIONAL 3 Credit hours
COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP
The student will complete an attachment in the industry, business or research
organization, or carry out a client sponsored project in the fourth year of study.
The internship will be at least seven weeks of full time work with the employer
within Nairobi and its environs. (270 hours); Assignments will require
competence in the areas relevant to the student’s course of study and which will
stimulate growth in those areas of competence. The student may not enroll in
other courses while undertaking the field study. Prerequisite Completion of third
year and all relevant courses.
ACS 111 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMING
3 Credit Hours
Definition of a program; algorithms; program design and steps to writing a good
program; flowcharts and pseudo-code; structure sequence, decisions, loops;
top down programming modules and hierarchy charts; decision making using
Boolean, and, or logic; looping using “while”, “for”, “do until”, and nested
loops; arrays and parallel arrays; using menus; validating input; debugging
error types; compile (syntax), run time logic; methods modularization and
implementation using procedures and functions.
ACS 361 INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE
3 Credit hours
SYSTEMS
File systems and databases; database design methodology; the relational
database model; Entity Relationship (ER) Modeling; introduction to Structured
Query Language (SQL); normalization of database tables; project using a
selected database management system.
Assessment
Student assessment will be based on project work, continuous assessment and
a final examination. The project work and continuous assessment will comprise
70% of the final grade and the final examination 30%.
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167
POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME
MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE IN COMMUNICATION
Rational
Courses
The MA in Communication Programme is a two-year 48 credit hour programme
designed to prepare graduates with sound theory and professional skills for
further postgraduate study in communication and for service in the church, the
media, corporate and development establishments and the society at large.
Our graduates are servng in media houses, corporate establishments, NGOs,
academic institutions, churches and para-church organisations.
Postgraduate Core Courses
Objectives
Remedial Communication Courses
1.
COM 302 Statistics
0 (3)
COM 592 Exploring Mass Media
0 (3)
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
To prepare students for leadership, management and service in communicationrelated offices in churches, para-church organizations, non-governmental
organizations, government agencies, corporate establishments and other
societal institutions;
To equip students for further postgraduate study in communication;
To promote students’ ability to integrate their Christian faith with the
various disciplines in the field of communication;
To develop students’ ability to think critically about human problems and
to effectively strategize communication-related solutions;
To equip students with advanced research and writing skills;
To train students to be critical consumers of communication research and
to effectively apply research findings.
Requirements for Graduation
M.A. in Communication students are expected to begin their M.A. studies
with basic knowledge and skills in communication. Students accepted into the
programme without sufficient undergraduate coursework in those areas will
be required to enroll in a remedial block course (COM 592) that will take
place during the first semester. A basic knowledge of statistics is also assumed;
therefore students who have not had statistics at the undergraduate level will
be expected to take COM 302 (Statistics) during their first semester of the
M.A. study.
To qualify for graduation, a student must successfully complete 48 credits
including an oral defence of his or her thesis before a panel appointed by the
Dean of the School and pass with a minimun grade of B (GPA 3.00). An error
free copy of the thesis must be submitted to the department no more than 90
days after a successful defence, and final copies must be bound before the
student will be allowed to graduate.
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Credit Hours
9
Communication Core Courses
18
Required Courses in Concentration
18
Optional Communication Courses
3
TOTAL
48
Communication Core Courses
COM 618/GRA 614 Communication & Leadership
3
COM 621 Communication Theory
3
COM 624 Media Law & Ethics
3
COM 636 Global Communication
3
COM 698 Communication Thesis
6
SUBTOTAL
18
Optional Courses (3 hours)
Students must also take three additional hours of communication courses. These
may be either courses from other concentrations, or special topics courses
(COM 608s) on corporate communication topics when these are offered.
Examples of special topics in corporate communication that might be offered
are Marketing for Non-profits, International Relations and Diplomacy, and Risk
and Crisis Communication.
Students choose one of three concentrations: Corporate Communication,
Development Communication or Media Studies.
Students should follow the degree requirements for the specific concentration
they have selected.
Course Descriptions
Corporate Communication Concentration
Required Courses
COM 600 Corporate Communication
3
COM 639 Media Relations & Crisis Communication
3
COM 643 Advanced Public Relation Writing
3
COM 652 Communication and Advocacy
3
COM 653 Public Relations Research
3
COM 654 Advanced Corporate Communication
Management
3
SUBTOTAL
18
Development Communication Concentration
Required Courses
COM 652 Communication and Advocacy
3
COM 684 Theories of Development Communication
3
COM 685 Theories of Health Communication
3
COM 686 Programme Monitoring & Evaluation
3
COM 687 Risk Communication
3
COM 692 Development Communication Campaigns
3
SUBTOTAL
18
Media Studies Concentration
Required Courses
COM 668 Writing for Media
3
COM 669 Applied Media Research
3
COM 675 Mass Media Language, Formats Aesthetics
& Criticism
3
COM 681 Advanced Audio and Video Production
3
COM 682 Advanced Print & Multimedia Production
& Design
3
COM 683 Media Planning, Evaluation & Strategy
SUBTOTAL
3
18
Note: Students with a Daystar undergraduate degree will take six hours of
optional communication courses rather than three.
GRW 611 Graduate Research & Writing i 2 Credits
This course forms part of a 4 credit hour course that is taken in two semesters
with the first part (GRW 611) meant to introduce research to students and build
up to the level where students can have the first parts of a proposal written in
draft form ( Introduction, background, problem statement, objectives, research
questions, hypothesis, rationale and literature review). The course will seek to
ground students in the basics of research writing. The next course (GRW 613)
is intended to build up on GRW 611 and will concentrate on methodology
section and wriring up of the final thesis after data collection.
GRW 613 Graduate Research & Writing II
2 Credits
This course forms part of a 4 credit hour course that is taken in two semesters
with the first part GRW 611 meant to introduce research to students. GRW
613 concentrates on methodology section and writing up of the final thesis
after data collection. The course content includes, Data collection procedures,
approaches to sampling, Data analysis and processing. Pre-requisite GRW
611.
INS 612 Process and Principles of Communication
3 Credits
& Culture The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic principles of
communication and their application in messages to audiences and to acquaint
them with key concepts and assumptions with which cultural anthropologists
work.
COM 592 Exploring Mass Media 0(3) Credit
An introduction to the main principles, terms and process, as well as the theories
of mass media. The course is a requirement for all M.A. students joining the
M.A. programme without undergraduate or sufficient professional background
in communication. Content covered includes: history and development of
media globally, regionally and nationally; impact of media on society; future
of media industry in Kenya; and specific characteristics of various print and
electronic media.
COM 600 Corporate Communication 3 Credits
An introduction to the importance of corporate communication and its role
and function in organizations. Topics covered in the course include: theoretical
foundations, historical development, corporate communication practice,
corporate citizenship, corporate identity, corporate culture, the role of corporate
communication in propagating an organization’s purpose and goals, public
opinion and persuasion, developing communication policies, and public
relations ethics and professionalism. Prerequisite: COM 592 or equivalent.
COM 618/GRA 614 Communication & Leadership 3 Credits
This course explores ideas in leadership, management, and communication
from a realistic and Christian framework, and to apply those ideas to current
communication challenges in East Africa. Leadership skills addressed include
problems-solving, decision-making, persuasion, negotiation, and compliancegaining, managing internet and external communication. Emphasis is on active
learning, personal assessment and Christian growth.
COM 621 Communication Theory 3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to review the development of the academic study
of communication, focusing on the theoretical frameworks that have shaped the
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169
field. It studies the nature of communication theories and theory development,
theories of meaning, information processing and influence with applications
to selected communication contexts. Attention will be directed throughout
the course to the processes of developing a theoretically based research
programme within a disciplinary context, conducting useful and significant
research, and understanding the relation between types of claims and the
data and arguments used to support them. Students will be invited to envision
themselves as potential developers of original programmes of communication
research. Content includes the history of communication studies, the broad
intellectual and institutional contours of the field, issues related to disciplinarity
and professionalism, epistemological foundations of communication research,
and how basic assumptions about knowledge shape research and theory in
the field.
COM 624 Media Law & Ethics 3 Credits
This course acquaints students with important ethical issues involved in the
communication process as human beings interact with one another, with
particular attention to the ethical problems arising from the use of the mass
media. Course content includes: definition of ethics; components of ethical
systems; bases for ethical judgment: legal constraints on the mass media;
laws concerning defamation, libel and slander; copyright law; registration of
publications; systems of media law; constitutional guarantees; Christianity and
communication ethics.
COM 636 Global Communication 3 Credits
This course introduces the student to the underlying historical trends of global
communication, attempts to theorize global communication, globalization of
media industries its impact on the world economy, politics and culture as well
as the implications of new technologies for communication in the future.
COM 639 Media Relations & Crisis Communication 3 Credits
This course will develop skills in students for effectively dealing with the
news media and create an understanding of the make up, methodology
and motivations for media relations efforts. Students will learn how to assess
and critique media relations to meet the needs of their organization or client.
Emphasis will be placed on writing and interviewing for the news media in
addition to methods of preparing for and dealing with crisis communication.
COM 643 Advanced Public Relations Writing
3 Credits
This course provides guidance in crafting a story for the media on behalf
of an organisation, with an emphasis on strategic thinking, and sharply
focused writing. Attention is paid to defining clear message points, organizing
information for clarity, and understanding different audiences and media.
Students will learn to conceptualise and execute a variety of written pieces.
An introduction to research and writing about and for the ever-changing new
media. Prerequisite COM 600.
COM 652 Communication & Advocacy 3 Credits
This course provides information and skills to plan, implement an evaluate
advocacy programmes, that is, to highlight important issues to decision makers
in order to influence and facilitate eventful change in policy maker attitudes,
practices, or policies. This course provides the students with the tools to plan,
implement and evaluate advocacy programmes to effectively impact society.
COM 653 Public Relations Research 3 Credits
This course is designed to equip students with the theoretical background and
research methodology skills for successful transition to continued education or
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to professional employment in the public relations field. It introduces the major
theoretical traditions in public relations illustrated by specific theories, and
builds on understanding of PR research methodologies. The students will learn
to apply various theories and skills for PR research in the work place. Topics
covered will include: communication audit, opinion polls, audience analysis,
context analysis, focus groups, evaluation of message exposure, measurement
of audience awareness, attitude, activity, supplemental activity, web and email
surveys, market research. Prerequisite: COM 600.
COM 654 Advanced Corporate 3 Credits
Communication MANAGENENT An examination of the importance of strategic corporate communication to the
success of organizations, providing analyses of critical challenges confronting
today’s communications professionals in business, government and non-for-profit
enterprise as well as enhancing development of communication skills to resolve
these challenges. Topics covered include: theoretical foundations, definition,
and characteristics of strategic corporate communication; communication
processes, principles and models; the social context of strategic communication;
philosophical implications of strategy, tools and techniques used by
communications practitioners; strategic planning, execution, and evaluation
of communications; practical and ethical dimensions of communications.
Prerequisite: COM 600.
COM 668 Writing For Media 3 Credits
The course enhances students’ skills in writing quality professional script for the
electronic media (radio, print, television and film). Content covered includes
principles of good writing; news writing; style, format, script; news features and
documentaries; entertainment programmes; music shows, variety show, radio
magazines, radio drama, analysis and critique of radio and television drama;
children’s programmes, women’s programmes, writing for the Christian world,
ethics and social responsibility of journalism and media. Prerequisite: COM
592.
COM 669 Applied Media Research 3 Credits
The course equips the student with knowledge and skills in applied media
research. Topics explored include: application of mass media theories to
research, formative research for programme design, production, and pretesting; audience research; uses and gratification, audience dynamics,
analysis of programme design; research for public communication; public
opinion research; market research; research skills on media effects; research
for programme rating, viewership, listenership and readership.
COM 675 Mass Media Language, Formats, 3 Credits
Aesthetics & Criticism
The course helps the student to explore the history of various media, and how
content interacts with each to form a message. Content covered in the course
includes history of media aesthetics, media language and formats; media
appreciation; criticism of media and society; art for arts sake, technical and
artistic critique; working and implications of digital technology. Prerequisite:
COM 592 or equivalent.
COM 681 Advanced Audio & Video Production 3 Credits
This course explores the aesthetics of picture and sound through studying the
design and creation of video, audio, graphic and narrative content. The visual
portion will include such topics as: the color of light, sound in its environments,
color schemes, the emotions of color, theories of editing, aesthetics of lighting
and the aesthetics of composition; use of the camera to tell a story; explore the
way the camera uses color, depth of field, exposure, movement, angles and
composition to express deeper message meaning. The audio portion studies
advanced recording and mixing techniques for voice, music, sound effects and
silence while focusing on the quality of emotions and messages it produced.
The students will evaluate both audio and video production but will spend
considerable time in the practice of production.
COM 682 Advanced Print &
3 Credits
Multimedia Production & Design
This is a practical course designed to sharpen the student reporting, writing,
editing, publishing and design skills in print media. Content covered includes:
advanced reporting and writing of news; designing and writing online news;
fundamentals and principles of page design; typography; fundamentals of
jacket design; computer editing of text; and the editor-writer relationship.
Students will spend considerable time in practical work of designing, writing
and editing using the appropriate computer software.
COM 683 Media Mgt, Planning & Evaluation 3 Credits
A capstone course that highlights and analyses the field of management
within the print and electronic media industry. The course aims at developing
and sharpening skills in media management. Content includes: management
philosophy and principles, management of media institutions; radio, television,
cable, print and the Internet; management of not-for-profit and for-profit media
entities; media ownership and control, resource management and mobilization,
audience management, media policy regulations and ethics; planning,
promotions, sales and advertising; management of convergent media and the
future of media management; strategic management skills, and evaluation of
media performance. Prerequisite: COM 685.
COM 684 Theories of Development Communication 3 Credits
An introduction to use of communication and information systems and processes
to promote national and regional development, to support specific development
projects, and to facilitate social change. By the end of the course, students
should have developed through exposure to a variety of approaches the
flexibility to critically adapt to specific social, political, cultural, and economic
realities. Topics covered include: definition, history, and philosophy of
development; theories of development; definition and concept of development
communication; development communication theories; development
communication study as a multi-disciplinary field; strategies in communication
for development; participatory development; perspectives on participation in
development; nature of aid agencies; debates on information flow and new
technologies, diffusion theory and practice; social marketing; entertainment
education/infotainment; indigenous communication and folk media; meanings
of “third world”. Prerequisite: COM 592 or equivalent.
COM 685 Theories of Health Communication 3 Credits
An introduction to theories and research about the role that communication
plays in health behavior change programmes. The first half of the course focuses
on behavioural change theories. The second half of the course covers research
on specific topics relevant to health communication. Topics covered include:
entertainment education, multicultural audiences, the relationship of health
communication theory to general communication theory, community-based
health care organizations, health and daily interpersonal communication,
health literacy, patient provider communication, popular media and health,
the role of faith-based organizations in health and health communication, and
health communication ethics. Prerequisite: COM 684.
COM 686 Programme Evaluation & Monitoring 3 Credits
An introduction to issues and strategies for monitoring and evaluating
development programs in a variety of settings. The course establishes a
framework, rationale, and the basic concepts essential to planning, designing,
and conducting an evaluation of development and health programming at
various stages. Content includes: background and significance of programme
evaluation and monitoring; programme conceptualization and design;
programme coverage and delivery; participatory planning and evaluation;
planning an evaluation; internal, construct, and external validity; impact
evaluation; formative evaluation; process evaluation; cost evaluation; the
evaluation report; critiquing evaluation proposals; and needs assessment.
Prerequisites: GRW 611, GRW 613.
COM 687 Risk Communication 3 Credits
An examination of theory and research related to communication of scientific
information about environmental, agricultural, food, health, and nutritional risks.
Course concentrates on social theories related to risk perception and behavior.
Case studies involving waste management, water quality, environmental
hazards, and/or personal health behaviors are examined. Topics covered
include: defining risk; situating risk communication in the field of risk studies;
psychological aspects of risk; risk assessment; trust and credibility as related to
risk perception; media coverage and risk; sociological aspects of risk; strategies
for risk communication; stakeholder involvement in risk communication.
Prerequisite: COM 684.
COM 692 Development Communication Campaigns 3 Credits
A critical and practical examination of what does and does not work with
development campaigns. Blending theory and practice, the course encourages
thoughtful criticism of past campaigns based on solid theoretical ideas and the
subsequent development of worthwhile applications. Students are expected
to apply theories by creating a mini-campaign on the development issue of
their choice. Topics covered include: history of campaigns; free and paid
modalities; application of social marketing, risk communication, edutainment,
and media advocacy to campaigns; assessing campaign effectiveness;
planning models for communication campaigns, ethical issues in campaigns
planning and implementation. Prerequisites: COM 684, COM 685.
COM 698 Communication THESIS/PROJECT 3 Credits
The final thesis/project takes the form of a research proposal followed by an
oral defense. Upon successful presentation the student, under the guidance of
a supervisor drawn from among the faculty, will conduct research/project and
analyze the results in a written thesis. The student will be required to defend the
core ideas therein to a review board, which may comprise of class instructors,
a supervisory committee of instructors from previous courses, members of the
program’s advisory board and if, necessary, including an external examiner.
The thesis/project course is conducted all year round. Due to the demands of
this course, students are advised to avoid excessive course load in the same
semester. Students must have completed three semesters of course work before
enrolling in thesis/project.
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TWO-YEAR SUGGESTED PROGRAMME
1ST YEAR
1st Semester
2ND YEAR
2nd Semester
1st Semester
COM 302
0 (3)
COM 624
3
COM 636
COM 592
0 (3)
GRW 613
2
OR
BIL 615
2
COM 618
3
COM 621
3
Corporate
GRW 611
2
COM 639
3
INS 612
3
COM 643
3
COM XXX
(Students with
Daystar undergraduate degree)
OR
Media
COM 636
COM 668
3
COM 682
3
COM 600
3
Development Communication
OR
COM 675
3
OR
COM 684
3
TOTAL
13
3
OR
COM 608b
OR
172
Corporate
COM 652
3
COM 653
3
COM 654
3
Development
COM 686
3
COM 687
3
COM 652
3
COM 692
3
TOTAL
14
COM 608a
3
COM 608b
3
OR
COM 608c
3
COM 608c
3
TOTAL
3
TOTAL
3
www.daystar.ac.ke
3
3
OR
3
3
COM 685
July Semester
COM 608a
2nd Semester
Media Studies
COM 669
3
COM 683
3
COM 681
3
TOTAL
12
COM 698
6
TOTAL
6
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN COMMUNICATION
Rationale
Communication technologies in Africa in the 21st century are impacting society
and the Church. While Daystar University will continue to provide, with other
Christians, academic leadership to the church in Africa so as to address
through research, education, and consultation, the economic, social, political,
post-colonial, and conflict communication challenges of African societies and
those issues unique to the church of Christ, the Ph.D. in Communication seeks to
provide further education for aspiring servant leaders desiring to integrate their
Christian faith with their communication skills, creative abilities and knowledge
of communication and the arts in an African context.
Our programme seeks to equip our graduates on two levels: intellectual and
spiritual. On the intellectual front, we aspire to instil within the framework
of African values the following qualities in our graduates: critical and
creative thinking skills; confidence to commit to African ideas and values; an
understanding of the larger context in which they live; opportunity to develop
competence to compete in academic, corporate, and governmental arenas.
Spiritually, the programme seeks to enable graduates to do the following: know
God through Christ as Saviour within an African context; develop an individual,
authentic walk with Him; share that journey with others; find a purpose and a
calling; and develop the skills to pursue that calling.
Finally, in producing a network of Ph.D graduates, Daystar seeks to empower
Christians with a powerful voice in our global society through, development and
health communication channels, through corporate communication networks,
through both print and electronic media, through media professionalism,
teaching and academic scholarship.
Admission Requirements
Admission to the doctoral programme is limited to one intake annually,
comprising a 5-10 member student cohort of candidates of exceptionally high
competence and promise. All applicants must meet the entry requirements of
the School of Communication, Languages & Performing Arts. Specifically,
the students wishing to enter the Ph.D in Communication program must hold
a Master’s degree in Communication. The admission requirements normally
include:
• Evidence of devotion to Christ and good standing with their churches as
stipulated in Daystar University’s Charter Section 5(1);
• A 3.00 (on 4.00 system) grade point average in Master of Arts in
Communication with thesis or a Master of Arts in Communication without
thesis but with at least two research-based papers published in refereed
journals.
• For students whose medium of instruction is not English, and who have not
earned an earlier degree at a college or university at which the teaching
language is English, a score of 250 out of 300 (computer assisted)/
500 out of 677 (manual) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL) is required.
Student Assessment
•
•
•
A final examination will be administered at the end of each semester
for some courses; the mark scored by the student will be added to those
marks from continuous assessments to establish the student’s final mark for
a given course.
Course grades for Communication Ph.D students will vary from course to
course. The dissertation will be based 100% on assessment of complete
work at defence, while the Professional Development and Service
Learning will be based 100% on assessment on completed work at final
submission.
For each course the student is given a letter grade, which has the
following significance:
Marks
Letter Grade
Grade Point Average
91 – 100
A
4.00
81 – 90
A-
3.70
76 – 80
B+
3.30
71 – 75
B
3.00
Below 71
Significance
Superior
Average
Unacceptable for
credit
Duration of the Course/Examinations and Dissertation
Defence
The duration for the Ph. D in Communication program will be between three
to four years of full-time study, including time for dissertation. The program will
run on a semester basis, whereby a semester will run for 15 weeks (13 weeks
of classwork and 2 weeks of examinations) The program will operate a
credit system where one credit hour is equivalent to one lecture hour per week.
All requirements must be completed within eight-year limit from the time of a
student’s first enrolment in the program.
For one to start the dissertation, one will be expected to pass the comprehensive
examination.
Coursework
The coursework will consist of 39 credit hours which include 8 hours of general
education core courses, 10 hours of statistics and research methods courses,
6 hours of core communication courses, 12 hours of communication elective
courses and 3 hours of a professional development course. Students must
achieve a minimum of B grade (3.00) in each course.
Comprehensive Examination
A comprehensive examination is given when the student has completed all
required and prescribed courses. The comprehensive examination must be
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173
taken within three years of a student’s first enrolment in the program. The exams
will be written but students may be required to submit to oral examination
in cases where the written exams need clarification. To undertake the
comprehensive examination, a student must have passed all the core courses
and attained a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.00. It is on a
pass or fail basis and will not contribute to the total credit hours. However,
candidates who do not pass the comprehensive examination will not be
allowed to proceed with the program.
The Dissertation
Each candidate for the Ph.D in Communication degree must submit an
acceptable dissertation. The Ph.D dissertation at Daystar is expected to be
a substantial contribution to research in the field of study, demonstrating
originality, creativity, breadth of research, careful argumentation, and clear
English style. In principle, a good dissertation will be publishable (certainly
in the form of an article or articles). The dissertation is the centrepiece of
the doctoral enterprise. The topic should be chosen wisely, and the proposal
should be written after extensive appropriate reading and careful and thorough
research.
Specific Deadlines for Graduation
To graduate in any one academic year the final defence must be held at least
2 months before graduation. Note that meeting these deadlines in no way
guarantees graduation at the specified time. The need for extensive revisions
of the initial or defence draft and/or extra time needed by the external reader
to read the dissertation may prolong the process.
In order to graduate, a student must successfully complete the 60 credit hours
comprising 21 credit hours dissertation, 24 credit hours of core course and
15 elective credit hours chosen from specialization courses and a professional
development course as specified below:
Research Methodology
4
RES 851
Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis
3
RES 852
Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis
3
Communication Core Courses
6 Credits
COM 810
Advanced Communication Theory
3
COM 815
Communication Ethics
3
Specialization Courses
12 Credits
Students must complete any four of the following:
COM 830
Seminar on Human Communication
3
COM 831
Media Stewardship and Socio-Cultural
Institutions
3
COM 832
Seminar on Political, Public and Corporate
Communication
3
COM 833
Seminar on Development and Health
Communication
3
COM 834
Media Studies
3
COM 835
Seminar on Applied Organizational
Communication
3
3 Credits
Students must complete one of the following:
GRA 814
Leadership Development and Management
3
or
GRA 870
Education, Critical Thinking and Teaching
Methods
3
Credits
General Education Core Courses
Dissertation Research Project
8
21 Credits
10
COM 995
Dissertation I
6
6
COM 996
Dissertation II
6
12
COM 997
Dissertation III
6
Professional Development Course
3
COM 998
Dissertation IV
3
Dissertation
21
Some of these may be taken concurrently with approval of your supervisor
TOTAL
60
Statistics and Research Methods Courses
Communication Core Courses
Communication Elective Courses
General Education Core Courses
174
10 Credits
RES 850
Professional Development Courses
Requirements for Graduation
Course
Research Methodology and Analysis Courses
8 Credits
GRA 801
Doctoral Colloquium
2
BIL 801
Seminar on Integration of Faith and Life
3
BIL 802
Philosophy of Scientific Inquiry
3
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Tentative Schedule for the Communication Ph. D. Program
Semester 6-9:
Semester 1:
COM 995
Dissertation I
6
GRA 801
Doctoral Colloquium
2
COM 996
Dissertation II
6
BIL 801
Seminar on Integration of Faith and Life
3
COM 997
Dissertation III
6
BIL 802
Philosophy of Scientific Inquiry
3
COM 998
Dissertation IV
3
COM 810
Advanced Communication Theory
3
COM 815
Communication Ethics
3
RES 850
Research Methodology
4
RES 851
Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis
3
COM 830
Seminar on Human Communication
3
RES 852
Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis
3
COM 835
Seminar on Applied Organizational
Communication
3
COM 834
Seminar on Media Studies
3
COM 830
Seminar on Human Communication
3
COM 832
Seminar on Political, Public and Corporate
Communication
3
COM 833
Seminar on Development and Health
Communication
3
Semester 2:
Semester 3:
Semester 4:
Choose One Professional Development Course- (3 credits)
GRA 814
Leadership Development and Management
3
or
Education, Critical Thinking and Teaching
Methods
3
COM 831
Media Stewardship and Socio-Cultural
Institutions
3
COM 832
Seminar on Political, Public and Corporate
Communication
3
GRA 870
Semester 5:
Schedule for Comprehensive Examinations
COM 834
Seminar on Media Studies
3
COM 835
Seminar on Applied Organizational
Communication
3
Course Descriptions
GRA 801 DOCTORAL COLLOQUIUM
2 Credits
This course is intended to develop the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary
for students to fulfil academic requirements for producing and evaluating
postgraduate research writing. Through the course, students gain exposure to
major steps in designing, implementing, analysing, synthesising, and evaluating
research reports. The students will demonstrate understanding of the academic
rigour and standards expected of postgraduate students.
BIL 801 SEMINAR ON INTEGRATION OF FAITH AND LIFE
3 Credits
The course seeks to enable students to reach their full potential as Christians by
integrating their faith with their disciplines, lives and careers.
BIL 802 Philosophy of Scientific Inquiry
3 Credits
This course is designed to help students to critically review the nature and
the development of assumptions, concepts, terms, propositions, hypotheses,
arguments and conclusions as they function in the world of scholarship and
more specifically communication inquiry; to analyze the nature of knowledge
and how it relates to truth, belief and justification; to assess methodology of
production and acquisition of knowledge; and to relate truth claims to the study
of communications.
RES 850 Research Methodology
4 Credits
The purpose of the course is to inculcate in students advanced knowledge of
research techniques in the field of communication so as to prepare them for
the dissertation phase of the program, as well as equip them to conduct future
research in both academic and applied settings.
RES 851 Quantitative Research Methods & Analysis 3 Credits
This course is intended to train students in the use of a range of inferential
statistical techniques related to analysis of variance, correlation and regression.
Further, the course is intended to train students to develop for a real world
situation a representation (statistical model) that will provide an avenue for
obtaining results when the model is employed to analyze data. Students
will also be introduced to relevant research statistical software packages.
Prerequisite: Research Methodology (RES 850)
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RES 852 Qualitative Research Methods & Analysis
3 Credits
This course is intended to provide the students with skills needed to do
qualitative research. Building on foundational material from RES 850, it
aims at developing the students to become researchers that can competently
study social and cultural phenomena related to communication. Through the
course students will gain exposure to major steps in designing, preparing,
and conducting qualitative research. This course provides an opportunity for
students to explore data analysis within the context of the principles of individual
qualitative research approaches. Prerequisite: Research Methodology (RES
850)
COM 810 Advanced Communication Theory
3 Credits
This course is designed to equip communication doctoral students with the
requisite advanced theoretical background in interpersonal, group, public and
mass communication contexts for a successful transition to continued education
or to professional employment in their chosen communication field.
COM 815 Communication Ethics 3 Credits
This course provides students with an opportunity to grow in moral wisdom,
through case analysis, reading moral theory from African and other authors,
and engaging in the contemporary conversation surrounding communication
ethics with leaders in business, media, church and the academy.
COM 830 Seminar on Human Communication
3 Credits
This course is designed to critically review the concepts, models and theories
in several areas in the human communication discipline particularly in gender,
intercultural, intrapersonal and interpersonal context. It seeks to enable students
to articulate some of the crucial questions in the field, summarize current
theories and research, and provide relevant applications, and interrogate the
gender and cultural variation of human communication.
COM 831 Media Stewardship & 3 Credits
Socio-Cultural Institutions
The course is designed to provide students with tools to better understand
and explore and critically evaluate society’s own experiences of religion and
other emerging themes. and the portrayal of social institutions in the media:
religions, ethnicity, marriage and family, cultural practices, electronic faith
communities.. The course will also examine the impact of media content
underlying motivations for usage of selected media within divergent groups in
community. Students will come out of the class with improved critical thinking
skills for understanding the integration of faith in media selection, media content
and culture, stewardship and the future development and appropriation of
mass communication technologies locally and internationally.
COM 832 Seminar on Political, Public & 3 Credits
Corporate Communication
This seminar equips students with a communication knowledge bank that
enables them to operate in the public arena, corporate world, and within the
academic community, engaging in both research and teaching.
COM 833 Seminar on Development &
3 Credits
Health Communication
This course will provide students with an in-depth look at the theory, the
practice, and an examination of the emerging trends in development and
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health communication. It will examine the role of communication as an
intervention tool particularly within the backdrop of continuing poverty and
health challenges in the emerging democracies. The course will apply social
marketing principles to campaign strategies in health and development sectors
and critique their suitability for the African environment. Students will explore
current research trends in development and health communication.
COM 834 Media Studies 3 Credits
The course addresses relationships among audiences, media texts and
institutions (the way that media and society interact and affect each other
within political, cultural, and social contexts); development of the necessary
skills for critical consumption and production of media texts; relationships
between media technologies, economy, politics and socio-cultural forms
through a range of innovative methodological approaches, with a focus on
placing these developments within historical and social contexts; development
of critical understanding of digital media and online social practices that inform
academic research and public debates. The course also addresses emerging
media issues in today’s increasingly information-driven and globalised digital
world.
