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CROSSCULTURAL:
Nigerian pastor
blessed by US sojourn
CONSECRATED:
ST. ANTHONY’S:
Special year to help
laity learn about
religious
Thousands celebrate
opening of new
dining room
PAGE 7
PAGE 3
PAGE 21
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Newspaper of the Archdiocese of San Francisco
www.catholic-sf.org
SERVING SAN FRANCISCO, MARIN & SAN MATEO COUNTIES
State bishops
challenge �coercive’
abortion coverage
$1.00 | VOL. 16 NO. 26
OCTOBER 10, 2014
Pope to bishops at synod:
Speak fearlessly, listen humbly
VALERIE SCHMALZ
FRANCIS X. ROCCA
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
The California Catholic Conference has п¬Ѓled a federal civil rights
complaint protesting a state ruling
mandating the inclusion of voluntary
direct abortion – including genderselection and late-term abortion – in
California health insurance policies.
“This is a coercive and discriminatory action by the state of California,” said Bishop Robert W. McElroy,
auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese
of San Francisco and chair of the
Institutional Concerns Committee of
the California Catholic Conference,
the public advocacy office of the bishops of California.
The ruling violates the Weldon
Amendment, a federal law enacted in
2005 to protect the conscience rights
VATICAN CITY – Pope Francis
opened the п¬Ѓrst working session of an
extraordinary Synod of Bishops Oct.
6, urging participants to speak fearlessly and listen humbly during two
weeks of discussion of the “pastoral
challenges of the family.”
Hungarian Cardinal Peter Erdo of
Esztergom-Budapest then outlined
some of the major challenges the
bishops would discuss, including such
controversial topics as cohabitation,
divorce, birth control and the impact
of social and economic pressures.
“Let nobody say: �I can’t say this;
they’ll think such-and-such about
me,’” Pope Francis told more than 180
bishops and more than 60 other synod
participants. “Everyone needs to say
SEE BISHOPS, PAGE 18
(CNS PHOTO/PAUL HARING)
Pope Francis raises the Book of the Gospels as he celebrates a Mass to open the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican Oct. 5.
SEE SYNOD, PAGE 17
Archbishop rededicates National Shrine of St. Francis
�As we come together to
rededicate this church, let
us see it as a sign of our
commitment to rededicate
ourselves to the person of
Jesus Christ and to the mission
of this shrine.’
After a п¬Ѓve-month closure for
renovations, the National Shrine of St.
Francis of Assisi reopened Oct. 4, the
feast of St. Francis, with a rededication Mass celebrated by Archbishop
Salvatore J. Cordileone.
The Golden Gate Boys Choir and
Bell Ringers and the shrine’s Festival
Schola assembled in the choir loft
looked down onto a congregation of
around 250 where the shrine’s new
cross-design inlaid granite floor and
refurbished pews were in full evidence, installed this spring and summer as a gift from a major donor.
“Perhaps no saint in the history of
the church is more celebrated for his
identity to the person of Jesus Christ
than is St. Francis,” the archbishop
said in a homily centered on the
saint’s life and what he called the
“perfect joy of St. Francis.”
Francis had no claim on anyone or
ARCHBISHOP CORDILEONE
(PHOTO BY CHRISTINA GRAY/CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO)
Archbishop Cordileone processes after
celebrating Mass at the National Shrine of St.
Francis Oct. 4, marking the saint’s feast day and
the rededication of a remodeled shrine church.
anything, he said, his only heritage
was his Lord Jesus Christ. “And yet
what most of us think п¬Ѓrst when we
conjure up the image of St. Francis of
Assisi is a picture of simple joy, the
perfect joy of St. Francis,” the archbishop said.
The contemporary world doesn’t
associate joy with the denial of all
material comforts, however, or the
embrace of that which is repugnant
and socially outcast, he said, but there
is no perfect joy without embracing
the cross, he said.
This was made possible for St.
Francis, the archbishop said, because
he gave first place “No, not to Lady
Poverty, no, not to service of the lepers,
not to his love of creation, but to his
love of the creator.”
The archbishop said Francis’
encounter with the passion of Christ
was so intense that it left “stigmata,”
or marks of the crucified savior, on
his own body. Stigmata means mark
or scar, the archbishop said, but it also
means branding or ownership, and
that was the physical manifestation of
Francis’ life.
How many people today, far from embracing the cross, flee the cross, asked
the archbishop. “How many people
even if they intellectually acknowledge
his existence, fail to give God the п¬Ѓrst
place in their lives that is his due and
live as if he didn’t exist?” he asked.
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SEE SHRINE, PAGE 19
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CHRISTINA GRAY
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
INDEX
On the Street . . . . . . . . .4
National . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
World . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Faith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . .22
2 ARCHDIOCESE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
The mystery of the perfect joy of St. Francis
This is an abridged version of the
homily Archbishop Cordileone gave
Oct. 4 on the Feast of St. Francis
of Assisi at the rededication of the
church at the National Shrine of St.
Francis.
“All things to all people”
- 1 Corinthians 9:22
ARCHBISHOP SALVATORE J. CORDILEONE
E
ven in a very secular world,
St. Francis certainly has a
universal appeal even beyond
our Catholic family. Francis was
completely identified to his Lord, our
Savior Jesus Christ.
Perhaps no saint in
the history of the
church is more celebrated for his identity to the person of
Jesus Christ than
St. Francis.
Archbishop
This identity even
Salvatore J.
manifested itself
Cordileone
physically toward
the end of his life, which was difficult for him. In 1224, having the
leadership of his community taken
from him and seeing it head in a direction not to his liking, and being
afflicted with a painful disease of
the eyes, he took refuge atop Mount
Laverna for a lengthy retreat.
On Sept. 14, the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, he underwent a profound and mysterious
event, an encounter with the Passion of Christ so intense that it left
the marks of the Crucified on his
body. He bore the wounds of Christ,
the stigmata, on his body. This is
the literal word St. Paul uses in
reference to himself in the passage
we just heard from his letter to the
Galatians: “I bear the marks” – the
stigmata – “of Jesus on my body.”
This word literally means a mark, a
scar, a brand indicating ownership
– just as a cattle rancher brands his
cattle to identify them as his own.
This was the physical manifestation
of Francis’ entire life: his identification with Christ in his Passion.
Francis readily embraced the
Cross, not just in theory, but in
practical ways that changed his life
severely and permanently. Even
before his radical embrace of Lady
Poverty, there was another embrace, a literal, physical embrace
that changed him for good. This is
how he describes that moment in
his own words: “The Lord granted
Animals blessed
Top, Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Mill Valley, parishioners David and Jill Thornton celebrated the
feast Day of St. Francis of Assisi by bringing their
dogs to the church parking lot for the annual
Blessing of the Animals Oct. 4. Center and below,
pet blessing duties brought smiles to Capuchin
Father Harold Snider at the National Shrine of St.
Francis in San Francisco and Father Larry Goode
at St. Francis of Assisi Parish, East Palo Alto.
NEED TO KNOW
ROSARY RALLY, OCT. 11: Noon at
San Francisco’s U.N. Plaza, Market
and Seventh Streets. Speakers
include Archbishop Salvatore J.
Cordileone and Franciscan Father
Andrew Apostoli. www.RosaryRallySF.com; (415) 272-2046.
LIVING TRUSTS WILLS
PROBATE
MICHAEL T. SWEENEY
ATTORNEY AT LAW
782A ULLOA STREET
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94127
(415) 664-8810
Comment from Archbishop Cordileone and guest writers
me, brother Francis, to begin doing
penance this way: When I was in
my sins, just to see lepers was very
bitter for me. And the Lord himself
took me among them, and I showed
mercy to them. And on leaving
them, what seemed bitter to me had
turned for me into sweetness of
body and soul.”
Embracing the leper, an act
formerly repugnant to him, was
the pivotal turning point of his life
that led him to embrace the Cross
of Christ. In identifying himself
with the lepers, loving them, being
with them and serving them, and so
finding in them “sweetness of body
and soul,” he identified himself
with Christ in his Passion. In this
way Francis started to lose himself
and find himself anew in Christ.
His only heritage was to be his Lord
Jesus Christ; he had no claim to
anyone or anything else.
Owning nothing and hanging
out with lepers doesn’t seem like a
promising life. Yet this is the “perfect joy” of St. Francis. The secular
world and many good people in it
cannot recognize this as joy. Modern joy requires many possessions
and people who are healthy and fun
to be with.
The folly of the cross and the wisdom of God point to the same reality: There is no perfect joy without
embracing the Cross.
For Francis, neither Lady Poverty
nor service to lepers, nor his love
for animals came first. Love of the
Creator took precedence over all.
He always gave first place to the
Lord of all Creation. To His Majesty
we owe fitting reverence. The finest
gift was required for worship of
the Lord of Heaven and Earth. And
that worship, the Holy Sacrifice of
the Mass, was to be celebrated with
the utmost dignity and respect.
When Francis descended Mount
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Around the National Shrine of St. Francis
Phone: 415-983-0213
1318 Grant Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94133
Between Vallejo & Green Street
Hours: Now open 7 days, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
www.knightsofsaintfrancis.com
Easy access: 3 blocks west of 101
Bibles, Books, Rosaries,Statues,
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Mon – Fri 9:30 to 5:30 Sat 9:30 – 5
Laverna after receiving the stigmata at the end of his life, he spoke
sternly to his priests that they must
always celebrate Holy Mass with
great reverence. Only reverent celebration of Holy Mass constituted
proper praise and thanksgiving to
the Lord of all things living.
How many people today, far
from embracing the Cross, flee the
Cross? How many people today find
the enduring of any kind of suffering for a just cause, any form of
self-denial, even any inconvenience,
incomprehensible, intolerable, and
offensive? How many ignore God,
how many, even if they intellectually acknowledge His existence, fail
to give Him the first place in their
lives that is His due and live as if
He didn’t exist? And how much
sadness and suffering has this produced, how much conflict and hurt
– always the result of human pride?
Conforming oneself to Christ and
embracing the particular cross that
he gives us require great humility,
the swallowing of one’s pride in
order to embrace whatever it is that
one once found repugnant. And yet,
it is the path to healing, to wholeness, to perfect joy.
The Porziuncola is the small
church in which St. Francis had
one of his great visions. Thank
God we now have a porziuncula as
part of the national shrine. The
Porziuncula means the “little portion” of St. Francis. We all have a
little portion to give. But when we
give it together, we give something
beautiful to God, and God gives us
something beautiful in return: the
perfect joy of St. Francis. May the
Poor Man of Assisi now intercede
for us, that each of us, the Catholics of St. Francis, that is, of San
Francisco, may embrace the cross
and identify ourselves with Christ
in his Passion.
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone Publisher
Rick DelVecchio Editor/General Manager
EDITORIAL
Valerie Schmalz, assistant editor
Tom Burke, On the Street/Calendar
Christina Gray, reporter
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
ADVERTISING
Joseph PeГ±a, director
Mary Podesta, account representative
Chandra Kirtman, advertising & circulation coordinator
PRODUCTION
Karessa McCartney-Kavanaugh, manager
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HOW TO REACH US
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ARCHDIOCESE 3
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
�Thirsting for Christ’: A priest’s cross-cultural education
RICK DELVECCHIO
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Nigerian Father Edward Edward S. Inyanwachi
counts his 11-year sojourn as a visiting priest in
the Archdiocese of San Francisco as a blessing
that is serving him well as he leads a growing
parish in his native country, he told Catholic San
Francisco.
The daily Massgoing son of devout parents,
Father Inyanwachi was only 24 when he п¬Ѓnished
seminary in his home Diocese of Abakaliki in
southeast Nigeria. Just six years later, in 2000, he
was in San Francisco studying for his doctorate in
Catholic educational leadership at the University
of San Francisco and serving in the п¬Ѓrst of many
pastoral and administrative roles in archdiocesan
parishes including Holy Name of Jesus in San
Francisco, Our Lady of Loretto in Novato, St.
Catherine of Siena in Burlingame and п¬Ѓnally St.
Raymond in Menlo Park.
He returned to Nigeria last year to become the
pastor of St. Patrick Church, a new parish made
up of 700 families and including three mission
churches in a largely rural area.
On his п¬Ѓrst Easter as pastor, Father Inyanwachi
baptized 67 children and adults and administered
п¬Ѓrst Communion to 27 parish members. His regular schedule includes six or seven infant baptisms
a week, religious education twice weekly, Bible
study monthly and ongoing activities for children
and youth including the Mary League for girls,
the St. Joseph League for boys and, reflecting the
strong devotion to Mary in the diocese, the Block
Rosary Crusade for children 6 and older.
Father Inyanwachi п¬Ѓnds time to oversee the
building projects necessary for a new and growing
parish.
“My ministry has been very challenging and
exciting,” Father Inyanwachi, visiting friends and
associates in the archdiocese, said during a recent
stop at the archdiocesan Pastoral Center. “Readjusting took a little while but it was also exciting.
“One of the great excitements to me is the
growth of the faith and the willingness to learn,”
he said. “They’re thirsting for Christ.”
The majority of parish members were born
into the faith and Catholic roots are deep. Packed
Masses include all generations and are full of
music and movement, with newly catechized children, parents and elders who converted from traditional spiritualty celebrating together. Worshippers dancing to the front of the church with their
contributions extend the offertory to 45 minutes.
The offertory is followed by a prayer of thanksgiving with Massgoers again coming forward singing
and dancing in gratitude for blessings in their
lives.
In U.S. culture, time is money. When he returned
home after his immersion in U.S. Catholic style,
Father Inyanwachi celebrated a Mass that clocked
an hour and 20 minutes. That would have been on
the possibly painfully long side in the U.S. but not
in Nigerian culture, where music is integral to
communication and defines the sense of time.
McCoy Church Goods Co. Inc.
Competitive Prices & Personalized Service
Father Edward Inyanwachi and parishioners gather at newly formed St. Patrick Church, Diocese of Abakaliki, southeast Nigeria.
“A lot of people said, �Why did you finish it
so quickly?’” Father Inyanwachi said. “I had to
remind myself that I was home.”
As a new pastor in Nigeria with experience in
parish administration in the U.S., Father Inyanwachi is in a position to combine the spontaneity
of one tradition with the organizational qualities
of the other.
He is part of a diocesan team of priests who will
attend the local church’s first clergy study days,
Nov. 19. Such study days are a tradition in the
Archdiocese of San Francisco, where the Nigerian priest got the idea. There will be workshops
on liturgy, п¬Ѓnance and administration.
Father Inyanwachi п¬Ѓnds that clergy study time
“helps with ongoing formation, and helps new
priests learn the basics. There’s a need for more
learning – liturgical, pastoral, organizational.”
He cited marriage as an example – “how the
traditional way of marriage can work without
offending the sacrament” in a culturally diverse
parish, especially when two ethnic groups marry.
Father Inyanwachi would like to see a single approach to such situations for all priests.
As a priest in the archdiocese Father Inyanwachi enjoyed working with people on the path of
conversion. One of his RCIA students was a man
who born Catholic, went on to become a Buddhist
monk and finally “after so many years, wanted to
go home.”
Father Inyanwachi and the former Buddhist are
still friends. He also counts among his formative
relationships in the archdiocese brother priests
including retired St. Catherine of Siena pastor the
SEE CROSS-CULTURAL, PAGE 20
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Join us acknow
acknowledge and celebrate the lifetime work of these special men.
Friday, October 24, 2014 В‡11:30 AM
St. Mary’s Cathedral in San Francisco
1010 Howard Avenue
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650) 342-0924
Limited Seats Available В‡ Tickets at $125 each
For me information, please call (415) 614-5580 or email at [email protected]
4 ON THE STREET WHERE YOU LIVE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
New hats, familiar
faces at Mercy,
Burlingame
TOM BURKE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Students, as well as the wider Mercy High
School, Burlingame community,
have known Natalie Cirigliano
and Lauren Conklin for some
time. Natalie is now in her п¬Ѓfth
year at Mercy having served in
roles including chair of the History Department. Lauren signed
on as dean of the English Department in 2012.
