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1 APPLICATION COVER SHEET NAME OF - Charter Schools

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APPLICATION COVER SHEET
NAME OF PROPOSED CHARTER SCHOOL: Gulf Coast Charter Academy (GCCA)____
NAME OF NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION/MUNICIPALITY UNDER WHICH
CHARTER WILL BE ORGANIZED OR OPERATED: Gulf Coast Charter Academy, Inc._
The Organization has applied for 501(c)(3) Non-profit Status:
Yes ____ No _____X______
Provide the name of the person who will serve as the primary contact for this Application. The primary
contact should serve as the contact for follow-up, interviews, and notices regarding this application.
NAME OF CONTACT PERSON: Helen Deitriech
TITLE/RELATIONSHIP TO NONPROFIT:
Board President
MAILING ADDRESS: 5157 Estero Blvd, City: Fort Myers Beach, State: FL, Zip Code: 33931
PRIMARY TELEPHONE: (239) 321-1778
E-MAIL ADDRESS:
ALTERNATE TELEPHONE: ( )
[email protected]
NAME OF EDUCATION SERVICE PROVIDER (if any): NA
NAME OF PARTNER/PARENT ORGANIZATION (if any): NA_
Projected School Opening: ____2014 - 2015________
Grade Levels
Total Projected Student
Enrollment
Student Enrollment
Capacity (if known)
2014 - 2015
K-5
188
370
2015 - 2016
K-6
232
370
2016 - 2017
K-7
298
370
2017 - 2018
K-8
342
370
2018 - 2019
K-8
364
370
School Year
I certify that I have the authority to submit this application and that all information contained
herein is complete and accurate, realizing that any misrepresentation could result in
disqualification from the application process or revocation after award. I understand that
incomplete applications will not be considered. The person named as the contact person for the
application is so authorized to serve as the primary contact for this application on behalf of the
applicant.
______________________________________________
Signature
Helen Deitriech
Printed Name
Board Member
Title
July 26, 2013
Date
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Table of Contents
Gulf Coast Charter Academy
Section
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
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Title
Section 1 Mission, Guiding Principles and Purpose
Target Population and Student Body
Educational Program Design
Curriculum Plan
Student Performance, Assessment and Evaluation
Exceptional Students
English Language Learners
School Climate and Discipline
Governance
Management
Education Service Providers
Human Resources and Employment
Student Recruitment and Enrollment
Facilities
Transportation Service
Food Service
Budget
Financial Management and Oversight
Action Plan
Statement of Assurances
Appendix
Budgets
3
11
14
38
90
105
121
132
137
153
172
173
180
190
194
197
199
203
211
214
215
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Section 1: Mission, Guiding Principles and Purpose
A. Provide the mission statement for the proposed charter school.
The mission of Gulf Coast Charter Academy, grades K-8, is to foster pride in academic
achievement for all students. We will focus on the STEM Model (Science, Technology,
Engineering, and Mathematics) learning opportunities, resulting in higher student learning
outcomes, concurrently with teaching lifelong fitness and developing the students’ creative ability.
We strive to provide the students with an environment to learn and be successful in a safe and
orderly school. In addition we will provide an arts infused program across the curriculum.
However, our main focus is STEM.
B. Describe how the school will utilize the guiding principles found in section 1002.33(2)(a),
F.S.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy (GCCA) will:
Meet high standards of student achievement while providing parents flexibility to choose
among diverse educational opportunities within the state’s public school system.
In order to meet these guiding principles we will establish a school that recognizes and honors the
giftedness in all students. We will seek ways to enhance the learning opportunities of all students.
We will provide complete services to all students, as well as ESE, and ELL students, both learning
disabled and gifted, along with the general student population while guiding them with authentic
learning opportunities.
GCCA will ensure high standards of student achievement through the delivery of a rigorous and
relevant authentic learning curriculum: learning by doing, with special emphasis on the STEM
model that (1) meets state academic standards and grade-level expectations and elementary and
middle school testing and exit requirements, (2) provides additional preparation to assure high
school readiness, (3) meets high school entry/placement requirements, (4) provides academic and
career-related knowledge and skills in career awareness, and (5) provides opportunities for students
to earn high school credit through credit-based transition programs, including credits that may be
achieved in Spanish 1, Algebra, and Geometry.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy (GCCA) will:
Promote enhanced academic success and financial efficiency by aligning responsibility with
accountability.
Accessing data from the State’s Accountability Reports, the school will measure its own progress
in meeting the needs of its student population and make the necessary accommodations (via the
Multi-Tiered System of Supports, MTSS, previously Response to Intervention [RtI] model) as
applicable, to meet its educational responsibilities. The School will develop and utilize the MTSS
model, integrating assessment and intervention within a multi-level prevention system to maximize
student achievement and to reduce behavior problems. In the first year of operation, the school will
gather varied data to develop a School Improvement Plan as a method of accountability on an
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annual basis. This plan will detail specific goals and strategies to achieve academic success and
fiscal efficiency (including budget projections and evaluations from internal audits).
Financial controls - including an annual audit and regular board review of financial statements will be employed to safeguard finances and promote financial efficiency. By communicating
specific educational goals and financial responsibilities to its stakeholders - governing board, staff,
students, and parents - the School Improvement Plan will serve as a viable vehicle ensuring
continuous academic success and financial efficiency.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy (GCCA) will:
Provide parents with sufficient information on whether their child is reading at grade level
and whether the child gains at least a year’s worth of learning for every year spent in the
charter school.
GCCA will provide parents with PARCC/FCAT 2.01 Assessment Results on a yearly basis for
every year their child participates in the PARCC/FCAT 2.0. This means of communication informs
parents whether or not their child is reading at grade level and whether or not their child has gained
a year’s worth of learning for every year spent at the School. The School will also provide its
parents with a detailed PARCC/FCAT 2.0 report, annually, to communicate to the parent the
child’s reading learning gains for each year.
Through a detailed assessment of academic performance using standardized test scores and other
assessments the School will:
- Identify students who are a level below, at grade level, or a level above grade level;
- Identify those students not making adequate progress toward the Next Generation
Sunshine/Common Core State Standards, institute applicable measures for improvement via a
MTSS/ RtI model; and
- Report student progress throughout the academic school year on standards-based report cards.
GCCA will provide ongoing communication regarding the student’s progress. The school will
publish via the schools web site, teacher sites, and hard copy documents weekly updates on class
activities, and special events. Additionally, the school will provide a site for parents and students
alike for the opportunity to check on grades and/or missing work. The school will provide
midterm progress reports for all students as well as end of quarter reports. Students within the ELL
or ESE sectors of our population will receive detailed progress reports on a regular basis.
Moreover, Education Plans (EPs), Individual Education Plans (IEPs), Individual ELL Plans will be
reviewed when the need arises. Finally, Conference Nights through the year will be scheduled,
moreover, conferences at any time, may be initiated by either the teachers or the parents to discuss
the child’s progress.
C. Describe how the school will meet the prescribed purpose for charter schools found in
section 1002.33(2)(b), F.S.
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Throughout this document we will refer to FLDOE assessments as PARCC/FCAT 2.0 as the transition from one to
the other is a work in progress. FCAT 2.0 results will be used to compare growth with the PARCC.
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In Accordance with the law, GCCA will fulfill the following purposes:
Improve student learning and academic achievement
GCCA’s focus on the STEM Initiative with the constructivist approach emphasizing the Modern
Socratic Method will increase the achievement levels of all students for the Next Generation
Sunshine/Common Core State Standards, not only as fact based elements, but to the extent of full
appreciation and understanding of the intricacies of the benchmarks through the inquiry process
which stresses critical thinking.
The Integrated STEM Education, Through Project-Based Learning via Authentic Learning is based
on the constructivist theory which is, inquiry driven within an environment of authentic learning,
which is learning-by-doing. Constructivism is based on observation and scientific study. According
to Lombardi (pg.2, 2007), most educators consider learning-by-doing the most effective way to
learn. Constructivist teachers encourage students to constantly assess how the activity is helping
them gain understanding. By questioning themselves and their strategies, students in the
constructivist classroom ideally become "expert learners." This gives them ever-broadening tools
to keep learning. With a well-planned classroom environment, the students learn HOW TO
LEARN. As the student fine-tunes his/her skills on how to learn, their academic achievement will
also increase.
GCCA will design and implement a continuous improvement methodology (through MTSS/RtI)
wherein student assessment results offer opportunities for differentiated and targeted instruction
that is tailored to students’ individual needs, ensuring consistent increased student achievement
outcomes.
GCCA expects and encourages students to pursue their highest academic potential, especially in
the core subjects of STEM and provide the means for these students to reach their potential,
realizing their increased ability in how to learn.
GCCA will seek out and establish beneficial educational partnerships, such as: Corkscrew Swamp
Sanctuary, and the Children’s Science Center. These places will offer fantastic educational
programs for the students, and will tie into STEM Education, building ties with the community etc.
The Florida Department of Conservation often provides free classes for students, that the school
will begin scheduling on a preliminary basis.
GCCA will also partner with local higher education programs, which will also provide a wide array
of educational experiences for increased academic achievement.
Increase learning opportunities for all students, with a special emphasis on low-performing
students and reading.
GCCA will be able to increase the learning opportunities for all students by virtue of adopting the
unique STEM approach to learning. Students that are actively engaged in their own learning, by
using critical thinking skills, coupled with the hands-on project approach of STEM with authentic
applied applications to real world situations, and using the arts across the curriculum, will result in
authentic lifelong learning.
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STEM education can help all students demonstrate what they know and are able to do. Research
literature on performance assessments for learners offers evidence on the effectiveness and
usefulness of performance assessments for students.
In as much as performance assessments have shown to be authentic assessments, it is also true of
authentic learning via a STEM curriculum, which is at its core a constructivist approach to
learning. Any assessment is more valid when it mirrors the teaching and learning done in the
classroom. With STEM education assessment is what is going on at every step of the process.
Abedi states: Open-ended assessments improve the chances for students to engage with language
production and learning, unique opportunities for students to express their knowledge in a broader
sense than the limited linguistic opportunities given to them in traditional multiple choice items.
Open-ended projects, or tasks, provide students improved chances to engage with language
production and learning by providing unique opportunities that are not present in the traditional
teaching methods of lectures, work sheets, note taking, and multiple choices testing.
The school will increase learning opportunities for all students through careful, continuous
monitoring and assessment of student performance. Emphasis will be placed on low performing,
students, beginning with identification of those not making adequate progress and/or not
demonstrating mastery of Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards, as evidenced
by their previous year’s performance on standardized tests. Differentiated instruction methods and
other appropriate measures for targeted instruction will then be instituted for these students.
Further, the School’s curriculum will serve students of all ability levels in accordance with the
Florida Department of Education Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards. Using
data from the published PARCC/FCAT 2.0 reports to measure its own progress in meeting the
needs of its student population, the school will annually develop measurable learning objectives
over the major subject areas, to target student learning and development needs in its annual school
improvement Plan. Next Generation Sunshine State/Common Core Standards that are not mastered
will be identified, and appropriate measures for remediation will be instituted. Remedial students
and students with special learning needs will have access to supervised study time and tutoring
after school to accelerate their progress. In addition, students performing at grade level will be
offered similar opportunities in order to maximize their potential and advance their progress.
In addition to the above opportunities, the following methods and procedures, centered on Reading,
will also enhance the learning of all students, especially low performing students.
GCCA will be following the Lee County Reading Curriculum Plan at all levels (K-8). Teachers
will informally and formally assess student progress and adjust instruction and intensity of
intervention based on the data collected. Said data will be kept on data spreadsheets created at the
school level.
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Treasures is being implemented in grades 1-5. Cambium Learning Read
Well K is implemented as the Kindergarten Comprehensive Core and Intervention Reading
Program.
GCCA will follow the Comprehensive Core Reading Program (CCRP) for K-8 in Lee County. The
scope and sequence of the comprehensive core-reading program is implemented during the literacy
block and provides guidance to teachers in K-8 classrooms for selecting and assessing instructional
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targets. Cambium Learning Read Well 1 and Read Well 2 are also used as CIRP in grades 1 and 2.
is the district-adopted Cambium Learning Read Well K is the Kindergarten CCRP.
GCCA will follow the Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs are intended for flexible use
as part of differentiated instruction or intensive interventions to meet student learning needs in
specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension).
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Triumphs is used as an SIRP in Lee County. Supplemental programs
support and enhance, but do not replace the CCRP.
Exceptional students and students who enter the school below grade level will be evaluated and
appropriate strategies will be used to enhance their progress either by the classroom teacher(s), or
through the ESE Department, ELL Department, or through the MTSS/RtI process in order to
identify and prescribe a plan of intervention.
CIRPs are intended for students who are reading one or more years below grade level, and who are
struggling with a broad range of reading skills. The instruction provided through these programs
should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of grade level proficiency. Intervention programs
currently in use in Lee County Elementary schools for students reading one or more years below
grade level include Developmental Reading Program-Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Treasures, The
Comprehensive Literacy 2014 B/140 Curriculum, SRA Reading Mastery, and SRA Reading
Mastery Signature edition. Macmillan Treasure Chest is used with ELL students in need of
additional support. The Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs are utilized to increase
student achievement in reading when use of CCRP and SRP do not provide sufficient support and
pacing of instruction to accelerate student learning.
Additionally, proficiency in reading is considered a curriculum focus for all subject areas, thus all
teachers become reading teachers, will be trained in reading instruction strategies, will conduct
assessments within their academic areas that assess the level of achievement in reading in that core
content area, and share said assessments with the reading teachers.
Encourage the use of innovative learning methods.
The School will maintain a commitment to Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State
Standards as well as commit to student mastery of those standards. This will be monitored by each
teacher and their accountability documentation that demonstrates the standards that have been
mastered by each child. A variety of instructional methods will be used by teachers at the School
to deliver the coursework in the most effective way possible. In addition, while setting high
academic expectations for all students, the school will provide students the means to reach these
expectations through differentiated instruction methodology, hands-on inquiry-based
investigations, and project based instruction, Service Learning programs, instruction based on the
Modern Socratic Method and others in all subjects. To strengthen computer literacy, tutorial
software will be available for in-class and after-school use. Moreover, tutoring after school is also
afforded twice a week, to every child that wants to take advantage of it.
GCCA’s blended approach to learning is unique and innovative in that it brings together very
similar philosophical ideals of educational methods in a unique way to reach all learners: ELL,
ESE (learning disabled and gifted), along with the regular student population. All students will
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come to realize and respect the individual giftedness of all other students and learn to work in
collaborative activities where each individual has a special and important contribution to make.
By combining these methods with a dedication to student achievement, the School will offer a
disciplined, balanced and enriched education of the highest quality, thus preparing its students for a
successful high school career.
Require the measurement of learning outcomes
The School will participate in all applicable components of the Florida State Accountability system
as required by Florida law, as well as any other age-appropriate research-based assessments. Using
data from the published PARCC/FCAT 2.0 Reports to measure its own progress in meeting the
needs of its student population, the School will:
 Identify students not making adequate progress towards mastery of the Next Generation
Sunshine/Common Core State Standards (with emphasis on low-performing students and
students exhibiting reading deficiencies)
 Annually develop measurable learning objectives over the major subject areas to target
student learning and development needs
 Implement the Sponsor’s K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan
 Institute and monitor appropriate measures for students requiring remediation in reading
and other prescribed subjects.
Apart from the self-examination that the school community will undergo through the development
of the School Improvement Plan, the School will also report progress on its goals, the learning
outcomes of its students, and other pertinent school wide data through the State issued Annual
Accountability Report.
Measuring learning outcomes will provide useful information to the school for improving
educational planning, management, and teaching. The measurement of learning outcomes will start
in the classroom, where teachers informally evaluate students’ knowledge and performance. As
students progress throughout the year, they will be required to take further assessments. The results
of these assessments will be used to determine the support that students will need to improve
academic outcomes. The outcomes of the measurements will also be used to make decisions about
the allocation of resources to support student learning.
In addition, with the Modern Socratic Method the teacher sets his/her learning outcomes, based on
the Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards and develops the questions to be
asked to lead to the mastery of said benchmarks within those standards. Said outcomes are
continually assessed during the teaching/learning process as well as through teacher generated tests
at the close of every lesson and or unit. Teachers are required to generate pre- and post-tests to
assess the learning outcomes. Not only are the students given the end of the year post-test that
mirrors the pre-test but interim “indicator tests,” throughout the year. These tests are used to assess
and measure the growth of the students, and the lessons being delivered.
D. Describe how the charter school will fulfill, if applicable, the optional purposes of charter
schools found in section 1002.33(2)(c), F.S.
Create innovative measurement tools.
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GCCA believes that each student is unique, with his/her own learning style, and should be assessed
in a variety of ways. For this reason, in addition to all required state and district assessments, the
School will utilize other measurement tools, such as teacher-made assessments, projects,
portfolios, computer-assisted assessments, expositions, fairs, and a school wide accountability tool
generated to monitor each and every student with regard to their mastery of each and every
standard, which will measure student growth as is relevant to the coursework taught.
These measurements will provide valid, reliable, and timely information, and some will be focused
on allowing students to demonstrate what they do know and have learned, versus what they do not
know and have not learned, as is often the norm. This innovative method reinforces knowledge and
boosts student confidence. Based on these various measurements, teachers will modify their
instruction, monitor student progress, select appropriate classroom activities, and use assessment
results more effectively. These methods will inform teachers of the effectiveness of their teaching,
as well as improvement made by students in order to ensure continuous progress.
GCCA will use an assessment and record-keeping plan for both students and teachers. We have a
plan of pre-tests based on the Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards per subject
area and level, that each class creates based on the curriculum content of said class. Students will
record their proficiency in each benchmark area, and teachers will establish class proficiency data
for each class. Unit tests, mid-quarter, and end of quarter test will be used to assess the growth of
each student. Lessons will be adjusted to either remediate or enhance said benchmarks, and
parents will be continuously updated on their child’s progress toward mastery of said benchmarks.
End of the year post-tests will establish a guide as to how effective a process has been, and plans
for the next year will be based on these results.
Additionally, school climate surveys from parents, students, and teachers will be used to evaluate
teaching and learning processes, and data gathered from these will be utilized to improve the
school environment on a consistent basis.
Provide rigorous competition within the public school district to stimulate continual
improvement in all public schools.
As with all charter schools, or regular public schools, when any new school opens with a new
focus all schools are continually stimulated. We at GCCA plan to implement not only a school for
all students in the county, with an in-depth focus on the STEM education, but doing so with
authentic learning with relevancy to the real world the students participate in. Our
Constructivist/STEM combined focus using the Modern Socratic Method will offer a new dynamic
model for schools, and choices for parents.
In addition, in an effort to stimulate continual improvement in the county, throughout the state of
Florida, and beyond, GCCA will share the best practices and innovations it finds most effective
with other interested schools.
Expand the capacity of the public school system.
With the establishment of GCCA, more students are able to be served throughout the county.
Being able to accommodate a given number of students will lessen the numbers of students in
classes throughout the county, thus making the ratio of teacher to student in the county smaller.
Students in all schools benefit from smaller class sizes whenever a new school opens.
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One main function of charter schools is to provide parents with a variety of choices within the
state’s public education system. The School will expand the capacity of the public school system
by providing parents seeking a rigorous, authentic learning STEM educational experience for their
children as an additional high quality choice option.
Mitigate the educational impact created by the development of new residential dwelling
units.
GCCA is considering placing its educational facility in Cape Coral, which has seen a rapid growth
in the last five years. We are looking at 2911 Del Prado Blvd. South in Cape Coral. The facility is
already approved for a charter school. While there are schools located in the general area, GCCA’s
presence will lower the student/teacher ratio of all schools in that area. This ratio will increase the
opportunity for one on one or at least fewer students per teacher, which significantly enhances the
learning opportunity for the ELL, and/or ESE students, as well as the general population of
students. Moreover, as the recent economic downturn levels out and subsequently a stronger
economy develops, it is projected that this geographic area will return to an area of significant
growth and GCCA presence will assist in ameliorating any short term overcrowding of the schools
in this area.
Create new professional opportunities for teachers, including ownership of the learning
program at the school site.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy will promote significant professional development for teachers in the
areas of: STEM, ESOL, ESE, educational tools that enhance learning for the ELL, as well as
professional development in teaching via the Modern Socratic Method, acquiring a full
understanding of Authentic Learning, Constructivism, Team teaching, and in implementing the
STEM initiative, for all students, with a focus on the arts. With the unique blend and eclectic
approach of several educational philosophies and methods, we have an approach that requires the
teachers to take ownership of the learning program. Teams of teachers must meet, plan, and
collaborate together in order to establish a cohesive flow between and within individual content
areas of the school. Teachers must plan the outcomes and develop questions and scenarios that
will bring about the desired outcomes, one of which is higher student learning outcomes.
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Section 2: Target Population and Student Body
A. Describe the anticipated target population to be served. If applicable, applicants should
describe if they will target, in accordance with the law, certain populations defined in
1002.33(10) (e), F.S.
The population of Gulf Coast Charter Academy will be comprised of:
 Any student residing in the school district that is eligible to enter the appropriate grade
level.
 Any eligible student who submits a timely application, unless the number of applicants
exceeds the capacity of the program.
 Siblings of enrolled students and children of employees and board members of the school
will be given preference.
GCCA will not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, national/ethnic origin, or disability in the
admission of students. The school will comply with all applicable federal, state, and/or local
health, safety, and civil rights requirements. The school and its governing board will not violate
the anti-discrimination provisions of the Florida Statutes.
B. Provide the following projection for each year of proposed operation: the grades the
school will serve, the projected number of students to be served in each grade, the number of
students expected in each class, and the total number of students enrolled.
The school will comply with the constitutional class size maximum. Our Teacher/Student ratio will
comply with all statutes to be at or below class size maximum numbers.
Numbers of students at each grade level are hard to predict. Tentative projections are shown
below, but may vary based on demand at any particular level. New sections of each level will be
opened when and where numbers of applicants equal an entire class section at that level. Where
we may predict an opening of an additional class at each level with each passing year, reality may
dictate no additional class at a particular grade level, while adding 2 sections of classes at another
grade level, which will in turn affect the next year’s projections.
The school will not serve more than the enrollment capacity identified in the application without
approval from the Lee County School Board. Here is our anticipated student enrollment for each
year:
1st year K-5: 188 students with a capacity of 188
K: 2 classes of 18= 36
1: 2 classes of 18= 36
2: 2 classes of 18= 36
3: 2 classes of 18= 36
4: 1 classes of 22= 22
5: 1 class of 22= 22
2nd year K-6: 232 students with a capacity of 232
K: 2 classes of 18 = 36
1: 2 classes of 18 = 36
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2: 2 classes of 18 = 36
3: 2 classes of 18 = 36
4: 2 classes of 22 = 44
5: 1 classes of 22 = 22
6: 1 class of 22 = 22
3rd year K-7: 298 students with a capacity of 298
K: 2 classes of 18 = 36
1: 2 classes of 18 = 36
2: 2 classes of 18 = 36
3: 2 classes of 18 = 36
4: 2 classes of 22 = 44
5: 2 classes of 22 = 44
6: 2 classes of 22 = 44
7: 1 class of 22 = 22
4th year K-8: 342 students with a capacity of 342
K: 2 classes of 18 = 36
1: 2 classes of 18 = 36
2: 2 classes of 18 = 36
3: 2 classes of 18 = 36
4: 2 classes of 22 = 44
5: 2 classes of 22 = 44
6: 2 classes of 22 = 44
7: 2 classes of 22 = 44
8: 1 class of 22 = 22
5th year K-8: 364 students with a capacity of 364
K: 2 classes of 18 = 36
1: 2 classes of 18 = 36
2: 2 classes of 18 = 36
3: 2 classes of 18 = 36
4: 2 classes of 22 = 44
5: 2 classes of 22 = 44
6: 2 classes of 22 = 44
7: 2 classes of 22 = 44
8: 2 classes of 22 = 44
School Year
Grade Levels Total Projected Student
Enrollment
Student Enrollment
Capacity
First Year
K-5
188
188
Second Year
K-6
232
232
Third Year
K-7
298
298
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Fourth Year
K-8
342
342
Fifth Year
K-8
364
364
The numbers provided herein are estimates, and may fluctuate due to space availability, and within
each grade level depending on student enrollment and/or attrition in the respective grade levels.
C. Provide a description of how the student population projections were developed.
Numerous charter schools have closed in Lee County over the past years. We feel that there is a
need for a good, quality K-8 charter school in Lee County. We want to be able to offer the parents
whose children attended these charter schools an alternative.
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Section 3: Educational Program Design
A. Describe the school’s daily schedule and annual calendar, including the annual number of
days and hours of instructional time.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy will follow the Lee County’s Annual Calendar. The school year will
consist of 180 days. The extended school day will commence, at 7:40 a.m. – 7:55 a.m. with
breakfast, for those that desire said program, keeping in mind that GCCA follows the Lee County’s
free and reduced lunch program for its students. Homeroom begins at 8:00 a.m. and the 7th period
class ends at 3:30 P.M. The day will be 7.5 hours. The school day will consist of seven hours of
instruction and a 30-minute lunchtime. This extended day permits additional classes, outside the
norm, and other school programs to run more effectively. We will adhere to all state and county
mandates, such as having ninety minutes of uninterrupted reading for elementary school students
and middle school students, appropriate health, career-planning classes.
INSTRUCTIONAL HOURS/DAYS REQUIRED BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA
GCCA will significantly exceed the following instructional hour requirements):
Kindergarten: 3 net hours per day or 540 hours per year
Grades 1-3: 4 net hours per day or 720 hours per year
Grades 4-8: 5 net hours per day or 900 hours per year
The net hours are actual classroom instruction time. It does not include recess, bathroom breaks, or
the time spent moving from one class to another.
Daily Schedule: Middle School
Before School Care
Breakfast
Homeroom
1st Period
2nd Period
3rd Period
4th Period
Lunch
5th Period
6th Period
7th Period
After School Care
Clubs/Sports
7:00
7:40
8:00
8:13
9:11
10:09
11:07
12:05
12:38
1:36
2:34
3:30
3:30
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
7:40
7:55
8:10
9:08
10:06
11:04
12:02
12:35
1:33
2:31
3:30
6:00
4:30
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
Possible Middle School Courses for High School credit:
Spanish 1 8th Grade
Algebra 1 7th or 8th Grade
Geometry 8th Grade
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A Sample Elementary Daily Schedule is as follows:
Before School Care
Breakfast
Homeroom
Reading
Recess
Math
Lunch/Recess
Language Arts/Writing
PE/Music
Social Studies
Science/Technology (Formal Instruction)
STEM Projects/Interdisciplinary Art
After School Care
7:00
7:40
8:05
8:10
9:40
10:05
11:00
11:35
12:30
1:25
2:20
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
7:40
8:00
8:10
9:40
10:00
10:55
11:30
12:25
1:20
2:15
3:30
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
3:30
p.m.
6:00
p.m.
Interdisciplinary Art: integrated art tied to subject curriculum (Holistic Approach to the Total
Child)
Technology is integrated across the curriculum. Technology will have a specific time period to
teach and practice new technological skills, and or working on projects involving specific areas of
the curriculum coupled with the technology component. Communication forms, techniques, and
processes will be taught and used throughout the curriculum as a necessary skill for success in this
century.
At the Elementary level Science and Technology will over-lap. They may be split depending on
age level in such a way as to have a half hour instruction in each area, or have classes on alternate
days.
Reading and Language Arts will be taught in a blocked period of time.
Both the Elementary and Middle School sections of the school will have morning and after school
care, coupled with after school sports and clubs. Said care, sports and clubs will have fees
attached, which have not at this time been decided on. These fees will not be, however, of a size
that would make them exclusive care, clubs and sports reserved for those families able to pay.
Said fees will be adjusted for free and reduced lunch families, as per any and all federal, state and
local guidelines. Additionally, we will consider any unusual or extra-ordinary circumstances that
affect families, as well as numbers of students within a single family. Therefore, there will be
family rates.
K-5 will participate in Intramural Sports, while 6-8 will participate in Interscholastic Sports.
B. Describe the proposed charter school’s educational program.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy is dedicated to a well-rounded educational program where the
curriculum is precisely aligned with the Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State
Standards. Each student at GCCA will follow a comprehensive program for student progression
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which is based on an evaluation of each student’s performance, including how well the student
masters the performance standards approved by the state board.
The school will provide students with a balanced academic program which emphasizes
creativity, theme-based and interdisciplinary study, Character Education, reading, and
writing across the curriculum, critical thinking skills, cooperative learning projects, and
Service Learning Initiatives, with a focus on authentic performance learning and assessment
through STEM Education throughout the curriculum while learning and mastering
communication skills through the afore mention initiatives.
The school will focus on data-driven performance monitoring through assessment to help
drive our educational program.
Developmentally appropriate practice is utilized as part of the GCCA, strategy for reaching and
teaching each child. The Developmental Domain Paradigm, as the basis for the “Holistic Approach
to the Total Child,” (Anspaugh, 1984) focuses on the child as a developing human being and
lifelong learner. Developmentally appropriate practice recognizes the child as an active participant
in the learning process; a participant who constructs meaning and knowledge through interaction
with peers, friends and family, materials and environment. Based on Constructivism, the classroom
teachers serve as active facilitators who help children derive meaning from the various activities
and interactions encountered throughout the day.
GCCA recognizes that every child learns differently and at different rates; therefore every child at
GCCA will receive the personalized attention needed to reach his or her fullest potential. A full
array of differentiated instructional strategies, accommodations, and modifications are utilized in
classrooms to reach and teach every child. Students thrive with this tiered approach and positive
results will be seen rapidly.
Children learn best when they have real materials they can manipulate. Through direct sensory
involvement with their environment, students learn about topics that are personally meaningful and
interesting.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy students will receive an education through an encouraging learning
atmosphere that offers content mastery through stimulating and engaging studies. GCCA believes
in the use of the Constructionist Approach to learning, which will be grounded in the Next
Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards. In keeping with the GCCA educational
philosophy, the student, not the standards, will be the center of the academic focus. Exemplary
content mastery (and subsequent PARCC/FCAT 2.0 performance) will be a consequence of the
educational program, not the driver.
GCCA believes schools must be a place where students “DO” learning. This “DO” learning
approach has its roots in Constructivism, which is based upon observation and scientific study,
about how people learn. Constructivism (Brooks, 2005), based on the Modern Socratic Method, is
a tenet of GCCA’s approach to teaching and learning. “…People construct their own
understanding and knowledge of the world through experiencing things and reflecting on the
experience.” Students should experience the core subject areas in meaningful, transformative
experiences that promote authentic learning and success. GCCA envisions a school that achieves
mastery in the core subject areas by teaching in a context that develops civic literacy, promotes
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environmental stewardship, fosters global awareness, and integrates information and
communication literacy which emphasizes the creative use of the many forms of technology to
collect data and communicate results and the learning that has taken place. At GCCA the
importance of each person making a positive contribution to the greater community and the
importance of education as a tool enabling each person to make a greater contribution will be
stressed. Core values include high expectations for responsibility and scholarship. Our students’
success will flow from and validate these high expectations. At GCCA, education is an individual,
family, school, and community responsibility.
GCCA believes the Constructionist Approach, as it is widely defined (see preceding paragraphs)
and the ideals rooted in STEM efforts are intertwined. When asked “why STEM,” Arne Duncan,
US Secretary of Education stated, “…the world is changing and that scientific knowledge and
skills are essential for success in the knowledge economy.” He also added, “This goes so far
beyond memorizing the periodic table or Newton’s laws of motion. Passionate science teachers
create classrooms of discovery that model excitement for their field and learning.” (Duncan,
5/2011) We at GCCA believe ALL teachers should be invested in the STEM ideals to mirror that
passion by creating classrooms of discovery. Using a fully concentrated interdisciplinary approach
to learning, coupled with a Holistic Approach to the Total Child, all classes will support
accelerated learning with STEM, not only as supportive members of the team, but as integral part.
No learning is complete without the ability to communicate to the highest degree; therefore all
teachers will contribute to the student’s ability to communicate using a variety of formats in which
students are encouraged to tap into their creative talents.
According to Diana Laboy-Rush, STEM Solutions Manager at Learning.com, in her paper entitled,
Integrated STEM Education Through Project-Based Learning, “everyone naturally engages in
problem solving. We all use the tools and materials available to us to adapt the environment to
meet our needs. The ability to solve problems comes naturally to most. The project approach to
STEM, or “learning by doing,” is grounded in constructivist theory that is shown to improve
student achievement in higher level cognitive tasks, such as scientific processes and mathematic
problem solving (Satchwell & Loepp, 2002).”
We agree with Kenneth Maxwell (2009) in that, “Never in the history of humanity has it been more
important to the survival of our species to raise whole generations of excellent thinkers than it is
today.” Furthermore, he states, “The ultimate goal of the Modern Socratic Method is to increase
understanding through inquiry. In this style of the Socratic Method, the Socratic questioner adopts
his/her own constructive agenda and sets out to bring that agenda to life in the minds of the
respondents.”
Our goal is to use process of inductive questioning to successfully lead students to knowledge
through small steps.
Arts-Based Curriculum
The Arts are integrated into the general curriculum to enhance and influence concepts. We are a
school dedicated to educating the total child, as well as authentic teaching/learning and
assessments. As such art will be “taught” across the curriculum as a tool for learning and
expressing the learning at any given time. Art addresses the total child with the cognitive, affective
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and psychomotor domains. Art therefore increases learning by tapping into the full brain, and
allows for another area of communicating what a child has learned.
C. Describe the research base for the educational program and/or curriculum approach.
Modern Socratic Method
Research has been conducted and at least ten books have been written on the subject of using the
Modern Socratic Method (MSM) in K-12 levels. We see within the MSM, components that are in
concert with other buzz words in today’s educational circuits: Authentic Learning and
Assessment, Constructivism, Hands on Minds on, Critical Thinking, STEM, Project Based
Learning, Inter-disciplinary Thematic Teaching, Brain Based Learning, Differentiated Learning, as
well as The Holistic Approach to the Total Child. While each element mentioned has specific
points that are stressed, or different, than the others they have similar fundamental principles. We
are taking those approaches and infusing them into our curriculum as a blended approach.
Looking from the integral perspective, the mentioned approaches to learning operate from different
dimensions, but integrally their implications become meaningfully stronger in the educational
field. An implication would be that the blended model offers a stronger theoretical basis for
contemporary educational reform. An integral approach to education would be more promising
instead of only brain-based or constructivist approach for the anticipated outcomes. Also, a
blending of similar yet different models may serve as a powerful and holistic theoretical
perspective to educational research. (Ajda Kahveci, 2007)
St. Andrew’s, a K-8 school, has been widely written about in research for their adoption of, and
commitment to the Modern Socratic Method. Their results have shown enormous growth since the
first year of their adopting this teaching method. They are used as a type of banner child for the
Modern Socratic Method movement.
“Currently, the faculty has developed and is utilizing approximately 10-12 Modern, Socratic
Techniques. Not all techniques can be applied to all grade levels and all age groups. However, as
we fine tune techniques and student groups, we continue to discover that all techniques used
engage students, regardless of the size of the class. These techniques elicit responses from the
students that actually accelerate learning. They continue to push students to a higher level of
thinking. The unique aspect is that the entire staff is trained in these techniques so that the students
are engaged continually, regardless of the subject or the grade level. Students are educated (drawn
out) at every turn!” (St. Andrew’s Country Day School, a Pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade,
Kenmore, New York). On average these students in Buffalo gained 4.4 years in academic
achievement level in one school year, 2008-2009. One class gained eight years in just the one year.
(Wenger, 2011)
The other area where this method has been adopted to a great extent is in the home school
movement, and this has also been in a huge part accepted as to contributing to the success of homeschooled children.
Constructivist Approach to teaching and learning
Although the constructivist theory of teaching and learning has become influential in education in
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recent years, it is not a new approach. According to a number of scholars, Socrates is among the
first constructivists (Erdem & Demirel, 2002; Nola, 1998). According to Nola, in Socrates’ view
the students do not directly acquire knowledge but learn after a process of reasoning.
In the constructivist approach, the students are in the center of the teaching and learning process.
The students learn by themselves in a social setting. They construct knowledge with stimuli from
their surroundings and these constructs are mostly related with the way they perceive the
environment. The tenets of constructivism can be summarized as following:
1. Individuals base their knowledge on their already existing conceptual frameworks. A learner’s
previous experiences with the world and life (physical, social or imaginary) represent a conceptual
frame reference for giving meaning to new phenomena (Taylor, 1993).
2. For constructing science --individually or socially—more than a theory, data and instruments is
needed. Although individuals are free to develop argumentations to some extent, the experiences of
the society with theories, data and instruments affect decisions of what should be accepted as data
and what should not, what can be a strong evidence and what cannot (Grandy, 1998).
3. The role of the teacher is mediating learning. Relevantly, the focus needs to be on the learner,
and the classroom environment should be much more interactive than a traditional classroom.
4. The teacher as a mediator provides quality experiences to learners for meaningful learning. A
constructivist approach involves providing experiences for learning in certain directions (i.e.,
viable knowledge) impossible without the guidance of a teacher.
5. Constructivism suggests that learning is a social process of giving meaning to experiences in
light of the already known (Tobin & Tippins, 1993).
6. In the classroom the teacher should provide the students various opportunities such as writing,
drawing, using symbols and the language appropriately to express their previous knowledge. Time
for reflection is also essential during the course of a lecture.
7. Generating questions may be a way of initiating conceptual conflict and seeking answers to
those questions may start the process of resolving the conflict. Establishing interactions for group
discussions, answering questions with peers, explaining a certain scientific content, finding and
explaining differences in understanding, generating new questions, designing research and solving
problems may play a significant role in learning.
8. According to the constructivist approach one of the most important roles of the teacher is
evaluating learning. Rather than being in the form of reward or punishment at the end of the
teaching, evaluation should be regarded as a part of the teaching process itself.
Team Teaching
Expert in Field: Station Teaching or Rotational Teaching
Team teaching boasts many pedagogical and intellectual advantages: it can help create a dynamic
and interactive learning environment, provide instructors with a useful way of modeling thinking
within or across disciplines, and also inspire new research ideas and intellectual partnerships
among faculty (Leavitt, 2006). There are several ideologies and types relating to Team Teaching.
Many of them are outstanding, however, concurrently, can be very costly, simply because of the
number of teachers that are required in a single classroom. However, the cost factor variable can
be ameliorated via the Team Teaching “Rotational Model of Expert in Field,” or “Expert in Field
Station Teaching.” It is not only an outstanding approach to disseminating information, but it also
cost effective. Two or more groups are set-up in order for all students to work with each teacher
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and one or more independent work area, for this collaborative approach. Students can travel to
each group or teachers can rotate to each group.
Professors Lanier Anderson (Philosophy) and Joshua Landy (French and Italian), who have teamtaught several courses together, summed up some of the lessons taken from their experience in an
Award-Winning Teachers on Teaching presentation during Winter Quarter 2005-2006. In the
following paragraphs their suggestions for team-teaching, presented as a mock Decalogue, “Thou
Shalt…,” are interspersed with results from recent research on team teaching (Leavitt, 2006).
Thou Shalt Plan Everything with Thy Neighbor:
The team of teachers will plan together which promotes a better understanding of each teacher’s
role, and the scope and sequence of the material in the curriculum. Moreover, each teacher will be
more in line with the procedures, including such areas as assignments, grading procedures, and
teaching strategies (Letterman and Dugan, 2004). Each teacher will at some point be the expert in
field and the other(s) as support staff, reinforcing the concepts that are or were being presented.
Team teaching requires different preparation than traditional, single-instructor courses, particularly
concerning the organizational aspects of course management. Careful and extensive planning can
help instructors prevent disagreements down the line regarding assignments, grading procedures,
and teaching strategies (Letterman and Dugan, 2004; Wentworth and Davis, 2002). The educators
will realize that they are involved in a meaningful intellectual experience, when their planning
sessions become interdisciplinary conversations.
Thou Shalt Attend Thy Neighbor’ Classes
This allows and provides the greatest opportunity for the visiting teacher to incorporate the host’s
teacher’s approach into the visiting teacher’s own discipline, moreover, promotes the
interdisciplinary conversations on the part of all faculty members that make up this team. However,
when scheduling or budget constraints make this level of interaction unfeasible, there are different
formats that can give students and instructors the experience of a team-taught course. For instance,
in a rotational model, only one instructor is present at a time, but a series of instructors rotate
throughout the course, teaching only the course topics that fall within their specialty, while the
remaining teachers are in a support role reinforcing the concepts presented by the expert-in-field.
Ergo, Team Teaching, allows students to hear multiple perspectives on the same topic, which is
one of the core learning advantages of this approach to teaching.
Thou Shalt Refer to Thy Neighbor’ Ideas
The purpose of a team-taught course, from an educational standpoint, is to push students to achieve
higher levels of synthesis and integration in their study of new material. It is, therefore, vitally
important for instructors to model the process of integration by interweaving teaching
partners’ perspectives into each presentation. Often students are assigned projects that require them
to integrate the material individual instructors have presented. Consequently, students have
expressed a desire for teachers to demonstrate the same practice of integration in their own lectures
and presentations (Minnis and John-Steiner, 2005). Anderson and Landy integrate their different
disciplinary approaches by referring to each other in lectures and presentations. By showing
respect for each other’s ideas, even when they may disagree, they are able to keep students
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interested and engaged in all aspects of the course material. Some teaching teams take a more
direct approach, and assign one instructor during each class meeting the task
Thou Shalt Model Debate with Thy Neighbor
The art of professional disagreement is a skill that students should be able to acquire by modeling
team teachers involved in said process, expert and collegial and always without hostility (Anderson
& Specht, 1998). Effective team teachers, will also promote the skill of how to participate in
interdisciplinary debate. “In addition, interdisciplinary debate encourages students to apply the
skills of integration and collaboration to other courses and assignments” Anderson & Specht,
1998).
Thou Shalt have something to say, even when thou are not in charge
If the team teachers are in the rotation mode, then only one teacher will be presenting as the expert,
however, those in support roles as the rotation develops should make sure they are cognizant of the
facts presented by the expert teacher and be prepared to discuss and create an atmosphere where
the students’ knowledge is increased and enhanced by the support teacher. If at least two teachers
are in the same classroom, one as the expert presenter the other teacher can support the expert in a
variety of ways.
Among them are: “model learner,” in which the instructor asks questions and otherwise contributes
to discussion; “observer,” in which the instructor takes notes and gauges student response to the
presentation; “discussion leader,” in which the instructor facilitates or leads break-out groups; or
“devil’s advocate,” in which the instructor raises provocative or challenging questions in an effort
to stimulate class creativity” (Wentworth and Davis, 2002, p. 27).
Thou Shalt apply common grading standards
One of the benefits that team teaching offers students is an increase in the amount of feedback they
receive from instructors (Wadkins, Miller, and Wozniak, 2006). However, with the increase in
feedback from a team of teachers in lieu of one, students will be preoccupied with the concern that
the feedback will not be uniform or consistent. To ameliorate this concern, the team of teachers
must establish, an agreed upon by all members of the team, a rubric that will be followed
consistently by all team members, when evaluating the students in the class.
Thou Shalt attend all staff meetings
Review and reflection are critical to the success of this teaching approach. For team teaching to
remain effective in disseminating knowledge to its students, all member of the team, must set aside
a designated time, to plan together. Without this procedure, the common goal and purpose of the
class will most likely be lost. It is important to have regular class meetings, Landy urges, because
in a team-teaching environment, “you have everyone pulling in different directions, and you need
to keep coherence in the course” (Anderson & Specht, 1998).
Thou shalt ask open questions
Most students are accustomed to sitting in classes that center on a lecture and perhaps an activity
with definitive answers expected to the questions that are asked by the teacher. However, in team
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teaching, open-ended questions are the modus operandi. There is some resistance to this approach
as students have been indoctrinated to another style of teaching coupled with an expectation of
certain types of questions and responses. At the beginning of any team-taught class, it is critical
that at the onset of the class, students are prepared to expect the unexpected. Although many
students enjoy the diversity of voices and viewpoints that emerge in the team-taught classroom,
others struggle to figure out the key points of a lesson when faculty choose to present many
possible solutions to a problem (McDaniels and Colarulli, 1997). In some cases, faculty must work
hard to overcome students’ resistance to the non-lecture format; a good first step is to be clear
about the format of the course right from the start (Helms, Alvis, and Willis, 2005).
Thou Shalt let thy students speak
Most students have been raised in an educational system that promotes an environment that
suggests, that for every question, queried, there is one correct, or mostly correct response. This
alienates those students that may have alternative responses or responses that were discovered
based on a less than traditional way of determining said response, which could in fact, be an
acceptable response. Ergo, there is little action on the part of the student to be an active participant
in the learning process. Team teaching can have a highly positive impact on student learning
outcomes, largely due to the increased opportunity for student participation that team teaching
provides. The presence of more than one instructor involved in the teaching of a class, either by the
team-teaching approach with more than one teacher in the classroom, or more than one teacher
involved in the teaching of the class, via a rotational model, results in the increased opportunity of
student-teacher interaction (Wadkins, Miller, and Wozniak, 2006). More importantly, a
collaborative teaching environment invites students to take a more active role in the learning
process. Because team teaching encourages a variety of perspectives on a topic, students are more
likely to feel they can make valuable contributions to class discussions. (Anderson and Speck,
1998).
Thou Shalt be willing to be surprised
In the “Expert-In-Field,” Team Teaching Model, via Station Teaching or Rotational Teaching, the
faculty that make up this team, will rotate from being in the role of the expert, to faculty support
role, and/or expert learner role guiding the student learners, all within a collaborative classroom
where teachers and students join in a shared process of intellectual discovery (Wentworth and D
2002, p.23). Teachers at GCCA are not only encouraged to participate in team teaching, but must
also complete four official observation forms by visiting other classrooms throughout the year.
Team teaching, coupled with a minimum of four official observations per year, will enhance the
teacher’s ability to “get out of their own conceptual boxes,” and learn new approaches that will
enhance their teaching skills (Corcos, Durchslag, and Morriss, 1995, p. 235).
Team teaching gives teachers the opportunity, “to teach in a different way, and to learn in a
different way.” It allows instructors to hone their pedagogical skills and develop new topics for
research and scholarship. The benefits of team teaching extend to students as well, improving
learning outcomes by offering increased student-teacher interaction, as well as a multidimensional approach to subject matter. Ultimately, the advantages of team teaching far outweigh
the time and energy it requires (Leavitt, 2006).
Interdisciplinary Thematic Teaming
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Teams are groups of people working together, with a shared purpose or common goal, pooling
their skills, talents, and knowledge with a payoff for everyone on the team. Moreover, drawing
creativity from diversity! Mature teams operate at times from an almost “mind melt” approach that
defies language. Interdisciplinary Thematic Teaming consist of teams of teachers across the
disciplinary divide, joining together with common themes and groups of students. As such, a
teacher when teaching his/her content and concepts use other disciplines content and concepts to
reinforce all content and concepts. All units/lessons should contain some element that ties their
area to other areas. In “real life” no discipline stands alone. In the interdisciplinary thematic team,
we see a mirror of real life situations, not contrived lessons set up to just give a nod to other subject
areas. Team decision-making is a critical component of the process so that all teachers work in
concert. In the process each teacher becomes familiar with the curriculum of all teachers on their
team.
Teaming is valuable because:
 We can achieve more as a group than alone.
 It provides school insight…the unique opportunity for shared discovery.
 It promotes a true understanding of the total curriculum.
 Teachers get to know more students well; and students get to know more teachers well.
 It promotes significant curriculum development.
 Team members can gain a depth of knowledge of other curriculum.
 It promotes consistent classroom management techniques and instructional procedures.
 Teaming allows students to see the utilization of consistent procedures for work routines.
Teaming is Valuable because:
 It empowers teachers.
Research shows that teachers who are empowered with more input are more invested in the total
process, and the results are multi-faceted.
Research Shows Effective Teams:
 Have a student-centered focus.
 Strong commitment to academic achievement.
 Realize the importance of Accountability features.
 Consist of experts recognize the acquisition of professional knowledge is a lifelong process.
 Are confident, express job satisfaction, and are proud of their schools.
 Develop ways to access student performance, and share among the team.
 Establish the use of common rubrics.
 Have a proactive approach and not reactive.
 Have regular communication with parents.
 Document all team meetings, all parent conferences, and establish a phone call log.
 Help students set goals.
 Have uniform guidelines and rules.
 Constantly nurture the relationship among members.
 Have a strong sense of team community.
 Are curriculum risk-takers who are given the autonomy to accomplish their goals?
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