COM 835 Seminar on Applied 3 Credits
Organizational Communication
This seminar will enable students to understand the foundational and current
research trends in the theories and practices of the lifeblood of all organizations:
communication. The course covers the nexus between theory and practice,
enhances students’ critical thinking ability, develops their organizational
diagnostic and analytical skills through the study of organizational processes
and structures, enables them to carry out research on organizational
communication and ultimately prescribes solutions to communication problems
in organizations.
GRA 814 Leadership Development & Management 3 Credits
This course will equip students with knowledge, skills, and help them form
attitudes that will enable them to assume leadership in the academia, church,
private and corporate organisations, and also public institutions or any
other place where they may be called upon to serve. The course is aimed at
enabling graduates of the Ph.D. in communication program to be equipped
with leadership and management skills, drawn from their area of specialisation,
that they can draw from as they assume leadership positions in the various
facets of society.
GRA 870 Education, Critical Thinking & 3 Credits
Teaching Methods The course aims at enabling students to develop skills, engender knowledge, and
create (and renovate) attitudes that will enable them to facilitate transformative
learning, critical reflective thinking, and perspective transformation in the lives
of learners in post-secondary education programmes. The course focuses on a
variety of educational philosophies and their related teaching methodologies.
Additionally, students will experience these philosophies and methodologies in
ways that will facilitate transformative learning, critical reflective thinking, and
perspective transformation in them, their worldview, teaching, and profession.
DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGE AND PERFORMING ARTS
Communication and creativity play a vital role in any society. The courses in the Department of Language and Performing Arts contributes to this
role by offering students the opportunity to develop their talent in poetry, fiction, writing, translation, speech and music, as well as to appreciate the
arts from different parts of the world. We also equip students with the skills to become educators who will develop skills in these areas among the
upcoming generations.
The programmes under the department are;
• Graded Certificate in Music (GCCM)
•
Diploma in Music
•
BA Kiswahili
•
BA English
•
BA French
•
BA Music.
Each degree programme has a variety of courses which
prepare students interested in careers in;
• teaching
• film/script writing
• acting for theatre and film
• poetry writing and performance
• speech writing
• fiction writing
• journalism and news broadcast
• translation and interpretation
• music performance
CERTIFICATE COURSE
Graded Certificate Courses in Music (Gccm)
Rationale
Admission Requirements
Music plays a major role in the church and society in general. However,
many churches lack well trained musicians and instrumentalists in music
ministry. The GCCM is designed to develop musicians that are equipped
with the skills and knowledge needed to provide music leadership in the
administration of the church music administration, and to develop musicians
with entrepreneurial skills needed in the music industry. It is also designed to
provide music education for people interested in short term music training and
those interested in acquiring music knowledge and skills for further training.
Applicants must fulfill the spiritual requirements that apply to the admission of
all Daystar University students. In addition, they must demonstrate competence
of the English language and have attained �O’ Level education or its
equivalent. No prior knowledge of music is required. Those students intending
to pursue diploma in music at Daystar University after the GCCM must have
obtained at least a C- in �O’ Level or its equivalence and a GPA of 2.5 at
GCCM level.
Graduates in GCCM are prepared for a variety of careers including
music production, music composition and arranger of songs, performing
artist, instrumentalist/accompanist, theatrical musician, music writer, music
researcher, music educator, music technologist, choral trainer, church
music administrator, worship leader, music video producer, dancer, and
choreographer.
The graded certificate courses in music are designed to:
1. produce qualified Christian musicians who can apply biblical principles
in the development, administration and management of church music in
Africa
2. provide students with opportunity for developing their individual
capabilities in music through practical training;
3. produce musicians who can demonstrate the capacity to impact their
fellow musicians and congregations with positive moral and spiritual
values through their music compositions and choice of songs for ministry
4. prepare students for further training in music education.
Student Assessment
All quizzes, assignments, projects, tests, term papers, practical work, and
final examination will be included in the calculation of the student’s final
grade for a given course.
All grades below D will carry no credit and will be calculated as 0 grade
point and automatically carry an F rating.
The student is allowed to repeat failed courses only once. If the student fails
the course again, s/he will be discontinued from the program.
A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.00 must be maintained.
Course grades are derived from continuous assessment and from final
examination as guided by the following two categories.
i) First category: 100% Continuous Assessment, 0% Final Examination
Courses under this category are purely practical in orientation. Students
are continuously graded on contact hour basis. The final grade constitutes
an average of all the grades attained throughout the course. The following
courses fall under this category.
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CMU 003 Performance Instruction I
Concentrations
CMU 004 Performance Instruction II
There are six different certificates with different concentrations.
CMU 007 Recital I
Credit Hours
CMU 008 Recital II
Certificate In Performance
24
CMU 016 Music Project Planning and Management
Certificate In Church Music
24
CMU 018 Class Instrumental/Vocal Studies & Techniques
Certificate In Music Business
24
CMU 026 Performance Repertoire I
Certificate In Performing Arts
24
CMU 027 Performance Repertoire II
CMU 028 Dance Performance
CMU 031 Instrumental instruction (keyboard/guitar/voice)
ii) Second category 70% Continuous Assessment, 30% Final Examination
Courses under this category combine both knowledge and skills in music. The
final grade consists of an average of written continuous assessments and the
final examination marks. Courses under this category are:
CMU 001 Basic Music Theory and Aural Skills I
CMU 002 Basic Music Theory and Aural Skills II
CMU 005 Biblical Foundation of Performing Arts
CMU 006 Presentation, Stagecraft & Concert Organization
CMU 009 Church Music Administration
CMU 010 Church Music and Ministry
CMU 011 Leading Worship
CMU 012 Business Ethics in Music
CMU 013 Music Business Outlets and Marketing
CMU 014 Music Business Management
CMU 015 Basic Principles of Administration & Personnel Management
CMU 017 Music Production
CMU 019 Music Collection and Composition for Ministry
CMU 020 Performing Arts Instruction I
CMU 021 Performing Arts Instruction II
CMU 022 General Teaching Methods & Administration in Music
CMU 023 Micro-teaching
CMU 024 Music Educational Planning & Human Development
CMU 025 African Performing Arts
CMU 029 Curriculum Development in Music
CMU 030 Special Topic—elective
Requirements for Graduation
Students will be required to take music courses in their area of concentration.
They will require a minimum of 24 credit hours in the relevant and required
courses to qualify for graduation with a certificate in music. Each of the
certificate courses lasts for six months. There are two terms of three months
each.
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Certificate in Performance
Term One (12 Hours)
Term Two (12 Hours)
CMU 001
3
CMU 002
2
CMU 003
2
CMU 004
2
CMU 005
3
CMU 006
3
CMU 018
3
CMU 019
4
CMU 007
1
CMU 008
1
CMU 001
3
CMU 002
2
CMU 003
3
CMU 006
3
CMU 005
3
CMU 004
2
CMU 011
3
CMU 010
2
CMU 007
1
CMU 009
2
CMU 030
3
CMU 008
1
CMU 030
1
Certificate in Church Music
Term One (12 Hours)
Term Two (12 Hours)
Certificate In Music Business
Term One (13 Hours)
Term Two (11 Hours)
CMU 001
3
CMU 008
1
CMU 003
2
CMU 014
2
CMU 005
3
CMU 015
3
CMU 007
2
CMU 016
2
CMU 012
2
CMU 017
3
CMU 013
2
CMU 030
2
CMU 030
3
and impolite language; Reading aloud of texts and making conversation on
different topics such as ordering a meal in a restaurant, looking for a house
to rent.
Certificate In Performing Arts
Term One (13 Hours)
Term Two (11 Hours)
CMU 001
3
CMU 002
2
CMU 005
3
CMU 006
3
CMU 007
1
CMU 008
1
CMU 020
2
CMU 021
1
CMU 025
2
CMU 027
2
CMU 026
2
CMU 028
2
CMU 030
3
CMU 030
2
General Electives
The department offers the following courses to all students as part of their
electives requirements:
KIS 111 Beginning Kiswahili I 3 Credits
This course is intended for foreign students who have not been exposed to
the Kiswahili language. Content includes: A short introduction to the Kiswahili
language; The language situation– geographically and historically; Dialects
and related languages; Greetings; Morphology: Vowels and consonants; The
syllable; Sentence formation; Verb forms– infinitive, imperatives and plurals;
The Noun Classes: Introduction to noun classes. �M-Wa’ class: its pronominal
concords, prefixes; possessives and demonstrative agreements; Adjectives:
types and their pronominal concords; Other noun classes and their agreements
will be dealt with as above. Diminutive and Augmentative forms; The Phrase
Structure: Noun Phrases, verb phrases and prepositional phrases; Adverbs:
Adverbial concepts and prefixes �Pa’ - Definite, �Ku’- indefinite, etc; Complex
structures with �amba’, �ingine’ �-enye’, �ndi’ and �si’; Conclusion: Miscellaneous
notes/and drills. Pre-requisite:KIS 111.
FRE 112 Beginning French II 3 Credits
The preposition �a’ and the article; Questions with �quel’, �quelle(s)’; Imperative–
positive and negative; Verbs– simple present; Indirect interrogation; Pronominal
verbs; Adjectives; Tenses (futur proche, passe compose); The pronoun �moi’
with imperative; Interrogation using �qui’; Reciprocal verbs; Answering using
the words �parce que’; Expression of quantity; The past tense with �etre’ as
auxiliary; The past tense of auxiliary verbs; Construction of sentences using the
infinitive; The past tense using �il y a’. Pre-requisite: FRE 111
LIT 111 Literature 2 Credits
This course provides an introduction to Literature, different genres and concept
of literature, different themes addressing a variety of contemporary issues, e.g.
Love, Human Suffering, Culture conflict, Racism, Religion and Gender issues.
The primary aim of the course is to sensitize the student to the universality of
some of these themes regardless of differences in culture, race, age or ethnicity.
MUS 111 Music in Africa 2 Credits
Definition and meaning of major terms and concepts such as ethnomusicology,
musical culture, musical syncretism and musical acculturation; Role of music
in the African societies; Characteristics of African music; Study, functions and
categorization of African musical instruments; African vocal music and style
(including African popular music); African dances and dance dramas; Process
of musical acculturation in Africa; Characteristics of contemporary African
music; Approaches in ethnomusicology; History of church music in Africa;
Characteristics of African church music; Approaching innovations in church
music and worship in Africa.
KIS 112 Beginning Kiswahili II 3 Credits
Introduction: To discuss and revise the work covered in KIS 111, to establish
a systematic grammatical structure base for KIS 112; Verb Forms; Reciprocal,
prepositional, passive, etc; Negative tenses– prefixes, present and past; The
�Ja’ tense; The �Ki’ tense– conditional and present participle; The �Ka’ verb
tense; Subjunctive; The Relatives: �Amba’ and Infixes, general relative, manner
and time; Adjectives: compound adjectives, comparison of adjectives,–’ote’, -oenye, etc; Prepositions and Conjunctions— coordinating conjunctions,
subordinating; Adverbs– Adverbial concepts, prefixes �Ku’, �Pa’, �Mu’,
adverbial concepts and phrases; Nouns; Noun formation from verbs; Nouns—
Diminutives, augmentatives and collectives; Conclusion: general revision.
FRE 111 Beginning French I 3 Credits
This course is intended for students who have no knowledge of the French
language. Course content includes: how to greet people and introduce oneself
in French, different kinds of professions; French phonetics; Numbers and French
alphabet; Days of the week, months of the year and telling time; French regular
verbs; Forming simple sentences in present tense; Negation using the words Ne
— Pas; Interrogation; Articles, both definite and indefinite plurals; Presentation
- voici, voila, il ya ....; Demonstrative and possessive adjectives; Pronouns;
Tenses; Irregular verbs and verbs of other categories; French expressions, polite
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Course Descriptions
CMU 001 Basic Music Theory And Aural Skills I
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to African and Western
music literacy skills (reading and writing music) and to develop students’ music
aptitude and aural skills. Emphasis is placed on developing the aural skills of
sight singing using tonic solfa and staff notations. Introduction to the grandstaff;
note names, values and rests; key and time signatures, major scales in all
keys in treble and bass clefts, introduction to minor scales; intervals, primary
triads with their inversions and basic performance directions, sight singing of
melodies in sofa and staff notation within pentatonic scales; aural dictation
of melodies and rhythms up to four bars using semibreves, minims, crochets,
quavers and semiquavers; composing simple melodies and rhythms up to 8
bars; knowledge and use of Kodaly’s solfa hand signs and introduction to
simple four part harmony in major keys.
CMU 002 Basic Music Theory & Aural Skills II 2 Credits
This course is a development of music concepts, skills and materials acquired in
CMU 001. Sight-sing melodies in diatonic major and minor keys in both treble
and bass clefts; identify and sing intervals up to one octave; aural identification
of harmonic and melodic forms of minor scales; chromatic scale; major
and minor triads; clapping and aural recognition of simple and compound
time rhythms with syncopation using semi-breve, minim, crotchet, quaver,
semiquaver, in original and dotted notes, double sharps and flats; composing
rhythm to words; four-bar rhythms and melodies; irregular time signatures and
beat divisions; harmonizing a melody; common chord progressions; basic
principles in choral singing; analysis of chords in 4 – parts (Roman numeral
and popular chord analysis); voices in score; dominant sevenths, augmented
and diminished triads.
CMU 003 Performance Instruction I 2 Credits
The course is designed to enable each student to acquire and develop
performance skills and knowledge on a chosen musical instrument. Emphasis
is placed on correct expressions, execution and techniques of performing the
musical instrument. The content will vary depending on the musical instrument
chosen and the student’s entry level/experience with the musical instrument.
The students will be exposed to the care of instrument chosen; playing and/or
singing techniques; the role of the instrument in ministry; and skill development
of the range and performance ability of the instrument.
CMU 004 Performance Instruction II 2 Credits
This course is a development of CMU 003: Individual Performance Instruction I.
It is designed to further advance and develop the student’s performance on his/
her chosen instrument. The content varies depending on the musical instrument
chosen and student’s previous level/experience in CMU 003: Individual
Performance Instruction I. General contents include advanced playing and/or
singing techniques, and performance skill development.
CMU 005 Biblical Foundation of Performing Arts 3 Credits
This course exposes the student to biblical principles, knowledge and
understanding of music, dance and drama. Definitions of performing arts;
biblical teachings on God; biblical patterns of worship; music, dance and
drama in worship; performing arts as ministry; African performing arts;
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determining culturally appropriate performing arts for the church; and issues
in contextualization of performing arts in church worship, evangelism and
discipleship.
CMU 006 Presentation, Stagecraft 3 Credits
& Concert Organization The course seeks to equip the student with production skills of major musicals.
Essential elements of music, dance and drama; forms and varieties of dance and
drama; production skills; voice, speech, design and costume for productions;
scenery and stage-setting for concert productions; preparing, planning and
organizing Performing Arts concerts; and evaluating and directing concerts.
CMU 007 Recital I 1 Credit
The purpose of the course is to develop the student’s ensemble performance
skills in music. Singing selected pieces within students ability; playing musical
instruments to accompany group songs; conducting music performances; team
work; song selection; sightsinging songs for performances; performance skills;
SATB harmony and singing; composition skills; choral arrangement; adaptation
and arrangement techniques; vocal production skills; practical choral rehearsal
techniques; and accompaniment skills and techniques.
CMU 008 Recital II 1 Credit
This course is a development of CMU 007: Recital I. The objectives, teaching
methodology, instructional materials/equipment, and student assessment
remain the same. Only the choice of songs/music pieces will vary according
to the student’s level of performance skills and competence. Singing selected
pieces within student’s ability; playing musical instruments to accompany
group songs; conducting music performances; team work; song selection;
sightsinging songs for performances; performance skills; SATB harmony and
singing; advanced composition skills; choral arrangement; adaptation and
arrangement techniques for choirs and small singing groups; advanced vocal
production skills; practical choral rehearsal techniques; and accompaniment
skills and techniques.
CMU 009 Church Music Administration 2 Credits
The course aims at providing the student with basic administrative and
leadership skills in the management of church music ministry and musicians.
Biblical perspective of accountability; introduction to financial management;
budget and audit practices; general procurement; maintenance of inventory;
time management; church music ministries; record keeping; introduction to
modern trends in information technology; basic principles of administration;
work of boards and committees; decision making and problem solving
processes; efficient and effective administrators; planning for music ministry
and management; and managing the church music office.
CMU 010 Church Music and Ministry 2 Credits
This course introduces the student to church music as ministry. It examines
the use of music for worship, evangelism, and discipleship in the context of
the African church. Definitions of terms; an examination of the use of music
for worship, evangelism, and discipleship; issues of African church music;
identification of music areas in church ministry; choral ministries; conducting
and song selection; worship and worship teams’ ministry and leadership;
instrumentalists and instruments; solo and group ensembles; ministry needs for
the church musicians and the congregation; music as ministry; communication
through music; and contemporary gospel music.
CMU 011 Leading Worship 3 Credits
The course is designed to prepare the student to be an effective worship leader
who has a deep biblical understanding of worship. Definitions of worship;
biblical patterns of worship; music in worship; patterns for personal and group
worship; biblical teachings on corporate worship; qualities of a worship
leader; the roles of a worship team; congregational worship; practical guide
to leading worship; building effective worship teams; and ministry evaluation.
CMU 012 Business Ethics in Music 2 Credits
The course seeks to equip the student with moral principles and convictions in
the music business in order to work and behave as an upright person at his/
her place of work. Principles of business ethics to the world of music business;
Christian concept of work; fair employment practice; honesty in business;
social responsibilities; relationship with competitors; work ethics; morality with
advertising; definition of ethics; structure of an ethical system; free enterprise
and fair competition; the socially responsive manager; and a Christian in the
business world.
CMU 013 Music Business Outlets & Marketing 2 Credits
The purpose of the course is to prepare the student to perform marketing roles
and functions in the music production and service industry. It will expose the
student to a wide range of career opportunities in the music business. Definitions
of marketing and terminology used in marketing; principles of marketing;
integration of Christian faith and marketing; marketing opportunities in music
business; product, price, promotion and distribution decisions; designing
marketing strategies; marketing management; and music
production.
CMU 014 Music Business Management 2 Credits
The course aims at preparing the student for management roles in music
business. Starting a music business; management functions; biblical principles
of stewardship; music business development; book-keeping and costing;
marketing, pricing and costing; risks of music business; loan schemes and
insurance; attitude and performances; and legal issues such as copyright laws,
patents, contracts, performing laws, publishing and distribution laws.
CMU 015 Basic Principles of Administration 3 Credits
and Personnel Management
The course is designed to prepare students for administrative and personnel
management roles in running a music business. Basic principles of administration;
interview skills for personnel selection; task clarification; discipline; orientation
of new workers; conducting appraisal, interviews and planning for personnel
development; employing and placing staff according to competency; employee
relations and working with volunteers; wage and salary administration; and
keeping personnel records.
CMU 016 Music Project Planning & Management 2 Credits
This course prepares the student for management roles and functions in a music
business organization. It equips the student with practical skills in developing
music projects/businesses of the student’s choice. Identifying of investment
opportunities; market and demand analysis; technical analysis; financial
analysis; institutional analysis; planning and developing a music project.
CMU 017 Music Production 3 Credits
The course seeks to prepare students for the music production careers and
functions.Video, CD and audiocassette work and production processes;
research and strategies for cassette/CD/video project; the distribution system;
knowing your audience’s musical tastes; selecting musical styles; music CDs/
tapes/and video for Christians and non-Christians; programming recorded
music for evangelism; production facilities; purchasing equipment; and
management in Christian music recording ministry.
CMU 018 Class Instrumental/
3 Credits
Vocal Studies & Techniques The purpose of the course is to equip the student with theoretical understanding
of their chosen instrument and ensemble performance skills. This course will
be taken as a class. All students taking similar instruments will be grouped
together for instruction. Students can select African and/or Western instruments.
The course content will vary depending on the instrument chosen. General
topics will include historical background of instruments, harmony, ensemble
performance, rehearsal techniques, varied accompaniment or performance
techniques, tonal range of chosen instrument (s), theoretical and cultural issues
of instrument chosen, and use of instruments in African context.
CMU 019 Music Collection & 4 Credits
Composition for Ministry The course aims at helping the student to develop a repertoire of resource
materials for use in music performances and teaching. The course provides an
essential preparation for Christian music composers who will enhance worship
ministry. Topics include repertoire selection; music and ministry; identifying song
texts for worship, evangelism and discipleship; composing songs for church
ministry; record-keeping of songs/pieces; principles of music ethics; melodies,
rhythms, text and accompaniment; and compositional styles.
CMU 020 Performing Arts Instruction I 2 Credits
This course prepares students to be effective and efficient African Christian
performing artists. An examination of drama, music and dance elements;
dance drama; dramatization; dance patterns, styles and choreography;
stage performance; preparing for performance; song/music piece selection
for performing arts; creating performing arts that educate; acting; rehearsal
techniques; and presentations.
CMU 021 Performing Arts Instruction II 1 Credit
This course is a development of CMU 020: Performing Arts Instruction I.
Elements and concepts learnt in CMU 020 will further be developed for deeper
understanding. The purpose of this course is to advance the performance
skills of the student. An examination of drama, music and dance elements;
dance drama; dramatization; dance patterns, styles and choreography;
stage performance; preparing for performance; song/music piece selection
for performing arts; creating performing arts that educate; acting; rehearsal
techniques; and presentations.
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CMU 022 General Teaching Methods 3 Credits
& Admn. Music This course seeks to prepare the student to be a practical and effective music
teacher and administrator. It will assist the student to identify and choose the
best methods and materials suitable for his/her lessons and appropriate ways
of managing the classroom. Organization and planning for music lessons;
techniques of teaching music; nature and components of teaching and learning
process; planning for instruction; lesson objectives; lesson plans, scheme of
work; record of work; marking scheme; effective classroom communication;
basic principles of teaching; preparation and use of learning and teaching
materials: electronic media, photographic, non-projected media; graphic
media, and other visual /audio media; and leadership management.
CMU 023 Micro-teaching 1 Credit
The course aims at developing the student’s teaching methods, techniques, and
confidence. Demonstration in a simulated classroom; evaluation and critique
of demonstrations.
CMU 024 Music Education Planning 2 Credits
& Human Development
This course is designed to prepare students to plan effectively for music
education with specific reference to the human developmental stages/needs of
their pupils/students. Definition of human development terms such as growth,
development and maturation; music education; planning for music teaching;
rationale for studying child development; psychological theories of Piaget,
Ausubel and Bruner and their application to music education; authorities in
music education and their philosophies-Zoltan Kodaly, Carl Orff, and Suzuki;
music developmental stages; music needs of students; elements of planning and
their application to music education; and factors to consider in music education
planning.
CMU 025 African Performing Arts 2 Credits
This course aims at exposing the students to the history, practice, and nature
of African performing arts. An examination of the music, dance and drama in
Africa; vocal forms, history, values and cultural contexts of performing arts in
Africa; traditional and contemporary forms of African performing arts; definitions
of terms used in performing arts; the role of performing arts in Africa; dance
drama, dance rituals, dramatized dances and songs; choreography; music
making in Africa; organology; church music in Africa; approaching innovations
in church music and other performing arts in Africa, and presentations of
African performing arts.
CMU 026 Performance Repertoire I 2 Credit
This course provides an opportunity for students to practically develop their
performance skills and to collect a large repertoire of the performing arts.
Content will vary depending on chosen musicals for a given term. General
content will include theme, songs, artistic interactions, dance, integration of
music and other performing arts, and choice of props, movements, costumes,
choreography and performing arts.
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CMU 027 Performance Repertoire II 2 Credits
This course is a development of CMU 027: Performance Repertoire. New
musicals will be used to add to the repertoire of the students’ experiences. The
objectives, content, teaching methodology, instructional materials/equipment,
and assessments remain the same. Content will vary depending on chosen
musicals for a given term. General contents discussed and demonstrated in
CMU 026:Performance Repertoire I will be developed further.
CMU 028 Dance Performance 2 Credits
The course aims at preparing the student for dance roles and functions in
the church such as choreographer, dancer, and dance teacher. Biblical
foundation of dance; types of dance; dance choreography; dance movements
and patterns; dance styles; body language; interpretative dances; music
and dance; dance aerobics; care of the body; diet for dancers; dancers’
psychological, social, physical and spiritual well-being and performance;
dance performance; dance aerobics; and costumes.
CMU 029 Curriculum Development in Music 2 Credits
The purpose of this course is to prepare the student for music curriculum
development roles in schools, private sectors, and churches. It will also aid
students in developing and managing teaching resources. Definition of terms
used in curriculum development; curriculum goals and objectives; social
cultural and spiritual forces affecting curriculum; psychological basis for
curriculum design; the curriculum development process with specific reference
to music education in schools (pre-school, primary, Sunday school, music
schools); formulating learning objectives; organizing subject content; selecting
learning experiences; curriculum evaluation; and developing resources for
music education.
CMU 030 Special Topic (Elective) 3 Credits
This course will only be offered to a student who has had prior music training
in music theory and aurals. If the student’s level is higher than the course, CMU
001: Basic Music Theory and Aural Skills I, s/he will be given a proficiency
placement test (Written music theory and aural tests) to determine his/her level
of competency. The minimum grade required for this test is 70% for each exam
(written and aural). A student who gets less than the required grade will need
to take CMU 001. Students who pass the proficiency placement test will be
allowed to take CMU 031.
In term two, these students will be allowed to take the special topic course for
2 credit hours in place of CMU 002: Basic Music Theory and Aural Skills II,
which also carries 2 credit hours.
CMU 031 Instrumental Instruction (Keyboard/guitar/voice)
The course is designed to enable students to acquire and develop performance
skills and knowledge on a chosen instrument. Emphasis is placed on correct
expressions, execution and techniques of performing the instrument. The
course is open to all students/staff and faculty of Daystar. The content will vary
depending on the instrument chosen and the student’s entry level/experience
with the instrument. The student will be exposed to the care of instrument
chosen; playing/singing techniques; the role of the instrument in ministry; and
skill development of the range and performance ability of the instrument.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
SHAHADA YA KISWAHILI (BA)
Kiswahili ni Lugha ya Taifa nchini Kenya na Tanzania. Aidha Kiswahili ni
lugha inayozungumzwa katika nchi nyingi kote duniani na hasa katika nchi
tatu za Afrika Mashariki. Umuhimu wa Kiswahili kama lugha ya kimataifa
inazidi kuongezeka kwa kuteuliwa kwake kuwa mojawapo kati ya lugha
rasmi za Muungano wa Afrika Mashariki (EAC), Muungano wa Afrika (AU)
na viungo vingine kama vile bunge la Afrika. Isitoshe, changamoto nyingi
zinazidi kutolewa na matumizi ya Kiswahili kama lugha ya mawasiliano
katika mtandao, katika tarakilishi, katika maandishi ya Kimtandao, katika
uwanja wa tafsiri na katika vyombo mbalimbali vya habari, hapa nchini na
kwingineko.
Masaa
Masomo ya Jumla (General Education)
51
Lugha na Fasihi
72
Uchaguzi huru
Jumla ya Masaa ya kiusomi (Credit hours)
6
129
Mpangilio wa Kozi Kuu:
Kozi za lazima katika lugha na fasihi
Masaa
Mahitaji ya kujiunga na Kozi
KIS 113 Historia ya Lugha ya Kiswahili
3
Pamoja na kutimiza masharti ya chuo ya kijumla, mwanafunzi anayenuia
kutaalimikia somo la Kiswahili anahitaji kupata alama ya B- katika somo la
Kiswahili katika mtihani wa KCSE, au “alama” 5 katika elimu ya mfumo wa
awali nchini Kenya, au asilimia sitini na tano (65%) katika mifumo inayotumia
tuzo za asilimia au alama Ahadi E katika mfumo wa elimu wa “A”.
KIS 114 Misingi ya Lugha
3
KIS 115 Fonetiki na Fonolojia
3
KIS 210 Mofolojia na Sintaksia
3
KIS 211 Stadi za Mawasiliano
3
KIS 212 Utangulizi wa Fasihi
3
Tathmini
KIS 213 Nadharia za Fasihi
3
Jumla ya tuzo zifuatazo zitazingatiwa katika kila kozi:
Mtihani:
Asilimia sabini (70%)
Mijarabu:
Asilimia thelathini (30%)
KIS 214 Fasihi Simulizi
3
KIS 310 Isimujamii
3
KIS 312 Riwaya ya Kiswahili
3
Masharti ya Kufuzu
KIS 313 Tafsiri na Ukalimani
3
KIS 315 Ushairi wa Kiswahili
3
KIS 316 Hadithi Fupi
3
KIS 317 Mbinu za Utafiti
3
KIS 414 Uandishi na Uhariri
3
KIS 413 Sanaa za Maigizo
3
KIS 412 Tamthilia ya Kiswahili
3
KIS 597 Mradi wa utafiti (Fasihi au lugha)
3
Ili kufuzu na shahada ya B.A (Kiswahili) mwanafunzi anapaswa kutimiza
masharti yafuatayo:
1. kufanya kozi ishirini na nne (24) katika lugha na fasihi, kumi na nane
zikiwa za lazima na sita za kuchagua.
2. kufanya kozi ishirini za elimu ya jumla (General Education)
3. kufanya kozi angalau mbili za uchaguzi huru
Ili kuhitimu mwanafunzi atahitajika awe ametimiza masaa ya kiusomi (credit
hours) yasiyopungua mia moja ishirini na tisa na kujipatia jumla ya pointi
2.00 za chini kabisa kwenye kiwango cha GPA. Kozi zitafuata mpangilio
ufuatao:
www.daystar.ac.ke
183
Mpangilio wake ni kama ufuatavyo.
Kozi za hiari katika lugha (mwanafunzi achague kozi tatu)
3
KIS 314 Kiswahili na Vyombo vya Habari
3
Kozi nne za lazima
KIS 409 Mada Maalum (Lugha)
3
Kozi za hiari (kozi moja ya lugha na moja ya fasihi)
6
KIS 410 Lugha na Teknolojia
3
Jumla
18
KIS 411 Ujifunzaji Lugha ya Pili
3
KIS 418 Uchanganuzi Usemi
3
KIS 419 Somo Huru (lugha)
3
Kozi za hiari katika fasihi: (mwanafunzi achague kozi tatu)
12
Mpangilio wa Kozi Ndogo
Kozi za lazima
Masaa
KIS 113 Historia na Maendeleo ya Kiswahili
3
KIS 114 Misingi ya Lugha
3
KIS 215 Fasihi ya Watoto
3
KIS 212 Utangulizi wa Fasihi
3
KIS 409 Mada Maalum (Fasihi)
3
KIS 213 Utangulizi wa Nadharia za Kifasihi
3
KIS 415 Mtindo
3
KIS 416 Tungo Teule
3
Kozi za Hiari I - Lugha (Wanafunzi wachague kozi moja)
KIS 417 Masuala ya Kijinsia katika Fasihi
3
KIS 211 Stadi za Mawasiliano
3
KIS 419 Somo Huru (fasihi)
3
KIS 310 Isimujamii
3
KIS 313 Tafsiri na Ukalimani
3
KIS 314 Kiswahili na Vyombo vya Habari
3
KIS 410 Lugha na Teknolojia
3
KIS 411 Ujifunzaji Lugha ya Pili
3
KIS 414 Uandishi na Uhariri
3
Mwanafunzi atasoma kozi moja ya KIS 597 AMA katika fasihi au lugha. Vivyo
hivyo atasoma KIS 409 mara moja, ama katika fasihi au lugha.