New jobs for both are part of
Natalie
the new school year: Natalie
Cirigliano
is now assistant principal for
student life and Lauren assistant
principal for academics. I spoke
with both women via email.
Natalie is a Mercy alumna and
class valedictorian as well as a
graduate of neighboring St. Catherine of Siena School.“I went into
education because I wanted to
make a difference,” Natalie told
me. “I wanted to instill a passion
Lauren Conklin
for learning in teenagers.”
A call from her old grade school to join the
faculty there was Natalie’s “sign from God” that
teaching was for her.
“I love my role as assistant principal for student
life,” Natalie said. One thing she likes is that it
puts her at the table for creating “new programs
according to student needs and wants.”
Natalie’s new job puts her, too, at the table for
the school’s disciplinary program.
“I believe that many students are made to feel
bad about mistakes they make along the way,” she
said. “It is my ultimate goal that every student
who leaves my office after a difficult conversation
feels supported and encouraged. All I want is for
my students to learn from their mistakes and to
learn to be good people who will positively influence others.” “Giving your child the gift of a Catholic education is one of the greatest things you can give
your child, and one that continues to give their
entire life. I will forever be thankful to my parents
for investing in the Catholic school system and
me!”
Lauren Conklin said she “felt completely at
home at Mercy, Burlingame” right on arrival.
“The hospitality and family-like atmosphere at
Mercy are one-of-a-kind,” she said.
Lauren started her career after college as a
journalist. Covering stories on family life and
education pushed her to consider teaching. “Each
summer I volunteered at journalism camps at
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ALL IN: Students from Sacred Heart Cathedral Preparatory visited Jesuit Father Greg Boyle’s Homeboy Industries in July. Homeboy
includes businesses from bakeries to a plumbing company where employees are former gang members. The group’s schedule included
training in the Homeboy program, meals at the Homegirl CafГ©, and attending Mass daily. Father Greg was social justice assembly speaker
at SHC last year. His “Tattoos on the Heart” was last year’s all-school book. Pictured in LA are, back from left, Julia Rinaldi, SHC faculty;
Noelle Petersen; John Albach , Archbishop Riordan High School faculty; SHC senior Shay McWeeny; Gloria Cortez; SHC juniors Sidney
McKenzie and Ellie Zavala. Front from left, Father Greg; SHC juniors Emiliano Salazer and Maya Redlinger.
English and journalism and has been an invited
presenter several times at conferences of the National Journalism Education Association.
Lauren has also been a freelance journalist,
feature writer, and reporter in her home state of Illinois and fulfilled “a life-long dream” as a stringer
for the Chicago Tribune.
Karen Hanrahan who was named Mercy
president in 2013 and at that time introduced in
Catholic San Francisco now has the title head of
school.
CIAO DOWN: Next date for the pasta lunch at Immaculate
Conception Church, 3255 Folsom St. off Cesar Chavez, is Oct. 15 at
noon. All the great, pasta, meatballs and salad you can eat for $9.
The meal and the experience are both family style as well as fun.
Pictured from left at a recent lunch are Konrad von Emster, retired
Father Frank Murray, and retired Immaculate Conception pastor,
Franciscan Father Guglielmo Lauriola who has been on hand to say
“Hi” and “thanks” to diners for years too many to count.
my alma mater, and I realized that working with
students was my calling,” Lauren said.
Lauren has extensive teaching experience in
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This is a secured line and is answered only
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If you wish to speak to a non-archdiocesan
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CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Catholic San Francisco (ISSN 15255298) is published (three times per
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June, July, August (twice a month) and four times in October by
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9 DAYS: A novena to St. Jude will be prayed Oct.
20-28 at St. Dominic Church, St. Jude shrine, 2390
Bush St. at Steiner, San Francisco. Masses, rosary
and blessing with the St. Jude relic at all liturgies.
This year’s novena pilgrimage from Daly City to
St. Dominic’s is Oct. 25 and ends with a Mass with
Bishop William J. Justice as principal celebrant;
www.stjude-shrine.org; [email protected];
(415) 931-5919; (415) 333-8730.
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ARCHDIOCESE 5
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
Cathedral hosts special day for women to study St. Edith Stein
Endow stands for Educating on the Nature and
Dignity of Women and is an educational program
of prayer and study for Catholic women.
Endow speaker Eileen Love will lead the “Endow
in a Day” seminar. She travels the country speaking about the “new feminism” of St. John Paul II,
promoting Endow and training women to lead their
own Endow study groups.
The daylong Oct. 25 event will be structured
around the eight-chapter Endow biography on
Edith Stein. Since it is designed to be studied in a
small group setting over eight to 10 weeks, Love
said “Endow in a Day” will introduce main themes.
“We are going to kind of turbocharge through it
and introduce some of the points about Edith Stein
that really resonate with women,” Love said.
Prior to joining Endow, Eileen worked as aВ parish director of religious formation and was a
featured columnist in the Denver Catholic Register
from 1994-2000. She holds certification as a master
catechist, is a 1994 graduate of the Catholic Biblical
School, and has her master’s degree in theological
VALERIE SCHMALZ
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
The Archdiocese of San Francisco presents “Endow in a Day seminar: Edith Stein,
seeker of truth” on Oct. 25 at St.
Mary’s Cathedral. The cost is $35
and includes lunch.
Edith Stein, also known as St.
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, was
a German Jewish philosopher who
converted to Catholicism, became
a Carmelite nun and was martyred
St. Edith Stein
in the Auschwitz concentration
camp during World War II.
In remarks on the beatification Edith Stein in Cologne, Germany, in 1987, St. John Paul II said, “We bow
down before the testimony of the life and death of Edith
Stein, an outstanding daughter of Israel and at the same
time a daughter of the Carmelite Order, Sister Teresa
Benedicta of the Cross, a personality who united within
her rich life a dramatic synthesis of our century.”
University and Hastings Law School. He was appointed to the bench in 2005 by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. He and his wife, Veronique, live in Marin County
and are the parents of four children.
Isabelle Ord, St. Thomas More Society president,
said Siggins “embodies the mission of our society and
has made significant contributions to our community
through serving as a Catholic attorney while affirming a higher calling through faithful instruction and
example.”
Fellow jurist Martin L. Jenkins said Siggin’s “commitment to family, faith and community reflect the
values most evident in the life of St. Thomas More.”
The Red Mass is a centuries-old tradition where judges, attorneys, and others in the legal profession pray
for inspiration from the Holy Spirit. Red vestments
worn at the Mass have given the liturgy its name.
ARCHBISHOP TO CELEBRATE ANNUAL
RED MASS FOR LEGAL PROFESSION
Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone will be principal
celebrant of the annual Red Mass
Oct. 23, 5:30 p.m., Sts. Peter and Paul
Church, San Francisco. Justice Peter
J. Siggins of the California Court of
Appeal will be honored with the St.
Thomas More Society of San Francisco’s St. Thomas More Award.
Msgr. Peter Vaghi, a priest of the
Archdiocese of Washington and an
Justice Peter
attorney is homilist at the Mass. He
J. Siggins
is pastor of Little Flower Parish in
Bethesda, Maryland. Msgr. Vaghi
and Archbishop Cordileone know each other from
days when both were studying or serving in Rome.
Justice Siggins is a 1973 graduate of St. Ignatius College Preparatory, San Francisco, Loyola Marymount
studies.В EileenВ and her husband Mike have four
sons.
To register, visit endowgroups.org/calendar. For more
information contact Ed Hopfner, director of the archdiocesan Office of Marriage and Family Life at hopfnere@
sfarchdiocese.org.
Girl’s Volleyball
Club Tryouts Nov. 1st
(Girls ages 10-17)
Pre-Tryout October Clinics
(Sundays – October 12, 19 and 26)
5:30-7:00 PM 11; 12; and 13 year olds
7:15-8:45 PM 14; 15 and 16 year olds
Paye’s Place, 595 Industrial Rd.
San Carlos, Ca 94070
Call:
888.616.6349
Email:
brian@
elitevolleyballclub.net
www.elitevolleyballclub.net
Visit www.stthomasmore-sf.org.
St. Anthony’s Relics Visit
Northern California
From October 26 to November 2
St. Anthony will be visiting us in the form of two precious relics
from his Basilica in Padua, Italy. The relics will be accompanied by
Fr. Mario Conte OFM Conv. from the Messenger of St. Anthony.
A Messenger of Hope from padua, italy
San Francisco - San Pablo
Santa Clara - San Bruno
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26
St. Thomas More Church
1300 Junipero Serra Blvd. in San Francisco
8 AM, 10 AM, 11:45 AM,
8 PM masses with veneration
MONDAY, OCTOBER 27
St. Paul’s Church
1845 Church Lane in San Pablo
7:30 AM mass, veneration all day, 7 PM mass
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28
Cathedral of St. Mary of the
Assumption
1111 Gough St. in San Francisco
12:10 PM and 6 PM masses with veneration
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29
St. Dominic’s Church
2390 Bush St. in San Francisco
5:30 PM and 7:30 PM masses with veneration
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30
St. Anne of the Sunset
850 Judah St. in San Francisco
12 PM and 6 PM masses with veneration
Read the latest Catholic world and national news at catholic-sf.org.
The Veneration Events are sponsored by the
Please visit our website at www.saintanthonyofpadua.net
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31
National Shrine of St. Francis of Assisi
610 Vallejo St. in San Francisco
12:15 PM mass with veneration until 7 PM
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1
St. Paul of the Shipwreck
1122 Jamestown Ave. in San Francisco
12:30 PM mass with veneration
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Our Lady of Peace
2800 Mission College Blvd. in Santa Clara
5:00 PM and 7:30
PM Vigil Masses with veneration
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2
Saint Bruno Church
555 West San Bruno Ave. in San Bruno
8 AM, 10 AM, 12 Noon and
6 PM masses with veneration
FOR MORE INFORMATION
PLEASE CONTACT
Anthonian Association of the Friends
of St. Anthony - TEL: 347 738 4306
6 ARCHDIOCESE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
Chinese Catholics have new website, renewed ministry
VALERIE SCHMALZ
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Chinese Catholics in the Bay Area are feeling the
energy.
Last week the new and п¬Ѓrst San
Francisco archdiocesan Chinese
Catholic website– sfcatholicchinese.
com– went live, with audio and
video, Mass times, audio of homilies
in Mandarin, and Scripture readings. The new director of Chinese
Catholic ministry Father Peter Zhai
worked on the Chinese language
website “day and night, probably for
Father Peter
a week,” he said.
Zhai
That is just the latest of many
projects for Father Zhai, a member of the Society
of the Divine Word who grew up in mainland China
with parents so passionately Catholic that four of
their six children entered religious life. Two of Father
Zhai’s sisters are religious in the People’s Republic of
China and a brother was recently ordained a Jesuit
priest in the Philippines.
Father Zhai came to this country in 1997 as a seminarian with the Society of the Divine Word and lived
in Chicago and the Archdiocese of Los Angeles before
moving here.
For Father Zhai, who became director of Chinese
ministry in February, it’s all about evangelization. He
is reaching out to every age group, but is particularly
focused on the young. And he is using multiple forms
of communication. In addition to the website, there
(PHOTO COURTESY ARCHDIOCESAN CHINESE MINISTRY)
The mid-Peninsula Chinese-Catholic community celebrated its 13th anniversary at St. Matthew Parish in San Mateo on Sept. 13.
CHINESE MINISTRY EVENTS
NOV. 22: Young adult evening of prayer, St. Anne
of the Sunset Parish, San Francisco
DEC. 13: Retreat, St. Matthew Parish, San Mateo
DEC. 24: Christmas Eve Mass, St. Anne Parish,
for the entire Chinese community, beginning at
7:30 p.m. with Christmas carols and followed by
8 p.m. Mass
is a new quarterly newsletter Catholic Chinese Community Newsletter, and of course the Facebook page,
11th Annual Pilgrimage for
Saint Jude Thaddeus
Saturday October 25, 2014
Location: Walk starts at 9:15 am from Our Lady of
Perpetual Help Church, 60 Wellington Ave., Daly City; and
ends at 1:00 pm approx. at St. Dominic’s Church (Home of
the Shrine of Saint Jude), 2390 Bush St., San Francisco.
Transportation: Buses will be running from St. Dominic’s
Church to O.L. of Perpetual Help Church from 6:30 am to
8:30 am only.
Parking: Available at St. Dominic’s Church parking lot.
Route: Exiting O.L. of Perpetual Help Church, start walking
towards Mission St. Turn right on Mission St., right on 14th
Street. Turn left on South Van Ness Ave. to Van Ness Ave.,
left on Pine St. and left on Steiner St. (Approx. 8 miles).
Bilingual Solemn Mass: 1:30 pm - St. Dominic’s Church.
Most Rev. William J. Justice, Auxiliary Bishop
Archdiocese of San Francisco
For more Information:
Shrine of Saint Jude Office
(415) 931-5919
Mon-Fri 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
E-mail: [email protected]
www.stjude-shrine.org
Jaime or Rosa Pinto: (415) 333-8730
facebook.com/ccinsf as well as the ongoing radio
show Cross Radio, a Cantonese language radio show
п¬Ѓrst begun in the 1990s.
Youth are a big focus for Father Zhai.
In August, about 100 Chinese young adults turned
out for a picnic organized by Chinese Catholic Ministry and it was so successful that there will be a young
adult evening of prayer Nov. 22 at St. Anne of the
Sunset. The Chinese Legion of Mary just started in
San Francisco and the Chinese Legion of Mary at St.
Matthew’s recently celebrated 500 meetings after 10
years of existence, he said.
Father Zhai is tickled that close to 20 people have
signed up for Chinese Rite of Christian Initiation,
to enter or become full members of the Catholic
Church. Classes began two weeks ago and will culminate at Easter Vigil. “Once they come in, they don’t
want to leave – everyone feels so much welcome,”
Father Zhai said, crediting the RCIA teams at St. Matthew and St. Anne.
Chinese New Year celebrations will be revamped
this year – the centerpiece will be a Chinese New Year
Mass celebrated by San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone at St. Mary’s Cathedral on Feb. 21,
with the official Catholic Chinese New Year banquet
following in the hall below the cathedral church.
“The Mass is the most important,” part of the
Chinese New Year’s celebration and that’s why the
banquet will be held at the cathedral as well, Father
Zhai said. Chinese and non-Chinese come from all
over for the event, which in the past has been held
at a Chinatown restaurant. By hosting the banquet
in conjunction with the Chinese New Year’s Mass,
Father Zhai hopes to reach out with the good news of
the Catholic faith to those who would otherwise not
hear its truth or feel its warmth and energy, he said.
“It’s an opportunity to evangelize,” Father Zhai said.
SCRIPTURE SEARCH
Gospel for October 12, 2014
Matthew 22:1-14
Following is a word search based on the Gospel
reading for the 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle
A: a strange wedding feast. The words can be found
in all directions in the puzzle.
JESUS
WEDDING
BUSINESS
TROOPS
STREETS
GUESTS
DARKNESS
KINDGOM
INVITED
MISTREATED
MURDERERS
GATHERED
FRIEND
TEETH
A KING
PREPARED
ENRAGED
BURNED
FOUND
BIND
MANY
NOT WORTHY
B
B
U
R
N
E
D
N
E
I
R
F
B
M
A
N
Y
K
I
N
G
D
O
M
I
U
I
S
S
E
N
I
S
U
B
J
N
R
N
S
D
A
R
K
N
E
S
S
D
D
V
A
T
I
T
D
A
N
A
W
E
E
I
S
T
R
E
E
T
S
J
E
R
R
T
L
P
R
E
P
A
R
E
D
D
E
E
E
L
E
A
T
A
J
O
S
H
R
D
H
D
C
H
O
T
A
U
I
T
S
T
D
E
G
A
R
N
E
S
N
A
A
K
I
N
G
L
W
K
F
D
G
G
U
E
S
T
S
P
O
O
R
T
X
В© 2014 Tri-C-A Publications www.tri-c-a-publications.com
Please be advised that the Shrine of St. Jude, as sponsor, will photograph and video record this event. The photographs or video recording may be used in St. Jude Shrine
publications and posted on their website, for educational and religious training purposes, and/or for other non-commercial uses. By participating in this event, participants are
deemed to have given their consent and approval to the St. Jude Shrine to use a photographic or digital likeness or reproduction of themselves and any minors in their custody or
control without further permission or notification.