Have teachers who work professionally and collaboratively.
Are in harmony with the administrative leadership.
STEM
STEM education is an approach to teaching and learning that integrates the content and skills of
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. STEM Standards of Practice guide STEM
instruction by defining the combination of behaviors, integrated with STEM content, which are
expected of a proficient STEM student. These behaviors include engagement in inquiry, logical
reasoning, collaboration, and investigation. The goal of STEM education is to prepare students for
post-secondary study and the 21st century workforce.
Standards of Practice
1.
Learn and Apply Rigorous Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Content
STEM proficient students will learn and apply rigorous content within science, technology,
engineering, and mathematics disciplines to answer complex questions, to investigate global issues,
and to develop solutions for challenges and real world problems.
A. Demonstrate an understanding of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics content.
B. Apply science, technology, engineering, or mathematics content to answer complex questions,
to investigate global issues, and to develop solutions for challenges and real world problems.
2.
Integrate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Content
STEM proficient students will integrate content from science, technology, engineering, and
mathematics disciplines as appropriate to answer complex questions, to investigate global issues,
and to develop solutions for challenges and real world problems.
A. Analyze interdisciplinary connections that exist within science, technology, engineering,
and mathematics disciplines and other disciplines.
B. Apply integrated science, technology, engineering, mathematics content, and other content
as appropriate to answer complex questions, to investigate global issues, and to develop
solutions for challenges and real world problems
3.
Interpret and Communicate Information from Science, Technology, Engineering, and
Mathematics
STEM proficient students will interpret and communicate information from science, technology,
engineering, and mathematics to answer complex questions, to investigate global issues, and to
develop solutions for challenges and real world problems.
A. Identify, analyze, and synthesize appropriate science, technology, engineering, and
mathematics information (text, visual, audio, etc.).
B. Apply appropriate domain-specific vocabulary when communicating science, technology,
engineering, and mathematics content.
C. Engage in critical reading and writing of technical information.
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D. Evaluate and integrate multiple sources of information (e.g.: quantitative data, video and
multimedia) presented in diverse formats.
E. Develop an evidence-based opinion or argument.
F. Communicate effectively and precisely with others.
4. Engage in Inquiry
STEM proficient students will engage in inquiry to investigate global issues, challenges, and real
world problems.
A. Ask questions to identify and define global issues, challenges, and real world problems.
B. Conduct research to refine questions and develop new questions.
5. Engage in Logical Reasoning
STEM proficient students will engage in logical reasoning to answer complex questions, to
investigate global issues, and to develop solutions for challenges and real world problems.
A. Engage in critical thinking.
B. Evaluate, select, and apply appropriate systematic approaches (scientific and engineering
practices, engineering design process, and/or mathematical practices).
C. Apply science, technology, engineering, and mathematics content to construct creative and
innovative ideas.
D. Analyze the impact of global issues and real world problems at the local, state, national,
and international levels
6. Collaborate as a STEM Team
STEM proficient students will collaborate as a STEM team to answer complex questions, to
investigate global issues, and to develop solutions for challenges and real world problems.
A. Identify, analyze, and perform a STEM specific subject matter expert (SME) role.
B. Share ideas and work effectively with a STEM focused multidisciplinary team to achieve a
common goal.
C. Listen and be receptive to ideas of others.
D. Analyze career opportunities that exist in a variety of STEM fields relevant to the
STEM focused multidisciplinary team’s goal.
7. Apply Technology Strategically
STEM proficient students will apply technology appropriately to answer complex questions, to
investigate global issues, and to develop solutions for challenges and real world problems.
A. Identify and understand technologies needed to develop solutions to problems or construct
answers to complex questions.
B. Analyze the limits, risks, and impacts of technology.
C. Engage in responsible/ethical use of technology.
D. Improve or create new technologies that extend human capabilities
The STEM approach is based on the constructivist theory, which is inquiry driven within an
environment of authentic learning, which is learning-by-doing. This approach marries well with the
new teaching methods that will be necessary, in order to more effectively teach the Common Core
Standards. Constructivism is based on observation and scientific study. According to Lombardi
(pg.2, 2007), most educators consider learning-by-doing the most effective way to acquire
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knowledge. Constructivist teachers encourage students to constantly assess how the activity is
helping them gain understanding. By exploring themselves and their strategies, students in the
constructivist classroom will ideally become "expert learners." This gives them ever-broadening
tools to become life-long learners. With a well-planned classroom environment, the students learn
HOW TO LEARN.
Effective STEM programs have a 5-step process involved:
Reflection
The purpose of the first stage is to ground the student in the problem’s context and to provide
inspiration for things the student can immediately begin to investigate the problem. (Fortus,
Krajcikb, Dershimerb, Marx, and Mamlok-Naamand, 2005). Moreover, this phase is also intended
to connect what is known and what needs to be learned (Diaz and King, 2007).
Research
The second stage can take the form of student research, teacher-led lessons in science, selected
readings, or other methods to gather relevant information and sources (Fortus, Krajcikb,
Dershimerb, Marx, and Mamlok-Naamand, 2005). Significant learning gains occur during this
stage, in which students’ progress from concrete to abstract understanding of the problem (Diaz
and King, 2007). During the research phase teachers often lead discussions through probing
questions to determine whether students are developing appropriate conceptual understanding of
the project and its relevant concepts (Satchwell and Loepp, 2002).
Discovery
The discovery stage generally involves bridging the research and information that is known with
the project’s requirements leading to answers regarding the unknown. This step is when students
begin to take ownership of the learning process and determine what is still unknown (Satchwell
and Loepp, 2002). Some models of STEM projects break students into small working groups to
present possible solutions to the problem, to collaborate with fellow students, and to build on the
strengths of their peers via student-to- student interaction and collaboration (Fortus, Krajcikb,
Dershimerb, Marx, and Mamlok-Naamand, 2005). Other models use this step to develop the
students’ ability to reflect on the “habits of the mind,” i.e., the process is designed to build (Diaz
and King, 2007).
Application
In the application stage the goal is to model a solution that sufficiently solves the problem. In some
cases, students test the model against requirements, the results of which direct the students to
repeat a previous step (Diaz and King, 2007). In other models, this stage extends the learning to
contexts beyond STEM or to enable connections between the STEM disciplines (Satchwell and
Loepp, 2002)
Communication
The final stage in any project is presenting the model and solution to peers and community. This is
a critical step in the learning process because of the desire to develop both communication and
collaboration skills and the ability to accept and implement constructive feedback (Diaz and King,
2007). Often, reviewers score authentic (rubric) assessments based on completion of this final step
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(Satchwell and Loepp, 2002).
We agree with Kenneth Maxwell (2009) in that “never in the history of humanity has it been more
important to the survival of our species to raise whole generations of excellent thinkers than it is
today.” Our goal is to use probing questions to successfully lead students to knowledge through
small steps of learning-by-doing. Moreover, endeavor to determine why students come up with
varying answers by completing, “Misconception,” sheets in order to collaborate with other
educators and students.
We believe that it is much easier to lead a student, via small steps, to specific knowledge through a
series of probing questions and discovery learning, than it is to coerce a person to adopt what they
are told, or read. We believe, through authentic learning, that children learn material for a lifetime.
Moreover, they learn to question on their own leading to a lifetime of seeking out knowledge and
skill. Through questioning and seeking answers to authentic problems that are based on material
relevant to the student, moreover, by them using STEM, the student will produce answers of a
higher quality, concurrently, with a higher rate of retention.
STEM is the instrument for us to tie all areas together providing for richer experiences, with the
end result being a love for learning. We believe that all students, irrespective of their background
and/or first acquired language will thrive academically by following the stated mission.
Art-Based Learning: The Arts in Education
As a result of their varied inquiries, the Champions of Change researchers found that learners can
attain higher levels of achievement through their engagement with the arts. Moreover, one of the
critical research findings is that the learning in and through the arts can help “level the playing
field” for youngsters from disadvantaged circumstances.
James Catterall’s analysis of the Department of Education’s NELS: 88 database of 25,000 students
demonstrates that students with high levels of arts participation outperform “arts-poor” students by
virtually every measure. Since arts participation is highly correlated with socioeconomic status,
which is the most significant predictor of academic performance, this comes as little surprise. The
size and diversity of the NELS database, however, permitted Catterall to find statistical
significance in comparisons of high and low arts participants in the lowest socioeconomic
segments. This closer look showed that high arts participation makes a more significant difference
to students from low-income backgrounds than for high-income students. Catterall also found clear
evidence that sustained involvement in particular art forms—music and theater—are highly
correlated with success in mathematics and reading.
These findings are enriched by comparisons of student achievement in 14 high-poverty schools in
which the Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE) has developed innovative artsintegrated curricula. The inspiring turnaround of this large and deeply troubled school district is
one of the important education stories of this decade. Schools across Chicago, including all those
in this study, have been improving student performance. But, when compared to arts-poor schools
in the same neighborhoods, the CAPE schools advanced even more quickly and now boast a
significant gap in achievement along many dimensions.
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Schools are not the only venue in which young people grow, learn, and achieve. Shirley Brice
Heath spent a decade studying dozens of after-school programs for disadvantaged youth. These
programs were broadly clustered into three categories—sports/academic, community involvement,
and the arts. This research shows that the youth in all these programs were doing better in school
and in their personal lives than were young people from the same socioeconomic categories, as
tracked by NELS: 88.
To the researchers’ surprise, however, the youth in the arts programs were doing the best. Skeptical
about this finding, Heath and her colleagues looked more closely at the arts programs and the
youth participating in them. Although the youth in the arts programs were actually at greater “risk”
than those in the other programs, the researchers found that characteristics particular to the arts
made those programs more effective. They now believe that a combination of “roles, risks, and
rules” offered in the arts programs had a greater impact on these young lives.
Another broad theme emerges from the individual Champions of Change research findings: the arts
no longer need to be characterized solely by either their ability to promote learning in specific arts
disciplines or by their ability to promote learning in other disciplines. These studies suggest a more
dynamic, less either-or model for the arts and overall learning that has more of the appearance of a
rotary with entrances and exits than of a linear one-way street.
This rotary of learning provides the greater access to higher levels of achievement. “Learning in
and Through the Arts” (LITA) and other Champions of Change studies found much evidence that
learning in the arts has significant effects on learning in other domains. LITA suggests a dynamic
model in which learning in one domain supports and stimulates learning in others, which in turn
supports and stimulates learning in a complex web of influence described as a “constellation.”
LITA and the other researchers provide compelling evidence that student achievement is
heightened in an environment with high quality arts education offerings and a school climate
supportive of active and productive learning.
Why the Arts Change the Learning Experience. When well taught, the arts provide young
people with authentic learning experiences that engage their minds, hearts, and bodies. The
learning experiences are real and meaningful for them.
While learning in other disciplines may often focus on development of a single skill or talent, the
arts regularly engage multiple skills and abilities. Engagement in the arts—whether the visual arts,
dance, music, theatre or other disciplines—nurtures the development of cognitive, social, and
personal competencies. Although the Champions of Change researchers conducted their
investigations and presented their findings independently, a remarkable consensus exists among
their findings:
The arts reach students who are not otherwise being reached.
Young people who are
disengaged from schools and other community institutions are at the greatest risk of failure or
harm. The researchers found that the arts provided a reason, and sometimes the only reason, for
being engaged with school or other organizations. These young people would otherwise be left
without access to any community of learners. The studies concerning ArtsConnection, CAPE, and
learning during non-school hours are of particular significance here.
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The arts reach students in ways that they are not otherwise being reached. Other recent
educational research has produced insights into different styles of learning. This research also
addresses examples of young people who were considered classroom failures, perhaps “acting out”
because conventional classroom practices were not engaging them. These “problem” students often
became the high-achievers in arts learning settings. Success in the arts became a bridge to learning
and eventual success in other areas of learning. The Arts Connection study provides case studies of
such students; the “Learning In and Through the Arts” research examines the issue of learner selfperception in great depth.
The arts connect students to themselves and each other. Creating an artwork is a personal
experience. The student draws upon his or her personal resources to generate the result. By
engaging his or her whole person, the student feels invested in ways that are deeper than “knowing
the answer.” Beyond the individual, Steve Seidel and Dennie Palmer Wolf show how effective arts
learning communities are formed and operated. James Catterall also describes how the attitudes of
young people toward one another are altered through their arts learning experiences.
The arts transform the environment for learning.
When the arts become central to the learning
environment, schools and other settings become places of discovery. According to the Teachers
College research team and those examining the CAPE schools, the very school culture is changed,
and the conditions for learning are improved. Figurative walls between classrooms and disciplines
are broken down. Teachers are renewed. Even the physical appearance of a school building is
transformed through the representations of learning. The Heath research team also found “visible”
changes in nonschool settings.
The arts provide learning opportunities for the adults in the lives of young people.
Those held
responsible for the development of children and youth—teachers, parents, and other adults—are
rarely given sufficient or significant opportunities for their own continuing education. With adults
participating in lifelong learning, young people gain an understanding that learning in any field is a
never-ending process. The roles of the adults are also changed—in effective programs, the adults
become coaches—active facilitators of learning. Heath and other researchers here describe the
altered dynamics between young and less young learners.
The arts provide new challenges for those students already considered successful.
Boredom
and complacency are barriers to success. For those young people who outgrow their established
learning environments, the arts can offer a chance for unlimited challenge. In some situations
described in the research, older students may also teach and mentor younger students. In others,
young people gain from the experience of working with professional artists. The ArtsConnection
researchers in general, and James Catterall in particular, explored the impact of intensive
involvement in specific art disciplines.
The arts connect learning experiences to the world of real work.
The world of adult work has
changed, and the arts learning experiences described in the research show remarkable consistency
with the evolving workplace. Ideas are what matter, and the ability to generate ideas, to bring ideas
to life and to communicate them is what matters to workplace success. Working in a classroom or a
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studio as an artist, the young person is learning and practicing future workplace behaviors.
A
company is a company, whether producing an opera or a breakthrough technological service.
How the Arts Change the Learning Experience. The programs and schools examined by the
Champions of Change researchers were selected because they appeared to be models of excellence
that were making a real difference to young people. Their research helps us identify the principles
and requirements that make these arts learning models work. By helping to better define the
characteristics of effective arts learning programs, the Champions of Change researchers have also
done a great service.
Education reformers and researchers have learned a great deal about “what works” in recent years.
In examining the work of Shakespeare & Company, Steve Seidel cites the general characteristics
of “project-based learning” as factors that also support effective arts learning. In Real Learning,
Real Work, author Adria Steinberg identifies six elements that are critical to the design of projectbased learning: authenticity, academic rigor, applied learning, active exploration, adult
relationships, and assessment practices. Seidel also emphasizes that the best assessment of a
person’s understanding is a product that “puts that understanding to work.” Learning is deepest
when learners have the capacity to represent what they have learned, and the multiple disciplines of
the arts all provide modes of representation.
The quality arts learning experiences described by the Champions of Change researchers regularly
contain these project-based learning elements. The best programs display them in great breadth and
depth. To be effective, the arts learning experience will also
Enable young people to have direct involvement with the arts and artists.
Young people
become and see themselves as artists. Whether creating art works, as in the Creating Original
Opera program, or performing, as in the Fall Festival of Shakespeare program, or perhaps even
teaching younger student artists, as in the Arts Connection program, the students learn various
disciplines through hands-on arts experiences. They actively engage with artistic content,
materials, and methods.
Require significant staff development. The best teachers are life-long students. The teachers
involved in the staff development programs examined by the Champions of Change researchers
describe life-changing experiences that transform their professional lives. High-impact programs
demand both adequate staff preparation and strong administrative support. Well-trained staff and
teachers also become leaders for institutional and systemic change.
Support extended engagement in the artistic process. Opportunities to achieve artistic and
learning excellence cannot be confined to forty-five minute time periods. Sustained engagement
during individual sessions as well as expanded program length support enhanced learning
opportunities. These learning experiences are also not limited to place; school is just one of many
settings where this learning occurs. Superior results are also associated with the concept of
“practice” and the development of a sense of “craft.”
Encourage self-directed learning. Students learning in and through the arts become their own
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toughest critics. The students are motivated to learn not just for test results or other performance
outcomes, but for the learning experience itself. According the to the Arts Connection study, these
learners develop the capacity to experience “flow,” self-regulation, identity, and resilience—
qualities regularly associated with personal success.
Allow management of risk by the learners.
Rather than see themselves as “at-risk,” students
become managers of risk who can make decisions concerning artistic outcomes and even their
lives. The students learn to manage risk through “permission to fail,” according to the Shakespeare
& Company study, and then take risks “to intensify the quality of their interactions, products, and
performances,” according to Heath and her colleagues.
Engage community leaders and resources.
Another recent study, Gaining the Arts Advantage:
Lessons from School Districts That Value Arts Education, found that “the single most critical
factor in sustaining arts education in (their) schools is the active involvement of influential
segments of the community in shaping and implementing the policies and programs of the district.”
Similarly, effective arts learning out of school also requires the active engagement of the
community. The CAPE and Heath studies show a process that attracts and builds on this
engagement from parents and other community members.
Policy Implications of the Champions of Change Research. The Champions of Change studies
examined the messy, often hard-to-define real world of learning, both in and out of schools. As a
result, these research findings have immediate relevance for both policy and practice in American
education today.
For example, if we now know that arts experiences help level the educational playing field for
disadvantaged students, as revealed by James Catterall, then we need to bring more proven arts
learning resources to these students. If arts learning can help energize or re-energize the teaching
workforce, as described by Steve Seidel, then we must look to the arts both as a vehicle for
preparing entrants to the teaching profession and as a means of supporting its more-experienced
members. Looking beyond classrooms, Shirley Brice Heath found the profound impact the arts can
have on learning for youth outside school settings. If this is so, we must expand quality arts
learning programs outside of schools as well.
In the CAPE model, the researchers find that arts learning can have a defined impact on the
academic performance of students in an urban setting. If well-constructed partnerships between
school and arts organizations can increase student achievement, then such partnerships must be
nurtured and replicated. In another urban program, ArtsConnection researchers define the role of
the arts in enabling students to overcome obstacles to success; again, such experiences should be
made more widely available. Researcher Dennie Palmer Wolf describes the impact of group versus
individual learning generated through a collaborative arts experience. For this approach to grow, a
more serious commitment to developing communities of arts learners, rather than just opportunities
for “stars,” is required. If sustained, integrated, and complex projects, like producing an opera, a
Shakespeare production, or a visual arts exhibition, significantly deepen the learning process, as
these studies suggest, then school schedules must also be modified to make such experiences
possible. (Champions of Change, 1999)
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D. Explain how the educational program aligns with the school’s mission.
The mission of GCCA is to provide a high quality, replicable, sustainable and equitable model for
standards-based education of grades K-8 by engaging a diverse student body and developing
students into culturally-literate, responsible citizens in a more globalized and technological future.
We intend to provide students with an educational experience that facilitates lifelong learning and
achievements, as well as promoting a positive self-image and respect for all people. GCCA
intends to focus especially on STEM education with an infusion of art throughout the curriculum.
With this in mind, our program has been designed to support and elevate all students, irrespective
of being high or low, to their optimum level of academic success. As research shows low
performing students and ELL students work best, and achieve the highest goals through
constructing their own learning while being guided, and knowing that much is expected of them in
this process. With that said, this premise actually benefits all students regardless of their academic
acquisition.
In keeping with creating highly educated young people, our faculty and staff are expected to also
be life-long learners concentrating on, how students learn. In this process they will not only learn
how to teach all students better, with more effective strategies, but will become more sympathetic
and empathetic to students and their families. In addition the continued acquisition of knowledge
by our teachers and staff will illustrate the concept of lifelong learning to the students, a modeling
approach.
Additionally, the work of Robert Marzano through Classroom Instruction That Works is imbued
into the day-to-day teaching strategies at GCCA. In addition to Marzano, and earlier with the ideas
of Piaget, the Constructivist Approach coupled with Interdisciplinary Teaming we have illustrated
that research shows academic achievement gains as a result. We know that engaging in these
promising and powerful strategies fully aligns and upholds our mission.
E. Explain how the services the school will provide to the target population will help them
attain the Next Generation Sunshine State- Common Core Standards, as required by section
1002.33, F.S.
GCCA will generate a variety of services, made up in part, by teacher procedures designed from
specific research regarding how children learn; moreover, utilize teaching strategies and
procedures that will significantly enhance student learning gains. In addition, GCCA will provide
the “normal” ESE and ESOL services, as well as Remedial Classes to assist those students falling
behind academically, or who are at risk of falling behind. Both ESE and ESOL Liaisons will work
with students and enlighten teachers of “best practices,” to use with students who are at risk.
Coupled with the above tools for ameliorating student-learning issues, the Liaisons will present
teachers with the appropriate accommodations for students with diagnosed learning disabilities and
exceptionalities.
Lesson plans will reveal and demonstrate the Next Generation Sunshine State /Common Core
Standards and benchmarks being taught. Each Department Head will review these plans
weekly for alignment to the standards, research-based instructional practices and technology
integration. Monitoring of instruction through daily walk-through practice and weekly
informal observations conducted by the Principal as an additional accountability component.
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Teachers will be held highly accountable to instruction based on the Next Generation
Sunshine/Common Core State Standards. Teachers will maintain curriculum binders to
include quarterly benchmarks, scope and sequence, daily lesson plans, and assessments,
including the benchmark check off list. This binder will also contain resources to support
daily instruction of standards in each content area. Students will be given frequent
opportunities to demonstrate mastery of the state standards through informal and formal
assessment. Students who are unable to demonstrate mastery will be targeted to receive
additional classroom support through small group instruction and if necessary, before and
after school tutoring. Those students who are identified as needing intensive assistance wi ll
be placed in the intensive math, science, and/or reading classes.
Additionally, the school will provide a tutoring program. Teachers are available before and
after school to provide students with individualized tutoring designed to meet individual
student needs. Students who are unable to demonstrate mastery will receive tutorials. These
services are designed to bring students who are not proficient at grade level the intervention
necessary to achieve at higher levels. Data from most recent benchmark assessments will be
used to guide the instruction in the tutoring class. Tutors will have access to meaningful,
student specific reports generated from benchmark data. These reports will serve to guide
the tutors on developing a student specific, individualized achievement plan.
Literacy Expert, Richard Allington, stated in an Interview, that “Response to Intervention,” is
possibly “our last, best hope,” for achieving full literacy in the United States ( Teacher PD
Sourcebook/Spring/Summer 2010). GCCA also participates in this intervention model.
Key Findings:
All students differ so teachers must attend to different needs by first creating unique instructional
goals for each student. Teachers need to follow up on these goals with practical learning activities.
Research indicates that differentiation improves student learning.
Differentiation emphasizes the needs of individual learners, while mixed-ability teaching is
managing groups of students for teaching purposes. The goal of differentiation is to create learning
environments, content, process, and products that enable students with learning challenges or
exceptionalities (including giftedness) to succeed with meaningful curriculum.
Instructional activities should be created based on instructional needs, multiple intelligences,
learning modalities, cognitive levels, student backgrounds, and personal interests. Differentiated
teaching strategies include cooperative learning, individual learning, learning centers, and
technology.
Student-centered, and use a mix of whole-class, group, and individual instruction. Teachers must
understand and attend to the needs of both advanced and struggling learners. Content and
instructional modifications include multilevel instruction, the use of learning contracts, smallgroup instruction, language study, the use of centers, projects, using different tasks for different
ability levels, supporting independent learning, utilizing more carefully organized group work,
curriculum replacement, acceleration, course compacting, pull-out programs, competitions, and
out-of-school programming.
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Problem Solving / Response to Intervention (RtI) / Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS):
(We will be using the MTSS model as referenced in this document.) Every student will be taught
using the problem solving Response to Intervention (RtI) model/Multi-Tiered System of Supports
(MTSS). RtI/MTSS is the practice of the following:
 Providing high-quality instruction / intervention matched to student needs;
 Using learning rate over time and level of performance;
 Make important educational decisions to guide instruction.
MTSS:
Three tiers describe the level and intensity of the instruction/interventions provided across the
continuum.
Tier 3
Intensive Individualized Interventions and Supports: More focused targeted
instruction/intervention and supplemental support in addition to and aligned with the core
academic and behavior curriculum and instruction.
Tier 2
Targeted Supplemental Interventions and Supports: More focused targeted
instruction/intervention and supplemental support in addition to and aligned with the core
academic and behavior curriculum and instruction.
Tier 1
Core Universal Instruction and Supports
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General academic and behavior instruction and support designed and differentiated for all students
in all settings. The three tiers are not used to describe categories of students, timelines, procedures,
or specific programs.
Problem Solving has 4 steps to consider:
1. What’s the problem? This is where the problem is identified and data is collected.
 Benchmark level of performance
 Student level of performance
 Peer level of performance
2. Problem Analysis: Why is it occurring? The assessments are then conducted to gather
information to determine which are most / least likely
3. Intervention Design: What are we going to do?
 Effective teaching strategies consider both what to teach and how to teach it.
 Making good decisions with increase student progress.
 It is critical that the instruction be matched to the problem.
4. Evaluation the effectiveness of the intervention
 Gap is closing
At GCCA we will address the varying intelligences, and learning styles, and apply differentiated
instruction as needed. We will continually monitor via informal and formal assessments, and
analyzing the collected data to form a learning plan for all students
All lessons will be aligned with the State Standards, and all areas will be assessed to establish the
percents of student mastery. Results of said assessments will influence and guide lessons for
remediation, enhancement, or for continuing on with the concepts. Teachers will maintain a
database of all levels of achievement as a class, and per pupil. This will insure that the State
Standards are being met and mastered to an acceptable degree with at least 70% of all students
mastering any given standard.
Pre-testing at the onset of the academic year will set the base line for not only the level of the
students, but for the design of lessons. Informal daily assessments will drive the focus of
succeeding lessons. Formal assessment throughout each quarter will inform and influence lesson
development, as well as help identify students who may need more attention and help. Mid-term
exams will further this process, as will end of quarter “interim” exams. End of the year post-tests
that mirror the pre-tests will help establish the effectiveness of the teachers and programs. School
Leaders and teams of teachers will evaluate and analyze all data. When it is clear that perhaps one
teacher is having more success in a given area, that teacher will be looked to for help in developing
plans for the success of other teachers in that particular area. Thus, each teacher becomes the
teacher of other teachers, insuring greater success for all.
Students that are identified as being at risk will be formally evaluated through the MTSS/RtI
process. Appropriate measures will be taken to insure that the student is placed in the most
successful environment possible. (Possibilities include but are not limited to: ESE Resource Room
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time and help, ESOL Resource Room time and help, new classroom techniques, Math Labs,
Reading Labs, placement in Intensive Math, Science, Language Arts, Reading, or individual
tutoring during or after the school day.)
GCCA utilizes the Holistic Approach to the Total Child, with a Constructivist foundation. These
methods and ideals put the child first and at the center of the academic focus, addressing real life
and real situations with project based learning where the students themselves develop their own
learning with the guidance of the teacher who leads them through their projects in such a way as to
help draw out the learning being accomplished, and communicate said learning in a creative way
with the use of extensive technological choices and avenues.
All areas of the Language Arts curriculum are important aspects of all classes. Reading also takes
a center stage at GCCA, with reading skills stressed in every area of the classes. Writing across
the curriculum, as well as using writing to produce oral and computer generated presentations from
a variety of formats all serve to support the acquisition of the language arts skills and reading.
In total, with a fully implemented integrated curriculum, all areas of the curriculum will support all
other areas on a consistent basis, thus creating the supports to learning, and illustrating that no
subject stands alone, but are indeed integrated into our daily lives.
It is through proper placement, and guidance that students will achieve authentic learning. GCCA
has high expectations for their students, and it is believed that the students will live up to these
expectations and exceed them when given a chance to help design their own course of action
within units. In the course of their studies, on a spiraling continuum of greater responsibility,
students will be expected to develop and sharpen the skills needed to formulate a question or define
and issue.
They will learn to cull out information from the ever-growing base of knowledge. They will learn
to organize their research and present it in a meaningful way of their own design. This process
illustrates authentic learning.
GCCA uses Technology across the curriculum, to support and increase student acquisition of
knowledge. All areas of the curriculum will use a variety of technology instruments to assist
students daily. Students will have access to the Internet, electronic books, as well as a variety of
software course work components.
Furthermore, the teachers will use technology in their lesson and in presentations of materials.
Students will generate reports and projects using computers, cameras, as well as a variety of data
collecting tools. Students will be given choices as to what type of presentation to design and
construct, while needing to use different methods throughout the year. Examples include but are
not limited to: video, podcast, power point, documentary, newscasts, a hard copy or electronic
magazine, and websites. Such processes have been proven to increase the desire to produce a
product far more than mere printed reports for a large percentage of students. While students still
must use the important skills they would have used to produce a printed report complete with
graphs, data tables, and citing resources the students do not “feel” like they are doing a mere
report. The output is normally greater, with a greater amount of information learned.
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Additionally, as a STEM education initiative school, classes will be infused with projects and the
technological component parts that are needed to create said projects.
In order to maintain the ability to effectively disseminate the appropriate educational program to
the target population, it is critical to maintain an ongoing professional development program, for
the school’s faculty and staff. In addition, in an effort to assist newly hired faculty, the school will
generate a Teacher Induction Program with mentoring faculty members. This will result in highly
effective and skilled teachers, and promote longevity in those positions.
The new school year will begin with the following program:
Professional Development of Teachers
Four days are built into the school’s calendar in order to provide ongoing professional development
for teachers. Five additional days take place before the beginning of the new school year.
Projected Timeline for Professional Development by Practice:
Professional development will begin in August and will be ongoing as needed for the following:
 MTSS/RtI –ESE/ELL Guidelines, Strategies and Policies
 Writing with Chris Lewis
 Core Content Areas Across the Curriculum
 Integrating Technology Across the Curriculum
 CRISS Training
 Robert Marzano’s Instructional Strategies
 Constructivist approach major components training
 STEM training
 The use of technology and various methods of communicating with said use.
Classroom observation, teacher surveys, and student performance on assessments will be utilized
to monitor for successful implementation of practices. These observations will assist leadership in
measuring the need for continued professional development both by practice involved and
individual/faculty need.
Success of the school’s program design hinges on adequate preparation in these areas and ongoing
monitoring of successful implementation by all teachers. It is the intent of the school to provide
adequate advance preparation with follow-up professional development to be provided as needed at
the individual teacher and faculty levels. Teachers who may be hired after the beginning of the
school year, should the need arise for any reason; will receive the professional development needed
in order to maintain program integrity via the Teacher Induction Program.
F. Provide evidence that the existing design has been effective and successful in raising
student achievement.
“GCCA" is not using a pre-existing school design.”
G. Describe the applicant’s capacity to replicate an existing school design.
“GCCA" is not using a pre-existing school design.”
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Section 4: Curriculum Plan
A.
Describe the school’s curriculum in the core academic areas, illustrating how it will
prepare students to achieve the Next Generation Sunshine State-Common Core Standards.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy will provide a safe and orderly school which promotes a supportive
learning environment that offers content mastery of the Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core
State Standards through challenging and engaging work. Teachers will work in teams to integrate
the curriculum. GCCA will forge partnerships with local businesses, social service agencies, and
community groups to provide varied learning opportunities for all students. By developing a
classroom experience that extends well beyond the classroom, GCCA will provide a unique and
innovative approach to the mastery of the core subjects using the standards-based program using
research based instructional techniques.
The curriculum at GCCA will focus on a STEM approach to reading, language arts, math, science,
social studies, technological skills, PE, and the arts. Throughout this interdisciplinary curriculum
will be components of career planning, and character education. Moreover, GCCA will have a
concentration which will foster tolerance and anti-bullying programs.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy students will receive an education through an encouraging learning
atmosphere that offers content mastery through stimulating and engaging studies. GCCA believes
in the use of the Constructionist Approach to learning which will be grounded in the Next
Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards. In keeping with the GCCA educational
philosophy, the student, not the standards, will be the center of the academic focus. Exemplary
content mastery (and subsequent PARCC/FCAT 2.0 performance) will be a consequence of the
educational program.
GCCA believes schools must be a place where students “DO” learning. This “DO” Learning
approach has its roots in Constructivism, which is based upon observation and scientific study,
about how people learn. Constructivism (Brooks, 2005) based on the Modern Socratic Method is a
tenet of GCCA’s approach to teaching and learning. “…People construct their own understanding
and knowledge of the world through experiencing things and reflecting on the experience.”
Students should experience the core subject areas in meaningful, transformative experiences that
promote authentic learning and success. GCCA envisions a school that achieves mastery in the
core subject areas by teaching in a context that develops civic literacy, promotes environmental
stewardship, fosters global awareness, and integrates information and communication literacy. At
GCCA the importance of each person making a positive contribution to the greater community and
the importance of education as a tool enabling each person to make a greater contribution will be
stressed. Core values include high expectations for responsibility and scholarship. Our students’
success will flow from and validate these high expectations. At GCCA, education is an individual,
family, school, and community responsibility.
GCCA believes the integration of arts across the broad spectrum of the curriculum increases
student achievement, due to addressing the developmental domain paradigm, and tapping into a
child’s creativity.
In order to master the Next Generation Sunshine State/Common Core Standards, GCCA
will:
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Design and Construct yearly instructional calendars, based on the Lee County Focus
Calendars.
Design fully integrated units via a Team Teaching approach via STEM activities,
effectively uniting the various curriculum areas in order to enhance the retention of core
concepts, and establish a broader base of understanding of all standards.
Design and Construct lesson plans that are clearly aligned with the Next Generation
Sunshine State/Common Core Standards, in order to insure said standards are integrated,
introduced, investigated, and mastered.
The school leader will read and assess teacher plans and make sure they are aligned with
the State Standards.
Utilize a student-centered constructivist approach to learning based on prior knowledge,
current experiences, and building on said experiences and knowledge.
Develop classroom experiences that extend beyond the classroom into the community at
large via project based assignments and/or Service Learning initiatives.
Measure student performance via an Accountability Approach, as per the Lee County
Focus Calendar in each applicable subject area, via Pre, Interim, Mid Term, and Post Term
Indicator Tests, based on the Next Generation Sunshine State/Common Core Standards,
within all content areas.
Offer choices to students as to how they will present their findings i.e. powerpoints,
podcasts, videos, research papers and so forth.
With a wide range of data observation and collection tools, as well as software, students
will generate charts, graphs and data tables for their presentations.
Offer cooperative and collaborative opportunities in order to establish a broader base of
communication and work skills. “Students learn about learning not only from themselves,
but also from their peers. When students review and reflect on their learning processes
together, they can pick up strategies and methods from one another: (Brooks, 20005).
Identify students who are not achieving at the expected rate and diagnosis the possible
reasons at the base of the non-achievement. As a result of said study and identification,
appropriate measures will be taken to ensure the highest learning gains possible for said
students.
Utilize ESE Resource Room instruction, and interventions.
Utilize Differentiated Instruction in order to reach all modes of learning, thus increasing the
acquisition and retention of core ideas and skills.
Provide an integrated use of technology throughout the curricular areas, coupled with
access to subject materials and teachers not only while at school, but from home computers.
Endeavor to maintain small class sizes to allow for maximum teacher /student exposure.
Utilize The Holistic Approach to the Total Child, addressing the cognitive, affective and
psychomotor domains to learning.
Utilize an arts-based approach to learning.
All students will participate in the screening, diagnostic assessment, intervention, remediation, and
enrichment processes as published in the district’s K-12 Comprehensive Reading Plan.
Students in grades K-5 will participate in regular district or classroom reading and math
assessments. The assessments for reading will assess phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary,
comprehension, and fluency.
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Students that exhibit a substantial deficiency in reading and/or math as determined by standard
assessments will be provided intensive reading instruction immediately following the identification
of the reading deficiency. The student’s reading proficiency will be reassessed by locallydetermined assessments or through standardized assessments at the beginning of the grade
following the intensive reading instruction. As with the county, GCCA will utilize:
ELEMENTARY TEXTBOOKS
Kindergarten:
Handwriting: D’Nealian Handwriting,
Math: Go Math! Florida,
Music: School Choice from the State
Reading: Pearson Reading Street
Intervention Reader: SRA Reading Mastery Signature Ed.
Science: National Geographic Science
Soc. Studies: Harcourt Horizons
World Languages
Spanish: Viva el Espanol.
Spanish for Spanish Heritage Speakers: Nuevo Siglo de Espanol
First Grade:
Handwriting: D’Nealian Handwriting
Math: Go Math! Florida,
Music: School Choice from the State
Adopted Music Series
Reading: Pearson Reading Street
Intervention Reader
SRA Reading Mastery Signature ed.
Science: National Geographic Science
National Geographic/Hampton-Brown
Soc. Studies: Harcourt Horizons
Spelling: No District Recommendation
World Languages
Spanish: Viva el Espanol!
Espanol Para Ti,
Spanish for Spanish Heritage Speakers: Nuevo Siglo de Espanol
Second Grade
Handwriting: D’Nealian Handwriting Series
Math: Go Math! Florida,
Music: School Choice from the State Adopted Music Series
Reading: Pearson Reading Street
Intervention Reader
SRA Reading Mastery Signature ed.
Science: National Geographic Science
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Soc. Studies: Harcourt Horizons
Spelling: No District Recommendation 2013
World Languages
Spanish: Viva el Espanol!, 2005, 3rd ed.
Espanol Para Ti
Spanish for Spanish Heritage Speakers: Nuevo Siglo de Espanol,
Third Grade
Handwriting: D’Nealian Handwriting
Math: Go Math!
Music: School Choice from the State Adopted Music Series
Reading: Pearson Reading Street
Reading Intervention Reader: SRA Reading Mastery Signature ed.
Science: National Geographic Science
Soc. Studies: Florida Social Studies
Spelling: No District Recommendation
World Languages
Spanish: Viva el Espanol
Espanol Para Ti
Spanish for Spanish Heritage Speakers: Nuevo Siglo de Espanol,
Grade 4
Handwriting: D’Nealian Handwriting
Math: Go Math! Florida,
Music: School Choice from the State Adopted Music Series
Reading: Pearson Reading Street
Intervention Reader: SRA Reading Mastery Signature ed.
Science: National Geographic Science
Soc. Studies: Florida Social Studies
Spelling: No District Recommendation
Spanish: Viva el Espanol!
Espanol Para Ti
Spanish for Spanish Heritage Speakers: Nuevo Siglo de Espanol, 2001,
Grade 5
Handwriting: D’Nealian Handwriting
Math: Go Math! Florida,
Music: School Choice from the State Adopted Music Series
Reading: Pearson Reading Street
Intervention Reader: SRA Reading Mastery Signature ed.
Science: National Geographic Science
Soc. Studies: Florida Social Studies
Spelling: No District Recommendation
Spanish: Viva el Espanol!
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Spanish Espanol Para Ti, 2005,
Spanish for Spanish Heritage Speakers: Nuevo Siglo de Espanol
Middle School:
Computer Applications: ITCenter 21: Introduction to Computers and IT, Applied Educational
Systems
Language Arts
Grammar Grades 6-8: BK English: Communication Skills in the New Millenium
Literature Grades 6-8: Glencoe Literature: The Reader’s Choice
Reading Grade 6: Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program Language!
SpringBoard by College Board ELA Level 1
Developmental Reading Program: Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Treasures,
Reading Grade 7: Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program Language!
SpringBoard by College Board ELA Level 2
Grades 7-8: National Geographic & Hampton-Brown EDGE, As a Supplement
Reading Grade 8: Comprehensive Intervention Reading Program Language!
SpringBoard by College Board ELA Level 3
Math Grades 6-8: Big Ideas Math, 6-8 Big Ideas Learning
Honors Algebra I: Florida Larson Algebra 1 N
Music: School Choice from the State Adopted Music Series
Science Grade 6 – 8 Florida Science Fusion
Social Studies
World History/Advanced Grade 6: myWorld History
Pearson Prentice Hall
District adopted, not approved for purchase or use
Journey Across Time: Early Ages
Continue to use as non-adopted
Civics, Integrated/Advanced Grade 7: Civics, Economics, and Geography,
U.S. History/Advanced Grade 8: America: History of Our Nation Beginnings Through 1877,
Spanish Grades 7-8: Florida Holt Spanish IA, Expresate!
Spanish Exploratory Grades 6 or 7: Exploring Spanish, 2008, 3rd ed.
Spanish for Spanish Speakers Grade 6: Nuevo Siglo de Espanol
Spanish for Spanish Speakers Grade 7: for Espanol Serie Amigos (Classroom)
Spanish for Spanish Speakers Grade 8: Espanol Serie Amigos
GCCA will utilize the Just Read Florida and FCAT Explorer web site to support their curriculum.
In accordance with The School Board of Lee County Curriculum (for elementary students) all
subjects are based in the benchmarks of the Florida State Board adopted Next Generation
Sunshine/Common Core State Standards in language arts, mathematics, science, social studies,
physical education/health and the arts.
Students in K-5 shall have regular study of mathematics, science, language arts, art, music, social
studies and physical education. Technology skills will be taught in the above subjects.
GCCA will offer instruction for English Language Learners that complies with the 1990
LULAC/META Consent Decree and with the Lee District ELL/LEP Plan.
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K-5 Curriculum
Students in K-5 will be offered a core curriculum of basic skills with mastery of the Next
Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards. Basic Skills will be enhanced through peer,
collaborative, and cooperative groupings with hands on projects and learning as reflected in the
Constructivist Approach (Brooks, 2005) and STEM activities. The focus of GCCA will be on
reading, language arts, math, science, social studies, and technology skills.
Rounding out the curriculum to enhance greater academic achievement, moreover, to develop the
social, emotional, and physical growth of each child to an optimum level, GCCA will offer art,
music and physical education both as separate classes and within the core academic areas.
All subject areas will administer pre, mid-term, end of quarter interim and final post-tests to
measure the acquisition of the Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards.
Standards that are not met will become the focus of re-teaching.
Physical Education K-5
Policy for Elementary School Physical Education:
All games, sports, activities in the elementary physical education curriculum will include emphasis
on physical fitness and healthy lifestyles. All elementary school PE teachers will follow a Physical
Education Program, which comply with Florida State Law. The Next Generation
Sunshine/Common Core State Standards will be met in accordance to the adopted physical
education program.
The PE program is designed to have students participate in physical education on a moderate to
vigorous level of physical activities (MVPA) for a duration of time in order to provide a significant
health benefit to students, subject to the differing capabilities of students. Each week, all students
K - 5 receive 150 minutes of weekly instruction that includes physical education health / nutrition.
On any day during which physical education instruction is conducted there will be at least 30
consecutive minutes per day.
GCAA expected outcomes Physical Education Program in Elementary School:
Students will maintain or improve their level of fitness indicated by their pre and post fitness test.
Students will be accountable in demonstrating competency in the course content using the Next
Generation/Common Core Standards to validate performance.
If for some reason, the student experiences any difficulty with physical activity, the physical
education instructors will counsel that student. Such difficulties could be an obesity situation or a
skill related situation.
GCCA students will participate in year round daily Physical Education classes.
Grading said subjects will be:
Grades K-3 will utilize the Lee County system to report level of mastery of the Next Generation
Sunshine and Common Core State Standards.
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The grades reflecting achievement for academic subjects in grades 4-5 with numerical equivalents
will be:
A = 90 B = 80 C = 70 D = 60 F=0 I=
100%
89%
79%
69%
59%
Outstanding Progress
Above Average Progress
Average Progress
Lowest Acceptable Progress
Failure
Incomplete
The grades reflecting achievement for art, music, physical education and, in grades K-2, for
science and social studies shall be:
S = Satisfactory achievement
N = Needs improvement
U = Unsatisfactory achievement
The grades reflecting achievement for work habits in grades 1 – 5 shall be:
P = Pass
F = Fail
Evaluation of achievement will include progress toward mastery of Next Generation Sunshine
State Standards objectives.
Florida Statutes requires academic performance to be reported in regards to grade level standards,
not instructional level.
Student effort shall be indicated by the following codes:
E = Excellent Shows outstanding participation. Strives beyond class assignment and homework.
Is highly motivated and well organized.
G = Good Participates much of the time. Completes class assignments and homework. Is
motivated and organized.
S = Satisfactory Usually participates. Completes class assignments and homework. Is attentive.
N = Needs Improvement Rarely participates. Frequently does not complete assignments. Is
inattentive and poorly organized.
U = Unsatisfactory Does not participate. Does not complete assignments. Lacks motivation and
organization.
Kindergarten grading shall be a checklist of specific competencies marked to indicate progress.
Middle School - 6-8 Curriculum
The Middle School (6-8) curriculum objectives for Middle School courses are aligned with the
Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards. Proficiency in reading, mathematics,
and science is measured by the PARCC/FCAT 2.0, end of course exams (EOC), and district
assessments. We will offer courses of study and instruction that reflect the Next Generation
Sunshine/Common Core State Standards in Grades 6-8 language arts, mathematics, science, social
studies, foreign languages, health-physical education, the arts and career-technical education.
Instruction will address the skills and competencies that a student must master in order to be
promoted from Middle School to High School.
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MIDDLE GRADES PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS (FS 1003.4156)
Promotion from middle school grades 6, 7, and 8 requires that a student must successfully
complete the following academic courses:
Grade Required Courses
6 Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies
7 Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies/
Career Education and Planning
8 Language Arts, Math*, Science, Social Studies/Civics
GCCA will offer at least two high school mathematics courses, Algebra I, and Geometry. In
addition, GCCA will offer Spanish I for which students may earn high school credit.
The Career and Education Planning course is a required component of the Middle School Social
Studies curriculum and will include online access to career planning options and tools. In grade 7,
students will develop a personalized academic and career plan signed by student, teacher, and
parent/guardian. In grade 8, the plan will be reviewed and updated by student and guidance
counselor.
Intensive Reading:
For each year in which a student scores a Level 1 on FCAT Reading, the student must be enrolled
in and complete an intensive reading course the following year. Placement of Level 2 readers in
either an intensive reading course or a content area course in which reading strategies are delivered
shall be determined by diagnosis of reading needs. All diagnostic, placements, progress
monitoring, and reading program strategies will be conducted in accordance with the Lee County
K- 12 Comprehensive Reading Plan as required by Florida Statutes.
Integrated Mathematics Intensive
For each year in which a student scores at Level 1 or 2 on FCAT 2.0 mathematics, the student must
receive remediation the following year. This remediation requirement will either be integrated into
the student’s required mathematics course at the next grade level, or the student will participate in
an intensive math class.
As with our students in K-5, our Middle School students will be offered a core curriculum of basic
skills with mastery of the Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards. Classrooms
in some subject areas may vary from multi-age groups to the more traditional groupings of grade
level students. Basic Skills will be enhanced through peer, collaborative, and cooperative
groupings with hands on projects and learning through the Constructivist Approach coupled with
STEM applications
rounding out the curriculum to address greater academic achievement as well as to develop the
social, emotional, physical and emotional growth of each child, GCCA will offer art, music and
physical education both as separate classes and within the core academic areas evidencing the use
of The Holistic Approach to the Total Child which addresses the Cognitive, Affective, and
Psychomotor Domains which fosters student learning.
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All subject areas will administer pre, mid-term interim, and post-tests to measure the acquisition of
the Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards. Standards that are not met will
become the focus of re-teaching. Individual students who are not making adequate progress will
be identified, and appropriate measures of improvement will be instituted, whether by a teacher readdressing an area, or more severe cases of lack of achievement will be addressed through
MTSS/RtI channels. Data collection will be an ongoing process that will insure informed
instruction and achievement of mastery.
Students who are excelling above grade level will be addressed and evaluated for gifted studies,
and advanced classes. Students not meeting standards at the rate expected will be placed in
appropriate tutoring programs.
All results of testing and achievement levels will be communicated to parents so that they are
aware of their student’s advancement, and are able to assist in the learning process. Parents will be
notified via email, phone calls, conferences, progress reports, and report cards.
ELL and ESE Liaisons will work with students that qualify for their services at the level of service
the students are placed in. Additionally, the liaisons will be in communication with the families
and teachers of said students on a regular basis.
GCCA’s curriculum at all levels will be based on and in accordance with the Next Generation
Sunshine/Common Core State Standards.
Subject Areas:
Subject areas with no text stipulated will be announced at a later date. GCCA will be using the
same text materials as Lee County.
Math
The purpose of these courses are to provide opportunities to help students explore several
problem-solving techniques, algorithms, and real world scenarios centered on the new
standards using the constructionist approach with emphasis on applications and the use of
technology. The content should include, but not limited to the following:
Course Title: M/J Mathematics 1
Course Title: M/J Mathematics 1, Advanced
Course Title: M/J Mathematics 2
Course Title: M/J Mathematics 2 Advanced
Course Title: M/J Mathematics 3 – Regular
Course Title: M/J Mathematics 3 - Advanced
Course Title: Mathematics: Algebra I Regular HS School Schedule – 180 days
Course Title: Mathematics: Algebra I Honors
Course Title: Geometry
Algebra and Geometry classes will have End of Course (EOC) exams.
Language Arts
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The purpose of this course is to provide students integrated language arts study in reading, writing,
speaking, listening, language, and literature in preparation for college and career readiness.
In the language arts class the academy will stress writing. Each classroom represents the
“wholeness” of language, whether in the subject areas of reading, mathematics, art, music, or
physical education. Language is used within all these areas: reading/language arts cannot be
separated from the other academic subjects. A student uses reading/language arts techniques and
cues throughout the day. This is what is meant by “wholeness”, not separating isolated skills at
will. The goal is to develop richly literate environments in which students become effective users
of language. Language skills are inseparable from the actual speaking, writing, and reading
experiences.
All students at all levels need rich experiences with good literature; and need a wide range of
literature-based activities that focus on vocabulary, comprehension, writing, study skills, and
strategies. Students also need opportunities to practice essential reading and writing skills.
Assessment and instruction will be continually intertwined. Students must become proficient in
applying reading/language arts skills and strategies. Evaluation takes place in the following forms:
teacher observation, self-evaluation formal testing, and student’s work. Continuous feedback is
necessary to guide instruction. Students will also be taught to monitor and direct themselves
within their own learning. They will become aware of how they learn and what they do while
learning. Self-correction is essential when acquiring new strategies. Reading is not passive; it is a
process that involves the text itself (including all the writer brings to it) the reader (and all the prior
knowledge) and the context of the reading situation.
The School will provide writing workshops and a handbook to assist parents with techniques to
support the development of their child’s writing skills.
The writing curriculum will include the 6 +1 writing traits:
 Ideas - A clear point, message, theme or story line, backed by important, carefully chosen
details and supportive information.
 Organization - How a piece of writing is structured and ordered.
 Voice - The fingerprints of the writer on the page - the writer's own special, personal style
coming through in the words, combined with concern for the informational needs and
interests of the audience.
 Word Choice - Language, phrasing, and the knack for choosing the "just right" word to get
the message across.
 Sentence Fluency - The rhythm and sound of the writing as it is read aloud.
 Conventions - Editorial correctness and attention to any detail a copy editor would review,
including: Spelling, Grammar and usage, Capitalization, Paragraph indentation,
Punctuation
 RAFTS: Role, Audience, Format, Topic, Strong Verb
Sixth Grade Level Expectations: Students will:
 Predict ideas or events that may take place in the text, gives rationale for predictions, and
confirms and discusses predictions as the story progresses.
 Use pre-reading strategies before reading (for example, a KWL or skimming text headings,
bold type, and other text features).
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 Make predictions about purpose and organization using background knowledge and text
structure knowledge.
 Read and predict from graphic representations (for example, illustrations, diagrams, graphs,
maps).
Seventh Grade Level Expectations: Students will:
 extend and apply previously learned pre-reading knowledge and skills of the sixth grade
with increasingly complex reading selections and assignments and tasks.
Eighth Grade Level Expectations: Students will:
 refine and apply previously learned pre-reading knowledge and skills of the seventh grade
with increasingly complex reading texts and assignments and tasks.
Middle School Language Arts – Students must be scheduled in one Language Arts class in
grades 6th – 8th. Students in grades 6-8 who score PARCC/FCAT 2.0 level 1 or 2 must be
scheduled in a Language Arts class back to back with an Intensive Reading Plus class. The
same teacher will be teaching the 2-hour block.
All ELL students are enrolled in ESOL courses: English through ESOL (Counts as Language
Arts / English Credit by grade level) and Developmental Language Arts through ESOL
(elective credit by ESOL level) with an ESOL Endorsed Teacher.
Special Note: As students progress from one grade-level course to the next, increases should occur
in the complexity of materials and tasks and in the students’ independence in their application and
use. Scaffolded learning opportunities are to be provided for students to develop and apply the
critical skills of discourse analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.
Course Title: M/J Language Arts 1
Course Title: M/J Language Arts 1, Advanced
Course Title: M/J Language Arts 2
Course Title: M/J Language Arts 2, Advanced
Course Title: M/J Language Arts 3
Course Title: M/J Language Arts 3, Advanced
Course Title: M/J Intensive Language Arts
Course Title: M/J Intensive Reading
Science
Our science curriculum will align to the School District of Lee County’s M/J Comprehensive
Science 1, 2, and 3 curriculum. We will use the same textbooks that Lee County uses.
Science Summary
Textbook selection will be modified as the Sponsor’s text adoption and modification.
Curiosity and questioning is the foundation of science explorations. The Standards -Based
curriculum and instruction, via the inquiry approach, will provide students with meaningful
questions coupled with hands-on activities to produce actively involved learners while
applying the scientific method. Employing skills such as gathering, assemble, observe,
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construct, compose, manipulate, draw, perform, examine, interview, testing hypothesis, and
collect of data about the environment around them.
ELL Students: Curriculum Content in Home Language (CCHL) will be provided to English
Language Learners (Ell’s levels 1 and 2). 6th – 8th grades will receive 150 minutes of
CCHL.
Students will participate in the Science Fair projects. Participation in the Science Fair will
allows students to practice a number of scientific methods learned throughout the year, such
as:
 Observing - The learner will identify objects and their properties utilizing all five
senses, identify changes in various systems, and make organized observations.
 Classifying - The learner will sort objects by their properties, match objects by their
likenesses and differences, and describe the sub-components of objects.
 Measuring - The learner will compare two like quantities where one is used as a unit
of measure.
 Collecting and Organizing - The learner will gather, describe, and record data and
then order, classify, and compare the data to identify patterns and similarities.
 Predicting and Inferring - The learner will suggest explanations for a set of collected
data and then form generalizations.
 Identifying Variables - The learner will formulate a hypothesis from a set of
observations and inferences, and devise a method to verify the hypothesis.
 Synthesizing - The learner will integrate process skills in the design, experimentation,
and interpretation of an investigation of an observable phenomena.
Grades: 6th-8th: At the completion of the course, students will have achieved a year’s worth
of learning, all objective and concepts that are aligned to the CCSS. We will use the Science
pacing guide establish by the Sponsor to provide the proper timeframe.
Technology: FCAT Explorer
Writing / Reading Across the Curriculum:
Students observe or read about Science Concepts and they record the cause and effect
relationships on a graphic organizer.
Strategy: Two Column Notes
Students collect information about two or more scientific concepts, systems and/or examples.
The attributes are recorded on a graphic organizer in order to clarify similarities and
differences. The students will write a comparing paragraph on the findings.
Strategy: Venn Diagram
Students graphically represent how sub-concepts, vocabulary terms and examples are related
to a main topic or central concept. Students will write descriptively to develop a personal in depth understanding of key scientific concepts and terms.
Strategy: Concept Definition Map
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The students will be required to have a Science Notebook. This notebook will be a record of
student inquiry learning experiences over a period of time. The notebook can be used
exclusively for inquiry investigations or it can be used to include reflections from reading or
class discussions. It is more than a collection of observations, data collected, facts learned
and procedures conducted. The notebook also documents student reflections, questions,
predictions, and conclusions.
Strategy: Science Notebook (Journaling)
Students will use a sentence summary to understand the main idea. Students will organize by
relative importance. Main ideas and supporting examples and/or evidence are identified and
represented on an appropriate graphic organizer.
Strategy: Main Idea Table
Students will use marginal notes to write statements in which they record their interaction
with the text while reading. Students will independently record everything they can think of
3-5 minutes before, during or after reading.
Strategy: Quick Write
Students will use graphic organizers to represent events in their natural world that happens in
a specific order.
Strategy: Time Sequence
Students will write a non-fiction piece of writing usually written in the author’s point of
view. It will include the thesis statement and the supporting details. Essay will conform to
all rules of grammar and punctuation.
Strategy: Essay Writing
Essay questions will be a part of a unit and term performance task. These questions ca n be a
paragraph or longer. Students will write scientific knowledge or will tell the reader how to
do something. It will be factual accurate.
Strategy: Informal Writing
After hands on laboratory experiences, students will report and on what they did in the lab
activity to make sense of their results. The final report will be typed for publishing.
Strategy: Investigation Report
Students write a newspaper/magazine article to explain a topic in Science based on the
results of their investigation report.
Strategy: Journalistic Reporting
Students will write to apply and demonstrate knowledge learned about Scientific - concepts,
science examples, and/or famous scientist.
Strategy: Narrative / Expository Writing
Some Possible Micro-Society Science Activities – Students will:
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Set up experiments in their science museum to reinforce skills learned in the
classroom.
Establish an Environmental Protection Agency to sponsor recycling.
Create an Animal Caretaker venture where live animals are observed and cared for.
Set up a Weather Station to measure, record, analyze, and predict weather patterns.
Establish a Wellness business where citizens can exercise, learn about healthy living
habits, and weigh and measure growth.
Create a Plant Place venture to plant, propagate, and experiment on green and growing
things.
Some Possible Service Learning Science Activities – Students may:
 Beautify their campuses with gardens and murals.
 Learn about animals during a fieldtrip to the nature center. They then may per form a
play for other students and their parents dealing with what they had learned about
animals in the nature center.
 Design and make placemats with a Science concept. These mats are laminated and
presented to a local park for distribution.
 Consult with experts in a variety of fields. The students may then prepare a section
and install or plant appropriate feeders, trees and plants. The students may become
familiar with the animals’ routines and their interest in the wildlife will grow. The
students may also learn how to calculate the cost of regular food refills, and how to
coordinate regular maintenance.
 Increase recycling on the campus and around the community.
 Study the causes of natural disasters including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions,
hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes; they may explore the needs of their
school/community to be prepared for such disasters, as well as how they can help
others who have experienced one of these disasters. (Implement a drive to collect
food, money and clothing to send to the Red Cross, Create and Implement a
community-wide drive campaign on emergency preparedness)
 Be responsible for researching, planning, implementing, and revising a safety drill
procedure if needed for their school or community.
COURSES FOR: 6th GRADE SCIENCE:
SCIENCE
M/J COMPREHENSIVE SCIENCE 1 1.00 Credit
The purpose of this course is to provide the first year of a sequential three -year course of
study in exploratory experiences and activities in concepts of life, earth/space, and physical
sciences. The content should include, but not be limited to, scientific method; cells, human
body; protists; plants, animals, matter and energy, geology; astronomy, meteorology, and
oceanography. This course meets the requirement for sixth graders. Laborator y investigations
of selected topics are an integral part of this course.
M/J COMPREHENSIVE SCIENCE 1 Advanced 1.00 Credit
The purpose of this course is to provide the first year of a sequential three -year course of
study in exploratory experiences and activities in advanced concepts of life, earth/space, and
physical sciences. The content should include, but not be limited to, scientific method; cells,
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human body; protists; plants, animals, matter and energy, geology; astronomy, meteorology,
and oceanography. This course meets the requirement for sixth graders. Laboratory
investigation of selected topics are an integral part of the course.
COURSES FOR: 7th GRADE SCIENCE:
M/J COMPREHENSIVE SCIENCE 2 1.00 Credit
The purpose of this course is to provide the second year of a sequential three-year course of
study in exploratory experiences and activities in the concepts of life, earth/space, and
physical sciences. The content should include, but not be limited to, scientific method; cells,
human body; protists; plants, animals, matter and energy, geology; astronomy, meteorology,
and oceanography. Students are introduced to basic concepts about life, are given an
overview of living organisms from the simple to the complex, and are taught about the
human body. Also emphasized with respect to the human body are the importance of
nutrition, the causes and effects of disease, and the effects of drugs, tobacco, and alcohol.
Laboratory investigations of selected topics in the content which also includes the use of th e
scientific method, measurement, laboratory apparatus and safety are an integral part of the
course. Completion of credit precludes earning credit in M/J Comprehensive Science 2,
advanced.
M/J COMPREHENSIVE SCIENCE 2 Advanced 1.00 Credit
The purpose of this course is to provide the second year of a sequential three-year course of
study in exploratory experiences and activities in advanced concepts of life, earth/space, and
physical sciences. The content should include, but not be limited to, scientific method; cells,
human body; protists; plants, animals, matter and energy, geology; astronomy, meteorology,
and oceanography. Students are introduced to basic concepts about life, are given an
overview of living organisms from the simple to the complex, and are taught about the
human body. Also emphasized with respect to the human body are the importance of
nutrition, the causes and effects of disease, and the effects of drugs, tobacco, and alcohol.
Laboratory investigations of selected topics in the content which also include the use of the
scientific method, measurement, laboratory apparatus and safety are an integral part of the
course. This course meets the requirement for seventh graders. Completion of credit in this
course precludes earning credit in M/J Comprehensive Science 2.
M/J PHYSICAL SCIENCE Honors Bright Futures 1.00 Credit
The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for the student to develop concepts
basic to the earth, its materials, processes, history and environment. The content should
include, but not be limited to, theories for the formation of universe, solar system, life cycle
of stars interstellar matter, famous astronomers, study of astronomical observatories,
different types of telescopes, the solar system, U.S. Space Program, inter-planetary
explorations, nature of matter and atomic structure, periodic table, mineral identification,
igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, rock cycle, earth’s interior, land formation,
theory of plate tectonics, formation of rivers and streams, erosion, wind, water and
weathering, glaciers and glacial features and structures, hydrologic cycle, oceanography,
island formation, atmosphere, mapping weather conditions, composition of soils, energy
resources, and topographic maps. Laboratory investigations of selected topics in the content
which also include the use of the scientific method, measurement, laboratory apparatus and
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safety are a part of this course. SELECTION CONSIDERATION. Precludes earning credit in
any other Earth/Space Science titled course.
COURSES FOR: 8th GRADE SCIENCE:
M/J COMPREHENSIVE SCIENCE 3 1.00 Credit
The purpose of this course is to provide the third year of a sequential three -year course of
study in exploratory experiences and activities in concepts of life, earth /space, and physical
sciences. The content should include, but not be limited to, scientific method; cells, human
body; protists; plants, animals, matter and energy, geology; astronomy, meteorology, and
oceanography. Meets requirement for eighth graders. Completion of this course precludes
earning credit in M/J Comprehensive Science 3, Advanced. Laboratory investigations of
selected topics are an integral part of the course. Meets requirements for 8th graders.
M/J COMPREHENSIVE SCIENCE 3 Advanced Florida Scholars
High School Credit for Science 1.00 Credit
The purpose of this course is to provide the third year of a sequential three year course of
study in exploratory experiences and activities in advanced concepts of life, earth/space, and
physical sciences. The content should include, but not be limited to, scientific method, cells,
human body, protists, plants, animals, matter and energy, geology, astronomy, meteorology,
and oceanography. Laboratory investigations of selected topics are an integral part of the
course.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE Honors
Florida Scholars High School Credit for Science 1.00 Credit
The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for the student to develop concepts
basic to the earth, its materials, processes, history and environment. The content should
include, but not be limited to, theories for the formation of the universe, solar system, life
cycle of stars interstellar matter, men of astronomy, study of astronomical observatories,
different types of telescopes, the solar system, U.S. Space Program, inter-planetary
explorations, nature of matter and atomic structure, periodic table, mineral identification,
igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, rock cycle, earth's interior, land formation,
theory of plate tectonics, formation of rivers and streams, erosion, wind, water and
weathering, glaciers and glacial features and structures, hydrologic cycle, oceanography,
island formation, atmosphere, mapping weather conditions, composition of soils, energy
resources, and topographic maps. Laboratory investigations of selected topics in the content,
which also include the use of the scientific method, measurement, laboratory apparatus and
safety are a part of this course. Precludes earning credit in any other Earth/Space Science
titled course.
BIOLOGY 1 Honors Bright Futures 1.00 Credit
Graduation Credit for Science. The purpose of this course is to provide advanced, in depth,
exploratory experiences, and real life applications in the biological sciences. The content
should include, but not be limited to the following: the nature of science; matter, energy, and
chemical process of life; cell biology, reproduction and communication; genetic principles,
diversity, and biotechnology; levels of organization, classification, and taxono my; structure,
function, and reproduction of plants, animals, and microorganism; behavior of organism;
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interdependence of organism, humans, and the environment; biological selection,
adaptations, and changes through time; agriculture, food, and medical tec hnologies, and
biological careers. Laboratory investigations, which include the use of scientific research,
measurement, laboratory technologies, and safety procedures, are an integral part of this
course.
SELECTION CONSIDERATION. Completion of a credit in this course precludes the earning
of credit in Biology I. State authorized honors course.
Social Studies
Social studies may be defined as "the integrated study of the social sciences and humanities to
promote civic competence." Within the school program, social studies provides coordinated,
systematic study drawing upon such disciplines as anthropology, archaeology, economics,
geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology, as well
as appropriate content from the humanities, mathematics, and natural sciences. In essence, social
studies promote knowledge of and involvement in civic affairs. And because civic issues-such as
health care, crime, and foreign policy-are multidisciplinary in nature, understanding these issues is
vital to our student's and our nation's future.
Course Title: M/J World History
Course Title: M/J World Geography & Career Planning
Course Title: M/J United States History & Career Planning
Sixth Grade: M/J World History - The sixth grade social studies curriculum consists of the
following content area strands: World History, Geography, Civics, and Economics. The primary
content for this course pertains to the world’s earliest civilizations to the ancient and classical
civilizations of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Students will be exposed to the multiple dynamics of
world history including economics, geography, politics, and religion/philosophy. Students will
study methods of historical inquiry and primary and secondary historical documents.
Eighth Grade: M/J U.S. History – The eighth grade social studies curriculum consists of the
following content area strands: American History, Geography, Economics and Civics. Primary
content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of American history from the Exploration
and Colonization period to the Reconstruction Period following the Civil War. Students will be
exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events which
influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. So that
students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students
should have the opportunity to explore those fundamental ideas and events which occurred after
Reconstruction.
Mathematics Benchmark Guidance - Instruction of U.S. History should include opportunities for
students to interpret and create representations of historical events using mathematical tables,
charts, and graphs.
Career and Education Planning - The career and education planning course required by Florida
Statutes, has been integrated into this course. This course must include career exploration using
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CHOICES or a comparable cost-effective program and educational planning using the online
student advising system known as Florida Academic Counseling and Tracking for Students at the
Internet website FACTS.org (FACTS.org is now part of the new Florida Virtual Campus) ; and
shall result in the completion of a personalized academic and career plan.
Listed below are the competencies that must be met to satisfy the requirements of (Florida
Statutes):
Understanding the Workplace
1.0 Describe how work relates to the needs and functions of the economy, society, and
personal fulfillment.
2.0 Describe the influences that societal, economic, and technological changes have on
employment trends and future training.
3.0 Describe the need for career planning, changing careers, and the concept of lifelong learning
and how they relate to personal fulfillment.
4.0 Appraise how legislation such as the Americans with Disabilities Act and Child Labor Laws
regulates employee rights.
Self- Awareness
5.0 Use results of an interest assessment to describe their top interest areas and relate to
careers/career clusters.
6.0 Identify five values that they consider important in making a career choice.
7.0 Identify skills needed for career choices and match to personal abilities.
8.0 Demonstrate the ability to apply skills of self-advocacy and self-determination throughout the
career planning process.
9.0 Identify strengths and areas in which assistance is needed at school.
10.0 Apply results of all assessments to personal abilities in order to make realistic career choices.
Exploring Careers
11.0 Demonstrate the ability to locate, understand, and use career information.
12.0 Use the Internet to access career and education planning information.
13.0 Identify skills that are transferable from one occupation to another.
14.0 Demonstrate use of career resources to identify occupational clusters, career opportunities
within each cluster, employment outlook, and education/ training requirements.
15.0 Explain the relationship between educational achievement and career success.
Goal Setting and Decision-Making
16.0 Identify and demonstrate use of steps to make career decisions.
17.0 Identify and demonstrate processes for making short and long term goals.
Workplace Skills
18.0 Demonstrate personal qualities (e.g. dependability, punctuality, responsibility, integrity,
getting along with others) that are needed to be successful in the workplace.
19.0 Demonstrate skills to interact positively with others.
20.0 Demonstrate employability skills such as working on a team, problem-solving and
organizational skills.
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Career and Education Planning
21.0 Identify secondary and postsecondary school courses and electives that meet career plans.
22.0 Identify advantages and disadvantages of entering various secondary and postsecondary
programs for the attainment of career goals.
23.0 Demonstrate knowledge of varied types and sources of financial aid to obtain assistance for
postsecondary education.
24.0 Identify inappropriate discriminatory behaviors that may limit opportunities in the workplace.
25.0 Develop a career and education plan that includes short and long-term goals, high school
program of study, and postsecondary/work goals.
26.0 Describe how extracurricular programs can be incorporated in career and education planning.
27.0 Demonstrate knowledge of high school exit options (e.g., standard diploma, certificate of
completion, special diploma, GED, etc.) and impact on post-school opportunities.
28.0 Describe high school credits and explain how GPAs are calculated.
Job Search
29.0 Demonstrate skills to complete a job application.
30.0 Demonstrate skills essential for a job interview.
Middle School Grading System
The teacher shall be the authority in assigning each student a grade.
Evaluation of achievement will indicate progress toward the mastery of Sunshine
State/Common Core Standards. The grades reflecting achievement in academic courses in grades
6-8 with numerical equivalents shall be:
A 90-100%
4.0 GPA
B 80-89%
3.0 GPA
C 70-79%
2.0 GPA
D 60-69%
1.0 GPA
F 0-59%
0.0 GPA
I 0% 0.0
GPA
N
Outstanding Progress
Above average progress
Average progress
Lowest acceptable progress
Failure
Incomplete
No Grade
The student’s final grade in a course will be determined by quarterly academic grades and other
relevant performance criteria (e.g., exams, projects and other demonstrations of mastery of the
Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards). Teachers have the responsibility to
determine final grades using quarter grades and other evaluations as appropriate. (The final grade
does not always reflect a simple average of quarter grades).
Student Work Habits and Effort will be indicated by the following codes:
E = Excellent
G = Good
S = Satisfactory
N = Needs Improvement
U = Unsatisfactory
=
Not evaluated
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EXPECTED PERFORMANCE LEVELS
Students in Florida and Lee County schools are expected to meet state and local performance
standards as follows:
Grade Level
6
Reading
Comprehension
Writing
Assessment
> Level 3 FCAT
>4.0
Classroom/School
Mathematics
Science
> Level 3 FCAT
Assessment
7
> Level 3 FCAT
>4.0
Classroom/School
> Level 3 FCAT
Assessment
8
> Level 3 FCAT
>4.0 FCAT
Writing
> Level 3 FCAT
> Level 3
FCAT
Students with disabilities are required to meet the same standards as non-disabled students unless
they are taking access point classes and participating in Alternative Assessment instead of
PARCC/FCAT 2.0.
B: Describe the research base and foundation materials that were used or will be used to
develop the curriculum.
The Gulf Coast Charter Academy will follow the district’s plan for the research based materials,
tools and books that will be used in the classroom as the foundation for each subject, moreover,
will utilize the training available to how best use the selected texts. Curriculum, however, is more
for GCCA, than simply the tools and books that will be used in the classroom. “John Kerr and
taken up by Vic Kelly in his standard work on the subject. Kerr defines curriculum as, 'All the
learning which is planned and guided by the school, whether it is carried on in groups or
individually, inside or outside the school.” (Quoted in Kelly 1983: 10; see also, Kelly 1999).
Moreover, GCCA sees its curriculum as being consistent with its school mission, and as a vehicle
that provides a clear and concise framework for teaching and learning. The curriculum is
researched based, follows the Constructivist philosophy, utilizes an instructional approach which is
based on a variety of teaching techniques and programs, is appropriate for all students at all levels,
and when presented, based upon the tenets of an effective school, will enable its students to attain
Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards and receive a year’s worth of learning.
Effective schools, as defined by Lawrence W. Lazotte and first identified by Ron Edmonds in
1982, are successful in educating all students regardless of their socioeconomic status or
family background. The Gulf Coast Charter Academy as an effective schoo l will exhibit these
characteristics:
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Strong Instructional Leadership - The school leader acts as an instructional leader and
effectively communicates the mission of the school to all stakeholders. He/she also
understands the characteristics of instructional effectiveness.
Clear and Focused Mission - A mission has been clearly articulated, and the staff will share
an understanding of and a commitment to the instructional goals, priorities, assessment
procedures and accountability. The staff accepts responsibility for students' learning and
curricular goals of the school.
Climate of High Expectations of Success - There will be a climate at the school in which staff
believes that all students can attain mastery of the essential school skills, and the staff believes
they have the capability to help all students.
Safe & Orderly Environment - There is an orderly, purposeful, businesslike atmosphere,
which is free from the threat of physical harm. The school climate is conducive to learning.
Frequent Monitoring of Student Progress - Student academic progress is measured frequently,
and a variety of assessments are used.
An Opportunity to Learn and Student Time on Task - Teachers allocate a significant amount
of classroom time to instruction in the essential skills.
Positive Home School Relations - Parents understand and support the school's basic mission
and are given the opportunity to play an important role in helping achieve this mission.
In addition, GCCA, by following the District’s Plan, is enhancing its students’ efforts in
mastering the State’s standards of education, because of the fact that the District’s curriculum
is based on the Next Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards. Moreover,
provides a supplemental curriculum based on the broader definition of curriculum, as
described in the first paragraph by incorporating the (although, not inclusive) following
educational philosophies, theories, teaching techniques, and school wide procedures.
In order to build a solid foundation that supports the broader definition of curriculum as
presented above, the following programs, and procedures have been adopted and will be
utilized, in addition to the regular traditional school program and procedures, resulting in
each GCCA student having more success in mastering the curriculum.
Constructivism: based on observation and scientific study -- about how people learn. “It says that
people construct their own understanding and knowledge of the world, through experiencing things
and reflecting on those experiences. When we encounter something new, we have to reconcile it
with our previous ideas and experience, maybe changing what we believe, or maybe discarding the
new information as irrelevant. In any case, we are active creators of our own knowledge. To do
this, we must ask questions, explore, and assess what we know” (Brook, 2005).
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This spiraled up curriculum, based on the Modern Socratic Method, utilizes ongoing reflections by
the student and their experiences, realizing that their ideas are becoming more complex.
Moreover, it becomes more and more apparent that they are integrating new information from said
experiences.
One of the teacher's main roles is to encourage this learning and reflection process, by becoming
more of a facilitator, engaging students with higher and higher level probing questions based on
Bloom’s Taxonomy. “Contrary to criticisms by some (conservative/traditional) educators,
constructivism does not dismiss the active role of the teacher or the value of expert knowledge.
Brook (2005) stated:
Constructivism modifies that role, so that teachers help students to construct knowledge rather than
to reproduce a series of facts. The constructivist teacher provides tools such as problem-solving
and inquiry-based learning activities with which students formulate and test their ideas, draw
conclusions and inferences, and pool and convey their knowledge in a collaborative learning
environment. Constructivism transforms the student from a passive recipient of information to an
active participant in the learning process. Always guided by the teacher, students construct their
knowledge actively rather than just mechanically ingesting knowledge from the teacher or the
textbook.
A plethora of teaching methods can and have grown out of this theory. Although Brian G. Rude
feels that constructivism can be too general in its approach at times, he stated, “that constructivism
leads to many teaching practices that have been used for many years, because they are effective”
(2004).
STEM and ELL
The following is from a Jamal Abedi study and report entitled Performance Assessments for
English Language Learners, published by the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education.
In this we find support for choosing a focus for STEM education to engage and encourage learning
in all students, but especially among Ell and ESE students.
This report describes how performance assessments can help the ELL student population
demonstrate what they know and are able to do. Unfortunately, research literature on performance
assessments for English language learners is thin, but it offers evidence on the effectiveness and
usefulness of performance assessments for these students.
One goal of a performance assessment is to judge the level of competency students achieve in
doing reading/language arts, science, and mathematics (Parker, Louie, & O’Dwyer, 2009).
Therefore, performance assessments can also produce useful information for diagnostic purposes to
assess what students know, and they can help teachers decide where to begin instruction or
determine which groups of students need special attention. These assessment strategies can also be
used to monitor students’ processing skills and problem-solving approaches, as well as their
competence in particular areas while simulating learning activities. These characteristics can be
extremely beneficial for special needs student populations, including ELLs, since these students
may not have received equal education opportunities because of their linguistic needs (Abedi &
Herman, 2010). These students often exhibit greater interest and a higher level of learning when
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they are required to organize facts around major concepts and actively construct their own
understanding of the concepts in a rich variety of contexts.
These same goals attached to performance assessments and the emphasis on “in doing…” help to
illustrate the importance of doing authentic work with a constructivist approach and STEM
education.
The question on most educators, as well as others, is this: Just what constitutes STEM education?
According to Diana Laboy-Rush, STEM Solutions Manager at Learning.com, in her paper entitled,
Integrated STEM Education Through Project-Based Learning, “everyone naturally engages in
problem solving. We all use the tools and materials available to us to adapt the environment to
meet our needs. The ability to solve problems comes naturally to most. The project approach to
STEM, or “learning by doing,” is grounded in constructivist theory (Fortus, Krajcikb, Dershimerb,
Marx, & Mamlok-Naamand, 2005) that is shown to improve student achievement in higher level
cognitive tasks, such as scientific processes and mathematic problem solving (Satchwell & Loepp,
2002).”
Her study reports that effective STEM programs have a 5-step process involved:
Reflection
The purpose of the first stage is to ground the student in the problem’s context and to provide
inspiration for things the student can immediately begin to investigate (Fortus, Krajcikb,
Dershimerb, Marx, & Mamlok-Naamand, 2005). This phase is also intended to connect what is
known and what needs to be learned (Diaz & King, 2007).
Research
The second stage can take the form of student research, teacher-led lessons in science, selected
readings, or other methods to gather relevant information and sources (Fortus, Krajcikb,
Dershimerb, Marx, & Mamlok-Naamand, 2005). Much learning happens during this stage, in
which students’ progress from concrete to abstract understanding of the problem (Diaz & King,
2007). During the research phase teachers often lead discussions to determine whether students are
developing appropriate conceptual understanding of the project and its relevant concepts
(Satchwell & Loepp, 2002).
Discovery
The discovery stage generally involves bridging the research and information that is known with
the project’s requirements. This step is when students begin to take ownership of the learning
process and determine what is still unknown (Satchwell & Loepp, 2002). Some models of STEM
projects break students into small working groups to present possible solutions to the problem, to
collaborate with fellow students, and to build on the strengths of their peers (Fortus, Krajcikb,
Dershimerb, Marx, & Mamlok-Naamand, 2005). Other models use this step to develop the
students’ ability to reflect on the “habits of mind” that the process is designed to build (Diaz &
King, 2007).
Application
In the application stage the goal is to model a solution that sufficiently solves the problem. In some
cases, students test the model against requirements, the results of which direct the students to
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repeat a previous step (Diaz & King, 2007). In other models, this stage extends the learning to
contexts beyond STEM or to enable connections between the STEM disciplines (Satchwell &
Loepp, 2002)
Communication
The final stage in any project is presenting the model and solution to peers and community. This is
a critical step in the learning process because of the desire to develop both communication and
collaboration skills and the ability to accept and implement constructive feedback (Diaz & King,
2007). Often, reviewers score authentic (rubric) assessments based on completion of this final step
(Satchwell & Loepp, 2002).
While most agree on many components the hardest part of STEM education is in the definition
individual schools, and how they translate that definition into the actual school curriculum. Not
only must schools decide to “become” STEM, they must have the backing of the administration,
but also the teachers themselves.
To become STEM we must obtain the needed components that speak to the Technology part of
“STEM”. Students must be presented with computers and necessary software, as well as hardware
in the form of probes and other tools to enhance their ability to construct reasonable solutions.
We do recognize that several challenges to successfully implementing integrated STEM education
programs while seemingly daunting can be overcome with specific attention to the program’s
design. There are, of course, the obvious challenges, including additional preparation time for
teachers, the need for additional materials and resources, and the inventory storage, which, on the
surface, may seem insurmountable. With a supportive administration and collaborative team
approach, these challenges are manageable.
For a new school to become a STEM initiative might be perhaps easier to accomplish on a
complete scale than for a rooted traditional school might find more resistance. Our largest obstacle
will be in budget and the purchasing of the needed inventory. While we would desire to be fully
STEM from the outset, we recognize that we will either need to solicit outside funds via gifts and
or grants, or set a reasonable goal to achieve a fully functional STEM program within five years.
Accountability: With input from the Department Heads and Advisory Teams, each teacher
will submit a list of designated New Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards that
should be mastered by each student during the course of the year in their classe s. As each
standard is mastered, by each child, the teachers will check off their attainment of that goal.
If there is a standard that a significant number of children have not mastered, the teacher will
teach said concept again.
The teacher will use New Generation Sunshine/Common Core State Standards’ checklists for
each course and level they teach, in order to record what mastery level the students have
achieved on said standards. The teacher must generate an evaluative tool that reflects and
monitors the actual learning gains of the students. Therefore, the teacher must create pre and
post annual tests as well as indicator tests for each 9-week period for all subject areas.
GCCA’s accountability will also require that the Department Head insures that e ach teacher
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is cognizant of the curriculum presented at each grade level within the department. This
facilitates appropriate scope and sequence continuity between levels. Moreover, promotes
more effective learning on the part of the student, when the teacher is aware of what the
student should have learned the previous year and what information they will need to master
in order to be successful in the subsequent year.
Accountability also relates to the supervision of students, in that, hall supervision between
classes and before and after school duties. GCCA students will be supervised 100% of the
time while on campus and when attending school functions/sporting events/field trips, etc.
off school grounds. Just a note: Before and after school duties is in fact, part of the teachers’
work day. We will establish rotating lists as to give as many breaks as possible to the faculty
and staff in this arena. Using parents for any type of supervisory role especially in the area
of safe and orderly school legislation, other than local field trips, is never considered.
Service Learning: is a method of teaching, learning and reflecting, frequently found in school
settings. More specifically, it integrates meaningful community service with instruction to enrich
the learning experience, teach, encourage lifelong habits, and strengthen communities for the
common good. The Community Service Act of 1990, defines service-learning as: "a method under
which students or participants learn and develop through active participation in thoughtfully
organized service that is conducted in and meets the needs of a community; is coordinated with an
elementary school, secondary school, institution of higher education, or community service
program, and with the community; and helps foster civic responsibility; and that is integrated into
and enhances the academic curriculum of the students, or the educational components of the
community service program in which the participants are enrolled; and provides structured time for
the students or participants to reflect on the service experience."
Alternatively, service learning has been defined as "a philosophy, pedagogy, and model for
community development that is used as an instructional strategy to meet learning goals and/or
content standards Service-learning can be distinguished in the following ways:
Curricular connections- Integrating learning into a service project is key to successful servicelearning. Academic ties should be clear and build upon existing disciplinary skills. Beyond being
actively engaged in the project itself, students have the opportunity to select, design, implement,
and evaluate their service activity, encouraging relevancy and sustained interest. In community
settings, this is alternatively called Reflection - Structured opportunities are created to think, talk,
and write about the service experience. The balance of reflection and action allows a student to be
constantly aware of the impact of their work.
Community partnerships - Partnerships with community agencies are used to identify genuine
needs, provide mentorship, and contribute assets towards completing a project. In a successful
partnership, both sides will give to and benefit from the project. In order for this partnership to be
successful, clear guides must be implemented as to how often a student engages in service to a
particular community agency.
Authentic community needs – Local community members or service recipients are involved in
determining the significance and depth of the service activities involved.
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Assessment - Well structured assessment instruments with constructive feedback through reflection
provide valuable information regarding the positive 'reciprocal learning' and serving outcomes for
sustainability and replication.
Differentiated Instruction: Is similar to other educational techniques, strategies, and
approaches, i.e. the concept, is not knew but the name is. This approach was very popular in
the 1970’s and in fact, this writer began his career, teaching in a school, with the name,
Individualized Learning School, in Miami, Florida (Anspaugh, 1974). Differentiated
instruction is teaching with student variance in mind. It means starting where the individual
students are, rather than adopting a standardized approach, where “one-size-fits-all” teaching. “A
fuller definition of differentiated instruction is that a teacher proactively plans varied approaches to
what students need to learn, how they will learn it, and/or how they can express what they have
learned in order to increase the likelihood that each student will learn as much as he or she can as
efficiently as possible” (Tomlinson, 2003, p. 151).
Team Teaching
Expert in Field: Station Teaching or Rotational Teaching
Team teaching boasts many pedagogical and intellectual advantages: it can help create a dynamic
and interactive learning environment, provide instructors with a useful way of modeling thinking
within or across disciplines, and also inspire new research ideas and intellectual partnerships
among faculty (Leavitt, 2006).
There are several ideologies and types relating to Team Teaching. Many of them are outstanding,
however, concurrently, can be very costly, simply because of the number of teachers that are
required in a single classroom. However, the cost factor variable can be ameliorated via the Team
Teaching “Rotational Model of Expert in Field,” or “Expert in Field Station Teaching.” It is not
only an outstanding approach to disseminating information, but it also cost effective. Two or more
groups are set-up in order for all students to work with each teacher and one or more independent
work area, for this collaborative approach. Students can travel to each group or teachers can rotate
to each group.
Professors Lanier Anderson (Philosophy) and Joshua Landy (French and Italian), who have teamtaught several courses together, summed up some of the lessons taken from their experience in an
Award-Winning Teachers on Teaching presentation during Winter Quarter 2005-2006.
In the following paragraphs their suggestions for team-teaching, presented as a mock Decalogue,
“Thou Shalt…,” are interspersed with results from recent research on team teaching (Leavitt,
2006).
Thou Shalt Plan Everything with Thy Neighbor:
The team of teachers will plan together which promotes a better understanding of each teacher’s
role, and the scope and sequence of the material in the curriculum. Moreover, each teacher will be
more in line with the procedures, including such areas as assignments, grading procedures, and
teaching strategies (Letterman and Dugan, 2004). Each teacher will at some point be the expert in
field and the other(s) as support staff, reinforcing the concepts that are or were being presented.
Team teaching requires different preparation than traditional, single-instructor courses, particularly
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concerning the organizational aspects of course management. Careful and extensive planning can
help instructors prevent disagreements down the line regarding assignments, grading procedures,
and teaching strategies (Letterman and Dugan, 2004; Wentworth and Davis, 2002). The educators
will realize that they are involved in a meaningful intellectual experience, when their planning
sessions become interdisciplinary conversations.
Thou Shalt Attend Thy Neighbor’ Classes
This allows and provides the greatest opportunity for the visiting teacher to incorporate the host’s
teacher’s approach into the visiting teacher’s own discipline, moreover, promotes the
interdisciplinary conversations on the part of all faculty members that make up this team. However,
when scheduling or budget constraints make this level of interaction unfeasible, there are different
formats that can give students and instructors the experience of a team-taught course. For instance,
in a rotational model, only one instructor is present at a time, but a series of instructors rotate
throughout the course, teaching only the course topics that fall within their specialty, while the
remaining teachers are in a support role reinforcing the concepts presented by the expert-in-field.
Ergo, Team Teaching, allows students to hear multiple perspectives on the same topic, which is
one of the core learning advantages of this approach to teaching.
Thou Shalt Refer to Thy Neighbor’ Ideas
The purpose of a team-taught course, from an educational standpoint, is to push students to achieve
higher levels of synthesis and integration in their study of new material. It is, therefore, vitally
important for instructors to model the process of integration by interweaving teaching
partners’ perspectives into each presentation. Often students are assigned projects that require them
to integrate the material individual instructors have presented. Consequently, students have
expressed a desire for teachers to demonstrate the same practice of integration in their own lectures
and presentations (Minnis and John-Steiner, 2005). Anderson and Landy integrate their different
disciplinary approaches by referring to each other in lectures and presentations. By showing
respect for each other’s ideas, even when they may disagree, they are able to keep students
interested and engaged in all aspects of the course material. Some teaching teams take a more
direct approach, and assign one instructor during each class meeting the task
Thou Shalt Model Debate with Thy Neighbor
The art of professional disagreement is a skill that students should be able to acquire by modeling
team teachers involved in said process, expert and collegial and always without hostility (Anderson
& Specht, 1998). Effective team teachers, will also promote the skill of how to participate in
interdisciplinary debate. “In addition, interdisciplinary debate encourages students to apply the
skills of integration and collaboration to other courses and assignments” Anderson & Specht,
1998).
Thou Shalt have something to say, even when thou are not in charge
If the team teachers are in the rotation mode, then only one teacher will be presenting as the expert,
however, those in support roles as the rotation develops should make sure they are cognizant of the
facts presented by the expert teacher and be prepared to discuss and create an atmosphere where
the students’ knowledge is increased and enhanced by the support teacher. If at least two teachers
are in the same classroom, one as the expert presenter the other teacher can support the expert in a
variety of ways.
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64
Among them are: “model learner,” in which the instructor asks questions and otherwise contributes
to discussion; “observer,” in which the instructor takes notes and gauges student response to the
presentation; “discussion leader,” in which the instructor facilitates or leads break-out groups; or
“devil’s advocate,” in which the instructor raises provocative or challenging questions in an effort
to stimulate class creativity” (Wentworth and Davis, 2002, p. 27).
Thou Shalt apply common grading standards
One of the benefits that team teaching offers students is an increase in the amount of feedback they
receive from instructors (Wadkins, Miller, and Wozniak, 2006). However, with the increase in
feedback from a team of teachers in lieu of one, students will be preoccupied with the concern that
the feedback will not be uniform or consistent. To ameliorate this concern, the team of teachers
must establish, an agreed upon by all members of the team, a rubric that will be followed
consistently by all team members, when evaluating the students in the class.
Thou Shalt attend all staff meetings
Review and reflection are critical to the success of this teaching approach. For team teaching to
remain effective in disseminating knowledge to its students, all member of the team, must set aside
a designated time, to plan together. Without this procedure, the common goal and purpose of the
class will most likely be lost. It is important to have regular class meetings, Landy urges, because
in a team-teaching environment, “you have everyone pulling in different directions, and you need
to keep coherence in the course” (Anderson & Specht, 1998).
Thou shalt ask open questions
Most students are accustomed to sitting in classes that center on a lecture and perhaps an activity
with definitive answers expected to the questions that are asked by the teacher. However, in team
teaching, open ended questions are the modus operandi. There is some resistance to this approach
as students have been indoctrinated to another style of teaching coupled with an expectation of
certain types of types of questions and responses. At the beginning of any team-taught class, it is
critical that at the onset of the class, that students are prepared to expect the unexpected. Although
many students enjoy the diversity of voices and viewpoints that emerge in the team-taught
classroom, others struggle to figure out the key points of a lesson when faculty chooses to present
many possible solutions to a problem (McDaniels and Colarulli, 1997). In some cases, faculty must
work hard to overcome students’ resistance to the non-lecture format; a good first step is to be
clear about the format of the course right from the start (Helms, Alvis, and Willis, 2005).
Thou Shalt let thy students speak
Most students have been raised in an educational system that promotes an environment that
suggests, that for every question, queried, there is one correct, or mostly correct response. This
alienates those students that may have alternative responses or responses that were discovered
based on a less than traditional way of determining said response, which could in fact, be an
acceptable response. Ergo, there is little action on the part of the student to be an active participant
in the learning process. Team teaching can have a highly positive impact on student learning
outcomes, largely due to the increased opportunity for student participation that team teaching
provides. The presence of more than one instructor involved in the teaching of a class, either by the
team-teaching approach with more than one teacher in the classroom, or more than one teacher
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65
involved in the teaching of the class, via a rotational model, results in the increased opportunity of
student-teacher interaction (Wadkins, Miller, and Wozniak, 2006). More importantly, a
collaborative teaching environment invites students to take a more active role in the learning
process. Because team teaching encourages a variety of perspectives on a topic, students are more
likely to feel they can make valuable contributions to class discussions (Anderson and Speck,
1998).
Thou Shalt be willing to be surprised
In the “Expert-In-Field,” Team Teaching Model, via Station Teaching or Rotational Teaching, the
faculty that make up this team, will rotate from being in the role of the expert, to faculty support
role, and/or expert learner role guiding the student learners, all within a collaborative classroom
where teachers and students join in a shared process of intellectual discovery (Wentworth and D
2002, p.23). Teachers at GCCA are not only encouraged to participate in team teaching, but must
also complete four official observation forms by visiting other classrooms throughout the year.
Team teaching, coupled with a minimum of four official observations per year, will enhance the
teacher’s ability to “get out of their own conceptual boxes,” and learn new approaches that will
enhance their teaching skills (Corcos, Durchslag, and Morriss, 1995, p. 235).
Team teaching gives teachers the opportunity, “to teach in a different way, and to learn in a
different way.” It allows instructors to hone their pedagogical skills and develop new topics for
research and scholarship. The benefits of team teaching extend to students as well, improving
learning outcomes by offering increased student-teacher interaction, as well as a multidimensional approach to subject matter. Ultimately, the advantages of team teaching far outweigh
the time and energy it requires (Leavitt, 2006).
Interdisciplinary Thematic Teaming
Teams are groups of people working together, with a shared purpose or common goal, pooling
their skills, talents, and knowledge with a payoff for everyone on the team. Moreover, drawing
creativity from diversity! Mature teams operate at times from an almost “mind melt” approach that
defies language. Interdisciplinary Thematic Teaming consist of teams of teachers across the
disciplinary divide, joining together with common themes and groups of students. As such, a
teacher when teaching his/her content and concepts use other disciplines content and concepts to
reinforce all content and concepts.
All units/lessons should contain some element that ties their area to other areas. In “real life” no
discipline stands alone. In the interdisciplinary thematic team, we see a mirror of real life
situations, not contrived lessons set up to just give a nod to other subject areas. Team decisionmaking is a critical component of the process so that all teachers work in concert. In the process
each teacher becomes familiar with the curriculum of all teachers on their team.
Teaming is valuable because:
 We can achieve more as a group than alone.
 It provides school insight…the unique opportunity for shared discovery.
 It promotes a true understanding of the total curriculum and the necessary and
possible interdisciplinary connections.
 Teachers get to know students well; and students get to know teachers well.
 It promotes significant curriculum development.
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66