Usomi wa Kozi Ndogo ya Kiswahili
(Swahili Minor)
Kozi hii inanuiwa kuwawezesha wanafunzi wa Kiswahili kutumia lugha
na fasihi ya Kiswahili katika nyanja mbalimbali za maendeleo ndani na
nje ya nchi ya Kenya. Mwanafunzi atapewa fursa kusoma lugha na fasihi
kwa minajili ya kumwezesha kujiendeleza yeye binafsi na pia kumwezesha
kutumia vipengele vyote vya lugha na fasihi kwa madhumuni aliali. Kufikia
mwisho wa kozi hii mwanafunzi anatarajiwa:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Kuwa na misingi bora katika dhana ya lugha na fasihi ya Kiswahili
Kufahamu sayansi ya lugha kwa Kiswahili.
Kuimarisha stadi mbalimbali za lugha mathalani kuzungumza na
kuandika kwa ufasaha kwa lugha ya Kiswahili.
Kukuza ujuzi wa kuchambua na kuchanganua makala mbalimbali za
lugha na fasihi ya Kiswahili
Mahitaji ya Kujiunga na Kozi
Mwanafunzi anayechukua Kiswahili kama kozi ndogo atafanya kozi sita (tatu
lugha na tatu fasihi) kwa masaa kumi na manane (18). Kozi nne zitakuwa za
lazima na mbili za kuchagua.
Mahitaji ya Kufuzu
Ili mwanafunzi afuzu akiwa na kozi ndogo ya Kiswahili, ni sharti awe
amesoma masaa18 au kozi sita katika Kiswahili. Ni lazima afanye kozi
mbili katika lugha na mbili katika fasihi. Kozi nyingine mbili ni za hiari.
184
Masaa
KIS 311 Semantiki
www.daystar.ac.ke
Kozi za Hiari II - Fasihi (Wanafunzi wachague kozi moja)
KIS 214 Fasihi Simulizi
3
KIS 312 Riwaya ya Kiswahili
3
KIS 315 Sanaa za Maigizo
3
KIS 316 Hadithi Fupi
3
KIS 412 Tamthilia ya Kiswahili
3
KIS 417 Masuala ya Kijinsia katika Fasihi
3
Ufafanuzi Wa Kozi
KIS 113: HISTORIA NA MAENDELEO YA KISWAHILI
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi atambue asili ya Waswahili
na Kiswahili na kuenea kwa Kiswahili katika Afrika Mashariki, Afrika na
duniani kwa jumla. Hii itamwezesha mwanafunzi kubaini uamilifu wa Kiswahili
katika miktadha na sajili mbalimbali kiwakati na kimaeneo.
Maelezo: Asili ya Waswahili na Kiswahili. Ithibati kama vile maandishi ya
awali ya Kiswahili. Kuenea kwa Kiswahili katika pwani ya Afrika Mashariki.
Hali ya Kiswahili katika muktadha wa sera ya lugha katika Afrika Mashariki.
Kiswahili katika Elimu. Nafasi ya asasi mbalimbali katika uenezaji wa
Kiswahili. Kiswahili na utandawazi.
KIS 114 MISINGI YA LUGHA
Madhumuni ya kozi hii ni kumtanguliza mwanafunzi kwa somo la lugha na
isimu kama mawanda ya taaluma na kumtanguliza kwa dhana na istilahi za
kimsingi za lugha na isimu. Aidha somo hili litamwezesha mwanafunzi kubaini
umuhimu wa lugha kama ala ya mawasiliano ya kibinadamu.
Maelezo: Dhana za kimsingi katika lugha: isimu, isimu kama sayansi; fonetiki,
fonolojia, mofolojia, sintaksia, semantiki na pragmatiki; Maana na sifa za
lugha: asili, sifa bia za lugha, aina za lugha, kazi za lugha.
KIS 115 FONETIKI NA FONOLOJIA YA KISWAHILI
Kozi hii inanuiwa kumpa mwanafunzi mafunzo kuhusu sauti za lugha ya
Kiswahili kwa kuchanganua dhana mbalimbali. Mada zitakazojadiliwa ni
kama vile sauti na mageuko yake.
Maelezo: Dhana za fonetiki na fonolojia kwa jumla; uainishaji wa sauti za
lugha ya Kiswahili– foni; matamshi; sifa za sauti: vipashio vya sauti, fonimu,
silabi, usimilisho, muungano na udondoshaji.
KIS 210 MOFOLOJIA NA SINTAKSIA
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kuzifahamu dhana
muhimu zinazohusika katika uchanganuzi wa lugha. Miongoni mwa mada
zitakazofundishwa ni maana ya mofolojia, mofu, mofimu, dhana ya sintaksia,
neno, sentensi na umuundo.
Malelezo: Dhana muhimu za mofolojia: mofu, mofimu na alomofu; Uundaji
wa maneno; Dhana ya sintaksia; neno, kirai, kishazi na sentensi; Nadharia
ya wanamapokeo; sarufi miundo, umuundo, uchanganuzi; sarufi zalishi na
misingi yake, milisi, utendaji, muundo nje na muundo ndani. Sarufi geuza
maumbo, dhana za ugeuzaji, aina za ugeuzaji; Uhusiano kati ya mofolojia
na sintaksia.
KIS 211 STADI ZA MAWASILIANO
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kuzimudu stadi za lugha
za kuwasiliana vyema. Miongoni mwa vipengele muhimu vya kozi ni sarufi
mwafaka, uwakifishaji ufaao na mpangilio na mtiririko wa hoja. Kozi hii
inazingatia pia stadi za kusikiliza, kuzungumza na kuandika ipasavyo.
Maelezo: Dhana ya mawasiliano na umuhimu wake; sifa za mawasiliano,
mkondo na vipengele vya mawasiliano: Vikwazo vya mawasiliano,
mawasiliano mwafaka: Mazungumzo; mada, hadhira, muktadha: Kusikiliza
na kuandika, viashiria katika mihadhara; sarufi na mitindo sahihi katika
mawasiliano bora: Mbinu za uandishi; hatua, tahajia na uakifishaji: Utafiti
wa maktabani, kutafuta marejeleo, kudondoa na kurejelea, bibliografia na
tanbihi. Kuandika ripoti na hojaji.
KIS 212 UTANGULIZI WA FASIHI
Kozi hii inanuiwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kuzielewa dhana za kimsingi
zinazohusiana na uchambuzi wa fasihi na pia kutambua misingi ya fasihi na
uhusiano wake na jamii kwa jumla. Baadhi ya mada zitakazorejelewa ni fani,
maudhui, riwaya, tamthilia, hadithi fupi na fasihi simulizi.
Maelezo: Dhana ya fasihi; maana, fani na maudhui; fasihi na maisha.
Uchambuzi wa fasihi. Uainishaji wa fasihi; fasihi simulizi, riwaya, hadithi fupi,
tamthilia na ushairi. Mikondo na mielekeo katika tanzu za fasihi.
KIS 213 NADHARIA ZA FASIHI
Kozi hii inanuiwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kutambua na kufafanua nadharia
mbalimbali za uhakiki wa fasihi na kuzitumia katika uchambuzi wa matini
mbalimbali za fasihi.
Maelezo: Misingi ya nadharia za uhakiki wa fasihi, fasihi, uhakiki na nadharia:
Nadharia na ulimbwende; urasimi, uhalisia na uhalisia wa kijamaa; umuundo,
u-Marxi, semiotiki, udhanaishi, unisai/ufeministi, ujumi mweusi; ubwege,
uamali uhalisiajabu, usasa na usasaleo, na nyinginezo.
KIS 214 FASIHI SIMULIZI
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kuthamini utanzu wa fasihi
simulizi ya Kiafrika na vile vile kuthamini mila na tamaduni za Kiafrika kwa
jumla. Aidha Kozi hii inatazamiwa kumwonyesha mwanafunzi uhusiano
uliopo kati ya fasihi simulizi na jamii husika. Kozi itazingatia mada mbalimbali
zikiwemo uainishaji wa tanzu za fasihi simulizi k.v. ngano, tarihi, methali,
vitendawili na nyimbo.
Maelezo: Dhana ya fasihi simulizi; utunzi, uhifadhi na ueneaji wa fasihi
simulizi: Uainishaji wa fasihi simulizi: Tanzu na vitanzu vya fasihi simulizi;
Fasihi simulizi na utamaduni; Fasihi simulizi katika jamii ya kisasa. Mabadiliko,
ueneaji na uamilifu.
KIS 215 FASIHI YA WATOTO
Kozi hii inanuiwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi afahamu nadharia kuhusu fasihi
ya watoto na pia kumwezesha kuchambua vitabu na makala za fasihi juu ya
fasihi ya watoto.
Maelezo: Maana ya fasihi ya watoto; dhima na mitazamo mbalimbali;
wadau katika fasihi ya watoto; Tanzu za fasihi ya watoto; fasihi simulizi, njozi,
tamthilia, riwaya, hadithi fupi, ushairi na nyimbo: Usimilisho; uandishi na
tathmini ya fasihi ya watoto. Historia na maendeleo ya fasihi ya watoto nchini
Kenya. Utafiti katika fasihi ya watoto.
KIS 310 ISIMUJAMII
Kozi hii inanuiwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kutambua nadharia mbalimbali
kuhusu isimujamii. Masuala yatakayojadiliwa ni kama vile isimujamii na
www.daystar.ac.ke
185
taaluma nyinginezo, uhusiano wa lugha na jamii, jamii lugha, lugha na
maingiliano na pia sera na upangaji wa lugha.
Maelezo: Maana ya isimujamii; isimujamii na taaluma nyinginezo; umuhimu
wa somo la isimujamii; nadharia; masuala ya kimsingi: lugha, lahaja, tabia
na mielekeo, jamii lugha, uwili lugha, ulumbi, diglosia, triglosia, lingua
franka, pijini, krioli. Lugha na mahusiano, hali na miktadha, uchanganuzi na
ubadilishaji misimbo, kuimarika na kufifia kwa lugha; sera na upangaji wa
lugha.
KIS 311 SEMANTIKI
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi atambue dhana kuu na
nadharia muhimu katika uchambuzi wa maana.
Maelezo: Dhana na nadharia za maana. Nafasi ya semantiki kama kipengele
cha lugha: malengo na mawanda ya maana.
KIS 312 RIWAYA YA KISWAHILI
Kozi hii inanuiwa kumpa mwanafunzi ujuzi kuhusu maana, mawanda na
uchambuzi wa riwaya ya Kiswahili. Kozi yenyewe ina sehemu tatu kuu.
Maana ya riwaya katika muktadha wa kinadharia, historia ya riwaya ya
Kiswahili na mapitio ya riwaya kadhaa.
Maelezo: Ufafanuzi kuhusu riwaya kwa jumla. Chimbuko na maendeleo ya
riwaya ya Kiswahili. Uchambuzi maudhui, mtindo na muundo katika riwaya
mbalimbali. Nafasi ya riwaya katika fasihi kwa jumla, riwaya ya Kiswahili na
utandawazi.
KIS 313 TAFSIRI NA UKALIMANI
Kozi hii kama kitangulizi cha taaluma ya tafsiri inadhamiriwa kumwezesha
mwanafunzi kufahamu maana, historia na maendeleo ya tafsiri pamoja na
nadharia ya tafsiri.
Maelezo: Nadharia ya tafsiri kwa ufupi; fasihi ya matini chasili; aina za matini
na upekee wake, mtazamo wa mtafsiri, Kuhariri; stadi na mikakati ya kutafsiri;
kutafuta visawe vya lugha lengwa; upekee wa lugha chasili na lugha lengwa;
Tafsiri matumizi; aina mbalimbali za matini; matatizo ya kutafsiri. Tathmini ya
tafsiri; malengo yake, mbinu, taratibu: Ukalimani; historia na umuhimu wake,
aina za ukalimani, nyenzo za ukalimani; sifa za mkalimani.
KIS 314 KISWAHILI NA VYOMBO VYA HABARI
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kutambua nafasi ya Kiswahili
katika vyombo vya habari. Kozi italenga kubainisha matumizi ya lugha katika
vyombo hivyo yakiwemo matangazo, vipindi tofauti na pia machapisho
ya magazeti. Miktadha na mashirika mbalimbali yanayotumia Kiswahili
yatarejelewa.
Maelezo: Matumizi ya Kiswahili katika vyombo mbalimbali k.v. majarida,
magazeti, redio na televisheni. Uainishaji wa vyombo hivyo. Mchango
wa Kiswahili katika uendelezaji wa harakati za kimaendeleo katika nchi
mbalimbali. Tathmini ya ufaafu wa Kiswahili kinachotumika. Mabadiliko na
mielekeo katika matumizi ya Kiswahili na lugha kwa jumla katika vyombo
hivyo.
186
www.daystar.ac.ke
KIS 315 USHAIRI WA KISWAHILI
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumpa mwanafunzi fursa ya kuchanganua maudhui na
maumbo ya ushairi wa Kiswahili kwa kuzingatia ushairi mkongwe na ule wa
kisasa.
Maelezo: Dhana ya ushairi; uchambuzi wa ushairi mkongwe na ule wa kisasa
katika muktadha wa jamii za nyakati hizo na umuhimu wake katika maendeleo
ya jamii; Fani na maudhui; Tanzu za ushairi wa Kiswahili; Mgogoro katika
taaluma ya ushairi wa Kiswahili. Maudhui ya ushairi katika vipindi mbalimbali:
Kazi za watunzi k.v. Ahmed Nasir, Muyaka, Shaaban Robert, Amri Abedi, A.
Abdalla, E. Kezilahabi, Kahigi na Mulokozi.
KIS 316 HADITHI FUPI
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumpa mwanafunzi maelezo kuhusu hadithi fupi kwa
kuzingatia asili na historia yake pamoja na muundo na kanuni za hadithi hizo.
Maelezo: Utanzu wa hadithi fupi, usuli, utendakazi na aina zake; muundo na
kanuni za utunzi; ngano, hekaya, visasili: Hadithi fupi ya kisasa; hadithi za
upelelezi; fasihi pendwa; uhakiki wa hadithi fupi za waandishi mbalimbali k.v.
E. Hussein, R. Haggard, M.S. Mohamed, K. Wamitila, M. Mbatiah.
KIS 317 MBINU ZA UTAFITI
Mahitaji ya kozi: mwanafunzi awe amechukua Kiswahili kama somo kuu.
Madhumuni ya kozi: Kozi hii inakusudiwa kumpa mwanafunzi stadi na ujuzi
unaofaa katika kufanya utafiti kwa jumla na hasa utafiti wa kiakademia.
Isitoshe, Kozi inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kutambua aina na
majukumu ya kazi za utafiti katika lugha na fasihi ya Kiswahili.
Maelezo: Maana na umuhimu wa utafiti, Aina na majukumu ya kazi za utafiti;
Mada ya utafiti; uteuzi wa kundi la kufanyiwa utafiti, ukusanyaji data; Data ya
kimsingi kutokana na maktaba, mahojiano; hojaji na uchunguzi: Uchanganuzi
na ufafanuzi wa data, Uandishi na mswada, kurejelea, kuhariri na kuhakiki.
KIS 409 MADA MAALUM KATIKA LUGHA NA FASIHI
Madhumuni ya kozi hii ni kumpa mwanafunzi nafasi ya kufanya kozi ambayo
angeihitaji lakini hakupata nafasi ya kuisoma kwa sababu haipo katika mtaala
wa masomo wa Chuo kikuu cha Daystar. Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha,
mwanafunzi kuzama zaidi katika uchanganuzi wa mada atakayosoma mradi
tu pawe na mwongozo wa kozi utakaoidhinishwa na kamati ya kitivo.
Lengo la kozi hii ni kustawisha yale ambayo mwanafunzi amejifunza katika
lugha na fasihi
Maelezo: Mada mbalimbali zinaweza kuzingatiwa katika kozi hii kama vile
Uchanganuzi wa Miundo ya Sentensi katika Kiswahili, Uchanganuzi wa
Makosa, Fasihi ya Afrika Mashariki, Uchanganuzi wa Matini, Mchango wa
Fasihi Shuleni, Kiswahili Ulimwenguni, Lugha katika Siasa n.k. Mada za kozi
zitabadilika kutegemea mahitaji ya kila muhula.
KIS 410 LUGHA NA TEKNOLOJIA
Kozi hii inadhamiria kumwezesha mwanafunzi kutambua maswala muhimu
kuhusu lugha na teknolojia ya kisasa hasa katika ukuaji na uamilifu wa lugha
ya Kiswahili.
Maelezo: Nafasi ya teknolojia katika kukuza lugha ya Kiswahili; Matumizi ya
tarakilishi na mtandao; Tarakilishi na ufundishaji wa lugha; Uchanganuzi wa
data za lugha kwa kutumia tarakilishi; kamusi za elektroniki; tafsiri kwa kutumia
mashine; vyombo vya habari na ukuaji wa lugha ya Kiswahili; Kiswahili na
Utandawazi; Nadharia za teknolojia na mawasiliano.
KIS 411 UJIFUNZAJI LUGHA YA PILI
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kutambua maswala muhimu
yanayohusu lugha ya pili pamoja na nadharia zinazoelezea utaratibu wa
kujifunza lugha ya pili.
Maelezo: Nadharia mbalimbali kuhusu kujifunza lugha ya pili. Tathmini ya
mbinu mbalimbali za utafiti wa maswala kuhusu kujifunza lugha ya pili; Dhana
za kimsingi; Mikakati ya mawasiliano; tofauti miongoni mwa wanafunzi;
mchango wa taaluma zingine.
KIS 412 TAMTHILIA YA KISWAHILI
Mahitaji ya kozi: KIS 212:- Utangulizi wa Fasihi; KIS 213:-Nadharia za
Fasihi Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kutambua chimbuko
la tamthilia kwa jumla na uhusiano wake na tamthilia ya Kiswahili na pia
kuelezea maendeleo ya tamthilia ya Kiswahili kwa kurejelea nadharia husika.
Maelezo: Maana na asili ya tamthilia. Aina za tamthilia k.v. futuhi, tanzia;
uchambuzi wa tamthilia kimaudhui na kimuundo; Maendeleo ya utanzu wa
tamthilia na nafasi yake katika kukua na kubadilika kwa fasihi ya Kiswahili.
KIS 413 SANAA ZA MAIGIZO
Kozi hii inanuiwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kufahamu asili na historia ya
sanaa za maigizo pamoja na maendeleo yake katika fasihi ya Kiswahili.
Maelezo: Maana ya sanaa za maigizo; aina za maigizo (miigo, sherehe,
muziki nk), sifa za sanaa za maigizo: Sanaa za maigizo na utendaji kazi
wake; mwigizaji, hisia, vitendo, sauti, “Kumwesesha mwanafunzi kupata
maarifa kuhusu matumizi ya Kiswahili katika vyombo vya habari ikiwemo
magazeti, utangazaji na vipindi maalum” mazungumzo, uimbaji; maleba na
vifaa vingine, hadhira; uigizaji, jukwaa, mawanda ya uigizaji.
KIS 414 UANDISHI NA UHARIRI
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kutambua mbinu na taratibu
zinazopaswa kutiwa maanani katika taaluma ya uandishi.
Maelezo: Kanuni za uandishi; utayarishaji wa miswada; uhariri, alama za
uhariri, usahihishaji, picha, uchapaji; sheria za Uchapishaji; usambazaji na
mauzo ya machapisho. Aina mbalimbali za uandishi mathalani uandishi wa
kiumbuji, uandishi wa kiuamilifi, uandishi wa hojaji nk. Stadi za uandishi kama
vile uakifishi, ufupishaji, tafsiri na nyinginezo. Uandishi wa makala mbalimbali
kama vile, ripoti, majarida, magazeti, vitabu.
KIS 415 MTINDO
Kozi hii inadhamiria kumwezesha mwanafunzi kutambua na kutumia mitindo
mbalimbali katika matini na sajili tofauti tofauti. Nadharia mbalimbali za
mtindo zitafundishwa.
Maelezo: Maana ya mtindo; Nadharia za mtindo; Mtindo na Isimu; Mtindo
na sajili mbalimbali; Uchambuzi wa matini kimtindo.
KIS 416 TUNGO TEULE
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kutathmini ubora wa kozi za
fasihi kwa kutumia vigezo vya mtindo, maudhui na nadharia, kwa kuzingatia
vipindi mbali mbali vya kihistoria.
Maelezo: Uchambuzi wa tungo teule za ushairi, riwaya na tamthilia kwa
kuzingatia mtindo, maudhui nadharia; Kubainisha sifa maluum katika vipindi
mbalimbali vya kihistoria kama vile urasimi; Uhalisia, Umuundo na Usasaleo.
KIS 417 MASUALA YA KIJINSIA KATIKA FASIHI
Kozi hii inadhamiriwa kumpa mwanafunzi uwezo wa kutathmini mielekeo ya
kiuana kama inavyobainika katika fasihi ya Kiswahili.
Maelezo: Dhana ya uana; Nadharia za kiuana; Uhakiki wa kiuana kwa
mujibu wa nadharia za kiuana; Uandishi na mielekeo ya kiuana; Itikadi za
kiuana katika fasihi simulizi; Mielekeo ya kiuana katika kazi za fasihi andishi
kwa mujibu wa maudhui, Matumizi ya lugha na usawiri wa wahusika.
KIS 418 UCHANGANUZI USEMI
Kozi hii inanuiwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kuchanganua maana kwa
kurejelea mzungumzaji na msikilizaji. Inahusika pia na fasiri ya nia ya
anayezungumza kwa kuhakiki jinsi muktadha unavyoathiri kile kinachosemwa
na mzungumzaji. Kozi hii inashughulika pia na jinsi wasikilizaji wanavyofasiri
kinachosemwa na kutambua maana.
Maelezo: Uchanganuzi wa maana; fasiri ya makusudio ya mazungumzo
katika miktadha mbalimbali; Nadharia za Uchanganuzi usemi – Mtazamo
wa Birmingham, Ethnografia ya mazungumzo, uchanganuzi wa mazungumzo,
Uzungumzaji tendaji/usemi tendaji, uchanganuzi usemi, matini na umatini:
Mshikamano na muwala, urejeleaji, udondoshaji, deiksisi na umbali.
KIS 419 SOMO HURU
Mahitaji ya kozi: ENG 111, ENG 112, KIS 114, KIS 212
Somo hili linadhamiriwa kumwezesha mwanafunzi kuzamia maeneo ya lugha
au fasihi yanayomvutia yeye binafsi lakini hayapo katika ratiba ya masomo
yanayotolewa.
Maelezo: Somo hili litachaguliwa na mwanafunzi mwenyewe. Wanafunzi
wana uhuru wa kuchagua maeneo katika lugha au fasihi mradi tu maeneo
hayo yasilingane na mada zilizo kwenye kozi za lazima au alizochagua
kati ya kozi za hiari. Mwanafunzi atahitajika kuandika mswada katika eneo
alilochagua. Mswada huu si mradi wa utafiti kwani hili ni somo la kuchagua.
Mifano ya mada za somo huru; Utafiti kuhusu mwandishi maalum katika
riwaya, tamthilia au ushairi. Utafiti juu ya mada fulani kwa kuzingatia wasanii
tofauti; kulinganisha kwa mtindo katika matini mbalimbali; kulinganisha athari
za muundo wa sauti wa lugha fulani ya kwanza (ya mama) kwa wazungumzaji
wa Kiswahili kama lugha ya pili; masuala ya kijinsia katika lugha na fasihi;
kulinganisha miundo ya sentensi kati ya lugha yoyote na Kiswahili; uchanganuzi
wa makosa; hali; uchanganuzi wa matini kwa kurejelea hasa vitabu vya kiada
vya shule; Fasihi Simulizi – Utafiti linganishi.
KIS 597 MRADI WA UTAFITI
Mahitaji ya Kozi: Kozi kumi na moja (11) katika lugha na fasihi; KIS 317
Kozi hii inajikita katika utafiti.
Mwanafunzi atabidika kutumia ujuzi
aliopata katika kozi mbalimbali kufanya utafiti na kuwasilisha matokeo
hayo kimaandishi. Ni sharti mada itakayoshughulikiwa ipitishwe na idara.
Mwanafunzi atawasilisha pendekezo la utafiti la kurasa 3-4 likiwa na suala
la utafiti, malengo ya utafiti, mbinu za utafiti, muhtasari wa utafiti, matarajio
na marejeleo. Karatasi ya mwisho ya utafiti ni sharti ipigwe chapa na iwe
na suala la utafiti, malengo ya utafiti, yaliyoandikwa kuhusu mada, mbinu,
uwasilishaji na uchanganuzi wa data, maamuzi na mapendekezo. Maendeleo
ya uandishi wa mradi huu yatachunguzwa kila wiki. Hii ni kozi ya lazima kwa
kila mwanafunzi anayechukua somo la Kiswahili kama somo kuu (Kiswahili
Major).
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187
UTARATIBU WA KOZI KATIKA MIAKA MINNE YA MASOMO SOMO KUU LIKIWA KISWAHILI
MWAKA WA KWANZA
Muhula wa Kwanza
MWAKA WA TATU
Muhula wa Pili
Muhula wa Kwanza
3
INS 112
3
INS 313
3
RET 321
3
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
KIS 310
3
KIS 313
3
KIS 113
3
ENV 102
2
KIS 311
3
KIS 315
3
KIS 114
3
KIS 115
3
KIS 312
3
KIS 316
3
MAT 102
2
LIT111/
MUS111/
ART111
2
RET 320
2
KIS 317
3
3
2
KOZI YA HIARI
(Lugha)
3
ACS 101
KOZI YA
HIARI(Fasihi)
ENG 112
3
ENG 098/111
JUMLA
3
17
JUMLA
Muhula wa Kwanza
Muhula wa Pili
2
BIO 111
3
INS 212
3
BIL 212
3
HPE 113
1
KIS 211
3
PHY 112
2
KIS 213
3
KIS 210
3
KIS 214
3
KIS 212
3
KOZI YA HIARI
(Lugha)
3
KOZI YA HIARI
(Fasihi)
3
www.daystar.ac.ke
17
JUMLA
16
JUMLA
Muhula wa Pili
INS 412
3
KIS 597
3
KIS 412
3
KOZI YA HIARI
(LUGHA)
3
KIS 413
3
KOZI YA HIARI
(FASIHI)
3
KOZI YA HIARI
(LUGHA)
3
UCHAGUZI
HURU
3
KOZI YA HIARI
(FASIHI)
3
JUMLA
18
18
MWAKA WA NNE
Muhula wa Kwanza
ECO 111
JUMLA
JUMLA
18
MWAKA WA PILI
188
Muhula wa Pili
INS 111
15
JUMLA
15
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH
English plays a significant role as one of Kenya’s two official languages and
as a medium of instruction in educational institutions. It is also the medium
of oral and written communication in both public and private institutions.
Graduates in English can pursue a variety of vocations, including teaching,
writing, translation, editing and journalism, as well as professions in the civil
service, the Christian ministry and business.
The graduate of Language and Literature
1. is acquainted with both historical and current developments in literature
and language;
2. has developed creativity in and appreciation of the creative arts,
particularly oral literature, story telling, poetry, fiction
3. can employ skills of literary criticism in the appreciation of literature and
the creative arts;
4. has keen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills;
5. is able to promote human values as seen from a Christian perspective;
and
6. employs scientific insight into the structural, psychological and
sociological properties of human language in general and the English
language in particular.
Admission Requirements
In addition to the general requirements by the University, a student who has
used English as a medium of instruction at secondary school major must have
any of the following:
• a minimum grade of B- in English at KCSE or
• Credit 4 under the �0’ Level system , or 66% with systems that use
percentages, or a Principal Pass in Literature at �A’ Level.
English Major (non-teaching)
Credit Hours
General Education
51
English
54
Minor
18 -22
Free Electives
2-6
TOTAL
129
Required Courses
Credit Hours
ENG 210 History and development of the English
Language
3
ENG 211 African Literature
3
ENG 212 The Phonology of English
3
ENG 213 Theory of Literature
3
ENG 214 English Structure and Usage
3
ENG 215 Oral Literature
3
ENG 314 Creative Writing
3
ENG 315 Major Trends in World Literature
3
ENG 327 Modern African Poetry
3
ENG 411 Stylistics and Literary Criticism
3
ENG 416 Advanced English syntax
3
ENG 597 Senior Project
3
TOTAL
36
Student who have not used English as the medium of instruction at secondary
school must take ENG 096 (Basic English) and ENG 098 (Remedial English)
before embarking on any of the degree level courses.
Student Assessment
Course grades in this department will be derived as follows:
1. For conceptual courses (e.g. ENG 111 and ENG 210), 70% will come
from the final examinations and 30% from continuous assessment items.
2. For courses that include a significant skill component (e.g. ENG 112,
ENG 314), 70% will come from the project and 30% from continuous
assessment.
Requirements for Graduation
1.
2.
The student must do 30 credit hours of the required courses.
In addition to required courses, the student must take nine (9) credits
from the Language electives and nine (9) credits from the Literature
electives.