Sponsored by DUGGAN’S SERRA MORTUARY
500 Westlake Avenue, Daly City
650-756-4500 в—Џ www.duggansserra.com
NATIONAL 7
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
Year of Consecrated Life events to help laity learn about religious
CAROL ZIMMERMANN
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
WASHINGTON – In an effort to
help lay Catholics gain a deeper understanding of religious life, priests,
brothers and women religious intend
to open their convents, monasteries,
abbeys and religious houses to the
public one day next February.
“If you’ve ever wondered what a
brother or religious sister does all
day, you will find out,” said Dominican Sister Marie Bernadette Thompson in announcing the open house
scheduled for Feb. 8, 2015.
The open house is just one of the
events for the upcoming Year of
Consecrated Life, which begins the
weekend of Nov. 29-30 – the first
Sunday of Advent is Nov. 30. It will
end Feb. 2, 2016, the World Day of
Consecrated life.
The special year dedicated to consecrated life was announced by Pope
Francis and is similar to previous
themed years announced by popes
such as Year of the Priest (2009-2010)
or Year of St. Paul. (2008-2009).
The year also marks the 50th anniversary of “Perfectae Caritatis,” a
decree on religious life, and “Lumen
Gentium,” the Second Vatican Council’s Dogmatic Constitution on the
Church. The purpose of the yearlong
celebration, according to a Vatican
statement, is to “make a grateful remembrance of the recent past” while
embracing “the future with hope.”
Bishop Michael F. Burbidge of
Raleigh, North Carolina, chairman
of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Clergy,
Consecrated Life and Vocations,
(CNS PHOTO/TYLER ORSBURN)
Dominican Sister Marie Bernadette Thompson, council coordinator for the Council of Major
Superiors of Women Religious, discusses initiatives focused on bringing together men and
women religious and families, during an Oct. 1 press conference in Washington.
announced the Year of Consecrated
Life events at an Oct. 1 news conference at the USCCB headquarters in
Washington.
He said the scheduled events will
provide an opportunity, especially
for young people, to see how men and
women religious live. He also urged
heads of religious orders to let his
committee know of activities they
are planning so they can be publicized.
Sister Thompson, council coordinator of the Council of Major Superiors
of Women Religious, said the purpose
of the open house gatherings will be
to provide people with an encounter
with men and women religious and
also an encounter with Christ.
Sister Marcia Allen, a member of
the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia, Kansas, and president-elect of
Leadership Conference of Women
Religious, said another initiative for
the upcoming year is called “Days
with Religious,” during which laypeople will have opportunities to join
men and women religious in works
of service throughout the summer
of 2015.
She said these opportunities, to
be announced locally, will not only
give laypeople the chance to “work
with us side by side” but will also
enable them to become aware of the
charisms of different orders.
Sister Allen said she hoped the
experience would be a “coming
together for the sake of the church’s
presence” in the modern world.
The third major initiative for the
year is a day of prayer scheduled
Sept. 13, 2015.
Prayers intentions, prayer cards, a
video on consecrated life and other
resources are available at: www.usccb.
org/beliefs-and-teachings/vocations/
consecrated-life/year-of-consecratedlife/index.cfm.
Shrine of St. Jude Thaddeus
DOMINICAN FRIARS
Solemn Novena in Honor of
ST. JUDE THADDEUS
October 20 – 28, 2014
Masses • Mon–Sat: 8:00 am & 5:30 pm; Sun: 11:30 am
(preceded by the Rosary; blessing with St. Jude relic)
Pilgrimage Walk • Sat, Oct. 25, 9:15 am–1:00 pm
from Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, 60 Wellington
Ave (at Mission St), Daly City, to St. Dominic’s
Church, 2390 Bush St. (at Steiner), San Francisco.
Bilingual Mass at 1:30 pm
Novena in St. Dominic’s Church – Plenty of Parking
Fr. Kieran Healy, O.P.
Novena Preacher
Send Novena petitions to: Shrine of St. Jude Thaddeus
Fr. Allen Duston, O.P.
P.O. Box 15368, San Francisco, CA 94115-0368
www.stjude-shrine.org (415)-931-5919
Notre Dame des Victoires
School Celebrates 90 Years!
Please join our
At SHC, curiosity drives the
path to student success.
Supported by SHC’s inclusive
community, our students explore
their passions to become leaders
in our ever-changing world.
WHERE WILL
YO U R C U R I O S I T Y
L E A D YO U ?
Find out at
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, November 1
9–11 am
z
1 0 5 5 E L L I S S T R E E T, S A N F R A N C I S C O , C A 9 4 1 0 9
Saturday, October 18, 2014
from 2 pm to 5 pm
Celebrating
90
Mass Honoring NDV Students
at 5:15 pm
19 2 4 - 2 014
Notre Dame des Victoires
659 Pine Street, San Francisco, CA
R S V P AT S H C P. E D U
S A C R E D H E A RT C AT H E D R A L P R E PA R ATO R Y
Open House Celebration
with School Tours
(415) 421-0069 | www.ndvsf.org
z
415.775.6626
8 NATIONAL
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
Catholic group launches alternative to health insurance
CAROL ZIMMERMANN
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
WASHINGTON – A Catholic group
is launching an alternative to health
insurance that enables people to pay
their medical expenses without being part of a health insurance plan
they feel compromises their religious
beliefs.
“We have to find new ways to protect
conscience rights in health care,” said
Mike O’Dea, one of the co-founders
of the new program, Christ Medicus
Foundation CURO. “Curo” is Latin for
care for, cure and heal.
The health sharing program, announced at the National Press Club
Oct. 2 as the п¬Ѓrst one in the United
States that is Catholic, is partnering
with Samaritan Ministries International, an evangelical health sharing
program that has been operating since
1994 and serves 120,000 members.
Under the Affordable Care Act,
health sharing ministries in existence
before 1999 are exempt from the federal
health care law’s individual mandate
requiring everyone to have insurance.
These types of groups, currently
serving more than 300,000 in the U.S.,
are founded on the biblical mandate of
believers sharing each other’s needs.
They receive no government funding
or grants and are not insurance companies. Members contribute monthly
KINDERGARTEN – 8th GRADE
OPEN HOUSE
Parents interested in Kindergarten – 8th grade for the current
OR 2015-2016 school year, join us for an Open House. Meet the
Principal and parents and see our teachers in action with a school
tour. Open Houses will begin at 8:30am. Come and join us for
Morning Prayer and Assembly at 8:00am for a feel of our
community. October 15, October 28, and November 13.
Please call (415) 648-2008 for a reservation.
299 Precita Ave. San Francisco, CA 94110
(close to Hwy 101 and 280) www.saicsf.org
�We have to find new ways
to protect conscience rights in
health care.’
MIKE O’DEA
Co-founder, Christ Medicus Foundation CURO
fees and submit their medical expenses
to the group.
David Wilson, the other co-founder
of Christ Medicus Foundation CURO,
based in Troy, Michigan, said the likely
candidates for this program are “people
who view their faith and religious liberty as very important.”
He described it as a good п¬Ѓt for the uninsured, self-employed and small-business owners. Members pay a monthly
fee, which varies for individuals, couples
and families and is spelled out on the
group’s website, http://cmfcuro.com.
Medical needs that cost less than $300
are not “shared among members” but
amounts from $300 to $250,000 per need
are. In circumstances with medical bills
exceeding the top amount, special arrangements can be made.
Applicants can pre-register for the
program on the website, but enrollment
does not begin until Dec. 15 and the program will be operational Jan. 1, 2015.
To qualify, potential members must be
professed Christians who attend church
services at least three times a month,
abstain from smoking, drug use and
sexual immorality, and limit alcohol
consumption. To enroll, candidates
must submit a signed letter from their
pastor attesting that they meet the
group’s criteria.
Wilson, the п¬Ѓrst to register for the
program, said its costs are significantly
less than health insurance premiums
and O’Dea concurred, noting recent
skyrocketing deductible payments.
When asked whether the program
would continue if the Affordable Care
Act were overturned, the resounding
answer was yes.
“With or without the Affordable Care
Act, we’re building on community,” said
Louis Brown, the program’s director.
He said the program reflected the new
evangelization going on in the Catholic
Church today, emphasizing preaching
the Gospel with words and actions and
being in solidarity with one another.
Wilson similarly indicated that this
new way of paying for health care was
opened up by disputes that Catholics, in
particular, had with the Affordable Care
Act, which he said “created an opportunity for us to practice our faith.”
A key aspect in the structure of this
program is its ecumenical base, Brown
added, stressing the importance of joining with Samaritan Ministries.
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NATIONAL 9
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
Court declines to review
marriage equality rulings
PATRICIA ZAPOR
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
WASHINGTON – Rulings that overturned state bans on same-sex marriage
in п¬Ѓve states will be allowed to take
effect, after the Supreme Court Oct. 6
declined to consider appeals of seven
lower court rulings that such prohibitions are unconstitutional.
Another half-dozen states in the same
appellate court jurisdictions also are
likely to begin allowing such marriages.
But the high court’s refusal to hear the
cases does not translate to a nationwide
mandate for all states to follow them.
The action effectively allows same-sex
marriages to begin in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin
as soon as lower courts lift temporary
stays that were imposed while appeals
went to the Supreme Court.
Six other states within the same three
federal circuit court jurisdictions would
fall under those appellate rulings and
likely also will begin allowing such
marriages, bringing to 30 the number
of states that allow same-sex couples to
wed.
The justices’ decision not to take up
any of the cases came as a surprise to
legal observers. The high court typically
does not take up cases with nationwide
implications unless there are conflicting
lower court rulings. But in each of the
seven marriage cases, both the winning
and losing sides had asked the court to
review the lower court decisions, to help
clarify the overall situation.
When the Supreme Court justices
consider whether to take a case, it
takes four votes to put an appeal on the
docket. Four justices dissented from the
2013 rulings that overturned the federal
Defense of Marriage Act, which defined
marriage as between one man and one
woman. After the U.S. v. Windsor rul-
FATHER GROESCHEL, BELOVED AUTHOR,
RETREAT MASTER AND PREACHER, DIES
TOTOWA, N.J– Father Benedict J.
Groeschel, who was
a founder of the
Franciscan Friars
of the Renewal, a
leading pro-life п¬Ѓgure
and popular author,
retreat master and
preacher, died Oct. 3 at
St. Joseph’s Home for
Father Benedict J. the elderly in Totowa
after a long illness. He
Groeschel
was 81.
“We are deeply saddened by the death
of Father Benedict. He was an example
to us all,” said Father John Paul Ouellette, who is also a Franciscan friar and
the order’s community servant.
ing, attorneys general in some states
declined to defend their bans on samesex marriage, while others vigorously
fought to keep them intact.
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th,
6th, 9th and 11th circuits all have samesex marriage cases on the docket. The
Supreme Court’s decision not to take
up the cases gives the appellate courts
little new information on which to base
their rulings, so it’s possible that a split
between circuits could still develop.
While supporters of laws allowing
same-sex marriage hailed the result of
the court’s decision to bypass the cases,
some opponents called on Congress to
act.
A statement from the chairmen of two
committees of the U.S. Conference of
Catholic Bishops said they were disappointed that the court didn’t take up the
cases.
“All of these state laws were democratically enacted, including most
by the direct vote of large majorities
within just the last decade,” said the
Oct. 6 statement from Bishop Richard J.
Malone of Buffalo, New York, chairman
of the Committee on Laity, Marriage,
Family Life and Youth, and Archbishop
Salvatore J. Cordileone of San Francisco, chairman of the Subcommittee for
the Promotion and Defense of Marriage.
“Millions of Americans had looked to
the court with hope that these unjust
judicial decisions might be reversed.”
“The Supreme Court’s action fails
to resolve immediately the injustice of
marriage redefinition, and therefore
should be of grave concern to our entire
nation,” the bishops said.
While Catholic teaching opposes discrimination against homosexuals, the
church holds that homosexual acts are
always immoral and that marriage can
only be a union between one man and
one woman.
“His fidelity and service to the church
and commitment to our Franciscan way
of life will have a tremendous impact for
generations to come,” he said in a statement released Oct. 4 by the order’s community office in the Bronx, New York.
“Father Benedict was a brother and a
father to everyone he encountered. In a
world often overwhelmed with darkness,
he was a man п¬Ѓlled with hope, a hope
that he shared with both the rich and
poor alike,” said an Oct. 3 statement by
Father Groeschel’s community. “His
love for others and deep desire to serve,
sent him among poor families who were
in need of assistance, young people trying to п¬Ѓnd their way, bishops faced with
challenging decisions, priests and religious in need of an encouraging word,
and the stranger who was far from God.”
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10 WORLD
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
Debate emerges on St. John Paul II’s early writings on social ethics
JONATHAN LUXMOORE
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
WARSAW, Poland – Less than six months after
St John Paul II was canonized, questions are being
raised about a book of lectures he penned as a young
priest in his Polish homeland.
The two-volume “Katolicka Etyka Spoleczna” (“The
Catholic Social Ethic”) has never been officially published. But it could, some observers said, affect interpretations of the future pope’s philosophical development, highlighting a youthful commitment to radical
change which sounded, at times, close to Marxism.
“The text certainly reveals how he viewed the
political realities of the early 1950s, as well as his
deep sensitivity to social issues,” said Msgr. Albert
Wierzbicki, director of the John Paul II Institute
at Poland’s Catholic University of Lublin. He said
it contained “a polemical dialogue with Marxism
that was courageous at the time, and which throws
important light on his later evaluation of such things
as liberation theology.”
“The Catholic Social Ethic” was bound in a cheap
underground edition of 300 copies at the request of
students at Krakow’s Jagiellonian University in 1953
and 1954, when other books on Catholic social teaching had been suppressed by Poland’s communist
rulers.
It provides no evidence that then-Father Karol
Wojtyla had any direct political affiliation. However,
it shows he had acquired, by his early 30s, a detailed
knowledge of Marxism and some empathy at least
with its strident critique of capitalism.
Concepts important in his later papal teachings,
such as “solidarity” and “moral victory,” make first
(CNS PHOTO)
Father Karol Wojtyla, the future Pope John Paul II, is pictured
reading in a kayak in this photo dated 1955.
appearances in the writings and have a sharp, passionate edge.
“The church is aware that the bourgeois mentality
and capitalism as a whole, with its materialist spirit,
acutely contradict the Gospel,” the young priest
wrote in one section.
“Class struggle should gain strength in proportion
to the resistance it faces from economically privileged classes,” he wrote.
“Jesus Christ showed many times that the realization of God’s kingdom on earth will not happen
without a struggle,” he continued. “According to the
Gospel assumptions followed by the church in all its
social teaching, the realization of social justice is one
of its elements.”
When the text’s existence was reported in Polish
newspapers in 2006, one national daily, Zycie Warszawy, accused the country’s Catholic Church of trying
to suppress it.
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The work was authenticated by Msgr. Andrzej
Szostek, a prominent ethicist, who told a May
2006 Lublin conference that Father Wojtyla had
used it to “formulate fundamental intuitions
concerning capitalism and Marxism.”
The John Paul II Institute, which oversees St.
John Paul’s pre-papal writings, ran extracts on
revolution and class struggle in its quarterly
journal, Etos, and also agreed to issue a full edition of the 511-page text with commentaries.
Msgr. Wierzbicki, institute director, said problems have since emerged.
