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The Sheridan Press E-Edition Nov. 5, 2014

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WEDNESDAY
November 5, 2014
129th Year, No. 143
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
Election
2014
U.S. CONGRESS (statewide
totals)
U.S. Senator
R - Mike Enzi, incumbent (119,444)
D - Charlie Hardy (29,031)
L - Joseph S. Porambo (3,600)
I - Curt Gottshall (13,164)
U.S. Representative
R - Cynthia Lummis, incumbent
(111,054)
D - Richard Grayson, Apache Junction,
Arizona (37,345)
L - Richard Brubaker (7,019)
I - Daniel Clyde Cummings (6,628)
Press
THE SHERIDAN
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
PHOTOS, VIDEOS AND BREAKING NEWS
UPDATES
City, county to
partner with UW
on incubator. A2
Jennings wins HD30 seat over write-in
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — During the campaign for the
general election, several state and local officials
shared anecdotal evidence, based on their recollections, that a write-in candidate has never
been elected to state office since at least 1998 and
some say even as far back as 1954.
That trend still stands.
Candidate Mark Jennings won the election for
House District 30 with 2,068 votes, beating challenger Val Burgess, who received 341 write-in
votes. There were a total of 544 write-in votes.
Jennings beat incumbent Rep. Kathy Coleman,
R-Sheridan, in the primary election and was set
to run uncontested in the general election.
Burgess launched a write-in bid against
Jennings after the primary election.
Mead gets four more years
STATE POSITIONS
Governor
R - Matt Mead, incumbent (97,959)
D - Pete Gosar (45,299)
L - Dee Cozzens (3,941)
I - Don Wills (9,606)
Secretary of State
R - Ed Murray (117,779)
L - Kit Carson (16,619)
C - Jennifer Young (18,673)
Superintendent of Public
Instruction
R - Jillian Balow, Cheyenne
(97,399)
D - Mike Ceballos, Cheyenne (61,529)
State Representative, District 29
R - John Patton, incumbent (2,012)
Write-ins (157)
State Representative, District 30
R - Mark Jennings (2,068)
Write-ins (544)
COUNTY, CITY AND TOWN
POSITIONS
Sheridan Councilmember, 4-year
term (elect 3)
Kelly Gooch (3,108)
Alex Lee, incumbent (2,841)
Jesus Rios, incumbent (2,709)
Darryl Szymanski (2,334)
Sheridan Councilmember, 2-year
term (elect 1)
Thayer Shafer (2,646)
Robert Lloyd Webster, incumbent (1,880)
Dayton Mayor
Robert Alley (134)
Norm Anderson (212)
Dayton Councilmember (elect 2)
Eric Lofgren (199)
Clifford Reed (144)
Craig Reichert (184)
Jeremy Smith (131)
Ranchester Councilmember, 2-year
term (elect 1)
Gayle Ogle (94)
Jesse Hinkhouse (122)
SCHOOLS
Sheridan County School District 1
trustees (elect 2)
Carol Garber (1,124)
Penny Mentock-Barkan (731)
Mary Schilling (865)
Sheridan County School District 2
trustee (elect 4)
Ann Perkins (3,468)
Marva Craft (3,889)
Erica O’Dell (2,940)
Jeff Jones (2,488)
Ami Erickson (2,292)
Susan Wilson (3,181)
Northern Wyoming Community
College District (elect 3)
Bob Leibrich (3,650)
Mike Watkins (2,955)
Norleen Healy (4,994)
Jerry Iekel (4,734)
Rolf Thor Distad (3,120)
Sheridan County Conservation
District, At-large (elect 1)
Robert Brug (2,972)
Susan Holmes (3,818)
COURTESY PHOTO | BLAINE MCCARTNEY/WYOMING TRIBUNE EAGLE
Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead, left, visits with his father, Pete, after winning re-election in the 2014 General Election during a party
at the Old West Museum on Tuesday in Cheyenne.
Mead to focus on coal,
Endangered Species Act
CHEYENNE (AP) — Gov. Matt Mead says he plans to
push in his second term to finish projects that map out
a better future for the state.
Addressing campaign workers Tuesday night in
Cheyenne, Mead said it's incumbent on people who live
in Wyoming to question what they can do every day to
make the state better. "In Wyoming, if you find one
blade of grass, you have an obligation to leave two," he
said.
SEE MEAD, PAGE 10
BY THE NUMBERS
Registered voters in Sheridan County
(as of noon Nov. 4): 14,961
Ballots cast: 9,664
New elected officials in Sheridan
County: 10
Local candidates who ran unopposed:
20
Write-in votes cast for local races:
2,544
Anderson edges out Alley in Dayton mayor race
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DAYTON — After 25 years of leadership in Dayton, Mayor Bob Wood
will hand over the reigns to newly
elected mayor Norm Anderson.
Former Councilmen Anderson
and Bob Alley both pursued the
position of mayor. Anderson won
the election with 212 votes. Alley
received 134 votes. There were 13
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
write-in votes.
Anderson has served 14 years on
Town Council and nearly 20 years on the Dayton
Planning Committee. He
has been part of much of
the development of the
town.
Anderson has said he
Anderson
will continue maintenance on town infrastructure and will seek to promote
controlled and sustainable growth.
Anderson also serves on the
Tongue River Valley Joint Powers
Board and said he will work actively
to bring natural gas to the area.
“One of the first and foremost
things is to get our gas line in and
that will work for our growth better
than anything else we can do,”
Anderson said.
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
SEE DAYTON, PAGE 8
Today’s edition is published for:
Jenny Heuck
of Sheridan
SEE HD30, PAGE 8
Balow wins
education
post
CHEYENNE (AP) —
Republican Jillian Balow
has been elected Wyoming's
new superintendent of public instruction.
Balow defeated Democrat
Mike Ceballos in Tuesday's
election.
She is a former teacher
and an administrator for the
Department of Family
Services, and she cited her
experience in the
school system as
making her most
qualified for the
job.
Ceballos is a
retired telephone
company executive. During the Balow
campaign, he
touted his experience as a
businessman comfortable
with managing large budgets.
Balow will succeed Cindy
Hill, who didn't seek re-election to focus on her bid for
governor, which she lost.
One of the first challenges
will be to stabilize a system
that saw significant staffing
turnover under Hill.
Voters reject
nonresident
UW trustees
CHEYENNE (AP) —
Voters have rejected a ballot
initiative that would have
allowed out-of-state residents to serve as University
of Wyoming trustees.
Constitutional
Amendment A would have
allowed the governor to
appoint up to two nonresidents to the 13-member
board. The appointees
would have been required to
have past or continuing
involvement with the university.
Supporters of the amendment said it has been a mistake to ignore the potential
contributions of UW graduates just because they don't
live in Wyoming.
Opponents said there are
enough talented people in
Wyoming to serve as
trustees.
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
11
TASTE
SPORTS
COMICS
CLASSIFIEDS
B1
B2
B4
B5
A2
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JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
PJ Treide, project manager of HealthLinkNow, works from his office Tuesday at the Sheridan
Business Incubator on Double Eagle Drive in Sheridan. Treide has been using the office space since
2012.
Change in managing
organization to free
up Forward Sheridan
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan will become the
third city in Wyoming to house a branch of
the Wyoming Technology Business Center,
a business development program launched
by the University of Wyoming in 2006 to
help entrepreneurs grow their business
start-ups.
Sheridan County Commissioners voted
Tuesday to sign an agreement with UW
that will allow the Wyoming Technology
Business Center to operate the Sheridan
Business Incubator.
The incubator is located in the Hi-Tech
Business Park east of Interstate 90 on
Double Eagle Drive off of East Ridge Road.
It is currently operated by Forward
Sheridan.
�What we have seen over the
years is that we have the potential now
for the university to come in and take
that to a higher level.’
Renee Obermueller
Sheridan County administrative director
County Administrative Director Renee
Obermueller said county officials felt it
was time to take the business incubator to
the next level.
“What we have seen over the years is that
we have a potential now for the university
to come in and take that to a higher level,”
Obermueller said. ”Forward Sheridan cannot dedicate 100 percent of their time to
growing business. They have a menagerie
of other commitments and their mission
statement doesn’t say, �We are going to be
an incubator facility operator.’”
With the agreement signed, the Sheridan
Business Incubator will become a branch
of the WTBC, joining similar facilities in
Laramie and Casper to become the third
incubator in the state managed by the
WTBC.
Since there cannot be two operators of
the business incubator, Forward Sheridan
will relocate to the space in the old county
courthouse formerly occupied by the UW
Cooperative Extension Service,
Obermueller said. That space is currently
occupied by the county attorney’s office,
which will move back into its old building
once renovations are complete, likely in
December.
The Sheridan Business Incubator began
in 2010 when the county was awarded a
Wyoming Business Council grant to purchase the property.
“Forward Sheridan saw an opportunity to
create this incubator environment for
start-up businesses that needed a place to
hang their hat until they got off the ground
while they were in that elementary or
start-up period,” Obermueller said.
There are currently four tenants in the
incubator space: software solutions company IO Services, Inc.; Sheridan
Programmers Guild/OMP Engineering, a
programming consultant and engineering
firm; HealthLinkNow, a telemedicine
provider for mental health care; and Tall
Grass Capital Partners, a merchant banking firm for early stage energy technology
companies that service the energy sector.
Those business start-ups and any others
the Wyoming Technology Business Center
can recruit will receive one-on-one business counseling with WTBC Assistant
Director John Dick, who will move to
Sheridan in January to manage the WTBCSheridan Area business incubator. WTBC
CEO Jonathon Benson will also work with
the businesses on regular visits to
Sheridan, according to a media release.
“Sheridan is an exciting entrepreneurial
community with a lot of potential for highgrowth companies,” Benson said.
All five companies that have graduated
from the WTBC incubator program have
multi-million dollar annual revenues and
collectively employ more than 135 people
and lease more than 21,000 square feet of
office space in their respective communities.
Also on Tuesday, commissioners
approved a cooperative funding agreement
with the city of Sheridan to fund the business incubator facility.
That agreement states that the city and
the county shall each pay equal semi-annual payments for a period of four years for
WTBC services. Installments from each
entity will be $42,500 in January and July
of 2015 and $40,000 twice yearly in 2016,
2017 and 2018.
In other business, county commissioners:
• approved an amendment to the
Sheridan County Fairgrounds water system upgrade project to have EnTech, Inc.
perform construction administration
duties for the remainer of the project.
County Grants Administrator Mike
Mackey was acting as the project administrator but has left Sheridan to take a job in
Cody. The county will pay EnTech, Inc. up
to an additional $34,648 for the revised services.
• awarded a bid for fairgrounds Exhibit
Hall upgrades and upgrades to the
Grandstand bathrooms to enhance ADAaccessibility to O’Dell Construction, the
lowest of three bidders for the projects.
Exhibit Hall upgrades were bid at
$403,250 and Grandstand bathroom
upgrades were bid at $5,200. Obermueller
said much of the project cost would be paid
with State Loan and Investment Board
Countywide Consensus grant funds, but
the county will need to come up with additional funds to cover the higher than
expected costs.
• approved two conditional use permits
for two 195-foot cell towers near Clearmont.
One tower will be located on Chad and
Debra Klaahsen’s land about 150 feet east of
County Road 219, and the other will be
located on Robert and Mary Moore’s land
about 600 feet south of U.S. Highway 14/16.
The towers will be operated by Mercury
Towers and will be able to hold up to four
major wireless carriers and some smaller
carriers.
• approved receipt of a notice of vacancy
on the Wild Rose Water Improvement and
Service District. Commissioners will
appoint members to fill the positions of
president, vice president and
secretary/treasurer at their meeting Nov.
18.
Miss something in a recent edition of The Sheridan Press?
Find it online at thesheridanpress.com.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
Gun stolen from Sheridan in 1973 shows up in Minnesota
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — It was anything but a typical interagency call.
The sheriff ’s office in
Clay County, Minnesota,
notified the Sheridan Police
Department to say they’d
found property that had
been reported stolen in
Sheridan.
The property? One Colt
.45 caliber semi-automatic
handgun. The year it was
stolen? 1973.
The Ritz Sporting Goods
on South Main Street was
owned by Sam Henry
Mavrakis and was a centerpiece of downtown
Sheridan. The store not
only sold hunting and fishing equipment, but also led
fly fishing expeditions.
Among its customers were
Joe DiMaggio, George H. W.
Bush, Prince Philip of
England and Queen
Elizabeth.
The store was broken into
the night of June 6, 1973,
and nearly 40 firearms were
stolen. According to Sam
Paul Mavrakis, who was
only 11 at the time of the
break in, some of the stolen
weapons were recovered in
the 1990s.
“I think they’d just
backed a truck into the
doors and threw a bunch of
guns into it,” Mavrakis
said.
The case remains
unsolved.
“The insurance paid out,”
Det. Sgt. Travis Koltiska of
the Sheridan Police
Department said. “Now the
Ritz no longer exists and
the insurance company no
longer exists.”
But now, 41 years after the
burglary, Minnesota may
have a lead.
“They got a call (for assistance) out there and the
caller advised dispatch he
was armed and would
defend himself if necessary,” Koltiska said. “There
was no incident, but they
took the gun and ran the
serial number through
(National Crime
Information Center).”
The NCIC hit came back
to Sheridan.
Koltiska said the individual who had been in possession of the gun had not
owned it long enough to
have been the Ritz burglar
in 1973. The authorities in
Minnesota have identified
the gun’s previous owner,
and Koltiska said it’s up to
them to determine how the
gun came to be in his possession.
Clay County investigators
have not returned any calls
for additional information
on the case.
As for the gun, Koltiska
said it’s worthless.
“It’s in really bad shape,”
he said. “No one is going to
want to own this.”
Patton hangs
on to House
District 29
seat
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Rep. John Patton,
R-Sheridan, will now enter his
fourth term as a representative in
the state Legislature and said he
looks forward to continuing to
serve Sheridan County and the
state with the well-respected
Sheridan and Johnson counties
delegation.
Patton won the House District 29
seat with 2,012 votes. He beat
write-in challenger Darryl
Szymanski who received 44 writein votes. There were 157 total
write-in votes in the
race.
Throughout his campaign, Patton has highlighted both the health
of the state and the
need for changes, particularly in education.
Patton
Patton said this
morning that his interim committee work as chairman
of the select committee on capital
financing and investments has
made him optimistic about the
state’s financial health. He said
income from oil and gas royalties
looks like it will be stable for at
least the next 2 1/2 years.
He hopes to continue his work
with education and finance and
has also said he’d like to address
needed improvements in transportation around the state, especially air service in Sheridan
County, the needs and concerns of
Sheridan County’s older residents
and what he sees as an inappropriate use of footnotes in budget
appropriations, which can eliminate legislative deliberation.
“I look at the coming session as
being an opportunity, a positive
one, and I’m really desirous to be
part of it,” Patton said. “I am pretty humbled by the turnout.”
Patton said several issues in his
committee work this year will
likely be important in the 2015
Legislative session.
One major issue that legislators
will need to address is how to reinstate the state education system
following the Wyoming Supreme
Court’s ruling that Senate File 104
was unconstitutional. The roles
and duties of the state superintendent of public instruction and
the Department of Education will
need to be reviewed and reinstated.
Patton said there may be amendments made along the way and
that everything may not go exactly
back to the way it was before. The
final draft bill regarding the matter will be completed by the interim education committee Dec. 1011, but the new education committee appointed in the 2015 session
will vote on the bill.
Patton is also looking forward to
working on an educational
accountability bill that will consider how to make all 48 school
districts in the state accountable
to testing standards. He said right
now the tone of the bill is a topdown accountability approach but
that he’d like to see it become a
bottom-up approach that gives
local school districts the primary
say in accountability.
“Our plates are going to be pretty large and pretty full,” Patton
said.
Patiently waiting
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Two-year-old Eli Schreiber entertains himself as his mother Sarah Schreiber votes Tuesday at the polling station at Holy
Name Catholic Church.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
Fungus affects New
Fork brown trout
PINEDALE (AP) — The Wyoming Game and
Fish Department is investigating reports from
anglers who say they found sick or dead
brown trout in the New Fork River south of
Pinedale.
Pinedale fish managers believe it is due to a
common fungal infection. Infected fish have
patches of a cotton-like growth on their skin
and often are lethargic.
Wildlife officials say there is no way to treat
fish populations in a stream or river.
They say the New Fork River should still
have a healthy brown trout population next
spring.
Holmes earns spot
on Conservation
District board
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Incumbent Susan Holmes has
retained her at-large seat with the Sheridan
County Conservation District.
The SCCD oversees comprehensive natural
resource conservation programs under the
supervision of an elected board. It is the
board’s duty to focus and coordinate available
resources, whether technical, educational or
financial, to meet the needs of local land
users.
As part of the educational component of the
SCCD’s mission, the board provides outreach
to the public to help keep them informed
about what they can be doing to help with the
conservation of land and water resources.
Holmes sees no change to that plan in her
next four years as a board member.
“I plan to continue with project development and public outreach,” Holmes said.
В©COPYRIGHT 2014 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
307-672-2431
144 Grinnell Ave.
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Periodicals Postage Paid in
Sheridan, Wyoming.
Publication #0493-920
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
Office Manager
Production Manager
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
QUOTABLE |
Music, theater choices
enliven cultural scene
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“That cable looked like it was going
straight up.”
— Daredevil Nik Wallenda on the
19-degree angle of the wire between
two Chicago skyscrapers that he completed tightrope walking.
M
usic, theater – Sheridan’s cultural offerings
this week are many.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
“I took them to be checked, not
because it was serious. Instead of getting better, they got worse.”
— Rosa Elba Santana, whose
infant twins were among 11 other
babies who died within three days at
Robert Reid Cabral Children’s
Hospital in the Dominican Republic.
“They would want you to think
we’re going to do wall-to-wall coverage so people can watch Netflix. It’s
just about taking the infrastructure
we have and making it work.”
— Yellowstone National Park
technology chief Bret De Young on
debate over installation of expanded
wireless service throughout the park.
• Thursday, cellist Evan Drachman and pianist
Mary Au will perform a recital at the WYO
Theater beginning at 7 p.m. The performance and
reception after honors the longtime support of Dr.
Seymour Thickman towards the Piatigorsky
Foundation. Tickets: 672-9084.
• Also Thursday, in the new Mars Theater inside
the WYO, is the Sheridan College Theater
Department’s production of “Dancing at
Lughnasa.” It was the 1992 Tony Award winner for
Best Play on Broadway. Curtain: 7:30 p.m. It’s directed by Aaron Odom and will feature music by
Celtic Sage.
• Friday, it’s opening night for a
nine-performance run by the
Sheridan Civic Theater Guild.
They will be presenting Neil
Simon’s acclaimed comedy, “The
Prisoner of Second Avenue.” It’ll
be at the Carriage House
Theater. You have to like their
slogan: Every Seat the Best Seat.
PUBLISHER’S It’s on the grounds of the Trail
End Museum. Curtain: 7:30 p.m.
NOTEBOOK
Tickets: 672-9886. It is the CTG’s
|
50th season. The play is directed
Stephen Woody
by Dimitra Dugal and features
cast members Matt Davis, Amber Hanson, Josh
Hanson, Donna Gifford, Anne Quick, Deborah
Saurage.
••••••
Time was, Sen. William Proxmire of Wisconsin
would put out his regular “Golden Fleece Award”
highlighting wasteful government spending.
Proxmire was a Democrat from Wisconsin, served
the public for 32 years, and died in 2005. Some of
Proxmire’s more famous findings of government
waste:
• $84,000 to the National Science Foundation on
why people fall in love.
• The FAA spending taxpayer dollars to measure
the “length of the buttocks” on 432 flight attendants.
Nowadays, it’s Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, a
Republican who is retiring after almost 20 years.
He’s battling cancer. He calls it his “wastebook.”
• $856,000 to the National Science Foundation for a
grant to study mountain lions walking on a treadmill.
• $124 million to the U.S. Investigations Services,
Inc. It does background checks on federal employee
applicants and contractors, but missed Edward
Snowden and Aaron Alexis, the fella who shot dead
12 people at the U.S. Navy Yard in Washington, D.C.