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189
English Electives
Credit Hours
a. Language (All students must choose three (3) courses
ENG 317 Psycholinguistics
3
ENG 320 Second Language Learning
3
ENG 408 Special Topics
3
ENG 413 Discourse Analysis
3
ENG 414 Sociolinguistics
3
ENG/COM 415 Advanced Writing and Speech
Consultation
3
ENG 496 Independent Study
3
b. Literature (All students must choose three (3) courses)
ENG 229 Introduction to Dramatic Art
3
ENG 323 East African Literature
3
ENG 324 European Drama
3
ENG 325 Shakespeare
3
ENG 326 Survey of English Literature
3
ENG 343 Fiction Writing
3
ENG 408 Special Topics
3
ENG 412 African-American and Caribbean Literature
3
ENG 421 The English Novel
3
ENG 496 Independent Study
3
English Minor
Requirements for Graduation
Students with a minor in English, must have accumulated 21 credit hours in
English as follows:
Required Courses
3
ENG 211 African Literature
3
or
ENG 215 Oral Literature
3
ENG 212 The Phonology of English
3
ENG 214 English Structure and Usage
3
ENG 320 Second Language Learning
3
TOTAL
15
Electives I— Language (Student must choose one)
www.daystar.ac.ke
Credit Hours
ENG 314 Creative Writing
3
ENG 413 Discourse Analysis
3
ENG 414 Sociolinguistics
3
ENG/COM 415 Advanced Writing and Speech
Consultation
3
ENG 496 Independent Study (in Language)
3
Electives II —Literature (Student must choose one)
190
Credit Hours
ENG 210 History and Development of the English
Language
Credit Hours
ENG 315 Survey of World Literature
3
ENG 323 East African Literature
3
ENG 326 Survey of English Literature
3
ENG 411 Stylistic and Literary Criticism
3
ENG 412 African-American and Caribbean Literature
3
ENG 496 Independent Study in Literature
3
Course Descriptions
ENG 096 Basic English 0(9) Credits
This is a non-credit course that covers one semester. It is intended for those
students who come to Daystar from educational backgrounds where English
is not the medium of instruction. The only criterion for exemption is a TOEFL
score of at least 500 out of 700 or 250 out of 300 computer based points
less than two years old. Such students are introduced to the basic English skills
which will enable them to do other English courses as well as all other courses
taught in English at the University. The course focuses on oral skills, grammar,
intensive and extensive reading and various writing tasks. It helps students to
get intensive practice in using the English language.
ENG 098 Remedial English 3 Credits
Listening comprehension; Reading comprehension involving extracts depicting
different styles of writing; Grammar, comprising parts of speech and their
functions: nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions,
conjunctions, interjections; Tenses; Modal auxiliaries; Vocabulary: common
roots, synonyms, antonyms, homonyms; Figures of speech: similes, metaphors,
personification, hyperbole, euphemism, onomatopoeia, proverbs; Sentence
structure and punctuation; Creative writing, including official letter writing,
report writing, minute writing, writing of memos and notices, essays of different
types; Literature– analysis of given texts.
ENG 111 Advanced Reading 3 Credits
A variety of listening passages given regularly; Faster reading skills: establishing
reading goals, time management, dealing with bad reading habits, developing
vocabulary, previewing, scanning and search reading, noting relationships;
Various comprehension passages that help the student to appreciate varieties
of written English: formal, informal, literary, journalistic, etc; verbal expressions:
defining; Facts and opinions; transcoding; judging interpretations; summarizing
skills; critical thinking, connotations; book reviewing techniques; analysis of
given texts in terms of plot, themes, characterization, styles, taking exams etc.
ENG 112 Advanced Writing 3 Credits
Introduction to the research paper process; Using the library and other sources
of information; Pre-writing and thesis statement; Outlining–purpose and method;
Quotations; Footnotes and endnotes; Tables, illustrations, numbering systems;
Bibliography; Sentence structure: sentence types and fragments–comma splices,
fused sentences, unbalanced sentences; Punctuation: the period, capitalization,
quotation marks, underlining, comma, semicolon, colon, apostrophe; Spelling;
Paragraph writing: Topic sentence, assertions and supports; deductive,
inductive, combination paragraphs; Methods of paragraph development;
Types of writing: expository, descriptive, argumentative, narrative; Research
paper project. Pre-requisite: ENG 111, ICA 111
ENG 210 History and Devt of the English Language 3 Credits
The origin of English; Old English; Celtic and Christian influence on English;
Invasions and their influence (The Danes and the Normans); Latin and Greek
influence on the grammar and vocabulary of English; Sound change from
the Early Modern English period to the present; Standardization of English:
Expansion of English; English today. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.
ENG 211 African Literature 3 Credits
Study of the major concerns of African writers during the colonial and postcolonial periods. These will include anti-colonial literature, cultural conflicts in
different parts of Africa, struggle for independence, disillusionment, apartheid,
current social and political themes; Textual analysis of short stories, novels,
plays and poems from leading writers in Eastern, Western, Southern and
Northern Africa. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.
ENG 212 The Phonology of English 3 Credits
Organs of speech; Articulation of English vowels (including diphthongs),
and consonants; Phonemic analysis and transcription; Stress, rhythm and
intonation; Strong and weak forms and how they occur in spoken English;
Relation between English sound and the spelling systems; American and British
English; Rhoticity; Varieties of spoken English; The choices of a formal standard
of pronunciation and its uses; Appropriateness of other varieties for different
purposes; A comparison of English sounds with those of the students’ mother
tongue. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.
ENG 213 Theory of Literature 3 Credits
General Introduction to theory of Literature; definition of literature; theory, critic
and criticism. Functions of Literature with special focus on: Plato (427-347)
and Aristotle (384-322B.C), Dante Alghieri (1265-1321) Alexander Pope
(688-1744), William Wordsworth (1770-1850), Henry James (1843-1916);
Reader response criticism, new criticism; structuralism, realism; romanticism;
maxism, feminism; deconstruction; cultural poetics and post-colonialism. Prerequisites: ENG 111, ENG112.
ENG 214 English Structure and Usage 3 Credits
Traditional school of grammar; Principle elements of sentence structure;
Common sentence patterns; Parts of speech; Phrases: their sub-classes and
internal structure; Clauses: their sub-classes and internal structure; Morphological
categories of number, person, gender, tense and mood; Practice exercises.
Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.
ENG 215 Oral Literature 3 Credits
Definition and general characteristics of oral literature; Oral poetry: praise,
pleasure, survival, relationships, gods and ancestors, protest and satire; Oral
narratives: content and form; Proverbs: form, style and content; Riddles: style
and content; field techniques and methods. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG
112.
ENG 229 Introduction to Dramatic Art 3 Credits
The history and development of drama: Greek, Medieval, Renaissance,
Elizabethan, Western and African; Essentials of drama: (a) Characterization,
conflict, plot, performance, meaning (b) Forms: tragedy, comedy, ritual; Variety
of drama: play, musical, dance-drama; Script writing and development: raw
material, organizational language; Acting and movement: techniques of acting,
use of senses and body, relaxation and concentration; Improvization: the idea,
characterization development of the plot and acting; Production skills: casting,
rehearsals, production team, design, stage management, directing; Voice and
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191
speech in drama: production of sounds, variety of speeches, oral interpretation;
Design of costumes and make-up in drama: planning a production, role of
costumes and reasons for make-up; Sound and lighting effects. Pre-requisites:
ENG 111, ENG 112.
ENG 314 Creative Writing 3 Credits
A study of the basic elements of fiction writing: plot, theme, setting,
atmosphere, characterization, conflict, dialogue, suspense, flashbacks, story
beginnings, story endings, climax; A critical analysis of these techniques in
selected stories from different writers; Individual writing of short stories of a
given length; Elements of drama; A study of these elements of drama in short,
one-act plays; Students’ individual writing of short, one-act plays; Elements of
poetry; A comparative study of different poems to appreciate how the different
techniques have been employed; Individual writing of poems as guided. Prerequisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214.
ENG 315 Major Trends in World Literature 3 Credits
This course aims at introducing students to literature as universal and as a
world experience. The students will therefore study selected works from different
regions and historical periods with the purpose of enabling them to appreciate
world socio-economic, political and philosophical experiences and hence be
able to put their own experiences into perspective. The course surveys world
literature by focusing on selected texts that exemplify major philosophical and
literary trends that have significantly influenced literature. The trends include
classism, realism, feminism et.c. Samples from Greek literature, European,
Russian, Afro-American and Indian literatures are studied. Pre-requisites: ENG
111, ENG 112, ENG 214.
ENG 317 Psycholinguistics 3 Credits
Introduction to the area of study, nature and limitations of available evidence;
Child language development; Nativism versus Behaviourism; Development
stages; Chomsky’s premises; Syntactic approaches to child language
development; Pivot grammar; Telegraphic speech; Semantic approaches; Case
grammar; Holophrases; Functional and interactional approaches; Ontogenetic
and philogenetic development; Lexical development; Caretaker speech;
Comparability of first and second language development; Animal language
and attempts to teach human language to animals; Language and the brain;
Evidence for laterisation and localisation; Insights and evidence from speech
disorders, surgery and autopsy; Language and the mind; Memory storage and
retrieval; Encoding and decoding language. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG
112, ENG 214.
ENG 320 Second Language Learning 3 Credits
The concept of a second language; The audio-lingual approach; Direct
association principle; Learning by immersion; The translation approach;
Theories of learning vocabulary and grammar; First and subsequent language
inference; Variability; Learning and communication strategies. Pre-requisites:
ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 210.
ENG 323 East African Literature 3 Credits
The concept of East African literature. Poetry: examples; Jared Angira, Everett
Standa, Amateshe, Luvai, Kassam from Kenya; Okot p’Bitek, Kalungi Kabuye,
Richard Ntiru, Laban Erapu from Uganda; Noah Ndosi , Richard S. Malaba,
192
www.daystar.ac.ke
Eric Ng’maryo, Bahadur Tejani from Tanzania. Drama: Francis Imbuga from
Kenya, John Ruganda from Uganda, Hussein from Tanzania. Prose: Ngugi
wa Thiong’o from Kenya, Taban Lo Liyong from Uganda, Eric Ng’maryo from
Tanzania. These may be changed from time to time to include new authors.
Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.
ENG 324 European Drama 3 Credits
A historical survey of European drama ; Major thematic concerns of chosen
European dramatists; Such themes as love, nature versus the supernatural, class
struggle and the implications will be studied; Playwrights like Shakespeare,
Marlowe, Henrik, Ibsen, Homer, Chekov, etc. will be studied; Changes in
European drama through time e.g. the shift from gods to man and nature as
influencing man’s character. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.
ENG 325 Shakespeare 3 Credits
The course will deal with chosen plays and poems by Shakespeare. These
will be chosen from four categories namely: comedies, histories, tragedies
and poems. Life and times of Shakespeare comedies such as “The Comedy of
Errors”, “Much ado About Nothing”, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”; Histories
such as “King Richard the Second”, “King Henry the Fifth”, “King John”, “King
Richard the Third”; Tragedies such as “ Romeo and Juliet”, “Julius Caesar”,
“Macbeth”, “Othello” and “Hamlet”; Poems such as “Sonnets”, “A Lover’s
Complaint”, “Venus and Adonis”, “The Passionate Pilgrim”. Pre-requisites:
ENG 111, ENG 112.
ENG 326 Survey of English Literature 3 Credits
Early English literature (from antiquity to the 15th Century); 15th - 18th Century
English literature; 19th - 20th Century English literature; Major movements in
English literature (a) Romanticism (b) Realism (c) Socialism. Pre-requisites: ENG
111, ENG 112.
ENG 327 Modern African Poetry 3 Credits
The study will focus on the rise of modern African poetry, its origin and growth;
Major features of African poetry— case studies, e.g. p’Bitek and the cultural
revolutions; A study of poetry from different regions, i.e. poets from North,
South, West, East and Central Africa. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112,
ENG 214.
ENG 343 Fiction Writing 3 Credits
Plot structure; characterization; theme; viewpoint; dialogue; suspense and
suprise; flashbacks and transitions; beginnings and endings; emotions and
conflicts; setting; language style; The short story and the novel. Pre-requisites:
ENG 112, ENG 213, ENG 214.
ENG 408 Special Topics in Language & Literature 3 Credits
The course will be offered when students wish to study areas in language or
literature which are not in the Daystar curriculum. The course is intended to
enrich what students have studied in Language and Literature. The topic chosen
may not have the same content as any required course or an already chosen
elective in any department at Daystar. The course will be taught when there is
faculty with interest and expertise in that area and a complete course outline
approved by the Faculty Board is availed to the student. Examples of proposed
areas of study include the English verb phrase; Error analysis; The noun phrase;
North American literature; African drama; Drama in education; Women in
African literature; Women writers; Generative phonology; Transformational
syntax and pragmatics. Contents of the course may change from semester to
semester. Pre-requisites: All 200 level courses.
ENG 411 Stylistics and Literary Criticism 3 Credits
General introduction to the concepts of style and stylistics, language and
criticism; An overview of literary criticism beginning with clasical times to
the present; Literature and language use: inflections, word formation, foregrounding, lexico-semantic choices in literary style,syntax; Literature and style.
Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214.
ENG 412 African-American &Caribbean Literature 3 Credits
Introduction I: Landmarks in African-American Literature. Introduction II:
Landmarks in Caribbean Literature; African-American, Caribbean literature
and history. Major thematic concerns of the author in the Caribbean and
African-American regions; Perspective, style and innovation in literary art from
the two regions. Pre-requisites: All ENG 200 and 300 level courses.
ENG 413 Discourse Analysis 3 Credits
The meaning of discourse in the study of language; The domain and objectives
of discourse analysis: functions of language; Spoken and written discourse;
The role of context in interpretation; Discourse topic; Cohesion; Coherence;
Analysis of discourse. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214.
ENG 414 Socio Linguistics 3 Credits
The meaning and domain of socio-linguistics in the study of language; The
linguistic principles and methods involved in the study of geographical, social
and stylistic variations within languages; Language and human interactions;
Bilingualism, multilingualism; Pidgins and creoles, lingua franca; Speech
communities; Idiolect, dialect, languages in contact (transfer, code switching
and language shift); Language and culture and how they affect modes of
thinking; Language choice and language planning; Policy with regard to
education, administration, commerce; Language registers; Language situation
in Kenya and the roles of former colonial languages, indigenous languages in
Kenya and the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa. Pre-requisites: All ENG 200 level
courses.
ENG/COM 415 Advanced Writing 3 Credits
& Speech Consultation This is a limited enrollment course that trains selected students in advanced
writing and speaking pedagogy as well as consultation methodology. Upon
completing the course, students will serve on work study as peer tutors in the
Writing and Speech Center, where they will help other students with their
language and writing. Course content includes English grammar and syntax,
bibliographic and reference formats, techniques and philosophies of tutoring,
advanced public speaking instruction. Pre-requisite: Invitation by instructor.
Students who would like to be interviewed to join the course should have
scored a B+ and above in ENG 112, and will apply a semester in advance
to the course instructors in the Communication Department and the Language
and Performing Arts Department.
ENG 416 Advanced Grammar 3 Credits
Introduction to the study of syntax; traditional approaches to syntax; structural
approach to syntax; basic English syntax; the simple sentence; the verb phrase;
noun, pronoun and the basic noun phrase; adjectives and adverbs; the verb;
adjuncts, disjuncts, conjuncts; sentence connection; complex sentence; focus,
theme and emphasis. Pre-requisites: All 200 level courses.
ENG 421 The English Novel 3 Credits
The rise of the novel: Contribution of philosophers such as Descartes, John Locke,
Thomas Reid, etc.; The rise of the reading republic, social change, e.g. effects
of the industrial revolution movements that have affected the English novel:
Realism, Romanticism, Naturalism, Surrealism, Formalism, Art for Arts sake,
Social Darwinism, etc. Points of view and the narrative modes of the English
novel: First person, Omniscient narrator and other aspects of the novel; Critical
examination of novels by chosen English Novelists, e.g. Defoe, Richardson,
Fielding, Dickens, Austen, D.H. Lawrence, Conrad, E.M. Forster, James Joyce
etc.; The place of modern theory in the English novel; Deconstruction, Feminism,
New Historicism, Psycho-analysis, etc. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.
ENG 496 Independent Study 3 Credits
This will depend on the area of study that the student wants to explore. Students
are free to choose study areas from either Language or Literature, as long as
they do not have the same content as a required course or a chosen elective.
Examples: Study of a particular author in prose, drama or poetry; Study of a
particular theme from different authors; A comparative study of style in specific
texts; A comparative study of the effects of the sound system of a specific
first language on speakers of English as a second language; Gender issues
in literature or language; A comparative study of sentence patterns between
a specific language and English; Error analysis; Aspect and mood; Textual
analysis with special reference to school textbooks; Oral literature — a
Comparative Study. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214.
ENG 597 Senior Project 3 Credits
The course enables students to apply what they have learned in their major
fields of study through a written research paper. A student’s topic must meet
departmental approval. The student will submit a 3-4 page proposal stating:
the problem, objectives of study, method of study, preliminary outline of
study, expected results, tentative bibliography. The final paper will be typed
and should contain: statement of the problem, objectives of study, literature
review, methods, presentation of the research findings, analysis of the findings,
conclusions and recommendations. The writing of the paper will be reviewed
every week. Pre-requisite: 33 credit hours in Language and Literature.
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193
SUGGESTED FOUR YEAR PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR BA ENGLISH MAJOR
3rd YEAR
1st YEAR
Semester I
INS111
Semester I
Semester II
3
POL 111
1
ACS 101
Semester II
2
RET 321
2
BIL111
3
BIL 112
3
RET 320
2
ENG 327
3
ENG098 or 111
3
ENG 112
3
INS 313
3
ENG 411
3
MAT 102
2
PHY 112
2
ENG 314
3
ENG 416
3
ENV112
2
HPE113
1
ENG 315
3
ENG ELECTIVE
3
PHIL 111
3
INS112
3
ENG ELECTIVE
3
ENG ELECTIVE
3
FREE ELECTIVE
3
TOTAL
16
TOTAL
17
TOTAL
16
TOTAL
16
4th YEAR
2nd YEAR
Semester I
ECO111
194
Semester I
Semester II
2
BIL212
Semester II
ENG 597
3
ENG ELECTIVE
3
2
INS 412
3
ENG ELECTIVE
3
INS212
2
BIO111
2
FREE ELECTIVES
10
FREE ELECTIVES
12
ENG 211
3
ENG212
3
TOTAL
16
TOTAL
18
ELECTIVES
3
ENG214
3
LIT/MUS/ART
2
ENG215
3
ENG210
3
ENG Electives
3
TOTAL
15
TOTAL
16
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BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH
French is the official language as well as the medium of instruction in many
African countries. The French degree programme aims to prepare graduates
to practice a range of professions such as teaching, translation, interpretation,
journalism, as well as service in the civil service, Christian mission and
business in Africa and beyond. The degree in French will also enable them to
enhance the cultural exchange between different countries in Africa.
Admission Requirements
In addition to the general requirements by the university listed in Chapter 1,
section 4, a student pursuing the French Major degree must also have:
• a minimum grade of C+ in French in KCSE, or
• credit 6 under the `O’ level system, or
• 60% with systems that use percentages, or
• a principal pass at `A’ level in French.
Student Assessment
For conceptual courses, 70% will come from the final examinations and 30%
from continuous assessment.
Marks for the Research Project in French (FRE 597) will be 30% from the
research proposal and 70% from the final research project.
Reqiured Courses for the B.A. French Major
To graduate with a major in French is listed as follows:
Required Courses
36
Language electives
(students must choose at least 3 courses)
9
Literature electives
(students must choose at least 3 courses)
9
TOTAL
54
Required Courses for French Major
Credit Hours
FRE 121 French Language
3
FRE 122 French Usage
3
FRE 210 Introduction to General Linguistics
3
FRE 211 Introduction to African Literature in French
3
FRE 212 French Phonetics
3
FRE 215 Oral Literature
3
FRE 312 Literary Theory
3
FRE 318 Theories and Techniques of Translation I
3
FRE 315 French Syntax
3
Requirements For Graduation
FRE 327 African Poetry in French
3
Students may graduate with a major in French, or a major in French and a
minor in another field, or a major in another field and a minor in French. The
number of credit hours required for each option varies according to the field
of study. Regardless of the students’ option, they must complete at least 129
credit hours in order to graduate.
FRE 414 African Novel and Short Stories in French
3
Credit Hours
General Education
51
French
54
Minor in another field/Free electives
24
TOTAL
129
FRE 597 Research Project in French
3
TOTAL
36
Language Electives for French Major
(Students must choose at least 3 courses)
Credit Hours
FRE 216 French Semantics
3
FRE 217 Discourse Analysis
3
FRE 218 Sociolinguistics
3
FRE 313 Applied Linguistics
3
FRE 408 Special Topics
3
FRE 411 Theories and Techniques of Translation II
3
FRE 413 French for Specific Purposes
3
FRE 496 Independent Study
3
TOTAL
9
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195
Literature Electives for French Major
(Students must choose 3 courses)
Credit Hours
FRE 214 Introduction to the Francophone World
3
FRE 314 Issues in the Francophone World
3
FRE 316 French Literature in the 20th Century
3
FRE 319 Gender and African literature in French
3
FRE 408 Special Topics
3
FRE 415 History of French literature: 17th to 19th
Century
3
FRE 496 Independent Study
3
French Minor
A breakdown of the French courses required to graduate with a minor in French
is listed as follows:
Credit Hours
Required Courses
15
Language electives
(students must choose at least 1 course)
3
Literature electives
(students must choose at least 1 course)
3
TOTAL
21
Required Courses for French Minor
FRE 121 French Language
3
FRE 122 French Usage
3
FRE 210 Introduction to General Linguistics
3
FRE 211 Introduction to African Literature in French
3
FRE 212 French Phonetics
3
Language Electives for French Minor
(Students must choose at least 1 course)
FRE 216 Semantics
3
FRE 217 Discourse Analysis
3
FRE 218 Sociolinguistics 3
FRE 312 Applied Linguistics
3
FRE 413 French for Specific Purposes
FRE 496 Independent Study
Literature Electives for French Minor
(Students much choose at least 1 course)
196
FRE 314 Gender and African literature in French
3
FRE 316 French Literature in the 20th Century
3
FRE 414 The African Novel
3
FRE 415 History of French Literature: 17th to 19th
Century
3
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Course Descriptions
FRE 121 FRENCH LANGUAGE
3 Credits
The purpose of the course is to help students understand the different uses of
tenses and voices in oral and written French. Special emphasis will be laid on
listening and reading comprehension, with the aim of helping students identify
the use of special aspects of communication.
The following topics will be covered: conjugation of verbs in different tenses
and how they are used: present, past and future. Kinds of verbs: transitive,
intransitive and pronominal verbs, the conditional and the subjunctive, the
active and passive voices, pronouns (personal, possessive indefinite and
demonstrative), number and gender, compound and complex sentences,
homophones and markers of written language.
FRE 122 FRENCH USAGE
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to enable the student to understand oral and
written expressions in French in different situations of communication such as in
conversation, the media and literature.
The course will cover oral and written expression in the French language: the
different registers of French, Formal and informal communication, narratives,
notices, official documents, French in the print and electronic media.
FRE 210 INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL LINGUISTICS 3 Credits
This course seeks to introduce the student to linguistics as a field of study, to
help the student appreciate language as a human tool of communication, and
to introduce the student to different linguistic terms with particular reference to
the French language. The following topics will be taught: general linguistics
as the study of language, language as a human ability, language as a
performance and language as communication; introduction to phonetics,
syntax and semantics; dialect, idiolect and style, `standard’ language, pidgins
and creoles, bilingualism and multilingualism. Pre-requisite: FRE 122
FRE 211 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN 3 Credits
LITERATURE IN FRENCH
This course introduces the student to African literature written in French, and to
the philosophical, historical and economic backgrounds that influenced African
authors. The course will trace the historical development of literature from oral
literature to the beginning of the 20th century, the period before the World
Wars, the negritude movement in Africa and the diaspora, panafricanism and
literature in the period before independence. The course will also focus Pan
African Congress of 1919. The role of PrГ©sence Africaine in publication of
works by African writers and works of major writers such as AimГ© Cesaire,
L. S. Senghor, LГ©on Damas, Bernard DadiГ© and Frantz Fanon. Pre-requisite:
FRE 122
FRE 212 FRENCH PHONETICS
3 Credits
This course seeks to enable the students to understand the pronunciation and
intonation of French to enable them to improve their own oral skills in French.
Topics include the organs of speech, production and classification of French
sounds; vowels, semi-vowels and consonants in French, liaisons, intonation
and articulation, transcription and practical exercises in speech production and
International Phonetics system.
FRE 214 INTRODUCTION TO THE 3 Credits
FRANCOPHONE WORLD
This course seeks to help the students understand the extent of the use of French
in the world today, the history, the political organizations of the Francophone
world and their objectives, and the importance of French in global politics
and economy. The course will cover members of the Francophone world “La
Francophonie”, the assimilation colonial policy, de Gaulle and decolonisation,
Senghor and Negritude, the role of international organizations such as the
United Nations, the establishment of the group of Francophone nations as
an organization, Franco-African relations, organizations of cooperation such
as the ACCT, the Francophone vis - a - vis Anglophone world, historical,
geographical, economic and political perspectives of the Francophone world,
the differences between the Francophone body and the Commonwealth.
FRE 215 ORAL LITERATURE 3 Credits
This course will introduce the students to oral literature in order to help them
understand and appreciate this genre of African literature as well as African
culture as a whole. The course will cover the definition of genres of African
oral literature: narratives, proverbs, riddles and poetry; African oral literature
as source of traditional wisdom, style and content of African oral genres.
Literature under study will be mainly from, but not restricted to oral literature
from francophone countries.
FRE 216 FRENCH SEMANTICS
3 Credits
This course seeks to introduce the students to the field of semantics so that they
can appreciate the application and significance of the study and understanding
of language. It will cover philosophical and linguistic interest in meaning, word
and sentence meaning, syntagmatic and paradigmatic relations between
words as lexical items, lexicology and lexicography.
FRE 217 DISCOURSE ANALYSIS
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to enable students to make an interpretation and
analysis of language and discourse. It will cover the meaning of discourse in
the study of language, the functions of language, spoken and written discourse
with reference made to biblical and Christian discourse, cohesion, coherence
and analysis of discourse.
FRE 218 SOCIOLINGUISTICS
3 Credits
This course seeks to give the student a deeper understanding of the social
factors that influence the development and use of language, in order for the
student to appreciate the richness of language diversity.
The course will cover the meaning and domain of sociolinguistics in the study
of language, varieties of language: dialects, language, pidgin and creole,
speech and thought, language and social interaction, linguistic and social
inequality, languages in contact (interference, code-switching and language
shift), language choice and language policy and planning, the role of former
colonial languages and indigenous languages in Sub-Saharan Africa.
FRE 312 LITERARY THEORY
3 Credits
This course seeks to help students understand literary criticism and give them
the tools with which to analyze varied literature using various literary theories
including the Christian perspective. Students will not only be introduced to
literary criticism but will also be exposed to Marxist, psychoanalytic theories,
stylistics, and the impact of feminist criticism. Study will be done of chosen
texts from Africa and the diaspora such as “Une si longue lettre” “Les bouts de
bois de dieu” “Les Soleils des indépendances, “Le vieux nègre et la médaille”.
Prerequisite: FRE 210
FRE 313 APPLIED LINGUISTICS
3 Credits
This course seeks to help the students apply the study of linguistics to professional
and scholarly work. Students will learn about the application of linguistics to
other domains in the world; anthropology, sociology, psychology, language
teaching, communication, translation and literature. Prerequisites: FRE 210
FRE 314 ISSUES IN THE FRANCOPHONE WORLD
3 Credits
This course seeks to help the students understand the political, social and
cultural issues in the Francophone world surrounding the use of the French
language. It will focus on the period beginning from the history and growth
of the Francophone region to linguistic issues in Francophone countries,
colonisation and independence. Other topics covered will be the influence
of Francophone countries in international politics and economy. Issues such
as the Francophone countries vis-a-vis the Commonwealth, conflict as a result
of use of French with particular reference to Belgium, the Maghreb - (Algeria,
Morocco and Tunisia), Sub-Saharan Africa, Canada and South Eastern Asia
(Laos , Thailand and Cambodia), use of French at the expense of indigenous
(African) languages, feminization of the French language, orthography and the
dictionary. Prerequisite: FRE 211
FRE 315 FRENCH SYNTAX
3 Credits
This course seeks to help the students understand the relationship between
words in a sentence and sentence structure, with specific reference to the
French language.Topics to be covered will include: types of sentences, analysis
of sentence structures, as well as noun, verb, adjective and adverbial phrases,
preposition and their roles in the sentence, agreement and cohesion in the
sentence, meaning, transformational rules and grammar. Prerequisite: FRE 210
FRE 316 FRENCH LITERATURE IN THE 20TH CENTURY
3 Credits
The aim of this course is to give the students an understanding of literature
by French authors in the 20th century. Particular attention is paid to the
philosophical and historical background that influenced poetry, drama and
the novel during this particular period. The course will cover French literature
before, between and after the World Wars, Surrealism, Existential and Free
Liberal philosophy in French literature and selected works by authors such as
Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Mauriac, Beckett, PrГ©vert, Valery, Malraux,
Saint-ExupГ©ry, Simone de Beauvoir. Prerequisite: FRE 312
FRE 318 THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES 3 Credits
OF TRANSLATION I
This course aims at giving students the theoretical background and practical
skills necessary for translation. The student will learn the theory and techniques
of translation, interpretive theory, source and target language, machine
translation, translation of texts in certain communication situations such as
scientific, technical and literary texts.
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197
FRE 319 GENDER AND AFRICAN LITERATURE 3 Credits
IN FRENCH
The purpose of this course is to enable the students to appreciate gender
issues in Africa put forward through literature. The students will be exposed to
the gender issues facing writers in Africa; themes, metaphors, language and
images of both genders in literature, as well as sex roles, theories of criticism
and Biblical perspective. A study of selected works by Mariama BГў, Aminata
Sow Fall, Ousmane Sembene, and Henri Lopes will be done. Prerequisite:
FRE 312
FRE 327 AFRICAN POETRY IN FRENCH
3 Credits
This course seeks to acquaint the students with African poetry written in French. It
will cover themes, the historical, cultural and political background of its writing,
as well as the Negritude movement and its influence on poetry in the period
after the World Wars leading up to independence, legendary, historical and
anti-colonial themes of poetry in French. A study of works of poetry by Senghor,
Birago Diop, David Diop, Benard Dadié, Gérald Félix, Tchicay U Tam’si.
FRE 408 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 Credits
The purpose of the course is to create greater awareness in the students who
have special interest in studying a language or literature topic in more detail.
The topic will be derived from any area in language, literature or civilization
selected on the basis of student interest and faculty availability. Content will
vary from semester to semester and may be repeated for credit if topics are
different. The course will be offered for areas the students wish to study that
are not normally included in the curriculum. Examples of proposed areas
of study include Literature from the diaspora, issues such as exile, disease
and war in African literature, African drama, theory and method in Oral
literature, ideology and language: (language and power, language and
social emancipation, feminism and linguistic theory), oral communication vs
written communication, the Bible as literature. Prerequisite: 300 level courses
in language and literature.
FRE 411 THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES 3 Credits
OF TRANSLATION II
This course seeks to give the students detailed analyses of the different theories
of translation with special reference to Bible translation especially in Africa, as
well as introduce the students to the skills of interpretation. Topics include literal
translation, dynamic equivalent, comparative stylistics and simultaneous and
consecutive interpretation. Prerequisite: FRE 318
FRE 413 FRENCH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES 3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to equip the students with the written language and
conversational skills necessary for the business and professional world.
