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TREASURES OF THE ARCHIVES:
HOLY ANGELS:
Colma parish
celebrates centennial
with �100 Good Deeds’
An introduction to the 10 greatest hits
of archdiocesan documentary history,
with Deacon Jeffrey Burns
PAGE 3
PAGES 12-13
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Newspaper of the Archdiocese of San Francisco
SERVING SAN FRANCISCO, MARIN & SAN MATEO COUNTIES
www.catholic-sf.org
NOVEMBER 14, 2014
$1.00 | VOL. 16 NO. 30
Filipinos continue
to mourn a year
after typhoon
SIMONE ORENDAIN
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
TACLOBAN, Philippines – The sun was fierce over
the п¬Ѓeld of dried grass and clumps of earth marked
with 3,000 small white crosses. Priests in white vestments walked along the rows of graves, sprinkling
streams of holy water from plastic bottles.
The blessing was part of the Catholic community’s remembrance of the thousands who lost their
lives in and around this city of 224,000 in the central
Philippines, one year after their lives were ravaged
by Typhoon Haiyan.
More than 7,300 people died or went missing.
More than 1 million people were left homeless and
jobless. A year later, people harbor a deep sense of
loss.
A Mass Nov. 8 – the one-year anniversary of the
SEE TYPHOON, PAGE 18
�Tale of two synods’
emerged from Vatican,
says USCCB president
MARK PATTISON
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
BALTIMORE – October’s extraordinary Synod of
Bishops on the family was just one event, but “a tale
of two synods” emerged from it, according to the
president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.
Speaking to reporters Nov. 10 after the morning
session of the USCCB’s annual fall general assembly in Baltimore, Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of
Louisville, Kentucky, acknowledged the differences
in the synod experienced by the bishops participating in it and news accounts disseminated outside
the synod.
Those differences were highlighted by Cardinal
Timothy M. Dolan of New York in remarks delivered during the assembly’s morning session.
“There must have been two synods,” he said, and
SEE US BISHOPS, PAGE 18
(CNS PHOTO/PAUL JEFFREY)
A Catholic priest sprinkles holy water on the crosses at a mass gravesite for victims of Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, Philippines,
Nov. 8. Many Filipinos continue to struggle with the loss of family members, homes and jobs a year after the storm ravaged the
central Philippines Nov. 8, 2013.
25 years after massacre, Jesuit institutions
working to commemorate, emulate lives of martyrs
CHRISTINA GRAY
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
In a memorial garden overlooking the entrance to
the University of San Francisco’s
Lone Mountain campus, Kate Carter sits on a bench dedicated to one
of the six Jesuit priests executed
by the Salvadoran military in1989.
Twenty-п¬Ѓve years after the
atrocity shocked the world, Carter
discusses the ways the martyrs’
spirit is very much alive here.
“As a Jesuit institution we are
Kate Carter
called to use our place of privilege
in the world to tell the truth, which is why the Jesuits were killed, and to help our students understand that we are part of something much larger
than we are,” Carter, USF’s assistant director of
admissions, told Catholic San Francisco Nov. 6.
When Carter talks to students during information sessions about the university, she says she
emphasizes that an important part of a Jesuit
education is the knowledge that their education
and careers are “not just for us.”
“Learning about who is here and whose is not here
and why is an important part of our education,” said
Carter, 60, a parishioner at St. Agnes Parish. Helping students understand this and work for a more
“humane and just world,” whatever profession they
choose, is the mission of Jesuit schools, she said.
It was certainly what the six Jesuits were doing
as they pursued educational and economic justice
for the people of El Salvador in the 1980s.
On Nov. 16, 1989, during the height of the Salvadoran civil war, which was essentially a conflict between an impoverished majority and the powerful
elite, Jesuit Fathers Ignacio EllacurГ­a, Ignacio MartГ­n-BarГі, Segundo Montes, Juan RamГіn Moreno,
JoaquГ­n LГіpez y LГіpez and Amando LГіpez were
summarily executed by American-trained Salvadoran militants. They stormed the Jesuit residence
at the Universidad Centroamericana where the
priests taught and lived and also killed the priest’s
cook, Elba Ramos and her daughter Celina.
The Jesuits were aware they were viewed as a
threat to the government for their outspoken support for the poor, but they remained to advocate
SEE MARTYRS, PAGE 5
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INDEX
On the Street . . . . . . . . .4
National . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
World . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Faith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . .22
2 ARCHDIOCESE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Book, play spark schoolwide
conversation about death penalty
CHRISTINA GRAY
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Before he was cast as condemned
killer Matthew Poncelet, the lead in
Archbishop Riordan High School’s
production of “Dead Man Walking”
running Nov. 14-23, 16-year-old Dominic Collantes did not spend much time
thinking or talking about the death
penalty with friends and family.
That’s changed for Collantes, 16, and
the entire school community since
the book by Sister Helen Prejean was
chosen this year for the school’s first
experience with the “One School, One
Book” program, a community-building
educational initiative that aims to create a shared reading experience within
a single school community.
“It has definitely opened up more
dialogue,” Collantes said in an email to
Catholic San Francisco a week before
opening night. The book was read over
the summer by the entire school and
was chosen as the fall play.
“I think it has made every member
of the Riordan community think more
about how our justice system is being
run and if capital punishment is fair
and just,” he said.
The book, published in 1994, chronicles Sister Helen’s real-life experience
as the spiritual advisor to Elmo Patrick
Sonnier, a Louisiana man sentenced
to die in the electric chair for his part
in the murder of two teenagers in
1977. Out of that dreadful intimacy
which ended with her witness of his
execution in 1984 she wrote “Dead
Man Walking.” Her story about the
experience and the human and moral
consequences of the death penalty
became an Academy Award-winning
movie in 1995.
The title comes from a phrase once
used by prison guards as they walked a
condemned man to his execution.
Collantes, a junior in his п¬Ѓrst leading
role, said he has always rejected the
death penalty based on his Catholic beliefs, but his conviction has deepened.
“This story showed me that even a
man who committed such a horrible
crime is still a child of God,” he said.
He believes the death penalty is the
“taking of another human life,” not
unlike abortion, and he’s now asking
friends and family to think about the
topic in the light of their shared beliefs.
(PHOTO COURTESY ST. ANTHONY FOUNDATION)
New suits for
homeless veterans
St. Anthony Foundation honored homeless
and hungry veterans Nov. 10 with the help
of Men’s Wearhouse, which made 50 new
suits available to veterans who frequent the
foundation’s free food and clothing program
in San Francisco. Veterans Day was Nov. 11.
San Rafael dining
room needs supplies
San Rafael’s free dining room
serves almost 700 meals daily to
people in need. The holiday count is
even higher.
The cupboards of the dining room
are missing a vital ingredient for
their holiday meals this season, turkey and other meats. The Marin St.
Vincent de Paul Society, operator of
the dining room, sounded the alarm
in a statement asking for donations.
“This year in November and
December alone, we will serve more
than 40,000 hot meals to individuals
and families struggling to make ends
meet here in Marin,” said Christine
Paquette, executive director. “We’re
asking the public to help create a nice
holiday for a lot of people experiencing very serious hardship.”
The Free Dining Room appreciates donations of ground beef, п¬Ѓsh,
canned tuna, chicken and turkey.
Meat donations are accepted at 820 B
St., San Rafael, 6:30 a.m.-1 p.m., every
day. Drivers may easily drive to the
front of the dining room and hand off
donations to a volunteer.
For more information about food donations, call (415) 454-3303, ext.12;
visit www.vinnies.org; email [email protected]
LIVING TRUSTS WILLS
PROBATE
MICHAEL T. SWEENEY
ATTORNEY AT LAW
782A ULLOA STREET
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94127
(415) 664-8810
(PHOTO BY VALERIE SCHMALZ/CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO)
Liz Merski and Dominic Collantes star in Archbishop Riordan High School’s production of
“Dead Man Walking,” running Nov. 14-23.
“Redemption is possible and powerful,” he said.
Liz Merski, a senior at Lowell High
School in San Francisco, said she was
surprised by how her lead role as Sister
Helen impacted her, given that her belief system was already so similar. “Taking on this part has given me a glimpse
of what it’s like to carry the burden of
human life on your shoulders,” she said.
Merski, 17, understands why some
Catholics don’t see the death penalty
through the same pro-life eyes as they
do abortion and euthanasia. “But
you can’t be pro-life and pro-death
penalty,” she said. “To be pro-life is to
believe that all life has sanctity, that all
life is precious and that life is not ours
to destroy.”
She’s also troubled by the Christian
contradiction. “Is killing people who
kill people to show that killing is wrong
really the most ethical or effective way
to go about the problem of violence?”
she asked.
In a phone call squeezed between
classes and the play’s last days of
rehearsal, American literature teacher
and drama director Valerie O’Riordan
said she recommended “Dead Man
Walking” to the school because she
wanted to make “a bigger impact.”
She said the play became a natural
extension of the book and The Dead
Man Walking School Theatre Project
created by Sister Helen and actor Tim
Robbins, who wrote the screenplay.
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High schools and colleges have the
rights to the play if they include an
interdisciplinary, cross-curriculum
program on the subject. At Riordan, every teacher was asked to integrate the
death penalty into a lesson or project.
As an example, O’Riordan said her
American literature class is writing
lyrics for the play’s musical score and
the music department’s jazz class is
composing music. “Even the PE department is doing a project on the diet in
death row,” she said.
Stephen Baccari, Riordan’s freshman
theology teacher, said the experience
gave his students the opportunity to associate the required theology curriculum to a real-life, modern-day issue.
“In my Hebrew Scriptures class, students were assigned a project whereby
they became modern-day prophets trying to eradicate social issues that lead
to crimes that might result in a conviction and a death sentence,” he said.
Sally O’Connell, an associate in Riordan’s admissions department, said the
most important part of the schoolwide
project and the play is that “we are engaging our students and colleagues in
the exchange of ideas in a knowledgeable and respectful manner.”
“While opinions of the subject matter may vary, isn’t it enriching to all
be discussing with a common foundation?” she said. “It has broadened horizons on a topic that can really make
people squirm.”
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone Publisher
Rick DelVecchio Editor/General Manager
EDITORIAL
Valerie Schmalz, assistant editor
Tom Burke, On the Street/Calendar
Christina Gray, reporter
[email protected]
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[email protected]
ADVERTISING
Joseph PeГ±a, director
Mary Podesta, account representative
Chandra Kirtman, advertising & circulation coordinator
PRODUCTION
Karessa McCartney-Kavanaugh, manager
Joel Carrico, assistant
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ARCHDIOCESE 3
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Parish, school marking
�100 Good Deeds’ during
anniversary year
Holy Angels Parish
celebrates centennial
(PHOTO COURTESY GINA MORABE, HOLY ANGELS PARISH)
Auxiliary Bishop Robert W. McElroy blesses the new Holy Angels statue at Holy Angels Church during last month’s centennial celebration.
The eucharistic celebration of the
centennial jubilee of Holy Angels
Parish, Colma, was celebrated Oct. 5,
officiated by Auxiliary Bishop Robert
W. McElroy and assisted by pastor Father Alex L. Legaspi, parochial vicar
Father Erick Arauz and many priests
from the archdiocese.
The liturgy started with the
entrance of the Color Guard of the
Knights of Columbus, followed by
the lay ministers and the clergy. The
combined adult and children’s choir,
and the prayerful liturgical dance of
the students of Holy Angels School,
added to the prayerful atmosphere of
the celebration.
“The Archbishop Riordan High
School Band played joyful music
while Bishop McElroy blessed the
new Angel Garden,” school principal
Dominican Sister Leonarda Montealto said. “The 100 times ringing of the
bells and 100 pigeons released and set
free made everyone in the crowded
courtyard feel the presence of the
holy angels in the community.”
Sister Leonardo thanked Bishop
McElroy, the clergy, centennial committee members, donors and benefactors and all parishioners and friends.
“The 100 Good Deeds that the parish
and school community put together
during the centennial year will continue to bring joy and thanksgiving in
our hearts,” she said.
4 ON THE STREET WHERE YOU LIVE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Priesthood and
ministry to Chinese
community Father
McCotter’s joys
TOM BURKE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Paulist Father Dan McCotter calls it “a wonderful 31 years.” The time is his
tenure as pastor of Holy Family
Chinese Mission in San Francisco and since 2010, of both the
mission and Old St. Mary’s Cathedral from where he recently
retired.
Father Dan hails from Missouri, the “show me state.” He
attended Christian Brothers
Father Daniel
Military High School in St. Louis
McCotter, CSP
and entered the Christian Brothers in September 1959. “I admired their dedication to teaching,” he said. He served as a Christian Brother until priesthood beckoned and he
became a Paulist in 1978.
“I had worked with the Paulists as a Christian Brother at Good Shepherd School in New
York and was attracted to the charism of Paulist founder Father Isaac Hecker – to preach
the Gospel to those who have not yet heard it.”
Father Dan was ordained at New York City’s St.
Paul the Apostle Church May 16, 1981.
“My ordination and working in the Chinese
community,” are the two favorite things Father
Dan said he will take into retirement. He is
grateful and glad for the new St. Mary’s School
and Chinese Center on Kearny Street though
he said its path to completion was filled with
“almost impossible challenges” and “many,
many sleepless nights.” He shares the legacy of
the new facility with retired Archbishop George
Niederauer and Auxiliary Bishop Robert W.
McElroy.
“One never retires from being a priest,” Father
Dan said, though he said he does look forward to
fewer responsibilities.
“In the Paulists we call it SMS – Senior Ministry Status.” He will continue to work at St.
Mary’s School part time as director of development and chaplain and plans to travel as well as
spend time with his family in St. Louis.
“After 31 years it was time to let go … well not
really let go,” Father Dan said.