The company has been accused of submitting
665,000 fake background investigations, in which
they were paid, and may have included “thousands
of people” who may not have been eligible for classified security clearance.
• A grant of nearly $400,000 to the National
Institutes of Health for a study of Swedish massages on rabbits to test the best kind of rub-downs
for various injuries.
••••••
More government spending…….
India’s government has hired 40 monkey impersonators to scare off real monkeys that are terrorizing government employees and Parliament members at government buildings in New Delhi. The
monkeys chew through Internet and phone cables
and steal food.
To frighten the macaques, officials have recruited
a “very talented” team of “monkey wallahs (specialists)” who will dress up as larger, more aggressive langur monkeys. Their job description is to
“hoot and shriek” at the smaller simians.
“It’s not a bad way to earn a living,” said one
monkey impersonator in This Week magazine.
••••••
Quotable
“Hulk Hogan says he’s going to wrestle again.
Hulk Hogan is 61 years old. That’s an old wrestler.
He’s such an old wrestler, his archrival is stairs.”
— Craig Ferguson, late night funnyguy
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
L
Lena Dunham's bare, naked truth
ena Dunham, creator of the sensational HBO series "Girls" — and
now the object of overwrought
child abuse accusations by boys on
the right — seems the perfect antidote
to election fatigue.
Poor Dunham. Everything was rocking along just fine. At 28, she has her
own television series, a new book
released in September, money, fame
and, as these things go, critics. Her
book, "Not That Kind of Girl," has
become an overnight cri de coeur for
righteous types offended by what they
read about what she wrote.
It's a cinch that
many of her harshest critics haven't
read the book themselves, but a few
principles have
emerged that concern not the content
but the treatment of
the author. We're not
KATHLEEN
quite at the point of
burning books,
PARKER
though there's a hint
|
of kerosene in the
air.
Basically, Dunham
wrote about her 7-year-old self and
her anatomical curiosities at the time,
which included wondering whether
all vaginas are the same. To answer
this question, not satisfied with her
mother's "I guess so," Dunham
explored her 1-year-old sister Grace's
private parts. Lo and behold, there
she discovered pebbles, put "there" by
little Grace for reasons that only 1year-olds know.
Let me interrupt myself here to say
that I would prefer a world in which
uterus and vagina discussions took
place primarily in homes and doctor's
offices. It isn't prudery but decorum
that compels me to say this. But then,
DROP US A LINE |
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I am sentimental about many things,
such as the days when people married
before having children.
But back to Dunham.
The pebble anecdote, combined with
a couple of others, constituted child
sexual abuse in the fevered minds of
Dunham's critics. The other small
tales, lest your imagination gallop off
into de Sade territory, were: (1) bribing Grace with candy to let Dunham
kiss her on the lips for five seconds;
(2) exploring her own anatomy in bed
at night after Grace fell asleep beside
her.
One might find this offensive but,
contextually, Grace didn't stop sleeping with her older sister until she
(Lena) was 17. Dunham's was apparently an affectionately demonstrative
family that favored physical closeness,
which is not the same as sexual. If we
weren't talking about vaginas all the
time, we might know this.
Dunham's brand of blunt truth is, in
fact, her brand and is the reason
"Girls" has been such a hit. She shows
girls (young women), or at least a subset of girls, as they really are -- imperfect and striving. In Dunham's case,
they're also self-absorbed, hurting,
seeking, wanting and painfully,
humorously neurotic, as well as
refreshingly lacking in vanity.
These adjectives have led not surprisingly to comparisons to Woody
Allen, who most closely resembles
Winston Churchill next to Dunham.
But the interior dialogue that tortures
both Allen and Dunham links them to
each other and to their respective
audiences. They treat us to the contents of their unconscious minds,
which entertain us precisely because
we realize, oh dear, we're not the only
ones.
Don't all men wonder at some point
what it's like to be a sperm, as Allen
portrayed himself in his 1972 film
"Everything You Always Wanted to
Know About Sex — But Were Afraid
to Ask"? (You have to see the movie.)
Likewise, Dunham might ask, don't
all little girls wonder what other vaginas look like?
But never mind. Nasty sees what
nasty knows. Instead of critiquing
Dunham's book as a work of art or literature — or even as a display of narcissistic self-parody — Kevin
Williamson, writing in National
Review, focused on the anecdotes that,
one surmises, interested him most.
They were repeated in an article by
Bradford Thomas at TruthRevolt.org
that prompted Dunham's attorneys to
seek both a cease-and-desist and an
apology.
No go.
Reasonable arguments accrue to
both sides. Dunham sees her stories
taken out of a context of humor and
innocence, though she did write
(tongue in cheek) that "anything a
sexual predator might do to woo a
small suburban girl I was trying." On
the other side, lazy reviewing isn't
illegal.
To the larger point, artistic freedom,
including offensive or "bad" art, has to
be protected just as unpopular opinions must be. We don't need a First
Amendment to protect Hallmark slogans but to protect us from forces that
would silence certain thoughts, and,
inevitably, certain people.
For now, Lena Dunham is stuck
with the story she wrote. And critics,
as always, are stuck with themselves.
KATHLEEN PARKER is a syndicated columnist of The
Washington Post, a regular guest on television shows like The Chris
Mathews Show and The O’Reilly Factor, and is a member of the
Buckley School’s faculty. She won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for
distinguished commentary.
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The White
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House
Longworth
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Phone: 202-225-2311
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Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
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The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
PEOPLE
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
Sheridan College to host beekeeping lecture ONLINE NOW!
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The next event in the Sheridan College
Museum of Discovery’s science lecture series will focus on
beekeeping.
Tongue River Honey beekeeper Clifford Reed will present “Survival of Beekeeping in the 21st Century,” Nov. 12
at 7 p.m.
Beekeepers today find themselves in a fight for survival,
with both the use of chemical pesticides and the parasitic
�Varroa’ mite having strong negative effects on honey bees.
Reed will discuss these challenges while highlighting how
the food supply depends on the success of beekeepers in a
harsh environment.
Tongue River Honey was established in 1918 in
Ranchester by a railroad worker who turned to beekeeping, Earl C. Reed. It has since been passed down three generations. Clifford Reed, who grew up working honey bees
with his family, and his wife took over operations in 1984
and are the current owner/operators. They are members
of the Sioux Bee Honey Association, the world’s largest
honey co-op, and Clifford has served as past president of
the Wyoming Beekeepers Association.
The event is free and open to the public. It will be held at
the Sheridan College Science Museum in the Mohns
Science Center, located at 3059 Coffeen Ave.
For more information, contact Dr. Scott Newbold at 6746446 ext. 3112 or [email protected]
Your guide to Sheridan!
www.DestinationSheridan.com
Forbes, Lee wed in August
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Tallie Forbes of Sheridan and Justin
Lee of Denton, Texas, wed at a family home in Sheridan
on Aug. 16, 2014.
Forbes is a Sheridan High School graduate who graduated cum laude with an engineering degree from
Brown University. She also received a doctorate in
chemical engineering from the University of California
– Santa Barbara. She is currently working on her postdoctorate in San Antonio, Texas.
She is the daughter of Cam and Trish Forbes of
Sheridan.
Lee graduated from Denton Ryan High School then
with honors from the University of Texas – Austin with
a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering. He also
earned a doctorate degree in chemical engineering from
the University of California – Santa Barbara. He is currently employed with Exxon in Baytown, Texas.
He is the son of Byoung and Soo Lee of Lewisville,
Texas.
The couple will reside in Houston, Texas.
Tallie Forbes and Justin Lee wed in Sheridan on Aug. 16, 2014.
COURTESY PHOTO |
SHS to perform
fall jazz concert
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan
High School jazz band will perform its fall concert Tuesday.
The concert will be held at 7
p.m. in the Sue Henry auditori-
um at SHS.
The event is free and open to
the public.
The high school is located at
1056 Long Drive.
For more information, call
672-2495.
BHMS announces first-quarter honor rolls
FROM STAFF REPORTS
BIG HORN — Big Horn Middle
School has announced its first-quarter
honor roll recipients.
Eighth-grade principal’s honor
roll
Ellie Bard, Elliot Boley, Cameron
Brown, John Chase, Reata Cook,
Shyan Davidson, Kade Eisele, Dalton
Gregory, Nathan Hecker, Kade
Koltiska, Nathaniel Lydic, Brock
Michaud, Seth Mullinax, Kaylie
Redinger, Georgina Ringley, Jovenai
Rosselott, Leah Schuster, Chelsey
Swaney, Delaney Walker, Samuel
Walker, Mollie Watson, Hunter Weiss
Seventh-grade principal’s honor
roll
Joel Bailey, Sheridan Blackburn,
Cutler Bradshaw, Carly Craig, Quinn
McCafferty, Anna Melin, Haydon
Mullinax, Mary Nicholson, William
Pelissier, Casey Prior, Nolan Radar,
Courtney Wallach, William Watson,
Shayla Wrenn
Sixth-grade principal’s honor
roll
Carson Bates, Jacob Carter, Garrett
Custis, Bode Dunham, Aleyah Eisele,
Porter Gardiner, Sam Gregory,
Cassandra Guelde, Will Huckeba,
Rayna Kobielusz, Gentry Lattin,
Deena Lee, Bridger Michaud,
Kennady Myers, Dalton Nelson,
Ayden Phillips, Jessica Quillen,
Kendall Redinger, Christian Walker,
Joshua Walker
Eighth-grade school honor roll
Shannon Flynn, William Greenelsh,
Nathaniel Haworth, Talon Heatley,
Ryan Johnson, Katherine Lambert,
Jack Nance, Alahna Shew, Sydney
Schmidt
Seventh-grade school honor roll
Mallory Arneson, Peyton
Etchechoury, Ashlyn Ibach, Dugan
Irby, Carley Jo Motsick
Sixth-grade school honor roll
Brandon Cummins, Luke Daniels,
Jersey DeHaven, Elizabeth Foley,
Camryn Hecker, Connor Isakson,
Brodie Juergens, Winfield Loomis,
Bryce Lydic, Bridget McCurry,
Matthew Melin, Robert Morton, Luke
Mullinax, Chrysanthi Paninos, Kalee
Parker
Sports special for Brokaw looks at hunting season
NEW YORK (AP) — Tom Brokaw will take NBC Sports
Network viewers with him on a trip to his native South
Dakota for pheasant hunting season, a special that could
become the template for a regular series.
The veteran NBC anchor hosts “Opening Day,” airing at
11 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Nov. 19, after a hockey game.
The program examines traditions around the beginning
of hunting season, which is a big business in South
Dakota. Brokaw details how the state made itself a destination, visits the annual dinner of the hunters’ group
Pheasants Forever and goes out with fellow hunters
including Ted Turner.
Brokaw got rid of his guns while living in Los Angeles
during the tumultuous year of 1968. But he took up hunting again a couple of decades later, usually accompanied
by his bird dog Sage.
Brokaw, who splits his time between New York and
Montana, looks forward to opening day as a way to connect each year with friends he grew up with.
“I stay in the small towns, and it’s revisiting my youth,”
he said.
South Dakota has cultivated businesses surrounding the
opening of pheasant hunting season, making it a destination for hunters around the country each year on the third
Saturday of October.
“The state just gets it,” he said.
Turning his outings into TV isn’t new for Brokaw. For
years, an annual fishing trip he conducts with pals like
Michael Keaton has been chronicled on “Buccaneers &
Bones,” a series on the Outdoor Channel.
If the “Opening Day” special works well, the idea could
spread to examine the culture around other sports and traditions, according to NBC Sports.
Brokaw, 74, keeps busy while undergoing chemotherapy
for multiple myeloma, a cancer affecting blood cells in the
bone marrow. He worked on Election Night on Tuesday,
where an alarm on his cell phone went off while he was on
the air at MSNBC. He quickly made light of the gaffe by
taking out the phone and pretending to take a grocery list.
“I’m near the end of the treatment and I’m very encouraged by the process,” he said.
Fall Savings....
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Clip this ad, bring it in at time of drop off and
receive 33% off any dry cleaning or laundry
order. Offer valid until November 30, 2014.
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(behind Perkins)
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories
that will be talked about
today:
1. WHERE A NEW
REALITY HAS BEGUN
Washington wakes up
to a Republican-controlled Congress that will
shape America’s government in the last two years
of the president’s term.
2. WHAT THE NEW
SENATE LEADER’S
PRIORITIES WILL BE
A veteran senator,
Mitch McConnell is determined to force a showdown over President
Obama’s health care overhaul and environmental
and financial regulation.
3. ALL EYES ON 2016 AS
MIDTERMS CHANGE
LANDSCAPE
Republicans waste no
time in attacking their
next target: Hillary
Clinton.
4. WHO IS
MASTERMINDING IRAQ’S
WAR AGAINST THE
ISLAMIC STATE
Iranian general
Ghasem Soleimani is
credited with engineering
a number of victories
that the Iraqi army has
achieved in fighting the
terrorist group.
5. LOW-KEY SCION
AWAITS TURN TO RUN
SAMSUNG
South Korea’s business
world is wondering
whether the 46-year-old
son of the company’s
chief can lead it to more
profits in a rapidly changing technology market.
6. MEXICO’S
MOST-WANTED COUPLE
CAPTURED
A mayor and his wife
are accused of running
their town as a drug fiefdom — and of ordering
deadly attacks on students.
7. HBO BIDS FAREWELL
TO �THE NEWSROOM’
The show about a struggling cable-news network
is coming to an end in its
third season after mixed
reviews and faltering ratings.
8. PRINCES RELEGATED
TO LESSER ROLES
Where romance was
once the goal of Disney’s
cinematic princesses
(think “Cinderella” and
“Sleeping Beauty”), the
moviemaker is shifting
its lens toward independent female protagonists.
9. TIBET’S EXILES MOURN
LOST FAMILY TIES
Many of the Buddhist
region’s emigres left were
smuggled out when they
were children and have
never really known their
families.
10. VIKINGS’ ADRIAN
PETERSON AVOIDS JAIL
IN CHILD ABUSE CASE
The All-Pro running
back pleads no contest to
a misdemeanor. It’s not
clear how the plea deal
will affect his playing status.
COURTESY PHOTO |
Miss Wyoming visits Arvada-Clearmont schools
Miss Wyoming 2014 Jessie Allen visits an elementary classroom with FFA members Ben Briscoe and Shaylee Adamson, both
freshman, during Halloween activities last Thursday at Arvada-Clearmont schools in Clearmont.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Early release for SHS
students Thursday
SHERIDAN — Sheridan
County School District 2 will
hold parent/teacher conferences
Thursday and Friday.
Students will be released early
Thursday and there will be no
school on Friday.
The following are the early dismissals times:
• Kindergarten: 11:25 a.m.
• Elementary schools: 12:35 p.m.
• Sheridan Junior High School:
1:10 p.m.
• Ft. Mackenzie/Wright Place:
1:10 p.m.
• Sheridan High School: 1:15
p.m.
only thing he can — he has a
nervous breakdown, and it’s the
best thing that ever happened to
him.
Tickets are $15 for adults and
$12 for students, seniors and
active military. Tickets are available at the WYO Theater box
office or by calling 672-9084.
Tickets may also be purchased
one hour before each of the performances.
Performances are set for
Friday through Sunday, Nov. 1416 and Nov. 21-23. Show times are
7:30 p.m. on Fridays and
Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays.
For more information, call the
Civic Theatre Guild at 672-9886.
The theater is located at 419
Delphi Ave.
Stroll button design
winner to be announced
Civic Theatre Guild to
Thursday
perform �The Prisoner of
Second Avenue’
SHERIDAN — The winner of
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan
Civic Theatre Guild will perform
“The Prisoner of Second
Avenue” this month at the
Carriage House Theater.
Dimitra Dugal will direct the
dramatic play by Neil Simon in
which a well-paid executive of a
high-end Manhattan firm gets
the ax. While things fall apart
around the executive, he does the
the 2014 Christmas Stroll button
design contest will be announced
Thursday at 4:30 p.m.
Sheridan Mayor John Heath
will present the winner at
Sheridan City Hall.
The 19th annual Christmas
Stroll is set for Nov. 28. This
year’s theme is “Sugar Plum
Stroll.”
Stroll buttons will be available
for purchase Friday at partici-
pating businesses for $5 each. In
addition to more than 90 prizes
available, those who purchase
stroll buttons could also win $25500 in Chamber Bucks.
For more information on the
annual Christmas Stroll, see
sheridanwyomingchamber.org.
Sheridan City Hall is located at
55 E. Grinnell St.
�Dancing at Lughnasa’
production set for this
weekend
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan
College Theater Department will
present “Dancing at Lughnasa”
inside the Mars Theater at the
WYO Theater this weekend.
The play, written by dramatist
Brian Friel, the winner of the
1992 Tony Award for Best Play,
will have showings at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday. A
matinee at 2 p.m. will also be
offered Saturday.
“Dancing at Lughnasa,” recalling Ireland in the mid-1930s, is
directed by Sheridan College
staff member Aaron Odom and
will feature music by Celtic Sage.
Tickets cost $15 for adults and
$10 for seniors, military and students. They may be purchased
through the WYO Theater box
office located at 42 N. Main St.,
online at wyotheater.com and by
calling 672-9084.
THURSDAY EVENTS |
• 4:30 p.m., presentation of the 2014 Christmas Stroll button design winner, Sheridan City Hall, 55 E.
Grinnell St.
• 7 p.m., performance by cellist Evan Drachman and pianist Mary Au followed by the recognition of Dr.
Seymour Thickman, WYO Theater, 42 N. Main St.
• 7:30 p.m., "Dancing at Lughnasa," Mars Theater at the WYO Theater, 42 N. Main St., $15 for adults, $10
for seniors, students, veterans and active military
TIPPED OVER |
NPR’s �Car Talk’ co-host Tom
Magliozzi dies
BOSTON (AP) — Tom Magliozzi, a Boston-area
mechanic and MIT graduate who became an
unlikely radio star as part of the brother duo that
hosted “Car Talk,” one of public radio’s most popular show’s ever, died of complications from
Alzheimer’s disease. He was 77 years old.
On “Car Talk,” Tom and his younger brother,
Ray, dispensed sound advice about repairing cars
mixed generously with sharp one-liners, self-deprecating humor and off-topic digressions on philosophy and other mysteries of life.
“I like to drive with the windows open. I mean,
before you know it, you’re going to spend plenty of
time sealed up in a box anyway, right?” Tom once
quipped on-air.
“Car Talk” reached more than 4 million people a
week on more than 600 radio stations across the
country at its peak. It continued to be a top-rated
show even after the brothers stopped taping live
shows in 2012 and the network began airing reruns
and archived materials.
Tom Magliozzi died on Monday.
“He and his brother changed public broadcasting
forever,” Doug Berman, Car Talk’s executive producer said in a statement. “Before Car Talk, NPR
was formal, polite, cautious ...even stiff.”
The duo, which called themselves the “Click and
Clack, the Tappet Brothers,” always ended their
shows with a catchphrase, “Don’t drive like my
brother,” delivered in their signature Boston
accents.
“We can be happy he lived the life he wanted to
live; goofing off a lot, talking to you guys every
week, and primarily, laughing his ass off,” Ray
Magliozzi wrote Monday on the “Car Talk” website. He also affectionately teased his late brother,
who was 12 years his senior: “Turns out he wasn’t
kidding. ...He really couldn’t remember last week’s
puzzler.”
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Nov. 5, 1914, Britain
and France declared war
against the Ottoman Empire;
Britain also annexed Cyprus.
On this date:
In 1605, the “Gunpowder
Plot” failed as Guy Fawkes
was seized before he could
blow up the English
Parliament.
In 1781, the Continental
Congress elected John
Hanson of Maryland its chairman, giving him the title of
“President of the United
States in Congress
Assembled.”
In 1872, suffragist Susan B.
Anthony defied the law by
attempting to cast a vote for
President Ulysses S. Grant.
(Anthony was convicted by a
judge and fined $100, but she
never paid the fine.)
In 1912, Democrat
Woodrow Wilson was elected
president, defeating
Progressive Party candidate
Theodore Roosevelt, incumbent Republican William
Howard Taft and Socialist
Eugene V. Debs.