For one thing, the pope was personally against
publishing the text. For another, a textual analysis suggested much of his material was borrowed from an earlier textbook by Father Jan
Piwowarczyk, a former Krakow seminary rector.
Yet much of the work is “original and important,” Msgr. Wierzbicki’s conceded.
“Given the huge interest in his thoughts and
teachings, we felt it should be published,” he
said. “But the fact that he used Piwowarczyk’s
textbook as his model has also made it hard
to define precisely how much is Wojtyla’s own
work.”
Not everyone agrees this should impede the
book’s publication, at least in his native Poland,
where most of St. John Paul’s other writings
have long since been made available.
In February, St. John Paul’s private notebooks
were published commercially, despite a request
in his final will that they should be burned, suggesting the late pontiff ’s personal wishes have
not always been treated as binding.
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WORLD 11
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
POPE: GLORIFY GOD BY BEING
HONEST ABOUT SINS HE FORGAVE
VATICAN CITY – Giving glory to God for what he
has done in one’s life means being
absolutely honest about one’s sins
and failures, Pope Francis said in a
morning homily.
“The practice of remembering
our histories is not very common.
We forget things; we live in the moment,” the pope said Oct. 7 during
his morning Mass in the Domus
Pope Francis
Sanctae Marthae where he lives.
“Each one of us has a story: a
story of grace, a story of sin, a story of journey,
many things,” he said. “And it’s good to pray with
our story,” to recognize our failures and how, despite
our sin and infidelity, God continues to seek us out,
call us back and offer his grace.
According to Vatican Radio, Pope Francis focused his remarks on the example of St. Paul in the
day’s reading from Galatians 1:13-24. The apostle
asks, “Why were we chosen? Why – he asked – am I
Christian and that person, who has not ever heard of
Jesus Christ, isn’t?”
Paul’s response, he said, is “it’s a grace, a grace
of love.” In the day’s reading, Paul is honest about
the fact that he had once persecuted Christians. The
pope said he proclaims the greatness of God by honestly describing what that grace had to overcome.
ENGLISH BISHOP RESIGNS, ADMITS AFFAIR WITH WOMAN
HOVE, England – An English Catholic bishop has
resigned after admitting that he has been “unfaithful
to his promises as a Catholic priest.”
Bishop Kieran Conry of Arundel and Brighton,
chairman of the Department of Evangelization and
Catechesis of the Bishops’ Conference of England
and Wales, said in a statement read in parishes of his
dioceses at Masses Sept. 27 and 28 that he would step
down “with immediate effect.”
The Vatican announced Oct. 4 that Pope Francis
accepted the resignation of Bishop Conry in conformity with Canon 401.2 of the Code of Canon Law,
which covers “ill health or some other grave cause.”
“I would like to reassure you that my actions were
not illegal and did not involve minors,” Bishop Conry
said in the statement.
ABUSE PANEL TO INCLUDE ANOTHER SURVIVOR
VATICAN CITY – A papal commission on child
protection will be expanding its nine-member panel
to include more experts and another survivor of
clerical abuse.
The Commission for the Protection of Minors,
which Pope Francis established last December, is
now awaiting the pope’s approval of members’ latest
efforts as they aim to lay out a pastoral approach to
helping victims and prevent future abuse.
Marie Collins, a commission member and survivor
of clerical abuse, told The Associated Press Oct. 6
that the specially appointed group has agreed on its
provisional statutes and п¬Ѓnalized a list of potential
new members, adding experts from other countries
and disciplines as well as including another survivor.
Currently the commission includes: U.S. Cardinal
Sean P. O’Malley of Boston, head of the commission;
U.S. Father Robert W. Oliver, commission secretary;
Collins and six, mostly European, experts in mental
health, civil and church law, and moral theology.
The group, which had its third meeting Oct. 4-5 at
the Vatican, is awaiting the pope’s final approval of
their proposals.
The pope, who has called for zero tolerance and
complete accountability for the “despicable” crime
of abuse, has said he wants the commission to help
the church develop better policies and procedures for
protecting minors.
Collins also told the AP that the commission has
created working groups that will focus on priestly
formation, accountability and reaching out to survivors.
Getting input from survivors is “essential” for an
appropriate, effective and compassionate response to
the crisis, said Mark Vincent Healy, one of six abuse
survivors who met Pope Francis at the Vatican in
July.
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PAID ADVERTISEMENT
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
OCTOBER 19, 2014
“I will build my church”
Every day dedicated missionaries live out these words as they reach out
in the name of Christ to communities, families and children in need.
… all of us committed to the worldwide Mission of Jesus
World Mission Sunday 2014
Dear Friends of the Missions,
October 19 – World Mission Sunday – is a special day for all of us who are called, by Baptism, to be
involved in the missionary work of the Church. On that Sunday, every nation, even the poorest mission
countries, contributes to the mission needs of the Church worldwide.
World Mission Sunday truly belongs to the world. It is celebrated in every country, in every diocese and in
every parish – in a remote chapel far out in the African bush, in a predominately Muslim or Hindu area in
Asia, in a poor village in Latin America. We are citizens of the world, members of the one Body of Christ,
and are at our best when we act lovingly and generously to our brothers and sisters in the Missions.
On October 19, with the World Mission Sunday theme “I will build my Church” (Mt 16:18), the Church
celebrates that we are “one family in mission.” I ask that you pray for the people of the Missions and for
missionaries. I ask also for your help, such as these examples of help provided to the young Church in
Mongolia, a Church that is being built:
PLEASE USE THE COUPON BELOW
A Sunday to Help the Whole World…
Your prayers and generous help on World Mission Sunday help the mission Church – places where there
is great zeal and enthusiasm for the faith but where schools can’t pay salaries, the parish halls can’t keep
the lights on, and where missionaries lack the means for transportation. Specifically, such help keeps
the following going day in and day out:
• 9,000 clinics caring for the sick and dying
• 10,000 orphanages, providing a place of safety and shelter
• 1,200 schools, educating children in some of the poorest parts of the world
• 80,000 seminarians preparing for the priesthood
• 9,000 religious Sisters and Brothers in formation programs
… all of these operating in 1,150 mission dioceses, where the poor receive an education and health care,
while experiencing the loving heart of our Lord through the service of priests, religious and lay faithful.
Yes, I want to support the Missions! Enclosed is my contribution of:
{ } $15.00 { } $25.00 { } $50.00 { } $75.00 { } $100.00 { } Other $ ___________
{ } Yes! I would like to become a mission benefactor.
While I can, I will support a missionary by my monthly sacrifice of $ _________
NAME:
ADDRESS:
•
$40.00 – supports the work of one catechist for a week
•
$80.00 – helps with educational resources at a center for street children
•
$110.00 – covers a week of English classes for 10 students at a Church-run center
VISA/MC: ACCOUNT NUMBER:
•
$430.00 – runs a medical outreach clinic for a day
AMOUNT:
PHONE:
EXPIRATION DATE:
*SIGNATURE (REQUIRED)
We are called in a special way to be missionaries through prayer and participation in the Eucharist,
and by giving generously. Whatever you can contribute to the collection through the Society for the
Propagation of the Faith will be a great blessing to local priests, religious and lay catechists throughout
Asia, Africa, the Pacific Islands, and parts of Europe and Latin America.
Please make check payable to: Society for the Propagation of the Faith
Asking the Lord to bless you for your generous missionary spirit.
A Pontifical Mission Society
Sincerely,
MISSIONARIES IN TRAINING
Genevieve Elizondo
Archdiocesan Director
CITY/STATE/ZIP:
As the school year is well underway, so too is the Missionary Childhood Association (MCA).
Students in our Catholic schools and parish religious education programs are invited and
encouraged to be co-missionaries, and to live the MCA motto of Children Helping Children.
Thanks again to all who participated last year, including the religious education programs of
Star of the Sea (SF) and St. Francis of Assisi (E. Palo Alto). Keep up the great work!
Send to: Archdiocese of San Francisco, 1 Peter Yorke Way, San Francisco, CA 94109
On behalf of our Missionaries worldwide, thank you for your support.
Please remember The Society for the Propagation of the Faith
when writing or changing your Will.
ARCHDIOCESAN MISSION OFFICE | Genevieve Elizondo – Director;
MCA Coordinator: Michael Gotuaco; Admin Assistant: Robert O’Connor
Phone: (415) 614-5670 | Email: [email protected]
13
14 OPINION
When God
says no,
he is testing us
W
hat do you do when God, your
friend and protector, suddenly
turns you down and says “no”?
A tragic event, such as a death, can
topple your childhood dreams about
a heavenly Father
who will help you
through the trials
and tribulations of
life. Deaths happen all the time.
However, when
someone you love
dies, even though
you pray and plea to
FATHER JOHN
save them, it can be
CATOIR
heart-wrenching.
The anger and
confusion that an
unwanted death unleashes can be devastating. You begin to doubt the very
existence of God. Ultimately, the experience will either lead you to a reluctant
acceptance of God’s will or a rejection of
his will.
We see examples of this in the Bible, in
those disillusioned that God, their protector, would allow others to enslave them,
and in those who remained faithful and
praised God for their subsequent liberation.
We hear of this when some question
why God would allow unthinkable atrocities such as the Holocaust to occur.
In the Bible, God reveals his answer
to such questions. A man named Job
had his world turned upside down by
numerous tragedies. One misfortune
after another devastated him, and yet he
remained steadfast in his faith. He put
on the will to honor God, no matter how
great the miseries of his life affected him.
In the end, God rewarded him for his
deep devotion.
Upon prayerful reflection of the Job
story, you may gain some perspective on
the simple concept: Life is a test.
We all have drama in our lives, things
that we can’t understand and sometimes
take out on God. I had my own drama
when I was in the seminary. My mother
was very sick, and I prayed incessantly
that God would heal her and let her live to
see me ordained.
Was that too much to ask?
I was confident that God would grant
my plea, but God did not answer. He took
her home two years before my ordination.
Needless to say, I was deeply shaken, not
because I needed motherly care. After all,
I had been on my own throughout my college years and in the Army. I was shaken
because I suddenly had serious doubts
about God as a helper and protector.
How could I go on as a priest if I could
not depend on God’s promise to help
when I needed it?
I began to doubt my vocation. Was God
really calling me to be a priest, or was it
all a п¬Ѓgment of my pious imagination?
In the weeks that followed, I endured a
state of distress and continued with my
classes, putting on as brave a front as I
could muster.
Then gradually, in a month or two, I began understanding the whole experience
as a test of faith. I thought about the fact
that my mother’s suffering, which had
lasted for many years, was at last over.
This was a good thing. I could see her sitting in a front-row seat, in heaven, on my
ordination day.
I began to realize that time does heal
and that God’s will takes into account the
suffering of others, not just the pain of
one person.
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
LETTERS
Keep up the battle
Re Special report on Faithful America, Sept. 12, 19, 26:
A million thanks for having the courage to publish
Valerie Schmalz’ superb expose of the millions of dollars that certain wealthy individuals are pouring out
to fund the attacks on the Catholic Church by rogue
groups pretending to be Catholics.
As one of your regular readers, I am accustomed to
Ms. Schmalz’ thorough researching of the facts in her
articles, but this series is obviously the result of a Herculean effort to ferret out the facts that the church’s
enemies would rather keep hidden. Those of us who
follow Santayana’s famous advice not to neglect the
study of history can easily recognize the familiar
tactic used by Lenin, Stalin, Hitler, Mao Tse-tung and
other tyrants: that of applying to their actions the terminology of the exact opposite of what they are really
doing: Socialist Republic, People’s Republic? Faithful
America indeed!
I don’t doubt for a second that your office is half buried under an avalanche of letters initiated by the internet appeal to thousands of the church’s enemies who
never read Catholic San Francisco, and I fully expect
that those millionaire organizers of the campaign will
soon be hiring a rent-a-mob to picket your office – if
they haven’t started already. After all, they can’t allow
freedom of speech to anyone who discloses the falsehoods they are promulgating! Imagine the damage to
their campaign if the truth were to get out!
I can’t recall how many decades have passed since
I last wrote a letter to an editor, but I want to applaud
your continuous publication of the truth, even when
it meets with outlandish resistance. I know a number
of Catholics who feel the same, even if they haven’t
gotten around to writing you a letter.
Please keep up the battle for the truth about the
church’s actual teachings.
Robert D. Griffin
San Francisco
The writer is a member of St. Anne of the Sunset Parish.
Great piece of journalism
I would like to commend Valerie Schmalz and Catholic San Francisco for a great piece of real journalism.
The article was well-researched, well-written and
clearly let us all know the work of principalities and
their agents. God bless Valerie and our archbishop. Remember, a few beads tied together and used for prayer
routs all evil. Let us continue to have prayer and sacrifice for the glory of Jesus at the center of our lives.
Deacon Dominick Peloso
Church of the Nativity
Menlo Park
Follow Pope Francis’ lead
Your article about Faithful America on Sept. 10
struck me as being a rant that boiled down to character assassination of the organization.
Your criticism of the Family Research Council being
labeled as a “hate group” makes me think that you
all might be as bigoted as the FRC is with their views
on homosexuality. The Southern Poverty Law Center
has classified the FRC as a hate group. Some of the
accusations the FRC has made about homosexuals are
blatant lies. They evidently don’t think the commandment “thou shalt not bear false witness” applies to
them.
Pope Francis’ attitude about homosexuals is a
welcome change from yours. Why don’t you all try to
follow Pope Francis’ lead?
Bill Butler
Evansville, Indiana
Mercy rather than severity
I found the special report painful and even hurtful
to read. I fear that the effect of these articles will only
be to push many people of good will even further away
from the church.
In my opinion these articles continue the culture
wars that are exhausting and demoralizing our
church. Without changing teaching Pope Francis has
clearly told us that the church has grown “obsessed”
with abortion, gay marriage and contraception and
that he chose not to talk about those issues despite
recriminations from critics. Francis indeed criticized
the church for putting dogma before love, and for
prioritizing moral doctrines over serving the poor
and marginalized. He has articulated his vision of an
inclusive church, as a “home for all” saying:
“It is not necessary to talk about these issues all the
time. The dogmatic and moral teachings of the church
are not all equivalent. The church’s pastoral ministry
cannot be obsessed with the transmission of a disjointed multitude of doctrines to be imposed insistently. We have to п¬Ѓnd a new balance, otherwise even
the moral edifice of the church is likely to fall like a
house of cards, losing the freshness and fragrance of
the Gospel.”
Francis’ new priorities are a deep challenge to all
of us as Catholics, whatever our positions on these or
any issues, indeed wherever we see ourselves within
the church. For Francis is truly radical in this sense, a
person who cannot be defined in the usual tired terms
of right and left, liberal and conservative.
Many faithful Catholics have told me they found
these articles alienating. Whether they are right or
wrong in this is almost beside the point. What is important is that their voices be heard and respected. Only
history and the Holy Spirit know the eventual significance of our present debates on these contested matters. It will take us as church a long time to study and
prayerfully discern some of these disputed matters.
What we do know however is that our moral teaching will continue to evolve, just as it has in the past.
Consider, if you will, how radically our teaching on
religious freedom has evolved, most especially at
Vatican II.
Francis is clearly saying we need to become a church
with fewer condemnations, one that more fully shows
the face of God’s mercy and love for all humans. With
Francis may we truly become “a church that knows
how to open her arms and welcome everybody, that
is not a house for the few, but a house for everybody,
where all can be renewed, transformed, sanctified by
his love, the strongest and the weakest, sinners, the
indifferent, those who feel discouraged or lost.”
Father Donal Godfrey, SJ
San Francisco
The writer is associate director for faculty and staff spirituality at the University of San Francisco.