HERE AND NOW: Sacred Heart Cathedral Preparatory calls the late Michael Del Debbio “a beloved SHC investor.” The UC Berkeley grad left
his entire estate of some $10,000 to the school to
buy textbooks for low-income students. Michael
lived the last two decades of his life homeless
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CONSECRATED LIVES: Mercy Sister Diane Grassilli, now deceased, was honored for her efforts on behalf of SVdP’s Catherine’s
Center Oct. 23 at a Kohl Mansion gala. More than $100,000 was raised for the now 11-year old ministry assisting women leaving
incarceration. “Catherine’s Center shows the love of God at work,” said Mercy Sister Marguerite Buchanan, a founder of the facility and
pictured here with Sister Diane’s brother Bob Grassilli at the event.
anced and less agitated.” His health eventually sagged and the monastery facilitated his
admittance to St. Mary’s Medical Center with
terminal cancer. His last days were in hospice
with the Missionaries of Charity. He had given
one of the volunteers a key to keep. The key was
to a safe deposit box where the cash and a will
leaving it all to SHC were found. “We grew to
love Michael and I think he felt safe, cared for
by us and protected by his time in the chapel,” a
monastery representative said.
MADAME SECRETARY: Former U.S. Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice was a special guest at St. Ignatius College Preparatory Oct. 10. The one-time cabinet member is godmother to
SI senior Joe Begovich and it was at his invitation that the SI visit
came to be. “Dr. Rice answered questions from students in the
AP Government Class, met faculty and administrators and spoke
to the entire student body,” the school said. “She urged them to
discover their passions and to pursue their dreams.”
and suffering from mental illness. Over the last
half-dozen years Michael spent much time in
the chapel of the Cristo Rey monastery near the
University of San Francisco. Volunteers at the
chapel welcomed “the man with a full straggly
beard, a huge backpack stuffed with a sleeping
bag and grocery bags in each hand.” As time
passed they suggest his hours before the Blessed
Sacrament helped Michael become “more bal-
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(415) 346-6719
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BREAKING BREAD: San Mateo Pro-life welcomed Eva Muntean as speaker for the group’s
annual dinner Oct. 19 at St. Mark Parish,
Belmont. Eva is a founder of Walk for Life West
Coast coming up in January. Caite Fitzgerald,
Maria Healy and Kira Costello, all seniors at
Notre Dame High School, Belmont, were among
the volunteer servers for the event. “Eva spoke
about her background and how she and her
family escaped from behind the Iron Curtain in
Hungary when she was 12 years of age,” said
Vicki McNamara in a note to this column. After
Eva’s family immigrated to the United States,
they were blessed with the gift of conversion
and became devout Catholics, Vicki said.
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ARCHDIOCESE 5
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
MARTYRS: Jesuits working to honor, emulate lives of massacre victims
FROM PAGE 1
for social change. Their murders
marked a turning point in the nearly
13-year uprising in which 75,000 civilians died or disappeared. A peace
accord was reached in 1992.
Carter said USF students, many
of whom were not even born in 1989,
understand what the priests’ sacrifice
means to them and to the world. On
Nov. 16 they will walk in candlelit
procession from a Mass at St. Ignatius
Church to the garden dedicated to
Jesuit Father Ignacio Martin-Baro.
They will pray and plant wooden
crosses in the soil around his statue.
But the priests’ legacy extends far
beyond annual commemorations.
The work continues in part through
the Ignatian Solidarity Network, a national faith-based social justice organization mobilizing Jesuit educators
in the U.S.to follow in the footsteps of
the martyrs.
“We are challenged as persons and
communities of faith to live more in
solidarity with persons at the margins of our church and society,” said
Carter, who is a member of the network. “That is the crux of our faith.”
On Nov. 15-17, Carter will join 1,300
other people in Washington, D.C., for
17th Annual Ignatian Family TeachIn for Justice.
“This a community that sees faith
and justice integrally linked,” said
Carter, one of the event’s speakers.
“Blood in the Backyard,” a documentary depicting the story and legacy
of the Jesuit murders, will make its
national premiere at the event.
(CNS PHOTO/LUIS GALDAMEZ, REUTERS)
(PHOTO COURTESY KATE CARTER)
Leadership development is the
primary focus for participants
coming from Jesuit universities,
high schools and parishes as well as
Jesuit Volunteer Corps volunteers.
On the last day of the event participants will go to Capitol Hill to talk
with lawmakers about immigration
reform and other justice issues.
In July, Carter traveled to El
Salvador as part of a 45-person
Ignatian Solidarity Network delegation to mark the 25th anniversary of
the Jesuit massacre. The delegates
were housed at Jesuit University in
San Salvador but also stayed in the
homes of Salvadoran hosts, most of
Above, a stone bearing the names of six Jesuits
massacred in 1989 is seen at Central American
University in San Salvador, El Salvador, Nov. 16,
2009, the 20th anniversary of their deaths. Left,
Kate Carter, an assistant director of admissions at
the University of San Francisco, is pictured with
members of her host family in El Salvador last July.
Carter was one of 45 people from Jesuit institutions
around the country who traveled to El Salvador with
the Ignatian Solidarity Network to commemorate the
25th anniversary of the murders of six Jesuit priests
and two local women by the Salvadoran military.
whom did not have water or electricity.
Even two decades after the peace
accords officially ended the conflict, the country suffers epidemic
violence and impunity from legal
prosecution, social disintegration,
a stagnant economy and extensive
migration that tears apart communities and families, Carter said.
Poverty remains widespread, she
said, although towns are slowly
building road and electricity networks that did not exist 20 years ago.
Carter said the saddest reality
of El Salvador is the migration of
unaccompanied children who are
fleeing for their lives as Salvadorans
struggle for basic needs. “They are
no longer fleeing military violence,”
she said. “Now it’s gang violence.”
The most positive aspect was seeing how much hope remains despite
the hardships.
“They have a tremendous desire
for a parcel of land to work, food on
the table and to send their kids to
school,” Carter said. “They are not
giving up. Neither can we.”
“In my Catholic tradition, there
are many people at the table, but
there are so many people who aren’t
there,” she said. “What are we going
to do to make the table bigger?”
6 ARCHDIOCESE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
A Sister of Mercy finds her inner artist
LIZ DOSSA
A year ago, Mercy Sister Janet Chau began to
learn to draw. She didn’t know if she could be an
artist, but it was something she had wanted to do
since she was a little girl in Hong Kong. She had
accompanied her older brother Edwin to his art
class, but he was the student. She was just his
small chaperone. After retiring from 10 years of
ministry as coordinator of children’s faith formation at St. Agnes Parish in San Francisco, last year
she decided to take art classes at the newly opened
Peninsula Museum of Art in Burlingame.
Artist and teacher Susan Switzer took Sister
Janet under her wing in class. “She was so diligent
in working on her п¬Ѓrst picture and was so excited
when she п¬Ѓnished it because she never knew she
could do something so nice,” said Switzer.
Few beginning artists receive the support that
has surrounded her. Her Mercy sisters encouraged
her, visiting shows when her art was displayed.
Several pieces are exhibited outside the convent
dining room. After a Chinese retreat at Mercy
Center in December 2013, she took retreatants
to the open studios event at the museum. They
were enthusiastic about the work of their leader
who showed another side in addition to her skill
at facilitating spiritual formation in their п¬Ѓrst
language.
St. Agnes Parish invited Janet to their fundraising dinner last February. She was happy to donate
her drawings to their silent auction. The second
and third she had ever created were sold. The pastor, Jesuit Father Ray Allender, liked her work, but
said “I can’t be part of this auction. I’m staff.” Janet said offhandedly, “There will be another time.”
(PHOTO COURTESY LIZ DOSSA)
Father Ray himself arranged for another time.
In September he invited her to exhibit her work
at the parish volunteer appreciation brunch.
Janet brought п¬Ѓve pieces and sold six, she said,
laughing. Father Ray liked her portrait of a hummingbird so much that he commissioned a piece
from her. Her proceeds have gone to Mercy Beyond Borders, a ministry for women and girls in
Sudan and Haiti created by Sister Marilyn Lacey.
Art is part of her family history. The brother
she followed to class, Edwin H.K. Chau, was accomplished in Chinese painting, watercolor and
“Never tire of working for a more just world, marked by greater solidarity!”
—Pope Francis, Apostolic Journey to Rio de Janeiro, July 25, 2013
Members of a Chinese retreat group at
Mercy Center in Burlingame are pictured
with artwork by Mercy Sister Janet
Chau, fourth from left, who found a new
avocation as an artist after retiring from
10 years of ministry as coordinator of
children’s faith formation at St. Agnes
Parish in San Francisco.
oil. He left 300 paintings at his death in Toronto
many years ago. His youngest daughter Katie
Chau Niergarth, is an architect working with
the Ottawa government. Her other niece was
curator at the Detroit Institute of Art for more
than 10 years until the financial chaos of Detroit. Currently, Amelia is enjoying working at a
museum at Sacramento.
Shy and soft spoken Sister Janet has a focus
and determination that has led to her artistic
development. Still busy giving retreats in Chinese three times a year and mentoring Chinese
groups that gather at Mercy Center, she loves to
relax and do her artwork. “Sitting in front of the
TV is a torture for me. I like to do things with
purpose. I draw instead,” she says. The proceeds
of the next sale of her drawings will go to St.
Vincent de Paul’s Catherine’s Center where
women after incarceration are helped to transform from deep within, and start a new life.
She likes simplicity, not abstraction, she
says. Her subjects are a rose, a goblet, a hummingbird. But Switzer points out that her work
has complexity and depth to it. “Her work has
progressed. She has learned how to pay attention to detail,” said Switzer. “She is very excited
about being able to use charcoal and give the
object dimension. She uses light and dark to get
perspective.”
Switzer explains the popularity of Sister
Janet’s art: “When you really love something
it shines through. When people know her, it is
an honor to have a piece of her work in their
home.”
DOSSA is West Midwest communications manager for
the Sisters of Mercy.
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NATIONAL 7
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Look to his history to understand �pope of surprises,’ cardinal says
PATRICIA ZAPOR
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
WASHINGTON – Pope Francis is
clearly “a pope of surprises,” German Cardinal Walter Kasper said in
an address in Washington Nov. 6, and
those who would try to understand the
pontiff, he added, should remember his
Argentine roots and how they influence his theology and his world view.
The president emeritus of the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity, Cardinal Kasper was at
The Catholic University of America to
accept the Johannes Quasten Medal for
Excellence in Scholarship and Leadership in Religious Studies.
In a 45-minute address about the
pope’s ecclesiology and ecumenical
vision to a crowded hall that included
many seminarians, Cardinal Kasper
said that Pope Francis has, “succeeded
in a short time in brightening up the
gloomy atmosphere that had settled
like mildew on the church.”
However, he acknowledged, every
pope has his “proponents and his
enemies.” Likewise, Pope Francis has
his own detractors, the cardinal said.
Those who do not trust his new style or
new enthusiasm and may “decide to sit
this papacy out.”
“What for some is the beginning of a
new spring, is for others a temporary
cold spell,” he said.
Cardinal Kasper said Pope Francis
“is the first pope to have grown up in a
multicultural megalopolis in the southern hemisphere.” That shaped him
with some European influences, but he
also was strongly affected by Argentine
culture, including its п¬Ѓlms and music.
The cardinal compared the theological influences on Pope Francis with
those of his predecessor Pope Benedict
XVI. Pope Benedict comes from the
best European theological traditions,
seeking to put the doctrine of the faith
into practice.
“Pope Francis works differently,”
Cardinal Kasper said, and not necessarily in the way in which he is sometimes portrayed. “He’s not a Franciscan in disguise, he’s a Jesuit, through
and through.” That means, according
to the cardinal, that he begins with a
concrete situation and seeks to assess
(CNS PHOTO/TYLER ORSBURN)
German Cardinal Walter Kasper, retired president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting
Christian Unity, wears the 2014 Johannes Quasten Award medallion on a purple ribbon. It was
presented to him Nov. 6 by Msgr. Paul McPartlan, acting dean of the School of Theology and
Religious Studies at The Catholic University of America in Washington.
it according to the rules for discernment drawn from the Ignatian spiritual
exercises, before arriving at a concrete
action or position.
That method corresponds to the
approach of St. John XXIII during the
Second Vatican Council, he said, “reading the signs of the times.”
Understanding Argentina’s variant
of liberation theology also is instructive for those who wish to understand
Pope Francis, he said.
The same “see, judge, act” approach
of the Jesuits describes Argentine liberation theology, Cardinal Kasper said.
While in other places in Latin
America, the approach focused on the
social and political conditions that
led to societal inequality, sometimes
in a Marxist manner, “Argentinian
liberation theology is a theology of the
people and their culture.”
It proceeds from a historical and
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cultural analysis of popular culture,
in which people are unified by shared
conscience, he said. “It does not want
to instruct people, but listen to their
wisdom.”
Cardinal Kasper said the pope is a
deeply spiritual man who is convinced
that the light of the Gospel is the only
thing that can help people fully understand and interpret reality.
For Pope Francis, he said, “faith is a
light, but not like a lighthouse which
expels all dark, but a lighted torch
which guides our steps into the night.”
That insight helps to understand how
Pope Francis operates, from a basis of
the Gospel as an instrument of joy and
of reform.
“Pope Francis stands in a great
tradition,” Cardinal Kasper said. “He
does not represent a liberal tradition,
but a traditional position,” as in going
back to the Gospels as the source and
strength of renewal for the church.
Pope Francis doesn’t intend to
revolutionize faith and morality, as “he
wants to lead faith and morality back
to their original center,” to the heart of
the Gospels, the cardinal said.
Particularly through his constant
message of the need for mercy, Pope
Francis emphasizes that, as St. Thomas
Aquinas said, “God is not bound by
our views of justice,” but only to God’s
own desires. “God allows himself to be
moved by the needs and sympathies of
man.”
“For him, a new beginning and a new
chance are always possible. It’s impossible that any human being can fall into
a hole from which there is no way out.”
Cardinal Kasper said another
message of Pope Francis is that it is
important that the church not be so
self-centered.