Team members can gain a depth of knowledge of other curriculum and can
reinforce other tam members’ content standards.
It promotes consistent classroom management techniques and instructional
procedures. Adolescents appreciate and need this structure and consistency.
Teaming allows students to see the utilization of consistent procedures for work
and work routines: tardiness, homework, late work, and so forth.
Teaming is Valuable because:
 It empowers teachers.
Research shows that teachers who are empowered with more input are more invested in the total
process, and the results are multi-faceted.
Research Shows Effective Teams:
 Have a student-centered focus.
 Strong commitment to academic achievement.
 Realize the importance of Accountability features.
 Consist of experts who recognize that the acquisition of professional knowledge
is a lifelong process.
 Are confident, express job satisfaction, and are proud of their schools.
 Develop ways to access student performance, and share among the team what is
happening in that area.
 Establish the use of common rubrics.
 Have a proactive approach and not reactive.
 Have regular communication with parents.
 Document all team meetings, all parent conferences, and establish a phone call
log.
 Help students set goals.
 Have uniform guidelines and rules.
 Constantly nurture the relationship among members.
 Have a strong sense of team community.
 Are curriculum risk-takers who are given the autonomy to accomplish their
goals.
 Have teachers who work professionally and collaboratively.
 Are in harmony with the administrative leadership.
“Holistic Approach to the Total Child”:
The GCCA curriculum is based on the Lee County Plan. Faculty members of GCCA are
encouraged; to present their ideas, and enhance the curriculum at it applies to GCCA. The
“Holistic Approach to the Total Child,” (Anspaugh, 1984), an educational philosophy, marries well
with said curriculum. This educational/psychological philosophy is based upon the Developmental
Domain Paradigm. The Developmental Domain Paradigm creates an approach fostering an
educational vehicle that carries all students to their optimum level of development in the cognitive,
affective, and psychomotor domains. This philosophy incorporates the various intelligence areas,
and neural pathways of learning along with the tenets of the Developmental Domain Paradigm.
Thus, all students will hopefully reach their optimum level of development in the cognitive,
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67
affective, and psychomotor domains. At GCCA, we are aware that students have varying learning
styles, diverse ways of learning, comprehending, and knowing. Our teachers work tirelessly in
diagnosing these styles and endeavor to shape instruction to meet individual needs (Differentiated
instruction). It is evident that they look at all developmental domains when processing their
diagnostic/prescriptive approach to facilitating each student.
“Holistic Approach”
Environmental
Variables
Cognitive
Affective
Heredity
Variables
Most
meaningful
learning
Psychomotor
Cognitive Domain (thinking) – Students have different ways of perceiving, organizing, and
retaining information via varying neural pathways. Some students learn more effectively via visual
retention, others through aural methods, and still others via a kinesthetic approach. Moreover, there
is a plethora of combinations. Some of our students focus attention narrowly and with great
intensity while others pay attention to many things at once. There are those that respond quickly to
questions and others who take longer to process their answers. Ergo, our teachers must use varying
tools in an effort to facilitate each child in reaching his/her optimum level of learning.
The Affective Domain (emotions and attitudes) – Our students bring different levels of motivation
to learning, and the intensity level of this motivation is a critical determinant of said learning style.
Other aspects of the affective domain include curiosity, the ability to tolerate and overcome
frustration, and the willingness to take risks. A fascinating aspect of the affective domain that our
teachers are aware of is a concept termed “locus of control.” A teacher’s knowledge of internal
versus external locus of control on the part of the student is critical when endeavoring to develop a
plan reaching the needs of each student.
Psychomotor (physiology) - Clearly a student who is hungry and tired will not learn as effectively
as a well-nourished and rested child. GCCA offers the District’s “free” and “reduced” lunch and
breakfast program in an effort that no child comes as described above. Certainly, heredity and
environmental factors are contributors to how the child learns, as well as, a child’s life situation at
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68
home. Our teachers include the psychomotor domain in learning by utilizing manipulative
educational devices, and/or hands on activities which promotes a higher level of retention of
concepts.
Moreover, our PE program and the interscholastic sports program ensures that serious attention is
given to the domain realizing it is a critical component to the overall good of our students.
Coupled with the above philosophy, student achievement will be enhanced by incorporating an
interdisciplinary curriculum, utilizing the Developmental Domain Paradigm, and while embracing
the District’s curriculum of core subjects, fosters in their students, a global awareness, an
acquisition of world languages, communicative technology, with the end result being an educated
and culturally literate individual. Research confirms this approach as being successful.
According to Dr. Labofsky and others, regarding the 3 R's of the Brain: If new experiences are
RECEIVED via many neural paths, they will be RETAINED in many locations, and can thus be
RETRIEVED from many neural networks in the brain, if linked to prior experiences. This research
again supports the idea of using the Developmental Domain Paradigm and Interdisciplinary
instruction. Knowledge is NOT stored in specific brain locations; rather, it is stored in MANY
locations AND joined in MANY circuits or networks of neurons.
Thus, the MORE modalities we
use to store knowledge or experiences, the MORE pathways we have available to access it later.
Ergo, retention of information in the Cognitive, Affective and Psychomotor Domains via an
interdisciplinary curriculum fosters more meaningful learning.
Arts-Based Curriculum
As a result of their varied inquiries, the Champions of Change researchers found that learners can
attain higher levels of achievement through their engagement with the arts. Moreover, one of the
critical research findings is that the learning in and through the arts can help “level the playing
field” for youngsters from disadvantaged circumstances.
James Catterall’s analysis of the Department of Education’s NELS: 88 database of 25,000 students
demonstrates that students with high levels of arts participation outperform “arts-poor” students by
virtually every measure. Since arts participation is highly correlated with socioeconomic status,
which is the most significant predictor of academic performance, this comes as little surprise. The
size and diversity of the NELS database, however, permitted Catterall to find statistical
significance in comparisons of high and low arts participants in the lowest socioeconomic
segments. This closer look showed that high arts participation makes a more significant difference
to students from low-income backgrounds than for high-income students. Catterall also found clear
evidence that sustained involvement in particular art forms—music and theater—are highly
correlated with success in mathematics and reading.
These findings are enriched by comparisons of student achievement in 14 high-poverty schools in
which the Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE) has developed innovative artsintegrated curricula. The inspiring turnaround of this large and deeply troubled school district is
one of the important education stories of this decade. Schools across Chicago, including all those
in this study, have been improving student performance. But, when compared to arts-poor schools
in the same neighborhoods, the CAPE schools advanced even more quickly and now boast a
significant gap in achievement along many dimensions. (Champions of Change, 1999)
69
69
C: Describe the school's reading curriculum. Provide evidence that reading is a primary
focus of the school and that there is a curriculum and set of strategies for students who are
reading at grade level or higher and a separate curriculum and strategy for students reading
below grade level.
GCCA will be following the Lee County Reading Curriculum Plan at all levels. As per the county
plan:
Teachers will informally and formally assess student progress and adjust instruction and intensity
of intervention based on the data collected. Said data will be kept on data spreadsheets created at
the school level.
For programmatic interventions, this would include fidelity to both the time and class size
recommendations that the publisher used in developing their evidence-base for the program. Given
that there is no such thing as a “one size fits all” program, teacher judgment through analysis of
formal and informal assessment should guide instructional adjustments to the program when it is
determined that the desired effect may not be occurring for individual students.
Samples:
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70
TH( SCHOOl DISTbCT Of La COUNTY
Literacy Qua rterly Conte nt Guide 20 13-201 4
Langu age Arts - Kinderga rten ( 50 1004 1)
Adopted Instructional Materials:
P~inc
Ll ll(Uilr:e Arts
Pea rson Read ing St reet Florida Common Core Edition, 2013/1 SI. Edition
Scie nce
ScK:i..J15t udiu
P;Kinr:
h n r:;uiil r:e Arts
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IIoot 4. Wc du 1-6
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bport: lloob ::
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8.ir;i5ooks
e
Q 1-1
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d . y.
IIook 1. Wccb 1-6
florid. bplore on V_
Sm. rtc..n ter
M. ps & Globe<
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24-16
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55.I: .C.U
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f loowe r G>rde,,;
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florid . IIccomu >J'I
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£opert IIoob
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Q3-2
12-11
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Physic . 1Sc:H,nce :
CI"'pte< 6 le......... I -I
ss.U:..1..l
55.I: .c.2_t
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h n r:;uill:e Arts
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m
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71
71
TH( SCHOOl DISTbCT Of La COUNTY
Li te r acy Qua rte rly Content Guide 20 13-201 4
Quarter: I -I
Language Arts - Kindergarten (50 1004 1)
Pacing Range: 24-36 days
Adopted Instructional Materials· Pea rson Read ing Street Florida Common Core Edition 2013/ 1 SI. Edition
Desa-iption of t his Concept: All Together NOIII- In this concept, students will learn about how we (students, families and communities) INe, work and
ploy together. Through the Science concepts physi cal science, earth science, pushes and pulls, vibration and sound, and objects in the night sky, and the
Social Studies concepts of eamomics, history, government, working together, belonging to a group, rules at schoo l, culture, citizenship, and
responsibility, the benchmarks and skills wi thin the fng fish (anguage arts common core state standards will be modeled and i nstructed by the teacher.
While working pieces offiction and non-ficti on that focus on building content knowledge, students will practice and apply the cess EtA benchmarks and
skills.
The Reading Street instructional materials are the primary English Language Arts materials. The Notional Geographic instructional materials are the
primary NGSSS Science materi als_ The Smart Centers instructional materials ore the primary NGSSS Social Studies materials. Any of these districtadopted materials may be used when developing lesson plans to teoch the content knowledge ond reading skills. The Reading Foundational Learning
Goofs w ill be best addressed wi th the use of the Reading Street instructional materials. The Reading Infol Ut, Writing, Speaking & Listening, Writing,
Social Studies and Science Learning Gools may be addressed through any of the district-adopted malerials, wi th the goal being srudenrs build content
knowledge ond demonstrate prOficiency in the reading skills to ensure success as they progress towards the end-of-yeorexpectations offhe EtA cess.
Standa rds
English Language Arts Standards
cess
Reilldim! Street FOW5 on
tACC.K.RF.l Demonstrillte [email protected]@ orCilinizilition iIInd billsic [email protected] @s
of print.
tACC.K.RF.h Follow words f rom left to ~t, top to bottom, iIInd pillce by pillge
tACC.K.RF.1d RKocniz@ iIInd nillm @illil upper· iIInd [email protected]@ [email protected]@rsofthe
iIIlpllilibet.
tAcc.K.RF.2 Demonstr.llte [email protected] wor ds, syllill [email protected], illndsounds
(phonemes).
tACC.K.RF.2i11 RecOCnile iIInd produce rhyming w ords
tAcc.K.RF.2b Count , pronounce, blend, iIInd [email protected] ent [email protected] inspoken wor ds.
tACC.K.RF.2c [email protected] @nt o [email protected] ndrWnHof sincle-syl [email protected]
words.
tACC.K.RF.2d [email protected]@ initiilll, [email protected] vowe l, andfinilii sounds
(ph onem es) in t hree-phoneme (COnSOnillnt -VOWeI-cOruOnillnt, or eve) worels.'
(This does not incl ud@ [email protected],with /ll, / r/ , or / x/.J
tAeC.K.RF.2e Add or substitut@ indNiduilil sounds ([email protected])in simpl@, one-
Science Standards
NGSSS S<;H!~ in Nill t lonilll Geornphi(:
SC.K.P .10.1 Observe that things tBat make sound vibrate.
NGSSS S<;H!~ fro m u!!I;uiII£e Arb Course Code i n [email protected]£Street
Leveled R~odetJ
SC.K.N.1.4 Observe iIInd creillte ill visuilil r epr esentilltion of iIIn obj ect w hich
[email protected] its m illjor [email protected] r es.
Sleuth Inllesrigarioru
SC.K.N.l .3 Keep record s illS iIIppropriillte-such illS pictoriilll records-of investigillt ions
conduo @cI.
SC.K.l.14 .2 RKDcni ze thillt [email protected]
plillntl wi th [email protected] illnd behillviors [email protected] have in r @iIIl life.
SC.K.N.l.l Coh bor.lte wi th ill [email protected] tocollect n fonnilltion .
Making More Connections
SC.K.P.12.1 rnvesticilte thillt th incs move in different WiIIVS, such illS fast, slow , ett.
SC.K.P.9 .1 RKD£nize thillt t [email protected]@riillls suchillSpiliper ilinddillyun bE!
72
72
TH( SCHOOL DISTbCT Of La COUNTY
Li te r acy Qua rterly Conte nt Guide 20 13-201 4
Language Arts - Grade Three (50 10044)
Adopted Instructio nal Materials :
P~iOC
Qt-!
10-1.
""
QI-2
150-21
.."
Ql-3
15-21
u oc u Oice Aru
Il0011 I, wee:lt 1
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Il0011 I, w ee:lt 5
.."
P~iOC
uocu Oice Aru
""
Q2-2
15-21
""
Q2-3
10-14
""
Sde~
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ProtlW skills
Il0011 2, w ee:lt 1
Il0011 2, w ee:lt 2
Il0011 2, wee:lt i
Q2-t
10-14
Pea rson Reading Street Florida Common Core Edition, 2013/1 SI. Edition
Il0011 2, Wee:lt4
Il0011 2, Wee:lt So
life s.c ience·
<:tu pler I l1!'uons
1-S
.
life SCience:
<:tu pter 1 Le uons
~
life SCience:
<:tu pler 2 l1!'uons
'-ll
<:tu pter .5 Leuons
1-2
5o<;iOl I St ud ies
PKinc
EConomics:
u nit 3 LeSson 1
Unit 3 LeSson 2
EConomics:
u nit 3 LeSson i
MCG~W-HiD
Citiansllip BOOk
LOincu Oice Arts
Sc:ienu
SociOll Studies
10-14
BoOk c. wee k 1
BoOk c. wee k 2
Eilrtll sc:ielKe:
cNpt er 5 LeSsons
GeGp"il phy:
Unitl LeSson 1
Unit 1 LeUOll 2
Q3-2
15-21
dOlys
Book 4, w ee.k .5
Book 4, Wee.lt 4
BoOk C. Wee.lt 5
physicill SdelKe:
CNpter 6 LeSsons
Q3-3
15·21
dOlys
800k 5, Wee.lt 1
800k 5, Wee.lt 2
Book 5, Wee.lt 3
Physicill SdelKe:
CN pler 7 LeSsons
..,
CtlebumC CUfture :
u nit 2 LeS son !
u nit 2 LeS son 2
Sc:ienu
SociOll St udies
Ql-1
d,,,
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LOin c uOice Arts
life SCience:
<:tu pter 3 l1!'ssons
Government &;
Q4-1
10-14
dOlYs
Book 5, Wee.lt 4
Book 5, Week 5
Q4-2
2!>-35
dOlys
Book 6,
Book 6,
IIoOk 6,
IIoOk 6,
IIoOk 6
....
CiYics
Unit . LeSson 1
Government"
Il0011 3, wee:lt 1
Il0011 3, w ee:lt 2
Il0011 3, w ee:lt i
Il0011 3, Wee:lt 4
Il0011 3, w ee:lt So
(OInll SCience:
cN pter 4 Leuons
1-4
(OInll SCience:
Cbi pter 4l1!'ssons
H
CiYics
u nit . LeSson 2
u nit . LeSson i
u nit . LeSson 4
f lCC:
Purpose of
GOVfl"nmenl
Week 1
Week 2
Wee.lt 3
weelt 4
weelt 5
....
...
physicill SdelKe:
Chi pter , LeSsons
....
GeGp"OI phy:
u nit 1 lesson .5
u nit 1 Lesson.
Unit 1 Lesson '5
celebrOim C cufture :
Unit 2 lesson.3
Unit 2 lesson 4
Unit 2 lesson 5
Physicill SdelKe:
CN pler 9 LeSsons
>-1.
UpcIoua: NIr H . 1Dll
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TH( SCHOOl DISTbCT Of La COUNTY
El e me ntary Literacy Acade mi c Pla n 2013 -2014
Quarter: 1-1
Language Arts - Gra de Three (5010044)
Adopted Inn ructianal Materials:
Pacing Range: 10-14 days
Pearson Reading Street f lorida Common Core Edition, 2013/ 1>t Edit ion
Description of this Concept: l earning From Neo.v Experiences - In th is concept, students will learn about how new experiences shape who we are.
Through the Science concepts 0/ ini tiative, discovery, the nature of science, and plan ts living and growing, and t he Social Studies concepts 0/ economics
and ban ering, buyers and sellers, and scarcity and trade, the benchmarks and skills wi thin the English language arts common core state standards will
bI! modeled and instructed by the teacher. While working pieces 0/ /icti on and non-fiction thar focus on building content knowledge, students will
proctice and apply t he
ELA benchmarks and skills.
cess
The Reading Stree t instructional mat erials are the primary English Language Arts materials. The National Geographic instructi onal materials are the
primary NGSSS Science marerials. McGraw-Hili instructi onal maten'als are the primary NGSSS Social Studies materials. Any 0/ these d;srrict-adop red
materials may be used when developing Jesson plans to reach the content knowledge and reading skills. The Reading Foundational Learning Goals will
bI! besr addressed with the use 0/ the Reading Stree t instructional maren-als. The remaining Learning Goals m ay be addressed through any of the
districr-adopted marerials, with the goal being students build content knowledge Of the NGSSS content area standards and demonstrate proficiency in
the reading sk.ills defined by the
ELA standards.
cess
St andards
English language Arts Standards
Read in!! Street Focus o n cess
lACC.3.RF.3.3 Know and appty ,rade·level phonics and word analysis skills in
decodin, words.
lACC.3.Rf 3c Decode mu lti5yll able words..
lACC.3.RF.4 Re ad with sufficient ..ccur..cy iIInd fluency to support
comprehe nsion.
lACC.3.Rf.4b Re ad ,rade-Ie vel p,-ose and poetry orally with "cClJracy,
a ppro pri illt e rate, and e)(JI ression o n success ..... e read ings.
lAct.3.RF .4I: U5e context to confirm or 5elf-correct word reco,nition and
understilndinc, reread ing ..s necessary.
lAct.3.RL l Ask ilnd answer questions to demonst rat e understilndinl!: of .. telCt,
referrinc ellplicit ly to t he t elCt as t he bnis for the .. nswers.
lACC.3.RLZ Recou nt stories, includ in, fables, folka les, and myths from dwerse
culttlfll!s; de termine the central messa,e, lesson, or mora l ilnd explain how it is
conveyed t hrough key dea ils in t he tert.
Scie nce Standa rds
NGSSS 56e nu in Nilt iona l Geo , raphK;
SC.3.L.14.2 Investigate and desc ribe how plants respond t o stimu li (heat , light,
,ravity), such as the way pl.. nt stems , row tow .. rd Ii, ht and t heir roots ,row
downward in response to ,ravity.
SC.3.N.l .3 Keep reco rds .. s appropriiilte, such ..s pOoriiill, written, or sim ple
charts .. nd ,raphs, of in ... esti, ations conducted.
SC.3.l.14.1 1M ) Describe structures in pl.. nts and their roles in food prod uctio n,
support, w .. ter an d nutrient transport, and reproduction.
Sc..3.L1 7.2 Reco!! nize thilt pla nts use e ne rrv from the run, .. ir, ilnd wat er to
ma ke the ir own food.
NGSSS 56enU!' fro m L.. n; u!Ee Arts Course Code in Re ad in; Street
Reoden
Sc..3.N.1.1 Raise questtons .. bout the natura l world, investi,atl!! them indMdua l1y
and in t e .. ms t hfou,h free exploration .. nd ~em .. tic: investigations, and
L~led
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TH( SCHOOL DISTbCT Of La COUNTY
Liter acy Qua rterly Conte nt Guide 20 13-201 4
Langu age Arts - Gra de Five (SO I0046)
Adopted Instructional Materials:
Pxinr:
a..ncUilr:~ArU
Q1-l
10-14
8(0);
"'"
Ql-2
15-2.1
""
Ql-)
15-2.1
""
Pxinr:
Q2-1
10-14
..
Q2-2
10-14
""
Q2-3
5-7 d;ays
Q'~
10- 14
""
8(0);
I, week 1
I, week 2
80011 I, week }
80011 I, week 4
80011 I, week 5
80011 2, week 1
80011 2, Week 2
80011 2, Week}
Pea rson Reading St reet Florida Common Core Edition, 2013/1 SI. Edition
scierK~
socQl StulHs
SCience M~mods &;
pfO(~Ss Skills
Geoc~p hy:
u nit 1 LeSson 1
lif~ scienc~·
Geor;~p hy:
Cflilpter 1
Unit 1 lesson 2
lif~
SCience:
Cflilpter 2
a..ncUil,eArU
SCience
8(0);
2. w eek 4
8(0); 2. w eek 5
(ilrth SCience:
chilpter 3
80011 3, Week 1
80011 3, Week 2
(ilrth SCience:
chilpter 4
NiitiYe Am erKins:
Unit 2 lesson 1
Unit 2 lesson 2
Unit 2 lesson }
PiKinll:
a..nCUilll:e Arts
SCience
QH
10-14
dilYs
Book 4, weelt 1
Book 4, weelt 2
physicil Sdence:
Chilpte r6
QH
15-21
dil'l's
Book 4, Weelt 3
Book 4, Weelt4
Book 4, Weelt 5
Physial Sdl':lKe·
Chilptl':r 7
QH
5-7 d ilYS
Book 5, Weelt 1
Physial Sdl':nce :
6egin CN pter'
QH
10-14
dil'l'S
Book 5, Weelt 2
BOOk 5, w ee k 3
Physial Sde nce :
COmple te Chilpte r II
a..nCUill:e Arts
SCience
SOOiII StulHs
NiitiYe AmerKi ns:
u nit 2 lesson 4
u nit 2 lesson 5
PiKinll:
Q4-1
10-14
d•
£lIpICWiltion:
Q4-2
15-21
d. "
Book 6, Weelt 1
Book 6, Weelt 2
Book 6, Weelt 3
Q4-3
10-14
di'l'S
Book 6, wee k 4
Book 6, wee k 5
BOOk 5, Weelt 4
Book 5, Weelt 5
sociillstudies
COIon5i1AmerKiI:
Unit 4 ll':sson 4
Unit 4 ll':sson '5
Unit 4 lesson 6
AmI':rioIn
Revolution:
Unit 5 ll':sson 1
Unit 51..1':sson 2
AmI':ra n
Revolution:
Unit 5 ll':sson J
Unit 5 ll':sson 4
foundinl: the
Nition:
u nit 6 wson 1
u nit 6 wson 2
sociill5tudies
Unit 6 lesson J
Unit 61..1':sson 4
Unit 6 lesson '5
w~w.d
8(0);
Unit ) lesson 1
Unit ) lesson 2
EXpIOf"ition:
3, w eek 3
u nit 3 lesson 3
EJtp;lnsion:
Unit 11..1':sson 1
Unit 1 lesson 2
u nit 1 wson 3
W~wird
EXp.lI nsion:
u nit 7 lesson 4
u nit 7 lesson 5
~niilI Americil:
800k 3, week 4
8(0); 3, week 5
(,11th science:
Cflilpter 5
u nit 4 lesson 1
Unit 4 lesson 2
Unit 4 lesson 3
UpcIou a: N Ir H . 1Dll
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TH( SCHOOl DISTbCT Of La COUNTY
El e me ntary Literacy Acade mi c Pla n 2013 -2014
Quarter: 1-1
Adopted Inn ructio nal Materials:
Langu age Arts - Grade Five (50 10046)
Pacing Range: 10-14 days
Pearson Reading Street Aorida Common Core Ed ition, 2013/1>t Edit ion
Description of this Concept: Challenges and Insp iration s - In this concept, students will learn about inspiratrons and challenges. Through th e Science
concepts of the weat her, at mosphere and the nature of science, and the Social Studies concepts of courage, heroism, and the wOIld in spatial tenns, the
benchmarks and skills with in rhe EtA
wiJ/ be modeled and instrucred by rhe reacher.
While reading text t har focuses on buildi ng content
knowledge, students will practice and opply th e
EtA benchmarks and skills.
cess
cess
The Reading Street instructionol materials are the primary Englis h Language Am: materials. The Narional Geographic instructional materials are the
primary NGSSS Science materials. Mc:Graw·HiIJ instructional materiols are rhe primary NGSSS Sodol Studies materials. Any of these distrier-adopted
morerials moy be used when developing lesson plans to teach t he content knowledge ond reoding skills. The Reading Foundarionol Learning Goals will
be best addressed with the use Of the Reading Screet instructional materials. The remoinin g Learnin g Goals may be addressed through ony Of the
disrricr-adopted materials, with the goal being students build content knowledge of the NGSSS content area standords and dem onstrate proficiency in
i ELA
,,.~,,,o~.nd po,"'" ~.I 'w'h "m.".
lACC. ' .Rf.4. R•• d
appropriiillte me, and elCpression on successive.
lACC.S.RL l Quote accurate ly from a te xt w hen e xplaining what th e t ext s a~
explicitly a nd when draw inG inferences from t he t ext.
lAtc.S.RL 2 Determine a t heme o f a story, drama , or poem from det.ils in the
text, includinc how characters in a story or drama respond to ch. ll enges or how
the spea ker in a poem reflects upon a topic; su mm ari"le the t ext.
lAtc.S.RI.1 Quo te accura t ely from a t ext whe n up laining what t he text says
e xplicitly and when draw inG inferences from t he t ext.
lAtc.S.RI.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a t ext and explain how tney
are supported by key deta ils; summarize t he t ext .
lACC.S.W.2 W rite inform ative/ explanatory texts t o e:umine a topk and co nvey
KIe.s and info rm ation cle arty.
lACC.S.W.3 W rite narTiltives to
I
experiences or events
"d ,
,
"'-'~lar"
,d.... ,.
,
;
SC5 .N.l . l (AA) Define a pro blem, use appropriate reference ma terials to support
scie ntifIC undemanding, plan and any out scientific invest igations of various
types such as: systematk o bserntions, e xperiments requiring the identificat ion
of variables, collecting and o rganizing data, interpreting d ata in charts, tab les,
and Cr.phics, ana lyze information , ma ke predict;ons, and defe nd conclusions
SC5.N .l. 2 Expla in t he difference between a n e xperime nt . nd other types of
scien tific inve stig.t ion.
SC5 .N.l . S Recognize and e xplain t hat a ut nentic scientif"1C investigat io n freq uent ly
does not paralle l the steps of "ttle scientifIC met hod."
NGSSS Seiena!' from Lan,u!£e Arts Course Code in Reilld in, Str eet
Leve~d R~aders
SC5 .E.73 (AA) Recognize how air t emperature, ba romet ric press ure , humidity,
;a~dic=;:I::: :~rd~:;~ and precipitilltion determ ine the weather in ill
UpcIoua: N'rH . 1Dll
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GCCA will conduct at the Elementary Level the same 90-minute reading block for scheduling all
elementary classes.
The diagnostic tree provided to schools is the guide for placement of students in a 57 or 103 minute
reading block at the middle and high school levels.
All reading classes will adhere to the class size amendment.
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Allocations for Intensive Reading classes were based on percentages of Level 1 and 2 students at
all levels. Class sizes are also being held at lower levels than required by the Class Size
Amendments. In some middle and high schools, classes are "paired" with other Language Arts
courses to extend the time beyond the 103 minutes.
All teachers, regardless of content area, are considered reading teachers in that they all include
reading in their areas, and do address specific benchmarks in reading. Data will be collected,
analyzed and reported on a regular basis. Classrooms will develop libraries with high interest
leveled books, both fiction and nonfiction. The core series provides leveled readers using the
phonic and comprehension skills introduced for the week.
Students can revisit and apply the skills learned by rereading already visited leveled readers.
Vocabulary presented for the core series’ selection is revisited in all of the leveled readers so
students who read on, above, or below grade level have access to similar application. The districtadopted social studies and science texts offer leveled readers building on the content. GCCA will
also purchase leveled reader packages that support the student's reading achievement level. Topics
are explored more deeply in content area leveled reading packages.
Comprehensive Core Reading Programs (CCRP): Comprehensive Core Reading Programs are
the instructional tools used to provide high quality instruction in K-5 classrooms. The CCRP
correlates to all Reading and Language Arts State Standards and includes instructional content
based on the six essential components of reading instruction: phonological awareness, phonics,
fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, and oral language. The CCRP contains instructional
design components including explicit instructional strategies, coordinated instructional sequences,
ample practice opportunities, aligned student materials, and assessment to guide instruction.
We will use the same Comprehensive Core Reading Program being implemented in Lee County.
The scope and sequence of the comprehensive core-reading program is implemented during the
literacy block and provides guidance to teachers in 1-5 classrooms for selecting and assessing
instructional targets. Cambium Learning Read Well K is implemented as the Kindergarten
Comprehensive Core and Intervention Reading Programs.
Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs (SIRP): Supplemental Intervention Reading
Programs are intended for flexible use as part of differentiated instruction or intensive
interventions to meet student learning needs in specific areas (phonological awareness, phonics,
fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). Supplemental materials with training currently available
to schools in Lee County will be followed by GCCA. Supplemental programs support and
enhance, but do not replace the CCRP.
Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs (CIRP): CIRPs are intended for students who
are reading one or more years below grade level, and who are struggling with a broad range of
reading skills. The instruction provided through these programs should accelerate growth in
reading with the goal of grade level proficiency. CIRPs include instructional content based on the
five essential components of reading instruction (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency,
vocabulary, and comprehension). CIRPs also provide more frequent assessments of student
progress and more systematic review in order to ensure proper pacing of instruction and mastery of
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all instructional components. Cambium Learning Read Well 1 and Read Well 2 are also used as
the CIRP in grades 1 and 2.
GCCA will be utilizing any technology that comes with the reading text and programs, as well as
FCAT Explorer at all levels.
Students reading at or above a Level 3 will be placed in Advanced Reading Classes, when numbers
are adequate. If adequate numbers do not allow for separate classes, teachers will address the
Advanced Students needs separately in the class at large. These students will be reading books at
or above their grade level and will do work at least one level higher than their grade level.
Educational technology is intended for additional support in reading. Educational technology
without a teacher-led instructional component should be listed and described here. Educational
technology must supplement and not supplant instruction by a highly qualified instructor.
Educational technology that has an instructional component should be listed and described under
either Supplemental Intervention Reading Programs or Comprehensive Intervention Reading
Programs, where applicable. Reading software is viewed as a supplement to quality instruction.
Below is a listing of Reading Strategies by Reading Level that will be utilized in addition to the
above listing.
Reading Strategies by Level
The information below was created as a common language for teachers and students in the
Wallingford Public Schools in kindergarten through eighth grade. The level of the chart selected
for use in the classroom should be based on the reading levels of the students. At the fluent level,
the strategies are linked to the language through the Language Arts Resource Teacher.
Early Emergent Readers
Teacher Strategies Student Strategies
Before Reading
Note: In kindergarten these strategies would be taught as part of shared reading Guide students to
identify title, author, and illustrator. Guide students to connect to prior knowledge by asking,
“What do you know about?” Encourage students to become strategic readers by asking, “What do
good readers do?” Elicit strategies at right. Set a purpose for reading.
During Reading
The student strategies to the right will need to be introduced, modeled, and practiced for mastery in
the context of reading one at a time. Our goals with early emergent focus on left-hand tracking,
using picture cues, and using initial sounds.
After Reading
Ask students to retell what happened in the story or what the text was about. Have the student
practice sequencing parts of the story in order to get the idea of beginning, middle, and end.
Check the pictures
Touch the print as I read
Get my mouth “ready”
© 2001 Wallingford Public Schools Approved by LA Management Team 6/01
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Reading Strategies by Level
Emergent/Beginning Readers
Teacher Strategies Student Strategies
Before Reading
 Cause students to become strategic readers by asking, “What do successful readers do
before they start to read?” Elicit strategies at the right.
 Guide students to identify title, author, illustrator
 Guide students to connect to prior knowledge by asking, “What do you know about?”
 Guide students to make a prediction by asking something like, “How do you think it will
end?”
 Set a purpose for reading
Before Reading
Take a picture walk
Think – what is this about? Make a prediction
During Reading
 Before starting to read, encourage students to become strategic readers by asking, “What
can you do to help yourself when you find a word you don’t know?”
 The student strategies to the right will need to be introduced, modeled, and practiced for
mastery in the context of reading one at a time. Our goal is to have student use a balanced
cueing system that includes the way words look (and sounds letters make), the syntax of the
sentence (does is sound right?), and the meaning of the text.
During Reading
Touch the print as I read
When I get stuck, I can
- look at the pictures
- say “blank” and read on
- go back and read it again
- get my mouth “ready”
- find chunks I know
- look for little words
- blend the sounds together
Try the word and ask myself,
- Does it make sense?
- Does it sound right?
- Does it look right?
After Reading
 Have students reflect on the strategies they used by asking, “Did anyone come to a word
you didn’t know? What did you do?” You want to communicate that finding words we
don’t know is normal. We need to have and use strategies to figure out those words.
 Ask student to retell what happened in the story or what the text was about.
 Have the student practice sequencing parts of the story in order to get the idea of beginning,
middle, and end.
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After Reading
Tell what happened
Who was in the story?
Where did the story take place?
© 2001 Wallingford Public Schools Approved by LA Management Team 6/01
Reading Strategies by Level
Early Fluent Readers
Teacher Strategies Student Strategies
Before Reading
 Encourage students to become strategic readers by asking, “What do successful readers to
before they start to read?” Elicit strategies to connect to prior knowledge, make
predictions, and set a purpose using the student words in the right column.
 Guide the students to identify text structure/genre by asking, “What type of text is this? Is
it a story, is it to give information, or is it a poem?” Guide students to look for key words
and text structure to determine what type of text it is. Awareness of text structure supports
student’s comprehension of a variety of texts.
Before Reading
Preview the text by looking at the cover, pictures, and chapter titles.
Think – what is this about?
Ask yourself –
- What do I already know about this?
- What do I want to know?
- What do I think will happen?
During Reading
 Immediately before starting to read, encourage students to become strategic readers by
asking “What can you do to help yourself when you find a word you don’t know?”
 The first two bullets of student strategies to the right have been introduced, modeled, and
practiced for mastery earlier grades. We want to continue to reinforce use of a balanced
cueing system that includes the way words look (and sounds letters make), the syntax of the
sentence (does it sound right?), and the meaning of the text.
 “Try a different sound” is a cue to try another sound the letter might make (for example:
the hard or soft sound for c, a long or short vowel.) At this level teachers need to guide
students to consciously make pictures in their minds as they read.
 Stop students and ask them to tell you what they are thinking while they are reading. This
is part of guiding students to recognize when they are not comprehending. Many students
have to be taught to stop when they don’t comprehend and apply one or more strategies to
make the text make sense.
During Reading
When I get stuck, I can
- look at the pictures
- say “blank” and read on
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- go back and read it again
- get my mouth “ready”
- find chunks I know
- look for little words in big words
- blend the sounds together
Try the word and ask myself,
- Does it make sense?
- Does it sound right?
- Does it look right?
Stop now and then to think
- What do I know so far?
- Does it make sense?
- Can I see it in my mind?
- Am I finding out what I want to know?
- Did I guess what would happen?
If it is not making sense
- Go back and read it again
- Talk with someone about it
After Reading
 Ask students to retell what they read. Practice sequencing story events.
 If it was a story, talk about the type of story plot (step-by-step is a plot where the characters
solve the problem or reach the goal. A circular plot returns to the problem at the end, for
example, When You Give a Mouse a Cookie.)
 Use a story map to show the parts of the story or a web to show the groups of ideas n
informational text.
 Ask students questions and then require them to support their opinions or responses with
passages from the text.
 Ask students to make connections between events of the story and their own lives or other
stories.
 Guide students to reflect on the author’s purpose or main idea.
After Reading
Do I know the story parts?
- characters
- setting
- problem or goal
- solution or resolution
- events in the order they happened
- feelings or what happened next?
If the text is information, what is the main idea?
© 2001 Wallingford Public Schools Approved by LA Management Team 6/01
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Strategies by Level
Word Recognition
Fluent Readers
Teacher Strategies Student Strategies Before Reading
• Immediately before starting to read, encourage students to become strategic readers by asking,
“What can you do to help yourself when you find a word you don’t know?
• We want to continue to reinforce use of a balanced cueing system that includes the way words
look (and sounds letters make), the syntax of the sentence (does it sound right?), and the meaning
of the text.
• “Try a different sound” is a cue to try another sound the letter might make (for example: the hard
or soft sound for c, a long or short vowel.)
During Reading
• During oral reading support by prompting students to select a strategy and try it.
Discourage other students from just giving the word by encouraging them to give a strategy they
believe will work. Praise students for trying to self-correct their errors.
• Modify the role of “Vocabulary Enricher” in literature circles by adding the responsibility of
explaining word strategies used and the effects.
After Reading
• After periods of silent reading have students talk about their strategy use by asking, “Did anyone
get stuck on a word? What strategies did you try? What worked? What didn’t work? Why do you
think that strategy didn’t work here?”
What do I do if I’m stuck on a word?
• Say “blank” and read on (fill I the blank after a sentence or two, using the meaning of the
rest of the paragraph)
• Backtrack and read again
• Look at the word –
Find word parts I know
Look for compound words
Find the root word
Notice prefixes and suffices
Blend sounds and word parts
Try a different sound
Try the word and ask
Does it sound right?
Does it look right?
Does it make sense?
Use a dictionary
Ask someone
© 2001 Wallingford Public Schools Approved by LA Management Team 6/01
D. Explain how students who enter the school below grade level will be engaged in and
benefit from the curriculum.
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Students who enter the school below grade level will be evaluated and appropriate strategies will
be used to enhance their progress either by the classroom teacher(s), or through the ESE
Department, ELL Department, or through the MTSS/RtI process in order to identify and prescribe
a plan of intervention.
The school staff will conduct a file review to determine the needs of each student entering the
school. Students involved in the MTSS process who have current Problem Solving Worksheets
(PSW) from their previous school will be provided with a timely PSW review and revision of
interventions, if needed.
Other students may enter the school below grade level as documented by a PMP or other
assessments. In these cases the school will provide a variety of instructional support and resources
for the students. These include enrollment in specific Intervention courses, daily intensive
remediation, tutoring, and working with an instructional specialist, as needed. These students will
be carefully monitored for progress and the MTSS process may be started if the data warrants it.
Struggling students will benefit from the curriculum at the School. Students will be engaged in
hands-on, inquiry-based instruction that captures their attention and addresses a variety of learning
styles. Additionally, students will benefit from the small school environment and close monitoring
by the Advisory Cohort facilitator to ensure that they are meeting appropriate academic and social
goals.
Procedures for implementing services for students below grade level will be modeled after those in
place in Lee County Public Schools. The School is committed to the concept that all students
deserve a quality education, especially students with disabilities, and those entering the school
working below grade level. Below grade level students will benefit from the curriculum by the
strategies stated in this application. Moreover, Response to Intervention (RtI)/MTSS will be the
process that aligns instruction and intervention to students’ needs based on ongoing data analysis.
The school will implement RtI/MTSS as follows:
Tier 1: The core instruction for all students and includes differentiated large group instruction and
small group skill-based enrichment or remediation. The instruction and differentiated instruction
will be guided by diagnostic and progress monitoring data gathered at least three times per year.
The effectiveness is measured using a standard where 80% of students receiving only core
instruction will make at least one year’s academic growth for one year’s time.
Tier 2: The school will provide small group supplemental instruction for all students who are
either identified through assessment data as at risk for meeting grade level standards (or students
who have demonstrated below proficient achievement based on the FCAT 2.0/PARCC Tests. This
tier is provided in addition to the core, differentiated instruction. Tier 2’s effectiveness is measured
by a standard that approximately 70% - 80% of students receiving supplemental intervention
should be closing the gap toward meeting standards. Progress monitoring will be monitored
frequently every 20 instructional days.
Tier 3: The school will provide students who are not progressing towards meeting standards, even
with targeted, supplemental interventions or intensive, individualized interventions. The fidelity
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and effectiveness of the individualized instruction will be monitored weekly. The effectiveness is
measured by a standard that approximately 70%-80% of students improve performance and close
gap towards benchmarks.
Special Note: Tier 2 or 3 time requirements for students retained two times in the same grade may
be modified in art, music, social science and physical education (through the waiver process) with
a minimum of 30 minutes each for art and music and 60 minutes for social science.
Classroom assignment, and/or classroom strategies will be used in order to address the individual
needs of the child. Informed decisions based on collected and verifiable data will drive the
process.
E: Describe the proposed curriculum areas to be included other than the core academic
areas.
The Arts
Course Title:
Course Title:
Course Title:
Course Title:
Course Title:
M/J Orientation to Art/2-D
M/J Art/2-D1
M/J Art/2-D
M/J Art/3-D1
M/J Art/3-D2
Courses in the Visual Arts will have a spiraled curriculum to increase the awareness of and abilities
to recognize and reproduce art forms. Students with an interest in Visual Arts will be given the
opportunity to polish their skills with the goals to build a portfolio to present for acceptance into
one of the county Visual Art programs for their high school careers. Students who are talented or
interested in the Visual Arts will likewise be able to polish their talents in order to enhance and
encourage a life long interest in said art forms.
Physical Education
Course Title: M/J Comprehensive Physical Education 1
Course Title: M/J Comprehensive Physical Education 2
Course Title: M/J Comprehensive Physical Education 3
Course Title: M/J Health 1
Course Title: M/J Health 2
Course Title: M/J Health 3
Materials: The school will supply the necessary equipment to make a variety of sports and
physical activity instruction available for students at grade level.
Subject Area: Physical Education / Health - Grades 6 – 8
GCCA will follow the districts basic plan for all Physical Education and Health Classes. It
has not yet been determined as to which of the plans available we will incorporate, or if there
will be an alternate plan chosen that incorporates parts of the different Lee County Physical
Education Plans. We do, however, plan to offer Physical Education classes on a daily basis
for the entire year.
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The purpose of this curriculum area will be to examine comprehensive health issues that ar e
important to adolescent development. Basic skills and safety procedures will be emphasized.
The content will include, but not limited to, the following:
 Growth and development
 Mental and emotional health
 Personnel health and individual wellness planning
 Family life education
 Nutritional health and physical activity
 Safety, first aid and violence prevention
 Prevention and control of diseases
 Consumer knowledge
 Alcohol, tobacco and other drug use and abuse
 Community and environmental health
 Health and safety practices
 Critical thinking skills
 Relationships between physical education and other disciplines
 Fitness program design
 Components of fitness
 Improving health related fitness
 Skill improvement
 Positive participation in physical education
 Community resources
The student will be able to:
 Determine and describe how changes in data values impact measures of central
tendency.
 Provide feedback on skill patterns of self and partner by detecting and correcting
mechanical errors.
 Identify the critical elements for successful performance in a variety of sport
skills or physical activities.
 List specific safety procedures and equipment necessary for a variety of sports
and physical activities.
 Explain basic offensive and defensive strategies in individual/dual and
alternative/extreme sports activities.
 Describe how movement skills and strategies learned in one physical activity can
be transferred and used in other physical activities.
 Participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on a daily basis.
 Participate in a variety of individual/dual and alternative/extreme sport activities
that promote cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance,
flexibility, and body composition.
 Identify the in-school and community opportunities for participation in
individual/dual and alternative/extreme sports.
 Participate in a variety of individual/dual and alternative/extreme sport activities
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that promote effective stress management.
Demonstrate achievement and maintenance of a health-enhancing level of
personal fitness by creating, implementing, and assessing a personal fitness
program in collaboration with a teacher.
Demonstrate program planning skills by setting goals and devising strategies for
a personal physical fitness program.
Use a variety of resources including available technology to assess, design, and
evaluate their personal physical activity plan.
Select a variety of physical activities when developing a personal fitness
program.
Describe health-related problems associated with inadequate levels of cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body
composition.
Discuss training principles appropriate for enhancing cardio-respiratory
endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition.
Demonstrate body management for successful participation in a variety of
modified games and activities.
Apply skill-related components of balance, reaction time, agility, coordination,
power, and speed to enhance performance levels.
Apply technology to evaluate, monitor, and improve individual motor skills.
Select and utilize appropriate safety equipment.
Act independently of peer pressure both in and out of school.
Develop strategies for including persons of diverse backgrounds and abilities
while participating in a variety of physical activities.
Demonstrate responsible behaviors during physical activities.
Maintain appropriate personal, social, and ethical behavior while participating in
a variety of physical activities.
Demonstrate appropriate etiquette, care of equipment, respect for facilities, and
safe behaviors while participating in a variety of physical activities.
Discuss opportunities for participation in a variety of physical activities outside
of the school setting that contribute to personal enjoyment and the attainment or
maintenance of a healthy lifestyle.
Describe the potential benefits of participation in a variety of physical activities.
Compare and contrast games, sports, and/or physical activities from other
cultures.
M/J Health
The purpose of this course is to examine comprehensive health issues that are important to
adolescent development. The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
 comprehending concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention to
enhance health
 analyzing the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other factors
on health behaviors
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demonstrating the ability to access valid health information, products, and se rvices to
enhance health
demonstrating the ability to use goal-setting skills to enhance health
demonstrating the ability to use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health
and avoid or reduce health risks
demonstrating the ability to use decision-making skills to enhance health
demonstrating the ability to practice advocacy, health enhancing behaviors, and
avoidance or reduction of health risks for oneself
demonstrating the ability to advocate for individual, peer, school, family, and
community health
Any student whose parents make a written request to the school principal shall be
exempt from HIV/AIDS and human sexuality instructional activities. Course
requirements for HIV/AIDS and human sexuality education shall not interfere with
the local determination of appropriate curriculum, which reflects local values and
concerns.
This course provides an in-depth study of health-related concepts and principles derived from
ten major content areas of comprehensive health education.
This course shall integrate the Goal 3 Student Performance Standards of the Florida System
of School Improvement and Accountability as appropriate to the content and processes of the
subject matter.
Note: Any students whose parents make a written request to the principal s hall be
exempt from the HIV/AIDS and human sexuality instructional activities.
Foreign Languages
It is the intent for GCCA to offer Spanish after the first year of operation, and/or other languages as
demand dictates, to students at the Middle School level. In addition we will offer Spanish Native
Speakers. If other languages are represented, in adequate numbers we will service those students
too. As other languages are requested for English as a first language students we will expand our
Foreign Language department. According to NEA Research, 2007, “Language skills and cultural
expertise are urgently needed to address economic challenges and the strength of the American
Businesses in an increasingly global marketplace.
Professions such as law, health care, social work, and education call out for an international
dimension that reflects the changed world environment and increasingly diverse U.S. population.”
Furthermore, there is a “growing recognition that proficiency in more than one language benefits
both individual learners and society.” For the individual there has been found a “positive link
between second language proficiency and cognitive and academic ability. In addition to
developing a lifelong ability to communicate with people from other countries and backgrounds,
other benefits include improved overall school performance and superior problem-solving
awareness. (Bamford & Mizokawa, 1991)
F. Describe how the effectiveness of the curriculum will be evaluated.
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The curriculum’s effectiveness will go through a continuous process of evaluation that is data
driven with several layers of analysis.
The effective teacher goes through a process of informal evaluations of his/her curriculum on an
ongoing basis. Ongoing evaluation of the curriculum and lessons will promote the continuation of
the scope and sequence of the content material based on the focus calendar, or enhance the concept
mastered to a higher degree of difficulty, thus reinforcing the concept, or remediate if the concepts
were not mastered. Furthermore, the teacher gives a variety of assessments to ascertain the
achievement levels reached.
In order to truly assess the growth in achievement of students teachers need a base line of data to
compare to. GCCA via accountability instruments will be implementing a Pre-Test instrument for
each subject to be given at the onset of each year. These tests will be constructed to reflect the
NGSSSs that the students are expected to master throughout the year. This data not only sets the
base line for further testing for analysis and comparisons, but informs the teacher as to where they
need to begin, what to remediate, and drives the curriculum at that point.
Mid-term and end of term indicator tests will be given that mirror the pre-test instrument, allowing
for direct comparisons and indicate growth of classes and individual students. Again, this data can
be used not only to show the percent of growth, but promotes remediation in those areas where the
concepts were not mastered.
Additionally, this data will inform the teacher and the administration as to the curriculum’s success
and where perhaps changes need to be made in the methods of delivery, actual content, or the focus
of said content.
End of Year Post-Test that are a mirror image of the Pre-Test will give an accurate accounting of
the curriculum in each area for each teacher as well as each student. Said collected data will be
analyzed and adjustments will be made accordingly. Changes in the curriculum may be made,
and/or additional teacher training will be held for individual teachers or departments when it is felt
a weakness exists that needs to be addressed. Said evaluations and analysis will drive all
curriculum decisions.
Finally, the annual results generated by PARCC/FCAT 2.0 data will also be a measure of the
effectiveness of GCCA’s curriculum.
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Section 5: Student Performance, Assessment and Evaluation
A. State the school’s educational goals and objectives for improving student achievement.
Indicate how much academic improvement students are expected to show each year, how
student progress and performance will be evaluated, and the specific results to be attained.
Grades K-2
1. Given school-wide emphasis on instruction for mastery of the Common Core Standards in
Language Arts, at least 75% of students will demonstrate grade level reading proficiency, as
evidenced by students in grades K- 2 achieving 75% or higher on the BS/PMT (Broad
Screen/Progress Monitoring Tool- Green Success Zone) and:
In Kinder – Responding to 4 or 5 out of 5 questions correctly on the Listening Comprehension or
Reading Comprehension task; and/or If Vocabulary was administered, scoring in the average range
(40th-60th percentile).
In 1st Grade – Reading the target passage for AP3 with fluency (60 wcpm) and accuracy (75% or
above), and responded to most (4 or 5 out of 5) questions correctly; and/or If Vocabulary was
administered, scored in the average range (40th-60th percentile).
In 2nd Grade – Reading the target passage for AP3 with fluency (90 wcpm) and accuracy (88% or
above) and responded to most (4 or 5 out of 5) questions correctly; and/or If Vocabulary was
administered, scored in the average range (40th–60th percentile)
a. Consider spelling percentile – scored in the average range (40th–60th percentile).
2. Given school-wide emphasis on instruction for mastery of Common Core Standards in
Mathematics students in grades K, 1, and 2 will exceed by at least 2 percentage points the State
and/or District average (whichever is higher) on the Stanford Achievement Test for Mathematics.
Grades 3-5
3. Given school-wide emphasis on instruction for mastery of the State Standards in Language Arts,
at least 75 percent of grades three through five students in all eligible subgroups, will demonstrate
grade level proficiency in Reading, as evidenced by earning a 3 or higher on the 2014 PARCC
Assessment Test of Reading.
4. Given school-wide emphasis on instruction for mastery of the State Standards in Mathematics, at
least 75 percent of students in grades three through five will demonstrate grade level grade level
proficiency for Mathematics, as evidenced by earning a 3 or higher on the 2014 Florida
Assessment Test of Mathematics (PARCC).
5. Given school-wide emphasis on instruction for mastery of the State Standards in Language Arts,
with an emphasis in writing, at least 75% of fourth grade students will demonstrate grade level
proficiency in Writing, as evidenced by earning a 4 or higher on the 2014 Writing Test.
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6. Given a school-wide emphasis on instruction for mastery of the State Standards, at least 50
percent of the lowest quartile of students will make learning gains in Reading and Mathematics as
evidenced by:
 demonstrating improvement in one or more achievement levels; OR
 maintaining achievement level 3, 4, or 5; OR
 demonstrating one year’s growth to exceed the Developmental Scale Score (cut score) for
the respective grade level – for those students who had previously scored below proficiency
level.
7. Given school-wide emphasis on instruction of the State Standards in Science, 75 percent of
students in 5th grade will meet and/or exceed the District and/or State average, whichever is
higher, on the 2014 Science examination.
The curriculum objectives will parallel those stated in the State Standards of the State of Florida. In
addition to evaluating the charter's success on objectives stated above, the School shall submit the
information required in the annual school report and the education accountability system governed
by Florida statutes.
It is the responsibility of the governing board of the charter school to report its progress annually to
the Lee County School District.
ACADEMIC YEARLY PERFORMANCE
The School is committed to attaining Academic Yearly Performance (as determined by the
FLDOE) growth targets in accordance with Florida policy and procedures. Under the direction of
the principal and the program director and director of teacher training and development, a wide
variety of data will be used to make decisions regarding instruction designed to attain AYP.
Performance data as well as fall diagnostic data from FAIR will be reviewed and analyzed to
identify strengths and weaknesses of students. Teachers will be expected to provide appropriate
instruction that addresses weaknesses as well as challenges advanced students. Furthermore,
school leadership staff will monitor growth and, where needed, institute mid-course corrections
such as additional assessment, tutoring, focused instruction, and parent involvement and support. If
the State becomes exempt from AYP, the school will also.
METHOD(S) OF ASSESSMENT
Per Florida Law, all of the School students will be assessed annually via Florida required tests.
Staff will use the results in addition to other assessments for diagnostic, remedial, and enrichment
purposes. All aspects of assessment will be considered when evaluating student progress. We will
look at learning gains, percent of students scoring 3 or higher, a decrease in the percent of students
scoring level one, improvement in State Assessment scores, and improving scores on national
recognized assessment test. We will use the Florida Assessments in Reading (FAIR) that is
provided by the Just Read, Florida! Office.
A multifaceted assessment plan will be used to evaluate student performance in the core academic
areas. The FAIR test is usually administered to students in grades K-5 three times a year.
Collection of Performance Data
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Each student will be assessed at the beginning of the school year using the SAT 10, Scholastic
Reading Inventory, and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Math Assessment. The data from these
assessments will be used to identify strengths and needs for all students and will be the basis for
establishing individual learning plans for each student. This will help us establish a baseline to
measure academic improvement each year.
Performance in other core subjects will be monitored through the administration of published unit
and chapter tests for textbook series used by the School. Furthermore, teachers will make use of
portfolios to document and monitor learning related to growth and achievement of skills and
knowledge. Portfolios will be jointly compiled with students’ work so that they reflect typical
products completed during instruction and long-term projects. Portfolios will be regular
components of parent/teacher conferences and will enhance standardized data, giving parents a
clear understanding of their child(ren)'s performance. Finally, teacher-generated tests, quizzes, and
rubric-based projects will be used as data gathering and monitoring tools. This comprehensive
approach to assessment will provide all stakeholders (administration, teachers, students, parents,
community, Charter School Board, district Board of Education, and State Board of Education) with
a clear picture of the impact of the School’s educational program.
Locally administered assessments will be scored and reviewed in-house by administrative and
teaching staff. Results of statewide assessments will be similarly reviewed upon receipt. All
results, along with progress toward achieving targets and goals/objectives of the School, will be
reported to parents, the Charter School Board, the district, and the Florida State Board of Education
in an annual report, consistent with local and state requirements.
USE AND REPORTING OF DATA
Student evaluation data will be carefully analyzed on a regular basis to determine individual
student strengths and weaknesses. Teachers will use the aforementioned assessments to determine
skills and information that students have mastered and specific learning needs or deficits. These
data will be the foundation for students’ intervention (making decisions about what to teach next
and for ameliorating any identified learning deficits). Teachers will be able to address individual
student learning needs effectively by using assessments as the basis for designing learning
activities appropriate to the learning style of the individual student.
Teachers will use assessment data to make suggestions for family learning activities that address
students’ learning needs and help to improve student achievement. Assessment data will also be
used to inform parents both of their child's progress and of the specific learning needs that they can
help to address. As parents are informed they will be able to make informed choices about the role
they will play in improving student achievement. Assessment data will be shared with students to
inform them of their progress, identify their learning needs and help them to assume appropriate
responsibility for their own learning.
If formative and summative data analysis suggests that adequate yearly progress is in jeopardy,
immediate steps will be taken. These steps include remedial instruction on targeted areas as
revealed by diagnostic and achievement tests. Furthermore, as these areas are identified, staff will
be provided with professional development in designated content, pedagogy, and instructional
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strategies. Finally, consistent with the performance culture of the School continued employment
and salary adjustments will be based on yearly academic measures.
Middle school's educational goals include but are not limited to:
• Given school-wide emphasis on instruction for mastery of the State Standards in Mathematics,
the School will meet and/or exceed the District and/or State average (whichever is higher) of
students who achieve a passing score (as established by FL-DOE) on the respective End of Course
exam (Algebra or other Courses as applicable).
• Given school-wide emphasis on instruction for mastery of the State Standards in Language Arts,
with an emphasis in Writing, 85 percent of the 8th Grade students will demonstrate proficiency in
writing scoring at a 4 or above on the Writing Test.
• Given school-wide emphasis on instruction for mastery of the State Standards in Science, the
School will meet and/or exceed the District and/or State average (whichever is higher) of students
who achieve a passing score (as established by FL-DOE) on the administration of EOC exams for
all high school classes taught at the middle school level (Algebra, Geometry, and Spanish I).
• Given a school-wide emphasis on instruction for mastery of the State Standards, at least 50
percent of the lowest quartile of students will make learning gains in reading as evidenced by
demonstrating improvement in one or more achievement levels; or by maintaining achievement
level 3, 4, or 5; or for students maintaining an achievement level of 1 or 2 they must ALSO
demonstrate one year’s growth to exceed the Developmental Scale Score (cut score) as evidenced
by their performance on the State’s Reading Test annually.
• Students are expected to make annual learning gains toward achieving the State Standards
appropriate for the student's grade level. The annual gains will be measured by the student’s
developmental scale score on the PARCC/FCAT 2.0, and on internal pre- and post-tests to be
administered at the beginning and end of each school year.
Students are expected to make annual learning gains toward achieving the Next Generation
Sunshine State Standards/Common Core Standards appropriate for the student's grade level. The
annual gains will be measured by the student’s developmental scale score on the FCAT/PARCC
and on internal pre and posttests to be administered at the beginning and end of each school year.
In addition to PARCC/FCAT assessments, the School will use internal pre and post testing to
measure annual gains. The following instructional activities will be will be intergraded in the
School program as a vehicle to achieve performance standards and to increase learning
opportunities:
• Implement early bird tutoring or Saturday tutoring for Level 1 and 2 students in order to
maximize student achievement
• Implement parent workshops that will assist with the implementation of effective strategies at
home
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• Facilitate student participation in essay, poetry, and book writing contest in order to promote
writing success
• Utilize assessment data, writing pretest, and other ongoing assessments to drive instruction and
target remediation.
• Utilize assessment data to drive instruction and target remediation in order to maximize student
achievement
• Implement Super Saturdays and Early Bird tutoring program to increase reading Implement a
variety of literature and maximize the use of reading components such as determining main idea,
author’s purpose, and sequence
• Utilize state-adopted supplemental material in order to increase reading critical thinking skills.
• Implement flexible scheduling that designates two hours of Language Arts/Reading instruction
and one hour of daily collaborative grade level planning times
In addition to the PARCC and all applicable district/State assessments, the School will conduct its
own internal pre and post testing and assessment to measure annual gain. The test will be
comprehensive, and will include assessments in readiness, listening, reading, spelling, writing,
research and study skills, and mathematics. The assessment instrument to be used will ultimately
be determined by the testing professional retained to provide that service. Other internal testing and
assessment, such as competency-based standardized tests, may also be used by the School to
evaluate the effectiveness of its curriculum and teaching methods.
Other methods of assessing students' mastery of performance outcomes will include, but will not
be limited to, facilitator observation, peer- and self-evaluations, teacher tests and quizzes, projects,
presentations, exhibitions, portfolios, and attendance rates. The student portfolios will show not
only the student’s “best” work, but also drafts of student work that will demonstrate progress.
Ongoing internal audits (Progress Reports and Report Cards) of student performance, including
beginning year, mid-year, and end-year assessments, will be utilized as reflective and guidance
tools.
English Language learners (ELL) will be assessed and served by ESOL-certified personnel. The
School will adopt and abide in all respects by the requirements of the LULAC et.al. Vs. State Board
of Education Consent Decree (1990).
B. Describe the school's student placement procures and promotion standards.
The School may provide students with disabilities certain modifications to basic education
programs of study to ensure students with disabilities the opportunity to meet graduation
requirements for a standard or a special diploma in accordance with all guidelines and parameters
delineated therein the Sponsor’s Student Progression Plan. Modifications to basic courses shall not
include modifications to the curriculum frameworks or student performance standards.
GRADING STUDENT PERFORMANCE
By School Board directive, academic grades are to reflect the student's academic progress. The
determination of the specific grade a student receives must be based on the teacher's best judgment
after careful consideration of all aspects of each student's performance during a grading period,
including such factors as class attendance, homework, and participation.
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In authorized semester courses, the student's final grade shall be determined as follows: 40 percent
value for each of two nine-week grading periods and 20 percent value for the final examination,
with a provision for teacher override. In authorized annual courses, the student's final grade shall
be determined as follows: 20 percent value for each of four nine-week grading periods, 10 percent
value for the midterm exam, and 10 percent for the final exam, with a provision for teacher
override.
RADE POINT AVERAGE
 Grade point averages (GPA) may be used for any of the reasons listed below.
 Rank in class
 Eligibility to participate in interscholastic extracurricular activities
 Academic Recognition Program
 Placement on the honor roll and/or membership in honor societies
The following are the academic grades used:
GRADE NUMERICAL VALUE (%) VERBAL INTERPRETATION GRADE POINT VALUE
A
90 -100
OUTSTANDING PROGRESS
4
B
80 -89
GOOD PROGRESS
3
C
70 -79
AVERAGE PROGRESS
2
LOWEST ACCEPTABLE PROGRESS
1
D
60 -69
F
0 -59
FAILURE
0
I
0
INCOMPLETE
0
C. If the school will serve high school students, describe the school's graduation requirements,
to include the methods used to determine if a student has satisfied the requirements specified in
section 1003.43, F.S., and any proposed additional requirements.
Not applicable to Elementary and Middle Schools.
D. Describe how baseline achievement data will be established, collected, and used. Describe
the methods used to identify the educational strengths and needs of students and how these
baseline rates will be compared to the academic progress of the same students attending the
charter school.
The School will participate in all required assessments as specified in Florida Statutes. In addition
to the discussion of required and mandated assessment requirements for graduation (i.e. FCAT
2.0/PARCC) at Elementary and Middle School levels, and End of Course Exams for High School
Level classes); and teacher-made classroom assessments for evaluative purposes to determine
mastery of State Standards content for earning specific class credit requirements, as discussed
above; the School will use state standardized assessment scores, district and school-based
assessments to measure student progress toward mastery of the State Standards in all grade levels.
These include but are not limited to the following:
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School-Based Assessments in all Courses
 Weekly teacher-generated quizzes
 Monthly teacher-generated chapter tests
 Midterm and Final Examinations
 Portfolios and presentations
 Class participation rubrics
 Quarterly projects /investigations
At a minimum, charter schools must participate in the statewide assessment program created
under s. 1003.43.
The baseline student academic achievement levels for the school will be established using multiple
measures of student’s academic performance on the school and the Florida Assessment Programs
in where applicable. Some of the assessments to be utilized will include the following:
 State Assessment in Reading
 End of Course Exams
 Writing Test
 Other Standardized tests
 Other standards-based exams
 Baseline Benchmark assessments as applicable
 Portfolio assessments (whenever applicable)
The baseline levels of academic achievement established during the first academic year will be
compared to academic achievement levels in prior years, when data is available, in order to assess
rates of prior academic progress and the baseline rates of academic progress for the School’s
students. Other than standardized test scores, other baseline data may include report card grades,
attendance records, and behavioral records (including in school and out of school suspensions as
well as exemplary behavior). In the case of Special Education (SPED), Individual Education Plans
(IEP) will be secured and the Individual ELL Student Plans will be obtained for English language
learners (ELL). This data will be made available to teachers who will assess progress against the
baseline data.
Baseline Data for individual courses and for individual students in said courses will be generated
via pre-tests. Interim exams and EOC exams will be used to generate percents of growth for
students as well as for courses.
Baseline data will also be utilized to determine the extent to which educational goals and
performance standards have been met (inasmuch as the achievement of the specific measurable
objectives identified in the charter school application for the first year of operation). Said baseline
data is also made available to stakeholders and the community at-large, as reported in the School
Improvement Plan via the needs assessment and also through specific learning objectives, which
are written to address student’s learning needs. In subsequent years, the results (based upon those
baseline data items) will be gauged against the objectives specified in the School Improvement
Plan and this method of goal setting and data collection will be utilized as a living and continuous
improvement tool.
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E. Identify the types and frequency of assessments that the school will use to measure and
monitor student performance.
The School will participate in all Statewide and District assessment programs and will use the state
standardized assessment scores, district assessment scores and school-based assessments to
measure student progress toward mastery of the NGSSS and/or CCSS, as adopted, at all grade
levels. These include but are not limited to (grades K-5):
DESCRIPTION
Alternative Assessment for Grade 3
Promotion
Interim Assessment Tests in Common Core
(reading in math), Baseline Reading,
Mathematics, and Science
Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screener,
Florida Assessment for Instruction in
Reading
Writing Pre-Test (instrument to be
selected)
Florida Assessments for Instruction in
Reading
(Assessment 1, 2 & 3)
Interim Assessment Tests (Common Core
Reading and Math): Fall Reading,
Mathematics, and Science
Grade 3 Mid-Year Promotion
ABBREVIATION PARTICIPANTS
AAGTP
Grade 3, retained only
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test
Writing Field Test
Florida Alternate Assessment
IA
Grades 3-5*
FLKRS, FAIR
Kindergarten
WT
Grades 1-5
FAIR
Grades 1-5
IA
Grades 3-5
GTMYP
FCAT-Writing
Grade 3, eligible retained
students
Grades 4 selected schools
FAA
Grades 3-5**
Interim Assessment Tests: Winter Reading,
Mathematics, and Science
Grade 3 Reading Student Portfolio
IA
Grades 3-5
GTRSP
Grade 3
National Assessment of Educational
Progress
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test
Writing
Comprehensive English Language
Learning Assessment (District approved
instruments) LAS Links Oral, Reading, or
Writing Level
Trends in International Mathematics and
Science Progress in International Reading
Literacy Study
NAEP
Grades 4 selected schools
FCAT Writing
Grades 4
CELLA, LAS
Grades K-5, all current ELLs
and selected former ELLs
TIMSS PIRLS
Grades 4, selected schools
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Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test
Reading and Mathematics Science
Partnership for Assessment of Readiness
for College and Careers
Stanford Achievement Test, Tenth Edition
Reading and Mathematics
FCAT 2.0
Grades 3-5, Grades 5
PARCC
Grades 3-5, Grades
SAT-10
Grades K-2
Notes:
*All Differentiated Accountability schools must administer assessments according to the dates
established by the Office of School Improvement.
**Only includes SPED students exempted from standardized testing at these grade levels.
FAIR assessments will be administered three times per year to provide an ongoing measure of
reading fluency and comprehension, predict FCAT 2.0 performance, and serve as a progressmonitoring device for teachers and students. Furthermore, English Language Learners will be
assessed and served by ESOL-certified personnel and in accordance with the Sponsor’s ELL Plan
and the requirements of the LULAC et al. vs. State Board of Education Consent Decree (1990).
Middle School:
Students at the School will participate in all Statewide and District assessment programs and will
use the state standardized assessment scores, district assessment scores and school-based
assessments to measure student progress toward mastery of the NGSSS/CCSS at all grade levels.
The School will abide by the Sponsor’s annual testing calendar. The assessments administered
include but are not limited to:
• Florida Assessment For Instruction In Reading (FAIR) AP1
• District Writing Prompt
• District Benchmark Assessment
• Florida Assessment For Instruction In Reading (FAIR) AP2
• Florida Alternate Assessment Administration (ESE)
• NAEP grade 8
• FCAT/PARCC Writing Assessment grade 8
• Florida Assessment For Instruction In Reading (FAIR) AP3
• FCAT 2.0/PARCC Reading and Mathematics State Standards grades 6-8
• FCAT 2.0/PARCC Science State Standards grade 8
• Comprehensive English Language Learning Assessment (CELLA)
• Florida End-of-Course (EOC) Exams as per FL-DOE requirements (as applicable for middle
grade students taking high school courses)
• Oral Language Proficiency Test I (IPT-I) 2nd Edition – Grade 6
• Oral Language Proficiency Test II (IPT-II) 2nd Edition – Grades 7 – 8
FAIR assessments will be administered three times per year to provide an ongoing measure of
reading fluency and comprehension, predict FCAT performance, and serve as a progress
monitoring device for teachers and students. English Language Learners will be assessed and
served by ESOL-certified personnel and in accordance with the Sponsor’s ELL Plan and the
requirements of the LULAC et.al. vs. State Board of Education Consent Decree (1990).
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Additionally, the School will use a variety of other assessments, such as teacher-made tests,
textbook exams, alternate assessments, pre-and post-assessments, benchmark tests, midterm and
final exams, etc. as needed to monitor student progress. The School may also choose to purchase
research-based assessments such as STAR and SAT 10.
As stakeholders in the educational process, students and their parents will be an active part of the
assessment program. The School will develop a testing calendar aligned to the School’s Scope and
Sequence plans which will be posted throughout the school, published on the School’s website, and
sent home. Additionally, the School will encourage and promote positive test prep strategies such
as eating a balanced breakfast and getting at least eight full hours of sleep. Following the release of
assessment results, school personnel will disseminate the information to parents and engage
students in data chats. A data chat serves as an effective instructional tool because it allows the
student to see where exactly he/she made progress and where improvement is still needed,
resulting in increased motivation and understanding.
School-Based Assessments in all Courses:
• Weekly teacher-generated quizzes (6-8)
• Monthly teacher-generated chapter tests (6-8)
• Quarterly projects and/or investigations based on focus lessons (6-8)
• Midterm and Final Examinations (6-8)
• Portfolios and presentations (6-8)
• Class participation rubrics (6-8)
F. Describe how student assessment and performance data will be used to evaluate and
inform instruction.
The comprehensive assessment program will be used to inform stakeholders (students, parents, and
teachers) about where a student is succeeding and what areas need strengthening. Assessment will
serve as a feedback system to guide teachers in lesson planning and individualizing instruction.
Additionally, it will guide students in understanding full mastery of each respective standard and it
will keep parents informed about student progress to specific learning objectives. Expectations are
that students will progress at least as well as they did before attending the charter school, and that
the specific measurable objectives for the School are achieved.
Student performance in the classroom will be assessed by the classroom teacher, and students not
making adequate progress towards the State Standards, as evidenced in teacher made evaluations,
will also be identified, and appropriate measures for improvement will be instituted. Ongoing
communication between the School and the parents will be maintained through on-line reporting
systems such as a web-based grade book, and through progress reports, parent conferences, and
other forms of written and oral communication that the parents may be comfortable to utilize.
Ongoing internal audits (Interim Progress Reports and Report Cards) of student performance,
including beginning of year, mid-year, and end-of -year assessments, will also be utilized as
reflective and guidance tools.
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Accountability:
Keeping in mind that the Merit Pay Plan is based on learning gains, that more rigorous
requirements on earning Adequate Yearly Progress and achieving higher levels of proficiency on
the State Assessment are being expected, we are honing in on our Accountability Procedures here
at GCCA.
Moreover, the Merit Pay Plan also covers areas of accountability regarding supervision of students,
professional development, and so forth. Ergo, teachers will be evaluated in said areas as well.
With input from the Department Heads and Advisory Teams, each teacher will submit a list of
designated State Standards that should be mastered by the student during the course of the year in
their classes.
The teacher will use their State Standards’ checklist for each course and level they teach to list
what mastery level the students have achieved on said standards. Moreover, the teacher must
generate an evaluative tool that reflects and monitors the actual learning gains of the students.
Therefore, the teacher must create pre and post annual tests as well as post tests for each 9 week
period for all subject areas.
GCCA’s accountability will also require that the Department Head ensures that each teacher is
cognizant of the curriculum presented at each grade level within the department. This facilitates
appropriate scope and sequence continuity between levels. Moreover, promotes more effective
learning on the part of the student when the teacher is aware of what the student should have
learned the previous year and what information they will need to master to be successful in the
subsequent year.
This communication between grade levels should be ongoing and encourages classroom visitation
among peer teachers.
The Department Head will ensure that each teacher will submit a list of designated State Standards
that should be mastered by the student during the course of the year in their classes. Moreover, the
Department Head will ensure that the teacher will use their State Standards’ checklist for each
course and level they teach to list what mastery level the students have achieved on said standards.
The teacher must generate an evaluative tool that reflects and monitors the actual learning gains of
the students. Therefore, the teacher must create pre/post and indicator tests for all subject areas
they teach except for Math and Language Arts which are tested on a yearly basis and serve as a
baseline and growth indicator.
The Department Head will collect said checklist at the end of each nine-week grading period,
review the percentages of student mastery listed, review the pre/post, and indicator tests with
student results, and then compare said results to the lesson plans that were submitted. Finally, the
Department Head will meet for a conference with each teacher about the number of standards that
were covered and learning gains achieved during the course of that nine-week period. This
conference will be documented and findings presented in writing to the Principal.
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Accountability also relates to the students. All students will maintain a checklist for themselves in
all courses. Each list will list the State Standards. As students are tested they will place a check on
the list indicating their level of mastery of each of the benchmarks.
The establishment of a School Improvement Plan will ensure school-wide student assessment and
performance data can be shared with parents, students and other stakeholders. The EESAC
Committee will participate in the development of the School Improvement Plan to ensure input
from all stakeholders, including teachers, students, and parent representatives. The attainment of
specific learning objectives, with supporting documentation, will be detailed in the School’s
Annual Report, and copies will be made available to the charter school constituents on an annual
basis.
Furthermore, the School will develop and utilize a Response to Intervention model that integrates
assessment and intervention within a multi-level prevention system to maximize student
achievement and to reduce behavior problems. The school will identify students at risk for poor
learning outcomes, monitor student progress, provide evidence-based interventions and adjust the
intensity and nature of those interventions depending on a student’s responsiveness, and identify
students with learning disabilities or other disabilities. The MTSS/RtI implementation at the school
will contribute to more meaningful identification of learning/behavioral problems, improve
instructional quality, provide all students with the best opportunities to succeed at the school, and
assist with the identification of learning disabilities and other disabilities.
The MTSS/RtI model at the school will have four essential components: A school-wide, multilevel instructional and behavioral system for preventing school failure, screening, progress
monitoring, data-based decision making for instruction and movement within the multi-level
system. Regardless of the number interventions the school implements, each will be classified
under one of the three levels of prevention: primary, secondary, or tertiary. This will allow for a
common understanding across the entire process.
Student Assessment and Instructional Intervention
The MTSS/RtI framework will be a comprehensive support to students. The school will practice
MTSS/RtI as prevention oriented approach to linking assessment and instruction. This can then
inform teachers on how to best teach their students. The goal of the MTSS/RtI model at the school
is to minimize the risk for long-term negative learning outcomes by responding quickly and
efficiently to documented, learning or behavioral problems, and ensuring appropriate identification
of students with disabilities that will impact their learning and outcomes.
Multi-level Prevention System
The model being employed by the school is a rigorous prevention system that provides for the
early identification of learning and behavioral challenges and timely intervention for students who
are at risk for long-term learning problems. This system includes three levels of intensity or three
levels of prevention, which represent a continuum of supports. The school may use more than one
intervention within a given level of prevention. These levels of intervention will be as follows:
 Primary prevention: high quality core instruction that meets the needs of most students
 Secondary prevention: evidence-based intervention(s) of moderate intensity that addresses
the learning or behavioral challenges of most at-risk students
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
Tertiary prevention: individualized intervention(s) of increased intensity for students who
show minimal response to secondary prevention
Identification of Students at Risk for Poor Learning outcomes of Behavior
Struggling students will be identified by implementing a 2-stage screening process. The first stage,
universal screening, is a brief assessment for all students conducted at the beginning of the school
year; For students who score below the cut point on the universal assessment (summative
assessment), a second stage of screening is then conducted to more accurately predict which
students are truly at risk for poor learning outcomes. This second stage involves additional, more
in-depth testing or short-term progress monitoring to confirm a student’s at risk status. The tools
utilized for the screening will mirror those used at the school district.
Researched Based Interventions
Classroom instructors will use research-based curricula in all subjects. When a student is identified
via screening as requiring additional intervention, evidence-based interventions of moderate
intensity will be provided. These interventions are in addition to the core primary instruction and
will typically involve small-group instruction to address specific identified problems. These
evidenced-based interventions are well defined in terms of duration, frequency, and length of
sessions. Students who show minimal response to secondary prevention move to tertiary
prevention, where more intensive and individualized supports are provided. All instructional and
behavioral interventions will be selected with attention to their evidence of effectiveness.
Adjustment to Interventions
Progress monitoring data will be used to determine when a student has or has not responded to
instruction at any level of the prevention system. For a student who has not responded to the
intervention, the increasing of the intervention will take place. This can be accomplished by
lengthening instructional time, increasing the frequency of instructional sessions, reducing the size
of the instructional group, or adjusting the level of instruction. The intervention may also be
increased by providing intervention support from a teacher with more experience and skill in
teaching students with learning or behavioral difficulties. Some students may be provided a
Secondary prevention by the school. That may typically involve small-group instruction that relies
on evidence-based interventions that specify the instructional procedures, duration and frequency
of instruction.
Tertiary Intervention
This will be the most intensive of the three levels and the school will individualize and target each
student’s area(s) of need via differentiated instruction. At this level, the teacher will begin with a
more intensive version of the intervention program used in secondary prevention (e.g., longer
sessions, smaller group size, more frequent sessions). The teacher will conduct frequent progress
monitoring (i.e., at least weekly) with each student. When the progress monitoring data indicates
the student’s rate of progress is unlikely to achieve the established learning goal, the teacher will
engage in a problem-solving process. The teacher modifies the components of the intervention
program and continues to employ frequent progress monitoring to evaluate which components will
enhance the rate of student learning. By continually monitoring and modifying (as needed) each
student’s program, the teacher is able to design an effective, individualized instructional program.
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G. Describe how student assessment and performance information will be shared with
students and with parents.
The comprehensive assessment program will be used to inform students, parents, and teachers
about where a student is succeeding and what areas need strengthening. Assessment will serve as a
feedback system to guide teachers in lesson planning and individualizing instruction. Additionally,
State Assessments and Interim assessment results will guide students in understanding full mastery
of each respective standard and it will keep parents informed about student progress to specific
learning objectives. However, it is important to note that a child’s performance is not nearly as
significant as the interpretation of that performance on a test. Keeping with our mission, students
will have an active role in their education by learning to monitor and evaluate their work. Teachers
will use assessment rubrics as teaching tools in the classroom by helping students to interpret their
performance and comprehend their results. In addition, students will be given the opportunity to
participate in DATA chats with teachers. This will provide the student the opportunity to
understand their strengths and weaknesses on standardized tests and make them active participants
in their education.
Appropriate measures for improvement will be instituted for students not making adequate
progress towards the State Standards. The parent/guardian will be advised in a special conference
as needed, and remedial strategies will be communicated. If a child’s performance is on target for
his or her immediate stage of development, we will so advise the parents. Assessment and
performance information will be shared with parents and evidence by parental contact logs for
every teacher. Progress reports shall be signed by the parent and returned to the teacher. Not later
than midway between marking periods, an interim report shall be sent to parents of students who
are experiencing difficulty including, but not limited to, the following: failing, a drop of two or
more grades, unacceptable behavior and excessive absences. An automated system for record
keeping and grading, interim reports will be provided for all students.
Ongoing communication between the school and the parents will be maintained through on-line
reporting systems such, for example, a web-based grade book and through progress reports, parent
conferences, and other forms of written and oral communication that the parents may be
comfortable to utilize. Conferencing will be a highly effective way to keep parents apprised of their
child’s progress in all grade levels.
Specifically, the school will ensure communication with parents via the following districtmandated means, as follows:
Progress Reports (Report Cards):
The School will issue Progress reports at the end of each marking period. These will not be
withheld from students because of failure to pay dues, fees or charges for lost or damaged books or
property.
Interim reports:
No later than midway between marking periods, an interim report shall be sent to parents of
students who are experiencing difficulty including, but not limited to, the following: failing, a drop
of two or more grades, unacceptable behavior or excessive absences. An automated system for
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record keeping and grading, interim reports will be provided for all students, as an indicator of
satisfactory or unsatisfactory progress.
Required Parental Notification for students in danger of failing.
Any student with a GPA below 2.5 shall have their parent or guardian notified that good work and
improvement is necessary to ensure that high school graduation requirements are met. The School
will assist students to meet these requirements through a variety of options, which may include, but
are not limited to:
a. extended learning,
b. special counseling,
c. volunteer and/or peer tutors,
d. school-sponsored help sessions,
e. homework hotlines, and
f. study skills classes.
Further, the establishment of a School Improvement Plan will ensure school-wide student
assessment and performance data can be shared with parents, students and other stakeholders. The
ESE Committee will participate in the development of the School Improvement Plan to ensure
input from all stakeholders, including teachers, students, and parent representatives. The attainment
of specific learning objectives, with supporting documentation, will be detailed in the School’s
Annual Report, and copies will be made available to the charter school constituents on an annual
basis.
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Section 6: Exceptional Students
A. Please indicate the level of Service that the school will provide to students with
disabilities by selecting from the list below.
The School will serve students with disabilities whose needs can be met in a regular classroom
environment (at least 80% of instruction occurring in a class with non-disabled peers) with the
provision of reasonable supplementary supports and services and/or modifications and
accommodations.
The charter school will not reject the application of or withdraw a student identified as disabled
based on a finding the student needs a service delivery model not presently in existence at the
School.
The school will include non-discrimination statements and statements of inclusion in any
application handouts or brochures concerning the school and on the school website.
The school will not request a copy of a student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP) or any other
student information from the parent or any other source, prior to the completion of the application
process.
The school will not include questions concerning the student’s IEP or a need for a special service
in the enrollment application.
The school will schedule a meeting of the IEP team when a student with an IEP is admitted to the
school. Sponsor staff will be invited to attend the meeting.
The school will ensure that students with a disability who complete the enrollment application at
the charter school will be referred for enrollment in the school district only when the IEP team
finds that the student’s educational needs cannot be met at the charter school.
B. Describe how the school will ensure that students with disabilities will have an equal
opportunity of being selected for enrollment in the charter school.
The Board of Directors of Gulf Coast Charter Academy will establish a Policy whereby, Gulf
Coast Charter Academy ensures that an equal opportunity of being selected for enrollment will be
afforded to all students with disabilities whose needs can be met:
 in a regular classroom environment (at least 80% of instruction occurring in a class with
non-disabled peers) with the provision of reasonable supplementary supports and services
and/or modifications and accommodations.
Therefore, all students with disabilities in Lee County, that meet the above criteria, will be afforded
the same Application Process as those students in Lee County without disabilities.
Moreover, GCCA will not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, national/ethnic origin, or
disability in the admission of students. The School and its founders/governance board will not
violate the anti-discrimination provisions of the Florida Statutes. The School will meet all
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applicable state and federal requirements including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
(IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The school will provide all services
identified in the IEP plans of each student with a disability.
Lottery: If in any given year, more applications are registered for admission, than seats available,
a lottery will ensue. Each student represented by an application, including those students with
disabilities, will have an equal opportunity of being selected for enrollment into GCCA via said
lottery system.
C.
Describe how the school will work with the sponsor to ensure the charter school is the
appropriate placement for each student with a disability, based on the student’s needs.
In, Lee County’s Manual – ESE Policies and Procedures it is clear that Lee County as the charter
school’s Sponsor, is involved in ongoing articulation with the charter schools, making sure that
each charter is in compliance with Federal, State, and County laws, moreover, ensuring that each
charter is following all ESE county procedures, and supplies to the charters, the appropriate forms
and documents necessary to maintain that status. Ergo it is evident, that these two entities will
collaborate on a consistent basis, with the end result, making sure that the charter school is the
appropriate placement for each student with a disability, based on the student’s needs.
Charter Schools must follow the same rules and procedures regarding the evaluation, identification,
and placement of ESE students. The level (resource, self-contained etc.) of ESE services offered is
documented in the charter for each particular school. An ESE liaison is on the staff of each charter
school along with a limited staff of ESE teachers. Service provision beyond the scope of the ESE
teachers (Visually and Hearing Impaired, Specific Learning Disability, Occupational Therapist,
and Physical Therapist, psychologist, social worker, audiologist, vision and hearing screening) is
contracted at the expense of the charter school. Specific questions regarding ESE procedures and
charter schools can be directed to the ESE Program Specialist assigned to the charter school.
ESE Liaison Meetings
The ESE Liaison will be one of the most important positions to fill as the staffing plan is unveiled.
ESE liaison meetings are held on a monthly basis. Changes in procedures, rules, paperwork,
etc…are disseminated at these meetings. It is expected that the ESE liaison attend all meetings so
that this important information can be shared with ESE staff and administration at the school. This
is yet another way, that describes how the school works, and collaborates with the sponsor, to
ensure the charter school is the appropriate placement for each student with a disability, based on
the student’s needs. The district will assign a staffing specialist to assist with the review of IEP’s
following application and eligibility meetings.
ESE Liaison Job Responsibilities
ESE Liaison Job Description
What do you do at the beginning of school?
• Have registrar run a roster (verification) of ESE students
• Check student records to ensure that each student has a current IEP – IEP must be current
on the first day of school
• Check with registrar for pending transfer cases
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• Elementary liaisons – schedule incoming pre-k staffing
• Ensure that Middle school transfer students have a schedule
• Provide class lists for all ESE service providers
• Review pending cases from last school year
• Work collaboratively with guidance and other support staff to determine scheduling of
CARE, team meetings, etc…
• Check ESE transportation roster to ensure that all students that need transportation are
routed.
• Ensure that regular education teachers have copies of IEPs as appropriate and that
specials/explo teachers have copies of accommodations
• Verify that services on the IEP are reflected on the student’s schedule
• Verify that placement and time with non-disabled peers on the IEP match the data on the
district data reporting system.
Ongoing Responsibilities:
Articulations
A meeting will be held between our school ESE Specialist and the staff at the school that our
students will transition to (high school). This process is done in conjunction with the guidance
department. This meeting does not involve parents.
General Guidelines for Articulations:
th
• The IEP must be current through September 30 .
• The EPs of all gifted students are reviewed via the articulation process.
• Collaborate with guidance counselors to ensure that ESE students are included in general
presentations and orientation opportunities provided by the receiving school
Excent Computer IEP Software, supplied by the Sponsor to the charters
The Excent software is a tool for the Special Educator to use in order to complete various
requirements regarding federal, state, and district procedures. The following forms/procedures are
required to be completed using the Excent software:
1. Parent Notification
2. Individual Education Plan
3. Staffing
4. Reevaluation
5. Education Plan
6. Consent for Placement
7. Consent for Evaluation
8. Evaluation Reports
9. Manifestation Determinations
10. Matrix of Services
11. Prior Written Notice (Free and Appropriate Public Education change, dismissal, refusal,
etc…)
If, for whatever reason, the Excent software program is unavailable, hard copies can be found in
the ESE Folders.
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Even with strict ESE Guidelines that must be followed by each charter, there are still given certain
areas of leeway, such as the level of service a school is going to provide and the model of
instruction that works best at their school, as is presented in the following via an overview of the
ESE program at GCCA, moreover, the specific outcomes that they are trying to achieve.
Overview
Gulf Coast Charter Academy (GCCA) will focus on giving every ESE student an equal opportunity
to learn and be included in the regular education environment and curriculum through the regular
education classroom. At GCCA, we will accommodate ESE students with a combination of
regular education curriculum in an inclusion setting when appropriate. The inclusion classroom is
designed to allow the regular education teacher and the ESE teacher to work together to educate all
the students in the regular education environment. In addition, we will provide special education in
an environment that is conducive to meeting the goals, accommodation, modifications and services
as indicated in the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP) including resource room, speech
therapy, language therapy, occupational therapy, visually and hearing impaired, and physical
therapy.
Specific Outcome Objectives
 Provide students with the least restrictive environment (LRE)
 Assure full educational opportunity to all students with disabilities, K-8, utilizing the kind
and number of facilities, personnel, and services necessary to meet this goal. Provide a free
and appropriate education (FAPE) to all students with disabilities.
 Promote inclusion.
 Promote cooperative collaboration between the exceptional education teacher,
parent/guardian, regular education teacher, student, Lee County, State of Florida as
indicated under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), 2004.
 Be in compliance with federal and state law that requires that the student’s IEP be followed
by all school personnel and staff.
 The school community will work together to assure that all the ESE students have the
maximum opportunity to reach their annual IEP goals as stipulated in their IEP’s.
Best Practices for Inclusion:
The Gulf Coast Charter Academy Board believes that all children need a quality education. Based
upon our respect for diversity and appreciation of differences, GCCA offers the full inclusion
model of education.
In this model, serving children with social, physical, speech and learning differences shall be an
integral part of the regular classroom program. Exceptional Student Education services shall be
carried out by professional ESE teachers and related support personnel with the full cooperation
and collaboration of trained and informed regular classroom teachers.
The GCCA Board recognizes that the following components are important to supporting the
inclusive education model:
 school-wide commitment to this ideal
 classroom and school environment designed for inclusion
 teacher training
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