Jesus welcomed the woman at the well
I am afraid that this is a classic case of denial:
blaming anti-Catholicism for a legitimate issue that
concerns many Catholics. When the pedophile scandal
п¬Ѓrst came out I, like everyone, thought it was vicious
lies told by people intent on hurting the church. But the
people speaking out turned out to be victims who were
hurting. And not listening to them when it п¬Ѓrst came
out and responding appropriately ended up doing far
more damage in the long run and alienating so many
people. Gay people are also hurting because of this
rejection. They don’t want to destroy the church; they
want to be included. This is an issue of shunning and
rejecting people who are asking to be respected and
to have a civil marriage so that they can take care of
their families and loved ones, a legitimate human need
and right. Civil marriages should not be a concern of
our church. And we, as Pope Francis has said, need to
embrace all who come to us as our brothers and sisters.
By the way I am very happily married in the church.
Carolyn Coughlin
Half Moon Bay
Enlarging the tent
I’m sorry you chose to take up so much time and
material resources to target one group of struggling
Catholics: gays and lesbians. The articles and action
further reinforce the culture wars.
Perhaps a more beneficial approach is to create dialogue and enlarge the tent for believers. It may help the
long-term sustainability of the church infrastructure.
After a prayerful, reflective process to determine an
appropriate response and action, I have decided to go
on record with this email and no longer contribute to
the archdiocesan annual appeal.
I will reconsider my annual appeal contribution
once the archdiocesan leadership demonstrates
through thought, word and deed that “all are welcome!”
Prayerfully,
Tom Matty
San Francisco
The writer is a member of St. Agnes Parish.
LETTERS POLICY
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OPINION 15
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
Sacred permission to be human
S
ometimes certain texts in the
Bible make you wonder: Is this
really the word of God? Why is
this text in scripture? What’s the lesson here?
For example,
we have verses
in the Psalms,
in passages
that we pray
liturgically,
where we ask
God to bash
the heads of
the children of
our enemies
FATHER RON
against a rock.
ROLHEISER
How does that
invite us to
love our enemies? We see passages in the Book
of Job where Job is in despair and
curses not on only the day he was
born but the very fact that anyone
was born. It’s impossible to find even
a trace of anything positive in his lament. Similarly, in a rather famous
text, we hear Qoheleth affirm that
everything in our lives and in the
life of this world is simple vanity,
wind, vapor, of no substance and of
no consequence. What’s the lesson here? Then, in the Gospels, we
have passages where the apostles,
discouraged by opposition to their
message, ask Jesus to call down
п¬Ѓre and destroy the very people to
W
whom they are supposed to minister.
Hardly an exemplar for ministry!
Why are these texts in the Bible?
Because they give us sacred permission to feel the way we feel
sometimes and they give us sacred
tools to help us deal with the shortcomings and frustrations of our
lives. They are, in fact, both very
important and very consoling texts
because, to put it metaphorically,
they give us a large enough keyboard to play all the songs that we
need to play in our lives. They give
us the laments and the prayers we
need to utter sometimes in the face
of our human condition, with its
many frustrations, and in the face of
death, tragedy and depression.
To give a simple example: A friend
of mine shares this story: Recently
he was in church with his family,
which included his seven year-old
son, Michael, and his own mother,
Michael’s grandmother. At one
point, Michael, seated beside his
grandmother, whispered aloud: “I’m
so bored!” His grandmother pinched
him and chided him: “You are not
bored!” as if the sacred ambience of
church and an authoritative command could change human nature.
They can’t. When we’re bored, we’re
bored! And sometimes we need to be
given divine permission to feel what
we’re spontaneously feeling.
Some years ago, for all the noblest
of intentions, a religious community I know wanted to sanitize the
Psalms that they pray regularly in
the Divine Office to rid them of all
elements of anger, violence, vengeance, and war. They had some of
their own Scripture scholars do the
work so that it would be scholarly
and serious. They succeeded in
that, the product was scholarly and
serious, but stripped of all motifs of
violence, vengeance, anger, and war
what resulted was something that
looked more like a Hallmark card
than a series of prayers that express
real life and real feelings. We don’t
always feel upbeat, generous and
faith-п¬Ѓlled. Sometimes we feel angry,
bitter, and vengeful. We need to be
given sacred permission to feel that
way (though not to act that way) and
to pray in honesty out of that space.
My parents, and for the most part
their whole generation, would, daily,
in their prayers, utter these words:
To you do we send up our sighs,
mourning and weeping in this valley
of tears. Our own generation tends
to view this as morbid, as somehow
denigrating both the beauty and
joy of life and the perspective that
faith is meant to give us. But there’s
a hidden richness in that prayer. In
praying in that way, they gave themselves sacred permission to accept
the limits of their lives. That prayer
carries the symbolic tools to handle
frustration; something, I submit,
we have failed to sufficiently give to
our own children. Too many young
people today have never been given
the symbolic tools to handle frustration, nor sacred permission to feel
what they are feeling. Sometimes,
all good intentions aside, we have
handed our children more of Walt
Disney than Gospel.
In the Book of Lamentations we
п¬Ѓnd a passage that while sounding
negative on the surface, is paradoxically, in the face of death and tragedy, perhaps the most consoling text
of all. The text simply states that,
sometimes in life, all we can do is
put our mouths to the dust and wait!
That’s sound advice, spoken from
the mouth of experience and the
mouth of faith.
The poet Rainer Marie Rilke once
wrote these words to a friend who, in
the face of the death of a loved one,
wondered how or where he could
ever п¬Ѓnd consolation. What do I do
with all this grief ? Rilke’s reply:
“Do not be afraid to suffer, give that
heaviness back to the weight of the
earth; mountains are heavy, seas are
heavy.” They are, so too is life sometimes and we need to be given God’s
permission to feel that heaviness.
OBLATE FATHER ROLHEISER is president of the
Oblate School of Theology, San Antonio,
Texas.
Bombing Islamic State is fueling the violence
e need to do something!
With the barbaric Islamic
State now controlling large
portions of Iraq and Syria, and
inflicting rape,
torture and
even beheading
on those who
do not conform
to their fundamentalist
interpretation
of Islam, it is
imperative that
they must be
stopped.
TONY MAGLIANO
So yes, we
need to do
something. But that “something” is
not more violence and war. Answering violence and war, with more violence and war, is always part of the
problem, not part of the solution.
Shortly after the start of the п¬Ѓrst
Gulf War in 1991, St. John Paul II
wrote: “No, never again, war, which
destroys the lives of innocent people,
teaches how to kill, throws into upheaval even the lives of those who do
the killing and leaves behind a trail of
resentment and hatred, thus making
it all the more difficult to п¬Ѓnd a just
solution to the very problems which
provoked the war.”
There is a collective amnesia that
continues to block government and
society’s memory that we have been
there, and done that, many times
before. Therefore, the war machine
keeps rolling on with the encouragement of hawkish politicians, pundits
and the military-industrial complex.
During a “Democracy Now” interview with Rami Khouri, director of
the Issam Fares Institute for Public
Policy and International Affairs at the
American University of Beirut, Khouri said the major problems that lead to
the formation and growth of militant
CATHOLIC VOICES ON USE OF FORCE
AGAINST MIDEAST EXTREMIST VIOLENCE
JESUIT FATHER ZIAD HILAL, PASTOR OF HOLY SAVIOR PARISH IN
HOMS, SYRIA, and project manager
for Jesuit Refugee Service: “Things
will get worse” if the U.S.-led coalition
continues to bombard Syria.
CARL HETU, CATHOLIC NEAR
EAST WELFARE ASSOCIATION
CANADA national director: Even if
the Islamic State is expelled, civil war
could result unless the Shiites, Sunnis
and Kurds are able to work under a
strong government. “The problem is
not military, it is political.”
(CNS PHOTO/RODI SAID, REUTERS)
Displaced people fleeing violence in Iraq walk toward the Syrian border town of Elierbeh in
this Aug.11 file photo. Pope Francis opened a three-day summit Oct. 2 on the violence and
persecution underway in the Middle East, saying arms trafficking was the root cause of many
problems in the region.
Islamic groups like the Islamic State,
are brutal dictators – often backed by
the United States – who rule much of
the Arab Islamic world, and a foreign
military presence like the U.S. in Muslim majority countries.
Khouri said American led military
action in the Islamic world is the best
recruiting tool for al-Qaida and the
Islamic State.
And it stands to reason. Imagine
how most people would react – including many Christians – to a foreign
power bombing and killing their
loved ones.
So, what would be a Gospel-based
way of responding to this violent
crisis?
The Gospel calls us to mount an
active response to suffering based on
love and nonviolence. This means no
bombs, no drones, no missiles.
The U.S. and other arms supplying
nations need to stop flooding the Middle East (and world) with weapons.
A total multilateral arms embargo is
needed.
And the diplomatic tool must be
vigorously pursued.
Yes, negotiations with the Islamic
State are highly unlikely. But negotiating just settlements to the grievances of hurting populations in Iraq
and Syria will dry up support for
the Islamic State and other militant
groups.
The U.S. and other wealthy nations
need to provide adequate resources
for the quick evacuation of Christians and other minorities who are in
harm’s way.
And funds and supplies need to be
VATICAN SUMMIT ON THE PLIGHT
OF MIDEAST CHRISTIANS, Oct.
2-4: “One cannot be silent, nor (can) the
international community remain inactive,
in the face of the massacre of persons.”
… “The activity of some extremist groups
is a cause of grave concern, particularly
the so-called �Islamic State,’ whose violence cannot be met with indifference.”
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE REPORTS
massively increased to assist nations
– like Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey –
that are being overwhelmed by Iraqi
and Syrian refugees.
Finally, the U.S. and other industrial nations need to do their fair
share in offering emergency asylum
to these poor, frightened refugees.
It would do us all well to seriously
reflect on the words of Pope Francis:
“War is never a necessity, nor is it inevitable. Another way can always be
found: the way of dialogue, encounter
and the sincere search for truth.”
MAGLIANO is a syndicated social justice
and peace columnist.
16 FAITH
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
SUNDAY READINGS
Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time
�The kingdom of heaven may be likened to a king who gave a wedding feast for his son. …’
MATTHEW 22:1-14
ISAIAH 25:6-10A
On this mountain the Lord of hosts will provide for all peoples a feast of rich food and choice
wines, juicy, rich food and pure, choice wines. On
this mountain he will destroy the veil that veils all
peoples, the web that is woven over all nations; he
will destroy death forever. The Lord God will wipe
away the tears from every face; the reproach of his
people he will remove from the whole earth; for the
Lord has spoken. On that day it will be said: “Behold our God, to whom we looked to save us! This is
the Lord for whom we looked; let us rejoice and be
glad that he has saved us!” For the hand of the Lord
will rest on this mountain.
PSALM 23:1-3A, 3B-4, 5, 6
I shall live in the house of the Lord all the
days of my life.
The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. In
verdant pastures he gives me repose; beside restful
waters he leads me;
he refreshes my soul.
I shall live in the house of the Lord all the
days of my life.
He guides me in right paths for his name’s sake.
Even though I walk in the dark valley I fear no evil;
for you are at my side with your rod and your staff
that give me courage.
“T
I shall live in the house of the Lord all the
days of my life.
You spread the table before me in the sight of my
foes; you anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows.
I shall live in the house of the Lord all the
days of my life.
Only goodness and kindness follow me all the
days of my life; and I shall dwell in the house of the
Lord for years to come.
I shall live in the house of the Lord all the
days of my life.
PHILIPPIANS 4:12-14, 19-20
Brothers and sisters: I know how to live in
humble circumstances; I know also how to live with
abundance. In every circumstance and in all things
I have learned the secret of being well fed and of
going hungry, of living in abundance and of being
in need. I can do all things in him who strengthens
me. Still, it was kind of you to share in my distress.
My God will fully supply whatever you need, in
accord with his glorious riches in Christ Jesus. To
our God and Father, glory forever and ever. Amen.
MATTHEW 22:1-14
Jesus again in reply spoke to the chief priests
and elders of the people in parables, saying, “The
kingdom of heaven may be likened to a king who
gave a wedding feast for his son. He dispatched
his servants to summon the invited guests to the
feast, but they refused to come. A second time he
sent other servants, saying, �Tell those invited:
“Behold, I have prepared my banquet, my calves
and fattened cattle are killed, and everything is
ready; come to the feast.”’ Some ignored the invitation and went away, one to his farm, another to
his business. The rest laid hold of his servants,
mistreated them, and killed them. The king was
enraged and sent his troops, destroyed those murderers, and burned their city. Then he said to his
servants, �The feast is ready, but those who were
invited were not worthy to come. Go out, therefore, into the main roads and invite to the feast
whomever you find.’ The servants went out into
the streets and gathered all they found, bad and
good alike, and the hall was п¬Ѓlled with guests. But
when the king came in to meet the guests, he saw
a man there not dressed in a wedding garment.
The king said to him, �My friend, how is it that you
came in here without a wedding garment?’ But he
was reduced to silence. Then the king said to his
attendants, �Bind his hands and feet, and cast him
into the darkness outside, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth.’ Many are invited, but
few are chosen.”
Inviting all to the banquet
he Lord of the Rings” author J.R.R. Tolkien says, “If more of us valued food and
cheer and song above hoarded gold, it
would be a merrier world.” Similar sentiments
have been echoed by others. “One cannot think well,
love well, sleep well, if one
has not dined well” (Virginia Woolf ). “People who
love to eat are always the
best people” (Julia Child).
“I can’t stand people who
do not take food seriously”
(Oscar Wilde). “Laughter is
brightest in the place where
the food is” (Irish proverb).
Food is connected with
everything we cherish as
beautiful and noble in life.
Family is best at the dining table. Friendships are
FATHER CHARLES
nourished around food.
PUTHOTA
Forgiveness can be best celebrated over a meal. Enmity
can be ended in food. In death, life is celebrated
by sharing food. Mourning and grief are brought
to an end by families and communities eating
together. Eating is the way to connect with people.
We can show love and affection by breaking bread
together.
SCRIPTURE
REFLECTION
POPE FRANCIS
SALVATION COMES FROM JESUS, NOT DIY RULES
Jesus, with his gift of mercy, is the source
of salvation, not commandments made by
people, Pope Francis said. God’s only wish
is to save humanity, but people often want
to decide the rules for salvation themselves,
the pope said in a morning homily Oct. 3. Jesus, just like the prophets before him, faced
resistance by the people and even death
because their message “ended up being
inconvenient” or uncomfortable, he said.
Such delicious blessings flowing from food are
celebrated by movies. Among them are “Julie and
Julia,” “Chocolat,” “The Hundred-Foot Journey,”
“Mostly Martha,” “Big Night,” “Tortilla Soup,”
“Haute Cuisine,” “Eat Drink Man Woman,” and
“Chef.” There is one film that tops the list for
celebration of extravagant generosity, incredible
self-denial, and exquisite cuisine, “Babette’s Feast.”
The story is reminiscent of the eucharistic meal as
well the ultimate messianic banquet.
The oracle of Isaiah evokes the Messianic age in
terms of “a feast of rich food and choice wines.” At
this banquet on the Lord’s mountain, God will wipe
away all tears and destroy death forever. There will
be no more pain, no more sorrow. It’s said that a
7-year-old girl came up with her version of John
3:16: “God so loved the world that he gave his only
son that whosoever believeth in him should not
perish but have ever-laughing life.” Over a banquet,
ever-laughing life will be celebrated for everlasting
time.
This banquet is what Jesus calls the wedding
feast of the kingdom of God. A luxurious meal has
been prepared. The invited had said yes, but now
they say no. God makes sure to п¬Ѓll the banquet hall
with all the people who care to come. While the
chosen decline, the so-called sinners and tax collectors are eager to share the fullness of life and joy
that only Jesus can give.
The wedding garment implies a message to Mat-
thew’s Christian community that they are to live
up to the call of Christ continuously by embracing
love and service through concrete deeds. This is
the garment Paul encourages the Colossians to
wear: “Put on then, as God’s chosen ones, holy and
beloved, heartfelt compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience, bearing with one
another and forgiving one another … ; as the Lord
has forgiven you, so must you also do. And over all
these put on love, that is, the bond of perfection”
(3:12-14).