“A self-centered person is sick,”
Cardinal Kasper said. “A self-centered
church is a sick church.” Pope Francis
wants to leave behind the self-centered,
self-pitying church immersed in its
own suffering, he added.
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8 NATIONAL
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Ruling sets up possible Supreme Court round
PATRICIA ZAPOR
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
WASHINGTON – Although the Supreme Court just
a few weeks ago declined to accept any of several challenges to rulings making same-sex marriage legal in
various states, a 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision Nov. 6 could lead to another shot at the high court
weighing in on a nationwide approach to such unions.
It is the п¬Ѓrst federal appeals court ruling to uphold
states’ rights to decide that marriage may be restricted
to only heterosexual couples. Four federal appellate
courts – the 4th, 7th, 9th and 10th – have said such bans
are unconstitutional.
In a 2-1 ruling, the panel of the 6th Circuit said that
although the question is no longer whether same-sex
marriage will be allowed in the United States, but
when and how, the two judges said it is better “to allow
change through the customary political processes,”
than through court rulings.
“When the courts do not let the people resolve new
social issues like this one, they perpetuate the idea
that the heroes in these change events are judges and
lawyers,” the ruling said, in overturning lower courts
in the circuit that covers Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio
and Michigan.
The Supreme Court typically does not accept cases
of nationwide impact unless there is a division among
lower circuit courts. The 6th Circuit’s ruling is the first
to uphold states’ rights to prohibit same-sex marriage.
As Judge Jeffrey Sutton noted in his 34-page opinion,
“four federal courts of appeal have compelled several
other states to permit same-sex marriages under the
14th Amendment,” and 19 states plus the District of
Columbia have expanded the definition of marriage to
v
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The appellate court had acknowledged �the reasonable
arguments for preserving
the true definition of marriage’ and respecting �the
self-determination of states on this issue.’
ARCHBISHOP SALVATORE J. CORDILEONE
Chairman, U.S. bishops’ Subcommittee for the Promotion and Defense of Marriage
include same-sex unions.
The ruling could be appealed to the full 6th Circuit
or directly to the Supreme Court. If the latter, the case
could come to the high court for review this term.
Cases are typically heard through April with rulings
by the end of June.
Sutton was joined in the majority ruling by Judge
Deborah Cook. They found that “the marriage laws
do not violate the Constitution. A principled jurisprudence of constitutional evolution turns on evolution in
society’s values, not evolution in judges’ values. Freed
of federal-court intervention, 31 states would continue
to define marriage the old-fashioned way.”
Judge Martha Craig Daughtrey wrote an equally
lengthy dissent arguing that the majority was shirking the court’s responsibility to determine “individual
rights under the 14th Amendment, regardless of popular opinion or even a plebiscite.”
In her dissent, Daughtrey said that if “we in the
judiciary do not have the authority, and indeed the responsibility, to right fundamental wrongs left excused
by a majority of the electorate, our whole intricate,
constitutional system of checks and balances, as well
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as the oaths to which we swore, prove to be nothing but
shams.”
Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone of San Francisco, chairman of the U.S. bishops’ Subcommittee for the
Promotion and Defense of Marriage, praised the 6th
Circuit panel’s majority ruling for upholding citizens’
rights “to protect and defend marriage as the unique
relationship of a man and a woman.” He said the court
had acknowledged “the reasonable arguments for preserving the true definition of marriage” and respecting “the self-determination of states on this issue.”
“It is not society’s laws or for that matter any one religion’s laws, but nature’s laws – that men and women
complement each other biologically – that created the
policy imperative,” Archbishop Cordileone said in a
statement.
The Michigan Catholic Conference, which supports
upholding the state’s 2004 voter-approved amendment
defining marriage as limited to between a man and a
woman, called the court’s ruling “a joyous occasion
for many communities and families across the state
that have sought to protect the traditional definition of
marriage.”
Catholic teaching upholds the traditional definition of marriage and holds that any sexual activity
outside of marriage is sinful. The church also teaches
that homosexual attraction itself is not sinful and that
homosexual people “must be accepted with respect,
compassion and sensitivity.”
On Nov. 5, a federal judge in St. Louis overturned
Missouri’s ban on same-sex marriage. Before the close
of business that day, at least some Missouri local governments began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex
couples.
Two days later, a federal judge in Kansas City, Missouri, also overturned the state limits on marriage.
That judge said the order could not take effect until
appeals to higher courts are concluded. Attorney General Chris Koster said he would appeal.
On Nov. 4, a federal judge in Topeka, Kansas, said
that state’s ban on same-sex marriage is unenforceable,
but blocked the ruling from taking effect until the state
has time to appeal. Kansas is in the 10th Circuit, where
a panel ruled 2-1 in July that Oklahoma’s and Utah’s
bans on same-sex marriage are unconstitutional.
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NATIONAL 9
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Chicago documents detail
abuse cases from decades ago
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
CHICAGO – The Archdiocese of
Chicago Nov. 6 released approximately 15,000 pages of documents related
to 36 archdiocesan priests who have
substantiated allegations of sexual
misconduct with minors. The documents are posted on the archdiocesan
website, www.archchicago.org.
All of the records pertain to
incidents that took place years or
decades ago, and the names of all of
the priests involved have been posted
on the website for years. Fourteen of
the 36 priests have died; none of them
are in ministry in the Archdiocese of
Chicago.
John O’Malley, special counsel to
the archbishop for misconduct issues,
said the documents answer several
questions: what the abuse was and
when it happened; when the archdiocese learned about it; and what the
archdiocese did about it.
The archdiocese released similar records pertaining to 30 other priests in
January. The two sets of documents
released cover all of the archdiocesan
priests with substantiated allegations
of sexual misconduct with minors
who are identified on the archdiocesan website except for two, who have
ongoing civil or canonical legal cases.
“As we said in January, we are
committed to transparency with the
people we serve,” Cardinal Francis
E. George said in a statement. “We
cannot change the past but we hope
we can rebuild trust through honest
and open dialogue. Child abuse is a
crime and a sin. The Archdiocese of
Chicago is concerned п¬Ѓrst and foremost with bringing healing to abuse
victims.”
O’Malley said he hopes that people
who want to know how the archdiocese has responded to abuse allegations will look to the documents.
“There still remains some unsureness about what has happened in the
Archdiocese of Chicago, and some of
the advocates continue to say nothing
has changed and that the archdiocese’s response to this issue has been
bad, that it’s not enough,” O’Malley
said. “Let’s get the full story out. Our
hope is that fair-minded people can
look at these documents and see that
the archdiocese has worked very hard
since 1992 to respond compassionately, responsibly, appropriately and
fairly.”
The release of documents in January was part of a mediated agreement
involving Minnesota-based attorney
Jeffrey Anderson. When those documents were released, Cardinal George
made a commitment to release the
rest of the п¬Ѓles as well, although this
release was completely voluntary
and not required by any court or any
agreement with plaintiffs or their attorneys, O’Malley said.
While many other dioceses have
released similar documents, it has
generally been as part of a court
settlement or bankruptcy, he said.
Ninety-two percent of the cases
included in the documents released
Nov. 6 occurred before 1988, the statement said
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10 WORLD
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Pope: Don’t be
afraid of critics;
seek out, share
Gospel with sinners
CAROL GLATZ
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
(CNS PHOTO/PAUL HARING)
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VATICAN CITY – God isn’t afraid of getting his
hands dirty, being inconvenienced or even scorned
because he will do whatever it takes to save everyone from sin, Pope Francis said in a morning
homily.
“A true priest, a true Christian, have this zeal
inside that no one should be lost. And for this
reason they aren’t afraid of getting their hands
dirty. They’re not afraid,” he said Nov. 6 during
his morning Mass in the Domus Sanctae Marthae
where he lives.
“They go where they must, they risk their life,
risk their reputation, risk losing their comforts,
their social status, even losing their ecclesiastical
career, too. But they are a good pastor, and Christians must be this way, too,” he said, according to
Vatican Radio.
The pope’s homily focused on the day’s Gospel
reading from St. Luke (15:1-10), in which Jesus
explains to the scandalized Pharisees and scribes
why he welcomes and eats with sinners.
“It was a real scandal back then” for anyone to
associate with such sinners, the pope said. “Imagine if there had been newspapers back then!” he
said, implying there would have been many shocking headlines.
But with his parables of the lost sheep and the
lost coin, Jesus explains why he came: “To go and
search for those who were distanced from the
Lord,” Pope Francis said.
“God is not a businessman,” who is making sure
any effort brings in high returns; “God is a father
and he goes all out, all the way to save” even just
one person, the pope said, “This is God’s love.”
“He doesn’t stop halfway on the path of salvation, as if to say, �I did everything. It’s their
problem.’ He always goes, he heads out, he comes
down.”
The scribes and Pharisees, on the other hand,
“go halfway. They care about having the balance
sheet of profits and losses be more or less in their
favor,” so the thought of losing a few sheep doesn’t
bother them in the least as long as they can say “I
earned a lot” in the end.
The pope said, “It’s sad” when priests and Christians today only go “halfway” in sharing God’s
love and salvation.
“It’s sad, the priest who opens the door of the
church and stays put, waiting. It’s sad, the Christian who doesn’t feel deep down, in his heart, the
need, the necessity to go and tell others the Lord is
good,” the pope said.
“How much perversion there is in the heart of
those who believe themselves righteous, like these
scribes, the Pharisees. Oh, they don’t want to get
their hands dirty with sinners,” he said.
“A priest must have God’s heart and go all the
way” because he wants no one to be lost, the pope
said. Lay Christians must do the same.
“It’s so easy to condemn others,” the pope said,
“but it is not Christian, you know? It is not what
children of God do. The children of God go all out,
give their lives for others, like Jesus did. They cannot be at ease, taking care of themselves and their
comfort, their reputation,” he said.
Good priests and laypeople “go out, always heading out, going out of themselves, heading towards
God, in prayer, in adoration, heading out toward
others to bring them the message of salvation.”
This attitude means that good priests and laypeople also know what tenderness and joy are, the
pope said. They know the tenderness of “putting
the lost sheep over their shoulders and bringing it
back to the others” and the joy “that comes from
God, that joy that comes from the heart of the
father who goes to save!”
“Do not be afraid of people being critical of you
for going to look for brothers and sisters who are
distanced from the Lord,” he said. “Let’s ask for
this grace for each one of us and for our mother,
the holy church.”
WORLD 11
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Pakistan bishops protest beating
deaths of Christian couple
Irish archbishop
decries comments
critical of pope
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
THRISSUR, India – Catholic leaders in Pakistan protested the Nov.
4 beatings and burning of a young
Christian couple accused of desecrating the Quran.
“The government has absolutely
failed to protect its citizens’ right to
life,” said the National Commission
for Justice and Peace of the Catholic
Bishops Conference of Pakistan in a
statement Nov. 5.
Condemning the brutal killing of
Shahzad Masih, 28, and his pregnant wife, Shama Bibi, 24, the NCJP
pointed out that the killing of the
couple at the hands of a mob was
based on a “false accusation of blasphemy.”
Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz
Sharif added his voice those condemning the killings. He described
the incident as “an unacceptable
crime” in a Nov. 6 statement.
“A responsible state cannot tolerate mob rule and public lynching
with impunity,” he said.
“I have directed the Punjab
(province) chief minister to show
no mercy, and the law should take
its course to punish those who are
responsible for this act,” he told local media.
Jawad Qamar, a police official
DUBLIN – Archbishop Diarmuid
Martin of Dublin decried comments
from clerics and others who said
Pope Francis caused confusion in
his calls for an open discussion on
how the church should reach out to
those who are marginalized, hurt
and wounded in their lives during
the recent Synod of Bishops on the
family.
Archbishop Martin said he was
“quite surprised at the remarks of
some commentators within church
circles about the recent Synod of
Bishops, often making accusations of
confusion where such confusion did
not exist and so actually fomenting
confusion.”
He did not identify specific comments during a Mass marking the
refurbishment of a church at the
Dublin Institute of Technology
Nov. 4.
Archbishop Martin said he believed that “a longing for certainties
may spring from personal uncertainty rather than strong faith. A strong
– and indeed orthodox faith – is never
afraid of discussion,” he said.
“They fail to see how Pope Francis
shows that his concern for people
who suffer is far from being a sign
of dogmatic relativism, but rather is
a sign of pastoral patience,” Archbishop Martin said.
Archbishop Martin also said that
“a church which becomes a comfort
zone for the like-minded ceases to be
truly the church of Jesus Christ.”
(CNS PHOTO/RAHAT DAR, EPA)
Relatives of a Christian couple killed after being accused of blasphemy cry at their home in
Kasur, Pakistan, Nov. 5.
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ple for the killing? The trial will
not reach anywhere,” Michelle
Choudhry, director of Cecil & Iris
Choudhry Foundation, told Catholic
News Service.
“This is the umpteenth time that
crowds have been provoked on religious sentiments to settle personal
scores and dispense mob justice.
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nearly 50 people were arrested and
600 were charged in connection with
the murder.
At least one Catholic advocacy
group expressed doubt about the arrests and charges.
“How can they charge 600 peo-
12
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014V
TREASURES
of the archives
STORY BY RICK DELVECCHIO
PHOTOS BY DENNIS CALLAHAN
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
O
utgoing archdiocesan archivist Deacon Jeffrey
Burns is your guide to the documentary greatest hits of local church history.
Deacon Burns, who retires in
January, gathered many little-known
but revealing collections during his 31year career, and spoke to Catholic San
Francisco about 10 that he feels will
be of exceptional value to historians
in the future. The Ph.D. historian
helped expand the archives into a
resource not only for the instituDeacon Burns
tions of the archdiocese but also for
all aspects of church life. The archives, housed in the
basement at St. Patrick’s Seminary & University in Menlo
Park, extensively documents the historic archdiocese that
long contained territories split off in 1962 to form the Oakland, Santa Rosa and Stockton dioceses.
