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Seattle Children’s Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Seattle Children’s Hospital
and the Department of Pediatrics,
University of Washington School of Medicine
2005 Academic Annual Report
2005 Academic Annual Report
4800 Sand Point Way N.E.
Seattle, Washington 98105
(206) 987-2000
www.seattlechildrens.org
© 2006 Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. All rights reserved.
10/06
Our Vision
We will be the best
children’s hospital
Our Mission
WE WILL:
> Provide patients and their families
excellent care with compassion
and respect
We believe all children have unique
needs and should grow up without
illness or injury. With the support of
the community and through our spirit
of inquiry, we will prevent, treat and
eliminate pediatric disease.
> Deliver superior, accessible,
cost-effective service
> Attract and retain the best talent
at all levels of the organization
> Be one of the top five pediatric
research institutions in the country
> Be the nation’s premier pediatric
educator
> Achieve worldwide prominence by
integrating patient care, research,
education and advocacy
Our Vision
We will be the best children’s hospital
WE WILL:
> Provide patients and their families excellent care with
compassion and respect
> Deliver superior, accessible, cost-effective service
> Attract and retain the best talent at all levels of the organization
> Be one of the top five pediatric research institutions in the country
> Be the nation’s premier pediatric educator
> Achieve worldwide prominence by integrating patient care,
research, education and advocacy
Message from the President and CEO
Thomas N. Hansen, MD
DEAR COLLEAGUES AND FRIENDS,
I am pleased to share this annual report describing the work of Seattle
Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center. From its beginnings
nearly 100 years ago, Seattle Children’s has emerged as a world leader in
pediatric health care. We are the primary pediatric referral center for the
four-state region that includes Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho.
In addition to providing high-tech patient care, our research is advancing
the way pediatric medicine is practiced throughout the world.
Our vital link to the University of Washington — which has one of the nation’s best medical
schools — allows us to look confidently to the future as we train the next generation of
physicians who will focus on the health care of children. Two-thirds of our faculty trained at
the University of Washington School of Medicine, and many serve in key national leadership
positions across a broad spectrum of academic pediatrics and biomedical research.
Several achievements and milestones during the past year are worth highlighting. In July
2005, Seattle Children’s hosted the first conference of the newly established Treuman Katz
Center for Pediatric Bioethics. On Oct. 1, 2005, I became president and CEO of Seattle
Children’s, succeeding Treuman Katz who had served in that capacity for the past 26 years.
In December 2005, we announced plans to add 1 million square feet of research space during
the next decade. In February 2006, we introduced a $300 million fundraising campaign
to support uncompensated care, research and facility development. Also in February, we
began developing a five-year strategic plan to lay the foundation for our next 100 years.
The Board of Trustees unanimously approved this plan and launched us on our journey to
become the “best children’s hospital.” In April 2006, we dedicated the Melinda French Gates
Ambulatory Care Building, which consolidates nearly all of our clinical outpatient services
in one state-of-the-art facility. Most recently, we placed 12th in the nation in pediatrics in
the U.S.News & World Report’s �America’s Best Hospitals,’ and we were the highest ranked
pediatric hospital on the West Coast.
Our mission is to prevent, treat and eliminate pediatric disease. It is a lofty goal — but great
accomplishments do not come from small ambitions. I hope you will take time to read about
our achievements and the faculty who have helped make us one of the best pediatric medical
centers in the country.
Thomas N. Hansen, MD
President and CEO
Seattle Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
1
Message from the Vice President for
Medical Affairs and Dean of the
University of Washington School of Medicine
Paul G. Ramsey, MD
DEAR COLLEAGUES AND FRIENDS,
I am honored to join Seattle Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center
in celebrating the many achievements of University of Washington pediatrics
faculty. The information presented in this annual report demonstrates the
dynamic link between Seattle Children’s and UW Medicine. This partnership
is dedicated to improving the health of children by advancing medical knowledge, providing outstanding primary and specialty pediatric medical care
and training the next generation of health professionals.
Seattle Children’s provides inpatient facilities for the majority of children hospitalized within the
UW-affiliated system and is where many of our medical students learn pediatrics. UW–Seattle
Children’s pediatrics residency program is one of the most sought-after residencies in the United
States and is educating the pediatrics leaders of tomorrow.
UW Medicine pediatrics faculty are world leaders in biomedical research, innovators in education,
and nationally recognized for patient care. Through excellence, innovation and collaboration,
UW Medicine pediatrics faculty are improving the health of children everywhere.
I am pleased to welcome Dr. Tom Hansen to Seattle as president and CEO of Seattle Children’s and
as a member of our faculty. I am personally committed to working closely with him and with our
faculty leadership to achieve Seattle Children’s vision to be the “best children’s hospital” anywhere.
Paul G. Ramsey, MD
Dean, University of Washington
School of Medicine
2
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Executive Staff
Thomas N. Hansen, MD
President,
Chief Executive Officer
Richard Molteni, MD
Vice President,
Medical Director
Jeffrey Sconyers
Vice President,
General Counsel
Patrick Hagan
Executive Vice President,
Chief Operating Officer
Douglas Picha
Vice President, Executive Director,
Children’s Hospital Foundation
F. Bruder Stapleton, MD
Pediatrician-in-Chief
James Hendricks, PhD
Vice President,
Research
Robert Sawin, MD
Surgeon-in-Chief
Kelly Wallace
Vice President,
Chief Financial Officer
Sanford Melzer, MD
Vice President,
Strategic Planning and
Business Development
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
3
Welcome
2005 was a year of achievement for Seattle Children’s Hospital
Drs. Michael Cunningham and Richard
Hopper co-direct Seattle Children’s
Craniofacial Center and collaborate closely
to provide the best medical and surgical
outcomes to their patients.
4
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
T O P L E F T:
Dr. Corrie Anderson leads Seattle Children’s pain management team.
T O P R I G H T:
Infectious disease researcher Dr. Amanda Jones
Children enjoy the open feel and engaging artwork in
the new Melinda French Gates Ambulatory Care Building.
O T H E R P H O T O S T H I S PA G E :
Seattle Children’s Hospital was
founded in Seattle in 1907 on the
belief that all children deserve medical
care that addresses their unique
needs. During the past century, we
have blossomed into one of the best
academic pediatric medical centers in
the nation. We now provide inpatient,
outpatient, diagnostic, emergency,
outreach and telemedicine services
in nearly 60 pediatric subspecialties.
The key elements of our mission
are to prevent, treat and eliminate
pediatric disease, and everything we
do is designed to help us achieve
these goals.
We take pride in our role as
the region’s primary pediatrics
teaching resource, training pediatrics
specialists, family practitioners, nurses,
technicians, dentists and postdoctoral
researchers. In partnership with the
University of Washington School of
Medicine, our residency program
offers more than 50 fellowships each
year and is consistently ranked among
the best in the nation.
Our state-of-the-art facilities
support a high-tech, high-touch
approach to patient care. In the past
two years, we have opened two new
buildings that have expanded our
capacity to deliver complex, highintensity care in both the inpatient
and ambulatory settings.
Our flourishing research program
is the engine that drives our success.
It produces the discoveries that
transform the way medicine is
practiced. It attracts the best doctors,
nurses, scientists and staff. It brings
new hope to children and families
battling life-threatening illnesses and
chronic conditions. So in late 2005,
Seattle Children’s announced plans to
add 1 million square feet of research
space during the next decade.
Ultimately, we owe our success
to the dedicated faculty and staff who
work tirelessly on behalf of children.
Their care and compassion at the
bedside motivate their search for
scientific discoveries at the bench.
We also are grateful to our generous
community, whose philanthropic
support helps assure our legacy to
provide the best care for children.
This report details the teaching,
research and clinical highlights
of 2005 and the faculty expertise
behind them. Turn the page and share
our energy, our excitement, our
commitment to pediatric medicine
and research — and our ultimate
goal of improving the lives of
children everywhere.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
5
2005 Achievements
> The Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric
Bioethics at Seattle Children’s — one
of the nation’s first centers dedicated
to the study of research and health
care for children — hosted its first
conference in July 2005. Presenters,
panelists and attendees discussed the
ethical issues that arise when children
are involved in medical research.
> Bone marrow transplant pioneer
Dr. Jean Sanders completed a
longitudinal study of infants with
acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It
showed that infants who received
total-body radiation and bone
marrow transplants had a vastly
better disease-free survival rate than
those treated with chemotherapy
alone. Additionally, they did not
suffer long-term harmful effects
from the initial radiation treatment.
> Drs. Craig Rubens and Amanda
Jones contributed to a national study
that found that the genetic material
of bacteria and viruses evolves as
much as 30 percent from one strain
to the next.
Dr. Danielle Zerr investigates
the impact of infectious diseases on immunosuppressed patients; Dr. Ernest Conrad develops
limb-sparing surgeries for children with bone
tumors; Dr. Jean Sanders pioneers bone marrow
transplant protocols.
C LO C K W I S E F R O M TO P :
6
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
> Seattle Children’s established the
only small intestine transplant
program in the Northwest — and
one of only a handful in the country
— under the leadership of pioneering
surgeon Dr. Jorge Reyes.
Organ transplant pioneer
Dr. Jorge Reyes is improving
surgical techniques for
split-liver and living-donor
liver transplantations.
> Dr. Dimitri Christakis and Michelle
Garrison found no scientific evidence
that “educational” media products
have any educational value for babies
and toddlers.
> In the most comprehensive study
ever conducted on infants hospitalized
with bronchiolitis, Dr. Christakis
and his team found that shortening
hospital stays and eliminating
unnecessary medications and tests
can enhance patient safety and will
likely lower treatment costs. The
study also found considerable
differences in the way the illness
is treated at 30 large children’s
hospitals across the United States.
> Dr. Christakis and Dr. Frederick J.
Zimmerman published a study that
showed that the more TV children
watched between the ages of 1 and
3, the greater their risk of attention
problems by age 7.
> A team of Seattle Children’s and
University of Washington researchers,
led by Dr. Danielle Zerr, uncovered
new information about when and
how the human herpesvirus 6 is
acquired, its symptoms and the
length of time the virus is active
in toddlers.
> Dr. Zerr also led a study showing
that there were fewer hospitalacquired infections in hospitals
where staff had access to alcohol
gel for disinfecting their hands
than at those hospitals without
regular alcohol hand-gel programs.
The study used data from 31
children’s hospitals and more
then 48,000 patients.
> As part of a national, multisite study
sponsored by the National Institutes
of Health (NIH), Dr. James Stout
and his team showed that home
visits and education on reducing
exposure to allergens and tobacco
smoke in the home significantly
improved the health of children
with asthma.
> Seattle Children’s nursing program
began a multiyear journey to attain
Magnet status from the American
Nurses Association.
> Eighty-nine members of Seattle
Children’s medical staff were included
in Seattle magazine’s annual list of
top doctors in the Seattle area. The
magazine also listed 11 of Seattle
Children’s medical staff among
Seattle’s best dentists.
> Seattle Children’s became the first
medical center west of the Mississippi
to perform a heart transplant on an
infant whose blood type was different
than the organ donor’s (known as an
ABO-mismatched transplant).
> Dr. David Rawlings and his team
identified the trigger that activates
a pathway in T and B immune
cells that leads to the survival and
growth of these cells. This discovery
could ultimately lead to more
effective treatments of cancers and
autoimmune diseases.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
7
Leadership in Faculty
and Programs
Dr. Richard Ellenbogen is
president of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons;
Dr. Frederick Rivara was elected to the Institute
of Medicine of the National Academies; Elizabeth
McCauley, PhD, was among the п¬Ѓrst to recognize
depression as a childhood illness.
C L O C K W I S E F R O M L E F T:
8
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Renowned cancer researcher
Dr. Irwin Bernstein
Endowed Chairs
Professional Appointments
Irwin D. Bernstein, MD, John R. Hartmann
Endowed Chair in Pediatric Oncology/Hematology,
University of Washington
Phillip F. Chance, MD, Medical Advisory
Committee, Muscular Dystrophy Association;
Chairman, Scientific Review Committee,
Les Turner ALS Association
Robert J. Boucek Jr., MD, MS, Thomas Bradley
Armstrong Endowed Chair in Pediatric Cardiology,
Seattle Children’s
Phillip F. Chance, MD, Allan and Phyllis Treuer
Endowed Chair in Genetics and Development,
Seattle Children’s
Gordon A. Cohen, MD, PhD, Sam and Althea
Stroum Endowed Chair in Pediatric Cardiovascular
Surgery, Seattle Children’s
Michael L. Cunningham MD, PhD, Jean Renny
Endowed Chair in Pediatric Craniofacial Medicine,
Seattle Children’s
Benjamin S. Danielson, MD, Janet and Jim
Sinegal Endowed Chair for the Odessa Brown
Children’s Clinic, Seattle Children’s
Richard G. Ellenbogen, MD, Theodore S.
Roberts Endowed Chair in Pediatric Neurosurgery,
Seattle Children’s
J. Russell Geyer, MD, Evans Family Endowed
Chair in Pediatric Cancer, Seattle Children’s
Richard G. Ellenbogen, MD, President, Congress
of Neurological Surgeons (CNS)
Debra L. Friedman, MD, Director, Fred Hutchinson
Cancer Research Center Survivorship Program
John M. Neff, MD, Council on University Relations,
University of Washington
Frederick P. Rivara, MD, MPH, Elected Member,
Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National
Academies
Academic Journal Editors and
Board Members
Michael E. Mitchell, MD, Dr. Michael Mitchell
Endowed Chair in Pediatric Urology, Seattle Children’s
Robert J. Boucek Jr., MD, MS, Editorial
Board Member, Journal of Heart and Lung
Transplantation
F. Bruder Stapleton, MD, Ford Morgan Endowed
Chair, University of Washington
Kenneth M. Jaffe, MD, Editor-in-Chief,
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation;
Editorial Board Member, Journal of Brain Injury
Scott C. Manning, MD, Editorial Board Member,
Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery
Vincent S. Mosca, MD, Editorial Board Member,
Journal of Pediatric Orthopedics
Irwin D. Bernstein, MD, Consulting Editor,
Journal of Clinical Investigation; Editorial Board
Member, Current Cancer Therapy Reviews
Jean E. Sanders, MD, Gerald and Gloria Swanson
Endowed Chair in Pediatric Bone Marrow
Transplantation, Seattle Children’s
Simon P. Horslen, MBChB, FRCPCH, Chair,
Joint Pediatric Liver and Intestine Subcommittee,
United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)
Sandra L. Watkins, MD, President, American
Society of Pediatric Nephrology
Joseph S. Gruss, MD, Marlys C. Larson
Endowed Chair in Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery,
Seattle Children’s
Craig E. Rubens, MD, PhD, Children’s Hospital
Guild Association Endowed Chair in Pediatric
Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children’s
James Hendricks, PhD, Editor-in-Chief,
Journal of Histotechnology
Elizabeth A. McCauley, PhD, Editorial Board
Member, Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Abraham B. Bergman, MD, Associate Editor,
Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Bonnie W. Ramsey, MD, Bonnie Ramsey
Endowed Chair in Cystic Fibrosis Research,
University of Washington
Sidney M. Gospe Jr., MD, PhD, Editorial Board
Member, Pediatric Neurology
F. Bruder Stapleton, MD, first annual Endowed
Residency Visiting Professor, University of
Florida Health Sciences Center in Jacksonville;
elected President, Association of Medical
School Department Chairs
Sidney M. Gospe Jr., MD, PhD, Herman & Faye
Sarkowsky Endowed Chair in Child Neurology,
University of Washington
Jeffrey G. Ojemann, MD, Richard G. Ellenbogen
Endowed Chair in Pediatric Neurosurgery,
Seattle Children’s
Debra L. Friedman, MD, Pediatric Board
Member, National Cancer Institute PDQ
Dimitri A. Christakis, MD, Associate Editor,
Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine
Michael L. Cunningham, MD, Editorial Board
Member, American Journal of Otolaryngology;
Deputy Editor, Birth Defects Research Part A:
Clinical and Molecular Teratology
Allison A. Eddy, MD, Deputy Editor, Journal of
the American Society of Nephrology; Editorial
Board Member, Pediatric Nephrology
Eric L. Effmann, MD, Editorial Board Member,
Pediatric Radiology
Richard G. Ellenbogen, MD, Editor, Science
Times; Editorial Board Member, Neurosurgery
Michael E. Mitchell, MD, Consulting Editor,
Journal of Urology, Journal of Pediatric Surgery,
Urology and European Journal of Urology
Roberta A. Pagon, MD, Editorial Board Member,
Genetics in Medicine
Michael A. Portman, MD, Editorial Board
Member, American Journal of Physiology —
Heart and Circulatory Physiology
David J. Rawlings, MD, Editorial Advisory
Board Member, Clinical Immunology
Jorge D. Reyes, MD, Editorial Board Member,
Pediatric Transplantation, Current Opinions in
Organ Transplantation, and Intestine; Member,
Board of Directors, LifeCenter Northwest; Chair,
Pediatric Transplantation Committee, United
Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)
Frederick P. Rivara, MD, MPH, Editor, Archives
of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine; Deputy
Editor, Injury Prevention; Founding President,
International Society for Child and Adolescent
Injury Prevention
Craig E. Rubens, MD, PhD, Editorial Advisory
Board Member, Future Microbiology
F. Bruder Stapleton, MD, Editor-in-Chief, Journal
Watch — Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Jerry J. Zimmerman, MD, PhD, Editorial Board
Member, Critical Care Medicine and Pediatric
Critical Care Medicine
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
9
Hematology
and Oncology
Finding Better Ways
to Treat Brain Tumors
in Kids
JAMES M. OLSON, MD, PHD
Titles
Attending Physician, Seattle Children’s Hospital
Assistant Program Head, Fred Hutchinson
Cancer Research Center Pediatric
Oncology Program
Adjunct Associate Professor of Pathology,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Associate Professor of Pediatric Hematology/
Oncology, University of Washington School
of Medicine
Founder, Olson Lab at Fred Hutchinson
Cancer Research Center
Editorships and Appointments
Young Investigators Committee Member and
Biology and Translational Research Committee
Member, Children’s Oncology Group
Director, Hereditary Disease Array Group
Scientific Advisory Board Member, Hereditary
Disease Foundation
Ad Hoc Reviewer, Multiple Study Sections,
National Institutes of Health and the Medical
Research Council of Great Britain
10
In only six years, Dr. James Olson
and his research team have broken
new ground in the п¬Ѓght against brain
tumors. His lab was the п¬Ѓrst to identify
growth pathways of medulloblastoma
cells that are not essential for the
body’s other cells. This discovery
has opened the door to developing
targeted cancer therapies that are
more effective and less toxic: more
effective because they can interrupt the
signaling pathways cancer cells need
to stay alive; less toxic because they
leave non-cancerous cells untouched.
So far, the team has identified three
vulnerable growth pathways.
The method Olson’s team
developed has become the standard
for studying growth pathways in other
types of cancer — and his laboratory
has also become the national reference
lab for performing tissue culture
studies on medulloblastoma samples
sent by 240 institutions that treat
this cancer.
By analyzing the effectiveness of
therapeutic agents in lab and mouse
models, Olson’s team helps prioritize
which drugs should be brought to
clinical trial. Their studies have
resulted in three national clinical
trials, including a Phase III trial
testing to see if their recommended
therapy — simple 13-cis-retinoic
acid (also known as Accutane) in
conjunction with cisplatin — should
become the standard of care for
treating medulloblastomas.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Improving surgical excision of brain
tumors is another of Olson’s goals. He is
working with renowned neurosurgeon
Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, who leads
Seattle Children’s neurosurgery division
and chairs the Department of
Neurological Surgery at the University
of Washington School of Medicine,
to develop tumor paint to help
surgeons distinguish between cancer
cells and normal brain tissue.
Tumor paint utilizes a molecule
that targets cancer cells and avoids
normal brain cells. Olson’s team—
which includes neurosurgeons,
engineers and biologists — linked this
molecule to another small molecule
that emits a near-infrared light. In
mouse models, they demonstrated
that they could light up brain tumors
as small as 1 millimeter in diameter
without lighting up adjacent normal
brain tissue. Used in the operating
room, tumor paint will enable
surgeons to clearly distinguish
cancerous cells from normal tissue.
Olson has п¬Ѓled a patent
application on tumor paint and his
team is preparing for the necessary
toxicity studies before seeking
approval from the Food and Drug
Administration to begin clinical trials.
“The unique collaboration
between Children’s and the Fred
Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
provides a great environment for
research. The philanthropic support
has enabled us to do high-risk, highpayoff studies that can lead to true
advances in medicine,” Olson says.
Children’s multifaceted approach to pediatric oncology is a
standout feature of our cancer program. Our efforts run the gamut
from studying cancer at the molecular level, to developing and
refining clinical treatments, to leading survivors into the future.
Our collaboration with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
and the University of Washington provides a unique, synergistic
environment for this work.
Surviving Is Just the
First Step
The good news is that the last 30
years have seen significant increases
in survival rates for children who
battle cancer. But this growing cadre
of survivors has shown that the
cost of beating cancer can include
many significant health risks and an
impaired quality of life.
In the small but growing п¬Ѓeld that
has emerged to address survivors’
needs, Dr. Debra Friedman is a leader.
Her work addresses this multifaceted
issue from a variety of angles.
The model of care Friedman
developed for long-term follow-up for
childhood cancer survivors is being
adapted by pediatric and adult
survivorship programs throughout the
country. Her work also has contributed
to changes in treatment protocols for
children, which should lessen the longterm adverse effects of both the disease
and its cure.
Friedman is leading a 13institution clinical trial, funded by
the National Cancer Institute (NCI),
to see if changes in the way Hodgkin
lymphoma is treated — reducing the
п¬Ѓeld and dose of radiation, lowering
the dosage of some chemotherapy
drugs and eliminating others — has
improved long-term physical and
emotional outcomes for patients.
“We know the survival rate has
improved, but we want to know if
we’ve reduced the long-term
physiologic effects, like cardiovascular
disease, infertility, secondary cancers
and fatigue,” Friedman says. “And if
we have, will the psychological effects
follow, or are they separate issues?”
She is also leading two novel pilot
studies on exercise and its role in
enhancing a survivor’s quality of life
both physically and socially. By
improving patients’ fitness and their
engagement in social activities,
Friedman hopes to improve healthrelated quality of life and to address
the growing problem of obesity and
inactivity in childhood cancer survivors.
Secondary malignancies are
another area where Friedman is
making inroads. She’s trying to tease
out the environmental and genetic risk
factors that may trigger second
malignancies in some patients but not
others who had the same diagnosis
and underwent the same treatments.
The ultimate goal is to modify either
the environment or the treatment to
lower the risk of developing a
secondary cancer.
In 2005, Friedman was appointed
director of a new survivorship program
at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research
Center (FHCRC), which is part of the
LiveSTRONGTM Survivorship Center
of Excellence Network. It is one of п¬Ѓve
such centers in the nation funded by
an invitation-only grant from the
Lance Armstrong Foundation. The
center is located in the outpatient
clinic of the Seattle Cancer Care
Alliance (SCCA) — which unites the
cancer care services of Seattle Children’s,
FHCRC and University of Washington
Medicine. The center will expand
clinical care, education and research
for survivors of pediatric and medical
oncology and of bone marrow and
stem cell transplant, including adult
survivors of pediatric malignancies.
DEBRA L. FRIEDMAN, MD
Titles
Attending Physician, Seattle Children’s Hospital
Founding Director, Children’s ACCESS program
(After Cancer Care Ends Survivorship Starts)
Director, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Survivorship Program
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Associate Member, Fred Hutchinson Cancer
Research Center
Editorships and Appointments
Editorial Board Member, Children’s Oncology
Group CureSearch Web site
Pediatric Board Member, National Cancer
Institute PDQ
Member of several disease, strategy and study
committees, Children’s Oncology Group
“Our survivors are teaching us
how to better care for them,” Friedman
says. “Hopefully we can improve the
outcome for the next generation until
we can п¬Ѓgure out how to prevent
cancer in the first place.”
To learn more about the survivorship
program call (866) 543-4272 or e-mail
[email protected]
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
11
Craniofacial
Treating What Children
Know as Themselves
MICHAEL L. CUNNINGHAM, MD, PHD
Titles
Jean Renny Endowed Chair in Pediatric
Craniofacial Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital
Medical Director, Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center,
Seattle Children’s Hospital
Chief, Division of Craniofacial Medicine,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University
of Washington School of Medicine
Adjunct Associate Professor, Department
of Biological Structure, University of Washington
School of Medicine
Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of
Oral Biology, University of Washington School
of Dentistry
Editorships and Appointments
Deputy Editor, Birth Defects Research Part A:
Clinical and Molecular Teratology
12
The very nature of craniofacial
conditions poses an interesting
challenge in medicine. Whether an
isolated malformation — like simple
craniosynostosis — or part of a
more complex multi-system genetic
syndrome — like Apert syndrome
— craniofacial issues require care that
crosses traditional medical specialties
and academic disciplines.
To meet the range of needs
presented by children with
abnormalities of the head and neck,
Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center
brings together 40 team members
from 19 distinct disciplines (see box
for complete listing).
Rather than a loosely affiliated
group of specialists that see the
same patients on different days in
different clinics, members of Children’s
craniofacial team work together — and
see patients together. Each child is
assigned a core team that includes a
pediatrician who oversees the child’s
care as well as surgeons, dentists,
orthodontists, nurses and social
workers. A wealth of other specialists
is available to help as needed. The
team meets weekly to map out the best
plan of care for each child on their
panel and follows the child until age
21, or until the child graduates from
the program.
“Having a pediatrician coordinate
care makes a difference,” says Dr.
Michael Cunningham, the center’s
medical director. “We take a holistic
approach and care for the entire
patient, not just the condition.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
That means caring for the medical and
surgical needs of each child in the
context of their family and community.
“Our team members have different
strengths, but shared goals. We all
want to do what’s in the best interest
of the child. When our team meets,
everyone’s input counts. A patient
may be scheduled for a surgery or a
procedure, but if a social worker says
�I don’t think this patient or family is
ready,’ the plan is adjusted until it fits
the family’s unique situation.”
National peer organizations
have praised the center as a model
for addressing the interrelated
medical, surgical and social issues
presented by patients with craniofacial
abnormalities.
In 2005, the center named its
п¬Ѓrst surgical director, Dr. Richard
Hopper, in recognition of the critical
integration of medical and surgical
services needed to achieve the best
outcomes for craniofacial patients.
“We have created a unique, supportive
environment within our clinic that
responds to the needs of our patients,”
Hopper says. “Our next challenge is to
extend that customized support to the
children while they are hospitalized
during their operations and recovery.”
The center is set to build on its
successes. “With a large, dedicated
team and the support of the hospital,
we are in the enviable position of
helping define the future care of
children with craniofacial conditions,”
Hopper says.
Also in 2005, the Division of
Craniofacial Medicine was created
within the University of Washington’s
Department of Pediatrics. Currently
composed of pediatricians and basic
scientists with expertise in genetics,
epidemiology and developmental
biology, the Division of Craniofacial
Medicine is poised to make significant
research contributions in the п¬Ѓeld.
This interdisciplinary division allows
its members to address shared clinical
and research challenges from different
perspectives — in much the same
way the Craniofacial Center functions,
but on a larger scale.
Already one of the busiest
craniofacial programs in the nation,
Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center
will double its clinical capacity in
2006. Of the more than 1,700 patients
evaluated by the craniofacial team
in 2005, 527 were new referrals. The
craniofacial clinic saw an average of 70
patients each clinic day and registered
nearly 9,000 patient visits last year,
making it one of the busiest clinics at
Seattle Children’s. The surgeons in the
Craniofacial Center performed more
than 1,500 surgical procedures in 2005.
On the horizon is the Center for
Craniofacial Research. The research
is geared to answer several important
questions: What are the molecular,
genetic and environmental causes for
the conditions we treat? What are the
outcomes of the treatments we provide?
What are the social and psychological
ramifications of being a young child or
teenager with a facial difference?
This interdisciplinary approach
to research will allow close working
relationships needed by physicians
and scientists to ask the most critical
questions, while having the intellectual
resources available to п¬Ѓnd important
answers. The significance of these
answers is more than just academic.
“Craniofacial conditions get
right to the heart of a child’s identity,”
Cunningham notes. “If you were asked
to identify three photos — one of your
hand, one of your shoulder and one of
your face — you would undoubtedly
reply �my hand,’ �my shoulder’ and �me.’
We treat what children will come to
know as themselves.”
RICHARD A. HOPPER, MD
Titles
Surgical Director, Seattle Children’s
Craniofacial Center
Craniomaxillofacial Plastic Surgeon,
Seattle Children’s Hospital
Associate Professor, Division of Plastic Surgery,
University of Washington School of Medicine
It Takes a Team
Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center
has 40 team members from the
following disciplines:
Audiology
Craniofacial Genetics
Database Management
Dental Medicine
Genetic Epidemiology
Neurosurgery
Nursing
Nutrition
Occupational/Physical Therapy
Ophthalmology
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Otolaryngology
Pediatrics
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine
Psychiatry
Respiratory Home Care
Social Work
Speech Pathology
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
13
Transplant
Transplant
Getting to the Heart
of Innovation
GORDON A. COHEN, MD, PHD
Titles
Sam and Althea Stroum Endowed Chair in
Pediatric Cardiovascular Surgery, Seattle
Children’s Hospital
Chief, Cardiothoracic Surgery and Co-director,
Heart Center, Seattle Children’s Hospital
Associate Professor, Department of Surgery,
Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery,
University of Washington School
of Medicine
14
If you ask Dr. Gordon Cohen why he
has dedicated his career to working
with children who suffer from endstage heart failure, you’ll get a simple
answer: it’s all about improving a
child’s quality of life.
Cohen co-directs Seattle Children’s
Heart Center, which is rapidly becoming
one of the most innovative clinical
heart transplant programs in the
United States and which sees some of
the highest numbers of patients. While
most pediatric transplant programs
operate on older children, the average
age of heart transplant patients at
Seattle Children’s is 1 year, proof of
the center’s ability to handle complex
neonatal and infant transplants.
In 2005, Cohen performed the
п¬Ѓrst ABO-mismatched surgery in
the Western United States. To date,
he has successfully performed п¬Ѓve of
these procedures, including one on a
13-day-old, 7.5-pound infant. This was
the п¬Ѓrst neonate in the region bridged
to transplant on ECMO, a mechanical
cardiac assist device that Cohen uses
aggressively for very high–risk patients.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Cohen is also innovating ways to
support weakened hearts while they
recover from transplant surgery.
He is pioneering the use of an
existing implantable ventricular assist
device (VAD) for older children and
developing a VAD for younger children.
VADs offer the potential for children
to recover at home after transplant.
To date, no such device has been
developed for children under 5 years
of age. Cohen and his team modified a
left VAD and demonstrated that they
could provide total heart support to
a patient with only one ventricle.
Recently, Cohen listed a fetus
for a donor heart after Children’s
cardiologists Drs. Chris Steffanelli
and Mark Lewin made an inutero diagnosis of a terminal heart
condition. When a suitable match for
a donor heart was found, the child
was delivered via C-section — the first
baby to be born at Seattle Children’s.
Cohen and his surgical team went
on to perform a successful ABOmismatched transplant several hours
after the infant’s birth, another giant
step forward for the Heart Center.
Thinking Outside
the Box
“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” is an
old adage to which Dr. Jorge Reyes
does not subscribe. “When we finish
a procedure and it’s perfect, that’s the
time to reinvent it and do it again even
better,” Reyes explains.
Clearly, the man who has
performed more than 200 multi-organ
transplantations, including small
intestine and liver, and more than
1,000 liver transplantations
is never happy with the status quo.
Reyes came to Seattle Children’s
from Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh
in 2004 with a two-fold vision: to
JORGE D. REYES, MD,
FACS, FAAP
Titles
Director, Transplant Surgery, Seattle
Children’s Hospital
Chief, Department of Surgery, Division of
Transplantation, University of Washington
School of Medicine
Director, Transplant Surgery, University of
Washington Medical Center Transplant
Service Line
Editorships and Appointments
Chair, Pediatric Transplantation Committee,
United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)
Member, Joint Membership Criteria
Subcommittee, UNOS
Member, Board of Directors, LifeCenter
Northwest
develop a pediatric intestinal care
program and to make the existing liver
transplant program — which already
boasts some of the best outcomes in
the country — the best in the nation.
Helping give the very sickest
children a second chance at life is the
idea that drives Reyes to make this
powerful vision a reality. That mission
is shared by Dr. Simon Horslen, who
joined Seattle Children’s in 2005 from
University of Nebraska Medical Center
in Omaha.
Together, Reyes and Horslen have
more combined experience treating
intestinal and liver failure in children
and teens than any other physician
pair in the nation.
SIMON P. HORSLEN, MBChB, FRCPCH
Titles
Medical Director, Liver and Intestine Transplantation
Program, Seattle Children’s Hospital
Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of
Gastroenterology, University of Washington
School of Medicine
Editorships and Appointments
Chair, Joint Pediatric Liver and Intestine Subcommittee,
United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)
Pediatric Transplantation Committee Member-at-Large, UNOS
Liver and Intestine Transplantation Committee
Member-at-Large, UNOS
Joint Membership Criteria Subcommittee Member, UNOS
Pediatric Symposium Organizer, American Association
for the Study of Liver Diseases
Co-chair, Education Committee, International Pediatric
Transplant Association
Post-graduate Course Organizer, International Pediatric
Transplant Association
Reyes trained with organ transplant
pioneer Dr. Thomas Starzl, and was
part of the team that pioneered
intestinal transplant surgery. He has
also been at the forefront of improving
surgical techniques for split-liver and
living-donor liver transplants.
His clinical research program to
reduce transplant patients’ dependence
on immunosuppressive drug therapy
will soon start up in Seattle. Here,
Reyes brings new tools he developed
in Pittsburgh that enable early
diagnosis of post-operative infections.
Horslen is one of the few
physicians in the world with a breadth
of experience in gastroenterology,
hepatology, transplant and congenital
metabolic disorders. Working in Great
Britain, Australia and the United
States, Horslen has gained a depth
of experience treating patients
with very rare intestinal and liver
conditions. He is internationally
recognized for his work to support
intestinal function using non-surgical
therapies — even when the children
meet transplant criteria.
Both physicians are strong
advocates on the issue of access to
organs for children. Ten years ago,
Reyes realized that there were a
significant number of adults being
transplanted with pediatric organs.
He vowed to change this national
policy, even speaking to Congress
on the topic. Today, thanks to Reyes’
work, pediatric organs are allocated
to children before being offered to
adults. Horslen has made significant
contributions promoting equitable
distribution of pediatric organs
based on socioeconomic and
geographic variables.
Reyes and Horslen complement
each other’s strengths as they bring
new ways of thinking about transplant
evaluation, surgical technique and
post-transplant care to Seattle
Children’s. “Getting the organ is a big
deal, but keeping kids healthy postop requires creativity and constant
vigilance,” Reyes says.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
15
General Pediatrics
Safeguarding the
Public’s Health
FREDERICK P. RIVARA, MD, MPH
Titles
Vice-chair, Department of Pediatrics, University
of Washington School of Medicine
Division Head of General Pediatrics, Department
of Pediatrics, University of Washington
School of Medicine
Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology, University
of Washington School of Public Health
Editorships and Appointments
Editor, Archives of Pediatrics &
Adolescent Medicine
Deputy Editor, Injury Prevention
Founding President, International
Society for Child and Adolescent
Injury Prevention
Honors
Elected to Institute of Medicine, 2005
16
The facts are sobering: injuries and
trauma are the leading cause of death
among children, teens and young
adults. What’s more, almost half of
all adult illness and death is caused
by behaviors and disorders that begin
in childhood.
That’s why Dr. Frederick Rivara
has committed his career to preventing
avoidable injuries and diseases,
safeguarding the health and wellbeing of children he will never meet.
His recent election to the Institute
of Medicine (IOM) of the National
Academies recognizes his successes.
“I became interested in the field
of injury prevention almost out of
frustration,” Rivara recalls. “I saw that
there are limits to what doctors could
do for sick or injured children and
started wondering what we could do to
prevent these things from happening
in the first place.”
Influencing public policy and the
choices people make every day are his
goals, and Rivara’s research has been
instrumental in changing many of our
cultural norms.
He may be best known for his
work to increase the use of bicycle
helmets. When his research showed
that bike helmets reduce the risk of
head injury by 85 percent, Rivara
worked to change laws and create
effective interventions. Helmet usage
increased from a meager 2 percent to
70 percent over a 10-year period.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
And the next time you ride in a
car with someone younger than age 8,
compare their seat to the one you rode
in at that age.
Rivara is studying the adult
implications of childhood and
adolescent behaviors such as smoking,
drinking and violence, to see if
intervening during childhood and
adolescence can improve later health
outcomes.
As part of a team from the
University of Washington and Johns
Hopkins University, Rivara recently
published a landmark, seven-year
study illustrating the benefits of
regional centers in the treatment
of trauma.
Decreasing domestic violence —
against children and partners — is also
on Rivara’s agenda. As part of a study
with Group Health Cooperative, a
Northwest HMO, Rivara is evaluating
the п¬Ѓnancial cost of domestic violence
in terms of increased utilization of the
health-care system.
“Establishing the costs of
unhealthy behaviors is a key to making
change because it gets policy makers
to take notice and invest in prevention
and intervention,” Rivara says. He is
realistic, however, about how quickly
things change.
“Behavior can change, but it takes
time and isn’t easy. Many interventions
fail because they aren’t maintained for
enough time. It’s been 40 years since
the Surgeon General said smoking
is bad for health, but attitudes about
smoking are finally changing and it’s
only now that it is illegal to smoke in
public places.”
Optimizing Technology
to Improve Children’s
Health
A question began nagging Dr. Dimitri
Christakis about eight years ago during
his one-month stint as a stay-at-home
dad. Observing his 3-month-old son
riveted to the TV screen, Christakis
wondered: how is the explosion of
electronic media influencing the
cognitive, emotional, behavioral and
social development of young children?
His work to answer that question
has raised the national profile on the
multitude of issues surrounding media
and children. His study linking early
TV exposure with attention problems
at age 7 has sparked a growing debate
among parents, caregivers, academics
and the media.
He continues to publish regularly
on the topic, including a 2005 report
with colleague Michelle Garrison,
MPH, that found no evidence that
videos, DVDs and computer programs
intended for young infants and
toddlers and labeled “educational” had
any educational value at all.
But technology also holds great
promise to improve the health of
children, Christakis says. He is
studying ways to use the Internet to
improve families’ ability to care for
their children.
In 2005, he concluded a threeyear prevention study in which 2,000
families provided basic information
about their demographics, health
history and lifestyle. His team
then tailored high-quality health
information and sent it to the families,
via the Internet, on a regular basis.
The goals were to help parents
understand the health issues and risks
their families face and to encourage
them to be more active partners
during well-child visits.
“When you take your child to a
well-child visit, the doctor usually runs
through the standard checklist of ageappropriate issues,” Christakis says.
“We want parents to understand their
family’s specific needs so they can help
set the agenda with their doctor.”
The study, which will be published
later this year, found that the tailored
information not only changed families’
experience during well-child visits, it
resulted in behavioral changes within
the home.
Another study underway involves
two groups of families with children
between 18 months and 30 months
of age. One group is receiving sets of
blocks and monthly “blocktivities” that
encourage children and parents to
play together. The other group won’t
receive the blocks and “blocktivities”
until the study ends.
Christakis hopes to discover
whether the children who get the
blocks experience an increase in
language acquisition, cognitive skills
and attention span — and a decrease
in TV viewing.
His research has uncovered a need
for more work in this arena: This year,
he will speak at three high-profile
conferences — hosted by the National
Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers
DIMITRI A. CHRISTAKIS, MD
Titles
Director, Child Health Institute, University of
Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Adjunct Associate Professor, University of
Washington School of Public Health
Editorships and Appointments
Associate Editor, Pediatrics
Associate Editor, Archives of Pediatrics
& Adolescent Medicine
for Disease Control (CDC) and the
National Academy of Sciences —
aimed at motivating more researchers
to study media and child health.
“We live in a media-rich
environment. We’re inundated with
it all the time. The question isn’t how
to de-technologize children,” he says.
“It’s how to help parents optimize
technology to best serve the interests
of their children.”
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
17
Infectious Disease
and Immunology
Fighting a Microbial War
CRAIG E. RUBENS, MD, PHD
Titles
Children’s Hospital Guild Association Endowed
Chair in Pediatric Infectious Disease Research
Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases,
Immunology and Rheumatology, Department
of Pediatrics, University of Washington School
of Medicine and Seattle Children’s Hospital
Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University
of Washington School of Medicine
Adjunct Professor, Department of Microbiology,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Editorships and Appointments
Editorial Advisory Board Member, Future
Microbiology
Member, American Society of Clinical Investigators
Member, American Pediatrics Society
18
After 5-year-old Jake Finkbonner fell
against a basketball pole while playing,
the cut on his lip became infected with
group A streptococci (GAS). Twentyfour hours later, Jake’s face and neck
had swelled to more than twice its size
as his small body attempted to п¬Ѓght
this common bacterium.
As the swelling progressed it became
clear that the GAS had turned into a
very serious infection — necrotizing
fasciitis. After Jake was airlifted to
Seattle Children’s, Dr. Craig Rubens
coordinated aggressive treatment to
stave off the life-threatening disease:
several types of antibiotics, repeated
surgeries and hyperbaric oxygen
therapy. These treatments saved the
kindergartner’s life, but not before the
deadly bacteria severely damaged his
scalp, face and chest.
“Cases like Jake’s — when a
virulent strain of common bacteria
turns into a deadly disease — highlight
the importance of studying microbes.
These pathogens sometimes have the
ability to quickly change, adapt and
evolve at a much faster pace than
the human immune system can п¬Ѓght
them,” Rubens explains.
In a 2005 study, Rubens and other
scientists found that some bacteria
might be tougher to characterize because
their genome is always changing. The
team tracked the genome of group B
streptococci (GBS), and found that the
bacteria are constantly evolving with
as much as 30 percent of the gene
content reshaping itself from one
strain to the next.
“This study helps us understand why
some bacteria become drug-resistant.
It also illuminates the challenges we face
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
in developing vaccines, because if the
bacteria genes are always changing, the
vaccines against GBS become ineffective,”
Rubens says.
GBS is a leading cause of newborn
death in the United States. As many as
30 percent of pregnant women carry
GBS and can unknowingly pass it on
to their babies during birth.
Rubens participated in shaping
national CDC guidelines that require
all clinicians practicing obstetric care
to test women for GBS between 35
and 37 weeks of pregnancy. Because of
these recommendations, the number
of infants infected with the bacteria
has decreased by 75 percent.
Rubens is also helping the
scientific community understand how
GBS evades the body’s immune system,
while other pathogens are more easily
thwarted by the body’s innate diseasefighting mechanisms.
“GBS bacteria produce a sugar
coating that acts like a protective
shield. The immune system makes
no effort to п¬Ѓght off these bacteria,
because the body doesn’t recognize
GBS as an invader,” Rubens says.
He has identified factors produced
by GBS bacteria and is working with
drug developers to create a protein
vaccine that stimulates antibodies in
moms-to-be. The stimulated antibodies
would then be transferred to the fetus
via the mother’s bloodstream, preventing
fetal infection during labor and delivery.
Rubens has also identified another
important connection in his war on
germs. His perinatal studies show
that GBS bacteria that have colonized
the birth canal can eventually infect
placental membranes, which can
rupture the membranes and cause
premature birth.
Cracking the Code
of Immunity
Recent work to understand the human
genome has made it possible to link
immune system disorders to one of the
body’s approximately 20,000 genes.
To date, more than 130 different types
of primary immunodeficiency disease
(PIDD) have been identified, each
caused by a different defect in a
single gene.
Dr. David Rawlings is one of
the nation’s few physician-scientists
identifying the molecular basis for
many of these PIDDs and pioneering
clinical therapies for children suffering
from primary autoimmune diseases.
After discovering that the “Btk” gene
causes X-Linked agammaglobulinemia
(XLA) — a PIDD that prevents young
boys from producing immunoglobulins
— Rawlings went to work on a gene
therapy solution. After removing stem
cells from mice, Rawlings used a
retrovirus as a carrier to infect the
cells’ chromosome with a normal copy
of the Btk gene. Then he returned the
stem cells to the mice. The mice used
in Rawlings’ study developed B cells
that made antibodies.
“We’ve proven that gene therapy
can overcome this disease in mice for
the lifetime of the animal; now we’re
working to make sure that the carrier
virus is as safe as possible and has no
other impact on human DNA before
we begin clinical trials for patients
suffering from XLA,” Rawlings says.
His work has also led to the
discovery of pathways in the body that
control the survival and production of
infection-п¬Ѓghting cells.
In 2005, Rawlings identified
a crucial trigger that activates a
signaling pathway in T and B white
blood cells, leading to the survival
and growth of these cells. Normally,
T and B cells work together with the
immune system to make antibodies or
to directly attack bacteria and viruses;
however, over-activity of B cells causes
many inflammatory and autoimmune
diseases, and produces tumors in
patients with lymphoma.
“We have shown that this signaling
pathway promotes the survival of
normal B cells and we are now testing
whether it also controls the growth
and survival of some forms of B-cell
lymphoma,” Rawlings explains. “We
hope to identify classes of chemical
agents that block activation of this
pathway; eventually, our work may
lead to the development of less toxic
drugs that slow or stop the production
of autoimmune or cancerous cells.”
DAVID J. RAWLINGS, MD
Titles
Section Head, Division of Immunology,
Seattle Children’s Hospital
Professor, Department of Pediatrics,
and Adjunct Professor, Department of
Immunology, University of Washington
School of Medicine
Head, Immunodeficiency Clinical Program,
Seattle Children’s Hospital
Editorships and Appointments
Editorial Advisory Board, Clinical Immunology
Chair, XLA Patient Registry, USIDNET
Member, American Association of Immunologists
Section on Pediatric Rheumatology Member,
American College of Rheumatology
Member, American Society for Clinical
Investigation
Member, American Society for Gene Therapy
Member, American Society of Hematology
Member, Clinical Immunology Society
Cellular and Molecular Immunology (CMI-A)
Study Section Member, National Institutes
of Health
F R O M L E F T: Immunologist Dr. Andrew Scharenberg;
infectious disease specialist Dr. Lisa Frankel
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
19
Urology
Setting a
Global Standard
RICHARD W. GRADY, MD
Titles
Interim Chief, Division of Urology, Seattle
Children’s Hospital
Director, Clinical Research, Division of Urology,
Seattle Children’s Hospital
Director, Fellowship Program, Division of Urology,
Seattle Children’s Hospital
Associate Professor, Department of Urology,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Editorships and Appointments
Executive Committee Member, Section of Pediatric
Urology, American Association of Pediatrics
Dr. Richard Grady is a busy man.
When he’s not in the operating
room treating complex urologic
malformations, he’s traveling around
the world — India, Korea, South
Africa — training surgeons to perform
the delicate bladder reconstruction
techniques that put Seattle Children’s
Division of Urology on the map.
Grady carries on the legacy of Dr.
Michael Mitchell, the Seattle Children’s
urologist who discovered that if bladders
with congenital defects are surgically
repaired and allowed to empty and п¬Ѓll
within the п¬Ѓrst few days of life, they
will heal and develop normally.
Grady helped pioneer complete
primary exstrophy reconstruction
in the United States. This singlestage surgical procedure on neonates
corrects bladders that are exposed
outside the body — a serious birth
defect that used to require numerous
reconstructive surgeries and left many
children incontinent and suffering
from chronic infections.
Urologist
Dr. Byron Joyner
20
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
In addition to forming reconstructions of the surgical type, Grady
is also building a multi-platform
research database that will help
physician-scientists advance treatments
for bladder exstrophy and other rare
urologic disorders. The HIPAAcompliant database is the п¬Ѓrst of its
kind in the п¬Ѓeld of urology, and will
allow sharing of lab and radiology
results as well as surgical and medical
outcomes of patients from participating
institutions around the world.
“What used to take a lifetime
of experience by a single physician
or institution may be realized in
just a few years with this multiinstitutional database,” Grady explains.
“Collaborating with other clinicians
today will establish standards of care
so that young patients everywhere
receive optimal care.”
Dr. Michael Mitchell is internationally
known for his work to correct urologic
defects in children. Among his many
contributions, Mitchell revolutionized
surgical procedures for gastrocystoplasty
and bladder exstrophy reconstruction.
His surgical methods are now the standard of practice throughout the world.
In 2004, Mitchell was awarded the
American Urological Association’s Hugh
Hampton Young Award for outstanding
contributions to the study of genitourinary tract disease. Mitchell retired from
Seattle Children’s in 2006 and moved
to Wisconsin so he and his wife, Connie,
could spend more time with their children
and grandchildren; Mitchell works part
time at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin.
Helping the Bladder
Heal Itself
Dr. James Bassuk has no shortage of
human urothelial cells. These cells,
which line the lower urinary tract,
have an amazing ability to grow and
divide in response to injury. In fact, in
the span of two months, the cells he
keeps frozen in his lab could proliferate
and form a patch of bladder tissue big
enough to cover a football п¬Ѓeld.
Yet, Bassuk isn’t trying to grow
a bladder. To date, getting blood
vessels and nerves to grow in tissueengineered organs has proved
problematic for scientists. Instead, this
international expert on urothelial cells
is proving that a patient’s own cells
can be used to repair bladder damage
caused by congenital defect, injury or
illness. His visionary work is leading
to the development of a cell-seeded
“scaffold” that surgeons will be able
to use in place of skin grafts to better
treat conditions such as hypospadias —
one of the most common birth defects
in boys where the urethral opening
forms on the underside of the penis.
In 2002, Bassuk identified the
human protein FGF-10, a growth
factor that could have profound impact
in bladder regeneration. Recently,
he used experimental models to
demonstrate that FGF-10 activates
cell division in the lining of the lower
urinary tract. Next, he will investigate
whether FGF-10 repairs the urothelial
lining in animal models when
delivered locally through a catheter.
“Being able to turn on urothelial
cell proliferation in a controlled fashion
is a major advance,” Bassuk says. “But
we need to be able to turn it off as well.”
Bassuk and his team created
a “Super-SPARC,” a recombinant
mutant human protein isolated from
bacteria that can effectively shut
down urothelial cell proliferation.
The breakthrough of a combinatorial
therapy of FGF-10 and SPARC will
someday give clinicians the ability to
better manage, and ultimately cure, a
variety of urological afflictions such as
interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer and
urethral stricture — diseases where
normal cell growth, differentiation
and wound healing have gone wrong.
JAMES A. BASSUK, PHD
Titles
Director, Human Urothelial Biology Program,
Division of Urology, Seattle Children’s Hospital
Associate Professor, Department of
Urology, University of Washington
School of Medicine
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
21
Nephrology
Striking a
Delicate Balance
RUTH A. MCDONALD, MD
Titles
Medical Director, Solid Organ Transplantation,
Seattle Children’s Hospital
Co-director, Urology/Nephrology Outreach Clinics
in Washington, Alaska and Montana, Seattle
Children’s Hospital
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Nephrology, University of Washington
School of Medicine
Editorships and Appointments
Board of Directors Member-at-Large, United Network
for Organ Sharing (UNOS)
Pediatric Transplantation Committee Member
ex Officio, UNOS
Kidney Allocation Review Subcommittee
Member, UNOS
Kidney-Pancreas Subcommittee Member, UNOS
Pediatric Nephrology Sub-board Member,
American Board of Pediatrics
Board of Directors Member, North American
Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative
Studies (NAPRTCS)
22
In the mid-1990s, Dr. Ruth McDonald
noticed a glaring disparity in the number
of deceased-donor organs allocated to
children and to adults. She vowed to
develop a national organ allocation
policy that would give the 600 children
listed for a kidney an equitable chance
when competing with the pool of
70,000 adults on the wait list.
McDonald’s years of persistence
paid off in September 2005 with a
change in United Network for Organ
Sharing (UNOS) policy. Children now
go to near the top of the list for kidneys
from deceased donors under the age
of 35. This important policy change
shortens a child’s transplant wait from
years to months and decreases growth
and development delays brought on
by dialysis — a lifesaving treatment
much better tolerated by adults
than children.
In 2006, McDonald was
elected to a two-year term as an
at-large member of the UNOS
Board of Directors in recognition
of her leadership and advocacy for
pediatric renal transplant patients.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
In her clinical research and
practice, McDonald strikes a delicate
balance between immune suppression
to prevent organ rejection and immune
enhancement to п¬Ѓght viral attack.
An active clinical researcher with
a special interest in post-transplant
lymphoproliferative disease, she leads
Seattle Children’s involvement in
two North American Pediatric Renal
Trials and Collaborative Studies trials
— multicenter pilots funded by the
National Institutes of Health. In both
studies she is investigating steroidfree immunosuppression for kidney
transplant recipients. Early results
indicate that patients have good
graft outcome and improved growth
without steroids.
In her day-to-day clinical care,
McDonald keeps patient- and graftsurvival outcomes far above the
national average through close patient
follow-up. As part of an aggressive
viral surveillance protocol that she
developed, McDonald modulates
immunotherapy in response to active
viral infection, which allows patients’
own immune systems to п¬Ѓght off
viruses that cause malignancies
and trigger organ rejection.
Making the
Scarring Stop
More than 40 years after Dr. Bob
Hickman founded the Division
of Pediatric Nephrology at Seattle
Children’s, Dr. Allison Eddy’s
research on kidney п¬Ѓbrosis may
lead to therapies that are every bit
as revolutionary as the procedures
performed with the original
Hickman catheter.
Eddy is one of only a few pediatric
researchers in the world investigating
basic pathogenetic mechanisms
of chronic kidney disease, which
has reached epidemic proportions
worldwide. The goal of her basic
science research program is simple:
identify new ways to prevent the
buildup of scar tissue that eventually
causes kidneys to fail.
Since discovering that a clotting
protein, the molecule PAI-1, plays an
important role in the renal scarring
process, Eddy is now studying
interventions that might halt the
effects of PAI-1 in the kidney. Her
п¬Ѓndings could have far-reaching
implications, since PAI-1 and other
members of this family of proteins
may also promote scarring in other
solid organs such as the heart, liver
and lungs.
Developing the next generation
of nephrology specialists is another
specialty of Eddy’s — and an important
one, since half of all pediatric
nephrologists in the United States
will retire within a decade. Eddy
oversees one of only six NIH-funded
pediatrics fellowship programs in
the country that trains pediatric
nephrologists. Her program has
enrolled 30 physician-scientists in
the last 15 years, and offers both
basic science and clinical research
opportunities. Her goal is to mentor
the best and brightest of these
physician-scientists in the hope
of expediting new treatments
for childhood kidney failure.
ALLISON A. EDDY, MD
Titles
Chief, Division of Nephrology, Seattle Children’s Hospital
Director, Nephrology Fellowship Program,
Seattle Children’s Hospital
Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of
Nephrology, University of Washington School
of Medicine
Co-director, Research Training Program in Pediatric
Nephrology, NIH Training Grant
Program Director, Child Health Research Center,
University of Washington
Editorships and Appointments
Deputy Editor, Journal of the American
Society of Nephrology
Editorial Board Member, Pediatric Nephrology
Drs. Allison Eddy and Ruth McDonald train the next
generation of pediatric specialists.
Need Photo for McDonald
Dr. Sandra Watkins
is director of clinical nephrology and
co-director of the
Clinical Research
Center at Seattle
Children’s Hospital,
and professor of
pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of
Medicine. She also serves as president
of the American Society of Pediatric
Nephrology. Watkins is one of the principal investigators for two NIH-funded
studies looking at new therapies for focal
segmental glomerulosclerosis and the
causes in kidney failure due to infection
with the 0157:H7 strain of E. coli.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
23
Fine-tuning Our Performance
Continuously working to improve patient care
The Campaign for Children’s —
Fulfilling the Promise
Seattle Children’s Hospital is in the midst
of a bold fundraising campaign to advance
our mission to prevent, treat and eliminate
pediatric disease. The Campaign for
Children’s — Fulfilling the Promise will raise
$300 million and secure 1,200 legacy gift
notifications for the following key areas
of our work:
Uncompensated Care
Children’s was founded on the belief that
all children deserve medical care that
addresses their unique needs, regardless
of their family’s ability to pay. Children’s
provides some level of financial assistance
to more than 60% of our patients, nearly
$35.8 million in 2005.
Research
Research is the key to unlocking cures and
discovering new treatments for diseases
that affect children in our region and around
the world.
Facilities
Family-friendly facilities with leading-edge
technology and equipment help Children’s
provide the best medical care and enhance
our research capabilities.
The Skinny on Our Efforts to Go Lean
During the last several years, Seattle
Children’s has undergone a major cultural
shift by using Toyota Production System
Principles — often referred to as lean
processing — to increase patient safety,
improve family satisfaction, streamline work
flow and reduce costs. We call this effort
Continuous Performance Improvement (CPI).
24
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Our faculty and staff — among the first
health-care professionals in the nation to
take advantage of Toyota’s lean principles —
remove waste from our processes as a way
to create more value for our patients while
reducing barriers and obstacles for our
people. Families are routinely involved in
our “rapid process improvement” events.
To date, our faculty and staff have
participated in more than 80 improvement
events, which last from three to five days
and are designed to rapidly identify, test
and implement improvements in all areas
of a defined process. In-house facilitators
encourage participants to try out ideas
with the goal of improving our results
by at least 50% by the end of the event.
Afterwards, faculty and staff keep trying new
improvements — a fundamental principle by
which we continually enhance our systems
and processes.
“CPI helps us eliminate waste in its
many forms and enables us to tap into
the creativity and energy of our staff and
families,” says Patrick Hagan, executive
vice president and chief operating officer.
Growing into the Future
Seattle Children’s is growing. In a little more
than two years, we’ve opened new facilities
that improve our quality of care, enhance
the family experience and expand our
research capabilities.
The Janet Sinegal Patient Care Building
increased our inpatient capacity from 208 to
250 beds.
The Melinda French Gates Ambulatory
Care Building brings together more than 30
specialty outpatient clinics and diagnostic
services in a 168,000-square-foot facility
adjoining the hospital.
Approximately 350 physician-scientists
and staff researchers are now centrally
located in downtown Seattle’s vibrant biotech
community. Several leased floors in two
buildings provide close to 100,000 square feet
of laboratory, clinical and outcomes research
space to facilitate teamwork and stimulate
interdisciplinary investigations.
Within the next decade, we plan to
double the size of our emergency department
and add regional ambulatory centers — all
to keep pace with regional growth and rising
numbers of patients.
However, it is our commitment to
preventing, treating and eliminating pediatric
disease that has spawned our boldest vision
— to quadruple our research facilities by
adding 1 million square feet of space. It’s
a lofty goal that will support a commitment
worth keeping.
An Ear for the Family Experience
Nine and a half years ago when her infant
daughter was first admitted to Seattle
Children’s intensive care unit, Amy Jonas
remembers that communication with
clinicians was decidedly one-way. “I was
told what would be done to my daughter,”
she recalls.
This year, nurses not only asked Jonas
how she wanted to be involved in the care
of her daughter, but the attending physician
invited her to be a part of rounds. There,
Jonas participated in a discussion about
her daughter’s progress and gave input
about the plan of care.
Quality-of-care improvements like this
one are the direct result of asking families
about their experiences at Seattle Children’s
and acting on their suggestions.
Each year, nearly 7,000 of our families
respond to a confidential Family Experience
Survey that measures specific staff actions
and practices.
This rich source of feedback has
served as the catalyst for much stronger
family-provider partnerships and better
teamwork between departments across
the institution. Most important, the survey
results give us insight into how our actions
affect patients and families, helping us make
the experience better for the next family.
That’s the best reason we know for keeping
our ears to the ground.
Building Safety into Everything We Do
Integral to our efforts to provide the best
possible care is a rigorous emphasis on
patient safety.
We work actively and systematically
to assess risks and prevent errors. Those
who work most closely with our patients
— our medical staff, nurses and support
staff — identify vulnerabilities in our patient
care processes and are trained to report
them through a Web-based system we call
eFeedbackNow.
The majority of our eFeedbackNow
reports are close calls — failures in the
system that are caught before they reach
the patient. This data directs our efforts to
continuously build safety into everything
that we do — and protect our patients from
accidental injury while in our care.
For example, we’ve drastically reduced
total parenteral nutrition (TPN) errors by
adding a dietitian and pharmacist to rounds
on every inpatient service where TPN
is prescribed. Shifting TPN prescriptive
authority from residents to pharmacists
reduced the number of corrections needed
for a TPN order, improved communication
between members of the care team
and standardized TPN order flow while
improving patient safety.
Nearly 60 specialty clinics now enter
orders, prescriptions, appointment requests
and fee sheets online, eliminating lost or
illegible orders and streamlining billing.
Departmental “reminder” files are now a
thing of the past, as orders and appointments
submitted for a future date become part of
the electronic record.
At the end of each clinic appointment,
busy families receive an electronically
generated summary of their child’s visit —
an easy way to remember all post-visit
instructions. The system also reduces
medication errors by flagging drug conflicts
and dosing discrepancies.
Moving more of our ambulatory
information online is an important step
forward in our evolution toward a completely
electronic medical record. Not only does the
new computerized system allow hospitalbased providers and referring physicians to
view orders, diagnostic images, lab results,
scheduling information and other details of
their patients’ care anytime, from anywhere
— it’s another way that we provide the safest
care possible for our patients and families.
Advancing Patient Safety with
Information Technology
In 2004, the New York Times and U.S.News
& World Report hailed Seattle Children’s
as a national leader in the medical use of
information technology for successfully
implementing a computerized provider orderentry (CPOE) system for inpatients. This year,
we’ve implemented the same CPOE system
in our outpatient clinics — a conversion
that puts us ahead of the game in complying
with national patient safety standards
that prohibit verbal and telephone orders
in all settings.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
25
Contents
For your convenience,
the Department and
Division reports are
identified by color bars
on the outside of each
page. Please refer to the
color key on this page
for help with locating
the correct section.
DEPARTMENT AND DIVISION REPORTS
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine 28-36
Craniofacial Center 37
Dental Medicine 38-42
Heart Center 43
Laboratory Medicine/Pathology 44-48
Neurology 49-53
Orthopedics 54-57
Pediatrics (Department of) 58
Adolescent Medicine 60-63
Cardiology 64-70
Craniofacial Medicine 71-75
Critical Care Medicine 76-80
Emergency Medicine 81-86
Endocrinology and Diabetes 87-89
Gastroenterology, Hepatology
and Nutrition 90-94
General Pediatrics 95-110
Genetics and Developmental
Medicine 111-123
Hematology/Oncology and
Bone Marrow Transplant 124-136
Hospitalists 137-139
Infectious Disease, Immunology
and Rheumatology 140-159
Neonatology 160-166
Nephrology 167-173
Pulmonary Medicine 174-182
Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine 183-191
Radiology 192-196
Rehabilitation Medicine 197-199
26
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Surgery (Department of) 200
Cardiothoracic Surgery 202-203
Craniofacial, Plastic and
Reconstructive Surgery 204-206
General and Thoracic Surgery 207-209
Neurosurgery 210-212
Ophthalmology 213-215
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 216
Otolaryngology 217-219
Transplant Surgery 220-224
Urology 225-228
Transplant Center 229
Research 230-237
Fellows and Residents 238-239
Financial Summary 240-241
Department and Division Reports
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
27
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
The Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine provides safe, family-friendly
care for children before, during and after surgery. The pain medicine team also
consults about, evaluates and treats children experiencing acute or chronic pain.
Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual
and potential tissue damage. It is important to manage pain when treating a child:
Inadequately controlled pain has undesirable effects on a child’s metabolic,
physiological and emotional conditions.
We are dedicated to improving infant, child and adolescent pain care and quality
of life, and we provide our patients relief from a variety of afflictions, including pain
related to surgical procedures, cancer, sickle cell disease and other conditions.
Our team includes expert pediatric anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists and
nurse practitioners. Each has special experience and training with issues facing
children during anesthesia. Before surgery, a nurse practitioner takes a complete
medical history, including post-anesthetic experiences, and provides a complete
physical exam. We provide information to the family on how children fall asleep
under anesthesia. We also discuss the surgery center routine, recovery and criteria
for home discharge. Our team includes attending physicians and advance practice
nurses who provide pain management services 24 hours a day.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Lynn D. Martin, MD, is director of the Department of
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at Seattle Children’s
Hospital, and professor of anesthesiology and adjunct
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He received his MD from
the University of Washington School of Medicine; he
completed a pediatric residency at Phoenix Children’s
Hospital and an anesthesia residency and a fellowship
in pediatric anesthesia and critical care medicine at
Johns Hopkins University. He is board certified by both
the American Board of Anesthesiology and the American Board of Pediatrics with specialty certification in
pediatric critical care medicine. His research interests have involved conventional and nonconventional
forms of mechanical ventilation in the OR and ICU.
In addition, Dr. Martin has become involved in quality
improvement and operative outcomes research. He is
involved in the supervision of residents, fellows and
CRNAs in the OR and ICU.
Corrie T.M. Anderson, MD, is clinical director of the Pain
Medicine Program for the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital.
He is also professor of anesthesiology and adjunct
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
28
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
School of Medicine. Dr Anderson graduated from
the Stanford University School of Medicine and completed a pediatrics residency and anesthesia fellowship
at Children’s Hospital Boston; he did an anesthesia
residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He
is board certified in pediatrics and anesthesiology,
and holds a certificate in special competency in pain
medicine. Dr. Anderson worked at the University of
California, Los Angeles School of Medicine for 13 years.
For the past two years, he has been listed as one of
Seattle’s Best Doctors.
Sanjay M. Bhananker, MBBS, MD, DA, is attending
faculty anesthesiologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital, Harborview Medical Center and the University
of Washington School of Medicine. He completed
residencies in anesthesiology in India and the UK and
a fellowship in pediatric anesthesiology in Ottawa,
Canada. Dr. Bhananker is a clinician educator and
plays a significant role in the education of anesthesiology residents at the University of Washington. His
research interests include pediatric trauma, pediatric
burns and pediatric pharmacology. Dr. Bhananker has
been active in regional, national and international
anesthesiology societies, and has presented many
topics at their meetings.
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
James C. Chen, MD, is acting assistant professor of
anesthesiology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. He
completed his residency in anesthesiology at Yale-New
Haven Hospital and completed a fellowship in pediatric
anesthesiology at Seattle Children’s. He is a member of
the acute pain service at Seattle Children’s, and has an
interest in QI data analysis for the service. He is board
certified in anesthesiology, is active in intraoperative
supervision and training of anesthesia residents and
puts in time in the OR.
Ursula Class, MD, is attending anesthesiologist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and is clinical assistant professor of
anesthesiology at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. She studied medicine at Eberhard-Karl
University in Germany. She completed a pediatric
residency at St. Louis Children’s Hospital and an
anesthesia residency at Barnes Hospital, St Louis. She
completed a pediatric anesthesia fellowship at Denver
Children’s Hospital. Dr. Class served on the faculty at
St. Louis Children’s Hospital. At Seattle Children’s,
she participates in the supervision and training of
anesthesia residents and fellows.
Michael J. Eisses, MD, is attending anesthesiologist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital in the Cardiac Anesthesia
Program and assistant professor of anesthesia at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. He
earned his MD at the University of Washington
and received the John J. Bonica Award for medical
students. He did a residency in anesthesiology at the
University of Washington, followed by a fellowship in
pediatric anesthesia at Seattle Children’s; he completed
a clinical fellowship and a one-year research fellowship
in the Department of Laboratory Medicine. He is
board certified in anesthesiology and is active in the
FACULTY
Lynn D. Martin
MD, Director
Lynn D. Martin, MD, Director
Corrie T.M. Anderson, MD
Sanjay M. Bhananker,
MBBS, MD, DA
James C. Chen, MD
Ursula Class, MD
Michael J. Eisses, MD
Inge Falk van Rooyen, MBChB
Sean H. Flack, MBChB
Jeremy M.Geiduschek, MD
supervision and training of anesthesia residents and
fellows. His primary clinical responsibilities include
providing anesthesia for neonates, infants and children
undergoing procedures to treat congenital heart
disease, and heart and liver transplants. He researches
mechanisms and complications of coagulation and
п¬Ѓbrinolytic activation as they relate to anesthesia
and surgery, in particular cardiopulmonary bypass.
He collaborates with the university departments of
Laboratory Medicine and Bioengineering in constructing computer and kinetic models for hemostasis due
to cardiopulmonary bypass in children. He received
the B. Raymond Fink Research Award from the
university in 2004.
Inge Falk van Rooyen, MBChB, is attending anesthesiologist at Children’s Hospital and assistant professor in
the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. She completed her
anesthesia subspecialty training at the University of
Cambridge in the UK. She is the lead clinician at
Seattle Children’s for pediatric anesthesia for airway
surgery. Dr Falk van Rooyen’s interests include
management of the complex pediatric airway, development of safe sedation techniques and education within
clinical anesthesia. As a member of the TEE writer
group, she is part of the team of specialists that create
exam practice questions for resident education. Her
published works reflect her interest in airway surgery,
respiratory pathology and physiology, and orthopedic
and neurosurgery pediatric anesthesia. She has
taught pediatric life support nationally, and directed
courses locally; she is preceptor and mentor to medical
students and anesthesia residents. She is an active
member of the Washington State Society of Anesthesiologists, the American Society of Anesthesiologists
and the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia.
Charles M. Haberkern, MD, MPH
Laurilyn D. Helmers, MD
David S. Jardine, MD
Nathalia Jimenez, MD, MPH
Christer Jonmarker, MD, PhD
Helen W. Karl, MD
Anjana Kundu, MBBS, MD, DA
Katie L. Larkin, MD
Anne M. Lynn, MD
Rosemary J. Orr, MBBCh
Sally E. Rampersad, MB,
DCH, FRCA
Daniel D. Rubens, MBBS
Edouard Saade, MD
Nancy Setzer-Saade, MD
Joshua C. Uffman, MD
Karen Wong, MBBS
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
29
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Sean H. Flack, MBChB, is attending anesthesiologist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant professor in the Department of Anesthesiology in the University of Washington School of Medicine. He completed
his MB and anesthesiology residency at the University
of Cape Town, South Africa. He completed his fellowship at the Royal United Hospital in Bath, UK, and
returned to the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s
Hospital in Cape Town. He is the lead anesthesiologist
for general surgery at Seattle Children’s. Dr Flack’s
clinical interests include regional anesthesia and the
role of ultrasound in the practice of pediatric regional
blocks. He has also developed an interest in anesthesia
for awake craniotomy surgery. His laboratory research
focuses on an animal model for the study of intrathecal
drug distribution. Clinical research interests include
the efficacy of rectus sheath catheters for laparotomy
pain, ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks and
the use of dexmedetomidine as an adjunct to general
anesthesia. He has presented at a national level on a
number of these topics. He is an active member of the
Washington State Society of Anesthesiologists, the
American Society of Anesthesiologists and the Society
for Pediatric Anesthesia.
Jeremy M. Geiduschek, MD, is clinical program director
of clinical anesthesia services at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and clinical professor in the Department
of Anesthesiology at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He has been at Seattle Children’s
since starting his internship in pediatrics in 1983.
He completed a residency in anesthesiology and a
one-year fellowship in pediatric anesthesiology. He did
clinical research in Basel, Switzerland, on the effects
of anesthesia on laryngeal mechanics in children. He
is board certified in anesthesiology and participates in
the supervision and training of anesthesia residents
and fellows. Dr. Geiduschek has been active in establishing several clinical programs including the delivery
of anesthesia to infants receiving ECMO, provision of
anesthesia for children with cancer undergoing painful
invasive procedures and use of ECMO in the repair of
complete laryngtracheoesophageal п¬Ѓstula. Dr. Geiduschek was part of the group that established the national POCA (Pediatric Operative Cardiac Arrest) registry.
He has been involved in improving operating room
efficiency, patient safety and timely delivery of care.
Dr. Geiduschek is an active member of the pediatric
cardiac anesthesia team and has a strong clinical interest
30
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
in delivery of anesthesia for children with complex
congenital heart disease.
Charles M. Haberkern, MD, MPH, is staff anesthesiologist
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and clinical professor of
anesthesiology at the University of Washington. He is
board certified in anesthesiology and is active in the
supervision and training of anesthesia residents and
fellows. He has worked at Seattle Children’s for the
majority of years since he came to the hospital as an
intern in pediatrics in 1974. He completed fellowship
training in neonatology at the University of California,
San Francisco, a residency in anesthesiology at the
University of Florida, Gainesville, and a fellowship in
pediatric anesthesia at Children’s Hospital Boston. He
earned an MPH at Harvard University. Dr. Haberkern
has been active in clinical care, resident and fellow
education, operating room management and clinical research. He has maintained research interest in
perioperative care of patients with sickle cell disease,
health care services and the POCA (Pediatric Operative
Cardiac Arrest) registry that is directed by the University of Washington.
Laurilyn D. Helmers, MD, is attending anesthesiologist
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant
professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and
Pain Medicine at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. She served as division director
for pediatric anesthesia and as fellowship program
director in the Department of Anesthesia at University
of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, Iowa. She
is board certified in anesthesiology. She completed
her internship in internal medicine at Good Samaritan
Regional Medical Center in Phoenix and completed
her anesthesia residency and pediatric anesthesia
fellowship in Iowa City. In the clinical arena, Dr.
Helmers is involved in the provision of anesthesia
care to all pediatric age groups. She has an interest in
acute pain management in the perioperative period,
especially with the provision of regional anesthesia
alternatives. Peripheral nerve blockade via single
injections or catheters and the safety associated with
these techniques are her special interests. In the
academic arena, she is involved in teaching anesthesia
residents and fellows and has an interest in incorporating alternative teaching methods into the current
curriculum, especially in the subspecialty areas of
pediatric anesthesia and regional anesthesia.
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
David S. Jardine, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and Harborview Medical Center,
and associate professor of anesthesiology and pediatrics at the University of Washington Medical Center.
He completed residencies in pediatrics and anesthesiology and a fellowship in pediatric anesthesiology and
intensive care. He is board certified in anesthesiology
and is active in the supervision and training of anesthesia residents and fellows. He has served as a reviewer
for a variety of medical journals and has published
widely, with an emphasis on hemorrhagic shock and
encephalopathy syndrome. His laboratory interests are
using heat shock proteins as biomarkers and examining the protective effect of heat shock proteins during
brain injury. He has been principal investigator on
several projects. Other interests include medical staffing issues; he helped formulate and interpret a recent
American Academy of Pediatrics survey on pediatric
intensive care staffing. He serves on the Institutional
Review Board at Seattle Children’s and on the research
committee for the Department of Anesthesiology.
He serves on the board of the SIDS Foundation of
Washington and is incoming president for 2007.
Nathalia Jimenez, MD, MPH, is attending physician
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant
professor at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She completed her residency at Pontificia
Universidad Javeriana in Colombia. She completed her
fellowship in pediatric anesthesia at Seattle Children’s
and earned an MPH in epidemiology at the University
of Washington School of Public Health. As a fellow,
she tested a new device for local anesthesia for IV
cannulation in children that now is used routinely in
clinical practice. As part of her MPH she worked at
the injury prevention center helping educate Latino
families about traffic safety; in the American Society of
Anesthesiologists Closed Claims Project, she evaluated
trends in pediatric anesthesia liability. Her research
interests include outcomes in anesthesia and ethnic
differences in health services.
Christer Jonmarker, MD, PhD, is director of the Cardiac
Anesthesia Program at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
associate professor at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He received residency training in
surgery at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle, and in
anesthesia and intensive care at the University Hospital
in Lund, Sweden. He became a specialist in anesthesia
and intensive care in Sweden in 1985 and completed a
PhD thesis in respiratory physiology the same year. He
was named docent at the University of Lund and was
awarded the European Diploma of Anesthesiology.
He served as director of pediatric anesthesia at the
University Hospital in Lund. Dr Jonmarker’s primary
interest is pediatric cardiac anesthesia and training.
He has published articles on pediatric respiration and
ventilation, circulation and clinical pharmacology.
Helen W. Karl, MD, has been attending anesthesiologist
at Seattle Children’s Hospital since 1990 and is associate professor of anesthesiology at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. She received her MD
from the University of Virginia School of Medicine.
She completed an anesthesia residency at Hartford
Hospital, Connecticut and completed a pediatric
anesthesia fellowship at Children’s Hospital, Philadelphia. She is board certified in anesthesiology and
participates in the supervision and training of the
anesthesia residents and fellows.
Anjana Kundu, MBBS, MD, DA, is director of the Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program and associate director of the Pediatric Pain Medicine Program at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. She is assistant professor
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Kundu earned her MD and completed a residency
program in anesthesiology in India. She completed
her fellowship training in pediatric pain medicine and
acupuncture training at Harvard Medical School and
Children’s Hospital Boston. She completed a second
residency in anesthesiology at Medical College of
Wisconsin, Milwaukee. Her main areas of clinical and
research interest include complementary and alternative medicine and pediatric pain medicine. Dr Kundu
established the п¬Ѓrst formal clinical acupuncture service
as part of the Complementary and Integrative Medicine
Program at Seattle Children’s. She is board certified
in anesthesiology and provides anesthesia for surgical
procedures, radiological procedures, hematology and
oncology services at University of Washington Medical
Center. She served as co-director for a regional pediatric pain management conference and is developing a
pediatric pain medicine fellowship at Seattle Children’s.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
31
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Katie L. Larkin, MD, is acting assistant professor in
the Department of Anesthesia at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Larkin began her
training in general surgery at Virginia Mason Medical
Center in Seattle, and completed an anesthesia residency there. She did fellowships in pediatric anesthesia
and pediatric pain management at Children’s Hospital
Boston. She also attended Harvard Medical School’s
course on acupuncture for physicians. She has an active
clinical and teaching role on the acute pain service as
well as seeing children in the outpatient Chronic Pain
Clinic. She has a growing acupuncture practice. She
has a strong clinical interest in palliative care and
cancer pain management. She is board certified in
anesthesiology and is active in the supervision and
training of anesthesia residents and fellows.
Anne M. Lynn, MD, is attending anesthesiologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor of anesthesiology and adjunct professor of pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. She received her
MD from Stanford University School of Medicine and
did residencies in pediatrics and anesthesiology at the
University of Washington. She completed a pediatric
critical care fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children
in Toronto. She is board certified in anesthesiology and
is active in the supervision and training of anesthesia
residents and fellows. She has been treasurer, secretary,
vice president and president of the Society for Pediatric
Anesthesia, the largest pediatric anesthesia professional group in the US. She has been an active clinical investigator of pain management in infants with several
studies of morphine use in postoperative infants. She is
a pediatric section reviewer for Anesthesia and Analgesia. Dr. Lynn has been an active member of Seattle
Children’s committees, including chairing the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee from 1996 to 2001.
She has been listed in Seattle’s Best Doctors every year
since 2001 and Best Doctors in America since 2003.
