close

Enter

Log in using OpenID

How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure - Engineers Without

embedDownload
How to run a �How to Build Emergency
Relief Infrastructure Course’
A hand-over guide book for Engineers Without
Borders UK
By Colin Younge
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’ by EWB-UK is
licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
How to run a �How to Build Emergency
Relief Infrastructure Course’
Contents
Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 3
Background ....................................................................................................................................... 3
Why run this course? ........................................................................................................................ 3
Organising the course ........................................................................................................................... 4
Finding a speaker .............................................................................................................................. 4
Marketing .......................................................................................................................................... 4
Food .................................................................................................................................................. 4
Payment ............................................................................................................................................ 4
Number of participants ..................................................................................................................... 4
Timing................................................................................................................................................ 4
The tricky bits ........................................................................................................................................ 5
Materials ........................................................................................................................................... 6
Getting the wood there .................................................................................................................... 6
Beg, Steal or Borrow ......................................................................................................................... 6
Storage .............................................................................................................................................. 6
Expense and authenticity.................................................................................................................. 6
Paperwork ............................................................................................................................................. 8
Risk assessment ................................................................................................................................ 8
Evaluation ......................................................................................................................................... 8
Joining Instructions ........................................................................................................................... 8
Appendices............................................................................................................................................ 8
References ........................................................................................................................................ 8
Appendix 1 ........................................................................................................................................ 9
Appendix 2 ...................................................................................................................................... 13
Appendix 3 ...................................................................................................................................... 14
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 2 of 16
Introduction
This course itself largely revolves around the construction of a medium-sized timber structure, possibly
preceded by a couple of talks and a health and safety briefing.
I can’t emphasise the simplicity of this course enough – I began organising this on the Wednesday and
was sitting down evaluating how it had gone on Sunday of the same week.
Background
Shelter Centre1 has put together a manual on the construction of �Emergency Relief Infrastructure’
(http://sheltercentre.org/sites/default/files/shelterproject_emergencyInfrastructure.pdf).
Before the weekend was run the documentation was largely unproven. Shelter Centre wanted to do
something about this, and EWB-UK decided to help them out! The idea was to prove or disprove that
Shelter Centre’s ideas worked in practice and to test the ruggedness and �malleability’ of the design. The
ultimate test was if the structure could be put up satisfactorily by untrained, unskilled workers, using
only intuition and the manual. In a sense, it was the manual that was really on trial here.
Stephanie Smithers and Tom Whitworth were the main leaders of the course, and are at least partially
responsible for the content within the manual. If these aren’t available, suitable replacement leaders
can be found.
Why run this course?
When I ran this, there was the dual benefit of Shelter Centre testing their ideas, but also (and mainly for
us) there were the skills that each participant took away with them, and the knowledge of the context of
these kinds of buildings. I also firmly believe that any good course like this is an excellent opportunity to
network (I hate this word!) with professionals who have considerable experience in the field. Even the
other participants themselves are often worth spending time with, and I have had many engaging
conversations while sharing time on a workshop. The course is extremely simple to plan for and
organise, and the initial outlay in financing has already been made. Plus it leaves participants feeling like
they’ve achieved something really ambitious!
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 3 of 16
Organising the course
As with any course, you should start organising things AS SOON AS HUMANLY POSSIBLE. It’s not
uncommon for events like these to be planned months in advance.
Finding a speaker
Speak to the EWB-UK training manager who has an EWB-UK speaker list of contacts interested in giving
talks and running training. Talks of interest might include:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Case studies of building experience in development contexts
Representatives from Shelter about the purpose of Emergency Relief Infrastructure
The economics of availability of materials, and adaptation, using for example bamboo or steel.
In any case you should always have someone present with considerable skill and experience in
construction.
Marketing
Shelter Centre are very fond of calling this project a �shed course’. While this is strictly accurate, it
doesn’t sell well! Upon editing the title from �How to Build a Shed’ to �How to Build Emergency Relief
Infrastructure’, there was an upsurge in subscriptions which simply enabled us to run the course!
Food
Your participants will need to eat! We provided lunches from a nearby patisserie, and then took
everyone to the pub after for tea (which they paid for). Breakfast was supplied ad hoc by a friend of a
participant.
Payment
If you are not familiar with the normal expenses procedure, please speak to someone at head office.
Otherwise, Fran3 can arrange for the website to charge people for their attendance.