1
Father Donald
McDonnell
One of five archdiocesan priests
known as the “Spanish Mission
Band,” Father McDonnell is credited
with having helped discover farmworkers’ union leader Cesar Chavez. Chavez once
called Father McDonnell, who died in 2012, the most important man in his
life. Father McDonnell’s personal papers include reports he filed from the
field when he reported to Archbishop John J. Mitty, starting in 1950-51.
Given nonparochial duties ministering to migrant workers in farm fields
around the Bay Area, the original four members of the “mission band” were
Fathers McDonnell, Thomas McCullough, Ralph Duggan and John Garcia.
The priests were sent to attend to the spiritual needs of migrants and braceros but the clerics “are so shocked by what they see about the physical needs
that they end up advocating for higher wages,” Deacon Burns said. The
“Mission Band” priests were controversial in their work helping to organize
farmworkers, and Deacon Burns calls the collection “an incredible set” that
documents the lives of migrants in the 1950s and church ministry to them.
3
An image on a
Boyle for Assembly
campaign letter
2
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
4
The POPE papers
POPE stood for Parents for Orthodoxy in Parochial Education, a group
established in Marin County in the
1960s in the backlash to the reforms
of Vatican II. Led by school parent Frances Bodeen, the group was
particularly concerned about the
breakdown of Catholicity in parochial
education and alarmed by such developments as sex education. The collection “provides a window into the
conservative movement that would blossom later,” Deacon Burns said. A foreshadowing of later battles
can be seen in the group’s fight to protect Catholic teaching. In one document, the group laments that a “a
vicious unrelenting campaign” has been waged to discredit the Baltimore Catechism. “The Catholic intellectual left composed of liberal educators including priests and nuns occupying high positions with the
education established are the �elite’ who damn the Baltimore.” Another memo, from 1976, says that since the
group was founded 10 years earlier “we have heard from about 60,000 parents whose children were religious
illiterates” and were begging for orthodox teaching aids.
5
Sister Corita Kent
Sister Maria
de la Cruz Aymes
The Society of Helpers sister worked
for the archdiocesan religious education department in the 1950s and
developed the “On Our Way” series
of CCD texts. At the time Catholic
school and religious ed texts were
moving away from the Baltimore
Catechism, a controversial trend. “On
Our Way” emphasized experience in a
style known as kerygmatic, referring
to preaching the Gospel especially in
the manner of the early
church. “The loveliest
lady,” Deacon Burns
said, Mexican-born
Sister Maria, who
died in 2009, later
became very involved in catechesis to the Spanishspeaking.
A detail from the cover of
“With Christ to the Father,”
a workbook with the “On Our Way”
religious ed series
Immaculate Heart Sister Corita Kent was a Catholic pop artist who decorated the
Vatican pavilion at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair and remixed advertising
slogans to create colorful posters in the style of the era. But the story told in her
collection is one of struggle as the church adapted to Vatican II. The sisters who
led Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles renewed their charism post-council
but the change did not suit the local ordinary, Cardinal Francis A. McIntyre.
Sister Corita poured out her heart to Sulpician Father Robert Giguere at St.
Patrick’s Seminary, writing him more than 100 letters, many in the margins of
pages torn from magazines, from 1964-68. She shared intensely personal feelings about the great hopes the sisters felt in 1964-65 and the sense that matters
were spiraling out of control in 1967. She left the order in 1968. The controversy
“had to do with a vision of the future but in my estimation it ended up a battle
over authority,” Deacon Burns said.
Latin American
Mission Program
7
Formed in the 1960s, LAMP
sent missionaries of the
archdiocese to Mexicali,
Mexico, and Guatemala.
Missionaries sent back
regular field reports, which
were published in the
archdiocesan newspaper
The Monitor. In a tragic
note from a brutal time
in Central America, one
missionary prepared 26 lay
catechists in a Guatemalan village – and all were
killed by government death
squads during the nation’s
civil war.
9
AIDS ministry
Dominican Father Michael
Lopes, succeeded by Father
Rodney DeMartini, developed
the first response of the local
church to the AIDS crisis, in
the mid-1980s. They formed a
hospice program and helped
provide proper information to
combat fear and misinformation as the crisis grew. The
collection includes the personal
papers of two priests who were
working their way through the
process of creating what Deacon
Burns called a groundbreaking ministry and high point
for the church. For example,
a 1987 paper for an interfaith
conference on the crisis, titled
“Reflections on Roman Catholic
Moral Teaching in the AIDS
Epidemic,” includes thoughts
by another priest, Father Xavier
Harris from the Franciscan
School of Theology in Berkeley. “God is in the AIDS crisis,”
he reflects, “bringing us into
Irasmos, so that the works of
God might be revealed in us. We
cannot predict how, but we are
all being transformed. And may
God help us in the process.”
Father Eugene Boyle
An archdiocesan priest in the 1960s and early �70s, he
worked with Cesar Chavez and was a leading civil rights
advocate as well as the director of the archdiocesan
Social Justice Commission. In 1968 he was appointed
pastor at now-closed Sacred Heart Parish in San Francisco. The Black Panthers had a breakfast program for
children at the time and Father Boyle allowed the Panthers to use the church for the activity, a move that got
him into trouble when FBI counterintelligence planted a
Panther coloring book – drafted but never distributed – that
depicted police in highly inflammatory terms. Father Boyle
was called before a U.S. Senate committee, resulting in a
June 24, 1969, San Francisco Examiner screaming headline
“Catholic-Panther ties rapped by Senators.” During
the hearing, Sen. Karl Mundt of South Dakota
commented, “When they’re handing out materials like this in a church basement you begin to
understand why this country’s in trouble.” The
collection fills more than 20 boxes and captures many of the controversies of the era,
Deacon Burns said. Father Boyle kept everything, including a letter from a detractor
with the salutation “Dear Father Boyle, or
should I say Dear Fathead Boyle.” He later
ran for state Assembly, and the collection
includes a campaign letter hailing the priest
as “synonymous with justice and equality.”
Msgr. Boyle, who was ordained in 1946, is a
retired priest in the Diocese of San Jose.
6
13
Bishop Mark Hurley
Bishop Hurley’s collection includes a
glimpse of the working process at the
Second Vatican Council: the bishop’s
copies of various drafts and then final
documents as churchmen from around
the world conferred. On the inside flap
of one draft, on the activities of the mission church, Bishop Hurley jotted down
the names of the attendees on Nov. 6, 1964: 19
bishops from at least 14 countries, with the pope
present. The collection also includes Bishop Hurley’s personal papers,
documenting his work in settling the San Francisco State strike in 1970
and his concern about the church-state question in the United States
and in Ireland, a topic of one of the many books written by the San
Francisco auxiliary who later served as Bishop of Santa Rosa.
Bishop Hurley took roll at a Nov. 6, 1964, Vatican II session on the mission church.
8
Father
Leo Schmidt
This Sister Corita Kent serigraph features an early Beatles lyric.
Archdiocesan priest Father
Schmidt was an amateur filmmaker who shot footage of
St. Patrick’s Seminary in the
early 1930s. Scenes of seminarians playing baseball and
Archbishops John J. Mitty
and Edward Joseph Hanna at
a gathering are included in
the collection’s two reels.
10
Priests’ senate and council
The representative body of the archdiocesan presbyterate first met
in 1966 and was highly active and independent through the 1980s, with
secretary Peg Moses keeping records so scrupulous as to provide a guide
to almost any topic in the archdiocese during the period. Highlights of the
records include the gap between younger and older priests revealed in the
1960s and a 1969 USF study of priests’ attitudes toward authority. The collection includes a Nov. 13, 1980, Social Action Committee report by Franciscan Father Floyd A. Lotito summarizing Vatican hopes for world peace and
for a “new history” of mankind incorporating faith, hope and charity.
14 WORLD
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Pope names new Vatican foreign minister, high court prefect
CINDY WOODEN AND FRANCIS X. ROCCA
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Pope Francis named the
60-year-old nuncio to Australia, Archbishop Paul
R. Gallagher, to be the Vatican’s
new foreign minister.
The position, formally known
as the secretary for relations with
states, was held by the Moroccoborn French Archbishop Dominique Mamberti, who was named
Nov. 8 the new prefect of the
Apostolic Signature, the Vatican’s
Archbishop
highest court.
Mamberti
Archbishop Gallagher, a native of Liverpool, England, is a
veteran of the Vatican diplomatic corps and had
been named nuncio to Australia by Pope Benedict
XVI in 2012.
In his п¬Ѓrst posting as a nuncio, St. John Paul II
sent him to Burundi in 2004 to replace Archbishop
Michael A. Courtney, who was gunned down
by unknown assailants. The nuncio’s death in
Burundi marked the п¬Ѓrst time in the modern age
that a papal ambassador had been assassinated.
In an interview with Catholic News Service in
2000, then-Msgr. Gallagher said that although an
ambassador’s life is filled with protocol, social
niceties and cocktail parties, the Vatican foreign
service counts less on “social animals” than on
good priests.
The Holy See looks for “someone who can
express his priesthood through his diplomatic
work,” said the Liverpool-born cleric, who served
as the Vatican permanent observer at the Council
of Europe from 2000 to 2004.
Ordained to the priesthood in 1977, he later
earned a degree in canon law and studied at the
Pontifical Ecclesiastical Academy, which trains
Vatican diplomats. He joined the Vatican’s diplomatic service in 1984, serving in nunciatures
in Tanzania, Uruguay and the Philippines. He
worked at the Vatican Secretariat of State from
1994 to 2000, focusing particularly on Southeast
Asia.
From 2009 to 2012, he served as nuncio to Guatemala.
The Archbishop Mamberti, 62, also is a veteran
of the Vatican diplomatic corps and has been secretary for relations with states since September
2006.
Ordained to the priesthood in 1981, he holds
degrees in civil and canon law. After entering the
Vatican diplomatic corps in 1986, he held posts
in Algeria, Chile, at the United Nations in New
York, and in Lebanon. He was named an archbishop, nuncio to Sudan and apostolic delegate in
Somalia in 2002 by St. John Paul II and was given
additional responsibilities two years later as the
nuncio to Eritrea.Pope removes Cardinal Burke
from Vatican post
Separately, the Vatican announced that Pope
Francis removed U.S. Cardinal Raymond L.
Burke, 66, as head of the Vatican’s highest court
and named him to a largely ceremonial post for a
chivalric religious order.
Cardinal Burke, formerly prefect of the Apos-
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The move had been widely expected since an
Italian journalist reported it in September, and
the cardinal himself confirmed it to reporters the
following month.
It is highly unusual for a pope to remove an official of Cardinal Burke’s stature and age without
assigning him comparable responsibilities elsewhere. By church law, cardinals in the Vatican
must offer to resign at 75, but often continue in
office for several more years. As usual when announcing personnel changes other than retirements for reasons of age, the Vatican did not give
a reason for the cardinal’s reassignment.
In December 2013, Pope Francis did not reappoint Cardinal Burke to his position on the Congregation for Bishops, which advises the pope on
episcopal appointments.
Cardinal Burke expressed frustration, in a February 2014 article in the Vatican newspaper, that
many Americans thought Pope Francis intended
to change Catholic teaching on certain “critical
moral issues of our time,” including abortion and
same-sex marriage, because of the pope’s stated
belief that “it is not necessary to talk about these
issues all the time.”
Insisting that the pope had “clearly affirmed
the church’s moral teaching, in accord with her
unbroken tradition,” Cardinal Burke blamed perceptions to the contrary on “false praise” of Pope
Francis by “persons whose hearts are hardened
against the truth.”
POPE HAILS ROLE OF ST. JOHN PAUL IN WALL’S FALL
VATICAN CITY – Commemorating the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, Pope Francis said
the sudden end to the division of Europe was prepared
by the prayers and sacrifice of many people, including
St. John Paul II.
After reciting the Angelus prayer Nov. 9 with visitors
in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis spoke about the
25th anniversary of the wall coming down, a wall “that
for so long cut the city in two and was a symbol of the
ideological division of Europe and of the entire world.”
“The fall was sudden, but it was made possible by
the long and hard commitment of many people who
struggled, prayed and suffered for it, some even sacrificing their lives,” the pope said.
During his lifetime, the Polish-born pope refused to
claim personal credit for the collapse of communism
in Eastern Europe.
In a 1993 interview, Pope John Paul said, “I think
the crucial role was played by Christianity itself: its
content, its religious and moral message, its intrinsic
defense of the human person. All I did was recall this,
repeat it and insist on it.”
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OPINION 15
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Spiritual warfare
S
piritual literature has always highlighted the
primordial struggle between good and evil, and
this has generally been conceived of as a war, a
spiritual battle. Thus, as Christians, we have been
warned that we must be
vigilant against the powers of
Satan and various other forces
of evil. And we’ve fought these
powers not just with prayer
and private moral vigilance
but with everything from
holy water, to exorcisms, to a
dogmatic avoidance of everything to do with the occult, the
paranormal, alchemy, astrology, spiritualism, sГ©ances,
FATHER RON
witchcraft, sorcery and Ouija
ROLHEISER
boards. For Christians these
were seen as dangerous venues
through which malevolent
spirits could enter our lives and do us harm.
And Scripture does, seemingly, warn us about these
things. It tells us that for our world to come to its completion and its fulfillment Christ must first triumph
over all the powers that oppose God. And for that to
happen, Christ has to first vanquish and destroy death,
darkness, evil, the powers of hell, the powers of Satan,
and various “thrones, dominions, principalities, and
powers.”
What, concretely, are these powers and how is Christ
ultimately to triumph over them? How should we
conceive the battle that’s taking place?
We are clearer about how death will be defeated: We
believe that the resurrection, Jesus’ and our own, is
how that battle is to be won. As to Satan and hell, each
of us has her own idea of what these are, but what
we share in common as Christians is the belief that
these will not be vanquished but will continue to exist,
alongside and opposed to God and heaven, for eternity.
That’s the common Christian belief, though not the
universal one. There have always been theologians and
mystics who believed that the full triumph of Christ
will occur when the Satan himself converts and goes
back to heaven along with everyone else in hell. The
love of God, they believe, is so powerful that, in the
end, nobody, not even Satan himself, will hold out
against it. Eventually love will win everyone over and
Christ will be fully triumphant when hell is empty.