Rosemary J. Orr, MBBCh, is associate professor at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and the University of Washington
School of Medicine. She is clinical director of sedation
services for Seattle Children’s. Dr Orr received her MB
from Queen’s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland and
completed a pediatrics residency in Belfast. She completed a pediatrics residency at the University of Washington, a pediatric cardiology fellowship and two years
as a neonatal biology fellow. She did an anesthesiology
residency at the University of Washington and worked
32
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
in pediatric anesthesia at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She joined the University of Washington as the
п¬Ѓrst academic anesthesiologist working with the private
practice of anesthesia at Seattle Children’s. She is board
certified in pediatrics and anesthesiology, and she chairs
Seattle Children’s Sedation Committee. She is a clinician
and an educator, and her research has been clinically
based. Recently she has studied several anesthetic drugs
and anesthesia for airway procedures. Other research
interests involve gathering data from anesthetics given
for procedures outside the operating room.
Sally E. Rampersad, MB, DCH, FRCA, is attending
anesthesiologist at Seattle Children’s and assistant
professor at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She earned her MB from the University of
Southampton, England, and her DCH from the Royal
College of Physicians of London. She trained in anesthesiology in the UK, becoming a fellow of the Royal
College of Anaesthetists. She did a pediatric anesthesia
fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto
and worked as a visiting attending for two years at
Seattle Children’s. She was a resident in anesthesiology
at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle. Her
professional interests include pediatric anesthesia,
regional anesthesia and improving error management
in the operating room. She has served as an instructor
for Pediatric Advanced Life Support in the US and
Canada. She coordinates training for anesthesiology
residents from the University of Washington and
Virginia Mason Medical Center during their rotations
at Seattle Children’s.
Daniel D. Rubens, MBBS, is assistant professor of
anesthesiology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Rubens also serves as director of medical simulation at Seattle Children’s. He earned his MBBS from
the University of New South Wales, graduating with
honors. He completed his anesthesia residency training
at Liverpool Hospital, England, including rotations to
Prince of Wales and Saint Vincent’s Hospitals for intensive care and pediatric retrieval training. Dr. Rubens is
board certified in anesthesia and his primary teaching
activities include supervising and training residents
and fellows. He helped develop Simbaby, the world’s
п¬Ѓrst infant simulator. He is researching the п¬Ѓnding of
a hearing deficit from inner ear damage, noted at birth
in SIDS infants with newborn hearing tests, and its
potential relationship to the later mechanism of death.
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Edouard Saade MD, is an attending anesthesiologist
and associate clinical professor of anesthesia at Seattle
Children’s Hospital. Dr Saade completed his MD and
residency training in anesthesia at McGill University
and Montreal Children’s Hospital, Canada. He is board
certified in anesthesiology and pain management and
holds an MBA from Duke University. His previous clinical experience includes pediatric anesthesia and pain
management at Miami Children’s Hospital and Driscoll
Children’s Hospital. Dr. Saade is involved in all aspects
of pediatric anesthetic care and is an active member of
the cardiac anesthesia and liver transplant teams.
at Liverpool Hospital in Sydney. She completed a
fellowship at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children
in Perth and worked as attending anesthesiologist at
Sir Charles Gardiner Hospital in Perth. Dr Wong’s
clinical interests include anesthesia for spinal surgery,
sedation and simulator training. She has an active
interest in anesthesia education and participates in oral
board preparation for residents and fellows. She is also
actively involved in the use of the simulator baby for
the training of pediatric residents in anesthesia
and emergency management of the sick child.
Nancy Setzer-Saade MD, is educational director at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. She earned her MD from
the University of Miami School of Medicine and
completed a pediatrics residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami. She completed a
fellowship in pediatric critical care and a residency in
anesthesiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. Setzer
served on the faculty at the University of Miami, where
she established an accredited pediatric anesthesiology
fellowship program. She serves as an associate examiner for the American Board of Anesthesiology and
sits on the editorial board of the Self-Education and
Evaluation Program, a continuing education tool of the
American Society of Anesthesiologists. She is board
certified in anesthesiology and is active in the supervision and training of anesthesia residents and fellows.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Joshua C. Uffman, MD, is attending anesthesiologist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and Harborview Medical
Center and acting assistant professor at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. Dr Uffman received
his MD from Indiana University and completed an
anesthesia residency at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He completed a pediatric anesthesia fellowship at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. He
is board certified in anesthesiology and is active in
the supervision and training of anesthesia residents
and fellows.
Continuing
Karen Wong, MBBS, is attending anesthesiologist
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant
professor in the Department of Anesthesiology at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. She is
the lead anesthesiologist for spinal surgery at Seattle
Children’s. She completed her MBBS at the University
Melbourne, Australia, and an anesthesiology residency
Corrie T.M. Anderson, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Nathalia Jimenez, MD, MPH
Best scientific abstract for junior faculty, Academy
of Pediatrics Section on Anesthesiology and Pain
Medicine, 2005
Anne M. Lynn, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Listed in “Best Doctors in America,” 2005–2006
RESEARCH FUNDING
Anne M. Lynn, MD
Ketorolac in Surgical Infants: Pharmacokinetics/
Analgesia (IND 59883), Food & Drug Administration,
$119,549
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Corrie T.M. Anderson, MD
Pediatric Pain – Past, Present and Future: How
to Stop the Hurt (program chair and moderator),
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Acute Pain Management in Children,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Neonatal Pain and Practical Pain Management,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
33
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Orientation to Pain Service, Seattle Children’s, 2005
Pediatric Sedation for Remote Locations,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Management of Tracheoesophageal Fistula,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Difficult Airway Workshop, course director,
National Medical Association, 2005
Postoperative Pulmonary Hypertension, Seattle
Children’s and the University of Washington, 2005
Developmental Circulatory Physiology, Seattle
Children’s and the University of Washington, 2005
James C. Chen, MD
Alternative Therapies in Pediatric Pain, Seattle
Children’s fellow pain topic review, February 2005
Anesthesia for Cardiac Catheterization in Pediatric
Patients and Pediatric Anesthesia for Patients with
Congenital Cardiac Conditions, Alberta Children’s
Hospital, Calgary, Canada, November 2005
Michael J. Eisses, MD
Coagulopathy and CPB, annual fellow lecture series,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Anne M. Lynn, MD
Intraoperative Case Management, Seattle Children’s
and the University of Washington, 2005
Consequences of CPB, annual fellow lecture series,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Induction Methods, Seattle Children’s and the
University of Washington, 2005
Coagulation Problems Post-CPB: Problem-Based
Learning, Society of Pediatric Anesthesia winter
meeting, Miami, February 2005
Congenital Syndromes and Anesthesia Implications,
Seattle Children’s and the University of Washington,
2005
Sean H. Flack, MBChB
Journal Club, Department of Anesthesiology,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Pharmacology in Pediatrics, Seattle Children’s and
the University of Washington, 2005
Pharmacology of Inhaled Agents and Neuromuscular
Blockers, resident lecture, Seattle Children’s, 2005
Nathalia Jimenez, MD, MPH
Statistics and Study Designs, anesthesiology
department fellow lecture, Seattle Children’s, 2005
Induction Techniques, anesthesiology department
fellow lecture, Seattle Children’s, 2005
Christer Jonmarker, MD, PhD
Clinical Teaching in Pediatric Cardiac Anesthesia,
Seattle Children’s and the University of Washington,
2005
An Overview of Congenital Heart Anomalies, Seattle
Children’s and the University of Washington, 2005
34
Anesthesia for Non-Cardiac Surgery in Children with
Congenital Heart Disease, Seattle Children’s and the
University of Washington, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Poster discussion, moderator, SPA winter meeting,
Miami, February 2005
Lynn D. Martin, MD
Society for Pediatric Anesthesia Winter Conference,
invited faculty/workshop instructor, Miami, February
2005
Anesthesia and the URI; Neuromuscular Blocking
Agents in Infants and Children; Developmental Respiratory Physiology; Transitional Circulation, Physiologic Mechanical Ventilation in Children; quarterly
pediatric anesthesia core lecture series, University of
Washington, 2005
Developmental Respiratory Physiology; Basics of
Mechanical Ventilation, Transitional Circulation;
and various topic reviews, annual fellow lecture series,
University of Washington, 2005
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Developmental Respiratory Physiology; Basics of
Mechanical Ventilation; Advanced Mechanical Ventilation; Experimental Cardiorespiratory Support;
Essentials of Airway Management; and various topic
reviews, biannual fellow lecture series, University of
Washington, 2005
An Unsound Sleep: Anesthesia and URIs, Columbia
University, New York, September 2005
Rosemary J. Orr, MBBCh
Anesthesia for the Premature Infant, Seattle Children’s
and the University of Washington, 2005
Anesthesia for Eye Surgery in Children, Seattle
Children’s and the University of Washington, 2005
Anesthesia for Airway Surgery, Seattle Children’s and
the University of Washington, 2005
Challenges of Remote Anesthesia, Seattle Children’s
and the University of Washington, 2005
Extreme Difficulty with Ventilating the Lungs of a
7-Year-Old Surgical Patient (Protecting Patient Safety),
PBLD presenter, ASA meeting, New Orleans,
October 2005
Problem-Based Learning Discussion, presenter, ASA,
Atlanta, October 2005
Sally E. Rampersad, MB, DCH, FRCA
PALS and PBLD, Society for Pediatric Anesthesia
winter meeting, February 2005
Visiting Professor, University of British Columbia,
February 2005
Edouard Saade, MD
CMEs, Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society, 2005
Joshua C. Uffman, MD
Capnography, Gas Analysis and Pulse Oximetry,
Department of Anesthesiology resident lecture,
University of Washington, 2005
Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, fellow lecture,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Muscular Dystrophies and Mitochondrial Myopathies,
fellow lecture, Seattle Children’s, 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Anand KJS, Aranda JV, Bende CB, Buckman S, Capperelli EV, Carol W, Hummel P, Johnston CC, Lantos
J, Tutag-Lehr V, Lynn AM, Oberlander TF, Raju TNR,
Maxwell LG, Soriano S, Taddio A, Walco GA. Analgesia
and anesthesia for neonates: study design and ethical
issues. Clin Ther. 2005;27:814–843.
Berde CB, Jaksie T, Lynn AM. Anesthesia and
analgesia during and after surgery in neonates.
Clin Ther. 2005;27:900–921.
Bhananker SM, O’Donnell JT, Salemi JR, Bishop MJ.
The risk of anaphylactic reactions to rocuronium in the
United States is comparable to that of vecuronium: an
analysis of Food and Drug Administration reporting of
adverse events. Anesth Analg. 2005;101(3):819–822.
Blomquist S, Jonmarker C. Anesthesia for cardiothoracic surgery. Anestesi (Anesthesiology), 2nd edition.
Stockholm, Sweden: Halldin and Lindahl, 2005
(in Swedish).
Eisses MJ, Velan T, Aldea GS, Chandler WL. Strategies
to reduce hemostatic activation during cardiopulmonary bypass. Thromb Res. 2005; e-publication.
Goodwin SR, Haberkern CM, Crawford M, Lerman J,
Mancuso T, Yaster M. Sickle cell and anesthesia: do not
abandon well-established practices without evidence.
Anesthes. 2005;103(1):205.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
35
Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Jimenez N. Trends in pediatric anesthesia malpractice claims over the last three decades. ASA Newsletter.
2005;69(6):8–9,12.
Morray JP, Bhananker SM. Recent п¬Ѓndings from
the Pediatric Perioperative Cardiac Arrest (POCA)
Registry. ASA Newsletter 6, 2005.
Orr R. Anesthesia for microlaryngoscopy.
Paediatr Anaesth. 5:81; author reply. 2005;81–82.
Rampersad SE, Mulroy MF. A case of awareness
despite an “adequate depth of anesthesia” as indicated by a Bispectral Index monitor. Anesth Analg.
2005;100:1363–1364.
Rampersad SE, Lynn AM. Pediatric patient selection
and provider issues. Ambul Surg. 2005;12:15–18.
36
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Craniofacial Center
Children’s Craniofacial Center is one of the largest programs of its kind in the country
and one of the busiest clinics in the hospital. It comprises an interdisciplinary team of 40
members from 19 specialty areas. Our team provides diagnosis and long-term management
for children with complex craniofacial abnormalities. We treat all craniofacial conditions
from the most common — cleft lip and palate and craniosynostosis — to the most rare
Apert and Treacher Collins syndromes. The Craniofacial Center is organized to meet
patients’ medical and surgical needs related to their condition, including breathing,
feeding, sleeping, growth, hearing, vision and dental. We also offer prenatal counseling
and a craniofacial genetics clinic.
Surgical techniques developed by our craniofacial surgeons are revolutionizing the
way craniofacial surgery is done all over the world. These innovative procedures enable
doctors to address even the most serious and complex craniofacial abnormalities and
provide the benefits of improved health and a more normal appearance for an increasing
number of children. Our leadership team includes both a medical and a surgical director,
which strengthens our ability to provide the highest-quality outcomes for our patients.
FACULTY
Michael L. Cunningham, MD, PhD,
Medical Director of Children’s
Craniofacial Center, Chief of the
Division of Craniofacial Medicine
(see also, Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Craniofacial Medicine)
Anthony M. Avellino, MD (see also,
Department of Surgery, Division of
Neurosurgery)
Brent R. Collett, PhD (see also,
Department of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Medicine)
Mark A. Egbert, DDS, Chief of the
Division of Oral and Maxillofacial
Surgery (see also, Department
of Surgery, Division of Oral
and Maxillofacial Surgery and
Department of Dental Medicine)
Richard G. Ellenbogen, MD, Chief
of the Division of Neurosurgery
(see also, Department of Surgery,
Division of Neurosurgery)
Ian A. Glass, MD, MBChB,
Director of the Medical Genetics
Program (see also, Department of
Pediatrics, Division of Genetics and
Developmental Medicine)
Joseph S. Gruss, MD, Chief of the
Division of Craniofacial, Plastic and
Reconstructive Surgery (see also,
Department of Surgery, Division
of Craniofacial, Plastic and
Reconstructive Surgery)
Anne V. Hing, MD (see also,
Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Craniofacial Medicine
and Division of Genetics and
Developmental Medicine)
Richard A. Hopper, MD, Surgical
Director of Children’s Craniofacial
Center (see also, Department of
Surgery, Division of Craniofacial,
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery)
Charlotte W. Lewis, MD, MPH
(see also, Department of Pediatrics.
Division of General Pediatrics)
Wendy Mouradian, MD, MS (see
also, Department of Pediatrics,
Division of General Pediatrics)
M. Lena Omnell, DDS, MSD, Chief
of Orthodontics in the Department
of Dental Medicine (see also,
Department of Dental Medicine)
Barbara L Sheller, DDS, MSD
(see also, Department of Dental
Medicine)
Kathleen C.Y. Sie, MD (see also,
Department of Surgery, Division
of Otolaryngology)
Dennis I Sipher, DDS (see also,
Department of Dental Medicine)
Matthew Speltz, PhD (see also,
Department of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Medicine)
Jacqueline R. Starr, PhD, MS, MPH
(see also, Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Craniofacial Medicine)
Avery H. Weiss, MD, Chief of the
Division of Ophthalmology (see also,
Department of Surgery, Division of
Ophthalmology)
Bryan Williams DDS, MSD,
MEd, Director of the Department
of Dental Medicine (see also,
Department of Dental Medicine)
Jonathan A. Perkins, DO (see also,
Department of Surgery, Division of
Otolaryngology)
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
37
Dental Medicine
The Department of Dental Medicine addresses the dental needs of medically complex
children and adolescents in the region up to age 17. We provide high-quality specialized dental care available only in the unique setting of a tertiary level pediatric medical
center. The department’s professional staff have the expertise and the resources
to render care to children referred from a variety of programs at Seattle Children’s
Hospital; we’re most closely involved with the craniofacial, hematology/oncology,
rheumatology, cardiology, rehabilitation medicine and neurodevelopment programs.
The Department of Dental Medicine actively pursues clinical research, most often
in collaboration with Seattle Children’s tertiary care programs, to further knowledge
about diagnostic and treatment techniques and assure excellence in clinical care.
The department participates in teaching future providers of pediatric medical and
dental care, including integration with the teaching programs of the University of
Washington, with a primary goal of assuring continued clinical excellence in the
future care of children.
The Department of Dental Medicine acts as a strong advocate for oral health
on local, state and national levels. We feel that good oral health is critical to the
well-being of the children in our society.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Bryan J. Williams DDS, MSD, MEd, is director of the
Department of Dental Medicine at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and staff orthodontist for the craniofacial
team. He is affiliate professor at the University of
Washington School of Dentistry in the departments
of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics. Dr. Williams
received his dental training at the University of
Western Ontario and received specialty training and
an MEd at the University of Washington. He is a
diplomate of both the American Board of Orthodontics
and the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. He
lectures internationally on pediatric behavior management, emergency management, cleft palate, craniofacial
anomalies and the care of children with complex
medical and developmental problems. His professional
interests include dental care for children with complex
medical problems, management of dentoalveolar
trauma and orthodontic management of children
with cleft palate and other craniofacial anomalies.
Jason Chang, DDS, is dental provider at the Odessa
Brown Children’s Clinic in Seattle. Dr. Chang is a fulltime faculty member at the University of Washington
School of Dentistry Department of Restorative Dentistry. Dr. Chang completed his dental training at the
University of Detroit Mercy in 1999. He completed a
38
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
general practice residency at the University of Texas in
San Antonio and an advanced dental practice residency
at the University of Washington. He spends most of his
clinical time at the Veterans Hospital in Seattle, where
he specializes in advanced restorative techniques and
dental materials. He is a member of the Academy of
General Dentistry.
Christopher Delecki DDS, MPH, MBA, is chief of the dental program at the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic in
Seattle. He is also a faculty member at the University
of Washington School of Dentistry in the departments
of Pediatric Dentistry and Restorative Dentistry.
Dr. Delecki completed dental training and specialty
training in public health at the University of Michigan.
His received his MBA from City University in Bellevue,
Washington. He served as commissioned officer in
the US Public Health Service, receiving more than 10
honors and awards including the Surgeon General’s
Outstanding Service Medal. He has provided dental
treatment, program management, consultation and
preventive dental services on numerous Indian
reservations throughout the Western US. His professional interests include preventive dental care and
community-based oral health promotion and policy
initiatives for children and families in Washington
state. He is a member of the Washington State Oral
Health Coalition and is working on assuring access
to dental care for all children in Washington.
Dental Medicine
Mark A. Egbert, DDS, is Chief of the Division of Oral
and Maxillofacial Surgery at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and associate professor of OMS at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He served as chief of
OMS trauma services and the Dental Department at
Harborview Medical Center for 12 years. Dr. Egbert
received his dental and OMS training at the University
of Washington, and spent one year studying OMS at
the Gemmente Ziekenhuis, Arnhem, The Netherlands.
His particular interests include the biological basis of
facial growth and development, the management of
cleft lip and palate, applications of distraction osteogenesis in the correction of facial anomalies and the
treatment of pediatric oral and maxillofacial pathology. Dr. Egbert serves on numerous review boards
for journals, including the International Journal of
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the American Journal
of OMS and Triple O. His professional society memberships include the AAOMS and ACPA, and he has
served as president of the Western Society of OMS and
the Washington State Society of OMS. He chairs and
serves on committees of the American Association of
OMS. He has served on the examining committee of
the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
Geoffrey M. Greenlee, DDS, MSD, is attending dentist at
the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic, and clinical assistant professor in the University of Washington School
of Dentistry Department of Orthodontics and a senior
fellow in the Department of Dental Public Health Sciences. He is director of pre-doctoral orthodontics at
the School of Dentistry. Dr. Greenlee completed dental
school at the University of Michigan and received his
MSD and certificate in orthodontics from the University of Washington. He completed a fellowship in cleft
lip and palate and craniofacial anomalies at Seattle
Children’s Hospital.
FACULTY
Bryan J. Williams
DDS, MSD, MEd, Director
Bryan J. Williams, DDS, MSD,
MEd, Director
Jason Chang, DDS
Christopher Delecki, DDS,
MPH, MBA,
Mark A. Egbert, DDS
Geoffrey M. Greenlee,
DDS, MSD
James A. Howard, DDS
Lina Kim, DDS
James A. Howard, DDS, is chief of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction in the Department of Dental
Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Dr. Howard
earned his DDS from the University of Washington
School of Dentistry and did a special research and
clinical fellowship in temporomandibular dysfunction
at the university. Dr. Howard has a strong international
reputation in the management of temporomandibular
dysfunction. He has published numerous scientific
papers and he lectures widely. In the pediatric population he is particularly interested in the management of
temporomandibular function in children with juvenile
rheumatoid arthritis.
Lina Kim, DDS, is dental provider at the Odessa Brown
Children’s Clinic in Seattle. She is a faculty member
in the University of Washington School of Dentistry
Department of Restorative Dentistry. Dr. Kim completed her dental training and a hospital-based general
practice residency at the University of Washington.
Her professional interests include providing compassionate and quality care to all of her patients while
focusing on prevention.
Cynthia L. Koudela, DDS, MSD, is pediatric orthodontist
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and affiliate associate
professor in the University of Washington School of
Dentistry Department of Orthodontics. Dr. Koudela
cares for children in the outpatient Dental Clinic and
in the Craniofacial Center at Seattle Children’s. She
received her DDS from the University of California,
Los Angeles School of Dentistry and completed postdoctoral training in orthodontics at the University of
Washington School of Dentistry. Dr. Koudela attended
at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence and is a diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics. She
has expertise and training in craniofacial and surgical
orthodontics and oral
appliance treatment for
obstructive sleep apnea.
Cynthia L. Koudela, DDS, MSD
Seok Bee Lim, DMD
Specific areas of cliniJeffrey B. Marks, DDS
cal and research interest
M. Lena Omnell, DDS, MSD
include nasoalveolar
Andrea M. Pearson, DDS
molding, nonsurgical
Donna J. Quinby, DMD
correction of congenital
Mark M. Schubert, DDS, MSD
Barbara L. Sheller, DDS, MSD
auricular deformities
Dennis I. Sipher, DDS
and dental treatment for
Terry M. Thomas, DDS
obstructive sleep apnea.
Lisa H. Zimberg, DMD
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
39
Dental Medicine
Seok Bee Lim, DMD, is attending dentist at the Odessa
Brown Children’s Clinic and on the clinical faculty
at the University of Washington School of Dentistry
Department of Pediatric Dentistry. Dr. Lim completed
her dental training at Harvard School of Dental
Medicine and did a hospital-based general practice
residency at the University of Washington. She also has
a management certificate from the university’s School
of Business. Dr. Lim provides direct patient care,
mentors residents and directs the dental program.
Jeffrey B. Marks, DDS, is clinical assistant professor
in the Department of Dental Medicine at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and holds an affiliate faculty
appointment in the University of Washington School
of Dentistry Department of Pediatric Dentistry.
Dr. Marks supervises postgraduate anesthesia and sedation training at the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic.
He served as a residency coordinator in the Division of
Pediatric Dentistry at Primary Children’s Medical Center in Salt Lake City. Dr. Marks has lectured to many
groups including the United States Turner Syndrome
Society. He has submitted his research on the effects
of myelomeningocele on intracranial structures to the
Journal of Child Neurology and presented the results
to the International Association of Dental Research.
His current clinical and research interests include craniofacial anomalies, dental trauma and emergency care
and anticipatory guidance for infants and toddlers.
M. Lena Omnell, DDS, MSD, is chief of orthodontics
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and affiliate professor
in the University of Washington School of Dentistry
Department of Orthodontics. She received dental
and orthodontic specialty training in Lund/Malmö,
Sweden, and worked as regional chief orthodontist
for nine years for the Trellborg District in Sweden. Dr.
Omnell did research on growth and development at
the National Institute of Dental Research in Bethesda,
Md., and received her MSD in Washington state. She
is involved in team care of children with craniofacial
anomalies and provides orthodontic care to children at
the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic. Her main research
interests are access to orthodontic care and growth and
development in children with craniofacial anomalies.
Dr. Omnell has presented at national and international
meetings and authored and coauthored many articles
in peer-reviewed publications on these topics. She
has been involved in the Washington State Society of
40
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Orthodontists and serves on the review board for the
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial
Orthopedics and the Cleft Palate – Craniofacial Journal.
Andrea M. Pearson, DDS, is a dentist at the Odessa
Brown Children’s Clinic and affiliate faculty member
at the University of Washington School of Dentistry.
She graduated with honors from the University of the
Pacific dental school in San Francisco. She completed a
general practice residency at the University of Washington and became certified in intravenous conscious
sedation and advanced cardiac life support. Her clinical duties at Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic include
infant, toddler, adolescent and teenager dentistry and
dental resident supervision. Dr. Pearson is a member
of the American Dental Association, Washington
State Dental Association, Seattle King County Dental
Society, American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and
Academy of General Dentistry. She has published several articles in national newsletters advising predental
students and has served on committees to help young
dentists. Her interests in dentistry include pediatrics,
oral surgery and sedation dentistry.
Donna J. Quinby, DMD, is staff dentist at Seattle Children’s Hospital and affiliate clinical assistant professor
in the University of Washington School of Dentistry
Department of Pediatric Dentistry. Dr. Quinby graduated in dentistry from the College of Medicine and
Dentistry, University of New Jersey and completed
a hospital dental residency and a specialty training
residency in pediatric dentistry at the University of
Washington. Dr. Quinby has interests and expertise
in the dental management of children with complex
medical problems. She is a member of the regional
hemophilia team.
Mark M. Schubert, DDS, MSD, is attending dentist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor of oral medicine at the University of Washington School of Dentistry. He has an adjunct appointment in otolaryngology
and head and neck surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center and is associate member in the
clinical division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research
Center. He is director of oral medicine at the Seattle
Cancer Care Alliance and clinical director of the university undergraduate Dental Education for the Care of
the Disabled Program. Dr. Schubert received his DDS
from the University of Washington and completed a
Dental Medicine
hospital dental residency at the University Medical
Center. He is a diplomate of the American Board of
Oral Medicine and has published more than 85 articles
and numerous book chapters on oral complications of
cancer and cancer therapy. He was a founder of
the International Society for Oral Oncology and has
served as vice president and president. He is actively
involved with the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer and is dental director for the
Northwest AIDS Education and Training program.
He has lectured internationally on oral cancer, HIV/
AIDS and general oral medicine. He has served on
mucositis advisory boards and as principal investigator
on mucositis research.
Barbara L. Sheller, DDS, MSD, is chief of education and
resident training at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
affiliate professor in the University of Washington
School of Dentistry Department of Pediatric Dentistry
and Orthodontics. Dr. Sheller received her DDS and
MSD in orthodontics from the University of Washington and a certificate in pediatric dentistry from Seattle
Children’s Hospital. She practices pediatric dentistry
and orthodontics at Seattle Children’s. She is diplomate of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry and
a reviewer for the journals Pediatric Dentistry, The
Journal of Dentistry for Children, American Journal
of Orthopedics and Dentofacial Orthopedics and Angle
Orthodontist. Dr. Sheller serves on the Advisory Council of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry and is
a member of the Committee on Behavior Guidance for
the AAPD Council of Clinical Affairs.
Dennis I. Sipher, DDS, is pediatric dentist in the
Department of Dental Medicine at Seattle Children’s
Hospital. He is also acting assistant professor in
the University of Washington School of Dentistry
Department of Pediatric Dentistry. His clinical
interests include sedation in pediatric dentistry and
the dental management of children with ectodermal
dysplasia. He is diplomate of the American Board
of Pediatric Dentistry and past president of the
Washington State Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.
Terry M. Thomas, DDS, is chief of periodontics at Seattle
Children’s Hospital. Dr. Thomas completed dental
school at Loyola University Chicago, specialized in
periodontics at Boston University and did an internship at the University of Washington Medical Center.
He was an associate at Children’s Hospital in Denver.
He is an active member in the Academy of Osseointegration, American Academy of Periodontology,
American Dental Association and the Seattle King
County Dental Society.
Lisa H. Zimberg, DMD, is staff dentist at Seattle Children’s Hospital and instructor at the University of
Washington School of Dentistry. She graduated from
Boston University School of Dentistry and completed
her residency at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital in
New York. She taught dental students and residents
at Columbia College of Dentistry and Oral Surgery
in New York. Dr. Zimberg is a member of the American
Dental Association, Washington State Dental Association and Seattle King County Dental Society.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Christopher Delecki, DDS, MBA, MPH
Seattle Best Dentist, January 2006
Geoffrey M. Greenlee, DDS, MSD
T.M. Graber Teaching Fellowship Award, Orthodontic
Faculty Development Award, American Association of
Orthodontists Foundation, March 2006
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Christopher Delecki, DDS, MBA, MPH
Oral Health in the Primary Care Setting, presented to
numerous medical provider groups, 2005
Geoffrey M. Greenlee, DDS, MSD
Ethnicity in Malocclusion, Body Image, Treatment
Expectations, Quality of Life, poster presentation,
American Association for Dental Research 35th
Annual Meeting & Exhibition, Orlando, Fla.,
March 11, 2006
Descriptive Analysis: Medicaid Population Recruited
for an Orthodontic Prospective Clinical Trial, poster
presentation, International Association for Dental
Research 83rd General Session & Exhibition,
Baltimore, March 12, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
41
Dental Medicine
M. Lena Omnell, DDS, MSD
Descriptive Analysis: Medicaid Population Recruited
for an Orthodontic Prospective Clinical Trial, poster
presentation, International Association for Dental
Research 83rd General Session & Exhibition,
Baltimore, March 12, 2005
Barbara L. Sheller, DDS, MSD
Dealing with Difficult People, Women’s Interdisciplinary Study Group, Seattle, January 27, 2005
Behavior FUNdamentals for the Dental Team and
Common Pediatric Medical Conditions: Impact on
Dental Care, Charles A Sweet, Sr. Memorial Lecture,
University of the Pacific, San Francisco, May 7, 2005
Trauma, Special-Needs Patients, Behavior Management, Hospital Dentistry, Comprehensive Review of
Pediatric Dentistry, American Academy of Pediatric
Dentistry, Santa Monica, Calif., March 2005; Chicago,
September 2005
Child Behavior in the Dental Office: Professional
Response in a Changing Climate, Western Society of
Pediatric Dentistry annual meeting, Palm Springs,
Calif., April 8–9, 2006
Bryan J. Williams, DDS, MSD, MEd
Pediatric Behavior Management — What’s Fun and
What Works! Internet Dental Forum, Juneau, Alaska,
June 29, 2005
Oral Health in Primary Care Medicine, Inland
Empire Primary Care Convention, Spokane, Wash.,
April 29, 2005
Visiting professor, Great Falls, Mont., August 2–3, 2005
42
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
PUBLICATIONS
Lewis CW, Ose M, Aspinall C, Omnell ML. Community orthodontists and craniofacial care: Results of
a Washington state survey. Cleft Palate Craniofac J.
Sep 2005;42(5):521–525. PMID: 16149834
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE].
Rafferty KL, Sun Z, Egbert MA, Baird EE, Herring
SW. Mandibular mechanics following osteotomy
and appliance placement II: Bone strain on the
body and condylar neck. J Oral Maxillofac Surg.
Apr 2006;64(4): 620–627.
Rafferty KL, Sun Z, Egbert MA, Herring SW.
Mandibular mechanics after osteotomy and distraction appliance placement I: Postoperative mobility
of the osteotomy site. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. Apr
2006;64(4): 610–619.
Rowley ST, Sheller B, Williams BJ, Mancl L. Utilization of a hospital for treatment of pediatric dental
emergencies. Pediatr Dent. 2006;28:10–17.
Theis JE, Huang GJ, King GJ, Omnell ML. Eligibility
for publicly funded orthodontic treatment determined
by the handicapping labiolingual deviation index. Am J
Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. Dec 2005;128(6):708–715.
Woo A, Omnell ML, Williams B, Hopper R. Threedimensional midface stability following Lefort III
distraction in syndromic pediatric patients (abstract).
63rd Annual Meeting Cleft Palate Craniofacial
Association. 2006;108:67.
Woo D, Sheller B, Williams B, Mancl L,
Grembowski D. Dentists’ and parents’ perceptions of
health, esthetics, and treatment of maxillary primary
incisors. Pediatr Dent. 2005;27:19–23.
Heart Center
Seattle Children’s Heart Center is one of the nation’s most comprehensive cardiac programs.
We provide comprehensive cardiac care for fetuses, infants, children and teens and assist
with the transition of care into adulthood. Our specialized team includes pediatric cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, cardiac intensive care specialists, cardiac anesthesiologists,
nurses, echocardiograph technicians and caring staff. We have a national reputation for
excellence in a full range of cardiac services and procedures, from advanced catheterization for cardiac defects and heart rhythm disorders, to minimally invasive surgery for the
simplest problems, to open heart surgical repairs and transplantation for infants with more
complex cardiac problems.
We are committed to the best possible outcome for each patient, with ongoing
research into new treatments and technologies, ensuring that Children’s Heart Center
will continue to provide state-of-the-art care to all children.
FACULTY
Harris P. Baden, MD (see also,
Division of Critical Care Medicine)
Robert J. Boucek Jr., MD,
Co-director of Children’s Heart
Center, Chief of Cardiology (see
also, Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Cardiology)
Gordon A. Cohen, MD, PhD,
Co-director of Children’s Heart
Center, Chief of the Division of
Cardiothoracic Surgery (see also,
Department of Surgery, Division of
Cardiothoracic Surgery)
Terrence U. Chun, MD (see also,
Department of Pediatrics, Division
of Cardiology)
Michelle Z. Gurvitz, MD (see also,
Department of Pediatrics, Division
of Cardiology)
Bruce Hardy, MD (see also, Division
of Cardiology)
Howard E. Jeffries, MD, MPH, MBA
(see also, Division of Critical Care
Medicine)
Troy A. Johnston, MD, Assistant
Director of Cardiac Catheterization
Laboratories (see also, Department
of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology)
Thomas K. Jones, MD, Director of
Cardiac Catheterization Laboratories
(see also, Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Cardiology)
Isamu Kawabori, MD (see also,
Department of Pediatrics, Division
of Cardiology)
Mark B. Lewin, MD, Director of
Cardiac Ultrasound (see also,
Department of Pediatrics, Division
of Cardiology)
Robert Mazor, MD (see also,
Division of Critical Care Medicine)
Amy H. Schultz, MD (see also,
Department of Pediatrics, Division
of Cardiology)
Stanley J. Stamm, MD, Clinical
Professor of Pediatrics, University of
Washington
J. Geoff Stevenson, MD, Director
of Cardiac Ultrasound (see also,
Department of Pediatrics, Division
of Cardiology)
Karen Stout, MD (see also,
Department of Pediatrics, Division
of Cardiology)
Delphine Yung, MD (see also,
Department of Pediatrics, Division
of Cardiology
Lester C. Permut, MD (see also,
Department of Surgery, Division of
Cardiothoracic Surgery)
Michael A. Portman, MD, Director
of Research (see also, Department
of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology)
Jack C. Salerno, MD, Director of
the Electrophysiology and Pacing
Service (see also, Department of
Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology)
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
43
Laboratory Medicine/Pathology
The Department of Laboratory Medicine/Pathology is a comprehensive analytical
facility serving outpatients, inpatients and regional programs and providing testing to
more than 175 institutions in the country. In one year we have performed over 900,000
clinical laboratory tests, examined 6,000 surgical specimens, interpreted 600 bone marrow examinations, and performed 103 autopsies for perinatal and neonatal programs in
the region and as part of quality control on medical care at Seattle Children’s Hospital.
The laboratory is staffed by 10 University of Washington faculty members and
more than 120 additional staff. In addition, the laboratory administers an extensive
point-of-care testing program in the hospital and clinics, and for ground and air
transport. Advanced instrumentation is interfaced to the electronic medical record,
transferring information directly and minimizing input errors. All organ subspecialties
are covered in anatomic pathology with a broad spectrum of techniques including
histopathology, immunoproteomics and electron microscopy. Technicians complete
diagnostic work-ups in a holistic fashion using in-house flow cytometry, cytogenetics,
molecular cytogenetics and molecular pathology investigations.
A strong analytical chemistry laboratory includes a regional biochemical genetics
section. We continue to move microbiology work from conventional culture techniques
to more sensitive and rapid molecular assays both for patient care and for research
through the National Cystic Fibrosis Reference Microbiology Laboratory.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Joe C Rutledge, MD, is medical director of the Department of Laboratory Medicine/Pathology at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and professor of laboratory
medicine at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. Dr. Rutledge participates in all aspects of
the clinical laboratory but spends most of his time in
the area of clinical pathology. His research interest
in early mammalian development and teratology has
been supplanted by research in the area of laboratory
operations. He is former president of the Society for
Pediatric Pathology and he and members of his department continue to have major leadership roles in that
professional organization. He serves on the Pediatric
Pathology Test Committee for the American Board of
Pathology and is a consultant to the National Toxicology Program, the FDA and various medical centers in
China. He is a member of many national organizations
and serves on several editorial boards.
Laura S. Finn, MD, is staff pathologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor of pathology
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
In addition to general surgical pathology, Dr. Finn has
special expertise in pediatric renal pathology and is
invited to speak at national meetings in that specialized
44
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
area. Dr. Finn has extensive background in solid organ
transplantation pathology and serves as the liaison to
transplant teams at Seattle Children’s. She directs the
flow cytometry laboratory, which provides a wide range
of diagnostic testing in immunodeficiencies and in hematopoietic tumors. She is the education coordinator
for the Department of Laboratory Medicine/Pathology
and directs the pediatric pathology fellowship program.
Rhona M. Jack, PhD, is director of chemistry and codirector of the biochemical genetics lab at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and clinical associate professor in
laboratory medicine at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. Dr. Jack’s teaching responsibilities
include the university medical technology program,
post doctoral clinical chemistry fellowship program
and medical students. She is co-director of the clinical
chemistry training program in laboratory medicine.
Her clinical interests include newborn screening,
diagnosis and follow-up of children with genetic
metabolic diseases and lysosomal storage diseases.
Raj P. Kapur, MD, PhD, is staff pathologist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate professor of pathology
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
He is co-director of the fetal pathology service at
Seattle Children’s, which serves as a diagnostic reference
Laboratory Medicine/Pathology
laboratory to multiple hospitals throughout Washington
state. He has authored numerous papers related to
pathology of the fetus and infant, and is an associate
editor of a forthcoming text on this topic. Dr. Kapur is
an international authority on the pathology of pediatric
intestinal dysmotility and principal investigator for a
research program related to murine models of Hirschsprung disease and other forms of intestinal pseudoobstruction. Dr. Kapur’s primary research interests
involve the molecular and cellular events that underlie
normal and abnormal development of the intestinal
nervous system. His laboratory pioneered some of the
п¬Ѓrst transgenic mouse models for manipulating gene
expression in enteric neural precursors, and he and his
colleagues continue these types of studies to elucidate
when, where, and how the products of specific genes
influence enteric neurodevelopment. Dr. Kapur is council
member for the Society for Pediatric Pathology and
associate editor for Pediatric and Developmental
Pathology.
interests in neuromuscular disorder, pediatric cardiovascular disease and pediatric tumors. Dr. Patterson
serves as chair of the hospital Tissue Committee and
serves as pathology representation on the Cancer Committee, for which she chairs a subcommittee overseeing
the use of tissue for cancer research purposes. She also
oversees the pathology aspects of the many ongoing
Children’s Oncology Group (COG) research studies
at Seattle Children’s and actively participates in the
review of lung biopsy material with chILD, a national
consortium studying interstitial lung disease in children. Her teaching activities at Children’s center on
training University of Washington pathology residents
and the Children’s pediatric pathology fellow. She is an
active member of the Society of Pediatric Pathology;
she chairs the Publications Committee, which oversees
publication of the journal Pediatric and Developmental
Pathology. Dr. Patterson is also interested in teaching
pediatric pathology internationally, for which she has
spent time in Bulgaria and Romania.
Kent E. Opheim, PhD, is clinical cytogeneticist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate professor in the
Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He is board
certified in clinical chemistry and in clinical cytogenetics, and he is co-director of the clinical cytogenetics
laboratory at Seattle Children’s. His clinical interests
include molecular cytogenetic testing and translational
research related to new molecular diagnostic testing,
such as microarrays.
Xuan Qin, PhD, is director of the microbiology laboratory
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
He serves as microbiology consultant to the core
laboratory for cystic п¬Ѓbrosis microbiology, Cystic
Fibrosis Therapeutic Development Network. He is a
member of the faculty of the university postdoctoral
training program in medical and public health laboratory microbiology and of Seattle Children’s Infection
Control Committee. He is also microbiology laboratory
advisor to the infectious disease fellowship program
in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. His teaching and
research interests include molecular diagnosis of
infectious diseases, antimicrobial drug resistance
and laboratory quality assurance.
Kathleen Patterson, MD, is director of anatomic pathology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate
professor at the University of Washington. Her clinical
duties encompass the full range of anatomic pathology
including surgical and autopsy pathology, with special
FACULTY
Joe C. Rutledge
MD, Director
Joe C. Rutledge, MD, Director
Laura S. Finn, MD
Rhona M. Jack, PhD
Raj P. Kapur, MD, PhD
Kent E. Opheim, PhD
Kathleen Patterson, MD
Xuan Qin, PhD
Joseph R. Siebert, PhD
Karen Tsuchiya, MD
Min Xu, MD, PhD
Joseph R. Siebert, PhD, is program director of autopsy
services at Seattle Children’s Hospital. His chief clinical
teaching responsibility is training pathology residents
and fellows at autopsy, introducing them to a wide
variety of fetal and pediatric autopsy techniques and
relevant literature. This orientation may also involve
laboratory and other technologists, medical students
and pediatrics residents and fellows. His research
interests center around congenital malformations,
particularly of the craniofacial complex.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
45
Laboratory Medicine/Pathology
Karen Tsuchiya, MD, is co-director of cytogenetics and
molecular diagnostics at Seattle Children’s Hospital,
assistant professor of laboratory medicine at the
University of Washington School of Medicine, and
staff scientist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research
Center. Her clinical interests include cytogenetics and
molecular diagnostics of pediatric neoplasms. She is
a member of the College of American Pathologists
Cytogenetic Resource Committee. Dr. Tsuchiya’s
primary research interest lies in the characterization
of chromosome and molecular abnormalities in
neoplasia. She is studying genomic abnormalities
in mouse models of prostate cancer.
Min Xu, MD, PhD, is staff clinical pathologist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and acting assistant professor at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. She
is board certified in clinical pathology. Her clinical
interests include hematopathology, coagulation,
chemistry and immunoassays. She serves as a voting
member of the Pediatric Clinical Research Committee.
RESEARCH FUNDING
Continuing
Raj P. Kapur, MD, PhD
Sacral Crest Cells and Enteric Neurodevelopment,
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $208,600
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Rhona M. Jack, PhD
Measurement of Acid-Alpha Glucosidase in Lymphocytes for Diagnosis of Infantile Pompe Disease,
Northwest Genetics Exchange, Vancouver, BC,
Canada, May 2005
Raj P. Kapur, MD, PhD
Autopsy Case Presentations, pediatric Grand Rounds,
Seattle Children’s, January 14, 2005
Malignant Osteopetrosis, USCAP Pediatric Pathology
Specialty Case Conference, USCAP annual meeting,
San Antonio, Texas, February 27, 2005
46
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Genetic Disorders of Motility, International Symposium on Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders,
Madison, Wis., April 8, 2005
Diagnostically Challenging or Unusual Placental
Lesions, Washington State Society of Pathologists,
Seattle, June 18, 2005
Molecular Genetics and Embryology of Congenital
Intestinal Aganglionosis, general surgery lecture series,
Seattle Children’s, August 18, 2005
Enteric Neuropathology, Frontiers in Gastroenterology
and Hepatology, University of Washington,
September 16, 2005
Xuan Qin, PhD
Bordetella pertussis PCR: Simultaneous Targeting
of Signature Sequences, Northwest Coastal Medical
Microbiology Symposium, 2005
In Vitro Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing MIC,
MBC, and AUC, infectious diseases fellows lecture
series, University of Washington, 2005
Antimicrobial Drug Resistance, Northwest Medical
Laboratory Symposium, October 2005
Laboratory Accreditation and Quality Management,
China Medical Board Program, SiCuan University
School of Medicine, Chengdu, China, March 2005
Clinical Microbiology Laboratory Essentials: Structure,
Personnel, and QA/QC, The Second Chinese American
Association for Clinical Microbiology Symposium on
the Advancement of the Clinical and Public Health
Microbiology, Shanghai, China, September 2005
Visiting Professorship, Shanghai Public Health
Center, Shanghai Fudan University, Shanghai, China,
August 2005
Joseph R. Siebert, PhD
Introduction to Fetal Pathology, Seattle Midwifery
School, Seattle, March 2005
Fetal and Women’s Imaging 2005: OB-GYN
Ultrasound Update, Seattle, September 2005
Laboratory Medicine/Pathology
PUBLICATIONS
Beaudoin D, Hagenzieker J, Jack RM. Neuronal
ceroid-lipofuscinosis: what are the roles of electron
microscopy, DNA, and enzyme analysis in diagnosis?
J Histochemistry. Dec 2004;27(4):237–243.
Bittles MA, Sidhu MK, Sze RW, Finn LS, Ghioni V,
Perkins JA. Multidetector CT angiography of pediatric vascular malformations and hemangiomas: utility
of 3-D reformatting in differential diagnosis. Pediatr
Radiol. Nov 2005;35(11):1100–1106; e-publication,
Jul 23, 2005.
Bobola MS, Finn LS, Ellenbogen RG, Geyer JR, Berger
MS, Braga JM, Meade EH, Gross ME, Silber JR. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activity is associated
with response to radiation and chemotherapy in medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors.
Clin Cancer Res. Oct 15, 2005;11(20):7405–7414.
Chang A, Logar CM, Finn LS, Alpers CE, Seliger SL.
A rare cause of necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis in a young adult male. Am J Kidney Dis.
May 2005;45(5):956–960.
Crystal B, Gantt S, Qin X, Abe P, Zerr DM. Use of 16S
rDNA PCR to identify Haemophilus influenzae type
B as the etiology of pericarditis in an infant. Pediatr
Infect Dis J. Mar 2005;24(3):287–288.
Denno DM, Stapp JR, Booster DR, Qin X, Clausen
CR, Delbacarro MI, Tarr PI. Etiology of pediatric
diarrhea in outpatient settings. Pediatr Infect Dis J.
Feb 2005;24(2):142–148.
Doherty D, Glass IA, Siebert JR, Parisi MA, Shaw
DWW, Chance PF, Barr M Jr, Nyberg D. Successful Joubert syndrome prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound, verified by fetal MRI and confirmed by postmortem examination: implications. Prenat Diagn.
2005;25:442–447.
Duthie MS, Kahn M, White M, Kapur RP, Kahn SJ.
Critical proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory
functions of different subsets CD1d-restricted natural
killer T cells during Trypanosoma cruzi infection.
Inf Immun. 2005;73:181–192.
Duthie MS, Kahn M, White M, Kapur RP, Kahn SJ.
Both CD1d antigen presentation and IL-12 are required
to activate natural killer T cells during Trypanosoma
cruzi infection. Inf Immun. 2005;73:1890–1894.
Filippova GN, Cheng MK, Moore JM, Truong J-P,
Hu YJ, Nguyen DK, Tsuchiya KD, Disteche CM.
Boundaries between chromosomal domains of X
inactivation and escape bind CTCF and lack CpG
methylation during early development. Develop Cell.
2005;8:31–42.
Finn LS, Argenyi ZB. Congenital panfollicular
nevus: report of a new entity. J Cutan Pathol. Jan
2005;32(1):59–62.
Gilbert-Barness E, Oligny L, Kapur RP, Siebert JR,
eds. Potter’s Pathology of the Fetus and Infant (second
edition). In press.
Kapur RP. Mendelian and complex diseases in
gastroenterology and hepatology: multiple endocrine
neoplasia type 2B and Hirschsprung disease. Clin
Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005;3:423–431.
Kapur RP, Clarke CM, Doggett B, Taylor BE, Baldessari A, Parisi MA, Howe DG. Hox11L1 expression by
precursors of enteric smooth muscle: an alternative
explanation for megacecum in Hox11L1 -/- mice.
Pediatr Dev Pathol. 2005;8:148–161.
Li R, Johnson AB, Salomons G, Goldman JE, Naidu
S, Quinlan R, Cree B, Ruyle SZ, Banwell B, D’Hooghe
M, Siebert JR, Rolf CM, Cox H, Reddy A, GutiГ©rrezSolana LG, Collins A, Weller RO, Messing A, van der
Knaap MS, Brenner M. GFAP mutations in infantile,
juvenile and adult forms of Alexander disease. Ann
Neurol. 2005;57:310–326.
Loeb KR, Kostner H, Firpo E, Norwood T,
Tsuchiya KD, Clurman BE, Roberts JM. A mouse
model for cyclin E–dependent genetic instability
and tumorigenesis. Cancer Cell. 2005;8(1):35–47.
Manson J, Brabec MJ, Buelke-Sam J, Carlson GP,
Chapin RE, Favor JB, Fischer LJ, Hattis D, Lees PSJ,
Perreault-Darney S, Rutledge J, Smith TJ, Tice RR,
Working P. NTP-CERHR expert panel on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of acrylamide.
Birth Defect Research (Part B). 2005;74:17–113.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
47
Laboratory Medicine/Pathology
Murray KF, Finn LS, Taylor SL, Seidel KD, Larson
AM. Liver histology and alanine aminotransferase
levels in children and adults with chronic hepatitis C infection. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2005
Nov;41(5):634–638.
O’Sullivan J, Risques RA, Mendelson MH, Chen L,
Brentnall TA, Bronner MD, MacMillan MP, Feng
Z, Siebert JR, Potter JD, Rabinovitch PS. Telomere
lengths in the colon decline with age: a relation to
colorectal cancer? Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers
and Prevention. In press.
Parisi MA, Lipman NS, Clarke CM, Taylor B, Kapur
RP. Evaluation of Hox11L1 in the fmc/fmc rat model
of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction. J Pediatr Surg.
2005;40:1760–1765.
Phillips JJ, Mahony B, Siebert JR, Lalani T, Fligner C,
Kapur R. Dandy-Walker malformation: correlation of
diagnosis on prenatal ultrasound and on pathology review at autopsy. J Neuropath Exp Neurol. 2005;64:467.
Qin X. Krugman’s Infectious Diseases of Children,
11th ed. (book review) Pediatr Dev Pathol. Feb;8(1):136.
Qin X, Clausen CR, Stapp JR, Weissman SJ, Seidel
KD. A temporal disc co-diffusion method detected
piperacillin-tazobactam resistance in all Serratia marcescens isolates reportedly susceptible by conventional
methods. J. Pediatr Infect Dis. 2006;1(1).
Siebert JR. Current diagnosis and treatment in pulmonary disease [photographs]. Hanley M, Welsh C,
eds. In press.
Siebert JR. Erythropoietin neuroprotection in
the term and preterm infant: safety and efficacy
(photographs). Demers EJ, Juul SE. In press.
48
Siebert JR. The perinatal, fetal, and embryonic
autopsy. In: Potter’s Pathology of the Fetus and Infant
(second edition). In press.
Siebert JR: Review of Catalog of Teratogenic Agents
(eleventh edition), by Thomas H. Shepard and Ronald
J. Lemire. Ped Dev Pathol. 2005 8:402–403.
Siebert JR. Review of Teratogenic Effects of Drugs: A
Resource for Clinicians (TERIS) (second edition) by
J.M. Friedman and Janine E. Polifka. Ped Dev Pathol.
2005;8:402–403.
Siebert JR. Holoprosencephaly, anencephaly, kallman
syndrome, Klippel Feil syndrome, Norrie disease, orofaciodigital syndrome, Yunis-Veradi syndrome, Miller
Dieker – lissencephaly, subcortical band heterotopia,
osteogenesis imperfecta - type II, reviews for Medlink
CD-ROM and online information service for neurologists. Arbor Publishing Company, 2005.
Siebert JR, Kapur RP. The back and perineum.
In: Potter’s Pathology of the Fetus and Infant (second
edition). In press.
Siebert JR, Kapur RP, Resta RG, Luthy D. Methods for induced abortion (letter). Obstet Gynecol.
2005;105:221.
Siebert JR, Rutledge JC, Kapur RP. The association
of cloacal anomalies, caudal duplication, and twinning.
Pediatr Dev Pathol. 2005;8:339–354.
Siebert JR, Schoenecker K, Resta RG, Kapur RP.
Holoprosencephaly and reduction limb defects: a
consideration of Steinfeld syndrome and related
conditions. Am J Med Genet. 2005;134A:381–392.
Siebert JR. Medical genetics for the modern clinician:
chromosomal abnormalities (photographs). Westman
JA, ed. In press.
Sinha AE, Hope JL, Prazen BJ, Nilsson EJ, Jack RM,
Synovec RE. Algorithm for locating analytes of interest
based on mass spectral similarity in GC x GC-TOF-MS
data: analysis of metabolites in human infant urine.
J Chrom. Nov 2005;1058:209–215.
Siebert JR. Oro-facio-digital syndromes. In:
Malformations of the Nervous System. Series Volume
— Handbook of Clinical Neurology. Sarnat HB,
Curatolo P, eds. Elsevier. In press.
Spiller SE, Hawkins DS, Finn LS, Sze RW, Sybert V.
Metastatic malignant melanoma presenting as pancytopenia in a three-year-old boy. Pediatr Blood Cancer.
Jul 2005;45(1):60–63.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Neurology
The Division of Neurology provides outpatient and inpatient consultation and
management services for patients with a variety of neurologic, neuromuscular and
neurodevelopmental disorders. Infants, children and adolescents with epilepsy,
movement disorders, cerebral palsy, developmental delay, headache, muscular
dystrophy, mitochondrial cytopathies and other disorders of the nervous system are
evaluated by faculty pediatric neurologists who are certified by the American Board
of Psychiatry and Neurology. Patients are also evaluated and managed by pediatric
neurology mid-level providers (pediatric nurse practitioners and physician assistants).
The clinical program is supported by pediatric neurology nurses, dietitians, neuropsychologists and social workers.
The division operates regular clinics at Seattle Children’s Hospital and its regional
satellites, and pediatric neurology providers participate in outreach programs in
central Washington and Alaska. Faculty members provide inpatient consultation
for patients admitted to Seattle Children’s and to the intensive care nursery at the
University of Washington Medical Center. The division admits children to Seattle Children’s for evaluation of complex neurologic disorders and administers an inpatient video-EEG telemetry unit where children are admitted for intensive monitoring
of epilepsy and other paroxysmal disorders. Together with the Division of Neurosurgery, the Division of Neurology operates
a comprehensive pediatric epilepsy program. Management of children in the program may include epilepsy surgery, the
ketogenic diet, use of the vagus nerve stimulator programs and participation in trials of new anticonvulsant medications.
Children’s is the primary teaching site for the University of Washington residency training program in pediatric
neurology, a nationally recognized program that has trained more than 30 practicing pediatric neurologists. The department
has growing basic neuroscience and clinical research programs at Children’s and the university. Faculty research interests
include the physiology of motor control, neural stem cell biology, basic cellular mechanisms of epileptogenesis, neurotoxicology, mitochondrial cytopathies, infantile spasms, pyridoxine-dependent seizures and risk factors of neonatal encephalopathy.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Sidney M. Gospe Jr., MD, PhD, is chief of the Division of
Neurology at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Dr. Gospe is
professor of neurology and pediatrics and holds the
Herman and Faye Sarkowsky Endowed Chair in Child
Neurology at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. Dr. Gospe has been at Seattle Children’s
FACULTY
Sidney M. Gospe Jr., MD,
PhD, Chief
Nigel Bamford, MD
Heidi Blume, MD, MPH
Anthony Bouldin, MD
Raymond Ferri, MD, PhD
Laura A. Jansen, MD, PhD
John Kuratani, MD
Jerrold Milstein, MD, Emeritus
Sidney M. Gospe Jr.
MD, PhD, Chief
since 2000, and previously was on the faculty at the
University of California, Davis for 13 years. He received
his MD and PhD from Duke University and trained in
pediatrics and pediatric neurology at Baylor College
of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Gospe’s clinical interests
include general pediatric neurology and pediatric
neuromuscular disorders. His research concerns the
effects of maternal exposures to toxicants on the neurological development of
their offspring, as well as
the clinical and genetic
Russell P. Saneto, DO, PhD
aspects of pyridoxineHillary Shurtleff, PhD
dependent seizures.
Marcio Sotero de Menezes, MD
Mary H. Warner, PhD
At Children’s, he directs
the division’s clinical
and teaching programs,
including the University
of Washington residency
training program in
pediatric neurology.
Dr. Gospe is a member
of the American Board
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
49
Neurology
of Pediatrics, an examiner for the American Board
of Psychiatry and Neurology and a member of the
editorial board of the journal Pediatric Neurology.
Nigel Bamford, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of neurology and adjunct assistant professor of pediatrics at
the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Bamford treats patients with neurological disabilities and movement disorders at Seattle Children’s and
seeks answers to their problems in the laboratory. Dr.
Bamford’s research focuses on synaptic function and
regulation of presynaptic activity in the mammalian
basal ganglia. In the brain, the neostriatum plays an
important role in cognition, voluntary movement and
addiction. Evaluation of striatal function is paramount
to understanding numerous developmental, neurological and psychiatric disorders, including substance
abuse, juvenile Parkinson’s disease and Huntington disease. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying a
variety of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative
disorders, Bamford and his colleagues use multiphoton
microscopy, electrophysiology and other methods to
observe the effects of dopamine on glutamate release
in the striatum. Investigations focus on the function of
the mammalian corticostriatal system (the collection of
neurons that connect the cerebral cortex and striatum)
and its role in motor disorders including dopamine
depletion, the mechanisms of addiction and Huntington disease. In addition, pharmacological alternatives
are being investigated for improved treatment.
Heidi Blume, MD, MPH, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting instructor in the
Division of Pediatric Neurology at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. She attended Harvard
Medical School and completed residencies in general
pediatrics and pediatric neurology at the University of
Washington. She completed a research fellowship and
earned an MPH in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical
Scholars Program at the University of Washington. Her
primary research interests involve the epidemiology of
childhood neurological disease, specifically neonatal
and infantile neurological disorders.
Anthony Bouldin, MD, is an active clinician in Seattle
Children’s Hospital’s inpatient and outpatient neurology programs and also provides outreach clinics in
Yakima and Wenatchee, Wash. He is clinical assistant
professor in the Division of Pediatric Neurology at
50
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
the University of Washington School of Medicine. He
received his MD from the University of Louisville and
completed a pediatric residency at Tulane University.
Dr. Bouldin completed pediatric neurology fellowship
training at the University of Washington. His clinical interests include general pediatric neurology and
neurogenetics.
Raymond Ferri MD, PhD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and acting assistant professor of
neurology at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. His clinical interests are general child
neurology and leukodystrophies — inherited, degenerative disorders of central nervous system myelin.
Approximately half the children with abnormalities
in white matter have no identifiable etiology. Dr.
Ferri’s research program focuses on identifying factors
that regulate the development of normal myelin. In
particular, his lab is studying transcription factor
regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and
myelin maintenance. Dr. Ferri’s goal is to understand
normal myelination and identify gene mutations that
may result in abnormal myelination. In addition,
these studies may identify targets for treatment of
these disorders. Dr. Ferri is also involved in resident
and medical student teaching. He supervises pediatric
neurology residents in the continuity clinic, and
teaches pediatric neurology residents, as well as adult
neurology residents, pediatrics residents and medical
students rotating on the pediatric neurology service.
Laura A. Jansen, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. She received her MD and
PhD from St. Louis University School of Medicine.
She completed pediatrics and pediatric neurology
residencies at the Washington University School of
Medicine, St. Louis. She also did a research fellowship
in the Department of Clinical and Experimental
Epilepsy at University College London. Areas of
clinical interest include general pediatric neurology,
epilepsy and migraine. Her research activities include
investigation of abnormalities in ion channel function
in brain specimens from children treated surgically for
intractable seizures, with the goals of identifying causes
of pediatric epilepsy and optimizing medical treatment
of seizures.
John Kuratani, MD, is director of the pediatric EEG
laboratory at Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant
professor of neurology and adjunct assistant professor
Neurology
of pediatrics at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. His clinical interests include the management of infants, children and adolescents with epilepsy,
clinical neurophysiology involving EEG, long-term
monitoring and epilepsy surgery. His research interests
include epilepsy surgery outcome and a collaborative
project with colleagues from the Division of Neonatology on a treatment for perinatal asphyxia. He is
actively involved in educating fellows, residents,
medical students and EEG technologists on epilepsy
and EEG interpretation.
Russell P. Saneto, DO, PhD, is assistant professor of
neurology and adjunct assistant professor of pediatrics
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr Saneto received
his DO from Des Moines University in Des Moines,
Iowa and his PhD from the University of Texas Medical
Branch in Galveston, Texas. He trained in pediatrics,
pediatric neurology and pediatric epilepsy at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. Saneto’s clinical interests are in epilepsy, in particular difficult-to-control
epilepsy. He is involved in vagus nerve stimulation, the
ketogenic diet and epilepsy surgery to control seizures.
Dr. Saneto’s other interest is the diagnosis, treatment
and care of patients with mitochondrial disease. He
is particularly interested in patients with both mitochondrial disease and epilepsy. Dr. Saneto is board
certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and
American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He is
also on the scientific board of advisors to the United
Mitochondrial Disease Foundation and Northwest
Epilepsy Foundation.
Hillary Shurtleff, PhD, is clinical neuropsychologist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at the University
of Washington Medical Center. She is board certified in
clinical neuropsychology through the American Board
of Professional Psychology’s American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology. She is a board member and past
president of the Pacific Northwest Neuropsychological
Society, and a member of the Psychology Credentials
and Peer Review Committee at Seattle Children’s. Her
clinical, research and teaching interests include neuropsychological aspects of epilepsy and epilepsy surgery.
Marcio Sotero de Menezes, MD, is co-director of the
Epilepsy Center at Seattle Children’s Hospital and is
associate professor of neurology and pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. His
research interests include the outcome of epilepsy
surgery in children; infantile spasms; epileptic spasms
persisting beyond infancy; use of the ketogenic diet in
treatment of seizures refractory to antiepileptic medications; use of vagus nerve stimulation in children,
especially under age 12; alternatives for the current
treatment of neonatal seizures; alternative therapies
for the treatment of seizures; pharmacokinetics; and
therapeutic options for absence epilepsy. He is an
ad hoc reviewer for the journals Epilepsia and
Pediatric Neurology.
Mary H. Warner, PhD, is neuropsychologist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and clinical assistant professor
in the Department of Neurology at the University of
Washington Medical Center. She has worked in comprehensive epilepsy programs at Harborview Medical
Center and at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle. Her
principal interests are in the integration of the cognitive, social, emotional, educational and vocational
aspects of epilepsy and other neurological disorders,
with children, adolescents, adults and families. She
has a particular interest in neuropsychological aspects
of epilepsy surgery, including lateralization and
localization of language functions in the brain.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Heidi Blume, MD, MPH
Pediatric Academic Societies Travel Award
Seattle Children’s Hospital Fellow’s Award
Sidney M. Gospe Jr., MD, PhD
Listed in “Best Doctors in America,” 2005
Laura A. Jansen, MD, PhD
NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders
and Stroke Career Development Award
John Kuratani, MD
Best Teaching Award, Division of Pediatric Neurology,
Department of Neurology, University of Washington
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
51
Neurology
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Laura A. Jansen, MD, PhD
GABA-A Receptor Function in Pediatric Focal Cortical
Dysp, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and
Stroke/NIH/DHHS, $168,291
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Nigel Bamford, MD
Synaptic Plasticity in Neonatal Psychostimulant Withdrawal, North Pacific Pediatric Neurology Colloquium,
Seattle, May 2005
Presynaptic Regulation of Corticostriatal Terminals
by Acetylcholine Unveiled During Amphetamine
Withdrawal, Gordon Research Conference, Proctor
Academy, N.H., July 2005
Chronic Methamphetamine Mediates Long-Term
Depression of Corticostriatal Release in the Dorsal
Striatum, Child Neurology Society annual meeting,
Los Angeles, September 2005
Heidi Blume, MD, MPH
Fever, Chorioamnionitis and Neonatal Encephalopathy, PAS, platform presentation/abstract, May 2005
Neonatal Encephalopathy and Socioeconomic Status:
A Population-Based Case-Control Study, Child Neurology Society abstract, poster presentation/abstract,
October 2005
Developmental Anomalies of the Central Nervous
System, Resident Didactic Conference, Seattle
Children’s, 2005
Raymond Ferri MD, PhD
Childhood Epilepsy, Kindering Center Birth-3
Program, Belleuve, Wash., January 2005
Diagnosis of Metabolic Disorders, Harborview
Neurology Resident Teaching Conference, Seattle,
February 2005
Sidney M. Gospe Jr., MD, PhD
Update on Pyridoxine-Dependent Seizures, neurology
Grand Rounds, University of Washington, 2005
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Update on Neurocutaneous Disorders, and Differential
Diagnosis of Hypotonia, visiting professor program,
Pocatello and Boise, Idaho, October 2005
Laura A. Jansen, MD, PhD
GABA-A Receptor Function in Pediatric Epilepsy,
Pacific Northwest and Western Canada Pediatric Neurology Colloquium, Vancouver, BC, Canada, May 2005
Ataxia, Pediatric Resident Conference, Seattle
Children’s, October 2005
John Kuratani, MD
Outpatient Epilepsy: Diagnostic and Management
Issues About Seizures for the Primary Care Physician,
visiting professor program, Yakima and Toppenish,
Wash., April 2005
Update on Seizure Management, visiting professor
program, Bellingham, Wash., May 2005
Russell P. Saneto, DO, PhD
Mitochondrial Disease: A Primer and Rational Treatment for Mitochondrial Disease, International College
of Integrative Medicine 43rd annual meeting, Phoenix,
March 2005
Management Strategy for Acute Illness in Patients
with Mitochondrial Disease, Ask the Mito Doc Panel
(panel member), Mitochondrial Medicine Annual
Symposium, St. Louis, 2005
Marcio Sotero de Menezes, MD
Absence Seizures and Absence Epilepsy Syndromes,
Pediatric Neurology Conference, Seattle Children’s,
February 2005
Hypotonia in Neonates and Infants, Neurology Conference, Harborview Medical Center Seattle, March 2005
AEDs in Pediatric Epilepsy, Pediatric Neurology
Conference, Seattle Children’s, June 2005
Pediatric Epilepsy Syndromes, neurology Grand
Rounds, University of Washington, July 2005
Infantile Spasms, Madigan Hospital neurology course,
Tacoma, Wash., November 2005
Neurology
PUBLICATIONS
Allan WC, Gospe SM. Seizures, syncope or breathholding presenting to the pediatric neurologist —
when is the etiology a life-threatening arrhythmia?
Semin Pediatr Neurol. 2005;12:2–9.
Bamford NS, Joyce JA. Chronic methamphetamine
mediates long-term depression of corticostriatal release
in the dorsal striatum. Ann Neurol. 2005;58(S9):S81.
Bamford NS, Singh N, Erbe JK, Joyce JA. Activation
of striatal cholinergic neurons mediates long-term depression of corticostriatal release during methamphetamine withdrawal. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts.
2005;1030:11.
Bennett CL, Huynh HM, Chance PF, Glass IA,
Gospe SM. Genetic heterogeneity for autosomal recessive pyridoxine-dependent seizures. Neurogenetics.
2005;6:143–149.
Everett L, Von Rooyen IF, Warner MH, Shurtleff H,
Saneto RP, Ojemann, J. Use of dexmedetomidine in
awake craniotomy in adolescence: report of two cases.
Pediatric Anesth. 2005.
Ferri R, Chance P. Lorenzo’s oil: advances in the
treatment of neurometabolic disorders. Arch Neurol.
Jul 2005;62(7):1045–1046.
Gospe SM, Bell RMS. Hospital pharmacy and emergency department availability of parenteral pyridoxine.
Ped Emerg Care. 2005;9:586–588.
Gospe SM, Camfield P. Cardiac causes of sudden
death: virtual panel discussion of posed questions.
Semin Pediatr Neurol. 2005;12:67–69.
Gurnett CA, Dobbs MB, Jansen LA, Bowcock AM.
Identification of a locus for complex febrile seizures on
chromosome 12q22-q23.3 in a North American family.
Epilepsia 2005;46(s8):367–368.
Jansen LA, Uhlmann EJ, Crino PB, Gutmann DH,
Wong M. Epileptogenesis and reduced inward rectifier
potassium current in tuberous sclerosis complex-1-deficient astrocytes. Epilepsia. 2005;46(12):1871–1880.
Ouyang Y, Gazit V, Jansen LA, Ess KC, Yamada KA,
Gutmann DH, Wong M. Impaired long-term potentiation and excitotoxic cell death in an animal model of
tuberous sclerosis complex. Epilepsia 2005;46(s8):14.
Saneto RP, Sotero de Menezes MA, Ojemann J,
Bournival B, Murphy P, Cook WB, Avellino A, Ellenbogen R. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy for medically
intractable seizures in children under 12 years of age.
Epilepsia. 2005;46(8):229(suppl).
Saneto RP. Unverricht-Lundborg disease for
professionals. The Epilepsy Project’s Web site
program. 2005;e-publication.
Saneto RP. Unverricht-Lundborg disease.
The Epilepsy Project’s Web site program. 2005;
e-publication.
Smyth MD, Ojemann JG, Zempel J, Robinson S,
O’Brien DF, Saneto RP, Goyal M, Appleton RE,
Park TS. Surgical outcomes for temporal lobe
epilepsy in young children: A multi-institution
analysis. Epilepsia. 2005;46(8):158 (suppl).
Sotero de Menezes M. Ketogenic diet. MedLink.
June 2005; Neurobase CD-ROM and online book.
Sotero de Menezes M. Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. E-medicine — Neurology; eMedicine
Journal, 2005.
Sotero de Menezes M. Status epilepticus. E-medicine
— Pediatrics; eMedicine Journal, June 2005.
Zerr DM, Blume HK, Berg AT, Del Beccaro MA,
Gospe SM, Allpress AL, Christakis DA. Nonfebrile
illness seizures: a unique seizure category? Epilepsia.
2005;46:952–955.
Holmes MD, Tucker DM, Brown M, Saneto RP,
Ojemann JG. Intracranial confirmation of dense array
EEG localization of extratemporal seizure onset and
propagation. Epilepsia. 2005;46(8):142(suppl).
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
53
Orthopedics
The Department of Orthopedics specializes in providing the highest-quality
pediatric care based on clinic research. We provide a full spectrum of clinical
care at Seattle Children’s Hospital and locations in Bellevue, Olympia and Everett,
Wash. as well as outreach facilities in Yakima, Wenatchee and the Tri-Cities in
Washington and in Anchorage, Alaska.
Our faculty includes some of the most accomplished pediatric orthopedic
surgeons in North America completely dedicated to providing immediate access
and care to the children of our region. We treat fractures and pediatric trauma,
spinal deformities, pediatric foot deformities including clubfoot, sports injuries
and musculoskeletal tumors (malignant and benign) and infections (acute and
chronic). We collaborate on treating neuromuscular disorders, including cerebral
palsy and myelomeningocele; scoliosis, kyphosis and pediatric spine deformities
including idiopathic and congenital deformities; and skeletal dysplasia, including
achondroplasia. We specialize in pediatric hand disorders, correcting limb length
discrepancy with Illizarov reconstruction techniques and pediatric hip disease,
including Legg-CalvГ©-Perthes disease and slipped capital femoral epiphysis.
We also practice sports medicine for children and adolescents. Our research
and education provide the foundation for improving care to all of our patients.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Ernest U. Conrad III, MD, is director of the Department
of Orthopedics at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He completed training at the Hospital of Special Surgery in New York, a
musculoskeletal tumor fellowship at the University
of Florida and a pediatric orthopedic fellowship in
Toronto. When he joined the Department of Orthopedics, he instituted the Division of Musculoskeletal
Oncology and Transplantation and multidisciplinary
clinics at the University of Washington for sarcoma
and bone tumor. He directed the Division of Orthopedic Surgery at the university and serves as medical
director at the Northwest Tissue Center, a regional
nonprofit tissue center in Seattle. Dr. Conrad’s research
includes multiple clinical studies in pediatric and adult
tumors with a special interest in pediatric limb-sparing
procedures, benign pediatric tumors and soft-tissue
sarcomas in adults. His research interests include the
metabolic imaging of sarcomas with the use of PET
scans and the biologic responses associated with
musculoskeletal transplantation.
54
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Michael J. Goldberg, MD, is consulting orthopedic surgeon at Seattle Children’s Hospital and clinical professor in the Department of Orthopedics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. He was chairman
of the Department of Orthopedics at Tufts University
School of Medicine and Tufts-New England Medical
Center, Boston. His clinical interests include skeletal
dysplasias and orthopedic syndromes. Clinics focused
on bone dysplasias and orthopedic syndromes are held
at Seattle Children’s and in Bellevue, Wash. Outreach
clinics in general pediatric orthopedics take place in
Bellevue, Olympia and Federal Way, Wash. Dr. Goldberg’s research activities include orthopedic aspects of
syndromes, and measuring the outcomes and functional health of children with musculoskeletal conditions.
He is past president of the Pediatric Orthopedic Society
of North America and past chairman of the Orthopedic
Section of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Douglas P. Hanel, MD, is chief of the Hand Clinic at
Seattle Children’s Hospital; he is professor at the
University of Washington School of Medicine and
director of the orthopedic residency program. He
trained in orthopedic surgery at St. Louis University and completed fellowships in hand surgery and
microvascular surgery at the University of Louisville.
He has completed the Teaching Scholars fellowship at
Orthopedics
the University of Washington. He has a predominant
interest in surgery of the hand and the reconstruction
of devastating limb injuries. Dr. Hanel has published
more than 50 peer-reviewed articles and 13 book
chapters; he is co-editor for the second edition of the
textbook Harborview Orthopedic Trauma Protocols.
He is principal investigator and co-investigator on two
projects dealing with the outcomes of distal radius
fractures. Dr. Hanel has editorial duties on The Journal
of Bone and Joint, Microsurgery, Orthopedics Today,
The American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery and
Techniques in Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery. He
has been honored for his teaching efforts at St. Louis
University and Medical College of Wisconsin and has
been recognized as a “Best Doctor” by Seattle magazine.
Vincent S. Mosca, MD, is program director of clinical
research in the Department of Orthopedics at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate professor of orthopedics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He is past director of the Department of Orthopedics at Seattle Children’s Hospital and chief of Pediatric
Orthopedics at the University of Washington. He now
spends time doing clinical research and writing, while
maintaining his busy clinical practice. He is a member
of 22 national and international professional organizations including the American Orthopedic Association,
American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society and
International Pediatric Orthopedic Think Tank. He
is on the editorial board for the Journal of Pediatric
Orthopedics and is chairman of the Education Council
for the Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America.
Dr. Mosca has been repeatedly listed in “Best Doctors
in America” and is listed in 10 other “Who’s Who” publications. He has been an invited guest speaker at more
than 20 US medical centers and at more than 20 international orthopedic conferences. Dr. Mosca’s main area
FACULTY
Ernest U. Conrad III, MD,
Director
Michael J. Goldberg, MD
Douglas P. Hanel, MD
Vincent S. Mosca, MD
Gregory Schmale, MD
Kit Song, MD
Theodore A. Wagner, MD
Ernest U. Conrad III
MD, Director
of clinical and research interest, and the focus of most
of his publications and presentations, is deformities of
the child’s foot. More specifically, his work focuses on
the identification, classification and treatment of sites
of deformity.
Gregory Schmale, MD, is program director of
orthopedics medical education at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and assistant professor in the Department
of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. He earned his
MD at the University of Washington and completed
fellowship training in the Department of Orthopedics
at the Children’s Hospital and University of Colorado
Health Sciences Center. His clinical interests include
general pediatric orthopedics and sports medicine. His
research activities include anterior cruciate ligament
reconstruction in the skeletally immature.
Kit Song, MD, is assistant director of pediatric orthopedic surgery and acting head of spine surgery and head
of the brachial plexus injury clinic at Seattle Children’s
Hospital; he is associate professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He completed his fellowship training in pediatric
orthopedics at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital and was a
member of the hospital staff there for three years. His
clinical interests include pediatric spinal deformities
with an emphasis on infantile deformities, musculoskeletal problems in children with neuromuscular
disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, arthrogryposis and
hip problems. His research includes bone and joint
infections, functional activity of typically developing
and disabled children, spinal cord monitoring for
scoliosis surgery, vertical expandable titanium rib
prosthesis (VEPTR) for the treatment of thoracic
dysplasia and Legg-CalvГ©-Perthes disease in children.
Theodore A. Wagner, MD, is attending physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital; he is clinical professor of spine
surgery and joint clinical professor of neurosurgery at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. He
completed a residency at the University of Washington
and a fellowship in spine surgery in Hong Kong. He
has directed the Orthopedic Physician Associates Spine
Fellowship and is a member of the international Scoliosis Research Society. Dr. Wagner’s special interest has
been in spinal deformity and in establishing physician
exchange programs with the developing world. He
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
55
Orthopedics
has recently been honored to have research in tissue
regeneration established in his name in the form of an
endowed chair and hopes to direct that research in a
significant way. The focus of his clinical energies is in
the area of spinal deformity, whether it is the result of
fracture, tumor or adolescent deformities of kyphosis
and scoliosis. Many of these conditions remain idiopathic and an effort should include a very exact data
collection to help define the primary etiology.
Secondary Deformities of Clubfoot — Classification and
Management, instructional course lecture, American
Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons annual meeting,
Washington, D.C., March 2005
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Talipes Equinovarus and Maternal Smoking: A
Population-Based Case-Control Study in Washington
State, 2nd Joint Meeting of the International Federation of Foot and Ankle Societies, Naples, Italy,
September 2005
Ernest U. Conrad III, MD
A Comparison of Knee Implant Results in Pediatric vs.