In 1938, Samuel Barber’s
“Adagio for Strings” and
“Essay for Orchestra” made
their world debuts on the NBC
Blue radio network as they
were performed by the NBC
Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini.
In 1940, President Franklin
D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term in office as
he defeated Republican challenger Wendell L. Willkie.
In 1964, NASA launched
Mariner 3, which was supposed to fly by Mars, but the
spacecraft failed to reach its
destination.
In 1968, Republican
Richard M. Nixon won the
presidency, defeating
Democratic Vice President
Hubert H. Humphrey and
American Independent candidate George C. Wallace.
In 1974, Democrat Ella T.
Grasso was elected governor
of Connecticut, becoming the
first woman to win a gubernatorial office without succeeding her husband.
In 1989, death claimed
pianist Vladimir Horowitz in
New York at age 86 and
singer-songwriter Barry
Sadler in Murfreesboro,
Tennessee, at age 49.
In 1990, Rabbi Meir
Kahane, the Brooklyn-born
Israeli extremist, was shot to
death at a New York hotel.
(Egyptian native El Sayyed
Nosair was convicted of the
slaying in federal court.)
In 1994, former President
Ronald Reagan disclosed he
had Alzheimer’s disease.
Ten years ago: The
Kremlin announced that
Russia had given final
approval to the Kyoto Protocol
on global warming. In a surprise reversal, the Chilean
army for the first time
assumed institutional responsibility for widespread human
rights violations during the
dictatorship of General
Augusto Pinochet.
Five years ago: A shooting
rampage at the Fort Hood
Army post in Texas left 13
people dead; Maj. Nidal
Hasan, an Army psychiatrist,
was later convicted of murder
and sentenced to death.
One year ago: Republican
Gov. Chris Christie won a
resounding re-election victory
in Democratic-leaning New
Jersey, while Democrat Terry
McAuliffe prevailed in
Virginia’s gubernatorial contest. Toronto Mayor Rob Ford
acknowledged for the first
time that he had smoked
crack “probably a year ago”
when he was in a “drunken
stupor,” but he refused to
resign despite immense pressure to step aside as leader of
Canada’s largest city.
Thought for Today: “The
line of least resistance was
always the most difficult line
in the long run.” — Peter
Cheyney, English author
(1896-1951).
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
SCSD2 board
gets one new
member
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan County
School District 2 board of trustees
will have one newcomer in January
after Susan Wilson won the vacant
seat left when trustee Scott Hininger
decided not to run for another term.
The remaining three trustees up for
re-election retained their spots.
After 12 years on the board,
Hininger changed directions this year
and challenged incumbent county
Treasurer Peter Carroll, but was
defeated in the primary election.
Three challengers joined the race
for SCSD2 school board — Wilson,
Ami Erickson and Jeff Jones — hoping to fill the gap or oust an incumbent.
Wilson clinched the spot after
claiming the third most votes in the
election (3,181) and spending the highest amount of campaign funds for
this race.
Trustee Marva Craft retained her
seat, receiving the most votes in this
race (3,889) and reporting no campaign finances spent.
Craft said she knows Wilson
through her former work as a teacher
and times when she has served on
committees at the district, and Craft
believes she will be a great addition
to the board.
“She cares very deeply about the
school district as a whole,” Craft said.
“I feel like she is knowledgeable
enough already about the workings of
the administration that it’s going to
be a good, smooth fit.”
Craft is grateful for the number of
votes she received and excited for
another four years, saying that both
she and the board are in good spots to
progress.
“We’ve come a long way, we work
hard and we’re good as a team,” Craft
said. “It has been a hard learning
curve, and now that I know what I’m
doing I’m looking forward to more
work.”
Craft said the hardest lesson she
has learned in her years on the board
is how to listen carefully to every side
of every story and then apply her best
judgment to the whole situation
before her.
“That’s a tough thing to do, to make
sure you know overall where everyone is coming from, and that has
helped me in my personal life as
well,” she said. “You really have a
responsibility to the public to do
that.”
Trustee Erica O’Dell agreed that
post-learning production is in her
future after re-election.
“After four years I finally feel like I
am getting on my feet and learning
more about the district,” O’Dell said.
“I hope to keep learning more and get
better at what I’m doing.”
Included in this endeavor, she hopes
to attend more conferences and may
join more ancillary boards such as
the Sheridan Community Education
Foundation, which is currently seeking another SCSD2 trustee to join.
At one point O’Dell had considered
not running in this election, and she
discussed what made her change her
mind.
“I really enjoy it, I like learning
about what’s happening in the state
and it is important for me to be
involved in the community,” she said.
“Before, I had jobs in non-profits that
I thought benefitted the community,
and right now this is what I can do to
be involved. I’m just really glad to
have the chance to connect.”
O’Dell came in fourth in vote totals,
defeating challenger Jones 2,940-2,488.
Trustee Ann Perkins was the third
incumbent up for election and after
winning her second election, she said
it was a tougher race this time.
“Due to the quality of candidates
that were running I did more campaigning this time through social
media outlets that I didn’t do last
time, which was an interesting way to
campaign but it proved effective,” she
said.
Perkins pulled in the second most
votes with 3,468 and she attributed
that to being very involved in the
community including her work as a
professor and connection with community organizations.
Her plans and goals for her next
term include continuing the work the
district has started on improving
graduation rates, making sure the
board receives parent involvement
and continuing to strive for the goal
of overall excellence.
These winning women will join
trustees Richard Bridger, Hollis
Hackman, Jim Perkins, Wayne Schatz
and Molly Steel.
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
SCSD1 gets new board member
Dayton resident Mary Schilling ousts incumbent Penny Mentock-Barkan
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — One of only two incumbents in Sheridan County elections who
were ousted from positions by challengers
in Tuesday night’s general election came
from the Sheridan County School District
1 board of trustees.
Challenger Mary Schilling claimed a
spot on the five-person team after edging
out trustee Penny Mentock-Barkan, 865731.
Trustee Carol Garber was also up for reelection, and retained her seat by a large
margin, claiming 1,124 votes.
The race for SCSD1 school board was the
one with the greatest amount of collective
campaign funds raised in the county, with
Garber topping the list.
Approximately $1,335 was spent by the
three candidates, nearly half of that coming from Garber’s personal funds.
Unlike Mentock-Barkan, a former SCSD1
educator, Schilling comes from a diverse
but non-education related background that
includes experience in accounting, management and engineering.
Schilling’s connection to the district is
personal, being a mother, volunteer and
actively concerned citizen, and she thinks
that is what set her apart in this election.
“I had a strong local support base from
the Dayton/Ranchester area,” she said. “I
live in this area and my kids are in these
schools. I’m at the school all the time and
at functions, I believe I’m pretty approachable and I believe that’s why I had such
strong support.”
Schilling said that though the size and
separation of the large school district has
kept her from learning much about the Big
Horn half, she looks forward to getting to
know them and their concerns.
“Obviously as a school board member
you serve both sides, so it’s not like I am
only concerned with the
Ranchester/Dayton community, and I
know as the process goes along I will
become more apprised of the concerns
over there as well,” she said. “I look forward to getting over to Big Horn, and
hopefully the people in Big Horn will get to
know me and have confidence in me during my time of serving.”
A self-described extrovert, Schilling said
she wanted to run because she likes to “get
out there, visit with people, collaborate, listen to suggestions and give suggestions.”
Schilling has been in the Sheridan
County area since 1998 and in the
Ranchester community for nine years, but
she said she is not very well known yet.
She spent just $381 in yard signs and
brochures to get her name out there, but
made most of her connections by being at
the schools.
“I ran with a platform that I needed to be
approachable, accessible, and I’ll do that
by being out in the community because I
have kids in the community,” she said. “I’ll
be at the games because my kids are at the
games. I’ll be at the schools because I volunteer at the schools. And I’ll encourage
open communication.”
Among other causes she cares about,
Schilling said she takes it personally when
parents in the area send their kids to
Sheridan schools, saying that she wants to
use her position to see what she can do to
make sure everyone knows how great the
district is.
“What prompted me to run is I feel very
fortunate my kids are in this district and I
think they do an outstanding job,” she
said. “I think people were wondering about
certain things that were going on and
there wasn’t a voice out there that they
can walk up to and say, �I heard that…’ or
�Is this true?’ We all can make calls but
with our busy lives we often don’t. And
rumors get started when you don’t have a
point to go to and get clarification or vent
concerns.”
Schilling hopes to be that point by
remaining a consistent presence in the
community.
“This is our community, this is where we
live,” she said. “This is where we need to
invest our resources.”
She acknowledges, though, that she has a
lot to learn.
“I’m definitely going to be on a learning
curve for sure, but I’m ready for that,” she
said. “I’m ready to throw myself into that
and I’m equipped to learn and of course
grateful to serve the community.”
Schilling was also grateful to MentockBarkan for not only her service on the
board but also her personal support.
“Penny was very gracious to me,” she
said. “She was very encouraging every
time I ran across her during this election
time.”
Shafer ousts longtime incumbent for Sheridan City Council
FILE PHOTO | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Thayer Shafer, then candidate for the at-large council seat of the city of Sheridan, left, and Barbara Hill look over items at the silent auction table during the 2014 Reagan Day Dinner earlier this year at the Sheridan College Thorne-Rider Campus Center.
Gooch, an 11-year
resident, will also
join ranks
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Kelly Gooch will join the
ranks of Sheridan City Council members
this January after receiving enough votes
Tuesday to earn one of the three four-year
seats on the ballot.
Gooch moved to Sheridan 11 years ago
with his wife and two daughters. He works
at Rehabilitation Enterprises of North
Eastern Wyoming as an IT director and
started Go-Tec, LLC, an IT consulting business.
Gooch also serves as an associate pastor
at Bethesda Worship Center.
Throughout the campaign for Council,
Gooch voiced his opposition to the city’s
decision to fluoridate the water.
He earned more votes than the two
incumbents, Alex Lee and Jesus Rios.
Gooch tallied 3,108 votes compared to Lee’s
2,841 and Rios’ 2,709.
The trio edged out Darryl Szymanski,
who earned a seat on the ticket after waging a successful write-in campaign in the
August primary.
Rios said he is excited to be elected by
the community he has served since being
appointed in April.
“Being appointed is one thing,” Rios said,
“but being elected by members of the community is exciting.”
Rios added that one of the things he’d
like to tackle right away is the implementation of curbside recycling in Sheridan. He
said it will help reduce the demand on the
city’s landfill and would be beneficial to
the community as a whole.
He also noted the importance of getting
the business incubator that is currently in
the works up and running. That project
will likely be in conjuction with the
University of Wyoming, Sheridan College
and the county.
In the two-year race, Thayer Shafer
topped longtime incumbent Robert
Webster by 766 votes.
Webster has served on the Council for
nearly two decades.
“Now the work begins,” Shafer said this
morning.
He added that he feels he has a lot to
learn and will take things as they come
along.
“I have no agenda to go in and turn the
tables on things,” he said.
When asked if he thought his win over a
longtime incumbent signified that voters
are unhappy with the current administration, Shafer said, “It’s time for change.”
Webster noted that he will remain on the
Council until January, then plans to stay
involved with city happenings and projects.
Looking back over his 20 years of service, Webster said he feels pretty good about
what he’s been able to accomplish.
“I was lucky enough to accomplish everything that I had originally set out to do,”
Webster said, adding that his goals were to
pave the streets and update infrastructure
in Ward 3.
He congratulated Shafer and said he
thought the new councilor would “do a
good job.”
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
Ranchester Town Council to add young blood in January
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
RANCHESTER — Two candidates who
accepted write-in nominations during the primary election ran against each other in the
general election to fill one unexpired two-year
term on Ranchester Town Council.
Jesse Hinkhouse won the election with 122
votes. Candidate Gayle Ogle received 94 votes.
There were three write-in votes, but names of
write-ins had not been released as of press
time.
Jesse Hinkhouse was born and raised in a
small town in South Dakota but attended
Sheridan College and has worked for Sheridan
County School District 1 for five years, mostly
as a teacher at Tongue River Elementary.
Hinkhouse has said he is eager to help
Ranchester grow and move forward, with a
particular focus on improving the town’s visual presence and making it a place where families want to put down roots and raise their
children.
He said the town has a great foundation of
businesses but could be improved with opportunities such as a car wash, Laundromat and
grocery store.
“I’m ecstatic,” Hinkhouse said Wednesday
morning.
Hinkhouse said he plans to continue attending Council meetings to gather information
on current issues and get up to speed.
One thing he has spoken with several resi-
dents about is the coming expansion of
Ranchester with the development of a new
elementary school and new subdivision with
upwards of 120 houses.
“We need to start planning for the future
now rather than just handle it when it
comes,” Hinkhouse said.
He’d like to start working with the town
engineer to plan out needed utility expansion.
He has also suggested that the town hire a
town planner to help guide the process of
infrastructure expansion.
Hinkhouse also said he will focus on one
concern he heard from often residents: the
lack of family friendly community areas. He’d
also like to see a pathway system be developed
to provide greater safety.
Unopposed
winners in
2014 election
State Auditor
R - Cynthia Cloud, incumbent (135,974)
State Treasurer
R - Mark Gordon, incumbent (136, 596)
State Senator, District 21
R - Bruce Burns, incumbent (5,452)
State Representative, District 40
R - Mike Madden, incumbent (2,827)
State Representative, District 51
R - Rosie Berger, incumbent (3,233)
County Assessor
R - Paul Fall, incumbent (8,115)
County Attorney
R - Matthew Redle, incumbent (7,476)
County Clerk and Recorder
R - Eda Schunk Thompson, incumbent
(8,047)
Clerk of District Court
R - Nickie Arney, incumbent (7,969)
County Coroner
R - PJ Kane, incumbent (7,940)
County Sheriff
R - Dave Hofmeier, incumbent (8,170)
County Treasurer
R - Peter Carroll, incumbent (8,159)
County Commissioner (elect 3)
R - Terry Cram, Incumbent (6,938)
R- Steve Maier, incumbent (6,622)
R - Bob Rolston, incumbent (6,675)
Ranchester Mayor
Peter Clark (210)
Ranchester Councilmember, 4year term (elect 2)
Erin Carbert (176)
Dennis Dunn (161)
Sheridan County School District 3
(elect 2)
Barbara Carlock (114)
Kris Malli (75)
Sheridan County Conservation
District, rural (elect 1)
Orrin Connell (7,114)
Sheridan County Conservation
District, urban (elect 1)
Edith Heyward (6,737)
Optional One-Cent
Sales Tax approved
For: 6,469
Against: 2,999
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Making his voice heard
Johan Dykhorst casts his ballot at the polling station as election official Rosemary Storey, left, watches during the elections Tuesday at Holy Name Catholic Church.
Voters opt to maintain status quo on
college district board; three incumbents re-elected
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — The Northern Wyoming
Community College District retained three
incumbent board members after Tuesday’s election.
The district services Gillette College and
Sheridan College in both Sheridan and Johnson
counties.
Five candidates ran for seats on the board.
Robert Leibrich, Norleen Healy and Jerry Iekel,
all of whom were already serving, kept their
seats. Mike Watkins and Rolf Thor Distad also
sought seats on the college district’s board of
trustees.
Healy said she is looking forward to continuing
her work on projects that have been started over
her last term.
“The reason I ran again was because we started so many things and a lot of initiatives, and I
would like to see them through,” Healy said.
“We’re working to improve our rate of graduation and see that each student leaves with a certificate or a diploma. We also have a lot of build-
ing projects going on right now that I’d like to
see through.”
Jerry Iekel indicated that he was equally eager
to return to projects that have been started.
“It’s such an exciting college and job, and I
want to continue to have a part in expanding the
changes that are happening on the campus and
building on the successes of our Master Plan,”
Iekel said. “I also want to keep working in favor
of the students because it’s all about them. I’m
looking forward to seeing the development of the
Mars Agriculture and Science Building. I also
enjoy having some play in regard to the
Legislature concerning college funding.”
Iekel was a state representative for House
District 29 from 2001-2008.
“I still know people in the Legislature,” he
said. “I feel like I can get things done.”
Leibrich could not be reached by press time.
Before the election, he indicated to the Press that
he worked to address the concerns of local citizens concerning the college, discussing those
concerns with the district leadership so he and
the board could present concerned citizens with
answers and solutions.
HD30:
Jennings
aims to stop
tax increases
FROM 1
Jennings said he stepped
into the race to represent
House District 30 because
he felt like Coleman’s votes
in the Legislature were not
representative of his own
family values or the values
of other constituents he
knows.
Jennings said he has been
involved in church leadership and has always voted
and spoken with his legislators but that he has little
political experience. He said
he felt it was a positive
aspect of his resume to be
an average citizen and not a
politician.
Key issues he wanted to
address were to stop tax
increases, to stop government overreach and to
uphold Second Amendment
gun rights.
During his campaign,
Jennings spoke against the
passage of Senate File 104,
which stripped
Superintendent of Public
Instruction Cindy Hill of
most of her powers, and
said that should have been
decided by voters. He also
spoke against the increased
gas tax, Common Core and
the Affordable Care Act,
and called on legislators to
tighten state spending and
promote economic development by promoting the private sector.
Wednesday morning,
Jennings expressed thanks
to God for giving him the
strength to run his campaign, to his family and
campaign managers and
mostly to his constituents
who voted “constitutional”
and “conservative,” the
bedrocks of his campaign.
As Jennings prepares for
this new endeavor, he said
he will strive to have “two
ears and one mouth” in
order to learn as much as
he can from the Sheridan
County delegation, his constituents and other training
opportunities.
On a personal level,
Jennings said he will focus
on and potentially sponsor
bills that strengthen
parental rights.
“Families are the bedrock
of society, and that’s one of
the things I want to focus
on,” Jennings said.
Jennings also believes
that the Affordable Care
Act will become a primary
issue in the coming session
with the switch to a majority Republican U.S. House
and Senate. He wants to
look at how to turn health
insurance back to the private sector or other policies
Wyoming could put in place
to monitor the issue.
Jennings would also like
to focus on limiting federal
government overreach,
especially in the energy and
agriculture sectors.
“We need to let the energy
sector move forward and
create jobs and do what
they do best,” Jennings
said.
DAYTON: Maintenance, upgrade to sewer system, additional park space on agenda
Decker Coal Mine for 36 years. He was a volunteer on
Dayton Fire and Rescue for 28 years, 16 of which he served
Coming issues of importance to the town include mainte- as fire chief. He previously served on the Council in the
nance and upgrade of the sewer system, development of
mid-1990s.
additional park and parking space next to Scott
Lofgren has said he doesn’t have an agenda to accomBicentennial Park and making sure streets stay well-main- plish on the Council; he wants to be part of helping Dayton
tained.
grow at a slow, steady pace, and he will strive to improve
Anderson, who will retire from his career in the auto
outreach to residents.
business Dec. 31 before becoming mayor, also said he will
Reichert is a lifelong Dayton resident who has worked for
focus on training a new council with little experience.
the Wyoming Department of Transportation for 29 years.
Four candidates ran for two open seats on Dayton Town
He has been a volunteer firefighter on Dayton Fire and
Council.
Rescue for 18 years, 12 as assistant fire chief.
The top two vote-getters who will fill the seats are Eric
Reichert said he was asked by community members to
Lofgren with 199 votes and Craig Reichert with 184 votes.
run for Town Council. He is wrapping up his service with
Candidate Clifford Reed received 144 votes, Jeremy Smith the fire department and wanted to continue to serve the
posted 131 and there were two write-in votes.
town and keep it running as well as possible.
Lofgren has lived in Dayton his whole life and worked at
Reichert will focus on maintaining the town’s infrastrucFROM 1
ture and services for its people. He also wants to help
improve Internet access in the town and work on ways to
keep citizens better informed.
“It’s quite exciting,” Reichert said. “A couple of the other
candidates called me last night and congratulated me, and
I thought, �Holy cow, we had such a great selection of candidates this go-around and for me to get chosen out of that
group, I’m very honored by it.’”