Number of participants
We had originally intended that there would be two teams of ten (hence two sets purchased). However,
there were approximately fifteen participants at any one time, and this worked well with building one
structure, given that we were out by (but only just by) six on Sunday.
Timing
The course is best run in the summer, obviously with the better weather, longer work hours, etc. As for
the actual weekend itself, it’s best to run a two-day course with lectures on Saturday until 12 and
building until 6 both days, with a 9ish start on Sunday. If you get everyone to sleep in the same place, it
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 4 of 16
prevents the slow diffusion of participants throughout the second morning that happens with people
lying in. Clearly, this course works well run at the weekend to start Saturday and finish Sunday, although
you may find it helpful to start it running on Friday night/evening.
Permission
Don’t forget to get permission from all attendees before distributing photos and email addresses. Use
Blank carbon copy, or bcc wherever possible to contact participants.
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 5 of 16
The tricky bits
Materials
The one difficulty related to this course is the materials. The timber is actually very expensive –
approximately ВЈ500 a set. Very fortunately, EWB-UK has already purchased two sets! The material
requirements are described in the bill of quantities in the handbook. This can be used to order
replacement pieces, although in all honesty this isn’t a �kit’ project. Mistakes will be made, improvisation
and misunderstanding are inevitable, and some sizes of timber have had to be cut for transport reasons.
It is better simply to have enough wood so that you could join and cut two medium bits to get a long
one than to order in more wood.
Getting the wood there
It is best for branches to arrange transport them-selves, although we will of course be available to help
you in this respect, and we would much rather we paid for and ran the transport than the event never
happened. You will need to hire a Long Wheel Base van, and recruit a more senior student (usually over
23, with a UK driver’s licence) to drive said van to Cambridge to pick up the wood. It would be helpful to
bring some hands with you to move the timber, as it is quite a job loading up (it took us nearly one
whole working day to pack away).
Beg, Steal or Borrow
I am going to be shameless here. Groundsman, estates managers, Workshop managers, these are all
useful people for scrounging things off of. You will need at least two step ladders, and we only have
seven hard-hats. We have enough tape measures, hammers, saws etc, but more of these are always
useful. Don’t forget you’ll need to ask someone very kindly to desecrate their grounds by digging holes
and leaving piles of materials around!
Storage
Security is only an issue for the hand tools and small items. It is very unlikely that the wood will be
stolen, all the same all materials should ATLEAST be stored under tarpaulin (part of the kit, so don’t go
buying any!) out of sight and away from main roads. The wood is cheap, untreated material, and will
not cope well with being left in the cold or wet.
Expense and authenticity
It is better to go for cheaper replacements to expensive components in this event, as costs can spiral,
and the structure will not be staying up for long. The plastic sheets used for the walls and roof are
cheap, low-spec alternatives. We do, however, have a demonstration sample of the hi-spec material
available for show. The main costs associated with the course are transport of materials (should cost
about ВЈ50 a day for a van, hire on Friday and Monday) and Lunches, which could cost in the region of
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 6 of 16
ВЈ70 a day. Accommodation is another big expense, although if you do as we did and pinch some land at
a sports centre you may be able to camp out in a pavilion or gym.
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 7 of 16
Paperwork
Risk assessment
A risk assessment is required for this course. See attached, appendix 1, the risk assessment used on this
course. Note that site-specific hazards should also be quoted.
Evaluation
The feedback form used on our course is attached. It can be modified, particularly considering that we
are now less concerned with thoughts on the manual. It could also be adapted to be more location
specific. The version I have attached is the collated feedback, so that you can see what people thought,
and the suggestions people made. To adapt it for your own use, just delete all the answers and
comments!
Joining Instructions
People need to know where they’re going, what to bring, among a plethora of other needs. Joining
instructions are a good way to release this information in one hit. My joining instructions are probably
far from exemplary, but they more or less give you something to work from! They are attached in
appendix 3. Make sure yours are released good and early, so that people can book trains etc.
Any Questions, comments, issues?
Talk to either myself at [email protected] or the EWB-UK Training Co-ordinator
Good luck with your course, and I hope to hear from you soon!