adequate time for collaboration
administrative support
The GCCA Board is committed to insuring the success of the inclusive education model, within
available resources.
Expectations of the School Community
All students feel welcome and develop a positive sense of self in the inclusive school environment:
 Incoming kindergartners and their parents are invited to attend an orientation prior
to being assigned to classes;
 Receiving teachers of students transitioning to a new cluster are given opportunities
to observe children in their current classroom setting;
 Peer mentors are assigned to new incoming students;
 Peer mentors are assigned to transitioning students ;
 Transitioning second graders visit the third grade classes to which they’ll be
assigned;
 Transitioning fifth graders visit the middle school.
Teachers pursue the steps of a process to determine the needs of incoming special needs children in
order to determine the ability of GCCA to meet the needs of the child, and to plan in advance for
the transition to the new school:
 ESE and classroom teachers carefully review cumulative records to evaluate past
school history, testing previously done or referrals made;
 parents and ESE and classroom teachers meet to discuss the child’s strengths and
needs;
 new incoming ESE students and their parents have the opportunity to shadow at
GCCA;
 staff are willing to “think outside the box” regarding the kinds of services we might
be able to provide ESE children (GCCA may be better able to educate exceptional
education students because of small school size, greater flexibility, the ability to
offer individual attention and innovative instructional approaches that may be more
easily adapted to special needs.)
The school environment communicates respect for differences and appreciation for diversity:
 the school holds school-wide and class-wide discussions on respect;
 staff receives training to implement “social awareness programs”;
 students are encouraged to learn about disabilities during health units;
 peer empathy training is offered by local experts to all students;
 staff portrays a genuine positive and welcoming attitude toward ESE students.
Regular education students are an integral part of what makes inclusion successful; the school’s
philosophy of respect for differences is communicated to students at every grade level, through:
 regular social and academic mixing of students;
 “awareness training“ to develop sensitivity to differences and skills for handling
differences;
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