Prerequisite: FRE 312
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FRE 414 AFRICAN NOVEL AND 3 Credits
SHORT STORIES IN FRENCH
The purpose of this course is to expose the student to the novel in French by
African writers since 1921 in order to give the student insight into the political
and social issues treated by the authors. A study will be done of novels from
1921 to date. Writers such as Mongo Beti, Ferdinand Oyono, Henry Lopes,
Ousmane SembГЁne, Aminata Sow Fall, Boubacar Boris Diop, Fatou Diome
and Alain Mabanckou will be studied. Prerequisite: FRE 311
FRE 415 HISTORY OF FRENCH LITERATURE: 3 Credits
17TH TO 19TTH CENTURY
The purpose of the course is to expose the student to French literature from
the 17th to the 19th Century, as well as to give the students the philosophical
and historical issues that influenced their writing. A study will be done of
major literary movements in France from the 17th to 19th century: Romanticism,
Classical and Baroque Era, Surrealism; and of works by Voltaire, MoliГЁre,
Diderot, Hugo, Rousseau, Madame La Fayette. Prerequisite: FRE 311.
FRE 597 RESEARCH PROJECT IN FRENCH
3 Credits
The aim of this course is to give the students an opportunity to apply what
they have learned throughout the major fields of study and to carry out a
research and presentation on a topic of their own interest. This course will
cover proposal writing and report writing. Some of the topics to be covered
include statement of the problem, justification of the study, research questions,
objectives of study, hypotheses, significance of the study, scope and limitation,
conceptual framework, the literature review, the methodology, presentation of
research findings, analysis of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.
The writing of the paper will be reviewed every week.
FOUR-YEAR PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR B.A. FRENCH MAJOR
1st YEAR
Semester I
3rd YEAR
Semester II
Semester I
Semester II
INS 111
3
INS 112
3
INS 313
3
RET 321
2
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
RET 320
3
FRE 315
3
ENG 111
3
HPE 113
3
FRE 215
3
FRE 318
3
ENV 112
2
ENG 112
3
FRE 313
3
FRE ELECTIVE
3
ICA 111
1
MAT 102
3
ELECTIVE
3
FRE ELECTIVE
3
PHL 111
3
ACS 101
2
TOTAL
15
TOTAL
17
TOTAL
15
2nd YEAR
Semester I
ELECTIVE
3
TOTAL
17
4th YEAR
Semester II
Semester I
Semester II
ECO 111
3
PHY 112
2
INS 412
3
FRE ELECTIVE
3
INS 212
3
BIL 212
3
FRE327
3
FRE ELECTIVE
3
BIO 111
2
FRE 210
3
FRE 597
3
ELECTIVE
3
FRE 121
3
FRE 211
3
ELECTIVE
3
ELECTIVE
3
FRE 122
3
FRE 212
3
ELECTIVE
3
ELECTIVE
3
ELECTIVE
3
ELECTIVE
3
TOTAL
14
TOTAL
18
TOTAL
18
ELECTIVE
2
TOTAL
16
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199
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC
Rationale
The B.A Music major degree is designed to help students to acquire
knowledge and skills in music as well as promote the application of these
skills in the communication and contextualization of the gospel in Africa.
Specifically, graduates of the Music major are expected to become:
1.
qualified Christian musicians (choir directors for school and church music
festivals, worship leaders and ministers of music) capable of using music
effectively to communicate the gospel.
2.
musicians with an understanding of an international range of musical
cultures, a foundational grasp of the history of music of different cultures
and the role of music in contemporary society.
3.
musicians with exemplary skills in music performance
4.
teachers equipped with skills to teach music in schools and teacher
training institutions
5.
citizens who can contribute to the national consciousness and cultural
heritage through participation in musical events and research.
courses fall under this category:
MUS 113 Introduction to Choral singing
MUS 114 African Music Ensemble
MUS 115 Music and Dance Performance
MUS 221 Resources and Approaches for Schools and Churches.
ii) Second Category — 70% Continuous Assessment, 30% Final Exam
Courses under this category combine both knowledge and skills in Music.
Students are required to apply the knowledge acquired by giving elaborate
musical performances applicable to each area of study. The final grade
consists of an average of written Continuous Assessments, Mid-term
Examination, Performances and the Final Examination marks.
MUS 098 Introduction to Music Theory
MUS 111 Music in Africa
MUS 116 Music Literacy and Theory
MUS 118 Practical Musicianship I
MUS 119 Applied Private Instruction I (African and Western)
MUS 217 Western Music I
MUS 218 Practical Musicianship II
Admission Requirements
MUS 219 Applied Private Instruction II (African and Western)
Applicants must fulfill entry requirements that apply to the admission of all
Daystar undergraduate students. In addition, they must have obtained any of
the following:
• at least a grade C+ in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education
(KCSE) or its equivalent in Music
• diploma in Music from Daystar may join the degree program
MUS 221 Resources and Approaches for Schools and Churches
Student Assessment
a.
All quizzes, assignments, projects, tests, term papers, practical work
and the final examination will be included in the calculation of the
student’s final grade for a given course.
b.
All grades below D will carry no credit and will be calculated as 0
grade point and automatically carry an F rating.
c.
The student is allowed to repeat failed courses only twice. If the failed
course is a required course, the student will be discontinued from the
programme. Repeated courses will receive a grade not higher than a C.
d.
A cumulative grade point average (G.P.A) of at least 2.00 must be
maintained in all courses.
e.
Course grades for this major are derived from the continuous assessment
items and from the final examination as guided by the following two
categories.
i) First Category— 100% Continuous Assessment, 0% Final Exam
Courses under this category are purely practical in orientation. Students
are continuously graded on contact hour basis. The final grade constitutes
an average of all the grades attained throughout the course. The following
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MUS 311 Western Music II
MUS 312 Conducting
MUS 314 Music Education
MUS 318 Practical Musicianship III
MUS 319 Applied Private Instruction III (African and Western)
MUS 321 Music Composition and Ethics
MUS 408 Special Topics in Music
MUS 411 Church Music
MUS 412 Survey of World Music
MUS 414 Leading Worship
MUS 415 Advanced Music Composition
MUS 418 Practical Musicianship IV
MUS 419 Applied Private Instruction (African and Western) IV
MUS 421 Advanced Conducting
MUS 496 Independent Study in Music
Grading for MUS 408 (Special Topics in Music) will depend on the area of
study selected. For certain kinds of topics the first category of grading will be
applied while for others the �second category will be applicable.
Music Minor
Music Minor Requirements
Applied Private Instruction
Credit Hours
MUS 113 Introduction to Choral Singing
1
MUS 116 Music Literacy and Theory
3
MUS 118a Practical Musicianship I
2
MUS 118b Practical Musicianship II
2
MUS 119a Applied Private Instruction I
(African and Western)
Students may learn more than one instrument for the applied instruction series.
However, lessons for each instrument must be registered separately. As such,
the first semester of learning each instrument is as follows:
Year 1
Year 2
Semester 1
Semester 2
Semester 1
Semester 2
1
MUS 119a
piano
Music 119b
piano
Music 219a
piano
Music 219b
piano
MUS 119 b Applied Private Instruction II
(African and Western)
1
MUS 119a
violin
Music 119b
violin
Music 219a
violin
Music 219b
violin
MUS 217 Western Music I
2
MUS 312 Conducting
2
Year 3
Year 4
MUS 411 Church Music
3
Semester 1
MUS 412 Survey of World Music
3
TOTAL
20
MUS 319a
piano
MUS 319b
piano
MUS 419a
piano
MUS 419b
piano
MUS 319a
violin
MUS 319b
violin
MUS 419a
violin
MUS 419b
violin
Electives in Music
Semester 2
Semester 1
Semester 2
Credit Hours
MUS 314 Music Education
3
MUS 408 Special Topics in Music
3
MUS 415 Advanced Music Composition
3
MUS 496 Independent Study in Music
3
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201
Course Descriptions
MUS 098 Introduction to Music Theory 0(3) Credits
Sight-singing both pentatonic and diatonic melodies using staff notation in the
keys of C,F,Bb,Eb.G,D and A; Transcribing 4 to 8 beat patterns of rhythmic
dictation using semibreves, minims, crotchets, quavers and semi-quavers;
Melodic dictation up to 8 bars, knowledge and use of Koday’s sol-fa hand
signs; Identifying melodic and harmonic intervals; Understanding the grand
staff, note names, leger lines, note and rest values, accidentals, key and time
signatures, major scales, minor scales, chromatic scale, diatonic intervals,
primary triads with their inversions, use of triplets, double dots, double
sharps and flats, syncopation, transposition using treble and bass clefs and
performance directions; Analysis of simple four-part harmony using Roman
Numerals and Figured Bass.
MUS 111 Music in Africa 2 Credits
Definition and meaning of major terms and concepts such as ethnomusicology,
musical culture, musical syncretism and musical acculturation; Role of music
in the African societies; Characteristics of African music; Study, functions and
categorization of African musical instruments; African vocal music and style
(including African popular music); African dances and dance dramas; Process
of musical acculturation in Africa; Characteristics of contemporary African
music; Approaches in ethnomusicology; History of church music in Africa;
Characteristics of African church music; Approaching innovations in church
music and worship in Africa.
MUS 113 Introduction to Choral Singing
1 Credit
Vocal exercises with attention to proper posture and breathing to develop good
vocal technique; Rehearsal of selected songs as a choir; Performances of well
rehearsed/learned songs in Daystar chapel services or outside.
MUS 114 African Music Ensemble
1 Credit
Participation in learning basic techniques of music making on the chosen
instruments, incorporating individual playing into songs and pieces for the entire
group, singing and/or dancing when appropriate to the music; Developing
songs that will carry a Christian message, joining with student singing groups
such as the Daystar Choir, Daystar Christian Fellowship groups, or local church
choirs; Learning about instrument construction, maintenance, symbolism and
social contexts. Pre-requisite: MUS 111.
MUS 115 Music and Dance Performance
1 Credit
Participating in rehearsals as a class. This includes learning and perfecting
of selected songs and dances; Performance in a variety of settings such
as concerts, mass media (TV) and educational institutions; Selection and
adaptation of music for performance. Pre-requisite; MUS 111.
MUS 116 Music Literacy and Theory
3 Credits
Rhythmic and melodic dictation (African and Western styles); Interval
recognition- harmonic form up to two octaves; Alto and Tenor clefs; Diminished
sevenths and Neopolitan sixths; Realizing Figured Bass for keyboards and for
voices; Composing Figured Bass to a given melody; Part-writing and chorale
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harmonization; Melodic composition and harmonization (African and Western
styles); Secondary Seventh and their inversions in major and minor keys;
Suspensions, modulations; Composing within a given harmonic framework
(African and Western styles), counterpoint; Analysis of rhythmic structure and of
phrasing (African and Western music). Pre-requisite: MUS 098.
MUS 118 Practical Musicianship I a & b
2 Credits
Semester I (a)
Introduction to the course; Rhythm names; Rhythm exercises; Sol-fa: s-m-d;
Notation skills; Staff; Barlines; Notes; Handsigns; Rhythm names/exercises; 2
time; pentatonic scales, songs, exercises; first and second endings; conducting
in 24; Ostinato work; Extending the material learned; Rhythm names/exercises
in 34 time; Fa and Ti; Diatonic scale; Diatonic songs/exercise/dictation; Letter
names; Keyboard acquaintance; Diatonic intervals; Rhythm names/exercises;
Upbeat; Conducting in 44; Tie; Keyboard work; Inversion of intervals; Sharp;
Key of C and G; Slur; Ostinato; Pause; D. C. al Fine; Interval dictation;
sightsinging songs in Key of C and G; Keyboard work; Form AABA, ABBA;
Bass clef; Letter names; Leger lines; Phrases; Keyboard work; Flat; key of F;
songs in F; Two-part singing; Canons in F; Scales on key board
Sightsinging in 3 parts; Rhythmic exercises; Key of D; Note names; Italian terms
for dynamic markings; Key of B flat; Extending material learned; Keyboard
work/scales; Key of A; Rhythmic exercises; Three-part singing; Key of E flat;
Triads; Primary triads; Dictation in triads;
Note names; Keyboard work; Simple melodic writing; Review and extension of
concepts with more advanced musical experiences.
Semester II 2 Credits
Review all rhythmic and melodic elements; Sightsinging and aural dictation.
Sol-fa and note names; Review extended; Harmonic minor; Fi; Italian dynamic
markings extended; A harmonic minor; Songs and dictation in A harmonic
minor; Compound time; Conducting in 6; Keyboard work; D harmonic minor;
Songs; scales, keyboard work in D harmonic minor; E harmonic minor;
Compound time 64; Conducting in 6; Keyboard work; 44; Key of B minor
and G minor; Si; Melodic minor; Keyboard work; Sightsinging in compound
time in the studied minor keys; All triads and their functions; C harmonic minor;
F sharp harmonic minor; Form; Theme and Variations; Sightsinging in that
form; Keyboard work; Ostinato work; Extending the material learned; More
advanced keyboard work.
MUS 119 Applied Private Instruction I a & b 1
1 Credit
(African and Western)
The content will vary depending on the instrument chosen, and the students
entry level. Emphasis is placed on correct execution and technique, as well as
musical expression. The course is designed so that each student can acquire
meaningful musical growth from her/his entry level. The course is designed
so that a student goes through two semesters. This ensures that an absolute
beginner under the music minor programme can reach the standardized level
of proficiency at the end of the second semester of study. The proficiency
requirements also form a guideline for non-music students taking the course.
Pre-requisite: MUS 098.
NOTE: All music students will be required to pass a proficiency examination
in the piano keyboard. A pass in proficiency is a graduation requirement for
both music major and music minor students. The proficiency requirements are
as follows:
1. Any major scale — 2 octaves, both hands, ascending and descending.
2. Two contrasting ear pieces.
3. One prepared piece.
4. A four-part hymn.
Students coming with prior experience of the instrument under study will be
expected to advance progressively from their entry level. Their proficiency will
be at a higher level to match the progress envisaged.
MUS 217 Western Music I 2 Credits
Introduction to the course, ancient sources of music; World of chant, early
Medieval period (500-1100); Antiphon, trope, conductus, secular monophony,
Gregorian chant; Late Middle Ages (1100-1430), musical ficta, canzo,
conductus, motet,church modes, organum; Polyphony, polyphonic mass,
Estampie, Perotin, Machaut; Renaissance period (1430-1600), fauxbourdon,
motet, madrigal, anthem,chanson, cantus firmus, ricercar, canzona; Dunstable,
Dufay, Ockeghem, des Prez, Tallis, Gabrielli, Byrd, Victoria, Palestrina, Morley,
Gesualdo, Hassler, Monteverdi; Baroque period (1600-1750), recitative,
aria, trio sonata, opera, operaseria, oratorio, cantata, theme and variations,
homophony; Toccata, fugue, passacaglia, chaconne, chorale prelude, suite,
concerto grosso, solo concerto, passion; Monteverdi, Praetorius, Schutz,
Carissimi, Lully, Purcell, Pachelbel, Scarlatti, Vivaldi, Teleman, Rameau; J.S.
Bach, Handel; Classical period (1725- 1800), oratorio, opera buffa; SonataAllegro form; Rondo, variation form, minuet and trio, overture, chamber music,
symphony, serenade, divertimenti, requiem; Gluck, CPE Bach, Haydn, Mozart,
Beethoven. Pre-requisites: MUS 116, MUS 118.
MUS 218 Practical Musicianship II a & b 2 Credits
Semester I
Review of material learned in MUS 118; Extending the material learned with
new musical experiences;2 time; Conducting and singing in2 time; Key of E
and C sharp harmonic minor; Melodic minors in keys of E and C sharp; Partsinging in scales learned; Triplets; duplets; Upbeats with quaver; Keys of A flat
and F harmonic and melodic minors; Part-singing in scales learned; Dotted
quavers and semi-quavers; Upbeats with semi-quavers; Tied notes; all triads
and functions in the diatonic scale; Singing in four-parts; Extending the material
learned; Compound time 2; Rhythmic exercises and conducting in and 12;
Various rhythmic syncopations; Harmonic dictation; 34 time; Conducting and
singing in 34 time; 22; Extending the material learned. Pre-requisite: MUS
118.
Semester II
2 Credits
Review of material from Semester I; Review continued and extension of
concepts with more advanced musical experience; Review of forms learned;
Rondo form; Cadences; Key of B; Cadences continued; Keyboard work; More
complicated rhythms; Tied notes; Key of G sharp harmonic and melodic minors;
Key of D flat; Keyboard work; Part-singing; 5/4 time; Key of B flat harmonic
and me1odic minors; conducting and singing in 5/4 time; Extending the
material learned; Key of F sharp; Keyboard work; Key of D sharp harmonic
and melodic minors; Keyboard work; Part-singing; Key of G flat; Keyboard
work; Key of E flat harmonic and melodic minors
MUS 219 Applied Private Instruction II a & b
1 Credit
(African and Western)
The content will vary depending on the instrument chosen, and the student’s
entry level/experience with the instrument. Emphasis is placed on correct
execution and technique, as well as musical expression. The course is designed
that each student can acquire meaningful musical growth from her/his entry
level. The course is designed so that a student goes through two consecutive
semesters with one instrument of study. This is to ensure reasonable exposure
an instrument before changing from one to another, Pre-requisite: MUS 119.
MUS 221 Resources and Approaches 3 Credits
for Schools and Churches
Introduction to course, Folk song, A comparison between folk songs and art
music; Philosophy of music education - Orff, Suzuki, Daicrose, Kodaly; Scales,
)des, Analysis of folk songs; Tools for teaching; rhythm names, sol-fa, good
materials; Organization of Retrieval File; Song presentation; Lesson planning,
Teaching of aurals; Videos showing master music teachers; Ingredients of
dance; Presentation of dances in class setting; How to teach a dance; How to
listen music; kinds of listeners; Structured listening and analysis; Completion of
retrieval Files. Pre-requisites: MUS 115, MUS 217.
MUS 311 Western Music II
2 Credits
Introduction to the course, review of material studied in Mus 117; Romantic
period (1800- 1910), Art song. Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Wolf,
Brahms; Italian, French and German Opera, Verdi, Wagner, Rossini, Bellini,
Donizetti, Puccini; Choral works, Mendelssohn, sonata form, symphony,
Berlioz, Mahler; no works, polonaise, nocturne, mazurka, waltz, rhapsody,
etudes, chopin; Programme music, symphonic poem, Liszt, virtuoso, Paganini;
Nationalism, Smetana, Borodin, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Dvorak, Grieg,
Rimsky-Korsakov; Faure, Bruckner, Franck, Strauss, Sibelius; Early Twentieth
Century (1900- 1945), impressionism, Debussy, Ravel; Schoenberg, twelvetone technique, serialism, microtonality, sprechstimme, atonality; Stravinsky,
polytonality, concerto, suite, ballet; Choral works, Kodaly, Bartok, Vaughan
Williams, Hoist, Prokofiev, Varese, Gershwin, Jazz; Expressionism, Berg, Elgar,
Copland, de Falla, Bloch, Weberri, Ives, Milhaud, Orff, Hindemith, Sessions;
Late Twentieth Century music (1945-present), rise of jazz and popular music,
ragtime, blues, swing; Minimalism, electronic music, music, music theater,
Carter, Cage, aleatory music, Britten; Babbitt, Foss, Ligeti, Boulez, Musgrave,
Stockhousen, Crumb, Glass, Davies. Pre-requisite: MUS 217.
MUS 312 Conducting 2 Credits
During this course, students are taken from rudimentary levels of conducting
expertise to the point where they are able to competently conduct a song
of intermediate conducting difficulty. Class sessions will primarily consist
of conducting practice. While the emphasis is on practice in conducting
technique, related areas of importance to the choral conductor will be
discussed. Topics in addition to conducting techniques include: Physiology
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of breathing, diaphragmatic breathing, the role of the conductor, rationale for
church choirs, the role of the choir in the Church and school; Accompaniment,
elementary diction, marking a score, advantages of various musical styles,
e.g. Western and African, choir competitions; Techniques of choral arrangers,
composing for choirs, rehearsal techniques, performance considerations, basic
seating arrangements. Pre-requisite: MUS 217.
MUS 314 Music Education
3 Credits
Definition and meaning of major terms and concepts such as Music Education,
Teaching Methods, Teaching Strategies and Teaching Techniques; Music
and Education; The basic principles and methods of the music syllabus for
schools; Scheme of work and lesson plans in music; Music course objectives for
teaching; Music, motivation and psychology; Evaluation and measurement of
progress in music; Selection of music content; Teaching aids in music and their
use; Organization of music programmes; The Christian music teacher; Music
and communication. Pre-requisite: MUS 221.
MUS 318 Practical Musicianship III a & b 1 Credit
Semester I
Review of material learned in MUS 118 and MUS 218; Extending the material
learned; Alto Clef; Singing in the alto clef; Harmonic analysis of simple
works; tending the material learned; All altered notes; Enharmonic notes;
Review of material learned; Chromatic scale; Singing the chromatic scale;
Keyboard work; Harmonic analysis and harmonic composing; Keyboard
work; Sightsinging using letter names; Keyboard work; Tonal and real answers;
Review and tension of concepts with more advanced musical experiences.
Semester II 1 Credit
Review of material learned in Semester I; Extending the material learned with the
more advanced musical experiences; More complicated syncopated rhythmns;
Harmonic analysis; Keyboard work; 4/8’ Tenor clef; Singing in the tenor clef;
Harmonic analysis and composing in minor keys; Keyboard work; Modulation;
Harmonic analysis involving modulation; Simple harmonic composition with
modulation; Extending the material learned; 4/8 time; Singing and conducting
in 4/8 time; Parallel minors; Changing meters; Conducting melodies with
changing meters; Extending the material learned with more advanced musical
experiences. Pre-requisite: MUS 218.
MUS 319 Applied Private Instruction III a & b
1 Credit
(African and Western)
The course is an extension of the instrumental/vocal skills established in MUS
219. Students will be expected to perform at a progressively higher level with
continued emphasis on correct execution and technique. Pre-requisite: MUS
219
MUS 321 Music Composition and Ethics 3 Credits
Aural training techniques of composition incorporating motif, phrase, cadence,
augmentation, diminution, ornamentation, modulation, part-writing for voices
keyboard; Composing in the style of hymns, chorales. traditional melodies
from Africa and other parts of the world, composing vocal descants to a given
melody, composing vocal/instrumental music and applying African multi-part
harmonic style in vocal composition; Principles and application of music ethics.
Pre- requisite: MUS 311.
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MUS 408 Special Topics in Music 3 Credits
Topics will be offered depending on student interest and availability of faculty.
Course content will vary depending on the nature of the topic. Course may be
repeated for credit when topic is different. Pre-requisites: MUS 217, MUS
318, MUS 321.
MUS 411 Church Music
3 Credits
Introduction to course, logical fallacies, the infinite variety of music, meaning
in music; Philosophies of music ministry, foundations in worship, textual
considerations, matching of texts and tunes; Worship models, service planning,
continuums in worship, hymns, congregational singing; Choir ministry,
historical overview of church music, psychological considerations in worship;
Music for evangelism, the Engel scale, history of witness music; Popular music
styles, the secular/sacred debate, music for discipleship; History and issues in
African church music, directions for the 2 1 Century, summary. Pre-requisite:
MUS 111.
MUS 412 Survey of World Music 3 Credits
Introduction to course, connections between the New and Old Worlds;
Music philosophies of China; The nature of ethnomusicology, relationship of
ethnomusicology to the social sciences and the arts, history and approaches
from ethnomusicology, field methods in ethnomusicology (including sound
recording and reproduction techniques, notation and transcription), participant
observation, acoustics; American Indians; Overview of African music: selected
African cultures and their use of music, African music in Diaspora; Music of
the Middle East: music of India, music of Indonesia; Forces of world musical
acculturation, summary. Pre-requisite: MUS 217, MUS 411.
MUS 413 Advanced Choral Training& Conducting 2 Credits
Conducting technique: irregular/changing meters, unifying the technique,
achieving expressive conducting, adapting to styles (e.g., legato, marcato),
fast and slow tempos, offbeat and displaced accents, fermatas, syncopation,
facial expression and body posture; Preparing a score, accompaniment,
diction, building blocks of choral tone: posture, breath and vocalization, vocal
range, diction, vowels and consonants, classifying voices, interpretation,
evaluating techniques of other conductors; Overview of conducting stylistic
periods: Renaissance, Baroque, Classic, Romantic, 20th Century; Approaches
to conducting African songs; Arranging of African folk songs for choir,
international song styles; Rehearsal techniques: factors in choosing songs,
introducing songs, polishing songs, rhythmic responsiveness, tonal awareness,
balance and blend, pitch and intonation, use of verbal and physical directives,
warming up, pacing the rehearsal, stimulating concentration, memorization
of songs; Programmes and concerts: selecting songs, knowing the audience,
programming (achieving unity and variety), special programmes, publicity,
the final rehearsal, special problems of concert performance; Planning and
organization of the choir: recruiting, stimulating interest, festivals, adjudicating,
results of seating arrangements; Instrumental conducting: contrast with choral
conducting, the baton, reading orchestral scores, marking orchestral scores,
balancing of instruments, special challenges of orchestral conducting,
conducting combined instrumental and choral groups, achieving balance
between voices and instruments. Pre-requisite: MUS 312.
MUS 414 Leading Worship 2 Credits
Definition for worship, Biblical patterns of worship (old and new testaments),
music in worship, biblical patterns and teaching on corporate worship, planning
for congregational worship, team building in leading worship (pastors,
worship leaders/choir directors, instrumentalists, musicians); Practical hints for
leading worship, qualities and roles of worship team and its responsibilities.
Prerequisite: MUS 411.
MUS 415 Advanced Music Composition
3 Credits
Advanced aural techniques of composition incorporating motif, phrase,
cadence, augmentation, moduration, part-writing for voices and keyboard;
Composing advanced vocal descants to a given melody; Composing vocal/
instrumental music in African style; Applying hymns, chorales, German lied,
traditional melodies from Africa and other parts of the world to compose in
either African or Western style. Pre-requisite: MUS 321.
MUS 418 Practical Musicianship IV a & b 1 Credit
Semester I
Review of material learned in Mus 318; Extending the material learned; Church
modes; Review of modes; Sightsinging intermodal melodies of the Renaissance
period; Modal cadences; Extending the material learned: Composition and
analysis of modal pieces; Mezzo-soprano clef; Part-writing and part-singing;
Strong chord progressions; part-writing and analysis; Chord progressions
continued; Review and extension of concepts with more advanced musical
experiences.
song styles; Rehearsal Techniques: factors in choosing songs, introducing songs,
polishing songs, rhythmic responsiveness, tonal awareness, balance and
blend, pitch and intonation, use of verbal and physical directives, warming up,
stimulating concentration, memorization of songs; Programmes and concerts:
selecting songs, knowing the audience, progamming (achieving unity and
variety), special programmes, publicity, the final rehearsa1, special problems
of concert performance; Planning and organization of the choir; recruiting,
stimulating interest, festivals, adjudicating, results of seating arrangement;
Instrumental conducting: contrast with choral conducting, the baton, reading
orchestral scores, marking orchestral scores, balancing of instruments, special
challenges of orchestral conducting, conducting combined instrumental and
choral groups, achieving balances between voices and instruments. Prerequisite: MUS 312.
MUS 496 Independent Study in Music
3 Credits
Topics will vary according to student interest and the availability of faculty.
Topics are generally more advanced in nature than those covered in class
setting and include orchestral music, the place of music in worship in the
African Church, the music industry.
Semester II
1 Credit
Review of material from Semester I; Extending the material learned;
Harmonization of melodies in major keys; Harmonization of melodies in
minor keys; Baritone clef; Singing melodies in baritone clef; Transposition;
Extending the material learned; Chorale analysis and writing; Analysis of more
complicated musical material with modulations; Extending the material learned
with more advanced musical experiences. Pre-requisite: MUS 318.
MUS 419 Applied Private Instruction IV a & b 1 Credit
(African and Western)
The course is an extension of the instrumental/vocal skills established in MUS
219 and MUS 319. Students are expected to perform at a progressively
higher level with continued emphasis on correct execution and technique. Prerequisite: MUS 319.
MUS 421 Advanced Conducting 2 Credits
Conducting Technique: irregular/changing meters, unifying the technique,
achieving expressive conducting, adapting to styles, (e.g., legato, marcato),
fast and slow tempos, offbeat and displaced accents, fermatas, syncopation,
facial expression and body posture; Preparing a score, accompaniment,
diction, building blocks of choral tone: posture, breath and vocalises, vocal
range, diction, vowels and constants, classifying voices, interpretation,
evaluating techniques of other conductors; Overview of conducting stylistic
periods: Renaissance, Baroque, Classic, Romantic, 20th Century; Approaches
to conducting African songs; arranging African foiksongs for choir, international
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SELECTED FOUR YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME FOR BA MUSIC MAJOR
3rd YEAR
1st YEAR
Semester I
Semester I
Semester II
Semester II
ICA 100
1
MAT 098 or 111
3
PHY 111
3
RET 319
INS 111
3
INS 11
3
INS 31
4
MUS 312
2
BIL 111
3
BIL 112
3
RET 318
3
MUS 318 (b)
1
ENG 098 OR 111
3
ENG 112
3
MUS 311
2
MUS 319 (b)
1
MUS111
2
MUS 114
1
MUS 318(a)
1
MUS 321
3
MUS 113
1
MUS 115
1
MUS 319 (a)
1
FREE ELECTIVES
6
MUS 116
3
MUS 118 (b)
2
FREE ELECTIVES
3
MUS 118(a)
2
MUS 119 (b)
1
TOTAL
16
MUS 119(a)
1
TOTAL
18
TOTAL
17
TOTAL
17
4th YEAR
Semester I
2nd YEAR
Semester I
Semester II
INS 411
4
MUS 412
3
MUS 411
3
MUS 414
2
INS 211
4
ICA 211
2
MUS 418(a)
1
MUS 418(b)
1
BIL 211
2
BIL 212
2
MUS 419( a
1
MUS 419(b)
1
ICA 211
2
ENV 111
3
FREE ELECTIVES
8
MUS 421
MUS 217
2
BIO 111
2
MUS 218(a)
2
MUS 218(b)
2
TOTAL
17
MUS 219(a)
1
MUS 219(b)
1
MUS 221
3
TOTAL
18
TOTAL
206
Semester II
3
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16
2
FREE ELECTIVES
6
TOTAL
15
SCHOOL OF HUMAN & SOCIAL SCIENCES
Introduction
The School of Human and Social Science’s overall objective is
holistic service to all humankind through Novelty, Quality and
Integrity. The school endeavors to be the Center of Excellence
in innovativeness, Restoration of Human Dignity, Nurturance and
Servanthood. This is based on Daystar University’s Mission of
developing “managers, professionals, researchers and scholars
to be effective Christian servant-leaders through the integration of
Christian faith and holistic learning for the transformation of church
and society in Africa and the World.”