Adult Tumor Patients, abstract for poster presentation,
Connective Tissue Oncology Society meeting,
March 2005
Michael J. Goldberg, MD
Evaluation and Management of Skeletal Dysplasia,
instructional course lecture, American Academy of
Orthopedics, 72nd annual meeting, Washington, D.C.,
February 2005
Raising Special Needs Kids: Health, Growth and
Nutrition, Seattle, March 3, 2005
Limb Lengthening in Patients with Underlying Calcium Homeostasis Disorders, IPOTT annual meeting,
Seville, Spain, September 2005
Are We Helping? How Do We Know?, presidential
guest lecture, British Orthopaedic Association Annual
Meeting, Birmingham, UK, September 2005
Detection and Management of Osteoporosis, 26th
Annual Duncan Seminar, 2005
Vincent S. Mosca, MD
Leg Length Discrepancy and Foot Problems in
Children, LT Staheli Pediatric Orthopedic Seminar,
Seattle Children’s, January 2005
Lower Extremity Pediatric Orthopedics: Knowledge Is
Power, Washington State Chapter of NAPNAP annual
meeting, Shoreline, Wash., March 2005
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Tarsal Osteotomies in the Child’s Foot, Treatment of
Tarsal Coalition in Childhood, and Cavovarus Foot
Deformity in Charcot-Marie-Tooth, 11th annual meeting of the German Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society,
Augsburg, Germany, April 2005
Classification and Management of Cavovarus Foot
Deformities; Diagnosis and Management of Tarsal
Coalitions; Management of Secondary Deformities of
Clubfoot; and The Adolescent Flatfoot, XI Scientific
Meeting of the Hospital Ortopedico Infantil, Caracas,
Venezuela, October 2005
Management of Painful Flatfeet in Adolescents; Management of Tarsal Coalitions; The Ponseti Method for
Treatment of Clubfoot Deformities: The New (Old)
Gold Standard; Cavovarus Foot Deformities in CMT
Disease; and Management of Secondary Deformities
of Clubfoot, XLI Chilean Congress of Orthopedics and
Traumatology, Vina del Mar, Chile, November 2005
Pes Cavus: The Role of Tendon Transfers and Osteotomies; Adolescent Painful Flatfoot; Case Based-Discussion: What to Do When Ponseti and French Methods
Yield Partial Correction; Case-Based Discussion: Foot
and Ankle Pain in Children and Adults; and Breakout
Session: Foot Osteotomies, 2nd International POSNA/
AAOS Pediatric Orthopedic Symposium, Orlando, Fla.,
December 2005
Gregory Schmale, MD
Common Sports Injuries in Children and Adolescents
and Common Pediatric Hip Problems, LT Staheli
Pediatric Orthopedic Update, January 2005
Pediatric Foot, Gait, and Leg Disorders, American
Academy of Family Physicians, Family Practice
Board Review, April 2005
Orthopedics
More Evidence of Inadequate Preparation in
Musculoskeletal Medicine, Orthopedic Rehabilitation
Association annual meeting, Seattle, September 2005
Lee MB, Schmale GA, Leopold SS. Total hip
arthroplasty in the osteoporotic patient. Accepted to
Advances in Osteoporotic Management. January 2006.
Update on Sports Medicine, Pediatric Pearls for
Office Practice, September 2005
Lynch JR, Schmale GA, Schaad DC, Leopold SS.
Important demographic variables impact musculoskeletal knowledge and confidence of academic primary
care physicians. Accepted to the J Bone Joint Surg,
American. February 2006.
The Limping Child, 33rd Annual Advances in
Family Practice Conference, September 2005
Kit Song, MD
Advances in Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery and Nursing
Care of the Hospitalized Child, Seattle, April 2005
Non-Operative Management of Scoliosis; Pulmonary
Effects of Scoliosis; Use and Abuse of Gait Analysis;
Flexible and Rigid Flatfoot — Evaluation and Management; and Arthrogryposis — Lower Extremity Management, POSNA Croatia Outreach Course on Pediatric
Orthopedic Surgery, Dubrovnik, Croatia, and Tallinn
International Conference on Pediatric Orthopedics,
Tallinn, Estonia, September 2005
Pulmonary Effects of Scoliosis, spine Grand Rounds,
University of Washington, October 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Chang A, Schuetze SM, Conrad EU, Swisshelm KL,
Norwood TH, Rubin BP. So-called “inflammatory
leiomyosarcoma”: a series of three cases providing
additional insights into a rare entity. Int J Surg Pathol.
2005;13(2):185–195.
Conrad EU, ed. Orthopedic Oncology Diagnosis and
Treatment. New York: Thieme Publishing. 2006;
in press.
Conrad EU, Morgan HD, Leopold SS, Hawkins
DS, Bolejack VJ, Morgan AC. A comparison of knee
implant results in pediatric vs. adult tumor patients.
Abstract for poster presentation at the Connective
Tissue Oncology Society meeting. March 2005.
Mosca VS, Hennrikus W. Ankle and foot: pediatrics.
In: Orthopedic Knowledge Update 8. Vaccaro AR, ed.
Rosemont: American Academy of Orthopedic
Surgeons, 2005;757–765.
Mosca VS. Parent’s guide to Ponseti clubfoot
management. Global-HELP publication; 2005.
Mosca VS, co-author and assistant editor. Clubfoot:
Ponseti Management, 2nd ed. Staheli LT, ed. GlobalHELP Publication; 2005.
Rubin BP, Conrad EU, et al. Deep-seated, well-differentiated lipomatous tumors of the chest wall and
extremities: the role of cytogenetics in classification
and prognostication. Cancer. 2005; in press.
Schmale GA. More evidence of inadequate preparation
in musculoskeletal medicine. Clin Orthop Relat Res.
Aug 2005;437:251–259.
Schmale GA, Chansky HA, Raskind WH. Hereditary
multiple exostoses. University of Washington, 2005.
Schuetze SM, Rubin BP, Vernon C, Hawkins DS,
Bruckner JD, Conrad EU, Eary JF. Use of positron
emission tomography in localized, extremity soft tissue
sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
Cancer. 2005;103(2):339–348.
Schuetze S, Rubin B, Vernon C, Hawkins D, Conrad
EU, Eary JF, Brenner W. Metabolic imaging in the
orthopedic population. Multimedia scientific exhibit
#073, 72nd annual meeting of the American Academy
of Orthopedic Surgeons, Washington, D.C., 2005.
DuMontier TA, Falicov A, Mosca VS, Sangeorzan
B. Calcaneal lengthening: investigation of deformity correction in a flatfoot model. Foot Ankle Int.
2005;26:166–170.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
57
Department of Pediatrics
58
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
The Department of Pediatrics is proud to again be a contributor to the University
of Washington’s ranking as the number one primary care medical school in the
nation and one of its top research medical schools.
We are particularly proud of Dr. Frederick Rivara’s election to the Institute of
Medicine in 2005. Dr. Rivara, division chief of General Pediatrics, has made
many important contributions to the study of injury control methods.
Growth in our transplant programs was a priority in 2005 with the recruitment of
F. Bruder Stapleton, MD
Pediatrician-in-Chief
nationally renowned gastroenterologist Dr. Simon Horslen, director of our liver
and intestinal transplant program. Our department has a growing interest in
pediatric bioethics under the direction of Dr. Doug Diekema, interim director
of the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics.
The department’s pediatrics residency program continued to attract a record
number of applicants from across the country. A new endocrine fellowship
began in 2005.
Our immunology program has become an international leader in the genetics
of immunodeficiency disorders. We continue to be the coordinating center for
new therapy trials for children with cystic fibrosis and a leader in child health
outcomes research. Dr. Dimitri Christakis brought national attention to the
department through work that highlights the association of early exposure
to television with neurodevelopmental outcomes.
The future looks very bright with our substantial group of exceptional young
physician-scientists, 18 of whom hold mentored K-awards from the National
Institutes of Health.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
59
Adolescent Medicine
The Division of Adolescent Medicine (in the Department of Pediatrics)
provides expert consultation, diagnosis and treatment for conditions
commonly seen during adolescence, including mental health disorders,
sexually transmitted diseases, such as human papilloma virus, eating
disorders, obesity and chronic fatigue syndrome. Following a request,
members of the division also provide medical consultation for patients
throughout Seattle Children’s Hospital with conditions, such as chronic
musculoskeletal pain, gynecologic issues and somatiform disorders.
In the inpatient setting, providers coordinate closely with services
such as nutrition and child psychiatry to assure a multidisciplinary approach
to treatment. Patients are seen as outpatients following referral to the
Adolescent Medicine Clinic, the Eating Disorders Clinic, the Headache
and Biofeedback Clinic, the Reflex Neurovascular Dystrophy Clinic and
the Adolescent Gynecology Clinic. When appropriate, patients seen in
the outpatient setting are seen in consultation by members of our multidisciplinary team including physical and occupational therapy. Physicians and
nurse practitioners in the section provide medical consultation for all patients with eating disorders who are admitted
to the medical or psychiatric units.
Members of adolescent medicine are committed to providing treatment for underserved adolescents in the community
and also see patients at the Country Doctor Homeless Teen Clinic, which incorporates complementary and alternative
medicine with acupuncture, massage and naturopathy. An additional clinic at the King County Juvenile Detention Center
serves as a training site for pediatric and family medicine residents. Section providers also see patients at Harborview
Medical Center as consultants, in the Children and Teens Clinic and in the Public Health Seattle & King County STD
Clinic as attendings.
Researchers in the Division of Adolescent Medicine are working to improve the understanding and treatment for
conditions that are common for adolescents.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Mark S. Smith, MD, is chief of the Division of Adolescent
Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He is director of the University of
Washington’s adolescent medicine fellowship program
and principal investigator of a federal grant that
convenes community and academic pediatricians and
child psychiatrists in collaboration about adolescent
health issues. Additionally, Dr. Smith volunteers for
one month a year at a hospital serving Mayan Indian
children in Chiapas, Mexico. His clinical interests include psychophysiological disorders in adolescents and
the effects of stress on organic disorders. His research
interests include autonomic nervous system reactivity, the behavioral treatment of recurrent pediatric
headache and chronic fatigue syndrome in adolescence.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Cora C. Breuner, MD, MPH, is chief of the Adolescent
Medicine Clinic at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
associate professor of pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. She is also president
of the Northwest Society of Adolescent Medicine.
She received her MD from Jefferson Medical College
in Philadelphia. She completed an internship and
residency at the naval hospital in San Diego and completed a fellowship at the University of Washington.
She is a board-certified adolescent medicine specialist
and board-certified pediatrician. Dr. Breuner’s clinical interests include the treatment of eating disorders
and obesity in adolescents. She is also interested in the
management and treatment of adolescent headaches
and stress-related disorders. Dr. Breuner’s research
interests include the evaluation of yoga as an adjunctive intervention for patients with an eating disorder
and the assessment of complementary medicine usage
by pediatric patients with diabetes. She participates
in the study Incorporating Complementary and
Adolescent Medicine
Alternative Medicine into a Medical School Curriculum. Her goal is to incorporate complementary and
alternative medicine into the outpatient and inpatient
programs at Seattle Children’s.
Ann E. Giesel, MD, is chief of pediatric and adolescent
gynecology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and clinical
associate professor of pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. She serves as medical
director of the King County Juvenile Detention Center
Health Clinic and attends in Seattle Children’s Teen
HIV Clinic and the Evening Clinics for Homeless
Youth. She received her MD from the University of
Louisville. She completed her pediatrics residency and
a fellowship in adolescent medicine at the University of
Washington and was a fellow in child sexual abuse at
Harborview Medical Center. Dr. Giesel is a board-certified adolescent medicine specialist and board-certified
pediatrician.
Laura P. Richardson, MD, MPH, is director of the Adolescent Reflex Neurovascular Dystrophy Clinic at Seattle
Children’s Hospital. She earned her MD and completed
a combined residency in internal medicine and pediatrics at the University of Michigan, and she completed
an adolescent medicine fellowship. She earned her
MPH in epidemiology. Dr. Richardson specializes in
the treatment of adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions and has expertise in the treatment
of conversion disorders, somatiform disorders, obesity,
eating disorders, depression and anxiety. She is studying links between mental and physical health problems
in adolescents and developing innovative interventions
to improve the treatment of mental health conditions
for adolescents in primary care settings.
FACULTY
Mark S. Smith, MD, Chief
Cora C. Breuner, MD, MPH
Ann E. Giesel, MD
Laura P. Richardson, MD, MPH
Taraneh Shafii, MD, MPH
Mark S. Smith
MD, Chief
Taraneh Shafii MD, MPH, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. She serves as deputy medical
director of the Public Health Seattle & King County
STD Clinic. Among her clinical interests: adolescent
reproductive health care including sexually transmitted
diseases and unintended pregnancy; health manifestations of stress, anxiety and depression in adolescents;
and overweight and eating disorders in adolescents.
Dr. Shafii’s research focuses on the development and
assessment of primary and secondary interventions
to reduce high-risk sexual behaviors in adolescents
and the associated morbidity of sexually transmitted
infections and unintended pregnancy. Her interests
include early reproductive health education for youth
and early adolescents and behavioral risk-reduction
interventions for middle and older adolescents.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Cora C. Breuner, MD, MPH
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
RESEARCH FUNDING
Continuing
Laura P. Richardson, MD, MPH
Improve Primary Care Management of Adolescent
Depression, NIMH/NIH, $148,384
Mark S. Smith, MD
Health Care for the Homeless Youth, Seattle –
King County Department of Public Health,
$55,000
Department of Youth Services Contract, Juvenile
Detention, Juvenile Division (DAJD), $203,335
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Cora C. Breuner, MD, MPH
Herb Drug Interaction, noon conference,
Seattle Children’s, January 28, 2005
Substance Abuse, noon conference, Seattle Children’s,
February 18, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
61
Adolescent Medicine
Herbal Medicine in Adolescents: Who, What, When,
Where, and How?, Society for Adolescent Medicine
annual meeting, Los Angeles, March 2005
Sex, Drugs, and Rock and Roll: All You Need to Know
About Taking Care of Teenagers!, pediatric clerkship
lecture, Seattle Children’s, April 21, 2005
Bulimia, interdisciplinary conference, Seattle
Children’s, May 2005
Eating Disorders in Adolescents, noon conference,
Seattle Children’s, July 27, 2005
Obesity, Drug Use in Teens & Adolescent Violence, Portneuf Medical Center and Pocatello Children’s Clinic,
Pocatello, Idaho, August 23, 2005
Obesity, St. Luke’s Regional Medical Center, Boise,
Idaho, August 24, 2005
Ann E. Giesel, MD
Introduction to Adolescent Medicine, pediatric
clerkship lecture, Seattle Children’s, January 20, 2005
Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding, lecture to emergency
medicine fellows, Seattle Children’s, March 7, 2005
Menstrual Disorders, Multicare Health System,
Tacoma, Wash., September 17, 2005
Menstrual Disorders, noon conference, Seattle
Children’s, September 22, 2005
Contraceptive Update, Peninsula Children’s Clinic,
Great Falls, Mont., 2005
Laura P. Richardson, MD, MPH
Behavioral Aspects and Management of Pain and
Somatic Complaints in Adolescents, Grand Rounds
presentation, Seattle Children’s, February 3, 2005
Anxiety and Depression, adolescent medicine medical
meeting, Seattle Children’s, August 24, 2005
Taraneh Shafii, MD, MPH
STD Screening, adolescent medicine medical meeting,
Seattle Children’s, August 31, 2005
Approach to Adolescents, Harborview Medical Center,
Seattle, 2005
Adolescent Gynecological Issues, noon conference,
Seattle Children’s, March 18, 2005
STDs in Adolescents: Special Concerns, STD clinical
update, Seattle STD/HIV Prevention Training Center,
Seaside, Ore., 2005
Pelvic Pain, monthly interdisciplinary conference,
Seattle Children’s, April 2005
Adolescent Sexuality: ICM II Spring Quarter Human
Sexuality, University of Washington, 2005
Sexuality and Persons with Disabilities, Center on
Human Development and Disability, Seattle, Wash.,
April 4, 2005
Mark S. Smith, MD
Adolescent Medicine Issues, pediatric clerkship lecture,
Seattle Children’s, March 24, 2005
Pediatric Gynecology and Sexual Abuse Cases,
Children’s Urology Conference, Seattle Children’s,
June 7, 2005
Hypnosis for Pediatric Medical Disorders, interdisciplinary conference, Seattle Children’s, March 2005
Introduction to Adolescent Medicine, pediatric
clerkship lecture, Seattle Children’s, July 14, 2005
Physical Exam, lecture to child psychiatry residents,
Seattle Children’s, July 15, 2005
Contraception, adolescent medicine medical meeting,
Seattle Children’s, July 20, 2005
62
Contraception Update, collaborative office rounds,
Seattle Children’s, September 13, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Hypnosis with Adolescents, Society for Adolescent
Medicine annual meeting, Los Angeles, March 2005
Chronic Fatigue, monthly interdisciplinary conference,
Seattle Children’s, June 2005
Smoking, collaborative office rounds, Seattle Children’s,
July 12, 2005
Adolescent Medicine
Psychosomatic Disorders, adolescent medicine
medical meeting, Seattle Children’s, July 13, 2005
Pediatrics Among the Maya, Doctors of the World,
New York, September 27, 2005
Adolescent Medicine Issues, pediatric clerkship lecture,
Seattle Children’s, December 15, 2005
Chronic Fatigue, pediatric Grand Rounds, Sacred
Heart Medical Center, Spokane, Wash., April 13, 2005
Psychosomatic Disorders, Pediatric Society dinner,
Spokane, Wash., April 13, 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Shafii T, Kerani T, Holmes K, Handsfield H, Golden
M. Role of TPPA in the diagnosis of early syphilis
among men who have sex with men in King County,
Washington. The 16th Biennial Meeting of the
International Society for Sexually Transmitted
Diseases Research (ISSTDR), Amsterdam,
Netherlands, July 2005.
Shafii T, Stovel K, Holmes K. Early condom use by
adolescents does not predict increased number of sex
partners; it does predict lower rates of STIs: a longitudinal study with biomarkers. The 2005 Annual
Meeting of the Society for Adolescent Medicine,
Los Angeles, March 2005.
Smith MS. Chronic fatigue syndrome. In: Pediatric
Medicine, 3rd edition, Avery ME, First LR, eds.
Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 2005.
Breuner CC. Natural contraception. Adol Med Clinic.
2005;16:603–616.
Garrison MM, Katon W, Richardson LP. The impact
of psychiatric comorbidities on readmissions for diabetes in youth. Diabetes Care. 2005;28(9):2150–2154.
Hodes M, Calderon R, Breuner CC, Varley C. Treatment of eating disorders in children and adolescents.
In: The Cambridge Handbook of Effective Treatments
in Psychiatry. 2005.
Kerani RP, Handsfield HH, Stenger MS, Shafii T,
Zick E, Brewer D, Golden MR. Rising rates of
syphilis in the era of syphilis elimination. The 16th
Biennial Meeting of the International Society for
Sexually Transmitted Diseases Research (ISSTDR),
Amsterdam, Netherlands, July 2005.
Lewis CW, Lynch H, Richardson LP. Fluoride
varnish use in primary care: what do providers think?
Pediatrics. 2005;115:e69–e76.
Richardson LP, Katzenellenbogen R. Childhood and
adolescent depression: the role of primary care providers in diagnosis and treatment. Curr Probl Pediatr
Adolesc Health Care. 2005;35(1):6–24.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
63
Cardiology
The Division of Cardiology (in the Department of Pediatrics) is part of Seattle Children’s
Heart Center, a specialized team of pediatric cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, pediatric
cardiac intensive care specialists, cardiac anesthesiologists, nurses, echocardiographic technicians and caring staff. We are a comprehensive cardiac care provider
for the fetus to the adult, and our commitment to the best possible outcome for each
patient includes ongoing research into new treatments and technologies.
We have a reputation for excellence in services ranging from advanced therapeutic
catheterization procedures for common cardiac defects and heart rhythm disorders
to heart transplantation for infants with more complex cardiac problems.
The Division of Cardiology is committed to achieve greater national recognition as
a leader in innovation, collaboration and excellence. Our faculty’s intellectual curiosity
and spirit of inquiry define our culture, and our research and clinical care partnerships
provide models for our peers.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Robert J. Boucek Jr., MD, is chief of the Division of
Cardiology and co-director of the Heart Center at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. He is a professor and chief
of the Division of Cardiology in the Department of
Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He holds the Thomas Bradley Armstrong
Endowed Chair in Pediatric Cardiology. He received
his MD from Tulane University Medical School in
New Orleans. He completed a pediatrics internship
and residency at Duke University Medical Center in
Durham, N.C. and fellowships in biochemistry and
pediatric cardiology at Vanderbilt University Medical
Center in Nashville, Tenn. Dr. Boucek was the п¬Ѓrst
medical director for the pediatric heart transplant
programs at Vanderbilt and at the University of South
Florida/All Children’s Hospital. He remains active in
clinical research pertaining to cardiac transplantation. His basic research includes a collaboration on
myocardial regeneration strategies as applied to
right ventricular failure. He is principal investigator
for a study of the role of pro-apoptotic phenotype in
premature right ventricular failure. Dr. Boucek’s vision
is to develop a nationally recognized Heart Center at
Seattle Children’s.
Terrence U. Chun, MD, is attending pediatric cardiologist
and pediatric electrophysiologist at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and assistant professor at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Chun received his
MD from Hahnemann University School of Medicine
in Philadelphia and completed his pediatrics residency
64
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He also
did fellowships in pediatric cardiology at Cincinnati
Children’s Hospital and a joint pediatric electrophysiology fellowship at University of California, San Francisco and Stanford University School of Medicine.
Dr. Chun has expertise and training in pediatric
cardiology, pediatric electrophysiology and implantation of pacemakers and defibrillators. Specific areas
of clinical interest include catheter ablation of cardiac
arrhythmias, postoperative arrhythmias, implantable
device therapy for treatment of arrhythmias and
prevention of sudden cardiac death.
Michelle Z. Gurvitz, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She cares for children on an outpatient basis in
Seattle Children’s Heart Center and at Group Health
Eastside and attends and consults on the inpatient
service at Children’s. Dr. Gurvitz also participates in a
unique program with Children’s and the university that
supports the transition of older children with congenital heart disease from pediatric to adult cardiology
care. Dr. Gurvitz received her MD from the University
of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine. She
completed her internal medicine/pediatrics residency
at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and her pediatric
cardiology fellowship at the Mattel Children’s Hospital
at UCLA. Dr. Gurvitz earned an MPH at the UCLA
School of Public Health. She is board certified in pediatrics, pediatric cardiology and internal medicine. Dr.
Gurvitz has expertise and training in adolescent and
adult congenital heart disease. Specific areas of clinical
Cardiology
research interest include the transition of adolescents
with congenital heart disease to adult care and the
epidemiology of adults with congenital heart disease.
Bruce Hardy, MD, is a pediatric cardiologist who maintains a close affiliation with Seattle Children’s Hospital. He practices in Missoula, Mont., and in outreach
clinics throughout western Montana. Dr. Hardy travels
monthly to Seattle Children’s and participates twice a
week in cardiology conferences as part of telemedicine.
He earned his MD at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He completed an internship at the
University of Vermont, a pediatrics residency at the
University of Utah and a pediatric cardiology fellowship at Oregon Health Sciences University. He is board
certified in pediatrics and pediatric cardiology. He is a
fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the
American College of Cardiology. Dr. Hardy also teaches
in the Department of English at the University of
Montana, specializing in James Joyce.
Troy A. Johnston, MD, is assistant director of the cardiac catheterization laboratories at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and assistant professor in the Department
of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. He is certified by the American Board of
Pediatrics and the sub-board in pediatric cardiology.
Dr. Johnston is director of the pediatric cardiology
clerkship for medical students and residents. He has
developed a curriculum that exposes the trainee to the
basics of the sub-specialty, and he works with residents
and students on a one-on-one basis. He also supervises
residents and students on the inpatient cardiology
service. Dr. Johnston has participated in many
multi-institutional clinical trials of devices used in
transcatheter treatment of congenital heart disease
and has successfully recruited patients to participate
FACULTY
Robert J. Boucek Jr.
MD, Chief
Robert J. Boucek Jr., MD, Chief
Terrence U. Chun, MD
Michelle Z. Gurvitz, MD
Bruce Hardy, MD
Troy A. Johnston, MD
Thomas K. Jones, MD
Isamu Kawabori, MD
Mark B. Lewin, MD
Michael A. Portman, MD
Jack C. Salerno, MD
in these trials. Additionally, he has played an integral
role in writing proposals, abstracts and manuscripts
for transcatheter treatment of congenital heart disease
and has led a research project examining the use
of technology to improve the auscultation skills of
pediatric trainees. He has been an abstract reviewer
for the annual scientific session of the Society of
Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions.
Thomas K. Jones, MD, is director of the cardiac catheterization laboratories at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He is a graduate of the Jefferson
Medical College in Philadelphia. He completed his
pediatrics residency at the University of Washington
and his pediatric cardiology fellowship at the University of Colorado and the Denver Children’s Hospital.
He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics,
the American College of Cardiology and the Society
for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions.
Dr. Jones’ work has focused on congenital interventional cardiac catheterization, and he has been
co-investigator on virtually every multicenter clinical
trial in the US evaluating devices and procedures
developed for this patient population. He has served
on numerous national committees and task forces
promoting guidelines and practice standards for
patients with congenital heart disease. Dr. Jones
collaborates with emerging technology companies
developing and testing new products designed to
treat these conditions.
Isamu Kawabori, MD, is attending cardiologist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor
in the Department of Pediatrics in the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He attends in Seattle
Children’s Heart Center, Children’s Bellevue Cardiology
Clinic, Swedish Medical
Center and Central
Washington Hospital in
Amy H. Schultz, MD
J. Geoff Stevenson, MD
Wenatchee. His teachKaren Stout, MD
ing responsibilities at
Delphine Yung, MD
the university include
pediatric cardiology and
rehabilitation courses.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
65
Cardiology
Mark B. Lewin, MD, is co-director of the cardiac
ultrasound program at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Lewin’s clinical responsibilities at Seattle Children’s
include cardiology, transesophageal echocardiograms,
echocardiography and cardiovascular genetics clinics.
He is also involved in the regional fetal echocardiography service and the statewide echocardiography
telemedicine service. Dr Lewin is pediatric preceptor
of the medical student course, and he mentors residents in pediatrics who have a special interest in
cardiology or genetics.
Michael A. Portman, MD, is director of research in the
Division of Cardiology at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. He is
attending physician at Seattle Children’s Heart Center
and the Cardiology Clinic at Providence Everett Medical Center. Dr. Portman’s research activities include
pharmacological clinical trials, basic science research
projects focused on cardiac metabolism in animal
models and mentoring future clinical researchers. He
is an editorial board member of the American Journal
of Physiology — Heart and Circulatory Physiology
and co-investigator for a grant on cardiovascular
research training.
Jack C. Salerno, MD, is director of the electrophysiology
and pacing service at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
an assistant professor of pediatrics in the Cardiology
Division at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He cares for patients in Seattle Children’s
Heart Center and the electrophysiology laboratory and
also attends and consults on the inpatient service at
Children’s. Dr. Salerno received his MD from the
University of California, San Diego. He completed his
pediatric residency at UCSD and did fellowships in
pediatric cardiology and electrophysiology at Baylor
College of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Salerno has
expertise and training in pediatric cardiology, electrophysiology and pacemaker implantation. Specific areas
of clinical interest include long QT syndrome and
congenital atrioventricular block.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Amy H. Schultz, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Schultz sees outpatients in Seattle Children’s Heart
Center and at Children’s Olympia. She also attends
and consults on the inpatient service at Children’s.
Dr. Schultz received her MD from the University of
Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia. She
completed her pediatrics internship and residency at
Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and her pediatric
cardiology fellowship at The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia; she obtained additional training in
clinical epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania
School of Medicine. She is board certified in pediatrics
and pediatric cardiology. Dr. Schultz has expertise and
training in echocardiography. Her specific areas of
clinical research interest include identification of
newborns with critical congenital heart disease.
J. Geoff Stevenson, MD, is director of cardiac ultrasound
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. His clinical, research and teaching interests
are in pediatric cardiology, pediatric cardiac ultrasound
and instrumentation, intraoperative echocardiography
and international cardiac ultrasound education. He is
a working advocate for the profession of sonography in
conjunction with the American Registry for Diagnostic
Medical Sonography. He is a fellow of the American
College of Cardiology and the American Society
of Echocardiography and has served on numerous
committees, consensus groups and standards writing
committees for both organizations. He is author of
more than 100 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, has given more than 335 academic and teaching
presentations in 26 countries and has won awards
for his contribution to pediatric echocardiography.
Karen Stout, MD, teaches in the outpatient clinics at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and is assistant professor
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She is director of the Adult Congenital Heart Disease
program at the university and she teaches inpatient
and outpatient echocardiography. Her clinical interests
include adolescent and adult congenital heart disease.
Her research focuses on adolescent and adult congenital
heart disease, as well as pregnancy and heart disease.
Cardiology
Delphine Yung, MD, is attending cardiologist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She cares for children in the outpatient clinic
in Seattle Children’s Heart Center and also attends and
consults on the inpatient service. Dr. Yung received
her MD from Stanford University. She completed
an internship and junior residency in pediatrics at
Children’s Hospital Boston and a senior residency
in pediatrics at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital
in Stanford. She completed her pediatric cardiology fellowship at Children’s Hospital of New York, Columbia
University. Dr. Yung has expertise and training in all
aspects of pediatric cardiology, particularly pulmonary
hypertension and exercise testing. Her clinical interests
include cardiomyopathy, pulmonary hypertension,
transplant and the exercise lab at Children’s Heart
Center. Her current research focuses on exercise
capacity in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.
A Multicenter, Placebo-Controlled, Eight-Month Study
of the Effect of Twice-Daily Carvedilol in Children with
Congestive Heart Failure due to Systemic Ventricular
Systolic Dysfunction, University of Utah, GlaxoSmithKline, $57,615
AWARDS AND HONORS
Cardiolite 301, Bristol Myers Squibb Medical Imaging,
$252,849
Robert J Boucek Jr., MD
Thomas Bradley Armstrong Chair in Pediatric
Cardiology, awarded 2005
Mark B. Lewin, MD
Presentation award, Fifth International Conference
on Successes and Failures in Telehealth, Brisbane,
Australia, August 2005
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Michael A. Portman, MD
A Randomized Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled,
Dose-Ranging, Parallel Group Study of Oral Sildenafil
in the Treatment of Children, 1-16 Yrs, with Pulmonary
Hypertension, Pfizer, Inc., $155,987
A Multicenter, Open-Label Extension Study to Evaluate
the Safety of Twice-Daily Oral Carvedilol in Pediatric
Patients with Chronic Heart Failure, University of
Utah, GlaxoSmithKline, $62,645
A Multicenter, Long-Term Extension Study to Assess the
Safety of Oral Sildenafil in the Treatment of Subjects
Who Have Completed Study A1481131, Pfizer, Inc.,
U.S. Pharmaceuticals Group, $104,813
Triostat in Children During CPB Supplement,
Food & Drug Administration, $350,000
Delphine Yung, MD
Case History: International, Multicenter Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Cardiolite Myocardial
Perfusion Imaging in Pediatric Subjects with Kawasaki
Disease, Protocol Cardiolite 302, Bristol Myers Squibb
Medical Imaging, $165,180
DuP 843-201: A Phase I-II, Open-Label, Multicenter
Trial to Determine the Dosimetry and Safety of
Technetium Tc99m Sestamibi in Pediatric Subjects,
Bristol Myers Squibb Medical Imaging, $55,269
Continuing
Michael A. Portman, MD
Triostat in Children During CPB, Food & Drug
Administration, $388,757
Thyroid Regulation in the Developing Heart,
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/NIH/
DHHS, $139,184
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Robert J. Boucek Jr., MD
Assessment of Right Ventricular Function by
Echocardiography, International Symposia on
Congenital Heart Disease, February 2005
Terrence U. Chun, MD
Pacemakers and Defibrillators, surgical floor nursing
education, Seattle Children’s, February 2005
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Cardiology
Sudden Cardiac Death in Children, cardiology fellow
EP lecture, University of Washington Medical Center,
March 2005
Basic Electrocardiography, residency core curriculum,
Seattle Children’s, March 2005
Pacing 101, PICU orientation core lecture, Seattle
Children’s, March 2005
Arrhythmias for the General Pediatrician, residency
noon lecture, Seattle Children’s, July 2005
Complex Cases in Pediatric EP, NW Young EP
Symposium, July 2005
Complex Electrocardiograms, residency noon lecture,
Seattle Children’s, August 2005
Cardiac Emergencies, residency noon lecture,
Seattle Children’s, December 2005
Michelle Z. Gurvitz, MD
Intraoperative Pulmonary Artery Stenting: An Alternative Technique for the Management of Congenital
Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in Adjunct with Surgical
Repairs, annual meeting of the Society of Thoracic
Surgeons, Tampa, Fla., January 2005
Inpatient Service Utilization of Congenital Heart Disease Patients Surrounding the Transition to Adulthood,
annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies,
Washington, D.C., May 2005
Implementing Quality Improvement in a Pediatric
Cardiology Clinic and Insurance Patterns of Hospitalized Young Adults with Congenital Heart Disease:
What Predicts Private Insurance?, American Academy
of Pediatrics annual meeting, Washington, D.C.,
October 2005
Ventricular Septal Defect: From Simple to Eisenmenger,
Ahmanson-UCLA Adult Congenital Heart Center
Conference on Complex Management of Adults with
Congenital Heart Disease, Los Angeles, 2005
Troy A. Johnston, MD
Pediatric Cardiology: An Introduction, MEDEX
Northwest Physician Assistant Program, Seattle,
April 27, 2005
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Thomas K. Jones, MD
ASD & PFO Transcatheter Management, Cath
Lab Conference, Swedish Heart Center, Seattle,
January 4, 2005
Holes in the Heart, Oregon Heart and Vascular
Institute, cardiology Grand Rounds, Eugene, Ore.,
March 2005
Patent Ductus Arteriosus and Perivalvular Leaks,
ACCIS 2005, Interventional Approaches for Structural
Heart Disease, 54th Annual Scientific Session,
American College of Cardiology, Orlando, Fla.,
March 6, 2005
Heart Disease in Children and Adolescents, Family
Practice Board review, American Academy of Family
Physicians, Seattle, April 22, 2005
PFO and Stroke: Cause or Innocent Bystander?, 28th
Scientific Sessions, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.,
May 6, 2005
Interventional Catheterization, “Day of Honor”
celebration, Seattle Children’s, June 30, 2005
Structural Heart Disease, Scope of the Problem, and
Emerging Technologies Symposium session moderator,
Summer in Seattle (SIS) 2005, Seattle, July 20, 2005
Cath Lab Rounds, PFO, and ASD, Summer in Seattle
(SIS) 2005, Seattle, July 21, 2005
PFO: Technique and Strategy and live case moderator,
Summer in Seattle (SIS) 2005, Seattle, July 22, 2005
Pivotal Trial Results, Gore HELEX Septal Occluder
investigator’s meeting, Seattle, July 23, 2005
HELEX Septal Occluder — A Critical Look at
Factors for Success, Pediatric Interventional Cardiac
Symposium (PICS/ENTICHS-2005), Buenos Aires,
Argentina, September 15, 2005
Stents, Program moderator, Pediatric Interventional
Cardiac Symposium (PICS/ENTICHS-2005),
Buenos Aires, Argentina, September 16, 2005
Cardiology
Mark B. Lewin, MD
Accuracy and Utility of Real-Time Pediatric Echocardiographic Transmission Via Telemedicine, platform
presentation, Fifth International Conference on Successes and Failures in Telehealth, Brisbane, Australia,
August 2005.
Karen Stout, MD
Cardiology Pearls, American College of Physicians
National Board Review Course, 2005
Sudden Death: Preparticipation Cardiac Screening of
the Young Athlete, invited lecturer, 19th annual A Day
in the Office: Problems in Pediatric Practice, sponsor:
Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, April 2005.
Cardiology Gems, Washington Chapter, American
College of Physicians, Seattle, 2005
Pediatric Cardiology: An Overview of the Field, invited
lecturer, physical therapy graduate program, University
of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Wash., May 2005.
Perinatology visiting professor program, fetal cardiac
evaluation, Grand Rounds, Yakima Valley Memorial
Hospital, Yakima, Wash., August 2005.
How-To Session: Genetic Testing in Pediatric Heart
Disease, 2005 Scientific Sessions, American Heart
Association, Dallas, November 2005.
Michael A. Portman, MD
Obtaining Funding from the Food and Drug
Administration, American Pediatric Society,
Washington, D.C., 2005
Jack C. Salerno, MD
Syncope, residency noon lecture, Seattle Children’s,
May and August 2005
Morning Report: ECG Unknowns, residency noon lecture, Seattle Children’s, October and December 2005
J. Geoff Stevenson, MD
Congenital Heart Disease: Evaluation of Unoperated
Common Congenital Defects and Congenital Heart
Disease: Assessment After “Corrective” or Palliative
Surgery, Pacific Northwest Review of Perioperative
Echocardiography, Seattle, 2005
Complications During Pediatric Transesophageal
Echocardiography: Low and Avoidable and Does the
Age at Presentation Affect the Natural History of Mild
Isolated Valvular Pulmonary Stenosis?, World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery,
Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2005
Update in Heart Failure, emergency medicine
Grand Rounds, Seattle, Wash., 2005
Pregnancy and Congenital Heart Disease,
American Association of Pediatrics national meeting,
Washington, D.C., October 2005
Diastolic Dysfunction, American College of Physicians
regional meeting, Seattle, November 2005
Adults with Congenital Heart Disease, Washington
Chapter, American College of Cardiology annual
session, December 2005
Thomas K. Jones, MD
Visiting proctorship, proctored Dr. Samuel Lau in
performance of Amplatzer septal occluder closure of
atrial septal defects, Sacred Heart Medical Center,
Eugene, Ore., March 2, 2005
PFO: Technique and strategy, Summer in Seattle Interventional Cardiovascular Symposium, Webcast, Seattle
Visiting proctorship, proctored Dr. David Jessup in
performance of Amplatzer PFO occluder closure of
patent foramen ovale, St. Joseph Medical Center,
Bellingham, Wash., March 24, 2005
Visiting proctorship, proctored Dr. Todd Caulfield in
performance of Amplatzer septal occluder closure
of atrial septal defects, St. Vincent Medical Center,
Portland, Ore., June 3 and September 6, 2005
Karen Stout, MD
Care of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease, nursing
annual educational session, University of Washington
Medical Center, 2005
Visiting professor, interventional cardiology, Yakima/
Toppenish, Wash., October 26–27, 2005
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Cardiology
PUBLICATIONS
Berman Rosenzweig E, Dunbar Ivy D, Widlitz A,
Doran A, Claussen LR, Yung D, Abman SH, Morganti
A, Nguyen N, Barst RJ. Effects of long-term bosentan
in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension.
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005;46:697–704.
Boucek RJ Jr., Martinez R. Echocardiographic
determination of right ventricular function.
Cardiology in the Young. 2005;15:48–51.
Chang RK, Gurvitz M, Rodriguez S, Hong E, Klitzner
TS. Current practice of exercise stress testing among
pediatric cardiology and pulmonology centers in
the United States. Pediatr Cardiol. Oct 18, 2005;
e-publication.
Chrisant MRK, Naftel DC, Drummond-Webb J,
Chinnock R, Canter CE, Boucek, MM, Boucek RJ Jr.,
Hallowell SC, Kirklin JK, Morrow WR, the Pediatric
Heart Transplant Study Group. Fate of infants with
hypoplastic left heart syndrome listed for cardiac
transplantation: a multicenter study. J Heart Lung
Transplant. 2005;24:576–582.
Danzi S, Klein I, Portman MA. Triiodothyronine
mediates gene transcription in human heart.
Am J Card. 2005;95(6):787–789.
Gurvitz M, Chang R-KR, Ramos FJ, Allada V, Child
JS, Klitzner TS. Variations in congenital heart disease
training in adult and pediatric cardiology fellowship
programs. J Am Coll Cardiol. Sept 2005;46:893–898.
McBride KL, Pignatelli R, Lewin M, Ho T, Fernbach
S, Menesses A, Lam W, Leal SM, Kaplan N, Schliekelman P, Towbin JA, Belmont JW. Inheritance analysis
of congenital left ventricular outflow tract obstruction
malformations: Segregation, multiplex relative risk,
and heritability. Am J Med Genet. Feb 2, 2005;
e-publication.
Ploplys EA, Muzaffar AR, Stevenson JG, Cohen GC.
Direct microvascular repair of an infant’s transected
coronary artery. J Reconstructive Microsurgery.
2005;21(8):547–549.
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Portman MA, Qian K, Krueger J, Ning XH. T3
directly modifies phosphorylation potential in sheep
heart in vivo. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol.
2005;288:2484–2490.
Portman MA, Zhang J. Myocardial Energy transport
and heart failure. Current Cardiology Reviews. 2005;
1(1):17–27.
Quintessenza JA, Jacobs JP, Morell VO, Giroud JM,
Boucek RJ Jr. The initial experience with a bicuspid
polytetrafluoroethylene pulmonary valve in 41 children
and adults: a new option for right ventricular outflow
tract reconstruction. Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
2005;79:924–931.
Schultz AH, Jarvik GP, Wernovsky G, Bernbaum J,
Clancy RR, D’Agostino JA, Gerdes M, McDonaldMcGinn D, Nicolson SC, Spray TL, Zackai E, Gaynor
JW. Effect of congenital heart disease on neurodevelopmental outcome within multiple gestation births.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2005;130(6):1511–1516.
Steele A, Gok F, Marikar Y, Steele P, Chamizo W, Scott
M, Boucek RJ Jr. Resident stem-like cells traffic from
heart ex vivo, expanded in vitro, can be transplanted in
vivo. J Heart Lung Transplant. 2005;24:1930–1939.
Craniofacial Medicine
The Division of Craniofacial Medicine (in the Department of Pediatrics) aims to provide
and coordinate the highest-quality interdisciplinary care of patients with congenital and
acquired craniofacial conditions. Our faculty’s expertise spans the fields of epidemiology,
genetics, developmental biology and clinical research. We provide outpatient and inpatient
care at Seattle Children’s and comprehensive consultations at both Children’s and the
University of Washington.
Pediatric craniofacial medicine faculty coordinate care through Seattle Children’s
Craniofacial Center and several specialty clinics. These clinics include the Plagiocephaly
Clinic, which focuses on the diagnosis and management of postnatal deformational plagiocephaly; the Prenatal Clinic, which provides prenatal assessment, education and counseling
for mothers and families after the prenatal diagnosis of a craniofacial condition; and the
Craniofacial Genetics Clinic, which provides focused diagnostic evaluations, education and
counseling for families affected by craniofacial conditions. These clinical programs provide
long-term management of craniofacial conditions, including family education. We also
pursue state-of-the-art clinical research to develop improved diagnostic, preventive and
health care delivery strategies.
The chief of the Division of Craniofacial Medicine also directs the Center for
Craniofacial Research, which supports interdisciplinary research for the division. Our
long-term goal is to develop an interdisciplinary research program that parallels our
clinical center and to become an international leader in craniofacial-related science.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Michael L. Cunningham, MD, PhD, is chief of the Division
of Craniofacial Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and associate professor of pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. He is medical director of Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center and the
Jean Renny Endowed Chair in Craniofacial Medicine.
He is also adjunct associate professor at the university
School of Medicine and School of Dentistry. Dr. Cunningham balances responsibilities in administration,
patient care and research. He does bedside teaching
FACULTY
Michael L. Cunningham
MD, PhD, Chief
Michael L. Cunningham, MD,
PhD, Chief
Timothy C. Cox, PhD
Carrie L. Heike, MD, MS
Anne V. Hing, MD
Charlotte W. Lewis, MD, MPH
Wendy Mouradian, MD, MS
Jacqueline R. Starr, PhD,
MS, MPH
of medical students, dental students and pediatric
residents. His clinical interests focus on the diagnosis
and long-term interdisciplinary care of children with
craniofacial malformations with a particular interest in
the craniosynostoses. He is co-investigator on several
clinical research projects, ranging from the epidemiology of positional plagiocephaly to the risk factors
for obstructive sleep apnea. Dr. Cunningham’s basic
molecular and developmental biology lab has been
open since 1993 and is using mouse and tissue culture
models to investigate the molecular causes of craniosynostosis and developmental pathogenesis of midface
hypoplasia associated with syndromic craniosynostosis.
Timothy C. Cox, PhD, is research associate professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington and an
adjunct faculty member in the Department of Oral
Biology. His primary research interests focus on
the genetic and epigenetic factors that regulate
development of the craniofacial region and how
perturbations in these factors contribute in particular
to the presentation of cleft lip and palate. He has also
had a long interest and involvement in both X-linked
and mitochondrial diseases. His research team employs
existing and newly developed in-house genetic
technologies to create and investigate mouse and
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
71
Craniofacial Medicine
chick embryo models of cleft lip and palate. Dr Cox’s
interests also extend to other craniofacial malformations (most notably the craniosynostoses) and the
development of strategies to better diagnose, manage
and counsel patients. He held several leading positions
in craniofacial medicine in Australia, including director
of genetic programs at the Australian Craniofacial Unit
and co-director of Monash University’s MouseWorks,
a highly regarded mouse genetic modification facility.
Carrie L. Heike, MD, MS, is acting instructor in the
Department of Pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. She completed a
clinical fellowship in the Craniofacial Center at Seattle
Children’s Hospital. Dr. Heike’s research focuses on
the genetic epidemiology of craniofacial conditions.
She has a special interest in working with families
and children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. She is
investigating the genetic variation in children with
this syndrome and aims to understand whether this
variation contributes to the development of craniofacial anomalies in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. She is
also using three-dimensional imaging combined with
anthropometry to quantify the craniofacial variation
in syndromes that affect craniofacial structures.
Anne V. Hing, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor in the
Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine and an adjunct faculty member
in the Division of Medical Genetics. Her clinical
interests include the diagnosis and management of
infants, children and adolescents with craniofacial and
genetic conditions. She works in the Craniofacial and
Craniofacial Genetics Clinic and the Limb Deficiency
Clinic. She also serves as a genetics consultant in
seven different outreach genetics clinics throughout
the states of Washington and Alaska. She coordinates
the craniofacial resident elective course and provides
bedside teaching. She has served as Seattle Children’s
principal investigator in a multicenter international
study of the genetics of cleft lip and palate for the past
six years. She is collecting pilot data for a future genetic
study of sagittal synostosis using novel quantitative
measures of head shape.
Charlotte W. Lewis, MD, MPH, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. Her primary research interest is disparities
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in health and health care access, with a specific focus
on oral health and access to dental care. Her research
has involved documenting disparities in access to
oral health services for low-income and special needs
children as well as developing and evaluating strategies to improve pediatric oral health through expanded
pediatrician and family physician involvement in
these areas.
Wendy Mouradian, MD, MS, is clinical professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington, with
adjunct appointments in pediatric dentistry, dental
public health sciences and health services (at the
School of Public Health). She is director of regional
initiatives for the university School of Dentistry and
has served as director of the craniofacial program at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. Dr. Mouradian also heads
the Oral-Systemic Theme Committee at the university
School of Medicine, charged with integrating oral
health into the curriculum of medical students. Dr.
Mouradian earned her MD from Columbia University
and her MS from the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology. She completed a fellowship at the University of Washington. Dr. Mouradian has received several
national awards for her role organizing and chairing
The Face of a Child: Surgeon General’s Conference on
Children and Oral Health; she was recognized by the
American Dental Education Association for her efforts
to advance the importance of oral health to the overall
health of children. She is associate director of the
Center for Leadership Education in Pediatric Dentistry.
Her research areas include quality of life for children
with craniofacial conditions, ethics and educational
policy related to children’s oral health.
Jacqueline R. Starr, PhD, MS, MPH, is epidemiologist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and research assistant professor of pediatrics and epidemiology at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. She works full time
in Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center. Her primary
research interests relate to identifying genetic variants
that may contribute to the occurrence of craniofacial
anomalies, with a particular focus on craniofacial
microsomia. She also collaborates on research projects
that broadly target the causes of craniofacial anomalies
and the outcomes of clinical treatments for conditions
such as cleft lip and palate.
Craniofacial Medicine
AWARDS AND HONORS
Michael L. Cunningham, MD, PhD
Jean Renny Endowed Chair in Pediatric Craniofacial
Medicine, awarded 2005
Parent’s Choice Award, Seattle Children’s, 2005
Wendy Mouradian, MD, MS
American Dental Education Association, Presidential
Citation, 2005
Jacqueline R. Starr, PhD, MS, MPH
Young Investigator Award, Seattle Children’s, 2005
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Anne V. Hing, MD
Homozygosity Mapping of Oculo-oto-facial Dysplasia,
National Institute of Child Health and Human
Development/NIH/DHHS, $65,932
Continuing
Michael L. Cunningham, MD, PhD
Dental and Orthodontic Access in Craniofacial Care,
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research,
$157,930
Anne V. Hing, MD
Genetics of Cleft Lip/Palate: A Multicenter International Consortium, University of Iowa, National Institute
of Dental and Craniofacial Research, $52,716
Charlotte W. Lewis, MD, MPH
Primary Care Provider and Preventive Oral Health,
NIDCR/NIH, $125,959
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Timothy C. Cox, PhD
The Aetiopathology of Cleft Lip and Palate, Murdoch
Children’s Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria,
Australia, May 2005
Tissue Mosaicism for Respiratory Chain Deficiency in
Mice Provides Evidence of Capacity of the Embryonic
Heart to Remodel, symposium presentation, ComBio05, Adelaide, Australia, August 2005
Tissue Mosaicism for Respiratory Chain Deficiency in
Mice Provides Evidence of Capacity of the Embryonic
Heart to Remodel, International Congress of Developmental Biologists, Sydney, Australia, September 2005
What Determines the Severity of Clinical Presentation?
and Novel Insights into Fetal and Adult Cardiac Health
Revealed in a Unique Mouse Cardiomyopathy Model,
Genetic Health Services Victoria, Parkville, Victoria,
Australia, November 2005
Michael L. Cunningham, MD, PhD
A Fourier-Based Approach for Quantifying Sagittal
Synostosis Head Shape, American Cleft PalateCraniofacial Association (ACPA) annual meeting,
Myrtle Beach, S.C., April 2005
Classifying Craniosynostosis Deformations from Skull
Shape Imaging, Computer-Based Medical Systems
(CBMS), The 18th IEEE Symposium, Dublin, Ireland,
June 2005
TWIST Box Mutations, Sex-Related Asymmetries,
and Rare FGFR and TWIST1 Sequence Variants in
Single-Suture Craniosynostosis, American Society
of Human Genetics, Salt Lake City, October 2005
A Symbolic Shape-Based Retrieval of Skull Images,
American Medical Informatics Association,
Washington, D.C., October 2005
Prevalence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in the
Craniofacial Clinic Population, Otolaryngology —
Head & Neck Surgery, Los Angeles, September 2005
Cleft Lip and Palate; Craniosynostosis; Branchial Arch
Anomalies and Plagiocephaly, housestaff teaching
conferences, Seattle Children’s, 2005
Carrie L. Heike, MD, MS
Craniofacial Features and TBX1 in 22q11 Deletion
Syndrome, American Academy of Pediatrics Section
on Genetics and Birth Defects Annual Meeting at the
American Society of Human Genetics, Salt Lake City,
October 2005
Syndromes Associated with Orofacial Clefts, housestaff
teaching conference, Seattle Children’s, 2005
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Craniofacial Medicine
Anne V. Hing, MD
Fine Mapping of Two Genetic Loci for Nonsyndromic
Cleft Lip, American Association of Dental Research,
March 2005
A Fourier-Based Approach for Quantifying Sagittal
Synostosis Head Shape, American Cleft PalateCraniofacial Association (ACPA) annual meeting,
Myrtle Beach, S.C., April 2005
Novel Mutations in the TWIST Box Anti-Osteogenic
Domain of TWIST1 Associated with Single-Suture
Craniosynostosis, American Society of Human
Genetics, 2005
Fine Mapping Candidate Genes in Cleft Lip Loci
at 1p22-p33, 3q26-q28, 15q12-q14, and 17q12-31,
American Journal of Human Genetics, 2005
Mirror Image Findings Noted on Three-Dimensional
CT Scans of Monozygous Twins Concordant for
Sagittal Synostosis, Northwest Genetics Exchange,
Vancouver, BC, Canada
Genetic Assessment of Craniofacial Anomalies,
orthodontic resident lecture, Seattle Children’s,
November 17, 2005
Charlotte W. Lewis, MD, MPH
Maternal and Child Oral Health Institute
Meeting, keynote speaker, HRSA-MCHB, Denver,
November 2–3, 2005
Wendy Mouradian, MD, MS
Oral Health for Montana’s Children and Families:
What We Can Do Together, keynote address, Treasuring
Montana’s Maternal and Child Health, Montana State
— Spring Public Health Conference, Bozeman, Mont.,
May 2005
Whose Responsibility Is Children’s Oral Health?,
keynote address, Royal Melbourne Children’s Hospital,
Melbourne, Australia, Nov 2, 2005
The Importance of Oral Health in Children: Ethical
and Social Issues, keynote address, International
Association of Pediatric Dentistry, Sydney, Australia,
Nov 3, 2005
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Jacqueline R. Starr, PhD, MS, MPH
Adjusting for Potential Confounders via Propensity
Scores: Mimicking Randomization Through Observational Studies?, University of Washington Dental
Public Health Sciences, April 2005
Case-Control Versus Family-Based Approaches for
Evaluating Maternal Genetic Effects, American
Society for Human Genetics, Salt Lake City,
October 25–29, 2005
Complications Within the First 24 Hours Following
Cleft Lip Repair: A Justification for Overnight Observation, American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association
62nd annual meeting, Myrtle Beach, S.C., April 2005
A Multicenter Study of Inter- and Intrarater Reliability in the Evaluation of Velopharyngeal Insufficiency,
American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology 20th
annual meeting, Las Vegas, May 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Collett B, Breiger D, King D, Cunningham M,
Speltz M. Neurodevelopmental implications of
“deformational” plagiocephaly. J Dev Behav Pediatr.
Oct 2005;26(5):379–389.
Edwards T, Patrick DM, Topolski T, Aspinall C,
Mouradian W, Speltz M. Approaches to craniofacialspecific quality of life assessment in adolescents.
Cleft Palate Craniofac. 2005;42(1):12–24.
Heike CL, Cunningham ML, Steiner RD, Wenkert D,
Hornung RL, Gruss JS, Gannon FH, McAlister WH,
Mumm S, Whyte MP. Skeletal changes in epidermal
nevus syndrome: does focal bone disease harbor
clues concerning pathogenesis? Am J Med Genet A.
Dec 1, 2005;139(2):67–77.
Kapp-Simon KA, Leroux B, Cunningham M, Speltz
ML. Multisite study of infants with single-suture craniosynostosis: preliminary report of presurgery development. Cleft Palate Craniofac J. Jul 2005;42(4):377–384
Lewis CW, Robertson A, Phelps S. Unmet dental care
needs among children with special health care needs:
implications for the medical home. Pediatrics.
Sep 2005;116(3):e426–e431.
Craniofacial Medicine
Lewis CW, Ose M, Aspinall C, Omnell L. Community
orthodontists and craniofacial care: results of a
Washington state survey. Cleft Palate Craniofacial J.
Sep 2005;42(5):521–525.
Smith R, Lewis CW. Availability of dental appointments for young and Medicaid-insured children in
King County Washington: implications for access.
Pediatric Dentistry. May–Jun 2005;27(3):207–211.
Lin HJ, Ruiz-Correa S, Sze RW, Cunningham ML,
Speltz ML, Hing AV, Shapiro LG. Efficient symbolic signatures for classifying craniosynostosis skull
deformities. Lecture Notes in Computer Science.
2005;3765:302–313.
So J, Suckow V, Kijas Z, Kalscheuer V, Moser B, Winter
J, Baars M, Firth H, Lunt P, Hamel P, Meinecke P,
Moraine C, Odent S, Schinzel A, van der Smagt JJ,
Devriendt K, Albrecht B, Gillessen-Kaesbach G, van
der Burgt I, Petrij F, Faivre L, McGaughran J, McKenzie F, Opitz JM, Cox TC, Schweiger S. Mild phenotypic
spectrum in a series of Opitz BBB/G syndrome patients
with MID1 mutations. Am Med Genet. 2005;132A:1–7.
McGillivray G, Savarirayan R, Cox TC, Stojkoski C,
McNeil R, Bankier A, Bateman JF, Rosciolo T, Gardner
RJM, Lamande SR. Familial scaphocephaly syndrome
caused by a novel mutation in the FGFR2 tyrosine
kinase domain. Med Genet. 2005;42:656–662.
Mouradian W, Reeves A, Evans R, Kim S, Schaad
D, Marshall S, Slayton R. Oral health curriculum for
medical students at the University of Washington.
Acad Med. 2005;80:434–442.
Parashar SY, Anderson PJ, Cox TC, McLean N, David
DJ. Multidisciplinary management of Opitz GBBB syndrome. Annals of Plastic Surgery. 2005;55:402–408.
Pollack PS, Shields KE, Burnett DM, Osborne MJ,
Cunningham ML, Michael E, Stepanavage ME. Pregnancy outcomes after maternal exposure to simvastatin
and lovastatin. Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol.
Nov 2005;73(11):888–896.
Ratisoontorn C, Cunningham ML. Saethre-Chotzen
syndrome. In: GeneReviews at GeneTests: Medical
Genetics Information Resource. Seattle: University
of Washington, January 3, 2005; e-publication.
Ratisoontorn C, Seto ML, Broughton KM, Cunningham ML. In-vitro differentiation profile of osteoblast
derived from patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.
Bone. Apr 2005;36(4):627–634.
Slavotinek A, Parisi M, Heike C, Hing A, Huang E.
Craniofacial defects of blastogenesis: duplication of
pituitary with cleft palate and oropharyngeal tumors.
Am Med Genet, Part A. May 15, 2005;135(1):13–20.
Starr JR. The relative contribution of oral cancer risk
factors may differ in younger as compared to older
adults. J Evidence-Based Dent Pract. 2005;5:78–79.
Starr JR, Chen C, Doody DR, Hsu L, Ricks S, Weiss
NS, Schwartz SM. Risk of testicular germ cell cancer in relation to variation in maternal and offspring
cytochrome p450 genes involved in catechol estrogen
metabolism. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev.
2005;14:2183–2190.
Starr JR, Hsu L, Schwartz SM. Performance of the
log-linear approach to case-parent triad data for assessing maternal genetic associations with offspring
disease: type I error, power, and bias. Am J Epidemiol.
2005;161:196–204.
Starr JR, Hsu L, Schwartz SM. Assessing maternal
genetic associations: a comparison of the log-linear
approach to case-parent triad data and a case-control
approach. Epidemiology 2005;16:294–303.
Sze RW, Hopper RA, Ghioni V, Gruss JS, Ellenbogen
RG, King D, Hing AV, Cunningham ML. MDCT
diagnosis of the child with posterior plagiocephaly.
Am J Roentgenol. Nov 2005;185(5):1342–1346.
Yeung LC, Cunningham ML, Allpress AL, Gruss JS,
Ellenbogen RG, Zerr DM. Surgical site infections
following pediatric intracranial surgery for craniofacial
malformations: frequency and risk factors. Neurosurgery. Apr 2005;56(4):733–739.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
75
Critical Care Medicine
The Division of Critical Care Medicine (in the Department of Pediatrics)
delivers comprehensive, state-of-the-art critical care medicine focused
in three clinical arenas: cardiac intensive care at Seattle Children’s
Hospital, medical-surgical intensive care at Seattle Children’s and
trauma intensive care at Harborview Medical Center. Children’s Pediatric
Intensive Care Unit (PICU) represents an epicenter for a number of highprofile Children’s programs, including the Heart Center, Seattle Cancer
Care Alliance, solid organ transplantation, neurosurgery, craniofacial
surgery, hematology/oncology, Airlift Northwest and a range of extracorporeal life-support technologies. With a “right care right now” attitude,
12 critical care medicine faculty and seven fellows oversee all care in
the University of Washington PICUs.
Several crucial concepts first evolved within Children’s PICU,
including family-centered care, formal quality-improvement and patientsafety initiatives, computerized physician order entry (CPOE), severity of
illness risk-adjusted outcomes analysis and innovative infection control programs. Children’s PICU received a design award
from the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the American Institute of Architecture, and serves as a family-friendly, safe
haven for critically ill children in the WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho).
Critical care medicine faculty are involved in clinical, research, teaching and service activities within Children’s
Department of Pediatrics, Harborview Medical Center and the University of Washington. Despite the very high clinical
acuity and activity involved in intensive care training, critical care medicine fellows all participate in basic, translational/
clinical or outcomes research with an expectation of an academic career following fellowship training.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Jerry J. Zimmerman, MD, PhD, is chief of the Division of
Critical Care Medicine and director of the Pediatric
Intensive Care Unit at Seattle Children’s Hospital.
He is professor of pediatrics and anesthesiology at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr.
Zimmerman has been chair of the Scientific Advisory
Committee for Children’s Hospital Clinical Research
Center since its inception. He is a member of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and a charter member of
the American College of Critical Care Medicine. With
Bradley Fuhrman, Zimmerman is co-editor of the current premier textbook for the п¬Ѓeld, Pediatric Critical
Care. Additionally, Zimmerman serves on the editorial
boards for Critical Care Medicine and Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, and is book review editor for both
journals. He also provides ad hoc review for a number
of other journals. Dr. Zimmerman is interested in the
disequilibrium between the systemic inflammatory
response syndrome and compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome that occurs as an important
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
aspect of pathophysiology in critical illness. He is
particularly interested in the integrated role of neurological, endocrinologic and inflammatory cross-talk,
particularly involving reactive oxygen species and fatty
acid–derived mediators and their effect on metabolism.
Dr. Zimmerman was chosen as a charter principal
investigator for the recently established Collaborative
Pediatric Critical Care Research Network.
Harris P. Baden, MD, is director of the Cardiac Intensive
Care Program at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
director of the Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Fellowship Program. Dr. Baden has served in similar
capacities in the Department of Pediatrics at Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago. He
completed his fellowship training in the Department of
Anesthesiology at Seattle Children’s in 1995. Dr. Baden
serves on the ICU Leadership Committee, the hospital
Quality Improvement Steering Committee, and is
medical director of the Point of Care Testing Program
for the hospital. His clinical, teaching and research
interests relate to pediatric cardiac intensive care and
medical education.
Critical Care Medicine
Thomas V. Brogan, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and Harborview Medical Center
and associate professor of pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. He completed a
residency in pediatrics and a fellowship in pediatric
critical care medicine. Dr. Brogan has published a
number of peer-reviewed articles and several chapters
with an emphasis on respiratory physiology. He has
also published a number of articles related to pediatric
critical care including studies on mechanical ventilation, necrotizing fasciitis and extracorporeal membrane
oxygenation (ECMO). Dr. Brogan’s laboratory-based
research centers on pulmonary blood flow, the effects
of carbon dioxide on changes in pulmonary blood flow
and the matching of ventilation to pulmonary blood
flow. He has been a collaborating researcher on several
research projects. He also serves as reviewer for a
number of medical journals. In addition to his research
he has served as director of extracorporeal support
services at Children’s since 2001. He is also serves as a
member of the Airlift Landing Review Committee.
Michael P. Davis, MD, is assistant professor of pediatrics
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and medical director of
the PICU at Harborview Medical Center. He completed
his residency at the University of Maryland and a
fellowship in critical care at Seattle Children’s. In
addition to providing clinical care he serves on multiple committees including the Blood Utilization and
Transplant committees at Children’s, and the Trauma
Council and the ICU Steering Committee at Harborview. His clinical research involves designing and
implementing a database of all solid organ transplant
patients at Children’s for outcomes research. He has
special interest in education and is responsible for
resident education in the PICU; he is also a member
of the resident education subcommittee of the Society
FACULTY
Jerry J. Zimmerman
MD, PhD, Director
Jerry J. Zimmerman, MD,
PhD, Director
Harris P. Baden, MD
Thomas V. Brogan, MD
Michael P. Davis, MD
David S. Jardine, MD,
Howard E. Jeffries, MD,
MPH, MBA
Robert Mazor, MD
of Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Davis is responsible
for quality improvement measures in the PICU at
Harborview as well.
David S. Jardine, MD, attends in anesthesiology and
critical care at Seattle Children’s Hospital and pediatric
critical care at Harborview Medical Center, and he is
associate professor of anesthesiology and pediatrics.
He completed residencies in pediatrics and anesthesiology, and a fellowship in pediatric anesthesiology and
intensive care. He has published numerous chapters
and peer-reviewed articles, with an emphasis on hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome, which is
a special interest of his. His laboratory-based research
interests are in using heat shock proteins as biomarkers and in examining the protective effect of heat shock
proteins during brain injury. He has been principal
investigator on a number of grants. Other interests
include medical staffing issues; he helped formulate
and interpret a recent American Academy of Pediatrics survey on pediatric intensive care staffing needs.
He has served as a reviewer for a variety of medical
journals. He serves on the Institutional Review Board
at Seattle Children’s and on the research committee for
the Department of Anesthesiology. He serves on the
board of the SIDS Foundation of Washington and is
incoming president for 2007.
Howard E. Jeffries, MD, MPH, MBA, is clinical assistant
professor of pediatrics and attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. He completed a residency
in pediatrics and a fellowship in pediatric intensive
care. Dr. Jeffries is director for quality improvement for
critical care services. He has published chapters and
peer-reviewed articles, with an emphasis on cardiac
intensive care, informatics and quality improvement.
He sits on the advisory board for the Virtual PICU
and has played an active
role in the development
of a national cardiac
John K. McGuire, MD
Joan S. Roberts, MD
ICU database. Other
Kenneth A. Schenkman,
interests include health
MD, PhD
care п¬Ѓnance, billing and
compliance issues. He
serves on the Children’s
University Medical
Group (CUMG) Physician Education and
Compliance Committee,
the University of
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
77
Critical Care Medicine
Washington CUMG Retirement & Benefits Committee, the Children’s Hospital Pharmacy & Therapeutics
Committee, the Infection Control Committee, and the
Nutrition Committee.
Robert Mazor, MD, is assistant professor of pediatrics
and attending physician in the cardiac ICU at Seattle
Children’s Hospital. He completed a residency in pediatrics and fellowships in pediatric critical care medicine and pediatric cardiology. Dr. Mazor has an interest
in congenital heart disease and mechanical circulatory
support. He also has a special interest in education,
serving as the educational coordinator for fellow and
resident cardiac critical care electives. He has been
selected to participate in the University of Washington’s Teaching Scholars program.
John K. McGuire, MD, is assistant professor of pediatrics and attending physician in the PICUs at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and Harborview Medical Center.
Dr. McGuire earned his MD from Northwestern University and trained in general pediatrics and pediatric
critical care medicine at Children’s Memorial Hospital
and Northwestern University in Chicago. He worked
at Washington University in St. Louis. He is board
certified in general pediatrics and pediatric critical
care medicine and is a member of several academic
societies including the American Thoracic Society and
the American Society for Matrix Biology. Dr. McGuire
is a member of the University of Washington Center
for Lung Biology. His laboratory work is directed at
understanding how epithelial responses to acute injury
regulate repair and contribute to tissue п¬Ѓbrosis and
chronic organ dysfunction. Using complementary
cell and mouse-based models of human disease, Dr.
McGuire’s research focuses on the function of matrix
metalloproteinases (MMPs) in acute lung injury and
acute renal tubular injury. Related projects are focused
on elucidating the role of MMPs in viral and bacterial
lung infections. Dr. McGuire serves as a member of the
Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education
Board of Appeals Panel for Pediatrics.
Joan S. Roberts, MD, is assistant professor of pediatrics and attending physician in the PICUs at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and Harborview Medical Center.
Dr. Roberts earned her MD at the University of
Nevada. She did her pediatrics residency at Seattle
Children’s and served as chief resident; she completed
her critical care training at Seattle Children’s.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Dr. Roberts has authored more than two dozen
scientific manuscripts and abstracts. She has been
Children’s representative to the national Pediatric
Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI)
Network. She is interested in clinical outcomes
research and in decreasing time needed for mechanical ventilation in sick children with lung disease and
asthma. Dr. Roberts is director of the Children’s
Hospital Mock-Code Team, and also chairs the
Hospital Code Committee.
Kenneth A. Schenkman, MD, PhD, is attending physician in the PICUs at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
Harborview Medical Center; he is associate professor
of pediatrics and anesthesiology and adjunct associate professor of bioengineering at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He is director of
critical care medicine research at Seattle Children’s. Dr.
Schenkman received his MD from Indiana University
and completed a pediatric residency at the Children’s
Hospital of Pittsburgh, where he also served as chief
resident. He trained in pediatric critical care at Seattle
Children’s and received a PhD in bioengineering
from the University of Washington. He has an active
research program developing optical spectroscopic
technologies for clinical assessment of intracellular
oxygenation and mitochondrial function. Dr. Schenkman has been awarded a US patent for his pioneering
work on developing an intracellular oxygen monitor.
Dr. Schenkman has published dozens of manuscripts
and abstracts in the п¬Ѓeld of optical spectroscopy for
physiologic and clinical applications, and has published
several book chapters on pediatric critical care topics.
He also has been an active reviewer for journals in
the п¬Ѓelds of medicine, physiology and engineering.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Jerry J. Zimmerman, MD, PhD
Listed in “Best Doctors in America,” 2005
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
David S. Jardine, MD
BCL2 Inducible Transgenic Mouse Development
Project, Texas A&M/NIH, $75,800
Critical Care Medicine
Kenneth A. Schenkman, MD, PhD
Modeling of Cardiac Transport, Medical College
of Wisconsin/NIH, $73,304
Continuing
Kenneth A. Schenkman, MD, PhD
Mitochondrial Function by Optical Spectroscopy 2,
Whitaker Foundation, $80,000
Jerry J. Zimmerman, MD, PhD
Investigation of the Efficacy and Safety of Drotrecogin
Alfa (Activated) in Pediatric Severe Sepsis, Eli Lilly &
Co, Lilly Research Laboratories, $52,815
1st Tier Drugs В± Theophylline in Pediatric Severe
Asthma, National Institute of Child Health and
Human Development/NIH/DHHS, $367,311
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Harris P. Baden, MD
Blue Baby, White Knuckles, resident noon lecture,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Thomas V. Brogan, MD
Shock States in the Children, Madigan Pediatric
Department, November 2005
Howard E. Jeffries, MD, MPH, MBA
Arrhythmias in the PICU, pediatric resident
PICU lecture, Seattle Children’s, 2005
ECLS Equipment, ECMO training coursework,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Quality improvement in critical care lecture series,
multidisciplinary quality improvement conference,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
ECLS, PCCM lecture, Seattle Children’s, 2005
What Can Go Wrong, Will Go Wrong: The Interface of
Humans and Technology, patient safety conference,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Pulmonary Hypertension in the PICU, PICU
nursing education day, Seattle Children’s, 2006
Balancing Qp & Qs in the Postoperative Norwood
Patient, PICU nursing education day, Seattle
Children’s, 2005
Robert Mazor, MD
Pulmonary Hypertension, PICU RN core classes,
March 2005
Palliation of the Single Ventricle Patient, CICU RN
orientation, October 2005
Inlets and Outlets of Congenital Heart Disease,
resident noon conference, October 2005
John K. McGuire, MD
Matrix Metalloproteinases in Epithelial Injury: A Role
for MMP-7 in Inflammation and Re-epithelialization,
European Tissue Repair Society, Stuttgart, Germany, 2005
Jerry J. Zimmerman, PhD, MD
Steroids in Pediatric Sepsis: The Good and the Bad,
Society of Critical Care Medicine 2005 Congress,
Phoenix, January 15–19, 2005
Medicine faculty development leadership course,
University of Washington, February 15–16, 2005
Update on Pediatric Critical Care Research, Pro/Con
Debate: Tight Glucose Control Should be Implemented
in the PICU (con position) and 2004 Year in Review—
How the Current Literature May Change My Practice,
Second Annual Canadian Critical Care Conference,
Whistler, BC, February 23–26
Fluid Therapy in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine,
Blood Component Therapy in Pediatric Critical Care
Medicine, Role of the Endothelium in Sepsis Pathophysiology, Contemporary Treatment of Sepsis, Case
Presentation: A Teenager with Fever and Coma, Case
Presentation: An Infant with Seizures, URI and Diarrhea, SimpГіsio Internacional de Terapia Intensiva
PediГЎtrica e Cirurgia CardГ­aca, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,
March 10–12, 2005
How to Mend a Broken Heart, pediatric resident
noon conference, Seattle Children’s, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
79
Critical Care Medicine
Update on Sepsis Research, Contemporary Treatment
of Pediatric Sepsis and Activated Protein C in Sepsis,
Sepsis Case Discussant, Pediatric Sepsis Update,
Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine, Pediatric
Section, Apollo Centre for Advanced Pediatrics
— ACAP. New Delhi, India, April 16, 2005
Septic Shock — Fine Tuning the Management, Status
Asthmaticus — My Management Approach and
Workshop on Managing Mechanical Ventilation,
Critical Care Pediatrics, Indian Academy of Pediatrics,
Nagpur, India, April 17, 2000
A Brief Introduction to ECLS, ECLS training course,
Seattle, July 6, 2005
Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators
(PALISI), Sixth International Meeting, Montreal,
September 21–24, 2005
Surrogate Endpoints in Pediatric Critical Care
Medicine Research; Mouvement en Г‰pidГ©miologie
et Recherche Clinique; Stress Dose Steroids as Adjunctive Therapy for Pediatric Severe Sepsis; and visiting
professor, Sainte-Justine Hospital, University of
Montreal, Department of Pediatrics Grand Rounds,
September 21, 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Baden HP. Does Nesiritide offer something new in the
management of pediatric heart failure? Ped Crit Care
Med. 2005;6(5):613–614.
Cengiz P, Brogan TV, Roberts JS. Central nervous
system complications during pediatric extracorporeal
life support: incidence and risk factors. Crit Care Med.
2005;33(12):2817–2824.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Ciesielski WA, Arakaki LSL, Schenkman KA. Temperature and pH effects on myoglobin optical absorbance
spectra. Proceedings of the SPIE International Symposium on Biomedical Optics. 2005;(4)5702–5727.
Curley MAQ, Zimmerman J. Alternative outcome
measures for pediatric clinical sepsis trials. Pediatr
Crit Care Med. 2005;6:S150–S156.
Ejike JC, Arakaki LSL, Beard DA, Ciesielski WA,
Feigl EO, Schenkman KA. Myocardial oxygenation
and adenosine release in isolated guinea pig hearts
during changes in contractility. Am J Physiol Heart
Circ Physiol. 2005;288(5):H2062–H2067.
Garrison M, Jeffries H, Christakis D. Risk of death for
children with Down syndrome and sepsis. J Pediatr.
2005;147:748–752.
Lupu LA, Roberts JS, Seidel K. Surfactant therapy in
ECMO patients. Proceedings of the American Thoracic
Society. 2005;2:252.
Marcinek DJ, Schenkman KA, Ciesielski WA,
Lee D, Conley KE. Reduced mitochondrial coupling
in vivo alters cellular energetics in aged mouse
skeletal muscle. J. Physiol. 2005;569(2):467–473.
Markovitz BP, Goodman DM, Watson RS, Bertock D,
Zimmerman J. A retrospective study of prognostic
factors associated with outcome in pediatric severe
sepsis: what is the role of steroids? Pediatr Crit Care
Med. 2005;6:270–274.
McGuire JK. Adhesion, cell-cell: epithelial. In:
Encyclopedia of Respiratory Medicine. Laurent GJ,
Shapiro SD, eds. Oxford: Elsevier, 2005.
Emergency Medicine
The Division of Emergency Medicine (in the Department of Pediatrics) is
a 24-hours-per-day, 365-days-per-year operation. The emergency division
provides specialized expertise in management of urgent, emergency and
critical medical and surgical issues. Emergency Medicine is dedicated
to premier, up-to-date, consistent and efficient pediatric care in a
family-centered environment. The Emergency Department (ED) is actively
redefining and refining its operation, standards and facilities to ensure
highest quality and optimal practice. The Emergency Department treats
approximately 31,000 patients per year, with half of all patients admitted to
Seattle Children’s being cared for initially in the ED setting. The department
is a center for education in the acute management of ill and injured infants,
children and adolescents to age 21.
Over 120 residents train in our division each year, from the University
of Washington pediatric training program and multiple family medicine and
emergency medicine programs, as well as medical, nursing and paramedic
students. This experience includes a didactic curriculum and significant hands-on training. Faculty also participate
actively in local, regional, national and international teaching endeavors. The division sponsors a fellowship program
with four fellows enrolled.
Division faculty include 14 faculty positions and 19 clinical pediatric physicians. Faculty physicians hold leadership
positions in local and university activities outside the division and are active in state and national organizations in
membership and leadership positions. Faculty are active in clinical research, focusing on education, infectious diseases,
injury management, injury prevention, informatics, quality, respiratory illness, resuscitation, safety and sedation; and
division research includes several interdisciplinary projects.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
George A. (Tony) Woodward, MD, MBA, is director of the
Division of Emergency Services at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and professor of pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. He is director for
Transport Medicine at Seattle Children’s. He received
his MD from Temple University Medical School and
his MBA from The Wharton School at the University
FACULTY
George A. (Tony) Woodward
MD, MBA, Director
George A. (Tony) Woodward,
MD, MBA, Director
Julie C. Brown, MD, MPH
Dena R. Brownstein, MD
Brian H. Coleman, MD, MS
Mark A. Del Beccaro, MD
Douglas S. Diekema, MD, MPH
Ron L. Kaplan, MD
Eileen J. Klein, MD, MPH
Suzan S. Mazor, MD
of Pennsylvania. He completed an internship and
residency at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children in
Philadelphia and a fellowship at the pediatric emergency medicine program at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He held faculty positions at the University of
Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Primary Children’s Medical Center in Salt Lake City. Dr. Woodward
is a member of the Children’s University Medical Group
(CUMG) Board of Directors. He has been awarded
the Norcliffe Foundation Endowed Chair in
Pediatric Emergency
Russell T. Migita, MD
Medicine and has been
Carolyn A. Paris, MD, MPH
elected as a member for
Linda Quan, MD
Richard P. Shugerman, MD
the American Pediatric
Paige L. Wright, MD, MS
Society — Society for
Pediatric Research. Dr.
Woodward’s specialty
and board certifications
include being an ACLS
provider, an ATLS provider, and being certified
as a Pediatric Education
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
81
Emergency Medicine
for Prehospital Professionals (PEPP) provider and
instructor. Dr. Woodward has held several editorial
positions and authored numerous publications.
Julie C. Brown, MD, MPH, is emergency attending
physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant
professor at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She received her MD from McGill University, Montreal, an MHSc from the University of British
Columbia, Vancouver, and her MPH from the University of Washington. She completed her residency and
pediatric emergency medicine fellowship at Seattle
Children’s. She is board certified in general pediatrics
and pediatric emergency medicine by the American
Board of Pediatrics. She is a member of the American
Academy of Pediatrics and the Ambulatory Pediatric
Association. She was principal investigator for research on a new model for asthma care in the emergency department. She has also been co-investigator
on research in handheld technology in ADHD care, a
computerized asthma management system (CAMS)
and pediatric evidence-based medicine (EMB.)
Dena R. Brownstein, MD, is emergency attending
physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate
professor at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She is quality improvement coordinator in
the Department of Medicine at Seattle Children’s. She
received her MD from the University of Washington;
she completed her residency at Seattle Children’s
and a fellowship in pediatric emergency medicine
at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She is board
certified in general pediatrics and pediatric emergency
medicine by the American Board of Pediatrics and is
a diplomate of the National Board of Medical Examiners. Dr. Brownstein is coordinator of the University
of Washington’s internship for paramedic students
and paramedic course director. She is co-chair of the
American Academy of Pediatrics National Pediatric
Education for Prehospital Professionals (PEPP)
Steering Committee and a member of the American
Academy of Pediatrics — Emergency Medical Services
for Children Subcommittee of Quality Indicators.