the teaching of creative approaches to problem solving;
a culture with a policy of “zero tolerance for put downs” consistently positive
modeling of respect on the part of teachers, staff and administration
The school communicates a whole-hearted belief in inclusion through:
 interviews with all new hires;
 new parent orientations;
 Parent/teacher organizational meetings and parent training;
 regular discussions with staff about how to make inclusion happen more effectively;
 throughout the school;
 the use of effective strategies
D. Describe how the school will utilize the regular school facilities and adapt them to the
needs of exceptional students to the maximum extent appropriate, including the use of
supplementary aids and services.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy will ensure that:
Accessibility- Students with sensory or physical impairments will have an accessible location,
specific room conditions, or special equipment.
Physical access to the educational setting requires a barrier-free environment. Accessibility
standards included in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) specify requirements for
facilities, such as exterior routes, entries into buildings and rooms, alarms, drinking fountains, and
restrooms.
GCCA will provide as needed:
Accessible workstations to include desks and tables that are adjustable for students who use
mobility aids, such as a wheelchair. These workstations provide needed support or allow the
student to change positions. Adaptive furniture and equipment will be provided as needed.
Preferential seating involving locating the student’s desk in a place where he or she is best able to
see or hear the teacher and complete assignments. The specific location will depend on the needs
of the student and the typical activities used in the classroom, such as sitting near the front of the
classroom so the student can see materials displayed for the class.
Specialized lighting or light filters which may be needed by a student who experiences unusual
eyestrain or fatigue. The student may need a natural light source or alternative lighting.
Visual Formats: Students who require visual formats include students who are visually impaired
who are able to read large print, as well as students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and require
sign language translation.
Accommodations: Assisting Students with Disabilities To Be Addressed by GCCA:
Large print text must be clear, with high contrast between the color of the print and the
background color. This may also be achieved via computer programs, documents, and online text
books which the student can manipulate to the size text and size of other visuals as needed.
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Sign language interpreters may be required for students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and need
assistance understanding printed material. Some students need sign language interpretation to
accompany their reading of print materials when they are learning to read. The interpreter must be
able to translate using the same method of sign language as the student.
Video recordings and descriptive video present stories or information as movies, giving students a
visual and auditory way to access information. Videos may be closed-captioned with the dialogue
provided visually as text at the bottom of the screen. A decoder is required to activate captions and
is available on most television sets.
Descriptive video adds a narration of key visual elements, such as actions, gestures, facial
expressions, and scene changes.
Tactile Formats: Tactile formats provide information in ways that can be accessed through touch.
Students who are unable to obtain information through visual channels may use tactile formats.
Braille is a method of representing text using a raised-dot code that is read by touch with the
fingertips.
Refreshable Braille displays create temporary print-to-Braille transformations. Braille characters
are displayed on a flexible membrane using a series of movable pins. Refreshable Braille displays
read one line of text at a time, which may affect the time needed to read text.
Tactile graphic images are designed to be touched rather than viewed. A set of tactile symbols in
raised format represents the content and concepts of the graphic material (e.g., maps, charts,
graphs, diagrams, illustrations). A tactile graphic is not a straight reproduction of the print graphic.
Real objects may be used instead of printed images.
Auditory Formats: Students who are unable to read standard print may require auditory formats.
This may include students who are visually impaired or physically limited, as well as some
students who have severe reading disabilities.
A person reads the text aloud to the student. Readers should read to the student on an individual
basis, not with a group of students.
Recorded books are produced on audiotape, compact discs (CDs), or as electronic files. A tape
recorder, CD player, or MP3 player may be required to play the recorded books. Some students
may experience difficulty with replaying audiocassette tapes or locating specific information.
Audio versions should be accompanied with a print or Braille version of the text, particularly if
graphic information is included.
A screen reader changes digitized text to synthesized speech (text-to-speech). Screen reader
software provides an audible version of text displayed on a computer screen.
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Equipment with auditory output includes talking clocks, calculators, scales, thermometers,
voltmeters, and timers. Light probes and special adapters are available to transform visual and
digital signals into audio outputs
Personal audio amplification devices may be needed by students with hearing impairments, often
in addition to their hearing aids, to amplify sounds in the educational setting.
Response Accommodations: Students typically respond to classroom tasks by speaking, writing,
drawing, or other types of expression. Response accommodations allow students to use different
ways to complete assignments, tests, and activities.
Scribes record student responses expressed through speech, sign language, pointing, or using a
communication device. The scribe writes down what the student dictates.
Word processor or computer for students who are unable to effectively use their own handwriting
will be used. Assistive technology devices, such as touch screens, trackballs, mouth- or headsticks,
and other pointing devices, as well as alternative keyboards, can be used for typing.
If needed a brailler keyboard for typing text that can be printed in standard print or Braille.
Voice recorders record the student’s class work or test responses electronically rather than writing
on paper.
Sign language is used for communication by some students with disabilities, such as those who are
deaf or hard-of-hearing.
E. Describe how the school’s effectiveness in serving exceptional education students will be
evaluated.
Evaluations of any program are important, but more so for the exceptional education program. The
goal of any exceptional education program is to set goals for each child in their individual
education plan, along with accommodations. One primary way to assess the effectiveness of the
school’s exceptional educational program is to collect data on student achievement. Student
achievement data can be collected from a variety of sources.
How well are students meeting their goals? (Are the programs working?)
Two meetings per quarter will be held where the goals for each student will be reviewed by the
teachers of said student, who will reply to a series of questions dealing with the level of
achievement each student has reached based on their individual goals, and their overall
achievement reached in their classes. Teachers will discuss what is working and what does not
seem to be as effective. Based on those findings we will:
1. Conduct an informal meeting with the students to discuss their achievements and where
they have not reached their individual goals, collectively (between students and either the
Liaison, or the ESE Teacher assigned to them) decide on a plan to help the student further.
It will be discussed with the student their perception of what is or is not happening that is
preventing the reaching of the goals.
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2. Conduct informal meetings with the teachers to discuss the same concerns as shown in
point 1. Discussions as to what the teachers perceive as the problem concerning why goals
are not being met will also evolve into brainstorming what additional steps can be made in
order to help the student reach goals.
3. Consider giving the student more individualized help within the ESE Resource Room to
help the student with their goals.
4. If through discussions with the student, or at the student’s request the School Counselor
will become involved at some point to ascertain if there are other matters within or outside
the school that need to be addressed in order to help the student succeed.
Students will be placed in various levels of service as per their IEP. Those services if found to not
be elevating the student to the desired level with goals being met or adequate progress being seen
on them, may need to have their IEP revisited and revised. The ESE Liaison will keep accurate
and up to date files on all ESE Students at all times. Said files will be revisited on a regular basis,
and the ESE Liaison will ensure that students are receiving their services through the meetings
held, discussion with ESE Staff, as well as with the parents of ESE students. The Liaison will
make quarterly reports to the Principal on the progress of the students in the ESE Program, as a
whole, and any and all concerns held by parents, students, ESE Staff, or teachers.
Surveys (Conducting surveys of all invested parties)
Periodically, with no fewer than bi-yearly occurrences, GCCA will conduct performance and
satisfaction survey of all invested ESE parties including but not limited to: Parents, Students,
Teachers, ESE Department Staff, Administration personnel dealing with the perception of the level
of services offered, the individuals satisfaction and/or concerns with said services.
Testing Results
Scores of all students are compiled and analyzed by every conceivable group by both the school
and the state. GCCA will analyze each student’s scores on the FCAT attaching said scores to the
PLP of the student, to assist in setting goals for the next school year. Beyond using this tool to
assist students, the scores for individual ESE students and as a group will be compiled and
evaluated on the basis of the students’ growth. These growth gains will be analyzed and used to
evaluate the program(s) the students participated in.
Furthermore, these said scores become a part of the (Annual Report) of the school.
If it is perceived by the state or federal government that there is an inordinate amount of children
from one group being identified with a disability they will notify the sponsor and an audit will be
performed by IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) representatives. Obviously, this
oversight would be a tool that would evaluate the program(s) at GCCA.
F. Explain how exceptional students who enter the school below grade level will be engaged
in and benefit from the curriculum.
Procedures for implementing services for students with disabilities will be modeled after those in
place in the School District of Leer County. The School is committed to the concept that all
students deserve a quality education, especially students with disabilities. Students who are
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currently enrolled in an ESE or gifted program will continue to receive services established by
their Individual Education Plan (IEP) or Education Plan (EP).
Students who have been determined to have an IEP, EP, or 504 plan will be scheduled for an IEP,
EP, or 504 meeting to review the document, determine a need for any changes, and establish
student services for the student. Our staff will seek guidance from the District's ESE department
and follow those established guidelines for determining the need for an alternative assessment
exemption from the State and/or District assessment. Each individual student's determinations are
made by, his/her IEP team. In addition, students who qualify for an alternative assessment
instrument will be administered the alternative assessment is accordance with federal, state, and
district policies.
G. Provide the school’s projected population of students with disabilities and describe how
the projection was made.
The following information was disseminated to GCCA by Jeff McCullers the District Liaison of
Charter Schools for Lee County. The ESE population for Lee County is approximately 14% as per
a study conducted by the Lee County School Board. 8% is made up of students with disabilities
and the other 6% is the gifted population. The Charters in Lee County draw students from the
entire county. Ergo, unless a Charter School has a very narrow targeted population; it is usually a
microcosm of the county at large. Although GCCA’s targeted population is in one area a focus on
ELL students, the majority of the population is based on a multicultural school setting and
therefore would reflect a percentage near to those reported by the county. Therefore, the projected
enrollment of students with disabilities at GCCA reflects the same number of 14% as reported by
the county, based on the microcosm premise. The gifted projection for GCCA is 6%. The total
ESE population projected for this first year is 14%. Should these projections, in reality, prove to
be significantly different; the school will make immediate adjustments in order to serve the needs
of these students.
H. Identify the staffing plan, based on the above projection, for the school’s special
education program, including the number and qualifications of staff.
The first year’s projection is based on the school’s total population of 188 students. The numbers
generated by the projected percentages results in approximately 23 students with learning
disabilities and approximately 13 students in the gifted program, with a total ESE population of
20% representing approximately 36 students. This may include students who are newly identified
and students who transfer from another school with an IEP. The school will employ a full-time
certified K-8 ESE Liaison to manage the ESE Program, documentation, instruction, and training
for students, staff and families of students with disabilities. In addition a certified K-8 ESE
Teacher trained in the Inclusion Model.
The ESE Liaison will be responsible for:
 Orientation of ESE parents and students during pre-planning.
 Weekly consultations with teachers of ESE students to ensure modifications and
accommodations are being met.
 Direct instruction of services as determined by the IEP.
 Administration of screenings and preparing district paperwork.
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Monitoring and scheduling annual and re-evaluation meetings.
Facilitating the support team and staffing meetings.
Assisting with scheduling ESE students for required services as per the IEP.
Reporting testing accommodations, as per the IEP, to the testing coordinator, regular
education, and ESE teacher.
Determining, with support of the IEP committee, if related services such as OT/PT,
Home Health, Family Counseling, or Transportation are being considered.
Transition planning for eligible students.
Training staff to identify learning difficulties as well as gifted characteristics.
Ensure that all dates on the IEP and in the student folder are correctly recorded in the
data reporting system for audit and funding accountability.
Perform progress monitoring audits to ensure accountability with student folders,
student schedules, ESE teacher logs, and all related compliance issues.
I. Describe how the school will serve gifted and talented Students.
Educators of the gifted are guided by the profession’s ethical and professional practice standards.
They practice in multiple roles and complex situations across wide age and developmental ranges.
Their practice requires ongoing attention to professional and ethical considerations. They engage in
professional activities that promote growth in individuals with gifts and talents and update
themselves on evidence-based best practices. Educators of the gifted view themselves as lifelong
learners and regularly reflect on and adjust their practice. They are aware of how attitudes,
behaviors, and ways of communicating can influence their practice. Educators of the gifted
understand that culture and language interact with gifts and talents and are sensitive to the many
aspects of the diversity of individuals with gifts and talents and their families.
Educators of the gifted effectively collaborate with families, other educators, and related service
providers. This collaboration enhances comprehensive articulated program options across
educational levels and engagement of individuals with gifts and talents in meaningful learning
activities and interactions. Moreover, educators of the gifted embrace their special role as advocate
for individuals with gifts and talents. They promote and advocate for the learning and wellbeing of
individuals with gifts and talents across settings and diverse learning experiences.
To be in compliance with Federal and State laws, and county compliance regulations, GCCA will
provide a quality gifted and talented program serviced by a gifted endorsed teacher to all eligible
students. The gifted and talented program will focus on problem solving, critical thinking, and
creative thinking activities. Depending on the numbers of Gifted Students in each grade, the
school will decide on the following models: Elementary Resource, Elementary Content, Full time
On Level Gifted Classrooms, or Full Time Multi-Age Gifted Classrooms, as well as possible
participation in Odyssey of the Mind Program.
At the Middle School level we will offer, depending on the numbers of Gifted Students: gifted
content area classes, and/or elective gifted resource classes, as well as possible participation in
Odyssey of the Mind groups. In addition, GCCA we will be offering Advanced Level content area
classes across the curriculum that are open to all students who with recommendation are placed in
the advanced course work classes.
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Teachers or parents may recommend a student for gifted and talented testing at any time, to the
ESE Liaison. If said student is tested and found to qualify, they will be placed in classes, with
parental approval, for gifted and talented students, and/or in classes for advanced studies.
The needs of gifted and talented students go beyond what is traditionally offered in a regular
classroom. The nature of their abilities, demonstrated or latent, requires differentiated learning
experiences and opportunities for them to maximize their potential. Teachers need to develop the
depth and quality of their student’s experiences while adjusting the pace to meet the individual
needs as outlined in their Educational Plan. GCCA’s Constructivist Approach will open the
possibilities for gifted students to explore, research, and report in an array of media opportunities.
Motivating gifted students requires an in-depth and thoughtfully developed curriculum plan that
goes deeper into the content rather requiring more of the same work as the regular education
classroom or student. The Constructivist Approach, used with all of our students is a natural
approach with all students and one that gifted students can excel greatly in. This approach uses the
curiosity of a student and allows them to develop their own activities, research and methods of
presenting the information learned around authentic real-life problems, issues and work. This will
also allow gifted students to develop a sense of self to a greater degree and explore the possibilities
that the world has to offer.
Additionally, GCCA Gifted students will serve as peer tutors within specific classes. Peers
assisting peers not only reinforces GCCA as a caring community, the idea of Service, and sharing
your talents enables students learn more about the subject, others, and themselves.
GCCA will follow the legislative guidelines of the State of Florida as per legislation: 6A-6.03019
Special Instructional Programs for Students Who Are Gifted. Specific Authority 229.053(1),
230.23(4)(m) FS. Law Implemented 228.041(18)(19), 229.565(2)(b)(c), 230.23(4)(m) FS. History
- New 7-1-77, Formerly 6A-6.3019, Amended 10-10-91, 5-19-98, 7-14-2002.
GCCA will follow the identification of Gifted students as per Lee County, and The State of Florida
in that:
(1) Gifted: One who has superior intellectual development and is capable of high performance.
(2) Criteria for eligibility: A student is eligible for special instruction programs for the Gifted if the
student meets criteria under (2)(a) or (b) of this rule.
a) The student demonstrates: 1. Need for a special program. 2. A majority of characteristics of
gifted students according to a standard scale or checklist, and 3. Superior intellectual development
as measured by an intelligence quotient of two standard deviations or more above the mean on an
individually administered standardized test of intelligence.
b) The student is a member of an under-represented group and meets the criteria specific in an
approved school district for increasing the participation of under-represented groups in programs
for gifted students.
1. For the purpose of this rule, under-represented groups are defined as groups: a. who are limited
English proficient, or b. who are from a low socio-economic status family.
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The referral process for gifted students as per Lee County Public School’s guidelines, states that
the screening process begins when the student’s teacher, parent or other qualified personnel
observe outstanding academic, creative or other superior abilities when compared with other
students of the same age group. Students may also be identified by their test scores on State
Assessments. The reporting of these observations initiates the process of collecting necessary data
to determine eligibility.
All teachers who will teach gifted students outside a fully gifted classroom should serve gifted and
talented students in a unique way in that they will:
1. understand the issues in definitions, theories, and identification of gifted and talented students,
including those from diverse backgrounds;
2. recognize the learning differences, developmental milestones, and cognitive/affective
characteristics of gifted and talented students, including those from diverse backgrounds, and
identify their related academic and social-emotional needs; and
3. understand, plan, and implement a range of evidence-based strategies to assess gifted and
talented students, to differentiate instruction, content, and assignments for them (including the use
of higher-order critical and creative-thinking skills), and to nominate them for advanced programs
or acceleration as needed.
The NAGC (National Association of Gifted Children)
Pre-K -- Grade 12 Gifted Programming Standards
Classroom teachers are the primary agent for identifying and serving gifted and talented students.
It is critical that all teachers are able to recognize a high-ability student who may need more depth
and complexity in instruction or be referred for further assessment and services. Teachers in
specialized programs for gifted learners or those who coordinate gifted and talented programs and
services should be familiar with the theory, research, curriculum strategies, and educational
practices necessary to developing and sustaining classroom-based opportunities for advanced
student learning.
Whether previously identified, or identified once a student enters GCCA there will be an
educational plan written, accommodations and goals specified, and followed by all parties involved
with a student. As with learning disabled students under the direction of the ESE Liaison, gifted
students will be serviced to the benefit of their furthered appropriate advancement as pursuant to
the laws of the State of Florida.
The contents of the EP (Educational Plan) will provide detailed information that is useful to school
personnel and to the parents. An EP will provide a clear picture of the student, how the student is
gifted, and the student’s special needs related to the giftedness.
Strategies focused in the classroom:
 Gifted students will be able to think creatively and critically to identify and solve realworld problems.
 Identify and investigate a problem, generate supportive arguments from multiple
perspectives of a complex issue.
 Analyze the relevance, reliability, and usefulness of data to draw conclusions and forecast
effective problem solutions.
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Use and evaluate various problem-solving methods to determine effectiveness in solving
real-world problems.
Gifted students will be able to create, adapt, and assess multifaceted questions in a variety
of fields/disciplines.
Identify significant questions within and across disciplines.
Generate significant questions within and across disciplines.
Evaluate and refine significant questions within and across disciplines.
Manifest significant leadership skills and organize group(s) to achieve project goals.
In as much as a part of GCCA’s target group will be ELL students, it is important that we
recognize the laws of the state of Florida as they pertain to Gifted ELL student and the services that
will be offered: If the primary language of the parents indicates a need for an interpreter, one will
be provided. That may include sign language or other mode of communication as necessary to
ensure parent participation.
The rule notes: that the student’s progress toward the goals (program and individual) will be
measured and reported to the parents. The goals should relate to meeting the needs of the student
that result from the giftedness to enable the student to receive an appropriate education. The intent
is to indicate to the parent that the student is continuing to make academic and personal gains.
Educational Plans are valid for three years. Once a student is labeled “Gifted” they are always
gifted. GCCA’s plan is to review the EP’s of Gifted Students with greater regularity, especially
when it comes to a student’s entry into our school. Given that our school is not a traditional school
in its design, reviews will occur fairly quickly upon a student’s enrollment, so as to place them in
the most appropriate way. Rule 6A-6.030191, FAC, states, “EPs may be reviewed more
frequently as needed… or if the student’s parent or teacher requests a review.”
Furthermore, When frequency, location, and duration of service changes, a new EP must be
developed. Our plans are to review each gifted student’s EP no less than every two years.
Beyond our initial review of a new student, we will be conducting reviews on a regular schedule
that includes 1st to 2nd, 4th to 5th, and 7th to 8th. Thus, our plans are to exceed the frequency of
review and evaluation of the individual EP.
Furthermore, a review will be conducted at the request of the parents, and/or faculty.
GCCA Teachers and Staff understand and demonstrate the foundations of the skills and standards
for the education of the gifted and talented (as well as in the education of all children, which
include the following to guide their interactions with said students:
Educators of the gifted know and demonstrate respect for their students as unique human beings.
They understand variations in characteristics and development between and among individuals
with and without exceptional learning needs and capacities. Educators of the gifted can express
how different characteristics interact with the domains of human development and use this
knowledge to describe the varying abilities and behaviors of individuals with gifts and talents.
Educators of the gifted also understand how families and communities contribute to the
development of individuals with gifts and talents.
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Educators of the gifted understand the effects that gifts and talents can have on an individual’s
learning in school and throughout life.
Moreover, educators of the gifted are active and resourceful in seeking to understand how
language, culture, and family background interact with an individual’s predispositions to impact
academic and social behavior, attitudes, values, and interests. The understanding of these learning
differences and their interactions provides the foundation upon which educators of the gifted plan
instruction to provide meaningful and challenging learning.
Educators of the gifted possess a repertoire of evidence-based curriculum and instructional
strategies to differentiate for individuals with gifts and talents. They select, adapt, and use these
strategies to promote challenging learning opportunities in general and special curricula and to
modify learning environments to enhance self-awareness and self-efficacy for individuals with
gifts and talents. They enhance the learning of critical and creative thinking, problem solving, and
performance skills in specific domains. Moreover, educators of the gifted emphasize the
development, practice, and transfer of advanced knowledge and skills across environments
throughout the lifespan leading to creative, productive careers in society for individuals with gifts
and talents.
Educators of the gifted actively create learning environments for individuals with gifts and talents
that foster cultural understanding, safety and emotional wellbeing, positive social interactions, and
active engagement. In addition, educators of the gifted foster environments in which diversity is
valued and individuals are taught to live harmoniously and productively in a culturally diverse
world. Educators of the gifted shape environments to encourage independence, motivation, and
self-advocacy of individuals with gifts and talents.
This standard of skills and practices is at the very heart of the mission of GCCA in that we believe
in an education that supports and encourages students to develop an embracement of cultural
understanding of the diverse makeup of their school community, city, county, country, and the
world. They will gain a lifelong outlook that embraces diversity and sees the value in diversity.
GCCA in having as a part of its target population students from diverse cultures and levels of
English Language Acquisition fully realizes and promotes the standard and skill for educators of
gifted and talented students that states: Educators of the gifted understand the role of language and
communication in talent development and the ways in which exceptional conditions can hinder or
facilitate such development. They use relevant strategies to teach oral and written communication
skills to individuals with gifts and talents.
Educators of the gifted are familiar with assistive technologies to support and enhance
communication of individuals with exceptional needs. They match their communication methods
to an individual’s language proficiency and cultural and linguistic differences. Educators of the
gifted use communication strategies and resources to facilitate understanding of subject matter for
individuals with gifts and talents who are English language learners.
Curriculum and instructional planning is at the center of gifted and talented education. Educators
of the gifted develop long-range plans anchored in general and special curricula rooted in the State
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Standards. They systematically translate shorter-range goals and objectives that take into
consideration an individual’s abilities and needs, the learning environment, and cultural and
linguistic factors. Understanding of these factors, as well as the implications of being gifted and
talented, guides the educator’s selection, adaptation, and creation of materials, and use of
differentiated instructional strategies.
Learning plans are modified based on ongoing assessment of the individual’s progress. Moreover,
educators of the gifted facilitate these actions in a collaborative context that includes individuals
with gifts and talents, families, professional colleagues, and personnel from other agencies as
appropriate. Educators of the gifted are comfortable using technologies to support instructional
planning and individualized instruction.
As stated previously in many areas of this proposal, GCCA has a very detailed and developed
system of assessment and accountability.
While this is school wide in all areas, it is an area that is specifically addressed in the skills and
standards of effective gifted programs: Assessment is integral to the decision-making and teaching
of educators of the gifted as multiple types of assessment information are required for both
identification and learning progress decisions. Educators of the gifted use the results of such
assessments to adjust instruction and to enhance ongoing learning progress. As do all teachers of
all students at GCCA. Educators of the gifted understand the process of identification, legal
policies, and ethical principles of measurement and assessment related to referral, eligibility,
program planning, instruction, and placement for individuals with gifts and talents, including those
from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. They understand measurement theory and
practices for addressing the interpretation of assessment results. In addition, educators of the gifted
understand the appropriate use and limitations of various types of assessments.
To ensure the use of nonbiased and equitable identification and learning progress models,
educators of the gifted employ alternative assessments such as performance-based assessment,
portfolios, and computer simulations. While the afore mentioned quotation was written for the
teachers of gifted and talented students, these standards and skills are those that all educators
should keep in mind at all times regardless of the students they serve.
GCCA believes and recognizes that all children are in some way gifted and talented. Through the
act of this recognition and teaching to the giftedness of students and holding all students to high
standards it is believed we can elevate all students to their optimum level of development. The
constructivist approach to learning, we believe, is the perfect avenue to address all levels of
giftedness.
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Section 7: English Language Learners
A. Describe how the school will comply with state and federal requirements for serving
English language learners, including the procedures that will be utilized for identifying such
students and providing support services.
GCCA is focused on STEM/Constructivist Approach to Learning, coupled with facilitating and
enhancing the learning of the ELL Student.
One goal of a performance assessment is to judge the level of competency students achieve in
doing reading/language arts, science, and mathematics (Parker, Louie, & O’Dwyer, 2009).
Therefore, performance assessments can also produce useful information for diagnostic purposes to
assess what students know, and they can help teachers decide where to begin instruction or
determine which groups of students need special attention. These assessment strategies can also be
used to monitor students’ processing skills and problem-solving approaches, as well as their
competence in particular areas while simulating learning activities.
These characteristics can be extremely beneficial for the special needs student population,
including ELLs, since these students may not have received equal education opportunities because
of their linguistic needs (Abedi & Herman, 2010). These students often exhibit greater interest and
a higher level of learning when they are required to organize facts around major concepts and
actively construct their own understanding of the concepts in a rich variety of contexts.
These same goals attached to performance assessments and the emphasis on “in doing…” help to
illustrate the importance of doing authentic work with a constructivist approach and STEM
education.
The school will use the district’s ESOL Manual. Here is the flowchart that we will use:
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According to Diana Laboy-Rush, STEM Solutions Manager at Learning.com, in her paper entitled,
Integrated STEM Education Through Project-Based Learning, “everyone naturally engages in
problem solving. We all use the tools and materials available to us to adapt the environment to
meet our needs. The ability to solve problems comes naturally to most. The project approach to
STEM, or “learning by doing,” is grounded in constructivist theory (Fortus, Krajcikb, Dershimerb,
Marx, & Mamlok-Naamand, 2005) that is shown to improve student achievement in higher level
cognitive tasks, such as scientific processes and mathematic problem solving (Satchwell & Loepp,
2002).”
Thus, we at GCCA believe our unique blending of several learning theories and methods, with an
emphasis on STEM will facilitate the ELL student to achieving at higher levels than a more
traditional classroom setting with little hands on activity. The STEM approach is more than just
hands on activities, and stress the building of concepts through active participation.
In addition, the School will follow the (LCPS) Lee County Public Schools’ District ELL Plan and
will abide by the requirements of the LULAC et.al. vs. State Board of Education Consent Decree
(1990) by servicing English Language Learner (ELL) student populations as follows:
All faculty will become trained and become ESOL Certified as required by the state of Florida with
18, 60 & 300 hours.
Students in grades K-12 who meet the eligibility requirements participate in the English for
Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Program.
Students entering any LCPS, including GCCA, are identified through responses to the Language
Survey Questions on the Registration Form: What is their first language? What is the main
language? And, What is the home language of the student?
Students are screened for ESOL services through the Aural-Oral, Reading/Writing and/or Limited
English Proficiency (LEP) Committee if they answer “yes” to any of the questions on the
Language Survey.
Students are classified, placed and offered programmatic instruction based on the assessment and
LEP Committee recommendation.
Students placed in the program are assessed at least once a year to determine if they may exit or
continue in the program.
A student can participate in the program for a period of three to six-years, however, they could exit
sooner based on their progress.
After students exit, they are followed up for a two-year period to ensure academic progress.
Parents may examine the State Standards at any of the schools in Lee County.
Parent workshops are held to assist parents of ESOL students in the educational adaptation process.
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A Parent Advisory Council serves as an advocate of ESOL students and empowers parents to
become directly involved in the education of their children.
The staff of GCCA organizes cultural activities, crafts, music and presentations to promote the
American culture while also validating all cultures represented. One of the basic tenets of GCCA is
to establish a true multicultural school environment through a program that fosters tolerance and
acceptance of others leading to a true brotherhood among and between students.
The ELL Program teaches English to Speakers of Other Languages through various program
models. Models chosen will be based on the needs of the individual students and if it is effective,
efficient and cost effective.
The Immersion Model places ELL students into monolingual English classrooms with special
support and assistance in heritage language from tutors and/or teachers.
The Sheltered Academic Instruction Model teaches regular content area courses in ways designed
to make them comprehensible to ELL students. Techniques include simplified speech
contextualization, task function orientation, computer assisted instruction and interactional
activities.
The ELL Instruction Model (ESL) teaches English instruction for the development of listening,
speaking, reading and writing skills of non-English speaking students through the Language Arts
curriculum.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy is dedicated to assisting its ELL students in achieving academically,
coupled with maintaining a sense of pride regarding their heritage. GCCA will use a variety of
methods to address and support these students and their families. According to research, the
constructivist approach and STEM methods aid in the acquisition of the host language for all
students. In addition to these special programs and focuses, GCCA will in concert with Lee
County:
 Provide appropriate identification, assessment and placement of ELL students.
 Provide staff development to enhance English instruction in both ELL and content area
courses.
 Encourage parental involvement in the education of ELL students.
 Provide for the utilization of thematic units of study, cooperative learning, multicultural and
cross-cultural activities, computer assisted instruction, tutorial assistance in academic lab
settings, after school enrichment activities, high interest reading materials, T.V. productions
and other instructional methods to meet students’ needs.
 Provide for the training of personnel.
 Provide equal access to all educational programs including gifted.
The School will survey ALL parents upon initial entry (registration) using the Home Language
Survey (HLS) as is required by the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) et al. v.
State Board of Education Consent Decree. The Home Language Survey includes three questions
and is given at the time of registration.
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The questions are as follows:
1. Is a language other than English used in the home?
2. Did the student have a first language other than English?
3. Does the student most frequently speak a language other than English?
If a parent answers “yes” to one or more of the three HLS questions, then the student is assessed in
English within 20 days of registration using the following assessment:

Administer the Oral Language Proficiency Scale to students who have at least one
affirmative response on the HLS.
After the student is assessed and determined to be ELL, the School will send a Notice to
Parent/Guardian of ELL Student (FM# 6577 Secondary) at initial entry into the program. The
School will also send letter annually and when programmatic changes occur. The letter will include
the following:
 School Name
 Work location #
 Date (day, month, & year)
 Student’s first and last name
 Student’s I. D. number
 Student’s proficiency level as a result of the OLPS-R (The first box in the letter is for the initial
testing. The second box is for the annual updated English Proficiency Level.)
 Instructional delivery models
 Content-area instructional delivery models
 Contact Person’s Name & Phone Number
 Principal’s Signature.
ESOL Program Placement: The School will implement an ESOL program of instruction in
meeting the needs of the ELL population to be served. Program instruction will be designed to
develop the student's mastery of the four language skills, including listening, speaking, reading,
and writing, as rapidly as possible. The School will provide ESOL instruction in English and
ESOL instruction in the basic subject areas of reading, mathematics, science, social studies, and
computer literacy, in accordance with the guidelines and procedures outlined by the current Lee
County ELL Plan.
Students identified as ELL will be placed in two ESOL courses, in addition to the regular
education language arts classes, as applicable to the grade level and language proficiency, as
follows: (See “Appendix ELL” for complete explanation of these courses.)
Language Arts content course scheduled by grade level:
English (1, 2, 3, 4) Through ESOL (by grade level)

Language proficiency course scheduled by ESOL level*:

Developmental Language Arts Through ESOL (required elective, by ESOL language
proficiency levels I-IV).
*If levels need to be combined, the Developmental Language Arts placement may be in the best
combination of mixed language level courses (ESOL levels 1 and 2; 3; 4).
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Providing Support services:
English Language Learners will receive instruction in all courses, which is comprehensible, equal
and comparable in amount, scope, sequence and quality to the instruction provided to English
proficient students.
Administrators will be responsible for monitoring the implementation of strategies by the
classroom teacher using the classroom walk-through model. Evidence of compliance to the law,
and of serving the ELL Students using a variety of methods, can be observed during classroom
visits, through lesson plans, through use of materials and audiovisuals, and through grade book
notations.
All teachers, of ELLs, document the ESOL strategies used for each lesson in their lesson plans.
Some of the ELL Strategies to assist ELLs include but are not limited to Marzano’s High
Yield Strategies, and as follows:

Identifying Similarities and Differences – Methods to help students in identifying
similarities and differences include, but are not limited to: Mind mapping, Venn diagrams, T
Charts, Cause and Effect Organizers, and Word Sorts;
Cooperative Learning – Through cooperative learning, students can be paired with peer

tutors that speak the same language and can assist the ELL student in their projects and speech
acquisition, as well as with non-ELL students. Through the informal processes actively involved
in work accomplished in groups, students can and do learn more of not only the content and skills
that are the focus of the projects, but in language development itself. Group Projects, Language
Experience Approach, Shared Reading and Writing, Book Pass, and Dramatizations;

Nonlinguistic Representations – Students can express what they are learning, in more
than just words, nonlinguistic representations include but are not limited to: Pictures,
Manipulatives, Concept Maps, and Student Drawings.

Questions-Cues-Advanced Organizers - Activate background knowledge, Frontload key
vocabulary, Predicting, inferencing, concluding, Reciprocal teaching and modeling, Think alouds
and guided questions, and KWL are all methods that can be used to help the ELL student, as well
as all students in acquiring language acquisition and content area skills and concepts.

Home learning and Practice – Students need to practice the English language often, and
be encouraged with their progress with not only the language use, but the skills and concepts
gained in their various courses. Students also need to practice at home, with an involved family,
often guided by suggestions from the teachers. Techniques that help in the acquisition of language
and skills and concepts include but are not limited to: Lesson opening (set induction) with review
and preview, Metacognition of strengths and weaknesses. Reflective journals, Sharing goals and
objectives with parents, Praise efforts to use English, Hold high expectations, Honor individual
learning styles, Use authentic assessment.

Resources: Resources that can and should be used include but are not limited to: Word-toWord dictionaries in the students’ heritage language/English language will be available in the
ESOL and Content classrooms throughout the year, as well as, for all district and state assessments.
Furthermore, the School Principal will commit to provide instruction to ELLs in equal amount,
sequence and scope, as to non ELL students, by ensuring:
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o The same program goals and objectives for ELLs as non ELLs exists (content of basic
subject area courses is the same in scope, sequence and quality as the instruction provided to nonELLs).
o Teacher classroom goals and objectives are for mastery of State Standards.
o ELL students will have access to honors, college preparatory, and advanced placement
courses, as appropriate and regardless of language proficiency.
o Instructional delivery, not content, is modified to meet the needs of ELLs at all times.
o Content area teachers receive appropriate ESOL training, and utilize appropriate ELL
strategies when ELLs are enrolled in their classes.

Home Language Assistance Program (HLAP) is implemented if the School has 15 or
more ELL students speaking another language (per language group) other than English upon
registration, the School will designate a linguistically qualified teacher who can assist ELL
students in understanding content instruction. The School will use the inclusion model as well as
the the pull-out resource model, as necessary. Teachers and paraprofessionals assigned to this
program are expected to assist ELL students using their home language in the core subject areas of
mathematics, science, and social sciences.

All ELLs participate in statewide assessments – and test accommodations are provided in
accordance with State and District mandates and guidelines, which may include:
o English to heritage language dictionary
o Flexible setting (parent must be notified prior to testing);
o Flexible scheduling;
o Assistance in the heritage language (as specified in testing manual for each respective
section of test to determine level of assistance).
o ESOL Department and Testing Chair (as designated by the school, TBA) attend all required
District Professional Development sessions.
o Abide by Student Progression Plan, including provisions for ELL students.
The Individual ELL Student Plan: All students classified as ELL will have an Individual ELL
Student Plan. Such plan is part of the permanent student cumulative record folder upon entry into
the ESOL program. The plan will include biographical student information (name, grade, home
language) initial assessment and placement data, ESOL program and updated information, program
participation, amount of instructional time and/or schedule, exit information, post program review,
ELL committee information, as well as a Progress Monitoring Plan (PMP) if needed. The plan will
be updated on an ongoing basis to include programmatic changes, assessments, level updating, and
ELL committee meeting information.
The ELL Plan will:

Inform the student, parent, and teachers of the student ESOL language level

Monitor student progression

Establish meetings between the school, the parents, and the student to discuss academic
progress

Provide methods for evaluation and provisions for monitoring and reporting student
progress

Provide for parental and teacher involvement to ensure that the students are being properly
serviced
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
Provide for student exit from and reclassification into the program.

The School will designate an ESOL coordinator to be responsible for developing and
updating all Student ELL Plans, keeping a record of parental contact and ESOL Program Records
Folder. The record folder containing the following will be available for all ELL students:
o
Home Language Survey (HLS) –Completed
o
Original copy (white) is placed in the Cumulative Folder
o
Yellow copy is for teacher information
o
English Language Proficiency Assessment
o
Oral Language Proficiency Scale (OLPS-R)
o
CELLA Results Report
o
Other Assessments
o
Programmatic Assessment
o
Notice to Parent/Guardian of LEP Students
(initial entry, annually, programmatic change)
o
o
Copy of Parent Notification ELL for Committee Meeting(s), if applicable
o
Copy of Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAO) Parent Letter
Copy of Student’s Schedule
o
o
Keep all prior year schedules
o
ESOL Level 1 students writing prompt.
The ELL Committee: The main function of the ELL Committee is to resolve any issue that
affects the instructional program of an ELL student. It is composed of at least 4 members: an
administrator or designee, the ESOL teacher, the home language teacher (if any), the
classroom/subject area teacher(s), plus guidance counselors, school social workers, school
psychologists or other educators as appropriate for the situation. The parent(s) will be invited to
attend any meeting of the ELL Committee.
The ELL Committee will:

Schedule meetings to review the student’s progress and make recommendations after
thorough review of all necessary data;
Invite parent(s)/guardian(s) to attend all meetings, discuss and explain all

recommendations;

Ensure that the parent(s)/guardian(s) understands the proceedings of the meeting, which
may include arranging for an interpreter for parent(s)/guardian(s) whose native language is other
than English;
Convene meetings in a timely manner and record recommendations in the Individual ELL

Plan;

File in ELL folder a copy of a letter inviting parent(s) to attend ELL Committee

Convene an ELL Committee for students with six semesters or more in the ESOL program;

Convene an ELL Committee for ESOL level V students within the two-year monitoring
period who have shown a decline of 1.0 point in the overall grade point average or when academic
concerns are identified;

Maintain a LEP Committee log to detail the date, name of child, reason for convening a
LEP committee, and the outcome of the meeting.
Exit procedures:
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The Comprehensive English Language Learning Assessment (CELLA): The CELLA will be
administered each spring to all current ELL students to measure proficiency and gains in reading,
writing, listening, and speaking as follows:

Criteria used CELLA and State Assessment
Student must be assessed with CELLA on grade level


Student must achieve scores at or above the Proficient Level on CELLA aural/oral

Student must achieve scores at or above the Proficient Level on CELLA writing.
The School’s ESOL contact person, in coordination with the teachers, will implement the
aforementioned procedures to exit students from the ESOL program.
Monitoring ELL students and subsequent exit: The School’s ESOL contact/designee with input
from classroom teacher(s), and any other applicable staff will be required for conducting follow-up
of former ELLs once they have exited the program. Exited student’s academic performance in
Language Arts/English will be monitored on an on-going basis and post program review updates
will be documented, by the Language Arts teacher, via the following timeframe:

At the end of the first grading period after exiting.

At the end of the first semester after exiting.

At the end of the first year after exiting.

At the end of the second year after exiting.
The school will monitor the student’s progress via the following:
report cards


test scores

classroom performance

Post Program Review Reports (as applicable)

Standardized tests as applicable)

Student Case Management referrals (as applicable).
This information will assist in determining student’s progress as well as the school’s effectiveness
servicing the needs of its ELL population. If the student’s performance is unsatisfactory, the
ESOL contact or designee will convene an ELL MTSS/RTI Committee meeting to determine the
reason(s) for the student’s lack of progress and to recommend appropriate alternative interventions,
including, but not limited to discussion over possible re-entry into the ESOL Program.
Parental Involvement: To promote parent and community participation in programs for ELLs, the
school will invite parents to participate in district parent organizations, as well as establishing a
school based parent group for ELL parents. Parents of ELLs who are, or wish to be, in leadership
positions will also be invited to attend local conferences and will be provided translation
technology for better understanding. ELL parents who cannot come to the school will be contacted
via home visits and invited to join other parents of the group in such a way as to obtain
transportation to and from the school and events.
B. Identify the staffing plan for the school’s English Language Learner Program, including
the number and qualifications of staff.
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The School will ensure that experienced and ESOL certified teachers, as appropriate, will be hired
to serve the School's English Language Learner Program, based on students' proficiency levels.
The number of teachers will be based on the number of students identified upon student enrollment
(results from home language surveys and/or ESOL levels).
Additionally, the School is committed to ensuring that all core curriculum personnel instructing
ELL students will have the appropriate training (ESOL endorsement/required coursework
including ESOL Issues and Strategies -18 or 60 hours) documentation. The Principal/Staffing
Committee will identify each teacher’s training status or requirement. The School will offer on-site
staff development opportunities for all staff to acquire ESOL endorsement. The Principal/Staffing
Committee will identify each teacher’s training status or requirement. The School will work with
the Teacher Education Center to provide ESOL in-service training program(s) to assist language
arts, basic subjects and other subject area teachers. The School will work with its Sponsor in
informing staff of the sessions or web-based courses available to meet the ESOL/META training
requirements.
All instructional members will be trained and expected to:
 identify the students in their grade book and record the ESOL level next to each student’s
name;
 use appropriate lessons and reflect ESOL strategies being used in lesson plans; and use
appropriate grading guidelines and report card comments;
 Additionally, in accordance with Rule 6A-6.0904, FAC., once the School has 15 or more ELLs
who speak the same language, the School will employ a bilingual paraprofessional or teacher, as
required;
 Teachers and/or paraprofessionals assigned to this program will be expected to assist ELL
students using their home language in the core subject areas and providing instructional assistance
in the classroom to ensure the delivery of comprehensible instruction for the ELL students.