Shall we do some concrete things? Let us participate in the eucharistic meal which foreshadows
the Messianic banquet. We need more people at
Mass, and more young people too, and more who
are on time and until the end. We need more who
pay more attention to the word of God as they do to
the ritual. Creating the bond of unity and charity
at Mass, we can take this explosive experience to
set the world on п¬Ѓre. This meal inspires us to wear
the wedding garment always, which is not only
professing faith but also practicing it. How can
we eat this meal meaningfully without addressing the hunger, poverty, and misery of the world?
Let’s give them some food ourselves because “to a
hungry person, God comes in the form of bread”
(Gandhi).
FATHER PUTHOTA is pastor at St. Veronica Parish, South
San Francisco.
LITURGICAL CALENDAR, DAILY MASS READINGS
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13: Monday of the Twentyeighth Week in Ordinary Time. GAL 4:22-24,
26-27, 31-5:1. PS 113:1b-2, 3-4, 5a and 6-7. LK
11:29-32.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16: Thursday of the Twentyeighth Week in Ordinary Time. Optional Memorial of
St. Hedwig, religious; St. Margaret Mary Alacoque,
virgin. EPH 1:1-10. PS 98:1, 2-3ab, 3cd-4, 5-6. LK
11:47-54.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14: Tuesday of the Twentyeighth Week in Ordinary Time. Optional Memorial
of St. Callistus I, pope and martyr. GAL 5:1-6. PS
119:41, 43, 44, 45, 47, 48. LK 11:37-41.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17: Memorial of St. Ignatius of
Antioch, bishop and martyr. EPH 1:11-14. PS 33:1-2,
4-5, 12-13. LK 12:1-7.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15: Memorial of St. Teresa
of Avila, virgin and doctor. GAL 5:18-25. PS 1:1-2, 3,
4 and 6. LK 11:42-46.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18: Feast of St. Luke, Evangelist. 2 TM 4:10-17b. PS 145:10-11, 12-13, 17-18.
LK 10:1-9.
FROM THE FRONT 17
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
SYNOD: Speak fearlessly, listen humbly, pope urges
FROM PAGE 1
what one feels duty-bound in the Lord
to say: without respect for human
considerations, without fear. And, at
the same time, one must listen with
humility and welcome with an open
heart what the brothers say.”
The pope recalled that, after a
gathering of the world’s cardinals in
February, one cardinal told him others had hesitated to speak out for fear
of disagreeing with the pope.
“This is no good, this is not synodality,” the pope said.
Later in the morning, Cardinal
Erdo, who as the synod’s relator has
the task of guiding the discussion
and synthesizing its results, gave an
hourlong speech that drew on written
statements submitted in advance by
the synod fathers and on responses to
a well-publicized questionnaire sent
to the world’s bishops last November.
The Oct. 5-19 synod is not supposed
to reach definitive conclusions but set
the agenda for a larger world synod in
October 2015, which will make recommendations to the pope.
Cardinal Erdo said the synods
would seek to develop shared pastoral “guidelines to help those living
in difficult situations,” so that individual bishops would not resort to the
“improvisations of a do-it-yourself
ministry.”
“What is being discussed at this
synod of an intense pastoral nature
are not doctrinal issues, but the
practical ones, nevertheless inseparable from the truths of the faith,” the
cardinal said.
Among the difficult family situations he identified was that of divorced and civilly remarried Catholics, whose predicament Pope Francis
has said exemplifies a general need
for mercy in the church today.
The cardinal made only an oblique
reference to what is sure to be one
the synod’s most discussed topics: a
controversial proposal by German
Cardinal Walter Kasper that would
make it easier for such Catholics to
receive Communion, even if they do
not obtain annulments of their п¬Ѓrst,
sacramental marriages.
“It would be misleading to concentrate only on the question of the
reception of the sacraments,” Cardinal Erdo said.
He focused instead on the possibility of streamlining and simplifying
the annulment process – the task of
a special commission Pope Francis
established in late August – and noted
proposals to allow bishops to declare
marriages null as an administrative
action, without holding a trial before a
church tribunal.
“Under the influence of the existing
culture, many reserve the right not to
observe conjugal п¬Ѓdelity, to divorce
and remarry if the marriage might
not be successful, or not to open themselves to life,” the cardinal said, citing
attitudes that could render many marriages invalid.
While he reiterated Catholic teaching that “a second marriage recognized by the church is impossible
while the first spouse is alive,” the
cardinal said it would be important
to study the “practice of some of the
Orthodox churches, which allows for
the possibility of a second or third
marriage.”
Noting that Catholics increasingly
choose to marry civilly or live together without marrying at all, Cardinal
Erdo said the church should “draw
close” to such couples in order to lead
them on the “path toward celebrating
�We need new
ways to touch
people’s hearts,’
couple tells
pope, synod
FRANCIS X. ROCCA
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
(CNS PHOTO/CNS PHOTO/MARIA GRAZIA PICCIARELLA, POOL)
Bishops arrive in procession for a Mass celebrated by Pope Francis to open the extraordinary
Synod of Bishops on the family in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican Oct. 5.
US COUPLE AT SYNOD CALLS FOR
�ROBUST, CREATIVE’ FAMILY PROGRAMS
VATICAN CITY – Existing diocesan programs
and Catholic
organizations
aimed at helping
Catholic families fulfill their
vocation clearly
are not strong
enough to meet
Alice Heinzen
modern needs, a
Wisconsin couple
told the Synod of Bishops.
“We must develop more robust
and creative methods to share the
fundamental truth that marriage
is a divine gift from God, rather
than merely a man-made institution,” Alice Heinzen, director of
marriage and family life in the
Diocese of La Cross, Wisconsin,
told the synod Oct. 7, reading a
the sacrament of marriage.” He said
doing that would require the church
to recognize the “best part of these
situations which oftentimes is not understood or capable of being grasped.”
“When these relationships are obviously stable in a publicly recognized
legal bond, they are characterized
by deep affection, display a parental
responsibility towards their offspring
and an ability to withstand trials,” he
said.
On the subject of birth control, the
cardinal emphasized that “openness
to life is an essential part, an intrinsic
requirement of conjugal love,” but
said that families cannot be expected
to live up to that value without an
increased expression of “diffused and
concrete solidarity” from the wider
community, including the church.
“The tendency toward the privatization of love needs to be overcome,”
he said. “The Western world risks
making the family a reality entrusted
exclusively to the choices of the individual, totally detached from a regulatory and institutional framework.”
Cardinal Erdo highlighted social
and economic pressures on the family,
an area that bishops from developing
countries are likely to emphasize.
“We are not dealing with only problems involving individual behavior
but the structures of sin hostile to
the family, in a world of inequality
and social injustice, of consumerism,
on the one hand, and poverty, on the
other,” the cardinal said, noting in
particular the weight of “increasing
job insecurity” and migration.
speech she and her husband, Jeff,
wrote.
The church needs to review “the
methods by which we teach our
children about the nature of human
sexuality and the vocation of marriage,” Heinzen said, named with
her husband as a synod auditor.
She said the church also needs to
review “how we provide for the aftercare of marriage that can help
couples deepen their relationship.”
The church is not confused or in
a state of crisis about its teaching on marriage and family life,
Heinzen said. But there is “a crisis
of methodology. How do we as a
church effectively share what we
know to be true in practical, simple and convincing ways, so that
all men and women are challenged
and supported to live lifelong marriages and build homes that reflect
the domestic church?”
In their discussions of sexual and
medical ethics, synod participants
are giving emphasis to the concept
of “graduality,” as a way of thinking
about morality that allows for human
imperfection without compromising
ideals.
In an address to the assembly on
its п¬Ѓrst working day, Oct. 6, Cardinal
Peter Erdo of Esztergom-Budapest,
Hungary, said that “Humanae Vitae,”
the 1968 encyclical by Pope Paul VI
that reaffirmed the church’s prohibition of artificial birth control, “needs
to be considered in light of the law of
graduality.” He suggested that it was
unrealistic to expect immediate acceptance of the widely flouted teaching.
The cardinal quoted “Familiaris
Consortio,” a 1981 apostolic exhortation by St. John Paul II on the role of
the Christian family in the world that
was inspired by the last synod on the
family in 1980. According to St. John
Paul, each person is a historical being
who “knows, loves and accomplishes
moral good in stages of growth.”
Several bishops referred to graduality in their remarks during an afternoon session dedicated to the theme
of “God’s plan for marriage and the
family.”
“Despite serious flaws that we
always identify in Western culture,
we also have to discern and to declare
what the steppingstones are for Christian wisdom,” one bishop said, according to Basilian Father Thomas Rosica,
an assistant to the Holy See Press
Office, who did not identify the bishop
in accordance with synod rules.
VATICAN CITY – A married
couple told Pope Francis and the
Synod of Bishops on the family
that Catholic parishes should welcome same-sex couples, following
the example
of parents
who invite
their son and
his male partner to their
home for
Christmas.
“The
church constantly faces
the tension of
upholding the
truth while
expressing
compassion and mercy. Families
face this tension all the time,”
Ron and Mavis Pirola of Sydney
told the synod Oct. 6.
“Take homosexuality as an
example. Friends of ours were
planning their Christmas family
gathering when their gay son said
he wanted to bring his partner
home too. They fully believed in
the church’s teachings and they
knew their grandchildren would
see them welcome the son and
his partner into the family. Their
response could be summed up in
three (sic) words, �He is our son.’”
“What a model of evangelization
for parishes as they respond to
similar situations in their neighborhood,” the Pirolas said.
While Catholic teaching insists
homosexual people should not be
discriminated against, it holds that
homosexual acts are always immoral and that marriage can only
be a union between one man and
one woman.
The couple, who are participating in the synod as nonvoting auditors, spoke at the beginning of the
afternoon session of the synod’s
first working day. The session’s
designated theme was “God’s plan
for marriage and the family.”
The Pirolas also spoke of a
divorced friend who “doesn’t feel
fully accepted in her parish” yet
“turns up to Mass regularly and
uncomplainingly with her children. For the rest of her parish,
she should be a model of courage
and commitment in the face of
adversity.”
The couple called for emphasizing the positive dimension of
Catholic teaching on sexuality.
“Marriage is a sexual sacrament
with its fullest expression in sexual
intercourse. We believe that until
married couples come to reverence
sexual union as an essential part
of their spirituality it is extremely
hard to appreciate the beauty of
teachings such as those of �Humanae Vitae,’” they said in reference
to the 1968 encyclical by Pope Paul
VI that reaffirmed the church’s
teaching on contraception.
“We need new ways and relatable
language to touch people’s hearts,”
the Pirolas said.
The couple
spoke as
nonvoting
auditors at
a session on
marriage and
family.
18 FROM THE FRONT
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
BISHOPS: State church leaders challenge abortion coverage as �coercive’
FROM PAGE 1
of institutions and individuals, the conference
states in a complaint п¬Ѓled Sept. 30 with the Office
of Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Health
and Human Services.
“For the first time in California – indeed, for the
first time anywhere in the United States – health
plans are now required, as a matter of regulatory
п¬Ѓat, to cover all legal abortions, even late term
abortions, for any reason,” the conference states
in its Sept. 30 letter.
“The state has robbed the freedom of the individuals and employers who object to abortion to
buy coverage which does not include unrestricted
abortion, including gender selection and lateterm abortion,” Bishop McElroy said.
All Californians who purchase or receive health
insurance through state licensed health insurance companies are affected by the Aug. 22 administrative ruling by the California Department of
Managed Health Care.
The department issued its administrative ruling
after abortion advocacy groups complained after
Santa Clara University and Loyola Marymount
University altered their health insurance plans
this year to exclude voluntary abortion coverage.
In 2008 and in 2012 the department had approved
health plans for Catholic institutional employers
that excluded coverage for voluntary abortions,
the Catholic conference letter notes. All state
�The state has robbed the
freedom of the individuals
and employers who object
to abortion to buy coverage
which does not include unrestricted
abortion, including gender selection and
late-term abortion.’
BISHOP ROBERT W. MCELROY
licensed health insurance includes coverage of
abortion in cases where the life of the mother is
in danger.
In an email Oct. 1, the department stated, “We
won’t be providing comment beyond what is in
the letters” to the insurance companies. Those
letters state that under the California Reproductive Privacy Act and multiple California judicial
decisions women have a “the fundamental right to
choose to either bear a child or to have an abortion.”
The Alliance of Catholic Healthcare, representing the 41 California Catholic health care systems
and hospitals, applauded the California bishops’
action, and in a statement joined them in urging
the HHS Office of Civil Rights “to commence an
immediate, thorough and impartial investigation”
of the Aug. 22 directive.
Jim Lyons, vice president of university relations at Santa Clara University, issued a statement noting that it was not a party to the complaint by the Catholic conference but stating that
the state agency’s decision “reversed its prior
position permitting limitations on voluntary
abortions.”
However, Santa Clara University and Loyola
Marymount University have both said they would
comply with the state agency’s administrative
ruling.
The state’s Aug. 22 letter to the heads of eight
different health insurance plans ordered them
to amend their current health plans and remove
any exclusions regarding voluntary abortions on
the basis that abortion for any reason was “basic
health care” and could not be excluded. The directive was issued to Aetna, Anthem/Blue Cross,
Blue Shield of California, GEM Care, Health Net,
Kaiser Permanente and United Health Care.
The HHS Office of Civil Rights can cut off
federal funds to California until it stops its discriminatory practices, according to the Catholic
conference.
The Weldon Amendment states: “None of the
funds available in this act may be made available
to a federal agency or program, or to a state or local government, if such agency, program, or government subjects any institutional or individual
health care entity to discrimination on the basis
that the health care entity does not provide, pay
for, provide coverage of, or refer for abortions.”
The statute specifically defines a health care
entity to include health insurance plans.
March 15 - 27, 2015
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Relax for a day at sea and continue to:
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within reach of the D-Day landing beaches;
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FROM THE FRONT 19
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
SHRINE: Archbishop rededicates St. Francis landmark
FROM PAGE 1
“As we come together to rededicate
this church, let us see it as a sign
of our commitment to rededicate
ourselves to the person of Jesus
Christ and to the mission of this
shrine,” the archbishop said. “That
this shrine can become all that it is
called to be, and capable of being,
imbued as it is with the spirit of St.
Francis who as himself so perfectly
conformed to the Christ.”
“Let us renew our efforts, our
stewardship for this shrine to be
true to its vision, a place of spiritual refuge, a place where people
find healing and solace,” he said.
“A place that radiates and teaches
peace, peace for our violent world,
peace for our violent neighborhoods.
A place where people are strengthened to embrace the cross in their
own lives and receive forgiveness
for their failure to do so. A place
where the poor are lifted up and the
marginalized п¬Ѓnd hope because God
is given п¬Ѓrst place where his majesty
is acknowledged and served in the
beautiful and worthy celebration of
the mysteries of our faith.”
St. Francis of Assisi Church was
built in 1849 to serve gold-rush era
Catholics and became the National
Shrine of St. Francis of Assisi in
1999. It is run by the Capuchin
friars under the auspices of the
Archdiocese of San Francisco, with
Capuchin Father Harold Snider as
current rector.
(PHOTO BY CHRISTINA GRAY/CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO)
Cardinal William J. Levada poses with a group of youths on the steps of the reopened
National Shrine of St. Francis church after the rededication Mass for the shrine church Oct.
4. Cardinal Levada was instrumental in transforming the closed St. Francis of Assisi Church
into the National Shrine of St. Francis in 1999 when he was archbishop of San Francisco.
On Oct. 2, the archbishop attended a fundraising dinner concert
featuring Franc D’Ambrosio, the
longest-running Phantom of the
Opera, to mark the sixth birthday
of the Porziuncola Nuova, a scaled
replica of St. Francis’ Porziuncola
in Assisi. Angela Alioto built the
Porziuncola with the support of
Cardinal William J. Levada, then
archbishop of San Francisco, in
2008. Alioto told Catholic San Francisco that the event was attended
by more than 200 supporters who
helped raise nearly a quarter of the
$2.4 million needed for the Piazza
St. Francis project set to begin in
2015. The 600 block of Vallejo Street
between Grant Avenue and Columbus Avenue will be closed and
transformed into an Umbrian-style
piazza.