Dr. Brownstein is a member of regional and national
organizations and is the recipient of numerous awards
including the University of Washington Outstanding
Public Service Award Dr. Brownstein was co-investigator on research for the Developmental Center for
Education and Research in Pediatric Safety.
82
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Brian H. Coleman, MD, MS, is emergency attending
physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant
professor at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He received his MD from the University of
Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Fla. and his
MS in epidemiology from the University of Washington
School of Community Health and Public Medicine.
He completed his residency at Shands Hospital in
Gainesville and a fellowship in pediatric emergency
medicine at Seattle Children’s. He is a diplomate of the
American Board of Pediatrics and the National Board
of Medical Examiners. He is a member of the American
Academy of Pediatrics and its Section on Emergency
Medicine. He was principal investigator for research
on serum phosphate and venous lactate in children
with intussusception.
Mark A. Del Beccaro, MD, is emergency attending
physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
He is associate director of the emergency department,
clinical director of information services and chair of
the medical informatics/medical records committee
at Seattle Children’s. He received his MD from the
University of Washington and his MS in epidemiology
from the University of Washington School of Community Health and Public Medicine. He completed
his residency at Seattle Children’s and the certificate
program in medical management at the University
of Washington. Dr. Del Beccaro is board certified in
general pediatrics and pediatric emergency medicine
by the American Board of Pediatrics, and he is certified
by the American Heart Association in ACLS , PNALS
and PALS. He is a member of many regional and
national associations. He is sought after nationally
as a speaker on the subject of medical informatics
and has an extensive bibliography.
Douglas S. Diekema, MD, MPH, is emergency attending
physician and interim director of the Treuman Katz
Center for Pediatric Bioethics at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and associate professor at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He received his MD
from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and his MPH from the University of Washington
School of Public Health. He completed his residency
at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in
Madison. He is board certified in general pediatrics
and pediatric emergency medicine by the American
Board of Pediatrics. He is a member of several medical
Emergency Medicine
organizations. His teaching responsibilities include
education in the emergency department, monthly pediatric ethics conferences and several education committees. He has been a visiting professor throughout the
WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho).
He is sought after as a lecturer nationally. He has numerous local and national committee responsibilities,
as well as an extensive bibliography. He is principal
investigator for a research grant on bioethics in health
care and research.
Ron L. Kaplan, MD, is emergency attending physician
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and clinical assistant
professor at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. He received his MD with highest honors from the University of North Carolina School of
Medicine. He completed his residency at the University of North Carolina Hospitals and a fellowship in
pediatric emergency medicine at Children’s Hospital
Boston. He is board certified in general pediatrics and
pediatric emergency medicine by the American Board
of Pediatrics. His teaching responsibilities include
education in the emergency department and monthly
didactic sessions with the Seattle Children’s housestaff.
He is involved in the research project Clinical Decision
Rule for Identifying Children with Cerebrospinal Fluid
Pleocytosis at Very Low Risk for Bacterial Meningitis.
Eileen J. Klein, MD, MPH, is emergency attending
physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate
professor at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. She is emergency medicine fellowship
director at Seattle Children’s. She received her MD
from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and her MPH
in epidemiology from the University of Washington
School of Public Health. She completed her residency
and a fellowship in pediatric emergency medicine
at Seattle Children’s. She is a fellow of the American
Academy of Pediatrics, and a member of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association and American College of
Emergency Physicians. She is board certified in general
pediatrics and pediatric emergency medicine by the
American Board of Pediatrics, and she is certified
by the American Heart Association in ACLS, ATLS
and PALS. Dr. Klein is part of the Teaching Scholars
program at the university School of Medicine, and
she trains pediatric emergency medicine fellows and
regularly teaches locally and regionally. Her recent
research as principal investigator includes the projects
Diarrhea Etiology and Risk Factors Study, and
Emergency Department Research Collaboration.
She was also an investigator on the study Center for
Evaluation and Research in Public Safety. She has an
extensive bibliography.
Suzan S. Mazor, MD, is emergency attending physician
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. She
is pediatric emergency medicine fellowship director at
Seattle Children’s. She received her MD from University
of Illinois at Chicago. She completed her residency
at Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati,
Ohio, a fellowship in pediatric emergency medicine
at Children’s Memorial Hospital, Chicago and a fellowship in medical toxicology at Toxikon Consortium,
John H. Stroger Hospital of Cook County, Chicago. Dr.
Mazor is associate medical director of the Washington
Poison Control Center in Seattle. She is a member of
the American College of Medical Toxicology, American
Board of Pediatrics, Ambulatory Pediatric Association
and the Section on Emergency Medicine of the AAP.
She is a diplomate of the American Board of Medical
Toxicology, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, American
Board of Pediatrics and National Board of Medical
Examiners.
Russell T. Migita, MD, is emergency attending physician
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
He received his MD from University of California,
San Diego School of Medicine. He did his internship, residency and fellowship at the University of
Washington. Dr. Migita has received certification from
the American Board of Pediatrics and is a certified
PALS provider and instructor, ATLS provider and
NRP provider. His special responsibilities include
membership on Children’s Pharmacy and Therapeutics
Committee, Emergency Department Night Float Committee, Emergency Department Education Committee
and participation on the Ambulatory Referral Process
Management Guidance Team, Emergency Department
Rapid Process Improvement Management Guidance
Team and Emergency Department CME Course
Planning Committee. Dr. Migita has received the
University of Washington Fellow Teaching Award.
Carolyn A. Paris, MD, MPH, is emergency attending
physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant
professor at the University of Washington. She received
her MD from Cornell University Medical College and
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Emergency Medicine
her MPH in epidemiology from the University of
Washington School of Public Health. She completed
a residency at Harbor–UCLA Medical Center and a
fellowship at Seattle Children’s. She is board certified
and licensed through the National Board of Medical
Examiners in Pediatrics and the American Heart
Association. Dr. Paris is a member of the American
Academy of Pediatrics and the Ambulatory Pediatric
Association. Her local responsibilities include Seattle
Children’s Fellowship Committee, adverse events
monitoring for JDRF Study of Autoimmunity and
the University of Washington Faculty Senate. She is
ad hoc reviewer for the journals Acta Paediatrica,
Pediatrics and Pediatric Emergency Care. Dr. Paris also
has an interest in research. Her extensive bibliography
includes her latest study, Search for Diabetes in Youth.
Linda Quan, MD, is emergency attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. She received her MD from the
University of Washington School of Medicine, where
she trained as an intern, resident and fellow. She was
chief of emergency services at Seattle Children’s for
more than two decades. Dr. Quan is board certified
by the American Board of Pediatrics in emergency
medicine. She is a member of many committees for
the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Heart
Association, National Emergency Medical Services for
Children Data Analysis Resource Center (NEDARC),
Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMS-C) and
CDC Injury Prevention Centers. She has spent a large
part of her career on research, spearheading a large list
of biomedical research grants. Dr. Quan has received
numerous awards and has an extensive bibliography.
directly in teaching committees for every service
through which residents rotate in three local hospitals
and four regional practices. Dr. Shugerman is active
on several regional and national committees and has
published extensively.
Paige Wright, MD, MS, is emergency attending physician
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She received her MD from Indiana University School
of Medicine and her MS in clinical investigation from
Northwestern University. She was clinical instructor
in pediatrics at Northwestern University School of
Medicine. She completed a residency and a fellowship
at Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Dr. Wright
is a diplomate of the American Board of Pediatrics,
and she is certified as an ATLS provider and a PALS
provider; she is also a PALS instructor. Dr. Wright is
a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Linda Quan, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Douglas S. Diekema, MD, MPH
Promoting Pediatric Bioethics in Health Care and
Research, Maternal and Child Health Bureau/Health
Resources and Services Administration/DHHS, $337,280
Continuing
Richard Shugerman, MD, is emergency attending physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. He is director of
the pediatric residency program at the University of
Washington. He received his MD from the University
of Alabama School of Medicine in Birmingham and
completed an internship and a residency in pediatrics
at the University of Washington. Dr. Shugerman is
board certified in pediatrics by the American Board
of Pediatrics and certified by the American Heart
Association as a PALS provider. As director of pediatric
residency, his responsibility is leading the education
of 72 pediatric residents; he leads and participates
84
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Eileen J. Klein, MD, MPH
Diarrhea Etiology and Risk Factor Study, Washington
University of St. Louis, $838,390
PRESENTATIONS AND TEACHING ACTIVITIES
Mark A. Del Beccaro, MD
EMR Implementation: Strategies and Lessons
Learned, Mercy Children’s Hospital, Kansas City, Mo.,
February 2005
CPOE Implementation, Washington Patient
Safety Coalition, Seattle, May 2005
Emergency Medicine
Dena Brownstein, MD
Beyond Stories: Engaging Physicians as Change Agents
for Patient Safety, NCHRI, New Orleans, spring 2005
Douglas Diekema, MD, MPH
Family Presence at Resuscitation and Sodium Bicarbonate in Tricyclic Anti-Depressant Overdose, Calcium-Channel Blocker Overdose, Hypermagnesemia,
and Prolonged Pediatric Resuscitation, International
Consensus on ECC & CPR Science with Treatment
Recommendations 2005, Dallas, January 23–27, 2005
Everyday Ethics, National Pediatric Emergency
Fellows Retreat, Los Angeles, March 5–7, 2005
Pediatric Advanced Life Support Course, Bartlett
Memorial Hospital, Juneau, Alaska, April 19–20, 2005
Approaching Moral Problems: A Primer in Ethics;
Introduction to Family-Centered Ethics; Unreasonable
Parent Demands; Foregoing Nutrition and Hydration,
4th Forum on Perinatal/Neonatal Ethical Issues,
Colorado Springs, Colo., May 11–13, 2005
How Cozy Is Too Cozy: Pharmaceutical Companies and
the Pediatrician, Pediatric Academic Societies annual
meeting, Washington, D.C., May 15, 2005
What Brain Science Can Teach Us About Ethics Education and Into the Future: New Strategies for Teaching
Bioethics, Pediatric Ethics: Setting an Agenda for the
Future, Cleveland, September 9–11, 2005
Eyes Wide Open: The Good Physician Meets the
Pharmaceutical Industry, Cincinnati Pediatric Society
Lyon Memorial Lecture/Pediatric Grand Rounds
for Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center,
Cincinnati, October 4, 2005
Eileen J. Klein, MD, MPH
Catastrophic Illness, Pediatric Advanced Life Support
renewal course, Seattle Children’s, January 28, 2005
Febrile Seizures and Toxicology — What You Don’t Need
to Worry About, Great Falls Clinic, Great Falls, Mont.,
June 6, 2005
Shock, Pediatric Advanced Life Support course,
Seattle Children’s, June 20, 2005
Status Epilepticus, Pediatric Advanced Life Support
course, Seattle Children’s, November 4, 2005
Suzan Mazor, MD
Delayed Toxic Syndrome and Cyanide and Fumigants,
Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry/American College of Medical Toxicology, Chemical Weapons
of Convenience and Opportunity course, Seattle,
September 2005
Carolyn Paris, MD, MPH
Dental Manifestations of Medical Disorders in
Children, University of Washington Medical School,
May 2005
Linda Quan MD
Biphasic Wave Dosing in the Pediatric Patient;
Age-Based vs. Etiology-Based Approach to CPR, 2005
International Consensus on ECC and CPR Science
with Treatment Recommendations, Dallas, January
23–39, 2005
George A. Woodward, MD, MBA
Pediatric Critical Care Transport, Pacific Region EMSC
Partnership Symposium, Seattle, January 2005
Pediatric Trauma, Pediatric Education for the
Prehospital Professional, Seattle, January 2005
What’s New: A Preview of the New Transport Guidelines; Transport of the Patient with Orthopedic Trauma
and Pediatric Critical Care Transport Case Studies,
Neonatal and Pediatric Transport Conference,
Clearwater Beach, Fla., April 2005
Prehospital Management of the Critically Ill Child:
Developing and Optimizing Emergency Medical Services and Injury Prevention: Comparisons, Successes and
Opportunities and Radiology Assessment in the ER,
4th Curso Emergencis Pediatricas, Santiago, Chile,
April 2005
Pediatric Orthopedic Injuries; Pediatric Head Trauma,
10th Annual Pediatric Emergency Care in Your Hospital, Dominican Hospital, Santa Cruz, Calif., April 2005
Pediatric Trauma: A Systematic Approach, WAMI
2005: Current Practices in Adult and Pediatric
Trauma, Seattle, June 2005
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Emergency Medicine
Curso de Trauma PediГЎtrico; Pediatric Head Trauma;
Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma; Pediatric Advanced Life
Support Instructor Course; Advanced Airway Assessment and Intervention; Vascular Access; Pediatric
Case Scenarios (student and instructor) and Cervical
Spine Immobilization and Stabilization, Congreso
Mesoamericano y del Caribe de PediatrГ­a: El NiГ±o ed
SituaciГіn de Crisis y de Desastres, Guatemala City,
Guatemala, July 2005
Scientific Platform and Poster Session: Section on
Transport Medicine (moderator) and Educational
Requirements for Transport Practitioners, AAP
National Conference and Exhibition, Washington, D.C.,
October 2005
Pediatric Critical Care Transport: Past, Present and
Future, keynote address, Pediatric-Neonatal Critical
Care Transport Conference, Boston, October 2005
An Approach to Pediatric Trauma, Pediatric Head
Injury, Pediatric Orthopedic Injury, Pediatric Critical
Care Transport Medicine, Pediatric Transport Cases
and Pediatric Radiology, Children’s Hospital of Orange
County Resident Retreat, Lake Arrowhead, Calif.,
November 2005
Pediatric Transport Cases and Pediatric Orthopedic
Injury, 30th Alaska EMS Symposium, Anchorage,
Alaska, November 2005
Paige Wright, MD, MS
Pediatric Medical Emergencies, Pediatric Education
of Prehospital Professionals, Seattle, January 2005
Pediatric Respiratory Arrest and Shock, Pediatric
Advanced Life Support renewal and initial certification, Seattle Children’s, April 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Ake JA, Srdjan J, Ciol MA, Watkins SL, Murray KF,
Christie DL, Klein EJ, Tarr PI. Relative nephroprotection during Escherichia coli 0157:H7 infections: association with intravenous volume expansion. Pediatrics.
2005;115(6):e673–e680.
Brownstein D, Dieckmann R. Pediatric Education for
Prehospital Professionals, Student Manual. Sudbury,
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
MA: American Academy of Pediatrics and Jones
and Bartlett Publishers, 2005.
Coleman B, Grant T, Mueller B. Hospitalization
and infant outcomes among women exposed and
unexposed to tocolysis. Journal of Perinatology.
2005;25(4):258–265.
Diekema DS, Committee on Bioethics, American
Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical report: responding to
parental refusals for vaccination of children. Pediatrics.
2005;115(5):1428–1431.
Horowitz R, Mazor S, Leikin, J. Pediatric clonidine patch ingestion. Am J Ther. May–June
2005;12(3):272–274.
Kaplan R. Gastrointestinal bleeding. In: Signs and
Symptoms in Pediatrics Urgent and Emergent Care.
Davis MA, Gruskin KG, Chiang VW, Manzi S, eds.
Philadelphia: Elsevier Mosby, 2005.
Mazor S. Antidotes. In: Pediatric Toxicology, Care
of the Poisoned Child. Erickson T, Aks S, Ahrens W,
Ling L, Baum C, eds. McGraw Hill, 2005.
Mazor S. Toxicology. In: Just the Facts in Pediatrics.
Green TP, Tanz RR and Franklin W, eds. McGraw Hill,
2005.
Stephens BD, Diekema DS, Klein EJ. Recreational
injuries in Washington state national parks. Wilderness
and Environmental Medicine. 2005;16(4):192–197.
Woodward GA. Rocky Mountain spotted fever and
Trichinosis (two chapters). In: The 5-Minute Pediatric
Consult, 4th edition. Schwartz MW, ed. Philadelphia:
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2005.
Wright PL, Woodward GA. Altitude illness and heat
stroke and related illness (two chapters). In: The 5Minute Pediatric Consult, 4th edition. Schwartz MW,
ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins,
2005.
Zerr DM, Blume HK, Berg AT, Del Beccaro MA,
Gospe SM, Allpress AL, Christakis DA. Nonfebrile
illness seizures: a unique seizure category? Epilepsia.
2005;46:952–955.
Endocrinology and Diabetes
The Division of Endocrinology (in the Department of Pediatrics) provides consultation and long-term management for children and adolescents with diabetes and
endocrine disorders in the WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho).
The division’s approach to patient care blends clinical practice, research and
education. A multidisciplinary team of dedicated physicians, mid-level providers,
certified diabetes nurse educators, dietitians and social workers offer familycentered care in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Endocrinologists work with
primary care providers and other sub-specialists to manage endocrine disorders
in children with complex health care needs.
Collaborative research efforts are underway in pediatric diabetes and gonadal
disorders, and with childhood cancer survivors. In 2005 the division launched
American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–accredited, sub-specialty
residency program, enhancing teaching efforts and recruitment potential for pediatric endocrine providers.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Catherine Pihoker, MD, is chief of the Division of
Endocrinology and Diabetes and attending physician
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. Her clinical focus
is inpatient and outpatient attending for endocrinology and diabetes. Her main research interests include
investigating factors that predict the clinical course of
diabetes, diabetes typology and improving outcomes of
children with diabetes. Dr. Pihoker is also interested in
the impact on children of being overweight and living
sedentary lifestyles, and she is involved in proposals
studying the quality of life and metabolic measures in
the general population as well as in cancer survivors.
Other research interests include endocrine dysfunction
in childhood cancer survivors and hypothalamic-pituitary function in children with tumors in the pituitary
FACULTY
Catherine Pihoker, MD, Chief
Helen L. Dichek, MD
Daniel F. Gunther, MD, MA
Gad B. Kletter, MD
Gail E. Richards, MD
Catherine Pihoker
MD, Chief
region. The studies Dr. Pihoker has been involved with
include the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth, TrialNet
and the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium. Her
teaching activities include serving as fellowship
director, and didactic and direct teaching of resident
physicians, medical students and support staff.
Helen L. Dichek, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and the University of Washington Medical Center; she is associate professor in
the Department of Pediatrics, Endocrinology, at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. She
is a board-certified endocrinologist, with expertise
in pediatric lipid disorders. Dr. Dichek directs the
only regional pediatric lipid clinic in the WAMI area
(Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho), which meets at
Seattle Children’s and at the University of Washington
Medical Specialties Lipid/Nutrition Clinic. Dr. Dichek’s
research interests include genetic modifiers of atherosclerosis and development of animal models of obesity
and fatty liver.
Daniel F. Gunther, MD, MA, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. His primary clinical and research interests
are Turner syndrome, disorders of growth and puberty
and intersex disorders. In addition to seeing general
endocrine and diabetes patients at Children’s Hospital,
Dr. Gunther attends regional clinics in Federal Way
and Yakima, Wash. He serves on the Scientific Advisory
Board to the CARES foundation, a national education
and support group for individuals with congenital
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Endocrinology and Diabetes
adrenal hyperplasia. He is involved in research studying long-term effects of growth hormone treatment
in girls with Turner syndrome, and is principal investigator in a study following individuals with Turner
syndrome who have been diagnosed prenatally.
Gad B. Kletter, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. His research interests include pubertal disorders
and gonadotropin biochemistry and physiology. He
is a member of the hospital’s Grand Rounds Steering
Committee and is responsible for the monthly endocrine teaching seminar, an event offering community
providers, students and other clinicians an opportunity
to expand their knowledge of endocrine disorders in
children and adolescents.
Gail E. Richards, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and professor of pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. In addition to providing inpatient attending services at the
hospital’s main campus, Dr. Richards provides patient
care in the hospital’s regional clinics in Bellevue and
Everett, Wash. She serves as director for the LawsonWilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society Clinical Research
Network. Her research interests include growth and its
disorders, and she participates in a number of clinical
trials of new treatments for children with short stature.
RESEARCH FUNDING
Catherine Pihoker, MD
Characteristics of Diabetes in Youth of the Puget Sound,
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/DHHS,
$494,620
JDRF Center for Translational Research, Benaroya
Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Juvenile
Diabetes Research Foundation, $123,820
Gail E. Richards, MD
Genentech National Cooperative Growth Study PostMarketing Surveillance Program for Protropin (Somatren for Injection) and Nutropin (Somatropin-rDNA
Origin) for Injection, Genentech, Inc., $125,000
Norditropin National Registry, Novo Nordisk
Pharmaceuticals, Inc., $277,553
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Daniel F. Gunther, MD, MA
Prenatal Diagnosis—Que Sera, Sera?, section chair,
GeNeSIS Symposium, Washington, D.C., May, 2005
Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, housestaff
conference, Seattle Children’s, 2005
Principles of Puberty, housestaff conference,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Disorders of Sex Differentiation, housestaff
conference, Seattle Children’s, 2005
New
Gad B. Kletter, MD
Phase III - Open Label Study to Evaluate Efficacy and
Safety of Histrelin Subdermal Implant in Children
with Central Precocious Puberty, Valera Pharmaceuticals, $113,073
Catherine Pihoker, MD
SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth 2: Washington Site,
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and
Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention/DHHS, $650,000
Continuing
Helen L. Dichek, MD
The Role of Hepatic Lipase in Cholesterol Homeostasis,
NHLBI/NIH, $304,000
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Gad B. Kletter, MD
Disorders of Thyroid, housestaff conference,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
Disorders of the Adrenal Cortex, housestaff
conference, Seattle Children’s, 2005
Short Stature, housestaff conference, Seattle
Children’s, 2005
Catherine Pihoker, MD
Autoantibodies in Diabetes, International Group
on Insulin Secretion, St. Jean Cap Ferrat, France,
March 2005
Endocrinology and Diabetes
PUBLICATIONS
Dichek HL, Agrawal, N, El Andaloussi N, Qian K.
Attenuated corticosterone response to chronic acth
stimulation in hepatic lipase-deficient mice: evidence
for a role for hepatic lipase in adrenal physiology.
Am Physiol: Endocrinol Metabol. DOI, 2005.
Gilliam LK, Brooks-Worrell BM, Palmer JP, Greenbaum CJ, Pihoker C. Autoimmunity and clinical
course in children with type 1, type 2, and type 1.5
diabetes. J Autoimmun. November 205;25(3):
244–250. Gilliam LK, Jensen RA, Yang P, Weigle DS,
Greenbaum CJ, Pihoker C. Evaluation of leptin levels
in subjects at risk for type 1 diabetes. J Autoimmun.
December 27, 2005; e-publication.
Mauras N, Pescovitz OH, Allada V, Messig M, Wajnrajch MP, Lippe B, Transition Study Group (Kletter
G). Limited efficiency of growth hormone (GH) during
transition of GH-deficient patients from adolescent
to adulthood: A phase III multicenter, double-blind,
randomized two-year trial. J. Clin Endocrinol Metab.
2005;90(7):3946–3955.
Pihoker C, Gilliam LK, Hampe CS, Lernmark A.
Autoantibodies in diabetes. Diabetes. 2005;54
(Suppl 2):S52–S61.
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Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
The Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (in the
Department of Pediatrics) provides expertise in consultative gastroenterology
for a broad range of gastrointestinal, liver and nutritional diseases. Our
division provides comprehensive care for a number of children with complex
gastrointestinal illnesses. The division is particularly skilled in the care of
patients with intestinal failure, inflammatory bowel disease and acute and
chronic liver disease. Three recently established programs are small bowel
transplant, intestinal care and the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treatment
Center. We also provide ongoing consultation and treatment for patients
with chronic recurrent abdominal pain, gastroesophageal reflux and
malabsorptive syndromes.
Technological advances in pediatric gastroenterology have enabled
us to apply diagnostic and therapeutic endeavors to the upper intestinal
digestive tract and colon. The recent addition of capsule endoscopy has
enhanced our ability to care for children with unusual small intestinal
diseases. Esophageal motility and anal rectal manometry are available to study selected patients.
We work in close consultation with our colleagues in general surgery, radiology and pathology in the diagnosis and
therapy of patients with gastrointestinal disease. Our emphasis on a team approach from a diagnostic and therapeutic
perspective has enhanced our quality of care and provided our patients the most advanced expertise available in the
WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho).
The division has a long history of contributions to basic science and clinical research. We continue to be leaders in
clinical and basic research in gastroenterology. Some of the division’s research investigations include treatment of hepatitis
B, hepatitis C and acute liver failure; use of mesalamine in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease; maternal microchimerism
in inflammatory bowel disease; and a controlled trial of managing recurrent abdominal pain. The division also participates
in the western regional pediatric inflammatory bowel disease registry.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Dennis L. Christie, MD, is chief of the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and professor of pediatrics at the
University of Washington’s School of Medicine. He is
board certified in pediatric gastroenterology. Dr. Christie was instrumental in establishing the specialty of
pediatric gastroenterology in the Pacific Northwest. He
collaborated in the establishment of the safety, efficacy
and practicality of using flexible fiber optic endoscopy
in the diagnosis and therapy of children with gastrointestinal diseases. Two of his early publications demonstrated the association between gastroesophageal
reflux and recurrent respiratory disease. His research
interests relate to inflammation in the intestine. He
is actively involved with the Inflammatory Bowel
Disease Treatment Center and the Autism Treatment
Network. He serves as vice chairman of clinical affairs
for the Department of Pediatrics and is a member of
the Children’s University Medical Group Advisory
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Board. He is past president of the pediatric committee
for the American College of Gastroenterology, is
an active member of the North American Society
for Pediatric Gastroenterology and belongs to the
American Gastroenterological Association.
Simon Horslen, MBChB, is medical director for liver
and intestine transplantation at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and professor of pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. He is helping lead
the expansion of Children’s transplant program. Dr.
Horslen earned his medical degree from the University of Bristol, England. He is a founding fellow of the
Royal College of Pediatric and Child Health, is a member of the Royal College of Physicians and is accredited
in general pediatrics and pediatric gastroenterology.
He was medical director of the pediatric transplant
program at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.
Clinical and research interests include metabolic liver
disease, intestinal failure and liver and intestine transplantation. Dr. Horslen is a member of the Hepatology
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
Committee for the North American Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and of the Cellular Transplant Committee for the American Society of
Transplantation. He serves as co-chair of the Education
Committee and member of the Nominations Committee for the International Pediatric Transplant Society.
He is chairman of the United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS) Pediatric Liver Transplant Subcommittee
and member of the UNOS Pediatric Committee and
the UNOS Liver & Intestine Committee.
Mary K. Len, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospitals and clinical associate professor at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. She
was trained in pediatric gastroenterology at University
of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine and is
board certified in pediatric gastroenterology. Dr. Len
has been a member of the outreach pediatric gastroenterology division attending clinics at Olympia and
Federal Way, Wash., and is a member of the North
American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and
Nutrition. Her research interests include celiac sprue
and inflammatory bowel disease.
Karen F. Murray, MD, is director of the hepatobiliary
program at Seattle Children’s Hospital and program
director of gastroenterology education; she is associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. She
received her MD from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and did a pediatrics residency and a chief resident
year at Seattle Children’s. She completed a clinical and
research fellowship in gastroenterology and nutrition
in the combined program at Children’s Hospital Boston
and Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Murray has done research and work in
Bangladesh and Tanzania. In addition to clinical care
FACULTY
Dennis L. Christie, MD, Chief
Simon Horslen, MBChB
Mary K. Len, MD
Karen F. Murray, MD
David Suskind, MD
Ghassan Wahbeh, MD
in gastroenterology and transplantation, she has an
active clinical research program in hepatology. Her
main focus is in the treatment and pathophysiology of
hepatitis C viral infection, and her studies also include
the treatment of hepatitis B viral infection and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Dr. Murray is president-elect
of Seattle Children’s medical staff. She is a member
of the Gastroenterology Sub-board of the American
Board of Pediatrics, and is on the steering committees
of three National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive
and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) clinical research
networks related to her research. She mentors
pediatrics residents and speaks at Seattle Children’s
noon conferences.
David Suskind, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. An expert in intestinal diseases, Dr. Suskind
has focused much of his energy in clinical care and
research in inflammatory bowel disease. He is studying
the effect of maternal cells in inflammatory bowel
disease (maternal microchimerism) as well as the effect
of maternal cells in biliary atresia. He is chair of the
nutrition committee at Seattle Children’s. He believes
in patient and family empowerment through medical
education.
Ghassan Wahbeh, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of pediatrics and gastroenterology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. His work focuses on pediatric
inflammatory bowel disease. His clinical and research
interests include early diagnostic tools in pediatric IBD
and advanced therapies. He also has clinical interests
in upper gastrointestinal inflammatory conditions in
children and interventional endoscopy.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Dennis L. Christie, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Mary K. Len, MD
Award for excellence as part of the Olympia clinic
based on patient survey results
Dennis L. Christie
MD, Chief
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Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Karen F. Murray, MD
A Phase 3 Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Adefovir
Dipivoxil in Children and Adolescents with Chronic
Hepatitis B, Gilead Sciences, Inc., $98,327
David L. Suskind, MD
Maternal Microchimerism in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Broad (Eli and Edythe L.) Foundation, $142,178
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Dennis L. Christie, MD
All That Vomits Is Not Reflux and New Perspectives
in Celiac Disease, North Pacific Pediatric Society,
171st Scientific Conference, Blaine, Wash., August
25–28, 2005
New Perspectives in Celiac Sprue, Kennewick General
Hospital, Kennewick, Wash., October 21, 2005
Understanding Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in
the Pediatric Patient, Central Washington Hospital,
Wenatchee, Wash., October 28, 2005
Reflux Disorder, Providence Everett Medical Center,
Bellevue, Wash., November 11, 2005
Isolated Liver Transplantation in Short Gut Patients
– Missed Opportunities?, 9th International Small
Bowel Transplantation Symposium, Brussels, Belgium,
July 2, 2005
Liver and Intestinal Transplantation Outreach,
Boise, Idaho, July 26, 2005
Growth, Puberty and Cognitive Development and
Post-Graduate Course: Fundamentals of Pediatric
Transplantation (course organizer), Third Congress
of the International Pediatric Transplant Association,
Innsbruck, Austria, August 2005
Neonatal Liver Disease, 75th North Pacific Pediatric
Society meeting, Blaine, Wash., August 28, 2005
Neonatal Liver Disease, Spokane Pediatric Society, Sacred Heart Hospital, Spokane, Wash., October 11, 2005
Liver and Intestine Transplantation in Children,
pediatric Grand Rounds, Sacred Heart Hospital,
Spokane, Wash., October 12, 2005
Liver Disease in Adolescence (chair and course
organizer), AASLD/NASPGHAN Pediatric
Symposium, AALSD annual meeting, San Francisco,
November 2005
Mary K. Len, MD
Celiac Sprue, Pediatricians of Olympia and
teleconferenced to Wenatchee, Wash. February 2005
Visiting professor, Port Angeles, Wash., June 2005
Simon P. Horslen, MBChB
Intestinal Transplantation, gastroenterology Grand
Rounds, University of Washington, January 21, 2005
Liver and Intestinal Transplant Outreach, Spokane,
Wash., March 2, 2005
Liver and Intestinal Transplant Outreach,
Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital, Tacoma, Wash.,
April 14, 2005
Liver and Intestinal Transplant Outreach,
Anchorage, Alaska, May 26–27, 2005
Karen F. Murray, MD
Pediatric Gastroenterology: Common Problems and
Hepatitis C Infection, plenary speaker, 33rd Annual
Advances in Family Practice and Primary Care,
Seattle, 2005
Common GI Problems, guest faculty lecture, noon
conference, University of Washington, April 12, 2005
Cholestasis, guest faculty lecture, noon conference,
University of Washington, 2005
Neonatal Cholestasis, lecture to nutritionists in the
region, ROSS, May 10, 2005
Visiting professor: Pocatello and Boise, Idaho, 2005
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
Ghassan T. Wahbeh, MD
Visiting professor, Great Falls, Mont., April 2005
Update on Treatment for Pediatric Inflammatory
Bowel Disease, Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation,
Evergreen Hospital Medical Center, January 2005
Celiac Disease, community physician meeting, St.
Francis Hospital, Federal Way, Wash., February 2005
Diagnosis of IBD in Children and Treatment of IBD
in Children, Oregon Health Sciences & University
of Washington Fellows IBD Retreat, Port Ludlow,
Wash., October 2005
Dubinsky M, Mei L, Landers C, Katzir L, Farrior S,
Wrobel I, Quiros A, Bahar R, Wahbeh G, Grill B, Silber
G, Kelts D, Pietzak M, Dallazadeh S, Vasiliauskas E,
Nelson C, Hershberg R, Huiying Y, Rotter J, Targan S.
Antibodies to a novel flagellin (CBIR1) adds clinical
utility to the diagnosis and differentiation of pediatric
IBD. NASPGHAN meeting, Salt Lake City. October 2005.
Gonzalez-Peralta RP, Kelly DA, Haber B, Molleston J,
Murray KF, Jonas MM, Shelton M, Mieli-Vergani G,
Lurie Y, Martin S, Lang T, Baczkowski A, Geffner M,
Gupta S, Laughlin M, International Pediatric Hepatitis
C Therapy Group. Interferon alfa-2b in combination
with ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis
C in children: efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics.
Hepatology. 2005;42(5):1010–1018.
PUBLICATIONS
Ake JA, Jelacic S, Ciol MA, Watkins SL, Murray KF,
Christie DL, Tarr PI. The nephroprotective effect of
intravenous volume expansion during Eschericia coli
0157:H7 infection. Pediatrics. 2005;15(6):e673–e680.
Bousvaros A, Guandalini S, Baldassano R, Botelho C,
Evans J, Ferry G, Goldin B, Hartigan L, Kugathasan
S, Levy J, Murray KF, Oliva-Hemker M, Rosh J, Tolia
V, Young R, Zholudev A, Vanderhoof J, Hibberd PL. A
randomized, double-blind trial of Lactobacillus GG vs.
placebo in addition to standard maintenance therapy
for children with Crohn’s disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis.
2005;11(9):833–839.
Bousvaros A, Murray KF, Leichtner A. Clinical manifestation and diagnosis of Crohn’s disease in children
and adolescents. In Up to Date. Chapra, LaMont,
Bonis, eds. Up To Date, Wellesley, 2005.
Dubinsky M, Mei L, Landers C, Katzir L, Farrior S,
Wrobel I, Quiros A, Bahar R, Wahbeh G, Grill B, Silber G, Pietzak M, Vasiliauskas E, Dallalzadeh S, Kelts
D, Nelson C, Hershberg R, Yang H, Targan S, Rotter J.
Familial expression of serological immune responses
in pediatric IBD. NASPGHAN meeting, Salt Lake City.
October 2005.
Murray KF, Barton B, Gonzalez-Peralta R, Rodrigue J,
Hoofnagle J, Shepherd J, Schwarz K, the PEDS-C
Clinical Research Network. Development of the п¬Ѓrst
large-scale multi-center, randomized controlled trial
for children with chronic Hepatitis C virus infection
(PEDS-C). J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2005;41(4):524.
Murray KF, Carithers RL. AASLD practice guidelines:
evaluation of the patient for liver transplantation.
Hepatology. 2005;41(6):1407–1432.
Murray KF, Finn LS, Taylor SL, Seidel KD, Larson
AM. A comparison of liver histology and alanine
amino transferase levels in children and adults with
chronic hepatitis C. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr.
2005;41(5):634–638.
Richardson PG, Soiffer RJ, Antin JH, Voss SD, Jin
Z, Kurtzberg J, Martin PL, Hockenberry D, Murray
KF, Vogelsang GB, Chen A, Krishnan A, Kernan MA,
Avignan D, Spitzer TR, Iannone R, Giralt S, Warren D,
Momtaz P, Revta C, Bradwin G, Iacobelli M, McDonald
GB, Guinan EC. Defibrotide (DF) for the treatment of
veno-occlusive disease (VOD) and multi-system organ
failure (MOF) post SCT: analysis of response and
survival according to degree of MOF. Submitted to
the 47th American Society of Hematology, 2005.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
93
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
Squires RH, Shneider BL, Bucuvalas J, Alonso E,
Sokol RJ, Narkewicz MR, Dhawan A, Rosenthal P,
Rodriguez-Baez N, Murray KF, Horslen S, Martin MG,
Lopez MJ, Soriano H, McGuire BM, Jonas MM, Yazigi
N, Shepherd RW, Schwarz K, Lobritto S, Thomas DW,
Lavine JE, Karpen S, Ng V, Kelly D, Simonds N, Hynan
LS. Acute liver failure in children: the п¬Ѓrst 348 patients
in The Pediatric Acute Liver Failure Study Group.
J Peds. Accepted December 2005.
Sudan D, Dibaise J, Torres C, Thompson J, Raynor S,
Gilroy R, Horslen S, Grant W, Botha J, Langnas A.
A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of intestinal failure. J Gastrointest Surg. 2005;9(2):165–77.
Suskind DL, Murray KF. Viral hepatitis. In: Current
Pediatric Therapy, 18th Edition. Burg, Ingelfinger,
Polin, Gershon, eds. London: Elsevier, 2005 (in press).
Sweet SC, Wong HH, Webber SA, Horslen S, Guidinger MK, Fine RN, Magee JC. Pediatric transplantation
in the United States, 1995В¬2004. Am J Transplant.
Accepted December 15, 2005.
Wahbeh G, Wyllie R, Seidel K, Steffen R. Symptoms
of reflux are not always reflective of persistent gastroesophageal reflux: a pediatric study using simultaneous
impedance-pH monitoring. NASPGHAN meeting,
Salt Lake City. October 2005.
Weinberg A, Horslen S, Kaufman SS, Jesser R,
DeVoll-Zabrocki A, Fleckton BL, Kochanowicz S,
Seipel KR, Levin MJ. Safety and immunogenicity of
Varicella-Zoster virus vaccine in pediatric liver and
intestine transplant recipients. Am J Transplant.
Accepted November 14, 2005.
Weinberg A, Horslen S, Kaufman SS, Jesser R, DeVoll-Zabrocki A, Fleckten BL, Kochanowicz S, Seipel
KR, Levin MJ. Safety and immunogenicity of Varicella
zoster virus (VZV) vaccine in pediatric liver transplant
recipients. 30th International Herpesvirus Workshop
(IHW). Turku, Finland. August 2005.
94
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
General Pediatrics
The Division of General Pediatrics (in the Department of Pediatrics) encompasses
academic general pediatrics and adolescent medicine. It is one of the largest
divisions in the Department of Pediatrics; members of the division are involved
with clinical care, teaching, advocacy, administration and research.
Our mission statement establishes our commitment “to improving the
health of children by teaching and modeling the practice of general pediatrics,
performing clinical research, and promoting the role of the general pediatrician
as a provider of primary care and advocate for children and their families.”
Our vision is for the division to continue to be the best division of general
pediatrics in the nation.
Members of the division provide inpatient and outpatient clinical care at
several locations in Seattle: Seattle Children’s Hospital, Harborview Medical
Center, University of Washington Medical Center, the medical center’s primary
care center and the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic. Our faculty are heavily
involved with running medical student programs for the University of Washington School of Medicine, the residency
program for the Department of Pediatrics and fellowship training programs. The division has a large research portfolio,
and our advocacy activities are intimately linked with our clinical, teaching and research activities.
TEACHING, RESEARCH, AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Frederick P. Rivara, MD, MPH, is chief of the Division
of General Pediatrics at Seattle Children’s Hospital,
George Adkins professor of pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine, and adjunct professor of epidemiology at the School of Public Health.
He is vice chair of the Department of Pediatrics in the
School of Medicine. Dr. Rivara received his MD from
the University of Pennsylvania and an MPH from the
University of Washington. He completed residencies
at the Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Boston
and the University of Washington and was a Robert
Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of
Washington. Dr. Rivara was director of the Harborview
FACULTY
Frederick P. Rivara
MD, MPH, Chief
Frederick P. Rivara, MD,
MPH, Chief
Abraham B. Bergman, MD
Julia M. Bledsoe, MD
Christine Caldwell, MD, MS
Dimitri A. Christakis, MD, MPH
Benjamin S. Danielson, MD
Julian K. Davies, MD
Donna M. Denno, MD
Beth E. Ebel, MD, MSc, MPH
Injury and Research Center in Seattle for 13 years. He
was founding president of the International Society for
Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention, and serves
as deputy editor of the journal Injury Prevention. He
is also editor of Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent
Medicine. His research interests have included the
efficacy and promotion of bicycle helmets, prevention
of pedestrian injuries, youth violence, the epidemiology
of п¬Ѓrearm injuries, intimate partner violence, interventions for alcohol abuse in trauma patients and the
effectiveness of trauma systems in the care of pediatric
and adult trauma patients. Dr. Rivara was elected to
the Institute of Medicine in 2005.
Kenneth W. Feldman, MD
Elinor A. Graham, MD, MPH
Brian D. Johnston, MD, MPH
Catherine J. Karr, MD, PhD
Charlotte W. Lewis, MD, MPH
Lenna L. Liu, MD, MPH
Paula Lozano, MD, MPH
Rita M. Mangione-Smith,
MD, MPH
Edgar K. Marcuse, MD, MPH
Carolyn A. McCarty, PhD
Heather A. McPhillips, MD, MPH
Wendy Mouradian, MD, MS
John M. Neff, MD
James W. Stout, MD, MPH
Naomi F. Sugar, MD
James A. Taylor, MD
Monica S. Vavilala, MD
Jeffrey A. Wright, MD
Kyle Yasuda, MD
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
95
General Pediatrics
Abraham B. Bergman, MD, is professor of pediatrics and
adjunct professor of health services at the University of
Washington. Dr. Bergman was head of the Division of
General Pediatrics and chief of pediatrics at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. Dr. Bergman practices what he calls “political medicine.” He has been
responsible for landmark legislation to improve the
health of children and families in the US including the
Flammable Fabrics Act to make children’s sleepwear
flame retardant, the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome
Act to provide NIH funding for research into SIDS and
legislation to create the National Health Service Corps.
Locally he has been responsible for legislation to fluoridate water in Washington state, improve the safety of
bicyclists, pedestrians and motorcyclists and to create
the Consumer Product Safety Commission. More
recently Dr. Bergman has been a Soros Fellow for his
work in foster care and is associate editor of Archives of
Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. His current area of
interest is improving health care of foster children.
Julia M. Bledsoe, MD, is clinical associate professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She is director of the University of Washington Center for Adoption Medicine and a staff
pediatrician at the university’s Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
Clinic. Dr. Bledsoe graduated from the University of
Washington School of Medicine. She has worked for
the US Public Health Service on the Navajo reservation
in northwestern New Mexico, and conducted a faculty
practice at the University of Washington’s Roosevelt
Primary Care Clinic. She developed a panel of families
formed through adoption and became recognized as a
national leader in understanding the unique needs of
these children over time. Through the Center for Adoption Medicine she provides pre-adoption counseling to
families internationally. She also sees newly adopted
children in consultation and welcomes local adoptees
into her primary care practice. Dr. Bledsoe’s clinical
interests include health care for foreign and domestic
adoptees, travel medicine, strategies for managing
complex behavioral issues and the multidisciplinary
approach to diagnosing and treating children with
alcohol-related neurological disorders.
Christine Caldwell, MD, MS, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and a pediatrician at the
University of Washington Pediatric Care Center.
Dr. Caldwell received her MD from Baylor College
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
of Medicine in Houston. She completed pediatric
residencies at Baylor Affiliated Hospitals and David
Grant USAF Medical Center/University of California,
Davis, with a fellowship in adolescent medicine at the
University of Washington Medical Center. She worked
as a community pediatrician in Seattle for 10 years.
At the Pediatric Care Center, she encourages teens to
increase responsibility for their own health.
Dimitri A. Christakis, MD, MPH, is director of the Child
Health Institute at Seattle Children’s Hospital and the
University of Washington School of Medicine, and
associate professor of pediatrics at the university.
He is associate editor of Archives of Pediatrics and
Adolescent Medicine. Dr. Christakis has published more
than 100 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters,
and his current research interest is the effect of media
usage on young children’s cognitive, emotional, behavioral and social development. His most recent studies
have found an association between television and video
viewing before the age of three years and attentional
and cognitive problems at age seven. He is piloting
interventions designed to both reduce and modify
television viewing in preschool children. His research
focuses on helping parents optimize their child’s media
usage to take advantage of its benefits and minimize
negative effects. He is the author of the forthcoming
book, The Elephant in the Living Room: Make
Television Work for Your Kids.
Benjamin S. Danielson, MD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. He has been medical
director of the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic
in Seattle since 1999, and he holds the Janet and
Jim Sinegal Endowed Chair for the Odessa Brown
Children’s Clinic. The clinic has been an active part of
Seattle’s multiethnic Central District since 1970, largely
serving children from disadvantaged backgrounds. The
clinic offers dental, mental health and medical services
and has special programs for children with sickle
cell disease, asthma, school underachievement and
obesity. Dr. Danielson completed his residency training
at Seattle Children’s. He has worked in a pediatric
sports medicine clinic at Harborview Medical Center,
a school-based teen health center and a primary care
clinic in West Seattle, and was an emergency department attending at Seattle Children’s. Dr Danielson
splits his time between clinical care, administrative
responsibilities, community advocacy and hospital
responsibilities. He serves on several community
General Pediatrics
boards, is active in mentoring efforts and participates
in a number of Seattle Children’s committees.
Julian K. Davies, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital, clinical assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington and staff
pediatrician at the university Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
Clinic, the longest-standing FAS center in the US. He
is co-director of the Center for Adoption Medicine,
where he provides pre-adoption consultations, postplacement evaluations and ongoing general pediatric
care for adopted children. He created and is the
primary author for the Center for Adoption Medicine
Web site, an online resource for medical and developmental issues in adoption and pediatrics. For the
past eight years, he has been a volunteer with Maria’s
Children, an arts rehabilitation center for Russian
orphans, teaching children’s theater and clowning,
and directing a summer arts camp for children
living in Moscow orphanages.
Donna M. Denno, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital, acting assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine, clinical assistant professor at the university
School of Public Health and attending pediatrician at
Harborview Medical Center. She earned her MD at the
University of Michigan Medical School. Her clinical
and research areas of interest include gastrointestinal
infections in children and risk factors related to food
safety. She has a strong interest in global medicine
and lived and worked in Ghana for three years; her
interests include the impact of intermittent presumptive treatment of malaria on anemia, the prevalence
of pneumococcal disease in children and determinants
of health. She is also interested in global medicine
education and п¬Ѓeld opportunities for physicians in
training, particularly residents at Seattle Children’s.
Beth E. Ebel, MD, MSc, MPH, is assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine and associate director of the Injury Prevention & Research Center at Harborview Medical Center.
She received an MSc in development economics from
Oxford University, an MD from Harvard Medical
School and the MIT Health Sciences and Technology
Program and an MPH from the University of Washington. Dr. Ebel’s research interests include injury prevention, community interventions and health behaviors
with emphasis on high-risk populations. She is
principal investigator in studies of the Seattle campaign
to encourage booster seat use for young passengers and
in a multisite community intervention to improve child
passenger safety in Latino communities. She is also
the principal investigator for several studies measuring the health care costs of unrestrained motor vehicle
occupants.
Kenneth W. Feldman, MD, divides his time between
primary care pediatrics at the Odessa Brown Children’s
Clinic in Seattle and child abuse consultation and
supervision of inpatient and emergency room care at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. Research interests have
focused on childhood injuries, including tap water
burn injuries.
Elinor A. Graham, MD, MPH, directs the Children and
Teen Clinic at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.
She earned her MPH at the Johns Hopkins School of
Public Health. Dr. Graham’s work focuses on children
and teens from low-income families; she has specialized in helping to build community support structures
for these families. She helped set up the Mud Creek
Health Project in Floyd County, Kentucky, to serve
disadvantaged communities. She worked for the
Seattle-King County Department of Public Health at
their Children and Teen clinic for 10 years, emphasizing the expansion of pediatric services at health
department clinics in the county, school health and
training low-income and immigrant parents to be more
effective advocates for their children’s education. She
helped establish the Community House Calls program
and EthnoMed Web sites to provide case management and community outreach services to immigrant
communities. She has supported pediatric residents in
conducting health projects at international sites and
has joined them for work with a project in El Salvador.
Brian D. Johnston, MD, MPH, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor
of pediatrics at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. He is chief of pediatrics at Harborview
Medical Center, the only level 1 trauma center in the
WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho).
He directs Harborview’s educational programs for
pediatric residents and medical students and oversees
hospital services and resources for pediatric patients.
He earned his MD at the University of California, San
Diego School of Medicine and his MPH at the University of Washington School of Public Health. His clinical
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
97
General Pediatrics
interests include medical consultation for pediatric
trauma patients, screening and treatment of traumatic
stress in children and integration of mental health
services into primary care. He conducts epidemiologic
research in the impact of child injury on family systems
and tests interventions to promote community-based
injury prevention. His work includes school-based
programs to promote physical activity while reducing
the risk of child pedestrian injury. On a national level,
Dr. Johnston has been involved in efforts to bring
evidence-based injury prevention into the work of
local child fatality review teams.
Catherine J. Karr, MD, PhD, is a pediatrician at the
University of Washington Pediatric Care Center; she
has an adjunct appointment in the Department of
Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences.
She is director of the Northwest Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU) at the University
of Washington. Her education includes an MS in
environmental health/toxicology; she earned her MD
from the university School of Medicine and her PhD
in epidemiology from the School of Public Health.
She was recently selected to serve on the American
Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Environmental
Health. Her primary research interest is the adverse
effects of environmental toxicants on child health.
Her current research is in the area of infant health
and ambient air pollution and pesticide risk communication. She is involved in primary care pediatrics
and teaching and also sees specialty pediatric
environmental medicine patients.
Charlotte W. Lewis, MD, MPH, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. Her primary research interest is disparities
in health and health care access, with a specific focus
on oral health and access to dental care. Her research
has involved documenting disparities in access to
oral health services for low-income and special needs
children as well as developing and evaluating strategies to improve pediatric oral health through expanded
pediatrician and family physician involvement in
these areas.
98
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Lenna L. Liu, MD, MPH, is clinician at Odessa Brown
Children’s Clinic, assistant professor of pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine
and investigator at the Child Health Institute. She
earned her MD from the University of Pennsylvania
and her MPH from the University of Washington
School of Public Health. She completed a pediatric
residency at the University of Washington. Dr. Liu is
co-investigator on the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth
study that examines rates of diabetes, particularly type
2 diabetes, in children and adolescents. She is active in
Seattle Children’s Hospital Obesity Action Team, the
university Center for Public Health Nutrition, and the
Seattle-King County Public Health Department’s Steps
to Health project. At the Odessa Brown Children’s
Clinic she teaches medical students and residents
and is developing an outreach program for improving
nutritional services and physical activity opportunities
in a community clinic setting. She is a consultant for
the Community House Calls program at Harborview
Medical Center, which does outreach and case management for refugee and immigrant communities. Dr. Liu
is a member of the American Diabetes Association’s
Asian and Pacific Islander Advocacy Council.
Paula Lozano, MD, MPH, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital, associate professor of pediatrics at
the University of Washington School of Medicine and
adjunct associate professor of health services at the
university School of Public Health. Dr. Lozano is also
associate investigator at the Center for Health Studies
at Group Health Cooperative in Seattle, and she practices and teaches pediatrics at the Children and Teens
Clinic at Harborview Medical Center. Dr. Lozano’s
research has explored the characteristics of health care
for children with chronic illnesses. She has conducted
several randomized trials of primary care–based interventions rooted in the chronic care model. Special
populations of interest include children with asthma,
ADHD, depression and obesity and disadvantaged
children. Dr. Lozano’s activities focus on developing
and evaluating interventions to support health behavior change in primary care pediatric settings, using
self-management support models derived from motivational interviewing. She has also published in the areas
of quality of care, access to care, health literacy, cultural
competence and electronic decision support and managed care. She also serves as pediatric co-director for
the NRSA Primary Care Research Fellowship.
General Pediatrics
Rita M. Mangione-Smith, MD, MPH, is attending physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington.
Her primary research interests are quality and appropriateness of care in pediatrics and the development
of interventions to improve care provided to children.
She is particularly interested in developing communication-based interventions to improve quality. Dr.
Mangione-Smith has taken an active role on several
quality-of-care projects at the University of California,
Los Angeles and RAND. At RAND, she took a supervisory role on a project to develop a comprehensive
pediatric quality-of-care assessment tool. She has collaborated with the measure development group at the
National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) to
expand the number of evidence-based pediatric quality
measures included in the HEDISВ®.
Edgar K. Marcuse, MD, MPH, is associate medical
director at Seattle Children’s Hospital, professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine and adjunct professor of epidemiology at the
School of Public Health. Dr. Marcuse received his MD
from Stanford University Medical School and his MPH
from the University of Washington School of Public
Health. He leads the hospital’s clinical quality improvement and patient safety activities. He has published
extensively on immunization, general pediatrics and
public health. Dr. Marcuse has served as a member
and chair of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee,
as a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics
Committee on Infectious Disease, and associate editor
of the Red Book. He is co-editor of AAP Grand Rounds,
a monthly publication critiquing new studies relevant
to pediatric practice. He is a member of the Advisory
Committee on Immunization Practice.
Carolyn A. McCarty, PhD, is research assistant professor
in pediatrics at the University of Washington and holds
an adjunct appointment in the Department of Psychology. Trained as a clinical psychologist, she is an active
member of the American Psychological Association,
the Society for Research in Child Development and
the International Society for Research on Child and
Adolescent Psychopathology. Her research has broadly
focused on family, peer and cultural influences on children’s mental health. The goal of her research is to use
knowledge of youth development to design, implement
and test programs that will improve the lives and mental health of children. Through a partnership with the
Seattle Public Schools, she is developing and testing a
preventive intervention for young adolescents designed
to reduce depression and improve their mental health,
academic success and interpersonal functioning.
Heather A. McPhillips, MD, MPH, is associate residency
director for the University of Washington Pediatric
Residency Training Program at Seattle Children’s
Hospital. Dr. McPhillips earned her MD from the
University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine
and her MPH at the University of Washington. She
completed a pediatrics residency at the University
of California, San Francisco and a fellowship at the
University of Washington. She focuses her clinical and
teaching efforts on the importance of understanding
patients and their families in terms of their development, innate and learned behaviors and the social and
medical context in which they live. Her research focus
is on health care quality and patient safety as well as
graduate medical education. She is a member of the
Association of Pediatric Program Directors (APPD)
and serves on the research task force for the APPD.
She is also a member of the Ambulatory Pediatric
Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Wendy Mouradian, MD, MS, is clinical professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington, with
adjunct appointments in pediatric dentistry, dental
public health sciences and health services (at the
School of Public Health). She is director of regional
initiatives for the university School of Dentistry and
has served as director of the craniofacial program at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. Dr Mouradian also heads
the Oral-Systemic Theme Committee at the university
School of Medicine, charged with integrating oral
health into the curriculum of medical students. Dr.
Mouradian earned her MD from Columbia University
and her MS from the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology. She completed a fellowship at the University of Washington. Dr Mouradian has received several
national awards for her role organizing and chairing
The Face of a Child: Surgeon General’s Conference on
Children and Oral Health; she was recognized by the
American Dental Education Association for her efforts
to advance the importance of oral health to the overall
health of children. She is associate director of the
Center for Leadership Education in Pediatric Dentistry.
Her research areas include quality of life for children
with craniofacial conditions, ethics and educational
policy related to children’s oral health.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
99
General Pediatrics
John M. Neff, MD is director of the Center for Children
with Special Needs at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He received his MD from Harvard
Medical School. He was a member of the Epidemic
Intelligence Service of the Public Health Service and
trained in virology and infectious diseases at Children’s
Hospital Boston. He was instrumental in determining the prevalence of complications associated with
smallpox vaccination in the US. Dr. Neff served on
the faculty and in the dean’s office at Johns Hopkins
Medical School. He directed the pediatric program at
The Baltimore City Hospitals, where he developed a
prepaid practice plan for the city’s foster children. He
has worked on issues concerning children with special
needs, including identification, delivery of services and
п¬Ѓnances. He has served as medical director and vice
president of Seattle Children’s and associate dean at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. He has
broad interests in child health and advocacy with two
special interests — smallpox and smallpox vaccination,
and how to best serve children with special health care
needs in our current environment. He has served on
many state and national committees.
James W. Stout, MD, MPH, is pediatrician at the Odessa
Brown Children’s Clinic and associate professor of
pediatrics and adjunct associate professor of health
services at the University of Washington. He leads the
clinic’s Asthma Clinic and provides direction for its
quality improvement programs. Dr. Stout is co-founder
of the National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare
Quality, a nonprofit organization headquartered in
Boston. He also leads QI Partners, a quality improvement group based at the Child Health Institute (CHI)
in Seattle. Through these organizations, he works on a
variety of local and national projects with the common
aim of improving the quality of children’s health care.
Naomi F. Sugar, MD, is attending pediatrician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and Harborview Medical Center
and clinical associate professor at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. She is medical director of the Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and
Traumatic Stress and child abuse consultant at Harborview Medical Center and Seattle Children’s. She
earned her MD at the Medical College of Wisconsin,
completed an internship and a residency in pediatrics
at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, and completed a
fellowship in behavioral pediatrics. She specializes in
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the evaluation of children and adolescents when there
is a concern for physical or sexual abuse, and in health
care for children in foster care. Dr. Sugar provides
training to medical, legal and social service professionals in the medical aspects of child abuse and adolescent
and adult sexual assault. Her research interests are in
evaluation of child abuse and foster care.
James A. Taylor, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital, medical director of the newborn
nursery at the University of Washington Medical Center and director of the Pediatric Residency Continuity
Clinic Program. He earned his MD from the University
of North Carolina School of Medicine; he completed a
pediatric residency at the University of Colorado and
a fellowship in general pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He is director of the
Puget Sound Pediatric Research Network, a collaborative effort of practicing pediatricians in the community,
the university Division of General Pediatrics and
Seattle Children’s. Dr. Taylor’s research interests
include maximizing the effectiveness of immunization
delivery in primary care practices, eliminating racial
disparities in immunization status, assessing the
efficacy of alternative therapies for children, developing
and assessing methods to promote the judicious use of
antibiotics in children and pediatric patient safety.
Monica S. Vavilala, MD, is attending physician in the
Emergency Department at Seattle Children’s Hospital,
and she is associate professor in the departments of
Pediatrics and Anesthesiology and adjunct associate
professor in the Department of Neurological Surgery
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She practices anesthesiology at Harborview Medical
Center. She is also involved in teaching anesthesiology
and pediatric trainees. Dr. Vavilala’s research interests
include hemodynamics and outcomes in pediatric
brain injury, and mechanisms of cerebral edema in
pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis.
Jeffrey A. Wright, MD, is associate professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine and adjunct
associate professor in the School of Dentistry. He is
medical director of the university Pediatric Care Center
and attending physician in the newborn nursery at the
University of Washington Medical Center. Dr. Wright
earned his MD at the University of Missouri–Kansas
City and was resident and chief resident at Children’s
Mercy Hospital in Kansas City. He has directed the
General Pediatrics
general pediatric service at Seattle Children’s Hospital, including the Medical Diagnostic/Referral Clinic,
Encopresis Clinic, Infant/Toddler Growth Clinic and
resident continuity clinic. Dr. Wright’s research
interests include behavioral pediatrics, children with
special health care needs and medical informatics.
He is a computer and Web programmer working to
use information technology for improving decision
support, individualized care and coordination of care.
Kyle Yasuda, MD, is clinical professor of pediatrics at
the University of Washington School of Medicine
and medical director of the Pediatric Clinic at
Harborview Medical Center. He works in the new
College Program, an integrated four-year curriculum
to teach clinical skills and professionalism. He has a
background in primary care practice, health policy,
nonprofit organizations and advocacy for children and
pediatricians. He is chair of the American Academy
of Pediatrics (AAP) Committee on Practice and
Ambulatory Medicine, immediate past chair of the
Washington Council for the Prevention of Child Abuse
and Neglect, former member of the Department of
Social and Health Services State Advisory Committee
and former member of the Governor’s Commission on
Early Learning. He has held leadership positions for
the AAP Washington Chapter, including nominee for
the Primary Care Health Policy Fellowship. Dr. Yasuda
formed and manages the 501C3 nonprofit foundation
of the chapter that focuses on community-based
collaborative research and education projects involving
practicing pediatricians. He received the national
2005 Commissioner’s Award for his contributions to
the п¬Ѓeld of child abuse and neglect.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Benjamin S. Danielson, MD
UW School of Medicine Charlie Garcia Distinguished
Service Award for Mentoring, January 2005
Home Care Association of Washington’s Physician
of the Year, May 6, 2005
Distinguished Faculty Honoree, University of
Washington, October 20, 2005
Janet and Jim Sinegal Endowed Chair for the
Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic, awarded 2005
Beth E. Ebel, MD, MSc, MPH
Special Emphasis Award for teaching and mentorship,
Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, 2005
Elected to Society for Pediatric Research
Elinor A. Graham, MD, MPH
Helen Rodriguez-Trias Award for Social Justice,
American Public Health Association, 2005
Catherine J. Karr, MD, PhD
NIH Pediatric Research Loan Repayment
Program Award
Paula Lozano, MD, MPH
Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program
Mentor Award
Carolyn A. McCarty, PhD
Travel Award, Family Research Consortium, 2005
Wendy Mouradian, MD, MS
American Dental Education Association,
Presidential Citation, 2005
Frederick P. Rivara, MD, MPH
Elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the
National Academies
James W. Stout, MD, MPH
University of Washington, Innovator Recognition
Program, 2005
Monica S. Vavilala, MD
EuroNeuro Poster Presentation Prize, 2005
University of Washington Department of Anesthesiology B. Raymond Fink Award for Research, 2005
Kyle Yasuda, MD
Stanley Stamm Role Model in Medicine Award,
2004–2005
National 2005 Commissioner’s Award for
Washington State
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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General Pediatrics
New
James W. Stout, MD, MPH
Children’s Preventive Collaborative Year 1,
King County Public Health, $80,644
Abraham B. Bergman, MD
Child Abuse Consultation Network, Washington DSHS,
$60,375
Children’s Preventive Collaborative Year 2,
King County Public Health, $80,410
Dimitri A. Christakis, MD, MPH
Parent-Initiated Prevention Program, AHRQ, $516,117
NICHQ YR 6, National Initiative for Children’s
Healthcare Quality, $177,318
RESEARCH FUNDING
Beth E. Ebel, MD, MSc, MPH
Dissemination of Booster Seat Community Intervention to the Latino Community, Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, $223,090
Impact of a Primary Enforcement Seat Belt Law on
Health Care Costs in Washington State, Washington
Traffic Safety Commission, $73,124
Increasing Booster Seat Use in At-Risk Communities:
Tailored Communication and Behavioral Change,
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, $79,584
Improving Child Occupant Protection in Latino Families, Washington Traffic Safety Commission, $75,648
Brian D. Johnston, MD, MPH
Improving Injury Prevention Capacity in the Child
Death Review Process, EMSC/MCHB/HRSA,
$200,000
Lenna L. Liu, MD, MPH
Diabetes in Youth, Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, $50,393
Paula Lozano, MD, MPH
Asthma Management Support Curriculum for
Pediatrics Residents, Group Health Community
Foundation, $67,646
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Continuing
Abraham B. Bergman, MD
Improving the Health Status of Foster Children in
Washington State, Allen Foundation, $150,000
Brian D. Johnston, MD, MPH
Family Stress, Resilience and Child Injury Risk,
NICHD/’NIH, $113,803
Injury-Free Coalition for Kids of Seattle,
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, $50,734
Charlotte W. Lewis, MD, MPH
Primary Care Provider and Preventive Oral Health,
NIDCR/NIH, $125,959
Paula Lozano, MD, MPH
Randomized Trial of a Computerized Asthma
Management System, NHLBI/NIH, $461,602
Using Handheld Technology to Reduce Errors in
ADHD Care, AHRQ, $293,136
Carolyn A. McCarty, PhD
Prevention of Depression Among Pre-Adolescent Youth,
NIMH/NIH, $115,855
Rita M. Mangione-Smith, MD, MPH
Dr-Parent Communication and Antibiotic
Over-Prescribing, AHRQ, $99,792
John M. Neff, MD
Care Management for Children with Special Health
Care: Addressing and Financing an Unmet Need,
Maternal and Child Health Bureau/Health Resources
and Services Administration/DHHS, $246,690
Frederick P. Rivara, MD, MPH
Academic Administrative Units in Primary Care,
HRSA, $217,093
Frederick P. Rivara, MD, MPH
Program to Prevent Shaken Baby Syndrome and Infant
Abuse, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, $472,238
Effectiveness of Designated Driver Programs, Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention, $350,000
Long-Term Effects of Domestic Violence, AHRQ/GHC,
$81,309
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
General Pediatrics
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Benjamin S. Danielson, MD
Disparities in Healthcare, Washington Health
Foundation Conference, February 2, 2006
Overweight and Motivational Interviewing Techniques,
Pediatric Weight Management Conference, Highline
Hospital, March 21, 2005
Culture, Diversity and Obesity, National Association
of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners National Conference,
Phoenix, March 31, 2005
Culturally Competent Primary Care, NICHQ
Community Health Collaborative, June 14, 2005
Overweight Among Youth, Pacific Northwest Regional
Conference, July 17, 2005
Culturally Competent Primary Care and Health
Disparities, Washington State Diversity Summit,
September 30, 2005
The Healthcare Needs of Minority Children,
Washington Women’s Foundation Conference,
November 2, 2005
Julian K. Davies, MD
Lectures on international adoption and FAS at local
adoption agencies, National Association of Adoption
Attorneys conference and NACAC annual meeting
Donna M. Denno, MD
Development of a Disposable-Based, Multiplexed Labon-a-Chip Assay for Enteric Pathogens, Symposium
on Vaccine Development, 40th annual panel meeting,
United States – Japan Cooperative Medical Science
Program, Boston, 2005
Casualties of War: Iraq and Health Care, Third Annual
Western Regional International Health Conference,
February 19, 2005
Beth E. Ebel, MD, MSc, MPH
Invited speaker, Alberta Centre for Injury Control and
Research Forum, Alberta, Canada, March 8, 2005
Booster Seat Use and The Health Care Costs of Unrestrained Drivers in Washington State, Three Flags Law
Enforcement Conference. Olympia, Wash., April, 2005
Booster Seat Use in an Urban and Rural Latino Community: A Qualitative Study, 2005 National Injury
Prevention and Control Conference, May 9, 2005
Prevention of Deaths from Violence in the United
States: The Role of Interventions During Childhood
and Adolescence, 2005 National Injury Prevention
and Control Conference, May 10, 2005
Invited panelist, Lifesavers Conference on Injury
Prevention in Latino Communities, Charleston, S.C.,
May 2005
Invited speaker, Risk Watch Community Coalition
Workshop on Child Passenger Safety, Yakima, Wash.,
September 2005.
Kenneth W. Feldman, MD
Child Physical Abuse, Risk Factors and Early Recognition, King County Bar Assoc. CLE for Guardians ad
Litem, Seattle, February 26, 2005
Problematic Nutrition and Growth, 26th Annual
Duncan Seminar: Raising Special Needs Kids: Health,
Growth, and Nutrition, Seattle, March 18, 2005
Child Abuse Recognition, Monthly Trauma Conference,
Providence Hospital, Everett, Wash., April 13, 2005
Pediatric Condition Falsification, Northwest Child
Maltreatment Peer Review, Seattle, June 2005
Hypocalciuric Hypercalcemia Presenting as Neonatal
Rib Fractures: A Newly Described Mutation in the
Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene, Ray E. Helfer Society,
5th annual meeting, New Paltz, N.Y., October 2005
Brian D. Johnston, MD, MPH
Using Best-Evidence Topic Reports for Self-Learning and
Practice Change in an Ambulatory Pediatric Rotation,
poster presentation, Pediatric Academic Societies Annual
Conference, Washington, D.C., May 14–May 17, 2005
Clinical Impact of Repeat Head CT in Pediatric Patients Admitted Following Blunt Head Trauma, American Society of Neuroradiology Conference, May 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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General Pediatrics
Invited plenary session speaker, Injury Prevention
Through Child Death Review, Injury and Violence in
America: Meeting Challenges, Sharing Solutions,
Denver, May 9–11, 2005
Catherine J. Karr, MD, PhD
Childhood Lead Exposure via School Drinking Water:
Assessing the Risk, platform presentation, Pediatric
Academic Societies, May 2005
Impact of Prenatal and Early Infancy Environmental
Exposures on Neonatal and Infant Health, American
Thoracic Society, May 2005
Border Air Quality Study: Puget Sound Component,
Border Air Quality Study Annual Conference, Victoria,
BC, Canada, August 2005
Impact of Ambient Air Pollution on Infant Bronchiolitis in Puget Sound and the Georgia Air Basin, Pacific
Northwest Air & Waste Management International
Association, November 2005
Organophosphate Pesticides and Children’s Health: A
Primer for Health Care Providers, 15th Annual Western
Migrant Stream Forum, Northwest Regional Primary
Care Association, Portland, Ore., January 2006
Air Pollution and Children: Not Breathing Easy,
Seattle Art Museum Series on Environment,
March 16, 2005
Advances and Controversies in Pediatric Environmental Health, course director, University of Washington
Center for Urban Horticulture, April 1, 2005
Lead and Other Toxicologically Relevant Metals,
University of Washington, July 2005
Charlotte W. Lewis, MD, MPH
Maternal and Child Oral Health Institute Meeting,
keynote speaker, HRSA-MCHB, Denver, November
2–3, 2005
Lenna L. Liu, MD, MPH
Childhood Obesity and Primary Care, University of
New Mexico Department of Pediatrics Grand Rounds,
April 2005
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Childhood Obesity and Primary Care, Mary Bridge
Children’s Hospital Grand Rounds, June 2005
Primary Care Management of Overweight Children,
Advanced Practice in Primary & Acute Care, Pacific
Northwest 28th Annual National Conference,
October 2005
Paula Lozano, MD, MPH
Missed Opportunities to Prescribe Controllers for
Children with Persistent Asthma; Randomized Trial of
Tailored Guideline-Based Electronic Decision Support:
Can Computers Help Pediatricians Prescribe Controllers for Persistent Asthma?; Using a Tablet Computer
to Gather Health Information; Exposure and Interest
in Information to Reduce Asthma Triggers in Children;
A Survey of Provider Satisfaction with an Electronic
Prescription Writer in Three Ambulatory Pediatric Settings; and Risk Factors for Missing Influenza Vaccination Among Medicaid-Insured Children with Asthma,
Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting, Washington, D.C., May 2005
Rita M. Mangione-Smith, MD, MPH
Assessing the Quality of Developmental Screening for
Young Children: How Often Is Indicated Care Received?
and Understanding Off-Label Prescribing to Children: How Often, Which Drugs, and Who Gets Them?,
platform presentations, Pediatric Academic Societies
annual meeting, Washington, D.C., May 16, 2005
Ruling Out the Need for Antibiotics: Are We Sending
the Right Message?, Children’s Memorial Medical
Center, Northwestern University, Grand Rounds,
Chicago, December 2, 2005
Edgar K. Marcuse, MD, MPH
Exploring Increased Public Participation in Making
Public Health Policy Decisions – The Case of Pandemic
Influenza and Our Pending Decision About Who First
to Vaccinate, American Epidemiology Society annual
meeting, March 2005
Vaccine Safety Issues and Immunization Hesitancy,
American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference
& Exhibition, Washington, D.C., October 2005
General Pediatrics
Heather A. McPhillips, MD, MPH
How Lean Processing Methods Took Resident and
Attending Physicians Out of Their Team Rooms and
Onto the Wards for Multidisciplinary Family-Centered
Rounds, poster presentation, National Initiative for
Children’s Healthcare Quality (NICHQ), 4th Annual
Forum for Improving Children’s Health Care, San
Diego, March 1, 2005
Whose Responsibility Is Children’s Oral Health?,
keynote address, Royal Melbourne Children’s Hospital,
Melbourne, Australia, Nov 2, 2005
When Cultures Collide: Strategies for Implementing
Rapid Change Within an Academic Teaching Program,
poster presentation, Association of Pediatric Program
Directors annual meeting, Washington, D.C.,
March 13, 2005
Frederick P. Rivara, MD, MPH
Second Annual Rud Polhill Lecture, Department of
Pediatrics, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Ala.,
April 13, 2005
Do Multidisciplinary Walk Rounds Result in Earlier
Discharges in an Academic Teaching Hospital?, poster
presentation, Pediatric Academic Societies meeting,
Washington, D.C., March 15, 2005
Communication, Teaching and Learning Styles,
workshop co-leader, University of Washington School
of Medicine faculty development workshop, March 29,
2005
Medication Safety in Ambulatory Pediatrics, Agency
for Healthcare Quality and Research (AHRQ) Annual
Patient Safety Meeting, Washington, D.C., June 6, 2005
Think Inside the Box! Incorporating Patient Safety
into the Curriculum and Culture of Residency Training, Patient Safety Conference, Seattle Children’s,
October 5, 2005
The Effect of a Standardized Rounding Practice on Patient Satisfaction, poster presentation, National Association of Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions
annual meeting, Indian Wells, Calif., October 12, 2005
Behavior: Birth to Toddler, pediatric residency noon
conference series, University of Washington, 2005
Wendy Mouradian, MD, MS
Oral Health for Montana’s Children and Families:
What We Can Do Together, keynote address, Treasuring
Montana’s Maternal and Child Health, Montana State
– Spring Public Health Conference, Bozeman, Mont.,
May 2005
The Importance of Oral Health in Children: Ethical
and Social Issues, keynote address, International
Association of Pediatric Dentistry, Sydney, Australia,
Nov 3, 2005
Methodologic Considerations for Injury Research,
Ambulatory Pediatric Association Injury Control
Special Interest Group, Pediatric Academic Societies
annual meeting, Washington, D.C., May 16, 2005
James W. Stout, MD, MPH
Innovations in Asthma Care, Pacific West Cluster
Transformation Summit, Portland, Ore., March 2005
Asthma Among First Nation and AI/AN Children:
Translating Evidence Into Practice, Mini-Plenary and
Workshop, International Meeting in Inuit and Native
American Child Health: Innovations in Clinical
Care and Research and 17th Annual IHS Research
Conference, Seattle, Wash., April 2005
Naomi F. Sugar, MD
HPV/HSV/HIV Viral Alphabet Soup and Abuse vs.
Accident: Analysis of Anogenital Injuries, CAREs
Northwest Child Abuse Medical Conference, 2005
Developmental Anatomy and Accidental Impalement
Injuries in Children, San Diego Conference on Child
Maltreatment, San Diego, 2005
James A. Taylor, MD
Pediatric Practice-Based Research Networks: Potential
and Pitfalls, Israeli Pediatric Research in Office Settings Network Meeting, Tel Aviv, Israel, April 11, 2005
Building Research Capacity in Primary Care Through
the Use of Practice-Based Research, The Israel National Institute of Health Policy and Health Services
Research, The National Research Agenda for Primary
Care Workshop, Dead Sea, Israel, April 14, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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General Pediatrics
Monica S. Vavilala, MD
Blood Pressure Management in Severe Pediatric
Traumatic Brain Injury, Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia, 2005
Blood Pressure Management in Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury, SAFAR Institute, Pittsburgh, 2005
Visiting professorship, Department of Anesthesiology,
University of Texas, Houston, April 18, 2005
Visiting professorship, Safar Center, University of
Pittsburgh, June 2005
Visiting professorship, Department of Anesthesiology,
Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, July 2005
Visiting professorship, departments of Anesthesiology
and Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
August 2005
Kyle Yasuda, MD
A Model for Peer-Based Training of Immunization
Practitioners, abstract, National Immunization
Conference, March 2005
Pediatricians — Partners in Early Childhood, Early
Childhood and Health Partnerships Symposium,
March 2005
Chan KS, Mangione-Smith R, Rosen M, Burwinkle
TM, Varni JW. The PedsQLTM: reliability and validity of the short-form generic core scales and asthma
module in children with asthma. Medical Care.
2005;43(3):256–265.
Christakis DA, Cowan CA, Garrison MM, Molteni R,
Marcuse E, Zerr DM. Variation in inpatient diagnostic
testing and management of bronchiolitis. Pediatrics.
Apr 2005;115(4):878–884.
Christakis DA, Wright JA, Taylor JA, Zimmerman FJ.
Association between parental satisfaction and antibiotic prescription for children with cough and cold symptoms. Pediatr Infect Dis J. Sep 2005;24(9):774–777.
Coates BM, Vavilala MS, Mack C, Muangman S, Suz P,
Sharar SR, Bulger E, Lam AM. The influence of definition and location of hypotension on outcome following
severe pediatric traumatic brain injury. Crit Care Med.
2005;33:2645–2650.
Cohen AL, Rivara F, Marcuse EK, McPhillips H,
Davis R. Are language barriers associated with
serious medical events in hospitalized pediatric
patients? Pediatrics. 2005;116:575–579.
Cohen AL, Rivara FP, Davis R, Christakis DA.
Compliance with guidelines for the medical care of п¬Ѓrst
urinary tract infections in infants: a population-based
study. Pediatrics. Jun 2005;115(6):1474–1478.
PUBLICATIONS
Bergman AB. Advocacy is not a specialty (commentary). Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. Sept 2005;159(9):892.
Bowman SM, Zimmerman FJ, Christakis DA, Sharar
SR, Martin DP. Hospital characteristics associated with
the management of pediatric splenic injuries. JAMA.
Nov 23, 2005;294(20):2611–2617.
Carroll AE, Zimmerman FJ, Rivara FP, Ebel BE,
Christakis DA. Perceptions about computers and
the Internet in a pediatric clinic population. Ambul
Pediatr. March–April 2005;5(2):122–126.
Chan KS, Keeler E, Schonlau M, Rosen M, MangioneSmith R. How does ethnicity and home language affect
management practices and outcomes in children with
asthma? Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005;159:283–289.
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Cummings P, Rivara FP, Thompson RS, Reid RJ.
Ability of parents to recall the injuries of their young
children. Inj. Prev. 2005;11:43–47.
Davies JK, Bledsoe JM. Prenatal alcohol and
drug exposures in adoption. Pediatr Clin North Am.
Oct 2005;52(5):1369–1393.
Denno DM, Stapp JR, Boster DR, Qin X, Clausen CR,
Del Beccaro KH, Swerdlow DL, Braden CR, Tarr PI.
Etiology of diarrhea in pediatric outpatient settings.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005;24(2):142–148.
Edwards T, Patrick DM, Topolski T, Aspinall C, Mouradian W, Speltz M. Approaches to craniofacial-specific quality of life assessment in adolescents. Cleft Palate
Craniofac J. 2005;42(1):12–24.
General Pediatrics
Feudtner C, Villareale N, Morray B, Sharp V, Hays
R, Neff J. Technology-dependency among patients
discharged from a children’s hospital: a retrospective
cohort study. BioMed Central Pediatrics. 2005;5:8.
Finkelstein JA, Lozano P, Fuhlbrigge AL, Carey VJ,
Inui TS, Soumerai SB, Sullivan SD, Wagner EH, Weiss
ST, Weiss KB. Practice-level effects of interventions
to improve asthma care in primary care settings: the
pediatric asthma care patient outcomes research
team. Health Services Research. Dec 2005;40(6 Pt 1):
1737–1757.