Bilingual paraprofessionals will assist students through the use of the following:
o
working in small groups,
translating information,
o
o
interpreting test questions and homework assignments as appropriate, and
o
helping students comprehend textbooks and other written materials.
The ESOL program coordinator, who will serve as a staff contact person, will have the
responsibility of overseeing/assisting staff in meeting the needs of the School's ELL population
throughout the school year.
The ELL Plan, as referenced herein, reflects current policies and procedures adopted by the
Sponsor. The School hereby agrees to adopt and implement the Sponsor's policies and procedures
with respect to the ELL Plan, as amended from time to time. GCCAs mission and vision is
dedicated to the success of all students, and as such it is paramount that our ELL students not only
excel in all areas of the curriculum, at an advanced pace, but feel accepted and valued within the
school community.
Furthermore, the school’s mission is rooted in the belief that an education of the highest quality
will steer student’s lives toward becoming lifelong learners, thus, promoting a brighter future for
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them and as an end result, as numbers of these students significantly increase, a better society in
which to reside. GCCA strives to create a community of learners that honors individual
differences and student needs, varied modalities of instruction, and nurtures character traits in an
effort to cultivate in students a sense of responsibility and citizenship.
C.
Explain how English Language Learners who enter the school below grade level will
be engaged in and benefit from the curriculum.
Apart from providing the specific services listed in a student’s ELL plan as applicable, the
School’s faculty will differentiate instruction as necessary and will offer tutoring services or other
such assistance to ensure all students remain successful. Student performance will be continuously
assessed as described in the Section 5. Students not making adequate progress towards the
Sunshine State Standards and/or Common Core Standards will be identified and the following
measures will be instituted:
• Each class will attend group sessions at least once a week wherein technology resources and
supplements obtained at professional development workshops will utilized.
• Saturday, and daily pull-out tutoring may be required for those students consistently
demonstrating non-mastery.
• All students not meeting standards will be placed on a Progress Monitoring Plan (PMP) and
specific strategies to remediate any learning deficiencies will be implemented.
• Reading strategies in the content areas will be provided to students in addition to those taught
during language arts classes
• Students consistently demonstrating non-mastery of Benchmarks on teacher generated quizzes,
chapter tests, projects, investigations, and poor academic progress will be targeted for
supplemental and intensive instruction/intervention.
Students needing remediation based on respective subject area assessments in specific subject areas
will be assigned to and placed on a specific (PMP) targeting these deficiencies, as mentioned
above. This plan requires active participation from the student, the parents and specific teachers in
order to ensure continuous student improvement. This initiative allows each student to have
ownership and understanding of his/her learning style and allows each student to track and monitor
his/her achievement. The PMP will be comprised of specific, measurable, individualized goals for
that student as well the strategies and services (tutoring/required additional classes, ELL services)
to be implemented in order for the student to achieve the specified goals.
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Section 8: School Climate and Discipline
A.
Describe the school’s planned approach to classroom management and student
discipline.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy (GCCA), believes that a safe and orderly school is of primary
importance to creating an enjoyable learning environment for both students and teachers. A great
deal of what centers around an orderly school, has to do with classroom management.
According to Harry Wong, “Classroom management refers to all of the things that a teacher does
to organize students, space, time, and materials so that instruction in content and student learning
can take place.” (p.84, 1998) Discipline has very little to do with classroom management.
Unfortunately, most classrooms are non-managed. Wong continues to discuss that the more on
task students are in learning activities, the higher their academic achievement. Teachers that are
excellent managers foster a high level of this on-task time on the part of the student. There is a
high correlation among highly effective and efficient teachers with being outstanding classroom
managers. Teachers that have poor management skills will not be effective in the classroom,
resulting, in lower student learning gains. “Classroom management includes all of the things a
teacher must do toward two ends:
1. To foster student involvement and cooperation in all classroom activities;
2. To establish a productive working learning environment.”
Furthermore, when students behave in a respectful, responsible and safe manner, they enjoy a more
productive learning experience and develop into responsible adults and citizens.
Thus, students will be expected to abide by a strict code of behavior. Proper conduct will be
recognized and consequences will be given for breaking rules in accordance with the belief that
inappropriate behaviors that interfere with the learning process must be extinguished. It is
anticipated through a progressive discipline model, with commitment to apply consistent, bestpractice behavior management techniques students will take ownership of their behavior mistakes
and learn from these. The school encourages children to believe that “mistakes” of judgment can
and often do occur, and it is the acceptance of responsibility for our actions and lesson(s) learned
from the “mistakes” that develop a student’s character.
Additionally, students will be taught character education throughout the school year, reinforcing a
sense of responsibility in their actions and deeds, thus molding more self-aware, capable
individuals. Students will be encouraged, at minimum, to be honest, kind, respectful, patient,
proud, and courteous. GCAA expects each parent to take an active role in supporting this plan. It is
in the student’s best interest that parents, faculty and staff work together to ensure a happy, safe
and productive learning experience.
The school wide philosophy regarding school behavior will be centered on Respect, Responsibility
and Readiness.
RESPECT- To respect oneself is to be validated as an important person. To respect someone else
is to offer him or her that same sense of dignity and appreciation that you would like to receive. To
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respect an animal is to treat it with kindness and understanding. Respect starts with your thoughts
and is shown in your actions.
Respect can be standing up for your beliefs in a polite manner. Sometimes it comes in the form of
listening. At other times respect is a simple gesture, such as thanking someone for helping you
even if it was their job to do so. Doing your part in a community project or in the classroom at
school is also a form of respect. Respect in all of its forms is a state of mind that shows through in
your actions. Think respectfully and act accordingly.
RESPONSIBILITY- Is to be accountable for your own conduct while performing a specific task
to its successful completion.
Responsibility is taking care of your duties, being reliable, answering for your actions, being
accountable, and trustworthy.
It is up to the student to become a person of good character. Many people in the student’s lives will
guide them, but only the student can determine the kind of person they are and ultimately become.
The best way to accomplish this is by being reliable, accountable, and trustworthy. “The price of
greatness is responsibility.” (Winston Churchill)
READINESS- Readiness is a complex concept with many influences and range of factors. It can
be a particular chronological age, a level of development, a set of skills, a process, or a set of
relationships. It is not just a certain age or stage but also a student's exposure to learning
opportunities. These opportunities place responsibility on families, schools, and communities to
ensure all children are exposed to the experiences and cognitive stimulation they need to flourish.
Ready to learn, ready for high school, and ready for life, are shared responsibilities of all adults and
institutions in a community. Family roles greatly influence children's readiness. High school
children need guidance in relationships and academic support. Not only is getting children ready
for high school important but also getting schools ready for the particular children they serve to
ensure success for every child is especially critical. Schools need to be ready by addressing the
diverse needs of children and their families in the community and providing smooth transitions to
the learning environment. Even when children are ready to learn, they must be taught how to learn
and the conditions must be ready for them to learn on their own.
In the classrooms, teachers will be able to set high expectations for students which include both
academic and behavioral expectations. The school will foster increasing self-esteem through
mechanisms to ensure the improvement of the students' self images as learners. Many students
have experienced failure in the classroom, and as a result have poor selfimages as learners. Due to
prior experiences, they resist the educational process through inappropriate behavior. Therefore,
the school will build in CHAMPs behavior management techniques to ensure improvement of
behavior. This is a proactive and positive approach to classroom management.
CHAMPs is a module series of materials designed to help the classroom teacher develop an
effective classroom management plan that is proactive and positive. The philosophy behind this
technique is that by using effective management practices, teachers can help every student exhibit
behavior that will make that student feel like a champion.
C Conversation (Can students talk to each other during this activity / transition?)
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H Help (How can students get questions answered during this activity/transition?)
An Activity (What is the task/objective of this activity/transition?)
M Movement (Can students move about during this activity/transition?)
P Participation (What does appropriate student behavior for this activity/transition look or sound
like? How do students show that they are fully participating?)
B.
Describe the school’s Code of Conduct, including the school’s policies for discipline,
suspension, dismissal, and recommendation for expulsion.
The school will use the Lee County’s Student Code of Conduct. Discipline is essential to a safe
environment conducive to learning. The discipline policies and procedures established by the Lee
County School Board are designed to make all students aware of the rules and responsibilities for
their behavior. Student discipline is a joint responsibility that must be shared by home and school.
A good working relationship is fostered if there is mutual understanding as to what is required
behavior. Students and parents/guardians are required to sign contracts when applying for
enrollment and are responsible for learning and abiding by the GCCA discipline policies and
procedures. Students with disabilities will be disciplined only in accordance with the requirements
of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the Rehabilitation Act.
GCCA expect students to follow the following rules of behavior:
1. Students are expected to speak to teachers, staff members, and classmates with respect.
2. Students are expected to respect school property and equipment.
3. Students are expected to respect the privacy of teachers and classmates.
4. Students are expected to be respectfully quiet while traveling through school.
5. Students are expected to respect a classmate’s personal property.
6. Students are expected to respect a classmate’s personal space.
7. No bullying will be tolerated at school.
8. Students are to respect the directions of student mentors and monitors.
9. Students are expected to be honest and truthful in every situation.
10. Students are expected to treat all teachers with equal respect including lunch room monitors
and substitutes.
Withdrawal from School:
Florida statute requires attendance of each student from six years of age, or five years of age if
enrolled in kindergarten, and not formally withdrawn until 18 years of age. The governing board
affirms that it is in the best interests of both students and the community that they complete the
educational program that will equip them with skills and increase their chances for a successful and
fulfilling life beyond the schools.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy will direct whenever a student wishes to withdraw, effort will be
made to determine the underlying reason for such action and the resources of the School will be
used to assist the student in reaching career goals. Prior to withdrawal of the student, an exit
interview will be provided with student and parent to determine the reason for withdrawal and the
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actions that can be taken to keep the student in school. The student will be informed of
opportunities to continue an education.
The School shall develop and update as needed administrative procedures for withdrawal from
school which:
A. Make counseling services available to any student who wishes to withdraw
B. Help the student define educational life goals and help plan the realization of those
goals.
C. Inform the student/parent of alternative programs
D. Initiate and complete an exit interview as prescribed by State law
E. Require the timely return of all District-owned supplies and equipment in the
possession of the student
Alternative to out of School Suspension (ATOSS)
This program will provide a viable option to ensure that students who are given an out-of-school
suspension shall continue to receive academic support while they are away from the school. Upon
return to school, they shall be able to make up any work missed to help maintain their academic
standing. Students who have been suspended in school shall:
 not be considered absent and shall not receive any grade penalty.
Program Includes:
 academic activities, with the inclusion of FCAT skills
 character education component
 information regarding Benchmark / FCAT 2.0 achievement furnished by the student’s home
school
 primarily independent work with small-group work when necessary
Suspension
The School Leader is authorized to suspend any pupils in compliance with the Florida Statue. The
pupil or his parents or others having his custodial care may appeal the decision of the School
Leader. Any suspension by a School Leader shall be immediately reported to the Board of
Directors and Lee County Public Schools. In the event of an appeal to the board of directors, the
School Leader shall promptly transmit the incident with a full report in writing of the facts relating
to the suspension, the action taken by the School Leader and the reasons therefore. The governing
board, upon request, shall grant and conduct a hearing to the appealing party. Students with
disabilities will be disciplined only in accordance with the requirements of the Individuals with
Disabilities Education Act and the Rehabilitation Act.
Grounds for Suspension
 immoral conduct
 intoxication or profanity in the buildings or school grounds or at any function
 vandalism of school property
 violent or persistent opposition to authority, persistent disobedience, causing disorder in school
 repeated offensives
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Special Education Students
Special Education students are expected to adhere to the same rules as other students. A special
education student shall not receive disciplinary suspensions because of his/her disability. The
flexibility of administrator discretion especially applies in judging appropriate consequences for
these students' misbehavior. If a special education student is suspended for an extended period of
time, he/she will be accorded all the rights. During the period of suspension, an Individual
Educational Program review conference may meet to formulate amendments to the original IEP if
needed. Students with disabilities will be disciplined only in accordance with the requirements of
the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the Rehabilitation Act.
CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT
Gulf Coast Charter Academy seeks to provide a safe and equal learning opportunity for each of its
students, regardless of race, religion, color, creed, sex, marital status, national origin, or disability.
Each school must be free from disruption that would interfere with the teachers’ right to teach and
the students’ right to learn. GCCA recognizes that students have certain constitutional rights to
which they are entitled, which shall not be limited, except by law. Therefore, GCCA has decided to
follow the Lee County District’s Code of Conduct.
GCCA shall not tolerate behavior that disrupts or interferes with the education of other students.
We shall offer assistance to parents and guardians in the form of special services, peer
mediation/conflict resolution, and other school, district, and community resources in order to
ensure a safe and hospitable environment. Students are responsible for understanding and adhering
to this Code of Conduct and the individual discipline plans of each instructor. Parents or guardians
are responsible for reviewing the code of conduct with their child to ensure that their child
understands and abides by all GCCA policies. Unacceptable behavior shall be subject to
disciplinary action.
Parent/Guardian Behavior Policy
In recent years in our society, there has been an escalation of parental/guardian verbal, written and
physical abuse, threats, and so forth towards teachers and school employees. Although that type of
behavior is rare, please be advised, that any verbal or physical abuse including but not limited to
threats, disparaging or condescending comments towards school staff before, during, or after,
school, including the pick-up/drop-off areas, will not be tolerated.
If this type of behavior does occur by a parent/guardian toward a school employee at any level,
said offense could result in that child being immediately dismissed from GCCA. Moreover,
parents/guardians are never permitted to go directly to a teacher’s classroom without first obtaining
a visitor’s pass from the front office. Administrative approval must be obtained, coupled with a
time and location before meeting with said teacher. If this does occur, the Security Officer (if we
can afford one) will be notified and said parent will be subject to trespass laws.
Dismissal Procedures:
The Charter School will implement the Dismissal Procedures of Lee County Public School’s Code
of Student Conduct for Elementary and Secondary Schools as published by the Bureau of Special
Programs, Division of Alternate Education, and Board Rule. The School will follow school board
policy regarding withdrawals or expulsion.
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II. ORGANIZATIONAL PLAN
Section 9: Governance
A. Describe how the school will organize as or be operated by a non-profit organization.
The proposed School will operate as a public charter school, based on its initial findings as a
private employer. The proposed School has filed for incorporation status with the State of Florida
pursuant to Florida Charter School Statutes. The School will file for Section 501 (C) (3) status as a
non-profit organization under the Internal Revenue Code once we are approved.
The Fiscal year of this Academy shall commence the first day of July in each year and end on the
last day of June in the following year. Annual meetings of this Academy shall be the first meeting
of each year. The Board of Directors, by giving fifteen days’ notice in writing, shall specify the
place and date of the annual meeting. Regular meetings shall be held monthly or as scheduled. The
board will hold at least two public meetings per year in the school district. Quorum at all meetings
shall be fifty-one percent of the Board of Directors. The newly elected officers and directors shall
take office at the first regular meeting of the calendar year. Officers shall serve for a period of one
year. Director’s terms will be defined by the by-laws.
The Board of Directors shall consist of the Chairman, Vice-Chairman, and Secretary- Treasurer,
and Directors as needed. Officers and Directors are expected to attend scheduled meetings.
Absence from three consecutive meetings or fifty (50) percent of the meetings during any six
month period is accepted as resignation from the office and the Board of Directors shall appoint a
replacement for the remaining term of office. The Directors, by a majority vote, can grant
exception to removal from office due to attendance requirements when circumstance indicates an
exception should be granted. Any officer or director may be removed from office by a vote of not
less than two-thirds of the board membership and his successor may be elected at the same
meeting.
The Board of Directors has hired educational consultants to assist with the writing of this
application, the planning and implementation of the school academic design, and to assist with the
continual oversight of the school. The Board in consultation with our consultants will determine
the duties of the school principal. The policies of the board and its directives will be executed
under the directions of the chairman.
No employee of the school, employee of one the school’s education service providers (if we hire
one) or family member of an employee of one of the school’s education service providers may
serve as a member of the school’s Governing Board.
The charter school will not use public funds to purchase or lease a property, goods or services from
any director, officer or employee of the school or the spouse, parent, child, stepchild or sibling or
any director, officer or employee, or from any business in which any officer or employee has an
interest nor shall the charter school use any property, good or services purchased or leased with
public funds for the private benefit or any person or entity, unless an exemption listed in Florida
Statutes applies.
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B. Provide an organizational chart for the school and a narrative description of the chart.
Clearly describe the proposed reporting structure to the governing board and the
relationship of the board to the school’s leader and administration.
The Governing Board is the ultimate policy-making body with the responsibility of operation and
oversight of the school including but not limited to academic direction, curriculum, and budgetary
functions. The school principal, hired by the board, will be responsible for all aspects of school
operations within the scope of operating policies and procedures and budgetary functions as
adopted and approved by the Governing Board. The school’s faculty and staff will report directly
to the principal, who shall report to the Governing Board.
Board of Directors
Consultants and Principal
Teachers
Receptionist
Teacher aides
ESOL
ESE
Accounting
Firm
Data Processors
Administrative
Assistants
Custodians/
Security
Payroll
Human
Resource
Auditors
Others TBD
Specialty teachers
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The School's on site administration (consultants, principal, reading coach, and lead teacher) will
ensure that the operations of the School (resources, courses, policies) are in accordance with the
mission and vision of the School as adopted and approved by the Governing Board. The
administrative staff, as instructional leaders, will make all school-based decisions, establishing and
implementing procedures for the day-to-day operations of the School. The faculty and secretarial
staff will be responsible for carrying out these procedures in their daily activities and interactions
with students, parents and the community.
GCCA is actually the idea of three charter school consultants and the board of Gulf Coast Charter
Academy South, a new K-8 charter school in Collier County. The three consultants/experts will be
providing guidance, direction, startup finances, curriculum design, etc. Our team hopes to remain
overseeing all aspects of the school; yet provide the autonomy to the local administration to be the
actual entity by law that is in charge of the school.
These consultants will be responsible for the financial and academic development of the school
during the start-up phase and throughout the schools existence. The School will also hire an
accounting firm for accounts payable/receivables, an auditor (different from accounting firm), a
payroll leasing company and any other consultants needed to provide the expertise to assure that
the school is financially and academically sound. The consultants are:
Ronald Renna:
Mr. Renna is a recognized charter school expert and has conducted workshops on subjects
including finance, budgeting, governance, curriculum, instruction, assessment, accountability,
governance and legal, and start-up procedures in Florida, Georgia, and Ohio and at the annual
Florida charter school conference. Mr. Renna served as State Director of Operations for Florida
and Georgia for one of the nation’s largest education management companies. In that position he
negotiated charter contracts with various School Boards, opened new schools, ensured regulatory
compliance and directly supervised operations of eleven schools in Florida.
His qualifications include:
 Specialist in Education degree in administration and leadership- all levels
 Over thirty years of practical experience in teaching and administration
 Elementary, Middle, and High School Principal for 20 years
 Athletic/Activities Director for 10 years
 State Director for charter school development for Florida, Tennessee, Washington D.C.,
New York, and Georgia.
 Ex-Board member of the Florida Consortium of Charter Schools
 Certification: State of Florida Professional Educator’s Certificate in Educational Leadership
(all levels)
 Florida Performance Measurement System trained and certified.
 Bilingual: Spanish/English
 Extensive computer experience in: database, spreadsheets, word processing, desktop
publishing, and navigation of the Internet.
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Mr. Renna has supervised charter schools in Florida for the last 8 years. Here are the schools that
he has worked with:
School
Position
School Grades
2011
2010 2009 2008 2007 2005 2006
Island Village
Montessori
(Sarasota, Florida)
Three schools: two
elementary and one
Middle.
Broward Community
Charter School
Wrote three successful
A
A B A A A A
applications. Assisted with
getting the schools open and
running. Served on the board of
directors for three years. Worked
with the principal.
Wrote application. Hired
B
C B C C
principal. Supervised the
principal and staff.
Paragon Elementary
Wrote application. Hired
A
A B A B
Charter
principal. Supervised the
principal and staff.
Pompano Middle
Wrote application. Hired
A
B B A
Charter
principal. Supervised the
principal and staff.
Paragon Academy of
Wrote application. Hired
A
B B C C
Technology
principal. Supervised the
principal and staff.
Broward Community
Wrote application. Hired
A
A B A A
Charter School West
principal. Supervised the
principal and staff.
Discovery Middle
Wrote application. Hired
B
B F
principal. Supervised the
*
principal and staff.
* The principal of the school was in Iraq for 10 months, as he is an officer in the Army Reserve
and was sent overseas. The board decided not to replace him and appointed a teacher to oversee
the school in his absence.
Charles Malatesta:
Charles (Chuck) Malatesta is a lifelong educator who has worked to improve education throughout
his entire career at every level of education as a Teacher, Coach, Dean of Students, (AP)
University Professor and Administrator, Principal, Regional Vice President of company operations
at Community Charter School of Excellence and Community Charter Middle School of Excellence
which he opened in 2008 and 2010 respectively.
Mr. Malatesta pursued his education at Florida Atlantic University where he majored in history
education and was awarded a swimming scholarship. He transferred to the University of Delaware
where he earned his Bachelor of Science in Health and Exercise Science. Subsequently, he began
teaching and coaching at the Charter School of Wilmington where he received State and National
Coach of the Year honors in 2000. His love of education propelled him further ahead as he earned
a Master's Degree from Wilmington University in Educational Leadership/Administration in 2003.
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Mr. Malatesta served as Dean of Students at Bishop Verot High School, and a University
administrator in the College of Education at Florida Gulf Coast University and St. Petersburg
College. Over the past five years, he has been the School Leader at the Community Charter School
of Excellence and Charter Middle School of Excellence which he opened in 2008 and 2010
respectively. He also assisted in the application process for the approved charter application,
Community Charter High School of Excellence, which is scheduled to open in 2013. Adding the
high school will result in the creation of a Unit School, grades K-12. Mr. Malatesta was promoted
in 2010 to Regional Vice President, and was responsible for establishing and enhancing
relationships with district personnel, review areas of need for potential new charter schools,
responsible for overseeing the companies Florida schools, and assist with building acquisitions.
Pepar R. Anspaugh:
Pepar R. Anspaugh has over 30 years in educational administration. Because of his heritage, he is
also known in many circles as the “Dream Catcher.” Mr. Anspaugh earned his BA in
Sociology/Psychology from the University of Miami, his BS in Secondary Social Studies
Education from Florida International University, a MS in Educational Leadership, and finally
completed his Doctoral classes in Educational Leadership, completed his Residency and
Dissertation from the University of Florida.
After teaching for three years, at the age of 24, he secured his first position as Principal in Miami,
Florida. During the subsequent decades, Mr. Anspaugh was Principal/Headmaster in both the
public and private school settings. During these two decades, he realized that his approach to
educating children was unique and significantly effective, and dedicated himself to educational
reform. He embraced the initiative, that “All Children Can Learn,” irrespective of race, color,
national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, gender, sexual orientation, or predisposing genetic
characteristics, learning style, cognitive aptitude, exceptionalities, or other environmental
influences such as socio economic status.
In addition to being a Principal, Mr. Anspaugh was also a Professor of Psychology, Education, and
Social Science for the State College of Florida and the University of South Florida. His work with
these institutions provided the backdrop for creating an Educational Philosophy entitled, “The
Holistic Approach to the Total Child.” Via this philosophy, he established high-level educational
opportunities and meaningful learning experiences to assist each child in reaching their optimum
level of development in the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains.
Mr. Anspaugh has been employed in educational administration, encompassing Private/Parochial,
Traditional Public, and Charter Public Schools for over thirty years. His first exposure to Charter
Schools commenced when he was asked to review sections of a charter application that eventually
became Sarasota School of Arts and Sciences opening its doors in 1997. At the end of the first
year of operation, all faculty and staff were replaced. Over the next three years there were 4
different Executive Directors and by the middle of the fourth year, the school, regrettably, had been
notified by the District Superintendent, that its doors were going to be closed by the School
District. Fortunately, that did not transpire.
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Mr. Anspaugh had been hired at the time of this notification and under his leadership the school
made a dramatic turnaround! This charter school reached premier status and ranks 7th in the State
of Florida. Mr. Anspaugh was credited with being directly responsible for this momentous
transformation. After his tenure at Sarasota School of Arts & Sciences, Mr. Anspaugh became the
owner and operator of “Anspaugh & Associates LLC,” and preferred Consultant for the Florida
Consortium of Charter Schools.
Mr. Anspaugh has been honored for his work in education on four occasions, with an invitation
that is extended to only a few educators in the U.S. each year, to attend and participate in the
Oxford Round Table. The Oxford Round Table is a nonprofit educational organization chartered
in England and Wales as a forum for discourse concerning matters of public importance. Each
Round Table session engages a small interdisciplinary group of scholars to examine the various
aspects of a given topic. Two years ago, he began working with Mr. Malatesta, as the Quality
School Initiative Director for the Community Charter School of Excellence and Community
Charter Middles School of Excellence, concurrently, worked with their sister schools throughout
the State of Florida. His continued efforts in disseminating education has resulted in more than 13
years’ experience working in, with, and for charter schools in the State of Florida.
Board Responsibilities:
The board of directors will have full fiduciary responsibility of the school. The consultants will
work with the leaders to facilitate and oversee the day-to-day operation. The consultants will be
responsible for payroll, financial reporting, and employee benefits, as well as professional
development and other training required by the staff, and providing support to the Principal of the
school. The Principal will report to the consultants’ designee who will also perform his or her
evaluation. The consultants will report to the School’s Board of Directors who ultimately holds
responsibility for the effectiveness and quality of the school program.
The School's on site administration (principal, and/or lead teacher) will ensure that the operations
of the School (resources, courses, policies) are in accordance with the mission and vision of the
School as adopted and approved by the Governing Board. The administrative staff, as instructional
leaders, will make all school-based decisions, establishing and implementing procedures for the
day-to-day operations of the School. The faculty and secretarial staff will be responsible for
carrying out these procedures in their daily activities and interactions with students, parents and the
community.
The Chairman: He/She shall preside at all meetings of this academy and at all meetings of the
board of directors. He shall appoint committees except as otherwise provided in the By-Laws. He
shall carry into effect all orders and resolutions of the board of directors and serve for one year.
The Vice-Chairman: shall, in the absence of or disability of the chairman perform the duties and
exercises the powers of the chairman and performs such duties as the board of directors or the
chairman shall prescribe.
The Secretary-Treasurer: of this academy shall be responsible for maintaining safe custody of all
corporate funds and securities as prescribe in the By-Laws.
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The Principal: The policies of the board and its directives will be executed under the directions of
the principal. The principal will be in charge of the day-to-day operation of the school and report
to the board monthly. The principal works with consultants regarding accounts payable and
receivable as well as payroll. He/She oversees all staff members.
The corporation shall be governed by the Florida-not-for-profit Corporation Law, or under such
successor provisions as may be in effect from time to time. No part of the net earnings of the
corporation shall go the benefit of, or be distributable to its members, trustees, officers or other
private persons, except that the corporation shall be authorized and empowered to pay reasonable
compensation for services rendered and to make payments and distributions in furtherance of the
purposes set forth in the By-Laws, and not withstanding any other provisions of these By-Laws.
The corporation shall not carry on any other activities not permitted to be carried on by an
organization exempt from federal income tax under section 501C3 of the Internal revenue Code of
1986, or a corresponding provision of any future United States Internal Revenue Law.
In the event of dissolution, the assets of the corporation that were purchased with public funds and
any public funds still in the possession of the school will revert to ownership of the Sponsor School
District, as required by Florida Statutes. The board will adopt policies establishing standards of
ethical conduct for instructional personnel and school administrators, as required by Florida
Statutes.
The school’s Governing Board will hold at least two public meetings per school year in the School
District, as required by Florida Statutes. The school’s principal and local representatives will be
physically present at each of the meetings as required by Florida Statutes.
The Board will appoint a local parent representative who resides in the district and whose contact
information will be provided annually to parents and posted on the school’s website, as required by
Florida Statutes.
C. Provide a description of how the governing board will fulfill its responsibilities and
obligations, including but not limited to:
o Adoption of annual budget
o Continuing oversight over charter school operations
The Board has hired consultants that will be able to develop written policies that will serve as
guidelines for operations and for the successful and efficient performance of the School. The Board
and the consultants will work together to provide guidelines for the discretionary action of those to
whom it delegates authority. These guidelines for discretionary action constitute the policies
governing the operation of the School. The formulation, adoption, and evaluation of reports
concerning the execution of written policies promulgated by a Personnel Policy and Procedures
Manual will constitute the basic method by which the Board will exercise its leadership in the
operation of GCCA. The formal adoption of policies will be recorded in the minutes of the GCCA
School Board. Only those written statements so adopted and so recorded are regarded as official
Board policy. The Board is a representative body to provide for and oversee the operation of the
School as mandated by state law.
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The role of the full governing Board will be to:
1. Safeguard the organization’s mission and competitive advantage
On an annual basis, Board members will assess the organization’s mission, strategic plan,
and annual goals as well as the external environment to assure that the organization is
fulfilling its charter and meeting the needs of the community.
2. Secure sufficient resources to fulfill the organization’s mission
Board members are expected to work in partnership with the organization’s administration
to raise funds to support the organization’s mission.
3. Ensure strategic and effective resource allocation
As the fiduciary agents of the organization, Board members will review and approve the
organization’s budget and funding plan and will hold the consultants or Principal
accountable for its effective and efficient management.
4. Hire, support, and assess the performance of the consultants or Principal
The Board will work as the governing partner to the organization’s management team and
will ensure that the Principal has the training, support, and encouragement necessary to
fulfill the charter. In addition, the Board will assess annually the performance of the
consultants and will hold them accountable to the performance criteria upon which they
mutually agree.
5. Serve as ambassadors for the organization
As the organization’s primary link to the community, the public, the media, and funder,
Board members are expected to garner support from the community through their
passionate commitment to and articulation of the organization’s mission.
6. Set policies and procedures
As the organization’s governing body, the Board is expected to establish policies and
procedures to support the mission.
7. Monitor and ensure legal and regulatory compliance
The Board should review organizational policies and programs to ensure compliance with
the law and with state regulations.
8. Assess its own performance
As a component of holding the organization accountable to achieving its mission and
efficiently allocating its resources, the Board is expected to evaluate its performance
against its job description and performance criteria.
Individual Board Members
The performance expectation for Individual Board members will be to:
1. Govern by helping to fulfill the Board’s collective responsibilities, detailed in the Board’s
job description and expectations.
2. Advocate for the organization's vision and mission and be a champion in building the
diverse constituencies necessary to support the successful launch and sustainability of the
organization.
3. Serve as a liaison with the public, interpreting the organization’s vision to the community
and informing the organization of needs of the community.
4. Lend credibility to the organization with professionalism, integrity, and enthusiasm.
5. Satisfy all legal requirements for the organization.
6. Consult by lending specific expertise for the benefit of the organization.
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7. Capitalize on personal networks to secure financial and other resources to support the
organization.
8. Attend regular Board meetings and participate in a meaningful and productive manner by
coming to meetings prepared and by focusing on strategic and critical questions and issues.
9. Be accessible for personal contact in between Board meetings and for committee serving on
a committee or taskforce as need be.
10. Assist as needed to complete tasks as needed and by serving on a Board committee.
11. Collaborate with fellow Board members to fulfill the obligations of the Board and to ensure
that diverse perspectives are heard and incorporated into the governance structure. Focus on
creating group, not individual success; support Board decisions; participate critically in the
appraisal of the Board’s performance.
12. Disclose to the Board any potential conflicts of interest, whether real or perceived, and
abide by the decision of the founding Board related to the situation.
D. Describe the proposed policies and procedures by which the governing board will operate,
including board powers and duties; board member selection, removal procedures and term
limits; code of ethics, conflict of interest, and frequency of meetings. If the Board has not yet
developed policies, the applicant shall describe the timeline for development and approval of
Board policies.
Florida Statutes allows public entities to organize and operate charter schools.
The board of directors will provide guidance and suggestions for School improvement and
continuity of the charter.
Vacancies of the Board of Directors shall exist (1) on the death, resignation or removal of any
director, and (2) whenever the number of authorized directors is increased. Each original member
shall serve for a period of years in staggered terms structured in such a way to ensure consistent
board oversight.
Any director may resign effective upon giving written notice to the Chair of the Board, the
President, the Secretary, or the Board of Directors, unless the notice specifies a later time for the
effectiveness of such resignation. No director may resign if the corporation would then be left
without a duly elected director or directors in charge of its affairs, except upon notice to the
Attorney General. Vacancies on the board may be filled by approval of the board or if the number
of directors then in office is less than a quorum, by (1) the unanimous written consent of the
directors then in office, (2) the affirmative vote of a majority of the directors then in office at a
meeting held pursuant to notice or waivers of notice complying with the articles of the Bylaws, or
(3) a sole remaining director. A person elected to fill a vacancy shall hold office until the next
annual election of the Board of Directors.
Public records and meetings: The School will comply with Florida Statutes relating to public
records and relating to public meetings. All meetings of the Governing Board will be open to the
public with sufficient and proper advance notice, posted in a public place. Meeting records shall
comply with the availability of all appropriate public school records and be readily accessible to
the public. The Governing Board of Directors functions under the State of Florida Sunshine Laws.
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All meetings will be announced two weeks in advance by sending home newsletters to parents,
advertisement in the local newspaper, and posting on the school website. All minutes of said
meetings will be available to the public and posted on the website. The board will schedule one
board meeting a month.
The primary qualifications for serving on the Board are:
1. An unwavering commitment to seeing our students superbly prepared for high school, college,
and success in life;
2. A commitment to improving access to quality education for all children regardless of race or
economic status;
3. An understanding of the Board’s obligation to act as an effective and vigilant steward of public
funds;
4. The ability to be a good judge of information regarding the consultant’s educational and fiscal
management of the organization and a willingness to replace the consultants if results are less than
satisfactory;
5. A willingness to focus on the academic achievement of children in the school, and not to divert
the Board’s attention to matters that are peripheral to this mission;
6. An ability to fairly and accurately assess the needs of the community, and to represent the
organization to the community and others;
7. Financial, legal, business, fundraising, management, governance, real estate, development,
and/or educational experience;
8. A willingness to accept and support decisions made in accordance with the bylaws;
9. An ability and willingness to give time and energy to the organization; and,
10. A willingness and ability to provide access to resources, both financial and other, in order to
support and strengthen the organization.
Code of Ethics: It is Board policy that employees and board members uphold the highest standards
of ethical, professional behavior. To that end, these employees and board members will agree to
commit themselves to carrying out the mission of this organization and shall:
•
Be mindful of and honor the safety, health and welfare of the public in the performance of
professional duties.
Act in such a manner as to uphold and enhance personal and professional honor, integrity
•
and the dignity of the profession.
•
Treat with respect and consideration all persons, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual
orientation, Maternity, marital or family status, disability, age or national origin.
•
Recognize that the mission, at all times, is the effective education of children and the
development of institutions to foster that mission.
•
Engage in carrying out the Governing Board’s mission in a professional manner.
•
Collaborate with and support other professionals in carrying out the educational mission.
•
Build professional reputations on the merit of services.
Keep up to date and informed on emerging issues and business of the Governing Board,
•
and to conduct themselves with professional competence, fairness, impartiality, efficiency and
effectiveness.
•
Uphold and implement policies adopted by the Governing Board.
•
Keep the faculty, parents, students and community informed about issues affecting the
above-named group respectively, and relating to the School, and/or the Governing Board.
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•
Conduct organizational and operational duties with positive leadership exemplified by open
communication, creativity, dedication and compassion.
•
Exercise whatever discretionary authority they have under the law so as to carry out the
mission of the organization.
•
Serve with respect, concern, courtesy, and responsiveness in carrying out the organization’s
mission.
•
Demonstrate the highest standards of personal integrity, truthfulness, honesty and fortitude
in all activities in order to inspire confidence and trust in such activities.
Avoid any interest or activity that is in conflict with the conduct of official duties.
•
•
Respect and protect privileged information to which they have access in the course of their
official duties.
•
Strive for personal and professional excellence and encourage the professional development
of others.
Conflict of Interest Policy: As a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization authorized to operate charter
schools, the operations of the Applicant can also be viewed as a public trust, which is subject to
scrutiny by and accountable to the public. Consequently, a fiduciary duty exists between the
Governing Board, officers, management employees, and the public, which carries with it a duty of
loyalty and fidelity. The Governing Board, officers, and management employees have the
responsibility of administering the affairs of the Corporation honestly and prudently. Those
persons shall exercise the utmost good faith in all transactions involved in their duties, and they
shall not improperly use their positions with the organization, or knowledge gained therefrom, for
their personal benefit.
Nature of Conflicting Interest: A conflicting interest may be defined as an interest, direct or
indirect, with any persons or firms mentioned above. Such an interest might arise through:
Owning stock or holding debt or other proprietary interests in any third party dealing with
•
the Corporation.
•
Holding office, serving on the Board, participating in management, or being otherwise
employed (or formerly employed) with any third party dealing with the Governing Board.
Receiving remuneration for services with respect to individual transactions involving the
•
Corporation.
•
Using the corporation’s time, personnel, equipment, supplies or good will for other than
activities, programs and purposes which have been approved by the Governing Board.
Receiving personal gifts or loans from dealing or competing third parties. Receipt of any
•
gift is not allowed. No personal gift of money should ever be accepted.
Interpretation of this Statement of Policy: The areas of conflicting interest listed and the relations,
in those areas, which may give rise to conflict, are not exhaustive. Conflicts might arise in other
areas or through other relations. Directors, officers and management employees will hopefully
recognize such areas and relation by analogy. However, it is the policy of the Governing Board that
the existence of any conflict of interest shall be disclosed before any transaction is consummated.
It shall be the continuing responsibility of the Governing Board, officers, and management
employees to scrutinize their transactions and outside business interests and relationships for
potential conflicts and to immediately make such disclosures.
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Disclosure Policy and Procedure: Transactions with parties with whom a conflicting interest exists
may be undertaken only if all of the following are observed:
1. The conflicting interest is fully disclosed;
2. The person with the conflict of interest is excluded from the discussion and approval of such
transaction;
3. Where products, goods or services are being procured or sold, that there exists reliable
independent evidence of fair value (which shall be specifically identified in and attached to the
minutes), which may include a competitive bid or market survey or comparable valuation or other
reliable evidence of market value; and
4. The Governing Board has determined that the transaction is in the best interest of the
organization.
Disclosure in the organization should be made to the Board Chair who shall bring the matter to the
attention of the Governing Board. Disclosure involving the directors should be made to the
Governing Board. The Governing Board shall determine whether a conflict exists and in the case
of an existing conflict, whether the contemplated transaction may be authorized as just, fair and
reasonable. If the conflict is not deemed to be Material and the conflicted party is excluded from
the decision making process, then the Governing Board can use its reasonable judgment and make
a decision, which it deems to be in the best interest of the entity. The decision of the Governing
Board on these matters will rest in its sole discretion, and its concern will be the welfare of the
Corporation and the advancement of its purpose.
Meeting schedule selection: A procedure for selection of meeting schedule will be established. The
Applicant will vote upon and post (school website) their meeting schedule for the opening school
year, and annually thereafter, in accordance with Florida Statutes, relating to public records, and
public meetings.
Regular and Special Meetings
Regular meetings of the Board of Directors may be held at such locations, dates and times as shall
be determined by the Board of Directors. Special meetings of the Board may be called by the
chairperson of the Board of Directors as such person sees fit and must be called by the chairperson
upon the written request of any two members of the Board. Except as otherwise required by law,
the Articles of Incorporation or these Bylaws, any business may be transacted at any annual or
regular directors’ meeting, but the business that may be transacted at any special directors’ meeting
shall be confined to the subject or subjects set forth on the notice thereof.
The Governing Board will hold meetings at regularly scheduled intervals (at least two during the
year in Lee County), during which they will be presented information at minimum regarding the
Academy’s monthly financial expenditures, enrollment, personnel issues and changes, facility
updates, and any additional issues related to the Academy. We plan on holding monthly meetings
our first year.
The board’s consultants have a policy and procedure manual that was developed by an Educational
Attorney out of Orlando. We will provide the 250 page manual to the Lee School Board’s charter
school office once our board has approved and adopted the manual.
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E. Explain how the founding group for the charter school intends to transition to a
governing board.
The founding group of the School is the same group who currently serves as the Governing Board.
The Governing Board is committed to ensuring that newly elected members will agree to support
the founding vision, in order to maintain continuity between these founders and any subsequent
board members who may be elected to serve in the future.
F. Describe the plans for board member recruitment and development, including the
orientation process for new members and ongoing professional development.
Since the Governing Board is an existing entity and has already been established, the Governing
Board will recruit members as vacancies arise, and will endeavor to fill these vacancies with those
who will commit to forward the mission of the School. All Board members will agree to oversee
the operational policies, and ensure academic accountability and financial accountability of the
School as well as participate in charter school governance training and successfully undergo a
background check by the Sponsor, as specified by law and board policy.
Governance Training: The administrators and Governing Board members will be trained in the
areas of Non-Profit Board Governance, Florida’s Open Government Requirements, the Florida
Sunshine Law, and the Florida Public Records Law. The Florida Association of Charter Schools
will provide this training or another approved vendors. Further, as presented in the Applicant’s
Bylaws, The Applicant shall develop an orientation and training program for new directors and an
annual continuing education program for existing directors.
Human Resources Training: Governing board members will be trained each year in the area of
Human Resources. The training will cover the areas of Hiring, Utilizing, and Evaluating
Administration, Personnel Policies and Procedures, Hiring Practices, Evaluation, Taxes and
Benefits.
New Board members will be nominated by existing members through a nominating committee.
The nomination committee will compile and submit to the Board a slate of candidates for the
directorships and offices to be filled at the upcoming meeting. These submissions shall be deemed
to be nominations for each person named. Persons shall be offered a position on the board
contingent upon a favorable vote of the Board.
Each board member will receive a comprehensive binder containing copies of the board by-laws,
charter contract, management agreement, minutes for the previous year, contact information and
other pertinent information.
G. List each of the proposed members of the school’s governing board, indicating any exofficial members and vacant seats to be filled. For each proposed member, provide a brief
description of the person’s background that highlights their contribution he/she intends to
make through service as a governing board member and any office of the board that
individual holds.
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Helen Deitriech currently is active real estate broker managing the daily requirements of a
successful real estate business; the scope of which includes research, project planning, transaction
coordination, advertising, computer technology integration, rental management and customer
service. Mrs. Deitriech is also Vice President and Co-Founder of DaBeach.com, Inc, an all
inclusive, interactive social community offering beach related goods, services and content. With a
Bachelor’s degree in Human Factors Engineering and Psychology, she worked in both research &
design and applied engineering. As a contractor for the US Air Force she work as a design engineer
directly involved in R&D aspects related to the human interfacing and design of aircraft cockpit
controls and displays. Mrs. Deitriech’s applied engineering methodology was utilized in her
experience within the petrochemical industry and included ergonomic workplace/workflow analysis
and system diagnostics, for the re-design and consolidation of refinery process control rooms. Mrs.
Deitriech has a passion for learning and feels it is an honor to dedicate her time and energy as a
member of the Gulf Coast Charter Academy board to furthering the education of students who are
the heart of America’s future.
Adaer Carreno-Lopez works for IMG Academics as an ELL teacher. He has been a Spanish
teacher for seven years in Bradenton, Florida. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Education
(Spanish and English as a Second Language). His professional development include: CRISS
Instructional Strategies, ESOL Training for Endorsement, SIOP (Shelter Instruction Observation
Protocol) Making content comprehensible for English Learners, and many others.
Jill Moreno has worked in education for the last seven years as an administrative assistant to the
principal and an executive secretary. Her duties include:
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Prepares confidential and non-confidential reports utilizing advanced software programs.
Collects information, compiles into standard and non-standard format, prints, and proofs
then distributes to appropriate school district personnel.
Establishes office procedures, trains and coordinates duties of clerical office personnel,
students and volunteers.
Supervises and creates schedules for office personnel.
Complete all personnel and payroll processing of new/terminated or employees requiring
change.
Prepares substitutes with teacher schedules and keeps track of attendance for all staff.
Works with the principal in carrying out the day-to-day operations necessary for the smooth
functioning of the school.
Contributes to a positive, professional office atmosphere
Ms. Moreno also has a background in accounting.
H. Outline the methods to be used for resolving disputes between a parent and the school.
GCCA will have a communication hierarchy, which the parents will receive, that outlines the
parties one should report any and all grievances to, and who to go to in order to settle disputes.
When a parent has a dispute with a teacher that cannot be settled, they will first contact either the
teacher’s Department Head, or Team Leader. The Team Leader and/or Department Head will
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endeavor to mediate the dispute. If they cannot successfully do so, they will refer to the Assistant
Principal, and/or the Principal for resolution.
Positive relations between the School and its parents and families are a primary concern. For that
reason, every effort will be made to handle disputes in the most positive way possible. The
Academy believes in just, fair and equitable treatment of ALL students and in providing a learning
environment which is free from unfair or discriminatory practices. Procedures for disciplinary
complaints and resolution of discriminatory practices have been established. Rights:
Students/Parents have the right to report, and seek redress for unfair treatment, discriminatory
practices or harassment.
Responsibilities: Students/Parents have a responsibility to know and follow procedures for filing
complaints.
There may be times when students feel they have been treated unfairly. In most cases, problems
can be resolved if students/parents speak with the teacher or staff member involved. If the
student/parent does not resolve the problem or feels uncomfortable addressing the issue directly to
the teacher or staff member, the student may request a conference with the Principal. The
student/parent may also request the presence of a third party, such as a guidance counselor, teacher
or other staff person. The parent may also be present. If the problem is not resolved at this level the
following steps should be followed:
A. The student/parent must present a written and signed statement to the principal within five (5)
Academy days. The statement should include the following information: (a) description of the
incident; (b) date and time of the incident; (c)persons involved and/or witnesses; (d) location of the
incident; and (e) attempts made to resolve the issue.
B. The principal shall respond, in writing, within five (5) Academy days of the receipt of the
statement. The principal shall make every effort to resolve the matter.
C. If the problem still has not been resolved or the principal fails to respond in a timely manner to
the student’s statement, the student/parent may submit the grievance to the Board of Directors for
resolution.
D. A meeting will be scheduled within five (5) Academy days of receipt of the student request for
such a meeting. This meeting will include the person involved in the original action, the principal,
the student, the parents and a Board of Director.
If a decision is made at this meeting, documentation of the agreed upon actions will be forwarded
to all parties within five (5) school days.
E. If the student or parents are not satisfied with the outcome of the decision, they may contact the
Governing Board for their input. This may be done at any point of the process.
F. At any time, a parent(s) may withdraw their student(s) from the Academy and enroll them in the
student’s assigned district Academy in accordance with Academy district policy.
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If the school is filing the application in conjunction with a college, university, museum,
educational institution, another nonprofit organization or any other partner, provide the
following information:
I. Name of the partner organization.
J. Name of the contact person at the partner organization and that person’s full contact
information.
K. A description of the nature and purpose of the school’s partnership with the organization.
L. An explanation of how the partner organization will be involved in the governance of the
school.
Not applicable.
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Section 10: MANAGEMENT
A. Describe the management structure of the school. Include job descriptions for teachers
and each administrative position that identify key roles, responsibilities and accountabilities.
The Charter Board is responsible for adopting policies that govern GCCA and the Principal is
responsible for implementing said policies. The School's on-site administration consists of the
principal and he/she will receive assistance from the administrative support staff. The
administration is responsible for curriculum development, instructional delivery, working with and
providing all necessary materials and information to the teaching staff, addressing student-related
issues, and overseeing the parental involvement agreements.
The Principal will be directly involved in the daily operation of the School, and the Principal will
report directly to, and be held accountable to the board of directors. If a management company is
needed (we don’t plan on hiring one at this time- only consultants), the Board of Directors will
make Principal report directly to the consultants who in turn will report to the Board. However we
do plan on hiring educational consultants (as mentioned earlier) that have opened charter schools.
They will be involved with all aspects of opening and running the school.
The Principal may delegate the necessary authority to other employees and develop necessary
procedures to efficiently operate the School. The Principal is responsible for the direction and
coordination of staff and students in their efforts to reach the School’s educational goals as well as
developing and implementing the school vision and mission.
The board will conduct an extensive search for the school Principal. We will advertise on
TeacherTeacher.com. We will also advertise in the local newspapers. The top four candidates will
be interviewed by the board and the final candidate will be selected after the interview process is
over.
Principal (Twelve Month Annual Contract)
Qualifications:
• Education: Valid Florida Certification in Educational Leadership, Administration,
Administration & Supervision, School Principal or Professional School Principal at the appropriate
grade level for the school.
• Required Experience: A total of five (5) years of school experience at a school site is required.
Reports to: School Governing Board
Supervises: All administrative, instructional, and non-instructional staff at the school.
Position Goal: To provide the leadership and management necessary to administer and implement
all programs, activities and policies essential to ensure high quality educational experiences and
services for all students in a safe, nurturing, and enriching environment resulting in an effective
and efficient school.
The Principal is expected to:
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Specialize in the decision-making and communication processes.
Plan, organize, implement, and evaluate educational programs and educational staff.
Develop and maintain close relationships with staff, parents, and the Charter Board.
Demonstrate effective educational leadership.
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Provide all documentations to the district in a timely manner.
JOB DESCRIPTIONS
PRINCIPAL
POSITION SUMMARY:
The principal, with the support of the administrative support staff, will ensure that the operations of
GCCA (resources, courses, policies) are in accordance with the mission and vision of the School.
The function of the Principal is to provide the School with effective programs, to provide referral
services to parents and to supervise the day-to-day implementation of the programs, and operation
of the school.
Position Goal: To provide the leadership and management necessary to administer and implement
all programs, activities and policies essential to ensure high quality educational experiences and
services for all students in a safe, nurturing, and enriching environment.
In addition to demonstrating all of Florida’s Principal Competencies, some of the principal’s duties
and responsibilities include the following:
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBLITIES:
1. Administers the development, coordination, maintenance, and evaluation of the educational
program and the special education program. In addition the principal supervises the school
operations and school personnel.
2. Develops, implements, and evaluates the School Improvement Plan.
3. Oversees the School Advisory Council.
4. Maintains a positive and productive relationship with the Parent-Teacher Association.
5. Develops and supervises new teacher programs.
6. Supervises all students and staff.
7. Supervises and coordinates school-wide programs, curricula and course options.
8. Supervises and coordinates student registration, scheduling, and master scheduling
construction.
9. Oversees the grade reporting system.
10. Monitors substitute teachers and the class coverage process.
11. Coordinates and supervises the testing and assessment program.
12. Supervises school activities and special events and initiates fundraising activities.
13. Establishes business partnerships and positive relationships with community leaders.
14. Maintains a master schedule of all school activities and events, including extracurricular
trips.
15. Coordinates and schedules the use of facilities for all events.
16. Implements and enforces attendance and tardy policies and procedures for all students.
17. Enforces the discipline plan and assist teachers with all concerns and issues related to
student behavior.
18. Supervises methods of teaching, supervision, and administration in effect in the school,
coordinates, supervises, and conducts the evaluations of all staff.
19. Monitors the programs and activities of the school toward specific goals, making or
providing for appropriate adjustment in the programs for improvement and assesses
effectiveness, weaknesses and progress toward the overall education objectives of the
school.
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20. Keeps the Charter School Board informed about modern education practices, educational
trends, and the policies, practices, and problems in the school community, also facilitates
frequent communication with the parents of the school community, also oversees the
implementation of RTI model
21. Encourages teachers and pupils to perform to the best of their ability and coordinates and
adapts school curricular programs and policies.
22. Ensures that all activities in the school community are conducted in accordance with the
applicable federal and state laws and the policies of the Charter School Board.
23. Assumes responsibility for the overall financial planning of the school and for the
preparation of the annual budget, and submits it to the Board for review and approval.
24. Establishes and maintains efficient procedures and effective controls for all expenditures of
school funds in accordance with adopted budget, subject to direction and approval of the
Board. Keeps accurate account of all money paid to the school and records the purpose for
which it was paid.
25. Maintains or has maintained adequate records for the school, including financial accounts;
business and property records; and personnel, school population, and scholastic records.
26. Provides suitable instructions and regulations to govern the maintenance of school
properties.
27. Provides suitable instructions and regulations to govern the safety and transportation of
students.
Assumes responsibility for the buildings, grounds, equipment and supplies of the school
supervise the work of the custodians and maintenance staff, reporting to the governing
board of the conditions and needs of the school.
28. Recommends the locations and sizes of new school sites and of additions to existing sites;
the locations and sizes of new buildings; the plans for new school buildings; all
appropriations for sites and buildings; and improvements, alterations, and changes in the
buildings and equipment of the school.
29. Oversees the processing and submission of required reports.
30. Interprets the budget and finances, educational program of the school and school system to
the community.
31. Recommends to the consultants the appointment or dismissal of all employees of the
school, coordinates and conducts the interview process and make hiring and termination
decisions for all staff.
32. Ensures that all employees are evaluated in accordance with the schedule established by the
Board.
33. Determines assignments, defines the duties and coordinates and directs the work of all
employees of the school.
34. Recommends all promotions, demotions, and salary changes to the consultants.
35. Communicates to all employees all actions of the consultants relating to personnel matters,
and receives from employees all communications to be made to the Board.
36. Attends and participates in all meetings of the Board and its committees, except when
excused by the Board.
37. Takes prompt action to implement all directives of the Board.
38. Advises the consultants on the need for new and/or revised policies.
39. Provides timely advice to the consultants on the implication of changes in statutes or
regulations affecting the school community.
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40. Informs and advises the consultants about programs, practices, and problems of the school,
and keeps the Board informed of the activities operating under the Board’s authority.
41. Prepares and submits to the Board recommendations relative to all matters requiring Board
action, placing before the Board such facts, objective information, and reports as are needed
to ensure the making of informed decisions. Develops and implements rules and regulations
in keeping with Board policy.
41. Compile and prepare all student achievement outcomes.
QUALIFICATIONS:
A. Master’s Degree in Education and School Administrator Certification.
B. Demonstrated interpersonal skills and demonstrated management ability to deal effectively
with a multi-disciplinary staff.
C. Demonstrated organization and managerial ability.
This organization reserves the right to review and change job duties and responsibilities as the need
arises. This job description does not constitute a written or implied contract of employment.
JOB DESCRIPTION
TEACHER
POSTION SUMMARY:
The teacher assists the student in discovering their academic potential and supports the student
through the process of building positive self-image through academic success.
Teacher (Ten-Month Salaried-Annual Contract):
Reports to: Principal
Qualifications: Ability to supervise aides and other personnel.
Demonstrated judgment to handle crisis situations and to use supervision constructively
Education: Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university; a degree in education or a
related field.
Certifications: Possess a valid Florida certification in the subject area or is eligible and committed
to waiver commitment, in accordance with Lee County School Board guidelines or has applied for
a Florida Teaching Certificate.
Preferred experience: Two (2) years of successful classroom experience in the appropriate
subject area.
Position Goal: To create and maintain a classroom atmosphere that generates high expectations
and enthusiasm for learning by infusing critical thinking skills, application skills, interpersonal
skills, and technology into an aligned curriculum and assessment process, resulting in measurable
student achievement gains for all students.
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
A. Offer a program that meets the emotional, physical, intellectual and social needs of both the
individual and the group. Be able to adapt, design and implement curriculum to meet the
needs of the individual students
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B. Interact with the children and to encourage their involvement in activities.
C. Prepare a safe environment that is orderly, clean and appealing and permits the child to
grow and to explore.
D. Plan weekly lessons based on a curriculum outline.
E. Uses observation techniques for identification, ongoing re-evaluation and planning for
students.
F. Suggests educational and classroom management strategies, materials and techniques to
parents and other support personnel working with students.
G. Posses knowledge of curriculum and sunshine state standards in the appropriate subject
area
H. Establish and maintain good communications with parents through parent conferences
twice a year and on an informal basis.
I. Observe, record and report significant individual and group behavior.
J. Use appropriate discipline and to train staff so that the discipline is consistent.
K. Maintain all records and files.
L. Keep personnel informed of program goals and developments both with children, parents
and administration.
M. Attend monthly personnel meetings.
N. Advise administration of needed equipment and supplies, on the appropriate requisition
form.
O. Clean and maintain classroom and equipment.
P. Be sufficiently prepared for indoor activities on rainy days (i.e., NO TV).
Q. Participates in Professional Development
R. Provides and maintains student grades
S. Provides communication with parents and participates in conferences and orientation nights
Teachers shall:
Demonstrate Proficiency
 Demonstrate mastery of all state competencies.
 Demonstrate mastery of all twelve of the teacher practices benchmarks for the 21St century
at the professional and eventually the accomplished level.
 Foster students’ achievement gains from baseline assessment levels to be evident in
pre/post test comparison results, standardized test scores, and portfolios.
 Maintain student portfolios.
Demonstrate Initiative
 Demonstrate consistent attendance.
 Demonstrate efficiency.
 Demonstrate punctuality.
 Initiate opportunities for professional development.
 Initiate and present innovative ideas for special projects, school functions, field trips,
extracurricular activities, and clubs.
 Maintain and work towards individual goals of a Professional Growth Plan
 Provide supplemental instruction.
Participate in Continued Professional Development
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Attend workshops and conferences.
Demonstrate oral proficiency.
Demonstrate written proficiency.
Pursue further education and supplemental credentials.
Serve as Role Models for Students
 Maintaining and promoting a safe learning environment.
 Promote problem-solving skills and character education.
 Promote and enforce Code of Excellence.
 Maintain a pleasant and respectful demeanor among students and parents.
Advise Parents
 Document parent phone calls, conversations, and conferences.
 Work as partners to create behavior modification plans and create.
 Pupil Progression Plans for students.
Keep parents updated through interim reports, report cards, phone calls, and notes home.
 Maintain flexibility and frequent contact with parents about student progress and school
events.
Demonstrate Awareness of Each Student’s Educational Needs
 Continually assess students' development (psychological and academic) through clearly
defined rubrics.
 Establish, maintain, assess, and (if needed) modify individual student progression plans.
 Identify those students who exhibit exceptional thinking styles and behaviors and
implement and/or accommodate those exceptional needs.
Participate Actively in School Functions
 Attend parent/teacher meetings and conferences.
 Plan and participate in special events.
Work Cooperatively and Productively with Co-Workers
 Take initiative to implement projects, programs, and/or compensate for shortcomings
within your classroom and/or the school environment.
 Exhibit congeniality among co-workers, students, and parents.
 Be flexible - always have a back-up plan.
Follow Guidelines Regarding Safety and Education
 Complete and maintain accident reports.
 Consistently maintain portfolios.
 Supervise student recreation.
 Complete, distribute, and maintain files of all behavior and homework referrals as required.
 Complete and maintain files of all report cards, interim reports, and county test records.
 Maintain up-to-date lesson plans within the guidelines of the School curriculum.
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Follow safety requirements regarding aisles, doorways, fire alarms, and fire extinguishers at
all times.
Participate in monthly fire and tornado drills.
Keep dangerous objects and toxic substances (ammonias, medicines, etc.) out of the reach
of children at all times.
Follow appropriate medication guidelines for all students (never to give Tylenol, cough
drops, or any prescription medications without the written consent of the parent and
administrator and accompanied by the appropriate medical forms).
This organization reserves the right to review and change job duties and responsibilities as the need
arises. This job description does not constitute a written or implied contract of employment.
B. Outline the criteria and process that will be used to select the school's leader and the
process by which the school leader will be evaluated.
The school principal will be hired by the board, and will be responsible for all aspects of school
operations within the scope of operating policy and budgetary approval by the Governing Board.
The Principal will maintain the day-to-day operations of the School and serve as the instructional
leader of the School. As such, the Board will recruit talented individuals who have knowledge of
and experience with instructional, educational, and school site matters. The School will adhere to
the antidiscrimination provisions of Florida Statutes.
At minimum, the Governing Board will seek an individual who has:
 extensive administrative (preferably in a school setting) and teaching experience;
 State of Florida Educational Leadership Certification;
 experience working with school or advisory educational boards;
 strong managerial capabilities;
 knowledge of the needs of student population;
 positive evaluations from previous administrative position(s);
 letters of recommendation;
 excellent communication skills; and
 demonstrated capacity to meet and or exceed the Florida Principal Competencies including:
Proactive Orientation; Decisiveness; Commitment to School Mission; Interpersonal Search;
Information Search;
Concept Formation; Conceptual Flexibility; Managing Interactions;
Persuasiveness; Concern for Image; Tactical Adaptability; Achievement Motivations; Management
Control; Developmental Orientations; Organizational Ability; delegation; self- presentation;
written communication.
Evaluation of Administrator:
The Board of Directors will evaluate the principal annually. The Board will use the Florida
Consortium of Public Charter School’s Evaluation tool in order to validate principal competence
and effectiveness, in accordance with the Florida Principal Competencies. Therein, administrative
performance will be measured in terms of meeting or exceeding said competencies with emphasis
in the areas of: improved student achievement; overall school site leadership; information and
analysis; strategic quality planning; management of processes; human resources and customer
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focus. Other data included as part of the school leader’s evaluation may include: results of parental
involvement efforts; FCAT and AYP reports in terms of continuous improvement efforts;
professionalism and attendance statistics; and results of parent, and staff climate surveys. We will
use the Florida Consortium of Public Charter School’s evaluation instrument for administrators and
staff.
Setting Performance Expectations (Principals)
Performance expectations are communicated in August of each year in two ways:
• Criteria on Performance Evaluation Tool. All criteria that the principal will be evaluated on, is
communicated in August. Given the range of responsibilities for which principals are accountable,
the August communication ensures that specific expectations are set. Performance within each
criterion is used to determine merit increases.
Principal Goals:
1. Academics
2. Operations
3. Academy Culture
4. Finance
5. Growth
Achievement of these goals are evaluated at the end of the year and linked to an incentive bonus.
Performance Management – Principal Evaluation Tool
The following are the categories included in the evaluation tool. For each factor specific criteria
has been identified in terms of what performance is expected.
Academic Excellence
• Curriculum
• Challenging goals and effective feedback
• Parent and Community involvement
• Safe and orderly environment
• Collegiality and professionalism
• Teacher level factors
• Technology
Operational Management
• Registration and student record keeping
• Customer service
• Governing board relations
• Following GCCA guidelines for facility operations
• Supports GCCA communications functions
• Compliance with District and State regulation
Superior Culture
• Leadership
• Human Resources
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• Performance and planning
• Compensation management
Financial Growth
• Budget Development and management
• Business manager relations
• Fund raising
• Risk management
Growth
• Enrollment
• Succession Planning
• Academy Opening
• Teams
Monitoring Performance and Providing Feedback:
Performance is monitored throughout the year and feedback is provided to support continued
improvements and high performance. Monitoring methods include:
• Academy site visits conducted at least two times a year by a consultant appointed by the board.
• Staff surveys conducted in December and April
• Parent survey conducted in December and April
• Monthly Principal meetings
• Monthly Principal reports
• Student Achievement
Professional Development for Administrator:
The professional development plan for administrators will encompass both internal and district
based in-service trainings. Administrators may also participate in professional development
conducted through: the National Association of School principals; the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools/AdvancEd; Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development; and
the William Cecil Golden School Leadership Development Program. At a minimum,
administrators will be encouraged to participate in the following professional development
trainings and conferences:
1. Florida Annual State Charter School Conference - administrators will attend state conference
on an annual basis.
2.
Clinical Educator Training – This training provides quality support for developing
administrators for the classroom or other educational environments such as the student services
area. The Clinical Educator Program is designed to assist experienced educators as they exercise
the very critical task of supporting and mentoring developing professionals in a variety of settings.
This course helps develop skills for coaches and mentors in a formative observation, clinical
supervision, feedback skills, and professional development planning for increased instructional
effectiveness.
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3. Classroom Walk-through Training - Provides school leaders with strategies and tools to
effectively structure classroom visits and follow-up reflection. Reflective thinking about one's
practice provides an effective strategy for change and improvement by fostering a process of
communication between the instructional leaders and the teacher to increase the focus on student
achievement. The process provides a powerful strategy for increasing student achievement; a
strategy for classroom visits that focuses on teaching and learning; methodology for analyzing the
classroom for feedback purposes, and the use of reflective conversation for providing feedback.
4. Budget Training for Administrators – This training addresses school budgeting as it pertains to
both the school’s operating budget and internal accounting policies and procedures, Financial and
Program Cost Accounting and Reporting for Florida Schools (Redbook) requirements, and checks
and balances to ensure a sound budget.
5. Master Scheduling for Administrators – Administrators are trained on creating an efficient and
effective master schedule that meets the national, state and district course requirements, is
financially sound, and that meets class size requirements.
6. Differentiated Instruction for Administrators – This training helps administrators to understand
how to facilitate differentiated instruction by teaching teachers and coaches to use data to
differentiate and individualize instruction and to create effective targeted instruction and tutoring to
increase student achievement and maximize instructional time.
7.
Data-Driven Decision-Making – Administrators learn how to analyze, extrapolate and
disaggregate school data from a variety of sources and to use this data to create effective school
improvement plans and increase student achievement.
8. Developing the School’s Improvement Plan – This training assists school administrators to
develop a sound and effective school improvement plan to ensure an equitable and high- quality
school improvement plan. This process includes data analysis, goal-setting, budget planning,
professional development planning and reflective practices.
9. Technology for the State Standards – Administrator participates in hands-on technology
workshops to learn how to integrate technology into the classroom. This may include the use of
Promethean Boards, Safari Montage, Document Imaging Cameras, Mimio boards, and academic
software programs and utilization of a variety of online resources. The purpose is to ensure
schools are growing with technology to ensure students and teachers are prepared for the
expectations of the 21st century and national technology standards.
10. Principal Chat Sessions – Administrators meet by level to go over pertinent topics and to share
best practices. These sessions include curriculum development, standards implementation,
scheduling, educational changes, innovative programs, and more. Experienced administrators share
their best practices for using student achievement data with teachers and staff.
11. Safety and Security – Safety and security training will prepare administrators to prevent and
protect the school and students, to handle emergency situations, to recognize potential threats, to
train school staff on daily safety procedures, and to write an annual school safety plan.
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Criteria and Process used to select Academy Leader
The Academy uses a thorough and extensive process for recruiting all positions within the
Academy. Principal candidates will be invited to participate in activities to assess their suitability
for the Principal position. Activities consist of:
In-Basket Activities
This activity evaluates a candidate’s ability to handle real life situations that are part of the
principal’s job. Candidates are asked to prioritize scenarios in terms of level of priority and are
then asked to describe what action they would take to address each situation.
• Each in-basket item requires a separate action that must be completed and its priority level,
identified.
• Assessors of this activity look for identification of problem, steps to solution, priority
level, communication skills and overall approach to each situation.
Essay Writing
This activity is used to assess the candidate’s writing ability as well as their overall philosophy of
Education.
• The subject of the essay forces the candidate to read an Education article, reviewing the subject
and asserting a personal view point.
• Assessors of this activity look for congruence with our educational model as well as the
candidate’s ability to articulate their viewpoint in written word.
Group Presentation
This activity is used to determine the candidate’s ability to work collaboratively with a group as
well as their ability to present in front of a group.
• Group topics are decided by company assessors. The group of candidates use chart paper and
markers to brainstorm topic solutions. The group uses cluster techniques to prioritize and
synthesize solutions and to develop an implementation plan.
• Assessors will look for specific behaviors observed in terms of group interaction.
• Assessors also look for the presentation results, communication, clarity, voice and other
leadership traits.
Interview
Each candidate is interviewed by the members of the Board of Directors.
Interview templates are prepared in advance and include the following topics:
• The candidate’s philosophy of Education
• The candidate’s understanding of his/her role
• The candidate’s use of data including understanding of High Schools
• The candidate’s familiarity with charter schools, knowledge of and accountability to governing
boards and other key information relevant to being a building leader in a charter school
environment.
• The candidate’s grasp of specific responsibilities relevant to his/her role such as: interviewing,
creating an Academy-wide culture, discipline, outreach, instructional leadership, supervision, etc.
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• For scenarios that may come up at an Academy, interviewers use behavioral interviewing
techniques to gain insight into the candidate’s past behavior, which is the best predictor of future
behavior.
• Each question is scored; a minimum score must be achieved to be considered a serious candidate.
Delegated Authority:
The Board delegates to the Principal the authority to:
 Issue teachers written preliminary notice of inadequacy of classroom performance.
 Issue notice to teachers of the intent of the Charter Board not to offer a teaching position
with either voluntary or involuntary termination.
C. Provide a staff plan for each year of the charter term aligned with the school's projected
enrollment as detailed on the cover page of this application.
The School’s initial staff will consist of the principal, certified educators, paraprofessionals and
other faculty to meet the needs of the School. The School will work toward a goal to employ as
many teachers as may be necessary to maintain a 1:18 student/teacher ratio in grades K-3 and 1:22
in grades 4-8. Services such as maintenance and security will be hired as additional support staff.
Grant money and other funding will be sought to enrich the curriculum.
Our staffing plan is based on the following student projections:
Five Year Enrollment Projections
Year 1
Kindergarten
1st Grade
2nd Grade
3rd Grade
4th Grade
5th Grade
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
1 Sections
22 Students
1 Sections
22 Students
6th Grade
Year 3
2 Sections 36 Students
2 Sections 36 Students
2 Sections 36 Students
2 Sections 36 Students
2 Sections 44 Students
1 Sections 22 Students
1 Sections
Students
22
7th Grade
8th Grade
Total
Possible
Enrollment
10 Sections
188 Students
12 Sections 232 Students
Year 4
Year 5
2 Sections
2 Sections
36 Students
36 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
36 Students
36 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
36 Students
36 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
36 Students
36 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
44 Students
44 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
44 Students
44 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
44 Students
44 Students
1 Sections
2 Sections
22 Students
44 Students
1 Sections
22 Students
15 Sections
17 Sections
298 Students
342 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
44 Students
2 Sections
44 Students
2 Sections
44 Students
2 Sections
44 Students
2 Sections
44 Students
18 Sections
364 Students
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Five Year Staffing Projections
Year 1
Year 2
Classroom
10
Teachers
ESE
0.6
Teachers
Gifted
0.2
Teachers
Other
1.8
Teachers
Principal
1
Assistant Principal
Business
1
Manager/
Consultants
Office Assistant
Data Prep
1
Clerk
Educational
1
Assistant
Maintenance
1
1
Maintenance
1
2
Total
Employees
18.6
Year 3
12.2
Year 4
15.5
Year 5
17.9
19
0.7
0.8
0.9
0.9
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.3
1.9
2
2
2
1
1
1
0.5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0.5
1
0.75
1
1
1
2
2.5
3
4
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
23
28
32.85
35.2
D. Explain the school’s plan for recruitment, selection, development and evaluation of staff.
The Charter School believes it has the obligation to employ the best qualified administrative
personnel and teachers available regardless of race, color creed, sex, national origin, age or
handicap.
Recruiting
Recruitment of Staff: The School will ensure that faculty members are highly-qualified and match
the learning needs of its students. GCCA will embark on a progressive and innovative recruiting
plan. Various resources are used to recruit qualified candidates. The plan will include but not be
limited to:
• Job Fairs
GCCA will hold and attend education job fairs to seek teaching professionals.
• College Recruiting
GCCA will identify colleges and universities, both locally and nationally in order to secure newly
graduated teachers. We will also coordinate efforts to partner with postsecondary educational
institutions to serve as host school for interns whenever possible.
• Newspapers
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GCCA will advertise both locally and statewide to entice Florida certified teachers to come to the
State and City to teach.
• Internet
GCCA will utilize selected educational Internet sites to advertise teaching openings. Recruit
teachers through the State-sponsored, Department of Education, Teach in Florida website. We will
also advertise on the school’s website.
• Referrals
Minority Organizations: GCCA will work closely with minority referring organizations to help
ensure that the work force hired will be reflective of the diverse community served.
When the School declares a position open, the Principal will advertise the position in local
newspapers, all schools, administrative offices, websites and appropriate university placement
offices. The opening will be advertised for a minimum of two (2) weeks and in case of multiple
openings, an applicant interested in more than one position will submit a resume for each position
to the Principal. Determination of the personnel need of the School will be the responsibility of the
Management Company. Recommendation to hire a teacher or administrator will not be made until
a personal interview with the candidate has been conducted and at least three references have been
conducted by the interview committee. The committee consists at a minimum of the Principal, one
teacher, and a parent. The Principal or his/her designee will verify that persons nominated for
employment meet all qualifications established by the applicable state laws, rules of the Florida
Department of Education and School Board policies for the type of position for which the
nomination is made. The School will not knowingly employ an individual who has resigned from a
school district in lieu of disciplinary action with respect to child welfare or safety or who has been
dismissed for just cause by any school district with respect to child welfare or safety.
Teachers:
All teachers will have at least a bachelor’s degree and be certified or eligible for certification. In
the hiring process, preference will be given to those that are certified in subject areas that will aid
in a staff that has diversified expertise and experience. Certifications of teachers will be disclosed
to parents/guardians during student registration for the new school year. A list of teacher
certifications will be available for viewing upon request from the main office of the School.
Staff Selection Process, Including Fingerprinting and Criminal Checks:
Gulf Coast Charter Academy will not employ an individual to provide instructional services or to
serve as a teacher aide if the individual’s certificate or licensure as an educator is suspended or
revoked by this or any other state. GCCA agrees to fingerprint all employees as required by Florida
Statutes. GCCA will not violate the anti-discrimination provisions of Florida Statutes, the Florida
Education Equity Act or any other provisions of Federal or state law in its hiring and employment
practices. Lee County School District will assist the School in processing fingerprint, background
checks, and certification applications.
Evaluations
All employees receive a mid-year and end-of-year review. Teachers and teacher associates also
will be reviewed by the Principal through the Classroom/Teacher Checklist. The purpose of these
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reviews is to have clear and open communication between staff and administration.
Periodic personnel evaluations will be conducted to improve teacher performance. Teachers will be
observed throughout the year using the Florida Consortium of Public Charter School Evaluation
Tool. The tool is used to help evaluate and offer professional development to teachers. Teachers
will maintain a portfolio as a part of their performance evaluation process which includes evidence
of relevant coursework, publications, published papers, recognition or awards they receive and
other such documentation of their investment and responsibility for their own professional growth.
Teacher Qualifications
In compliance with Florida Statute, minimum and preferred qualifications for each instructional
and student service position applicable to the charter Academy will be available for review at
GCCA. Each teacher’s qualifications will be disseminated to parents considering the charter
Academy for their child as required in the charter statute. In accordance with the guidelines for No
Child Left Behind and 1002.33 Florida Statute, parents will be notified in writing if a teacher is
teaching out of field. Based on the new law, this information will be posted on the school’s
website.
Additional methods of dissemination will include, but are not limited to:
• Displaying teacher qualifications at informational meetings and open houses.
• Inclusion of teacher’s qualifications in the Academy brochure or handbook.
• Qualification information will include: degree(s) held, past teaching experience, certification,
years of experience, and any other relevant information.
Support Staff
The support staff will include cafeteria staff, custodians, paraprofessionals, secretaries, and
substitute teachers in addition to others as approved to support the Academy’s programs. All
support staff will be required to be fingerprinted and have background checks prior to employment.
The School’s Governing Board will appoint a school screening committee to interview and
recommend to the Board the hiring of all other employees. The plan is as follows:
The School
Governing
Board:
Interviews and
Hires the School
Principal;
Develops partnerships
with local universities
to attain qualified,
certified teachers; and
Appoints a school
site screening
committee.
The Screening
Committee is
comprised of
school
administrators,
teachers,
counselors,
and lead staff:
Posts positions on
Teach in Florida,
Florida’s official
teacher recruitment
website, sponsored
by the Florida
Department of
Education
Verifies credentials of
interviewees (proper
documentation,
certifications, and
background checks are
conducted)
Makes official
recommendations to
the specific
department or
administrator
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The
Department
Chair or
Administrator
The Principal
Develops an
interview
questionnaire for
specific positions
and conducts initial
screening
interviews
Conducts in-depth
departmental
interview
Conducts final
interview;
Determines
interviewee’s expertise
in regards to subject
area or position
Reviews
recommendations of
both interviewers; and
Makes official
recommendations to
the Principal or
Board
Makes final hiring
decisions and reports
to the Governing
Board
Evaluation of Staff:
The administrative team, and/or the Principal’s designee(s), will conduct all faculty evaluations.
We will use the Florida Consortium of Public Charter Schools Evaluation Tool to validate teacher
competence in accordance with Florida Statutes and as specified in the Educator Accomplished
Practices (prepared by the Florida Education Standards Commission). The twelve Florida Educator
Accomplished Practices comprise the knowledge, skills and abilities needed by all teachers to
effectively support high student achievement. Research-based, these essential educator practices
include:
•
Assessment;
Communication;
•
•
Continuous improvement;
•
Critical thinking;
•
Diversity;
•
Ethics;
Human Development & Learning;
•
•
Knowledge of Subject Matter;
•
Learning Environments;
•
Planning;
•
Role of the Teacher; and
•
Technology.
Because every effective teacher will be able to integrate and apply all of the skills involved in the
aforementioned areas of professional practice, competent demonstration of each of the twelve
Educator Accomplished Practices will be evaluated. Formal teacher observations will be conducted
at least four times a year for new teachers and bi-annually for experienced teachers. Additional
appraisals may be effected, as needed, to address areas of concern and/or to inform completion of
improvement plans that may include specific strategies, resources, and timelines for improvement
deficiencies.
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The CWT (Classroom Walk Through) Program - will be used frequently to provide feedback
on objective-setting, grade level appropriateness of lessons, appropriate higher-level thinking
strategies, (as evidenced in Bloom’s Taxonomy) and appropriate use of texts and Materials.
Instructional strategies, classroom management skills, and engagement of learners in the classroom
will also be observed and teacher performance will be evaluated as a means to inform instruction.
Finally, the School will incorporate the Florida Department of Education’s Merit Pay Plan for
teachers, based on student performance, as it relates to learning gains, on the FCAT 2.0/PARCC.
The evaluation tool is aligned with the FLDOE’s Merit Pay Plan.
Other support staff, such as clerical staff and teacher assistants will also receive feedback on their
performance via in-house assessment tools and individual conferences with the principal or his/her
designee. School staff performance will be continually improved through a number of strategies.
Performance evaluations will be completed by the Principal, or his/her designee, and will serve as
the basis for continuing employment contracts.
Development of Staff:
In setting high expectations for both students and teachers, the School will be committed to
maintaining the level of high quality instructors by implementing a comprehensive professional
development plan. The school will support the professional development needs of all professional
staff by subsidizing college classes, facilitating the attainment of continuing education credits, and
offering trainings.
Teacher training will be offered throughout the school year in a variety of forms. Select teachers
will attend local, state and national conferences and serve as trainer to the remainder of the staff
upon return to the School. Appropriate and relevant school wide training will occur on teacher
planning days as well as on early release dates. All staff will participate in school-initiated and
other relevant and necessary workshops for professional development, and a member of the
administrative team will coordinate, assist and monitor the staff development process. In-house
workshops and meetings will be held monthly by administrators and may occur as often as
biweekly through team leaders, in order to facilitate support, encourage communication, allow for
team planning, and troubleshoot concerns and needs.
In addition to school wide professional development opportunities, faculty members will each
complete an Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP) as a means to document and
identify areas for personal targeted professional growth, including the identification of strategies
for obtaining specified goals, its’ compatibility to ensuring the professional development exercise
will serve to benefit the student, and a timeframe in which the staff development exercise should
occur. All IPDPs will be approved by the Principal, or his/her designee, at such time the principal
may elect to recommend additional recommended professional development that should occur
within a given timeframe.
The principal or member of the administrative staff, together with the teacher, will commit to the
IPDP, including the allocation of necessary resources for plan implementation, and observation of
new/struggling teachers by veteran/mentor teachers to implement support strategies.
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Retention of Staff:
The School wishes to provide the best benefits and employee services possible. Our experience has
shown that when employees deal openly and directly with supervisors, the work environment can
be excellent, communications can be clear, and attitudes can be positive. We believe that the
School will amply demonstrate their commitment to employees by responding effectively to
employee concerns.
A number of the programs (such as Social Security, workers' compensation, and unemployment
insurance) cover all employees in the manner prescribed by law. Additionally, the school will
provide a wide range of benefits to ensure the retaining of qualified and capable staff. These
include:
Employee Assistance Program: The School cares about the health and well-being of its
employees and recognizes that a variety of personal problems can disrupt their personal and work
lives. Through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the school will provide confidential
access to professional counseling services for help in confronting such personal problems as
alcohol and other substance abuse, marital and family difficulties, financial or legal troubles, and
emotional distress
Flexible Spending Account (FSA): A Flexible Spending Account (FSA) program that allows
employees to have pre-tax dollars deducted from their salaries to pay for eligible out-of-pocket
expenses. The pre-tax contributions made to the FSA can be used to pay for predictable nonreimbursed health care expenses and dependent care expenses during the plan year. Through the
FSA program, staff can reduce taxable income without reducing real income, in order to keep
more of the money they earn.
Support for Beginning and Struggling Teachers: Observation of new and struggling teachers by
veteran teachers may be conducted and support strategies will be implemented as applicable. A
new educator support system format will also be utilized as a means to offer support to beginning
teachers, through the assigning of a willing mentor, who will be assigned for struggling and/or
beginning teachers.
In addition to the employee programs prescribed by law, (such as Social Security, workers'
compensation, and unemployment insurance) the school will provide a wide range of benefits to
ensure the retaining of qualified and capable staff. The anticipated full range of services includes:
Benefit programs:
•
Flexible Benefits Plan;
•
Direct Deposit;
•
Tuition Assistance (if the budget allows)
•
Retirement/401(k) Savings Plan;
•
Bereavement Leave;
•
Dental Insurance;
•
Employee Assistance Program;
•
Family Medical Leave;
•
Financial Counseling;
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Health Insurance;
Holidays;
Jury Duty Leave;
Life Insurance;
Long-Term Disability;
Sick Leave; and
Vision Care Insurance.
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Section 11:EDUCATION SERVICE PROVIDERS
A. Describe the services to be provided by the ESP.
The School will NOT use an ESP at this time.
B. Provide a draft of the proposed contract between the school and the ESP including, at a
minimum, proposed services, performance evaluation measures, fee structure, renewal and
termination provisions, and terms of property ownership (real, intellectual and personal).
C. Explain why the ESP was selected, indicating what due diligence efforts were conducted
to inform the selection and how the relationship with the ESP will further the school's
mission.
D. Explain the ESP’s roles and responsibilities for the financial management of the proposed
charter school, if applicable, and the internal controls that will be in place to guide this
relationship.
E. Explain how the governing board will ensure that an "arm's length," performance -based
relationship exists between the governing board and the ESP.
F. Provide a summary of ESP's history including its educational philosophy and background
and experience of senior management.
G. Provide a list of other schools with which the ESP has contracts, including contact
information and student and financial performance data of such schools.
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Section 12: HUMAN RESOURCES and EMPLOYMENT
A. Explain the school’s compensation plan, including whether staff will be publicly or
privately employed.
The Board of Directors shall approve compensation, including salaries and fringe benefits, and
other conditions of employment. Pursuant to Florida Statutes, teachers employed by or under
contract to Gulf Coast Charter Academy will be certified as required by Florida Statutes. As
allowed in Florida Statutes, the Academy will operate as a private employer and will reflect an
employment practice that will seek to mirror the diversity of the community and student
population. The school employees shall have the option to bargain collectively, as required by
Florida Statutes.
GCCA will offer academic classes conducted by faculty who are academic specialists in their
disciplines. In addition, all teachers will attend a formal orientation program, which includes
segments on professional responsibilities, ethics, classroom management, instructional policies,
and related issues.
All teachers and staff members to be employed by GCCA must possess the personal
characteristics, knowledge base, and successful experiences in the responsibilities and
qualifications identified in each job description. Formal performance evaluations are conducted
throughout the employee's tenure. There will be an initial period. This period, known as the
introductory period, allows the supervisor and the employee to discuss the job responsibilities,
standards, and performance requirements of the new position. Additional formal performance
evaluations are conducted to provide both supervisor and employees the opportunity to discuss job
tasks, identify and correct weaknesses, encourage and recognize strengths, and discuss positive,
Conduct not specifically listed below, but which
purposeful approaches for meeting goals.
adversely affects or is otherwise detrimental to the interests of the school, to students, or to other
employees, may also result in disciplinary action.
B. Describe the personnel policies and procedures to which staff will be required to adhere,
including expectations for participation in the school’s professional development program. If
personnel policies and procedures have not been developed provide a clear plan, including
timeline, for the development and approval by governing board.
GCCA will not discriminate based on actual or perceived disability, gender, nationality, race or
ethnicity, religion or sexual orientation in the hiring of its employees. All faculty and staff
members employed by the School will possess the personal characteristics, knowledge base of and
belief in the educational and curriculum design as described in this proposal, as well as an ability
and motivation to work as part of a team with parental involvement. The school will look for
personnel who bring with them a sense of enthusiasm and commitment as well as a strong belief in
and understanding of the charter school concept.
Employees are expected to observe high standards of job performance and professional conduct.
When performance or conduct does not meet standards, the School may terminate employment, or
it may endeavor, if it deems appropriate, to provide the employee a reasonable opportunity to
correct the problem. If, however, a corrective opportunity is given and the school determines that
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the employee has failed to make the correction, he or she will be subject to further discipline,
including termination. Teacher’s qualifications will be posted on the school’s website.
Professional Development:
The Charter School agrees to establish a Professional Development Plan (PDP) for the School.
This plan will provide the foundation from which an annual slate of professional development
activities is prepared. The PDP will be an opportunity for employees to develop career and
educational goals. GCCA Charter School staff members will be eligible to participate in all
District-sponsored professional development activities. Typical activities available to faculty and
staff include graduate study, professional conferences, equity workshops, technology training, and
other applicable in-service opportunities. The employees and supervisor will develop the PDP,
which shall be reviewed and revised annually as necessary to meet the Charter School’s objectives.
Professional development goals and the attainment of such are incorporated into the annual
employee performance evaluation.
GCCA will support the professional development needs of all professional staff by subsidizing
college classes, facilitating the attainment of continuing education credits through the Teacher
Education Center (TEC), and offering trainings as the budget permits.
Teacher training will be offered throughout the school year in a variety of forms. Select teachers
will attend local, state and national conferences and serve as trainer to the remainder of the staff
upon return to the school. Appropriate and relevant school wide training will occur on teacher
planning days as well as on early release dates. All staff will participate in school-initiated and
other relevant and necessary workshops for professional development, and a member of the
administrative team will coordinate, assist and monitor the staff development process. In-house
workshops and meetings will be held monthly by administrators and may occur as often as
biweekly through team leaders, in order to facilitate support, encourage communication, allow for
team planning, and troubleshoot concerns and needs.
In addition to school wide professional development opportunities, GCCA faculty members will
each complete a Professional Development Plan (PDP) as a means to document and identify areas
for personal targeted professional growth, including the identification of strategies for obtaining
specified goals, its compatibility to ensuring the professional development exercise will serve to
benefit the student, and a time frame in which the staff development exercise should occur. All
PDPs will be approved by the Principal, or his/her designee, at such time the principal may elect to
recommend additional professional development that should occur within a given time frame. The
principal or member of the administrative staff, together with the teacher will commit to the PDP
including the allocation of necessary resources for plan implementation.
Observation of new and struggling teachers by veteran teachers may be conducted and support
strategies will be implemented as applicable. The New Educator Support System that was
developed in Broward County will be utilized as a means to offer support to beginning teachers,
through the assignation of a willing mentor, who will be assigned for struggling and/or beginning
teachers. Professional Development will include all state mandated course work, and will be
applied to certifications, or re-certifications with the state according to state/county requirements.
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In-Service Training:
At GCCA all administrators and teacher facilitators will receive in-service training by consultants.
Teachers will receive training from these consultants at least twice annually during site visitations.
The School will also provide in-service education for its parents, paraprofessionals and volunteers.
Such training may include, but is not limited to the following topics:
 Crisis Intervention
 Curriculum Development
 Character Development
 STEM Education
 Test Development and Administration
 Response to Intervention
 Differentiated Instruction
 CRISS Training
 ELL and ESE Strategies
 Ford PAS Curriculum Service Learning
 Other areas as appropriate
Personnel Procedures and Expectations
All employees will sign a written employment contract to include specific performance
expectations. All employees will receive and acknowledge by signature an employee handbook
explaining goals and aims as well as benefits, grievance procedures, causes for dismissal, and
dismissal procedures in accordance with due process. The handbook will also include lesson plan
requirements, ways to communicate with parents, faculty meeting dates, paid holidays, sick days,
emergency substitute plans, and the date for Open Houses at which attendance is mandatory. Each
employee will abide by the Code of Ethics as designed by Lee County Public Schools to uphold
high standards of job performance and professional conduct, and will be required to participate in
professional development programs. Each position has a job description which will be provided to
all Academy employees. Each employee will perform according to his or her job description.
Employees will be provided timely feedback to inform them when performance standards are
being met as well as when they are not. In cases where performance standards are not being met,
employees will be advised in a timely manner that their performance must improve with assistance
from colleagues, experts in their field and administration. Employees who elect not to conform to
expected standards will be provided progressive discipline up to the level of termination.
Employee-related challenges may arise, and will be addressed using clearly stated policies and
procedures which will be established by the Board and included in the employee handbook.
All employees hired by the Academy will be subject to the requirements of fingerprints and
background checks as outlined by the Lee County Public School System Human Resources
division. All teachers must be highly qualified and certified as per Florida Statute or are able to
present a letter of eligibility and/or a temporary certificate from the Florida Department of
Education. Obtaining proper certification is the responsibility on the teacher and continued
employment will be contingent on the completion of all certification requirements.
Academy is a drug-free workplace. Testing procedures and guidelines will be communicated to all
employees and are consistent with those of the Lee County School Board.
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All staff members will receive professional development in the Comprehensive Research-based
Reading Plan, Classroom Management, before the start of the school year. Teachers will be
required to report to work 10 days prior to the actual date indicated on the Lee County Public
Schools calendar to participate in this training. Teachers will also be required to work 2-3 days
after the end of the school year. They will also be required to supervise two Saturday tutoring
sessions from 9:00 am to noon during the school year.
Each year, as part of our commitment to continuous learning and continuous improvement, the
Academy will set 3-4 main areas of focus for professional development. In our first year of
operation, we will focus on:
 Pedagogy and-teaching strategies
 Stem Education
 Culturally relevant teaching styles
 And the establishment of a strong classroom and school culture.
Dedicated Intensive Two Weeks
The Academy professional development program will begin with an intensive two weeks of staff
development prior to the beginning of each school year. During these sessions, staff will prepare
their classrooms and participate in the professional development program.
The rules set forth below are not exhaustive and are intended to provide employees with
illustrations and fair notice of what is expected from them. However, such listing cannot identify
every situation of unacceptable conduct and performance. Employees should be aware that conduct
not specifically listed below, but which adversely affects or is otherwise detrimental to the interests
of the school, to students, or to other employees, may also result in disciplinary action.
Voluntary Termination
The School will consider an employee to have voluntarily terminated or abandoned his or her
employment if an employee does any of the following:
• Elects to resign from the school.
• Fails to return from an approved leave of absence on the date specified by the school.
• Will comply with SB 736 with respect to all teachers
• Fails to return to work without notice to the school for three (3) consecutive days.
Involuntary Termination
The School expressly reserves the right to discharge employees for cause, but without being in
violation of the laws of the State of Florida and the United States of America. The School assures
thorough, consistent, and even-handed termination procedures. Terminated employees will receive
all earned pay to the next regular pay period. An employee may be terminated involuntarily for any
reason not prohibited by law, including a leave of absence in excess of 180 days, poor
performance, misconduct, or other violations of the school's rules of conduct for employees.
Involuntary termination, other than for an administrative reason or abandonment of employment,
will result in forfeiture of all earned accrued compensation, other than as required to be paid by
law.
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Job Performance
Employees may be disciplined/discharged for poor job performance, including but not limited to,
the following:
• Below-average work quality or quantity
• Poor attitude or lack of cooperation
• Excess absenteeism, tardiness, or abuse of break or lunch privileges
• Failure to follow instructions or procedures
Misconduct
Employees may be disciplined or discharged for misconduct, including but not limited to the
following:
Insubordination
• Dishonesty
• Theft
• Discourtesy (to students, parents, peers, supervisors, etc.)
• Misusing or destroying school property or the property of another
• Disclosing or using confidential or proprietary information without authorization
• Falsifying or altering school records, including the application for employment
• Interfering with the work performance of others
• Harassing other employees or students
• Being under the influence of, manufacturing, dispensing, distributing, using, or possessing
alcohol or illegal or controlled substances on school property or while conducting school business
or supervising students.
• Conduct which raises a threat to the safety and well-being of the school, its employees, students,
or property, including being charged or convicted of a crime that indicates unfitness for the job
• Failing to report to the school, within five days, any charge or conviction under any criminal,
drug, state or felony arrests
The school may proceed directly to a written reprimand or to termination for misconduct or
performance deficiency, without resort to prior disciplinary steps, when the school deems such
action is appropriate. If an employee is recommended for dismissal by the principal of the school,
the principal will propose such dismissal at a meeting of the Board of the School. The employee
shall have the right to contest the dismissal at the board meeting and present testimony or evidence
in connection with the dismissal action. Additionally, school employees will be required to adhere
to The Code of Ethics of the Education Professional in Florida as defined in State Board of
Education Rule.
On-Going Workshops
In addition to intensive development experiences, more frequent trainings and workshops we will
cover school and staff culture, curriculum and standards, team building and logistics, teacher
evaluation, peer review, student assessment, lesson planning, parent involvement, community
relations, and partnerships with community based organizations, among other subjects. Teachers
will also receive training regarding the education of English Language Learners (ELL) and
Students with Disabilities. Such training will include, at a minimum, information on the referral
process to the Public Schools’ Committee on Special Education, the development of the
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individualized education plans (IEP), implementation and evaluation of student progress towards
meeting IEP goals, and reporting requirements.
Bridging the Gap between Teacher and Principal
Our Principal will work daily with each teacher providing constant support and feedback in
designing and implementing top-quality lessons that incorporate a clearly defined aim and
engaging activities that take into consideration various students learning styles and interests. These
informal feedback sessions will serve to bridge the gap between teacher development and formal
evaluation, and will equip faculty to self-assess more effectively. Faculty members will also
receive mid- and end-of-year formal evaluations by the Principal.
Peer Collaboration
Teachers at Academy will work together to refine, share, and develop effective teaching strategies,
which they can then utilize in team-teaching experiences. The academic day will be designed in
such a manner that faculty members will, at least twice a month, collaborate on planning (lessons,
curriculum, and school/ classroom culture), moreover, observe each other's instruction with
feedback of what they learned.
Employees will take part of a Human Recourses Orientation Program where all policies and
procedures will be reviewed and discussed in detail. Each employee will accept their responsibility
to adhere to the School’s policies. Some of the topics to be discussed will be harassment,
discrimination, workplace violence, safety, company ethics and conduct, insurance benefits, and
other policies.
Each employees’ performance evaluation will be based on how well they performed their job and
how they will demonstrate the values and principles of the School. Employee merit increase will be
based on how well the staff member performs and improves in their professional development.
The charter school will comply with and meet all requirements of the School District’s charter
school policy and any amendments thereto. The charter school will operate at all times in
compliance with Florida Statutes and the relevant State Board of Education rules and all
amendments thereto.
Professional Development: The School agrees to establish a Professional Development Plan
(PDP). This plan will provide the foundation from which an annual slate of professional
development activities is prepared. The PDP will be an opportunity for employees to develop
career and educational goals. Staff members will be eligible to participate in all District-sponsored
professional activities. The charter school will be charged for participation in such training at the
same rate as regular District schools.
Officers and employees of the charter school shall receive training in the operation of charter
school as provided by the Department of Education and required by Florida Statutes.
All teachers of core academic subjects will be highly qualified pursuant to the requirements and
definitions of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.
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In the event the school receives ESEA, Title I, Part A funding, the school shall comply with all
applicable requirements as described in Title I of that law, including but not limited to the
credential requirements for teachers and education paraprofessionals. The school will provide
documentation when requested by the School District to establish compliance with this
requirement.
The charter school shall not employ an individual whose relative, as defined in Section 1002.33,
Florida Statutes, advocated such employment and is an officer or an employee of the School with
authority to recommend employment. Additionally, the charter school governing board shall not
take action to appoint a relative of a governing board member to employment with the charter
school.
Typical activities available to faculty and staff include graduate study, professional conferences,
equity workshops, technology training, and other applicable in-service opportunities. The
employees and supervisor will develop the PDP, which shall be reviewed and revised annually as
necessary to meet the School’s objectives. Professional development goals and the attainment of
such are incorporated into the annual employee performance evaluation.
2014-2015
PROJECTED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CALENDAR
(Tentative Calendar we will begin two weeks before the first day of school)
August
August
August
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Staff Orientation
Employee Handbook
Teacher Handbook
Surviving the First Two Weeks
RtI/MTSS
Writing (Across the Curriculum)
ESE / ELL Guidelines, Strategies
and Policies
STEM
Textbook consultants
August
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August
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August
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Reading Across the curriculum with
strategies
Data Driven Decision Making
August
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Effective Classroom Management
Effective Lesson Plans
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Section 13: STUDENT RECRUITMENT AND ENROLLMENT
A. Describe the plan for recruiting students, including strategies for reaching the school’s
targeted populations and those that might otherwise not have easy access to information on
available educational options.
Gulf Coast Charter Academy will seek to target and distribute information to the community-atlarge with the intention of enrolling students, in Lee County, and via this approach will be a
microcosm of the county. GCCA's admission procedures are not designed to influence any racial
or ethnic balances. GCCA will abide by anti-discrimination provisions of Section
1002.33(17)(a)(4), Florida Statutes, which forbids discrimination on the basis of race, national
origin, sex, or handicap against a student or an employee in a state system of public education.
Outreach:
It is our belief that through the recruiting and marketing plan; we will be successful in attracting
families reflective of the community (a demographic study will be done to ascertain the
demographics of the “community”), and in doing so, create a multicultural school environment.
The school will admit students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, religion or gender. It
is the intention of the school to reflect the community it serves. A lottery process will be organized
after the school reaches student capacity. Siblings and employee’s children will be given
preference as provided for within the charter law. Students will be able to transfer in and out of the
school using the same procedures established in the public schools. We will make sure that we
have materials in Spanish, as that is the ELL population we will probably attract.
All medical records will be required as per County policy before a student can begin school. Proof
of all required immunizations will be required before school begins. GCCA will follow all laws
regarding admission for students with IEP’s. Students may withdraw from the school at any time
and enroll in another public school. If the number of applications falls short of the established
capacity, supplemental registration periods may be held for the purpose of reaching student
capacity.
Recruitment
Marketing to residents of the City of Fort Myers will be the primary focus. In order to ensure
strong demand and create a “wait-list” application pool, marketing will occur to all appropriate
populations (geographic, ethnic, age). Student applicants will be tracked appropriately by a first
come first serve basis. This method will provide an opportunity for all students applying to be
admitted, while ensuring an orderly management of achieving enrollment targets across all grade
levels.
Marketing Plan
The Academy will conduct a three phase marketing campaign. The efforts of this campaign should
achieve enrollment capacity with a low student-to-staff ratio. Phase I: Identification
Phase II: Awareness
Phase III: Recruitment
Phase I: Identification
First, the Academy will identify eligible students as identified in the charter.
• Second, GCCA will identify the target recruitment area based on a detailed and thorough
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analysis of the area and compliance with the Academy’s charter.
Some of the indicators to identify a target recruitment area include:
• Community demographics
• Local Academy capacity
• Local Academy academic performance
• Perform scientific surveys for interest areas (e.g. programs, transportation, etc.)
Phase II: Awareness
Beginning approximately one year prior to Academy opening or upon charter Approval (in
November or December), GCCA will conduct a broad marketing campaign throughout the targeted
areas that educates and publicizes to the community information about the charter school
movement and more specifically the opportunities and benefits available at the Academy.
Publications and media clips will be produced bilingually as needed to match the demographics of
the community.
These efforts will include, but not be limited to:
• Local print media
• Development of an Academy website accessible via the internet, with email options
• Distribution of brochures and pamphlets about the Academy and the programs offered
• Participation in “town hall” type meetings with local organizations
• Direct mailings to the community
• Local radio and television public service announcements
• Announcements in Human Resources Newsletters for area businesses
Phase III: Recruitment
Enrollment will take place until the Academy is fully enrolled and staffed. At this point of the
marketing campaign and continuing with the above efforts, a more extensive hands-on marketing
strategy will be implemented.
These efforts will include, but will not be limited to:
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Continued distribution of brochures and pamphlets about the Academy
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Presentations/Information sessions to the local community, neighborhood clubs, etc.
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Display signs and posters throughout the immediate and surrounding communities
Open Houses and information sessions at the facility
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Information sessions and meetings at area schools classified as “overcrowded”
Announcements at the local college and university career centers
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University and college print media
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Attendance at local career fairs
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Presentations/Information sessions for employees at local businesses
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Education fairs for employees
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Internal company email advertisements through local businesses
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Notifications and information through municipal opportunities
The School will ensure that students who are representative of the school’s local community are
recruited at the elementary and middle school levels. Families will receive assistance to understand
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the school’s program and enter its lottery to ensure that language or other barriers do not impede
their ability to join the school community. The School will distribute press releases and public
service announcements to various media outlets to promote the open enrollment period, open house
and other essential details about the school and its programs. A banner will also be posted on site
with relevant information.
The School will make efforts to reach families reflective of the demographic of the County. A
comprehensive advertising and promotional plan will include the use of print, broadcast and online
media including minority and community periodicals to disseminate information about the school’s
educational program and open enrollment period. Promotional flyers and/or brochures will be
distributed to community groups and churches to ensure that harder-to-reach families are aware of
the school and their eligibility to apply for enrollment. This information will also be posted in local
public facilities such as the post office, community centers, libraries and other locations of public
access. In order to best reach out to the county’s growing diverse population, informational
materials will be available in multiple languages as needed.
Once opened, parents and community partners will be encouraged to inform family, friends, and
their community groups about the School. Local elected officials will be invited to visit the School.
They will also be given an updated on the program’s growth and asked to share open enrollment
information with their constituents through their newsletter and upcoming community meetings.
B. Explain how the school will achieve a racial/ethnic balance reflective of the community it
serves or with the racial/ethnic range of other local public schools.
Recruitment of new students will be an ongoing process. An extensive marketing strategy to
attract a racial/ethnic balance in the students population, representative of the surrounding
community, including students from “hard to reach” families will be implemented. These efforts
will include:
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Direct mailing to parents/guardians via the district roster of students;
Community focus groups;
Program tours and open house for prospective students;
Parents/guardians and community members;
Media coverage;
Refer students to the Charter School;
Posting and distributing of flyers in facilities, (such as religious institutions, libraries,
grocery stores, and Laundromats,) service providers, and community centers.
Weekly tours at the school site.
The Academy is committed to enrolling a diverse student population and shall abide by the
provisions in the Florida Educational Equity Act, and Florida Statutes that forbid discrimination on
the basis of race, national origin, gender, marital status, ethnicity, or disability.
Pupils will be considered for admission without regard to ethnicity, national origin, gender, or
achievement level. The school expects to achieve diversity reflective of the community.
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The school’s promotional plan aims to reach a broad audience and, accordingly, all racial/ethnic
groups within it. By disseminating information in multiple languages to various media- including
minority and community periodicals, the racial/ethnic balance of the School should be equivalent
to that of the existing area and other local public schools, currently serving the area.
Informational meetings will be held in a variety of community forums, to ensure that a diverse set
of families are reached and given the opportunity to learn about the educational opportunity at the
School. The founding board will also work with diverse community groups to seek assistance in
disseminating information.
C. Describe the school’s proposed enrollment policies and procedures, including an
explanation of the enrollment timeline, criteria and/or any preferences for enrollment, and
lottery process.
GCCA will adhere to a policy of nondiscrimination in employment and educational/activities and
will strive to provide equal opportunity for all as required by the following statutory and
administrative rules and regulations:
 Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - prohibits discrimination on the basis of race,
color, religion, or national origin;
 Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended - prohibits discrimination in
employment on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, or national origin;
 Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 - prohibits discrimination on the basis of
gender;
 Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA), as amended - prohibits
discrimination on the basis of age with respect to individuals who are at least 40 years old;
 The Equal Pay Act of 1963, as amended, prohibits sex discrimination in payment of wages
to women and men performing substantially equal work in the same establishment;
 Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 - prohibits discrimination against the
disabled;
 American Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) - prohibits discrimination against individuals
with disabilities in employment, public service, public accommodations and
telecommunications;
 The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) - requires covered employers to
provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave to “eligible” employees for certain
family and medical reasons;
 The Florida Educational Equity Act (FEEA) - prohibits discrimination on the basis of race,
gender, national origin, marital status, or handicap against a student or employee;
 Florida Civil Rights Act of 1992 - secures for all individuals within the state freedom from
discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap, or
marital status;
 Lee County School Board Rules and Regulations.
Enrollment Timeline
Applications will be made available on January 1, 2014 (if we have been approved by the district)
at an announced site within the area of the intended school’s location and on the school’s website.
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Each application received will be time-stamped and dated. Applications will be considered during
a two-month application window. Applications must be fully completed and signed by a
parent/guardian to be considered submitted. Applications postmarked, or received in-hand by 5:00
p.m. on the final day of the two month application period will be considered. Parents will be
contacted by telephone to schedule an enrollment interview. At this time, instructions for providing
scholastic records and meeting all school district and state health requirements will be given. After
enrollment interviews have taken place with the student and parent present, and if the number of
qualified interviewees exceeds the number of available spaces in a particular grade level, the
lottery procedure will be put into effect.
All applications submitted during the designated enrollment period will be reviewed. Both parent
and prospective student must agree, during their enrollment interview, that the educational program
offered at the School would best suit their educational needs, interests, and abilities. If the number
of applicants exceeds capacity at the end of any enrollment period, admission lottery will be
conducted.
If no, students who have registered will be officially enrolled.
The following timeline will be followed with regard to admissions:
February 1, 2014: Begin Acceptance of Student Applications
March 1, 2014: Enrollment Window Ends
March 29, 2014: Lottery Conducted (If needed)
March 2, 2014 Second registration period begins if needed
May 2, 2014 Second enrollment window ends
May 3, 2014 Third enrollment opens
July 3, 2014 Third enrollment ends
Once the deadline passes, staff will analyze the number of applicants for the grade level openings
and verify that all applicants reside in the district. All students who qualify (do not exceed the
grade-level maximum and live within the district) will be sent a letter indicating they have been
accepted for enrollment. Parents will be given two weeks to accept enrollment in writing. For
students who apply for a grade level to which there is excess of capacity, a lottery will be held to
select students and establish an ordered waiting list by grade level. The waiting list will be used to
offer admission, as needed, throughout the year.
Lottery Process:
Upon the closing of each Registration Period, if the number of qualified applications exceeds the
projected number of available seats for any or all grade levels, a random selection (Lottery), open
to the public, will be conducted at the Charter School. All qualifying applicants will be contacted
of date, time and place of Lottery via phone and/or web-posting. Lottery will begin with each
qualifying applicant’s representative signing in. If applicant’s parent/guardian cannot be present at
the Lottery, their name will still be placed in the lottery pool for selection. Each name will be
written on a strip of paper and placed in a specified container. All strips will be the same in weight
and size. The names will be randomly selected from container by grade level. The order will begin
with 8th Grade descending to Kindergarten. Siblings will be given priority placement for available
seats, even if the random selection process has already occurred for the sibling’s grade. The sibling
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will be placed at the top of the list with subsequent names shifting down the list. The names will be
recorded as they are pulled until all the seats at that grade level are filled. Once all seats are filled,
the remaining names will be placed on the waiting list in the order in which they are drawn. If
additional seats become available after the Lottery, they will be filled from the applicants, in order,
on the waiting list.
Dismissal Procedures:
GCCA will implement the Dismissal Procedures of Lee County Public School’s Code of Student
Conduct for Elementary and Secondary Schools and ensure that due process procedures are
accorded the student. The School will follow school board policy regarding withdrawals or
expulsion. Students may withdraw from the school at any time and enroll in another public school
as determined by school board policy. As part of the withdrawal process of a child, the parent is
requested to meet with the Administration for an exit interview. Parents will receive a copy of the
Lee County Student Code of Conduct during Orientation. Students with disabilities will be
disciplined only in accordance with the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education
Act and the Rehabilitation Act.
Parent Contract: The Parent Contract outlines volunteer/support expectations, and rules of
conduct for parents. In addition, the Lee County Student Code of Conduct guaranteed by the
school board provides a detailed school-wide discipline plan, including rewards and consequences,
that all students are expected to follow. There is also a Student Contract that will be given to the
parents during Orientation. Both students and parents are expected to abide by all items in the
contract. Not following the contract can be a basis for losing their seat at the school.
D. Explain any student and/or family contracts that will be used as a requisite for initial and
continued enrollment in the school. Describe if and how the school will enforce such
contracts.
GCCA will require that all parents are actively involved in the school and in their child’s
education. During orientation night, parents will be given a Home/School Contract that parents
must submit to the school the subsequent day. It will outline the school, parent and student
expectations, which will be consistent with the school’s mission and purpose. A required
parent/guardian, as well as student signatures acknowledging their responsibilities will be filed.
Active parental participation will be required at the Academy. Parent participation is key to the
success of the overall program and will be solicited for the development of Academy goals and
objectives. Parents must sign a contract agreeing to volunteer a minimum of twenty hours per
Academy year. The principal verifies the completion of the hours and credit is applied to the parent
account. At the time of recommitment (usually January) for the following Academy year, parents
are sent a letter notifying them of their progress toward completion of their volunteer hours.
The home school partnership is solidified through a Parent Contract, entered into as a requisite for
initial and continued enrollment at the School. Through the contract, parents and students agree, as
members of the School’s family, to abide by all of the school rules and regulations, and
specifically, the parent contract stipulates various items that will be utilized in support of the
child’s education, providing certain means for ensuring their success. For example, the parent
contract dictates:
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•
The School’s Code of Conduct and acknowledges subsequent receipt of same at time of
registration.
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The School’s attendance policy that speaks to withholding of credit due to absences,
excusing absences, the tardy policy and authority for signing students out from school, and
consequences e.g. detention, etc.
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The school’s uniform policy and acknowledgement of parent/student handbook receipt at
time of registration.
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An acceptance of the parental volunteer hours to be completed by the last day.
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Breach of the parental contract, may result in the child’s losing preferential re-enrollment
status at the school for the following school year, meaning they may not automatically articulate to
the next grade level without reapplying for open enrollment.
Parent Contract
The parent(s)/guardian(s) of _________________________ have read and agree to abide by the
following:
WHEREAS, the undersigned parent(s)/guardian(s) has made a personal decision to enroll my
child(ren) at the Academy in order to provide my child with a unique educational opportunity;
WHEREAS, my desire and decision to enroll my child at the School is based upon my desire to
become an active partner in the education of my child; and
WHEREAS, I recognize that the School is a public charter school of choice not entitlement;
NOW THEREFORE, in consideration of the foregoing;
1. As a parent of a student at the School, my commitment is to abide by the following rules and
regulations adopted by the Board of Directors:
A. To recognize and embrace my role as having primary responsibility for the education of my
child.
B. To attend all conferences scheduled with any member of staff.
C. To participate in the Parent Volunteer Program, including volunteering 20 hours for one child
and 25 hours for two or more children, in a capacity that is sensitive to the needs of the School.
D. To provide transportation to and from school for my child. If I am late picking up my child, I
understand that I will be charged for after-school care at whatever rate is in existence at that time.
If my child is continually tardy, I understand that for the benefit of my child's education, he/she
may be required to attend a school that is more accessible for my child.
E. To purchase uniforms for my child from Board approved supplier and ensure my child abides by
the Dress Code of the School.
F. To supply a healthy lunch and snack, either brown bagged or purchased from the School boardapproved vendor, each school day for my child.
G. To be responsible for timely payment of any fees accrued to my account at the School.
H. To encourage participate in the Parent Teacher Association meetings which are scheduled
monthly throughout the year.
I. To encourage my child to abide by the County Public School Code of Conduct.
2. In order to enhance my child's academic growth, I agree to do the following:
A. To read and use information sent home by the School to keep parents informed of the academic
topics to be introduced and studied in the classroom.
B. To provide a suitable time and place within the home for homework.
C. To assist my child in obtaining and regularly using a library card at the Public Library and allow
for thirty minutes of reading daily.
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D. To limit television and video games during the week and allow more time for reading, studying,
and family time.
E. To check my child's homework folder nightly.
F. To encourage my child to research his or her academic level with deep commitment and
enthusiasm for learning.
I (We) understand that by not fulfilling my contractual obligations to the School and to my child,
this MAY result in my child being suspended or withdrawn at the end of the school year and
referred to a regular Public School or a private school of the parent’s choice.
Signature of Student _________________________
Date ______________
Signature of Parent/Guardian _________________________
Date ______________
Acknowledged by: ________________
Date ______________
The code of conduct will be given to students on the first day of school with the responsibility that
they will give the code to their parents. A form must be signed by the parents and returned to the
School as proof that it was received.
E. Explain any other efforts to encourage parental and community involvement, if
applicable.
The School’s Governing Board will appoint a representative to facilitate parental involvement,
provide access to information, assist parents and others with questions and concerns, and resolve
disputes. The representative will reside in the school district. The representative may be a
Governing Board member, employee, or individual contracted to represent the Governing Board.
Contact information for the representative will be provided in writing to parents each year, and will
be posted prominently on the School’s website. The representative will be physically present at
Board meetings (at least two required).
Parents and community members will have extensive opportunities for involvement in aspects of
school operations. Parental and community involvement in school matters is a fundamental and
required part of the philosophy and operation of the School. Through the parent/teacher
organization, Educational Excellence Advisory Council (EESAC), and other such committees,
parent and community representation and decision making in the educational processes of the
School is possible. Similarly, the administration will also require the faculty and staff of the School
to uphold a strong belief in and understanding of the charter school concept through the inclusion
of parents in the educational process.
Through open lines of communications, faculty and staff will also encourage parental involvement
through such endeavors as follow:
Parental Service Contracts – parents agree to volunteer with their child’s teacher and/or be
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involved in other ways in school activities.
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Educational Excellence School Advisory Council (EESAC)- This board will consist of
school personnel, parents, students, local business, and community members will be able to
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address and vote on pertinent school matters on a monthly basis.
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Quarterly Parent/Teacher Conferences – hosted in the evenings at the School where parents
can discuss topics that affect their children’s educational progress.
Open houses, Career Fairs, Family Day - events held yearly to recruit new students,
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maintain communication and involvement between the School and the community.
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School Website, Monthly Newsletters, and Event Calendars – updated monthly to
disseminate information and maintain open lines of communication in the community.
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PTSA – Parent Teacher Student Association coordinates extra-curricular events involving
the community.
Parent Workshops on education-related topics, such as decision-making regarding school
performance and student assessment needs will be topics to be addressed. Parent/Teacher
Conferences and the electronic grade book will also encourage parents to be fully involved in the
School’s operations and will promote parental partnerships in the educational process. Volunteer
opportunities to complete required parent participation (communicated through newsletters,
schoolnotes.com, the School website, and email blasts) will be plentiful and yearlong. Some of
these will include: activities such as chaperoning field trips, assisting with class projects, helping in
the library, speaking during Career Week, Family Day, and running the School store.
GCCA believes that parental involvement is critical to the academic, behavioral, and social
development and success of children and to the overall success of the school. There is ample
research to indicate that meaningful involvement opportunities in schools, increases academic and
behavior performance. As such, all parents are asked to sign a contract. For parents that might be
homebound, or whose work schedules conflict with volunteering at school, there are numerous
opportunities for participation from home.
Establishing Strong Community Relations
Beyond presenting to groups and working with the media, GCCA will network in the community.
Meetings with educational and business groups, as well as political leaders will provide direction
and gauge awareness of local programs and initiatives. The School will establish itself as a
community resource person that will communicate trends and opportunities in careers including
engineering and other high-tech fields. Educators can also take an active role in promoting
community relations.
Forming a Speakers' Bureau
GCCA will play an important role in the education and business community because it has a
significant impact on schools, business and local communities. GCCA will make every effort to
identify opportunities to present to these audiences, share its success, and offer opportunities for
involvement. To accomplish this, GCCA will create a local speakers' bureau. This is a group of
individuals trained and available to speak on behalf of an organization.
Reaching Out to Stakeholders and Community
GCCA will continue the process of extending the School’s mission out into the community in
order to increase awareness and exposure. In this way, the School will attract more students and
parents to the STEM/Constructivist Approach to Learning concept, engage more educators and
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administrators, recruit more business partners, impact local policymaking and reach a larger public
through use of the media.
Establishing a Parent Support Group
Within the parent teacher organization, a group dedicated to reaching out to our various families
that might need help with transportation, language acquisition, learning about our community as
well as the community at large, and forming a support group among parents will be established.
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BUSINESS PLAN
Section 14: Facilities
If the site is acquired:
A. Describe the proposed facility, including location, size and layout of space.
We have been looking at a school in Cape Coral. It is a two story 28,000 square foot facility that
was built in 2002. It was previous used as a K-8th grade charter school. There currently are 14
classrooms, 3 all-purpose rooms, 3 offices, 13 rooms have sinks. There are four classrooms on the
first floor that are 840 square feet each with bathrooms. The multi-purpose room is 1,704 square
feet. There is also a library/computer lab on the first floor that is also 1, 704 square feet. There are
three offices with bathrooms and one is a clinic/staff office with a bathroom. The second floor has
two classrooms with bathrooms that are 945 square feet. There are six classrooms (945 square
feet) with sinks on the second floor. We also have an art and music room on the second floor. We
have a girls and boys bathroom on the second floor.
The building is alarmed with camera security on all doors and in the halls. There is a Magna (buzz
in) security system at the main entrance. The school has an elevator, playground and basketball
courts. There is ample parking spaces and green space to add more classrooms if needed. We will
put two kindergarten and two first grade classes on the first floor only. These classrooms contain
bathrooms.
Safety and Inspections - The School agrees to use facilities which comply with the Florida
Building Code pursuant to Section 1013.37, Florida Statutes, or with applicable state minimum
building codes pursuant to Chapter 553, Florida Statutes, and state minimum fire protection codes
pursuant to Section 633.025, Florida Statutes, as adopted by the authority in whose jurisdiction the
facility is located. The School will allow the Sponsor to conduct annual site visits for the purpose
of reviewing and documenting, as appropriate, compliance with applicable health and safety
requirements. Other inspection agencies may include: Children and Family Services to do
inspections of the kitchens and related spaces; The Department of Labor and Employment to
inspect for OSHA compliance. The School will show proof of the annual inspections prior to the
first day of operations and will obtain and keep current all necessary permits, licenses and
certifications related to fire, health and safety within the building and on school property.
The building meets the minimum requirement established for state and federal laws regarding
access. The lease includes a clause for the allowance of future expansion inclusive of required
available parking spaces to ensure additional student capacity is maintained.
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B. Describe the actions that will be taken to ensure the facility is in compliance with
applicable laws, regulations and policies and is ready for the school’s opening.
The facility is in compliance with applicable laws, regulations and policies and will be operative
for the opening of school. The school will provide the School Board of Lee County evidence of our
lease and a certificate of occupancy at least four (4) weeks before the opening of the school. Once
the school board approves our application we will begin working with the county/city for all
necessary licenses required by law.
C. Describe how the facility will meet the school’s capacity needs for students to be served.
The site is already approved as an educational facility and has been used as such. There are
sufficient classrooms (14) for our needs for the first three years. Extra space is available to expand
in years four and five.
D. Explain the anticipated costs for the facility, including renovation, rent, utilities and
maintenance. Identify, if applicable, any funding sources (other than state and local
funding) that will be applied to facilities-related costs. NA
o The financial plan for the proposed school should align with the facilities-related costs
described.
There is no need for renovations as the school already meets state requirements. The additional
cost of utilities and maintenance will be cover by the school and is reflected in our budget. There
are already student desks, a computer lab, marker boards and other furniture, fixtures, and
equipment that will cut down on our start-up cost.
The rent, utilities, maintenance, etc. are addressed in our budget.
E. Describe the back-up facilities plan. NA
o What is the alternate plan for facilities if the proposed facility is not available or is
determined to be inappropriate for the school’s opening?
There is no need for a back-up plan/facility as we have an approved school site already. The
site has desks, a full operational computer lab, chairs, blackboards and all the necessary
furniture, fixtures, and equipment needed to operate our school.
If for any reason the existing facility was no longer the site where the student body could
attend, The Governing Board would seek assistance from Richard Moreno, at Building Hope.
Building Hope offers a number of different services including guaranteeing or insuring leases
of personal or real property that are needed to begin or continue the operation of charter
schools.
Should the board determine that a realistic plan for securing a facility is not attainable by
March 15, 2014 the Board will notify the District and request a one-year deferral of school
opening.
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If the site is not acquired:
F. Explain the school’s facility needs, including desired location, size, and layout of space.
G. Provide an estimate of the costs of the anticipated facility needs and describe how such
estimates have been derived.
o The financial plan for the proposed school should align with the facilitiesrelated costs described.
H. Explain the strategy and schedule that will be employed to secure an adequate facility.
I. Describe the back-up facilities plan.
J. Describe the plan and methods the school will employ to comply with Florida’s
constitutional class size requirements.
GCCA will comply with class size amendments. Core curricula courses for class size reduction
will adhere to the requirements set forth for all grade levels and all student populations including
ESOL, ESE, and ELL students set forth by the Florida Department of Education.
The school plans to implement methods, which will ensure that it is compliant with Florida’s
laws relating to class size. For example, the school will ensure that the facilities it occupies are
equipped with the number of classrooms needed to accommodate the necessary number of
classes. Additionally, the school’s Board will adopt annual budgets, which include sufficient
certified teachers to achieve the student-to-teacher ratios which are legally applicable.
We will be in compliance with the Quality Education Act (as it changes) in our first year.
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Section 15: Transportation Service
A. Describe the school’s plan for transportation, including any plans for contracting
services. Your plan should discuss, to the greatest extent possible, the issues relevant to the
school’s transportation plans.
Florida’s Charter School Legislation provides that transportation of charter school students shall
be provided by the charter school consistent with the requirements of Section 228.056(14)(c),
Florida Statutes. Therein it states that: Transportation of charter school students shall be provided
by the charter school consistent with the requirements of Chapter 234.
The governing body of the charter school may provide transportation through an agreement or
contract with the district school board, a private provider, or parents. The charter school and the
sponsor shall cooperate in making arrangements that ensure that transportation is not a barrier to
equal access for all students residing within a reasonable distance of the charter school as
determined in its charter.
GCCA will transport all students who reside within a reasonable distance, consistent with the
requirement of Chapter 234.1006, Florida Statues. Reasonable distance will be within 2-4 mile
radius of the school. All students inside that area shall have a right to free transportation.
Transportation will be contracted through a private provider who meets all applicable safety and
transportation standards with funds allocated by the State for student transportation. It is also
expected that many parents of students will provide individual transportation as well. All drivers
will have a valid driver’s operating license and insurance. The principal or designee will also
monitor that the buses are in compliance with all maintenance and repairs.
Contracting Services:
The School will make a public media announcement upon notification that the application is
approved by Lee County and send emails to bus vendors for contracts, open bids. The governing
board will meet with all the vendors interested in offering their bus service to the school with the
purpose of answering any questions about the services provided to the school. All vendors will
have a deadline to turn in Request for Information (RFI) (RFP)/ bids. Once the school has
received the bids from all bus vendors, the governing board will read the bids in front of
witnesses. The decision will take place during a designated board meeting. The minutes will be
recorded. Announcements will be made in the local newspaper and flyers will be provided. If we
can’t find a suitable vendor, we will purchase buses. We will have to rework our budget if we
have to go this route.
Level of service to be provided:
All school bus routes shall be so planned and adjusted to the capacitates of available equipment
and school busses should be so chosen and assigned to routes and attendances areas that are
practical where the full capacity of each bus will be utilized, without standees, to service students
whose homes are beyond reasonable walking distance of the assigned school center. A
reasonable walking distance for any student who is not otherwise eligible for transportation
pursuant to Florida Statutes, is any a distance not more than 2 miles between the home and
school or one and one half miles between the home and the assigned bus stop. The pedestrian
entry point of the residence shall be where private property meets the public right of way. The
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district shall determine the shortest pedestrian route whether or not it is accessible to motor
vehicle traffic.
School bus fleet acquisition, specifications, inspection, and maintenance:
The vendor will provide:

Supervision to conduct emergency school bus evacuation drills for all transported
students during the first six weeks of each semester and maintain documentation of the drills at
the school.

Instruction in safe riding practices to all transported students during the first six weeks of
the first trimester of the school year.

The vendor shall be liable and agrees to be liable for and shall indemnify, defend and
hold the school harmless for all claims, suits, judgments or damage, including court costs and
attorney’s fees, arising out of the negligence, acts or omission by the Vendor.
Adequate supervision in the school bus loading area at the school to insure student safety.


They meet the Federal Vehicle Safety Standards and Florida School Bus Specifications in
effect the year the bus was manufactured.

All of our school buses will meet all Florida School Board Specifications as stated in
Florida Statues and Florida Administrative Code.

Will provide the school with inspection reports every 30 days.
School Transportation Operation and Logistics:

Upon the final identification of a facility, demographic needs assessment will be
compiled for the surrounding neighborhoods.

School days of operations are noted under School Calendar.

The school will be providing a breakfast program and the buses will be scheduled to
arrive at the school with time to provide the students ample time to participate in this program.

The bus routes will be scheduled to leave the school immediately following dismissal.
Students enrolled in after school activities will not have bus transportation home. Parents will
have to provide the transportation for all students enrolled in after school activities.
The buses will be transporting multi-grade students from GCCA only and

will not be integrating with other public school students.

transportation will be provided only when school is in session.

the school agrees to take all necessary action to ensure that students provided with school
bus transportation adhere to the Student Code of Conduct while riding the bus.

the operator of the bus transporting students shall remain with the bus so that students
aboard will be under supervision at all times. In cases where a student with physical disabilities
is unable to leave the area of a student stop without assistance, the operator shall not assume
responsibility for such assistance except in an emergency, which threatens the safety of such
students.

the operator shall be provided with training related to students; however, the operator
shall not give medicine and shall limit his assistance to that which may normally be expected of
a reasonable person or as specified in the student’s Individual Educational Plan.

to request authority in writing for transportation of students on field trips and activity
trips in accordance with policies provided by the school board.
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
the vendor shall comply with the requirements applicable to Federal, State and local laws,
and all the rules and regulations related thereto, but not limited to the following:
All drivers provided by the vendor must be certified. They receive certification by meeting and
completing the following requirements:
 Have five years of licensed driving experience
 Hold a valid commercial driver’s license (Class A or B) with a passenger and school bus
endorsement
 Successfully complete forty hours of pre-service training
 Submit a set of fingerprints for background investigation
 Maintain a clean and safe driving record
 Pre-employment and drug testing
Additionally, the governing body of the charter school may provide transportation through an
agreement or contract with parents. The School will enter into agreements with the parents, of
the students (for whom riding a bus will be impractical) asking them to provide transportation for
their students. We recognize that a drive for the parent, both to and from school can sometimes
be a difficult task. Thus, the requirement to provide transportation via the family car, can
become a part of the school’s parental involvement obligation, and volunteer hours of service.
The school believes that the time a parent can spend daily transporting the student (his or her
child) to the school is a valuable opportunity for the parent and student to strengthen their bond
and share information regarding the day’s activities and events at the school. Parents can also
form car pools, thus providing volunteer hours that can be shared between families, or with one
family gaining hours by transporting other students from other families.
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Section 16: FOOD SERVICE
A. Describe the school’s plan for food services, including any plans for contracting services
or plans to participate in the National School Lunch Program.
GCCA will make a public media announcement upon notification that the application is
approved by Lee County Public School System and sent emails to Food Service vendors for
contracts, open bids. The principal will meet with all the vendors interested in offering their food
service to the school with the purpose of answering any questions about the services provided to
the school. All vendors will have a deadline to turn in Request for Information (RFI) (RFP) /
bids. Once the school has received the bids from all food service vendors, the governing board
will read the bids in front of witnesses. The decision will take place during a board meeting.
The minutes will be recorded. The school or designee will apply to the National Lunch Food
Program.
Public advertisement for food service proposals.
National School lunch and breakfast program for Gulf Coast Charter Academy:
Responses to this request for proposal (RFP) will be accepted by the designated sponsor contact
person at the______________ located at__________________
This proposal is seeking responses to provide meals and manage certain defined aspects of child
nutrition services at GCCA
The successful vendor will provide breakfast, lunch and afterschool snack to approximately 200
people (# students, faculty, guests and employees).
The scope of work, product descriptions, quantities, service requirements and timelines may be
obtained from the person specified herein. A pre-bid conference will be held
on____________at_______________ to discuss the proposal document and answer vendor
questions.
Any request to amend the bid document must be received by (not less than ten (10) days prior the
proposal opening. Any amendment(s) resulting from such a request will be mailed out and and
emailed to all registered vendors not less than seven (7) days prior to the bid opening.
The sponsor reserves the right to reject any and all responses, waive certain informalities and to
accept the lowest and best response in the judgment of the sponsor’s governing board consistent
with all applicable state and USDA rules, regulations and policy. (All recommended proposals
must be reviewed by FLDOE staff prior to award). The sponsor reserves the right to negotiate
with the most qualified vendor(s), whose response, being substantially compliant and economic
needs of this institution.
Any participating vendor has the right to protest the proposed award within three (3) business
days. Consistent with Florida Administrative Rule Chapter 120.57(3), sponsor shall publicly post
and email proposal evaluation results to all participating vendors. All questions concerning this
process and advertisement should be directed to: to be announced.
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The chosen service provider will:
Present organized meal service that meets local health, state and federal regulations to be offered
at the school site. Nutritious meals will be provided in accordance with the USDA Dietary
Guidelines of meal component and portion size requirements. All meals will be distributed to
students using a point of sale accountability procedure.
The School will:
 Sponsor the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs, as required, and will
provide free and reduced priced meals for eligible children - children from households
with incomes of less than or equal to the income criteria will be eligible for either free or
reduced priced meals.
 Provide a lunchroom that meets state nutritional and sanitation standards.
 Have two satisfactory health inspections conducted on a yearly basis, by the State
Department of Health, County Department, as required, to maintain a Permit for Food
Service.
 Contact the DOE for all information on sponsoring the National School Lunch Program.
 Process all necessary applications.
 Adhere to program operation and record keeping requirements.
 Use of the Child Nutrition Program (CNP) system.
 The School will implement the following procedure for processing Free/Reduced Lunch
Applications:
 Disseminate lunch applications to all students upon enrollment;
 Collect lunch applications and determine applications, according to Florida Income
 Eligibility Guidelines, published in the Federal Register by Food & Nutrition Service,
USDA;
 Enter determinations for each child into ISIS;
 Provide students with notice of eligibility;
 Serve/Charge student lunches in accordance with determined eligibility; and
 Submit claims for reimbursement within 30 days of the following month for each
approved month of the school year (if sponsoring the NSLP).
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Section 17: Budget
A. Provide an operating budget covering each year of the requested charter term that
contains revenue projections, expenses and anticipated fund balances. The budget should
be based on the projected student enrollment indicated on the cover page of the
application.
Through cooperation and sharing of information with neighboring charter schools, and with the
assistance of our accountant, the school’s budget was determined by using an accounting
database that has the statistical revenue and expense data for numerous successfully operating
charter schools in Florida. After analyzing the budgets of numerous successfully operating
charter schools, we anticipate that this budget will yield positive outcomes.
The budget revenue figures are based upon FEFP/FTE data provided by the Florida Department
of Education. The budget figures are conservative and only include weighted FTE without
considering grants or capital outlay funds for the first three years.
Instructional staff salaries will be commensurate with the Lee County Public Schools salary
schedule (within 20% of beginning teachers’ salaries) and is in compliance with the requirements
of class size reduction.
Furthermore, to ensure that our budget, payroll, and fiscal management practices are sound, our
school will utilize the services of a firm of certified public accountants who are familiar with the
red book, green book, GASB #34 and #54, charter school law, public school accounting
practices, and sound financial management.
Please see Appendix: Budgets
B. Provide a start-up budget (i.e. from the date on which the application is approved to the
beginning of the first fiscal year of operation) that contains a balance sheet revenue
projections, expenses and anticipated fund balance.
This startup budget is a representation of the resources we will need. The School has access to
sources that will provide such funds in the event that a Charter School Start- up Grant from the
Florida Department of Education is not awarded.
Please see Appendix: Budgets
C. Provide a detailed narrative description of the revenue and expenditure assumptions on
which the operating and start-up budget are based.
The GCCA budget was developed using available data from existing charter schools with a
similar growth patterns.
The revenue forecast in the budget is based upon data obtained from the Florida Department of
Education Charter School Revenue Estimate Worksheet. In addition, the school did not include
in the budget as anticipated revenue additional funding which may be available to the school
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such as grants and fundraising. Expenses are forecast using the pattern described above and
tailored to the projected enrollment.
Capital Outlay is only projected for years 4 and 5 and is only a conservative estimate using
projected capital outlay found in other charter school budgets. Title 1 funds, and monies from
grant, and donations, were not included in the revenue forecast in order to reflect conservative
budget projections, thus ensuring the school’s financial viability.
Staffing:
 Salaries are forecast using guidance from published pay scale in effect.
 Funds are allocated for staff development to achieve continued improvement in staff
effectiveness.
 The number of instructional staff complies with class size reduction.
 Payroll administration, human resources management, compliance reporting, and
employee benefits administration will be managed through an employee leasing firm and
our accounting firm.
 The School will retain hiring, firing, supervision, evaluation, promotion, salary
determination, and employee benefit determinations.
 Merit pay based on our teacher/administrator evaluation system (we will be using the
Florida Consortium of Public Charter School’s evaluation tools) is part of the budget.
Expenses
Expenses that will be incurred include staff salaries, equipment, facilities, professional
development, textbooks, curriculum materials, food service, plant operations, classroom supplies
and equipment and technology. Costs for educational staff and administrator salaries are
determined using the Lee County Public School District salary schedule so that salaries are
comparable to district salaries (within 20%). Expenditures will be entered in a database which
will be continuously updated.
Operations:
 Costs for instruction materials are based on consultations with various vendors and
through analysis of existing similar schools.
 The budget supports the infrastructure to implement the technology plan envisioned by
the School.
 Cost for a service education provider (if we decide to use one) will be negotiated for the
maximum benefit of the School.
 The Charter School will follow State and District policy in the procurement of supplies,
equipment, construction, training, and other services. The Charter School will establish a
monetary threshold for small purchase procedures.
The budget narrative should provide sufficient information to fully understand how budgetary
figures were determined. See Budget Narrative in the Appendix.
D.
Explain how the governing board will monitor the budget, including a strategy
for addressing revenue shortfalls due to lower than expected enrollment.
The budget and spending priorities are developed to ensure that the maximum amount of funding
goes directly to items related to the best instruction and academic program for our students.
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Expenditures will be prioritized to develop and maintain a highly qualified staff and to provide a
safe and appropriate learning environment.
All expenditures will be documented, will support the school’s mission, and will enhance student
achievement. The key to achieving success will be to acquire a team of highly-qualified staff
members, who will include professional administrators, certified teachers, and other highlyqualified school employees.
The Governing Board has the ultimate responsibility to ensure that the School’s finances are
managed properly. The Board will contract with an accounting firm which will assist the Board
and the School Principal with the preparation and reporting of the School’s finances. Monthly
reports will be sent to all board members for their review and questions. The budget will be
reviewed at each board meeting.
Shortfalls will be addressed at a board meeting. If our enrollment is not what we expected, we
will work with our accountant and modify the budget to fit our student enrollment.
The Board will review and approve a preliminary annual budget prior to the beginning of the
fiscal year. The Principal of the School will prepare a school-site budget, which will include
anticipated revenues and expenditures based on student enrollment. Each month, the Board will
review the budget and make revisions, as necessary.
The Principal will manage the day to day operations and site-based finances, including
expenditures and receivables. The Board will adopt a policy whereby the Principal will need to
seek prior approval from the Board for expenditures over a pre-approved amount. The Principal
will report monthly to the Governing Board on the progress of the site-based budget and make
recommendations and seek approval for large expenses. The Governing Board will oversee the
Principal and remain responsible for all financial matters delegated to the Principal. Our
accountant will be available to meet with our board at each meeting (in person or on a
conference call).
E. Provide monthly cash flow projections for the school’s start-up period (i.e. from the
date on which the application is approved to the beginning of the first fiscal year of
operation) through the first year of operation.
Please see Appendix: Budgets
F. Describe the school’s fundraising plan. Report on the current status of any fundraising
efforts, including verification of any fundraising monies reported in the school’s start-up or
operating budgets.
The Gulf Coast Charter Academy plans to avail itself of every opportunity to raise additional
funds to supplement the per pupil amount provided by the State. This will include local
fundraising activities that will involve students and parents and we will also seek grants for
specific programs from local and national philanthropic foundations. Following an established
policy of other charter schools in Florida, all teachers and administrators will be required to seek
out and write a minimum of one grant per year, to fund special programs and for obtaining
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equipment and supplemental books or supplies. A fundraising plan including outreach to
potential donors will be developed once the charter contract is approved.
GCCA is applying for tax exempt status with the State and Federal governments. We will seek
tax deductible donations from national, state and local philanthropic foundations that are willing
to support the school’s mission. The Academy will also develop partnerships with businesses in
the community, such as banks, restaurants, and retail stores that will support the Academy
through donations and/or in-kind services. Once GCCA opens, a Parent organization will be
established; they will schedule fundraising activities throughout the school year. All funds
generated through fundraising activities will be used to enhance our students’ education.
Fundraising will serve as a catalyst to further service the School’s needs. Throughout the school
year, the School will conduct fundraising activities to generate capital and to supplement the per
pupil allocations.
Examples of fundraising activities include Book Fairs, Yearbook Sales, Holiday Store, School
Pictures, and a School Fair. The School may also apply for grants from national, state, and local
foundations, as well as other sources for education grants, including the Charter School
Implementation Grants. Specific grant sources will be determined, based on appropriateness and
feasibility, by the school administration and Governing Board.
Additionally, the School will also receive a percentage of the sales made from school pictures,
uniform sales, and yearbook sales. The School will also welcome and encourage sponsorship and
donations from local business partners within the local community.
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Section 18: Financial Management and Oversight
A. Describe who will manage the school’s finances and how the school will ensure financial
resources are properly managed.
The school’s finances will be managed by the governing board. The Board of GCCA retains
ultimate control over the school’s finances and is responsible for the fiscal success of the school.
They will review monthly financial reports that are prepared by our accountant.
The school will contract with an accounting firm to provide assistance in the design,
development, planning, financing, staffing, maintenance, operations, and fiscal oversight of the
school. The relationship between the accounting firm and the school has already been initiated,
and will continue through the development of the school and into the operations phase of the
school’s life. In this way, the school will benefit from the experience and expertise the
accounting firm brings to bear.
Having appropriate financial statements will allow the preparation of projections of budget
performance and cash balances through the fiscal year, thus allowing the school to adjust activity
as necessary to maintain fiscal integrity.
It is important to note that although we are seeking professional assistance with our finances, the
board is responsible to the School Board of Lee County for the school’s fiscal soundness.
B. Describe the financial controls, including an annual audit and regular board review of
financial statements, which will be employed to safeguard finances.
An accounting firm, contracted by the Board of Directors, will assist GCCA with the start-up
requirements for setting up appropriate accounting procedures and controls. GCCA will develop
a written internal audit procedure and establish controls to ensure that financial resources are
properly managed.
Internal controls are based on sound practice, such as segregation of duties or compensating
controls, use of pre-numbered forms, limited access to cash, and monthly reporting to the Charter
School Board and Sponsoring District. The business process also emphasizes the seamless and
convenient delivery of service so that school staff can easily comply with internal controls and
are able to concentrate on the educational process.
The internal control policy of the School shall be guided by the following broad principles:
Responsibility will be clearly established.
•
Adequate records will be maintained.
•
Assets will be insured & inventoried and appropriate employees bonded.
•
Adequate procedures for cash receipts, cash disbursements, and record keeping will be in
place.
•
The School will undergo regular and independent audits.
Specific internal controls include, but are not limited to:
•
Only one bank account will be authorized for operations
•
The bank statement will be opened intact by the reconciler
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•
The bank statement will be reconciled by an employee who has access to neither the
general ledger nor check-writing system
•
Items outstanding for 180 days will be investigated
•
All receipts will be deposited intact
•
All checks received will be immediately stamped “For Deposit Only”
•
Deposits will be made at least twice weekly if funds have been received
•
Receipts will be evidenced by a multipart signed, pre-numbered receipt
•
A prepaid Visa card will be issued for the purchase of small items which are needed
immediately
•
All other disbursements will be made by check
•
Checks require two signatures
•
Checks will not be pre-signed under any circumstances
•
Checks for expenses other than payroll will be issued only upon verification by the
Principal of receipt of the good or services ordered in good condition and correct quantity
•Appropriate documentation will be maintained for disbursements (invoice, contract)
• Employees will be paid only upon verification of employment
•
Appropriate legal forms (W-4, I-9) must be completed prior to employees being paid
•
Investment activity will comply with 112.661, FS
•
Property will be tagged
•
Property will be inventoried at least annually
Discrepancies in the property inventory will be investigated and reconciled
•
•
Financial statements (see below) will be reviewed by Charter School Board monthly,
evidenced by action
•
The budget will be approved by the Charter School Board prior to the beginning of each
fiscal year, evidenced by action
•
Budget amendments will be approved as necessary
•
Financial reports will be submitted to the sponsor as required by Charter and Rule
•
An annual audit will be conducted by an independent CPA (see below)
Detailed financial statements will be prepared on a monthly basis for analysis by the Charter
School Board. These financial statements will be reviewed by the Charter School Board at
monthly meetings and will be submitted to the Sponsoring District for monitoring/review.
The monthly financial statements will be in compliance with Rule 6A-1.0081, F.A.C and
include:
•
Balance Sheet
Revenue and Expense Report
•
•
Year-to-date comparison of budgeted vs. actual revenues and expenditures
•
Notes to Accompany Financials, to include:
•
Actual enrollment at the time the statement is submitted
•
Projected enrollment for the current school year
Notes to the monthly financial statement to include other material information
Additionally, Bank Reconciliation and Bank Registers will be submitted to the Charter School
Board along with the financial statements.
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Providing further transparency, the Principal and Charter School Board will have access to the
bank register and images of paid invoices and checks at any time through an on-line document
storage facility at our accountant’s office.
The School will adhere to the audit selection requirements per Florida Statutes and the Auditor
General Requirements and ensure that the Audit Report checklist (§11.45(3)(a), Florida Statutes
accompany the audit in a timely manner according to the dates agreed upon for audited and
unaudited reports between the Sponsor and the Board in the Charter. The auditing firm shall be
selected by request for proposal (RFP) process and only those firms experienced in audits of
charter schools will be considered. The audit will be of assistance to the School’s Governing
Board in carrying out its responsibility to assure that its financial resources are properly
managed.
Standard procedures utilized to ensure sound internal accounting and a system of checks and
balances include:
General Accounting - utilization of accepted state codification of accounts pursuant to the
Financial and Program Cost Accounting and Reporting for Florida Schools in all transactions
pertaining to its operations.
Internal accounting procedures for the School pertaining to receivables and disbursements are as
follows:
For receivables, all cash payments will be logged, coded by source and deposited daily. Daily
deposits will be reconciled to cash receipts logs. Disbursements will be made only to approved
vendors and must be appropriately authorized. Disbursement voucher packages are prepared at
the School site and authorized by the School Principal. Disbursement vouchers are submitted to
the accounting firm with appropriate supporting documentation to substantiate the nature,
account classification, business purpose and amount.
Disbursement vouchers are reviewed and approved by the Principal and the accountant. All
checks over a pre-approved threshold, as established by the Board, will require dual signatures.
Certain checks & checks over a certain amount will require board chair signature and/or
approval. Authorized signatures on checks are limited to the Chair of the Governing Board, the
School Principal or designee, and a representative of the accounting firm, as approved by the
Governing Board.
Bank statements will be reconciled on a monthly basis. The School will provide regular
financial statements to the Sponsor including a statement of revenues and expenditures and
changes in fund balances, prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
These will be provided on the dates required by the School Board in the charter school
contractual agreement between the School and the Sponsor.
Wire Transfers - copies of all wire transfers (e.g., FTE funds, grants, charter school capital
outlay) into the school’s banking account(s) along with supporting documentation are maintained
and recorded in the general ledger by journal entry.
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Internal Revenue Collection - any funds collected at the school (i.e., lunch monies, fundraisers,
field trips) may be initially collected by the school staff. These funds along with supporting
documents are submitted to the Financial Manager whose responsibility is to record and prepare
the deposit. All deposits will be prepared in duplicate; the original goes to the financial
institution and the copy remains intact in the deposit book. A copy of the financial institution
validated receipt along with supporting documentation will be maintained.
Capital Expenditures - purchase orders are required for all capital expenditures and are preapproved by the Principal or Designee. Limits are set by the Board of Directors and may change
as necessary. These purchase orders are prepared in duplicate with one going to the vendor and
the other remaining at the school on file in the Accounting Office. Any purchase order totaling
more than the limit as set by the Board of Directors requires Board action.
Operational Checking Accounts - all expenses related to the operations of the school are paid
from the operating account. All operating expenditures are subject to the same approval
processes as indicated for capital expenditures. All accounts are reconciled on a monthly basis
and presented to the Board of Directors for review.
Authorized Check Signers - authorized signers on school accounts are limited to certain
specified individuals as approved by the Board of Directors.
Data Security - financial data will be maintained on a secured system/network. Only the School
Director and authorized representatives of the Board of Directors have access to the data.
Appropriate file backups and physical records will be maintained in a secure environment.
The School will provide the Sponsor with annual audited financial reports as required each year.
These reports will include a complete set of financial statements and notes thereto prepared in
accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for inclusion into the Board's financial
statements annually, formatted by revenue source and expenditures and detailed by function and
object, as per the Sponsor’s timelines.
The School will utilize the standard state codification of accounts as contained in the Financial
and Program Cost Accounting and Reporting for Florida Schools, as a means of codifying all
transactions operations for both internal and external reporting. Financial reporting will be
subject to any directives issued by the State of Florida and the local school district.
If the School District receives notice of an adjustment which is attributable to non-compliance by
the charter school, the charter school will consent to the deduction of the assessed amount from
the next available payment otherwise due to the charter school and if the assessment is charged
near the end or after the term of the charter, the charter school shall, within 30 days of notice,
refund the amount of the assessment.
In the event the charter school ceases operation or the charter is not renewed or was terminated,
that any public unencumbered funds of the school will revert to the sponsor, except for capital
outlay funds. All of the school’s property and improvements, including property, furnishings
and equipment purchased with public funds, will be peacefully delivered to the Sponsor and
automatically revert to full ownership by the Sponsor. If the School’s accounting records fail to
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clearly establish whether a particular asset was purchased with public funds or non-public funds,
ownership of the asset will revert to the School District.
C. Describe the method by which accounting records will be maintained.
GCCA will utilize accepted state coding of accounts pursuant to the Financial and Program Cost
Accounting and Reporting for Florida Schools in all transactions pertaining to its operations.
GCCA will prepare financial statements, and annual audited financial reports per state
requirements that include a statement of revenues and expenditures prepared in accordance with
generally accepted accounting principles.
GCCA will submit to the District and pay for an annual financial audit in compliance with
federal, state, and school district regulations showing all revenue received from all sources, and
all expenditures for services rendered. The fiscal audit shall be conducted by an independent
certified public account selected by the Governing Board of the Charter School and will be
delivered to the District within 90 days following the end of the district’s fiscal year.
In order to provide financial information that is comparable to that reported for other public
schools, the school will maintain all financial records in an accounting system that is in
accordance with the accounts and codes prescribed in the most recent issue of the publication
titled, “Financial and Program Cost Accounting and Reporting for Florida Schools” (Redbook),
pursuant to § 1002.33(9)(i)1 of the Charter School Law. Thus, the School’s accounting will be
consistent with accounting conducted for Florida school districts and will contain a uniform chart
of accounts for budgeting and financial reporting. The uniform chart of accounts addresses
topics that include governmental accounting standards, program cost accounting, and reporting.
We will also be in compliance with GASB #34 and #54.
The School Board of Lee County’s internal auditors or external auditors may request review and
inspection of books and records. In addition, any inquires related to accounting information
obtained from quarterly reports and year-end audits will be addressed by GCCAs administration.
D. Describe how the school will store student and financial records.
GCCA will comply with the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
(FERPA) and IDEA in the establishment, maintenance, correction, and disposal of student
records. The right to inspect and review educational records and the release of information, or
instructional materials will be consistent with federal and state law.
The School will maintain both student and financial records in accordance with Chapter 119,
Florida Statutes. Retention schedules established by the records and information management
program of the Division of Library and Information Services of the Department of State will be
followed. Student and financial records will be kept in accordance with the General Records
Schedules GS1-SL and GS7, as authorized by 119 and 257, FS.
“Record” includes any pertinent information, regardless of the media stored upon. Therefore,
written record, audio recordings, video recordings, disks, etc., are all considered records.
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The school maintains both active and archival records for current and former students in
accordance with federal, state, local laws and with the regulations prescribed by the Florida
Department of Education. The school ensures that all student records are kept confidential as
required by applicable law.
All permanent records of students leaving the school, whether by graduation or transfer to
another sponsoring district school are transferred to the sponsoring district school in which the
student is enrolled. All students leaving the school to attend an out-of county school or a private
educational institution shall have a copy of their permanent record forwarded to the school in
which the student is enrolled. All permanent records remain in the last school in which the
student was enrolled.
All student and financial records are kept in locked, fire-proof cabinets or in a fire-proofed
locked records storage vault. Only certain school personnel have access to student records, and
computerized student records are backed up regularly and stored in a secure area.
Confidentiality of student information will be maintained; access will be controlled by a records
custodian and limited to specific need and authority. Such access will be logged.
Financial records will be kept in electronic and paper formats. Permanent documents, such as
deeds, mortgages, etc., will be kept in secure, locked, fire-proof cabinets. All electronic files will
be password protected to ensure safety.
E. Describe the insurance coverage the school will obtain, including applicable health,
workers compensation, general liability, property insurance and directors and officer's
liability coverage.
As set forth in Florida Law, the school shall meet all applicable state and local health, safety and
civil rights requirements. A description of procedures that identify various risks and provide for
a comprehensive approach to reduce the impact of losses; plans to identify, minimize, and
protect others from violent or disruptive student behavior; and the manner in which the school
will be insured, including whether or not the school will be required to have liability insurance,
and, if so, the terms and conditions thereof and the amounts of coverage.
GCCA will comply with requirements specified by the School Board of Lee County or
applicable state statutes regarding insurance and liability coverage. The School will maintain
appropriate Commercial General Liability Insurance, Automobile Liability Insurance, Workers’
Compensation Insurance and Professional Liability Insurance. Evidence of insurance will be
provided by the School to the Sponsor before the initial opening day of classes.
Limitations on policies will comply with state statute and the GCCA Agreement as follows:
Where applicable, the School Board of Lee County will be named as an additional insured. The
Charter School shall, at its sole expense, maintain current policies throughout the entire term the
Charter.
The school will provide proof of insurance to the Sponsor four (4) weeks before the initial
opening day of classes for each school year. We will comply with the school district’s insurance
requirements. The following types of insurance and identification coverage in accordance with
school Board policies:
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•
School Leaders Errors and Omissions Insurance ($3 million per claim/annual aggregate,
maximum $25,000.00 deductible)
Commercial General Liability Insurance ($1 million per occurrence/$3 million annual
•
aggregate). Except with respect to coverage for property damage liability coverage shall be on a
first dollar basis without any application of a deductible or self-insured retention. The maximum
deductible for property damage Liability shall be $1,000.00.
•
Automobile Liability Insurance ($1 million/$3 million annual aggregate). Coverage will
be on all owned, non-owned and hired autos.
•
Worker’s Compensation: There shall be no maximum limit on the amount of coverage
for liability imposed by the Florida Workers’ Compensation Act or any other coverage
customarily insured under Part 1 of the standard Worker’s Compensation Policy. Part one of the
policy as required per Florida Statutes. Part II: $500,000 each accident each employee$500,000; disease policy limit $500,000; disease each employee $500,000.00. If the district
requires more, the school will comply with the district’s requirements.
•
Fire, Property & Casualty-Building and Equipment: Property coverage is required on all
owned real property and furniture fixtures and equipment.
•
Fidelity Bonds: $1,000,000 for each person performing the duties of chief administrative
officer, chief executive officer, chief financial officer, president, headmaster, principal, or
director of the school and $1,000,000 for each member of the school’s governing body and each
person employed by the school or its governing body who have authority to make purchases or
contract for services exceeding $6,000.
Acceptable Insurance Providers:
Insurance providers must be authorized by subsisting certificates of authority by the Department
of Financial Services of the State of Florida, or (II) an eligible surplus lines insurer under Florida
Statutes. In addition, the insurer or the providers with which the insurer contracts must have a
Best’s Rating of “A” or better and a Financial Size Category of “VI” or better, according to the
latest edition of Best’s Key Rating Guide, published by A.M. Best Company.
Coverages: The school’s insurance shall cover the school (and its subcontractors, to the extent
that it is not otherwise insured) for those sources of liability which would be covered by the
latest edition of the standard Workers’ Compensation Policy, as filed for use in Florida by the
National Council on Compensation Insurance, without restrictive endorsements. In addition to
coverage for the Florida Worker’s Compensation Act, where appropriate, coverage is to be
included for the Federal Employers’ Liability Act and any other applicable federal or state law.
The School will, at its own expense, provide evidence of insurance consistent with the Sponsor’s
requirements for insurance and in accordance with the time frame for providing that insurance as
stated in the charter. The School will only acquire insurance from an insurer (carrier) that is
authorized by the Department of Insurance of the State of Florida, or an eligible surplus line
insurer under Florida Statutes. The insurer will have a Best rating of “A” or better and financial
size category of “VI” or better according to the latest edition of Best’s key rating guide published
by AM Best Company.
Additional Insured: The School shall include the Sponsor and its members, officers, employees
and agents as "Additional Insured" on the required Liability Insurance. The coverage afforded
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such Additional Insured shall be no more restrictive than that which would be afforded by adding
the Sponsor as Additional Insured using the latest Additional Insured - Owners, Lessees or
Contractors (Form B) Endorsement (ISO Form CG 20 10). The certificate of insurance shall be
clearly marked to reflect "The Sponsor, its members, officers, employees and agents as
additional insured."
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Section 19: Action Plan
A. Present a timetable for the school’s start-up.
Action
Start Date
Finish Date
Responsibility
Application
Jan. 2013
Aug. 2013
Board of Directors/ consultants
Staff Review application
Aug. 2013
Dec. 2013
School Board Lee County
Application approval
Dec. 2013
Jan. 2014
School Board Lee County
Contract Negotiations
and Execution of
Contract
Jan. 2014
Feb. 2014
School Board and Our Board
Identify facility
Zoning/Permitting
Nov. 2013
Mar. 2014
Board of Directors/Consultants
Secure Facility
(Contract)
Dec.2013
March 2014
Board of Directors/consultants
Renovations if needed
Feb. 2014
July 2014
Board of Directors/consultants
Hire Principal
May 2014
Jun. 2014
Board of Directors/consultants
Enrollment Period
Mar. 2014
Aug. 2014
Board and Staff/consultants
Faculty and Staff
Recruitment/ hiring
January 2014 July 2014
Board and Principal
Board training and policy January 2014 March 2014
adoption/budget
Board of Directors
Marketing
January 2014 August 2014
Board and Principal/Staff
Order FF&E
March 2014
August 2014
Principal and Board of
Directors
Contracts: Food Service
and Transportation, etc.
March 2014
August 2014
Principal and Board of
Directors
Student
Registration/Enrollment
And Lottery if needed
March 2014
August 2014
Principal and Board of
Directors
Administration
Development, Training,
and Orientation
June 2014
August 2014
Principal and Board of
Directors
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211
Faculty and Staff
Development/Training
and Orientation
July 2014
August 2014
Principal and Board of
Directors
Tag and Install FF&E
April 2014
August 2014
Principal and Staff
Fingerprinting
Feb. 2014
July 2014
Board of Directors and staff
Inspections: (Fire, etc.)
June 2014
June 2014
Board of Directors
School Opens
Aug 2014
Aug 2014
Principal, Staff and Board of
Directors
School-Emergency Management and Recovery Plan - The School will implement a Security
Action Plan that prepares all staff for unanticipated events including but not limited to: medical,
fire, hazardous, weather security, etc. The School will cooperate with the District to provide the
safest school possible for the staff and students, and will incorporate all the applicable and
appropriate District approved emergency efforts in order to maintain a safe school environment.
Accordingly, the School will adopt the emergency plans for fire, hurricane, tornado, and child
safety currently in effect within the District.
All staff members will be trained regarding procedures for disaster preparedness plans outlining
procedures for emergency situations and natural disasters. Staff will be trained to implement an
action plan within an emergency situation. Both students and staff will be trained in planning for
these events through routine drills and practice. Procedures and plans will be provided to
teachers and the staff through the employee handbook, and parents and community members will
receive information regarding emergency procedures via newsletters and parent meetings.
Charter School Readiness Checklist:
1. School year calendar developed
2. Complete Charter School Agreement on file
3. Students enrolled through District’s Humming Bird System are shown at the
Charter School
4. Secure location for student cumulative files
5. Proof of ownership or signed lease for facility
6. Certificates of Occupancy
7. Fire Inspection Complete
8. Health Inspection Complete
9. Traffic Engineering Review
10. Safety Inspection
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11. Final Site Plan with Acreage and Floor Plan
12. Verification that no religious symbols, statues or artifacts etc. are affixed on or
about the property and facility and facility where the school operates
13. Proof of insurance naming the District as an additional insured
14. Teaching certificates or qualifications are on file for all instructional personnel
verifying certification and/or qualifications
15. Proof of fingerprinting for all school personnel and board members
16. Posted Compliance with Ch. 119 Fla. Stat. relating to Public records & Section
289.111 Fl. Stat., relating to public meetings
17. Governing Board training verification
18. Copy of Management Agreement (If Applicable)
19. Transportation arranged
20. Food Service Agreement / Contract
21. Updated budget for the opening year
22. Agreements in place for financial services
23. Application for 501 C3 status has been processed
24. Application for Sales Tax Exemption has been proceed
25. Application for Employer Identification Number been proceed
26. Employee benefits are clearly defined and payroll calendar developed
27. Policies have been developed with regard to approval of expenditures
28. The school has a clear understanding with the District as to the distribution of
funds
29. An evacuation plan, in case of emergency, is in place
30. An evacuation plan, in case of emergency, is in place
31. Emergency phone numbers on file for all students and charter school staff
32. Registration information is available for all students
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IV. STATEMENT OF ASSURANCES
This form must be signed by a duly authorized representative of the applicant group and
submitted with the application for a charter school.
As the authorized representative of the applicant group, I hereby certify under the penalties of
perjury that the information submitted in this application for a charter for Gulf Coast Charter
Academy is accurate and true to the best of my knowledge and belief; and further, I certify that,
if awarded a charter, the school:









Will be nonsectarian in its programs, admission policies, employment practices and
operations.
Will enroll any eligible student who submits a timely application, unless the school
receives a greater number of applications than there are spaces for students, in which case
students will be admitted through a random selection process.
Will adhere to the antidiscrimination provisions of section 1000.05, F.S.
Will adhere to all applicable provision of state and federal law relating to the education of
students with disabilities, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;
section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1974; and Title II of the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990.
Will adhere to all applicable provisions of federal law relating to students who are limited
English proficient, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal
Educational Opportunities Act of 1974.
Will participate in the statewide assessment program created under section 1008.22, F.S.
Will comply with Florida statutes relating to public records and public meetings,
including Chapter 119, Florida Statutes, and section 286.011, F.S., which are applicable
to applicants even prior to being granted a charter.
Will obtain and keep current all necessary permits, licenses and certifications related to
fire, health and safety within the building and on school property.
Will provide for an annual financial audit in accordance with section 218.39, F.S.
The governing board, at its discretion, allows Helen Deitriech, Board President, to sign as the
legal correspondent for the school.
______________________________________________
Signature
Helen Deitriech
Printed Name
July 26, 2013
Date
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Budget Lee
7/28/2013 11:22 AM
Revenue Estimate Worksheet for Gulf Coast Charter Academy
Based on the First Calculation of the FEFP 2013-14
School District:
Lee
2013
1. 2013-14 FEFP State and Local Funding
$3,752.30
Base Student Allocation
Program
(a)
101 Basic K-3
111 Basic K-3 with ESE Services
102 Basic 4-8
112 Basic 4-8 with ESE Services
103 Basic 9-12
113 Basic 9-12 with ESE Services
254 ESE Level 4 (Grade Level PK-3 )
254 ESE Level 4 (Grade Level 4-8)
254 ESE Level 4 (Grade Level 9-12)
255 ESE Level 5 (Grade Level PK-3 )
255 ESE Level 5 (Grade Level 4-8)
255 ESE Level 5 (Grade Level 9-12)
130 ESOL (Grade Level PK-3)
130 ESOL (Grade Level 4-8)
130 ESOL (Grade Level 9-12)
300 Career Education (Grades 9-12)
District Cost Differential: 1.0198
Number of FTE
(b)
121.00
19.00
36.00
6.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4.00
2.00
0.00
Totals
Weighted
FTE
(b) x (c)
(d)
136.1250
21.3750
36.0000
6.0000
0.0000
0.0000
0.0000
0.0000
0.0000
0.0000
0.0000
0.0000
4.5800
2.2900
0.0000
0.0000
Program
Cost Factor
(c)
1.125
1.125
1.000
1.000
1.011
1.011
3.558
3.558
3.558
5.089
5.089
5.089
1.145
1.145
1.145
1.011
188.00
2. ESE Guaranteed Allocation:
206.3700 $
Grade Level
PK-3
PK-3
PK-3
4-8
4-8
4-8
9-12
9-12
9-12
FTE
19.00
0.00
0.00
6.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
Additional Funding from the ESE
Guaranteed Allocation. Enter the
FTE from 111,112, & 113 by grade
and matrix level. Students who do
not have a matrix level should be
considered 251. This total should
equal all FTE from programs 111,
112 & 113 above.
Total FTE with ESE Services
25.00
3. Supplemental Academic Instruction:
District SAI Allocation
Matrix
Level
251
252
253
251
252
253
251
252
253
Guarantee
Per Student
$
992
$
3,203
$
6,535
$
1,112
$
3,323
$
6,656
$
791
$
3,002
$
6,335
789,694
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
18,848
6,672
-
Total from ESE Guarantee $
25,520
$ 18,196,709
86,260.58
divided by district FTE
2013-14 Base
Funding WFTE x
BSA x DCD
(e)
$
520,895
$
81,793
$
137,757
$
22,960
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
17,526
$
8,763
$
$
-
$
Per Student
211 $
39,668
(with eligible services)
4. Reading Allocation:
Charter Schools should contact their school district sponsor regarding eligibility and distribution of reading allocation funds.
Total Base Funding, ESE Guarantee, and SAI $
854,882
5. Class size Reduction Funds:
DCD
X Allocation factors
PK - 3
Weighted FTE (From Section 1)
162.0800
1.0198
1320.15
=
218,207
4-8
44.2900
1.0198
900.48
=
40,672
9-12
0.0000
1.0198
902.65
=
0
Total *
X
Total Class Size Reduction Funds
206.3700
$
258,879
(*Total FTE should equal total in Section 1, column (d).)
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1
Budget Lee
7/28/2013 11:22 AM
6A. Divide school's Weighted FTE (WFTE) total computed
in (d) above:
206.3700
to obtain school's WFTE share.
by district's WFTE:
6B. Divide school's Unweighted FTE (UFTE) total computed
in (b) above:
188.00
to obtain school's UFTE share.
by district's UFTE:
93,408.54
0.2209%
86,260.58
0.2179%
Letters Refer to Notes At Bottom:
(a)
1,732,320
7. Other FEFP (WFTE share)
Applicable to all Charter Schools:
Declining Enrollment
Sparsity Supplement
Program Related Requirements:
Safe Schools
Lab School Discretionary
x
0.2209% $
3,827
0
0
1,732,320
0
8. Discretionary Local Effort (WFTE share)
(d)
43,258,094
x
0.2209% $
95,557
9. Discretionary Millage Compression Allocation
.748 mills (UFTE share)
(b)
0
x
0.2179% $
-
10. Proration to Funds Available (WFTE share)
(a)
11. Discretionary Lottery (WFTE share)
(a)
x
0.2209% $
-
0
x
0.2209% $
-
12. Instructional Materials Allocation (UFTE share)
(b)
7,060,023
Dual Enrollment Instructional Materials Allocation (See footnote i below)
x
0.2179% $
15,384
13. Student Transportation
0
(e)
Enter All Riders
47.00
x
########### $
16,544
Enter ESE Student Riders
5.00
x
########### $
6,745
x
0.2209% $
34,470
Total $
1,286,288
14. Teacher Salary Allocation (WFTE share)
(j)
15,604,497
15. Florida Teachers Lead Program Stipend
16. Food Service Allocation
(g)
17. Performance Pay Plan
18. Funding for the purpose of calculating the administrative fee for ESE Charters.
If you have more than a 75% ESE student population please place a 1 in the following box:
(h)
$
-
NOTES:
(a) District allocations multiplied by percentage from item 6A.
(b) District allocations multiplied by percentage from item 6B.
(d) Proceeds of 0.748 millage levy (s. 1011.71(3)(b), Florida Statutes) multiplied by percentage from item 6A.
(e) Consistent with Section 1006.21, Florida Statutes and DOE Student Transportation General Instructions. Numbers entered here will be multiplied by the
district level transportation funding per rider. "All Riders" should include both basic and ESE Riders. "ESE Student Riders" should include only ESE Riders.
(f) Teacher Lead Program Allocation per Section 1012.71, Florida Statutes
(g) Funding based on student eligibility and meals provided, if participating in the National School Lunch Program.
(h) Consistent with Section 1002.33(20)(a), Florida Statutes, for charter schools with a population of 75% or more ESE students, the administrative fee shall be
calculated based on unweighted full-time equivalent students.
(i) As provided in the 2013 General Appropriations Act, school districts are required to pay for instructional materials used for the instruction of public school
high school students who are earning credit toward high school graduation under the dual enrollment program as provided in section 1011.62(l)(i), Florida
Statutes.
(j) The Teacher Salary Allocation is provided pursuant to Specific Appropriation 87, Chapter 2013-40, Laws of Florida, and Section 26 of Chapter 2013-45, Laws
of Florida.
Administrative fees charged by the school district shall be calculated based upon 5 percent of available funds from the FEFP and categorical funding for which charter
students may be eligible. For charter schools with a population of 251 or more students the difference in the fee calculation and the fee withheld may only be used for
capital outlay purposes specified in Section 1013.62(2) F.S. To calculate the administrative fee to be withheld for schools with more than 250 students, divide the
school population into 250. Multiply that fraction times the funds available, then times 5%.
For high performing charter schools, administrative fees charged by the school district shall be calculated based upon 2 percent of available funds from the FEFP and
categorical funding for which charter students may be eligible. For charter schools with a population of 251 or more students the difference in the fee calculation and
the fee withheld may only be used for capital outlay purposes specified in Section 1013.62(2) F.S. To calculate the administrative fee to be withheld for schools with
more than 250 students, divide the school population into 250. Multiply that fraction times the funds available, then times 2 percent.
FEFP and categorical funding are recalculated during the year to reflect the revised number of full-time equivalent students reported during the survey periods
designated by the Commissioner of Education.
Revenues flow to districts from state sources and from county tax collectors on various distribution schedules.
216
2
Five Year Enrollment Projections
Kindergarten
1st Grade
2nd Grade
3rd Grade
4th Grade
5th Grade
6th Grade
7th Grade
8th Grade
Total Possible
Enrollment
Year 1
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
1 Sections
22 Students
1 Sections
22 Students
Year 2
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
44 Students
1 Sections
22 Students
1 Sections
22 Students
Year 3
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
36 Students
2 Sections
44 Students
2 Sections
44 Students
2 Sections
44 Students
1 Sections
22 Students
Year 4
Year 5
2 Sections
2 Sections
36 Students 36 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
36 Students 36 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
36 Students 36 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
36 Students 36 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
44 Students 44 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
44 Students 44 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
44 Students 44 Students
2 Sections
2 Sections
44 Students 44 Students
1 Sections
2 Sections
22 Students 44 Students
10 Sections
12 Sections
15 Sections
17 Sections
18 Sections
188 Students 232 Students 298 Students 342 Students 364 Students
Five Year Staffing Projections
Classroom Teachers
ESE Teachers
Gifted Teachers
Other Teachers
Principal
Assistant Principal
Business Manager
Office Assistant
Data Prep Clerk
Educational Assistant
Maintenance 1
Maintenance 2
Total Employees
Year 1
10
0.5
0.2
1.1
1
Year 2
12.2
0.8
0.2
1.9
1
1
2
1
2
Year 3
15.5
1
0.2
2
1
0.5
1
0.5
1
2.5
1
2
Year 4
17.9
1.1
0.3
2
1
1
1
0.75
1
3
1
3
Year 5
19
1.1
0.3
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
17.8
23.1
28.2
33.05
35.4
Year 4
4
Year 5
4
Detailed ESE Estimates
Kindergarten
Year 1
4
Year 2
4
Year 3
4
217
1st Grade
2nd Grade
3rd Grade
4th Grade
5th Grade
6th Grade
7th Grade
8th Grade
4
4
4
2
2
0
0
0
4
4
4
4
2
2
0
0
4
4
4
4
4
3
1
0
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
1
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
Total ESE Enrollment
20
24
28
31
33
Detailed Gifted Estimates
1st Grade
2nd Grade
3rd Grade
4th Grade
5th Grade
6th Grade
7th Grade
8th Grade
Year 1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
Year 2
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
Year 3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
0
Year 4
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
Year 5
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
Total ESE Enrollment
5
6
8
10
11
Detailed ELL Estimates
Kindergarten
1st Grade
2nd Grade
3rd Grade
4th Grade
5th Grade
6th Grade
7th Grade
8th Grade
Year 1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
Year 2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
Year 3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
Year 4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Year 5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Total ESE Enrollment
6
7
8
9
9
Special Populations Summary
ESE Students
Gifted Students
ELL Students
Free / Reduced Lunch
Year 1
20
5
6
114
Year 2
24
6
7
140
Year 3
28
8
8
179
Year 4
31
10
9
205
Year 5
33
11
9
218
Total ESE Enrollment
145
177
223
255
271
218
Gulf Coast Charter Academy 's Five Year Budget Projections
Complete Budget - Lee County
Year 1
Maximum Students
Budgetted Students
Year 2
188
188
Year 3
232
232
Year 4
298
298
Year 5
342
342
364
364
Income Estimates
Func
Obj
Desription
Planning Year
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
FEFP Calculations
3310
3310
3310
3310
3310
3310
3310
3310
3492
3492
FEFP - Base Funding
FEFP - ESE Gurantee
FEFP - Supplemental Academic Instruction
FEFP - Class Size Reductions
FEFP - Other FEFP (WFTE Share)
FEFP - Discretionary Local Effort
FEFP - Instructional Materials Allocation
FEFP - Teacher Salary Allocation
Transportation (All Riders)
Transportation (ESE Student Riders)
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
791,088
25,520
39,668
258,879
3,827
95,557
15,384
34,470
16,544
6,745
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
974,716
31,080
49,686
324,260
4,794
119,690
19,269
43,176
20,722
8,094
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,250,558
37,752
64,778
422,754
6,250
156,046
25,122
56,290
27,198
9,443
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,446,269
43,312
75,458
492,451
7,280
181,773
29,264
65,570
31,655
10,792
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,557,472
46,648
81,517
531,991
7,864
196,368
31,614
70,835
33,998
10,792
$
$
$
$
35,064
10,296
-
$
$
$
$
44,730
12,870
-
$
$
$
$
57,060
16,740
-
$
$
$
$
65,628
18,972
93,390
-
$
$
$
$
69,840
20,610
84,722
-
Other Income
3261
3262
3397
3440
School Lunch Reimbursements
School Breakfast Reimbursements
Capital Outlay Funds
Gifts, Grants and Bequests
$
$
$
$
Total Income
$
50,000
50,000 $ 1,333,042 $ 1,653,087 $ 2,129,991 $ 2,561,815 $ 2,744,271
Expense Estimates
Function 5100 - Basic Instruction
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
120
130
140
160
210
220
Classroom Teacher Salaries
Other Certified Staff Member
Substitute Teachers
Other Support Personnel
Retirement
FICA
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
373,960
41,136
2,997
13,600
16,976
32,795
$
$
$
$
$
$
463,075
72,118
3,807
27,608
22,535
43,054
$
$
$
$
$
$
597,158
77,053
4,725
35,028
28,065
54,257
$
$
$
$
$
$
699,965
78,208
5,373
42,664
32,195
62,794
$
$
$
$
$
$
754,124
79,382
5,670
57,738
35,114
68,180
219
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
240
250
290
360
510
520
621
641
690
730
750
Worker's Compensation
Unemployment Compensation
Other Employee Benefits
Rentals
Supplies
Textbooks
AV Materials-Capitalized
Furniture, Fixtures-Capitalized
Computer Software
Dues and Fees
Other Personnel Services
5100 Sub Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5,359
3,400
31,528
16,250
6,016
35,250
12,000
5,720
5,000
94
7,288
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
42,232 $
57,533 $
$
-
$
846 $
$
-
$
846 $
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
350
3,000
700
500
$
-
$
4,550 $
4,641 $
$
-
$
2,500 $
2,500 $
609,368 $
7,035
4,287
41,851
16,250
6,960
10,501
2,424
6,974
5,100
118
9,568
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
743,265 $
8,865
5,160
52,120
16,250
9,119
15,301
3,672
8,855
5,202
155
12,057
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
10,260
5,601
59,791
16,250
10,674
41,358
2,473
10,109
5,306
181
13,954
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
11,141
6,043
65,211
16,250
11,590
38,044
1,249
10,736
5,414
197
15,151
933,041 $ 1,097,158 $ 1,181,233
Function 5200 - Exceptional Education
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
130
140
210
220
240
250
290
310
510
750
Other Certified Staff Member
Substitute Teachers
Retirement
FICA
Worker's Compensation
Unemployment Compensation
Other Employee Benefits
Professional and Technical Services
Supplies
Other Personnel Services
5200 Sub Total
26,177
189
992
2,003
327
418
1,842
7,020
2,820
445
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
37,957
270
1,421
2,904
474
421
2,638
7,090
3,712
645
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
46,232
324
1,710
3,537
578
424
3,175
9,549
5,066
786
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
54,746
378
2,000
4,188
684
648
3,715
12,055
6,156
931
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
55,567
378
2,006
4,251
695
648
3,725
12,175
6,916
945
71,379 $
85,500 $
87,306
1,065 $
1,395 $
1,635 $
1,773
1,065 $
1,395 $
1,635 $
1,773
357
3,060
714
510
364
3,121
728
520
371
3,184
743
531
$
$
$
$
379
3,247
758
541
4,734 $
4,828 $
4,925
3,000 $
3,000 $
3,500
Function 6100 - Pupil Services
Function 6200 - Instructional Media Services
6200
510 Supplies
6200 Sub Total
Function 6300 - Instructional/Curriculum Development
Function 6400 - Instructional Staff Training
6400
6400
6400
6400
140
310
330
510
Substitute Teachers
Professional and Technical Services
Travel
Supplies
6400 Sub Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Function 6500 - Instructional-Related Technology
6500
310 Professional and Technical Services
220
6500 Sub Total
$
-
$
2,500 $
2,500 $
3,000 $
3,000 $
3,500
$
$
1,000 $
$
3,500 $
5,640 $
4,000 $
7,099 $
4,500 $
9,301 $
5,000 $
10,888 $
5,500
11,820
$
1,000 $
9,140 $
11,099 $
13,801 $
15,888 $
17,320
Function 7100 - Board
7100
7100
310 Professional and Technical Services
320 Insurance and Bond Premiums
7100 Sub Total
Function 7200 - General / District Administration
7200
730 Dues and Fees
7200 Sub Total
$
-
$
64,384 $
79,774 $
86,250 $
87,128 $
88,225
$
-
$
64,384 $
79,774 $
86,250 $
87,128 $
88,225
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
18,750
1,800
502
1,572
257
265
932
3,500
15,000
1,500
2,000
349
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
108,174
59,959
5,797
12,862
2,102
1,054
10,766
930
6,556
2,247
3,099
6,821
1,000
1,240
1,240
2,858
141,167
64,435
6,925
15,728
2,570
1,080
12,862
1,088
8,208
2,630
3,629
7,986
1,000
1,450
1,450
3,495
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
143,284
69,031
7,261
16,242
2,654
1,080
13,485
1,183
8,736
2,857
3,938
8,667
1,000
1,576
1,576
3,609
Function 7300 - School Administration
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
110
160
210
220
240
250
290
310
360
370
390
510
641
643
644
730
750
Administrator Salaries
Other Support Personnel
Retirement
FICA
Worker's Compensation
Unemployment Compensation
Other Employee Benefits
Professional and Technical Services
Rentals
Communications
Other Purchased Services
Supplies
Furniture, Fixtures-Capitalized
Computer Hardware-Capitalized
Computer Hardware (Non Capitalized)
Dues and Fees
Other Personnel Services
7300 Sub Total
$
46,427 $
75,000
51,360
4,350
9,667
1,580
648
8,078
564
4,136
1,363
1,880
4,136
4,000
752
752
2,148
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
76,125
52,130
4,363
9,812
1,603
648
8,102
710
5,104
1,717
2,366
5,206
1,000
947
947
2,180
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
170,412 $
172,960 $
226,704 $
275,702 $
286,181
Function 7500 - Fiscal Services
7500
310 Professional and Technical Services
7500 Sub Total
$
-
$
11,100 $
11,445 $
11,797 $
12,155 $
12,521
$
-
$
11,100 $
11,445 $
11,797 $
12,155 $
12,521
$
$
-
$
$
2,000 $
45,360 $
$
57,600 $
$
73,800 $
3,000 $
84,600 $
90,450
$
-
$
47,360 $
57,600 $
73,800 $
87,600 $
90,450
$
-
$
40,500 $
40,905 $
82,627 $
83,455 $
84,290
$
-
$
40,500 $
40,905 $
82,627 $
83,455 $
84,290
Function 7600 - Food Services
7600
7600
510 Supplies
570 Food
7600 Sub Total
Function 7800 - Pupil Transportation
7800
390 Other Purchased Services
7800 Sub Total
221
Function 7900 - Operation of Plant
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
160
210
220
240
250
290
320
350
360
370
380
390
430
510
680
750
Other Support Personnel
Retirement
FICA
Worker's Compensation
Unemployment Compensation
Other Employee Benefits
Insurance and Bond Premiums
Repairs and Maintenance
Rentals
Communications
Public Utilities
Other Purchased Services
Electricity
Supplies
Remodeling/Renovations
Other Personnel Services
7900 Sub Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
200
200
500
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
900 $
30,480
1,315
2,332
381
421
2,442
9,009
2,500
131,600
2,256
1,222
5,600
22,022
3,760
518
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
38,651
1,318
2,957
483
633
2,447
9,189
2,575
185,600
2,840
1,553
5,869
22,462
5,104
5,000
657
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
39,231
1,320
3,001
490
639
2,451
9,373
2,652
268,200
3,719
2,055
6,198
22,912
6,854
5,100
667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
47,767
1,322
3,654
597
860
2,456
9,560
2,732
342,000
4,354
2,429
6,507
23,370
8,208
5,202
812
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
48,483
1,325
3,709
606
864
2,461
9,752
2,814
364,000
4,728
2,663
6,744
23,837
9,100
5,306
824
215,859 $
287,338 $
374,863 $
461,830 $
487,216
38,630 $
47,865 $
61,686 $
71,515 $
77,073
Function 9100 - Community Service
Reserve Fund
$
-
$
Total Expenses
$
48,327 $ 1,256,882 $ 1,517,990 $ 1,945,076 $ 2,287,395 $ 2,422,013
Total Income
$
50,000 $ 1,333,042 $ 1,653,087 $ 2,129,991 $ 2,561,815 $ 2,744,271
Net Revenue
$
1,673 $
76,160 $
135,097 $
184,914 $
274,419 $
322,258
Cash On Hand
$
1,673 $
77,833 $
212,931 $
397,845 $
672,264 $
994,522
222
Gulf Coast Charter Academy 's Five Year Budget Projections
Planning Year Cash Flow Estimates
Directions (Mouse Over Here)
Func
Obj
Desription
Planning Year
Total
Select
Distrib.
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
Jun.
Total
FEFP Calculations
Other Income
3440 Gifts, Grants and Bequests
Total Income
$
50,000
1
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
50,000
$
50,000
T
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
50,000
Expense Estimates
Function 7100 - Board
7100
310 Professional and Technical Services
7100 Sub Total
$
1,000
1
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
1,000
$
1,000
T
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
83
$
1,000
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
18,750
1,800
502
1,572
257
265
932
3,500
15,000
1,500
2,000
349
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
7
3
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
750
1,000
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
750
1,000
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
35
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
35
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
35
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
35
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
35
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
35
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
35
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
35
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
35
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,563
150
42
131
21
22
78
292
1,250
35
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
18,750
1,800
502
1,572
257
265
932
3,500
15,000
1,500
2,000
349
$
46,427
T
$
5,298
$
5,298
$
3,583
$
3,583
$
3,583
$
3,583
$
3,583
$
3,583
$
3,583
$
3,583
$
3,583
$
3,583
$
46,427
$
$
$
200
200
500
1
1
5
$
$
$
17
17
188
$
$
$
17
17
188
$
$
$
17
17
13
$
$
$
17
17
13
$
$
$
17
17
13
$
$
$
17
17
13
$
$
$
17
17
13
$
$
$
17
17
13
$
$
$
17
17
13
$
$
$
17
17
13
$
$
$
17
17
13
$
$
$
17
17
13
$
$
$
200
200
500
$
900
T
$
221
$
221
$
46
$
46
$
46
$
46
$
46
$
46
$
46
$
46
$
46
$
46
$
900
$
-
3
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
Function 7300 - School Administration
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
110
160
210
220
240
250
290
370
390
641
643
750
Administrator Salaries
Other Support Personnel
Retirement
FICA
Worker's Compensation
Unemployment Compensation
Other Employee Benefits
Communications
Other Purchased Services
Furniture, Fixtures-Capitalized
Computer Hardware-Capitalized
Other Personnel Services
7300 Sub Total
Function 7900 - Operation of Plant
7900
7900
7900
380 Public Utilities
390 Other Purchased Services
510 Supplies
7900 Sub Total
0 Reserve Fund
Total Expenses
$
48,327
$
5,602
$
5,602
$
3,712
$
3,712
$
3,712
$
3,712
$
3,712
$
3,712
$
3,712
$
3,712
$
3,712
$
3,712
$
48,327
Total Income
$
50,000
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
4,167
$
50,000
Net Revenue
$
1,673
$
(1,436) $
(1,436) $
454
$
454
$
454
$
454
$
454
$
454
$
454
$
454
$
454
$
454
$
1,673
Cash On Hand
$
1,673
$
(1,436) $
(2,871) $
(2,417) $
(145) $
310
$
764
$
1,218
$
1,673
(1,962) $
(1,508) $
(1,054) $
(599) $
223
Gulf Coast Charter Academy 's Five Year Budget Projections
Year 1 Cash Flow Estimates
Directions (Mouse Over Here)
Func
Obj
Year 1 Total
Desription
Select
Distrib.
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
Jun.
Total
FEFP Calculations
3310
3310
3310
3310
3310
3310
3310
3310
3492
3492
FEFP - Base Funding
FEFP - ESE Gurantee
FEFP - Supplemental Academic Instruction
FEFP - Class Size Reductions
FEFP - Other FEFP (WFTE Share)
FEFP - Discretionary Local Effort
FEFP - Instructional Materials Allocation
FEFP - Teacher Salary Allocation
Transportation (All Riders)
Transportation (ESE Student Riders)
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
791,088
25,520
39,668
258,879
3,827
95,557
15,384
34,470
16,544
6,745
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
1,654
675
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
1,654
675
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
1,654
675
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
1,654
675
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
1,654
675
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
1,654
675
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
1,654
675
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
1,654
675
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
1,654
675
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
65,924
2,127
3,306
21,573
319
7,963
1,282
2,873
1,654
675
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
791,088
25,520
39,668
258,879
3,827
95,557
15,384
34,470
16,544
6,745
$
$
35,064
10,296
4
4
$
$
-
$
$
-
$
$
-
$
$
3,896
1,144
$
$
3,896
1,144
$
$
3,896
1,144
$
$
3,896
1,144
$
$
3,896
1,144
$
$
3,896
1,144
$
$
3,896
1,144
$
$
3,896
1,144
$
$
3,896
1,144
$
$
35,064
10,296
$
1,333,042
T
$ 105,366
$ 105,366
$ 107,695
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 1,333,042
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
373,960
41,136
2,997
13,600
16,976
32,795
5,359
3,400
31,528
16,250
6,016
35,250
12,000
5,720
5,000
94
7,288
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
7
7
7
5
3
3
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
37,396
4,114
300
1,360
1,698
3,280
536
340
3,153
1,625
150
125
9
729
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
373,960
41,136
2,997
13,600
16,976
32,795
5,359
3,400
31,528
16,250
6,016
35,250
12,000
5,720
5,000
94
7,288
$
609,368
T
$ 30,616
$ 30,616
$ 54,814
$ 54,814
$ 54,814
$ 54,814
$ 54,814
$ 54,814
$ 54,814
$ 54,814
$ 54,814
$ 54,814
$
609,368
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
26,177
189
992
2,003
327
418
1,842
7,020
2,820
445
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
5
3
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
585
1,058
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
585
1,058
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,618
19
99
200
33
42
184
585
71
45
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,618
19
99
200
33
42
184
585
71
45
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,618
19
99
200
33
42
184
585
71
45
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,618
19
99
200
33
42
184
585
71
45
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,618
19
99
200
33
42
184
585
71
45
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,618
19
99
200
33
42
184
585
71
45
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,618
19
99
200
33
42
184
585
71
45
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,618
19
99
200
33
42
184
585
71
45
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,618
19
99
200
33
42
184
585
71
45
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,618
19
99
200
33
42
184
585
71
45
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
26,177
189
992
2,003
327
418
1,842
7,020
2,820
445
$
42,232
T
$
1,643
$
1,643
$
3,895
$
3,895
$
3,895
$
3,895
$
3,895
$
3,895
$
3,895
$
3,895
$
3,895
$
3,895
$
42,232
Other Income
3261 School Lunch Reimbursements
3262 School Breakfast Reimbursements
Total Income
Expense Estimates
Function 5100 - Basic Instruction
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
5100
120
130
140
160
210
220
240
250
290
360
510
520
621
641
690
730
750
Classroom Teacher Salaries
Other Certified Staff Member
Substitute Teachers
Other Support Personnel
Retirement
FICA
Worker's Compensation
Unemployment Compensation
Other Employee Benefits
Rentals
Supplies
Textbooks
AV Materials-Capitalized
Furniture, Fixtures-Capitalized
Computer Software
Dues and Fees
Other Personnel Services
5100 Sub Total
2,256
17,625
6,000
2,860
1,875
-
2,256
17,625
6,000
2,860
1,875
-
37,396
4,114
300
1,360
1,698
3,280
536
340
3,153
1,625
150
125
9
729
37,396
4,114
300
1,360
1,698
3,280
536
340
3,153
1,625
150
125
9
729
37,396
4,114
300
1,360
1,698
3,280
536
340
3,153
1,625
150
125
9
729
37,396
4,114
300
1,360
1,698
3,280
536
340
3,153
1,625
150
125
9
729
37,396
4,114
300
1,360
1,698
3,280
536
340
3,153
1,625
150
125
9
729
37,396
4,114
300
1,360
1,698
3,280
536
340
3,153
1,625
150
125
9
729
37,396
4,114
300
1,360
1,698
3,280
536
340
3,153
1,625
150
125
9
729
37,396
4,114
300
1,360
1,698
3,280
536
340
3,153
1,625
150
125
9
729
37,396
4,114
300
1,360
1,698
3,280
536
340
3,153
1,625
150
125
9
729
Function 5200 - Exceptional Education
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
5200
130
140
210
220
240
250
290
310
510
750
Other Certified Staff Member
Substitute Teachers
Retirement
FICA
Worker's Compensation
Unemployment Compensation
Other Employee Benefits
Professional and Technical Services
Supplies
Other Personnel Services
5200 Sub Total
Function 6200 - Instructional Media Services
6200
510 Supplies
6200 Sub Total
$
846
5
$
317
$
317
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
846
$
846
T
$
317
$
317
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
21
$
846
$
$
$
$
350
3,000
700
500
3
1
3
5
$
$
$
$
250
188
$
$
$
$
250
188
$
$
$
$
35
250
70
13
$
$
$
$
35
250
70
13
$
$
$
$
35
250
70
13
$
$
$
$
35
250
70
13
$
$
$
$
35
250
70
13
$
$
$
$
35
250
70
13
$
$
$
$
35
250
70
13
$
$
$
$
35
250
70
13
$
$
$
$
35
250
70
13
$
$
$
$
35
250
70
13
$
$
$
$
350
3,000
700
500
Function 6400 - Instructional Staff Training
6400
6400
6400
6400
140
310
330
510
Substitute Teachers
Professional and Technical Services
Travel
Supplies
224
6400 Sub Total
$
4,550
T
$
438
$
438
$
368
$
368
$
368
$
368
$
368
$
368
$
368
$
368
$
368
$
368
$
4,550
Function 6500 - Instructional-Related Technology
6500
310 Professional and Technical Services
6500 Sub Total
$
2,500
1
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
2,500
$
2,500
T
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
208
$
2,500
$
$
3,500
5,640
1
7
$
$
292
2,820
$
$
292
2,820
$
$
292
-
$
$
292
-
$
$
292
-
$
$
292
-
$
$
292
-
$
$
292
-
$
$
292
-
$
$
292
-
$
$
292
-
$
$
292
-
$
$
3,500
5,640
$
9,140
T
$
3,112
$
3,112
$
292
$
292
$
292
$
292
$
292
$
292
$
292
$
292
$
292
$
292
$
9,140
Function 7100 - Board
7100
7100
310 Professional and Technical Services
320 Insurance and Bond Premiums
7100 Sub Total
Function 7200 - General / District Administration
7200
730 Dues and Fees
7200 Sub Total
$
64,384
1
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
64,384
$
64,384
T
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
5,365
$
64,384
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
75,000
51,360
4,350
9,667
1,580
648
8,078
564
4,136
1,363
1,880
4,136
4,000
752
752
2,148
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
5
7
7
3
3
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
114
157
1,551
2,000
376
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
114
157
1,551
2,000
376
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
414
114
157
103
75
215
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
414
114
157
103
75
215
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
414
114
157
103
75
215
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
414
114
157
103
75
215
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
414
114
157
103
75
215
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
414
114
157
103
75
215
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
414
114
157
103
75
215
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
414
114
157
103
75
215
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
414
114
157
103
75
215
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,250
4,280
362
806
132
54
673
47
414
114
157
103
75
215
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
75,000
51,360
4,350
9,667
1,580
648
8,078
564
4,136
1,363
1,880
4,136
4,000
752
752
2,148
$
170,412
T
$ 16,801
$ 16,801
$ 13,681
$ 13,681
$ 13,681
$ 13,681
$ 13,681
$ 13,681
$ 13,681
$ 13,681
$ 13,681
$ 13,681
$
170,412
$
11,100
10
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
4,163
$
4,163
$
11,100
$
11,100
T
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
278
$
4,163
$
4,163
$
11,100
Function 7300 - School Administration
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
7300
110
160
210
220
240
250
290
310
360
370
390
510
641
644
730
750
Administrator Salaries
Other Support Personnel
Retirement
FICA
Worker's Compensation
Unemployment Compensation
Other Employee Benefits
Professional and Technical Services
Rentals
Communications
Other Purchased Services
Supplies
Furniture, Fixtures-Capitalized
Computer Hardware (Non Capitalized)
Dues and Fees
Other Personnel Services
7300 Sub Total
Function 7500 - Fiscal Services
7500
310 Professional and Technical Services
7500 Sub Total
Function 7600 - Food Services
7600
7600
510 Supplies
570 Food
7600 Sub Total
$
$
2,000
45,360
5
3
$
$
750
-
$
$
750
-
$
$
50
4,536
$
$
50
4,536
$
$
50
4,536
$
$
50
4,536
$
$
50
4,536
$
$
50
4,536
$
$
50
4,536
$
$
50
4,536
$
$
50
4,536
$
$
50
4,536
$
$
2,000
45,360
$
47,360
T
$
750
$
750
$
4,586
$
4,586
$
4,586
$
4,586
$
4,586
$
4,586
$
4,586
$
4,586
$
4,586
$
4,586
$
47,360
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
30,480
1,315
2,332
381
421
2,442
9,009
2,500
131,600
2,256
1,222
5,600
22,022
3,760
518
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
4,505
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
1,410
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
4,505
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
1,410
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
94
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
94
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
94
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
94
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
94
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
94
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
94
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
94
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
94
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,540
110
194
32
35
204
208
10,967
188
102
467
1,835
94
43
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
30,480
1,315
2,332
381
421
2,442
9,009
2,500
131,600
2,256
1,222
5,600
22,022
3,760
518
Function 7900 - Operation of Plant
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
7900
160
210
220
240
250
290
320
350
360
370
380
390
430
510
750
Other Support Personnel
Retirement
FICA
Worker's Compensation
Unemployment Compensation
Other Employee Benefits
Insurance and Bond Premiums
Repairs and Maintenance
Rentals
Communications
Public Utilities
Other Purchased Services
Electricity
Supplies
Other Personnel Services
7900 Sub Total
$
215,859
T
$ 22,839
$ 22,839
$ 17,018
$ 17,018
$ 17,018
$ 17,018
$ 17,018
$ 17,018
$ 17,018
$ 17,018
$ 17,018
$ 17,018
$
215,859
$
38,630
3
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
38,630
Total Expenses
$
1,256,882
$
Total Income
$
1,333,042
Net Revenue
$
Cash On Hand
$
0 Reserve Fund
-
82,366
$
-
3,863
3,863
3,863
3,863
3,863
3,863
3,863
3,863
3,863
3,863
82,366
$ 108,438
$ 108,438
$ 108,438
$ 108,438
$ 108,438
$ 108,438
$ 108,438
$ 108,438
$ 112,323
$ 112,323
$ 1,256,882
$ 105,366
$ 105,366
$ 107,695
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 112,735
$ 1,333,042
76,160
$
23,000
$
23,000
$
4,297
$
4,297
$
4,297
$
4,297
$
4,297
$
4,297
$
4,297
$
412
$
412
$
77,833
$
23,000
$
46,001
$
49,555
$
53,852
$
58,149
$
62,446
$
66,742
$
71,039
$
75,336
$
75,748
$
76,160
(743) $
45,258
$
76,160
225
226
Gulf Coast Charter Academy 's Five Year Budget Projections
General Budget Summary
Florida Charter Support Unit Budget Template - Summary #1
Planning
Year
Year
One
Year
Two
Year
Three
Year
Four
Year
Five
Revenue
Florida Educational Finance Program (FEFP)
Capital Outlay
NSLP Funds
Transportation Funds
Other Income Sources
$
$
$
$
$
50,000
$
$
$
$
$
1,182,865
41,472
20,884
-
$
$
$
$
$
1,464,144
53,550
26,395
-
$
$
$
$
$
Total Revenue
$
50,000 $
1,245,221 $
1,544,089 $
Employee Salaries
Employee Benefits
Employer Costs
$
$
$
20,550 $
1,434 $
2,094 $
645,382 $
70,761 $
62,006 $
Total Employee Costs
$
24,078 $
778,148 $
1,890,259
68,850
33,479
-
$
$
$
$
$
2,189,823
87,365
79,200
37,540
-
$
$
$
$
$
2,362,974
79,358
84,600
41,573
-
1,992,588 $
2,393,929 $
2,568,504
768,276 $
84,269 $
73,973 $
960,487 $
104,589 $
92,284 $
1,127,198 $
120,451 $
107,754 $
1,206,044
129,769
115,190
926,517 $
1,157,360 $
1,355,403 $
1,451,003
43,062
47,523
268,200
18,081
24,836
7,752
9,855
4,833
5,202
22,388
77,143
52,848
342,000
19,748
25,643
7,934
11,109
3,830
5,306
23,930
Expenses
Academic Expenses
Academic Supplies
Services and Contracts
Facilities Costs
Insurance
Utilties
Maintenance
Furniture
AV / Computer Equipment
Software
Other Equipment
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
500
19,700
200
1,500
2,000
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
54,116
38,396
131,600
14,289
23,166
2,500
9,720
12,704
5,000
20,122
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
31,518
41,104
185,600
15,829
23,915
7,575
7,974
3,309
5,100
21,024
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
74,040
55,592
364,000
20,825
26,332
8,120
11,736
2,725
5,414
24,434
227
Travel Costs
Food
Transportation
Other Expenses
$
$
$
$
349
$
$
$
$
700
41,472
40,500
11,700
District Administrative Fees
Reserve Fund
$
$
-
$
$
60,187 $
36,112 $
74,527 $
44,716 $
48,327 $
1,673 $
1,280,433 $
(35,212) $
1,497,860 $
46,230 $
Total Expenses
Net Revenue
$
$
$
$
$
$
714
53,550
40,905
13,982
$
$
$
$
728
68,850
82,627
17,543
$
$
$
$
743
79,200
83,455
20,586
$
$
$
$
758
84,600
84,290
22,055
86,189 $
57,712 $
87,006 $
66,821 $
88,143
72,136
1,922,741 $
69,847 $
2,262,703 $
131,225 $
2,396,204
172,301
228
Gulf Coast Charter Academy 's Five Year Budget Projections
Detailed Budget Summary
Florida Charter Support Unit Budget Template - Summary #2
Planning
Year
Year
One
Year
Two
Year
Three
Year
Four
Year
Five
Revenue
FEFP State Revenue
Capital Outlay
NSLP Funds
Transportation Funds
Other Revenue
$
$
$
$
$
Total Revenue
$
50,000
$
$
$
$
$
50,000 $
1,182,865
41,472
20,884
-
$
$
$
$
$
1,464,144
53,550
26,395
-
$
$
$
$
$
1,890,259
68,850
33,479
-
$
$
$
$
$
1,245,221 $
1,544,089 $
1,992,588 $
590,095
12,520
44,724
5,000
28,250
5,720
700
8,329
727,246
12,650
21,874
5,100
18,674
6,974
714
10,259
909,514
15,670
30,259
5,202
19,922
8,855
728
12,857
2,189,823
87,365
79,200
37,540
-
$
$
$
$
$
2,362,974
79,358
84,600
41,573
-
2,393,929 $
2,568,504
Expenses
Academic Expenses
Employee Totals
Services
Supplies and Materials
Software
Equipement
Furniture
Travel
Other Expenses
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Total Academic Expenses
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
24,078
18,500
2,000
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
695,339 $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
803,492 $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,053,980
18,238
58,991
5,306
18,723
10,109
743
14,922
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,140,518
18,922
57,396
5,414
17,499
10,736
758
16,145
1,003,007 $
1,181,011 $
1,267,388
200,713
17,672
6,386
1,161
244,767
19,029
7,472
1,357
Administrative Expenses
Employee Totals
Services
Supplies and Materials
Computers
150,681
14,664
3,872
704
$
$
$
$
152,783
15,928
4,869
885
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
253,038
19,996
8,119
1,477
229
Equipement
Furniture
Other Expenses
$
$
$
$
1,500 $
349 $
3,872 $
4,000 $
2,852 $
4,774 $
1,000 $
3,066 $
6,138 $
1,000 $
4,019 $
7,680 $
1,000 $
4,852 $
8,184
1,000
5,086
$
46,427 $
180,645 $
183,306 $
237,090 $
286,157 $
296,899
$
$
1,000 $
$
3,500 $
5,280 $
4,000 $
6,640 $
4,500 $
8,708 $
5,000 $
10,188 $
5,500
11,073
$
1,000 $
8,780 $
10,640 $
13,208 $
15,188 $
16,573
Employee Totals
Facility Cost
Services
Insurance
Supplies and Materials
Maintenance
Utilities
Other Expenses
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
200
500
200
-
46,488
185,600
8,525
9,189
4,774
7,575
23,915
657
47,133
268,200
9,680
9,373
6,417
7,752
24,836
667
56,656
342,000
10,580
9,560
7,680
7,934
25,643
812
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
57,448
364,000
11,173
9,752
8,525
8,120
26,332
824
Total Facilities Expenses
$
900 $
Total Administrative Expenses
Governance Expenses
Services
Insurance
Total Governance Expenses
Facilities Expenses
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
37,372
131,600
7,712
9,009
3,520
2,500
23,166
518
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
215,397 $
286,724 $
374,058 $
460,866 $
486,174
Food Services Expenses
Supplies and Materials
Food
$
$
-
$
$
2,000 $
41,472 $
$
53,550 $
$
68,850 $
3,000 $
79,200 $
84,600
Total Food Services Expenses
$
-
$
43,472 $
53,550 $
68,850 $
82,200 $
84,600
$
-
$
40,500 $
40,905 $
82,627 $
83,455 $
84,290
$
-
$
40,500 $
40,905 $
82,627 $
83,455 $
84,290
$
$
-
$
$
60,187 $
36,112 $
74,527 $
44,716 $
86,189 $
57,712 $
87,006 $
66,821 $
88,143
72,136
$
-
$
96,300 $
119,243 $
143,901 $
153,827 $
160,280
Transportation Services
Services
Total Transportation Services
Other Expenses
District Administrative Fee
Reserve Fund
Total Other Expenses
230
Total Expenses
Net Revenue
$
$
48,327 $
1,673 $
1,280,433 $
(35,212) $
1,497,860 $
46,230 $
1,922,741 $
69,847 $
2,262,703 $
131,225 $
2,396,204
172,301
231
Gulf Coast Charter Academy 's Five Year Budget Projections
Accounting Codes Summary
Florida Charter Support Unit Budget Template - Summary #3
Planning
Year
Year
One
Year
Two
Year
Three
Year
Four
Year
Five
Revenue
3300 - State Funding
3400 - Transportation
3200 - NSLP
$
$
$
$
50,000 $
$
1,182,865 $
20,884 $
41,472 $
1,464,144 $
26,395 $
53,550 $
1,890,259 $
33,479 $
68,850 $
2,277,188 $
37,540 $
79,200 $
2,442,332
41,573
84,600
Total Revenue
$
50,000 $
1,245,221 $
1,544,089 $
1,992,588 $
2,393,929 $
2,568,504
488,192
101,554
23,270
43,432
22,720
8,329
601,012
125,877
23,340
20,368
14,498
10,259
752,759
156,390
25,799
28,433
17,729
12,857
873,459
180,150
28,305
56,930
17,888
14,922
Expenses
5000 Functions - Academic Programs
100s - Salaries
200s - Employee Costs
300s - Services and Contracts
500s - Supplies and Materials
600s - Capitalized Expenses
700s - Other Miscellaneous Costs
Total 5000's Academic Programs
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
687,497 $
795,355 $
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
350 $
6,200 $
1,292 $
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
944,867
195,272
28,425
55,194
17,399
16,145
993,968 $
1,171,653 $
1,257,302
357 $
6,274 $
1,506 $
364 $
6,849 $
1,826 $
371 $
6,926 $
2,060 $
379
7,505
2,202
7,842 $
8,137 $
9,040 $
9,358 $
10,086
126,360 $
24,321 $
67,816 $
128,255 $
24,528 $
72,247 $
168,133 $
32,581 $
119,646 $
205,601 $
39,166 $
125,352 $
212,315
40,722
129,044
6000 Functions - Support and Student Services
100s - Salaries
300s - Services and Contracts
500s - Supplies and Materials
Total 6000's Support and Student Services
7000 - Administrative Services (excluding 7900 Facilities)
100s - Salaries
200s - Employee Costs
300s - Services and Contracts
$
$
$
20,550 $
3,528 $
19,500 $
232
500s - Supplies and Materials
600s - Capitalized Expenses
700s - Other Miscellaneous Costs
$
$
$
$
3,500 $
349 $
47,344 $
4,704 $
63,040 $
58,419 $
1,885 $
77,593 $
75,236 $
2,161 $
90,208 $
89,672 $
2,357 $
91,858 $
92,719
2,477
93,229
$
47,427 $
333,585 $
362,928 $
487,964 $
554,006 $
570,506
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
400
500
-
Total 7900 Facilities Operations
$
900 $
Reserve Fund
$
Total Expenses
Net Revenue
$
$
Total 7000's Administrative Services
7900 - Facilities Operations
100s - Salaries
200s - Employee Costs
300s - Services and Contracts
400s - Power Services
500s - Supplies and Materials
600s - Capitalized Expenses
700s - Other Miscellaneous Costs
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
30,480
6,892
151,965
22,022
3,520
518
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
38,651
7,837
207,342
22,462
4,774
5,000
657
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
39,231
7,902
291,829
22,912
6,417
5,100
667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
47,767
8,889
367,146
23,370
7,680
5,202
812
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
48,483
8,965
390,234
23,837
8,525
5,306
824
215,397 $
286,724 $
374,058 $
460,866 $
486,174
$
36,112 $
44,716 $
57,712 $
66,821 $
72,136
48,327 $
1,673 $
1,280,433 $
(35,212) $
1,497,860 $
46,230 $
1,922,741 $
69,847 $
2,262,703 $
131,225 $
2,396,204
172,301
-
233
Gulf Coast Charter Academy 's Five Year Budget Projections
Modified Accural Cash Flow Summary
Florida Charter Support Unit Budget Template - Summary #4
Planning
Year
Year
One
Year
Two
Year
Three
Year
Four
Year
Five
Revenue
District Funding (Oct FTE)
District Funding (Feb FTE)
Capital Funds
National School Lunch Program
Grants and Gifts
$
$
$
$
$
Total Revenue
$
50,000
$
$
$
$
$
50,000 $
601,874
601,874
41,472
-
$
$
$
$
$
745,270
745,270
53,550
-
$
$
$
$
$
961,869
961,869
68,850
-
$
$
$
$
$
1,113,682
1,113,682
87,365
79,200
-
$
$
$
$
$
1,202,273
1,202,273
79,358
84,600
-
2,568,504
1,245,221 $
1,544,089 $
1,992,588 $
2,393,929 $
75,000
471,190
3,752
13,600
51,360
30,480
70,761
72,914
76,125
569,354
4,407
27,608
52,130
38,651
84,269
86,959
108,174
712,736
5,359
35,028
59,959
39,231
104,589
108,521
141,167
825,098
6,068
42,664
64,435
47,767
120,451
126,813
Expenses
Salaries and Benefits
100's - Salaries
Administrative Staff
Instructional Staff
Substitute Teachers
Paraprofessionals / Teacher Asst
Office Staff
Maintenance Staff
210, 230, 290 - Employee Benefits
220, 240, 250, 750 - Employer Costs
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Total Salaries and Benefits
$
18,750
1,800
1,434
2,443
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
24,427 $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
789,056 $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
939,503 $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
143,284
881,135
6,373
57,738
69,031
48,483
129,769
135,584
1,173,597 $
1,374,462 $
1,471,398
32,837
18,081
728
2,652
2,104
85,529
36,411
19,748
743
2,732
2,461
86,850
Purchased / Contract Services
310 - Professional / Technical Services
320 - Insurance and Bond Premiums
330 - Travel
350 - Repairs and Maintenance
370 - Communications
390 - Other Purchased Services
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,000
3,500
15,000
$
$
$
$
$
$
27,648
14,289
700
2,500
1,276
42,260
$
$
$
$
$
$
28,759
15,829
714
2,575
1,606
43,118
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
38,052
20,825
758
2,814
2,677
87,980
234
Total Purchased/Contract Services
$
19,500 $
88,673 $
92,602 $
$
$
$
$
$
200
200
131,600
20,122
2,112
23,166
5,600
185,600
21,024
2,656
23,915
5,869
$
400 $
182,600 $
239,064 $
$
$
500 $
$
18,956 $
41,472 $
$
500 $
141,931 $
148,945 $
153,105
Rent and Utilities
360 - Rent
360 - Rentals
370 - Communications
380 - Utilties
390 - Other Services
Total Rent and Utilities
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
268,200
22,388
3,482
24,836
6,198
$
$
$
$
$
342,000
23,930
4,074
25,643
6,507
$
$
$
$
$
364,000
24,434
4,430
26,332
6,744
325,104 $
402,153 $
425,939
21,132 $
53,550 $
27,910 $
68,850 $
35,959 $
79,200 $
36,183
84,600
60,428 $
74,682 $
96,760 $
115,159 $
120,783
Materials & Supplies
510 - Supplies
570 - Food
Total Materials & Supplies
Other Expenses
730 - Dues and Fees
730 - District Adminstrative Fees
Reserve Fund
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
792 $
60,187 $
36,112 $
996 $
74,527 $
44,716 $
1,306 $
86,189 $
57,712 $
1,526 $
87,006 $
66,821 $
1,661
88,143
72,136
Total Other Expenses
$
-
$
97,092 $
120,239 $
145,207 $
155,354 $
161,940
Expenses (without Capitalized Items)
SubTotal (Net Income Before Depreciation)
Depreciation
Net Income After Depreciation (Accrual Basis)
Add Depreciation
$
$
44,827 $
5,173 $
1,217,849 $
27,372 $
1,466,090 $
77,999 $
1,882,599 $
109,990 $
2,196,074 $
197,855 $
2,333,165
235,339
$
$
5,173 $
$
27,372 $
$
77,999 $
$
109,990 $
$
197,855 $
$
235,339
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,500
2,000
-
$
3,500 $
Capitalized Expenses
520 - Textbooks
620,630 - Equipment and Materials
640 - Furniture
640 - Computers
680 - Remodeling and Renovations
690 - Software
Total Capitalized Expenses
$
$
$
$
$
$
35,160
12,000
9,720
704
5,000
$
$
$
$
$
$
62,584 $
10,386
2,424
7,974
885
5,000
5,100
$
$
$
$
$
$
31,770 $
15,153
3,672
9,855
1,161
5,100
5,202
$
$
$
$
$
$
40,143 $
41,183
2,473
11,109
1,357
5,202
5,306
$
$
$
$
$
$
37,857
1,249
11,736
1,477
5,306
5,414
66,630 $
63,039
235
Net Cash Flow (Modified Accrual)
$
1,673 $
(35,212) $
46,230 $
69,847 $
131,225 $
172,301
236
Gulf Coast Charter Academy 's Five Year Budget Projections
Detailed Budget Summary
Florida Charter Support Unit Budget Template - Summary #5
Planning
Year
Year
One
Year
Two
Year
Three
Year
Four
Year
Five
188
0
210
22
232
66
232
110
232
132
188
232
298
342
364
Enrollment
Kindergarten through 5th Grade
6th Grade through 8th Grade
Total Enrollment at 100%
Revenue
State Sources
Federal Sources
Other Sources
Total Revenue
$
$
$
$
$
$
50,000 $
1,203,749 $
41,472 $
$
1,490,539 $
53,550 $
$
1,923,738 $
68,850 $
$
2,314,729 $
79,200 $
$
2,483,904
84,600
-
50,000 $ 1,245,221 $ 1,544,089 $ 1,992,588 $ 2,393,929 $ 2,568,504
Expenses
Instruction
Salaries (Includes all teachers and assistants)
Fringe Benefits & Employer Costs
Contracted Professional Services
Classroom Supplies & Equipment
Textbooks
Software For Instruction
Furniture
Total Instruction
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
570,994
27,343
7,020
8,272
35,160
5,000
5,720
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
703,432
33,962
7,090
9,982
10,386
5,100
6,974
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
880,024
42,201
9,549
13,280
15,153
5,202
8,855
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,020,070
48,662
12,055
15,747
41,183
5,306
10,109
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,103,685
52,794
12,175
17,336
37,857
5,414
10,736
$
-
$
659,509 $
776,927 $
$
-
$
12,792 $
3,420 $
4,978 $
4,002 $
2,909
$
-
$
12,792 $
3,420 $
4,978 $
4,002 $
2,909
974,264 $ 1,153,132 $ 1,239,998
Media Services
Audio Visual Materials
Total Media Services
237
Staff Development
Workshops
Travel
Professional Services
Total Staff Development
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
3,000 $
700 $
500 $
3,060 $
714 $
510 $
3,121 $
728 $
520 $
3,184 $
743 $
531 $
3,247
758
541
$
-
$
4,200 $
4,284 $
4,370 $
4,457 $
4,546
$
-
$
2,500 $
2,500 $
3,000 $
3,000 $
3,500
$
-
$
2,500 $
2,500 $
3,000 $
3,000 $
3,500
$
$
1,000 $
$
3,500 $
5,280 $
4,000 $
6,640 $
4,500 $
8,708 $
5,000 $
10,188 $
5,500
11,073
$
1,000 $
8,780 $
10,640 $
13,208 $
15,188 $
16,573
Instruction Related Technology
Instructional Networks
Total Instruction Related Technology
Board
Professional Services (Legal)
Insurance
Total Board
General Administration
Management Fees
Administrative Fee
Total General Administration
$
$
-
$
$
528 $
60,187 $
664 $
74,527 $
870 $
86,189 $
1,018 $
87,006 $
1,108
88,143
$
-
$
60,715 $
75,191 $
87,059 $
88,024 $
89,251
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
23,576
851
15,000
3,500
1,500
2,000
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
146,332
6,498
20,122
1,760
792
1,276
3,872
4,000
704
148,420
6,543
21,024
2,213
996
1,606
4,869
1,000
885
194,917
8,655
22,388
2,902
1,306
2,104
6,386
1,000
1,161
237,841
10,421
23,930
3,395
1,526
2,461
7,472
1,000
1,357
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
245,776
10,871
24,434
3,690
1,661
2,677
8,119
1,000
1,477
School Administration
Salaries (Includes Principal, Secretary & Other Office Personnel)
Fringe Benefits & Employer Costs
Equipment Rental / Lease
Advertising and Professional Services
License Fees
Postage and Communication
Office Supplies
Office Equipment
Computer Equipment
Total School Administration
$
46,427 $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
185,355 $
187,558 $
240,818 $
289,403 $
299,704
131,600 $
$
185,600 $
5,000 $
268,200 $
5,100 $
342,000 $
5,202 $
364,000
5,306
Facilities Acquisition & Construction
Building Lease / Rent
Remodeling & Renovations
$
$
-
$
$
238
Total Facilities Acquisition & Construction
$
-
$
131,600 $
190,600 $
273,300 $
347,202 $
369,306
$
-
$
11,100 $
11,445 $
11,797 $
12,155 $
12,521
$
-
$
11,100 $
11,445 $
11,797 $
12,155 $
12,521
$
$
-
$
$
41,472 $
2,000 $
53,550 $
$
68,850 $
$
79,200 $
3,000 $
84,600
-
$
-
$
43,472 $
53,550 $
68,850 $
82,200 $
84,600
Fiscal Services
Professional Services (Payroll, Accounting, Auditing)
Total Fiscal Services
Food Services
Food
Materials & Supplies
Total Food Services
Pupil Transportation Services
239
Gulf Coast Charter Academy of Science and Technology
BUDGET NARRATIVE
FISCAL YEARS 2015-2019
REVENUES
FEFP
Food Service Revenue
Transportation
Grants / Donations
Loans
Capital Outlay
EXPENDITURES
INSTRUCTION
Classroom Teachers
Specialty Teachers
Paraprofessionals
Payroll Taxes
Health Insurance
Workers Compensation
Contracted Services
Travel
Supplies
Textbooks
AV Materials
Furniture and Equipment
Software and technology
Substitutes
Per Worksheet attached. Subsequent years reflect 1.5% increase.
Percent FRL Students Ordering Lunch: 75%; Rate: $0.40; Percent Other
Students Order Lunch: 25%; Rate $2.40. Cost of each lunch: $2.40. Federal
NSLP Reimbursement Rate: $2.40
Number of students reimbursed: Year 1- 44; Year 2-55; Year 3-70: Year 4-80;
Year 5-86; Reimbursement Rate: $352.00
Payments under Function 7500- Fiscal Services.
$255 / student, with eligibility commencing in 4th year.
Based on student / teacher ratio in compliance with CSR. See staffing
worksheet
See Staffing Worksheet
FICA: 6.20% of gross salaries; SUTA: 2.7% of first $7,000 per employee
$350 per employee per month 67% participation
1.25% of gross salaries
See Budget
Estimated amount
$32 per student
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
$90 / 5 days / teacher
PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES
Reading Specialist
DP Attendence
Starting in year 1 part time
See Budget
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
Contracted Services
Estimated amount
STAFF TRAINING
Contracted Services
Estimated amount
BOARD
Legal Fees
Contracted Services- Consultants
Contracted Services - Audit
Travel
Insurance
Licenses & Fees
District Fee
Estimated amount
To be determined
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
5% of FEFP
SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION
Principal
Admin Support
Payroll Taxes
Health Insurance
Workers Compensation
Travel
Equipment Rental
Postage
Principal @ $75,000 in FY14
See Budget
FICA: 6.20% of gross salaries; SUTA: 2.7% of first $7,000 per employee
$350 employee per month 67% participation
1.25% of gross salaries
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
240
Advertising
Supplies
Equipment
Software
FACILITIES ACQUISITION
Rents
Computer Hardware
FISCAL
Contracted Services - Finance
Contracted Services - HR
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
$3,200 year one
Business manager staffed.
FOOD SERVICE
Contracted Services
$2.40 / student / day / 75% participation free and reduced 25% full
TRANSPORTATION
Contracted Services
1 bus @225 a day in year one
PLANT OPERATIONS
Custodial
Payroll Taxes
Health Insurance
Workers Compensation
Contracted Services
Insurance
Telephone
Utilities
Supplies
Equipment
LOAN REPAYMENT
Contingency
See budget
See budget
See budget
See budget
See budget
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
Estimated amount
See budget
See Budget
241
Certified Copy
I certify the attached is a true and correct copy of the Articles of Incorporation of GULF COAST
CHARTER ACADEMY, INC., a Florida corporation, filed electronically on July 24, 2013
effective July 24, 2013, as shown by the records of this office.
I further certify that this is an electronically transmitted certificate authorized by section 15.16,
Florida Statutes, and authenticated by the code noted below.
The document number of this corporation is N13000006711.
Authentication Code: 130729155427-800250092698#1
Given under my hand and the
Great Seal of the State of Florida
at Tallahassee, the Capital, this the
Twenty Ninth day of July, 2013
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