Colin Younge
Appendices
References
1
http://www.sheltercentre.org/
http://www.sheltercentre.org/rp1/sheds
3
[email protected]
2
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 8 of 16
Appendix 1
Training
Risk Assessment
Risk should be assessed where 1 = low severity/ seldom; 2 = serious severity / occasional; 3 =
major severity / frequent
The overall risk level = severity x likelihood
Severity
Seldom
Slight
Serious
Major
L (1)
M (2)
H (3)
1
2
3
2
4
6
3
6
9
L (1)
Occasionally
Likelihood
M (2)
Risk level
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
Frequently
H (3)
= (1-2) Low; (3-4) Medium;
(6-9) High
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 9 of 16
Action and Timescale
Risk level
Trivial
No action is required to deal with trivial risks, and no documentary records
need be kept (insignificant risk).
(1)
L
O
W
Acceptable No further preventative action is necessary, but consideration should be
given to improvements that impose minimal or no additional cost burden.
Monitoring is required to ensure that the controls are maintained.
(2)
Moderate
M
ED
I
Efforts should be made to reduce the risk.
( 3-4 )
U
M
Substantial The risk must be reduced. If the risk cannot be reduced then the activity
must not be undertaken.
(6)
H
Intolerable
The risk must be reduced. If the risk cannot be reduced then the activity
must not be undertaken.
( 9+ )
Hazard =
task/ activity
with the
potential to
cause harm
Type of
injury
which
could
result if
harm
occurs
Typ
e of
Peo
ple
&
nu
mb
er
affe
cted
Likelihood
of injury
occurring
RISK
LEVEL
Current
Control
Measure
s in place
Further
Control
Measures
required
1;
With CURRENT
CONTROL in place
2; or
3.
1
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
Severity of
Harm if
injury does
occur
2
3
1 2
Person
Responsible
to implement
further
measures
required
Date to
implement
3
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 10 of 16
I
G
H
Digging
post-holes
Cutting
foot with
shovel
X
X
2
All
H+S
introducti
on at
beginning
of course
Clear and
defined
working
area.
Colin
Younge
(04/07/09)
Sturdy
footwear
Lifting heavy
/ awkward
objects
Splinters
from timber
Falling
Objects
Sore
back
Splinters
and cuts
Head
injury,
cuts and
bruises
All
X
X
All
All
X
X
X
2
3
X
2
H+S
introducti
on at
beginning
of course
advising
on good
lifting
technique
Clear and
defined
working
area.
H+S
introducti
on at
beginning
of course
Protective
gloves.
H+S
introducti
on at
beginning
of course
Hard-hats to
be worn
wear
necessary
Colin
Younge
(04/07/09)
Participants
to avoid
lifting more
than
comfortable.
Colin
Younge
(04/07/09)
First Aid Kit
on site
Colin
Younge
(04/07/09)
Clear and
defined
working area
Sawing
Hammering
Cuts and
grazes
Bruised
fingers
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
All
All
2
X
X
X
2
2
H+S
introducti
on at
beginnin
g of
course
Clear and
defined
working
area.
H+S
introducti
on at
Clear and
defined
working
Colin
Younge
(04/07/09)
Protective
gloves.
Colin
Younge
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 11 of 16
and cuts
Unstable
posts
Bruises,
head
injury
All
X
Tripping
Bruises,
cuts and
grazes
All
X
Sparks, dust
and airborne
material due
to sawing
Eyeinjury
All
Working at
height
Bruises,
head
injury,
back
injury etc
All
X
X
beginnin
g of
course
area.
4
H+S
introducti
on at
beginnin
g of
course
All posts
should be
supported
until
structurally
stable
Colin
Younge
(04/07/09)
2
H+S
introducti
on at
beginnin
g of
course
Clear and
defined
working
area.
Colin
Younge
(04/07/09)
X
2
H+S
introducti
on at
beginnin
g of
course
Eye
protection to
be worn
where
necessary
Colin
Younge
(04/07/09)
X
4
H+S
introducti
on at
beginnin
g of
course
All ladders to
be supported
by other
participants
Colin
Younge
(04/07/09)
x
X
Working
at height
to be
minimise
d
cuts
Stepping on
nails
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
All
X
X
2
H+S
introducti
on at
beginnin
g of
course
(04/07/09)
Protective
gloves.
All ladders to
be used on
level and
stable
ground
Clear and
defined
working
area.
Colin
Younge
(04/07/09)
Sturdy
footwear
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 12 of 16
Appendix 2
Training
Feedback
Participant
The course was largely subscribed to by students, with a smattering of professionals. Most users found
the manual helpful, although perhaps a little open to interpretation. People were at least reasonably happy
with the introduction, although I didn’t provide any badges, which would have been helpful.