Fishman PA, Ebel BE, Garrison MM, Christakis DA,
Wiehe SE, Rivara FP. Cigarette tax increase and media
campaign cost of reducing smoking-related deaths.
Am J Prev Med. Jul 2005;29(1):19–26.
Fuhlbrigge AL, Carey VJ, Finkelstein JA, Lozano P,
Inui TS, Weiss ST, Weiss KB. Validity of the HEDIS
criteria to identify children with persistent asthma
and sustained high utilization. Am Manag Care.
May 2005;11(5):325–330.
Galbraith A, Koepsell TD, Grossman D, Christakis
DA. Medicaid acceptance and availability of timely
follow-up for newborns with Medicaid. Pediatrics.
Nov 2005;116(5):1148–1154.
Garrison MM, Christakis DA. A teacher in the living
room: electronic media and babies, toddlers, and
preschoolers. Kaiser Family Foundation. Dec 2005.
Garrison MM, Jeffries H, Christakis DA. Risk of death
for children with Down syndrome and sepsis. J Pediatr.
Dec 2005;147(6):748–752.
Gentilello LM, Ebel BE, Wickizer TM, Salkever DS,
Rivara FP. Alcohol interventions for trauma patients
treated in emergency departments and hospitals: a cost
benefit analysis. Ann Surg. Apr 2005;241(4):541–550.
Glew G, Fan J, Katon W, Rivara FP, Kernic M. Bullying, psychosocial adjustment, and academic performance in elementary school. Arch Pediatr Adol Med.
2005;159:1026–1031.
Graham EA. Economic, racial and cultural influences
on the growth and maturation of children. Pediatrics
in Review. Aug 2005;26:284–288.
Gruchalla RS, Pongracic J, Plaut M, Evans R, Visness
C, Walter M, Crain E, Kattan M, Morgan W, Steinbach
S, Stout JW, Malindzak G, Smartt E, Mitchell H.
Inner City asthma study: relationships among sensitivity, allergen exposure, and asthma morbidity. Allergy
Clin Immunol. 2005;115(3):478–485.
Harsha WJ, Perkins JA, Lewis CW, Manning SC.
Head and neck endocrine surgery in children:
1997 and 2000. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg.
Jul 2005;131(7):564–570.
Harsha WJ, Perkins JA, Lewis CW, Manning SC.
Pediatric admissions and procedures for lymphatic
malformations in the United States: 1997 and 2000.
Lymphat Res Biol. 2005;3(2):58–65.
Johnston BD, Huebner CE, Anderson ML, Tyll LT,
Thompson RS. Healthy steps for young children in an
integrated delivery system: child and parent outcomes
at 30 months. Accepted for publication by Arch Pediatr
Adol Med. December 2005.
Karr CJ, Rivara FP, Cummings P. Severe injury among
Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children in Washington State. Public Health Reports. 2005;120:19–24.
Kattan M, Stearns SC, Crain EF, Stout JW, Gergen PJ,
Evans R III, Visness CM, Gruchalla RS, Morgan WJ,
O’Connor GT, Mastin JP, Mitchell HE. Cost-effectiveness of a home-based environmental intervention
for inner-city children with asthma. J Allergy Clinic
Immunol. 2005;166(5):1058–1063.
Lapidus J, Smith NH, Ebel BE, Romero FC. Restraint
use among Northwest American Indian children
traveling in motor vehicles. Am J Public Health.
Nov 2005;95(11):1982–1988.
Lewis CW, Robertson A, Phelps S. Unmet dental
care needs among children with special health care
needs: implications for the medical home. Pediatrics.
Sep 2005;116(3):e426–e431.
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Lewis CW, Ose M, Aspinall C, Omnell L. Community
orthodontists and craniofacial care: results of a
Washington state survey. Cleft Palate Craniofac.
Sep 2005;42(5):521–525.
Liu LL, The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study
Group. Incidence of diabetes in United States children
and adolescents. Diabetes. 2005;54 (suppl. 1):A31.
McPhillips H, Stille C, Smith D, Pearson J, Stull J,
Hecht J, Miller M, Davis R. Methodological challenges
in describing medication dosing errors in children. In:
Advances in Patient Safety: From Research to Implementation, vol. 2: Concepts and Methodology. Henriksen K, Battles J, Marks E, Lewin DI, eds. Rockville,
MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality;
February 2005, 213–223.
Liu LL, The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study
Group. Estimates of the prevalence of diabetes in
United States children and youth by age and race/ethnicity. Diabetes. 2005;54 (suppl. 1):A247.
McPhillips H, Stille C, Smith D, Pearson J, Stull J,
Hecht J, Debellis K, Miller M, Kaushal R, Andrade S,
Gurwitz J, Davis R. Potential medication dosing errors
in outpatient pediatrics. J Pediatr. Dec 2005;761–767.
Liu LL, Lawrence JM, Liese A, Pettitt D, Pihoker C,
Dabelea D, Hardy L, Kilgo P, Romanowski A, Waitzfelder B, Kahn HS. The SEARCH for Diabetes in
Youth Study Group. Prevalence of overweight among
U.S. diabetic youth. Diabetes. 2005;54 (suppl. 1):A450.
Miller P, Vavilala MS. Rozet I, Lee L, Muangman S,
Mack C, Wang M, Hollingworth C. Risk factors for
intraoperative hypotension during emergency decompressive pediatric craniotomy. J Neurosurg Anesthesiol.
2005;22.
Mangione-Smith R, Schonlau M, Chan KS, Keesey J,
Rosen M, Louis TA, Keeler E. Measuring the effectiveness of a collaborative method for quality improvement in pediatric asthma care: does implementing the
chronic care model improve processes and outcomes
of care? Ambul Pediatr. 2005;5(2):75–82.
Mouradian W, Reeves A, Evans R, Kim S, Schaad
D, Marshall S, Slayton R. Oral health curriculum for
medical students at the University of Washington.
Acad Med. 2005;80:434–442.
Mangione-Smith R, Elliott MN, Wong L, McDonald
L, Roski J. Measuring the quality of care for group A
streptococcal pharyngitis in п¬Ѓve U.S. health plans.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005;159:491–497.
Mangione-Smith R, Wong L, Elliott MN, McDonald
L, Roski J. Measuring the quality of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory infections and bronchitis
in п¬Ѓve U.S. health plans. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med.
2005;159:751–757.
McCarty CA, Zimmerman FJ, Digiuseppe DL, Christakis DA. Parental emotional support and subsequent
internalizing and externalizing problems among children. J Dev Behav Pediatr. Aug 2005;26(4):267–275.
McCarty CA, McMahon RJ. Conduct Problems
Prevention Research Group. Domains of risk in the
developmental continuity of п¬Ѓresetting. Behav Ther.
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Muangman S, Rozet I, Vavilala MS, Lee LA, Kincaid
MS, Souter MJ, Lam AM. Iso-osmolar solutions of
mannitol vs. hypertonic saline for intraoperative brain
relaxation. J Neurosurg Anesthesiol. 2005;243.
Muangman S, Vavilala MS, Suz P, Kincaid MS, Lam
AM. Return of cerebral autoregulation during the п¬Ѓrst
week following severe pediatric traumatic brain injury.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol. 2005;220.
Neff JM. Children with chronic conditions: Financial
issues and other resources. In: Comprehensive Pediatrics. Osborn, DeWitt, First, Zenel, eds. Philadelphia:
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Perkins J, Lewis CW, Gruss J, Eblen L, Sie K. Furlow
palatoplasty for management of velopharyngeal insufficiency: a prospective study of 148 consecutive patients.
Plast Reconstr Surg. Jul 2005;116(1):72–80.
Poland GA, Grabenstein JD, Neff JM. The U.S. smallpox vaccination program: a review of a large modern
era smallpox vaccination implementation program.
Vaccine. 2005;23(17–18):2078–2081.
General Pediatrics
Rivara FP, Alexander B. Occupational injuries. In:
Textbook of Clinical Occupational and Environmental
Medicine. Rosenstock L, Cullen MR, eds. Philadelphia:
Elsevier Saunders Company, 2005:825–833.
Shah M, Feldman KW, Vavilala MS, Hallam DK.
Motor vehicle crash brain injury in infants and toddlers: a suitable model for inflicted head injury?
Child Abuse and Neglect. 2005;29:953–967.
Rivara FP, Mock C. The 1,000,000 lives campaign.
Inj Prev. Dec 2005;11(6):321–323.
Sidman EA, Grossman DC, Koepsell TD, D’Ambrosio
L, Britt J, Simpson EV, Rivara FP, Bergman AB. Evaluation of a community-based handgun safe-storage
campaign. Pediatrics. June 2005;115(6);e654–e661.
Rivara FP, Stapleton FB. Closing the quality chasm in
health care: the role of critical reading. Arch Pediatr
Adolesc Med. Apr 2005;159(4):394–395.
Robertson AS, Rivara FP, Ebel BE, Lymp JF,
Christakis DA. Validation of parent self reported home
safety practices. Inj Prev. Aug 2005;11(4):209–212.
Rodriguez B, Mayer-Davis E, Bell R, Palla S, Pihoker C,
Liu LL, Kershnar A, Dolan L, Pettitt D, Klingensmith
G, Imperatore G, Liese A, Waitzfelder B, Fujimoto W.
The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study: Prevalence
of the metabolic syndrome among youth with diabetes.
Diabetes. 2005;54 (suppl. 1):A64–A65.
Smith R, Lewis CW. Availability of dental appointments for young and Medicaid-insured children in
King County Washington: implications for access.
Pediatric Dentistry. May–Jun 2005;27(3):207–211.
Sugar NF, Feldman KW. Oral surgical aspects of child
abuse and neglect. In: Management of the Pediatric
Maxillofacial Patient. Egbert MA, Padwa BL, eds. Oral
and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America.
Philadelphia: Elsevier Saunders, 2005;17:435–446.
Sox CM, Christakis DA. Pediatricians’ screening urinalysis practices. J Pediatr. Sep 2005;147(3):362–365.
Rosengart M, Cummings P, Nathens A, Heagerty P,
Maier R, Rivara FP. An evaluation of state п¬Ѓrearm
regulations and homicide and suicide death rates.
Inj Prev. Apr 2005;11(2):77–83.
Sugar NF. Review of: Forensic gynaecology:
towards better care of female victims of sexual
assault. J Forensic Sci. 2005;50(3).
Roudsari B, Ebel BE, Corso P, Molinari N,
Koepsell T. The acute medical care costs of fall-related
injuries among U.S. older adults. Injury. Nov 2005;
36(11):1316–1322.
Sugar NF, Feldman KW. Oral surgical aspects of child
abuse and neglect. In: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
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Philadelphia: Elsevier Saunders, 2005;17:435–446.
Sabin JA, Zatzick D, Rivara FP. A role for school
health personnel in supporting children and
families following childhood injury. J School Health.
2005;75:141–144.
Sullivan SD, Lee TA, Blough DK, Finkelstein JA,
Lozano P, Inui TC, Fuhlbrigge AL, Carey VJ, Wagner
E, Weiss KB for the PAC PORT Team. A multi-site
randomized trial of the effects of physician education
and organizational change in chronic asthma care:
cost-effectiveness analysis of the Pediatric Asthma Care
Patient Outcomes Research Team II (PAC-PORT II).
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. May 2005;159(5):428–434.
Sander JB, McCarty CA. Youth depression in
the family context: familial risk factors and
models of treatment. Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev.
2005;8(3):203–219.
Schonlau M, Mangione-Smith R, Rosen M, Chan KS,
Louis TA, Keeler E. An evaluation of a quality improvement collaborative method in asthma care: does it
improve processes and outcomes of care? Ann Fam
Med. 2005;3:200–208.
Thompson DA, Christakis DA. The association between television viewing and irregular sleep schedules
among children less than 3 years of age. Pediatrics.
Oct 2005;116(4):851–856.
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General Pediatrics
Vavilala MS, Kincaid MS, Muangman SL, Suz P, Rozet
I, Lam AM. Gender differences in cerebral blood flow
velocity and autoregulation between anterior and
posterior circulations in healthy children. Pediatr Res.
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Vavilala MS, Lam AM. Dentification of pressure
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AM. Relationship between cerebral autoregulation and
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Zatzick D, Russo J, Grossman DC, Jurkovich G,
Sabin J, Berliner L, Rivara FP. Post-traumatic stress
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Tablet Computer to Gather Health Information
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to Pediatric Academic Societies.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Zimmerman FJ, Christakis DA. Children’s television
viewing and cognitive outcomes: a longitudinal
analysis of national data. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med.
Jul 2005;159(7):619–625.
Zimmerman FJ, Glew GM, Christakis DA, Katon W.
Early cognitive stimulation, emotional support, and
television watching as predictors of subsequent bullying among grade-school children. Arch Pediatr Adolesc
Med. Apr 2005;159(4):384–388.
Genetics and Developmental Medicine
The Division of Genetics and Developmental Medicine (in the Department of
Pediatrics) is committed to providing excellence in clinical care, education
and research related to a broad spectrum of genetic disorders, birth defects
and developmental disabilities. Approximately 3 percent to 5 percent of all
newborns will have one of these conditions or some related problem that may
seriously influence the quality of the patients’ and their families’ lives.
The division is one of the largest in the United States and is the oldest
and most recognized referral center of its type in the Pacific Northwest.
Through an extensive network of outreach clinics we also provide outpatient
care to children in the WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho).
Faculty in the division have varied academic backgrounds and are drawn
from many disciplines, including human/medical genetics, neurology,
developmental/behavioral pediatrics, developmental biology and biochemistry.
Through our academic partnerships at the University of Washington, we
provide postdoctoral training programs in developmental pediatrics and medical genetics. Our training programs
are among the oldest in the country, and many of our alumni hold leadership positions at other institutions.
Faculty in the division are involved in many neurodevelopmental research projects, including research
into Joubert syndrome and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Phillip F. Chance, MD, is chief of the Division of Genetics and Developmental Medicine, and professor
in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine, with a joint appointment as professor in the Department of Neurology.
He is the п¬Ѓrst recipient of the Allan and Phyllis Treuer
Endowed Chair in Genetics and Development at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. Dr. Chance is director of
the neurogenetics laboratory in the Department of
Pediatrics, which includes trainees, technical staff, and
the participation of six full-time faculty. The lab conducts research into the molecular basis of several rare,
FACULTY
Phillip F. Chance
MD, Chief
Phillip F. Chance, MD, Chief
Michael J. Bamshad, MD
Craig L. Bennett, PhD
Forrest C. Bennett, MD
Shi-Han Chen, PhD
Charles A. Cowan, MD
Nora E. Davis, MD
Daniel A. Doherty, MD, PhD
Alan G. Fantel, PhD
Ian A. Glass, MD, MBChB
neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases
in children, focusing on four main areas: juvenile Lou
Gehrig Disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS4),
Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy, hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA, also called familial brachial
plexus neuropathy) and Joubert syndrome and related
cerebellar malformations. Dr. Chance has published
over 80 peer-reviewed articles and communications,
and authored 40 book chapters; he lectures frequently
on his research. He is a member of the Steering Committee of the university Center for Neurogenetics and
Neurotherapeutics. He serves on the medical advisory
committees for the Muscular Dystrophy Association,
the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Association, the Les Turner
Mark C. Hannibal, MD, PhD
Anne V. Hing, MD
Ronald J. Lemire, MD
John F. McLaughlin, MD
Daniel G. Miller, MD, PhD
William R.A. Osborne, PhD
Roberta A. Pagon, MD
Melissa A. Parisi, MD, PhD
Janine E. Polifka, PhD
Michael L. Raff, MD
C. Ronald Scott, MD
David B. Shurtleff, MD (Emeritus)
Katherine A. TeKolste, MD
Cristine M. Trahms, MS, RD
William O. Walker Jr., MD
Stephanie E. Wallace, MD
Samuel H. Zinner, MD
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Genetics and Developmental Medicine
ALS Association and the Joubert Syndrome Association. He is a regular member of the Cell Death and
Injury in Chronic Neurodegeneration (CDIN) Study
Section, NINDS/NIH, Bethesda, Md.
Michael J. Bamshad, MD, is professor of pediatrics at
the University of Washington. His laboratory addresses
the origins and affinities of humans, develops novel
strategies to п¬Ѓnd disease susceptibility variants and
characterizes genetic variants influencing an assortment of health-related conditions. Dr. Bamshad is
particularly interested in genetic variants that cause
birth defects, alter risk for chronic diseases of childhood and influence chemosensory perception. His
laboratory has identified genetic variants that underlie
about a dozen different disorders manifested by limb
defects, many of which are also characterized by
abnormalities of the face, heart, kidneys or genitalia. In
1997 they found that mutations in a gene called TBX3
cause ulnar-mammary syndrome. TBX3 is a member
of a family of about 20 so-called T-box genes that
play pivotal roles in development of all major organ
systems, and which over the past several years have
been shown to underlie half a dozen birth defects.
Dr. Bamshad’s lab has found mutations in several
genes (e.g., TNNI2, TNNT3, TPM2) that encode
proteins of the contractile apparatus of fast-twitch
myofibers and cause several syndromes characterized
by contractures of the feet and hands. Dr. Bamshad’s
clinical interests reflect his research and include
human evolutionary biology.
Craig L. Bennett, PhD, is research assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. His research is conducted in the neurogenetics laboratory and is focused in two areas. The п¬Ѓrst is
the molecular basis of a juvenile-onset form of motor
neuron disease known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
type 4 (ALS4) that results from mutations of the
Senataxin (SETX) gene. In recent work, Dr. Bennett
and co-workers generated mammalian expression
constructs of wild type SETX and three mutant forms
of SETX associated with ALS4. They also found the
amount and molecular weight of the SETX protein isolated from ALS4 patient lymphoblasts is approximately
equal to that from controls. Most important, they have
produced murine ALS4 transgenic founders that will
likely prove extremely important to understanding the
mechanism leading to motor neuron death resulting
from SETX mutations. The second area of research is
112
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1C (CMT1C).
He has collaborated to show that the SIMPLE protein
(which, through mutation, causes CMT1C) interacts
with two proteins, NEDD4 and TSG101, that act
sequentially in the lysosomal sorting pathway. Their
results show that SIMPLE co-localizes with NEDD4
at the plasma membrane and the Golgi apparatus.
Forrest C. Bennett, MD, serves as director for the HighRisk Infant Follow-Up Program at the Center for
Human Development and Disability at the University
of Washington School of Medicine; he is also director of
the Pediatrics WAMI (Washington, Alaska, Montana,
Idaho) Program and director of the Pediatric Medical
Student Program. Dr. Bennett is a member of the
university Clinical Curriculum Committee and serves
on the Pediatric Residency Committee and the Intern
Selection Committee. Dr. Bennett is director of the
State of Washington Medical Home Leadership
Network and chairman of the Subboard on Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics for the American Board
of Pediatrics. His research includes a Phase IV study
looking at the role of early developmental intervention
for premature infants. Dr. Bennett is also participating
in collaborative studies evaluating the role of nitric
oxide in the treatment of neonatal RDS and long-term
outcomes, including developmental and chronic lung
disease. Dr. Bennett lectures in rehabilitation medicine
and in public health and maternal child health courses.
He oversees the third-year pediatric clerkship students
and approximately 20 fourth-year medical students.
He also serves as a mentor to the regional medical
student faculty and gives CME lectures in developmental pediatrics at regional and national courses.
Shi-Han Chen, PhD, is professor of pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr.
Chen supervises the molecular (DNA) diagnosis lab at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. This laboratory processes
nearly 1,000 samples per year and in 2004 made about
150 “positive” diagnoses. Dr. Chen recently completed
a project that explored the diagnosis, family pedigree
and mutation search of a dominant form of congenital
stationary night blindness in a large family in China,
which was published in 2005 in the Annals of Human
Genetics. This project is continuing with a mutation
search and п¬Ѓne linkage analysis of the adCSNB on
chromosome 3q21 with scientists in China. His other
research interests include study of Fragile-X E mental
retardation in a three-generation family, P53 network
Genetics and Developmental Medicine
gene expressions in ischemic and hypoxic hearts and
a study of hypoxia in a Tibetan population in conjunction with the Chinese Academy of Sciences.
Charles A. Cowan, MD, is developmental pediatrician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor of pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine;
he works in the Neurodevelopment Clinic at Seattle
Children’s and the Autism Clinic in Bellevue, Wash.,
providing inpatient services and consultation. His
work includes resident and medical student teaching
on neurodevelopmental topics and supervision of
postdoctoral fellows in the Autism Clinic. Dr. Cowan
supervises the hospitalist programs at Evergreen
Hospital and Providence Evergreen and he serves as
medical director for the Kindering Center, a developmental preschool in Bellevue where he volunteers. Dr.
Cowan is clinical lead for use of the Pediatric Health
Information System (PHIS) database; his work has
focused on improved hospital practices for asthma and
bronchiolitis. He is also leading an effort at medication
reconciliation, a JCAHO national patient safety initiative. Dr. Cowan has recently completed research related
to variation and utilization patterns in bronchiolitis.
He has additional clinical research in progress looking
at bladder augmentation in spina bifida. Dr. Cowan’s
clinical interests also include Asperger syndrome and
autism disorders.
Nora E. Davis, MD, is director of the Apnea Program at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor of pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She just completed a term as medical director of the
Boyer Children’s Clinic in Seattle. Dr. Davis is responsible for planning and coordinating students and
fellows and for assisting in resident teaching rounds.
In addition, she supervises second- and third-year
residents on the neurodevelopmental rotation, as well
as providing supervision of the University of Washington and Madigan fellows during neurodevelopmental
rotations at Seattle Children’s. Dr. Davis is a member
of the SIDS Foundation of Washington, where she
has served as medical advisor, board member and
chairman of the Research Committee. She served as
president of the Northwest Society for Developmental
and Behavioral Pediatrics. Her clinical interests include
infant breathing disorders and SIDS.
Daniel A. Doherty, MD, PhD, is assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He is a developmental pediatrician working
with a group of doctors in the neurogenetics laboratory that focuses on Joubert syndrome (JS) and related
cerebellar malformation disorders. JS is a rare autosomal recessive malformation syndrome involving
agenesis of the cerebellar vermis with accompanying
brainstem malformations. JS is clinically characterized by the core features of hypotonia, developmental
delays, abnormal respiratory patterns and abnormal
eye movements; it exhibits variable additional clinical features, and confusion exists regarding its precise
definition. Genetic locus heterogeneity is likely, and
genes crucial to cerebellar and brainstem development
are functional JS candidates, particularly homeotic
genes specifying the vermian domain. This project
involves collecting medical records and blood samples
for DNA isolation from multiple families with JS and
carrying out a genome-wide scan for regions of halotype sharing in pedigrees with consanguinity. From this
data, the goal is to discover mutations leading to JS in
specific functional and positional candidate genes. Dr.
Doherty’s clinical interests include the care of children
with brain malformations, prenatal counseling for
fetal brain malformations and cultural factors in
medical care.
Alan G. Fantel, PhD, is professor of pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. His
laboratory has two main interests. His research is
focused on the role of free radical formation and
toxicity in the genesis of limb reduction anomalies.
He is studying the involvement of nitric oxide and
its metabolites in these malformations in mice. The
laboratory is also the major NIH-funded facility for
the collection and distribution of human conceptal
tissue to grant-funded institutions.
Ian A. Glass, MD, MBChB, is director of the Medical
Genetics Program at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
co-director of the Alaska Genetics & Birth Defects
Clinic. He is associate professor of pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine and
holds an adjunct appointment in the Division of
Medical Genetics. Seattle Children’s programs provide
virtually all of the pediatric genetic services for the
states of Washington and Alaska. He also serves on the
Genetics Advisory Committee and the Newborn Screening Committee of the Washington state Department
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
113
Genetics and Developmental Medicine
of Health. He serves as program leader for a focused
research project on Joubert syndrome and related
disorders of brain development. It is a collaboration
within the neurogenetics laboratory that includes several division faculty. His recent work with this group
includes two important discoveries, both of which
have been recently reported. The п¬Ѓrst is a description
of the NPNH1 gene deletions in patients with a subset
of Joubert syndrome. The second relates to a prenatal
diagnosis imaging protocol for Joubert syndrome.
Mark C. Hannibal, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor
of pediatrics at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. He is also on associate medical staff in
Pediatric Medical Genetics at Seattle Cancer Care
Alliance. Dr. Hannibal recently completed research
on the clinical and molecular analysis of the Grieg
cephalopolysyndactyly and Pallister-Hall syndromes as
well as mutations in the SALL4 gene as associated with
the Okihiro syndrome. In addition, he is completing a
project that relates to the analysis of the susceptibility
genes for arthritis in mice. Dr. Hannibal is co-principal investigator in a project studying the molecular
basis of hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy, which is his
primary research focus. His interest is in the translational aspects of genetic disorders, such as mutations
in the Septin 9 gene–associated hereditary neuralgic
amyotrophy. He is a member of the Professional Advisory Board for the Kabuki Syndrome Network. Dr.
Hannibal’s clinical interests include immunogenetics
(primary immunodeficiency) and Kabuki syndrome.
Anne V. Hing, MD, specializes in genetics and craniofacial pediatrics at Seattle Children’s Hospital and is
assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Hing’s research
interests include oculo-oto-facial dysplasia and the
genetics of cleft lip and palate. She serves as a Faculty
Senate member at the University of Washington and as
a member in the Intern Selection Committee at Seattle
Children’s. In 2005/2006 she was elected to the Society
for Pediatric Research. Dr. Hing also serves as a consultant in medical genetics at Tacoma General Hospital
and Central Washington Hospital and at Providence
Hospital in Alaska.
114
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Ronald J. Lemire, MD, is director for inpatient services
at Seattle Children’s Hospital, which include the
Transport Team and the Intensive Care Unit; he is also
attending physician in the Birth Defects Clinic. He is
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He is a member of the Children’s
Hospital Steering Committee, the COO Administrative
Staff Committee and the Medical Executive Committee for Children’s Hospital. Dr. Lemire is a chairman
of the Honorary Medical Staff Committee and serves
on the Review Committee for Airlift Northwest. His
committee memberships at Seattle Children’s also
include the Capital Equipment Committee and the
Intensive Care Unit Leadership Committee. Dr. Lemire
serves as an interface between the Harborview Medical
Center Trauma System and Seattle Children’s, and he
is coordinator for the Flight Service. Dr. Lemire also
provides coverage for the medical director of Seattle
Children’s and the chair of the Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Lemire’s main research interest is in teratology. With Dr. Tom Shepard, he has recently published
the 11th edition of the Catalog of Teratogenic Agents.
His research studies have included anencephaly,
holoprosencephaly and other aspects related to normal
and abnormal development of the human nervous
system. Dr. Lemire’s clinical interests include neural
tube defects and spinal cord malformations.
John F. McLaughlin, MD, is director of the Neurodevelopmental Program at Seattle Children’s Hospital. He is
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine and director of the Clinical Training Unit at the Center on Human Development and
Disability (CHDD) at the university. He is principal
investigator of the Leadership Education for Neurodevelopmental Disabilities interdisciplinary training
grant funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau
at the CHDD. He is involved in several national
committees, including the Data and Safety Monitoring
Committee for Management of Myelomeningocele
Study at the National Institute for Child Health and
Development (NICHD). He is a member of the NIH
Task Force on Childhood Motor Disorders at the
National Institute for Neurological Disorders and
Stroke (NINDS). Dr. McLaughlin is past president
and a member of the Therapy Outcomes Committee
of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and
Developmental Medicine. Dr. McLaughlin’s research
Genetics and Developmental Medicine
includes studies of the long-term effects of selective
dorsal rhizotomy and continuous intrathecal baclofen
using an implantable pump. He is involved in studies
of the incidence of pain and fatigue in persons with
cerebral palsy and in developing outcome measures for
quality of life. His also works in the Child Development
Clinic, the Neurodevelopmental Clinic, the Spasticity
Management Clinic and the Alaska Outreach Clinics.
He is a member of the Scientific Editorial Board for
Human Gene Therapy; he is also a member of the
Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering Study Section
at the NIH and a member of the Scientific Review
Board for the National Gene Vector Laboratories
also based at the NIH. He has trained numerous
post-doctoral fellows.
Daniel G. Miller, MD, PhD, is assistant professor at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and the University of Washington
School of Medicine. Dr. Miller’s research interests
include determining how genomic sequences might
aberrantly induce large-scale genomic alterations
during DNA repair. He uses vectors based on a virus
called Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) to tag genomic
locations where DNA double strand breaks are occurring in the human genome. Dr. Miller hypothesizes
that these spontaneous breaks may be an initiating
event for chromosomal microdeletions observed in
patients with genetic syndromes. He completed a
large-scale analysis of AAV vector integration sites in
primary human cells and identified several hotspots
where chromosomes spontaneously break. Dr. Miller
has also used vectors based on AAV to perform gene
targeting in a transgenic mouse model and in bovine
embryo п¬Ѓbroblasts as well as other human cell lines.
Using these techniques, he is able to modify primary
human cell lines to generate mutations similar to
specific disease states in patients. Dr. Miller’s research
also includes several subprojects identifying integration sites of retroviral vectors in the human genome.
He does clinical work in the Medical Genetics Clinic.
Roberta A. Pagon, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and professor of pediatrics and
ophthalmology at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. She is principal investigator for
GeneTests: Genetic Testing Information Resource, the
primary Internet-accessible database that helps clinicians identify genetic testing laboratories and apply
genetic testing to patient care. She is also collaborating
on a Web-based curriculum for primary care residents
focused on ethical, legal and social issues related to
genetic testing. Dr. Pagon is also collaborating to
develop a process to facilitate translation of genetic
testing from research laboratories into clinical practice.
Dr. Pagon’s clinical interests are hereditary eye disorders and disorders of sexual differentiation. In addition
to seeing patients at Seattle Children’s, she attends in
the genetics clinics in the Washington State Regional
Genetics Program and co-directs the Alaska Genetics
Clinic. Dr. Pagon serves on the Board of Directors of
the American Society of Human Genetics. She has
served as president and a member of the Board of
Directors of the American Board of Medical Genetics,
as well as serving on the Board of Scientific Counselors,
the National Human Genome Research Institute and
the NIH.
William R.A. Osborne, PhD, is research professor of
pediatrics and director of Gene Therapy Research at
the Center on Human Development and Disability
(CHDD) at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. His current research is in two areas. The
п¬Ѓrst is developing gene transfer therapies to treat
cyclic neutropenia in dogs. This research entails the
in vivo lentivirus-mediated delivery of canine granulocyte/colony stimulating factor and also its delivery
using encapsulated cells. The second area is in gene
therapy to treat type 1 diabetes. This work entails the
development of specific cell lines to secrete insulin and
glucagon like peptide 1 for transplantation into diabetic
rats. It also involves developing methods permitting
implantation of allogeneic islet cells for long-term
survival and therapy not requiring immunosuppression.
Melissa A. Parisi, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor
of pediatrics at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. Her clinical work is performed primarily through the Medical Genetics Clinic at Seattle
Children’s. She also sees patients at the State of Alaska
Outreach Clinics, participates in genetics clinics in
Bellingham, Wash., and provides consultation at
Swedish Hospital in Seattle in genetics and in the
neonatal ICU. Areas of special interest include congenital brain disorders and disorders of sexual differentiation. Dr. Parisi is researching the molecular basis
of genetic disorders of brain development, particularly
involving the hindbrain or cerebellum. She is involved
in studies on prenatal diagnosis of cerebellar malformation syndromes. Many of her publications focus on
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Joubert syndrome and related cerebellar malformations, a group of conditions with a shared feature of the
molar tooth sign on MRI. She and her colleagues have
recognized that the NPHP1 gene deletion is associated
with juvenile nephronophthisis in a subset of individuals with Joubert syndrome. Dr. Parisi is a member of
the steering committee for the Puget Sound Women’s
Pediatric Society and is chair of the Scientific Advisory
Board for the Joubert Syndrome Foundation and
Related Cerebellar Disorders parent support group.
Janine E. Polifka, PhD, is co-director of CARE (Counseling and Advice on Reproductive Exposures) Northwest,
a teratogen information service at the University of
Washington that receives approximately 70 inquiries
per month regarding exposures to drugs and chemicals
during pregnancy and lactation. She also manages
the TERIS (Teratogen Information System) database,
which provides information on the effects of drugs and
chemicals on the developing embryo. Recently completed research includes a study of asthma medications
in pregnancy and the North American Isotretinoin
information and survey line. Current research involves
effects of medications for rheumatoid arthritis
used during pregnancy. She serves on the PEHSU
(Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit)
committee, which addresses the concerns of health
care professionals and their patients about long- and
short-term exposures to environmental contaminants.
Dr. Polifka is also on the staff of the Community
Outreach & Education Program (COEP) of the Center
for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health (CEEH) at
the university. Dr. Polifka is a past president of OTIS
(Organization of Teratology Information Services),
which oversees 19 teratology information services in
the United States and Canada. She serves on the Board
of Directors, the Meeting Planning Committee and
the Research Committee. She also serves on the Public
Affairs Committee of the Teratology Society.
Michael L. Raff, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. He
provides clinical genetics services in the Medical
Genetics Clinic and the Telemedicine Genetics Clinic
at Seattle Children’s, the Washington State Regional
Clinics program, the Skeletal Dysplasia Clinic and the
Biochemical Genetics Clinics for the state of Alaska.
He is focusing on expanding the Biochemical Genetics
Clinics at Seattle Children’s, which he established
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two years ago. Dr. Raff has additional research in
progress related to hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase
deficiency as well as analysis of pilot projects related
to telegenetics. His clinical interests include disorders
of mitochondria and peroxisomes, connective tissue
disorders.
C. Ronald Scott, MD, is director of the biochemical
genetics laboratory and of the molecular diagnostic
laboratory at Seattle Children’s Hospital — both
laboratories were established by Dr. Scott. He heads
one of the largest biochemical genetics programs in
the US and serves as the metabolic disease consultant
at Seattle Children’s and the University of Washington
Medical Center. Dr. Scott is director of the Phenylketonuria Clinic at the University of Washington.
He serves as advisor on genetics for the Washington
state legislature and Department of Health and for
the Alaska Department of Health. He is a member
of the Genetics Screening Committee for the Pacific
Northwest Regional Genetics Group. He consults with
the Mead Johnson Company for the development of
special formulas for the management of inborn errors
of metabolism. Dr. Scott’s work with the university
Department of Chemistry focuses on the application
of tandem mass spectrometry in the diagnosis of
biochemical disorders; he receives many requests to
make presentations on this state-of-the-art undertaking. He also has an open label study with Fabry’s
disease entailing the administration of recombinant
alpha-galactosidase.
Katherine A. TeKolste, MD, is associate professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. Dr. TeKolste has worked within the Medical
Home Leadership Network at the university since 1993
to improve care for children with special health care
needs. She participates in many state and regional
projects, including the Kids Get Care/Children’s
Healthcare Initiative program in King County, Wash.
She is project director of the Adolescent Health
Transitions Project with the state department of health,
which aim to improve transitions for adolescents with
disabilities and chronic illnesses. She is also active
in regional efforts to improve oral health services for
children as part of the Interdisciplinary Children’s
Oral Health Promotion (ICOHP) project. She was
part of the multi-state team for the recently completed
Assuring Better Child Development grant from the
Commonwealth Fund and National Academy for State
Genetics and Developmental Medicine
Health Policy. She worked with regional administrators
and providers to pilot developmental screening in the
CHILD Profile mailings to parents of 18-month-olds
in Snohomish County. Dr. TeKolste worked on the
Infant Health and Development Program (IHDP)
multicenter study of premature infants and has served
as interim director of the university’s High-Risk Infant
Follow-Up Program.
Cristine M. Trahms, MS, RD, is senior nutritionist for the
Biochemical Genetics Clinic and the Metabolic Genetics Clinic at Seattle Children’s Hospital. She is program
director and senior nutritionist for the Phenylketonuria
(PKU) Clinic at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She coordinates cooperative educational and
support activities, including a live TV downlink to the
Spokane PKU Clinic. She serves on the Editorial Board
and the Advisory Board for the National PKU News.
She also writes a quarterly self-management column,
“Just for Kids”, and is reviewer for The Journal of the
American Dietetic Association. In addition to many
committee and board memberships, Trahms is nutrition discipline leader for the Leadership Education in
Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND)
training project at the university Center on Human
Development and Disability (CHDD). She is a
member of the Core Faculty of Nutritional Sciences
in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine and co-teaches courses and mentors students.
Ms. Trahms developed and continues to refine and
update a regional PKU treatment protocol/manual
— which incorporates current evidence-based medical
and nutritional care — as well as the PKU Clinic Web
site. Trahms has been recognized for Excellence in the
Practice of Clinical Nutrition by the American Dietetic
Association and named Outstanding Dietitian of the
Year by the Washington State Dietetic Association.
William O. Walker Jr., MD, is associate professor of
pediatrics and director of the Neurogenetics–Birth
Defects Clinic at Seattle Children’s Hospital. He
works in the outreach clinics at Olympia, Yakima
and Aberdeen, Wash., in telemedicine services and
in the inpatient service at Children’s Hospital. He is
focused on improving coordination of patient care
across multiple specialties, especially those involving
surgical specialties, in the Neurodevelopmental and
Birth Defects Clinic. He also seeks to improve access
to neurodevelopmental outpatient services by clarifying services and establishing additional pre-referral
guidelines. Dr. Walker is adjunct associate professor of
pediatrics within the Uniformed Services University
of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Herbert School of
Medicine, Bethesda, Md., and frequently lectures at
national conferences on spina bifida, metal retardation
and developmental disabilities. He serves as fellowship
director for Seattle Children’s Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics Scholarship Training Program. He is
a member of the Steering Committee of the Children’s
Association for Maximum Potential in San Antonio. Dr.
Walker has collaborative research projects underway in
spina bifida and is participating in a project evaluating
the role of assistive devices in promoting health and
reducing the onset and severity of secondary conditions
in patients with spina bifida.
Stephanie E. Wallace, MD, is medical geneticist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. Her
clinical interests include the long-term management
of genetic disorders and skeletal dysplasias.
Samuel H. Zinner, MD, provides inpatient general pediatric care at Seattle Children’s Hospital and outpatient
care services with Seattle’s Children’s Birth Defects
Clinic, with the Child Development Clinic at the Center
on Human Development and Disability (CHDD) and
with the Autism Center at the CHDD. He is assistant
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington;
he is also assistant director of fellowship training and
director of residency training in developmental and
behavioral pediatrics. Dr. Zinner pursues clinical and
research interests with a strong focus on psychosocial
and behavioral aspects of neurodevelopment. He has
a particular interest in Tourette syndrome and its
associated conditions, including attention deficit
disorders, learning disabilities, obsessive-compulsive
symptoms, sleep disturbances and others. He is
working to develop an interdisciplinary Tourette
syndrome¬based clinic for consultation, management
and research. His current research activities include
enhancement of “Medical Home” capabilities for
community providers via improved access to, and
awareness of, available resources. Dr. Zinner is a
member of the medical advisory board for the
national Tourette Syndrome Association.
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AWARDS AND HONORS
Ian A. Glass, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Elected to the Society for Pediatric Research
Anne V. Hing, MD
Elected to the Society for Pediatric Research
Ronald J. Lemire, MD
Lemire Endowed Lectureship in Teratology
Who’s Who in America
Roberta A. Pagon, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors,” Seattle magazine, 2005
Implantable System Performance Registry (ISPR),
Medtronic, Inc, $91,975
William R.A. Osborne, PhD
MTCC - Osborne Pilot, NIDDK/NIH, $75,800
Roberta A. Pagon, MD
Rare Disease Research Test Translation to Clinical
Testing, NIH/DHHS, $74,007
GeneClinics: Clinical Genetic Testing Resource,
NLM/NIH, $1,300,000
C. Ronald Scott, MD
PKU Clinic, Health Services Administration, $244,822
RESEARCH FUNDING
William O. Walker Jr., MD
Effectiveness of Bowel and Bladder Management
Techniques on Children with Spina Bifida, Children’s
Hospital, Los Angeles, Association of University
Centers on Disabilities-National Center on Birth
Defects and Developmental Disabilities Cooperative
Agreement, $54,420
New
Continuing
Craig L. Bennett, PhD
CMTIC: Possible Defects in PMP22 Regulation Due to
SIMPLE Mutations, Muscular Dystrophy Association,
$100,000
Phillip F. Chance, MD
Identification and Characterization of the ALS4 Gene,
NINDS/NIH, $288,040
William O. Walker Jr., MD
Outstanding Teacher Award, University of
Washington Pediatric Residency Program, 2005
Mutations in the ALS4 Gene (SETX) May Alter RNA
Processing in Motor Neurons, Robert Packard Center
for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins, $81,000
Phillip F. Chance, MD
Molecular Basis of Hereditary Neuralgic Amyotrophy,
NINDS/NIH, $323,634
Alan G. Fantel, PhD
Laboratory of Developmental Biology, NICHD/NIH,
$377,329
Mark C. Hannibal, MD, PhD
Analysis of Susceptibility Genes for Arthritis in Mice,
NIAMS/NIH, $119,210
Daniel G. Miller, MD, PhD
Mechanisms of Cellular Transduction with AAV
Vectors, NIDDK/NIH, $125,253
William R.A. Osborne, PhD
Insulin Gene Therapy of Type 1 Diabetes, NIDDK/
NIH, $201,628
Canine G-CSF Gene Transfer, NIDDK/NIH, $248,624
Ian Glass, MD, MBChB
Genetic Analyses of Cerebellar Malformations,
University of Washington, National Institute of
Child Health and Development/NIH, $94,153
John F. McLaughlin, MD
Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental/Related
Disabilities, MCHB/HRSA, $818,000
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Melissa A. Parisi, MD, PhD
Molecular Basis of Joubert Syndrome and Related
Diseases, NINDS/NIH, $166,271
Genetics and Developmental Medicine
C. Ronald Scott, MD
Treatment of Tyrosinemia-I with NTBC, FDA, $158,572
Lysosomal Registries, Genzyme, $200,000
Mass Spec, Genzyme, $179,562
Katherine A. TeKolste, MD
Adolescent Health Transition Project, WA DOH/
DHHS, $70,000
Samuel H. Zinner, MD
Descriptive Study of Tourette Syndrome:
Quality of Life, AUCD/CDC, $190,351
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Phillip F. Chance, MD
Hereditary Neuropathies Including Charcot-MarieTooth Disease, Genetics in Neurology, American
Academy of Neurology, Miami, April 2005
Clinical and Genetic Evaluation of Patients with
Inherited Peripheral Nerve Disorders, neurology Grand
Rounds, Tufts University School of Medicine/New
England Medical Center, Boston, June 2005
Nora E. Davis, MD
Bedside Teaching - A3 General Pediatrics, Neurodevelopmental Medicine, Apnea Program, Seattle Children’s
Teaching Materials for Parents and Professionals,
Apnea Program, Seattle Children’s
Daniel A. Doherty, MD, PhD
Mental Retardation, Rehab 400: Medical Science,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Ian A. Glass, MD, MB ChB
Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Joubert Syndrome
and the Relative Contribution of NPHP1 and AHI1
Gene Mutations to the Disorder, American College of
Medical Genetics annual meeting, Grapevine, Texas,
March 19, 2005
Spectrum of Phenotypic Findings in Individuals with
Joubert Syndrome and Clinical Correlation with Identified Mutations in the NPHP1 and AHI1 Genes, David
W. Smith Annual Workshop on Malformations and
Morphogenesis, Iowa City, Iowa, August 2–6, 2005
AHI1 Mutations Cause Both Retinal Dystrophy and
Renal Cystic Disease in Joubert Syndrome, poster presentation, American Society of Human Genetics, 55th
Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, October 25–29, 2005
Joubert Syndrome: A Paradigm for Prenatal Diagnosis
of Specific Hindbrain Malformations by Ultrasound
and MRI, poster presentation, American Society of
Human Genetics 55th annual meeting, Salt Lake City,
October 25–29, 2005
Anne V. Hing, MD
Genetic Assessment of Craniofacial Anomalies, orthodontic resident lecture, University of Washington,
November 17, 2005
John F. McLaughlin, MD
Raising Special Needs Kids: Health, Growth,
& Nutrition, Duncan Seminar, Seattle, March 18, 2005
Cerebral Palsy: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Board Review Course, University of Washington,
April 8, 2005
Child with Cerebral Palsy and Role of Developmental
Pediatrics, annual talks, Center for Human Development and Disability, Seattle, 2005
Roberta A. Pagon, MD
Course 2AC.001: Genetic Testing in Clinical
Neurology, American Academy of Neurology,
Miami, April 10, 2005
Melissa A. Parisi, MD, PhD
An Approach to the Dysmorphic Child, noon
conference presentation, University of Washington
Congenital Malformations of the Human Forebrain;
Congenital Malformations of the Human Hindbrain,
Ipokrates Conference: New Frontiers in Neonatology,
Innsbruck, Austria, March 1, 2005
Boy or Girl? A Genetics Approach to Ambiguous
Genitalia, Urology Conference, Seattle Children’s,
September 6, 2005
AHI1 Mutations Cause Both Retinal Dystrophy and
Renal Cystic Disease in Joubert Syndrome, poster presentation, American Society of Human Genetics 55th
annual meeting, Salt Lake City, October 25–29, 2005
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A Gender Assessment Team: Experience with 217 patients Over a Period of 23 Years, American College of
Medical Genetics Annual Meeting, Grapevine, Texas,
March 17, 2005
Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Joubert Syndrome
and the Relative Contribution of NPHP1 and AHI1
Gene Mutations to the Disorder, American College of
Medical Genetics Annual Meeting, Grapevine, Texas,
March 19, 2005
Spectrum of Phenotypic Findings in Individuals with
Joubert Syndrome and Clinical Correlation with Identified Mutations in the NPHP1 and AHI1 Genes, David
W. Smith Annual Workshop on Malformations and
Morphogenesis, Iowa City, Iowa, August 2–6, 2005
Developmental Screening and Surveillance Through
CHILD Profile Health Promotion, Philanthropy
Northwest, March 14, 2005
Community Partners in Developmental Surveillance,
panel moderator, Children’s Preventive Healthcare
Initiative, March 22, 2005
Child Development for Dentists, Pediatric Dentistry
Residents’ Seminar, University of Washington,
August 4, 2005
Congenital Malformations of the Posterior Fossa: New
Perspectives in Embryological Classification, Intensive
Workshop on Fetal and Congenital Anomalies, Bari,
Italy, December 2, 2005
Cristine M. Trahms, MS, RD
A Shared Management Model: Parents and Providers
Promoting Shared Management of Chronic Conditions
in Children, 26th Annual Duncan Seminar,
March 2005
Janine E. Polifka, PhD
Breast Milk Contaminant, Controversies & Advances in
Pediatric Environmental Health, Seattle, April 1, 2005
Assessment of Physical Growth: Using the CDC and
Specialized Growth Charts, Duncan Seminar, Seattle
Children’s, March 2005
David B. Shurtleff, MD
Symptomatic Cerebellar Tonsil Ectopia in Lipomyelomeningocele Patients, Society for Research into
Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida 49th Annual Scientific
Meeting, Barcelona, Spain, July 1, 2005
The Bridge from Pediatric To Adult Care: Our Clinical
Experience, 10th Ross Metabolic Conference, Atlanta,
Ga., April 2005
Obesity and BMI in Myelomeningocele Patients, Society for Research into Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida
49th Annual Scientific Meeting, Barcelona, Spain,
July 2, 2005
Katherine A. TeKolste, MD
Adolescent Transition, CSHCN Nurses, Southwest
Region, January 10, 2005
Developmental Surveillance and Screening, Children’s
Preventive Healthcare Initiative Collaborative Meeting,
January 25, 2005
Adolescent Transition, CSHCN Nurses, Northwest
Region, February 10, 2005
120
Dental Issues in Children with Special Health Care
Needs, pediatric dentistry residents seminar, University
of Washington, February 17, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Assuring Pediatric Nutrition in the Hospital and
Community, Seattle, June 22–24, 2005
William O. Walker Jr., MD
School Readiness, North Pacific Pediatric Society 171st
Scientific Conference, Blaine, Wash., August 2005
Mental Retardation: It’s Not Just A Number Anymore!
Instructional Course, 59th Annual Meeting, American
Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, Orlando, Florida, September 2005
Mental Retardation: It’s Not Just a Number Anymore!,
6th Annual Pediatric Conference, Madigan Army
Medical Center, Tacoma, Wash., October 2005
Samuel H. Zinner, MD
Tourette Syndrome: Past, Present & Future, 28th
Annual Advanced Practice in Primary & Acute Care,
Seattle, October 2005
Genetics and Developmental Medicine
National Ground Round Series, Centers for Disease
Control/Tourette Syndrome Association Partnership: Oregon Health & Science University, Portland,
Ore., March 2005; Duke University Medical Center,
Durham, N.C., May 2005; University of South Dakota
School of Medicine, Billings, Mont., November 2005
Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Medical Approach,
University of Washington Autism Center, August 2005
Bennett FC. Developmental outcome. In: Avery’s
Neonatology, Pathology and Management of the
Newborn, Sixth Edition. MacDonald MG, Mullett MD,
Seisha MMK, eds. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams
and Wilkins, 2005.
Beutler E, Gelbart T, Scott CR. Hematologically
important mutations: Gaucher disease. Blood Cells
Mol Dis. 2005;35:355–364.
Tourette Disorder and Comorbid Conditions, Learning Disabilities, Interviewing Families, Health and
Wellness for Teens Living with Disabilities, Autism
Spectrum Disorders – A Medical Approach, Speech
and Language Delays, Normal Behavior and Development (three-part series), lectures to fellows, residents,
medical students and other disciplines, University of
Washington, 2005
Chance PF. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to
pressure palsies. In: Neurological Therapeutics:
Principles and Practice. Noseworthy J, ed. London:
Martin Dunitz, 2005.
PUBLICATIONS
Davis BE, Dillon CM, Shurtleff DB, Duguay S, Seidel
KD, Ellenbogen RG, Joeser JD. Long-term survival of
patients with myelomeningocele. Pediat Neurosurg.
2005;41:186–191.
Alwan S, Polifka JE, Friedman JM. Addendum:
Sartan treatment during pregnancy. Birth Defects
Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2005;73:904–905.
Alwan S, Polifka JE, Friedman JM. Angiotensin II
receptor antagonist treatment during pregnancy.
Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2005;73:123–130.
Andersson HC, Charrow J, Kaplan P, Mistry P,
Pastores GM, Prakesh-Cheng A, Rosenbloom BE,
Scott CR, Wappner RS, Weinreb NJ. Individualization
of long-term enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher
disease. Genet Med. 2005;7:105–110.
Bamshad M. Genetic influences on health: does race
matter? J Am Med Assoc. 2005;294:937–946.
Barry S, Brzezinski M, Yanay O, Seppen JE,
Osborne WRA. Sustained elevation of neutrophils
in rats induced by lentivirus-mediated G-CSF delivery.
J Genet Med. 2005;7:1510–1516.
Bennett CL, Huynh HM, Barnett KL, Chance PF,
Glass IA, Gospe SM Jr. Genetic heterogeneity for
autosomal recessive pyridoxine-dependent seizures.
Neurogenetics. 2005;6:143–149.
Christakis DA, Cowan CA, Garrison MM, Molteni R,
Marcuse E, Zerr DM. Variation in inpatient diagnostic
testing and management of bronchiolitis. Pediatrics.
2005;115:878–884.
Doherty D, Glass IA, Siebert JR, Strouse PJ,
Parisi MA, Shaw DW, Chance PF, Barr M Jr,
Nyberg D. Prenatal diagnosis in pregnancies at risk
for Joubert syndrome by ultrasound and MRI. Prenat
Diagn. 2005;25:442–447.
Elstein D, Scott CR, Zeigler M, Abrahamov A, Zimran
A. Phenotypic heterogeneity in patients with Gaucher
disease and the N370S/V394L genotype. Genet Test.
2005;9:26–29.
Ferri R, Chance PF. Lorenzo’s oil: advances in the
treatment of neurometabolic disorders. Arch Neurol.
2005;62:1045–1046.
Gonzalez E, Kulkarni H, Bolivar H, Mangano A, Sanchez R, Catano G, Nibbs RJ, Freedman BI, Quinones
MP, Bamshad MJ, Murthy KK, Rovin BH, Bradley
W, Clark RA, Anderson SA, O’Connell RJ, Agan BK,
Ahuja SS, Bologna R, Sen L, Dolan MJ, Ahuja SK.
The influence of CCL3L1 gene-containing segmental
duplications on HIV-1/AIDS susceptibility. Science.
2005;307:1434–1440.
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Hannibal MC, Chance PF. CMT2, dominant intermediate CMT and CMTX. In: Hereditary Peripheral
Neuropathies. Kuhlenbaumer G, Stogbauer FD, Ringelstein B, Young P, eds., Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 2005.
Johnston JJ, Olivos-Glander I, Killoran C, Elson E,
Turner JT, Peters KF, Abbott MH, Aughton DJ, Aylsworth AS, Bamshad MJ, Booth C, Curry CJ, David
A, Dinulos MB, Flannery DB, Fox MA, Graham JM,
Grange DK, Guttmacher AE, Hannibal MC, Henn W,
Hennekam RC, Holmes LB, Hoyme HE, Leppig KA,
Lin AE, Macleod P, Manchester DK, Marcelis C, Mazzanti L, McCann E, McDonald MT, Mendelsohn NJ,
Moeschler JB, Moghaddam B, Neri G, Newbury-Ecob
R, Pagon RA, Phillips JA, Sadler LS, Stoler JM, Tilstra
D, Walsh Vockley CM, Zackai EH, Zadeh TM, Brueton
L, Black GC, Biesecker LG. Molecular and clinical
analyses of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly and PallisterHall syndromes: robust phenotype prediction from the
type and position of GLI3 mutations. Am J Hum Genet.
2005;76:609–622.
Jorde LB, Carey JC, Bamshad MJ, Raymond L,
White RW. Medical Genetics, 3rd Edition (revised),
Mosby, 2005.
Karafet TM, Lansing JS, Redd AJ, Reznikova S,
Watkins JC, Surata SP, Arthawiguna WA, Mayer L,
Bamshad MJ, Jorde LB, Hammer MF. Balinese
Y-chromosome perspective on the peopling of Indonesia: genetic contributions from pre-Neolithic huntergatherers, Austronesian farmers, and Indian traders.
Hum Biol. 2005;77:93–114.
Kapur RP, Clarke CM, Doggett B, Taylor BE, Baldessari A, Parisi MA, Howe DG. Hox11L1 expression by
precursors of enteric smooth muscle: an alternative
explanation for megacecum in HOX11L1-/- mice.
Pediatr Dev Pathol. 2005;8:148–161.
Kuhlenbaumer G, Hannibal MC, Nelis E, Schirmacher
A, Verpoorten N, Meuleman J, Watts GD, De Vriendt
E, Young P, Stogbauer F, Halfter H, Irobi J, Goossens
D, Del-Favero J, Betz BG, Hor H, Kurlemann G, Bird
TD, Airaksinen E, Mononen T, Serradell AP, Prats
JM, Van Broeckhoven C, De Jonghe P, Timmerman
V, Ringelstein EB, Chance PF. Mutations in SEPT9
cause hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy. Nat Genet.
2005;37:1044–1046.
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Lemire RJ. J. Bruce Beckwith: scholar, п¬Ѓsherman
and friend. Pediatric Developmental Pathology.
2005;8:270–281.
Ligon AH, Moore SD, Parisi MA, Mealiffe ME,
Harris DJ, Ferguson HL, Quade BJ, Morton CC.
Constitutional rearrangement of the architectural
factor HMGA2: a novel human phenotype including overgrowth and lipomas. Am J Hum Genet.
2005;76:340–348.
McLaughlin JF, Felix SD, Nowbar S, Bjornson KF, Hays
RM. Lower extremity sensory function in children with
cerebral palsy. Pediatric Rehabilitation. 2005;8:45–52.
Miller DG, Trobridge GD, Petek LM, Jacobs MA,
Kaul R, Russell DW. Large-scale analysis of
adeno-associated virus vector integration sites in
normal human cells. J Virol. 2005;79:11434–11442.
Pagon RA. Genetic testing: when to test, when to refer.
Am Fam Physician. 2005;72:33–34.
Parisi MA, Doherty D, Eckert ML, Shaw DW,
Ozyurek H, Aysun S, Giray O, Al Swaid A, Al Shahwan
S, Dohayan N, Bakhsh E, Indridason OS, Dobyns WB,
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
123
Hematology/Oncology and
Bone Marrow Transplant
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Fred Hutchinson Cancer
Research Center (FHCRC) and the University of Washington
Medical Center bring together their adult and pediatric
oncology programs in the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
(SCCA). Seattle Children’s is a nationally recognized leader
in pediatric cancer diagnosis and treatment, and the
Division of Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow
Transplant (in the Department of Pediatrics) provides the
pediatric cancer care for the SCCA. The dedicated pediatric
specialists in our 33-bed SCCA inpatient unit care for over
240 new patients each year.
Our multidisciplinary approach to treatment offers real
advantages to our patients. A diverse group of experienced
pediatric specialists, present in one location and focused
on the care of children, is able to deliver the best possible
treatments. Members of our team include oncologists,
surgeons, midlevel practitioners, nurses, nutritionists,
social workers and child life specialists working in inpatient and outpatient settings.
The Hematology/Oncology Clinic offers multiple specialty services, including a bone tumor clinic, bone marrow
transplant services, hematologic and sickle cell disease clinics, multidisciplinary solid tumor oncology clinic, neuro-oncology clinic, surgical oncology care, palliative care and radiation therapy. Whenever possible, we treat our patients with the
Children’s Oncology Group protocols approved by our review board, which include investigational therapy or drugs when
there are no effective standard therapies for a given diagnosis.
We offer long-term follow-up through the ACCESS (After Cancer Care Ends, Survivorship Starts) program, which helps
pediatric cancer survivors live healthy lives, and through the Long-Term Follow-up program, which evaluates effects after
hematopoietic cell transplant. Based on our overall dedication to improving survival rates for children with brain tumors,
the depth of our program, the clinical resources of our institution and our ability to perform innovative research, Seattle
Children’s was one of nine institutions in the United States selected for membership in the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium.
Our research activities to improve cancer treatment encompass internationally recognized programs at Children’s,
the University of Washington and FHCRC. These activities have been responsible for the development of widely used clinical
treatments, including hematopoietic stem cell transplant and a new targeted therapy for treating acute myelogenous leukemia.
TEACHING, RESEARCH, AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Irwin D. Bernstein, MD, is chief of the Division of Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor of pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
He is director of the Division of Pediatric Hematology/
Oncology in the university Department of Pediatrics
and head of the Pediatric Oncology Program at Fred
Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC). Dr.
Bernstein holds the John R. Hartmann Endowed Chair
in Pediatric Oncology/Hematology at Seattle Children’s
and is an American Cancer Society Clinical Research
Professor. He has been a board member for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, is chairman of the society’s
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Professional Education Committee, and is a member of
the Scientific Advisory Board for the University of Minnesota Cancer Center. Dr. Bernstein’s research interests
include hematopoietic stem cells, antibody targeted
therapies for lymphoma and leukemia, and the biology
of acute myeloid leukemia. He is principal investigator
on a Leukemia & Lymphoma Society SCOR program
in immunotherapy of hematologic malignancies, on
multiple grants from the National Institutes of Health
(NIH), including the Children’s Oncology Group AML
reference laboratory, and on a Program Project Grant
studying the biology of hematopoietic stem cells. Additional NIH grants support his studies of acute myeloid
leukemia cells — which have led to the development
of Mylotarg, a drug widely used for treating acute
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
myelogenous leukemia — and his current studies of
hematopoietic stem cell — which have led to a novel
approach for expanding stem cell numbers in cord
blood that will be tested in a clinical trial to improve
cord blood transplant. Dr. Bernstein also heads
NIH-supported grants for career development in
pediatric and medical oncology, and for the Pediatric
Oncology Research Training Program.
Robert G. Andrews, MD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor in
the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. He is
associate member of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research
Center (FHCRC) in the Clinical Research Division,
and head of stem cell and transplant biology at the
Washington National Primate Research Center. Dr.
Andrews has research interest in hematopoietic stem
cell and transplant biology, including gene therapy and
expansion of hematopoietic stem cells as well as fetal
stem cell transplant and embryonic stem cell–based
therapies. His laboratory is studying novel nonhuman
primate embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines to characterize the differentiation to hematopoietic stem cells
(HSC) and to develop strategies for the use of ESCderived HSCs for transplant in these pre-clinical
models. His work also includes examining the role
of natural killer and mesenchymal stem cells in
hematopoietic stem cell transplant.
Michael A. Bender, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and director of the Odessa
Brown Comprehensive Sickle Cell Clinic; he is associate professor at the University of Washington School of
Medicine and assistant member of the Clinical Division
at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC).
Clinically, Dr. Bender has a long-standing commitment
FACULTY
Irwin D. Bernstein
MD, Chief
Irwin D. Bernstein, MD, Chief
Robert G. Andrews, MD
Michael A. Bender, MD, PhD
Marie Bleakley, MD, MMSc
Lauri M. Burroughs, MD
Paul Carpenter, MBBS
Mari Dallas, MD
Colleen Delaney, MD, MS
Debra L. Friedman, MD
J. Russell Geyer, MD
to hemoglobinopathies with an emphasis on sickle cell
disease, and special emphasis on patient education,
community outreach and access to health care. He acts
as a consultant to the state newborn screening program
regarding hemoglobinopathies, providing advice to the
state, community physicians and families. Dr. Bender
has worked with the Puget Sound Blood Center’s Rare
Blood Groups program to increase the number of
minority donors by overcoming cultural barriers and
improving education and information services; and
he received the American Society of Hematology’s
Champion for Advocacy award. His research focuses on
two main areas: regulation of the chromatin structure
in vivo, using the beta-globin locus as a model; and the
manipulation of the oxidation/reduction state in vivo
to affect sickle cell anemia. Dr. Bender is working on
multiple research projects, ranging from developing
new techniques to analyze chromatin structure,
to establishing a statewide collaborative to provide
better support for patients, families, practitioners and
community members affected by sickle cell disease.
He has used several strategies to delete multiple DNaseI hypersensitive sites (HSs) of the beta-globin locus
control region. This region, termed the LCR, is essential for the activation of the locus. Loss of the LCR decreases, but does not eliminate expression, but does not
lead to a major change in chromatin structure. As this
is different than predicted from analysis of a human
with an LCR deletion, two approaches were pursued.
The п¬Ѓrst was to extend the deletion further upstream
of the LCR. The second was to identify and delete additional candidate regulatory regions from the endogenous locus in mice. Data from several systems has
implicated HSs flanking the locus as being important
in the regulation of chromatin structure and expression
of the locus. Several models have been generated as to
the role of these regions. Dr. Bender has recently published the results of these
studies, which demonstrate
the inaccuracy of several
Douglas S. Hawkins, MD
Thomas J. Manley, MD
prior models for globin gene
Dana C. Matthews, MD
regulation. He is using
Soheil Meshinchi, MD, PhD
long-range DNase sensitivJames M. Olson, MD, PhD
ity and chromatin immuJulie R. Park, MD
noprecipitation studies to
Thomas Pendergrass,
MD, MSPH
further characterize the
Jean E. Sanders, MD
region through erythroid
Barbara Small, MD, MA
development, and generate
Blythe G. Thomson, MD
new models.
Ann E. Woolfrey, MD
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
125
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
Marie Bleakley, MD, MMSc, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and in the Clinical Research
Division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
(FHCRC) and acting instructor in pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. She is
a research associate in immunology at FHCRC and
attending physician on the bone marrow transplant
service. Dr. Bleakley’s primary research focus is the
discovery of novel minor histocompatibility antigens
expressed on leukemic stem cells. The ability to
cure leukemia with allogeneic hematopoietic stem
cell transplant requires a type of donor immune cell
called a T cell that recognizes and destroys leukemic
cells. Some of these T cells can also damage normal
cells and cause a condition called graft versus host
disease (GVHD). Dr. Bleakley is conducting research
to identify the target molecules on leukemic cells that
the immune system recognizes, in order to develop
immunotherapy for transplant patients that selectively
kills leukemic cells without damaging normal cells.
Immunotherapy administered in the form of vaccines
or T cell infusions could improve the cure rate of
patients with advanced leukemia, and early results of
this research are very promising. Dr. Bleakley is also
developing a clinical protocol for a Phase I trial of
selective depletion of specific T cell subsets from donor
cells for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant
to prevent GVHD. She is the co-principal investigator on a multicenter study to evaluate a new test for
diagnosing fungal infections in children undergoing
chemotherapy or transplant in order to detect them
before they cause harm to the child and when they
can be more readily treated.
Lauri M. Burroughs, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital, acting instructor in the Division
of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at the University of
Washington School of Medicine and research associate
in the Clinical Research Division and in the Pediatric
Stem Cell Transplantation Center of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC). Her research
interests include hematopoietic cell transplant for
patients with primary immunodeficiencies and other
nonmalignant inherited disorders, and she has focused
her research efforts on reducing transplant-related
complications. She is conducting a clinical trial to
evaluate whether the addition of the T cell depleting
agent CampathВ® can decrease the incidence of graft
versus host disease (GVHD) and improve donor chimerism following hematopoietic cell transplantation.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
In addition, in order to increase the number of patients
with primary immunodeficiencies and other rare nonmalignant inherited diseases who may benefit from a
transplant, Dr. Burroughs developed a clinical trial for
patients who do not have an HLA-matched related or
unrelated donor. Patients receiving a nonmyeloablative
conditioning regimen will receive cyclophosphamide
before and after hematopoietic cell transplantation
followed by HLA-haploidentical grafts to remove
alloreactive T cells with the goal of improving
engraftment and decreasing GVHD.
Paul Carpenter, MBBS, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) and assistant professor at the
University of Washington, with a focus on graft versus
host disease (GVHD). He supervises junior attending
staff on the pediatric hematopoietic cell transplant
service at FHCRC. His local responsibilities include
long-standing contributions to the FHCRC Standard
Practice Committee and Standard Practice Manual.
He chairs a Data Safety Monitoring Board for multiple
FHCRC protocols and serves on the FHCRC Scientific
Review Committee and one of the two Institutional
Review Boards. His clinical and research interests
focus on GVHD, which is the major and potentially
lethal complication of hematopoietic cell transplant.
His research continues to explore new therapies for
the treatment of acute and chronic GVHD. He is also
researching therapies to ameliorate key morbidities
associated with chronic immunosuppressive therapies,
such as bisphosphonate therapy for glucocorticoidinduced bone disease and the use of statins to treat
hyperlipidemia. He recently completed a multicenter
pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of
imatinib as post-transplant therapy for high-risk
Philadelphia chromosome–positive leukemias.
Mari Dallas, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital, associate in the Clinical Research
Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research
Center (FHCRC) and acting instructor in the Division
of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Dallas’ research
interests center around bone marrow transplant and
immune reconstitution afterward, with the goal of improving immune recovery. Her research focuses on the
effects of Notch signaling in regulating multiple cell
fate decisions by hematopoietic precursors, including
the role of Notch in T cell development. Her work in
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
the mouse model demonstrated that murine hematopoietic stem cells cultured on Delta1 reconstituted the
T cell compartment more rapidly than non-cultured
cells. She is translating her п¬Ѓndings using human
umbilical cord blood progenitors. When applied in
a clinical setting, augmentation of transplanted
umbilical cord blood cells with Delta1 cultured cells
may improve clinical outcomes of patients undergoing
transplantation by decreasing the transplant-related
mortality secondary to infection.
Colleen Delaney, MD, MS, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital, assistant member of the
Clinical Research Division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer
Research Center (FHCRC) and assistant professor
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She is director of the Cord Blood Transplant Program
at FHCRC. Dr. Delaney’s research interests include
hematopoietic stem cell regulation and the development of novel and clinically feasible ex vivo expansion
systems for hematopoietic progenitor cells using the
Notch ligand, Delta1, which is a known regulator of
cell fate determination. Her goal is to improve the
outcome of patients in need of a cord blood transplant.
Dr. Delaney’s research on the role of Notch signaling
in hematopoietic stem cell regulation has led to the
development of a novel ex vivo expansion system for
umbilical cord blood progenitors. Her preclinical data
demonstrates not only the ability to expand cord
blood progenitor cells ex vivo that retain repopulating
ability, but also indicates that the expanded cells may
lead to more rapid engraftment as compared to the
non-expanded cells and therefore have the potential
to overcome delayed engraftment, the major disadvantage after undergoing cord blood transplantation.
Dr. Delaney is principal investigator on two multicenter clinical trials investigating the use of single or
double unrelated donor umbilical cord blood grafts as
an alternative source of stem cells for hematopoietic
cell transplant.
Debra L. Friedman, MD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor
at the University of Washington Medical Center;
she is associate member of the Clinical Research
Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
(FHCRC) and affiliate investigator in the Division of
Public Health Sciences. She is director of the FHCRC
Survivorship Program, one of only п¬Ѓve institutions in
the nation that are part of the LIVESTRONG Cancer
Survivorship Center of Excellence Network, funded by
the Lance Armstrong Foundation. She also directs the
After Cancer Care Ends, Survivorship Starts (ACCESS)
program at Seattle Children’s. She is on the steering
committee of the Hodgkin lymphoma, retinoblastoma
and late effects committees of the Children’s Oncology
Group (COG) and heads a study in each of these areas;
she has developed novel therapeutic protocols designed
to decrease adverse long-term effects of therapy. She
is also co-chair of COG’s Survivorship Transition Task
Force and is a nationally recognized expert in cancer
survivorship, participating in projects evaluating best
practices and models of care. Dr. Friedman is principal
investigator on seven projects and supporting investigator on seven additional projects. She is conducting
studies on the interaction between environmental
exposures and genetic predisposition toward several
types of childhood cancer, neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma and Wilms tumor, as well as second malignant
neoplasms (SMN). She is investigating a diverse group
of physiologic and psychosocial outcomes including
health-related quality of life, SMNs, exercise and
п¬Ѓtness, endocrinopathies, pulmonary and cardiac
dysfunction among survivors of pediatric cancer, hematopoietic stem cell transplant and medical oncology.
J. Russell Geyer, MD, is clinical director of the Hematology-Oncology Clinic at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
professor of pediatrics and adjunct professor in the
Department of Neurological Surgery at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Geyer holds the
Evans Family Endowed Chair in Pediatric Cancer at
Seattle Children’s. Nationally, Dr. Geyer is a member of
the COG-CNS Brain Tumors Committee and the CNS
Steering Committee of the Children’s Oncology Group
(COG), the Brain Tumor Strategy Group of the Children’s Cancer Group and the Steering Committee and
Quality Assurance Committee of the Pediatric Brain
Tumor Consortium (PBTC). Dr. Geyer also serves as
chairman of the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Pediatric
Cancer Committee and of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer
Research Center Consortium Pediatric Scientific
Review Committee. He is also COG co-chairman of
the Infant Brain Tumor Committee and chairman of
the PBTC Phase II brainstem glioma study of Iressa
and radiotherapy.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
127
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
Douglas S. Hawkins, MD, is clinician at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and associate professor at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Hawkins is the
principal investigator for the Children’s Oncology
Group (COG) activity at Seattle Children’s, associate
editor of the Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and vice chairman of the COG Soft Tissue
Sarcoma Committee. He is a member of several COG
committees including the Developmental Therapeutics
Scientific Committee, Bone Tumor Committee and
Voting Body Steering Committee. Dr. Hawkins has
focused on clinical research, particularly in the
treatment of pediatric sarcomas. He has developed a
very intensive chemotherapy regimen for metastatic
sarcomas, VACIME, and investigated the role of
autologous peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) to
support the use of this dose-intensive regimen. He has
been principal investigator for two trials of myeloablative therapy for recurrent pediatric sarcomas, using the
clinical resources of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research
Center (FHCRC). He is vice chairman and chairman of
several other studies. He is focusing on the continued
development of targeted radiotherapy for Ewing
sarcoma using 166-Holmium-DOTMP, and the
design and implementation of a multicenter trial
of 166-Holmium-DOTMP for patients with Ewing
sarcoma and osseous metastases.
Thomas J. Manley, MD, is attending physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Dr. Manley has developed
a strategy to identify novel CMV antigens targeted
by cytotoxic T cells using a CMV cDNA library in an
expression-cloning assay. Using this technique he has
identified 10 genes that encode CMV antigens and he
is mapping the epitopes recognized by cytotoxic T cell
clones. His planned studies of the function of these
cytotoxic T cells using an vitro reactivation model may
provide insight into their role in suppressing viral
replication, and may support the inclusion of a more
diverse repertoire of CMV-specific cytotoxic T cells into
adoptive immunotherapy trials. He will be using the
mutant strain of CMV to study CMV-specific immune
reconstitution of patients undergoing T cell depleted
haploidentical stem cell transplantation, a group of
patients at high risk for CMV reactivation and disease.
These efforts will provide the basis for future protocols
to examine the biology and therapeutic efficacy of
adoptively transferred CMV-specific T cell clones.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Dana C. Matthews, MD, is head of the pediatric hemophilia program and provides oversight for clinical hematology at Seattle Children’s Hospital; she is
associate professor at the University of Washington
and associate member of Fred Hutchinson Cancer
Research Center (FHCRC). Clinically, Dr. Matthews
supervises all hematology care at Seattle Children’s.
Her research interests include risk-based optimization
of the treatment of pediatric thrombosis, and clinical aspects of the immune response in patients with
hemophilia who develop inhibitors to clotting factor.
Dr. Matthews is participating in projects including an
effort to characterize immune responses to factor VIII
that are significant complications in the management
of hemophilia A, providing the clinical correlates for
their outcomes, including inhibitor status over time,
response to treatment and development of hemophiliarelated complications, and response to immune tolerance. Her primary interest is to improve the outcome
for pediatric patients with thrombosis by developing a
pediatric thrombosis registry and developing clinical
trials for subgroups of patients with thrombosis. She
is a member of the board of directors for the newly
developing American Thrombosis and Hemostasis
Network, a national organization with the mission to
“provide stewardship in the development and support
of an accessible national database to support excellence
in patient care, research, professional mentorship, and
public health translation.”
Soheil Meshinchi, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital, assistant professor at the
University of Washington School of Medicine and
assistant member of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research
Center (FHCRC), focusing on hematopoietic stem cell
transplant. He is co-director of the Children’s Oncology
Group (COG) Myeloid Resource Laboratory, vice chair
of the COG acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Phase III
trial, chairman of the COG committee on the role of
RTK activating mutations in pediatric AML. He serves
on several COG committees, including the committee for development of new APL therapy, the National
Myeloid Disease Steering Committee, Phase III AML
committee, Phase II trial of STI571 for Philadelphia
chromosome leukemias and the infant leukemia steering committee. Dr. Meshinchi’s clinical and research
interests center around the treatment of pediatric
myeloid leukemia. He is principal investigator on six
research projects at FHCRC and Seattle Children’s including a study on the biology of the alterations of the
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
signal transduction pathway in pediatric cancers, the
biology and prognostic implications of FLt3 mutations
in AML and the accurate prediction of AML relapse
using multidimensional flow cyclometry. He has
established a myeloid disease clinic at Seattle Children’s, and he is working to identify novel therapies
in AML and to establish the framework to create a
proteomic resource laboratory locally and nationally.
James M. Olson, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate member of
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC);
he is adjunct associate professor of pathology and
associate professor of pediatric hematology/oncology
at the University of Washington and on the faculty in
the Program in Molecular and Cellular Biology, the
Program in Neurobiology and Behavior and the Center
for Nanotechnology. He serves as assistant program
head of the pediatric oncology program at FHCRC and
has mentored more than 30 graduate students and
postdoctoral research fellows. He is chair of a national
Phase III clinical trial for high-risk medulloblastoma/
PNET patients, a member of the Biology and Translational Research Committee of the Children’s Oncology
Group, director of the Hereditary Disease Array Group
and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the
Hereditary Disease Foundation. Dr. Olson is principal
investigator on six projects that focus on developing
effective new therapies for pediatric brain tumors,
methods that allow surgeons to better visualize the
border of brain cancer and normal brain, the molecular
mechanisms of cerebellar development and geneticbased endpoints for neurodegenerative diseases.
Julie R. Park, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital, associate professor in pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine
and associate in clinical research at Fred Hutchinson
Cancer Research Center (FHCRC). She is director of
the pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship at the
University of Washington. Dr. Park is an active member
of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) Consortium,
coordinating the center’s participation in clinical trials
for treatment of neuroblastoma and non-Hodgkin
lymphoma and providing leadership for future development of neuroblastoma clinical research within
COG. Dr. Park’s primary focus has been investigating
new chemotherapy combinations for the initial treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma, a rare but aggressive form of childhood cancer. She has conducted a
multicenter clinical trial to determine the feasibility
and toxicity of adding topotecan and cyclophosphamide to intensively dosed standard induction agents.
She is collaborating to optimize the use of radiation
therapy as part of treatment for neuroblastoma. Dr.
Park’s work has led to the development of a national
randomized Phase III trial within COG for treatment
of newly diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma. Dr. Park
has steered our institution into becoming a leading
participant in the Phase I Consortium of COG and the
New Approaches to Neuroblastoma Therapy (NANT)
Consortium. She has been actively involved in the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents that may
block critical tumor cell pathways necessary for tumor
cell growth or survival. Her research has also focused
on developing molecular approaches to optimize the
effectiveness of current chemotherapy agents. She
is collaborating on an investigation of a possible
relationship between a patient’s ability to break down
chemotherapy agents and activity against their tumor
or risk for development of severe side effects.
Thomas W. Pendergrass, MD, MSPH, is director of medical
education at Seattle Children’s Hospital; he is professor
of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine and adjunct professor of epidemiology at the
School of Public Health, and associate in the Clinical
Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research
Center (FHCRC). He is vice chair for education programs in the Department of Pediatrics at the University
of Washington. For Seattle Children’s, he serves as
chair for the GME Council, a member of the Medical
Record/Medical Informatics Committee, a member of
the Hospital Steering Committee and a member for the
Children’s Protection Program Quality Advisory
Committee. Dr. Pendergrass’ clinical and research
interests center around bone and soft tissue sarcomas,
retinoblastoma, pediatric hematology, medical education and faculty development. He is interested in the
epidemiology and treatment of pediatric thromboses,
management of iron overload in chronically transfused
patients and treatment of retinoblastoma. His educational focus includes the pediatrics residency and
subspecialty curricula, evaluation process, residency
program management and continuing medical education.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
129
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
Jean E. Sanders, MD, is director of the Clinical
Pediatric Hematopoietic Transplant Program at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and the University of
Washington School of Medicine and member of the
Clinical Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer
Research Center (FHCRC). She is Gerald and Gloria
Swanson Endowed Chair in Pediatric Bone Marrow
Transplantation. For more than 28 years Dr. Sanders’
work has centered around pediatric hematopoietic
stem cell transplant, including the design of transplant preparative regimens for children with acute
lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia,
chronic myelogenous leukemia and other hematologic
malignancies, and pediatric solid tumors including
neuroblastoma, Ewing sarcoma and aplastic anemia,
and other non malignant hematologic disorders. She
has also been very involved in donor selection from
a matched family member, an unrelated marrow or
peripheral blood stem cell donor or an umbilical cord
blood donor. Dr. Sanders’ major research focus is in
the long-term follow-up issues of children surviving
after hematopoietic stem cell transplant, such as
chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD), recurrent
leukemia, growth and development problems and
other late effects. Her studies have demonstrated that
some patients who relapse after their п¬Ѓrst transplant
may have a successful second transplant, particularly
when the п¬Ѓrst transplant preparative regimen was
chemotherapy based and the second transplant uses a
total body irradiation–based preparative regimen. She
is involved in research projects to improve the outcome
of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in the
treatment of hematologic malignancies, to improve
ambulatory care of the stem cell transplant recipient
and to improve the long-term quality of life for
children after marrow transplantation. Her research
goals include developing interventions to minimize
or treat some of the delayed effects of hematopoietic
stem cell transplant, such as using a non-myeloablative
preparative regimen for second transplant.