But that still leaves us with what Scripture calls the
“thrones, dominions, principalities and powers.” Are
these simply another way of referring to Satan and
his powers? Or do these refer to spiritual forces that
many believe are hidden inside the occult, alchemy,
astrology, spiritualism, sГ©ances, witchcraft, sorcery
and Ouija boards? How might we conceptualize evil
spiritual forces?
To the extent that we do not dismiss them out of
hand as purely mythical, each of us conceptualizes
them in some way, usually in the graphic images given
us in the Book of Revelation and by centuries of Christian artists. And so we picture some kind of spiritual
warfare happening beneath the surface of things,
a spiritual battle between good and evil, a warfare
wherein, eventually, Christ will triumph by defeating
and destroying all these malevolent powers, akin to
the primordial battle wherein Michael, the archangel,
initially defeated Satan and threw him out of heaven.
But those are archetypal images, not meant to be pictured literally but intended rather to point us toward
something deeper. What really are the “thrones, dominions, principalities, and powers” that are opposing
Christ and how are they to be defeated? How might we
conceptualize the spiritual warfare going on beneath
the surface of things?
The spiritual warfare that is being described in
Scripture and inside all authentic spirituality has less
to do with the occult and exorcisms than it has to do
the malignant grip of narcissism, greed, anger, bitterness, hatred, lust, wound, grudges and ignorance.
These are the real “thrones, dominions, principalities and powers” that oppose Christ and the struggle
against them is the real battle between good and evil.
Authentic spiritual warfare is to be pictured this
way: Inside our world and inside each of us there’s
a fierce battle waging, a war between good and evil,
and these are the contestants: Hatred is battling love;
anger is battling patience; greed is battling generosity;
bitterness is battling graciousness, jealousy is battling
admiration; choosing to remain inside our wounds is
battling healing; holding on to our grudges is battling
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forgiveness, ego and narcissism are battling compassion and community; and self-hatred is in a bitter
battle with the acceptance of love and God’s unconditional embrace. Paranoia is waging a war against
metanoia. That’s the real war that’s going on, in our
world and inside each of us.
Hatred, anger, paranoia, greed, bitterness, lust, jealousy, non-forgiveness and self-hatred are the “thrones,
dominions, principalities, and powers” about which
Scripture warns us. Hence the final triumph of Christ
will occur when the last of these forces is eventually
subdued, when we are finally at peace with goodness,
with love, with trust, with ourselves, with others, with
our history, with our mistakes, with those who have
hurt us, with those whom we have hurt, with our
shortcomings, and with our impatience with God.
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16 OPINION
O
n a street corner in downtown
Denver, a peddler cried out that he
could tell me my future. I calmly
replied that I know the future. I did
not need him
to tell me what
my faith has
already taught
me. There will
be a new heaven
and a new
earth. Jesus
says, “I make all
things new!”
The new
evangelization
FATHER ANDREW
is integrated
KEMBERLING
into the context
of God’s created
order. The foundation of Christianity goes past the
natural world to a deeper reality. The
more profound reality is true and one
day will be real: It is a new heaven and
a new earth for those who, by imitating Christ, seek a kingdom of love and
respect, not one of consumption and
competition. This is a core Christian
belief to be shared with others.
Stewardship spirituality aims at
the conversion of a materialistic and
consumeristic world, which is the sad
consequence of our modern scientific
thinking. The world of the weighable
and the repeatable is the foundation of
materialism. Spiritual things appear
imaginary in this kind of world. But
spiritual realities are as true as love
and anger, regret and joy, or envy and
satisfaction, none of which have physical dimensions. They are substantial
but intangible.
Cultures in “developed societies”
look to pure reason to п¬Ѓnd solutions to
solve their problems, but pure reason
does not consider realities such as
sin, generosity and forgiveness to be
important. Catholics’ task is to make
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Stewardship spirituality
Perspectives from Archbishop Cordileone and guest writers
known a spiritual reality that interacts
with the material world. Stewardship
does not expect us to reject the world
we п¬Ѓnd ourselves in, but to transform
it. It’s ironic that the very materialism
that was used to lead us away from God
is according to a stewardship mentality
used as a means of conversion.
Materialism fuels a hedonistic way of
thinking where pleasure is the primary
focus. The pursuit of luxury and the
entertainment industry lead the populace to consume the goods of the earth
in a disordered way.
Consumerism believes that it is good
for people to spend a lot of money on
goods and services. Making money is
rewarded by status and influence. From
a Christian perspective, however, the
power that money gains is inordinate
compared to the proper use of money.
Stewardship reorders the use of
money and introduces accountability
and responsibility to how we consume
the goods of the earth. People who
don’t have a stewardship mentality assume that it’s always good to consume
more, if not of material things at least
of cultural things such as music, opera,
or scenic trips abroad. Stewardship,
on the other hand, says more is not
necessarily better. It forces people to
think critically about wealth. People of
wealth, that is, most Americans com-
pared to the vast majority of the world,
almost instinctively buy better and
п¬Ѓner things if they have the money.
Such actions are not evil in themselves;
the issue is whether they lead people
closer to their goal.
The irony of stewardship is it inverts
the role of consumption. The very
consumption that leads a secular world
away from God is, via stewardship, the
means for us to see his blessings. In a
stewardship perspective everything is
a gift and we eagerly return a portion
back to God for his purposes.
Consumerism ultimately dehumanizes because things become more important than people. Stewardship heals
this wound by focusing on our destiny.
Human dignity is extended from the
richest to the poorest people. Governments and societies need to believe that
people are more important than things.
People of a materialistic or consumerism bent are varied. The non-baptized have not even been introduced to
spiritual ideas, while many Christians
have heard the message of Christ but
not received it as a treasure. Jesus
Christ is true God and true man. He
is the creator and Lord of all creation.
Beyond all material goods or cultural
achievements, he is to be praised and
glorified. The nominal Catholic needs
to perceive that individualism needs
to give way to shared beliefs in our
exalted calling. Vending-machine
spirituality gives way to a mutual
understanding of gifts given and gifts
received. A culture of death gives way
to a culture of life.
Stewardship begins at the parish
level and converts the hearts and
minds of its parishioners. Materialistic
solutions need to be balanced with the
spiritual systems that smartly use the
ways of the world for God’s purposes.
Following Jesus means participating
in a transformation of the culture in
which we live. We п¬Ѓnd joy in living,
not in consuming. The blessings we
have received are our true wealth and
should be shared to improve the lives
of others, especially those in need.
We should always remember that
we have a need to give before giving to
a need. The materialistic person who
manages his goods according to the
ways of the world serves neither God
nor his purposes. A person guided by
a stewardship perspective acknowledges that everything she has – family,
friends, the institutions of society, the
planet Earth, and the entire universe –
are gifts. Even a poor person has abundant gifts. When one is aware of how
wealthy each of us is, the good news of
Jesus Christ is heard in a “new” and
authentic way. Stewardship spirituality
is the conversion of a materialistic and
consumeristic world.
FATHER KEMBERLING recently started his
assignment as pastor of St. Vincent
de Paul Parish in Denver, Colorado. A
frequent speaker at stewardship conferences in the U.S. and in the Philippines,
Father Kemberling, along with Mila
Glodava, director of communications
and stewardship, are authors of “Making
Stewardship a Way of Life: A Complete
Guide for Catholic Parishes” (Our Sunday Visitor, 2009).
Everyone deserves a home
J
ust imagine for a moment that you
have no home.
What will you do for meals today?
Where will you shower? Where will
you sleep? If you have children, how
will you provide
for them?
And how will
you cope with
being homeless tomorrow,
next week, next
month?
Such imaginations are
distressing.
Aren’t they?
TONY MAGLIANO
Last winter I
took imagining
what it would be like to be homeless
one step further. I lived one day in
Baltimore as a homeless man trying
to stay warm and fed. From street, to
soup kitchen, to shelter I ventured.
I learned a lot that day about how
rough it is to have no place to call your
own. But later that night my experience as a homeless person ended. I got
in my vehicle and headed for home.
But for 100 million people throughout the world, not having a home to go
to each night is a hard, sad reality (61st
session of the U.N. Commission on Human Rights).
And in the U.S., according to the
National Coalition for the Homeless
(www.nationalhomeless.org), 3.5 million people – 39 percent of whom are
children – have no place to call home.
Recently I spoke with Ken Leslie, a
(CNS PHOTO/L’OSSERVATORE ROMANO)
Pope Francis blesses the sculpture “Jesus the Homeless” during his general audience in St.
Peter’s Square at the Vatican Nov. 20, 2013.
former homeless alcoholic and drug
addict, who is now a leading advocate
for people who have no home. Based in
Toledo, Ohio, Leslie founded 1Matters
(www.1matters.org), an organization
inviting each of us to “Be 1 that matters to 1 that matters.”
As their motto indicates, one-on-one
relationships help break down homeless stereotypes and build community.
One major stereotype is the word
“homeless” itself. Because the word
“homeless” often conjures up negative
images of people – which in most cases
are completely untrue – Leslie prefers
using the word “unhoused.”
A model project of 1Matters is “Tent
City.” Every year on the last weekend
of October, Tent City brings together
doctors, nurses, medical students, social workers and over 500 other caring
souls to serve the unhoused.
Recently – Oct. 24-26, 2014 –Tent City
celebrated its 25th anniversary. On Toledo’s Civic Center Mall, under several
tents, approximately 1,000 unhoused
and marginally housed fellow human
beings received medical treatment,
prescriptions, job and housing assistance, ID acquisition, haircuts, food,
clothing, commitment to follow-up
care and lots of love.
To watch an inspiring video on Tent
City go to www.1matters.org/tentcity.
And then kindly consider how a Tent
City could be started in your town or
city. You can contact Ken Leslie for assistance at [email protected]
Another outstanding program of
1Matters is “Veterans Matter.”
According to the U.S. Department of
Veterans Affairs there are over 49,000
homeless veterans on the streets of
America. And while many of them
qualify for government rental assistance, they lack the upfront deposit
needed to get an apartment.
Veterans Matter has provided deposits for approximately 500 veterans to
date in several states. You can help an
unhoused veteran get off the street and
into decent housing by making a donation at www.veteransmatter.org.
Everyone deserves a home. And National Hunger & Homelessness Awareness Week – Nov. 15-23 – is an ideal
time to get started in helping to make
a difference in the lives of unhoused
people.
The social doctrine of the Catholic Church clearly teaches that safe,
decent housing is a basic human right.
And that individuals, governments and
society in general have a moral obligation to help end homelessness.
In the spirit of the beatitudes:
“Blessed are those who help the unhoused, for they shall find a home in
heaven.”
MAGLIANO is an internationally syndicated
social justice and peace columnist.
FAITH 17
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
SUNDAY READINGS
Thirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time
�Well done, my good and faithful servant. Since you were faithful in small matters, I will give you great
responsibilities. Come, share your master’s joy.’
MATTHEW 25:14-15, 19-21
PROVERBS 31:10-13, 19-20, 30-31
When one п¬Ѓnds a worthy wife, her value is far
beyond pearls. Her husband, entrusting his heart
to her, has an unfailing prize. She brings him good,
and not evil, all the days of her life. She obtains
wool and flax and works with loving hands. She
puts her hands to the distaff, and her п¬Ѓngers ply
the spindle. She reaches out her hands to the
poor, and extends her arms to the needy. Charm
is deceptive and beauty fleeting; the woman who
fears the Lord is to be praised. Give her a reward
for her labors, and let her works praise her at the
city gates.
PSALM 128:1-2, 3, 4-5
Blessed are those who fear the Lord.
Blessed are you who fear the Lord, who walk in
his ways! For you shall eat the fruit of your handiwork; blessed shall you be, and favored.
Blessed are those who fear the Lord.
Your wife shall be like a fruitful vine in the recesses of your home; Your children like olive plants
around your table.
Blessed are those who fear the Lord.
Behold, thus is the man blessed who fears the
Lord. The Lord bless you from Zion: May you see
the prosperity of Jerusalem all the days of your
life.
Blessed are those who fear the Lord.
1 THESSALONIANS 5:1-6
Concerning times and seasons, brothers and
sisters, you have no need for anything to be written to you. For you yourselves know very well that
the day of the Lord will come like a thief at night.
When people are saying, �Peace and security,’ then
sudden disaster comes upon them, like labor pains
upon a pregnant woman, and they will not escape.
But you, brothers and sisters, are not in darkness,
for that day to overtake you like a thief. For all of
you are children of the light and children of the
day. We are not of the night or of darkness. Therefore, let us not sleep as the rest do, but let us stay
alert and sober.
MATTHEW 25:14-15, 19-21
Jesus told his disciples this parable: “A man
going on a journey called in his servants and
entrusted his possessions to them. To one he gave
five talents; to another, two; to a third, one – to each
according to his ability. Then he went away.
After a long time the master of those servants
came back and settled accounts with them. The one
who had received five talents came forward bringing the additional five. He said, �Master, you gave
me five talents. See, I have made five more.’ His
master said to him, �Well done, my good and faithful servant. Since you were faithful in small matters, I will give you great responsibilities. Come,
share your master’s joy.’”
Building up the kingdom of God
I
f you and I were hearing the parable story in
this Gospel for the п¬Ѓrst time, not knowing who
told it, we would probably not attribute it to Jesus. Let’s be honest – it doesn’t sound very Christlike: “Take from the man
who has the least and give
it to the man who has the
most.” Is that the kind of
thing Jesus would do? Those
who have much would then
keep on getting more, until
they become rich. And those
who have little would keep
on losing, until they have
nothing left to lose. Is this
the kind of statement Jesus
would make?