As a school we exist for the purpose of building, shaping, modeling
and mentoring humankind through clinical services, integration
of faith and learning, promotion of intellectualism and Scholarly
discourse, and to this end we subscribe with humility.
DEPARTMENTS
•
Psychology & Counseling
•
Development Studies
•
Institute of Child Development
Programmes
Diploma Programme
• Counseling
• Community Development
Undergraduate Programme
• Bachelor of Arts in
- Community Development, Integrated
- Psychology & Counseling
- Social Work
Postraduate Programme
• Master of Arts
- Child Development
i) Integrated and
ii) Family Studies Concentrations
- Community Development
- Monitoring & Evaluation
- Psychology and Counseling
• Postgraduate Diploma in Child
Development
• PhD in Clinical Psychology
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DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELING
DIPLOMA PROGRAMME
DIPLOMA IN COUNSELLING
Required Courses
3
Rationale
ICM 053 Marriage and Family Counseling
3
Many people are facing problems caused by the complexity of modern
life and breakdown of the traditional ways of life. At the same time
we realize that many people have not heard the Gospel of Jesus
Christ. In response to these needs, the Department offers diploma
certificates in Counseling. The courses aim at producing workers
interested in counseling at the Diploma level, at the end of the course.
Students will graduate with a Diploma in Counseling. This will enable our
counseling students to be recognized by Kenyan Association of Professional
Counselors and other psychological associations.
ICM 056 Introduction to Psychology
3
ICM 057 Personality Development
3
ICM 058 Abnormal Psychology
3
ICM 059 Loss and Bereavement Counseling OR
ICM 065 HIV/AIDS and Crisis Counseling
3
ICM 060 Human Growth and Development
3
ICM 063 Introduction to Social Psychology
3
ICM 064 Christian Counseling
3
ICM 066 Personal and Professional Development
3
ICM 081 Introduction to Sociology
3
ICM 099 Field Project/ Practicum
6
Admission Requirements
Applicants must meet the general admission requirements for the
Diploma Programme in the department of Psychology and Counseling.
Electives
Student Assessment
1.
2.
The final course grades will be derived 40% from continuous assessment
and 60% from the final examination except for independent Study and
Practicum which are continuous assessment courses.
Practicum will be based 40% from student’s field report, 20% from
site supervisor’s written report, and 40% from evaluations by Daystar
University supervisors.
Diplomas in Counseling emphasizes on the development of skills. A letter
grade will be given for each course on the basis of continuous assessment
and a final examination, graded as follows:
Requirements for Graduation:
Credit Hours
Common Core Courses
15
Counseling Required Courses
33
Practicum
208
Credit Hours
ICM 051 Principles and Practice of Counseling
6
Electives
6
Total
60
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ICM 054 Counseling with Young People
3
ICM 067 Spiritual Growth and Development
3
ICM 071 Substance Abuse
3
Courses Descriptions
ICM 051 Principles & Practices of Counselling
3 Credits
This course will cover meanings and definitions; structure and process; the
counsellor and counselee; counselling. Crisis intervention and case studies.
Prerequisites: ICM 056, 060, 057, 058
ICM 053 Marriage & Family counseling
3 Credits
The course deals with the problems and conflicts within marriage and family
set up: systems, sex, and love, family planning, raising and disciplining
children, amongst others; Biblical basis of marriage; counselling techniques
and behavioral methods of solving marriage, family problems and conflicts;
conflict resolution; premarital counseling: building healthy relationships,
choosing a marriage partner, courtship, wedding and honeymoon, sexual
problems e.g gender roles and discrimination, prostitution, child labour. Case
studies. Prerequisites: ICM 051.
ICM 054 Counselling with young People
3 Credits
This course will cover the understanding of young people in general;
understanding their problems; the challenges they face; issues concerning
family relationships; peer pressure and delinquency. Prerequisites: ICM 060,
ICM 057, ICM 051, ICM 051.
ICM 056 Introduction to Psychology
3 Credits
Definition and the history of psychological aspects of human development Such
as learning, cognition, memory, motivation and emotions and consciousness.
ICM 057 Personality Development
3 Credits
An overview of personality theories represented by the major schools such
as analytic or dynamic, humanistic, cognitive, existential and behavioral;
personality disorders; case studies.
ICM 058 Abnormal Psychology
3 Credits
A study of nature, causes and intervention of a wide variety of mental
disorders such as personality disorders, anxiety, mood, stress and adjustment,
schizophrenia, disassociate and affective disorders; case studies. Prerequisites: ICM 056, ICM 057, ICM 060, ICM 063, ICM 081.
ICM 059 Loss and Bereavement Counseling
3 Credits
Biblical view of suffering and human pain; including divine omnipotence and
goodness, human wickedness and the fall of man; the loss of life; the meaning
of grief: effects and factors influencing; the grief process, problems in grieving
and recovery; recovering from other forms of losses; counseling in grief.
Prerequisite: ICM 051.
ICM 060 Human Growth and Development
3 Credits
The course will cover all aspects of growth and development from conception
to death. This will include physical and mental growth touching areas of
learning, emotions, and behavour. Pre-requisites: ICM 056.
ICM 061 Understanding the Old Testament
3 Credits
Old Testament history, geography and culture; literary genres; ways of
understanding the content of various books of the Old Testament major divisions
of Old Testament; Old Testament interpretations; major themes in the Old
Testament.
ICM 062 Understanding the New Testament
3 Credits
History of the inter-testamental period; first century Judaism; fulfillment of
scripture; summary of contents and themes of each New Testament book;
a survey of the life and history of Jesus Christ; Growth and expansion of the
Early Church in Acts; history, geography and cultural background of the New
Testament; survey and ministry of Paul; New Testament interpretation; key
themes in the New Testament.
ICM 063 Introduction to Social Psychology
3 Credits
The course will cover the definition of social psychology; building blocks
of social life- what makes humans unique: socialization; organization of
the self- the world as you think it is, the world as you feel it is, who am
I? Organization of personal relationships communication, social changes,
social interdependence; complex group interaction setting- group structure and
processes, social networks.
ICM 064 Christian Counselling
3 Credits
This course will cover the concepts of the Biblical and Christian counseling; the
presuppositions and principles- meaning of life, hope, prayer, reconciliation;
the Christian counsellor; practice and process – language of counselling;
language of emotions, sin, confession, forgiveness, love; effective Biblical
change-conversion, salvation, spirituality, the Christian personality; the art
pastoral conversation; Biblical case histories. Pre-requisites; ICM 051, ICM.
057, ICM 063
ICM 065 HIV/AIDS and Crisis Counselling 3 Credits
The course is intended to bring awareness of the pandemic nature of the
diseases and also develop skills that are necessary for dealing with victims
of HIV/AIDS; it will cover HIV/AIDS overview; human sexuality; methods
of management; cultural beliefs and practices; socio-economic development;
Biblical and theological issues; ethical and legal issues; behavior modification;
skills in counsellor care, training of trainers; dealing with crises. Pre-requisites.
ICM 051.
ICM 066 Personal & Professional 3 Credits
Development for Counsellors
This course will include what is personal and professional development; further
training; professional recognition; personal therapy; supervision; contribution
to the furtherance of knowledge; resourcing yourself; determining a personal
and professional development. Pre-requisites: ICM 056, ICM 060, ICM 057,
ICM 051.
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209
ICM 067 Spiritual Growth and Development
3 Credits
This course is intended to help a Christian grow in faith. The contexts will
include understanding and applying the biblical principles in one’s daily life;
understanding Christian faith and applying it in daily life; understanding sin
and salvation in order to develop deeper faith in Jesus Christ; spiritual morals
and discipline; discipleship and discipline; interpreting the mission of Daystar
University and its philosophy.
ICM 071 Substance Abuse
3 Credits
An introduction to chemical dependency including definitions of alcohol and
drug dependencies; diagnosis; management; recovery; community responses
to dependency problems and case studies.
ICM 081 Introduction to Sociology
3 Credits
The nature of sociology and theories; socialization; organization and
mobilization; social stratification and inequality; race and ethnicity; group
relations; the changing family; functions of religion; problems of social change;
African social issues and problems e.g polygamy, barenness and impotency,
medicine men and women, soothsayers, sorcerers, witches and wizards, witch
craft, magicians, elders, priests and prophets, etc. and their roles in society;
African concept of God and his/her role in regulating individual and corporate
life.
ICM 099 Field Project in Christian Counseling
6 Credits
Assigned tasks related to the course work done as agreed upon by the student,
the faculty, and , where applicable, the employer. A minimum of 10 weeks
(400 clock hours) and production of a project paper of 25 to 30 typed pages.
Students must provide verification by a professional counselor that he/she has
completed a minimum of 10 hours of personal psychotherapy. The student
must also submit a report of what has been gained from the experience of
personal counseling/psychotherapy including lessons learned, difficulties
faced, and overall evaluation of the process of the personal counseling/
psychotherapy experience.
NOTE:
1. Practicum must be registered for when the student has successfully
completed all the coursework.
2.
The student must not register for any other courses during practicum.
3.
Those working and would face challenge getting ten continuous weeks
can express his/her problem a semester before the practicum semester
to the HOD.
4.
The student should proceed to the practicum experience only after
registration. All practicum sites should be approved by the department
through the lecturer responsible for practicum.
5.
Every student should proceed to the practicum experience when they
have completed 10 hours of personal therapy
SUGGESTED TWO-YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME
2n YEAR
1st YEAR
Semester I
Semester II
ICC 012
3
ICC 013
3
ICM057
3
ICC 021
3
ICC 015
3
3
ICC 014
3
ICM 053
3
ICM 065
OR ICM O59
ICC 092
1
ICM 056
3
ICM 064
3
ICM 066
3
ICM 060
3
3
Electives
3
ICM 099
6
3
ICC 016
2
Electives
3
15
TOTAL
14
TOTAL
15
ICM 051
Total
210
Semester I
Semester II
www.daystar.ac.ke
ICM 063/081
3
16
Total
ICM 059
3
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE - PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELING
Rationale
Student Assessment
The Psychology and Counseling major degree is designed to equip students
with skills for the change of human behaviour, promotion of human growth,
and development
of human communities. The programme aims at producing graduates whose
responsibility is not only to help change maladjusted behaviour of members of
the community, but also to promote spiritual maturity. It enables the student to
acquire knowledge on human behaviour and mental processes, rehabilitation,
restoration and reconciliation, in light of God’s word.
1.
Specifically, the goals of the major are:
1. Provide students with a clear understanding of the principles of human
behavior;
2. Enable the students to develop coping skills, self-acceptance, selfappreciation, positive self-image, self-esteem, self-dignity and
appreciation of other people despite their limitations;
3. Promote and foster human relationships and adopt an objective outlook
to life;
4. Provide psychological tools to collect, analyze and evaluate information
and behavior in order to draw out/formulate sound conclusions;
5. Promote holistic growth and maturity in the student as an individual;
6. Provide courses which will enhance the understanding of the student and
help him/her appreciate and promote God’s workmanship in human
creation;
7. Enable the student to integrate psychology and Christianity; and,
Psychology and African traditional culture.
8. Prepare the student for advanced study at the graduate level in
psychology;
9. Enable the student to assume the responsibilities of a Christian
professional whose main goal is commitment to bettering the
contemporary society as God’s steward, co-worker and an agent of
change.
Admission Requirements
Applicants to the Bachelor of Psychology and Counseling must fulfill entry
requirements that apply to all other Daystar undergraduate students, i.e. ,an
overall minimum grade of C+ in KCSE OR its EQUIVALENT. In addition,
they must have obtained a minimum of C+ in English.
2.
The final course grades will be derived 40% from continuous
assessment and 60% from the final examination except for Independent
Study and Practicum which are continuous assessment courses.
Practicum will be based 40% from student’s field report, 20% from
site supervisor’s written report, and 40% from evaluations by Daystar
University supervisors.
Exemptions to the Undergraduate Programme Psychology Major
Diploma Courses
Equivalent Required Courses
ICM 056
PSY 111
ICM 057
PSY 212
Credit Hours
3
3
ICM 058
PSY 214
3
ICM 060
PSY 211
3
ICM 099
PSY 508
TOTAL CREDITS
6
18
Requirements for Graduation
A Psychology and Counseling major student must complete the following credit
hours to be able to graduate:
Courses in general education
Credit Hours
Integrated Studies
INS 111 Communication and culture
3
INS 212 Africa Societies and Traditional Religion
2
SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology
3
TOTAL
8
Bible and Theology
Credit Hours
BIL 111 Old Testament Introduction & Survey
3
BIL 112 New Testament Introduction & Survey
3
RET 320 Christianity & Islam in Africa
2
RET 321 Studying Theology in the African Context
2
TOTAL
10
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211
Science and Mathematics
Credit Hours
Required courses For Psychology Courses
Credit Hours
BIO 111 Biology
2
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology
3
ENV 112 Environmental Science
2
PSY 112 History, Systems & Schools of Psychology
3
MAT 102 Basic mathematics
2
PSY 211 Human Development
3
ACS 101 Basic computer Knowledge
2
PSY 212 Psychology of Personality
3
TOTAL
8
PSY 213 Physiological Psychology
3
PSY 214 Abnormal Psychology
3
Credit Hours
PSY 215 Basic Counseling Skills
3
ENG 096 Basic English
0(9)
PSY 311 Psychology of Learning
3
ENG 098 Basic English
0(3)
Language skills
PSY 312 Christian Guidance and Counseling
3
ENG 111 Advanced Reading
3
PSY 313 Introduction to Clinical Counseling
3
ENG 112 Advanced Writing
3
PSY 314 Child Therapy
3
TOTAL
6
PSY 318 Adolescent Therapy
3
PSY 319 Loss and Grief Counseling
3
PSY 408 Special Topics in Psychology & Counseling
3
32
PSY 411 Social Psychology
3
Psychology & Counseling Major
78
PSY 412 Theories of Marriage & Family
3
Minor (optional)/ Free electives
20
PSY 413 Group Dynamics in psychology
3
130
PSY 414 Ethics in Psychology
3
PSY 415 Human Sexuality
3
PSY 416 Short- Term Theories of Counseling
3
PSY 417 Addictions & Interventions
3
PSY 418 Trauma & Post Traumatic Stress Counseling
3
PSY 508 Psychology Practicum A & B
6
SOC 314 Introduction to Social Statistics
3
SOC 315 Social Research Methods
3
TOTAL
78
Credit Hours
General Education
TOTAL
I fell in love with Daystar. Simply because
education was focused on preparing the
person holistically. Daystar introduced
me to a mix of faith and the market
place, and gave me the opportunity to
think of how to exist in the marketplace
without losing my faith.
Samuel Poghisio
212
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Minor in Psychology
To graduate with a minor in Psychology and Counseling, the student MUST
take;
PSY 111 Introduction to psychology
3
PSY 211 Human Development
3
PSY 311 Psychology of Learning
3
PSY 411 Social Psychology
3
In addition to these courses, the student must take any other three (3) courses
from the following:
PSY 212 Psychology of Personality
3
PSY 214 Abnormal Psychology
3
PSY 216 Disaster Management
3
PSY 312 Christian Guidance & Counseling
3
PSY 313 Introduction to Clinical Counseling
3
PSY 408 Special Topics in Psychology
3
PSY 412 Theories of marriage & Family
3
PSY 413 Group Dynamics in Psychology
3
PSY 414 Ethics in Psychology
3
PSY 415 Human Sexuality
3
PSY 496 Independent Study in Psychology
3
Students must provide verification by a professional counselor that he/she has
completed a minimum of 15 hours of personal psychotherapy. The student must
also submit a report of what has been gained from the experience of personal
counseling/psychotherapy including lessons learned, difficulties faced, and
overall evaluation of the process of the personal counseling/psychotherapy
experience.
Course Descriptions
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology
3 Credits
Introduction: Psychology and Christianity; family issues and parenting;
neuroscience and behavior; sensing learning, cognition; memory; motivation;
emotion; personality; stress and health; states of consciousness; psychological
disorders; somatoform; dissociative disorders; personality disorders; organic
mental disorders; paranoia; affective disorders; schizophrenia; preventive
psychological disorders; treatment and therapy; individual and cultural diversity.
PSY 112 History, Systems & Schools of Psychology
3 Credits
Historical Roots of Psychology; Development of Psychology from its Beginning
to Today; Contributions of S. Freud, E. Erikson, C. Jung, Gestalt, B.F.Skinner, C.
Rogers, J. Watson, Beck, W. Glasser, A. Adler, A. Ellis, T.S. Mwa Mwenda.
How Psychology Relates to Philosophy, Science, Psychology and African
Culture. Prerequisite PSY 111
PSY 211 Human Development
3 Credits
Introduction; Prenatal Development and Birth; Physical and Cognitive
Development in Infancy; Early Influence on Development; the Preschool Child;
The School Age Child; Adolescence; Early Adulthood; Middle Adulthood; Late
Adulthood; Death and Dying; Developmental Theories. Prerequisite PSY 111,
112.
PSY 212 Psychology of Personality
3 Credits
Theories of Personality: S. Freud- Psychoanalytic; Neo-Psychoanalytic-Analytic;
A. Maslow- Humanistic; Albert Ellis – RET- Cognitive; Pavlov and Skinner –
Learning; J. Watson –Behavior; J. Piaget – Developments; Integration of
Personality with Biblical Teaching on Human Personality. Prerequisite PSY 111
PSY 213 Physiological Psychology
3 Credits
Introduction; Body Senses and how they Work; The Nervous Systems such
as Central, Autonomic, and Somatic; The Muscular Systems Such as Striated,
Smooth, and Cardiac and Glandular Systems such as Endocrine and Exocrine;
The Relationship Between and Physiological Systems and Behavior; ChoPhysiological Influence or Behavior Including Drug Effects. Prerequisite PSY
111, 112.
PSY 214 Abnormal Psychology
3 Credits
The History of Psychological Disorders; Various Kinds of Psychological Disorders
including Anxiety and Personality Disorders, Stress, Schizophrenia, Substance
Use and Addiction; Special Emphasis on Identification; Symptomatology;
Aetiology; Management; Biological, Pharmaceutical, Psychological; Cultural
and Demonic View Points. Prerequisite PSY 111, 211.
PSY 215 Basic Counseling Skills
3 Credits
Introduction; Personal Characteristics of the Effective Interviewer/Counselor;
Communication; Attending Skills; Body Posture, Vocal Qualities; Active
Listening; Questioning: Open and Closed Questions, Clarifying Questions;
Probing; Summarizing and Paraphrasing; Reflecting Back Feelings, Reflecting
Back Meaning; Challenging/Confronting; Stages of Counseling from Intake to
Termination, Follow Up; Record Keeping. Prerequisite PSY 111, 211, 212,214.
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213
PSY 216 Disaster Management
3 Credits
Introduction to Disaster; Types of Disasters; Theories and Practice of Disaster
Management; Effects of Disaster; Disaster Risk Management; Intervention and
Treatment of Survivors; Trauma; Stress; Post-Traumatic Stress; Conflict and
Conflict Reduction; Loss And Grief; Group Therapy
PSY 311 Psychology of Learning
3 Credits
Introduction; Historical Background of Learning; Observational Learning;
Theories of Learning – Classical or Pavlovian Conditioning, Pavlovian
Experiments, their Meaning and Application; Operant or Skinner’s Conditioning,
Skinner’s Experiments their Meaning and Application; Application of Principles
of Learning to Animal and Human Behavior including Transfer of Learning;
Relationship between Animal Experiments and Human Behavior; Perception;
Cognition; Sensation and Motivation. Prerequisite PSY 111, 211.
PSY 312 Christian Guidance & Counselling
3 Credits
Introduction and Definition of Counseling; the Principles of Counseling;
The Counselor/Counselor’s Language; Model’s of Counseling(Carkuff’s):
Psychoanalytical Therapy, Reality Therapy, Adlerian Therapy, Cognitive
Therapy; A Biblical View of People, Problems and Solutions; Counseling
Attitudes; Basic Skills: Listening, Responding and Feelings; Case Analysis/
Case study; The Communication Process; Crisis Intervention; Some Essential
Conditions for Crisis Counseling; Loneliness and Depression: Grieving Process;
Drug Abuse/Drug Addiction: Commonly Abused Drugs; Alcoholism: The Scope
of The Problem, The Family of The Alcoholic; Suicidal Persons and Suicidal
Counseling; Basic Principles of Suicidal Prevention; AIDS/HIV Counseling;
Ethical Issues. Prerequisite PSY 111, 211, 213, 215.
PSY 313 Introduction to Clinical Psychology
3 Credits
Meaning of Clinical Psychology; Examine Psychological Assessment Theories;
Interviewing Techniques – Carry out Video Tape and Audio Taped interviews
with Clients; Classroom Presentation and Role Play on Interviewing Style with
Clients; Practical Exercises on Taking of The History; Test Construction, Analysis
and Application; Diagnosis and How to Draw out Therapeutic Conclusions.
Prerequisite PSY 111, 211, 312.
PSY 314 Child Therapy
3 Credits
Introduction; Theories and Techniques for Studying Child Development; The
Infant: Personality, Physical, Mental, and Social Development, Early Childhood:
Physical – Growth and Motor Development, Brain and Nervous System, Health
and Wellness, and Abuse and Neglect - Cognitive Development (Piaget’s View,
Challenges to Piaget’s View, Alternative Theories of Early Childhood Thinking
and Language, Intelligence) and Theories of Social Development, Family
Relationships and Structure [Attachment, Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status and
Parenting Styles, Divorce, Peer Relations through Play, Aggressing, Pro-Social
Behaviour and Friendships. Moral Development (Kohlberg); Child Abuse;
Spirituality of Children during Early Childhood Development and Counseling
Children. Prerequisite PSY 111, 211, 212, 215.
PSY 318 Adolescent Therapy
3 Credits
Introduction; Theories of Counseling; the Adolescent (Physical, Mental,
Personality And Social Development); Adolescent-Related Issues (Eating
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Disorders, Drug Use, Suicide, Peer Related Issues, Mental Health Issues);
Techniques and Skills (Talk Therapy, Family Therapy, Adolescent Group
Therapy, Creative Arts Adolescent Therapy. Prerequisite PSY 111, 211, 212,
215.
PSY 319 Loss And Grief Counselling 3 Credits
Biblical View of Suffering and Human Pain; Meaning of Grief and Loss,
Definitions, Nature of Grief, Normal Grief Reactions, Grief Determinants,
Unhealthy/Abnormal Grief, Effects and Factors Causing Grief; Culture and
Grief; The Grief Process, Problems in Grieving and Recovery, Grief Models;
Dealing with Personal Grief and Death (Theory and Practical); Family and
Grief, Children and Grief, Adolescents and Grief, Parents and Grief; Traumatic
Bereavement; Grief Counseling; The Role of The Church in Loss and Grief;
Grief and Burnout; Caring for The Caregivers. Prerequisite PSY 214, 215,
211, 312.
PSY 411 Social Psychology
3 Credits
Introduction; Social Theories; Relationship between Social Theories And
Individual/Social Behavior; Development of Self as a Process, Individual/
Social Perception Attitudes, Motives, Values, Affiliations, Aggression and
Relationships; Interpersonal Communication Dynamics in the Society; Peace
and Resolution in Homes, Churches and Society. Prerequisite All 100 And
200 Level Courses.
PSY 412 Theories of Marriage and Family
3 Credits
Introduce the Major Models and Schools of Marriage and Family Theories
– Structural, Functional, Post-Modern, Behavioral, etc.; General Systems
Theory; Family Systems; Family Communication; Intergenerational and
Multigenerational Patterns; Marriage and Family Structural-Strategic Systems;
Marriage and Family Cognitive Behavior Patterns; Genograms; African and
Biblical Concepts of Marriage and Family; Marriage and Family Functions Role
Allocation Today; Changing Concepts of Marriage and Family – its Effects on
the Couples, Siblings Church and Society. Prerequisite All 300 level courses.
PSY 413 Group Dynamics in Psychology
3 Credits
Introduction and Definition of Groups; Characteristics of Groups; Major
Concepts of Groups; Group Resources; Group Types; Role Played By
Members; Advantages and Disadvantages of Groups; Conflicts in Groups,
Homes Church, Family and Application of Group Dynamics in East Africa and
the Region. Prerequisite PSY 111, 211, 212, 215.
PSY 414 Ethics in Psychology
3 Credits
Introduction; Morality, Standards, Laws, Professionalism, Community; Legal
and Ethical Issues in Child Abuse, Incest, Homosexuality, Lesbianism, Sodomy,
Infidelity, Suicide and Suicide Attempts; Confidentiality; Human Rights and
Divorce; Abortion; Professional Codes Governing a Therapeutic Relationship;
Legal, Moral and Spiritual Issues and the African Code of Conduct. .
Prerequisite ALL before Practicum.
PSY 415 HUMAN SEXUALITY
3 Credits
Introduction; Sex Roles; Gender Issues; Sexual Dysfunctions and Sexual Script
and Attitudes; Traditional African and Biblical Concepts of Human Sexuality;
Pre and Extra- Marital Sex; the Role Of Sex in Marriage; Incest, Homosexuality,
Lesbianism, Sodomy, Infidelity; Other Perverted Sexual Behavior in Relation to
African Traditional Beliefs and Biblical Teachings on Sex. Prerequisite All 100
And 200 Level Courses.
PSY 416 Short Term Theories of Counseling
3 Credits
Introduction: Historical Overview of Brief Theories of Counseling; Adlerian
Therapy: Historical Background, Theoretical Framework, Therapeutic Process,
Techniques and Application; Gestalt Therapy: Historical Background,
Theoretical Framework, Therapeutic Progress, Techniques and Application;
Reality Therapy; Behavioral Approaches: Fundamental Concepts, Therapeutic
Process and Techniques and Application; Cognitive Behavioral Approaches:
Key Concepts, Therapeutic Process, Techniques and Application; Place Of
Intake Interview/Assessment in Short-Term Therapies; Effectiveness of ShortTerm Therapies: the Counseling Relationship and The Issue of Effectiveness,
Client and Therapist Variables Affecting Effectiveness; Integration: Creating
a Personal Philosophy of Counseling, Biblical And Cross-Cultural Issues.
Prerequisite 300 level courses.
PSY 418 Trauma And Post Traumatic Stress 3 Credits
DisordeR - Crisis Counseling And Intervention
Introduction; History, Causes of Trauma; Epidemiology; PTSD as a Diagnosis;
Assessment Tools; PTSD in Relationship to other Psychological Disorders;
Symptoms of Trauma; Traumatic Losses; Coping with Trauma; Healthy and
Unhealthy Coping; Treatment of Trauma; Overview of Treatment Approaches,
Stabilization and Crisis Intervention (Introduction and Definition of Crisis
Counseling; Historical Background of Theories of Crisis Counseling; Methods
of Crisis Counseling; General Characteristics and Categories; Phases of
Crisis Counseling; Roles of an Effective Counselor and Counselee in Crisis
Counseling; Techniques used in Crisis Counseling; Specific Issues Requiring
Crisis Counseling: Family in Crisis, Grief, Divorce, Suicidal Crisis, Terminal
Illness, and Community Crisis; Role of the Church in Crisis Counseling;
Integration of Crisis Counseling Process; Review of Some Case Studies. (CISD),
Psychopharmacology in PTSD, Psycho-Education of Individual and Family,
Psychotherapy; Multicultural Issues in Diagnosis and Treatment; Special Topics;
Trauma in Children, Suicidal Patients; Therapists Issues; Theological Issues.
Prerequisite 300 level courses.
and diagnosis. Other areas of supervision include the ability to work with
the site supervisor and other personnel, demonstrating maturity, responsibility,
stewardship, and promoting interpersonal and interactional skills. At the end of
practicum, the student presents a written document of his/her observation and
experience, including a sealed confidential letter of the student’s report from the
site supervisor. This must be submitted in a sealed envelope through the student
to the University Departmental supervisor. Prerequisite ALL courses.
Note:
1. Practicum must be registered for when the student has successfully
completed all the coursework.
2. The student must not register for any other courses during practicum.
3. Those working and would face challenge getting ten continuous weeks
can express his/her problem a semester before the practicum semester
to the hod.
4. The student should proceed to the practicum experience only after
registration. All practicum sites should be approved by the department
through the lecturer responsible for practicum.
5. Every student should proceed to the practicum experience when they
have completed at least 15 hours of personal therapy.
PSY 496 Independent Study in Psychology
3 Credits
The content for each study will vary depending on the topic chosen. The
student(s) will choose a topic with the help of the lecturer responsible for the
course. The topic chosen must have sufficient content equivalent to any course
outline done in a psychology major but must not be a course already taken
by the student(s). The whole study is to be done by the student(s) under the
guidance and help from the lecturer for the purpose of obtaining text books and
also assessment on weekly consultations.
Note: Independent study will not be allowed for less than 4 students.
PSY 417 Addictions and interventions
3 Credits
Introduction, Addictions diagnosis, research and theory; substance additions;
CNS depressants (Narcotics/opiates, alcohol, sedatives/tranquilizers; CNS
stimulants (amphetamines, caffeine, cocaine/crack, cigarettes); Hallucinogens
(LSD, marijuana); Inhalants; steroids; other addictions (gambling, sex, work,
food, shopping, TV, internet etc); co-dependency diagnosis, treatment, theory
and research; Africans and addictive behaviors; the Bible and addictions;
management of addictions; health and economic consequences of additions;
prevention of addictions. Prerequisite 300 level courses.
PSY 508 Psychology Practicum
6 Credits
Practicum/field experience will take a minimum of ten weeks (400 hours).
This involves supervised fieldwork in a placement site where the student is
expected to apply knowledge in Psychological assessment, History taking
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215
POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME
MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
Rationale
Admission Requirements
The MA in Counseling Psychology is a two year, 48 credit hour programme,
designed to equip Christian professional counselors who will be well
grounded in Christian spirituality (theology), psychological principles, and
African cultural perspectives.
Counseling psychology programme requires more than sincere intentions and
humanitarian concern. It will try to understand and adequately address the
human psycho-social-spiritual needs and issues. It will do this by incorporating
integration on a number of levels of psychology, Christian and African
worldviews; ethical and multi-cultural concerns through the use of all-round
trained Christian counselor-lecturers. Training will enable students handle
clients become whole persons: spiritually, emotionally, socially, intellectually
and physically; enabling them to grow personally and professionally as they
critically look at their spiritual, social, emotional, intellectual and physical life.
All candidates wishing to enter the M.A. in Counseling Psychology
programme must meet the entry requirements of the School of Human and
Social Science. They must have completed a Bachelor’s degree with a
minimum G.P.A. of 2.7 on a 4.00 scale or upper second-class honors (or
G.P.A. 2.5 or lower second class honors or its equivalent with substantial
experience after graduation of not less than two years). While an
undergraduate major in Psychology is not required, it is strongly required that
a student whose background is not psychology should do some courses in the
undergraduate psychology especially human growth and development.