Barbara Small, MD, MA, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She has presented nationally and internationally on
issues surrounding end-of-life and quality-of-life
decisions. Dr. Small has also taught medical ethics
for pediatrics residents and has been a pediatric life
support instructor.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Blythe G. Thomson, MD, is clinical associate professor
at Seattle Children’s Hospital. She earned her MD
magna cum laude from Ohio State University College
of Medicine. Locally, she serves on the Cancer Care
Committee, Scientific Advisory Committee of the
General Clinical Research Center, Ambulatory
Oversight Committee and Institutional Biosafety
Committee of the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.
Dr. Thomson is a member of the Children’s Oncology
Group (COG) Stem Cell Transplant Steering Committee, the Institutional Performance Monitoring Committee and the Accreditation Committee of the Foundation
for Accreditation of Cellular Therapies. Her clinical
and research interests include bone marrow transplant
and leukemia research. She is taking a leading role on
several research projects including studies relating to
possible treatment methods of very high–risk acute
lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adolescents,
how using Nelarbine in an intensive chemotherapy
regimen can affect the treatment of T cell leukemia
and local COG studies on high-risk and standard-risk
B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the
classification of acute leukemia.
Ann E. Woolfrey, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate member of the
Clinical Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer
Research Center (FHCRC). She is director of the
Unrelated Marrow Donor Program for the Seattle
Cancer Care Alliance. Nationally, she is co-chair of
the Center for International Blood and Marrow
Transplant Research of the Chronic Leukemia
Working Committee, serves on National Marrow
Donor Program committees for Histocompatibility
and for Transplant Center Contingency Response
Planning and is on the Board of Medical Advisors of
the Immunodeficiency Foundation. Dr. Woolfrey’s
research interests involve pediatric oncology, particularly leukemia, and processes of stem cell, blood and
marrow transplant. She is involved in several studies
on overcoming genetic barriers in hematopoietic
stem cell transplant, identifying nonmyeloablative
transplants for nonmalignant disorders and investigating the use of blood stem cell and marrow transplant
from HLA-compatible related and unrelated donors.
Dr. Woolfrey’s goals include researching nonablative
treatments for pediatric diseases, the T cell depletion
of peripheral blood stem cells in HLA identical and
non-identical transplants and the effectiveness of
high-dose therapy for autoimmune diseases.
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
AWARDS AND HONORS
Jean E. Sanders, MD
Gerald and Gloria Swanson Endowed Chair
in Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplantation,
awarded 2005
Continuing
Robert G. Andrews, MD
Transplantation/Stem Cell Biology and Flow
Cytometry Resources Core NIH/NCRR, $103,159
Michael A. Bender, MD, PhD
Quantitating chromatin dynamics during
erythropoiesis, NIH/NIDDK, $259,500
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Debra L. Friedman, MD
Survivorship Center Grant, LIVESTRONGв„ў/
Lance Armstrong Foundation, $382,701
Soheil Meshinchi, MD, PhD
Biology and Prognostic Implication of Flt3 Mutations
in AML, NIH/NCI, $242,499
Strategic Partnering to Evaluate Cancer Signatures
(subaward), NIH/NCI, $259,972
James M. Olson, MD, PhD
Evaluation of Gamma-secretase Inhibitors in
Animal and ex vivo Culture Preclinical Models,
Merck & Co., Inc., $133,914
Molecular Imaging of Neurons in Brain,
Dana Foundation, $60,000
Targeted Therapy in Ex Vivo Medulloblastoma/PNET,
NIH/NCI, $226,761
Irwin D. Bernstein, MD
Biology of Hematopoietic Stem Cells, NIH/NHLBI,
$1,349,459
Career Development in Pediatric and Medical
Oncology, NIH/NCI, $537,840
Ex Vivo Replication of Immune Functions of Bone
Marrow and Thymus on Three-Dimensional Scaffolds,
VaxDesign/US Dept of Interior, $95,692
Human Specimen Banking, NCCF NIH/NCI, $87,955
Immunotherapy of Hematological Malignancies, LLS,
$1,377,365
Mechanisms of Resistance to Gemtuzumab
Ozogamicin, NIH/NCI, $373,230
Myeloid Leukemia Reference Laboratory,
NCCF NIH/NCI, $322,308
Notch Mediated Expansion of Hematopoietic
Precursors, NIH/NHLBI, $491,999
Julie R. Park, MD
ALS Translational Research for Neuroblastoma,
Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, $100,000
Pediatric Oncology Research Training Program,
NIH/NCI, $242,003
Children’s Oncology Group — Phase I Consortium,
NCCF, NIH/NCI, $50,000
Studies of Normal and Malignant Hematopoiesis,
American Cancer Society (ACS), $80,000
Novel Therapies for High-Risk Neuroblastoma, NCI,
$131,220
Colleen Delaney, MD, MS
Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood Progenitor Cells,
Amgen, $60,000
Targeted Hematopoietic Irradiation for Treatment
of High Risk Neuroblastoma, CHRMC Endowment,
$117,300
Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood Progenitor Cells,
NIH/NHLBI, $128,250
Debra L. Friedman, MD
Exercise and Fitness in Childhood Cancer Survivors,
NIH/NCI, $159,392
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
131
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
Health Outcomes for Hodgkin Disease Survivors,
NIH/NCI, $455,557
Radiation Sensitivity, DNA Repair, and Second
Cancers, NIH/NCI, $184,500
Social and Physical Activity of Childhood Cancer
Survivors, NIH/NCI, $185,975
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Paul A. Carpenter, MBBS
HCT for Severe Aplastic Anemia, pediatric hematology/oncology teaching lecture, Seattle Children’s,
April 8, 2005
NIH GVHD Consensus Conference — Supportive Care,
podium panel member, Bethesda, Md., June 6, 2005
J. Russell Geyer, MD
Pediatric Brain Tumor Clinical Trials Consortium,
St. Jude Hospital, NIH/NCI, $94,695
Acute GVHD, pediatric hematology/oncology teaching
lecture, Seattle Children’s, July 29, 2005
Douglas S. Hawkins, MD
Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Research Endowment,
Orrico Family, $378,874
Issues in the Management of Chronic GVHD,
hematology Grand Rounds (CME activity),
University of Chicago, August 1, 2005
Children’s Oncology Group Chair’s Grant, NCCF,
NIH/NCI, $263,191
Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The Basics,
teaching lecture, Seattle Children’s, August 29, 2005
Targeted Radiotherapy for Ewing’s Sarcoma,
NIH/NCI, $65,610
Mari Dallas, MD
In-Vitro Regulation of Stem Cell Fate by Notch Ligand,
Delta1, hematology/oncology Grand Rounds, Seattle
Children’s, June 17, 2005
Thomas J. Manley, MD
Specificity and Function of CMV-specific CD8+ T Cells,
NIH Continuation $128,250
Soheil Meshinchi, MD, PhD
Accurate Prediction of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Relapse
Using Multidimensional Flow Cytometry, NIH/NCI,
$173,000
Bacterial Infections & Antibiotics Choice in BMT
Patients, Seattle Children’s, August 2005
Viral and Fungal Infections in BMT Patients,
Seattle Children’s, August 2005
GVHD, Seattle Children’s, August 2005
Prognostic Implications of Flt3 Mutations in AML,
NIH/NCI, $100,000
James M. Olson, MD, PhD
BHLH Factors in Medulloblastoma Genesis and
Maintenance, NIH/NCI, $323,310
Mechanisms of Gene Dysregulation In HD, NIH/
NINDS, $432,500
Molecular Imaging, Diagnosis and Treatment of
Medulloblastoma (subaward), NIH/NCI, $77,901
Predicting Retinoid Responsive Medulloblastoma
Patient, DRWW, $190,000
The Role of Nmyc in Medulloblastoma Genesis,
CHRMC Brain Tumor Foundation, $75,000
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Common Conditioning Regimens, Seattle Children’s,
August 2005
Colleen Delaney, MD
Notch-Mediated Expansion of Cord Blood Progenitors:
Development of a Clinically Feasible Ex-Vivo Expansion System, Clinical Research Division seminar, Fred
Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, May 20, 2005
Notch-Mediated Expansion of Cord Blood Progenitors:
Development of a Clinically Feasible Ex-Vivo Expansion System, Hematology/Oncology Division research
seminar, Seattle Children’s, May, 2005
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
Culture of CD34+ Umbilical Cord Blood Progenitors
with Notch Ligand Results in Enhanced and More Rapid Human Engraftment in a Preclinical NOD/SCID
Mouse Model, 47th annual meeting, American Society
of Hematology, Atlanta, December 12, 2005
Douglas S. Hawkins, MD
Pediatric Sarcoma, teaching lecture, University of
Washington, October 14, 2005
Childhood Malignancies, teaching lecture, Seattle
Children’s dental department, November 7, 2005
Debra L. Friedman, MD
Cancer Survivorship, American Society of Pediatric
Hematology Oncology annual meeting workshop, 2005
Pediatric Sarcoma, teaching lecture, Seattle Children’s,
November 17, 2005
Cancer Survivorship, Seattle Children’s Cancer
Committee, 2005
Pediatric Sarcoma, teaching lecture, University of
Washington, November 28, 2005
Health-Related Outcomes for Hodgkin Disease
Survivors, National Cancer Institute Office of Cancer
Survivorship workshop, 2005
Soheil Meshinchi, MD, PhD
Children’s Oncology Group Biopathology and Translational Research Symposium and Children’s Oncology Group Biology Conference, invited speaker, COG
National Conference, Los Angeles, March 30, 2005
Long-Term Sequelae in Childhood Cancer Survivors:
Prevention and Intervention, “Clinical Research at the
University of Washington, Pushing Back the Frontiers,”
General Clinical Research Center Symposium, University of Washington, 2005
Molecular Mechanisms of Second Malignancies
After High-Dose Therapy, transplantation and aging
workshop, Seattle Cancer and Aging Program,
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 2005
Risk-Adapted Therapy for Intermediate-Risk Hodgkin
Disease; Health-Related Outcomes for Hodgkin Disease
Survivors; and Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Group
B Retinoblastoma, Children’s Oncology Group biannual meeting, 2005
Risk Factors for Second Malignancies After
Transplantation Differ Between Allogeneic and
Autologous Recipients, American Society of
Hematology annual meeting, 2005
James M. Olson, MD
Identifying Vulnerable Pathways in Medulloblastoma,
Grand Rounds, University of Michigan Cancer Center,
Ann Arbor, March 7, 2005
Jean E. Sanders, MD
Stem Cell Transplantation in Children: Current Results
and Controversies, Scottsdale, Ariz., January 20, 2005
Ann E. Woolfrey, MD
Umbilical Cord Transplantation, American Society for
Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics (ASHI) 2005
western regional meeting, Spokane, Wash., 2005
Unrelated Donor and Cord Blood Transplants,
MultiCare Health System and Mary Bridge Hematology/Oncology Department, Tacoma, Wash., 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Second Malignancies Following Childhood Cancer
— An Update, Childhood Cancer Survivor Study
annual meeting, 2005
Second Malignancies Following Hematopoietic Stem
Cell Transplant, Grand Rounds, University of
Minnesota Cancer Center, 2005
Aonzo TA, Wells RJ, Woods WG, Lange B, Gerbing
RB, Buxton AB, Neudorf S, Sanders JE, Smith FO,
Feig SA. Postremission therapy for children with acute
myeloid leukemia. The Children’s Cancer Group
experience in the transplant era. Leukemia.
2005;19:965–970.
Second Malignant Neoplasms in Hematopoietic
Transplant Survivors, Grand Rounds, Fred
Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
133
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
Arceci RJ, Sande J, Lange B, Shannon K, Franklin J,
Hutchinson R, Vik TA, Flowers D, Aplenc R, Berger
MS, Sherman ML, Smith FO, Bernstein ID, Sievers EL. Safety and efficacy of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (Mylotarg®) in pediatric patients with advanced
CD33+-positive acute myeloid leukemia. Blood.
2005;106(4):1183–1188.
Carpenter PA, Lowder J, Johnston L, Frangoul H,
Khoury H, Parker P, Jerome KR, McCune JS, Storer
B, Martin P, Appelbaum F, Abonour R, Westervelt P,
Anasetti C. A phase II multicenter study of visilizumab,
humanized anti-CD3 antibody, to treat steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease. Biol Blood Marrow
Transplant. 2005;11:465–471.
Barker LM, Pendergrass TW, Sanders JE, Hawkins
DS. Survival after recurrence of Ewing’s sarcoma
family of tumors. J Clin Oncol. 2005;23:4354–4362.
Cole PD, Drachtman RA, Smith AK, Cate S, Larson
RA, Winick NJ, Hawkins DS, Holcenberg J, Kelly K,
Kamen BA. Phase II trial of oral aminopterin for
adults and children with refractory acute leukemia.
Clin Cancer Res. November 15, 2005.
Baron F, Maris MB, Sandmaier BM, Storer BE,
Sorror M, Diaconescu R, Woolfrey AE, Chauncey
TR, Flowers MED, Mielcarek M, Maloney DG, Storb
R. Graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative
conditioning. J Clin Oncol. 2005;23:1993–2003.
Blaney SM, Balis FM, Berg S, Arndt CA, Heideman R,
Geyer JR, Packer R, Adamson PC, Jaeckle K, Klenke
R, Aikin A, Murphy R, McCully C, Poplack DG. Intrathecal mafosfamide: a preclinical pharmacology and
phase I trial. J Clin Oncol. 2005;23(7):1555–1563.
Bobola MS, Silber JR, Ellenbogen RG, Geyer JR,
Blank A, Goff RD. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, O6-benzylguanine, and resistance to
clinical alkylators in pediatric primary brain tumor
cell lines. Clin Canc Res. 2005;11(7):2747–2755.
Burroughs L, Mielcarek M, Little M-T, Bridger G,
MacFarland R, Fricker S, LaBrecque J, Sandmaier BM,
Storb R. Durable engraftment of AMD3100-mobilized
autologous and allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a canine transplantation model. Blood.
2005;106:4002–4008.
Burroughs L, Storb R. Low-intensity allogeneic
hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for myeloid
malignancies: separating graft-vs.-leukemia effects
from graft-vs.-host disease. Curr Opin Hematol.
2005;12:45–54.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Cornetta K, Laughlin M, Carter S, Wall D, Weinthal J,
Delaney C, Wagner J, Sweetman R, McCarthy P,
Chao N. Umbilical cord blood transplantation in
adults: results of the prospective cord blood
transplantation (COBLT). Biol Blood Marrow
Transplant. Feb 2005;11(2):149–160.
Cripe TP, Thomson B, Boat TF, Williams DA.
Promoting translation research in academic health
centers: navigating the “roadmap.” Acad Med.
2005;80:1012–1018.
Dallas MH, Varnum-Finney B, Delaney C, Kato K,
Bernstein ID. Density of the notch ligand Delta1
determines generation of B and T cell precursors from hematopoietic stem cells. J Exp Med.
2005;201(9):1361–1366.
Delaney C, Varnum-Finney B, Aoyama K, BrashemStein C, Bernstein ID. Dose-dependent effects of the
notch ligand Delta1 on ex vivo differentiation and in
vivo marrow repopulating ability of cord blood cells.
Blood. 2005;106(8):2693–2699.
Flowers MED, Traina F, Storer B, Maris M, Bethge
WA, Carpenter PA, Appelbaum FR, Storb R, Sandmaier BM, Martin PJ. Serious graft-versus-host disease
after hematopoietic cell transplantation following
nonmyeloablative conditioning. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005;3(5):277–282; erratum appears in BMT
2005;3(5):535.
Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
Friedman DL. The ovary. In: Survivors of Childhood
and Adolescent Cancer, Second Edition. Schwartz CL,
Hobbie WL, Constine LS, Ruccione KS, eds. London:
Springer Verlag, 2005.
Hoffmeister PA, Madtes DK, Storer BE, Sanders JE.
Pulmonary function in long-term survivors of pediatric
hematopoietic cell transplantation. Pediatric Blood
Cancer. Aug 5 2005; e-publication.
Friedman DL. Retinoblastoma. In: Manual of
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Fourth Edition.
Lanzkowsky P, ed. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2005.
Friedman DL, Constine LS. Late effects of cancer
therapy. In: Pediatric Radiation Therapy, Fourth
Edition. Halperin, Constine LS, Tarbell N, eds.
Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2005.
Kahl C, Leisenring W, Deeg HJ, Chauncey TR, Flowers
ME, Martin PJ, Sanders JE, Storb R. Cyclophosphamide and antithymocyte globulin as a conditioning
regimen for allogeneic marrow transplantation in
patients with aplastic anaemia: a long-term follow-up.
Brit J Haematol. Sep 2005;130(5):747–751.
Friedman DL, Hilden JM, Powaski K. Issues and
challenges in palliative care for children with cancer.
Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2005; 9:249–255.
Friedman DL, Kadan-Lottick NS, Whitton J,
Mertens AC, Yasui Y, Liu Y, Meadows AT, Robison LL,
Strong LC. Increased risk of cancer among siblings of
long-term childhood cancer survivors: a report from
the childhood cancer survivor study. Cancer Epidemiological Biomarkers Preview. 2005;14:1922–1927.
Li Y, Bleakley M, Yee C. IL 21 enhances the frequency
and affinity of the antigen-specific CD8 T cell response.
J Immunol. 2005;175(4):2261–2269.
Martin PJ, Friedman DL. How can hematopoietic cell
transplant centers and referring physicians help each
other during long-term follow-up? Hematology 10,
Supplement. 2005;1:250–254.
Fries BC, Riddell SR, Kim HW, Corey L, Dahlgren C,
Woolfrey AE, Boeckh M. Cytomegalovirus disease
before hematopoietic cell transplantation as a risk for
complications after transplantation. Biological Blood
Marrow Transplant. 2005;11:136–148.
Mielcarek M, Burroughs L, Leisenring W, Diaconescu
R, Martin PJ, Sandmaier BM, Maloney DG, Maris
MB, Chauncey TR, Shizuru JA, Blume KG, Hegenbart
U, Niederwieser D, Forman S, Bruno B, Woolfrey
A, Storb R. Prognostic relevance of “early-onset”
graft-versus-host disease following nonmyeloablative
hematopoietic cell transplantation. Br. J. Haematol.
2005;129:381–391.
Giaccone L, Martin P, Carpenter PA, Moravec C,
Hooper H, Funke VAM, Storb R, Flowers MED. Safety
and potential efficacy of low dose methotrexate for
treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease.
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005;36:337–341.
Nemecek ER, Hamlin DK, Fisher DR, Krohn KA,
Pagel JM, Appelbaum FR, Press OW, Matthews DC.
Biodistribution of yttrium-90 [90Y] labeled anti-CD45
antibody in a nonhuman primate model. Clin Cancer
Res. 2005;11:787–794.
Goemans BF, Zwaan ChM, Miller M, Zimmermann M,
Harlow A, Meshinchi S, Loonen AH, Hählen K, Reinhardt D, Creutzig U, Kaspers GJL, Heinrich MC. Mutations in KIT and RAS are frequent events in pediatric
core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemia.
September 2005;19(9):1536–1542.
Sanders JE. Response to Letter to the Editor. Blood.
2005;106:2593.
Gross TG, Bucuvalas J, Park J, Greiner TC, Hinrich
SH, Kaufman SS, Langnas AN, McDonald RA, Ryckman FC, Shaw BW, Sudan DL, Lynch JC. Low-dose
chemotherapy for refractory post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in children following solid organ
transplantation. J Clin Oncol. 2005;23(27):6481–6488.
Sanders JE, Guthrie KA, Hoffmeister PA, Woolfrey
AE, Carpenter PA, Appelbaum FR. Final adult heights
of patients who received hematopoietic cell transplantation in childhood. Blood. 2005;105:1348–1354.
Sanders JE, Im HJ, Hoffmeister PA, Gooley TA,
Woolfrey AE, Carpenter PA, Andrews RG, Bryant
EM, Appelbaum FR. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell
transplantation for infants with acute lymphoblastic
leukemia. Blood. 2005;105:3749–3756.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant
Schuetze SM, Rubin BP, Vernon C, Hawkins DS,
Bruckner JD, Conrad EU, Eary JF. The use of positron
emission tomography in localized, extremity soft tissue
sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
Cancer. 2005;103:339–348.
Spiller SE, Hawkins DS, Finn LS, Sze RW, Sybert V.
Metastatic malignant melanoma presenting as
pancytopenia in a three-year-old boy: a case report,
Pediatric Blood and Cancer. 2005;45:60–63.
Stirewalt DL, Kopecky KJ, Meshinchi S, Engel JH,
Pogosova-Agadjanyan EL, Linsley J, Slovak ML,
Willman CL, Radich JP. Size of FLT3 internal tandem
duplication has prognostic significance in patients
with acute myeloid leukemia. Blood. Dec 20, 2005;
e-publication.
Stapleton FB, Pendergrass TW. Improving departmental faculty meetings: an analysis of one department’s approach. J Pediatrics. 2005;146:155–156.
Vakoc CR, Letting DL, Gheldof N, Sawado T, Bender
MA, Groudine M, Weiss MJ, Dekker J, Blobel GA.
Proximity among distant regulatory elements at the
beta-globin locus requires GATA-1 and FOG-1.
Molecular Cell. 2005;17:453–462.
Walter RB, Raden BW, Kamikura DM, Cooper JA,
Bernstein ID. Influence of CD33 expressing levels and ITIM-dependent internalization on gemtuzumab ozogamicin-induced cytotoxicity. Blood.
2005;105(3):1295–1302.
Wenhong F, Pritchard JI, Olson JM, Khalid N,
Zhao LP. A class of models for analyzing GeneChipВ®
gene expression analysis array data. BMC Genomics.
2005;6:16.
Zanis-Neto J, Flowers MED, Medeiros CR, Bitencourt
MA, Bonfim CM, Setúbal DC, Funke V, Sanders JE,
Deeg HJ, Kiem HP, Martin P, Leisenring W, Storb
R, Pasquini R. Low-dose cyclophosphamide conditioning for haematopoietic cell transplantation from
HLA-matched related donors in patients with Fanconi
anaemia. Br J Haematol. 2005;130:99–106.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Hospitalists
The Division of Hospital Medicine (in the Department of Pediatrics) consists of
pediatricians who serve as attending physicians for inpatients at Seattle Children’s
Hospital. Division physicians attend on patients whose primary care physicians prefer
a hospital-based physician.
Our physicians ensure that the medical team keeps in close contact with primary
care physicians to coordinate inpatient and outpatient care. We provide care using a
family-centered model and meet daily with parents, nurses and resident physicians to
develop a plan of care and update families on the child’s condition. As hospitalists with
particular expertise in caring for pediatric inpatients, division members also take a lead
role in treating patients with complex medical needs, and in quality improvement projects
on the inpatient medical service.
Division physicians also participate extensively in medical education, providing
formal lectures, bedside teaching and mentoring for medical students and resident physicians.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Glen S. Tamura, MD, PhD, is director of the inpatient
medical service at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Tamura received his MD and PhD from Stanford
University, and trained in pediatrics and pediatric
infectious diseases at the University of Washington.
His clinical interests are focused on general inpatient
pediatric medicine and infectious diseases. He is
assistant director of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Fellowship Program. He teaches clinical skills to
second-year medical students, and mentors approximately 40 students throughout their medical school
career. Dr. Tamura’s research interests include clinical
research into quality improvement and patientcentered care, and basic science research in the
pathogenesis of Group B Streptococcal infections.
FACULTY
Glen S. Tamura
MD, PhD, Director
Glen S. Tamura, MD,
PhD, Director
Julianne K.J. Bishop, MD
Tellen Bennett, MD
Ronald L. Dick, MD
Janie G. Hallstrand, MD
Kristin Hayward, MD
Darren Migita, MD
Anne E. Phalen, MD
Joel S. Tieder, MD
Julianne K.J. Bishop, MD, is attending physician on
the inpatient ward at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
clinical instructor in the Department of Pediatrics at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. She
completed her residency in pediatrics at Seattle Children’s. Dr. Bishop earned her MD from the University
of Kansas. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of
Pediatrics. Dr. Bishop’s clinical interests include ethics
and palliative care.
Tellen Bennett, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and clinical instructor in the Department of Pediatrics in the University of Washington
School of Medicine and a member of the Emergency
Department Clinical Faculty. He earned his MD from
the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and completed
a pediatrics residency at the University of Washington.
He also attends on the pediatric inpatient service of
Evergreen Community Hospital and in the Emergency
Department at Seattle Children’s. He is a Pediatric
Advanced Life Support Instructor and is active in the
resident mock code training program. His research
interests include mechanisms of injury in trauma,
outcomes improvement through critical care education
and the application of computer technology to training
for high acuity, low frequency events.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
137
Hospitalists
Ronald L. Dick, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and clinical assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. Dr. Dick earned his MD from the University
of Massachusetts Medical School and completed his
pediatrics residency at the University of Washington.
He worked at The Everett Clinic in Everett, Wash.,
where he started the inpatient pediatric hospitalist
service. He served as medical director for the Pediatrics
Services Program at Providence Everett Medical Center. In addition to caring for general medicine patients,
Dr. Dick focuses on the care of medically complex
children with prolonged hospital stays. He is involved
in resident and medical student education through
bedside and didactic teaching. He is interested in
quality improvement, especially in issues related to
the care of medically complex children, and is a member of the Quality Improvement Steering Committee.
Janie G. Hallstrand, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and clinical associate professor
of pediatrics at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. She also works with medically complex
children with prolonged hospital stays. She earned her
MD at the University of Vermont School of Medicine
and completed residency training at Maine Medical
Center. Dr. Hallstrand is involved with resident and
medical student education through bedside and
didactic teaching. She is interested in quality improvement and participates in rapid process improvement.
Kristen Hayward, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital. She is a member of the clinical
faculty in the Department of Emergency Medicine
and an auxiliary faculty member of the University
of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Hayward
received her MD at the University of California, San
Francisco and completed a pediatrics residency at the
University of Washington. Dr. Hayward is responsible
for the initial assessment, laboratory evaluation and
treatment of children seen in the emergency room and
those hospitalized for ongoing therapy. She supervises
pediatric family medicine residents and medical
students involved in patient care at Seattle Children’s,
and she provides teaching in daily rounds and longer
discussions of patient-related topics. Her areas of
clinical interest include autoimmunity and musculoskeletal problems in children. She has an interest in
ongoing trainee development, specifically in teaching
educational skills to residents.
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Darren Migita, MD, is pediatric hospitalist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant clinical professor
in pediatrics at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. He is also chief of the pediatric hospitalist section at Evergreen Hospital Medical Center
in Kirkland, Wash,, a Seattle Children’s–sponsored
program founded in 1999. He completed his pediatrics
residency at Seattle Children’s. Dr. Migita has been
involved in a variety of Rapid Process Improvement
Workshops in conjunction with Seattle Children’s
hospitalwide Continuous Performance Improvement
(CPI) initiative. Project themes have included: improving the inpatient experience for families and providers,
maximizing pediatric inpatient and ED throughput
efficiency, streamlining the direct admission process
for community physicians and standardizing the care
of pediatric inpatients through the use of evidencebased clinical guidelines. He was also instrumental in
creating a single-care-provider hospitalist service (aka
the Relief Attending Service) at Seattle Children’s. Dr.
Migita’s current focus is the creation of a hospitalwide
vascular access service to streamline the availability of
central lines and decrease bloodstream infection rates.
With Dr. Dimitri Christakis, he co-authored a pediatric
handbook, The Saint Frances Guide to Pediatrics.
Anne E. Phalen, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital. She is also clinical associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. She received her MD from
Georgetown University Medical School and completed
her residency at the Children’s Hospital National
Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Dr. Phalen works
with medically complex children having prolonged
medical stays. She also provides didactic and bedside
teaching for residents and medical students on the
wards. Her interests also include patient care quality
improvement projects.
Joel S. Tieder, MD, is pediatric hospitalist and clinical
instructor at Seattle Children’s Hospital’s hospitalist
program at Evergreen Hospital Medical Center in
Kirkland, Wash., and for the Department of Pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
At Seattle Children’s he serves as an attending on the
inpatient pediatric service, relief attending service and
medically complex care service, where he provides
specialized care for hospitalized children and serves
as an educator for residents and medical students. He
is enrolled in the University of Washington School
Hospitalists
of Public Health MPH program in epidemiology.
He serves on Seattle Children’s Inpatient Guideline
Committee and is developing acute gastroenteritis
guidelines that facilitate quality of care and patient
safety assessment. He is an active member of the
American Academy of Pediatrics Section of
Hospital Medicine.
Visiting professorship, Yakima/Toppenish,
Wash., June 1–2, 2005
The Effect of a Standardized Rounding Practice on
Patient Satisfaction, 2005 NACHRI annual meeting
poster presentation, October 11, 2005
AWARDS AND HONORS
Darren Migita, MD
Poster winner, 2005 NACHRI annual meeting,
Palm Springs, Calif., October 2005
Glen S. Tamura, MD, PhD
Poster winner, 2005 NACHRI annual meeting,
Palm Springs, Calif., October 2005
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Tellen Bennett, MD
Status Epilepticus, PALS curriculum, June 2005
Kristen Hayward, MD
Medical student orientation to pediatric
physical exam, Seattle Children’s, April 2005
Pediatric Capstone cases, University of Washington,
May 2005
Glen S. Tamura, MD, PhD
Responding to Parental Concerns About Vaccines,
Seattle Children’s, February 4, 2006
Update on Infectious Diseases, Seattle Children’s,
February 4, 2006
Vaccine Update, Sacred Heart Hospital, Spokane,
Wash., March 17, 2005
Responding to Parental Concerns About Vaccines,
Sacred Heart Hospital, Spokane, Wash.,
March 17, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
139
Infectious Disease, Immunology
and Rheumatology
The Division of Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology comprises three sections in the Department of Pediatrics (see separate entries
for the Immunology Clinical Program and the Section of Rheumatology).
The division offers consultation and diagnostic services in the management of suspected or proven infectious diseases in children, in the hospital
and the outpatient setting. We treat complicated, chronic and recurrent
infections that arise from exposure to infectious diseases, or that follow
organ or hematopoietic cell transplantation and other surgical procedures.
The division provides laboratory assistance in the diagnosis of
infections and assistance in the selection and dosage of antibiotics, antivirals and other forms of therapy. The Virology Clinic provides specialized
treatment for difficult viral infections such as herpes and for patients who
have been exposed to or diagnosed with HIV or AIDS. Our program works
with Seattle Children’s home services to support patients on home IV
antimicrobial therapy. Our physicians provide one of the largest telephone
information consultation services for the hospital, serving community
physicians in the WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho).
International travel advice is available, providing the education and immunization of people traveling to foreign countries
and the treatment of patients returning from a foreign country with symptoms of infection.
Our research program investigates the specific traits of microbes that infect humans and influence the ability of the
microbe to establish infection in the host. We also investigate the immune mechanisms that thwart infection by human
pathogens. These studies include basic science experimentation at the molecular and cellular level and the use of relevant
animal models of human infections. Clinical studies investigate how viruses cause disease in childhood and in children
with immune-related problems from chemotherapy or transplantation. We also investigate new drugs and new vaccines
for treating infections.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Craig E. Rubens, MD, PhD, is chief of the Division of
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and the division in the
pediatrics department at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He is adjunct professor of microbiology and holds the Children’s Hospital Guild
Association Endowed Chair in Pediatric Infectious
Disease Research. He is program director for the
Pediatric ID Training Program. He completed his MD,
his pediatrics residency and his pediatric infectious
disease subspecialty certification at the University of
Washington. Dr. Rubens is investigating the important
biologic mechanisms involved in bacterial pneumonia,
and his work has identified important virulence traits
of bacteria that are critical to interaction with the host
and for escaping innate immunity. His laboratory has
also identified the genetic and biosynthetic basis for
production of these virulent factors. Dr. Rubens was
an integral part of development of the 307 Westlake
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Research Center. His society memberships include
the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the
American Pediatric Society, and he has served as consultant and grant reviewer for the FDA and the NIH/
NIAID. He is involved in graduate student education
and training and has served on several university
committees to improve faculty and graduate education.
Dr. Rubens is also a Regional Affiliate Investigator for
the Center on Human Development and Disability.
Jane L. Burns, MD, is director of the Infectious Disease
Clinic at Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor
in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Burns trained
in pediatrics and pediatric infectious diseases at the
University of Washington. She directs the Therapeutics
Development Network Core Laboratory for Cystic
Fibrosis Microbiology. Her clinical interests include
the management of recurrent fevers, bone and joint
infections, mycobacterial lymphadenopathy and
urinary tract infections. Dr. Burns has been active
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
for many years on the Pharmacy and Therapeutics
Committee at Seattle Children’s and has had a longstanding clinical and research interest in antimicrobial resistance. Her research is both translational and
basic in the areas of antibiotic resistance and cystic
fibrosis microbiology. Dr. Burns has been active in
many regional and national microbiology and infectious disease societies and is a founding member of the
International Burkholderia Cepacia Working Group.
Janet A. Englund, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital, associate professor of pediatrics at
the University of Washington and clinical associate at
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC).
She serves as the infectious disease representative
with the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. She serves as
chair of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee
at Seattle Children’s Hospital, and as pediatric representative of the infectious disease program at FHCRC.
Her clinical interests include the diagnosis, prevention
and treatment of respiratory diseases in children and
immunocompromised patients. Dr. Englund’s research
involves the study of live and inactivated influenza
vaccines in pediatric populations, including infants,
toddlers, school-age children and immunocompromised patients, and the evaluation of molecular-based
methods for the diagnosis of new and emerging respiratory virus pathogens in these populations. She also
conducts clinical trials for other vaccine-preventable
diseases, including pertussis (whooping cough) and
has interests in the field of maternal immunization.
Her ongoing research involves the study of respiratory
syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, and
human coronaviruses in children attending day care,
and as outpatients and inpatients. Dr. Englund has
conducted clinical studies with the assistance of
practicing pediatricians around Washington.
FACULTY
Craig E. Rubens
MD, PhD, Chief
Craig E. Rubens, MD, PhD, Chief
Jane L. Burns, MD
Janet A. Englund, MD
Lisa M. Frenkel, MD
Soren M. Gantt, MD, PhD
Tina Guina, PhD
Amanda L. Jones, PhD
Tobias R. Kollmann, MD, PhD
Ann J. Melvin, MD, MPH
Tamara C. Pozos, MD, PhD
Lisa M. Frenkel, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and professor in the Department
of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. Dr. Frenkel trained in pediatrics and
pediatric infectious diseases at the University of
California, Los Angles and the University of Rochester
in New York. She is the director of the HIV program
at Seattle Children’s. She has studied herpes simplex
virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type
1 (HIV-1), and has led and participated in multicenter
international trials. Her studies have found that
antiviral drugs can prevent most HIV-1 transmissions
from mothers to their babies, have improved the treatment of HIV-1 infected children and have elucidated
the role of drug-resistant virus in HIV-1 disease
progression. Dr. Frenkel’s laboratory focuses on the
development and transfer of practical and economical
assays for early HIV-1 diagnosis and monitoring of
drug-resistant mutants in resource-strapped communities; it also serves as a developmental laboratory
for the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent
AIDS Clinical Trials (IMPAACT) Network. Dr. Frenkel
directs research projects aimed at understanding the
evolution and treatment of drug-resistant viruses
in children and adults with colleagues in India,
Mozambique, Peru, Thailand, the US and Zimbabwe.
Soren M. Gantt, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant
professor at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He earned a combined MD-PhD at New
York University School of Medicine. He completed
his pediatrics residency and a fellowship in infectious
diseases at Seattle Children’s. Dr. Gantt has developed projects focused on mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 through breastfeeding in Zimbabwe
and Mozambique. Dr. Gantt was accepted to the K12
Clinical Research Career
Development Program and
attends the University of
Lakshmi Rajagopal, PhD
Sherilyn Smith, MD
Washington School of
Glen S. Tamura, MD, PhD
Public Health.
Kevin B. Urdahl, MD, PhD
Sing Sing Y. Way, MD, PhD
Scott J. Weissman, MD
Danielle M. Zerr, MD, MPH
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
Tina Guina, PhD, is research assistant professor in
the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious
Diseases and principal investigator of WAMI Research
Center for Excellence (RCE) in biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. Her research interests include
studies of Gram-negative bacterial respiratory infections such as chronic infections of cystic fibrosis (CF)
patient airways with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and
severe acute infections caused by Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Dr. Guina is using large-scale
genomic and postgenomic technologies for the identification of novel F. tularensis virulence factors and
P. aeruginosa protein markers that are associated
with the development of chronic and severe airway
infections in CF patients.
Amanda L. Jones, PhD, is research assistant professor
in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine and adjunct research
assistant professor in the Pathobiology Department at
the University of Washington School of Public Health.
Dr. Jones was senior fellow and then research scientist in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Seattle
Children’s Hospital. She earned her PhD in microbial
pathogenesis from the University of Calgary in Canada.
Research in her laboratory focuses on immune
evasion strategies used by group B streptococcus and
the molecular pathogenesis of neonatal infections.
Dr. Jones regularly teaches classes in medical bacteriology and on critical thinking and research design at
the University of Washington schools of Medicine
and Public Health. She is principal investigator on
an NIH-funded research grant.
Tobias R. Kollmann, MD, PhD, is affiliate assistant professor at Seattle Children’s Hospital. He received his MD
from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx,
NY. He completed residency training in pediatrics
and a fellowship in pediatric infectious diseases at
the University of Washington School of Medicine.
He also served as a consultant to the Immunization
Safety Review Committee of the American Institute
of Medicine (IOM). His research focused on the
neonatal immune system, and he was the first to
describe a key defect that might be responsible for
increased infections and decreased vaccine response
observed in neonates. He subsequently designed ways
to circumvent this defect using an attenuated strain
of Listeria monocytogenes as a vaccine vehicle and is
working on clinical application for the Listeria-based
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vaccine platform. This yet unpublished work has been
recognized by the award of an NIH-KO8, a Children’s
Health Research Center Grant and a Puget Sound
Partners for Global Health/Gates Foundation grant.
Ann J. Melvin, MD, MPH, is co-director of the HIV
program at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. At Harborview Medical Center she
is director of the Northwest Family Center Pediatric
Clinic and the teen and young adult HIV program. She
completed an internship in pediatrics at the University
of California, San Francisco; she completed a pediatrics residency and a fellowship in pediatric infectious
disease at Seattle Children’s. Dr. Melvin’s research
interests are in the antiretroviral management of HIV
disease in children and prevention and management
of complications of HIV treatment. Dr. Melvin is a
principal investigator in the Pediatric AIDS Clinical
Trials Group unit at the University of Washington,
through which she is co-chair of several national and
international research trials. She is also director of
the Research Subjects Advocate Program of the
Pediatric Clinical Research Center of the University
of Washington.
Tamara C. Pozos, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting instructor
in the Department of Pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. She earned a
combined MD-PhD at Stanford University. She
completed a pediatrics residency at the University of
California, San Francisco and a fellowship in pediatric
infectious diseases at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Dr.
Pozos’ research goal is to understand innate immune
responses to mycobacterial infection by investigating
the interconnected roles of immune cell migrations,
matrix metalloproteinase activity and early granuloma
formation. Her clinical and teaching interests are
pediatric tuberculosis and other infections in children
of the developing world, particularly Latin America.
Dr. Pozos mentors and encourages trainees, particularly women and minorities, to consider careers in
academic medicine.
Lakshmi Rajagopal, PhD, is research assistant professor in the departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She earned her PhD from the Jawaharlal Nehru
University in India and completed a fellowship in
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
the Department of Pediatrics at the University of
Washington. Dr. Rajagopal’s research interests center
on the role of eukaryotic-type signaling in prokaryotic
organisms. Her research focuses on elucidating the
role of a eukaryotic-type serine/threonine kinase in
the human neonatal pathogen, Group B Streptococci.
A number of peer-reviewed articles have resulted from
her research. Dr. Rajagopal was recently awarded
a Pilot Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical
Center Steering Committee Award to establish the link
between eukaryotic-type and two-component signaling
in regulation of a GBS toxin, beta-hemolysin.
Sherilyn Smith, MD, is co-director of the Infectious
Disease Clinic and an attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She completed residency training in pediatrics and served as chief resident at the University
of California, San Diego. She completed a fellowship
in pediatric infectious diseases at the University of
Washington. Her clinical responsibilities include
the Infectious Disease Clinic, inpatient infectious
disease consult service and general pediatrics ward
service. She is also associate director of the Pediatric
Clerkship at Seattle Children’s and head of the Big
Sky College at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. Dr. Smith is on the editorial board for
CLIPP (Computerized Learning in Pediatrics Project),
a national computerized curriculum of pediatric cases
for medical students.
Glen S. Tamura, MD, PhD, is director of the inpatient
medical service at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Tamura received his MD and PhD from Stanford
University, and trained in pediatrics and pediatric
infectious diseases at the University of Washington.
His clinical interests are focused on general inpatient
pediatric medicine and infectious diseases. He is
assistant director of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Fellowship Program. He teaches clinical skills to
second-year medical students, and mentors approximately 40 students throughout their medical school
career. Dr. Tamura’s research interests include
clinical research into quality improvement and
patient-centered care, and basic science research in
the pathogenesis of Group B Streptococcal infections.
Kevin B. Urdahl, MD, PhD, is assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. His clinical interests include the diagnosis
and management of infants, children and adolescents
with infectious diseases, particularly tuberculosis and
diseases associated with robust immune cell activation
(e.g., Kawasaki’s Disease and Toxic Shock Syndrome).
His research focuses on elucidating the mechanisms
of protective immunity to tuberculosis by applying
tools of modern immunology in the mouse model.
Dr. Urdahl’s laboratory showed that a subset of
suppressive T cells (i.e., T regulatory cells that
normally function to suppress immune responses to
self-antigens and prevent autoimmunity) is activated
after aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, dampens protective immunity against the organism and helps facilitate its persistence. His goal is to
test the idea that vaccines that induce large numbers
of M. tuberculosis–specific T cells producing IFN-Ð,
but induce little or no M. tuberculosis–specific
T regulatory cells, will have the greatest protective
efficacy. Dr. Urdahl is the recipient of a Burroughs
Wellcome Fund Career Award in the Biological
Sciences.
Sing Sing Y. Way, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Way cares for
patients with infectious disease and general pediatric
medical problems. His research interests encompass
using infectious disease models to examine how
protective immune responses are generated, with the
ultimate goal of more rational vaccine design. Dr. Way
has published numerous manuscripts over the past
ten years examining the immune response to Shigella
flexneri and Listeria monocytogenes infections. He
has received the Infectious Disease Society Young
Investigator Award for vaccine research.
Scott Weissman, MD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting instructor in
the Department of Pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He earned his MD
from the University of California, Irvine College
of Medicine. He completed a pediatrics residency
at Kaiser Foundation Hospital, Los Angeles, and
completed a fellowship in pediatric infectious
disease at Seattle Children’s. His research concerns
the evolution of virulence properties in Escherichia
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
coli strains associated with newborn meningitis and
urinary tract infection. Specifically, the work focuses
on the study of allelic variation in fimbrial adhesin
genes to delineate fine phylogenetic relationships
between strains grouped together by conventional
molecular footprinting techniques such as multiple
locus sequence typing. This improved resolution allows
the identification of key genetic adaptations, including
point mutation, recombination and pathogenicity
island acquisition/deletion that promote adaptation to
novel niches. Fimbrial adhesin sequence typing (FAST)
should provide an important tool in the understanding
of genomic plasticity in E. coli evolution, with application in bacterial pathogenesis, population biology and
epidemiology. This work has been published and
presented at national conferences. Dr. Weissman’s
clinical interests include the treatment of recurrent
urinary tract infections, as well as infections of skin/
soft tissue and bone by Staph aureus.
Danielle M. Zerr, MD, MPH, is medical director of
infection control at Seattle Children’s Hospital,
assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at
the University of Washington School of Medicine and
affiliate investigator at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer
Research Center. Dr. Zerr’s research has focused on
the epidemiology of human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6)
infections in healthy children and immunocompromised hosts. Dr. Zerr is principal investigator on a
study of HHV-6 reactivation in hematopoietic stemcell transplant recipients. She is also interested in
the epidemiology, viral pathogens and prognosis of
nonfebrile seizures occurring in the setting of mild
illness as well as the epidemiology and prevention
of infections associated with health care.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Tobias R. Kollmann, MD, PhD
Burroughs Wellcome Career Award in the
Biomedical Sciences, 2005
Tamara C. Pozos, MD, PhD
Award for poster presented, Department of
Immunology retreat, 2005
Award for talk, fellows research competition,
Seattle Children’s, 2005
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Craig E. Rubens, MD, PhD
Children’s Hospital Guild Endowed Chair in
Pediatric Infectious Disease Research, awarded 2005
Sherilyn Smith, MD
Outstanding Clinical Teacher Award, University
of Washington, 2005
Margaret S. Anderson Award, University of
Washington, 2005
Sing Sing Y. Way, MD, PhD
Child Health and Research Center Scholar,
University of Washington, 2005
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Jane L. Burns, MD
A Pilot Study of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in the Treatment
of High-Density Respiratory Tract Bacterial Load
in Adults with Cystic Fibrosis, Sensor Medics
Corporation, $84,033
Janet A. Englund, MD
Evaluation of Serologic Responses to Fluzone in
Infants >6 Month of Age Who Did or Did Not Receive
Fluzone Vaccine at 2 Months of Age, Sanofi Pasteur
Inc., $93,903
The Impact of Respiratory Viruses in Infants in
Fulltime Daycare, MedImmune, Inc., $78,575
A Phase IV Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of
Flumist Vaccination in a School-Based Intervention
Program, University of Washington, MedImmune,
Inc., $53,219
Proof of Concept Study of the Safety and
Immunogenicity of Influenza Virus Vaccine Fluzone*
2004–05 Among Healthy Children 2 Months vs. 6
months of Age, Aventis Pharmaceuticals, $204,600
Role of Viruses in CF Airway Infections, Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation, $82,844
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
Safety and Immunogenicity of Fluzone Influenza
Virus Vaccine (2005-2006 Formulation) Among
Healthy Children 6 to 12 Weeks of Age, GRC28,
Sanofi Pasteur Inc., $101,999
Lisa M. Frenkel, MD
Etiology of mastitis in HIV-1 infected women, National
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/NIH/
DHHS, $225,000
Reservoirs of Drug-Resistant HIV-1, National Institute
of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/NIH/DHHS,
$316,171
Tina Guina, PhD
Bac Act-Proj 3, Yr 03, Sam Miller/NIAID/NIH,
$173,632
New Opp-Vacc Dev-Sub, Sam Miller/NIAID/NIH,
$82,671
Proteomics Core, Sam Miller/NIH, $50,000
Continuing
Jane L. Burns, MD
Effects of Azithromycin on P. aeruginosa Gene
Expression, National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $77,500
Standard vs. Biofilm Susceptibility Testing in Cystic
Fibrosis, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, $228,355
Therapeutics Development Center Microbiology Core,
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, $223,762
Lisa M. Frenkel, MD
Women’s HIV Pathogenesis Program, University of
Washington, National Institute of Child Health and
Human Development/NIH/DHHS, $85,787
Immunization by HIV Exposure During
Chemoprophylaxis, National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development/NIH/DHHS, $324,912
PACTG.25.P1015.01, Social & Scientific Systems,
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/
NIH/DHHS, $68,428
Pediatric HIV Clinical Trials Network, Westat Inc.,
National Institute of Child Health and Human
Development/NIH/DHHS, $892,630
Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Seattle–King
County Department of Public Health, National Center
for HIV Prevention of the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, $140,672
Amanda L. Jones, PhD
Role of Penicillin Binding Protein 1a in GBS Virulence,
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/
NIH/DHHS, $335,250
Craig E. Rubens, MD, PhD
Academic Pediatric Infectious Disease (Competing
Continuation), National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $272,435
Early Host: Microbial Interactions in S. Aureus
Pneumonia, University of Washington, National Heart,
Lung and Blood Institute, $173,676
Genetics of Virulence of Type III Group B Streptococcus,
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/
NIH/DHHS, $242,281
Iron Acquisition by Group B Streptococcus: The Role
of Iron Transport, March of Dimes, $88,301
Role of a Novel Signal Transduction Pathway in GBS,
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/
NIH/DHHS, $303,950
Kevin B. Urdahl MD, PhD
The Role of MHC Class I Molecules in Immunity
Against Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Burroughs
Welcome Foundation, $500,000
MHC Class 1 Molecules in Immunity Against
Tuberculosis, NIAID/NIH, $120,663
Scott J. Weissman, MD
Type 1 Fimbrial Variation in E. coli 018:K1:H7
Virulence, National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $109,620
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
145
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
Danielle Zerr, MD, MPH
Defining Primary HHV-6 and HHV-7 Infections in
Children, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious
Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $158,220
HHV-6 and CNS Disease Following Stem Cell
Transplant, National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $318,426
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Quantitative RSV RT-PCR in Hospitalized Children,
International RSV Symposium, Oxford, England,
September 17–19, 2005
New Vaccines: Influenza Vaccination for All,
Alaska Health Summit, Anchorage, Alaska,
November 27–29, 2005
Jane L. Burns, MD
Microbiology Results from a Phase 2 Clinical Study
of Aztreonam Lysinate for Inhalation: A New Inhaled
Antibiotic to Treat CF Patients with Pseudomonas
aeruginosa, 28th European Cystic Fibrosis Conference,
Crete, Greece, 2005
What’s New with Pertussis, Grand Rounds, Alaska
Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska,
November, 28, 2005
Hypermutability in CF Pathogens and The Role of the
Clinical Microbiology Laboratory (roundtable moderator), North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference
(NACFC), Baltimore, 2005
Lisa M. Frenkel, MD
Laboratory Quality Assurance and Capacity Building
for HIV Research, University of Zimbabwe, Harare,
Zimbabwe, February 7–9, 2005
Pathophysiology and Therapy of Cystic Fibrosis
and Approaches to Antimicrobial Therapy in CF,
Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and
Chemotherapy (ICAAC), Washington, DC, 2005
Invited speaker. 3rd Annual Western Regional
International Health Conference, University of
Washington, February 2005
Antibiotic Resistance and Its Impact on the
Management of Neonatal Infections, Neonatal
Pharmacology Conference, Seattle, 2005
Janet A. Englund, MD
Influenza, Maternal Immunization, Sexually
Transmitted Diseases, Neonatal Infections, annual
convention of the Pediatric Infectious Disease
Society of the Philippines, Manila, Philippines,
February 23–25, 2005
Update on Vaccines, Grand Rounds, St. Peter’s
Hospital, Olympia, Wash., March 17, 2005
Pandemic Influenza Preparedness, Antiviral
Subcommittee, sponsored by NVAC, Washington, D.C.,
April 19–20, 2005
146
Maternal Immunization, sixth advanced vaccinology
course co-sponsored by Fondation Merieux/NIH/
WHO/CDC, Annecy, France, June 1–4, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
International Pertussis Consensus Symposium,
Paris, France, Dec. 11, 2005
Invited speaker, 2nd Workshop on HIV persistence,
St. Martin, French West Indies, 2005
Ann J. Melvin, MD, MPH
Congenital CMV: Etiology and Risk Factors for
Childhood Hearing Loss, lecture to audiologists,
University of Washington, August 2005
Tamara C. Pozos, MD, PhD
Research presented at US-Japan Conference on
Tuberculosis and Leprosy, Seattle, August 2005
Craig E. Rubens, MD, PhD
Starting and Maintaining a Successful Research
Program, St. Jude/PIDS Pediatric Microbial Research
Conference, Memphis, Tenn., February 2005
Role of a Eukaryotic-Type Signal Transduction
Pathway in Streptococcus agalactiae, 8th Bay Area
Symposium on Microbial Pathogenesis, San Francisco,
March 2005
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
Regulation of Purine Biosynthesis by a EukaryoticType Kinase in Group B Streptococci Contributes
to Bacterial Survival During Infection, Current
Global Perspectives in the Field of Streptococcal and
Pneumococcal Infections, London, April 2005
Bacterial Gene Expression During the Early Stages of
S. aureus pneumonia in a Mouse Model, 105th ASM
general meeting, Atlanta, June 2005
Group B Streptococcus: Update on Prevention
and Pathogenesis, Grand Rounds, University of
Washington, February 2005
Sherilyn Smith, MD
Infectious Disease Update: New Antibiotics,
Superinfections and Resistance, Nursing Care
of the Hospitalized Child, Seattle, April 2005
Glen S. Tamura, MD, PhD
Vaccine Update and Responding to Parental Concerns
About Vaccines, Sacred Heart Hospital, Spokane,
Wash. March 17, 2005
Launching a Successful Academic Career, fellows
workshop, Seattle Children’s, December 14, 2005
Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention of Tuberculosis
in Children: Limitations of Current Modalities and
Possibilities for the Future, Grand Rounds, Seattle
Children’s, December 2005
Scott J. Weissman, MD
Advanced Bacterial Genetics Course, Cold Spring
Harbor Laboratory, N.Y., June 8–27, 2005
Infectious Disease in the Field, paramedic training
course, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, 2005
Danielle M. Zerr, MD, MPH
HHV-6, 7 and 8: From Cradle to Transplant Recipient,
45th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents
and Chemotherapy (ICAAC), Washington, D.C.,
December 2005
HHV-6 Associated CNS Dysfunction Following HSCT,
neurology Grand Rounds, University of Washington,
March 2005
Tick-Borne Diseases and New Trends in Antibiotic
Resistance and Vaccine Controversies, visiting
professorship Yakima/Toppenish, June 1–2, 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Kevin B. Urdahl, MD, PhD
The Role of MHC Class I Molecules in Immunity
Against Tuberculosis, International Training
and Research in Emerging Infectious Diseases,
Intracellular Pathogens, New Delhi, India, 2005
Beckmann C, Brittnacher M, Ernst R, Mayer-Hamblett
N, Miller SI, Burns JL. Use of phage display to identify potential Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene products
relevant to early cystic fibrosis airway infections.
Infect Immun. 2005;73:444–452.
Vaccinations: Rationale, Adverse Reactions,
Parental Concerns, fellow lecture, Seattle Children’s,
October 28, 2005
Benson C, Gantt S, Xuan Q, Abe P, Zerr DM. Use
of 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction to identify
Haemophilus influenzae Type b as the etiology of
pericarditis in an infant [Letter/case report].
Pediatric Infect Dis. 2005;24(3):287–288.
T Cells and TB: Lessons from the Mouse Model,
Department of Pathobiology seminar, University
of Washington. 2005
Foxp3-Expressing T Regulatory Cells in Tuberculosis;
Foxp3-Expressing T Regulatory Cells Accumulate
in the Lungs after Aerosol Infection and Suppress
Immunity to Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and
Basic Immunology Considerations for TB/Leprosy
Product Development (panel workshop), 40th Annual
U.S.-Japan Cooperative Medical Science Program
Tuberculosis and Leprosy Conference, Seattle, 2005
Cieslewicz MJ, Chaffin D, Glusman G, Kasper D,
Madan A, Rodrigues S, Fahey J, Wessels MR,
Rubens CE. Structural and genetic diversity of
group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharides.
Infect Immun. 2005;73:3096–3103.
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Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
Chaffin DO, Mentele LM, Rubens CE. Sialylation
of group B streptococcal capsular polysaccharide
is mediated by cpsK and is required for optimal
capsule polymerization and expression. Journal
of Bacteriology. 2005;187:4615–4626.
Li CC, Beck IA, Seidel KD, Coombs RW, Frenkel LM.
Detection and quantification of HIV-1 p24Ag in dried
whole blood and plasma on filter paper stored under
various conditions. Journal of Clinical Microbiology.
2005;43:3901–3905.
Christakis DA, Cowan CA, Garrison MM, Molteni R,
Marcuse E, Zerr DM. Variation in inpatient diagnostic
testing and management of bronchiolitis. Pediatrics.
2005;115:878–884.
Moskowitz SM, Foster JM, Emerson JC, Gibson RL,
Burns JL. Use of Pseudomonas biofilm susceptibilities to assign simulated antibiotic regimens for cystic
fibrosis airway infection. Journal of Antimicrobial
Chemotherapy. 2005;56:879–886.
Englund JA, Walter EB, Fairchok MA, Monto AS,
Neuzil KM. A comparison of two influenza vaccine
schedules in 6–23 month old children. Pediatrics.
2005;115:1039–1047.
Englund JA. In search of a vaccine for respiratory
syncytial virus: the saga continues. Editorial,
J Infect Dis. 2005;191:1036–1039.
Fall LH, Berman NB, Smith S, White CB, Woodhead
JC, Olson AL. Computer-assisted learning in pediatrics project (CLIPP): Multi-institutional development and utilization of a computer-assisted learning
program for the core pediatric clerkship. Acad Med.
2005;80:847–855.
Frenkel LM. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal herpes simplex virus encephalitis
(solicited editorial). Pediatrics. 2005;115:795–797.
Goldstein E, MacLaren C, Smith S, Mengert T,
Maestas R, Foy H, Wenrich M, Ramsey PG. Promoting
fundamental clinical skills in medical education using
a competency-based small college approach. Acad
Med. 2005;80:423–433.
Johnson DC, McKarland EJ, Muresan P, Fenton T,
McNamara J, Read JS, Hawkins E, Bouquin PL, Estep
SG, Tomaras GD, Vincent CA, Rathore M, Melvin AJ,
Gurunathan S, Lambert J. Safety and immunogenicity
of an HIV-1 recombinant canarypox vaccine in newborns and infants of HIV-1-infected women. J Infect
Dis. 2005;1992:2129–2133.
Jones AL, Rubens CE. Molecular pathogenesis of
group B streptococcal infections. In: Molecular Biology
of Streptococci. Chhatwal S, ed. Wymondham, United
Kingdom: Horizon Scientific Press, 2005.
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Nair BM, Joachimiak LA, Chattopadhyay S,
Montano I, Burns JL. Conservation of a novel protein associated with an antibiotic efflux operon in
Burkholderia cenocepacia. FEMS Microbiology Letters.
2005;245:337–344.
Rajagopal L, Vo A, Silvestroni A, Rubens CE.
Regulation of purine biosynthesis by a eukaryotictype kinase in Streptococcus agalactiae. Molecular
Microbiology. 2005;56:1329–1346.
Smith S, Melvin AJ. Normal development and
physiology of the immune system. In: Handbook of
Pediatric HIV Care 2nd ed. Zeicher S, Read J, eds.
Lippincott, Williams & Wilkin, 2005.
Tamura GS, Bratt DS, Yim HH, Nittayajarn A. Use
of glnQ as a counterselectable marker for creation of
allelic exchange mutations in group B Streptococci.
App Environ Microbiol. 2005;71:587–590.
Tan T, Halperin S, Cherry JD, Edwards K, Englund
JA, Glezen P, Greenberg D, Rothstein E, Skowronski
D. Pertussis immunization in the Global Pertussis
Initiative North American region: recommended
strategies and implementation considerations.
Pediatr Infect Dis. 2005;24(Suppl);S83–S87.
Tanabe H, Ayabe T, Bainbridge B, Guina T, Ernst RK,
Darveau RP, Miller SI, Ouellette AJ. Mouse Paneth
cell secretory responses to cell surface glycolipids of
virulent and attenuated pathogenic bacteria. Infect
Immun. 2005;73:2312–2320.
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
Tettelin H, Masignani V, Cieslewicz MJ, Donati C,
Medini D, Ward NL, Angiuoli SV, Crabtree J, Jones
AL, Durkin AS, Rubens CE, et al. Genome analysis
of multiple pathogenic isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae: implications for the microbial “pan-genome.”
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA.
2005;102:13950–13955.
Tobin NH, Learn GH, Holte SE, Wang Y, Melvin AJ,
McKernan JL, Pawluk DM, Mohan KM, Lewis PF,
Mullins JI, Frenkel LM. Evidence that low-level
viremias during effective HAART result from two
processes: expression of archival virus and replication
of virus. J Virol. 2005;79:9625–9634.
Urdahl KB, Scott-Browne JP, Fontenot JD, Rudensky
AY, Bevan MJ. FoxP3-expressing T regulatory cells
accumulate in the lungs after aerosol infection and
suppress immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Proceedings of the 40th US-Japan Cooperative
Medical Science Program’s Tuberculosis and Leprosy
Conference. July 27–30, 2005.
Van Rie A, Wendelboe AM, Englund JA. Role of
maternal pertussis antibodies in infants. Pediatric
Infectious Disease Journal. 2005;24(Suppl):S62–S65.
Way SS, Wilson CB. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis
ESAT-6 homologue in Listeria monocytogenes is dispensable for growth in vitro and in vivo. Infect Immun.
2005;73:6151–6153.
Wendelboe AM, Van Rie A, Salmaso S, Englund
JA. Duration of immunity against pertussis after
natural infection or vaccination. Pediatr Infect Dis.
2005;24(Suppl):S58–S61.
Wu M, Guina T, Brittnacher M, Nguyen H, Eng J,
Miller SI. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteome
during anaerobic growth. J Bacteriol. 2005;187:
8185–8190.
Zerr D, House N, Melvin AJ. Life-threatening viral
disease and its treatment. In: Pediatric Critical Care,
Mosby, 3rd Edition. Fuhrman BP, Zimmerman JJ,
eds., 2005.
Zerr DM. Alcohol hand rub: a simple solution in
search of champions [Editorial]. Arch Pediatr Adolesc
Med. 2005;159:502–503.
Zerr DM. Effect of human herpesvirus 6 reactivation after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
[Review]. Contagion. 2005;2:352–357.
Zerr DM, Allpress AL, Heath J, Bornemann R,
Bennett E. Decreasing hospital-associated rotavirus:
a multidisciplinary hand hygiene campaign in a children’s hospital. Pediatr Infect Dis. 2005;24:397–403.
Zerr DM, Blume HK, Berg AT, Del Beccaro MA,
Gospe SM, Allpress AL, Christakis DA. Nonfebrile
illness seizures: a unique seizure category. Epilepsia.
2005;46:952–955.
Zerr DM, Corey L, Kim HW, Huang ML, Long N,
Boeckh M. Clinical outcomes of HHV-6 reactivation
during the course of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Clin Infect Dis. 2005;40:932–940.
Zerr DM, Garrison MM, Allpress AL, Heath J,
Christakis DA. Infection control policies and hospitalassociated infections in surgical patients: variability
and associations in a multicenter pediatric setting.
Pediatrics. 2005;115:e387–e392.
Zerr DM, Meier AS, Selke SS, Frenkel LM, Huang
ML, Wald A, Rhoads M, Nguy L, Bornemann R,
Morrow RA, Corey L. Virologic and clinical characteristics of primary human herpesvirus 6: a populationbased study. N Engl J Med. 2005;352:768–776.
Yeung LC, Cunningham ML, Allpress AL, Gruss JS,
Ellenbogen RG, Zerr DM. Surgical site infections following pediatric intracranial surgery for craniofacial
malformations: frequency and risk factors. Neurosurg.
2005;56:733–739.
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Immunology
The section of immunology under the Division of Infectious
Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology (in the Department
of Pediatrics) provides diagnostic and therapeutic services for
children and adults with a suspected or known primary immune
deficiency disorder (PIDD). We see patients referred from
throughout the WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana,
Idaho) and serve as a tertiary referral base for a regional
population of more than 10 million.
Members of our faculty have played key roles in identifying the molecular basis for many of the now more than 140
molecularly defined PIDDs, and in pioneering clinical care for
these diseases. Our faculty also works closely with members
of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Seattle
Cancer Care Alliance to coordinate care for PIDD patients
undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplants. Our extensive
molecular testing program identifies genetic alterations leading
to each of the major molecular causes for severe combined immunodeficiency, agammaglobulinemia, hyper-IgM syndromes
and common variable immunodeficiency. The immunology diagnostic program also provides high-resolution flow cytometric–based analysis of T and B cell developmental subsets (important for delineating unique developmental defects within
distinct PIDDs); expression analysis for potential mutant surface or intracellular proteins; analysis of thymic activity via
T cell excision circles; and assessment of T cell repertoire. Additionally, we carry out in vivo evaluations of antibody
response to the T cell–dependent neoantigen Bacteriophage X174. These combined approaches provide a unique capacity
to evaluate genetic alterations and their effects on the immune system, as well as to monitor immune reconstitution in
post-transplant patients.
Our research laboratories carry out basic, pre-clinical and clinical research. Because PIDDs represent some of the
best candidate disorders for treatment via hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy, our translational research programs
include modeling of novel gene and cellular therapies. We also carry out clinical trials related to optimization of immunoglobulin replacement and for non myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplant in PIDD. Members of the immunology
faculty also hold key international leadership positions in advocacy and research related to PIDD.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
David J. Rawlings, MD, oversees the immunodeficiency
clinical program at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
is professor of pediatrics and adjunct professor in
the Department of Immunology at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He graduated with
honors from the University of North Carolina School
of Medicine and completed a residency and chief residency in pediatrics at the University of California, San
Francisco. He was an intramural research fellow at
the NIH, and a senior fellow at the Howard Hughes
Medical Institute, UCLA. He completed specialty
training in pediatric rheumatology and immunology at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Dr. Rawlings
has received numerous awards and was elected to
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the American Society for Clinical Investigation. His
primary research interests include dysregulated B cell
development and signaling leading to immunodeficiency, autoimmunity or lymphoid malignancies; and
the development of gene therapy for primary immune
deficiency diseases. His laboratory uses expertise in
basic and clinical immunology, signal transduction and
lymphocyte developmental biology to understand how
altered signals can lead to immunologic disease, with
the ultimate goal of developing translational therapies
capable of specifically modulating these disorders.
Dr. Rawlings is a member of several organizations
and ad hoc reviewer for grant programs and
immunology journals.
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
Mark C. Hannibal, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He participates in the Immunodeficiency
Clinic and the inpatient immunology consult service
and is a member of the neurogenetics laboratory. His
clinical interests include general clinical genetics,
developmental cardiovascular genetics and primary
and syndromic immunodeficiencies. He has developed
clinical expertise in the diagnosis and management
of patients with Kabuki syndrome, a syndrome with
craniofacial, congenital heart and developmental
anomalies. He teaches genetics to preclinical medical
students and students, residents and fellows during
clinical rotations. His research interests are in the
molecular basis of an episodic painful inflammatory
neuropathy, hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.
Carol H. Miao, PhD, is principal investigator in the
immunology section at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and research assistant professor in the Department
of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. Her research focuses on developing gene
therapy strategies for treating genetic diseases. Her
primary interest is to develop and investigate two
prominent gene therapy model systems: hemophilia
and primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD). For
hemophilia gene therapy, her study was the first to use
non-viral naked DNA delivery to achieve phenotypic
correction in hemophilia A and hemophilia B mouse
models. Her group is pursuing two projects: development of safer and more efficient non-viral vectors and
delivery methods suitable for clinical applications; and
immunomodulation strategies involving immunosuppressive regimens and regulatory T cells. Dr. Miao also
participates in the gene therapy program for PIDD. A
major current focus for these collaborative studies is
FACULTY
David J. Rawlings, MD, Head
Mark C. Hannibal, MD, PhD
Carol H. Miao, PhD
Hans D. Ochs, MD
Andrew M. Scharenberg, MD
Troy R. Torgerson, MD, PhD
David J. Rawlings
MD, Head
lentiviral-based gene transfer in animal and cellular
models of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS). Dr. Miao
is active in many regional, national and international
scientific societies; she is a member of the Genetic
Diseases Committee of the American Society of
Gene Therapy.
Hans D. Ochs, MD, is chief of the Immunology Clinic
at Seattle Children’s Hospital. He studied medicine
in Austria, France and Germany, where he earned his
MD from the University of Freiburg. The focus of his
research is the molecular definition of primary immunodeficiency diseases and the investigation of new
techniques to confirm the diagnosis. He and his collaborators contributed significantly to the identification
of a number of genes associated with PIDD located
on the X chromosome (CD40L, Wiskott-Aldrich
Syndrome, FOXP3, gp91phox) or on autosomes (uracil-DNA glycosulase; Rag1, Rag2 hypomorphic mutations as the cause of Omenn syndrome). As a clinical
scientist, Dr. Ochs has initiated clinical trials for new
immunoglobulin preparations for intravenous and
subcutaneous infusions and has collaborated with
the bone marrow transplant team in the design of
new protocols for stem cell transplantation and gene
therapy. He is principal investigator for US Immune
Deficiency Network (USIDnet), co-founder and member of the summer school devoted to primary immune
deficiencies and principal editor for two medical
textbooks, Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases and
Immunological Disorders of Infants and Children.
Andrew M. Scharenberg, MD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital; he is associate professor
in the Department of Pediatrics and adjunct associate professor in the Department of Immunology at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. He
received his MD with distinction from the University
of North Carolina School of Medicine. He completed
residency training in pediatrics at the University of
North Carolina Children’s Hospital and completed a
fellowship in immunology at NIH and at the Division
of Experimental Pathology, Beth Israel Hospital. He
participates in Seattle Children’s Immunodeficiency
Clinic and the inpatient immunology consult service.
Dr. Scharenberg’s bench research interests include:
signal transduction in immune cells, particularly signaling pathways affected in primary immune deficiencies and those involving ion channels; and application
of immune mechanisms of somatic hypermutation to
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
engineering of homing endonucleases. He is working
on a new method of gene therapy that would repair
the existing DNA strand as a means to treat primary
immune deficiencies.
Troy R. Torgerson, MD, PhD, is attending physician
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He obtained his MD and PhD
from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and
completed residency training in pediatrics and a
fellowship in pediatric rheumatology and immunology
at the University of Washington. He participates in
clinical care of patients with immune deficiency and
autoimmune disorders at Seattle Children’s and coordinates care for our patients treated by hematopoietic
stem cell transplantation (HSCT). His clinical interests
include the diagnosis and management of children
and adults with primary immunodeficiency diseases
(PIDDs) and children with autoimmune disorders. His
research interests relate to the identification of basic
cellular mechanisms that jointly promote both autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. His research is focused
on studies of the molecular basis of immune dysregulation present in patients with immune dysregulation,
polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX).
The genetic defect present in this syndrome alters
the development and function of regulatory T cells,
which are required for controlling immune responses.
Dr. Torgerson is co-director of the immunodeficiency
molecular diagnostics laboratory at the University
of Washington, and he coordinates several joint clinical
research protocols designed to optimize HSCT in PIDD.
Andrew M. Scharenberg, MD
Signaling Competent Transformed Cell Lines for
Functional Analysis of PIDD, US Immunodeficiency
Network, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious
Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $125,000
Targeted Gene Repair of Primary Immune Deficiencies,
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/
NIH/DHHS, $232,500
TRPM2 HTS Screening Assay Development, National
Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/NIH/
DHHS, $108,500
Characterization of a B-Cell Calcium Channel,
National Institute of General Medical Sciences/NIH/
DHHS, $265,341
Mechanisms of B-Cell Receptor Calcium Signaling,
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/
NIH/DHHS, $232,500
Continuing
Carol H. Miao, PhD
Nonviral Gene Medicine for the Treatment of
Hemophilia, National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute/NIH/DHHS, $387,500
Hans D. Ochs, MD
Developmental and Genetic Defects of Immunity,
National Institute of Child Health and Human
Development/NIH/DHHS, $358,138
United States Immunodeficiency Network, Immune
Deficiency Foundation/NAIAD/NIH, $183,937
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Carol H. Miao, PhD
Gene Delivery of Factor IX by Nonviral Strategies,
National Hemophilia Foundation, $70,000
Gene Therapy for Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome,
US Immunodeficiency Network, $150,000
David J. Rawlings, MD
TSLP Receptor in the Regulation of B-Cell
Development, Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia
Mason, National Institutes of Health/DHHS, $90,450
MTCC – Rawlings Pilot, NIDDK/NIH, $75,800
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
David J. Rawlings, MD
Preclinical Model for Gene Therapy in X-Linked
Agammaglobulinemia (XLA), National Cancer
Institute/NIH/DHHS, $313,875
Regulation of B-Cell Development and Signaling by
BTK and PKCГђ, National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development/NIH/DHHS, $348,750
Lentiviral Gene Therapy for X-Linked
Agammaglobulinemia, National Heart, Lung,
and Blood Institute/NIH/DHHS, $387,500
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
Regulation of Lymphopoiesis from Pluripotent Stem
Cells, Children’s Hospital, Los Angeles, National Heart,
Lung, and Blood Institute/NIH/DHHS, $72,339
Andrew M. Scharenberg, MD
ADP Ribose-Dependent Calcium Entry in the Immune
System, National Institute of General Medical
Sciences/NIH/DHHS, $266,638
Troy R. Torgerson, MD, PhD
CHRC: FoxP3 Structure, Function, and Regulation in
Human T-Cell, University of Washington, National
Institute of Child Health and Human Development/
NIH/DHHS, $88,591
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Mark C. Hannibal, MD, PhD
Septin-9 Mutations in Hereditary Neuralgic
Amyotrophy, genetics Grand Rounds, University
of Washington, Feb 24, 2006
Hereditary Neuralgic Amyotrophy Research in the
Context of Peripheral Neuropathies, Neuropathy
Association biennial meeting, Minneapolis,
May 22, 2005
Kabuki Syndrome, pediatric Grand Rounds,
Providence Alaska Medical Center, Anchorage,
Alaska, November 29, 2005
Carol H. Miao, PhD
Expression Cassette Design, American Society of Gene
Therapy, 8th annual meeting, Nonviral Workshop
Education Session, St. Louis, June 1–5, 2005
Non-IVIG Therapy of PIDD, Burton Zweiman lectureship, American Academy of Allergy and Asthma
& Immunology, IPEX/FOXP3 and Autoimmune
Diseases, San Antonio, Texas, March 18–21, 2005
Perspective on History of IVIG, Current Important
Problems and Questions in the Field, Workshop on
Intravenous Immune Globulin in the 21st Century:
Progress and Challenges in the Efficacy, Safety and
Paths of Lecture, U.S. Food and Drug Administration,
Bethesda, Md., April 12–13, 2005
Immunodysregulation and Immunoreconstitution,
FOCIS meeting, Boston, May 10–15, 2005
FOXP3 and Regulatory T Cells: An Endocrinologist’s
Nightmare, GeNeSIS Symposium and Investigators
Meeting, Washington, D.C., May 18–21, 2005
Regulatory T Cells/T-Cell Development and
Function (moderator), IUIS Symposium on Primary
Immunodeficiency Diseases, Budapest, Hungary,
June 15–19, 2005
Immune Dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy,
Enteropathy (IPEX), Mutations of FOXP3 and
Regulatory T Cells, Robertson Parkman immunology lectureship, pediatric Ground Rounds, Children’s
Hospital, Los Angeles, July 14–15, 2005
Immune Deficiency Workshop: Evaluating the Patient
with Frequent Infections, 8th Annual Scientific Session
Intermountain West Allergy Association, “Advances
in Allergy and Immunology,” Coeur d’Alene, Idaho,
July 28–31, 2005
Gene Therapy and Immunomodulation for
Hemophilia Treatment, Abelson Lecture Symposium,
Seattle Children’s, August 18, 2005
Clinical Manifestation of PID: Protein Analysis in the
Diagnosis of PID, from Flow Cytometry to Western
Blotting, Real-Time PCR and Other Tricks, ASCIA
conference, Auckland, New Zealand, August 29–
September 10, 2005
Hans D. Ochs, MD
The Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: Multiple Clinical
Phenotypes, Molecular Basis, Therapeutic Consequences,
LeBein Visiting Professorship, Pediatric Ground
Rounds, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque,
N.M., February 23–24, 2005
Disorders of Immunoregulation and Past and Future
of Immunodeficiency Diseases, Modell Symposium,
University of Zurich, Switzerland, September 14–18,
2005
The Hyper IgM Syndromes, International Meeting on
PIDD, Teheran, Iran, February 28–March 2, 2005
Humorale Antikorpermangelsyndrome, German
Pediatric Congress, Bremen, Germany, September
28–October 9, 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
The Hyper IgM Syndrome, International Congress
on Immune Mediated Diseases, Moscow,
October 3–8, 2005
Specific Lentiviral Gene Therapy, 47th
American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
and Exposition, Atlanta, December 3–6, 2005
Faculty of the international “summer school” of
USIDNET, Miami Beach, Fla., October 13–17, 2005
Gene Therapy of Primary Immunodeficiency
Disorders, University of Washington CF Research
Seminar Series, University of Washington,
December 22, 2005
IPEX and Mutations of FOXP3, Clinical Phenotype
and Molecular Consequences, First Brazilian
Symposium on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases,
Sao Paolo, Brazil, October 25–November 5, 2005
Immune Dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy,
Enteropathy (IPEX) Syndrome, The Jeffrey Greene
Visiting Professorship, Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia, December 6–7, 2005
The Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome, Modell Symposium,
Haifa, Israel, December 11–17, 2005
David J. Rawlings, MD
Molecular Mechanism(s) Controlling PKC-Dependent,
Immunoreceptor-Induced NF-kappaB Activation
and chair of workshop on B-cell signaling, Keystone
Symposia Steamboat Springs, Col., March 28–
April 3, 2005
Andrew M. Scharenberg, MD
TRPM2 Cation Channels and Oxidative Stress
Signaling, American Academy of Allergy Asthma &
Immunology, San Antonio, Texas, March 18–22, 2005
Role of Cation Channels and Transporters in B-Cell
Biology, US/Japan Talk, University of Washington,
June 26, 2005
Primary Immunodeficiencies: Models for Immune
Reconstitution, Abelson Lecture Symposium,
Seattle Children’s, August 18, 2005
Physiological Roles of TRPM Channel/Enzymes,
physiology department seminar, University of Toronto,
September 22–24, 2005
Regulation of CARMA1-Mediated NF-ГђB Signaling via
PKC Isoforms in B and T Lymphocytes, Cantoblanco
workshops on “Signaling Networks in Immunity and
Inflammation,” Madrid, Spain, May 22–24, 2005
Troy R. Torgerson, MD, PhD
Analysis of the Genotype of a Large Cohort of IPEX
Patients Identifies Key Domains of FOXP3 Required
for Its Function, Federation of Clinical Immunology
Societies annual meeting, Boston, May 11–16, 2005
Btk-Dependent Events Controlling Calcium and NF-kB
Signaling in B Lymphocytes, 3rd Lymphocyte Signal
Transduction Workshop, Crete, Greece, May 27–
June 1, 2005
The Intersection Between Autoimmunity and
Immunodeficiency – An Accident Waiting to Happen,
pediatric Grand Rounds, Children’s Memorial
Hospital, Chicago, October 7, 2005
Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy as Treatment
for Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS): Pre-Clinical
Studies in Human Cell Lines and WASp -/- mice,
American Society for Gene Therapy 8th annual
meeting, St. Louis, Miss., June 1–5, 2005
Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis from an Immunologist’s
Perspective, gastroenterology Grand Rounds,
University of Washington, January 6, 2006
PUBLICATIONS
Distinct Signaling Responses of Transitional B-Cell
Subsets and Their Developmental Consequences, 7th
Latin American Congress of Immunology, Cordoba,
Argentina, October 2–6, 2005
Rescue of B Cells Development in an Animal Model of
X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia (XLA) via B lineage-
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Bearden CM, Agarwal A, Book BK, Vieira CA, Sidner
RA, Ochs HD, Pescovitz MD. Rituximab inhibits the
in vivo primary and secondary antibody response to a
neoantigen, bacteriophage phiX174. Am J Transplant
2005;5:50–57.