One issue Reichert hopes to focus on right away when he
begins in January is making sure the town’s employees
receive needed training to keep up with maintenance on
the water treatment plant and sewer treatment — and
make sure they are compensated for that training.
Reichert also spoke about the town’s coming consideration of installing a Verizon cell phone tower to improve
cell service. He wants to make sure technology access can
improve in the town.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A9
A10
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
3 charged with
feeding homeless in
Fort Lauderdale
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A 90year-old man and two South Florida ministers have been accused of breaking a new
ordinance that severely restricts public
feeding of the homeless in Fort Lauderdale.
Police arrested homeless advocate Arnold
Abbot and ministers Dwayne Black and
Mark Sims on Sunday as they handed out
food to homeless people in a Fort
Lauderdale park. The city ordinance took
effect Friday.
“One of the police officers said, �Drop that
plate right now,’ as if I were carrying a
weapon,” Abbott told South Florida television station WPLG. “It’s man’s inhumanity
to man is all it is.”
All three face up to 60 days in jail and a
$500 fine.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
Abbott runs a nonprofit group called Love
Thy Neighbor, Inc. He said he sued the city
in 1999 after they tried to stop him from
feeding the homeless on Fort Lauderdale
Beach. He won that case and now says he’ll
fight the new ordinance.
“I’m going to have to go back to court
again and sue the city of Fort Lauderdale —
a beautiful city,” Abbott said.
Women providing LA
adventure club a new challenge
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Rehearsing for �Prisoner’
Amber Hanson clings to a book after discovering her city apartment had been robbed during a
rehearsal for the play “The Prisoner of Second Avenue” Tuesday night at the Carriage House
Theater. The production is a presentation of the Sheridan Civic Theatre Guild and directed by
Dimitra Dugal. Show times are November 7-9. 14-16 and 21-23, Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.
and Sundays at 2 p.m. at the Carriage House Theater.
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Some of them have
hiked across a hundred or more countries.
Others have dived deep into the oceans off
every continent.
One member of the Adventurers Club of
Los Angeles has walked on the moon, while
another rode a crashed airplane to the
ground and walked away from the wreckage.
Still, for some members of this venerable
institution that has been meeting once a week
since 1921, their biggest challenge may lie
ahead: Deciding whether to admit women to
what has always been a “gentleman-only”
club.
One member angrily resigned after past
president Marc Weitz suggested the idea.
Initially the club’s board of directors unanimously supported him, Weitz says, but as
things grew more acrimonious three board
members had second thoughts.
The controversy has brought a rare
moment of discord to a group of ah-shucks
kind of guys who quietly go out and do amazing things, then meet just as quietly on
Thursday nights to shoot the breeze over a
meat-and-potatoes dinner in a clubhouse hidden above a drugstore in a modest LA neighborhood.
“It’s been quite divisive,” acknowledges
board member Kevin Lee, choosing his words
carefully. “Some of the folks opposed think it
would hurt the club’s camaraderie. Others
say if we let women in they should be as
qualified as men.”
Not that most members don’t think women
are as qualified. They sometimes attend as
guests and discuss their own adventures. One
who did so recently was Nancy Miller, a registered nurse who has walked on all seven continents, climbed Africa’s highest peak and
stood on both the North and South Poles.
“Some of our women guests have come in
with credentials so good that they’ve made
our members cringe,” past president Bob
Silver says with a smile. Still, this 50-year
member is leaning toward voting no. The
group’s full voting membership, 113 men, will
have the final say when ballots are counted
Thursday night.
For one thing, Silver and other members
say, women already can join the Explorers
Club, an international group. The
Adventurers Club of LA has always been just
for men, ever since its founder, Capt. Jack
Roulac, took seriously a toast to “gentlemen
adventurers” that was raised at a 1912 gathering in New York hosted by President
Theodore Roosevelt.
Only men who can prove their adventures
have “taken them off the beaten path” are
considered by the club, whose members vote
on who gets in. Members past and present
have climbed the world’s tallest mountains,
walked across entire countries, circumnavigated the globe, even won a Medal of Honor
for bravery in combat.
“Everybody in this room has done something fantastic,” says member Jay Foonberg.
“They just don’t think it’s fantastic. They just
think it’s fun.”
Wyoming GOP maintains dominance in state Legislature
CHEYENNE (AP) — The fact that
Republicans would maintain an overwhelming advantage in the Wyoming
Legislature was never in doubt.
The question entering Tuesday's election
was would they grow that advantage or
lose a seat or two.
According to early election results,
Democrats would gain one seat in the state
House while there would be no change in
the state Senate.
Before the election, Republicans held a
26-4 advantage in the Senate and a 52-8
majority in the House.
In Tuesday's election, with 15 of the 30
Senate seats on the ballot, Republicans won
all four Senate races that had a Democrat
opponent. The 11 other seats up for election
had nine Republicans and two Democrats
running uncontested.
In the House, all 60 seats were up for election with 34 Republican and three
Democratic incumbents running unopposed.
In 23 contested races, Republicans won or
were leading in 17 while Democrats won or
MEAD: Beat out Democrat Pete Gosar
FROM 1
Mead, a Republican and former U.S. attorney for Wyoming, won a second term
Tuesday, beating Democrat Pete Gosar and
two other challengers.
Looking ahead to his second term, Mead
said, "We think it provides an opportunity
for me and the office to continue our work
on the energy strategy, the water strategy,
expanding technology and broadband in
the state, continuing to strengthen our
local governments and our infrastructure."
Mead also said he looks forward to beginning a discussion on how Wyoming should
handle its rainy day fund — a $2 billion
fund that unlike state permanent savings
could be spent on projects or government
operations. Some state lawmakers have
been increasingly calling for an open policy
discussion on how the state should handle
the funds and how much money ultimately
should be in savings.
Mead said he wants to address where the
fund should be, what it should be used for,
"and how we can make sure we're investing
not only in our markets, but investing in
that which has made us so strong in our
own state."
Mead's second term also will likely find
him continuing to serve as a salesman with
efforts to try to lobby for markets for coal.
Wyoming is the country's leading coal-producing state, although recent revenue forecasts say the industry's future is clouded by
uncertainty.
Mead has traveled to Asia during his first
term and says nations there are hungry for
Wyoming coal. Meanwhile, domestic
demand is slipping due to a combination of
cheaper natural gas and increasingly strict
federal emissions standards that industry
officials say makes construction of new
coal-fired power plants infeasible in this
country.
Mead's administration has filed dozens of
legal challenges to EPA air quality regulations it says would hurt coal production. So
far, the state has been stymied in its efforts
to secure deep-water port access in the
Northwest for coal exports.
"While coal, no question, has a target on
its back, I remain optimistic," Mead said in
a recent interview. He said the U.S. gets 40
percent of its electricity from coal, and he
can't see the nation making the decision to
lose the competitive advantage of affordable energy by taking that off the table.
Another challenge facing Mead in his second term will likely continue to be how to
handle contentious decisions about the federal Endangered Species Act.
Acting in response to a lawsuit filed by
conservation groups, a federal judge in
Washington, D.C., recently rejected
Wyoming's wolf-management plan and
returned the animals to federal protections.
Mead has said he believes the state's best
path forward lies in calling on its congressional delegation to sponsor legislation,
similar to an existing law that already covers Idaho and Montana, specifying that
there can be no legal challenges to the
state's management plan.
In addition, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service is set to make a decision next year
whether to grant the sage grouse protections under the Endangered Species Act.
Although the sage grouse population has
dropped all over the West, its greatest numbers are still found in Wyoming. Officials
say a decision to grant federal protections
for the bird could threaten energy development across the state.
"I am so frustrated about wolves, and my
frustration is now not limited to wolves, it's
the Endangered Species Act," Mead said
recently.
Once a species is listed, Mead said states
have no way of knowing what they have to
do to end federal protections and regain
state management.
were leading in six.
In District 17, incumbent Republican
Stephen Watt, of Rock Springs, lost to
Democrat JoAnn Dayton, of Rock Springs.
In District 12, Republican challenger
Harlan Edmonds, of Cheyenne, unseated
Democratic incumbent Lee Filer, of
Cheyenne.
An open seat in District 23 in Teton
County went to Democrat Andy Schwartz.
The seat had been held by Republican
Keith Gingery, who did not run for re-election.
In a rematch of the 2012 race in District
48 in Rock Springs, incumbent Republican
Mike Baker beat Democrat Joe Barbuto for
a second time although by a very slim margin, according to unofficial results.
No third-party candidates succeeded in
any of the three races they fielded candidates.
However, Clarence Vranish, an independent, beat Democrat Larissa Sneider for second place behind incumbent Republican
Garry Piiparinen in Evanston's District 49
race.
ALMANAC
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
REPORTS |
OBITUARIES |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Tuesday
• Odor investigation, 400
block Burton Street, 11:13
a.m.
• Electrical fire, 400
block South Sheridan
Avenue, 5:17 p.m.
• Fraud, West 13th Street,
12:59 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, West 17th Street,
1:58 p.m.
• Court violation,
Sheridan area, 2:38 p.m.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Tuesday
• Andrew James Sidhu,
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Tuesday
• Trauma, Dayton, 10:39
a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block
West Fifth Street, 11:59
a.m.
• Medical, 700 block
Long Drive, 1:58 p.m.
• Trauma, 2300 block
Shirley Cove, 3:08 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block
West Brundage Lane, 4:45
p.m.
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 70
Female inmate count: 13
Inmates at treatment
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 3
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 2
Number of releases for
the previous day: 6
August 22, 1988 - November 2, 2014
Alec C. Olson, 26, of Sheridan, passed
away on Sunday, November 2, 2014, at his
residence of a self inflicted gunshot
wound.
Alec was born on August 22, 1988, in
Sheridan, WY to parents Gerald and
Kathleen Smith Olson.
Alec C. Olson
Alec enjoyed working in sales, video gaming, shooting, and marksmanship. He studied and loved WWII history, and enjoyed movies and animals.
He particularly loved his nieces, Lily and Quinn. They were
the light of his life.
Alec was preceded in death by his grandparents, Arvel and
Maizie Margaret Smith, Vernon Olson and uncle Robert
Olson. He is survived by his parents; Kathleen (Keith)
Davidson of Sheridan, WY, Gerald (Peggy) Olson of Billings,
MT, grandparents; Edna Olson of Big Rapids, MI, Stanley and
Ruth Davidson of Hulett, WY, siblings; Brandy (Mike) Fox of
Sheridan, WY, step siblings; Julie Davidson of Sheridan, WY,
Todd (Catherine) Davidson, Snoqualmie, WA, Andrea
Davidson ofВ Pinedale, WY, Heidi Davidson of Laramie, WY,
niece, Liliana, niece and Goddaughter, Quinn, his Aunt Linda
(Gerald) Risinger, Uncle David (Denise) Smith, all of Oxford,
MI, Uncle Dan (Luanne) Smith of Leonard, MI, Uncle Dale
(Vickie) Olson and Aunt Marsha Fry all of Big Rapids, MI and
his dog, Doogie.
A Celebration of Life will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday,
November 8, 2014, at Kane Funeral Home with Father Jim
Heiser officiating. A reception will follow in the Kane
Reception Hall. Inurnment will take place at a later date in
Ridge Lawn Memorial Cemetery, Oxford, MI .
Memorials to honor Alec can be made to the Sheridan Dog
and Cat Shelter at 84 East Ridge Road, Sheridan, WY 82801.
-Matthew 11:28-30
Jesus said,
“Come unto me, all ye that labor
and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.
“Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me,
for I am meek and lowly in heart;
and you will find rest unto your souls.
“for my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”
OnlineВ condolencesВ may
be
written
at
www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
SERVICE NOTICE |
Joyce Hartzell Rodell
Joyce Hartzell Rodell was a woman of deep faith and left
for her heavenly home on October 25, 2014.
A Celebration of Life will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday,
November 8, 2014, at St. Peter's Episcopal Church with Father
John Inserra officiating. A reception will follow in the
church hall.
Donations in her memory may be sent to the Samaritan’s
Purse at PO Box 3000, Boone, NC 28607 for helping people in
need around the world, to the Sheridan Senior Center at 211
Smith St., Sheridan, WY, 82801 or to the outreach program of
St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 1 S. Tschirgi, Sheridan, WY
82801.
OnlineВ condolencesВ may
be
written
at
www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFFS OFFICE
Tuesday
• Domestic, Big Horn,
1:33 a.m.
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
THURSDAY
67
Mostly cloudy;
breezy, cooler
40
55
Almanac
22
Sunshine and
patchy clouds
Mild with
periods of sun
60
61
33
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Tuesday
Temperature
High/low .........................................................63/24
Normal high/low ............................................52/24
Record high .............................................75 in 1999
Record low ............................................... -3 in 1973
Precipitation (in inches)
Tuesday .......................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.00"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.10"
Year to date ...................................................12.86"
Normal year to date ......................................12.99"
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Thursday
Friday
6:51 a.m.
6:52 a.m.
6:54 a.m.
4:51 p.m.
4:50 p.m.
4:49 p.m.
The Moon
Today
Thursday
Friday
Full
Rise
Set
4:21 p.m.
4:59 p.m.
5:42 p.m.
5:15 a.m.
6:25 a.m.
7:33 a.m.
Last
New
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Indexв„ў number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
27/62
Basin
28/63
Nov 6
Nov 14
Nov 22
Nov 29
27/67
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. В©2014
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
55/33/c
54/28/c
57/23/pc
51/29/pc
55/27/pc
53/29/c
58/27/pc
49/19/pc
Here are the results
of Tuesday’s
Mega Millions
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
9-15-24-39-41;
Megaball 1
Megaplier 4X
Estimated jackpot:
$15,000,000
Shown are
Thursday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
Gillette
29/65
Buffalo
36/66
Wright
32/63
Kaycee
30/64
TREE SERVICES
• Tree Pruning
• Tree Removal
Regional Cities
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
65/46/pc
62/42/pc
57/38/s
62/44/pc
59/35/s
65/43/pc
60/32/s
54/31/pc
Coffee
Clearmont
31/67
Story
30/64
Worland
25/64
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Ranchester
30/67
Thermopolis
28/64
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Shown is Thursday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Thursday's highs.
First
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Tuesday ..................... 0.00"
Cody
36/62
www.thesheridanpress.com
National Weather for Thursday, November 6
Hardin
29/67
Parkman
30/66
Dayton
30/68
Lovell
30/60
See these and past
obituaries online at
October 8, 2014 - November 1, 2014
Shaun Micheal Reese Kelley, 24 days, of Sheridan, passed
away on Saturday, November 1, 2014, at the Campbell County
Hospital in Gillette. Shaun was born on October 8, 2014, in
Sheridan, to Shaunelle Kelley.
A Celebration of Life will be held at 3:00 p.m. on Friday,
November 7, 2014, at the family home at 569 W. Works, Sheridan,
WY.
Angels
The sky is filled with Angels
With puffy lacy wings
The remnants of God's beauty
With treasures they now bring
Each one of them a Guardian
That travels in the sky
To watch throughout eternity
Their parents from on high
Smiles that come from Angels
They fall like crystal rain
Eases earthly burdens
Lifting all life's pain
Halos so astounding
That glitter gold each day
Following their loved ones
In such a perfect way
Wings in gentle breezes
That fall from up above
Kissing every parent
With everlasting love
Angels soar through heaven
With everlasting light
Looking down from heaven
Saying their "goodnights"
Kissing all who loved them
So gently on the face
This life's tender mercy
Each parent can embrace
Wings and shiny halos
Travel from on high
Surrounding all their loved ones
They never say good-bye.
by Unknown Author
OnlineВ condolencesВ may be written atВ www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Broadus
27/65
27
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
61/40/pc
57/34/s
55/41/s
59/39/s
56/32/s
61/37/s
55/28/s
52/26/s
A11
Shaun Micheal Reese Kelley
SUNDAY
Billings
37/65
27
Virginia Lee (Lindsay) Brown went to be
with our Lord on November 3, 2014. She
was born on August 6, 1927 in Huntington
Park, California. She attended Whittier
College in Whittier, CA, and Casper Junior
College in Casper, WY. She worked as a secVirginia Lee
retary at Chemical and Geological Labs in
(Lindsay)
Casper, where she met the love of her life,
Richard Brown, and married him in 1948.
Brown
They moved to Midland, TX in 1951 and
then to Billings in 1955 where they raised their 4 children.
They also had a beautiful home in Story, WY in the 1990s where
they made close friends, and created lasting memories for their
children and grandchildren.
Virginia’s family meant everything to her, and she created an
atmosphere of love and delight on many camping trips, scuba
diving expeditions, and family reunions, while making time to
do her own car maintenance and general “handyman” duties
around the home. She especially loved sharing a glass of wine
with her family gathered around for any occasion. She lived an
active life and kept a great sense of humor even when arthritis
and other health issues caused pain and suffering.
Virginia is survived by three sons, Roy (Kim), Bob (Mary),
Bill (Amy Gibler), of Billings, and one daughter, Patty
O’Connell (Curtis) of Colorado Springs, CO. Grandma Ginny
will be dearly missed by her 11 grandchildren, Katie, Gillian,
Roy, Nate, Joe, Amanda, John Samuel, Molly, Ryan, Timothy
and Colin, as well as her great-granddaughter, Leah. She was
preceded in death by her parents, Robert and Ruth
(Drummond) Lindsay, her sister, Joan (Diehl), and her beloved
Richard, whom she has missed since his passing in February of
this year.
A vigil will be held on Thursday, November 6, at 5:15 p.m. at
Michelotti-Sawyers Mortuary, 1001 Alderson Ave., Billings, MT,
59102. Funeral services will be held on Friday, November 7, at
10:00 a.m. at St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church, 2055
Woody Drive, Billings, MT 59102. Burial will take place at 2:00
p.m. at the Yellowstone National Cemetery, 55 Buffalo Trail
Road, Laurel, Montana.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made in Virginia’s name
to Billings Area Catholic Education Trust (BACET), P.O. Box
31158, Billings, MT 59107.
Regional Weather
SATURDAY
FRIDAY
Clouds and sun;
breezy, warmer
August 6, 1927 - November 3, 2014
Alec C. Olson
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the
police reports is taken
from the SPD website.
Tuesday
• Removal of subject,
North Main Street, 1:53
a.m.
• Welfare check, North
Main Street, 7:25 a.m.
• Alarm, South Gould
Street, 8:24 a.m.
• Welfare check, South
Lupine Street, 8:27 a.m.
• Animal found, North
Main Street, 8:40 a.m.
• Abandoned vehicle,
Kona Place, 8:44 a.m.
• Hit and run, Odell
Court, 9:19 a.m.
• Stalking, South
Linden Avenue, 9:36 a.m.
• Accident, East
Brundage Lane, 10:42 a.m.
• Traffic stop, Illinois
Street, 1:10 p.m.
• Found property, West
Fifth Street, 2:17 p.m.
• Malicious destruction,
Mydland Drive, 2:22 p.m.
• Scheduled drug surrender, West 12th Avenue,
3:04 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, Avoca Avenue,
3:47 p.m.
• Accident, Smith
Street, 3:48 p.m.
• Welfare check, Main
Street, 4:34 p.m.
• Domestic, Mydland
Drive, 4:34 p.m.
• Alarm, Big Goose
Road, 4:57 p.m.
• Attempt to locate,
West Alger Avenue, 4:59
p.m.
• Animal trap, North
Gould Street, 5:36 p.m.
Partly cloudy
and colder
Virginia Lee (Lindsay) Brown
28, Sheridan, DWUI, circuit
court, arrested by SPD
OBITUARIES |
SHERIDAN
MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Tuesday
• Dismissals — Nancy J.
Hamilton and Brooklyn
Irene Hamilton, both of
Sheridan
• No admissions reported.
TONIGHT
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
53/35/s
59/39/pc
55/35/s
60/39/pc
56/35/s
64/37/s
58/41/pc
47/29/pc
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
51/19/pc
55/24/c
53/23/sf
56/27/sf
54/28/pc
62/26/pc
49/26/c
41/16/sf
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
51/29/s
54/34/pc
51/32/s
57/34/s
53/32/s
60/36/s
53/36/pc
42/23/s
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
• Wood Chipping
& Clean Up
• Stump Grinding
facebook.com/LandscapingServicesInc
Call Bill Arno @ 752-6224
A12
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Survey finds people text and drive knowing dangers
BY BARBARA ORTUTAY
AP TECHNOLOGY WRITER
Nearly everyone agrees
that texting and driving is
dangerous. Most people do
it anyway.