Objectives
The Objectives for the M.A. in Counseling Psychology are:
1. To prepare students academically and professionally to counsel
effectively and ethically.
2.
To provide advanced training in experimental design and data analysis
so that students may conduct research in psychology:
3.
To equip students to be knowledgeable consumers of research literature.
4.
To provide opportunities for advanced study and practice in counseling
methods with clinical populations of interest to the student.
5.
To promote students’ ability to integrate psychology with Christianity and
with multi-cultural issues.
6.
To develop students’ ability to think critically about human problems and
solutions.
7.
To instill in students a desire for life-long learning through continued study
and through informal academic/professional pursuits.
8.
To prepare women and men to assume leadership roles, especially
in Africa, with the aim of reducing human suffering and promoting
psychological well-being.
9.
To improve students’ ability to communicate clearly both orally and in
writing to professionals and to lay persons about psychological matters.
10. To integrate throughout the course content, discussion, and practical
experiences relevant to psychological knowledge, Christian principles
and African perspectives.
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Student Assessment
The guidelines for assessment which apply to all MA programmes are the
standard.
It is noted that in the MA in Counseling Psychology programme, the
practicum/internship will be assessed as follows:
• 30% from student’s written reports of experience at the internship site,
• 10% from student’s proposal,
• 10% from student’s journal,
• 20% from the site supervisor’s written reports and evaluations,
• 30% from the Daystar’s seminars and faculty supervisor’s evaluations.
Students will periodically be evaluated by faculty on a number of dimensions
related to personal readiness to engage in the professional practice of
counseling psychology. Daystar University recognizes that it has responsibility
to graduate only those students who exhibit the ability to practice counseling
psychology independently with the highest degree of professional/ ethical
standards.
Requirements for Graduation
The MA in Counseling Psychology consists of 48 semester credits in specified
coursework, which includes a 500-hour practicum/internship. Optional
electives are available but must be taken over and above the specified 48
credits.
1. Students must do an internship.
2.
Students must provide verification from a professional counselor
that he/she has completed a minimum of 25 sessions of personal
psychotherapy. The student must also submit a report of what has been
gained from the experience of personal counseling/psychotherapy,
including lessons learned, difficulties faced, and overall evaluation of
the process of the personal counseling/psychotherapy experience.
Students will periodically be evaluated by faculty on a number of dimensions
related to personal readiness to engage in the professional practice of
counseling psychology.
Note:
1. All students whose undergraduate degree is not in psychology will
be required to have done PSY 211 Human Development before
commencing their MA in counseling programme or to do it during
the first or the second semesters of the programme. Those who have
psychology degree or have done this course on the undergraduate
level are exempted from doing it.
2. Students who have obtained an undergraduate degree from Daystar
are exempted from INS 612 and should replace it with an optional
course from their concentration chosen from PSY 608.
3. Because of psychological emphasis, GRW 611 and GRW 613 will be
projected by the department.
4. For proper and beneficial supervision of PSY 697, a class will have a
maximum of 10 and a minimum of 5.
Common courses
Credit Hours
BIL 615 Biblical Foundations of Christian Service
2
GRW 611 Graduate Research and Writing
2
GRW 613 Graduate Research and Writing
2
INS 612 Principles and Processes of Communication
and Culture
3
GRA 614 Leadership Development and management
3
COM 302 Statistics
(3)0
PSY 211 Human Development
(3)0
TOTAL
12
Required courses for MA Counseling Psychology major
PSY 608 Special topics Psychology
2
PSY 640 Personality Theories
2
PSY 641 Theories of Counseling
2
PSY 642 Addictions and Interventions
3
PSY 643 Counseling Fundamentals and Micro-skills
3
PSY 644 Family Systems and Marital Therapy
2
PSY 646 Group Processes
2
PSY 650 Psychopathology
3
PSY 651 Neuropsychology
3
PSY 656 Psychological Assessment 1(Career and
Intelligence Assessment)
2
PSY 657 Psychological Assessment 11 (Personality
and Psychopathology Assessment, report writing and
Treatment planning)
2
PSY 662 Professional Issues and Ethics
2
PSY 671 Integration of Psychology, Christian (Biblical)
and African Worldviews
2
PSY 697 Practicum and Seminars
6
TOTAL
36
Electives
PSY 696 Independent Studies
3
PSY 698 Thesis
3
TOTAL
6
Course Descriptions
PSY 608 Special Topics in Psychology
2 Credits
Effective Parenting /Family Violence and child therapy; Human Sexuality
and Sexual Therapies -Virginity in the African context; Issues of Aging and
gerontology (GERIATRICS); Loss and Grief; Gender Issues; Adolescence and
adolescent therapy; Psychological Issues of Orphaned/adopted Children;
Crisis Intervention; Psychological Issues in HIV and AIDS; Mental Health
in specials situations: Care and counseling in Refugee Camps; Support of
Pastors; Missionaries and their families; Career counseling.
NOTE: If a topic is chosen from here to replace INS612, it will be 3 credit
hour.
PSY 608A HIV and AIDS Counseling
2 credits
Introduction; definitions of terms; facts about HIV and AIDS; Human Sexuality
and sexually transmitted diseases (infections); impact of HIV and AIDS on family
income, population, education, health, employment, and economy; women,
children and HIV and AIDS; mother-child-transmission and prevention; HIV and
AIDS management and prevention, treatment and control; HIV and AIDS homebased care; Church and Community care; New trends in understanding and
dealing with HIV and AIDS; VCT. Prerequisite PSY 641, 640, 642, 646.
PSY 640 Personality Theories
2 credits
Overview of personality theory; Research and methodology issues in
personality theory; Psychodynamic theory: Sigmund Freud, Carl G. Jung,
Alfred Adler, Karen Horney, Erich Fromm; Phenomenological theory: Carl
Rogers, Abraham Maslow; Behavioral and Learning theory: B.F. Skinner, J.B.
Watson, Ivan Pavlov, Albert Bandura, Jullian Rotter, Albert Ellis; Cognitive Behavior theory: George Kelly; Interpersonal theory: Harry S. Sullivan, Jean
Piaget; Dispositional theory: Gordon Allport, Raymond Cattel; a non-Western
Approach. Prerequisite PSY 641, 643.
PSY 641 Theories of Counseling
2 credits
Overview of counseling theories; Creating a personal philosophy of counseling;
Research and methodology issues in counseling; The counseling relationship
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and the issue of effectiveness; Client and therapist variables affecting
effectiveness; effectiveness of psychodynamic and brief therapies; critique of
psychoanalytic model of counseling; Feminist approaches and cross-cultural
issues; Transference and counter-transference issues in counseling: Boundary
issues, touch and physical contact in counseling; Therapist self-disclosure and
the ethics of sharing Christian values (faith); Gestalt model of counseling.
PSY 642 Additions and Their Interventions 3 Credits
(psychopharmacology)
Addiction diagnosis,
treatment, research and theory; co-dependency
diagnosis, treatment, theory and research; Christians and addictive
disorders; Neuropsychopharmacology: basics of neuropsychopharmacology
principles of drug action and their adverse side effects; African and addictive
disorders; Substance abuse involving alcohol, marijuana, prescription
medication, amphetamines, benzodiazepines (addiction), nicotine, cocaine,
opiods, hallucinogens, sedatives, khat, hypnotics, gasoline, glue and paint
( the behavioral impulse control disorders, such as rage gambling and sex
addiction, eating disorders; common co-morbid disorders, such as depression,
post-traumatic stress disorders; treatment models, such as AA, harm reduction,
abstinence, inpatient, residential outpatient group, family, and individual
therapies; case reviews; program visits and participation. Prerequisite PSY
641, 640, 643.
PSY 643 Counseling Fundamentals 3 Credits
and Micro-skills
This course establishes fundamentals of good counseling practice and includes
demonstration of supervised practices of counseling skills. Emphasis is on
development of core helping skills and attitudes, which are foundational to an
effective counseling process. Special attention is given to introducing ethical
issues and how gender, class, and culture affect the counseling process. It
will cover introduction to counseling and process; the counselor as a person;
general counseling models; introductory ethical issues; the art of constructive
feedback. Diversity issues in counseling. Rapport and structuring; attending
behaviour; observational counseling; and “active partnership”. Clarifying
client’s present scenario; clarifying core concerns and assets; basic listening
sequence; encouraging, paraphrasing, summarizing; reflecting feeling; and
positive asset search. Establishing therapeutic contact; goal setting; “bestfit” strategies; agreeing on counseling plan. Implementing counseling plan;
evaluation; and modification. Termination and follow-up. Skill integration and
personal style including African therapeutic skills, such as story-telling, myths.
PSY 644 Family Systems and Marital Therapy
2 credits
Introduction and Definitions; Key family theorists: Minuchin, Bowen, Whitaker,
Satir, and others; General systems theory and how it applies to family systems;
Family relationship and communication patterns; Multigenerational patterns;
Genograms and sculpting; Christian family and marriage: definitions and
conceptions (meanings); Biblical marriage; role relationship: communication,
gender and sexuality, unfaithfulness, adultery; sexual problems and marriage:
impotence and infertility, premature ejaculation, family planning, sex and
HIV positive partner(s); African Traditional Marriage and Family - Cultural
considerations in family theory and therapy: polygamy, monogamy, parenting;
Rites of passage: conception, birth, naming, initiation, family structure: nuclear
and extended, marriage and death rites.
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PSY 646 Group Processes
2 credits
History of group therapy; Theoretical approaches to group therapy; Curative
factors and limitations of group therapy; Group therapist characteristics; Group
therapy techniques; Group formation: Screening and selection of members;
Ground rules; Group development: Conflict, power, coalitions, cohesiveness;
African community support system; Dynamics of African social groups; Special
issues in group therapy: Termination issues; Ethical issues in group therapy.
Prerequisite PSY 641, 640, 642,643, 644.
PSY 650 Psychopathology
3 credits
Course introduction: ethical, political, and economic considerations in
diagnosis; validity and reliability of diagnostic categories; overview of DSM1V: Multiaxial assessment and Emerging diagnostic categories; clinical
disorders and their pharmacological treatment (addiction): mood disorders,
anxiety disorders, thought disorders; interface between mental and medical
conditions; eating disorders, sexual disorders, personality disorders, childhood
disorders, substance abuse disorders; Christian and African understanding of
mental disorders: witchcraft, demonology, exorcism; holistic understanding of
Psychopathology – psychologically, physiologically, socially, culturally, and
spiritually. Prerequisite PSY 641, 640, 642,643, 644, 646.
PSY 651 Neuropsychology
3 credit
Introduction to the field of neuropsychology: neuron structure and function and
synaptic transmission. System organization: neurological assessment and brain
development. Visual perception: other sensory systems. States of consciousness:
motivation and sexual behavior; emotions: learning and memory; cognitive
disorders; literalization and language; disorders of language and brain
damage. African medicine: herbs, antipsychotic drugs, anti-anxiety drugs,
anti-depressant drugs and ECT (shock therapies). Prerequisite PSY 641, 640,
642,643, 644, 646, 650.
PSY 656 Psychological Assessment 1 3 Credits
(Career &Intelligence Assessment)
Philosophy and history of psychological assessment: Issues in administering
surveys and tests; Norms, reliability, and validity in assessment; Cross-cultural
issues: Issues arising from psychological testing; Report writing; Interest
Inventories; Aptitude Measures; Intelligence Testing; Achievement Testing;
Organicity Testing and Social Maturity; Future of Assessment.
PSY 657 Psychological Assessment 11 2 Credits
(Personality psychopathology Assessment,
Report Writing & Treatment Planning)
Course introduction and Overview: Diagnostic Interviewing; Mental status
exam; MMP-2; Theory, Administration, Interpretation, and report writing;
MCMI-3, Beck Depression Inventory: BVGT, SCL-R-90: Theory, administration,
interpretation and report writing; Projective Testing: theory, administration,
interpretation and report writing; Integrating Assessment Data: Considerations
of testing in the future and limitation, especially cultural bias of assessment
instruments. Prerequisite PSY 641, 643, 656.
PSY 662 Professional Issues and Ethics
2 credits
Introduction to African code of conduct: Ethical, legal, and professional issues;
Client rights: Confidentiality; Professional Responsibility: duty to warn; Counselor
as a person; Professional abuses and liabilities; Values and Controversial
issues; Christian values, competence, training, certification, Ethics in research,
Testing and diagnosis, Suicide and right to die (Euthanasia); Multicultural
concerns; Boundary issues, especially dual role relationship; Supervision and
consultation; Child, marriage and family issues; Group counseling/therapy
issues; Community issues; Recognizing burnout issues; Issues of termination.
Prerequisite PSY 641, 640, 642,643, 644.646, 650, 656, 657.
PSY671 Integration of Psychology, Christian 2 Credits
(Biblical) and African Worldviews
Definition of worldview, and specifically, a Christian worldview and an African
worldview; The Kingdom of God and an individual: spiritual maturity; African
spirit world; Models of integrating psychology, Christianity and African world
view; A Biblical understanding of the nature of persons, sin, evil, demonology,
and spiritual warfare with implications for counseling psychology; The role
of personal faith in professional life; The process of healing. Prerequisite ALL
except Practicum.
PSY 696 Independent Study
3 credits
The content for each study will vary depending on the topic chosen. The
student(s) will choose a topic with the help of the lecturer responsible for the
course. The topic chosen must have sufficient content equivalent to any course
outline done in a psychology major but must not be a course already taken
by the student(s). The whole study is to be done by the student(s) under the
guidance and help from the lecturer for the purpose of obtaining text books and
also assessment on weekly consultations.
Note: Independent study will not be allowed for less than 2 students.
PSY 697 PRACTICUM AND SEMINARS 3 Credits
Students are responsible for acquiring their own practicum sites, which meet the
minimum requirements of the Daystar graduate programme. They will be guided
and encouraged in that process by the lecturer supervising practicum. Students
will average 40 hours per week at the site over the course of the semester of
the practicum for a minimum total of 420 hours of the total 500 hours required
for the whole practicum experience including Saturday/weekday supervision
and seminars of 4 hours each. Students will be required to receive at least one
hour per week of individual supervision from their on-site supervisor. About half
of the student’s hours should be in direct clinical service, with the remaining
hours dedicated to other experiences, supervision, consultation with staff, and
other training activities. The site and supervisor must be approved by Daystar
and meet qualification standards established by the Daystar M.A. programme.
Prerequisite ALL.
NOTE:
1. Practicum must be registered for when the student has successfully
completed all the coursework.
2. The student must not register for any other courses during practicum.
3. Those working and would face challenge getting ten continuous weeks
can express his/her problem a semester before the practicum semester
to the HOD.
4. The student should proceed to the practicum experience only after
registration. All practicum sites should be approved by the department
through the lecturer responsible for practicum.
5. No student should proceed for practicum before they have done over
half of personal therapy of the required 25 hours.
SUGGESTED TWO-YEAR STUDY
PROGRAMME
1st YEAR
1st Semester
GRW 611
2nd YEAR
Credits
2
INS 612
3
PSY 641
2
PSY 643
3
1st Semester
PSY 646
3
PSY 698
2
PSY 608D
12
TOTAL
Credits
3
PSY 651
PSY 656
2nd semester
2
PSY 650
TOTAL
3(OPTION)
3
11(14)
2nd semester
GRW 613
2
PSY 698
BIL 615
2
PSY 608A
Credits
Credits
3(OPTION)
2
PSY 640
2
PSY 671
2
PSY 642
3
PSY 697
6
PSY 657
2
TOTAL
11
3rd Semester
TOTAL
10(13)
Credits
PSY 211
3(0)
COM 302P
3(0)
PSY 644
2
PSY 662
2
TOTAL
4
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DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PH.D.) IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
Rationale
The advent of modernism, post modernism and rapidly changing emerging
technologies, both local and global, are impacting culture and the church,
altering the way that Africans think and resolve issues in a myriad of ways.
Mental and community health in Africa, and the rest of the world have been
undergoing dynamic changes and for most part in none reversible ways.
While Daystar University will continue to provide academic leadership
to Africa so as to address through research, education and consultation,
economic, social, political, post-colonial, and spiritual challenges of African
societies and those issues unique to the Church of Christ, the Ph.D. in Clinical
Psychology seeks to provide further education for aspiring servant leaders
desiring to integrate their faith/learning with psychological research and
intervention skills, innovative capabilities and knowledge of psychology within
an African context. In addition, the Ph.D. program is a unique hands-on, more
practitioner and research oriented model that covers clinical, psychological
assessment tests and research in depth.
The program is designed for consumers of research, to attract students
interested in acquisition of psychological knowledge, psychological
assessment and clinical practice. The Ph.D. program seeks to equip
graduates to function integratively and competently, intellectually, ethically,
socially, spiritually, therapeutically and empirically.
Goal of the Program
The primary goal of this program is to instil within the framework of African
values and principles such qualities as critical and innovative thinking
skills; commitment to authenticity of ideas, adherence to high standards of
psychological professional standards and ethics, an awareness of self and
the larger context in which graduates live and the opportunity to promote
competence and professionalism in academic, corporate, church, clinical,
and governmental areas. In addition, the Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical
Psychology will empower graduates to reach out to the maladjusted in the
society, modelling moral principles through theory and practice, integrating
psychology and faith, and showing the interface between psychology and
the African culture. The program also aims at training clinical-researchers
who will not only provide holistic therapeutic ministry to the people within
the troubled Continent of Africa and beyond, but will also promote quality
teaching and academic scholarship in institutions of higher learning through
research, consultancy and high calibre professionalism.
admitted in the programs include persons involved in Governmental, nongovernmental, and corporate organisations; Clinical practice and supervision;
Church, Christian ministries, non-profit making local and international service
providers, Para- Church organizations and development agencies; Academic
research, teaching and scholarship in various settings: Diploma programs,
undergraduate or postgraduate levels in colleges and universities.
The graduates of this program will work in government institutions; para –
church organizations; non-governmental organizations; research centres;
institutions of higher learning; counseling centres and Churches.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of the Ph.D. program, graduates should be able to:
1. Exhibit ability to consume research, conduct qualitative and quantitative
research in the field of psychology.
2. Apply professional ethical principles in advocating for individual and
social Transformation.
3. Manage and operate in academic and medical institutions, and
organizations utilizing psychology principles.
4. Administer, score and interpret psychological tests.
5. Display skills for psychological assessment and diagnostic approach
towards clinical work and interventions.
6. Show competence in diagnostic impressions of maladaptive and
pathological behaviour.
7. Integrate spirituality appropriately in clinical work and interventions.
8. Write and publish in refereed journals;
9. Direct clinical settings and practices
Admission Requirements
All applicants must meet the entry requirements set by Daystar University.
Specifically, the students wishing to enter the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology
program must hold a Master’s degree in counselling, clinical psychology or
any other related field. The admission requirements normally include:
a.
Clientele
This program is designed for anyone, individually or corporately, interested in
the development of their psychological professional skills, engaging in various
dimensions of psychological studies, teaching and research, working in
corporate world, and dealing with mental health issues. The types of students
A 3.00 (on 4.001system ) grade point average (GPA) or its equivalent
in Master of Arts or Master of Science (from a recognized University)
in Clinical Psychology, Counseling Psychology or a closely related
discipline (e.g., Psychology, Marriage and Family Therapy, or Social
Work). Holders of Ph.D. in related fields (from recognized Universities)
can also seek to enter the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology program. All
applicants must have completed the prerequisite courses listed in the
following section, or their equivalent, prior to commencing Ph.D. studies.
If an applicant’s master’s degree does not contain all the prerequisite
courses, then he or she will be required to complete the prerequisites
before the admission into the Ph.D. program.
A GPA of 3.00 is equivalent to B in other Universities
1
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b.
Prerequisite Courses for the Ph.D.
Courses
Credit Hrs.
Abnormal Psychology
3
Introduction to Psychology
3
Human Growth and Development
3
Theories of Personality
3
Social Research Methods
3
Introduction to Statistics
3
Marriage and Family Therapy
3
Human Sexuality
3
Introduction to Clinical Practice/Practicum/
Interviewing Techniques or Micro Skills
3
Theories of Counseling
3
Psychopathology
3
TOTAL
33
c. Additional admission requirements:
i. Submit duly completed Daystar University admission forms.
ii. Provide one copy of transcripts of all previous collegiate coursework.
iii. Submit three references: two academic references and one clinical
reference (clinical supervisor).
iv. Submit a curriculum vita (rГ©sumГ©).
v. Submit a written essay of 1000 words covering the following areas
vi. State your interest in the field of Clinical Psychology, professional
experience (if any), and your reason for choosing Daystar University and
choice to pursue Ph.D. at this point in your life.
vii. Applicants who are shortlisted will be invited for an interview that will
provide an opportunity for them to present their qualifications for admission
and for faculty evaluation of student skills. International applicants will be
interviewed by telephone by one or more members of the admissions
committee. The Admissions Committee reserves the right to determine, in
its sole discretion, whether a candidate is suitable for admission to the
Ph.D. program.
viii. Upon notification of admission, applicants must confirm in writing to the
Chair, Admissions Committee, School of Human and Social Sciences
prior to joining the program of choice their intent to take up the offer.
Students who do not complete the program within the eight-year limit
can appeal for extension. Such an extension can only be approved for a
maximum of two years. Students who do not complete their studies within
the extended period shall be discontinued. Applicants who do not take
up their admission immediately have one year to do so after which they
would have to reapply.
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Required Courses for Graduation and Ph.D. Courses Structure
THIRD YEAR
FIRST YEAR
1st Semester
1st Semester
Credit Hours
GRA801: Doctoral Colloquium
RES 850: Research Methodology
PSY 815: Advanced Psychotherapy
PSY 842: Measurement & Assessment I: Cognitive and
Projective Tests
BIL 801: Seminar on Integration of Faith and Life
PSY 998A: Dissertation I
6
4
PSY 998B: Dissertation II
6
2
3
3
PSY888: Pre-practicum (NURU CC)
0(3)
TOTAL
14
PSY 998C: Dissertation III
3
TOTAL
15
2nd Semester
PSY 999: Final Internship
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
2nd Semester
Credit Hours
2
Credit Hours
6
80
Credit Hours
RES 851: Advanced Quantitative Research Methods
3
PSY 820: Child & Adolescent Psychotherapy
2
Optional Elective Courses
PSY 821: Attachment and Psychodynamic Therapy
2
PSY 806: Psychology of Faith, Healing and Demonology
2
BIL 802: Philosophy of Scientific Inquiry
3
PSY 808: Special Topic
2
PSY 843: Measurement & Assessment II: Personality
3
PSY 89I: Practicum I (Children)
3
PSY 811: Spiritual Formation
2
TOTAL
16
PSY 814: Advanced Social Psychology
2
PSY 819: Advanced Health Psychology
2
SECOND YEAR
1st Semester
Credit Hours
RES 852: Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
3
PSY 816: Advanced Cognitive and Affective Bases of
Behavior
2
PSY 817: Advanced Biological Aspects of Behavior
2
PSY 818: Multicultural Issues in Clinical Psychology
2
PSY 844: Measurement & Assessment III: Clinical
Disorders
3
PSY 892: Practicum II (Adolescents)
3
TOTAL
2nd Semester
15
Credit Hours
PSY 825: Trauma, Diagnosis and Psychopharmacology
2
PSY 854: Research Design
3
PSY 862: Ethics and Professional Issues; Consultation
and Supervision
2
PSY 876: Couples Therapy
2
PSY 855: Research Apprenticeship
2
PSY 893: Practicum III (Adults)
3
TOTAL
14
PSY 866: Alcohol/Substance Abuse and Interventions
2
PSY 873: Interpersonal Psychotherapy
2
PSY 896: Independent Study
2
Special Requirements of the Program
To continue with the program and start the dissertation, the student will be
expected to go through Personal psychotherapy; pass an Evaluation Interview,
pass Comprehensive Examinations and a Professional Qualifying Examination.
Personal Psychotherapy
All students are required to complete 50 hours of individual therapy with an
approved counsellor(s) or psychologist(s). Personal psychotherapy is designed
to facilitate personal growth and development of therapeutic techniques through
the student’s experience and modelling by the therapist. The therapist must be
approved by the Clinical Committee2 to ensure competency and credibility.
Personal psychotherapy must be undertaken with at least a Master level Counselor or
Therapist.
2
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Progress Evaluation Interview (PEI)
Professional Qualifying Examination
All students are required to have an oral Progress Evaluation Interview with a
Faculty Committee from the School of Human and Social Sciences, specifically,
Psychology Department, at the end of second year. The Progress Evaluation
Interview provides an opportunity for students to demonstrate their prowess
in terms of academic and clinical performance, and to demonstrate their
suitability in the doctoral clinical psychology program3. During the Progress
Evaluation Interview, students will receive personal progress evaluations
from their instructors through the committee. Depending on the committee’s
evaluation, the student may continue with or without conditions, or discontinue
doctoral study in the program4.
All Ph.D. students are required to successfully complete a Professional
Qualifying Examination that will show their readiness for Internship. This
examination must be taken prior to applying for Internship and after the
Comprehensive Examinations. The Faculty Committee Chair will co-opt one
more faculty member to constitute a panel. In addition, the student must submit
all the required materials to the Chair and the panel members one week prior
to the scheduled Professional Examination. All information for this examination
must be handled in a confidential manner . The examination will comprise the
following:
Comprehensive Examinations
A comprehensive examination (also referred to in this document as “comps”)
is given when the student has completed all the required and prescribed
courses. Comprehensive examinations are given once a year prior to taking
the Professional Qualifying Examination. The comprehensive examination
must be taken in the third year of a student’s first enrolment in the program.
The examinations will be written but students may be required to submit oral
examination in cases where the written examinations need clarification. To
undertake the comprehensive examination, a student must have completed
78 credit hours of coursework, passed all the core courses and attained a
cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.00. It is on a pass or fail basis
and will not contribute to the total credit hours. However, students who do not
pass the comprehensive examination will not be allowed to proceed with the
doctoral program.
All students must pass the following set of doctoral – level (administered for 3
hours each) examinations:
a. Professional Ethics and Issues.
b. Psychological Assessment including Diagnosis
c. Psychological Intervention (Treatment and Research)
d. Integration (Psychology, Theology/Spirituality and Worldview)
Intake and Diagnostic Skills
a. An Intake Report including diagnosis using DSM-IV and recommendations
(Raw data must be provided to show validity and reliability of the Intake
Report).
b.
An audio/visual recording of the Intake
An On-going Supervised Client Case Presentation
Students will present an on-going case of a client seen under supervision for a
minimum of 10 sessions. The student must submit the case in both audio and
transcript format as follows:
a. An audio/visual recording of the session,
b.
A typed transcription of the session in a., and
c.
A typed case summary report of the individual client or couple or family.
The student is expected to demonstrate competence in therapeutic interventions,
ethical considerations and professionalism to qualify for this examination.
3
Clinical Psychology programs are intended to produce clinical and research competency
in all students.
Bias will be dealt with through meticulous scrutiny, academic and professional ethics
substantiation.
4
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Course Descriptions
GRA 801 Doctoral Colloquium
2 Credits
Library research skills; use of search-engines, summarizing, synthesizing, and
critical evaluation skills; academic writing and referencing skills; literature
review; report writing and presentation; concepts and praxis on producing
a text in written form; activities of note-taking such as drafting the contents
and organization of the document; documentation entailing literature citation:
footnoting, proofreading and editing of text; and steps in writing a research
paper.
BIL 801 Seminar on Integration of Faith and Life
3 Credits
Definitions of faith, integration, worldview and kingdom of God; a critique of
the biblical basis for a Christian world-life view; analysis of kingdom of God
values and principles; analysis of other ideologies and philosophies of life;
examination of integration steps, models, styles and strategies; evaluation of
the integration of faith with the discipline of clinical psychology; application
of the concept of integration in ethics, values, attitudes and the building of the
kingdom of God; and an evaluation of the African worldview foundations and
Christian truth.
BIL 802 Philosophy of Scientific Inquiry 3 Credits
Scientific knowledge and its production in relation to concepts, statements,
observation, theory, evidence, scientific realism and instrumentalism,
constructivism, scepticism; analysis and reductionism; acquisition of
knowledge—the regress problem, a priori and a posteriori knowledge,
analytic/synthetic distinction, and theories of knowledge acquisition; the major
grounds of validity of reasoning; the crucial importance of social accountability;
modernism and postmodernism; towards a philosophy of science that is
relevant and adequate to the African context. The content will require students
to be able to discuss issues in psychology inquiry and distinguish claims based
on social empirical theories.
PSY 815: Advanced Psychotherapy
2 Credits
Intake procedures, interviewing skills, intake handouts, identifying data,
behavioral observations, presenting problems, informed consent, existential
therapy, diagnostic impressions, summary and recommendations. Ethical
dilemmas, dynamic therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, suicidal clients,
family systems theory and experience, and family secrets. Reality, Adlerian,
Limited/Brief, Gestalt, Rogerian, Schematic and other therapeutic techniques.
PSY 816: Advanced Cognitive & 2 Credits
Affective bases of behavior
A framework imaging the brain, the brain, brain injuries and its effects on
behavior, vision, attention and consciousness, learning and memory, hearing
and speech, thinking and problem solving, information processing, goals,
executive control, and action, brain and emotion, social cognition and
development.
PSY 817: Advanced Biological Aspects of Behavior 2 Credits
Define biopsychology. Neurons and communication within the nervous system.
The functions of the nervous system, drugs addiction, and reward, motivation
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and regulation of internal states, the biology of sex and gender, emotion and
health, hearing and language, vision and visual perception. The body sense
and movement, learning and memory, intelligence and cognitive functioning.
Sleep consciousness, psychological disorders. The brain; neurotransmitters
and hormones, reproductive behavior, sensory and motor functions, brain
development and change, arousal and sleep, emotions, and emotional and
neurological disorders. Research ethics in neuroscience, split brain studies, a
comparison of two (or more) methods of examination of the live brain, human
face recognition, the truth about crash diets, mnemonics, an example of
amnesia, and a biopsychological aspect of blindness (or deafness). What is
EMDR? Music and the brain, human attractants and meaning of mirror neurons.
PSY 818: Multicultural Issues in Clinical Psychology 2 Credits
Definition: Cultural competency, attribution theory, ethnic identity development,
acculturation (mendoza model) and identity development models. perspectives
on culture, individualism vs. Collectivism, value orientation and worldviews.
Differences in communication, culture and mental health. Worldview, intercultural
communication, Christian worldview, multicultural and ethnic underpinnings,
language, and artifacts. Intercultural conflict, assimilating, accumulating and
social mores or faux pas. Cultural values, rituals and beliefs. Comparison
of social taboos and rules of own culture. Examples of verbal or non-verbal
misunderstanding and miscommunication. Clinical issues in psychotherapy,
cultural shock, and acculturation, ethnocentrism and xenophobia, cues and
clues. Cultural orientations, appropriate means of communication, gender
roles, individualism or collectivism, dress protocol, stereotypes. Christian
culture, personal Ethnography charting, cultural Adaptation, communication for
Transformational relationships, Diversity in culture and case studies.