The second statement
sounds like something that
might be said by a cynic
who argues that all life is
DEACON
unfair. The rich get richer,
FAIVA PO’OI
and the poor get poorer. So
what is the meaning of this
story? What did Jesus have
in mind when he said, “Those who have will get
more until they become rich, while those who
SCRIPTURE
REFLECTION
POPE FRANCIS
WAGE WAR ON �TERRORISM OF GOSSIP’
Religious orders and communities must
combat “the terrorism of gossip,” which is
even worse than an occasional physical confrontation, said Pope Francis, a former Jesuit
provincial in Argentina.
Meeting Nov. 7 with Italy’s superiors of
men’s orders, the pope said the way members
of religious orders live should attract people
to Christ and the church, and should be a
model for other Catholics of creating harmony among a varied group of people thrown
together by a common call, Catholic News
Service reported.
“Please,” he told the superiors, “don’t let the
terrorism of gossip exist among you. Throw
it out. Let there be fraternity. And if you have
something against your brother, tell him to his
face. Sometimes it might end in fisticuffs,” he
said, causing the superiors to laugh. “That’s
not a problem. It’s always better than the terrorism of gossip.”
have not will lose even the little they have?” In
Jesus’ day, as is so often the case in our time, this
statement was true – that the rich gained while
the poor lost.
But perhaps, Jesus was talking about something other than money. Perhaps Jesus saw this
reality as a deeper parable of life. If we stop for
a moment and focus on spiritual values instead
of just п¬Ѓnancial matters, this parable provides
us with a very powerful insight! For example,
those who have love and invest this love in other
people will draw more love unto themselves. And
their human relationships will grow richer with
every passing day. But those who have little love,
seldom sharing it with others, will eventually lose
even the little they have.
The same thing is true of courage. Those who
bravely face up to life will gain more and more
courage along the way. Every adversity that they
encounter and overcome will increase their supply of courage. But those who run away and avoid
the problems of life will eventually lose even the
little courage they have.
Those who have joy and know how to laugh
will experience an increase in their happiness.
Their lives will become a symphony of gladness.
But those who have little joy and have no peace
in their hearts will п¬Ѓnd themselves with very
gloomy souls and eventually, may forget how to
laugh. Some sad day, they will wake up and realize that even their small supply of joy has slipped
away.
The central theme of this parable is that life
is an endowment from God. He has entrusted to
you and to me and to every individual on earth a
most valuable gift – the gift of human life. It is his
intention that each of us will take this priceless
possession and use it according to his plan. If we
do that, we will prosper, and we will be greatly enriched. If we turn away from God’s plan, however,
we are sure to fail, and we will lose even the little
we have. In other words, life is a divine/human
partnership. God provides the capital. We are
responsible for the investing. All our investments
are under his judgment. He is the senior partner.
Each of us has been given a share in responsibility for building up the kingdom of God. If we are
faithful servants, we will be greatly rewarded. If
we are irresponsible servants, we will have everything, even the kingdom, taken away from us.
May our choice always be the one that leads to
blessedness and a greater share in God’s joy.
DEACON PO’OI ministers at St. Timothy Parish, San Mateo.
LITURGICAL CALENDAR, DAILY MASS READINGS
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17: Memorial of St. Elizabeth
of Hungary, religious. RV 1:1-4; 2:1-5. PS 1:1-2, 3, 4
and 6. LK 18:35-43.
ELIZABETH OF HUNGARY
1207-1231
November 17
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18: Tuesday of the Thirtythird Week in Ordinary Time. Optional Memorials
of the Dedication of the Churches of Peter and
Paul, apostles; St. Rose Philippine Duchesne,
virgin. RV 3:1-6, 14-22. PS 15:2-3a, 3bc-4ab, 5.
LK 19:1-10.
Elizabeth’s short life was nonetheless full; she had a happy marriage
and children, was a secular Franciscan, and was so devoted to the poor and sick that
she gave away royal robes and founded hospitals.
The daughter of a Hungarian king, Elizabeth married a nobleman of Thuringia, Louis, at age 14. He
complained about the expense of her many charities
until he witnessed a miracle involving Elizabeth,
bread and roses. After he died during a Crusade,
she became a Third Order Franciscan at Marburg,
Germany, where she founded a hospital to care for
the sick. Elizabeth, who was declared a saint in 1235,
is the patron of bakers, young brides, widows, those
falsely accused, countesses and secular Franciscans.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19: Wednesday of the
Thirty-third Week in Ordinary Time. RV 4:1-11. PS
150:1b-2, 3-4, 5-6. LK 19:11-28.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20: Thursday of the Thirtythird Week in Ordinary Time. RV 5:1-10. PS 149:1b-2,
3-4, 5-6a and 9b. LK 19:41-44.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21: Memorial of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary. RV 10:8-11. PS
119:14, 24, 72, 103, 111, 131. LK 19:45-48.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22: Memorial of St. Ceci-
lia, virgin and martyr. RV 11:4-12. PS 144:1, 2, 9-10.
LK 20:27-40.
18 FROM THE FRONT
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
US BISHOPS: Prelates say consensus and listening marked synod
FROM PAGE 1
the participating U.S. bishops “happened to be at the wrong one.”
From what he said he had heard
and read about the synod, one synod
was “confrontational and divisive,”
“hijacked by left-wing dissenters intent
on eluding doctrine,” with proceedings
“smothered by new Ottavianis, dug in
to resist the fresh breeze” of change,
Cardinal Dolan said, referring to Italian
Cardinal Alfredo Ottaviani known for
his opposition to the changes being
brought about in the church during the
Second Vatican Council.
“Too bad we missed that one,” Cardinal Dolan added. “The one we were at
was hardly as spicy (and) juicy.”
The synod Cardinal Dolan said he
attended “was a synod of consensus.
This synod was led by a pope with a
radical charism for attentive listening,”
he said of Pope Francis, adding the only
time the pope spoke was in “reciting the
Angelus – twice.”
At this synod, “we listened to married couples who found God’s love in
one another and their kids,” Cardinal
Dolan said. “At this synod, we listened
to bishops from Africa who said the
(church’s) teaching on marriage, so
widely dismissed in the First World,
was enhancing their culture. ... We saw
brother bishops asking how we can
expedite and simplify marriage (annulment) cases.”
It was at this synod, Cardinal Dolan
(CNS PHOTO/BOB ROLLER)
Archbishop Gregory M. Aymond of New Orleans, center, listens to a speaker Nov. 10 during the
annual fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore.
said, that “life-giving marriage” was the
focus of “meeting the most urgent vocation crisis of the times.”
Archbishop Kurtz, in addressing his
fellow bishops, noted that each one of
the 62 paragraphs that constituted the
final “relatio,” or report, of the synod
met with majority approval – and all
but three of the paragraphs with approval by at least two-thirds of those
voting.
Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington, at a news conference following
the morning session, said Pope Francis
had asked that the “votation” be published along with the text to indicate the
degree of accord shared at the synod.
Archbishop Kurtz said there were
12 documents in all to be considered at
the synod before the final “relatio” was
discussed: the first two “relatios” – one
offered at the synod’s beginning and a
second draft issued mid-synod – plus
separate documents produced by each
of 10 small working groups.
“The work of the second �relatio’ was
the work of the small groups,” Archbishop Kurtz told reporters.
Cardinal Wuerl added that press
covering the synod and those bishops
participating in it “have different
perspectives.”
“So many people tend to reflect now
in terms of sound bites,” he said. “In
the church, we’re learning to speak a
little more crisply, but our teaching is
not reducible to sound bites.”
He noted it took some time for the
final “relatio” to be translated into
English from the official Italian. But
he urged the bishops to wait for the
translation, noting that the final “relatio” serves as the “lineamenta,” or
outline, for next year’s world Synod of
Bishops.
Archbishop Kurtz said the Vatican
was holding a meeting later in November to construct a system of reflection
for bishops’ conferences to use in seeking input from dioceses to be used in
preparation for next year’s synod.
In his п¬Ѓrst presidential address since
his election last November, Archbishop Kurtz said the role of Catholic bishops is to accompany their family of the
church through their fears and concerns. He told his brother bishops that
“as pastors, we accompany so many
families who face their own fears and
concerns and who yearn to experience
the love of Jesus in and through his
loving family – the church.”
“Together, brothers, we seek to walk
with these families and to build their
confidence in faith,” the archbishop
said.
Nuncio urges US bishops to provide example of faith for today’s youth
CAROL ZIMMERMANN
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
BALTIMORE – The apostolic nuncio
to the United States urged U.S. bishops
to lead today’s young people by example,
“not just by doctrinal teaching alone.”
“We have to let our young people
know that their lives are worth living
and that they were born for eternal
glory, not for glamour, or guns or sensationalism,” said Archbishop Carlo
Maria Vigano in a Nov. 10 address at
the annual fall general assembly of the
U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in
Baltimore.
“They are crying out to us. They desperately need to be inspired, to have the
life of Christ breathed back into them,”
he added.
Both before and after his talk, the
U.S. bishops gave the apostolic nuncio
a standing ovation and they interrupted his address with applause particularly when he spoke of the need to help
today’s youths find meaning.
The archbishop also pointed out that
young people, as well as those of all
ages, would benefit from knowing more
about the lives of the saints, noting that
youths would be inspired by their courage and the elderly would be comforted
by their steadfast example of faith.
He also gave the personal example
of how he read the life of St. Frances
Xavier Cabrini to his mother during
her last days of life.
“What a contrast for someone who
takes their own life into their hands,
for example, through suicide and
euthanasia, which leaves no hope and
future for those who accept and submit
themselves to the dark culture of our
times,” he said.
The archbishop, who referred to
“saints in our very midst,” said they
can help restore the church’s credibility.
“We know that the church, particularly in the United States, has been
deeply wounded by the behavior of
some priests and bishops by whose
deplorable actions the church’s reputation has been strongly shaken,” he
said.
Archbishop Vigano urged the bishops to “bring once again to light the
sanctity of the church which exists in
this country” and stressed that this
can flourish in the United States par-
ticularly because of its “great pillar”
of religious freedom.
He urged the bishops not to be afraid
in their ministry of leading others,
quoting St. John Paul II, who often
said: “Do not fear.”
“If we expect people, especially our
young people, to п¬Ѓnd direction and
meaning in their lives, we ourselves
must in total confidence teach them”
to discern God’s spirit in their minds
and hearts, he said. He also said the
bishops “must continually learn how
to listen with attentiveness and to
respond to the promptings of the Holy
Spirit.”
“May we all have the courage and
fortitude, the discernment and determination that we need to help bring
this about,” he added.
TYPHOON: Filipinos continue to mourn a year after devastating storm
FROM PAGE 1
storm – commemorated the dead and
served to offer survivors a sense of
hope.
Rosedel Vilarma, 36, was among
those at the Mass. She told Catholic
News Service she was trying to come
to terms with her younger brother’s
death and that his children, ages 1
and 4, went missing during the storm.
“I just prayed that hopefully he was
forgiven for his sins and the Lord has
now accepted him. I also prayed we
would find my niece and nephew,”
Vilarma said.
In Palo, a few miles south of Tacloban, another mass gravesite was
being prepared for a blessing. Days
after Haiyan did its damage, the
archdiocese’s cathedral, which lost its
roof, was a burial site for hundreds of
victims, some of them entire families
of multiple generations.
Inside the Palo’s Cathedral of the
Transfiguration of Our Lord, Massgoers filled pews under a web of
scaffolding as the roof replacement
project, now 10 months long, continued.
Archbishop John Du of Palo tried to
rally the faithful during his homily.
“We have been destroyed, but look
around,” he said. “God has called us
back. So many have died, but the hope
of those who survived continues to
give life.”
He repeatedly urged the congregation to follow God, whom, he said, is
“the way, the truth and the life.”
At the cathedral’s new memorial
garden, Jonno Cuesta repeatedly
traced his hand over one name on a
stenciled grave marker: his father’s.
“I’m still sad,” Cuesta, 25, told CNS.
“We still can’t quite accept what happened to our papa.”
Cuesta said that his father was a
п¬Ѓsherman and an excellent swimmer
and it was a shock to see his lifeless
body after the storm surge inundated
Palo’s shore. What made it harder,
he said, was that the rest of his own
small family survived.
Father Isagani Petilos, rector of
Santo Nino Church in Tacloban, said
the church continues to minister to
many who are struggling to accept
the loss of family, home and job.
“By the homilies that we have, to
continue our celebrations, these are
avenues where people can once again
pour out their questions to God,”
Father Petilos said.
He explained that addressing survivors’ material needs – decent shelter
and a way to earn a living – also
played an important role in healing.
“Because they go together. Having
no house would always remind them,
�Before we had these beautiful things.
Before, even if our life was simple, we
had our home with my family. Now
my home is gone and also, my family
is gone,’” he said.
The need for housing is the greatest
challenge facing international aid one
year after Haiyan. Philippine authorities recorded 1.1 million partially
damaged or destroyed homes. Aid
agency tents still serve as shelter in
dozens of towns and rural communities.
Joe Curry, country director for
Catholic Relief Services, estimated
that about 95,000 displaced families
continued to live in homes too weak to
withstand another powerful disaster.
19
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO ROOM WANTED
HELP WANTED
ROOM WANTED
CLASSIFIEDS
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
CALL (415) 614-5642 | FAX (415) 614-5641
VISIT www.catholic-sf.org
EMAIL [email protected]
Catholic woman
relocating to
San Francisco for a
nursing position is
in need of a local
room to rent from
a Catholic family.
CUSTODIAN RESPONSIBILITIES
PRIMARY FUNCTION:
Seeking a full time janitorial position for St. Gabriel
Parish. We are seeking an individual with experience
in the upkeep of Parish buildings and grounds. He/
she will be taking direction from the Pastor and Staff
but will be working independently at times. Candidate must be punctual, reliable, trustworthy, selfmotivated, observant, helpful and courteous as well
as work well with a variety of age and ethnic groups.
He/she must maintain and demonstrate a cooperative attitude and effective working relationship with all
groups, employees, volunteers and parishioners. Candidate must have good basic fix-it skills. Candidate
must be able to drive and have use of his/her own car.