OBITUARY
Sister Jacqueline
Golden, SND, 86
Notre Dame Sister Jacqueline
Golden died Aug. 24 at Mercy
Retirement and Care Center in
Oakland. She was 86 years old and a
Sister of Notre Dame de Namur for
68 years.
Sister Jacqueline was a graduate
of Notre Dame High School, San
Francisco and her congregation’s
Notre Dame de Namur University
in Belmont. She earned a graduate
degree in education from Stanford
University and doctorate in the
п¬Ѓeld from the University of Southern California.
Sister Jacqueline served as principal at San Francisco’s St. Thomas
More School as well as on the
faculty at Notre Dame High School,
Belmont. Sister Jacqueline was
also among the early leaders of the
Institute for Catholic Educational
Leadership at the University of San
Francisco.
“Former classmates remember
Jacqueline as fun-loving, proud of
her Irish heritage, a good friend,
a talented athlete and gifted in
math,” the Notre Dame Sisters said.
Sister Jacqueline is survived by
a nephew, Ron Golden, and niece,
Laura Golden.
Remembrances may be made to
Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur,
1520 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA
94002 or online at snddenca.org.
VISIT
INCARCERATED
YOUTH…
San Francisco Juvenile Justice Center
ATTEND 2 DAY TRAINING SESSIONS AND
BE PART OF OUR MINISTRY
Saturday, October 25 and
Saturday, November 1, 2014.
8:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M.
St. Brendan Parish Hall
29 Rockaway Ave., San Francisco, CA 94127
REQUIREMENTS
в–єAn interview is required before attending this training.
Please call Julio Escobar (415) 244-5594 to make an
appointment, email us at [email protected] or for
more information visit at www.sandimasministry.org
в–єMust complete a 2 day-training (2 Saturdays required).
в–єMust be 18 years old.
в–єVisit incarcerated youth 11 to 18 years old.
в–єBilingual English & Spanish speaker preferable but not required.
в–єAttend mandatory monthly meetings.
в–єMentor youth released from jail, in probation or parole. (optional)
20 FROM THE FRONT
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
CROSS-CULTURAL: Nigerian priest blessed by sojourn in archdiocese
FROM PAGE 3
�One of the things I learned was listening more,
giving people a chance. We may not have the
immediate answers, but sometimes they just want
someone to listen.’
late Father Al Vucinovich, current
pastor Father John Ryan and Auxiliary Bishop William J. Justice.
The example of these tested priests
paid off.
“I would say my stay here in the
U.S. reinforced my faith just by all
the challenges,” he said. “Going
back I’m more excited about the
faith, more renewed about the faith
and open to learn even more.”
Father Inyanwachi faced some
difficult pastoral issues during his
time in the archdiocese, notably as
administrator at a San Mateo parish after a sudden and traumatic
FATHER EDWARD INYANWACHI
leadership change. An initial “sense
of fear and trepidation” gave way to
clarity because of the candid, calming response of Bishop Justice to a
congregation that felt betrayed.
“By the time I left people had
calmed down and there was a
renewed sense of hope,” Father
Inyanwachi said. “I think the Holy
Spirit moved in a meaningful way in
the community.”
When he left to return to Nigeria,
a new parish council was in place,
the offertory rebounded and a better
relationship had taken hold between
the parish and school.
“It made me a stronger and better
pastor,” Father Inyanwachi said.
“One of the things I learned was listening more, giving people a chance.
“We may not have the immediate
answers, but sometimes they just
want someone to listen.
“I tried not to speak much,” he
said. “One of the things that kept me
going was just focusing on Scripture.
I tried not to explain anything but instead just explain the word of God.”
The parishioners “were willing to
say, �this is a community.’ They kind
of had ownership. I don’t think think
they teach you that in school.”
FUNERAL SERVICES
McAVOY O’HARA Co.
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
CALL (415) 614-5642 | FAX (415) 614-5641
VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | EMAIL [email protected]
SERV IN G WIT H T R U S T A N D CO NFIDENC E
S IN CE 1 8 5 0
E vergreen Mortua r y
4545 GEARY B O ULE VARD at T E N T H AV E N UE
For information prearrangements, and assistance, call day or night (415) 668-0077
FD 523
Bill, Matt & Dan Duggan
and the Staff of Duggan’s Serra Mortuary
invite the families we have served in the past year to our
Affordable solutions
12th Annual Service of Remembrance
Cost and
Services
Choices
Church
| Cemetery
| Cremation
Service
Mass вќ� Vigil вќ� Burial вќ� Cremation
Remembering those we have served from October 2013 - September 2014
“Celebrations of Life”
Please visit our New website
Visit
www.colmacremation.com
www.colmacremation.com
7747 El Camino Real
Colma, CA 94014 FD 1522
A Prayer Service in memory of your loved one with music,
scripture readings, reflections and a candle lighting ceremony
Sunday, November 9
3:00pm - 4:00pm
St. Stephen Catholic Church
111 Industrial Road Suite 5
Belmont, CA 94002 FD 1923
650..757.1300 | fax 650.757.7901 | toll free 888.757.7888 | www.colmacremation.com
451 Eucalyptus Dr., San Francisco
“Here’s wishing happiness and wellbeing to
all the families of the Archdiocese. If you
ever need our guidance please call at any
time. Sincerely, Paul Larson ~ President.”
Catered appetizers & desserts immediately following the Service
4:00pm - 6:00pm St. Stephen’s Donworth Hall
We invite each family to bring a favorite photo of your loved one to be placed
on the Altar of Remembrance before the service.
The Peninsula’s Local Catholic Directors…
Doors open at 2:30pm ~ Service will begin promptly at 3:00pm
Chapel of the Highlands
Funeral & Cremation Care Professionals
In keeping with the Holiday spirit, we ask each family to bring an
unwrapped toy for the Daly City Fire Department Operation Santa Claus
or unexpired canned food for the
North Peninsula Food Pantry and Dining Center of Daly City.
x Highly Recommended / Family Owned
x Please call us at (650)
RSVP 650/756-4500 by November 1
Please call with the number attending for a light reception and
to include your loved one’s name in the Song of Remembrance
588-5116
El Camino Real at 194 Millwood Dr., Millbrae
www.chapelofthehighlands.com
CA License FD 915
The Catholic Cemeteries в—† Archdiocese of San Francisco
www.holycrosscemeteries.com
H OLY C ROSS
HOLY CROSS CATHOLIC
MT. OLIVET
CATHOLIC CEMETERY
CEMETERY
CATHOLIC CEMETERY
TOMALES CATHOLIC
CEMETERY
1500 Mission Road,
Colma, CA 94014
650-756-2060
1400 Dillon Beach Road,
Tomales, CA 94971
415-479-9021
Intersection of Santa Cruz Avenue,
Menlo Park, CA 94025
650-323-6375
A TRADITION
OF
270 Los Ranchitos Road,
San Rafael, CA 94903
415-479-9020
ST. ANTHONY
CEMETERY
OUR LADY OF THE
PILLAR CEMETERY
Stage Road
Miramontes St.
Pescadero, CA 94060 Half Moon Bay, CA 94019
650-712-1679
415-712-1679
FAITH THROUGHOUT OUR LIVES.
COMMUNITY 21
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
Thousands celebrate St. Anthony’s new
free dining room on Feast of St. Francis
CHRISTINA GRAY
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Sixty-four years after it began feeding lowincome residents of San Francisco’s Tenderloin
neighborhood, St. Anthony’s Foundation celebrated the grand opening of a new and larger dining
room on Oct. 4, feeding nearly 4,000 people.
The day, which began with a ribbon-cutting ceremony followed by a tour, concert and hot meal,
coincided with the feast of St. Francis of Assisi.
The new dining room at 121 Golden Gate Ave.
is across the street from the old facility, Robillard said. The new space holds 300 diners at one
time, twice the number of the old dining room.
The larger facility doubles the space for children
and their families and enables the agency to cook,
freeze, and store large food donations for longer
periods of time.
Robillard said the new multistory facility is a
response to San Francisco’s widening income gap
and increase in urban poverty. According to the
San Francisco Food Security Task Force, 1 in 4
residents of San Francisco including seniors and
families with children, suffer from daily food insecurity.
The high demand for food in recent years meant
that while the dining room fed about 3,000 people
per day, long lines and long waiting times had
been an issue. When plans for the new dining
room were announced earlier this year, executive
director Barry Stenger reflected on the long lines
as a “social barometer and an indicator of economic inequality that continues to plague our city
and nation.”
The new building will also provide 89 lowincome housing units and a variety of community
services including a free clothing program, a social work center, a medical clinic and job training.
It will also be the cornerstone of a citywide plan
for disaster preparedness, becoming a communications and assistance center for the neighborhood and the city in general.
“We’ve been dubbed the �Miracle on Jones
Street’ because we’ve never run out of food in 64
years,” despite earthquakes, power outages and
(PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA GRAY/CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO)
Volunteer Carmelita Lozano served the first meal in St.
Anthony’s new dining room Oct. 4. The dining room served
almost 4,000 people that day.
any other operational disruptions, said spokesman Karl Robillard.
He said that on Oct. 4, 1950, Franciscan Father Alfred Boeddecker, St. Anthony’s founder,
expected to serve 150 meals but fed the 400 who
showed up.
“On Saturday, we expected to serve 3,000 meals
but the п¬Ѓnal tally after the last person was served
was 3,792 meals,” Robillard said. “The miracle
continues.”
Tenderloin residents joined St. Anthony’s staff, volunteers and
donors under tented tables on Golden Gate Avenue outside
St. Boniface Church to celebrate the opening of St. Anthony
Foundation’s expanded new facility.
IЙ„Й•ЗёЙ‘Йґ
IЗёИµИµЙґ
2014
ЗёИµИµ[email protected]
Saturday, October 11
Santa Sabina Center
October 14, 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m.~
Sing the Music of Hildegard of Bingen as
contemplative practice, through the Ear to the Heart.
This gentle, contemplative practice of listening and
singing the music of Hildegard together is led by
Devi Mathieu and requires no previous experience
with the music of Hildegard or with medieval music.
Suggested offering, $10-20.
Santa Sabina Center, 25 Magnolia Avenue, San Rafael,
415-457-7727; [email protected]
October 15, 9:30 a.m.-2:15 p.m. ~
Contemplative Day of Prayer
led by Marietta Fahey, SHF,
includes presentation, personal and shared reflection
and Eucharist. No reservations required.
Suggested offering, $20. Santa Sabina Center,
25 Magnolia Avenue, San Rafael,
415-457-7727; [email protected]
Santa Sabina Center
25 Magnolia Avenue, San Rafael
415-457-7727
[email protected]
12:00 noon at San Francisco’s U.N. Plaza
on Market & 7th Street
Keynote Speakers:
Most Reverend Salvatore J. Cordileone
Archbishop of San Francisco
Fr. Andrew Apostoli, C.F.R
R
World renowned speaker and author
r
The program will include Benediction,
Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and
an opportunity for Confession
Contact for more information:
www.RosaryRallySF.com
(415) 272-2046
Sponsored by: Archdiocese of San Francisco ? Ignatius Press
ss
? Immaculate Heart Radio ? Archdiocesan Ministry for the
Spanish-Speaking ? Legion of Mary ? Knights of Columbus
22 CALENDAR
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
FRIDAY, OCT. 10
3-DAY FESTIVAL: St. Gregory Church,
2715 Hacienda at 28th Ave., San
Mateo. Events and activities include
carnival rides, food booths, games
and entertainment for the whole family.
Saturday night dinner and Sunday pancake breakfast; Friday 6 p.m.-10 p.m.,
Saturday 2-10 p.m. and Sunday 1-6
p.m.. (650) 345-8506; www.saintgregorychurch.org.
SATURDAY, OCT. 11
ROSARY PROCESSION: St. Catherine of Siena Church, Bayswater at
El Camino Real, Burlingame, noon, to
Burlingame Avenue to pray rosary for
peace.
PRO-LIFE: Pray at 435 Grand Ave.,
South San Francisco, 10 a.m.-noon,
Saturdays in October. Rosa, (650) 5890998; Romanie, (650) 583-6169.
BOUTIQUE: Good Shepherd Parish,
901 Oceana Blvd., Pacifica, Oct. 11,
9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Oct. 12, noon-5 p.m.
Goods available for purchase from
more than 30 vendors. Breakfast burritos are on sale Saturday with lunch
on sale both days.
SUNDAY, OCT. 12
REUNION: St. Gabriel School, class
of 1969, 4:30-9:30 p.m., City Forest
Lodge, 254 Laguna Honda Blvd, San
Francisco, open bar, buffet dinner,
dancing. To be put on the invitation list
[email protected]
FIESTA: Mission Dolores School, 16th
Street at Church, San Francisco, 11
a.m.-4 p.m. with raffle, games, bounce
house, live entertainment, international
food and drinks, face painting, a DJ, and
more. www.mdasf.org; Stacey McNeill,
[email protected]; (415) 628-6213.
YOUNG ADULT RALLY: Our Lady of
Angels Parish, 1721 Hillside Drive, Bur-
SUNDAY, OCT. 12
SATURDAY, OCT. 18
ORGAN RECITAL: Mission Dolores Basilica’s
Second
Sunday Organ
Recital Series,
Jerome Lenk
on his 25th
anniversary as
basilica organist, 4 p.m.
Jerome Lenk
Free admission. Mission
Dolores Basilica, 3321 16th
St. at Dolores, San Francisco.
(415) 621-8203; www.missiondolores.org. Suggested
donation $10.
SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY: San
Francisco’s
Our Lady of
the Visitacion
School, 785
Sunnydale
Ave., celebrates 50
years beginning with
Father Jeff
Mass at 10
Finley, CPPS
a.m. Precious
Blood Father Jeff Finley and San Jose
Auxiliary Bishop Tom Daly,
both Visitacion alumni, will join
Father Thuan Hoang, pastor, on the altar. All who have
attended OLV School or who
have taught or worked at the
school are welcome. RSVP
www.olvsf.org, [email protected]
org or call the school office,
(415) 239-7840.
lingame with guest speaker Paul J. Kim
and his music and comedy. [email protected]
TUESDAY, OCT. 14
SCRIPTURE STUDY: Mercy Sister Toni
Lynn Gallagher on achieving gratitude and a joy-filled heart as well as
reflections on Pope Francis “Joy of the
Gospel,” 9-10 a.m., Marian Room of
St. Stephen Church, 451 Eucalyptus
Drive at 23rd Avenue, San Francisco.
SaintStephenSF.org; [email protected]
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 15
DIVORCE SUPPORT: Meeting takes
place first and third Wednesdays,
7:30 p.m., St. Stephen Parish O’Reilly
Center, 23rd Avenue at Eucalyptus,
San Francisco. Groups are part of
the Separated and Divorced Catholic
Ministry in the archdiocese and include
prayer, introductions, sharing. It is a
drop-in support group. Jesuit Father
Al Grosskopf, (415) 422-6698, [email protected]
GRIEF SUPPORT: Free monthly
grief support, St. Mary’s Cathedral,
Gough Street at Geary Boulevard,
San Francisco, third Wednesday
of each month, 10:30- noon, Msgr.
Bowe Room, on the west side of the
parking lot level of the Cathedral.
These sessions provide information on the grief process, and tips
on coping with the loss of a loved
one.В Facilitator is Deacon Christoph
Sandoval.В Mercy Sister Esther, (415)
567-2020, ext. 218.
FRIDAY, OCT. 17
3-DAY FESTIVAL: “Wizard of Oz” Fall
Festival, Oct, 17, 18, 19, St. Dunstan
Church, 1133 Broadway, Millbrae.