In a new survey, 98 percent of motorists who own
cellphones and text regularly said they were aware of
the dangers, yet three-quarters of them admitted to
texting while driving,
despite laws against it in
some states. Two-thirds
said they have read text
messages while stopped at a
red light or stop sign, while
more than a quarter said
they have sent texts while
driving.
More than a quarter of
the texting drivers believed
they “can easily do several
things at once, even while
driving.”
The telephone survey of
1,004 U.S. adults was
released Wednesday by
AT&T Inc. as part of an
anti-texting-and-driving
campaign. AT&T designed
the survey with David
Greenfield, founder of The
Center for Internet and
Technology Addiction and a
professor at the University
of Connecticut’s School of
Medicine.
The survey came as AT&T
expanded availability of a
free app that silences text
message alerts and acti-
to
s
r
e
ett tbe
l
l
l
A
s
u
y,
m
a
a
d
t
s
S a n by Tu e th
ed
16
v
i
r
e
e
c
b
re
m
D ece
vates automatically when a
person is moving 15 miles
per hour or faster.
(Passengers can turn it off.)
The DriveMode app is coming to iPhones after being
previously available on
Android and BlackBerry
phones for AT&T users
only. The iPhone version
will be available to customers of competing carriers as well, but some functions will work only on
AT&T devices.
The study in May was of
cellphone owners ages 16 to
65 who drive almost every
day and text at least once a
day. It has a margin of sampling error of plus or
minus 3.1 percentage
points. Researchers conducted surveys with people
on their cellphones, and it’s
possible those who would
have picked up on a landline might have different
attitudes.
Greenfield said the survey
is the latest to show a discrepancy between people’s
attitudes and behaviors.
It found a broad range of
reasons why drivers text.
Forty-three percent of the
texting drivers said they
want to “stay connected” to
friends, family and work.
Nearly a third did it out of
habit.
Among other reasons for
texting and driving:
• Twenty-eight percent
said they are worried about
missing out of something
important if they don’t
check their phones right
away.
• More than a quarter
believes that their driving
performance is not affected
by texting, and just as many
people said they believe
that others expect them to
respond to texts “right
away.”
• Just 6 percent answered
that they are “addicted to
texting,” although 14 percent admitted that they are
“anxious” if they don’t
respond to a text right away,
and 17 percent feel “a sense
of satisfaction” when they
can read or respond to a
text message.
Reggie Shaw was 19 in
2006 when he caused a car
accident while texting,
killing two people. Today, he
speaks out against texting
and driving.
“It’s something I struggle
with every day,” he said. “I
know that I need to go out
and talk to others about it. I
don’t want others to make
the same mistake I did.”
Shaw does not remember
what he was texting about
right before the accident.
Back then, he said, “being
on my phone when I drove
was something I did all the
time. It was just driving to
me. I guess you’d call it
ignorance but I never
understood that it was dangerous. How could me being
on the phone cause a car
accident?”
Today, his phone is off
when he’s driving. Never in
the past eight years since
the accident, he says, has he
gotten a phone call or text
message that was so important that it couldn’t wait
until he stopped the car.
Greenfield, who studies
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
Mom posts sunny
video before son
tossed off bridge
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — A mother accused of
throwing her son to his death from an Oregon bridge
posted cheery videos on YouTube nearly a year ago
of her 6-year-old boy holding a stuffed toy lion while
tossing coins in a fountain to make a wish.
As darkness fell Monday, Jillian McCabe parked
her car at the north end of the picturesque Yaquina
Bay Bridge in the coastal Oregon town of Newport,
took her son in her arms, carried him to the middle
of the span and threw him to his death in the water
below, a police affidavit said.
Then she dialed 911 on her cellphone.
“I just threw my son over the Yaquina Bay Bridge,”
McCabe told the dispatcher, according to a probable
cause affidavit filed by police Tuesday.
She described her son, London Grey McCabe, and
the clothes he was wearing, saying he was in the
water and gone. Later that night, a body was reported in the water at a bayside resort about a mile from
the bridge, and police said it was that of the kindergartner.
“It’s a great tragedy,” said the boy’s great aunt,
Tanya McCabe.
Attorneys appointed to represent Jillian McCabe
did not return calls seeking comment.
Her brother-in-law, Andrew McCabe, confirmed
that she had written an appeal on YouCaring.com, a
crowdfunding website. In it she described caring for
her autistic son and her husband, Matt, who has
been unable to work at his business doing email campaigns since developing multiple sclerosis and a
mass on his brain stem.
The appeal ended eight months ago after raising
$6,831 toward a goal of $50,000.
“If you are a praying person, pray for us,” Jillian
McCabe wrote. “I love my husband and he has taken
care of myself and my son for years and years and
now it’s time for me to take the helm. I am scared
and I am reaching out.”
Andrew McCabe also confirmed that his sister-inlaw had posted the YouTube videos.
One shows her son sitting in a hammock, smiling
with a cup of juice and engrossed in an iPad. When
she asks if he is happy, he says nothing. When she
tells him to say “help” if he wants a push in the hammock, he says, “help.” Another shows her husband
lying in a hospital bed, talking about his sudden
struggle to walk and even talk.
Jillian McCabe, 34, appeared by video Tuesday in
Lincoln County Circuit Court, but she did not enter
pleas on charges of murder, aggravated murder and
manslaughter. The aggravated murder charge, which
carries the possibility of the death penalty, was filed
because the boy was younger than 14.
Police said McCabe was from Seal Rock, south of
Newport, but Andrew McCabe said the family had
lived in Hood River.
Send your letters to Santa
The Sheridan Press is once again inviting children
throughout Sheridan County to send us their letters
to Santa. Here’s all you have to do:
1. Have your child write their letter to Santa as neatly
as they can on white paper and in black ink.
2. If you want a picture published with their letter,
please send us a recent photo with the child’s name
written clearly on the back.
3. Complete the form below, attach it to the letter,
enclose their photograph and mail them to: Letters to
Santa, The Sheridan Press, P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY
82801. You can also bring them by our office at 144
Grinnell Plaza in downtown Sheridan. (If you’re
sending letters from more than one child, please
complete a separate form for each letter.) Or, you can
e-mail your letter to [email protected]
Please include “Letters to Santa” in the subject line.
Please print clearly and legibly
Child’s Name & Age:
Parent’s Name:
Address:
City/State/Zip:
Daytime Phone:
I have enclosed a photo:
Yes
No
TASTE
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
F
Raising
the bar
all is the time for bar cookies,
casseroles and au gratin potatoes, just to mention a few of
my favorites. Cool weather
comfort food in all its glory.
I stumbled upon this recipe that is
completely different from the typical
bar cookie; actually more of a bar
entree — something to build a meal
around.
ARUGULA AND CHEESE BARS WITH A
CORNMEAL CRUST
For the crust:
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more
for work surface
3/4 cup cornmeal
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 stick unsalted butter, cut into small
pieces
2 eggs, whisked
3 tablespoons ice
water, for combining dough
1 tablespoon grated Parmesan
For the topping:
Small pinch red
pepper flakes
1 medium onion,
SUSAN
peeled and very
WOODY
thinly sliced
|
2 large cloves garlic, peeled and very
thinly sliced
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Large pinch ground cinnamon
Large pinch freshly grated nutmeg
2 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted
2 tablespoons dried currants
1/2 pound baby arugula
2 large eggs
1/2 cup fresh ricotta
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons finely crumbled feta or
ricotta salata
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F with
the rack in the middle position. Make
cornmeal crust: In a food processor, pulse
flour, cornmeal and salt until combined.
Add butter and pulse until pea-size
clumps form. With the motor running, add
eggs until dough just comes together, add
ice water, 1 teaspoon at a time. Do not let
it form a ball. Place dough into a 9-by-9inch baking pan, gently pressing on dough
to form an even layer. Place in oven and
bake until lightly colored, 15 minutes.
Remove from oven. Sprinkle crust with
Parmesan. Raise oven rack to highest
level and increase temperature to 475
degrees F.
2. Meanwhile, in a large skillet over
medium-high heat, saute red pepper
flakes, onions and garlic with oil until
onions are golden brown, about 10 minutes. Add cinnamon, nutmeg, pine nuts
and currants and cook, stirring, until very
hot, 2-4 minutes. Add arugula and cook,
stirring, until just wilted, about 3 minutes.
Remove from heat.
3. In a small bowl, whisk eggs, ricotta
and 1 tablespoons Parmesan until combined. Stir mixture into arugula. Season to
taste with salt and pepper. Spread arugula mixture evenly over cornmeal crust,
then sprinkle with remaining Parmesan
and feta.
4, Place baking pan in oven and bake
until cheese on top is beginning to color,
25 minutes. Remove from oven and let sit
at least 15 minutes before slicing into
bars. Serve warm or at room temperature.
Makes 10-16 bars.
SUSAN WOODY has been a food writer for more than 20
years and is a member of the Association of Food Journalists.
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Soups on
The Sheridan Press’ crew have a soup potluck
BY SUSAN WOODY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Celebrating Halloween, Friday
afternoon and the crisp new
twist in the weather, the employees of The Sheridan Press gathered, ladles in hand, for a
potluck featuring soup, homemade bread, and desserts.
Ten of us brought different
soups that we made. A committee of three judged the best tasting and then we all tore through
10 crockpots of various and delicious soups. And, even though
the Press’ employees are always
�up’ for a party, I can’t remember
a more satisfying potluck.
I, of course, asked for recipes.
First prize went to Sheree
Cossel.
CHEESEBURGER SOUP
1/2 lb hamburger
1/2 cup chopped onion
3/4 cup shredded carrots
3/4 cup diced celery
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon dried parsley
2 tablespoon butter, divided
3 cups chicken broth
4 cups peeled and diced potatoes
2 1/2 cups cubed Velveeta
3/4 cup half and half
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon olive oil
1. Brown beef (set aside).
2. In same skillet saute in 1 tablespoon. butter and olive oil, onion, carrots, celery, basil, parsley, potatoes, salt
and pepper. Saute until tender.
3. In a Dutch oven add ground beef,
chicken stock, and cooked vegetables
and bring to a boil. Cover and boil for 10
minutes.
4. Remove from heat and let cool for
3 minutes. Add Velveta and stir until
melted. Add half and half and simmer
on low heat. Add salt and pepper to
taste.
2nd place Alisa Brantz
WISCONSIN STYLE BEER
CHEESE SOUP
Ingredients
2 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoon flour
2 teaspoon onion powder
2 teaspoon garlic power
2 teaspoon dry mustard powder
1 - 32 oz. package of chicken broth
2 - 14 oz. cans Guinness draught beer
1 teaspoon cayenne hot pepper
sauce
2 - 10.75 oz. cans condensed cream
of chicken soup
1 - 10.75 oz. can cheddar cheese soup
1 lb brick of Velveeta, cut in cubes
1 box of plain cream cheese, cut in
cubes
2 tablespoon white granulated
sugar
1 lb brick of sharp cheddar cheese,
shredded
Salt and pepper to taste
1. Open beer and leave on counter to
flatten.
2. Melt butter in large pot or Dutch
oven.
3. Stir in flour until all flour is moistened but not browned.
4. Stir in onion powder, garlic powder
and mustard powder until all ingredi-
THE SHERIDAN PRESS PHIL ASHLEY
Cheeseburger soup was the winning recipe in the Halloween potluck held at The Sheridan Press last Friday.
Homemade bread by Press Editor Kristan Czaban added to the satisfaction of the afternoon.
ents are moist and integrated.
5. Stir in chicken broth and beer.
6. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently.
7. Reduce heat and simmer for 15
minutes.
8. Stir in three cans of soup, resume
to simmer.
9. Over low heat, stir in Velveeta and
cream cheese until fully melted.
10. Stir in sugar until fully melted.
11. Remove pot from heat and mix in
shredded cheese a little at a time. Make
sure each handful is fully melted before
adding more.
* Removing the pot from the heat
keeps the cheese from curdling but if
you need to return it to the heat, do so
at a low temperature and stir frequently.
12. Salt and pepper to taste. (Salt
lightly as popcorn adds more salt flavor.)
13. Recommended: blend soup with
immersion or hand blender for smooth,
creamy texture.
14. For a true Midwestern flair, top
each serving with fresh popcorn instead
of croutons or bread.
Optional: Serve with beer boiled
brats and a side of spicy brown mustard for a complete Wisconsin style
meal.
Marketing Manager Phil
Ashley
ELK AND ANTELOPE STEW
Ingredients:
2 lbs elk meat
2 lbs antelope meat
1 qt. beef broth
4 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons Worchestershire
sauce
1 bag pearl onions
6 medium sized carrots
1 large turnip
1 large potato
2 cups flour
2 tablespoons Wondra (or as much
needed to thicken stew)
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon garlic salt
1 tablespoon sea salt
1 tablespoon six pepper blend
Directions:
1. Cut the elk and antelope into 1/2 to
2-inch thick cubes.
2. Dice potato and turnip into 1-inch
pieces.
3. Peel the pearl onions and cut the
larger ones in half.
4. Peel and slice the carrots into 1/8inch pieces.
5. Put the flour, garlic salt and pepper
in a plastic bag that is big enough to
hold the cubed meat. Shake bag to
coat meat with flour mixture.
6. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over
high heat.
7. Cook elk and antelope cubes in the
skillet until they are brown in color.
8. When the meat has turned brown,
reduce the heat to medium and add
onions.
9. When the onions are browned,
remove the skillet from heat.
10. Pour the contents of the skillet
into a slow cooker.
11. Add beef broth and
Worchestershire sauce.
12. Add the olive oil, carrots, potatoes, turnip, garlic powder, and salt.
13. Let stew cook on low heat for 4
hours.
14. After 1 hour mix the Wondra with
water to make a paste and stir into the
stew.
15. Let the stew cook for 3 more
hours, seasoning to taste along the
way.
16. Feed the stew to people who say
they hate elk or antelope.
17. Tell anyone who eats the stew the
names of the elk and antelope you
killed. They like that.
Soup Storage
Many meat and vegetable
soups (but not cream soups) take
on a richer taste if refrigerated
for a day to give the flavors time
to blend and develop; this makes
them ideal for make-ahead.
To freeze, package soups in
pint or quart plastic freezer containers or heavy-duty zip-top
freezer bags; label with recipe
name, date, amount, and freeze
up to 3 months. Frozen soups
can be thawed in the refrigerator and slowly reheated in a
saucepan over low heat.
• Kitchen Soup Tip
If you have added too much
salt to a soup, simply drop in a
peeled, raw potato and cook a
few minutes. Then remove the
potato before serving.
(Source:Secrets from Southern Living)
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Basketball
talk
E
very so often I find myself
strolling over to the Bruce
Hoffman Golden Dome and
taking a seat in women’s basketball coach Frank McCarthy’s
office. The conversation usually
opens with McCarthy asking me
what time the Broncs play Friday
or any other happenings in the
busy world of Sheridan sports. I’ll
chat with assistant coach and
Kansas native Ryan Davis about
how much of a bummer it was that
the Royals didn’t win the World
Series.
But mostly, I go there to talk
basketball.
The two coaches update me on
practices, filling me in on
what to expect
come game
time.
After watching one practice, some
scrimmages
and finally regMIKE
ular season
PRUDEN
basketball, I
|
knew immediately what to
expect from
the Lady Generals.
The Sheridan women’s hoops
team has size and depth. But their
size isn’t just stick-a-girl-on-theblock size. Their size is athletic
size. They’re the LA Clippers of
JuCo basketball.
Sierra Toms returned as last
season’s leading scorer, and she
hasn’t skipped a beat heading into
her sophomore season. The 6-foot1 Toms won’t throw down any
Blake Griffin dunks, but she averages 21 points and 8.5 rebounds
through the first two games of the
season. She is strong running the
floor, strong from outside and
strong in the post.
Tiana Hanson, another 6-foot-1
forward, has shown her versatility by bringing the ball up the
floor while at the same time dominating the glass on her way to 12
rebounds a game. I wouldn’t hold
out for McCarthy drawing up lobs
for Hanson, but she will be a
nightmare to the other 6-footers
that have to guard her the entire
length of the floor all season.
Tamara Brine, another versatile
forward, is the top of the
Sheridan freshman class. At 5foot-10, Brine averaged 18.3 points
a game in Australia last season
and has adjusted to the Americancollege game quicker than expected. Through two games, she averages 18.5 a game, including 22 in
the season opener against Great
Falls. She uses her size and ballhandling skills to attack the basket but can stretch the defense
with her outside game. She’s a
young Hedo Turkoglu in his
prime.
That means that the Lady
Generals three leading scorers
are 5-foot-10 or taller.
Katie Kuhn, the team’s starting
point guard, doesn’t have the
Chris Paul deadly crossover, but
she’s a team captain that has to
translate Doc McCarthy’s game
plan to the floor and has to be a
facilitator to get their three leading scorers good shots.
Shae Bruursma is J.J. Redick.
She’s one of Sheridan’s taller
guards, allowing her to shoot, and
stroke, 3s over her defenders. I
just hope she starts throwing up
three goggles after she hits a 3pointer.
If the Lady Generals can find a
Jamal Crawford to do a little bit
of everything — maybe Peyton
Hinn — they will be a complete
package. If not, they’ve got the
Glen Davis’s and Matt Barnes’s to
pick up the slack.
They run the floor, they score
boat loads of points and they play
at the Staple’s Center of JuCo arenas. Expect the Lady Generals to
be at the top of Region IX.
Now, if someone could teach
these girls how to throw down
windmill dunks.
MIKE PRUDEN is The Sheridan Press sports editor.
EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the second half of a two-part
series previewing the Sheridan College basketball teams.
Part one can be found in the Oct. 29 issue of The Press.
SPORTS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
Generals defeat Laramie under Golden Dome
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Things got off to a slow
start for the Sheridan College Generals
last night, but a second-half dunk fest
opened things up on their way to a 91-73
victory.
Laramie County Community College
came into the Golden Dome last night
with a unique defense that took some
adjusting by the Generals early on. The
Golden Eagles ran a full-court 1-3-1-trap
defense, something that Sheridan coach
Matt Hammer says isn’t typically seen and
took some time getting used to.
The press forced the Generals to play
sloppy offensively, resulting in 10
turnovers in the first half.
Defensively, Sheridan struggled adjusting to the Golden Eagles’ quick ball movement and closing out on shooters. Eight
different LCCC players scored in the first
half on 55-percent shooting from the field.
“We’re pretty good when we’re solid on
defense,” Hammer said. “We keep the ball
in front of us, we pressure shots and we
block out and get rebounds, we’re pretty
good because then we can push the ball.”
The Generals took a one-point lead into
halftime, where Hammer and his coaching
staff made adjustments that helped his
team beat the zone press in the second
half.
“We told our guys, if you make enough
passes, you’re going to find a guy for a
wide open layup,” Hammer said. “We
found quite a few.”
Hammer was almost right.
The Generals came out in the second
half breaking down the LCCC zone like
oversized 6-year-olds smashing Lego towers at day care. They passed the ball like
Peyton Manning in a two-minute drill,
leading to, not layups, but dunks.
A bunch of dunks.
The crowd roared at the Golden Dome as
Benny Lufile stuffed a two-handed slam,
as Pablo Rivas soared through the air like
a hang glider bounding off of the
Bighorns, and as Tre McCallum threw one
down with the same hand that he smashed
in the weight room not four weeks ago.
The easy baskets not only upped the
energy in the stands, but it also upped the
energy at the other end of the floor for the
Generals.
Sheridan forced the LCCC field-goal percentage to drop to 31 percent in the second
half, and, after the Golden Eagles went 8-17
from behind the arc in the first half, the
Golden Eagles went 0-8 in the second half.