Salary will be commensurate with experience.
Please call
if you can help:
(501) 258-2841
NOVENA
Prayer to St. Jude
USED CAR NEEDED
Retired Senior
needs used car
in good condition,
for medical appts.
and errands.
Please Call (415) 290-7160
Email: [email protected]
Oh, Holy St. Jude, Apostle and
Martyr, great in virtue and rich in
miracles, near Kinsman of Jesus
Christ, faithful intercessor of all who
invoke your special patronage in time
of need, to you I have recourse from
the depth of my heart and humbly
beg to whom God has given such
great power to come to my assistance.
Help me in my present and urgent
petition. In return I promise to
make you be invoked. Say three
our Fathers, three Hail Marys and
Glorias. St. Jude pray for us all
who invoke your aid. Amen.
This Novena has never been known
to fail. This Novena must be said
9 consecutive days. Thanks.
D
HELP WANTED
GATEWAY GLOBAL SF
A Division of Gateway Limousines - Quality Driven Transportation
POSITION: Executive Chauffeur
Seeking reliable and punctual candidates to:
› Provide transfer service to/or from SFO-OAK-SJC airports
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San Francisco, San Mateo, Alameda, Contra Costa & Santa Clara.
› In-depth knowledge of the downtown and financial districts of San
Francisco for road show events.
› Good communication skills.
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TITLE: Maintenance Person
GRADE: Non-exempt
SUPERVISOR: Pastor
› Must conform with dress code and
grooming standards
› Must have a clean and insurable DMV
report
› Pass pre-employment drug testing and
criminal background screening
Please submit resume, cover letter
and two references to:
Fr. Thomas Hamilton, St. Gabriel Church
2559 40th Avenue, San Francisco, Ca 94116
Fax: (415) 731-1270 E-mail: [email protected]
ARCHDIOCESE OF SAN FRANCISCO
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT - FINANCE
Looking to make a difference? We, the Catholic Church of San Francisco, pledge
ourselves to be a dynamic and collaborative community of faith known for its quality of
leadership; richness of diversity of culture and peoples; and united in faith, hope and love.
The Archdiocese of San Francisco is seeking a qualified Administrative Assistant.
This is a regular, full-time non-exempt position based on a workweek of 37.5 hours.
Compensation is competitive in the Religious Non-profit market with a very substantial
benefits package including employer-funded Pension Plan, 403B and Flexible Spending
Account, generous holiday schedule and free, gated parking. The Administrative
Assistant reports to the Chief Financial Officer.
ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
Assists the Chief Financial Officer by acting as a major participant in various activities
with outside business and financial institutions such as, but not limited to, stock
brokerage transactions and insurance and banking arrangements.
CYO Transportation Services of Daly City, a program of Catholic Charities SF, has
employment opportunities for individuals who wish to be a school bus driver.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
• Ability to interact professionally, especially in dealing with committees,
financial vendors.
• Excellent communication and PC skills with experience in Word, Excel,
PowerPoint & Access.
• Good working knowledge of finance and accounting concepts.
• Ability to multitask while working fairly independently with a
minimum of detailed supervision or guidance.
• Excellent time management and organizational skills.
No experience… No problem. CHP – Certified School Bus Driver Training
provided at no cost. Class starting soon !
DESIRED EDUCATION:
• BS/BA or relevant work experience
• Must have a clean driving record; DMV H-6 printout required
• Drug testing, fingerprinting and background check required
• Must be at least 18 years old
• Must be responsible, punctual, and team-oriented
• Full & Part time hours available
• We offer excellent benefits package and competitive pay
PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:
• Experience and working knowledge of finance and accounting concepts –
experience working in an accounting office and/or financial institution.
• A general understanding of the Catholic Church and the workings of parishes
and schools.
If you are already a certified school bus driver, join our team and receive a
hiring bonus of $1,500 after 90 days of employment.
Equal Opportunity Employer. Qualified applicants with criminal histories considered.
INTERESTED? Scan and email a current resume and DMV report
along with a brief introductory letter to [email protected]
CONTACT: Gerry Jacinto, H.R. Manager, 650.697.5548 x218
Looking for a good paying job with benefits?
Please contact Bill Avalos,
Operations Manager at:
[email protected]
or 650.757.2117
Please submit resume and cover letter to:
Archdiocese of San Francisco
Attn: Patrick Schmidt, Office of Human Resources
Archdiocese of San Francisco
One Peter Yorke Way , San Francisco, CA 94109-6602
Fax: (415) 614-5536 E-mail: [email protected]
20 COMMUNITY
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
OBITUARY
Presentation Sister Frances Sherman – religious for 66 years
Presentation Sister Frances Sherman, formerly
Sister Mary Hilary, died Nov. 2 at California
Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. She was
SCRIPTURE SEARCH
Gospel for November 16, 2014
Matthew 25:14-30
Sister Frances
Sherman, PBVM
Following is a word search based on the Gospel
reading for the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle
A: the story of interest and no interest talents. The
words can be found in all directions in the puzzle.
JOURNEY
TRADED
LONG TIME
FORWARD
YOU KNOW
MORE
THROW
TALENTS
DUG A HOLE
WELL DONE
WICKED
INTEREST
GIVEN
DARKNESS
A
R
K
R
A
W
A
I
R
N
V
O
W
E
F
O
N
N
E
S
S
N
U
L
W
T
A
N
G
R
O
U
A
J
O
C
H
D
J
A
O
Y
X
A
R
W
E
L
L
D
E
T
L
E
N
T
S
A
N
D
T
L
E
W
E
H
A
L
R
A
R
Z
L
L
E
T
P
T
N
O
N
E
May 09 – 24, 2015 / $3799 Book Now, limited to 42 seats
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Isle Cruise / w/ Shore Excursions in Patmos /Crete /Santorini, Sightseeing with Licensed Tour Guides,
Tour Escort throughout the tour, Deluxe Motorcoaches, Additional baggage and optional airline fees may
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Y
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R
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M
K
I
R
C
H
O
J
U
U
I
Y
C
V
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O
O
D
P
I
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E
M
I
T
G
N
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Y
A
W
A
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B
J
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serve as secretary at St. Anne’s in 1986 until her
retirement in 1996.
Most recently, Sister Frances has been engaged
in the ministry of prayer for the homeless
A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m.
Nov. 13 at the Presentation motherhouse, followed by interment at Holy Cross Cemetery,
Colma.
Remembrances may be made to the Sisters of
the Presentation, Development Office, 281 Masonic Ave., San Francisco 94118.
GREECE & TURKEY
WENT AWAY
GROUND
GOOD
LAZY
TEN
TAKEN AWAY
TEETH
GIVEN & TAKEN
D
a religious for 66 years and 90
years old.
Sister Frances held degrees in
education and counseling from
the University of San Francisco
and Cal State Hayward.
Sister Frances taught at San
Francisco’s St. Anne School in
the early �50s as well as at the
now closed Cathedral Presentation School. She returned to
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CSF CONTENT IN YOUR INBOX:
Overnight Flight
Istanbul – Nicaea
Cappadocia
Konya
Psidia – Laodicea – Pamukkale
Heirapolis – Ephesus – Kusadasi
Kusadasi – Patmos
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Estela Nolasco 650.867.1422
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Visit catholic-sf.org to sign up for our e-newsletter.
ARCHDIOCESE OF SAN FRANCISCO
2014-2015 Official Directory
4 reasons why you should own the
2014-2015 Archdiocese of San Francisco
Premium Directory
1. It’s the who’s who of the Archdiocese of San Francisco all in one location:
* archdiocesan officials
* parishes and missions
* parish priests, deacons and deaneries
* elementary schools, high schools, universities and colleges
* archdiocesan and parish ministries
* religious orders & organizations
* Catholic media, charities and more
2. It includes important schedules and dates:
*adoration schedules
*devotions & prayer groups
*ethnic Masses and more
3. It’s redesigned for quicker and easier use.
Improved page layout, alphabetical listings, and more
4. It’s yours for only $18.00 including postage and handling.
Purchase yours today by calling 415.614.5640 or fill out the order form below and mail to:
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CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO, One Peter Yorke Way, San Francisco, CA 94109
COMMUNITY 21
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
1
2
(PHOTO BY JOSE AGUIRRE)
Around the archdiocese
1
CATHOLIC CHARITIES OFFICE
BLESSED: On Oct. 30, Archbishop
Salvatore J. Cordileone conducted an
office blessing ceremony at Catholic
Charities administrative building at 990
Eddy St., San Francisco. The introductory rites included reading of Scripture,
followed by intercessions and a prayer
of blessing for the building and all who
use it. Archbishop Cordileone then
blessed all five floors of the building,
followed by a concluding rite.
2
YOUTH RALLY AND MASS, SAN
FRANCISCO: Youths from various
parishes are pictured at the event Nov.
1, All Saints’ Day. Focusing on the lives
of the saints and our own call to sainthood, the day consisted of music, activities, talks, prayer stations and discussions. Auxiliary Bishop William J. Justice
celebrated the Mass, which included
youths from around the archdiocese as
liturgical ministers. Parents and community members also attended the Mass
and closing reflection. “Overall, the
youth of the archdiocese greatly enjoyed
it and learned more about living out their
3
FRANCISCAN FR. MARIO’S
2015 PILGRIMAGES
Catholic faith in their lives,” said Ynez
Lizarraga, archdiocesan associate director for youth ministry and catechesis.
Leading pilgrimages to the Holy Land for more than 100 years!
Customized Pilgrimages • Support for Christians in the Holy Land
800 Years Experience • Flights • Lodging • Meals • Transports • Mass
1-800-566-7499
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March 26 - April 6, 2015
$3,796 *Easter
May 23-June 3
MERCY HIGH SCHOOL, BURLINGAME: Junior Cassie Miller and senior Shelby McMillan are pictured with
Mercy Sister Diana Petz. Last week,
students in the Catherine’s Companion
Club worked with some of the Sisters
of Mercy at Marian Care to create baby
blankets. “It was a true expression of
love and a wonderful opportunity to
have the girls work hand in hand with
the Sisters to create these wonderful
soft blankets for needy children in the
community,” the school’s Carol Fraher
told Catholic San Francisco.
TRAVEL
PILGRIMAGES DIRECTORY
$3,158
Holy Land
3
HOLY LAND FRANCISCAN
February 4 - 13, 2015
In conjunction with Santours: CST#2092786-40
HOLY LAND & JORDAN
October 6-20
Prague, Budapest,Vienna, Poland
April 17-May 3
India
January 25-February 11
Write, call or email for free brochure:
Fr. Mario DiCicco, O.F.M.
St. Peter’s Church, 110 West Madison St., Chicago, IL 60602
(312) 853-2411, cell: (312) 888-1331
[email protected] | FrMarioTours.weebly.com
Catholic San Francisco and Pentecost Tours, Inc.
invites you
to join in the following pilgrimages
NORTHERN & CENTRAL ITALY
$3,860
May 24 - June 4, 2015
$3,660
11 DAY PILGRIMAGE
July 15 - 25, 2015
$3,960
including a rare viewing of the
February 5 - 13, 2015
$3,499
June 23 - July 5, 2015
$3,770
SHROUD OF TURIN
with Fr. Vincent Lampert
$3,979
HOLY LAND & TURKEY
May 7 - 17, 2015
$3,660
GREECE
June 24 - July 4, 2015
$4,439
POLAND
August 17 - 25, 2015
$3,549 + $659 per person*
from San Francisco
ITALY
April 20 - 30, 2015
September 5-16
Turkey: Following the
Footsteps of St. Paul
March 12 - 23, 2015
FATIMA & LOURDES
|
April 13-23, 2014
$3,649 + $659 per person* after Jan. 8, 2015
* Estimated airline taxes and final surcharges
VISIT: Rome (Papal audience), Tivoli, Subiaco, Siena, Florence, Pisa, Milan
For a FREE brochure on
this pilgrimage contact:
Catholic San Francisco (415) 614-5640
$3,599
www.HolyLandPilgrimages.org • [email protected]
Please leave your name, mailing address and your phone number
California Registered Seller of Travel Registration Number CST-2037190-40 (Registration as a
Seller of Travel does not constitute approval by the State of California)
22 CALENDAR
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
FRIDAY, NOV. 14
BOUTIQUE: Sisters of Mercy at Marian Oaks Annual Holiday Boutique,
Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.-3:30
p.m. Homemade jams, baked goods,
fudge, handcrafted items. 2300 Adeline
Drive, Burlingame. Enter at Hoover
gate, follow Lower Road to Marian
Oaks. Debbie Halleran, (650) 340-7426;
[email protected]
SATURDAY, NOV. 15
2-DAY BOUTIQUE: St. Charles Parish
Women’s Group, Saturday, 2-7 p.m.;
Sunday, 9:30-1 p.m., Tamarack and Belle
streets, San Carlos. [email protected]
MISSION TRIP: One-day pilgrimage to
Mission Santa Cruz and Mission Santa
Clara from St. Veronica Church, South
San Francisco. $100 fee includes transportation, lunch and mission entrance
fees. June Heise, (650) 871-7738.
WINE TASTING: Evening benefits Table
of Plenty, a meals program of Our Lady
of the Pillar Parish, Half Moon Bay,
4-7 p.m. $25. Must be age 21 or over.
Event includes music, silent auction,
selected wines for purchase. [email protected]; www.ourladyofthepillar.org/wine3; (650) 728-0909.
MONDAY, NOV. 17
GRIEF SUPPORT: Holiday Grief and
Healing Myself; St. Pius Parish, Redwood
City. [email protected] for more information; www.sfarchdiocese.org/grief.
FRIDAY, NOV. 14
SATURDAY, NOV. 15
MONDAY, NOV 17
JUSTICE TALK: “Catholic Social
Teaching 101,”
St. Dominic Parish hall, 2390 Bush
St. at Steiner, San
Francisco, 6:30
p.m. (415) 5677824;В socialjustice@
stdominics.org.