It has also been suggested that two teams work in parallel, and while this was originally the plan, building
one structure between fifteen people was just about possible. Most people found the course worthwhile,
and there were no serious complaints. Participants would have liked more break-time and tea and biscuits
made available, though they were happy to pay ВЈ15.
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 13 of 16
Appendix 3
EWB-UK Course: How to construct emergency relief infrastructure?
(Formerly how to build a shed?)
th
4 July 2009 – 5th July 2009
Joining Instructions
Venue
Address:
Wilberforce Road Sports Ground
Wilberforce road
Cambridge
CB3 0EQ
Organiser Contact Details
Name:
Tel:
E-mail:
Colin Younge
07595 826595
[email protected]
Getting There
There is parking available on site for those of you who wish to drive and your vehicle will be
safe at the sports ground during the entire duration of the event.
For anyone arriving by train, it might be worth getting a taxi as it is a significant trek (about 2530 mins from the train station. There should be a taxi rank in operation, this should cost
approximately seven pounds. Maps are attached. Keep to the instructions at the back, then
follow Wilberforce road down to the bottom where W road meets Adams road. You should see
a chicane to the left of the big blue sign (there will be signage in place). The sports ground will
be through the chicane and over the car park. Follow the signs.
Arrival and Registration
Registration will be from 9.00 AM, please be prompt! Signage will direct you from the front and
main building entrances. Tea and coffee will be available.
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 14 of 16
If you think you might have a problem arriving so early, it MAY be possible to arrange
somewhat �improvised’ sleeping space for Friday night.
Please print and bring a copy of these instructions with you. Saving my number in your phone
would be advised in case of emergencies / getting lost!
Things to Bring
1. Sturdy footwear, we really would recommend safety boots or walking boots. You will
NOT be able to wear open footwear (i.e. flip-flops and sandals) during the construction
phase.
2. Waterproofs, as we will be carrying on regardless of inclement weather.
3. Cash might be useful for food and Saturday night and the pub, if you wish to join us.
4. Notebook and pen if you want to take notes
5. Overnight kit / wash kit
6. Sleeping bag and mat (very important as accommodation will be on floorspace!)
7. Snacks (mainly for Sunday morning)
8. It may be hot, so remember to bring sun-cream, hat and sun-glasses
Food
Catering will be provided for Saturday and Sunday lunch. Sunday breakfast will have to be
catered for by yourselves, but the bar SHOULD be serving sandwiches and snacks by 9-10
Sunday morning. Saturday evening we will be going to the Granta pub for food, with the fallback otion of having a take-away on the grass. It should be noted that any food other than
provided by the caterers on Saturday and Sunday lunch time will be paid for by individuals.
Notes on the programme
Please check out the booklet “guidelines for constructing a shed for use as emergency relief
infrastructure”. It is available for free at the following website:
http://www.sheltercentre.org/rp1/sheds
During this weekend course, we will be working with a draft booklet written by a group of EWB
Professional Network Members. This booklet provides a set of guidelines for constructing
emergency relief infrastructure. The course will involve “field-testing” the booklet by putting
together shed structures. This course will accompanied by a series of talks and look at how very
small adjustments to information can make a huge difference to how it is used and its success.
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 15 of 16
The “guidelines for constructing a shed for use as emergency relief infrastructure” provides
step-by-step instructions on how to build a single-storey modular (a.k.a. a shed) building for use
as a reception centre, way station, transit centre or warehouse from timber and plastic
sheeting.
It is intended to be easy to use and address all of the major issues affecting the construction of
a shed. The booklet is designed for non-technical users who may have no prior construction
experience and may not be native English speakers.
The booklet was written by a group of former EWB-UK interns who worked as a Remote
Project team. It was written with guidance and experience provided by Shelter Centre. The
booklet is currently being reviewed by a large panel of emergency relief agencies. This weekend
will be the first time that the booklet has been field tested. This event is an important part of
the ongoing review of the guidelines, with a view to full publication in November 2009.
Questions?
If you have any questions then please don’t hesitate to get in touch, I will help in any way that I
can.
I look forward to meeting you all at the course!
Colin Younge
EWB-UK Training Programme Inter
Last Updated:
15-Nov-2012
How to Run a �How to Build Emergency Relief Infrastructure Course’
by EWB-UK is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
Page 16 of 16
Document
Category
Education
Views
29
File Size
1 257 KB
Tags
1/--pages
Report inappropriate content