Jamir Andrews led all scorers with 21
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Generals forward Tredarius McCallum pounds a slam dunk against the Golden Eagles Tuesday
night in the Sheridan College Golden Dome. Sheridan won over Laramie County Community College
91-73.
points, including five 3-pointers. Kyi
Thomas added 19 and Rivas scored 15 off
the bench. Lufile led all rebounders with
15 to go along with 16 points.
The Generals have opened the season
Flagg wins
long drive title
with three straight wins and will travel to
Utah this weekend to compete in the Snow
Tourney. Sheridan will return to the
Golden Dome for the Best Western
Tournament the weekend of Nov. 14.
Serving
up a win
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Jeff Flagg edged
Jeff Crittenden to win the World Long
Drive Championship on Tuesday night
at the Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort.
Both golfers hit their second ball of
the final round 365 yards off the platform, but Flagg’s shot measured 20
inches past the hash mark, while
Crittenden’s was seven inches from the
365-yard mark.
The 29-year-old Flagg earned $250,000
for the win.
Anya Fritz preps for a serve during
the opening round of high school
volleyball regionals Friday at
Sheridan High School.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Romo skips practice in London with injured back
LONDON (AP) — Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo sat out the team’s first
practice in London on Wednesday because
of his injured back.
Romo, who missed last Sunday’s 28-17
loss to the Arizona Cardinals with his
third back injury in the last 18 months,
made the trip to England but stayed at the
hotel while the rest of his teammates practiced at Allianz Park.
“It’s just based on the feedback, and what
he’s told us how he feels,” Cowboys coach
Jason Garrett said. “Is it more worthwhile
to stay there and get treatment, or come
over here and watch practice and stand up
for a couple of hours? It makes sense to
stay there and get some treatment.”
The Cowboys (6-3) face the Jacksonville
Jaguars (1-8) on Sunday at Wembley
Stadium, the last of three regular-season
NFL games in London this year.
Instead of Romo, backup Brandon
Weeden took the snaps during practice on
Wednesday. Weeden, who was dumped by
Cleveland two seasons after getting drafted
in the first round in 2012, threw two interceptions against Arizona and couldn’t get
the Dallas offense into the end zone until
the game was out of reach. He now has 25
touchdowns and 27 interceptions in his
career.
Garrett, however, remained optimistic
that Romo would be ready for Sunday.
“Obviously, all these things are medical
decisions. Really important for our medical team to weigh in on what our players
have,” Garrett said. “Getting feedback
from the player, as to how they feel, how
they handle the workload, is really, really
important. And then you come up with
what you need to do during the week to get
them prepared to play their best on
Sunday.”
Cowboys tight end Jason Witten said
Romo seemed to be on the mend after the
long trip to London.
“I know he felt good from the plane,”
Witten said. “He’s tough, he really is, so I
know he’s going to do everything he can (to
play Sunday).”
Romo has fractures in two small bones in
his back. The injury is unrelated to a herniated disk sustained last year and to offseason surgery to remove a cyst earlier in
2013.
Despite the focus on Romo and how he’s
feeling, Garrett said the attention was a
not a distraction for Weeden, who was 18 of
33 for 183 yards with one touchdown as the
Cowboys dropped their second straight
game last weekend following a six-game
winning streak.
“There’s a lot of media attention on the
NFL, on the Cowboys, and certainly if
you’re the quarterback of the Cowboys,
there’s a lot of media attention that comes
with that,” Garrett said. “If you’re that
guy, or someone around that guy, it’s just
part of the deal. It comes with the dinner,
as they say, and you get yourself ready to
go.”
Even if Romo says he is ready to go and
given clearance by the medical team,
Garrett and his assistants will make the
ultimate decision based on his performances in practice.
“We as coaches, the football people, we’re
most interested in function, how is the
player functioning,” Garrett said. “He
might say �this,’ the doctor may say �this,’
but what we see is �this.’
“We have to make the best decision during the week to get him ready to play on
Sunday.”
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
AHL |
American Hockey League
The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
9
6
2
1
0
Providence
9
5
3
1
0
Worcester
Manchester
8
5
3
0
0
10
5
5
0
0
Portland
St. John’s
12
3
5
3
1
East Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Hershey
10
6
4
0
0
Wilkes-Barre/Sc11
5
5
1
0
Lehigh Valley
8
4
3
1
0
Norfolk
9
4
5
0
0
Binghamton
10
3
5
2
0
Northeast Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Albany
9
6
1
1
1
Hartford
9
6
2
1
0
Bridgeport
9
5
3
0
1
Syracuse
9
4
4
1
0
Springfield
10
4
5
1
0
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Rockford
11
8
2
0
1
Milwaukee
9
7
2
0
0
Chicago
9
5
2
2
0
Lake Erie
10
4
4
1
1
Grand Rapids 7
3
3
1
0
North Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Utica
10
7
1
2
0
Rochester
10
6
4
0
0
Hamilton
10
4
4
2
0
Toronto
8
4
4
0
0
Adirondack
10
3
6
1
0
West Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Oklahoma City 8
4
2
2
0
Texas
8
4
2
2
0
San Antonio
10
5
5
0
0
Charlotte
9
3
6
0
0
Iowa
9
2
7
0
0
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Tuesday’s Games
Hamilton 6, Rochester 1
Rockford 5, Lake Erie 4, OT
Wednesday’s Games
Chicago at Grand Rapids, 11 a.m.
Norfolk at Bridgeport, 11 a.m.
Albany at Hartford, 11 a.m.
St. John’s at Springfield, 7 p.m.
Binghamton at Utica, 7 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Worcester, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Texas, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Rockford at Iowa, 11:30 a.m.
NFL |
National Football League
The Associated Press
All Times EST
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W
L
New England
7
2
Buffalo
5
3
Miami
5
3
N.Y. Jets
1
8
South
W
L
Indianapolis
6
3
Houston
4
5
Tennessee
2
6
Jacksonville
1
8
North
W
L
Cincinnati
5
2
Pittsburgh
6
3
Cleveland
5
3
Baltimore
5
4
West
W
L
Denver
6
2
Kansas City
5
3
San Diego
5
4
Oakland
0
8
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W
L
Philadelphia
6
2
Dallas
6
3
N.Y. Giants
3
5
Washington
3
6
South
W
L
New Orleans
4
4
Carolina
3
5
Atlanta
2
6
Tampa Bay
1
7
North
W
L
Detroit
6
2
Green Bay
5
3
Minnesota
4
5
Chicago
3
5
West
W
L
Arizona
7
1
Seattle
5
3
San Francisco 4
4
T
0
0
0
0
Pct
.778
.625
.625
.111
PF
281
178
211
154
T
0
0
0
0
Pct
.667
.444
.250
.111
PF
290
206
137
141
T
1
0
0
0
Pct
.688
.667
.625
.556
PF
194
248
185
240
T
0
0
0
0
Pct
.750
.625
.556
.000
PF
245
200
205
129
T
0
0
0
0
Pct
.750
.667
.375
.333
PF
234
230
178
197
T
0
1
0
0
Pct
.500
.389
.250
.125
PF
227
177
192
150
T
0
0
0
0
Pct
.750
.625
.444
.375
PF
162
222
168
180
T
0
0
0
Pct
.875
.625
.500
PF
192
202
168
Minnesota
1
2
.333
ВЅ
Utah
1
3
.250
1
Oklahoma City 1
4
.200
1ВЅ
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Golden State
3
0 1.000
—
L.A. Clippers
3
1
.750
ВЅ
Phoenix
3
1
.750
ВЅ
Sacramento
3
1
.750
ВЅ
L.A. Lakers
0
5
.000
4
___
Tuesday’s Games
Milwaukee 87, Indiana 81
Washington 98, New York 83
Toronto 100, Oklahoma City 88
Houston 108, Miami 91
New Orleans 100, Charlotte 91
Chicago 98, Orlando 90
Portland 101, Cleveland 82
Phoenix 112, L.A. Lakers 106
Wednesday’s Games
Orlando at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New York at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Washington, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Cleveland at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Chicago at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Washington at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Utah, 9 p.m.
Cleveland at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
St. Louis
3
5
0
.375 149
___
Thursday, Nov. 6
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 9
San Francisco at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Miami at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Dallas vs. Jacksonville at London, 1 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Houston, Indianapolis, Minnesota, New
England, San Diego, Washington
Monday, Nov. 10
Carolina at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 13
Buffalo at Miami, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 16
Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Denver at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Houston at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Detroit at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Baltimore, Dallas, Jacksonville, N.Y. Jets
Monday, Nov. 17
Pittsburgh at Tennessee, 8:30 p.m.
GOLF |
Golf Glance
The Associated Press
All Times EST
WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS
HSBC CHAMPIONS
Site: Shanghai.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Sheshan International Golf Club (7,199
yards, par 72).
Purse: $8.5 million. Winner’s share: $1.4 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Wednesday, 10 p.m.-7
a.m.; Thursday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., 10 p.m.-7
a.m.; Sunday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., 10 p.m.-7 a.m., 11
p.m.-4 a.m.).
Last year: American Dustin Johnson shot 69-6366-66 for a tournament-record 24-under 264 total.
He beat Ian Poulter by three strokes.
Last week: Ryan Moore successfully defended his
title in the PGA Tour’s CIMB Classic in Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia. Sergio Garcia, Gary Woodland
and Kevin Na tied for second, three strokes back. ...
Germany’s Marcel Siem won the European Tour’s
BMW Masters in Shanghai. He chipped in for birdie
on the first playoff hole to beat Alexander Levy and
Ross Fisher.
Notes: Top-ranked Rory McIlroy and Phil
Mickelson, the 2007 and 2009 winner at Sheshan
International, are skipping the tournament. Johnson
also is out after taking a “voluntary leave” to seek
professional help for “personal challenges.” ...
Second-ranked Adam Scott is paired with No. 3
Garcia and No. 10 Rickie Fowler. ... The PGA Tour’s
OHL Classic is next week in Mexico. ... The tournament is the second in the European Tour’s fourevent Final Series. The Turkish Airlines Open is
next week, followed by the World Tour
Championship in Dubai
Online: http://www.worldgolfchampionships.com
PGA Tour site: http://www.pgatour.com
European Tour site: http://www.europeantour.com
Asian Tour site: http://www.asiantour.com
___
PGA TOUR
SANDERSON FARMS CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Jackson, Mississippi.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Country Club of Jackson (7,354 yards, par
72).
Purse: $4 million. Winner’s share: $720,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Saturday, 2-5
p.m., 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Sunday, 2-5 p.m., 8-11 p.m.).
Last year: Woody Austin won in a playoff at
Annandale in July, opposite the British Open. At 49,
he became the eighth-oldest PGA Tour winner.
Last week: Ryan Moore successfully defended his
title in the CIMB Classic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Sergio Garcia, Gary Woodland and Kevin Na tied
for second, three strokes back.
Notes: Robert Streb and Ben Martin, first-time winners this season, are in the field. Martin won three
weeks ago in Las Vegas. Streb won two weeks ago
at Sea Island in Georgia. ... Austin finished 20th on
the Champions Tour money list with $821,435 in
eight starts. He also made $292,284 on the PGA
Tour, making 12 cuts in 22 starts... The OHL Classic
is next week in Mexico.
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
___
LPGA TOUR/JAPAN LPGA TOUR
MIZUNO CLASSIC
Site: Shima, Japan.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Kintetsu Kashikojima Country Club (6,506
yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.2 million. Winner’s share: $180,000.
Television: None.
Last year: Taiwan’s Teresa Lu won by two strokes.
She birdied the last two holes and six of the final
eight for a 64.
Last week: South Korea’s Inbee Park won the
Ronaldo
receives
Golden Boot
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Touchdown celebration
Riley Sessions, left, celebrates with teammate Blake Baker after scoring a
touchdown Friday at Homer Scott Field. The Broncs took down Cheyenne
Central, 28-7, to advance to the 4A semifinals this week at Natrona.
LPGA Taiwan for her third victory of the year, beating Stacy Lewis by two strokes at Miramar. Park
won six days after regaining the No. 1 spot in the
world from Lewis.
Notes: The second-ranked Lewis is in the field. The
American won the 2012 tournament, overcoming a
seven-stroke deficit in the final round. She birdied
the last three holes for a 64 and a one-shot victory.
... Annika Sorenstam swept the 2001-05 titles to
become the first LPGA Tour player to win an event
five straight times. ... The tournament ends the
LPGA Tour’s six-event Asian Swing. The Lorena
Ochoa Invitational is next week in Mexico, followed
by the season-ending CME Group Tour
Championship in Naples, Florida.
Online: http://www.lpga.com
Japan LPGA Tour site: http://www.lpga.or.jp
___
OTHER TOURNAMENTS
JAPAN GOLF TOUR: Heiwa PGM Championship,
Thursday-Sunday, Miho Golf Club, Ibaraki, Japan.
Online: http://www.jgto.org
PGA TOUR LATINOAMERICA: Brazil Open,
Thursday-Sunday, Gavea Golf and Country Club,
Rio de Janeiro. Online: http://www.pgatourla.com
EUROPEAN CHALLENGE TOUR: Challenge Tour
Grand Final, Wednesday-Saturday, Al Badia Golf
Club, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Online:
http://www.europeantour.com
WOMEN
THE LEGENDS TOUR: Walgreens Charity
Championship, Saturday-Sunday, The Seagate
Country Club, Delray Beach, Florida. Online:
http://www.thelegendstour.com
MLS PLAYOFF |
Major League Soccer Playoff Glance
The Associated Press
KNOCKOUT ROUND
Times EST
Eastern Conference
Thursday, Oct. 30: New York 2, Sporting Kansas
City 1
Western Conference
Wednesday, Oct 29: FC Dallas 2, Vancouver 1
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Eastern Conference
New England 1, Columbus 0
Leg 1 — Saturday, Nov. 1: New England 4,
Columbus 2
Leg 2 — Sunday, Nov. 9: Columbus at New
England, 5 p.m.
New York 1, D.C. United 0
Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 2: New York 2, D.C. United 0
Leg 2 — Saturday, Nov. 8: New York at D.C. United,
2:30 p.m.
MADRID (AP) — Cristiano Ronaldo
said he still has many years of football to
come as he picked up his third Golden
Boot award on Wednesday for scoring the
most goals in Europe’s domestic leagues
last season.
Ronaldo shared the award with Luis
Suarez, who also scored 31 goals.
At a lavish ceremony in Madrid,
Ronaldo said he was surprised so many
Western Conference
LA Galaxy 0, Real Salt Lake 0
Leg 1 — Saturday, Nov. 1: LA Galaxy 0, Real Salt
Lake 0
Leg 2 — Sunday, Nov. 9: Real Salt Lake at LA
Galaxy, 7:30 p.m.
Seattle vs. FC Dallas
Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 2: Seattle 1, FC Dallas 1
Leg 2 — Saturday, Nov. 8: FC Dallas at Seattle,
10:30 p.m.
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPLeg 1 — Sunday,
Nov. 23: teams TBD, 1:30 p.m.
Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 23: teams TBD, 5 p.m.
Leg 2 — Saturday, Nov. 29: teams TBD, 3 p.m.
Leg 2 — Sunday, Nov. 30: teams TBD, 5 or 9 p.m.
MLS CUP
Sunday, Dec. 7: Conference champions, 3 p.m.
NBA |
National Basketball Association
The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
Toronto
3
1
.750
Brooklyn
2
1
.667
New York
2
2
.500
Boston
1
2
.333
Philadelphia
0
4
.000
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
Miami
3
1
.750
Washington
3
1
.750
Atlanta
1
1
.500
1
3
.250
Charlotte
Orlando
0
4
.000
Central Division
W
L
Pct
3
1
.750
Chicago
Milwaukee
2
2
.500
Cleveland
1
2
.333
Indiana
1
3
.250
Detroit
0
3
.000
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
Houston
5
0 1.000
Memphis
4
0 1.000
Dallas
3
1
.750
New Orleans
2
2
.500
San Antonio
1
1
.500
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
Portland
2
2
.500
Denver
1
2
.333
people got up early for the event after
Real Madrid’s 1-0 win over Liverpool in
the Champions League the previous
night.
Madrid president Florentino Perez
highlighted the Portugal forward’s energy and ambition to win as he presented
the award.
“I promise to always give the fans the
best on the field,” Ronaldo said. “My pas-
Ray Rice’s appeal hearing set to begin today
ROB MAADDI
AP PRO FOOTBALL WRITER
Ray Rice’s appeal hearing begins
Wednesday in New York, nearly two
months after the former Pro Bowl
running back was suspended indefinitely by the NFL and released by the
Baltimore Ravens.
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell,
league security chief Jeffery Miller,
Ravens President Dick Cass and Rice
are among the key witnesses expected
to testify in the two-day hearing.
Rice’s wife, Janay, might testify.
Rice was suspended indefinitely
Sept. 8 for violating the NFL’s personal conduct policy after a video of him
hitting his then-fiancee was released
publicly. Goodell originally had suspended the running back for two
games. The incident occurred inside
an elevator at an Atlantic City casino.
The couple married a month later.
The league considered the video to
be new evidence, giving Goodell the
authority to amend Rice’s suspension.
But Rice’s attorneys will argue he
should not be punished twice, citing
Article 46 of the collective bargaining
agreement.
Former U.S. District Judge Barbara
S. Jones is the neutral arbiter selected
to hear the appeal. Jones was jointly
picked by the commissioner and the
players’ union to hear the appeal. It’s
uncertain how long Jones will take to
make a decision.
Rice is seeking immediate reinstatement, though it’s unlikely a team
would sign him this season. Rice has
also filed a separate wrongful termination grievance against the Ravens.
Goodell still could avoid testifying if
the league and Rice reach a lastminute settlement.
GB
—
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2
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TRANSACTIONS |
Tuesday’s Sports Transactions
The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with
manager Terry Francona on a two-year extension
through the 2018 season.
HOUSTON ASTROS — Named Alan Zinter assistant hitting coach.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Claimed RHP Taylor
Thompson off waivers from the Chicago White Sox.
Sent C Bryan Anderson outright to Nashville (IL).
National League
CHICAGO CUBS — Agreed to terms with LHP
Tsuyoshi Wada on a one-year contract.
COLORADO ROCKIES — Named Steve Foster
pitching coach and Darren Holmes bullpen coach.
American Association
SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS — Released RHP Alex
Caldera and LHP Jesse English.
ST. PAUL SAINTS — Exercised the 2015 contract
option on OF Willie Cabrera.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA — Fined Memphis G Tony Allen $15,000 for
intentionally striking a camera on the baseline during a Nov. 3 game against New Orleans.
SACRAMENTO KINGS — Assigned F Eric
Moreland to Reno (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS — Signed CB Rod Sweeting to
the practice squad. Released WR Naaman
Roosevelt from the practice squad.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Activated S LaRon
Landry and OL lineman Xavier Nixon. Waived CB
Jalil Brown and T Jamon Meredith. Waived FB
Stanley Havili. Released WR Chandler Jones from
the practice squad. Signed WR Eric Thomas to the
practice squad.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Placed FB Austin
Johnson on injured reserve. Signed OT Nick
Becton.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released LB L.J. Fort.
Waived/injury settlement S Terrance Parks from the
53-man roster. Released TE Brett Brackett and WR
Chris Matthews from the practice squad. Signed TE
Tony Moeaki and WR Bryan Walters to the 53-man
roster. Signed S Dion Bailey and WR Jalen
Saunders to the practice squad.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Activated WR
Leonard Hankerson from the reserve-PUP list.
Waived CB Chase Minnifield. Released OT Terren
Jones from the practice squad.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Reassigned C
Sean Collins to Springfield (AHL). Activated LW
Matt Calvert from the injured reserve.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Assigned G Scott
Clemmensen to Albany (AHL). Recalled G Keith
Kinkaid from Albany. Reassigned G Maxime
Clermont from Albany to Orlando (ECHL).
MOTORSPORTS
NASCAR — Suspended Kasey Kahne crew member Jeremy Fuller and Jeff Gordon crew members
Dwayne Doucette and Jason Ingle, six races apiece
for being “involved in a post-race physical altercation” and fined them each $25,000. Suspended Jeff
Gordon crew member Dean Mozingo three races
and fined him $10,000.
sion, my goals, my assists, my matches. I
still have many years left in Madrid.”