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
Bindl L, Torgerson T, Perroni L, Youssef N, Ochs
HD, Goulet O, Ruemmele F. Successful use of the new
immune-suppressor siromlimus in IPEX (immune
dysregulation, polyendorcrinopathy, enteropathy,
X-linked syndrome). J Pediatrics 2005;147:256–259.
Dorshkind K, Rawlings DJ. B cell development.
In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice,
4th Edition. Hoffman R, Benz EJ, Shattil SJ, Furie
B, Cohen HJ, Silberstein LE, McGlave P, eds.
Philadelphia: Elsevier, 2005, 11:119–133.
Hannibal MC, Chance PF. CMT2, dominant intermediate CMT and CMTX. In: Hereditary Peripheral
Neuropathies. Kuhlenbaumer G, Stogbauer F,
Ringelstein EB, Young P, eds. Steinkoppff Springer,
Darmstadt, 2005, 121–145.
Hawn T, Ozinsky A, Williams L, Rodrigues S, Clark A,
Pham U, Hill H, Ochs HD, Aderem A, Liles C.
Hyper-IgE syndrome is not associated with defects
in several candidate toll-like receptor pathway genes.
Human Immunology 2005;66:842–847.
Huang Y-T, Lin S-L, Miao CH, Hwang L-H. In vivo
functions of hepatitis C virus core protein: a study in a
mouse model generated by hydrodynamics-based DNA
injection of the core-expressing DNA. J Genet and Mol
Biology 2005;16:40–55.
Huang W, Ochs HD, Dupont B, Vyas YM. The
Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates nuclear
translocation of NFAT2 and NF-ГђB (Re1A) independently of its role in filamentous actin polymerization
and actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. J Immunol
2005;174:2602–2611.
Humblet-Baron S, Anover S, Kipp K, Zhu Q, Ye P,
Zhang W, Ovechkina Y, Khim S, Astrakhan A, Strom
T, Kohn D, Candotti F, Vyas Y, Ochs H, Miao C,
Rawlings DJ. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene
therapy as treatment for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome
(WAS): pre-clinical studies in human cell lines and
WASp -/- mice. Molecular Therapy 2005;11(1): S133.
Humblet-Baron W, Zhang K, Kipp S, Khim J, Jarjour
K, Sommer KM, Rawlings DJ. Rescue of B cells development in an animal model of X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) via B lineage-specific lentiviral gene
therapy. The American Society of Hematology
47th annual meeting 2005. Abstract #1287 appears
in Blood. Nov 16 2005;06(11).
Johnston JJ, Olivos-Glander I, Killoran C, Elson
E, Turner JT, Peters KF, Abbott MH, Aughton DJ,
Aylsworth AS, Bamshad MJ, Booth C, Curry CJ, David
A, Dinulos MB, Flannery DB, Fox MA, Graham JM,
Grange DK, Guttmacher AE, Hannibal MC, Henn
W, Hennekam RC, Holmes LB, Hoyme HE, Leppig
KA, Lin AE, Macleod P, Manchester DK, Marcelis C,
Mazzanti L, McCann E, McDonald MT, Mendelsohn
NJ, Moeschler JB, Moghaddam B, Neri G, NewburyEcob R, Pagon RA, Phillips JA, Sadler LS, Stoler JM,
Tilstra D, Walsh Vockley CM, Zackai EH, Zadeh TM,
Brueton L, Black GC, Biesecker LG. Molecular and
clinical analyses of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly and
Pallister-Hall syndromes: robust phenotype prediction
from the type and position of GLI3 mutations.
Am J Hum Genet 2005;76:609–22.
Kuhlenbaumer G, Hannibal MC, Nelis E,
Schirmacher A, Verpoorten N, Meuleman J, Watts
GD, Vriendt ED, Young P, Stogbauer F, Halfter H,
Irobi J, Goossens D, Del-Favero J, Betz BG, Hor H,
Kurlemann G, Bird TD, Airaksinen E, Mononen T,
Serradell AP, Prats JM, Broeckhoven CV, Jonghe PD,
Timmerman V, Ringelstein EB, Chance PF. Mutations
in SEPT9 cause hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.
Nat Genet 2005;37:1044–1046.
Lee WI, Torgerson TR, Schumacher MJ, Yel L,
Zhu Q, Ochs HD. Molecular analysis of a large
cohort of patients with the hyper immunoglobulin
M (IgM) syndrome. Blood 2005;105:1881–1890.
Levin SD, Rawlings DJ, Ziegler SD, Farr AG. TSLP
(thymic stromal lymphopoietin). In: Encyclopedia of
Hormones. 1st Edition. Henry HL, Norman AW, eds.
San Diego, CA: Academic Press, 2005.
Mazzolari E, Forino C, Fontana M, D’Ippolito C,
Lanfranchi A, Gambineri E, Ochs HD, Badolato R,
Notarangelo LD. A new case of IPEX receiving bone
marrow transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant
2005;35:1033–1034.
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Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
McDermott DA, Bressan MA, He J, Lee JS, Aftimos S,
Brueckner M, Gilbert F, Graham GE, Hannibal MC,
Innis JW, Pierpont ME, Raas-Rothschild A, Shanske
AL, Smith WE, Spencer RH, St John-Sutton MG,
van Maldergem L, Waggoner DJ, Weber M, Basson CT.
TBX5 genetic testing validates strict clinical criteria for
Holt-Oram syndrome. Pediatr Res 2005;58: 981–986.
Perraud AL, Takanishi CL, Shen B, Kang S, Smith MK,
Schmitz C, Knowles HM, Ferraris D, Li W, Zhang J,
Stoddard BL, Scharenberg AM. Accumulation of free
ADP-ribose from mitochondria mediates oxidative
stress-induced gating of TRPM2 cation channels.
J Biol Chem. Feb 18, 2005;280(7):6138–48;
e-publication, Nov 23, 2004.
Miao CH. A novel gene expression system: non-viral
gene transfer for hemophilia as model systems.
Adv Genet 2005;54:143–177.
Rajaiya J, Hatfield M, Nixon JC, Rawlings DJ,
Webb CF. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase regulates immunoglobulin promoter activation in association with
the transcription factor bright. Molec Cell Biol
2005;25(6):2073–2084.
Miao CH, Brayman AA, Loeb KR, Ye P, Zhou L,
Mourad P, Crum LA. Enhancement of nonviral gene
transfer of factor IX into mouse livers by ultrasound.
Human Gene Therapy 2005;16: 893–905.
Moreno-Garcia ME, Lopez-Bojorques LN, Zentella A,
Humphries LA, Rawlings DJ, Santos-Argumedo L.
CD38 signaling regulates B lymphocyte activation via
a PLCГђ2 independent, PKC, phosphatidylcholine-PLC
and PLD-dependent signaling cascade. J Immunol
2005;174(5):2687–2695.
Nicolay U, Kiessling P, Berger M, Gupta S, Yel L,
Roifman C, Gardult A, Eichmann F, Hagg S, Massion
C, Ochs HD. Health-related quality of life and
treatment satisfaction in North American patients
with primary immunedeficiency diseases receiving
subcutaneous IgG self-infusions at home. J Clin
Immunol 2005;26: 65–72.
Notarangelo L, Ochs HD. WASp and the phenotypic
range associated with deficiency. Curr Opin Allergy
Clin Immunol 2005;6:485–490.
Ochs HD, Notarangelo L. Structure and function of
the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Curr Opin
Hematol 2005;12:284–291.
Ochs HD, Ziegler SF, Torgerson TR. FOXP3 acts as
a rheostat of the immune response. Immunol Rev
2005;203:156–164.
Oda A, Miki H, Wada I, Yamaguchi H, Yamazaki D,
Suetsugu S, Nakajima M, Nakayama A, Okawa K,
Miyazaki H, Matsuno K, Ochs HD, Machesky LM,
Fujita H, Takenawa T. WAVE/SCARS in platelets.
Blood 2005;105:3141–3148.
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Scharenberg AM. TRPM2 and TRPM7: channel/
enzyme fusions to generate novel intracellular
sensors. Pflugers Arch. Oct 2005;451(1):220–227;
e-publication, Jul 7, 2005.
Sommer K, Guo B, Pomerantz JL, Bandaranayake AD,
Moreno-GarcГ­a ME, Ovechkina YL, Rawlings DJ.
Phosphorylation of the CARMA1 linker controls
NF-ÐB activation. Immunity 2005;23(6):561–574.
Vogt G, Chapgier A, Yang K, Chuzhanova N, Feinberg
J, Fieschi C, Boisson-Dupuis S, Alcais A, Filipe-Santos
O, Bustamante J, de Beaucoudrey L, Al-Mohsen I,
Al-Hajjar S, Al-Ghonaium A, Adimi P, Mirsaeidi M,
Khalilzadeh S, Rozensweig S, de la Calle Martin O,
Bauer TR, Puck JM, Ochs HD, Furthner D, Engelhorn
C, Belohradsky B, Mansouri D, Holland SM, Schreiber
RD, Abel L, Cooper DN, Soudais C, Casanova JL.
Gains of glycosylation comprise an unexpected large
group of pathogenic mutations. Nature Genetics
2005;37:692–700.
Wolf HM, Ochs HD. Störungen der humoralen
Immunität (B-Zellen). In: Pädiatrische Allergologie
und Immunologie. Wahn U, Seger R, Wahn V,
Holländer G, ed. Germany: Elsevier, Urban & Fischer.
2005, 551–568.
Worlein J, Leigh J, Larsen K, Kinman L, Schmidt A,
Ochs HD, Ho R. Cognitive and motor deficits associated with HIV-2(287) infection in infant pigtailed
macaques: a nonhuman primate model of pediatric
neuro-AIDS. J Neurovirol 2005;11:34–45.
Rheumatology
The section of rheumatology under the Division of Infectious Disease,
Immunology and Rheumatology (in the Department of Pediatrics) provides
consultation for children with possible inflammatory, musculoskeletal and autoimmune problems, and comprehensive ongoing management for children who
have childhood onset arthritis, spondyloarthropathies, dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Our team comprises
physicians with expertise in childhood rheumatic diseases and allied health
professionals from nursing, physical and occupational therapy, social work and
nutrition. As many of our children have multisystem diseases, we work closely
with other specialties such as ophthalmology, nephrology and orthopedics.
We are the only pediatric rheumatology resource in the WAMI region
(Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho), and we provide telephone consultation
and triage for physicians in our area, as well as outreach clinics in Anchorage,
Alaska. We provide physician and allied health education in the region through
continuing education seminars. We are members of the Childhood Arthritis and
Rheumatology Research Alliance, a national network of pediatric rheumatology
centers that undertakes collaborative studies to improve understanding of the
causes of rheumatic diseases in children and to improve the care of children with these diseases. We offer the opportunity
for patients to participate in a number of clinical studies. Our staff works closely with the Pacific Northwest Chapter of the
Arthritis Foundation for parent support and advocacy.
All our physicians are involved with basic or clinical investigation into the mechanisms, management or outcomes
of childhood rheumatic diseases. Pediatric rheumatology is an underserved field with only two hundred board-certified
pediatric rheumatologists for the estimated 385,000 children in the United States who have rheumatic diseases. About one
third of medical schools do not have a pediatric rheumatologist, and many practicing pediatricians and family physicians
have had no training in these conditions. The section of rheumatology maintains a strong teaching presence with residents
and fellows at the university.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Helen Emery, MD, is chief of the Rheumatology Clinic,
program director of Rheumatology Education and
attending physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital.
She completed a pediatrics residency and a fellowship
FACULTY
Helen Emery, MD, Chief
Victoria W. Cartwright,
MD, MS
Anne M. Stevens, MD, PhD
Carol A. Wallace, MD
Helen Emery
MD, Chief
in pediatric rheumatology at Seattle Children’s. She
established pediatric rheumatology programs at the
University of Chicago and the University of California,
San Francisco. Her clinical interests involve care
of children with rheumatic diseases, with a special
emphasis on rehabilitation of children with juvenile
arthritis and dermatomyositis, for which she has an
international reputation. Her educational activities
have been focused on community physicians, including a project to present educational seminars to
primary care physicians, adult rheumatologists and
orthopedists about the diagnosis and management of
childhood rheumatic diseases; the project also tracks
whether children are referred earlier and more appropriately, and their level of impairment. Dr. Emery
regards training of new investigators and clinicians as
a top priority and has graduated many trainees, all of
whom hold academic positions. She has received an
American College of Rheumatology Clinician Educator
Award, which enabled the expansion of educational
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
efforts into the medical school musculoskeletal curriculum. She is an executive member of the Pacific
Northwest Arthritis Foundation Chapter and has been
involved with the chapter’s parent group activities.
Victoria W. Cartwright, MD, MS, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital, clinical assistant professor
in the Department of Epidemiology at the University
of Washington School of Public Health and clinical
assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She received her MD from the Uniformed Services
University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Md.,
and her MS in epidemiology from the University of
Washington. Dr. Cartwright’s research is focused on
rheumatic diseases, particularly in children. She is
engaged in two studies utilizing a rheumatic diseases
database, which includes a cohort followed since
1976 and a study of pregnancy outcomes in patients
with systemic lupus erythematosus. Dr. Cartwright is
chief of pediatric rheumatology, clerkship director of
pediatrics and assistant residency program director at
Madigan Army Medical Center.
Anne M. Stevens, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. She
completed her residency in pediatrics at the Children’s
Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati and a fellowship in pediatric rheumatology at the University of
Washington. In the Rheumatology Clinic and inpatient
service at Seattle Children’s Hospital, Dr. Stevens cares
for children with chronic inflammatory diseases and
teaches residents and students. Her research interest
is in the role that maternal cells, passing into the fetus
during pregnancy and persisting for years in the child,
play in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. She
demonstrated that maternal cells can differentiate into
myocardial cells in the hearts of infants with neonatal
lupus syndrome, where these foreign cells may act as
targets for the child’s immune system. Alternatively,
maternal cells may respond to tissue injury and aid in
repair. Dr. Stevens is studying the immune response to
chimeric maternal cells in children with lupus and a
mouse model investigating the role of maternal cells in
renal injury. Dr. Stevens is a co-investigator on studies
of Lipitor (atorvastatin), etanercept and the long-term
outcome of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
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Carol A. Wallace, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She received her MD from the University of
Michigan. She completed a pediatrics residency and a
fellowship in pediatric rheumatology at the University
of Washington. Dr. Wallace’s main focus has been the
aggressive treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis
(JIA) and other pediatric rheumatic diseases. She has
published many of the sentinel studies of the use of
methotrexate in the treatment of JIA. She is co-principal investigator for a national collaborative study of
autologous stem cell transplantation for severe pediatric rheumatologic diseases, and participates in many
multicenter clinical trials of new biologic agents for the
treatment of JIA. With remission of disease as the goal
of treatment, Dr. Wallace helped to develop an international consensus definition for remission of JIA.
Dr. Wallace has served on the Pediatric Rheumatology
Sub-board for the American Board of Pediatrics
and sub-committees of the American College of
Rheumatology. She is on the Advisory Committee
of the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study
Group and is vice chair of the Childhood Arthritis
and Rheumatology Research Alliance.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Helen M. Emery, MD
“America’s Top Doctors,” 2005
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Anne M. Stevens, MD, PhD
Maternal Microchimerism in Pediatric Systemic
Lupus Erythematosus, Arthritis National Research
Foundation, $75,000
Potential Implications of Maternal Microchimerism
in Acute Renal Disease, National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS,
$181,000
Fibrotic Sequelae of Childhood Renal Disease,
Vanderbilt University, National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS,
$62,000
Infectious Disease, Immunology and Rheumatology
Carol A. Wallace, MD
Retrospective Validation of Draft Criteria for Clinical
Remission of Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Centocor,
Inc., $68,950
A Phase III, Multi-Center, Multi-National,
Randomized Withdrawal Study to Evaluate the
Safety and Efficacy of BMS-188667 in Children
and Adolescents with Active Polyarticular Juvenile
Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA), IM101-033,
Bristol Myers Squibb Immunology, $101,733
Continuing
PUBLICATIONS
Mullarkey ME, Stevens AS, McDonnell WM,
Loubiere LS, Brackensick JA, Pang JM, Porter AJ,
Galloway DA, Nelson JL. HLA Class II alleles in
Caucasian women with primary biliary cirrhosis.
Tissue Antigens. 2005;65(2):199–205.
Stevens AS. Maternal microchimerism – Allogeneic
target of autoimmune disease or normal biology?
Clin Appl Immunol Rev. 2005;5:325–338.
Helen Emery, MD
Early Identification and Intervention for Children
with Rheumatic Disease, Arthritis National Research
Foundation, $275,079
Stevens AS, Tsao BP, Hahn BH, Guthrie K, Gazinski
A, Lambert NC, Porter AJ, Tylee TA, Nelson JL.
Maternal HLA class II compatibility in males with
systemic lupus erythematosus. Arthritis Rheum.
2005;52(9):2768–2773.
Carol A. Wallace, MD
A Phase 4 Safety and Efficacy Study of Etanercept in
Children with Systemic Onset Juvenile Rheumatoid
Arthritis, Amgen Inc., $94,908
Wallace CA, Huang B, Bandeira M, Ravelli A,
Giannini EH. Patterns of clinical remission in select
categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).
J Rheumatol. 2005;31(11):2290–2294.
Phase IV Registry of Etanercept (Enbrel) in Children
with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Amgen,Inc.,
$130,625
Yan Z, Lambert NC, Guthrie KA, Porter AJ, Loubiere
LS, Madeleine MM, Stevens AM, Hermes HM, Nelson
JL. Male microchimerism in women with no prior
birth of a son: quantitative assessment and correlation
with pregnancy history. Am J Med. 2005;118:899–906.
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Helen Emery, MD
Abe Schorr Visiting Professor, Halifax,
Nova Scotia, Canada
Carol A. Wallace, MD
Rituximab Treatment of TMJ Disease, XII European
Paediatric Rheumatology Congress, Versailles, France
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Neonatology
The Division of Neonatology (in the Department of
Pediatrics) is a key component of Seattle Children’s
Hospital’s neonatal programs. The division’s mission is to
improve the neonatal outcome of pregnancy by providing
the region’s best evidence-based neonatal clinical care,
educating the next generation of neonatal caregivers
and advancing neonatal scholarship.
Neonatology division faculty provide clinical service
and medical direction at four regional neonatal intensive
care units (NICUs). The 19-bed NICU at Seattle Children’s
provides care for critically ill newborns and infants with a
wide variety of problems including prematurity, infection
and cardiac and surgical defects. Key services include
inhaled nitric oxide treatment, high-frequency ventilation,
and extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The
University of Washington Medical Center is equipped to
handle some of the highest-risk deliveries in the nation, and its 32-bed NICU specializes in maternal hypertension, diabetes
and preterm birth. The 29-bed NICU at Providence Everett Medical Center serves high-risk newborns in the north end of
the Seattle region. Division faculty direct and provide services in a 14-bed NICU at Overlake Hospital Medical Center, on
the east side of Lake Washington. Infants needing high-level care or cardiac and surgical services are transferred to
University Hospital or Seattle Children’s.
Division training programs include an American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–accredited fellowship
training program, plus medical student and pediatric resident education. Several fellows choose to combine training in
neonatology with a complementary MPH. Division faculty also participate in and direct regional educational programs in
the WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho), Infant Transport Program, Medical Consultation Program (MedCon)
and the High-Risk Infant Follow-up Clinic.
Faculty research interests include bench research, clinical trials, bioethics, informatics, computer simulation and
continuous quality improvement. In 2005, research programs addressed cerebral physiology and neuropathology, fetal
alcohol syndrome, developmental biology (erythropoietin), pediatric safety and biomedical informatics, in addition to
participation in several multicenter clinical trials.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Christine A. Gleason, MD, is chief of the Division of
Neonatology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and is
W. Alan Hodson professor of pediatrics and head
of the Division of Neonatology at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Gleason’s primary
clinical interest is the care of high-risk newborns,
especially infants born at the limits of viability (23–24
weeks gestation). Her research has been focused on
the development of cerebral circulation, specifically
the effects of drugs such as cocaine and alcohol on the
developing brain. She and her colleagues are trying to
understand the long-term effects of severe neonatal
stress — and the attempts to ameliorate these effects
with narcotics — on the developing brain. Her local
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teaching activities are focused on didactic teaching
of pediatric residents and neonatology fellows in
the NICUs at Seattle Children’s and University of
Washington Medical Center; research teaching and
mentorship of neonatology fellows; and teaching newborn resuscitation and basic stabilization procedures
to ground transport team and Airlift Northwest team
members. Regionally, she teaches as a visiting professor, does case reviews and presentations at regional
hospitals and has been invited to serve as a visiting
professor at academic medical centers.
Shilpi Chabra, MD, is medical director of the special
care nursery at Overlake Hospital Medical Center and
assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Chabra has a keen
Neonatology
interest in teaching residents and fellows. Her scholarly interests include neonatal lymphocyte subsets
and steroid effects, chronic lung disease in preterm
infants and its association with vitamin A and epidemiology of birth defects. She is also involved in quality
improvement projects in the Overlake NICU and has
helped establish the post-discharge nutrition clinic at
Overlake Hospital. Dr. Chabra also coordinates the
division’s regional outreach activities.
Eric Demers, MD, is associate medical director of
neonatology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting
assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He completed a
neonatal fellowship at the university. Dr. Demers’
patient care responsibilities rotate among the NICUs
at the University of Washington, Seattle Children’s
and Providence Everett Medical Center. His area of
scholarship is in the improvement of care delivered
to neonatal patients through the creation of evidencebased care guidelines in the intensive care setting
and during inter-facility transport. He is also active
in the education and training of the neonatal ground
transport team at Children’s.
W. Alan Hodson, MD, MMSc, is professor emeritus of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He works part-time teaching clinical neonatology to residents and neonatal fellows. He was head
of the Division of Neonatal and Respiratory Diseases
at the University of Washington. His interests and
activities include providing assistance and guidance
to postdoctoral fellows in their pursuit of excellence
as scholars in neonatal medicine, providing clinical
service to convalescing premature infants and teaching
overall neonatal medicine, fundamental to general
pediatrics training. He is also involved in enhancing
FACULTY
Christine A. Gleason,
MD, Chief
Shilpi Chabra, MD
Eric Demers, MD
W. Alan Hodson, MD, MMSc
J. Craig Jackson, MD
Sandra Juul, MD, PhD
David Loren, MD
Dennis E. Mayock, MD
Christine A. Gleason
MD, Chief
and improving the participation of other pediatric
sub-specialists in the evolving field of fetal medicine.
He has developed an interest in global neonatal
health issues: He is involved with the newly formed
Department of Global Health at the University of
Washington and in the development of a curriculum
for pediatric residents and post residents interested
in global health training. He continues a long-standing interest in neonatal respiratory disorders and
is currently chair of the NHLBI External Advisory
Committee for the Collaborative Program (U-10)
on Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.
J. Craig Jackson, MD, is medical director of the NICU at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor of pediatrics
at the University of Washington. He serves as associate division head for clinical activities at the university.
After 15 years of basic and clinical research in lung
diseases of newborns, Dr. Jackson has changed his
direction from research to neonatal medical direction
services. He is enrolled in the executive MHA program
at the University of Washington. He is active in quality
improvement and works with leaders in perinatology
at the university to build its program in maternal-fetal
medicine and fetal diagnostic services. Dr. Jackson
provides support for the division’s neonatal medical
directors at Seattle Children’s, University Hospital,
Providence Hospital in Everett and Overlake Hospital
in Bellevue, Wash. The clinical programs of the division include direction of the Children’s infant ground
transport team and medical support for the neonatal
nurse practitioner program.
Sandra Juul, MD, PhD, is director of the neonatology
fellowship at Seattle Children’s Hospital; she is
associate professor of pediatrics and associate division
head for scholarship and research at the University of
Washington. She is also
director of the fellowship
training program. Dr.
Janet Haworth Murphy,
MBChB
Juul completed medical
Michael D. Neufeld, MD, MPH
training and pediatric
Kendra Smith, MD
and neonatology
Thomas P. Strandjord, MD
subspecialty training
Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, MD
at the University of
David E. Woodrum, MD
Washington. She earned
a PhD in developmental
biology at the University
of Chicago. Dr. Juul is
principal investigator
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Neonatology
on studies focusing on the neuroprotective effects
of erythropoietin (Epo) in neonatal models of brain
injury and neonatal stress. She has identified Epo
and its receptor in the developing human brain,
demonstrated the functionality of the Epo receptor on
cultured neurons and documented Epo in the spinal
fluid of human neonates. Her research shows that Epo
protects the neonatal brain from hypoxia and oxidative
injury. Using a variety of approaches, Dr. Juul is
working to identify mechanisms of Epo neuroprotection and to discover ways to optimize its function in
the developing brain at risk for injury. Her ultimate
goal is to bring this new treatment from the laboratory
to the bedside.
David Loren, MD, is acting assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington. He teaches
and supports medical students, residents and fellows
at all of Seattle Children’s Hospital’s clinical practice
sites. Dr. Loren’s teaching and research interests focus
around the triangle of practical medical ethics, quality
improvement and communication. He has developed a
parent-as-faculty program in the infant ICU at Seattle
Children’s that helps medical teams improve their
communication skills with families. He is also part of
the family-centered care leadership team at Seattle
Children’s. In the University of Washington Medical
Center NICU, Dr. Loren helps guide the quality
leadership team, which recently completed an international collaboration with Vermont Oxford Network
on reduction of nosocomial infection. His work in
quality of care has focused around how culture and
individual behavior support or inhibit strategies
for process improvement. He is a participant in the
inaugural Pediatric Academic Societies Educational
Scholars Program, and he leads a research project to
develop a Web-based teaching program for pediatric
residents on safe and effective practices for disclosing
medical errors.
Dennis E. Mayock, MD, is professor of pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine, medical
director of the University of Washington Medical
Center NICU and director of the infant ground
transport team. Dr. Mayock’s basic research interests
include evaluation of the effects of fetal alcohol
exposure on fetal, neonatal and adult cerebrovascular
function. Additionally, he is evaluating the effects of
neonatal morphine exposure on adult cerebrovascular
function. These studies include testing isolated
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
cerebral resistance vessels and evaluation of specific
vasoactive mediators such as adenosine and vasoactive
intestinal polypeptide. Dr. Mayock’s clinical research
interests include evaluation of therapies, such as
inhaled nitric oxide and late surfactant treatments,
that may alter the development of chronic lung
disease. He is collaborating on an evaluation of
whether high-dose erythropoietin treatment has
neuroprotective effects in preterm infants.
Janet H. Murphy, MBChB, is medical director of Seattle
Children’s Hospital’s neonatal nurse practitioner
program, associate professor of pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine and
administrator of the Northwest regional perinatal
program. Dr. Murphy attends at the University
of Washington NICU and Newborn Plus Service,
Overlake Hospital Medical Center and Evergreen
Hospital Medical Center. She serves on the university
Infection Control Committee and is a founding member of the Perinatal Family Centered Care Committee.
Dr. Murphy’s primary research interest is lung
development and physiology. She has participated
in education programs and clinical case reviews for
obstetric and neonatal care providers in Washington,
with particular emphasis on neonatal resuscitation
and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) of the
American Academy of Pediatrics. Her education focus
for pediatric residents has been on bedside teaching,
review of common problems in neonatology and NRP
education and testing; her focus on NRP extends to
University of Washington residents in family practice
and obstetrics and gynecology.
Michael D. Neufeld, MD, MPH, is associate medical
director of the NICU at Providence Everett Medical
Center and acting assistant professor at the University
of Washington. Dr. Neufeld is interested in long-term
neurodevelopmental outcomes of premature infants.
His research focuses on maternal infection and the
risk of cerebral palsy in term and preterm infants
and on markers of inflammation and the risk of
severe retinopathy of prematurity. He helps manage
the division’s clinical database and is developing a
database of the patients seen in the High-Risk Infant
Follow-up Clinic. Other interests include quality
improvement and medical education.
Neonatology
Kendra Smith, MD, is medical director of the NICU
at Providence Everett Medical Center and assistant
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington.
The community-based NICU integrates neonatology
with hospital units at the university and Seattle
Children’s Hospital units and with perinatology at
the University of Washington. Dr. Smith’s focus in
research has been in lung injury and its prevention
in the preterm neonate. She has studied ventilator
techniques and different ventilation support modalities
and is working clinically on strategies to minimize
lung trauma in infants requiring ventilation due to
respiratory failure at birth. She serves as manager of
divisional respiratory care programs with the goal
of promoting improved ventilation strategies for
neonates in our region. Dr. Smith is also interested
in brain injury in neonates and is site investigator at
Providence Everett Medical Center for clinical trials
in preterm infants at risk for altered neurological
outcome using erythropoietin as a potential
neuroprotective agent.
Thomas P. Strandjord, MD, is associate medical director
of the NICU at Evergreen Hospital Medical Center and
associate professor of pediatrics at the University of
Washington. He is chair of University of Washington
Medical Center’s Perinatal/Neonatal Continuous
Quality Improvement Committee. Dr. Strandjord’s
primary clinical interests involve care of critically ill
newborn infants. He is particularly interested in the
initial stabilization and resuscitation of neonates,
and his research focuses on developing techniques
for training care providers to resuscitate newborns
effectively and safely. He has collaborated in the
development of a screen-based computer simulator of
newborn resuscitation and is studying its effectiveness
as a training tool. Dr. Strandjord is also working on
various quality improvement projects for the safety
of care in the NICU.
methods and models from the computing, information and behavioral sciences into tools and solutions
for care providers, patients, biomedical researchers
and public health providers. Dr. Tarczy-Hornoch’s
own BHI research has included real-time biomedical
instrumentation control systems, bench research and
mathematical modeling of liquid ventilation, clinical
information systems and electronic clinical knowledge resources. He collaborates with biologists and
clinical researchers looking at large-scale functional
gene annotation of bacteria and protozoans, single
nucleotide polymorphisms for elucidation of disease
mechanisms, expression array experiment analysis and
collaborative integrated analysis of a combination of
clinical data, experimental biological data and clinical/
translational research study data.
David E. Woodrum, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and professor of pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. He
is a member of the Treuman Katz Bioethics Center
and faculty associate in the Department of Medical
History & Ethics at the University of Washington. Dr.
Woodrum’s clinical and teaching activities are focused
on convalescing premature infants and on pediatric
biomedical ethics issues for residents, fellows and
other health care providers. His research explores the
determinative elements of parental decision making.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Eric Demers, MD
Fellow’s Research Day Basic Science Award,
Seattle Children’s
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, MD, is associate professor of
pediatrics and of medical education and biomedical
informatics at the University of Washington; he is also
adjunct associate professor of computer science and
engineering. He serves as the head of the Division
of Biomedical and Health Informatics (BHI) and as
associate division head for Evidence Based Education
in Neonatology. University BHI researchers — 17 core
faculty, 27 adjunct and affiliate faculty, 35 students
— play a leadership role in translating and advancing
Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, MD
II+(SEI): Information Integration in the Presence
of Uncertainty, NSF, $103,111
Continuing
Christine A. Gleason, MD
Cerebrovascular Effects of Prenatal Alcohol, NIAAA/
NIH, $358,869
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Neonatology
Sandra Juul, MD, PhD
Nonhematopoietic Developmental Functions of Epo,
NICHD/NIH, $165,852
Diagnosis and Management of Gastroesophageal
Reflux in Neonates, Contemporary Forum’s Conference
on Neonatal Pharmacology, Seattle, June 17, 2005
Epo as a Rescue Agent for Perinatal Hypoxia-Ischemia,
NICHD/NIH, $170,255
Sandra Juul, MD, PhD
Recombinant Epo as a Neuroprotectant, AAP Perinatal
Section, District VIII, Midway, Utah, June 24, 2005
Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, MD
BioMediator: Biological Data Integration & Analysis
System, NHGRI/NIH, $336,551
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Eric Demers, MD
Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Controversies in
Neonatal-Perinatal Care Conference Series, University
of Washington, September 16, 2005
Christine A. Gleason, MD
Contemporary Forums, co-chair/director,
Neonatal Pharmacology Conference, June 17, 2005
Management of Neonatal Pain and Sedation: Do We
Know What We’re Doing? University of Iowa pediatric
Grand Rounds, Iowa City, 2005
Chronic Neonatal Morphine: Effects on the Developing
Brain, Iowa Neonatology Day, Iowa City, 2005
Management of Neonatal Pain and Sedation: Do We
Know What We’re Doing? University of Rochester
pediatric Grand Rounds, Rochester, N.Y., 2005
164
Update on Neuroprotection in Neonates: Can Epo
Make a Difference?, Perinatal Research Society
Meeting, Quebec, September 17, 2005
Visiting professorship, University of Utah,
Salt Lake City
David Loren, MD
Family-Centered Perinatal-Neonatal Care,
Controversies in Neonatal-Perinatal Care Conference
Series, University of Washington, May 27, 2005
Neonatal End of Life and Bereavement, guest lecturer,
Anthropology 322, University of Washington, 2005
Dennis E. Mayock, MD
Oxygen Use at Delivery: Poisoning with the First
Breath?, Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric,
and Neonatal Nurses, Washington Section,
October 18, 2005
Janet H. Murphy, MBChB
Examination of the Newborn, Rehab 400,
University of Washington, January 10, 2005
Visiting professorship, University of Rochester,
Rochester, New York; University of Iowa, Iowa City
Clinical Case Discussion and NRP Testing,
pediatricians and family physicians, Valley General
Hospital, Monroe, Wash., April 18, 2005
J. Craig Jackson, MD
NeoSim Computer Simulation Program on CD for
Teaching Neonatal Resuscitation, AnaeSoft, 2005
Room Air Resuscitation and Neonatal
Hyperbilirubinemia, clinical case presentations,
Pocatello, Idaho, September 27, 2005
Computerized Simulation for Training Delivery Room
Resuscitation, Controversies in Neonatal-Perinatal
Care Conference Series, University of Washington,
April 22, 2005
Neonatal Hypoglycemia, clinical case presentation,
Boise, Idaho, September 27, 2005
NeoSim Computer Simulation Program on CD for
Teaching Neonatal Resuscitation, National Capital
Area Medical Simulation Center, Bethesda, Md.,
May 14, 2005
Michael D. Neufeld, MD, MPH
Neonatal Outcome and Follow-up of the High Risk
Infant, pediatric Grand Rounds, Providence Everett
Medical Center, Everett, Wash., 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Visiting professorships: Pocatello and Boise, Idaho
Neonatology
Case studies in neonatal respiratory care management,
guest lecturer, Providence Everett Medical Center,
Everett, Wash., 2005
Thomas P. Strandjord, MD
Computerized Simulation for Training Delivery Room
Resuscitation, Controversies in Neonatal-Perinatal
Care Conference Series, University of Washington,
April 22, 2005
Summer Seminar in Medical Ethics, University of
Washington, August 5, 2005
Visiting professorship: Port Angeles, Wash.
Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, MD
Biomedical and Health Informatics (BHI),
University of Washington School of Public Health
and Community Medicine Strategic Leadership
Retreat, Seattle, January 5, 2005
The Coming Convergence of Computing, Genomics,
and Clinical Practice, Anesthesia Grand Rounds,
University of Washington, February 16, 2005
Critical Thinking in Neonatology, Neonatal Nurse
Practitioner CME, University of Washington,
May 5, 2005
The Impact of Informatics on the Understanding and
Treatment of Human Disease: Visions of the Future,
moderator and organizing committee, 3rd Annual
Frontiers in Biomedical Research Symposium,
Seattle, May 23, 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Bookstein FL, Connor PD, Covell KD, Barr HM,
Gleason CA, Sze RW, McBroom JA, Streissguth AP.
Preliminary evidence that prenatal alcohol damage may be visible in averaged ultrasound images
of the neonatal human corpus callosum. Alcohol.
2005;36(3):151–160.
Chabra C. Fetal and Neonatal Physiology, 3rd Edition
(book review). Polin RA, Fox WW, Abman SH, eds.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005;159(4):402.
Chabra C, Gleason CA. Gastroschisis: embryology,
pathogenesis, epidemiology. Neoreviews. 2005;6:
e493–e499.
Demers EJ, Juul SE. Erythropoietin neuroprotection
in the term and preterm infant: safety and efficacy.
In: Erythropoietin and the Nervous System. Hoke A,
ed. Springer, 2005.
Demers EJ, McPherson RJ, Juul SE. Erythropoietin
protects dopaminergic neurons and improves neurobehavioral outcomes in juvenile rats after neonatal
hypoxia-ischemia. Pediatr Res. 2005;58(2):297–301.
Gleason CA, Back SA. Developmental physiology of
the central nervous system. In: Avery’s Diseases of the
Newborn, 8th Edition. Taeusch, Ballard, Gleason, eds.
Elsevier Saunders, 2005.
The Coming Convergence of Computing, Genomics, and
Clinical Practice, Translational Medicine Meeting of
Pacific Northwest Bio/Technologies Alliance, Seattle,
September 22, 2005
Jackson JC. Atelectasis, Aspiration syndromes,
Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Diagnosis and management of air leaks, Persistent pulmonary hypertension
of the newborn, Respiratory disease in the newborn,
Respiratory distress syndrome (seven chapters).
In: Pediatrics. Osborn LM, DeWitt TG, First LR,
Zenel JA, eds. Elsevier Mosby, 2005.
National Centers for Biomedical Computing:
Informatics Enabling Biomedical Research, moderator and organizer, plenary panel, Fall 2005 AMIA
Symposium, Washington, D.C., October 23, 2005
Juul SE. Developmental biology of the hematologic system. In: Avery’s Diseases of the Newborn,
8th Edition. Taeusch, Ballard, Gleason, eds. Elsevier
Saunders, 2005.
David E. Woodrum, MD
IICU and NICU Ethics Conferences,
University of Washington, 2005
Juul SE, Haynes JW, McPherson RJ. Evaluation
of eosinophilia in hospitalized preterm infants.
J Perinatol. 2005;25(3):182–188.
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Loren DJ, Campos Y, d’Azzo A, Wyble L, Grange DK,
Gilbert-Barness E, White FV, Hamvas A. Sialidosis
presenting as severe nonimmune fetal hydrops is associated with two novel mutations in lysosomal alphaneuraminidase. J Perinatol. 2005;25(7):491–494.
Loren DJ, Seeram NP, Schulman RN, Holtzman DM.
Maternal dietary supplementation with pomegranate juice is neuroprotective in an animal model of
neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Pediatr Res.
2005;57(6):858–864.
McPherson RJ, Juul S. Patterns of thrombocytosis
and thrombocytopenia in hospitalized neonates.
J Perinatol. 2005;25(3):166–172.
Mork P, Shaker R, Tarczy-Hornoch P. The multiple
roles of ontologies in the biomediator data integration
system. Data Integration in the Life Sciences: Second
International Workshop Proceedings. Ludäscher B,
Raschid L, eds. Lecture Notes in Computer Science.
2005;3615:96–104.
Neufeld MD, Frigon C, Graham AS, Mueller BA.
Maternal infection and risk of cerebral palsy in term
and preterm infants. J Perinatol. 2005;25(2):108–113.
Tarczy-Hornoch P. Evaluation of therapeutic
recommendations, database management, and
information retrieval. In: Avery’s Diseases of the
Newborn, 8th Edition. Taeusch, Ballard, Gleason, eds.
Elsevier Saunders, 2005.
Tarczy-Hornoch P, Minie M. Bioinformatics
challenges and opportunities. In: Medical Informatics:
Knowledge Management and Data Mining in
Biomedicine Series: Integrated Series in Information
Systems. Chen, Fuller, Friedman, Hersch, eds.
Springer, 2005.
Wang K, Tarczy-Hornoch P, Shaker R, Mork P,
Brinkley J. BioMediator data integration: beyond
genomics to neuroscience data. AMIA Fall 2005
Symposium Proceedings 779–783.
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Nephrology
The Division of Nephrology (in the Department of Pediatrics) provides
specialized primary and consultative care for infants, children and
adolescents with congenital and acquired renal problems. The division
serves as the regional referral center for children with end-stage
kidney disease and is a national leader in nephrology care. We have
also increased our ability to provide outpatient care at outreach
clinics in Washington, Alaska and Montana. The division runs a dialysis
unit and also provides emergency dialysis and ongoing renal support
to critically ill children in the intensive care units at Seattle Children’s
Hospital. The need for dialysis services at Seattle Children’s continues
to grow due to the increasing complexity of care for children undergoing cardiac surgery and transplants of bone marrow, heart and intestine.
Division physicians evaluate children who are candidates for
kidney transplantation; in conjunction with other members of a
multidisciplinary transplant program, they manage the pre- and
post-transplant care of renal transplant recipients. Our nephrology team of physicians, specialized nurses, dietitians and
social workers provides a variety of support and follow-up services to ensure the best family-centered care. The nephrology
research program at Seattle Children’s has become one of the largest and most productive programs in the country, and
division faculty have received several competitive grants.
We are committed to training physicians for careers in clinical and academic pediatric nephrology. Our fellowship
program offers one of the most sought-after fellowships in the country, with the goal of producing leaders in the field of academic pediatric nephrology. Since 1990, we have trained 18 pediatric nephrologists; six more are currently in the program.
Division members fulfill important educational roles in the community and continually participate in national organizations
and societies; several faculty members hold leadership roles in these organizations. Division faculty are also frequent invited
presenters at national and international meetings.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Allison A. Eddy, MD, is chief of the Division of Nephrology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and director of
the pediatric nephrology fellowship program. She is
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. Eight postdoctoral fellows — from
FACULTY
Allison A. Eddy
MD, Chief
Allison A. Eddy, MD, Chief
Nicole R. Becker, MD
Sangeeta R. Hingorani,
MD, MPH
JesГєs M. LГіpez-Guisa, PhD
Ruth A. McDonald, MD
Daryl M. Okamura, MD
Jodi M. Smith, MD, MPH
F. Bruder Stapleton, MD
the USA, Japan, China and Korea — have trained in
her laboratory. In addition to clinical work, she directs
an active basic science research program and handles
mentoring, training and administrative responsibilities. Dr. Eddy is internationally recognized for her
work on the cellular and molecular basis of progressive
kidney disease, and she is focused on two projects:
One investigates the role
of the urokinase receptor
family in renal scarring
Jordan M. Symons, MD
and the other investigates
Sandra L. Watkins, MD
the role of scavenger
Guoqiang Zhang, MD, PhD
receptors in chronic
kidney disease. Dr. Eddy
co-directs the research
training program in
pediatric nephrology
and is program director
for the University of
Washington Child Health
Research Center. This
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
167
Nephrology
program supports young pediatricians who have just
completed clinical and basic science research training
in any pediatric subspecialty area and who are ready
to transition to their first clinician-scientist faculty
position with ongoing research mentorship. Dr. Eddy
is deputy editor of the Journal of the American Society
of Nephrology and is an active member of the editorial
board for the journal Pediatric Nephrology.
Nicole R. Becker, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate clinical professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She received her MD from the University
of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
She completed a pediatrics residency and internship
at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and a pediatric
nephrology fellowship at Seattle Children’s. She also
completed an adolescent medicine fellowship while
working as an attending physician and assistant professor of pediatrics at Rush-Presbyterian–St. Luke’s
Medical Center in Chicago. Dr. Becker cares for children in the Nephrology Clinic and is the nephrologist
covering Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital in Tacoma,
Wash. She is medical director at the Pierce County
Juvenile Detention Center in Tacoma, where she
provides adolescent medicine for incarcerated youth,
as well as policy and management oversight for the
medical department. She also works with the Pierce
County Health Department and superior court
judges on the Juvenile Court Executive Committee.
Dr. Becker is working on a young adult patient
transitioning plan in the Division of Nephrology and
has a special interest in assuring that adolescents and
their parents have normal life experiences, despite
chronic illness, and successfully move into adulthood.
Sangeeta R. Hingorani, MD, MPH, is attending physician
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor
of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She received her MD from Albert Einstein
College of Medicine. She did a pediatrics residency and
a fellowship in pediatric nephrology at the University
of Washington; she also earned her MPH from the
university. Her clinical research program is investigating the pathophysiology of acute and chronic kidney
disease after hematopoietic cell transplant. She has
prospective studies ongoing at the Fred Hutchinson
Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) to gain a better
understanding of the timing and mechanisms of renal
injury and to identify potential biomarkers for kidney
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disease after stem cell transplant. Using the database
at FHCRC, Dr. Hingorani conducted large epidemiologic studies to identify risk factors for both acute
and chronic kidney disease after transplant and to
evaluate the mortality associated with kidney injury
in this patient population. Dr. Hingorani is co-chair
of the Research Oversight Committee for the university
pediatric nephrology fellowship program. She spends
time teaching and mentoring fellows in both the clinical and clinical research arenas. She is also a member
of the Pediatric Scientific Advisory Committee.
JesГєs M. LГіpez-Guisa, PhD, is affiliated research
assistant professor at the University of Washington
School of Medicine and supervises fellows and
research associates at the university. He earned his
PhD in biochemistry at the University of WisconsinMadison. Dr. LГіpez-Guisa researches the mechanisms
involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic mechanisms
in progressive renal diseases. At Seattle Children’s he
collaborated with the cardiology faculty on studies of
thyroid metabolism and with the rheumatology faculty
on the role of microchimerism in renal diseases. He
maintains study collaborations outside of Seattle
Children’s on the role of the IL-6 family of genes
during kidney development and in normal and
pathological conditions, and on the role of the IL-6
family of genes in osteoarthritis in a strain of mice
he developed. Dr. LГіpez-Guisa is a member of several
minority programs at the University of Washington
and is a member of the American Association of
Cancer Research and the National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) minority
network. He has published numerous papers in
peer-reviewed publications.
Ruth A. McDonald, MD, is medical director of solid
organ transplantation at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and associate professor of pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. She also serves
as co-director of several outreach clinics in pediatric
nephrology in Washington, Alaska and Montana. She
earned her MD at the University of Minnesota. She
completed her residency and served as assistant chief
resident, and completed a fellowship in the Division of
Pediatric Nephrology at the University of Washington.
She serves as principal investigator in many multicenter research studies on pediatric renal transplantation. She has a special clinical interest in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and viral infections
Nephrology
after transplant in all solid organ transplant recipients.
She is an at-large member of the Children’s University
Medical Group Board of Directors and chairs the
group’s Clinical Practice Committee. Dr. McDonald
is well known and respected nationally as a leader in
national organ allocation policy development, working actively in several organizations. She serves on the
United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) Pediatric
Committee and has been chair and vice chair; she is
a member of other UNOS committees and serves on
the board of directors.
Daryl M. Okamura, MD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting instructor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He completed his medical training and
pediatrics residency at the University of Hawaii and
completed his pediatric nephrology fellowship at
Seattle Children’s. His clinical interests include the
diagnosis and management of infants, children and
adolescents with renal disease, particularly renal
vasculitis, hypertension and chronic kidney disease.
His research interests include the role of scavenger
receptors and macrophages in the modulation of oxidative and inflammatory pathways in the progression
of chronic kidney disease. Dr. Okamura has presented
his research in many regional and national nephrology
conferences and published several papers in peerreviewed journals.
Jodi M. Smith, MD, MPH, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant
professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. She earned her MD and completed her pediatric residency at McGill University
in Montreal. She completed a pediatric nephrology
fellowship and earned an MPH in epidemiology from
the University of Washington. She is studying the role
of sub-clinical viral infections in the development of
kidney transplant dysfunction in pediatric recipients.
F. Bruder Stapleton, MD, is pediatrician-in-chief
at Seattle Children’s Hospital; he is chairman of
the Department of Pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine and Ford Morgan
Endowed Chair. He was chief of the Division of
Pediatric Nephrology at the University of Tennessee,
where he founded the pediatric General Clinical
Research Center. He served as A. Conger Goodyear
Chair of the Department of Pediatrics and pediatri-
cian-in-chief and medical director for Children’s
Hospital of Buffalo in New York. He has served as
secretary-treasurer and president of the American
Society of Pediatric Nephrology, assistant secretarygeneral and treasurer of the International Pediatric
Nephrology Association, president of the Southern
Society for Pediatric Research, chairman of the
Sub-Board of Pediatric Nephrology of the American
Board of Pediatrics and a member of its Board of
Directors and a member of the Council of Pediatric
Research for the American Academy of Pediatrics.
He is on the Executive Council of the American
Pediatric Society and is the founding editor-in-chief
of Journal Watch Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.
He is president of the Association of Medical School
Pediatric Department Chairs and head of the Data
Safety Monitoring Board for the NIH National Study
of Kidney Disease in Children.
Jordan M. Symons, MD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He is medical director of dialysis at Seattle
Children’s and he treats general nephrology, kidney
transplant and dialysis patients. He received his MD
from Columbia University College of Physicians and
Surgeons. He completed a pediatrics residency at
Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago and pediatric
nephrology training at Children’s Hospital Boston.
Dr. Symons has a primary interest in the care and
treatment of acute kidney injury in critically ill
patients; he is a founding member of the Prospective
Pediatric Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy
Registry, a pediatric multicenter consortium engaged
in cooperative study of CRRT methods. Dr. Symons
also has a strong interest in medical education; he is
a member of the College Faculty of the University of
Washington School of Medicine, a group of 30 medical
faculty dedicated to the development and implementation of a four-year integrated curriculum of clinical
skills and professionalism. He instructs and mentors
approximately 25 medical students per year.
Sandra L. Watkins, MD, is director of clinical nephrology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor of
pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She is co-associate program director of the
Pediatric Satellite of the clinical Research Center at
the University of Washington. She serves as president
of the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
169
Nephrology
She is a past board member of the Renal Physicians
Association and a member of the Northwest Renal
Networks Medical Review Board. Her clinical interests include the full breadth and depth of pediatric
renal disease and hypertension. Her research interests
include end-stage renal disease therapies and glomerulonephritis. She is principal investigator for the
Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis Clinical Trial,
a multicenter interventional trial. She has been listed
as one of Seattle’s top doctors for several years.
RESEARCH FUNDING
Guoqiang Zhang, MD, PhD, is senior scientist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital. He received two years of postdoctoral training at Sheffield Kidney Institute, University
of Sheffield, UK. Dr. Zhang’s research at the University
of Washington has focused on the molecular mechanisms of chronic renal injury, in particular the control
of renal myofibroblast activation. His studies have led
to the finding of an alternative urokinase fibroblast
receptor. The pathological function of this newly
identified urokinase receptor in the progression of
kidney disease is being studied intensively. Dr. Zhang
is actively seeking to expand this research and his
goal is to bring these studies to the bedside to benefit
kidney patients. Dr. Zhang has served as manuscript
reviewer for Experimental Nephrology (London) and
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. He
has supervised visiting research fellows, research
associates and summer students.
Sandra L. Watkins, MD
Pediatric Nephrology Research Training Program,
NIDDK/NIH, $251,337
AWARDS AND HONORS
Renal Injury After Hematopoietic Stem Cell
Transplant, National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $152,820
Daryl M. Okamura, MD
Research Trainee Award, American Society of
Pediatric Nephrology, 2005
F. Bruder Stapleton, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors in America,” 2005
One of America’s Top Pediatricians, Consumers’
Research Council of America, 2005
Guoqiang Zhang, MD, PhD
Young Investigator Award, Seattle Children’s
Hospital, 2005
Sandra L. Watkins, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
New
Jodi M. Smith, MD, MPH
Renal Transplant and Subclinical Herpesvirus
Infection, National Kidney Foundation, $50,000
Renal Transplant and Subclinical Herpesvirus
Infection, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive
and Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $127,845
Continuing
Allison A. Eddy, MD
Fibrotic Sequelae of Childhood Renal Disease,
Vanderbilt University, National Institute of Diabetes
and Digestive and Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS,
$154,081
Molecular Mechanisms in Renal Interstitial Fibrosis,
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $364,250
Sangeeta R. Hingorani, MD, MPH
Renal Injury After Hematopoietic Stem Cell
Transplant, American Society of Nephrology,
$200,000
Jodi M. Smith, MD, MPH
Chronic Allograft Nephropathy: The Role of
Subclinical Herpesvirus Infection, American Society
of Transplantation, $80,000
Ruth A. McDonald, MD
B7 Costimulatory Blockade in Pediatric
Transplantation, Children’s Hospital Boston, National
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/NIH/
DHHS, $91,706
Sandra L. Watkins, MD
Focal-Segmental Glomerulosclerosis in Young Patients,
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $372,729
Nephrology
Pathophysiology of Childhood Hemolytic Uremic
Syndrome, Washington University of St. Louis,
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $188,099
Sangeeta R. Hingorani, MD, MPH
Research in Progress: The Kidney After Hematopoietic
Cell Transplant, renal Grand Rounds, Northwest
Kidney Center, Seattle, June 17, 2005
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Ruth A. McDonald, MD
Renal Allograft Allocation in Children, KARS meeting,
Chicago, January, 13, 2005
Allison A. Eddy, MD
The Destruction of a Kidney: Scenes from the
Battlefield, renal Grand Rounds, University of
Pennsylvania, January 2005
Update on the Transplant Registry, 2004, NAPRTCS
annual meeting, Las Vegas, January 14, 2005
The Destruction of a Kidney: Scenes from the
Battlefield, AMSPDC/Frontiers in Science Meeting,
Kiawah Island, S.C., March 2005
Normal and Fibrotic Renal Structure and Architecture,
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases, fibrosis imaging workshop,
April 2005
Management Issues in the Child with Chronic Kidney
Disease, World Congress of Nephrology pediatric
nephrology workshop, Singapore, June 2005
Proteinuria as Mediator of Chronic Kidney Disease,
World Congress of Nephrology, Singapore, June 2005
Proteinuria as Mediator of Chronic Kidney Disease,
Western Regional Pediatric Nephrology meeting,
Honolulu, July 2005
The Destruction of a Kidney: Scenes from the
Battlefield, renal Grand Rounds, University of Alberta,
Edmonton, October 2005
Proteinuria, Lipids and Interstitial Fibrosis, American
Society of Nephrology Renal Week Symposium, Why
Kidneys Fail: Translating Basic Mechanisms of Disease
into Novel Therapies. Philadelphia, November 2005
Mechanisms of Kidney Destruction, Biogen Idec
Seminar: Novel Targets and Pathways in Tissue
Fibrosis. Cambridge, Mass., November 2005
Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome 2005: Destruction of
a Kidney: Scenes from the Battlefield, visiting professor
lecture, University of Texas Southwestern University,
Dallas, May 2005
Management of the Sensitized Transplant Recipient,
Dialysis Annual Conference, Tampa, Fla., March 2,
2005
Chronic Renal Insufficiency and Failure, Genentech
training seminar, San Francisco, March 4, 2005
Extended Donor Criteria and the Pediatric Recipient:
How to Optimize the Deceased Donor List for the
Benefit of Our Patients, American Society of Pediatric
Nephrology annual meeting, Washington, D.C.,
May 15, 2005
Optimizing Living Donor Transplantation in
Children, American Transplant Congress, pediatric
symposium, Seattle, May 21, 2005
Update NAPRTCS Transplant Registry, 3rd Congress
of IPTA, Innsbruck, Austria, August, 7, 2005
Daryl M. Okamura, MD
Role of CD36 in Progressive Renal Fibrosis,
Vanderbilt Research Conference, Nashville, Tenn.,
February 9, 2005
Management of Hypertensive Emergencies in Children,
University of Hawaii Pediatric Resident Teaching
Conference, Honolulu, July 26, 2005
Multifunctional Role of CD36 in Progressive Renal
Fibrosis, University of Hawaii Pediatric Resident
Teaching Conference, Honolulu, July 27, 2005
F. Bruder Stapleton, MD
How many pediatricians are needed for the future?,
Grand Rounds, University of Florida, Jacksonville.
Jan 17–18, 2005
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Nephrology
Quantitative measures of a healthy pediatric department, Association of Pediatric Department Chairs
annual meeting, Kiawah Island, S.C., March 9, 2005
Meet the Professor — Careers on Pediatric Nephrology,
Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting,
Washington, D.C., May 15, 2005
Diet and Kidney Stones: Good News/Bad News; Acute
Urate Nephropathy; and Genetics of Urolithiasis: The
Picture Grows More Confusing, VII Congress of the
Association of Latin American Pediatric Nephrologists.
San Jose, Costa Rica, November 5–8, 2005
Jordan M. Symons, MD
Pediatric CRRT: The Basics and Controversies in
Pediatric CRRT, Tenth International Conference on
Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy, San Diego,
March 2005
Proteinuria in Pediatric Patients, 19th Annual A Day
in the Office: Problems in Pediatric Practice, Group
Health Cooperative Continuing Medical Education
Program, Seattle, April 2005
Sandra L. Watkins, MD
Complications of Dialysis in Children, Pediatric
Nephrology Seminar XXXII, Miami, February 26, 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Ake JA, Jelacic S, Ciol MA, Watkins SL, Murray KF,
Christie DL, Klein EJ, Tarr PI. Relative nephroprotection during Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections: association with intravenous volume expansion. Pediatrics.
2005;115:e673–e80.
Andreoli S, Brewer E, Watkins SL, Fivush B, Powe N,
Shevchek J, Foreman J. American Society of Pediatric
Nephrology position paper on linking reimbursement
to quality of care. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005;16:2263–2269.
Brophy PD, Somers MJG, Baum MA, Symons
JM, McAfee N, Fortenberry JD, Rogers K, Barnett
J, Blowey D, Baker C, Bunchman TE, Goldstein
SL. Multi-centre evaluation of anticoagulation in
patients receiving continuous renal replacement
therapy (CRRT). Nephrol, Dialy, and Transplant.
2005;20:1416–1421.
CCTPT Study Group (Benfield MR, Tejani A, Harmon
WE, McDonald RA, Stablein DM, McIntosh M, Rose
S). A randomized multicenter trial of OKT3 mAbs
induction compared with intravenous cyclosporine in
pediatric renal transplantation. Pediatr Transplant.
2005;9:282–292.
Common Complications of Dialysis in Children,
Fundamentals of Dialysis in Children, Tampa, Fla.,
February 27, 2005
Debley JS, Smith JM, Redding GW, Critchlow CJ.
Childhood asthma hospitalization risk after cesarean
delivery in former term and premature infants.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2005;94:228–233.
FSGS NIH Study: An Approach to Multicenter Trials,
Pediatric Nephrology Seminar XXXIII, Miami,
March 11, 2005
Eddy AA. Can renal fibrosis be reversed?
(invited editorial commentary). Pediatr Nephrol.
2005;20:1369–1375.
Eddy AA. Progression in chronic kidney disease.
Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 2005;12:353–365.
Gillespie RS, Symons JM. Sodium ferric gluconate
for post-transplant anemia in pediatric and young
adult renal transplant recipients. Pediatr Transplant.
2005;9:43–46.
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Nephrology
Goldstein SL, Somers MJG, Baum MA, Symons JM,
Brophy PD, Blowey DL, Bunchman TE, Baker C,
Mottes T, McAfee N, Barnett J, Morrison G, Rogers K,
Fortenberry J. Pediatric patients with multi-organ dysfunction syndrome receiving continuous renal replacement therapy. Kidney International. 2005;67:653–658.
McClure TD, Young ME, Taegtmeyer H, Ning
X, Buroker NE, LГіpez-Guisa J, Portman MA.
Thyroid hormone interacts with PPAR{alpha} and
PGC-1 during mitochondrial maturation in sheep
heart. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and
Circulation Physiology. Nov 2005;289:H2258–H2264.
Gordon C, Stapleton FB. Hematuria in adolescents. In:
Adolescent Medicine Clinics: Nephrologic Disorders in
the Adolescent. Sherwinter J, Foulds DM, Greydanus DE,
eds. Philadelphia: Elsevier Sanders, 2005;16: 229–239.
Neu AM, Bedinger M, Fivush BA, Warady BA,
Watkins SL, Friedman AL, Brem AS, Goldstein SL,
Frankenfield DL. Growth in adolescent hemodialysis
patients — longitudinal data from the Centers for
Medicare & Medicaid Services end-stage renal disease clinical performance measures project. Pediatr
Nephrol. 2005;20:1156–1160.
Gorman G, Fivush B, Frankenfield D, Warady B,
Watkins S, Brem A, Neu A. Short stature and growth
hormone use in pediatric hemodialysis patients.
Pediatr Nephrol. 2005;20:1794–1800.
Gross TG, Bucuvalas JC, Park JR, Greiner TC,
Hinrich SH, Kaufman SS, Langnas AN, McDonald
RA, Ryckman FC, Shaw BW, Sudan DL, Lynch JC.
Low-dose chemotherapy for Epstein-Barr virus-positive post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease
in children after solid organ transplantation. J Clin
Oncol. 2005;23:6481–6488.
Harmon WE, McDonald RA, Reyes JD, Bridges ND,
Sweet SC, Sommers CM, Guidinger MK. Pediatric
transplantation, 1994–2003. Am J Transpl. 2005;
887–903.
Hingorani SR, Guthrie KA, Batchelder AL,
Aboulhosn N, Schoch HG, McDonald GB. Acute
renal failure after myeloablative hematopoietic
cell transplant: incidence and risk factors. Kidney
International. 2005;67:272–277.
Matsuo S, LГіpez-Guisa JM, Cai X, Okamura DM,
Alpers CE, Bumgarner RE, Peters MA, Zhang G,
Eddy AA. Multi-functionality of PAI-1 in fibrogenesis:
evidence from obstructive nephropathy in PAI-1
over-expressing mice. Kidney International.
2005;67:2221–2238.
Rivara FP, Stapleton FB. Closing the quality chasm
in health care — the role of critical reading. Arch Ped
Adol Med. 2005;159:39.
Smith JM, McDonald RA. Renal transplantation in adolescents. In: Adolescent Medicine Clinics:
Nephrologic Disorders in the Adolescent. Sherwinter J,
Foulds DM, Greydanus DE, eds. Philadelphia: Elsevier
Sanders, 2005;(16):201–214.
Stapleton FB. Asymptomatic microscopic hematuria: time to look the other way? Arch Ped Adol Med.
2005;159:398–399.
Stapleton FB, Jones D, Fiser D. Leadership trends
in academic pediatric departments. Pediatrics.
2005;116:342–344.
Stapleton FB, Pendergrass TP. A new approach
to the departmental faculty meeting. J Pediatr.
2005;146:155–156.
Symons J, Grady R. Disorders of the genitourinary
system in the newborn. In: Pediatrics. Osborn, DeWitt,
First, Zenel, eds., Philadelphia: Elsevier Mosby, 2005.
Stapleton FB. Acute urate nephropathy. In: Primer
on Kidney Disease, 4th Edition. Greenberg A, ed.
National Kidney Foundation, 2005;301–304.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Pulmonary Medicine
The Division of Pulmonary Medicine (in the Department of Pediatrics) devotes its time
and resources to improvement in diagnosis, care and outcomes of children with acute
and chronic respiratory disease. It provides comprehensive and innovative care for
infants and children in the WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho) through
outreach clinics and regional training. The division has 11 pediatric pulmonologists
and 30 health care support staff in multiple disciplines. It provided clinical care to
4,746 children in 2005.
The division includes nationally recognized programs and experts in cystic fibrosis
(CF), scoliosis, asthma and sleep medicine. It comprises interdisciplinary health care
teams of physicians, nurses, social workers, nutritionists and respiratory therapists.
The teams provide comprehensive coordinated care to children with chronic breathing
difficulties and children dependent on respiratory support technology at home. The
teams promote coordinated disease management, emphasizing family and patient
education, self-management, long-term planning and psychosocial well-being.
The University of Washington has a rich clinical and research foundation in CF,
and we are fortunate to be aligned with a CF Research Development Program and
a Core Center for Gene Therapy. The Cystic Fibrosis Center has affiliate programs in
Tacoma and Spokane, Wash. and in Anchorage, Alaska. The division provides and
develops innovative diagnostic techniques, management strategies and outcome
tracking systems for children with respiratory concerns. Our pulmonary diagnostic
services include function testing designed specifically for infants and for older children,
flexible bronchoscopy, complete imaging resources, quantitative microbiology, exhaled
breath analyses and formal polysomnography and cognitive evaluations for pediatric
sleep disorders.
The division maintains a nationally accredited pulmonary fellowship training
program. It also conducts molecular, clinical and outcomes research and has amassed
an impressive record of research contributions in various areas of pediatric pulmonary
medicine over the last two decades.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Gregory J. Redding, MD, is chief of the Division of
Pulmonary Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital.
He is professor of pediatrics and director of the
Pediatric Pulmonary Training Center grant. He earned
his MD from Stanford University. He completed a
pediatrics residency at Harbor General/UCLA and a
pediatric pulmonary fellowship at the University of
Colorado. Dr. Redding is committed to improvement
in children’s health and health care through research,
training, advocacy, clinical excellence and improvement in systems of health care. Dr. Redding is an
internationally recognized expert and leader in pediatric pulmonary medicine. His clinical scope is broad,
and he is specifically interested in children with chest
wall and spine deformities, interstitial lung diseases
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and asthma. He also specializes in chronic respiratory
disorders among Third World populations of children.
Dr. Redding’s research interests include the pathogenesis of chronic lung disease in developing countries,
disorders of the thoracic cage and their treatments and
interstitial lung disease in children. His training philosophy is to assure independent and critical thinking
and the application of physiologic principles to clinical
problems. He is a consultant to the Maternal–Child
Health Bureau on leadership training in multiple
health care professions.
Edward R. Carter, MD, is chief of the Asthma Center at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. He earned his MD from
Vanderbilt University Medical School and completed
a residency in pediatrics at Walter Reed Army Medical
Center. He completed pediatric pulmonary training
Pulmonary Medicine
at the University of Florida, Gainesville. At Madigan
Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Wash. he became
chief of pediatric pulmonology and then chief of the
department of pediatrics. He retired from the Army
with the rank of colonel. Dr. Carter is committed to
making the pulmonary division accessible to both
patients and primary care providers. He co-edited
the Department of Defense–Veteran’s Administration
guidelines for the management of asthma. This
guideline was implemented worldwide in federal
health facilities. His clinical interests are asthma,
the management of the respiratory complications of
neuromuscular disorders and home mechanical ventilator support. He is also active in the management
of children with cystic fibrosis. Dr. Carter’s research
interests include clinical asthma management, asthma
follow-up and medical adherence, and assessment of
new pulmonary function techniques in toddlers and
young children.
Maida L. Chen, MD, is associate director of the Pediatric
Sleep Center and attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and acting assistant professor
in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Her clinical interests
center on sleep disorders in infants, children and adolescents. Her research interests focus on respiratory
control disorders and sleep-disordered breathing.
Jason S. Debley, MD, MPH, is chief of the bronchoscopy
service at Seattle Children’s Hospital. He received his
medical degree from Northwestern University Medical
School, Chicago. He completed his pediatrics internship and residency at Children’s Memorial Hospital in
Chicago. He spent one year as chief resident followed
by a year as staff pediatric hospitalist at Emanuel
Children’s Hospital in Portland, Ore. He completed his
FACULTY
Gregory J. Redding
MD, Chief
Gregory J. Redding, MD, Chief
Edward R. Carter, MD
Maida L. Chen, MD
Jason S. Debley, MD, MPH
Julia C. Emerson, MD, MPH
Ronald L. Gibson, MD, PhD
Nicole Mayer Hamblett, PhD
Lucas R. Hoffman, MD, PhD
Yemiserach Kifle, MD
Susan G. Marshall, MD
pediatric pulmonary fellowship at Seattle Children’s
and also earned an MPH from the University of
Washington. Dr. Debley has expertise in asthma, cystic
fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, management of
acute and chronic respiratory failure, restrictive lung
diseases of childhood and flexible bronchoscopy. He is
director of pediatric flexible fiber optic bronchoscopy
at Seattle Children’s. His research interests include
recurrent wheezing of early childhood, asthma
epidemiology and non-invasive measures of airflow
obstruction and airway inflammation in young
children. Dr. Debley is committed to expanding
clinical pulmonary services at Seattle Children’s and
establishing a sound pediatric asthma research base.
He is also extremely involved with medical student,
resident and fellow training.
Julia C. Emerson, MD, MPH, is epidemiologist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and lecturer in pediatrics
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Emerson’s research interests include the natural
history of early cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease, the
design of clinical trials to improve CF therapies and
the development of better outcome measures for CF
clinical protocols. She also collaborates on studies
of the genotypic and phenotypic changes in airway
pathogens that may be associated with CF lung
disease severity and progression.
Ronald L. Gibson, MD, PhD, is co-director of the pediatric
pulmonary fellowship program and director of the
Cystic Fibrosis Center at Seattle Children’s Hospital.
He attended Washington University in St. Louis for his
graduate degrees and completed pediatrics residency
training and a fellowship in pediatric pulmonology at
the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Gibson is committed to excellent, multidisciplinary
patient care, small group
teaching and research.
His primary research
Samuel M. Moskowitz, MD
Bonnie W. Ramsey, MD
focus is on Pseudomonas
Margaret Rosenfeld, MD, MPH
aeruginosa airway infections in young children
with cystic fibrosis (CF).
As a member of the Cystic
Fibrosis Therapeutic
Development Network,
he has been principal
investigator or co-investigator for several Phase I
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
175
Pulmonary Medicine
and Phase II clinical trials involving novel antimicrobial
agents, anti-inflammatory compounds, gene therapy
and modulators of ion transport. He also collaborates
with divisional colleagues and faculty on single-center
CF research studies.
Nicole Mayer Hamblett, PhD, is research assistant
professor in the Division of Pulmonary Medicine at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and in the Department of
Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. She is biostatistician and associate director of statistics at the Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics
Development Network Coordinating Center based at
Seattle Children’s. Her research interests include the
design and analysis of clinical trials, with emphasis
in the pediatric and orphan disease settings. She is
also involved in the statistical training of clinical
researchers and scientists, with applications to
both the laboratory and clinical fields.
Lucas R. Hoffman, MD, PhD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. He earned his MD and a
PhD in biochemistry at the University of California,
San Francisco. He did his pediatrics internship and
residency at the University of Washington and
Seattle Children’s and completed training in pediatric
pulmonology at the university. Dr. Hoffman’s research
interests are centered on chronic lung infections.
He is investigating the bacteria associated with lung
infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While
the past century has seen remarkable advances in
fighting acute and devastating infections due to the
advent of antibiotics, chronic infections have proven
to be extremely difficult to treat due to their poor
response to these antibiotics. Dr. Hoffman’s research
aims for a better understanding of how these infectious organisms evade killing by these powerful
medications. This information should enable the
design of better medical regimens to combat chronic
infections. Dr. Hoffman also cares for patients and
teaches medical students, residents and fellows.
His areas of clinical expertise include asthma,
CF, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, restrictive lung
diseases and the pulmonary complications of
neuromuscular disease.
Yemiserach Kifle, MD, is clinical director of the sleep
program in the Division of Pulmonary Medicine at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. She obtained her MD from
Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia and completed her
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
pediatric residency at SUNY Health Sciences Center,
Children’s Hospital Brooklyn. She did her pulmonary
fellowship at the University of Florida. Dr. Kifle is
board certified in pediatrics, pediatric pulmonology and sleep medicine. She has been instrumental
in establishing a comprehensive and fully accredited
pediatric sleep center at Children’s Hospital. Her
clinical interests are obstructive sleep apnea and
sleep behavioral issues.
Susan G. Marshall, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate dean for curriculum
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She earned her MD at the University of California,
Los Angeles. She completed her pediatric residency
and fellowship at the University of Washington. She
participates in the Division of Pulmonary Medicine’s
weekly Chest Clinic. Dr. Marshall is especially involved
with patients suffering from neuromuscular disease,
cystic fibrosis and psychosocial problems. At the
School of Medicine, she is involved in teaching,
educational planning and curriculum development.
In the pulmonary division she works with medical
students, residents, fellows and faculty.
Samuel M. Moskowitz, MD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. He earned his MD from
the Harvard University Medical School; he did a
pediatrics residency and a fellowship in pediatric
pulmonology at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. His research and clinical interests center
on cystic fibrosis (CF). He devotes much of his time to
research into the molecular biology of Pseudomonas
bacteria, specifically looking at mechanisms of infection and resistance of this organism. His research
includes the study of antibiotic and antimicrobial
peptide resistance of P. aeruginosa, comparative
microbiology of lung infection in CF and other chronic
pulmonary disorders and microbiological and genetic
correlates of CF lung disease severity. His educational
interests include training medical students and
residents in pediatric pulmonary medicine, and
career mentorship of pediatrics residents and
subspecialty fellows.
Bonnie W. Ramsey, MD, is attending physician and
co-director of the Pediatric General Clinical Research
Center at Seattle Children’s Hospital. She holds the
Bonnie Ramsey Endowed Chair in Cystic Fibrosis
Research at the University of Washington School of
Pulmonary Medicine
Medicine. She earned her MD from Harvard Medical
School and completed her residency in pediatrics
at Children’s Hospital Boston and Seattle Children’s
Hospital. Dr. Ramsey has been part of the Seattle
Children’s team for more than 25 years and is internationally recognized as a premier clinical investigator
in cystic fibrosis (CF). She was lead investigator of the
TOBIв„ў (Tobramycin Solution for Inhalation) clinical
trials. She has authored numerous articles and book
chapters on CF and respiratory care, and has regularly
presented her research to the American Thoracic
Society Physicians and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation;
she is frequently invited to speak internationally.
Dr. Ramsey has served on two Institute of Medicine
committees reviewing guidelines for participant safety
in clinical research.. She is a member of the American
Pediatric Society and the American Association of
Physicians. Dr. Ramsey is also director of a clinical
trials network — the Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics
Development Network — which consists of 18
academic sites in the US with the coordinating
center at Seattle Children’s.