Dominican Sister
Sister Colleen
Colleen McDermott,
McDermott, OP
director of community service and
justice ministries at St. Dominic, and
has been involved in community service and justice education for more
than 25 years.
HANDICAPABLES MASS: Bishop
William J. Justice
is principal celebrant and homilist
at Handicapables
Mass and lunch,
noon, in lower halls
of St. Mary’s Cathedral, Gough Street
at Geary Boulevard,
San Francisco,
Bishop William
Gough Street enJ. Justice
trance. All disabled
people and their caregivers are invited. Volunteers are always welcome
to assist in this cherished tradition.
Joanne Borodin, (415) 239-4865.
3-DAY MISSION: A Pope Francis
Retreat with fellow
Jesuit Father Tom
Allender, Our Lady
of Angels Church,
1721 Hillside Drive
off El Camino
Real, Burlingame.
Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, 8:309:30 a.m., repeated
Father Tom
7:15-8:15 p.m.
Allender, SJ
(650) 347-7768;
www.olaparish.org.
3-DAY MISSION: A Pope Francis
Retreat with fellow Jesuit Father Tom
Allender, Our Lady of Angels Church,
1721 Hillside Drive off El Camino Real,
Burlingame. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 8:30-9:30 a.m., repeated 7:15-8:15
p.m. (650) 347-7768; www.olaparish.org.
TUESDAY, NOV. 18
3-DAY BOUTIQUE: St. Mary’s Medical Center auxiliary, Tuesday, 4-7 p.m.
with refreshments and free parking
for $10 entrance fee. Wednesday, 10
a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Proceeds help purchase new dialysis
equipment. (415) 750-5646.
FILMS AND SAINTS: What can films
tell about saints and sinners?” St.
Mary’s Cathedral, Gough Street at Geary
Boulevard, San Francisco, Msgr. Bowe
room, 7-9:30 p.m. The film “The Flowers
of St. Francis,” included in the Vatican’s
list of 45 great films commemorating the
100th anniversary of cinema in 1995 will
be shown in Italian with English subtitles
and discussed. Admission free. Hosted
by Stephen C. Córdova of St. Patrick’s
Seminary & University. cordovensis@
gmail.com; (415) 567-2020.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 19
DIVORCE SUPPORT: Meeting takes
place first and third Wednesdays,
7:30 p.m., St. Stephen Parish O’Reilly
Center, 23rd Avenue at Eucalyptus,
San Francisco. Groups are part of
the Separated and Divorced Catholic
COMMERCIAL
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Service Changes
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John V. Rissanen
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Office: (916) 408-2102
Fax: (916) 408-2086
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2190 Mt. Errigal Lane
Lincoln, CA 95648
Italian American Social
Club of San Francisco
Lic. #742961
Lunch & Dinner, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
Weddings, Banquets, Special Occasions
25 RUSSIA AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO
www.iasf.com
415-585-8059
Bill Hefferon Painting
Bonded & Insured
CA License 819191
Cell 415-710-0584
[email protected]
Office 415-731-8065
10% Discount to Seniors & Parishioners
Serving the
Residential Bay
Area for
Commercial over 30 Years
CAHALAN CONSTRUCTION
Painting & Waterproofing
Remodels & Repairs
Window & Siding Lic#582766
415.279.1266
[email protected]
Support CSF
If you would like to add your tax-deductible
contribution, please mail a check, payable to Catholic San Francisco, to:
Catholic San Francisco, Dept. W, One Peter Yorke Way, San Francisco CA 94109
ROOFING
IRISH Eoin
PAINTING
Lehane
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to CSF
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[email protected]
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License# 974682
Tel: (650) 630-1835
S.O.S.
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Lic # 526818 • Senior Discount
415-269-0446 • 650-738-9295
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F REE E STIMATES
DINING
FENCES & DECKS
650.291.4303
PAINTING
Lic. # 505353B-C36
Fully licensed • State Certified • Locally
Trained • Experienced • On Call 24/7
John Spillane
GRIEF SUPPORT: The Nature of Grief,
St. Peter Parish, 700 Oddstad Blvd,
Pacifica. 10 a.m.-noon, [email protected]
com; www.sfarchdiocese.org/grief.
CONSTRUCTION
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE
• Retaining Walls • Stairs • Gates
• Dry Rot • Senior & Parishioner Discounts
GRIEF SUPPORT: Free monthly grief
support, St. Mary’s Cathedral, Gough
Street at Geary Boulevard, San Francisco, third Wednesday of each month,
10:30- noon, Msgr. Bowe Room, on
west side of parking lot level of the cathedral.В Sessions provide information
on grief process, and tips on coping
with loss of a loved one. Deacon Christoph Sandoval leads the group.В Mercy
Sister Esther, (415) 567-2020, ext. 218.
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | CALL (415) 614-5642
EMAIL [email protected]
HOME SERVICES
ELECTRICAL
Ministry in the archdiocese and include
prayer, introductions, sharing. It is a
drop-in support group. Jesuit Father
Al Grosskopf, (415) 422-6698; [email protected]
(415) 786-0121 • (650) 871-9227
PLUMBING
HOLLAND
Plumbing Works San Francisco
ALL PLUMBING WORK
PAT HOLLAND
CA LIC #817607
BONDED & INSURED
415-205-1235
CALENDAR 23
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
FRIDAY, NOV. 21
FAITH CONFERENCE: Faith Formation
Conference, Santa Clara Convention
Center, liturgy, workshops, and exhibits
for catechists, parish leaders, parents,
youth and young adults. Registration:
www.faithformationconference.com.
FILM: “Desire of the Everlasting Hills,”
an extension of the Faith Formation
Conference, Santa Clara Convention
Center, 5001 Great America Parkway,
Santa Clara,В 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. showings. It is a 60-minute film followed by
dialogue. Free refreshments served
after first showing. Rilene Simpson,
[email protected] Admission is
free.В Film trailer is available at http://
everlastinghills.org.
RIORDAN LUNCH: Archbishop Riordan High School alumni and friends
annual downtown luncheon, Sir Francis
Drake Hotel, San Francisco. Jim Kozimor, Comcast SportsNet, is featured
speaker. $70 per person, reservations required. Tickets available online
atВ www.riordanhs.org. Marc Rovetti,
(415) 586-8200, ext 357.
SATURDAY, NOV. 22
TURKEY DRIVE: Annual Turkey Drive
at St. Emydius Church, 260 Ashton
Ave., San Francisco benefiting St.
Anthony’s dining room, 9 a.m.-noon,
Pierre Smit [email protected]
KNIGHTS FUNDRAISER: Knights of
Columbus and Marin Network for Life
benefiting Chaldean Catholic victims
of ISIS; Knights of Columbus Hall,В 167
Tunstead Ave., SanВ Anselmo, beginning
5:30 p.m. with dinner at 6:30 p.m. Evening is free with guests asked to donate
to the Chaldean cause. A refugee family and clergy fromВ St. Mary Assyrian
Chaldean Catholic ChurchВ in Campbell
will attend. National Knights of ColumbusВ will match donationsВ raised. Joe
Tassone, (415) 215-8571.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 3
SIMBANG GABI: Mass opening novena of
prayer anticipating birth
of Christ, St.
Mary’s Cathedral, Gough
Street at Geary
Boulevard, San
Francisco, 7:30
Archbishop
p.m. ArchbishBernardito Auza
op Bernardito
Auza, permanent observer of the Vatican at
the U.N., is principal celebrant.
[email protected], (415)
699-7927.
High School alumni moms’ brunch,
Lake Merced GolfВ ClubВ to support
Campus Ministry Programs. $50 per
person, reservations required. Tickets
available online,В www.riordanhs.org.
Sharon Udovich,В (415) 586-8200, ext.
217; [email protected]
SATURDAY, NOV. 29
2-DAY BOUTIQUE: Holy Angels Parish
Hall, 107 San Pedro Road, Colman, Saturday, 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.
- 6:30 p.m. Admission free. Handmade
articles for sale from many vendors.
Snacks will be sold. Pictures with Santa.
(650) 755-0478; [email protected]
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 3
2-DAY CRAFTS: Amazing and magnificent crafts sale benefiting Children’s
Medi-Fund, a 100 percent nonprofit
organization supporting efforts of the
Sisters of the Good Shepherd and projects making a difference in the lives
of children facing serious challenges;
Sisters of the Good Shepherd, 1310
Bacon St., San Francisco, noon-7 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday. (415) 586-2822.
BOUTIQUE: Mercy High School,
McAuley Pavilion, 19th Avenue, San
Francisco Holiday Boutique, 10 a.m.-3
p.m., with more than 40 vendors, raffle,
silent auction and Irish coffee with student entertainment. Admission is free.
Proceeds benefit Mercy athletics.
2- DAY BAZAAR: Mount Carmel Shop,
17 Buena Vista Ave. at Blithedale,
Mill Valley, Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.;
Sunday, 8:30 a.m.-noon. Many vendors
plus games and lunch available. (415)
388-4332.
SUNDAY, NOV. 23
RIORDAN MOMS: Archbishop Riordan
KOHL CHRISTMAS: Mercy High
School, Burlingame Alumnae Association’s Christmas at Kohl, 5-9 p.m., Kohl
Mansion on the Mercy campus, 2750
Adeline Drive, Burlingame, with more
than 60 vendors plus docent presentations of the mansion at 6:30 and 7. Musical entertainment, and light refreshments
will be available for purchase. Tickets,
$10 adults/children free, at the door.В Visit
www.mercyhsb.com for information on
the event and parking/shuttles.
FRIDAY, DEC. 5
FIRST FRIDAY: Contemplatives of St.
Joseph offer Mass at Mater Dolorosa
Church, 307 Willow Ave., South San
Francisco, 7 p.m., followed by healing
service and personal blessing with St.
Joseph oil from Oratory of St. Joseph,
Montreal.
TAIZE: All are welcome to TaizГ© prayer
around the cross, Mercy Center, 2300
Adeline Drive, Burlingame, 8 p.m.В TaizГ©
prayer has been sung on first Fridays
at Mercy Center with Mercy Sister
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in love and work – but find
things keep getting in the way?
вќ– Directed, effective and results-oriented
DIVORCE SUPPORT: Meeting takes
place first and third Wednesdays, 7:30
p.m., St. Stephen Parish O’Reilly Center,
23rd Avenue at Eucalyptus, San Francisco. Groups are part of the Separated
and Divorced Catholic Ministry in the
archdiocese and include prayer, introductions, sharing. It is a drop-in support
group. Jesuit Father Al Grosskopf, (415)
422-6698; [email protected]
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6
CABARET NIGHT: St. Stephen
Women’s Guild presents a fun night of
dinner, dancing and auction at Olympic
Club Lakeside. $135. www.cougarcabaret.com; [email protected];
Mary Kerford, (415) 624-6180.
�LOOKING EAST’: Our Lady of Fatima
Russian Byzantine Catholic Church,
5920 Geary Blvd. at 23rd Avenue, San
Francisco, with Divine Liturgy. 10 a.m.,
with lunch at noon and talk by Father
Kevin Kennedy, pastor, at 1. All are
welcome throughout the day. Series
continues first Saturdays of the month.
Parking is in St. Monica Church lot.
www.byzantinecatholic.org; (415) 7522052; [email protected]
SUNDAY, DEC. 7
CONCERT: Choirs and musicians of
St Bartholomew Parish, Alameda and
Crystal Springs Road, San Mateo, annual Christmas Concert, 3 p.m. Christmas favorites old and new sung by
four choirs accompanied by a 13-piece
orchestra conducted by Tim Cooney.
Freewill donations appreciated.
FINANCIAL ADVISOR
“The most compassionate care in town”
415-573-5141
or 650-993-8036
*Irish owned
& operated
*Serving from San Francisco to North San Mateo
вќ– 30 years experience with individuals,
. couples and groups
GRIEF SUPPORT: Holiday Grief and
Self-Care, St. Peter Parish, 700 Oddstad
Blvd, Pacifica; 10 a.m.-noon. tonilyng@
aol.com; www.sfarchdiocese.org/grief.
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | CALL (415) 614-5642
EMAIL [email protected]
HEALTH CARE AGENCY
SUPPLE SENIOR CARE
Unhealed wounds can hold you back - even
if they are not the “logical” cause of your problems
today. You can be the person God intended.
Inner Child Healing Offers a
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Suzanne Toolan since 1983. (650) 3407452.В HOME HEALTH CARE
Retirement planning
College savings plans
Comprehensive financial planning
Kevin Tarrant
Financial Advisor
750 Lindaro Street, Suite 300
San Rafael, CA 94901
415-482-2737
В© 2013 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.
NY CS 7181378 BC008 07/12
Irish Help at Home
вќ– Compassionate and Intuitive
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REAL ESTATE
“The Clifford Mollison Team”
вќ– Supports 12-step
Children, Men Women
(by: Henry)
Hair Care Services:
Clipper Cut - Scissor Cut
Hair Color - Highlight
Hair Treatment - Perm
Waxing - Tinting - Roler Set
Mon - Sat: 9:30 am - 5 pm
вќ– Enneagram Personality Transformation
Real Estate
вќ– Free Counseling for Iraqi/Afghanistani Vets
Born in Marin, Raised in Marin, Serving Marin.
30 years experience
Sunday: 10:30 am - 3:30pm
Lila Caffery, MA, CCHT
Appt. & Walk-Ins Welcome
San Francisco: 415.337.9474
1414 Sutter Street (Franklin St & Gough St)
San Francisco, CA 94109
Tel: 415.972.9995
W W W . Q LOT U S S A LO N . C O M
Complimentary phone consultation
www.InnerChildHealing.com
High Quality Home Care Since 1996
Home Care Attendants • Companions • CNA’s
Hospice • Respite Care • Insured and Bonded
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650.347.6903
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415.759.0520
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415.721.7380
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Ask about our $1,000
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Michael J. Clifford
Broker Associate
415.209.9036
Peter C. Mollison
RealtorВ®
415.254.8776
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24
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | NOVEMBER 14, 2014
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