Ronaldo said although his main aim
was to be a good team player, he also
acknowledged a liking for individual flair.
“A collective effort is important, but so
is individual talent, and I work hard to
achieve that,” he said.
Suarez picked up his award at a ceremony in Barcelona on Oct. 15.
2014 Adult Basketball League
Basketball season is right around the corner. Compete and have fun with a
reenergized league this year. Some new features this year include: stat keeping,
an established website for league leaders, individual and team awards, and more.
Registrations: October 20th - November 7th
How: Sign up online at www.sheridanrecreation.com or sign up in person
at 1579 Thorne Rider Park
Cost: $540 Where: Games will be played at Sheridan Jr. High Old Gym
Games: Games will begin November 18th
Manager’s Meeting: Thursday October 30th, 6 PM at Sheridan Jr. High School
If you attend the manager’s meeting your team will be rewarded a
$20 discount towards your team’s fees this year. Individuals wishing to
play this year but might not have a team is also encouraged to come so
that we can place you with a team.
Contact Robbie Spencer at the Sheridan Recreation District
office at 674-6421 for more information.
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUESВ® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSERВ® by Art and Chip Sansom
Granny Clampett on "The
Beverly Hillbillies" touted
moonshine as "rheumatiz
medicine." And your Granny
may have given you tea with
lemon and ginger for a sore
throat. But these well-known
folk medicines may have met
their match in what another
Granny, Granny Smith, deliv-
ers. This tart and juicy
Granny makes the microbes
in your digestive tract happy,
and that boosts your wellbeing, helping you maintain a
healthy weight and much,
much more!
A recent study out of
Washington state (where
else?) compared the nutrients
in seven varieties of apples.
Granny Smith, it turned out,
contains the most polyphenols and non-digestible compounds, such as insoluble
fiber, that are known to help
good gut bacteria thrive (a
whole lot more than Cheetos).
We also know that the more
of those you consume, the
more they help regulate glucose levels, body-wide inflammation and calorie use. No
wonder researchers have also
found that a healthy balance
of gut bacteria helps prevent
stroke and improves sexual
satisfaction!
But did you ever wonder
how air travel affects bacteria in your intestines? The
answer is, badly. Gut bacteria
can get jet-lagged too, especially if you're eating a highfat, sugar-rich diet. Their circadian rhythm is thrown off
so they can't do their healthprotecting job. (Grab a green
apple from a food stand in the
airport.) And there's "social
jet lag" too -- from staying up
late, not getting enough sleep
and eating fatty, sweet foods.
So, at home or on the road,
don't forget, a Granny Smith
a day really may keep the
doctor away!
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of
"The Dr. Oz Show," and Mike
Roizen, M.D. is Chief
Wellness Officer and Chair of
Wellness Institute at
Cleveland Clinic. To live your
healthiest, tune into "The Dr.
Oz Show" or visit www.sharecare.com.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNESTВ® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITSВ® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOPВ® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: My daughter,
the mother of six children,
has left her husband and is
now involved in a three-way
with a man and woman. She
has not shielded her kids
from these "new friends," as
she calls them. Because I
won't let her "friends" come
along, she refuses to visit me.
I love my daughter, but I
consider this relationship to
be sick, and I hate that she's
exposing her children to
these people. Am I wrong to
tell her to leave her bedroom
activity out of the picture
and visit me for just a day
without them? We were
always very close, but no
more. -- DISTRESSED MIDWESTERN GRANNY
DEAR DISTRESSED: I'm
sure you love your daughter,
but sometimes the way we
phrase things can get in the
way of the message we are
trying to convey. Perhaps if
you invited her to visit
"because you love her and
would like to spend some
mother-daughter time with
her," it would be perceived as
less judgmental and more
welcoming.
She may be reluctant to
spend time alone with you
because she knows it will
result in a lecture from you
about her lifestyle.
Remember, she's an adult
woman and can make decisions about her sex life for
herself. While you and I may
think it's unwise for her to
expose her children to this
triad, that message might be
more appropriate coming
from THEIR father, rather
than HER mother.
DEAR ABBY: For the past
few months I have been dating a man I'll call "Barry."
This is my first relationship
in five years and we get along
well.
When we first met, I was
physically attracted to Barry
for many reasons, but in particular because he had a gorgeous beard. A beard is kind
of important for me. Some
women like tall men, others
like long hair. I'm a "beard
woman."
The problem is, Barry has
told me I ogle any beard I see
(not true). And he now gets
annoyed if I look at or compliment HIS beard. A few
days ago, he shaved it off.
I care about Barry, but I'm
not as attracted to him when
he's clean-shaven. I think he
did it as an act of defiance.
How can I get him to understand that I don't ogle every
beard I see, and convince
him to keep his whiskers
without hurting his ego? -FUZZ-LOVING IN PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR FUZZ-LOVING:
Barry may have shaved the
beard as "an act of defiance"
-- or not. He may have done it
because it was uncomfortably hot or itchy, and he
prefers being clean-shaven.
My advice is to ask him -- in
a non-hostile way -- why he
got rid of it.
Many people think that the
person BEHIND a beard is
what's most important.
However, if you're not one of
them, because he's no longer
willing to wear one, you may
have to look elsewhere for a
furry friend.
DEAR ABBY: I am at a loss
about what to tell certain
friends and family members
about my job. I work in the
adult industry to put myself
through college, and I'm having a hard time finding a lie I
can stick to. While I am not
ashamed of what I do, I certainly can't tell my grandfather. This puts me in the
awkward predicament of
having to be dishonest with
someone I love. Do you have
any advice? -- LIVING A
DOUBLE LIFE
DEAR LIVING: Yes.
Because lying to your friends
and relatives makes you
uncomfortable, consider
some other way to pay for
your education.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
For an excellent guide to
becoming a better conversationalist and a more sociable
person, order "How to Be
Popular." Send your name
and mailing address, plus
check or money order for $7
(U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby,
Popularity Booklet, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 610540447. (Shipping and handling
are included in the price.)
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
TO PLACE YOUR AD
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DEADLINES
B5
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
ADOPT:
A loving, devoted
married couple longs to
adopt your newborn into
a home filled with love,
warmth & financial
security. Expenses
paid. Stephanie &
Jason @ 1-800-6728514.
WE WILL welcome your
baby into our hearts &
home with lots of love
for a bright future.
Expenses paid. Please
call/text Shannon &
Steve 347-243-6139
Hay, Grain, Feed
PASTURE FOR Lease
and Hay For Sale 1400 acres cow pasture
for lease in the Kaycee
area with hay meadows
and
good
water.
Available immediately til
April 1st. 144 Tons
alfalfa grass mix hay for
sale. Large rectangular
bales.
307-251-2430
evenings
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
SHERIDAN APARTMENTS
Taking Applications
for 1, 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments. Coin-op
laundry facility & play area.
Rental assistance depending
on availability and eligibility
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer.
307-672-0854
TDD#711
1917 N. Main Street
Sheridan, WY
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
TONGUE RIVER
APARTMENTS
901 W. Halbert • Ranchester, WY
655-9470 • TDD#711
Taking Applications for 2
bedroom Apartments. Coin-op
Laundry facility, play area, Rental
assistance depending on
eligibility and availability.
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider.
Computers, Accessories
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
MAC BOOK Air w/ soft
case. 11" Brand new.
$1200. 673-5271.
AVAILABLE IN
RANCHESTER: 2
Studio apts., $400/mo.
ea. & 2 bdrm apt.
$600/mo. + dep. & heat,
util. pd., pets? Laundry
rm. incl. No smk. 7514060
For Lease
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
STADIUM PLACE
TOWNHOMES
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
3 Bedroom $695/month
Available NOW
673-5555
For showing call 307.763.2682
• Attached Garage
• Washer & Dryer
• Dishwasher
Income restrictions apply
Furnished Apts for Rent
NEWER 3 BR 3 BA.,
ROCKTRIM $500. Wi- 2600 sq. ft. condo.
Fi/ Cable incl. 752-8783 Fplc., fam. rm.,
dishwasher,
WKLY FR $210. Mnthly refrig., W/D, AC, deck,
fr $630 Americas Best 2 car gar., maint. free,
snow remov., near
Value Inn 672-9757
hosp. & daycare. $1500
Unfurnished Apts for
+ dep.
Rent
Call 751-4951
WESTERN APARTMENTS
RENTS AS LOW AS
1 bedroom...$460-$560
2 bedroom...$565-$695
Dep. $450
Non Smoking Property
This institution is an
equal opportunity provider.
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
672-8681
TDD-1-800-877-9965
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
2BR, 1BA townhome
w/appl, new carpet
and paint. $900mo
+ util. Lease & dep.
No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-6772
2BR, 2BA townhome
w/garage, appl, new
carpet and paint.
$900mo + util. Lease
& dep. No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-6772
LOVELY COTTAGE in
Big Horn, 2BD 1BA, XLg
garage,
W/D,
includes all util & lawn
care. $1250/mo, no
smok/pets, 674-7718
2BR. 1BA $800 mo. +
util. Close to
downtown. No
Smk/Pets Dep. +
lease. 752-2090
SHERIDAN COZY 1BR
house. screened in
porch, nice location,
new carpet, paint &
windows, W/D, A/C. no
smk/pets. $600 + dep.
& util. 655-9350 leave
msg.
2 BR 1 ba. No smoking.
$1000 + utils. Avail
Now. 752-5090.
2BR $850/MO. utils.
incl. Pets negot. Call
307-752-0509
GOOD RETIREMENT
home. Renovated 1+
BR W/D, RV prkg,
NO smkrs. Avail 12/1.
$700+MDU. 672-6875
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
By day, month or year.
674-7718
Office Space for Rent
CLEAN 1BR
Ranchester 4Plex no
smk util incl $610+dep
672-8641
2 BEAUTIFUL SUITES
for lease. (One with
kitchen area). Security,
janitorial, & utilities
included. Conference
room avail to tenants.
672-8700 or 751-3828.
2BD $750/MO.
No smok/cat negotiable.
Dep & lease req'd.
(720) 939-7501.
25'X80' BUILDING.
Office/Storage.
Overhead door.
$400/mo. 307-256-6170
Help Wanted
TACO JOHN'S/GOOD
TIMES is looking for F/T
& P/T employees for all
shifts.
Clean
cut
appearances & pleasing
personality
are
essential. Stop by our
store for application and
your
interview.
References.
$10.00+
per hr DOE.
Delivery
problems?
Call The Press
at 672-2431
LOCAL BUSINESS
looking for Office
Assistant. Must have
valid DL. Background
check will be required.
Great personality,
dependability and multitasking a must.
Mon-Thurs 9-4.
Please stop by to pick
up application at
5211 Coffeen Ave
during business
hours ONLY!
No
phone calls.
THE STORAGE
Builders needs General
laborers 10 temp
positions for res const
duties, use hand & elect
tools, clean work area
3mo exp must bend/lift
& hold 50lbs work under
ext hot weather. No
edu. No travel req. No
transp. No on-the-job
train avail. Post-hire
drug test req M-F 7am4pm. No OT. 40hr/wk.
$8.68/hr.
Approx empl time
2/15/15-11/30/15. Fax
res to John Gaviotis at
307.673.9921.
Unknown multiple loc in
Sheridan Cty
RE:JO#XXXXXXX
PT SPEECH
Language Pathology
Position in Northeast
WY Children’s Clinic
Speech Language
Pathology job in
Sheridan WY. This is
a part-time job with
flexible hours &
competitive pay.
Wyoming SLP
license required. For
more information call
Matt at
(307) 217-0681.
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
FULL-TIME POSITION
available for
Farm/Ranch hand.
Some equipment
experience preferred,
benefits including
housing and more.
Call 406-679-1796,
Position currently open.
YOUTH
SERVICES
SPEC.
II
(FOOD
SERVICE) Wyo. Girls
School, Sheridan; Class
Code SOYS06-01979,
Target Hiring Range:
$2962-$3702. General
Description:
Meal
preparation for lunch &
dinner in addition to
aligning
the
meal
s e r v i c e
w/guidelines/expectatio
ns for Food Service
Program. recipe input,
menu creation, ordering
food/food
service
supplies,
maintaining
requirements of food
safety/sanitation
guidelines.
Oversee
students working in the
on-campus
kitchen
vocational program &
the evaluations of those
students. For more info
or to apply online go to:
http://www.wyoming.go
v/loc/06012011_1/Page
s/default.aspx or submit
a
State
of
Wyo.
Employment App. to the
HR Division, Emerson
Building, 2001 Capitol
Ave., Cheyenne, WY
82002-0060,
Phone:
(307)777-7188,
Fax:
(307)777-6562, along
w/ transcripts of any
relevant course work.
The State of Wyo. is an
Equal
Opportunity
Employer & actively
supports the ADA &
r e a s o n a b l y
accommodates
qualified applicants w/
disabilities.
COUNSELOR AT
Tongue River High
School needed.
Applicant must hold a
WY license. Willing to
consider both part-time
and full-time applicants.
To apply please call
Brandi Miller at
307-655-9541 or
[email protected]
wy.us or visit
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us Position open until
filled. E.O.E.
LOOKING FOR
Full Time
Farm Mechanic
responsibility include
equipment
maintenance and
repair, some other
farm duties included,
open immediately.
Benefits include
housing. Call 406-6791796
SHERIDAN ICE has the
following
open
positions: Adult Figure
Skating Instructor! Must
have figure skating
experience.
$15/hour
on
Tuesdays,
Thursdays
and
Saturdays.
Adult Skating Guards!
Skating experience a
must! Mainly weekend
shifts. $9/hour. Pick up
applications at the rink
located
at
475
Brundage or online at
www.sheridanice.org.
SCOTT BROTHERS,
Inc., a Gillette Wyoming
based company, is
looking to hire electrical
apprentices. Insurance,
401K, & vacation
available. E-mail
questions/ resume to
scottbros
@collinscom.net
BIG BROTHERS BIG
SISTERS is growing.
Now accepting resumes
for a part-time case
manager. Responsible
for intake of youth and
volunteers, coordinating
and providing ongoing
support of mentoring
relationships. Flexible
hours, Bachelor's
degree required. Send
over cover letter and
resume to
[email protected]
Casper, WY Location
We are looking for good people!!
ILCO is a family-owned business in
operation for 70+ years. We have been in
Wyoming for 35 years – started in 1980.
We are currently experiencing growth and
are seeking qualified employees for
Service Technician positions. Our
business has greatly expanded in several
industries including mining, construction,
industrial and railroads.
NORTH PARK
Transportation is hiring
for LINEHAUL DRIVER.
Must have class
A CDL w/ hazmat and
combination. Must be
able to pass
background check
and drug test. Benefits,
health & profit
sharing. Apply
in person
648 Riverside.
WE ARE currently
seeking vacuum truck
drivers to join our team
in Wyoming. We
provide 24/7 service.
He or she must have
class A CDL, with
tankers endorsement.
Housing available! We
also offer Insurance!
$18-$22 starting pay!
Contact our office in
Wright, WY 307-4641146. Contact: Gilbert
Moncibaiz at
307-299-9200. Email:
g.moncibaiz10services
@gmail.com
2BR W/GAR, fireplace,
W/D, DW, A/C,
$800/mo + elec. & $400
dep. Avail.12/1.Call
673-4307
LOST
PET?
Place an ad in
The Press!
Call 672-2431
NEED FT Auto Tech.
Salary
DOE.
Send
resume to: C.W. Auto
Service 951 Werco Ave.
Sheridan, WY 82801 or
email:
cwautoservice
@gmail.com.
Make life simpler and possibly less expensive.
Heritage Towers a HUD 202/8 senior/mobility
impaired apartment community has apartments
available for individuals who apply and meet
HUD program, income and age guidelines.
Rents are based on income. All utilities except cable
TV and phone are included in the rent. On site
laundry facilities, computer lab, meal program,
service coordinator and more, call 307-674-8825 or
stop by the office at 428 N Jefferson, Sheridan, WY
for an application or more information.
This community does not discriminate on the basis of
handicapped status in the admission or access to, or
treatment or employment in its federally assisted
programs and activities. The person named below
has been designated to coordinate compliance
with nondiscrimination requirements in regulations
implementing Section 504: Kenneth R Humphrey
307-674-8825, TDD 711 or 307-674-8825 - Equal
Housing Opportunity.
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
Rating: GOLD
Solution to 11/4/14
ILCO offers growth opportunities along
with competitive wages and excellent
benefits including medical, dental, life,
disability, and accident insurances. We
also offer flex spending, 401k, holidays
and paid time off.
В© 2014 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Adoption
If you are looking for employment with
an established company whose values
include safety, honesty, integrity, and
team work, please visit our website at
www.industriallubricant.com/jobs for
additional job information and to
apply online.
11/5/14
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
'14 CHEVY 1500 CREW
'11 CHEVY 1500 CREW LTZ
'12 CHEVY 1500 EXCAB LTZ
'08 CHEVY 3500 HD
'11 CHEVY SUBURBAN
'11 CHEVY 1500 LTZ
'11 CHEVY 2500HD
'09 CADILLAC ESCALADE
'12 CHEVY 1500 CREW LT
'13 GRAND JEEP CHEROKEE
'12 GRAND JEEP CHEROKEE
'14 CHEVY EQUINOX 2LT
'14 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
'12 DODGE JOURNEY CREW
'11 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
4
$
$
CARS
'10 CHEVY CAMERO SS
$ 27,495
'10 CHEVY CAMERO RS
$ 19,995
'13 CHEVY MALIBU 2LT
$ 18,495
'14 CHEVY IMPALA
$ 17,995
'13 CHEVY SONIC
$ 16,995
34,495
33,995
33,495
33,495
31,995
31,495
30,495
29,995
29,995
28,995
27,495
25,995
24,995
21,495
21,495
'12 CHEVY TRAVERSE
'08 GMC SIERRA
'08 CHEVY TAHOE LT
'07 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
'10 DODGE DAKOTA
'06 CHEVY 1500 CREW
'09 HONDA CRV
'06 GMC SIERRA
'06 CHEVY TAHOE LS
'05 CHEVY TAHOE Z71
'05 FORD EXPLORER XLT SPORT TRACK
'06 SUBARU OUTBACK I
'04 HONDA PILOT EX
'02 NISSAN XTERRA
'03 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
$ 20,995
$ 19,995
$ 19,995
$ 18,995
$ 17,995
$ 16,495
$ 15,995
$ 13,495
$ 12,995
$ 12,995
$ 10,495
$ 9,995
$ 8,495
$ 6,995
$ 4,995
CARS
r
o
F ars!
e
y
8
7
'13 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ
$ 15,995
'13 NISSAN SENTRA
$ 14,995
'12 CHEVY CRUZ LT
$ 13,495
'08 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
$ 10,500
'08 CHEVY HHR LT
$ 8,795
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
Help Wanted,
Professional
SEEKING QUALIFIED
tax preparer for long
standing CPA firm.
Experience a must.
Salary DOE. Retirement
plan and flex scheduling
available. Send reply to
box 215, c/o The
Sheridan Press, PO
Box 2006, Sheridan,
WY 82801
SEEKING
KNOWLEDGEABLE
bookkeeper with
experience and
understanding of
Quickbooks and
payroll reporting a must.
Retirement plan & flex
scheduling available.
Send reply to box 216,
c/o The Sheridan Press,
PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801
Child Care
SMART START
CHILDCARE now
enrolling. Infant-5 yrs
Mon-Fri. Well rounded
preschool curriculum,
breakfast, lunch &
snacks. Call 307-6602502
Motorcycles
Storage Space
2012 SUBARU
Outback. 4 cyl. 2.5L
Premium. -15K miles.
Like New Cond.
$23,000. Call 751-5175
or 751-0304.
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
Real Estate
FSBO, 1368 Yonkee
Ave., 7380 SF lot,
942 SF house, 2 BR
1 ba., excel. cond.,
w/lots
of
extras.
Ready to Move in.
call for more info.
Amy or Tim at 6725293.
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
CROWN STORAGE Inc
KROE Lane 674-9819.
LGE HOME near
Highland Park School.