PSY 820: Child & Adolescent psychotherapy
2 Credits
Introduction, brief review child and adolescent development, setting the frame
and ethical issues, role play on: initial interview, essential conditions and
therapeutic alliance, techniques of play therapy, barriers to successful treatment
outcomes , cultural issues & cultural responsiveness, role play: initial session,
introduction to play therapy and family based approaches, adolescent therapy,
interpretation in play, understanding play behavior and themes in play therapy,
child-centered play therapy, child-centered play therapy: a clinical session,
parent education and collaboration, psychoanalytic play therapy, physical
and sexual abuse 1, essentials of play therapy with abused children, physical
and sexual abuse ii, play therapy for severe psychological trauma, depression
and suicidal behaviors, ADHD and conduct disorder and autistic spectrum
disorder. Issues of treatment strategy, diagnosis, treatment implementation and
resolving ethical dilemmas.
PSY 821: Attachment and Psychodynamic Therapy 2 Credits
Introduction, foundations of attachment theory, the development of attachment
theory and relational psychoanalysis, neurobiology of attachment and emotional
information processing, internal working models and attachment patterns/
psychodynamics, nonlinear dynamics and intentionality in the change process
and psychotherapeutic applications of attachment/relational psychoanalysis.
how attachment shapes self, attachment in psychotherapy, and attachment and
spirituality. Multiple memory systems in psychotherapy, representations and
attachment styles. varieties of attachment experience, attachment and African
culture and mending the split between mind and spirit.
PSY 825: Trauma, Diagnosis and 2 Credits
Psychopharmacology
Introduction. Administration, absorption, effects and contraindications and
elimination of drugs. Types of drugs, principles of pharmacology and how
drugs affect the Central Nervous System. Scientology and its teachings
regarding mental illness and psychotropic medication, Pharmaceutical
companies’ marketing strategies, Validity of Informed Consent in the use of
psychotropic drugs, Benzodiazepines: are they useful or dangerous, or both?
Use of controlled substances in the treatment of children and adolescents with
ADHD, Use of alternative medicine options in the treatment of mental illness,
approaches to the treatment or mental disorders and Validity of research data on
the effectiveness of drugs. Introduction and Diagnosis of PTSD; Epidemiology,
Risk factors, Co-morbidity; Neurology of trauma / Psychopharmacology, Grief
and trauma / Childhood trauma, Assessment: Self-report scales I; Assessment:
Self-report scales II; and Assessment: Interview scales. Other pertinent issues
include intervention: EMDR / Hypnosis, Intervention: CISD / Cognitivebehavioral; intervention: Psychodynamic / Group and intervention: Family /
Art. It will also cover cross-cultural dimensions of trauma including all affected
populations.
PSY 842: Measurement & Assessment I: 3 Credits
Cognitive and Projective Tests
Philosophy and History of Psychological Assessment, issues in administering
surveys and tests, Norms, Reliability, and Validity in Assessment. Crosscultural issues arising from the use of assessment instruments in Africa, ethics
of psychological testing and report writing. Wechsler Adult Intelligence
Scale – IV (WAIS-IV), Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children-IV (WISC-IV),
Woodcock Johnson-III (WJII), Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder-(AD/HD),
Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-11),Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of
Visual-Motor Integration – V (VMI-5), Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt – II, Child
Behavior Checklist (parent and teacher versions), Stroop Color and Word
Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales – II,
Wechsler Individual Achievement Test – II (WIAT-II), Wechsler Memory Scale –
III (WMS-III), Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence – III (WPPSIIII) and Wide Range Assessment Test – IV (WRAT-4). It includes Integration
of test data and report 1 writing (Battery 1: WAIS-III or WISC-III, MMPI-11,
Rorschach, House-Tree-Person drawings, Clinical interview including Mental
Status). Cultural responsiveness and Rorschach, Thematic analysis, legal and
Forensic implications for Rorschach and Report 2 writing (Battery 2: WAIS-III
or WISC-III, MMPI-11 or MCMI-III, Rorschach, TAT or CAT, Clinical interview
including Mental Status).
PSY 843: Measurement & Assessment II: Personality
3 Credits
Course introduction and overview, diagnostic interviewing, mental status
exam, MMPI - 2 - Theory, administration, interpretation and report writing.
MCMI - 3, Beck Depression Inventory, BVGT, SCL-R-90: Theory, administration,
interpretation, report writing; Integrating assessment data, considerations of
testing in the future, limitation, especially cultural bias of assessment instruments.
In addition, Personality tests also include Thematic Apperception Test (TAT),
Symptom Checklist - 90 - Revised (SCL - 90 - R), Sentence Completion Test,
Projective Drawings, Myers – Briggs Type Inventory, Sixteen Personality Factor
Inventory (16PF) and modified California Personality Inventory (CPI).
PSY 844: Measurements & Assessment III: 3 Credits
Clinical Disorders
The assessment process, clinical judgement and psychological prediction.
Bias in psychological assessment: Empirical review and recommendations.
Testing and assessment in cross-cultural psychology. Psychological assessment
in treatment settings: Adult mental health; Child mental health; school settings;
medical settings; industrial/organizational and forensic settings. Assessment of
neurological functioning and psychopathology with behavioral approaches.
Computerized psychological assessment; ethical issues in assessment;
Education and training in psychological assessment. Exceptionality and
special education; Current trends and issues; multicultural and bilingual aspects
of special education; parents and families and mental retardation in Kenya
and elsewhere. Learning disabilities; Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder;
emotional or behavioral disorders; communication disorder; autism spectrum
disorders; low-incidence; multiple and severe disabilities. Physical disabilities
and other health impairments (child abuse). Special gifts and talents. RES 850 Research Methodology
4 Credits
Fundamental research paradigms and their philosophical underpinnings,
research process, social versus scientific research, inductive and deductive
psychology research methods, evaluation research, rhetorical criticism,
transformation inquiry, sampling techniques, ethics in psychology research,
current research developments in psychology, research proposal, research
design, methods of data collection, data collection instruments, validity,
reliability, triangulation, bias, qualitative or quantitative research, data analysis
software.
RES 851 Advanced Quantitative 3 Credits
Research Methods
Descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, measures of variability,
bivariate correlation, confidence intervals, inferential statistics, power analysis,
statistical vs. practical significance, hypothesis testing, significance testing, t-tests,
one-way, two-way and three-way ANOVAs, single and multiple regression, chisquare tests, analysis of covariance, factorial designs, post hoc and planned
comparisons, logistic regression. multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA),
multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), repeated measures analysis
of variance, discriminant analysis, ingredients of a statistical model, estimation
of linear models, time series analysis, evaluation and selection of models,
panel data models, structural equation modelling, stochastic models, linear
differential models, curvilinear models, probit models, multiple levels models
among others. Prerequisite: Research Methodology (RES 850)
RES 852 Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
3 Credits
Processes, principles, and application of qualitative research techniques,
coding and categorizing, grounded theorizing, narrative analysis, discourse
analysis, software tools and their use in analysing raw data, research
design in qualitative research, case study, action research, ethnography,
survey research, participatory research, historical research; methods of data
collection: interviews, observational methods, document analysis, focus
groups; populations and samples, record keeping in qualitative research,
methodological positions for the construction and interpretation of data;
overview of developments in qualitative analysis, thematic analysis, review of
contemporary approaches and their use in different arenas, selected analytic
schemes. Prerequisite: Research Methodology (RES 850)
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PSY 854: Research Design
3 Credits
Introduction;
advantages and limitations of the experimental method;
assumptions inherent in the method; key terms; flaws in an experimental design
and inappropriate conclusions drawn from a study; differentiation of multivariate
statistics to use for a given research design, and application of the experimental
method in selected areas of psychology. This course should help you develop
the skills necessary to conduct and evaluate research in the field of Psychology.
Review of relevant literature on a given research topic; application of the
appropriate research methodology to a given research question; and analysis
of different types of data. A formal written research proposal. Evidence-based
research methods; empirically supported treatments, meta-analysis, internal and
external validity; sources of bias; control and comparison groups; quantitative
research designs and observational research. Ethical issues; qualitative
research; mixed methods research; multiple regression, ANCOVA, MANOVA,
factor analysis, path analysis, and structural equation modeling. Developing a
research proposal.
PSY855: Research Apprenticeship
2 Credits
Introduction; review of Literature: Review of relevant literature that provides:
brief summary and appraisal of relevant literature with clear identification
of the rationale and importance of the research problem; foundation for
research procedures and assessment instruments and theoretical rationale for
hypotheses or expected outcomes. Statement of research question, objectives,
and hypotheses; statement of the research problem; hypotheses or expected
outcomes; Limitations and delimitations of the study. Methodology – subjects,
sampling and demographic characteristics; Type of design; identification
of independent and dependent variables. Instruments to be used, validity
of measures or scales to be used; scoring procedures and validity and
reliability of information. Data collection procedure, analysis, conclusions and
recommendations.
PSY 862: Ethics and Professional Issues; 3 Credits
Consultation and Supervision
History of Formal Ethics Code, Preamble, General Principles, Resolving
ethical issues, Ethical Standards, Competence, Human Relations, Multiple
Relationships, Privacy and Confidentiality, Therapy, Psychological Assessment,
Hospital Practice, suicidal clients, Avoiding Malpractice, Advertising and
making other public statements, Forensic Activities, Duty to warn, Child and
Elder Abuse, and Reporting Abuse issues. Record keeping and fees, Research
and Publication, Education and Training, Introduction, understanding of
components of effective supervision and application of ethical principles to the
supervisory process. Enhancement of supervision strategies regarding diversity,
exploration of current models of supervision, familiarity with significant research
and exploration of the integration of spirituality in supervision. Training and
practice in supervisory and consultation roles. Biblical ethical principles and
African values.
PSY 876: Couples Therapy
2 Credits
Introduction, attachment theory, a new light on love, Tasks and interventions,
demon dialogue, emotion, raw spots and affect regulation. Atkinson’s Pragmatic
Experiential Therapy for Couples (PET-C), Gottman Method Couple Therapy
and other theories and approaches. Special issues of abuse, affairs, and
addictions in the treatment of couples. Hold me tight, forgiveness, attachment
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injuries and forgiving injuries. Motivation, interaction, intervention, positive
emotion and keeping love alive. Abuse, addictions, affairs, healing power
of love and love connection. Bonding in sex, gender and culture issues, gay
couples, polygamy.
PSY 888: Pre-practicum
0(3)
Overview of empathy training; counseling setting; role play presentations;
vocabulary of affective adjectives and vocabulary of feelings; introduction
to professional ethics; listening skills and how to interview clients. Empathic
skills such as responding; paraphrasing; initiating and implementing. Highlight
Rogerian and Egan therapeutic skills. Self-growth and awareness.
PSY 89I: Practicum I (Children)
3 Credits
This will be a supervised clinical experience for Ph.D. students. Students will
be placed in Primary School sites around Nairobi, where they will receive
supervision on site as well as at Daystar University. They will be expected to
engage in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite: PSY 888
PSY 892: Practicum II (Adolescents)
3 Credits
This will be a supervised clinical experience for Ph.D. students. Students will
be placed in Secondary School sites around Nairobi, where they will receive
supervision on site as well as at Daystar University. They will be expected
to engage in both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite: PSY
888: Prepracticum
PSY 893: Practicum III (Adults)
3 Credits
This will be a supervised clinical experience for Ph.D. students. Students will be
placed in either hospitals or Counselling Centres around Nairobi, where they
will receive supervision on site as well as at Daystar University. They will be
expected to engage in both clinical diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.
Prerequisites: PSY 888, PSY 891 & PSY 892.
PSY 998(A-D): Dissertation I - IV
18 Credit Hours
All Ph.D. students are required to write a Dissertation. The Dissertation is divided
into 4 sub-sections (A-D) consisting 6, 6, 3 and 3 credit hours respectively.
Students may not enrol for more than 1 sub-section in a semester.
Each Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology student must submit an acceptable
dissertation not exceeding 100,000 words. The Ph.D. dissertation is expected
to be a substantial contribution to research in the field of study, demonstrating
authenticity, and creativity, breadth of research, careful critical argumentation,
quality work, and explicit English style. In principle, a good dissertation will be
publishable (certainly in the form of an article or articles). The topic ought to be
chosen wisely, and the proposal should be written after extensive appropriate
reading, careful and thorough research and consultation with the supervisor.
The Dissertation is done in the fourth year of study under the direction of a
faculty Supervisor and a Reader. Students must register for the appropriate
Dissertation credits hours every Semester. They may not enroll for PSY 998A I
until they have completed ALL the Research and other courses as indicated in
the Ph.D. courses structure.
Students must successfully defend the final Dissertation at an oral examination
panel before the Dissertation/Doctoral project committee in order to receive
credit for the Dissertation. More guidelines and details for proposing,
implementing, and completing the Dissertation are provided in 2.7.9 of this
curriculum.
PSY 999: Final Internship
6 Credit Hours
Internship is done in the Third year of study in the PhD program. It is a
requirement for all the PhD students to successfully complete 16 weeks (6 Credit
Hours) of full time internship prior to graduation.
All internship sites must be approved in advance by the Clinical Committee.
Students wishing to complete internship in 32 weeks (half-time) may apply to
the Clinical Committee for consideration.
Students will be expected to cover a minimum total of 600 hours combined.
About 300 of the student’s hours should be in direct clinical work with clients
(intake interviews and therapy) with the remaining 300 hours dedicated to staff
meetings, supervision, consultation, note-taking, report writing, psychological
assessment, reading, logging, administration, and other clinical training
activities.
The cross cultural interactions and
networks at Daystar, which is home
to over 26 student nationalities,
were my greatest attraction to it.
Daystar gave me the opportunity
to grow academically and in my
sporting career.
Biko Adema
www.daystar.ac.ke
227
INSTITUTE OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT
POSTGRADUTAE PROGRAMME
MASTER OF ARTS IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT
Rationale
Africa has a rapidly growing number of vulnerable children facing multiple
violations of their rights. Many of these children suffer hunger, ill health,
violence, neglect, lack of access to education and opportunities for play.
They also have little chance of a successful and happy future and eternal
life. An estimated 12 million children in Africa have lost one or both parents
to AIDS. Many others are living in households with sick parents, guardians,
and grandparents who are helping to care for them. Millions of African
children are affected by conflict, war, famine and poverty. The total number
of orphaned children in sub-Saharan Africa is more than 50 million today. All
these have interrupted the growth and development of children.
Although African governments have the responsibility to care for these
children, too often, they do not do it to satisfactory levels. For centuries,
communities in Africa have helped their needy members in crisis. Today, the
traditional social system where the extended family took care of their children
is dying or has died. Consequently, many children are forgotten and are in
deep trouble. The traditional support can no longer be relied on.
As a response, community members and organizations are coming together
to assist children and their families with various kinds of assistance including
parenting, protection, psychosocial and spiritual support, and material
assistance.
However, these groups and organizations require assistance to effectively
care for the children. They require support to deliver the best responses,
reaching the most vulnerable children holistically and for eternity in a
sustained way.
The Child Development Programme is designed to carter for this need to
equip professionals in the ministry to children that are currently supporting, or
wishing to support children with the necessary knowledge and skills to impact
positively into the lives of children. The programme curriculum is designed
to promote the competence of professionals to respond to needs of children
particularly those at risk as the first resort.
This curriculum includes excellent courses that provide clear guidance and
facilitation for community mobilization for supporting children; research in the
identification of children needs; programming interventions, administration
and leadership skills.
Instruction in Child Development is grounded on the essential principles that
are necessary when working with children. These include the following:
1. Child participation
228
2.
Child protection
3.
Provision of holistic services to children.
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Study objectives on child development, will do the following among other
aspects:
• Identify key activities that a supporting organization should consider to
enable the community to serve children well.
• Work with children as partners – listening to them, engaging them and
finding out their needs, interests and hopes, understand the challenges
they face, identify and prioritize strategies to address these challenges
• Ensure that all organizational activities protect children from harm,
• become transparent and accountable to children
• Make realistic and manageable plans that benefit children
• Make the best use of available resources and successfully access
additional resources to further the cause of children.
• Monitor and evaluate what is being done for children and see what
impact interventions are making in their lives.
• Advocate for changes within the community and within national and
international levels so that children’s rights are realized.
• Improve students’ ability to communicate clearly both orally and in
writing to professionals and to lay persons about psychological matters
concerning children.
• Provide students with a clear understanding of the principles of child
behavior;
• Enable the students to develop coping skills, self-acceptance, selfappreciation, positive self-image, self-esteem, self-dignity and
appreciation of children despite their limitations.
• Enable the student to assume the responsibilities of a Christian
professional whose main goal is commitment to bettering the
contemporary society as God’s steward, co-worker and an agent of
change.
Study Objectives for students on child development:
1. To equip students with knowledge, social and counseling skills in Child
Development.
2. To identify developmental needs and changes among children and
adolescents.
3. To identify various ways of handling the developmental needs and
changes in children.
4. To explore ways through which student will integrate Christian faith and
work among children and adolescents.
5. To equip students with skills in studying, research, and publication in the
field of Child Development.
6. To equip students with facilitation skills that will assist them in carrying
out participatory training on child development issues at the community
level.
7. To impart skills to students on how to connect theories of child growth
and development to social policy, education and intervention.
Duration & Course Structure
Required courses for graduation
Full time students will take 2 academic years to complete the course, which
will be through course work, examination, thesis or projects. The course will
comprise 4 Semesters. Part time students will take a minimum of 2 and half
years to complete.
Course Code/Course Title
Admission Requirements
To qualify for admission in the MA Child Development, an applicant should:
•
•
•
Hold an undergraduate degree in child-related study discipline like
Child Development, Social Work, Community Development, Psychology,
and Christian Ministry. Applicants with degrees in education, post
graduate diploma in education are also eligible. Applicants with fieldbased experience in working with children despite having degrees that
are not necessarily child –focused will be considered
Applicants should have attained their degrees from accredited
institutions of higher learning, with a cumulative Grade Point Average
(GPA) of at least 2.7 on a 4.0 scale, or a degree awarded with an
upper second class honors or lower second honors with further studies/
experience with working with children.
Because of the psychological courses in this programme, students will
need to have done psychology or a minor in psychology or must do PSY
211 as a zero credit hours.
Credit Hours
BIL 615 Biblical Foundations for Christian Service
2
GRW 611 Graduate Research & Writing (Research
Methods for Children) I
2
GRW 613 Graduate Research & Writing (Research
Methods for Children) II
2
CHD 600 Special Topics In Child Development
2
CHD 601 The Church and Child Development
3
CHD 610 Introduction to Child Development
3
CHD 611/PSY 608D Theories of Child & Adolescent
Therapy
3
CHD 621 Facilitation for Child Development
2
CHD 631/PSY 650 Psychopathology in Children
3
CHD 632 Health Education & Habit Formation in
Children
2
CHD 633/PSY 656 Child Psychological Assessment
2
CHD 641 Children Rights, Ethics & Advocacy Skills
3
CHD 635 Child Intervention
2
PGM 611 Project Development, Monitoring &
Evaluation
2
PGM 612 Management of Child Development
Programmes
3
CHD 698 Thesis/Project OR
CHD 697/PSY 697 Practicum and Seminar
6
TOTAL
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Course Descriptions
BIL 615 BIBLICAL FOUNDATIONS FOR CHRISTIAN SERVICE
2 Credits
Introduction and Definition of term: Kingdom of God; Servant hood; Jesus’
teaching on the Kingdom of God; Parables of the Kingdom; The teaching of
the early church on the Kingdom of God; various views on the Kingdom of
God; Ethics of the Kingdom; Implication Servant hood; Biblical teaching on
Christian service; Christian service and contemporary world; Integration of
Kingdom ethics into Christian life.
GRW 611 GRADUATE WRITING
2 Credits
This course is designed to expose the student to the higher level academic
skills required for graduate studies and to develop those skills, especially
as applied to the development of acceptable academic papers. It seeks to
prepare the student to do effective research in his/her major field of study
by introducing him/her to different research paradigms, procedures and
processes. Types of research studies and methodologies, philosophical bases
for perspectives, research design, statistical data analysis techniques, data
presentation, Qualitative methods - observational techniques, validity and
reliability, interpretation of research findings are explored.
GRW 613 GRADUATE RESEARCH & WRITING 2 Credits
( RESEARCH METHODS FOR CHILDREN)
These courses are an introduction to attitudes, skills and knowledge necessary
to fulfill academic requirements for producing and graduating postgraduate
communication research and writing. Through the courses, students gain
exposure to major steps in designing, implementing and reporting.
CHD 600 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT
2 Credits
Discipleship and children, Children and the Law, Street families, Child Labour;
Children with Special needs/ disabilities, current issues facing adolescents
including pregnancy, sexually- transmitted diseases, sexual abuse, sexual
harassment, alcohol/substance abuse, Abandoned Children, Children with
psychological disorders, Child participation, Effects of domestic violence on
children growth and development, parenting roles and training effects on Child
growth and development or any other topic the student may be interested in.
CHD 601 THE CHURCH AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT
3 Credits
An awareness of the history and activities in a wide variety of churches and
church-related contexts in both urban and rural Kenya as they specifically relate
to children. The mission of the church for children including preaching, worship,
evangelism, discipleship, pastoral care, leadership, mentoring children, faith
and moral development, effective ways of organizing bible study and other
activities that enhance cognitive, physical, social-emotional development of
children, counseling children about salvation, skills for equipping parents and
leaders to talk to children about conversion, baptism, prayer and confession.
Prerequisite CHD 610, 611.
CHD 610 INTRODUCTION TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT
3 Credits
Introduction to the child’s physical, social, emotional, intellectual growth and
development. Biological basis of Development, Prenatal Development, Infancy
and toddlerhood (Overview, Cognitive Development, Emotional and Social
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Development). Heredity, genetics, and genetic testing, Hormonal influences,
Influences of drugs, Motor development, Nutritional influences, Perinatal
influences, Physical growth and maturation, Prenatal influences, Sexual
maturation, Teratogens. Early childhood: Physical and Cognitive Development,
Emotional and Social Development. Middle childhood: Physical and Cognitive
Development, Emotional and Social Development. Adolescence :Physical
and Cognitive, Emotional and Social Development, atypical development:
Antisocial behavior, Asocial behavior, fears, phobias, and obsessions,
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Autism spectrum disorders, Chronic
illnesses and physical disabilities, Cognitive disorders, including dementia,
Genetic disorders, Giftedness, Learning disabilities, Mental retardation, Mood
disorders, Trauma-based syndromes.
CHD 611 THEORIES OF CHILD &
3 Credits
ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT
Selected models and theories of Child Development potentially applicable to
nurturing children including Piaget, Vygotsky, Kohlberg and Erikson, Freud,
Gardner, Bronfenbrenner, James Fowler, Oser, Gillespie, Elkind, Aden, and
Fuller. Explore the Holy Scriptures with a view to developing a theology of
children with the aim of developing an integrated approach to the transmission
of religious values and nurturing the spiritual and character growth of
children primarily through the home, and secondarily through the church,
the school and the wider community. Ecological influences of development:
Family relationships, Family structures, Media and technology, Multicultural
perspectives, Parenting styles Social and class influences. Personality and
emotion development: Attribution styles, Development of emotions, Emotional
expression and regulation, Emotional intelligence, Stability and change,
Temperament. Learning development: Classical conditioning, Discrimination
and generalization, Habituation, Operant conditioning, Social learning and
modeling.
CHD 621 FACILITATION FOR CHILD DEVELOPMENT
2 Credits
Introduce or reinforce facilitation as an empowering/enabling process
for working with partner projects, and to introduce and review facilitation
methodologies and techniques that are consistent with this philosophy in relation
to child and adolescent development. Prerequisite CHD 610, 611, 631, 632
CHD 631 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN CHILDREN
3 Credits
Course Introduction: ethical, political and economic considerations diagnosis;
validity and reliability of diagnostic categories; overview DSM – IV: Multiaxial
assessment and emerging diagnostic addiction): mood disorders, anxiety
disorders, thought disorders; interface between mental and medical conditions;
eating disorders, Prerequisite CHD 610, 611.
CHD 632 HEALTH EDUCATION AND HABIT 2 Credits
FORMATION IN CHILDREN
understanding the basic principles and practices of safety, health and nutrition
as they relate to the children settings, homes, and communities. This will
include a study of the principles of creating appropriate environments for
children to grow and live, a study of nutrition, health, safety, and related
activities, including skill development in management of issues, guidelines, and
practices in nutrition, as well as community health, hygiene, safety, and legal
implications. Integration of these principles applied to a variety of settings will
be emphasized. Prerequisite CHD 610, 611.
CHD 633 CHILD PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT
2 Credits
This course addresses the assessment of young children from birth to 12 years.
In this course, students will develop strategies for the assessment of young
children’s social, emotional, cognitive, adaptive, and motor development in
the context of home, school, and community environments. They will become
familiar with procedures and formal and informal instruments used in the
assessment of young children. Students will also develop methods of conducting
formative and summative evaluations of both individual children and programs.
Analysis and interpretation of observation and assessment results to enhance
learning outcomes and determine program effectiveness are key components of
this course. The role of the family and family concerns, priorities, and resources
in assessment will be addressed, as well the impact of cultural, economic, and
linguistic diversity. Prerequisite CHD 610, 611.
CHD 641 CHILDREN RIGHTS, ETHICS & ADVOCACY SKILLS
3 Credits
Identifying children’s rights as stipulated in the children’s act as per the current
constitution of Kenya. Understanding of the various categories of children with
special needs and their need for special care and protection. Under child
policy, learning the place of policy in the children’s rights, while appreciating
the role of research in influencing policy, learning on advocacy and how to
apply it to improve children welfare, learning on the place of Children’s rights
and justice in the bible, understanding why and how all children are covered
by the law and their duty to work towards advocating for children rights and
facilitate children to participate in issues affecting their lives. Prerequisite CHD
610, 611.
CHD 635 CHILD INTERVENTION
2 Credits
This course is designed to equip the learner with knowledge on the intervention
strategies to apply in the various levels of the problems of development
and deprivation affecting children. This course is designed to help students
develop a variety of child management strategies and skills for guiding and
counseling children based upon Child Development principles and ethics.
The emphasis of the course is on preparing, organizing and maintaining
physically and psychologically safe environments for children to live and thrive.
The establishment of positive, collaborative family relations and supportive,
professional, ethical behavior is emphasized. Special attention is given to
introducing ethical issues and how gender, class, and culture affect the helping
process. (prerequisite CHD 633). Prerequisite CHD 610, 611.
PGM 611 PROJECT DEVELOPMENT, 2 Credits
MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Introduction the knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques needed to successfully
initiate, implement and manage projects/ programmes throughout a project
lifecycle. Practical experience in designing a community-based project will
be taught. Introduction on the theory, methods and techniques used in the
design, monitoring and evaluation of community based programmes aimed
at improving the quality of life of children, women, and households. The
project cycle: needs assessment, design, implementation and management.
Monitoring and Evaluation, systems and approaches and report writing will
be covered.
PGM 612 MANAGEMENT OF CHILD
2 Credits
DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES
Introduction to key principles and framework for development and effective
management of Child Development programmes. Examining the issues
surrounding the development and administration of Child Development
programmes/projects and develop knowledge of and skills in the directorship,
the development of budgets, funding acquisition, the writing of program
policies, and the management of a facility and the formation of professional
relationships with staff, parents and the community. Introduction to the theory and
practice of leadership and management from a Child Development perspective
within public, private and faith based organizations. Theories of management
(human resource, policy, functional, and strategic management), organizational
structure, roles, and skills for macro and micro practice within an agency or
organization are examined. The unique perspective that child development
workers bring to program management in the resolution of community and
agency issues, ranging from teamwork, to personnel management, strategic
planning, power, and decision making, are central elements in this course.
Prerequisite PGM 611.
CHD 697 PRACTICUM AND SEMINARS
6 Credits
This course aims to assist students in integrating their learning as preparation for
beginning professional practice in Child Development. The course integrates
practical experience and theoretical knowledge as the student works directly
with children living in Childcare settings, families and Institutions. Students
examine and develop environments, materials, interactions, and planning
which foster meaningful growth and development of children. The course is
designed to provide comprehensive experience in application of knowledge
and values learned in previous coursework. Students will select a program or
facility which provides human child care services and will work at that site as
a supervised intern. Regular weekly meetings with the instructor and colleagues
will provide opportunities for discussion and evaluation of the work experience.
This practicum will focus more on direct service activities such as assessment,
planning and intervention skills, case management, documentation and
recording competencies, advocacy, and information and referral knowledge.
Educational/observational activities will also be credited as part of the
practicum experience. Students meet weekly for a seminar to discuss theory,
strategies, curriculum, and observations related to their practicum. Prerequisite
ALL.
CHD 698 THESIS/Project
6 Credits
The Masters’ Thesis for the M.A. in Child Development is a research project
designed and carried out by the student, under the direction of a SupervisorReader team. While all students in the M.A. programme are expected to
be good consumers of research, the thesis project is designed to prepare
students to contribute to the research in the field and to gain important research
experience necessary for entrance into a doctoral program and to contribute
to social policy.
The project will follow almost the same format as that of thesis, only that it will
not be subjected to the rigors of defenses, data collection and analysis. The
student will have a supervisor who will advise and guide him/her through the
whole project.
www.daystar.ac.ke
231
NOTE:
1. Practicum must be registered for when the student has successfully
completed all the coursework.
2. The student must not register for any other courses during practicum.
3. Those working and would face challenge getting ten continuous weeks
can express his/her problem a semester before the practicum semester
to the hod.
4. The student should proceed to the practicum experience only after
registration. All practicum sites should be approved by the department
through the lecturer responsible for practicum.
1st YEAR
1st Semester
Credits
1st Semester
Credits
GRW 611
2
CHD 631
3
CHD 610
3
CHD 600
2
CHD 601
3
BIL 615
2
CHD 633
2
CHD 698
3
PGM 611
2
TOTAL
12
TOTAL
10
2nd semester
Credits
GRW 613
2
CHD 611
3
PGM 612
3
CHD 621
2
CHD 632
2
TOTAL
12
3rd Semester
232
2nd YEAR
Credits
PSY 211
0(3)
CHD 641
3
CHD 635
2
TOTAL
8
www.daystar.ac.ke
2nd semester
CHD 698
CHD 697
TOTAL
Credits
3
6
9
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT (PGDCD)
Introduction
Admission Requirement:
Sub-Saharan Africa is currently faced with an ever-increasing number of
children growing under difficult circumstances. Such children are the victims of
a combination of several adverse human situations that include poverty, civil
wars, and the HIV and AIDS pandemic.
In the majority of cases, children born under any or some of these
environmental situations in Africa are prone to suffer from one form of
maladjustment, serious infection or some physical depriva