Enjoy carnival rides, games, food
and drink, chili cook-off, pie eating
contest, bingo, raffle, silent auction,
and Auntie Em’s Country Store filled
with handmade items and treats;
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Complimentary phone consultation
www.InnerChildHealing.com
REUNION: St. Gabriel School, San
Francisco, 1974 graduates. Please
respond to [email protected] REUNION: All Hallows School, San
Francisco, class of 1964, dinner at
Basque Cultural Center, South San
Francisco. [email protected]
com; (818) 889-4543.
REUNION: Holy Name of Jesus
School, San Francisco, class of 1974,
Mass in Holy Name Church 5 p.m.
followed by school tour and reception and dinner at 6:30 p.m. in parish
Flanagan Center, visit Holy Name
reunion website at http://holynameclassof74.myevent.com; Dave Petrini
[email protected] (415)
302-5608.
SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY: Ecole Notre
Dame des Victoires, 659 Pine St.,
San Francisco, celebrates 90 years
beginning at 3 p.m. with Mass at 5
p.m. in Notre Dame des Victoires
Church behind the school on Bush
Street across from Sutter/Stockton
garage. Micaela Heekin, micaela.
[email protected] RETREAT: Spiritual direction is focus
at St. Matthias Parish, Father Lacey
Hall, 1685 Cordilleras Road, Redwood City, 1:30-4:30 p.m. followed by
5 p.m. Mass.В Speakers include Vivian
Clausing, Sharon Erro, Sister Dee
Myers and Tim Valderrama on how
spiritual direction can help on faith
journey. Liz Vugrinecz, [email protected], (650) 366-9544, ext. 12,
to register. No fee.
FINANCIAL ADVISOR
Retirement planning
College savings plans
Comprehensive financial planning
Kevin Tarrant
Financial Advisor
750 Lindaro Street, Suite 300
San Rafael, CA 94901
415-482-2737
В© 2013 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.
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ANNIVERSARY: Marin Pregnancy
Clinic celebrates its 30th year with a
wine and cheese gala. (415) 8920558; visit www.marinpregnancyclinic.org.
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | CALL (415) 614-5642
EMAIL [email protected]
THE PROFESSIONALS
COUNSELING
Friday 5-10 p.m.; Saturday, noon10 p.m.; Sunday, noon-8 p.m. (650)
697-4730; [email protected]
Real Estate
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415.209.9036
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GP10-01506P-N06/10
Visit catholic-sf.org
for the latest
Vatican headlines.
CALENDAR 23
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
MONDAY, OCT. 20
SUNDAY, OCT. 19
�YEAR OF CONSECRATED LIFE’:
Pope Francis has declared 2015 as the
Year of Consecrated Life. To commemorate this wonderful occurrence, the
Archdiocese of San Francisco through
the Office for Consecrated Life will be
offering many opportunities for you to
join in the yearlong celebration. The
first event will take place in St. Mary’s
Cathedral, Oct. 20, at 7 p.m. Please
join us for this opening event for the
Year of Consecrated Life. Subsequent
events commemorating the lives and
work of women and men religious will
take place through the celebratory year.
PRO-LIFE DINNER: Evening
features keynote speaker
Eva Muntean,
co-founder of
Walk for Life
West Coast
plus catered
dinner and
raffles, 5- 8
Eva Muntean
p.m. $35.
Sponsored by
San Mateo Pro-life. Susan, (650)
349-9197; [email protected]
ST. JUDE NOVENA: Shrine of St. Jude
Thaddeus, St. Dominic Church, 2390
Bush St. at Steiner, San Francisco
commences Oct. 20. Masses MondaySaturday, 8 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sunday,
11:30 a.m. with rosary and blessing
with St. Jude relic at all liturgies; a
novena pilgrimage takes place Oct. 25
from Daly City to St. Dominic followed
by a bi-lingual Mass with Bishop William J. Justice, principal celebrant,
1:30 p.m. Plenty of parking. www.
stjude-shrine.org; [email protected]
org; (415) 931-5919; (415) 333-8730.
FRIDAY, OCT. 24
RETIRED PRIESTS’ LUNCH:
Luncheon
and program
honoring retired
priests of the
Archdiocese
of San Francisco and
retired priests
of religious
orders serving
Father Terence
in the ADSF, St.
Horan
Mary’s Cathedral Patrons Hall, Gough Street at
Geary Boulevard, San Francisco,
11:30 a.m. Tickets are $125 with
proceeds benefiting the Priests’
Retirement Fund. (415) 614-5580;
email [email protected] Father Terry Horan is
retired pastor of St. Michael Parish, San Francisco.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 22
MARYKNOLL: Pope Francis has
brought new attention to Christians’
call to be missioners. Hear how you
can do that assisting in the work of
Maryknoll; St. Isabella’s Parish hall,
One Trinity Way, San Rafael, 7 p.m.
Nancy McFarland, rnmcfar1938@
yahoo.com; (707) 773-0904.
OKTOBERFEST: Good Shepherd Guild
luncheon and bingo at Basque Cultural
Center, Railroad Avenue, South San
Francisco, 11:30 a.m. Tickets at $40
include three-course course lunch and
bingo cards. Judy Terracina, (415) 7532081). Proceeds benefit Good Shepherd Gracenter.
RIORDAN ALUMNI: All Archbishop
Riordan High School grads who live or
work in the San Jose area are invited
to attend the first annual San Jose
Alumni Luncheon at Scott’s Seafood
Restaurant in San Jose. $45 per person; reservations required. Tickets are
available online. Visit www.riordanhs.
org or call Marc Rovetti, alumni director, atВ (415) 586-8200, ext 357.
DISCIPLESHIP TALK: Hear about
the importance of belonging to a faith
community even and maybe especially
among the time constraints of work
and family. Father Joe Bradley of the
Archdiocese of San Francisco, speaks
on the topic, 7 p.m., St. Gregory
Church, 28th Avenue at Hacienda, San
Mateo.
SATURDAY, OCT. 25
REUNION: St Stephen School, �74 with
Mass in St. Stephen Church, 4:30 p.m.,
followed by school tours and refreshments with dinner 6:30-11, United
Irish Cultural Center. Geralyn Forghani
(Hayes), [email protected]; Katherine Moser,В [email protected]; (415) 664-8331.
VICTIM ASSISTANCE: Survivors of
clergy sexual abuse are invited to a
All Purpose
MONDAY, OCT. 27
RIORDAN ALUMNI: All Archbishop
Riordan High School grads who live
or work in the Marin County area are
invited to attend the first annual Marin
Alumni Luncheon at La Toscana Restaurant in San Rafael. $40 per person,
reservations required. Tickets are available online. Visit www.riordanhs.org or
call Marc Rovetti, alumni director, (415)
586-8200, ext 357.
PAINTING
O’DONOGHUE CONSTRUCTION
COMMERCIAL
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen/Bath Remodel
Dry Rot Repair • Decks /Stairs
Plumbing Repair/Replacement
Call: 650.580.2769
Cell (415) 517-5977
Grant (650) 757-1946
CA License #965268
CAHALAN CONSTRUCTION
Painting & Waterproofing
Remodels & Repairs
Window & Siding Lic#582766
FENCES & DECKS
Lic. #742961
415.279.1266
650.291.4303
ELECTRICAL
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE
[email protected]
Fully licensed • State Certified • Locally
Trained • Experienced • On Call 24/7
Interior-Exterior
Residential – Commercial
Insured/Bonded – Free Estimates
License# 974682
• Design - Build
• Retail - Fixtures
• Industrial
• Service/Maintenance
• Casework Installation
Serving Marin, San Francisco
& San Mateo Counties
S.O.S.
PAINTING CO.
Interior-Exterior • wallpaper • hanging & removal
Lic # 526818 • Senior Discount
415-269-0446 • 650-738-9295
www.sospainting.net
F REE E STIMATES
Bill Hefferon Painting
Bonded & Insured
CA License 819191
Support CSF
If you would like to add your tax-deductible
contribution, please mail a check, payable to Catholic San Francisco, to:
Catholic San Francisco, Dept. W, One Peter Yorke Way, San Francisco CA 94109
ROOFING
650.322.9288
Service Changes
Solar Installation
Lighting/Power
Fire Alarm/Data
Green Energy
M.K. Painting
Tel: (650) 630-1835
Lic. # 505353B-C36
NOT A LICENSED CONTRACTOR
• Retaining Walls • Stairs • Gates
• Dry Rot • Senior & Parishioner Discounts
PAROL MAKING: Parol-making
Workshop, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., St, Monica
Church hall, 470 24th Ave., San Francisco.В Parol kits are available for a
donation of $7.В Parol reminds Filipino
Christians of the star of Bethlehem;
[email protected] (415-6997927; Peter and Estrelle Chan, [email protected] CONSTRUCTION
Quality interior and exterior painting,
demolition , fence (repairs), roof repairs,
cutter (cleaning and repairs), landscaping,
gardening, hauling, moving, welding
John Spillane
DIGNITY OF WOMEN: A special
one-day presentation of Educating on
the Nature and Dignity of Women at
St. Mary’s Cathedral. Gough Street
at Geary Boulevard, San Francisco, 9
a.m.-4:30 p.m.; $35 fee includes study
materials and lunch, scholarships
are available. Talks explore the life of
Edith Stein, also known as St. Teresa
Benedicta of the Cross. Contact Maria
Martinez and Pauline Talens at endow.
[email protected]; to register, go to www.
endowgroups.orgВ and click under the
events tab.
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | CALL (415) 614-5642
EMAIL [email protected]
HOME SERVICES
HANDYMAN
Day of Mindfulness at Mercy Center, Adeline Drive, Burlingame led by
Catherine Regan, Ph.D. For reservations contact Renee Duffey, (415)
614-5506.
John V. Rissanen
Cell: (916) 517-7952
Office: (916) 408-2102
Fax: (916) 408-2086
[email protected]
2190 Mt. Errigal Lane
Lincoln, CA 95648
DINING
(415) 786-0121 • (650) 871-9227
Italian American Social
Club of San Francisco
Lunch & Dinner, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
Weddings, Banquets, Special Occasions
25 RUSSIA AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO
www.iasf.com
415-585-8059
Cell 415-710-0584
[email protected]
Office 415-731-8065
10% Discount to Seniors & Parishioners
Serving the
Residential Bay
Area for
Commercial over 30 Years
IRISH Eoin
PAINTING
Lehane
Discount
to CSF
Readers
415.368.8589
Lic.#942181
[email protected]
PLUMBING
HOLLAND
Plumbing Works San Francisco
ALL PLUMBING WORK
PAT HOLLAND
CA LIC #817607
BONDED & INSURED
415-205-1235
24
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 10, 2014
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
CLASSIFIEDS
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
CALL (415) 614-5642 | FAX (415) 614-5641 | VISIT www.catholic-sf.org
HELP WANTED
LAKE TAHOE
RENTAL
LAKE
TAHOE
RENTAL
REAL ESTATE
Violet Coturri Guerra
GRI, CRS, SRES, EпљєPRO, PREVIEWS PROPERTY SPECIALIST
When it comes to buying or selling real estate, the knowledge and
experience of a professional can open doors and save you money
A REALTORВ© since 1994, Violet specializes in sales and marketing
throughout the SF peninsula, and utilizes cutting edge techniques in
brokerage functions, credit analysis and investments. She is positive,
flexible and effective, has integrity, initiative, resilience and judgment as
well as analytical, organizational and communication skills. She’s skilled in
negotiation and is tech savvy. (International President’s Circle, President’s
Club, Diamond and Sterling Societies).
A native of SF (SVDP, Saint Rose and USF), she raised two children and
volunteered for Lincoln, OLA, Notre Dame, Serra and BIS as well as
community organizations. Violet speaks Italian fluently, enjoys dancing,
hiking, the outdoors, and spending time with her grandchildren, Lydia
and Sebastien.
Vacation Rental Condo
in South Lake Tahoe.
Direct: (650) 558-4274
Sleeps 8, near Heavenly
Valley and Casinos.
CALBRE LICENSE NUMBER: 01189127
Call 925-933-1095
See it at
RentMyCondo.com#657
HELP WANTED
Read the latest
Catholic world
and national news
at catholic-sf.org.
DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES
for the Archdiocese of San Francisco
NOVENA
PUBLISH A NOVENA
New! Personal prayer
option added
Pre-payment required
Mastercard or
Visa accepted
Cost
$26
If you wish to publish a Novena in the
Catholic San Francisco
You may use the form below or call (415) 614-5640
Prayer to the Blessed
Virgin never known to fail.
Most beautiful flower of
Mt. Carmel Blessed Mother
of the Son of God, assist me
in my need. Help me and
show me you are my mother.
Oh Holy Mary, Mother of
God, Queen of Heaven and
earth. I humbly beseech you
from the bottom of my heart
to help me in this need.
Oh Mary, conceived
without sin. Pray for us (3X).
Holy Mary, I place this
cause in your hands (3X).
Say prayers 3 days.
RP
Your prayer will be published in our newspaper
Name
Address
Phone
MC/VISA #
Exp.
SELECT ONE PRAYER:
вќ‘ St. Jude Novena to SH
вќ‘ Prayer to the Blessed Virgin
вќ‘ Prayer to St. Jude
вќ‘ Prayer to the Holy Spirit
вќ‘ Personal Prayer, 50 words or less
Please return form with check or money order for $26
Payable to: Catholic San Francisco
Advertising Dept., Catholic San Francisco
1 Peter Yorke Way, San Francisco, CA 94109
Prayer to the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit, you who make me
see everything and who shows
me the way to reach my ideal.
You who give me the divine gift
of forgive and forget the wrong
that is done to me. I, in this short
dialogue, want to thank you for
everything and confirm once
more that I never want to be
separated from you no matter
how great the material desires
may be. I want to be with you
and my loved ones in your
perpetual glory. Amen. You
may publish this as soon as
your favor is granted.
RP
CHIMNEY CLEANING AND REPAIR
The director’s
Th
di
primary commitment is to manage its human resources in accordance with
the teachings of the Catholic Church.
The Archdiocese must also comply with the legal directives at the national, state and local
levels for such Church organizations.
Responsibility for the director includes interacting with approximately 100 employees in
the Chancery and articulating and enforcing policies and procedures for an additional 4,000
employees in parishes and Catholic schools.
The director is responsible for making sure the Archdiocese fulfills its religious and secular
obligations related to employees in the areas of hiring, policies, compensation, ongoing professional development, evaluation, and promotion.
REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS:
A practicing Catholic with knowledge of the way parishes interact with the Chancery.
Ten or more years of work in human resources with at least 5 years as a director or assistant director.
Skill in managing large amounts of data on the computer; knowledge of effective practices for
assisting parishes via friendly computer software that provide guidance for people at the local
level, i.e., in the parishes and schools.
RESPONSIBILITIES AND SCOPE OF THE POSITION
The director reports to the Moderator of the Curia/Vicar for Administration.
The director provides support for the Vicar for Clergy who works with the priests, and to the
Dept. of Catholic Schools, which oversees policies and performance of the elementary and high
schools of the Archdiocese.
Half of the director’s efforts are focused on formulating and implementing proper policies for
employees at the Chancery.
The other half is making sure that good policies and procedures for employment are in place and
adhered to in the parishes.
EDUCATION
Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent required; MBA preferred.
Some experience in the non-profit sector.
Equal Opportunity Employer. Qualified applicants with criminal histories considered.
Apply by sending information via LinkedIn to Diana Powell.
Or for more information please call Diana Powell at (415) 614-5631.
Chimney Sweep
& Inspection
$75
Spread the good news through a Catholic San Francisco gift subscription
– perfect for students and retirees and others who have moved outside
SEND
CSF
AFAR!
the archdiocese. $24 a year within California, $36 out of state. Catholics in the archdiocese must register with their
parish to receive a regular, free subscription. Email [email protected] or call (415) 614-5639.
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