4 br/3 ba. Office, finish
basement, 2 car
garage, large private
yard, beautiful finishes,
abundant storage
& much more.
752-3452.
Storage Space
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
Sheridan County
Administration
107 E. ALGER
307.674.6419
$
29,995
�09 Cadillac Escalade
OPEN SATURDAYS UNTIL 4PM
Sheridan’s only full service dealership
$
31,495
�11 Chevy 1500 LTZ
on facebook at www.facebook.com/hammerchevy
www.hammerchevy.com
Hints from Heloise
Biscuits From
Heaven
Dear Readers:
With the holidays
coming up, many
will be going home
for Thanksgiving.
Who can resist home-baked
goods and the smell of something yummy when you walk
in the door that says "Welcome
home"?
So many keep asking about
the HELOISE ANGEL BISCUIT
recipe that my mother, the
original Heloise, printed more
than four decades ago. And yes,
they are just as soft as little angels. So here is my family
recipe just for you.
This dough can be made up to
three days in advance and
stored in the refrigerator in a
covered bowl. Gather the following ingredients:
1 package dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water
2 1/2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1/8 cup sugar
1/2 cup shortening
1 cup buttermilk
Heloise
Dissolve the yeast in warm
water and set aside. Place all
the dry ingredients (in the
above order) in a bowl and mix.
The shortening should be cut
in, similar to when making pie
crust. Stir in the buttermilk
and the yeast mixture. Mix well
and refrigerate in a covered
bowl.
Take the dough out when
ready to make biscuits. Knead
it LIGHTLY on a floured
counter or board. Roll out the
dough gently and cut into
shape. I use a small juice glass
to "cut" out just the right-size
biscuit. Place the biscuits in a
greased pan and allow to rise
slightly. Bake in a 400 F oven
for 12-15 minutes. Enjoy! -Heloise
P.S.: Make a double batch, because they will just "float"
away, they are so light.
SEND A GREAT HINT TO:
Heloise
P.O. Box 795000
San Antonio, TX 78279-5000
Fax: 210-HELOISE
Email:
Heloise(at)Heloise.com
HONEY FOR SUGAR?
Dear Heloise: I do a lot of baking and am alarmed at the
amount of sugar required. I
want to substitute honey. Can I
substitute honey for sugar? -Gaylen C., Bella Vista, Ark.
Yes, you can substitute honey
for sugar! Here are a couple of
hints: Use a one-to-one substitution (1 cup of honey in place of
1 cup of sugar). However, when
a recipe calls for more than a
cup, reduce the liquid in the
recipe by 1/4 cup per cup. Then
lower the oven temperature by
25 degrees to prevent overbrowning. -- Heloise
HEALTHY RINSE
Dear Heloise: I love coleslaw,
but everything sold in my area
is too rich and sugary. I purchase a package, put it in a
strainer, then pour water over
it and watch the excess mayonnaise and sugar go down the
drain. My coleslaw now has a
sensible calorie count, and to
me it tastes better. -- Marvin P.,
Torrington, Conn.
Marvin, you also could buy a
package of pre-cut or shredded
slaw and add your own dressing. -- Heloise
Job Title: Human Resource Coordinator/Full-time Grade 20
Salary Range: $49,100 to $60,000 annual DOE
Benefits: Medical insurance and prescription drug coverage, dental insurance,
term life insurance, Wyoming Retirement Program, vacation and sick leave, paid
holidays.
Hours of work are from 8:00AM to 5:00 PM, Monday-Friday.
Minimum Job Requirements: Knowledge and level of competency commonly
associated with the completion of a baccalaureate degree in a Human Resource
course of study or similar study related to the occupational field. Sufficient
experience to understand the basic principles relevant to the major duties of the
position usually associated with the completion of an apprenticeship/internship or
having had a similar position for one to two years. PHR certification preferred,
but not required. Possession of a valid driver’s license issued by the State of
Wyoming.
Application deadline is November 24, 2014. To apply submit a letter of interest, a
current resume, and three work related references, to Renee’ Obermueller,
Administrative Director, 224 S Main, Suite B-1, Sheridan, WY 82801. Job
description is available at www.sheridancounty.com/current job openings.
Bridge
Phillip Alder
FIREWORKS IN
ENGLAND
AND AT
THE
TABLE
Jeff Foxworthy joked, "You may
be a redneck if ... your
lifetime goal is to own a
fireworks stand."
That is timely
because this is Guy
Fawkes Night in England. Fireworks are set
off and bonfires burn an
effigy of Guy Fawkes,
whose gang tried to blow
up the Houses of Parliament in 1605.
There were fireworks when today's deal
was played. What do you
think of the auction,
what should West lead
against three clubs, and
what is the outcome?
East's passedhand takeout double was
aggressive but acceptable. South was right to
rebid one spade. Then
West might have passed,
but one no-trump was
reasonable. That should
have been passed out
(and defeated), but
South could not resist
one more bid. West's
two-spade call was imaginative, given South's
one-spade rebid. That
contract would have required excellent guesswork by West; however,
one can understand
North's three-club raise.
West found the
best start: a low trump.
South took the trick
with his king and led a
low spade. West carefully put up his eight,
but then strangely
shifted to the diamond
six, instead of continuing with the club jack
(not that that defeats the
contract if declarer
plays hearts twice
through West).
Declarer won
with his diamond ace
and should have led a
heart or ruffed a spade,
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Kelly Rutherford was born
in Elizabethtown, Ky., on
this day in 1968. This birthday gal is known to TV fans
for her roles as Lily van der
Woodsen on "Gossip Girl"
and Megan Lewis on the
original "Melrose Place."
She's also appeared on
episodes of "Reckless,"
"Being Mary Jane" and
"Bones." Rutherford made
her TV debut on the soap
opera "Loving" in 1988.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): It's time for all your
hard work to pay off. Improved communication and
understanding will help you
become closer to a significant other. You're inspired
as a career situation moves
to a new level.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Put forth what you wish
to get back. With Venus in
your opposite sign, it seems
as though everyone is
kinder toward you than
usual. But maybe what you
see is just your own
thoughtfulness reflected in
someone's face.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Money can't buy class or
distinction. You can
achieve your dreams by energetically pursuing them.
Don't be distracted by passing whims and fancies that
tempt you to spend money
carelessly.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You get credit as a good
business person but must
remember to give others
credit when credit is due.
Money could be siphoned
from your pocket if you're
fooled by appearances or if
you overindulge in creature
pleasures.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Those elusive castles in the
air are within reach. Share
your thoughts, dreams or
desires with a significant
other who may be ready to
offer support. The two of
you may become as obsessed with a new idea as a
dog with a bone.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Your dreams could come
true, but this may not be the
day to start off on a fresh
initiative without advance
planning. Family or home
expenses could spike. Don't
jump into action at the drop
of a hat.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Gather ideas and inspiration from someone close to
you. Ignore business
schemes that sound too
good to be true. Place a pre-
but he played a diamond
to dummy's king and
ruffed a diamond low.
West happily overruffed
and led the club jack, on
which East discarded
his heart four to give
West count in the suit.
So, when South won and
finally tried a heart,
West ducked and the
contract had to fail.
Jeraldine Saunders
mium on intuitive information that pops into your
head out of the clear blue
sky.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Your kinder instincts
are in play under these celestial conditions, making it
difficult to act on your
shrewd business instincts.
Don't be persuaded into
signing a financial contract
or making an investment.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): It's time to dream,
not to act. Flex your imagination and share that avalanche of new ideas with a
special someone. You're
more sensitive and inventive than usual, so play
make-believe and put practical matters aside for a bit.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You could find someone
who shares your passion for
business or admires the
way you handle yourself.
Sidestep a definite commitment until you know more,
but show that you're willing
to entertain the possibilities.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Easy come easy go.
Cash may flow like water in
the garden hose, but it doesn't seem like a serious drain
on resources when it brings
a smile to a loved one's face.
Tighten your financial belt
and cut corners tomorrow.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Your romantic nature
has the upper hand. Your
business sense is muddled.
This can be a good time to
rustle up some new ideas
and write them down. If you
start something new, you'll
soon be back to the drawing
board.
IF NOVEMBER 6 IS
YOUR BIRTHDAY: Your
prospects for the year ahead
may be dazzling as you experience heightened ambitions and become more
passionate about reaching a
pinnacle of success. An unobtrusive opportunity in
late November could be easily overlooked but could
open some important doorways and make life easier
for a long time to come. You
may find true love or your
true calling by the end of
the year, when you reach
the height of your attractive
powers. January is a good
time to make a key commitment or start a new job.
Whatever becomes a heartfelt passion in your life
you're sure to accomplish,
you'll be willing to work
hard.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Robert
Webster
Councilor
307-674-4206
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
INVITATION FOR BID
Northern Wyoming Community College District, State of Wyoming,
operating as Sheridan College, will receive bids for the construction of the
following:
1. 50’ x 70’ pole barn storage
building
Bids will be received until 1:00 p.m., November 24th, 2014 at the Physical
Plant Conference Room, Physical Plant Building. Bids will be opened at this
time and place. A pre-bid conference and site inspection will be conducted
at 1:00 p.m. November 10th, 2014 at the Sheridan College Physical Plant. All
proposals shall be clearly marked with the wording “Sheridan College
Storage Building” and information identifying the bidding firm on the
outside of the envelope. Contractors must be licensed to do business in the
state of Wyoming. Sheridan College reserves the right to accept or reject
any or all bids, but will award based on the best interest of the institution.
Preference shall be given to Wyoming contractors, sub-contractors,
laborers, and materials. For additional information or for copies of the
construction documents, contact James Lollar at Sheridan College Physical
Plant (307-674-6446 ex 2907), 3059 Coffeen, PO Box 1500, Sheridan,
Wyoming 82801.
DATED this 30th day of October, 2014
/S/ Kati Sherwood
Chairperson
Board of Trustees
Northern Wyoming
Community College District
Publish: November 3, 5, 7, 2014. ГҐ
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
REQUEST FOR BIDS
The Town Council of the Town of Dayton, WY, will accept bids until 4:00
p.m. on November 19, 2014 for the following:
Refuge truck, the bid to include 20
yard hydraulic actuated packer body
with a minimum of 1,000 lbs com
paction. The truck chassis shall be a
Single rear drive axel design with a
steerable slave axel or equivalent for
highway capacity transportation.
Bid specifications may be obtained by contacting the Dayton Town Clerk at
608 Broadway, Dayton, WY, or by calling the Dayton Town Hall at 307-6552217 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through
Thursday. Additional information about the bid unit may be obtained from
Johann Nield, Director of Public Works.
The Town of Dayton shall have the option to accept or reject all or any part
of the bid.
Linda Lofgren
Clerk
Publish November 5, 12, 2014
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Your Right
Wednesday Noon –
To Know
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
and be informed of
Wednesday Noon –
government legal
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
proceedings is embodied
Thursday Noon –
in public notices. This
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
newspaper urges every
Friday Noon –
citizen to read and study
It will be published in
these notices.
• Complete information, descriptions and billing
We strongly advise those
seeking
further information to
exercise their right of
access to public records
and public meetings.
Wednesday’s paper.
information are required with each legal notice. A
PDF is required if there are any signatures, with a
Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information WILL cause
delay in publication. All legal notices must be
paid
in
full
before
an
"AFFIDAVIT
• Please contact The Sheridan Press legal
advertising department at 672-2431 if you have
questions.
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Kathy
Coleman
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-675-1960
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
This photo depicts cattle sales in process at the Sheridan County fairgrounds. Note the sale barn in the background, built by the WPA during the great depression. The photo is in the Ostrom Collection in the Sheridan County Museum's Memory Book project.
OF
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
The City of Sheridan, Wyoming will receive sealed bids for the SOUTH PARK
BOARDWALK Project. These improvements are generally described as
follows:
Construction of 258 LF of 8 FT wide boardwalk with helical piles.
Sealed bids will be received at City Hall, to the Clerk’s office on the 1st floor,
until 2:00 p.m. local time on November 20, 2014. The bids will then be
opened and read aloud at the Council Chambers on 3rd floor of City Hall.
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with and on the forms included in
the Project Manual. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope addressed
to:
City of Sheridan
Attn: Scott Badley, City Clerk
South Park Boardwalk
55 Grinnell Plaza
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Electronic or hard copy Contract Documents, including proposal bid forms,
drawings and Project Manual, have been placed on п¬Ѓle and may be
examined at the office of EnTech, Inc., 1949 Sugarland Drive Suite 205,
Sheridan Wyoming, and Engineering Department in City Hall, Sheridan,
Wyoming as well as the following plan rooms:
Billings Builder’s Exchange, Billings,
Montana
Northeast Wyoming Contractors and
Plan, Gillette, Wyoming
The Bid Center, Casper, Wyoming
Wyoming Plan Service, Casper,
Wyoming
Cheyenne Plan Service, Cheyenne,
Wyoming
Construction Industry Center,
Rapid City, South Dakota
Contract Documents may be obtained on or after October 31, 2014 at the
office of EnTech, Inc. at the non-refundable cost of $25.00 per set.
A PRE-BID CONFERENCE will be held on November 13, 2014 at 2:00 p.m.
local time, beginning in the Council Chambers on 3rd floor of City Hall,
Sheridan, Wyoming.
Contractors, in submitting their respective bids, acknowledge that such bids
conform to all requirements of Wyoming State Statute and Federal-Aid
DBE Requirements. Each bidder must include a bid security with the bid,
payable to the City of Sheridan, in accordance with the Instruction to
Bidders.
No bidder may withdraw its bid after the scheduled time of the bid opening.
Bids are to remain open for 60 days after the bid opening. The Owner
reserves the right to reject any and all bids or parts thereof, and to waive
any irregularities of any bid. The Owner also reserves the right to award the
contract to such responsible bidders as may be determined by the Owner.
City of Sheridan, Wyoming
By: /s/Nicholas L. Bateson,
Public Works Director
Publish: October 29th, November 5th, 12th, 2014.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
CORRECTION |
A few scores from the high school state swim meet in Saturday’s edition of The
Sheridan Press were incorrect. Pippin Robison finished third in the 200 freestyle
and Sol Montero finished sixth.
The 200 freestyle-relay team of Ava Johannesmeyer, Katie Beardslee, Emery
Raien and Teal Scheuber finished in seventh place.
The Press regrets the error.
www.thesheridanpress.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014
Bonino scores 2 goals
as Canucks beat Avalanche
DENVER (AP) — The Vancouver
Canucks had a hard time solving goaltender Semyon Varlamov. Once they did,
the goals came in bunches.
Nick Bonino scored two goals, Ryan
Miller made 20 saves and the Canucks overcame an early deficit to beat the Colorado
Avalanche 5-2 on Tuesday night.
Henrik Sedin and Derek Dorsett also
scored for the Canucks. Chris Higgins had
two assists for Vancouver, which controlled
the game after two quick goals by the
Avalanche.
It was Vancouver’s fourth win in five
games. It looked like the Canucks were
going to be victimized by a hot goalie until
Sedin finally got one by Varlamov in the
waning moments of the second period.
Sedin, stationed in front of the net, picked
up Daniel Sedin’s rebound and beat
Varlamov with 4 seconds left in the period.
It capped a dominant period for
Vancouver, which outshot Colorado 16-8.
“In the second we just took the game
over,” said Shawn Matthias, who scored the
final goal. “I’d like to see how long we had
the puck. It seemed like we were rolling the
lines and cycling the puck. All four lines
were rolling.”
The Canucks continued to control the
play and tied it early in the third when
Dorsett deflected Dan Hamhuis’ shot over
the shoulder of Varlamov at 2:27. Bonino
gave Vancouver the lead when he corralled
a loose puck in the crease and put it in the
open net at 4:47.
“Seems like when they scored that late
goal with 4 seconds left in the second period that gave them some momentum going
into the third period,” Avalanche coach
Patrick Roy said.
Bonino got his second nearly five minutes
later when he beat Varlamov on the short
side to make it 4-2. Matthias iced with his
first goal at 13:10.
“A great play again by Higgy. He had
three guys on him, gave me the pass,”
Bonino said. “I was going to get squeezed
off if I didn’t put it on net. Sometimes they
go in, sometimes they don’t.”
Varlamov had 32 saves and John Mitchell
and Jamie McGinn had goals for the
Avalanche, which has lost three straight.
Colorado, which started last season 12-1, is
3-6-5.
�I spotted them two goals I felt like
I had to calm things down, in my mind as
well. I needed to calm down and battle
through. We were able to get through
some penalty kills and the guys got
rewarded in the third period.’
Ryan Miller
Goaltender for Vancouver Canucks
The team had an impromptu meeting
after the game following Tuesday’s loss.
“We talked amongst ourselves, and I
think we’ll keep that at that,” captain
Gabriel Landeskog said. “We’ll keep that in
the dressing room. We have to be better.”
The Avalanche went ahead 1-0 on
Mitchell’s goal 1:15 into the game. He got a
drop pass from Alex Tanguay and beat
Miller with Colorado’s first shot of the
game.
McGinn made it 2-0 late in the first when
Jarome Iginla fed him with a pass from
behind the net and McGinn put the puck in
the top right corner at 16:33.
Nathan MacKinnon had a chance to make
it 3-0 in the second when he stole the puck
in the Vancouver zone but Miller made a
glove save.
“I spotted them two goals I felt like I had
to calm things down, in my mind as well,”
Miller said. “I needed to calm down and
battle through. We were able to get through
some penalty kills and the guys got rewarded in the third period.”
The Avalanche killed off all four of their
penalties and increased their streak to 29
straight penalty kills. It’s the longest for
the team in a single season since 2001-02.
O’Grady to step down as European Tour chief exec
SHANGHAI (AP) — European Tour chief
executive George O’Grady is stepping down
after 10 years, saying it was a good time to
leave after another overwhelming Ryder
Cup success and enough “green shoots of
recovery” across the tour.
O’Grady asked the board to start looking
for a successor, the tour said Wednesday in
a statement.
It was not clear when he would officially
step down. O’Grady has agreed to stay on
until the European Tour board finds a
replacement, and then sufficient time for
his successor to make a smooth transition.
O’Grady, who has been with the tour in
some capacity for more than 40 years, will
become president of international relations, in which he will represent the
European Tour when golf returns to the
Olympics in 2016.
“The European Tour and its players are
admired throughout the world of golf, and
George has played a key part in building
global relationships and developing the
tour,” said David Williams, chairman of
the tour.
O’Grady became only the third chief
executive of the tour in January 2005, following 30 years of Ken Schofield and John
Jacobs, who oversaw the tour’s formative
years from 1971-74.
“In the aftermath of what I believe to
have been the best presented Ryder Cup
since my first involvement in the contest at
Royal Lytham in 1977, I felt this was the
right time to ask the board to begin the
search for my successor,” O’Grady said.
“It is my firm belief that, coming toward
the end of what has been another incredibly successful season, we are now seeing
the green shoots of recovery across
Europe, and I am pleased that this coin-
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cides with all our building blocks, in terms
of key television and sponsorship contracts, being in place.”
It has not always been smooth sailing.
A year after O’Grady was on the job, PGA
Tour commissioner Tim Finchem
announced The Players Championship
would move from March to May, right
about the time European events returned
to the continent. The U.S. tour also
launched the FedEx Cup, a $35 million
bonus pool in August and September which
became even more attractive to Europeanborn players.
With more players heading for America,
the European Tour bumped up the required
number of events for its members from 11
to 13 to beef up support.
A critical point was in 2006 at La Costa
for the Match Play Championship, where
O’Grady assembled two dozen European
players in the field for a meeting to allow
them to share ideas on keeping the
European circuit strong. He said the central message that night was that the
“European Tour is worth fighting for.”
A few years later, O’Grady oversaw the
new Race to Dubai that provided a year-end
bonus to European players.
And with the economy struggling in
Europe, the tour adjusted its schedule to
become the most global tour in golf. It was
the first to tap heavily into the Asia markets — particularly China — and holds
events in the Middle East, along with South
Africa.
“He’s had a good reign,” Justin Rose said.
“There’s no doubt there has been challenges. The European Tour and the economy and the markets in which the European
Tour has been going is difficult.”
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