Margaret Rosenfeld, MD, MPH, is medical director of the
pulmonary function laboratory at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and associate professor of pediatrics at
the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Her clinical interests focus on the diagnosis and
management of respiratory illnesses in children of
all ages. Her research program focuses on the assessment and treatment of early cystic fibrosis (CF) lung
disease, including infant lung function tests and an
investigation of risk factors for early acquisition of
Pseudomonas aeruginosa. She is co-fellowship
coordinator for the university Department of
Pediatrics and serves as CF consultant to the
Washington State Newborn Screening Program.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Maida L. Chen, MD
Best Poster Award, Saban Research Institute,
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
Ching-I Wong Research Award for Outstanding
Research in Pediatric Pulmonology, Children’s
Hospital Los Angeles
Ronald L. Gibson, MD, PhD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Listed in “Best Doctors in America,” 2005
Lucas R. Hoffman, MD, PhD
Leroy Matthews Physician Scientist Award
First author of one of 2005’s “Top Articles in
Infectious Disease,” Pediatric News
Samuel M. Moskowitz, MD
Young Investigator Award, General Clinical Research
Center, University of Washington School of Medicine
Bonnie W. Ramsey, MD
National Library of Medicine Women of Distinction
Gregory J. Redding, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors in America,” 2005
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Family Experience Survey Award Winner, Seattle
Children’s Division of Pulmonary Medicine
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Jason S. Debley, MD, MPH
Noninvasive Measures in Wheezy Infants and
Toddlers, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/
NIH/DHHS, $126,645
Lucas R. Hoffman, MD, PhD
Antibiotic-Mediated Adaptation of Pseudomonas
aeruginosa, NIAID/NIH, $126,306
Yemiserach Kifle, MD
Pediatric Pulmonary Training Center, University
of Washington, Health Resources and Services
Administration/DHHS, $67,008
Samuel M. Moskowitz, MD
Polymyxin Pseudomonas in CF Lung Infection,
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, $75,000
Bonnie Ramsey, MD
General Clinical Research Center-Pediatric Satellite,
University of Washington, National Institutes of
Health/DHHS, $894,859
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177
Pulmonary Medicine
Therapeutic Development Network Coordinating
Center, University of Washington, National Center
for Research Resources/NIH/DHHS, $813,473
P. Aeruginosa as a Surrogate Marker of Cystic Fibrosis,
University of Washington, National Institute of
Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases/NIH/
DHHS, $59,022
A Phase I Safety and Dose-Finding Study of Orally
Administered Curcuminoids in Adult Subjects with
Cystic Fibrosis Who Are Homozygous for Delta
F508 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance
Regulator (F508 CFTR) Mutation, SEER
Pharmaceuticals, Inc., $396,712
General Services Agreement Task Order No. 4: Natural
History of Progressive CF Lung Disease Utilizing
Controlled Volumetric Lung CT Imaging, Pulmonary
Function Measurements, Sputum Indices, and Clinical
Scores in Children with Mild CF Lung Disease – Proto,
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, $57,714
A Phase 2 Study of PTC124 as an Oral Treatment for
Nonsense-Mutation-Mediated Cystic Fibrosis, PTC
Therapeutics, Inc., $234,525
Gregory J. Redding, MD
Pediatric Pulmonary Leadership Training Center,
HRSA/MCHB, $366,000
Continuing
Ronald L. Gibson, MD, PhD
Cystic Fibrosis Centers, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation,
$97,650
Lucas R. Hoffman, MD, PhD
Adaptation to the CF, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation,
$67,500
Samuel M. Moskowitz, MD
Host-Pathogen Interactions in Cystic Fibrosis,
NHLBI/NIH, $125,658
Influence of ENaC Regulators on CF Lung Severity,
NHLBI/NIH, $185,048
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Bonnie W. Ramsey, MD
MTCC Human Core, NIDDK/NIH, $163,895
CHRMC Administrative and Clinical Cores —
Molecular Biology in CF, University of Washington,
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, $57,522
Duration of Antimicrobial Treatment Effect Following
Administration of Tobramycin Solution for Inhalation
(TOBI) in Young Children with Cystic Fibrosis, Chiron
Corp., $940,848
Inhaled Tobramycin in Young Cystic Fibrosis Patients,
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $702,749
A Multicenter, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled,
Phase 2 Study of Aerosolized tgAAVCF for the
Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis, Targeted Genetics
Corporation, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, $2,231,299
Core Center for Gene Therapy: Administrative and
Human Cores, University of Washington, National
Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney
Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $125,456
Therapeutics Development Network — Coordinating
Center, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, $2,800,036
CP-AI-003 A Blinded, Multicenter, Randomized,
Placebo-Controlled Trial with Aztreonam for
Inhalation (AI) in Cystic Fibrosis, Salus Pharma, Inc.,
$1,008,984
Long-Term Safety and Efficacy of Azithromycin in CF:
Observational Study of AZ0001 Participants, Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation, $662,138
Efficacy and Safety of Intermittent Antimicrobial
Therapy for the Treatment of New Onset Pseudomonas
Aeruginosa Airway Infection in Young Patients with
Cystic Fibrosis (Early Antipseudomonal Therapy in
CF), Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, $1,131,388
Early Antipseudomonal Therapy in Cystic Fibrosis,
National Heart, Lung, and Blood, Institute/NIH/
DHHS, $1,388,177
Pulmonary Medicine
Assessment of Induced Sputum as a Tool to Evaluate
Anti-Inflammatory Agents in Patients with Cystic
Fibrosis, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, $2,011,287
A Phase 2, Randomized, Double-Blind, ParallelDose Ranging Study of Oral TheraCLEC-Total in
Cystic Fibrosis Subjects with Exocrine Pancreatic
Insufficiency, Altus Pharmaceuticals, Inc., $232,867
Margaret Rosenfeld, MD
Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career
Development Award, NCRR/NIH, $69,796
Evaluation of Pulmonary Function Tests from Raised
Lung Volumes as Outcome Measures for Clinical
Trials in Infants with Cystic Fibrosis, Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation, $328,040
EPIC Observational Study, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation,
$385,805
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Edward R. Carter, MD
Management of the Wheezing Infant, plenary session,
Contemporary Forums Regional Nursing Program,
Seattle, March 2005
Pediatric Pulmonary Peals, and William Osler:
His Legacy to Pediatrics and Medical Education,
workshops, Madigan Army Medical Center Annual
Regional Military Pediatric Conference, Tacoma,
Wash., October 2005
Epidemiology of Asthma, plenary session, Annual
Northwest Regional Respiratory Therapy Conference,
Seattle, October 2005
Inpatient Bronchiolitis, Grand Rounds, Seattle
Children’s, November 2005
Evaluation of the Wheezy Infant: Management of
Empyema, Bellingham, Wash., February 2005
Jason S. Debley, MD, MPH
Chronic Lung Disease of Prematurity, University of
Washington School of Nursing, May 2005
Asthma Update, Port Angeles, Wash., November 2005
Analysis of Exhaled Breath in Pulmonary Disease:
Exhaled Nitric Oxide and Biomarkers in Breath
Condensate as Clinical and Research Tools,
Grand Rounds, Seattle Children’s, December 2005
Ronald L. Gibson, MD, PhD
Cystic Fibrosis — Research Update and Sharing
of Center-Specific Data, CF Parent’s Day —
Educational Conference, Seattle, March 2005
Hypertonic Saline in Cystic Fibrosis, quarterly
regional CF conference, Seattle, April 2005
Biomarkers of Early CF Lung Disease, Surrogate
Biomarkers Summit at CF Foundation, Bethesda, Md.,
January 2005
Early Intervention in CF Lung Disease, North
American CF Conference, Baltimore, October 2005
Inhaled Tobramycin in Young Children with CF,
American Thoracic Society meeting, San Diego,
May 2005
Samuel M. Moskowitz, MD
Diverse Mutational Events in Polymyxin-Resistant
Pseudomonas Aeruginosa from Colistin-Treated Cystic
Fibrosis Patients Are Associated with a Common
Pattern of Lipid A Modification, poster presentation,
ASCI/AAP joint meeting, Chicago, April 2005
Polymyxin-Resistant Pseudomonas from Cystic
Fibrosis Patients: Specific Lipid A Changes Associated
with Diverse Mutational Events, UCLA School of
Medicine, June 2005
Colistin-Treated Cystic Fibrosis Patients Harbor
Polymyxin-Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas
Aeruginosa, Some with Mutation of PmrAB, a TwoComponent Regulator of Lipid A Structure poster
presentation and Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Workshop co-moderator, North American CF
Conference, Baltimore, October 2005
Bonnie W. Ramsey, MD
Development of New Antimicrobial Therapies: How
Can the CF Community Successfully Partner with
Industry and FDA?, CFF Antimicrobial Taskforce,
Bethesda, Md., 2005
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Pulmonary Medicine
CF Care Centers and Quality Improvement, CF
Parents Day, Seattle Children’s, March 2005
Cystic Fibrosis Part 2, noon housestaff lecture,
Seattle Children’s, April 2005
Ethical Conduct of Clinical Research Involving
Children: The Institute of Medicine Report, Annual
Pediatric Bioethics Conference, Seattle, July 2005
Margaret Rosenfeld, MD, MPH
Launching a Successful Academic Career, organizer and
moderator, South Central Cystic Fibrosis Consortium,
Houston, Texas, April 2005
Gregory J. Redding, MD
Diagnosis of Wheezing in Infants and Young
Children, Grand Rounds, University of New Mexico,
Albuquerque, March 2005
Children with CF Do Not Benefit from Surveillance
Bronchoscopies, CF Around the World: Same Disease,
Different Treatments, American Thoracic Society
International Conference, San Diego, May 2005
Gastro-esophageal Reflux in Children: A Pulmonary
Perspective, American Academy of Pediatrics,
New Mexico Chapter, N.M., March 2005
Pulmonary Exacerbations, 2005 Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation Williamsburg Conference, Williamsburg,
Va., June 2005
Diagnosis of Wheezing in Infants and Young Children,
Grand Rounds, University of Texas, Houston,
November 2005
Predictors of CF Morbidity and Mortality, CF Is
Now an Adult Disease, 28th European Cystic Fibrosis
Society Conference, Crete, Greece, June 2005
Measurements of Asthma in Infants and Young
Children and Treatment of Acute Severe Asthma in
Children, Intermountain Western Allergy Association,
Sun Valley, Idaho, July 2005
Newborn Screening for CF: Is It Time? Advisory
Committee to Washington State Board of Health
to consider universal newborn screening for cystic
fibrosis, Shoreline, Wash., July 2005
Gastro-esophageal Reflux in Children: A Pulmonary
Perspective, Central Washington pediatric Grand
Rounds, November 2005
Educational Opportunities, Department of Pediatrics
new fellows orientation, Seattle Children’s, July 2005
Thoracic Insufficiency Syndrome in Children,
Bronchiectasis in Childhood and Interstitial Lung
Disease in Childhood: Update, Thoracic Society
of Australia and New Zealand, Perth, Australia,
March 2005
Pulmonary Considerations and Assessments in
Children with Congenital Spine and Chest Wall
Disorders, Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North
America (POSNA), Ottawa, May 2005
Pulmonary Assessment of Congenital Kyphoscoliosis
and Current Research Update on Pulmonary
Measurements in Spine Disease of Children, master’s
course in pediatric spine disorders, University of Texas
at San Antonio, February 2005
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Assessment of Spine Rotation and Lung Function
Asymmetry in Children with Kyphoscoliosis,
International Meeting on Advance Spine Techniques
(IMAST), Banff, Canada, July 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
New Frontiers in Clinical Research: From Diagnosis
to Therapy, moderator, University of Washington,
General Clinical Research Center, First Annual
Symposium, September 2005
Endpoints in CF Clinical Trials: One Size Does Not
Fit All, Imaging Endpoints for Cystic Fibrosis Clinical
Trials, sponsored by Cystic Fibrosis Foundation,
Chantilly, Va., September 2005
Pediatric Asthma: An Update, Grand Rounds, Toppenish
Hospital, Toppenish, Wash., September 2005
Monitoring for Early CF Lung Disease, roundtable moderator, North American Cystic Fibrosis
Conference, Baltimore, November 2005
Pulmonary Medicine
CF Clinical Research: An Update, Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation Virtual Patient Education Day Webcast,
November 2005
Gibson RL. Cystic fibrosis. In: Pediatrics. Osborn L,
DeWitt T, First L, Zenel J, eds. Philadelphia: Elsevier
Mosby, 2005: 1198–1207.
Pulmonary Exacerbations: Definitions and Their
Use in Clinical Trials, workshop for fellows in the
Department of Pediatrics, South Central Cystic
Fibrosis Consortium, Houston, Texas, December 2005
Hendeles L, Marshik P, Ahrensn R, Kifle Y, Shuster J.
Response to nonprescription epinephrine inhaler
during nocturnal asthma. Ann Allergy Asthma
Immunol. 2005;95:530–534.
PUBLICATIONS
Carter E, Debley J, Redding G. Changes in asthma
prevalence and impact on health and function in
Seattle middle-school children: 1995 versus 2003.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2005;94:634–639.
Chang AB, Redding GJ. Bronchiectasis. In: Kendig’s
Disorders of the Respiratory Tract in Children (7th
Edition). Chernick, Boat, Wilmott, Bush, 2005.
Chen ML, Tablizo MA, Kun S, Keens TG. Diaphragm
pacers as a treatment of congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Expert Review of Medical Devices.
2005;2:577–585.
Davis S, Gappa M, Rosenfeld M. Respiratory mechanics. In: Pediatric Pulmonary Function Testing Hammer
J, Eber E, eds. Prog Respir Res. 2005;33:20–33.
Debley JS, Carter ER, Gibson RL, Rosenfeld M,
Redding GJ. The prevalence of ibuprofen-sensitive
asthma in children: a randomized controlled
bronchoprovocation challenge study. J Pediatr.
2005;147:233–38.
Debley J, Smith J, Redding GJ, Critchlow C. Childhood
asthma hospitalization risk after cesarean delivery in
former term and premature infants. Ann Allergy
Asthma and Immunol. 2005;94:228–233.
Deterding R, Retsch-Bogart G, Milgram L, Gibson
RL, Ramsey BR, et al. Safety and tolerability of
Denufosol tetrasodium inhalational solution, a novel
P2Y2 receptor agonist: results of a phase 1/phase 2
multi-center study in mild to moderate cystic fibrosis.
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2005;39:339–348.
Hoffman LR, Yen E, Van Niel C, Effman, E, Gibson
RL. Lipoid pneumonia due to Mexican folk remedies:
cultural barriers to diagnosis. Arch Pediatr Adolesc
Med. 2005;159:1043–1048.
Hoffman LR, D’Argenio DA, MacCoss MJ, Zhang Z,
Jones RA, Miller SI. Aminoglycoside antibiotics
induce bacterial biofilm formation. Nature.
2005;436:1171–1175.
Kulich M, Rosenfeld M, Campbell J, Kronmall R,
Gibson RL, Goss C, Ramsey BR. Disease-specific
reference equations for lung function in patients
with cystic fibrosis. Am J Resp Critic Care Med.
2005;172:885–891.
Marshall SG, Debley JS. The respiratory system.
In: Nelson Essential Pediatrics, 5th edition. 2005,
133–138.
Moskowitz SM. A role for the vanishing physicianscientist? Letter to the editor of Journal of Clinical
Investigation (comment on editorial by Marks AR,
How to support the basic sciences, J Clin Invest,
115:2); e-publication, Jan. 20, 2005.
Moskowitz SM, Foster JM, Emerson JC, Gibson RL,
Burns JL. Use of Pseudomonas biofilm susceptibilities to assign simulated antibiotic regimens for cystic
fibrosis airway infection. J Antimicrob Chemother.
2005;56:879–886.
Moskowitz SM, Gibson RL, Effman E. Cystic
fibrosis lung disease: genetic influences, microbial
interactions, and radiologic assessment. Pediatr
Radiol. 2005;35:739–757.
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Pulmonary Medicine
Moss RB, Mayer-Hamblett N, Wagener J, Daines C,
Hale K, Ahrens R, Gibson RL, et al. A randomized,
double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalating
study of aerosolized interferon Гђ-1b in patients
with mild to moderate cystic fibrosis lung disease.
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2005;39:209–218.
Redding GJ (co-author and ad hoc subcommittee,
American Thoracic Society). Statement on home care
for patients with respiratory disorders. Am J Respir
Crit Care Med. 2005;171:1443–1464.
Rosenfeld M. Overview of published evidence on
outcomes with early diagnosis from U.S. observational
studies. J Pediatr. 2005;147:S11–S14.
Saiman L, Mayer-Hamblett N. Heterogeneity of
treatment response to azithromycin in patients
with CF chronically infected with P. aeruginosa.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005;172:1008–1012.
182
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine provides a
continuum of psychiatric services including inpatient, outpatient, day
treatment and hospital and community consultations for youth with a
wide spectrum of developmental, psychiatric and behavioral problems.
Mental and behavioral problems result from a complex interplay of
biological, environmental, psychological and social factors. Mental
health disorders affect a significant and growing number of youth, and
exact a significant cost in the lives of these children and their families.
The psychiatry program at Seattle Children’s Hospital is in the
top tier of pediatric behavioral medicine divisions in the country,
serving as a national and regional resource. In conjunction with the
University of Washington Department of Psychiatry, Seattle Children’s
is the center of clinical training, research and pediatric mental health
care for the WAMI region (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho). The
Department of Psychiatry is undergoing an expansion of its research
in basic science, genetics, developmental psychopathology and health
services related to understanding the origins, course and treatment of
mental illness in children and adolescents. Seattle Children’s serves
as the primary pediatric mental health training site for medical students, psychiatry and psychology residents and child
psychiatrists for the University of Washington. In addition, we are committed to working collaboratively with medical
colleagues in pediatrics and primary care throughout the region to expand the availability of mental health expertise
and services to children, and we offer a variety of seminars and continuing education programs.
The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine is proud of its tradition as a leader in advancing knowledge
of the origins and treatment of mental illnesses in youth, training clinician scientists and improving access to care. We
are committed to growing these efforts to reach the increasing numbers of children and families in need.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Bryan H. King, MD, is director of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and professor and vice chair of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He joined the university from
FACULTY
Bryan H. King
MD, Director
Bryan H. King, MD, Director
Elizabeth McCauley, PhD,
ABPP, Associate Director
David Breiger, PhD
Zoran Brkanac, MD
Rosemary Calderon, PhD
Lynda L. Carlisle, MD
Heather Carmichael Olson, PhD
Brent R. Collett, PhD
Amy Henry, MD
Dartmouth Medical School, where he held a similar position and served as medical director for New
Hampshire’s Division of Developmental Services.
Dr. King completed medical training at the Medical
College of Wisconsin and a medical internship and
psychiatric training at the UCLA Medical Center and
Neuropsychiatric Institute. He obtained his clinical
and research training in child and adolescent psychiatry at
Stefanie Hlastala, PhD
UCLA and the Merck
Jon McClellan, MD
Neuroscience Research
Kathleen Myers, MD,
MPH, MS,
Center in England.
Kelly Schloredt, PhD
Dr. King’s clinical and
Matthew Speltz, PhD
research interests focus
Michael G. Storck, MD
on psychiatric aspects of
Stephen Sulzbacher, PhD
developmental disorders,
Ann Vander Stoep, PhD
Christopher Varley, MD
and on severe behavioral
disturbances in autism
in particular. He chairs
a multisite clinical trial
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
183
Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
by the STAART (Studies to Advance Autism Research
and Treatment) Centers examining an antidepressant
medication in treatment of children with autism who
have significant problems with repetitive behaviors.
Dr. King is co-author of the American Academy of
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry’s practice parameters
for patients with developmental disorders and mental
illnesses. He has received lifetime achievement awards
from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry and from the American Psychiatric
Association for his work on developmental disabilities.
in children with thought disorders or chronic fatigue
syndrome, the cultural context and understanding
of autism and the evaluation of early intervention
in children with autism. He supervises psychology
residents at the university and also supervises post
doctoral fellows in pediatric neuropsychology; he also
lectures psychiatry fellows and pediatric residents,
and teaches graduate seminars in the Department
of Psychology at the University of Washington.
Dr. Breiger has served as president of the Pacific
Northwest Neuropsychological Society.
Elizabeth McCauley, PhD, ABPP, is associate director of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and professor at the University of
Washington with a primary appointment in psychiatry
and joint appointments in psychology and pediatrics.
She contributes to the Child Psychiatry Fellowship
Seminar series, the child psychology internship
didactic program and the university’s Department of
Psychology graduate seminars on childhood psychopathology and treatment issues. She also participates
in the university’s Continuing Medical Education programs and provides clinical supervision to psychiatry
residents, child psychiatry fellows and psychology
residents. She spends one week a month attending on
Seattle Children’s psychiatry consultation and liaison
service. She serves on the Children’s gender assessment
team and sees patients who have medical conditions
affecting the development of their genitalia or their
pubertal development; she also does assessments of
children with gender identity confusion. Her clinical
work includes treating adolescents with mood disorders. For 19 years her research team has been engaged
in a research program designed to characterize clinical
depression in young people. She has also studied the
psychosocial and cognitive functioning of girls and
women with Turner syndrome and cloacal exstrophy.
Zoran Brkanac, MD, is attending psychiatrist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. He is
board certified in child and adolescent psychiatry.
His interests include behavioral genetics and the
genetics of dyslexia. Dr. Brkanac received the
University of Washington’s Department of Psychiatry
Graduating Acknowledgment for Academic Excellence
in 2001 and the Psychiatric Research Society Young
Investigator Travel Award in 2002.
David Breiger, PhD, is clinical program director of
the neuropsychological assessment service at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and clinical assistant professor
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Seattle Children’s neuropsychological assessment service evaluates children and adolescents with medical,
neurological, psychological and genetic conditions that
affect development, and provides inpatient and outpatient neuropsychological assessments. His interests
include neuropsychological outcomes of children
with brain tumors, neuropsychological functioning
184
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Rosemary Calderon, PhD, is attending psychologist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor
in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral
Sciences at the University of Washington. She is
chief of psychiatric services for the Deaf and Hard of
Hearing Program and chief of the Eating Disorders
Program. Her clinical interests include long-term
outcomes for adolescents with eating disorders
(anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa) and hearing loss,
and behavioral and psychiatric problems in children.
Lynda L. Carlisle, MD, is attending psychiatrist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and acting assistant professor at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. Her
clinical interests include child abuse, post-traumatic
stress disorder, pervasive developmental disorders,
psychopathology in early childhood and metabolic
effects of atypical antipsychotics.
Heather Carmichael Olson, PhD, is attending psychologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital, senior lecturer in
the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
at the University of Washington School of Medicine
and adjunct in the Department of Speech and Hearing
Sciences at the university. She is also director of the
Early Childhood Assessment and Intervention Clinic
at Seattle Children’s and staff psychologist for the Fetal
Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
Alcohol Syndrome Diagnostic and Prevention Network
at the university. Her research interests include fetal
alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD); she is a research
affiliate of the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute and
the Center on Human Development and Disability.
Her teaching responsibilities include clinical training
for child psychiatry residents and psychology interns.
She also does a wide variety of presentations to professional and lay audiences, typically on topics of FASD
and the impact of parental substance abuse on child
development and family function. She is an appointed
member of the National FAS Task Force, a congressionally mandated committee designed to advance activities related to FASD. She is also vice president of the
FASD Study Group, a satellite research organization
with an international membership affiliated with the
Research Society on Alcoholism.
Brent R. Collett, PhD, is attending psychologist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and acting assistant professor at
the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Working in Seattle Children’s Early Childhood Clinic,
he is involved in evaluation and treatment of children
from birth to age 5 (and their families), particularly
children who have complex medical conditions (e.g.,
craniofacial anomalies) in addition to developmental,
behavioral or psychiatric problems. His research is
primarily in the area of pediatric psychology and
includes studies of children with craniofacial anomalies and survivors of childhood cancer. Dr. Collett
also maintains an active research interest in
the developmental psychopathology of disruptive
behavior disorders. His teaching activities include
supervision of child psychiatry fellows and psychology
interns in the Early Childhood Clinic and didactic
teaching related to early onset behavior problems
and normative preschool-age development.
Amy Henry, MD, is attending psychiatrist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and acting instructor in the
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at
the University of Washington. At Seattle Children’s she
works in the inpatient psychiatry unit, and is medical director of the outpatient psychiatry clinic. She
supervises child and adolescent psychiatry residents,
general psychiatry residents and medical students
both on the inpatient psychiatry unit and through the
outpatient clinic. Dr. Henry also provides some clinical
care as well as supervision to residents at community
psychiatry sites including school-based clinics, Asian
Counseling and Referral Services and a rural mental
health center in Alaska. Her clinical interests include
assessing and treating adolescents with self-harmful
behaviors, depressive disorders, developmental
disorders and anxiety disorders.
Stefanie Hlastala, PhD, is attending psychologist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant professor at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. Her interests include early onset psychosis,
and depression and bipolar disorders in youth and
adolescents. She is principal investigator for an award
aimed at adapting interpersonal and social rhythm
therapy for use with adolescents who have bipolar
disorder. She is a co-investigator on a multisite study
examining the effectiveness and safety of lithium in
youth with mania; she is also a co-investigator on
a study examining the effectiveness and safety of
antipsychotic medications in youth with schizophrenia
spectrum disorders.
Jon McClellan, MD, is medical director of Washington’s
Child Study and Treatment Center (CSTC), the state
hospital for children and adolescents, and associate
professor at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. His research focuses primarily on the diagnosis, phenomenology and treatment of early onset
schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Dr. McClellan is
involved with two multisite treatment trials, one for
early onset schizophrenia, the other for early onset
bipolar disorder. He is also collaborating on genomic
research for schizophrenia. He has been involved
in the development of treatment guidelines for the
American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
and authored the academy’s practice parameters on
early onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Dr.
McClellan’s teaching responsibilities include resident
supervision, research mentoring and didactic presentations for residents and university medical students.
Kathleen Myers, MD, MPH, MS, is director of the
psychiatry consultation and liaison service at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate professor at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. Her
interests include telepsychiatry for youth living in
underserved communities (especially those living in
rural communities in Eastern Washington and Alaska),
mood disorders in children and adolescents (especially
bipolar disorder) and the mental health needs of
medically ill children.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
185
Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
Kelly Schloredt, PhD, is attending psychologist and
research associate at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and clinical assistant professor in the University
of Washington School of Medicine. In the Seattle
Children’s inpatient psychiatry unit and the consultation and liaison service, she supervises and clinically
trains child psychiatry fellows, general psychiatry
residents, psychology residents and medical students.
She lectures in the didactic series for child fellows,
general psychiatry residents and psychology residents;
she has given a number of lectures for organizations
including the Washington State Council on Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry and the Pierce County Medical
Society. She manages a multisite longitudinal research
project following children of depressed parents as their
parents undergo treatment for depression. She is also
a co-investigator on a treatment development grant
focused on adapting behavioral activation therapy for
depressed adolescents and examining the efficacy of
this treatment.
Stephen Sulzbacher, PhD, is attending psychologist
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and the University of
Washington Medical Center. He is on the medical staff
at Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee, Wash.,
and is associate professor emeritus of the University
of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Sulzbacher’s
research focuses on early identification of central
nervous system effects of inborn errors of metabolism
and on following up on children identified through the
State Newborn Screening Program with periodic neuropsychological testing. He is also conducting research
to study the effects of pesticides on the health of
children of farm workers. Additionally, Dr. Sulzbacher
does applied research to demonstrate the use of videoconferencing as a way to provide consultation to rural
school districts serving children with special health
care needs like autism. He provides regular telehealth
consultation to rural practitioners and clinics throughout the state, as an adjunct to outreach clinics in
which he participates.
Matthew Speltz, PhD, is chief of outpatient service in the
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor in the
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
in the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Speltz’s research focuses on the neurobehavioral
development of children with craniofacial disorders,
including cleft lip and palate, psychiatric assessment
and diagnosis of adolescent disorders, disruptive disorders, autism, anxiety disorders and behavioral medicine.
Ann Vander Stoep, PhD, is assistant professor with
joint appointments in the Department of Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences and the Department of
Epidemiology at the University of Washington. Her
research interests include developmental epidemiology of adolescent depression, mental health status of
children in the juvenile justice system, transition to
adulthood for adolescents with psychiatric disorders
and development of children’s mental health interventions. She is a partner in launching the Developmental
Pathways Research Program, a collaborative effort
with the Seattle Public Schools to study the etiology
of childhood depression and to develop effective
strategies for prevention. She teaches psychosocial
epidemiology in the university School of Public
Health and provides research mentorship to epidemiology graduate students and junior scientists in the
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine.
She also teaches basic epidemiological methods to
graduate students in the university School of Nursing
and the Community Oriented Public Health Practice
Program in the Department of Health Services.
Michael G. Storck, MD, is attending psychiatrist at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and at Washington state’s
Child Study and Treatment Center, and assistant
professor at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He lectures on growth and development,
cross-cultural psychiatry, spirituality, and religion
and health, systems of care and narrative therapy. Dr.
Storck is also a supervisor and preceptor for fourthyear medical students and University of Washington
School of Nursing students. His clinical interests
include child and adolescent psychiatry and crosscultural psychiatry with Native Americans. He is a
university mentor and co-chair of the Colleges Medical
Communications Committee. He is lead investigator
in a study assessing patient and second-year medical
student perspectives on the process of early clinical
education, and co-investigator in a study on Navajo
youth and the experience of psychiatric treatment.
186
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Christopher Varley, MD, is attending psychiatrist and
medical director of the inpatient psychiatric unit at
Seattle Children’s hospital; he is also attending psychiatrist for the outpatient psychiatry clinic. He is
consulting psychiatrist for the Gateway Center for
Human Services in Ketchikan, Alaska. He is professor
Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
in the University of Washington School of Medicine
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
and is training director for the Division of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry. His clinical interests include
pediatric psychiatry and psychopharmacology.
Hemifacial Microsomia: Psychosocial and Other
Sequelae, Boston University, National Institute of
Dental and Craniofacial Research/NIH/DHHS,
$100,126
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
AWARDS AND HONORS
Jon McClellan, MD
Dr. Alexander Gralnick Award from the Child
Welfare League of America, 2005
Kathleen Myers, MD, MPH, MS
Teaching Excellence University of Washington
Fellowship in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2005
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Heather Carmichael Olson, PhD
Intervention for Individuals with Fetal Alcohol
Syndrome: Transitioning Science to Community
Projects, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/
DHHS, $300,001
Matthew Speltz, PhD
Neurodevelopment Among Infants with Deformational
Plagiocephaly, National Institute of Child Health and
Human Development/NIH/DHHS, $479,500
Continuing
Elizabeth McCauley, PhD, ABPP
Treatment of Depression in Parents: Impact on
Children, National Institute of Mental Health/NIH/
DHHS, $240,099
Jon McClellan, MD
Treatment of Early Onset Schizophrenia Spectrum
(TEOSS), National Institute of Mental Health/NIH/
DHHS, $170,043
Matthew Speltz, PhD
Neurobehavioral Correlates of Craniosynostosis,
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial
Research/NIH/DHHS, $818,170
Rosemary Calderon, PhD
Management of Eating Disorders, WSCCAP Spring
Conference, Seattle, April 30, 2005
Heather Carmichael Olson, PhD
Helping Families Move Forward: Practical Ideas
Based on FASD Research, National Fetal Alcohol
Spectrum Disorders Conference, Victoria, BC,
Canada, February 2005
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders—An Overview:
Understanding Childhood and Looking to the Future,
Pacific Northwest Neuropsychological Society Annual
Conference, Seattle, March 2005
Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders:
The Relationship of Children’s Deficits and Parenting
Challenges (poster presentation) and Caregiver
Expressed Emotion and Child Problem Behavior in
Families Raising Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum
Disorders, biennial meeting of the Society for Research
in Child Development, Atlanta, April 2005
Psychiatric Diagnosis and Medication in Fetal Alcohol
Spectrum Disorders, annual meeting of the American
Psychiatric Association, Atlanta, May 2005
Efficacy of a New Model of Behavioral Consultation for
Families Raising School-Aged Children with FASD and
Behavior Problems, annual meeting of the Research
Society on Alcoholism, Atlanta, June 2005
Brent R. Collett, PhD
Presurgery Development of Infants with Isolated
Craniosynostosis, annual conference of the American
Cleft Palate–Craniofacial Association, Myrtle Beach,
S.C., April 2005
Amy Henry, MD
Depression and Antidepressants in Adolescents,
University of Washington School of Nursing Pediatric
Drug Therapy Pharmacology Conference, March 2005
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
187
Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
Psychopathology and the DSM-IV, epidemiology graduate mental health seminar, University of Washington,
April 2005
Adolescent Depression: Prevention and Treatment
Approaches, Grand Rounds: University of Rochester,
Department of Psychiatry, Rochester, N.Y., April 2005
DBT Case Management Techniques, Harborview
DBT seminar, Seattle, October 2005
Changes in Family Environment and Child
Functioning in Relation to Changes in Parental
Depression; Treating Parents’ Depression: How
Does It Affect Their Children? (symposium); and
Methodological Considerations in Implementing
Preventive Interventions to Reduce Risk for
Depression in Adolescence (symposium chair),
SRCD, Atlanta, April 2005
Appetite and Weight-Related Side Effects of
Medications, Seattle Children’s, October 2005
Depression and Antidepressants in Adolescents,
University of Washington School of Nursing Advanced
Practice in Primary and Acute Care Conference,
October 2005
Bryan H. King, MD
Psychopharmacologic Targets in Autism, UCLA Center
for Autism Research and Treatment seminar series,
Los Angeles, January 2005.
Autism 2005 (keynote presentation) and Autism and
Medication, University of Florida Center for Autism
and Related Disabilities Annual Conference, Orlando,
Fla., January 2005
Overview of Psychotropic Drug Use in Persons with
Developmental Disabilities; Innovative Approaches:
Treatment for People with Developmental Disabilities
& Psychiatric Disorders, Northern California Regional
Centers Conference on Wellness in Developmental
Disabilities, Sacramento, Calif., January 2005
Contributions of St. Kitts to Psychiatry and
Neuroscience, Benjamin Rush Society annual meeting,
St. Kitts, W.I., February 2005
Pharmacotherapeutic Targets in Autism, psychiatry
Grand Rounds, Seattle Children’s, October 2005
Causality, Intervention and Support in Relation to
People with Intellectual Disability Who Self-Injure,
keynote lecture, Royal Society of Medicine Intellectual
Disability Forum, London, December 2005
Elizabeth McCauley, PhD, ABPP
Mental Health Update—Treating Mental Disorders
in General Medical Settings, Managing Depressed
Adolescents, University of Washington, February 2005
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School-Based Screening for Emotional Health (poster
presentation), Society for Prevention Research,
Washington, D.C., May 2005
Forms and Meanings of Comorbid Psychopathology
(symposium discussant) and Cognitive Style:
Externalizing and Internalizing Disorders (poster presentation), ISRCAP meetings, New York, June 2005
Jon McClellan, MD
Early Onset Schizophrenia, Child Welfare League
of America, Washington D.C., March 2005
Kathleen Myers, MD, MPH, MS
Pediatric Telemental Health: Reach Out and Touch
Kids on Their Home Turf — Part One, 9th annual
meeting of the American Telemedicine Association,
Denver, 2005
Kelly Schloredt, PhD
Epidemiology of Pediatric Obesity and Comprehensive
Weight Management in Children, Washington State
Council on Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Spring
Conference, Seattle, April 2005
Motivational Interviewing Practice Sessions:
Preschool Children (breakout session), Pediatric
Weight Management: Skills & Resources for Providers
Conference, Seattle Children’s and University of
Washington School of Medicine, April 2005
Michael G. Storck, MD
To Medicate Kids or Not?: The �Psychologic’
and �Physiologic’ Aspects of Medication and
Non-Medication, University of Washington
Neuropsychotropic Drug Therapy Conference,
March 2005
Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
Exile and Refuge: An Update on Youth at Child Study
and Treatment Center, Psychiatry Grand Rounds,
Seattle Children’s, June 2005
Ann Vander Stoep, PhD
Methodological Considerations in Identification
of a Target Group for Preventive Interventions
Methodological Considerations in Implementing
Preventive Interventions to Reduce Risk for
Depression in Adolescence symposium, Society for
Research in Child Development, Atlanta, April 9, 2005
Concurrent Heterotypic Co-Morbidity: Depressive
and Disruptive Behavior Problems in Early
Adolescence, and Forms and Meanings of Co-morbid
Psychopathology (symposium chair and presenter),
International Society for Research in Child and
Adolescent Psychopathology, New York, June 25, 2005
School-Based Emotional Health Screening,
University of Washington School of Public Health
and Community Medicine epidemiology seminar,
June 7, 2005
Christopher Varley, MD
ADHD in Adults, Western State Hospital Grand
Rounds, Steilacoom, Wash., March 3, 2005
Meeting Residency Education Challenges as New
Directors, American Association of Directors of
Psychiatric Residency Training annual meeting,
Tucson, Ariz., March 10, 2005
Gained in Translation: Evidence-Based Medicine
Meets Psychiatric Training, American Association of
Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training annual
meeting, Tucson, Ariz., March 12, 2005
Anxiety Disorders, Child Clinical Consultation Forum,
Anxiety Disorders Association of America 25th Annual
Conference, Seattle, March 18, 2005
Current Issues in Pediatric Psychopharmacology,
Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Update,
Seattle Children’s, April 2, 2005
Childhood Psychopathology, Cascadia Training
in Foster Care and Adoption Therapy, Northwest
Resource Associates, Seattle, May 13–14, 2005
ADHD and Other Disruptive Behaviors in Preschool
Children: Challenges in Diagnosis and Treatment,
Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting,
Washington, D.C., May 15, 2005
Antidepressants in Kids: The Controversy,
Pharmacology Conference: Neuropsychotropic Drug
Therapy, University of Washington School of Nursing,
Shoreline, Wash., June 10, 2005
Antidepressants in Children and Adolescents, 33rd
Annual Advances in Family Practice and Primary
Care, University of Washington School of Medicine,
September 15, 2005
Management of ADHD Across the Age Spectrum,
Management of Chronic Mental Illnesses, University
of Washington School of Medicine, September 30, 2005
Essentials for Training Directors, 52nd annual
meeting of the American Academy of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Toronto, October 20, 2005
Depression/Anxiety, Autism and Behavior
Management and ADHD and Comorbidities:
Assessment and Treatment, Pediatric Update
Conference, Providence Everett Medical Center,
Everett, Wash., November 10, 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Bostic JQ, King BH. Autism spectrum disorders:
emerging pharmacotherapy. Expert Opin Emerg
Drugs. 2005;10(3):521–536.
Cheng K, Myers KM, eds. Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry: The Essentials. New York: Lippincott,
Williams & Wilkins, 2005.
Collett BR, Breiger D, King D, Speltz ML,
Cunningham M. Neurobehavioral aspects of
deformational plagiocephaly: review of research and
critical issues. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2005;26:1–11.
Collett BR, Myers KM. Suicide. In: Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry: The Essentials. Meyers K,
Cheng K, eds. New York: Lippincott, Williams &
Wilkins, 2005;299-320.
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Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
Collett BR, Breiger D, King D, Cunningham M,
Speltz ML. Neurodevelopmental implications of
“deformational” plagiocephaly. J Dev Behav Pediatr.
Oct 2005;26(5):392.
Jensen J, Breiger D. Learning disorders. In: Child
and Adolescent Psychiatry: The Essentials for Primary
Care. Cheng K, Myers K, eds. New York: Lippincott,
Williams, & Wilkins, 2005.
Crowell S, Beauchaine TP, McCauley E, Smith C.
Autonomic and serotonergic correlates of parasuicidal
behavior in adolescents. Dev Psychopathol. 2005;
17:1–23.
Kapp-Simon K, Leroux B, Cunningham M,
Speltz ML. Multisite study of infants with singlesuture craniosynostosis: preliminary report of
pre-surgery development. Cleft Palate-Craniofac.
July 2005;42(4):377–385.
Edwards T, Patrick D, Topolski T, Aspinall C,
Mouradian W, Speltz ML. Approaches to craniofacialspecific quality of life assessment in adolescents.
Cleft Palate-Craniofac. Jan 2005;42(1):19–24.
Geyer JR, Sposto R, Jennings M, Boyett JM, Axtell
RA, Breiger D, Broxson E, Donahue B, Finlay JL,
Goldwein JW, Heier LA, Johnson D, Mazewski C,
Miller DC, Packer R, Puccetti D, Radcliffe J, Tao
ML, Shiminski-Maher T, Children’s Cancer Group.
Multiagent chemotherapy and deferred radiotherapy
in infants with malignant brain tumors: a report
from the Children’s Cancer Group. J Clin Oncol, 2005.
Gimpel GA, Collett BR, Veeder M, Bushman B,
Sneddon P, Hughes K, Odell JD. The effects of stimulant medication on the cognitive performance of
children with ADHD. Clin Pediatr. 2005;44:405–411.
Harle J, McClellan J. Family and group psychosocial
interventions for child- and adolescent-onset schizophrenia. In: Juvenile-Onset Schizophrenia: Assessment,
Neurobiology and Treatment. Findling RL, Schultz SC,
eds. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2005.
Hlastala SA, McClellan JM. Early onset schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. In: Child
and Adolescent Psychiatry: The Essentials. Meyers
K, Cheng K, eds. New York: Lippincott, Williams &
Wilkins, 2005.
Hlastala SA, McClellan JM. Phenomenology
and diagnostic stability of youth with atypical psychotic symptoms. J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol.
2005;15:497–509.
Hodes M, Calderon R, Varley C, Breuner CC.
Treatment of eating disorders in children and
adolescents. In: The Cambridge Handbook of
Effective Treatments in Psychiatry (in press).
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King BH, Hodapp R, Dykens E, Mental Retardation.
In: Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry–VIII.
Kaplan, Sadock, eds. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins,
2005;3076–3106.
King BH, State M, Maerlender A. Mental Retardation.
In: Clinical Child Psychiatry, 2nd Edition. Klykylo W,
Kay J, Rube D, eds. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co.,
2005;391–413.
Kuo ES, Vander Stoep A, Stewart DG. Assessing
screening tools for depression in the juvenile justice
system. Assessment. 2005;12:374–383.
Leichner P, Hall D, Calderon R. Meal support training
for friends and families of patients with eating disorders. Eating Disorders – The Journal of Treatment
and Prevention: Special issue “Addressing the Needs
of Parents.” July/September 2005;13:4.
Losh DP, Mauksch LB, Arnold RW, Maresca TM,
Storck MG, Maestas RR, Goldstein E. Teaching inpatient communication skills to medical students: an
innovative strategy. Acad Med. Feb 2005;80(2):118–124.
McCarty CA, Vander Stoep A, Kuo ES, McCauley E.
Depressive symptoms among delinquent youth:
testing models of association with stress and support.
J Psychopathol Behav Assess. 2005;28:85–94.
McClellan J. Commentary: treatment guidelines for
child and adolescent bipolar disorder. J Am Acad
Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005;44(3):236–239.
McClellan J. Early onset schizophrenia. In:
Sadock’s Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry/VIII.
Kaplan and Kaplan, eds. Baltimore: Lippincott,
Williams & Wilkins, 2005.
Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
McClellan JM. Evidence-based therapies in child and
adolescent psychiatry. Psychiatric Times. 2005;22:17–20.
Myers KM, Collett BR. Psychiatric rating scales: theory and practice. In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry:
The Essentials. Meyers K, Cheng K, eds. New York:
Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins, 2005.
Raskind WH, Igo RP, Chapman NH, Berninger VW,
Thompson JB, Matsushita M, Brkanac Z, Holzman
T, Brown M, Wijsman EM. A genome scan in multigenerational families with dyslexia: identification of
a novel locus on chromosome 2q that contributes to
phonological decoding efficiency. Mol Psychiatry.
Jul 2005;10(7):699–711.
Rockhill CR, Hlastala S, Myers KM. Bipolar disorder,
Early onset bipolar disorder (two chapters). In: Child
and Adolescent Psychiatry: The Essentials. Meyers
K, Cheng K, eds. New York: Lippincott, Williams &
Wilkins, 2005;191–210.
Vander Stoep A, McCauley E, Thompson K, Kuo
ES, Herting J, Stewart D, Anderson C, Kushner S.
Universal screening for emotional distress during the
middle school transition. Journal of Emotional and
Behavioral Disorders. 2005;13:213–223.
Varley CK, Jibson MD, McCarthy M, Benjamin S.
A survey of the interactions between psychiatry
residency programs and the pharmaceutical industry.
Acad Psychiatry. 2005;29(1):40–46.
Weber W, Taylor JA, Vander Stoep A, Weiss NS,
Standish JL, Calabrese C. Echinacea purpurea for
prevention of upper respiratory tract infections in
children. J Altern Complement Med. 2005;11(5):
1021–1026.
Winters NC, Collett BR, Myers KM. Ten-year
review of rating scales VII: scales assessing functional
impairment. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry.
2005;44:309–338.
Rosen M, Brady R, Long T, Minkel J, Reed P, Richards
J, Sulzbacher S, Zabala J. An introductory curriculum
for assistive technology, 2005; e-publication.
Sattler JM, Breiger D. Brain injuries: formal batteries
and informal measures. In: Assessment of Children:
Behavioral and Clinical Applications, 5th Edition.
San Diego: Sattler, 2005.
Saxon AJ, Oreskovich MR, Brkanac Z. Genetic
determinants of addiction to opioids and cocaine.
Harv Rev Psychiatry. Jul–Aug 2005;13(4):218–232.
Schloredt K, Varley CK. Current perspectives on
diagnosis and treatment of adolescent depression
in the primary care setting: a case-based review.
J Clin Outcomes Manag. 2005;12(5):260–274.
Storck M, Weber W, Vander Stoep A. Complementary
and complex interventions in child psychiatric treatment. In: Cambridge Manual on Evidence-Based Care
for Child Psychiatric Disorders. Cambridge University
Press, 2005.
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Radiology
The Department of Radiology has the largest concentration of board-certified
specialists in pediatric radiology in the Northwest. Serving the needs of
hospital-based physicians and community providers, 12 full- and part-time
radiologists offer the full array of pediatric radiology and medical imaging
services. Our dedicated staff members are uniquely trained and skilled in the
care of infants, children, adolescents and their families. Our team of technologists achieves the best possible images in a child-friendly environment while
always keeping radiation safety in mind. We perform and interpret more than
75,000 examinations each year.
Our team’s complete range of diagnostic and therapeutic imaging services
includes radiography, computed tomography, fluoroscopy, magnetic resonance
imaging, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, bone densitometry and 3-D imaging
data reconstruction and analysis. Seattle Children’s provides a complete range
of vascular and interventional radiology procedures, including diagnostic and
therapeutic procedures. Therapeutic procedures include body and cerebral
embolization of tumors and vascular malformations as well as fibrinolysis,
abscess drainage, radiofrequency ablation, gastrostomy and joint and
tendon injections.
Faculty members are authorities in neuroradiology, thoracic and
abdominal imaging, musculoskeletal imaging, neonatal radiology, oncologic imaging and vascular and interventional
procedures. We are continually enhancing our digital information capability in such areas as speech recognition software
for rapid report turnaround, PACS systems for soft copy reading and teleradiology review for off-hours consultation.
Children’s provides radiation oncology services through our affiliations with the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and the
University of Washington Medical Center. The Department of Radiology, in association with the University of Washington
School of Medicine, educates radiology residents and trains fellows in pediatric radiology in an American College of
Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–approved fellowship.
Faculty members are engaged in a variety of research projects in the areas of neuro-oncology, behavioral
disorders, craniofacial malformations, functional brain imaging, oncology, medical informatics and 3-D image and
high-resolution analysis.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Eric L. Effmann, MD, is director of the Department of
Radiology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and division
director of the Section of Pediatric Radiology and
professor of radiology at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He has served as chief of pediatric imaging at Duke University Medical Center. Dr.
Effmann has a long-time interest in basic and clinical
aspects of pediatric chest disease with particular interest in early cardiopulmonary development, congenital
lung lesions and quantitative and functional chest
imaging. He is a major contributor to the 10th and
11th editions of Caffey’s Pediatric X-Ray Diagnosis.
Dr. Effmann served in a variety of capacities in the
Society for Pediatric Radiology, including president,
and received the society’s Gold Medal, its highest
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honor. He is member of two honorary societies, the
Fleischner Society (chest disease) and the John Caffey
Society (pediatric radiology). Dr. Effmann serves on
the editorial board of Pediatric Radiology and is a regular examiner for the American Board of Radiology for
general boards and subspecialty board credentialing.
David K. Brewer, MD, is division chief of Computed
Tomography at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
associate professor of radiology at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He trained as the
department’s first fellow in pediatric radiology in 1977.
He completed his radiology residency and pediatric
radiology fellowship through the university. Dr. Brewer
performs radiologic-pathologic correlation on many
of the department cases and has served as pediatric
radiology fellowship director since 1999.
Radiology
Stephen L. Done, MD, is division chief of general
diagnosis in the Department of Radiology at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and clinical associate professor
of radiology and pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He completed his
residency in pediatrics at the Letterman Army Medical
Center in San Francisco, his diagnostic radiology
residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard
Medical School and a pediatric radiology fellowship at
Children’s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School.
He was chief of diagnostic radiology at Walter Reed
Army Medical Center and director of residency training when he retired from the army in 1989. He has a
clinical interest in early X-ray recognition of disease,
skeletal dysplasias and child abuse. He is an active
member in several national radiology societies.
C. Benjamin Graham, MD, is staff radiologist and attending physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital; he is
professor emeritus of radiology and pediatrics at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. His
training included internship, residency and pediatric
radiology fellowship through the university, Seattle
Children’s Hospital and the Karolinska Institute in
Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. Graham has served as associate director and director of radiology. He continues
to work part time with special interests in teaching,
general diagnosis, developmental conditions and skeletal dysplasias. He has 47 publications and is a member
of many local, national and international societies.
Angelisa M. Paladin, MD, is the radiology residency
coordinator at Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant
professor of radiology at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. She completed her radiology residency at University of Texas Southwestern/Parkland
Hospital and her pediatric radiology fellowship
FACULTY
Eric L. Effmann, MD, Director
David K. Brewer, MD
Stephen L. Done, MD
C. Benjamin Graham, MD
Angelisa M. Paladin, MD
Marguerite T. Parisi, MD,
MS Ed.
Grace S. Phillips, MD
through the University of Washington. She has a clinical research interest in pediatric urological conditions
and the temporal bone. She is a member of several
local and national radiology societies.
Marguerite T. Parisi, MD, MS Ed., is division chief of
ultrasound at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate
professor of radiology and pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. She completed her
pediatrics residency at Children’s Hospital of Buffalo
and trained as a radiology resident with fellowships in
pediatric radiology and nuclear medicine. She earned
her MS in medical education from the University of
Southern California. Dr. Parisi’s clinical and research
interests center around oncologic imaging, including
evaluation of new techniques, modalities and imaging
agents and their utilization, efficacy and clinical outcomes in both pediatric radiology and nuclear medicine. She has special expertise in the use of metaiodobenzylguanidine to image neuroblastoma and the use
of Iodine-131 radiotherapy to treat pediatric thyroid
cancer. She developed the pediatric bone densitometry
(DXA) program at Seattle Children’s. She actively participates in many regional and national radiology societies and in numerous national committees including
the national oncology cooperative, Childrens Cancer
Group. She is president of the Pediatric Council of
the Society of Nuclear Medicine and is also chair of
the Nuclear Medicine Committee of the Society of
Pediatric Radiology.
Grace S. Phillips, MD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and acting assistant professor of radiology at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. She completed her diagnostic
radiology residency at the Mallinckrodt Institute of
Radiology and her pediatric radiology fellowship
through the University
of Washington. She has
a clinical interest in
David M. Rosenbaum, MD
Dennis W.W. Shaw, MD
pediatric genitourinary
Manrita K. Sidhu, MD
radiology, organ transEdward Weinberger, MD
plantation, body imaging
and resident education.
She is an active member
in regional and national
societies.
Eric L. Effmann
MD, Director
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Radiology
David M. Rosenbaum, MD, is division chief of nuclear
medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate
professor of radiology at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He completed his pediatric radiology fellowship at Children’s Hospital Boston. He has
a clinical interest in nuclear medicine and general
pediatric radiology. He is an active member in many
regional and national radiology societies.
Dennis W.W. Shaw, MD, is division chief of pediatric
vascular-interventional radiology at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and professor of radiology at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. He completed
pediatric and neuroradiology fellowships through the
University of Washington. He divides his clinical time
between pediatric interventional and neuroradiology
services. His research interests include morphometric
brain imaging and MR spectroscopy applied to autism.
He has a particular interest in neuro-oncologic imaging and is a member of the Radiology Subcommittee
within the Children’s Oncology Group, a national
oncologic cooperative. He is also a member of the
Neuroimaging Committee of the Pediatric Brain
Tumor Consortium.
Manrita K. Sidhu, MD, is staff radiologist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of radiology
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She completed her pediatric radiology fellowship at the
University of Washington and a fellowship in vascular
and interventional radiology at Stanford University
Hospital. She has a clinical and research interest in
pediatric vascular malformations and tumors. She
is an active member of Seattle Children’s Dialysis
Access Committee and Medical Staff Nominating
Committee and is part of the expert panel of the
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Pediatric
Quality Indicators. She is also an active member of
the Vascular/Interventional Committee and Poster
Committee of the Society for Pediatric Radiology and
a member of the Educational Evaluation Committee
of the American Roentgen Ray Society.
Edward Weinberger, MD, is division chief of magnetic
resonance imaging and division chief of informatics at
Seattle Children’s Hospital; he is professor of radiology, adjunct professor of pediatrics and professor of
neurological surgery at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He completed his pediatric
residency, his diagnostic radiology residency, and a
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pediatric radiology fellowship through the University
of Washington. He has a clinical interest in pediatric neuroradiology and research interests in medical
and imaging informatics. He is a member of many
local and national societies, serving as member of the
General and Pediatric Committee of the American
College of Radiology Commission on Standards and
Accreditation and as member of the Radiological
Society of North America’s Radiology Lexicon
Committee. He is a board examiner for the
American College of Radiology.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Stephen L. Done, MD
Teacher of the Year, Department of Radiology,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Eric L. Effmann, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Dennis W.W. Shaw, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Edward Weinberger, MD
Summa Cum Laude Award, Interactive Atlas of
Pediatric Brain CT/MR Imaging, ASNR annual
meeting
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Stephen L. Done, MD
A Newly Described Mutation in the Calcium-Sensing
Receptor Gene, Ray E. Helfer Society 5th annual
meeting, New Paltz, N.Y., October 2005
Eric L. Effmann, M.D.
Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Rib (VEPTR)
and Bronchopulmonary Fistula/Hydropneumothorax,
John Caffey Society annual meeting, San Francisco,
June 22–25, 2005
Marguerite T. Parisi, MD, MS, Ed.
The Role of Nuclear Medicine in Evaluation and LongTerm Follow Up of Children with Cancer, American
Pharmacists Association annual meeting, Orlando,
Fla., April 2, 2005
Radiology
Developmental Anomalies of the Upper Urinary
Tract in Children, postgraduate course; Genitourinary
Section of Post Graduate Course, course co-development; Essentials of Pediatric Genitourinary Imaging
I, moderator and course development; Essentials of
Pediatric Genitourinary Imaging II, moderator and
course development; Pediatric Uroradiology Case
Review: Masters Cases; and Interactive Digital Atlas
of the Pediatric Skeletal System, The Society for
Pediatric Radiology 48th annual meeting, New
Orleans, May 3–6, 2005
Neonatal Abdominal Masses: Pediatric GU 101,
Canadian Society of Nuclear Medicine annual
meeting, Vancouver, BC, Canada, May 12, 2005
Pediatric PET, PET/CT and CT Anatomy for the
Nuclear Medicine Physician, moderator and course
development, 52nd annual meeting of the Society of
Nuclear Medicine, Toronto, June 18, 2005
Pediatrics “Read with the Experts,” moderator and
course co-development, 52nd annual meeting of the
Society of Nuclear Medicine, Toronto, June 19, 2005
Interpretation of Infrequently Performed Pediatric
Nuclear Medicine Procedures—Includes Adult Diseases
Presenting in the Pediatric World, course organizer,
52nd annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear
Medicine, Toronto, June 20, 2005
Pediatric DEXA: Indications, Strategies for Developing
a Referral Base; and Adult and Pediatric DEXAApplications and Interpretation, moderator and
course organizer, 52nd annual meeting of the Society
of Nuclear Medicine, Toronto, June 22, 2005
Manrita K. Sidhu, MD
3D CTA of Pediatric Head and Neck Vascular
Anomalies, The Society for Pediatric Radiology
48th annual meeting, New Orleans, May 3–6, 2005
Pediatric Interventional Radiology for Urology,
Department of Urology, Seattle Children’s,
September 2005
Edward Weinberger, MD
Interactive Digital Atlas of the Pediatric Skeletal
System, The Society for Pediatric Radiology 48th
annual meeting, New Orleans, May 3–6, 2005
Interactive Atlas of Pediatric Brain CT/MR imaging,
American Society of Neuroradiology annual meeting,
Toronto, May 21–27, 2005
Interactive Digital MR Atlas of the Pediatric Knee,
Association of University Radiologists annual meeting,
Montreal, May 4–7, 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Amundsen LB, Artru AA, Dager SR, Shaw DWW,
Friedman S, Sparks B, Dawson G. Propofol sedation
for longitudinal pediatric neuroimaging research.
J Neursurg Anesthsiol. 2005;17:180–192.
Bittles MA, Sidhu MK, Sze RW, Perkins JA, Finn L.
Multidetector CT angiography of pediatric vascular
malformations and hemangiomas: utility of 3-dimensional reformatting in differential diagnosis. Pediatr
Radiol. 2005;35(11):1100–1106.
Pediatric DXA: Background, Indications, Strategies
for Developing a Referral Base, Interpretation,
Seattle Children’s, November 18, 2005
Doherty D, Glass IA, Siebert JR, Strouse PJ, Parisi
MA, Shaw DWW, Chance PF, Barr M, Nyberg D.
Prenatal diagnosis in pregnancies at risk for Joubert
syndrome by ultrasound and MRI. Prenat Diagn.
2005;25:442–447.
Grace S. Phillips, MD
Interactive Digital Atlas of the Pediatric Skeletal
System, The Society for Pediatric Radiology 48th
annual meeting, New Orleans, May 3–6, 2005
Hoffman LR, Yen EH, Kanne JP, Effmann EL, Gibson
RL, Van Niel CW. Lipoid pneumonia due to Mexican
folk remedies: cultural barriers to diagnosis. Arch
Pediatr Adolesc Med. Nov 2005;159(11):1043–1048.
Mayock R, Phillips G, Parisi MT, Ngo A, deRegt D,
Weinberger E. Interactive digital atlas of the pediatric
skeletal system. Pediatr Radiol. 2005;35(S-1):S92.
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Radiology
Moskowitz SM, Gibson RL, Effmann EL. Cystic
fibrosis lung disease: genetic influences, microbial
interactions, and radiological assessment. Pediatr
Radiol. 2005;35:739–757.
Parisi MA, Doherty D, Eckert ML, Shaw DWW,
Ozyurek H, Aysun S, Giray O, Adulrahman AS, Al
Shahwan S, Dohayan N, Bakhsh E, Indridason OS,
Dobyns WB, Bennett CL, Change PF, Glass IA.
AHI1 mutations cause both renal dystrophy and
renal cystic disease in Joubert syndrome. J Med Genet,
Sept 9, 2005; e-publication.
Parisi MT. Developmental abnormalities of the
upper urinary tract in children. Post Graduate Course
Syllabus, The Society for Pediatric Radiology 48th
annual meeting, 88–93, 2005.
Perkins JA, Sidhu M, Manning SC, Ghioni V, Sze RW.
Three-dimensional CT angiography imaging of
vascular tumors of the head and neck. Int J Pediatr
Otorhinolaryngol. 2005; 69(3):319–325.
Sidhu MK, Perkins JA, Shaw DWW, Bittles MA,
Andrews RT. Ultrasound-guided endovenous diode
laser in the treatment of congenital venous malformations: preliminary experience. J Vasc Interv Radiol.
2005; 16:879–884.
Strand AD, Aragaki AK, Shaw DWW, Bird T,
Holton J, Turner C, Tapscott SJ, Tabrizi SJ, Schapira
A, Kooperberg C, Olson JM. Gene expression in
Huntington’s disease skeletal muscle: a potential biomarker. Hum Mol Genet. Jul 2005; 4(13):1863–1876.
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Rehabilitation Medicine
The Department of Rehabilitation Medicine helps children and their
families adapt to changes in functioning brought on by injury, illness or
congenital defect. The department includes the divisions of Occupational
Therapy, Speech and Language Services, Physical Therapy and
Rehabilitation Psychology. As the regional leader in pediatric rehabilitation,
we receive patients from the WAMI region (Washington, Alaska,
Montana, Idaho).
The Seattle Children’s rehabilitation program draws on the experience
and expertise of its staff of board-certified pediatric physiatrists; nurses;
occupational, physical and recreational therapists; speech and language
pathologists; teachers; social workers; child clinical psychologists;
neuropsychologists; and nutritionists. These professionals perform a
comprehensive assessment of each child’s needs and abilities and
develop short- and long-term treatment plans suited to the individual
child’s medical and family circumstances.
Rehabilitation services are provided for inpatients and outpatients at
Seattle Children’s Hospital. Outpatient services are offered through the Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic as well as through
our arthrogryposis, brachial plexus, limb deficiency and Muscular Dystrophy Association sub-specialty clinics. Physician
outreach clinics are held in Yakima and Bellingham, Wash. and some outpatient therapy services are available at our
satellite location in Bellevue, Wash. Inpatient care is provided in our new 12-bed unit, which is certified by the Rehabilitation
Accreditation Commission (CARF) as a Pediatric Family-Centered Program in Medical Rehabilitation, and designated by
the State Department of Health as the only Level I Pediatric Trauma Rehabilitation Center in Washington.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Kenneth M. Jaffe, MD, is director of the Department of
Rehabilitation Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital;
he is professor of rehabilitation medicine and adjunct
professor of pediatrics and neurological surgery at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. He
is board certified in pediatrics and physical medicine
and rehabilitation. His clinical activities include inpatient rehabilitation and outpatient clinics at Seattle
FACULTY
Kenneth M. Jaffe, MD,
Director
Ross M. Hays, MD
Teresa L. Massagli, MD
Kenneth M. Jaffe
MD, Director
Children’s and consultation at Harborview Medical
Center. Clinical interests include care of children with
multiple traumas, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord
injury, limb deficiency, arthrogryposis and other neurological and neuromuscular disorders. His research
interests include outcomes from pediatric trauma and
brain injury, and management of arthrogryposis and
pediatric pain. He has served as principal investigator
and co-investigator on numerous research grants. He
is editor-in-chief of Archives of Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation, the mostly highly cited journal in the
rehabilitation sciences. He also serves on the editorial
board of the journal Brain Injury.
Ross M. Hays, MD, is medical director of the Pediatric
Palliative Care Program at Seattle Children’s Hospital,
professor in the Department of Rehabilitation
Medicine and adjunct professor of pediatrics at
the University of Washington School of Medicine;
he is also a faculty associate in the Department of
Biomedical History and Ethics. He attends in Seattle
Children’s neurodevelopmental and rehabilitation
medicine clinics and leads the inpatient pediatric
rehabilitation consult service. He is board certified
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
197
Rehabilitation Medicine
in pediatrics, rehabilitation medicine and hospice
and palliative medicine. Dr. Hays has been principal
investigator on a trial using botulinum toxin to
improve function for children with cerebral palsy and
co-investigator in a study of the efficacy of selective
dorsal rhizotomy in the treatment of cerebral palsy.
He has participated in research investigating pain and
painful procedures in children and projects to improve
education on chronic disease and disability. Dr. Hays
is pediatric clinical core leader for the Seattle Cancer
Care Alliance’s Muscular Dystrophy Cooperative
Research Center, which provides care to children with
severe life-limiting illness using a unique model that
is highly regarded throughout the country. He also
provides consultation on pediatric palliative care to
hospitals regionally and nationally.
Teresa L. Massagli, MD, is attending physician at
Seattle Children’s hospital and professor of rehabilitation medicine and pediatrics at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. She is board certified
in pediatrics and in physical medicine and rehabilitation, and subspecialty certified in spinal cord injury
medicine. Her clinical activities include inpatient
rehabilitation and outpatient clinics at Seattle
Children’s, regional outreach clinic in Bellingham,
Wash., and consultative rehabilitation medicine at
Fircrest School and Harborview Medical Center. She is
also residency program director for physical medicine
and rehabilitation at the University of Washington.
Clinical interests include care of patients with spinal
cord injury, traumatic brain injury and other neurological and neuromuscular disorders. Her research
interests are in outcomes after traumatic brain injury
and medical and rehabilitation issues in pediatric
spinal cord injury. She is also interested in methods
of evaluation of resident competence in graduate
medical education.
Teresa L. Massagli, MD
Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award,
ACGME, 2005
New Jersey Medical School Excellence in
Teaching Award, 2005
Listed in America’s Top Doctors, 2005
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Ross M. Hays, MD
Alaska Native Health System Program in
Palliative Care, May 2005
Kenneth M. Jaffe, MD
Conflicts of Interest in Medical Publishing, Archives
of Physical Medicine Rehabilitation Editorial Board,
March 6, 2005
Teresa L. Massagli, MD
Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury, University of
Washington, January 31, 2005
Effective Presentations, resident seminar, Department
of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington,
March 21, 2005
Building Your Educator’s Portfolio, faculty development workshop, University of Washington,
May 24, 2005
Using the 360-Degree Evaluation to Assess Resident
Competence, New Jersey Medical School, June 7, 2005
Effective Presentations, New Jersey Medical School,
June 7, 2005
AWARDS AND HONORS
Ross M. Hays, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Kenneth M. Jaffe, MD
Listed in America’s Top Doctors, 2005
Listed in “Best Doctors in America,” 2005
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
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Enhancing PM&R Resident Teaching Skills: Strategies
in Clinical Precepting, and Enhancing PM&R
Resident Teaching Skills: Giving Effective Feedback,
New Jersey Medical School, June 8, 2005
The Neurological Examination, orientation seminar,
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of
Washington, July 11, 2005
Rehabilitation Medicine
Clinical Precepting Skills, seminar, Department of
Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington,
October 3, 2005
Strategies for Managing Fatigue, resident seminar,
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University
of Washington, November 7, 2005
Educator Portfolio Development, Department
of Psychiatry, University of Washington,
November 7, 2005
McLaughlin JF, Felix S. Nowbar S, Ferrel A,
Bjornson K, Hays R. Lower extremity sensory function in children with cerebral palsy. Pediatr Rehab.
2005;8(1):45–52.
Slomine BS, McCarthy ML, Ding R, MacKenzie EJ,
Jaffe KM, Aitken ME, Durbin DR, Christensen JR,
Dorsch AM. Healthcare utilization and needs following
pediatric traumatic brain injury. Pediatrics. 2005;
in press.
PUBLICATIONS
Ding R, McCarthy ML, Houseknecht E, Ziegfeld S,
Knight VM, Korehbandi P, Parnell D, Klotz P,
MacKenzie E, Durbin D, Paidas C, Aitken M,
Jaffe KM, Slomine B, Dorsch A, Christensen J,
Berk R. Health-related quality of life of children
with an extremity fracture: a one year follow-up
study. J Pediatr Orthop. 2005; in press.
Engel JM, Kartin D, Jaffe KM. Exploring chronic
pain in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy:
a model for pediatric neuromuscular disease. In:
Carter, G, ed. Rehab Clin North Am. Philadelphia:
Elsevier, 2005:1113–1124.
Feudtner C, Larter N, Villareale BM, Sharp V,
Hays R, Neff JM. Technology-dependency among
patients discharged from a children’s hospital: a retrospective cohort study. BMC Pediatr. May 9, 2005;5:8.
Hakimi KN, Massagli TL. Anterior spinal artery
syndrome in two children with genetic thrombotic
disorders. J Spinal Cord Med. 2005;28:69–73.
Massagli TL, Knowles J. Special considerations for
pediatric patients with disability due to trauma. In:
Robinson LR, ed. Trauma Rehabilitation. Lippincott
Williams & Wilkins, 2005:pp 291–312.
McCarthy, ML, MacKenzie EJ, Durbin DR, Aitken
ME, Jaffe KM, Paidas CN, Slomine BS, Dorsch AM,
Berk RA, Christensen JR. The pediatric quality of life
inventory: an evaluation of its reliability and validity
for children with traumatic brain injury. Arch Phys
Med Rehabil. 2005;86(10):1901–1909.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Department of Surgery
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
The Department of Surgery consists of 29 full-time University of Washington
School of Medicine faculty members who have devoted their practices to
clinical excellence, innovation, surgical education and expanding research.
Our surgeons are members of nine different divisions: Cardiothoracic Surgery,
Craniofacial, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, General and Thoracic Surgery,
Neurosurgery, Ophthalmology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Otolaryngology,
Urology and Transplant Surgery. With fellowship training programs in five of these
disciplines, we have consistently attracted top trainees from around the world.
The spirit of innovation has characterized the Department of Surgery. A number
of our faculty are internationally recognized for developing revolutionary pediatric
Robert S. Sawin, MD
Surgeon-in-Chief
surgical techniques, including Dr. Michael Mitchell, Urology, for pioneering
complete primary exstrophy reconstruction; Dr. Joseph Gruss, Craniofacial,
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, for innovating surgical techniques for facial
trauma and infant cleft; and Dr. John Waldhausen, General and Thoracic Surgery,
for leadership in using minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques.
Basic science laboratories are led by Dr. James Bassuk in the human urothelial
biology lab, and by Dr. Stephen Kim, who focuses on tissue engineering of
the intestine. Dr. Jonathan Perkins, Otolaryngology, performs collaborative
translational research efforts with the vascular biology laboratory at the
University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Kathleen Sie performs clinical research focused on childhood hearing loss in
the Childhood Communication Center. Dr. Henry Ou investigates ototoxicity with
a focus on otoprotection. Dr. Jeffrey Ojemann leads research funded by the
National Institutes of Health (NIH) that focuses on functional MRI.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
201
Cardiothoracic Surgery
The Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery (in the Department of Surgery) treats neonates,
infants, children and teens with heart failure, coronary disease, structural defects and
rhythm disturbances. We perform open and closed heart surgeries, specializing in
one-stage corrective procedures. Surgical therapies include coronary artery bypass
graft, heart valve repair and replacement, heart transplantation (including cardiac
assist devices), electrophysiology, arrhythmia surgery and thoracic aorta repairs.
We have a dedicated cardiac intensive care unit with state-of-the-art equipment
and an exceptional nursing staff for all cardiac surgical patients.
Areas of research include developing an implantable ventricular assist device
for young children and studying intracellular energetics of myocites relating to
pathophysiology of the failing heart using novel tools.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Gordon A. Cohen, MD, PhD, is chief of the Division of
Cardiothoracic Surgery at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and associate professor of pediatric cardiothoracic
surgery at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He is co-director of Seattle Children’s
Heart Center and holds the Sam and Althea Stroum
Endowed Chair in Pediatric Cardiovascular Surgery.
He received his medical degree from Tulane University
School of Medicine; he earned an MS and a PhD in
pharmacology from the University of California, Los
Angeles. He completed residencies in cardiothoracic
surgery at the University of Washington School of
Medicine and in general surgery at UCLA Medical
Center. He has been consulting cardiothoracic surgeon
at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in
London and senior lecturer at the Institute of Child
Health at University College London. His interests
include complex neonatal repairs, pediatric heart and
lung transplant, mechanical cardiac assistance and
heart failure. He is conducting research on a pediatric
ventricular assist device (VAD) program.
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Lester C. Permut, MD, is attending surgeon in pediatric
cardiothoracic surgery at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and associate professor in the Department of Surgery
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Permut received his MD from Boston University
School of Medicine, and did postgraduate training at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and University
of California, Los Angeles Medical Center. He has
completed the University of Washington’s Teaching
Scholars program. He is director of education for the
pediatric cardiac surgery program and cardiothoracic
surgery lecturer for the anesthesia and pediatric
ICU (Intensive Care Unit) fellowship programs. His
clinical interests include pediatric cardiac surgery
and complex congenital heart defects.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Gordon A. Cohen, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Cardiothoracic Surgery
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Gordon A. Cohen, MD, PhD
Cardiac ECMO and Mechanical Cardiac Assist,
AmSECT Pediatric Perfusion Meeting, 2005
annual meeting, July 2005
Lester C. Permut, MD
Normal Cardiac Anatomy and Pathology of
Congenital Heart Disease, pediatric critical care
fellowship lectures, Seattle Children’s, 2005
Hoskote A, Cohen GA, Goldman A, Shekerdemian L.
Tracheostomy in infants and children after cardiothoracic surgery: indications, risk factors and timing. J
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. Oct 2005;130(4):1086–1093.
Jacobs JP, Elliott MJ, Anderson RH, Quintessenza
JA, Chai PJ, Morell VO, Botero LM, van Gelder HM,
Badhwar V, Kanani M, Cohen GA, Burke RP.
Creating a database with cardioscopy and intraoperative imaging. Cardiology in the Young. 2005;15
(suppl 1) 184–189.
Myocardial Protection in Cardiac Surgery and
Surgery of CHD, pediatric critical care fellowship
lecture, Seattle Children’s, 2005
Muzaffar AR, Ploplys EA, Stevenson JG, Cohen G,
Permut LC. Direct microvascular repair of an infant’s
transected coronary artery: case report. J Reconstr
Microsurg. Nov 2005;21(8):547–550.
PUBLICATIONS
Ricci M, Cohen GA, Kocyildirim E, Khambadkone S,
Elliott M. Arterial switch operation with quadricuspid
pulmonary valve. Ann Thorac Surg. Apr 2005;
79(4):1428–1430.
Balfour-Lynn IM, Abrahamson E, Cohen GA,
Hartley J, King S, Parikh D, Spencer D, Thomson
AH, Urquhart D (on behalf of the Pediatric Pleural
Diseases Subcommittee of the BTS Standards of Care
Committee). BTS guidelines for the management of
pleural infection in children. Thorax. 2005;60:i1–i21.
Choudhary AK, Sellars ME, Wallis C, Cohen GA,
McHugh K. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax
in children: the role of CT in guiding management.
Clin Radiol. Apr 2005;60(4):508–511.
Cohen GA, Permut LC. Decision making for mechanical cardiac assist in pediatric cardiac surgery. Semin
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg Pediatr Card Surg Annu.
2005;8:41–50.
FACULTY
Gordon A. Cohen, MD, PhD,
Chief
Lester C. Permut, MD
Gordon A. Cohen
MD, PhD, Chief
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Craniofacial, Plastic and
Reconstructive Surgery
The Division of Craniofacial, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (in the Department
of Surgery) provides a comprehensive range of plastic and craniofacial services for
congenital and acquired conditions affecting infants, children and adolescents. Two of
our surgeons are part of the multidisciplinary Craniofacial Center at Seattle Children’s
Hospital, which treats children with cleft lip and palate and other craniofacial problems.
The plastic surgeons play an integral role in the treatment of patients with cleft and
craniofacial conditions and also help manage maxillofacial trauma, tumors and other
developmental anomalies of the head and neck. The Plastic Surgical Clinic treats
children with general plastic surgical issues such as skin and soft tissue tumors and
abnormalities and other reconstructive problems. The plastic surgery program has
recruited a third full-time surgeon, who will be arriving in September 2006, to provide
needed services to our large patient load.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Joseph S. Gruss, MD, is chief of the Division of
Craniofacial, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor in
the Department of Surgery at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He is the first
holder of the Marlys C. Larson Endowed Chair in
Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery. He earned his MD in
Johannesburg, South Africa and completed general
and plastic surgery training as well as a fellowship in
head and neck oncological and craniofacial surgery.
Dr. Gruss came to Seattle Children’s in 1991 to establish a state-of-the-art craniofacial surgical program;
the Craniofacial Center is now the busiest program of
its type in North America. Dr. Gruss has pioneered the
application of craniofacial techniques to the care of
facial trauma and the use of rigid internal fixation of
the craniofacial skeleton. In addition he has pioneered
numerous techniques in the field of infant cleft and
craniofacial surgery. Dr. Gruss has supervised and
trained fellows from all over the world and is a regular
teacher in North America, Europe and the Far East.
Loren H. Engrav, MD, is attending surgeon at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and professor in the Department
of Surgery at the University of Washington School
of Medicine. He served as chief of the Division of
Plastic Surgery from 1977 to 2001 and also attends at
University of Washington Medical Center, Harborview
Medical Center and the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound
Health Care System hospital in Seattle. He does
didactic and clinical teaching at the University of
Washington. Dr. Engrav’s clinical interests include
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acute and reconstructive burns and general plastic
surgery. His research interests include hypertrophic
scarring and wound healing.
Richard A. Hopper, MD, is surgical director of the
Craniofacial Center at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
assistant professor in the Department of Surgery at
the University of Washington School of Medicine.
He received his MD from Memorial University of
Newfoundland in St. John’s, Newfoundland and
Labrador, Canada. Dr. Hopper’s clinical practice
focuses on the surgical treatment of cleft lip and
palate, craniosynostosis and rare and severe birth
deformities of the bones and soft tissues of the face.
He has worked to standardize a two-year CT scan
protocol for patients undergoing cranial vault
expansion for the treatment of craniosynostosis.
The database now has 60 patients with complete
data, and will increase at about 60 patients per year.
Seattle Children’s also has the second-largest clinical
database on external midface distraction in the
country. Dr. Hopper and his colleagues have used this
data to complete studies on generate bone formation,
long-term 3D stability and psychosocial impact.
Matthew B. Klein, MD, MS, is attending surgeon at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and assistant professor
of surgery at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He is associate program director for the
plastic surgery residency program at the university.
He earned his MD from Yale University and an MS
in epidemiology from the University of Washington.
Dr. Klein does didactic and clinical teaching and has
hospital appointments at Seattle Children’s, University
Craniofacial, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
of Washington Medical Center, Harborview Medical
Center, and the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health
Care System hospital.
Nicholas B. Vedder, MD, is attending surgeon at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and chief of the Division
of Plastic Surgery in the Department of Surgery at
the University of Washington. He attends at Seattle
Children’s, Harborview Medical Center, University
of Washington Medical Center, Veterans Affairs
Puget Sound Health Care System and Seattle Cancer
Care Alliance. He is professor in the departments
of Surgery and Orthopedics and in the Division of
Plastic Surgery at the University of Washington.
Dr. Vedder’s clinical and research interests include
plastic and reconstructive surgery, hand surgery
and reconstructive microsurgery.
Symposium on Facial Reconstruction, Plastic Surgery
Educational Foundation, Tucson, Ariz., February 2005
Management of Complex Craniofacial Trauma,
visiting professor, University of Miami, February 2005
Cleft and Craniofacial Surgery, mini medical school,
University of Washington, March 2005
Symposium on pediatric plastic surgery, Baylor College
of Medicine, Houston, March 2005
Symposium on orbital surgery, Johns Hopkins
University, Baltimore, April 2005
Visiting professor: University of Mississippi, Jackson,
Miss., May 2005
Visiting professor: University of Montana and
St. Patrick’s Hospital Postgraduate Symposium
on Facial Trauma, Missoula, Mont., June 2005
AWARDS AND HONORS
Joseph S. Gruss, MD
Best Paper Award, Educational Foundation of
American Society of Maxillofacial Surgery, 2005
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Joseph S. Gruss, MD
Differential Diagnosis of Abnormal Head Shape
in Infants, Ralph Millard lecture, International
Symposium on Pediatrics, Miami Children’s
Hospital, January 2005
Management of Vascular Malformations in Kids and
Adults, Northwest Society of Plastic Surgeons, Maui,
Hawaii, February 2005
FACULTY
Joseph S. Gruss, MD, Chief
Loren H. Engrav, MD
Richard A. Hopper, MD
Matthew B. Klein, MD, MS
Nicholas B. Vedder, MD
Visiting professor: University of Cardiff, ACMF
International Symposium on Orbital Surgery,
Cardiff, UK, September 2005
Visiting professor: Stanford University, Management
of Facial Fractures postgraduate course in plastic
surgery, Palo Alto, Calif., October 2005
Differential Diagnosis of Abnormal Head Shape in
Infants, visiting professor, University of Akron, Ohio,
October 2005
Course chairman, ACMF advanced maxillofacial
course, Portland, Ore., November 2005
Special honored lecturer, ACMF advanced maxillofacial course on facial trauma, Frankfurt, Germany,
December 2005
Richard A. Hopper, MD
Hopper RA, Kelley P. Use of a nasal “passenger” graft
during Lefort III distraction in a child with MarshallStickler syndrome. American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial
Association 62nd annual meeting, Myrtle Beach, S.C.,
April 2005
Joseph S. Gruss
MD, Chief
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
205
Craniofacial, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Hopper RA, Lewis C, Starr J, Umbdenstock R.
Outpatient cleft lip repair – should we do it? NWSPS
annual meeting, Kapalua, Hawaii, February 2005
Hopper R, Kelley P, Gruss JS. Definitive care
phase: maxillofacial injuries In: Surgery. Greenfield L,
ed. 2005.
Kelley PK, Cunningham M, Hing A, Sze R, Gruss JS,
Ellenbogen RG, Hopper RA. Anterior plagiocephaly
secondary to minor suture synostosis: clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. American Cleft
Palate-Craniofacial Association 62nd annual meeting,
Myrtle Beach, S.C., April 2005
Manning SC, Bloom DC, Gruss JS, et al. Diagnostic
and surgical challenges in the pediatric skull base.
Otolaryngol. Clin. North Am. Aug 2005;38:773–794.
Kelley P, Hopper RA, Watts R. Temporal 3-D CT
imaging of pterygomaxillary ossification following Lefort III distraction. American Cleft PalateCraniofacial Association 62nd annual meeting,
Myrtle Beach, S.C., April 2005
Umbdenstock R, Hopper RA, Lewis C, Starr J, Fisher
D. Complications within the first 24 hours following
cleft lip repair: a justification for overnight admission.
American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association 62nd
annual meeting, Myrtle Beach, S.C., April 2005
Watts R, Hopper RA, Umbdenstock R, Lewis C, Starr
J, Fisher D. Complications within the first 24 hours
following cleft lip repair: a justification for overnight
admission. Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons 59th
annual meeting, Nanaimo, Canada, June 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Gruss JS. Foreword. In: Evaluation and Treatment
of Orbital Fractures: A Multidisciplinary Approach.
Holck DC, ed. Elsevier, 2005.
Heike CL, Cunningham M, Gruss JS, et al. Skeletal
changes in epidermal nervus syndrome: does ipsilteral
involvement provide clues to the pathogenesis? Am J
Med Genet. Dec 2005;139:67–77.
Hopper RA, Gruss J. Trauma — definitive care
phase: maxillofacial injuries. In: Surgery: Scientific
Principles and Practice, 4th edition. Mulholland,
Lillemoe, Doherty, Maier, Upchurch, eds. Philadelphia:
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2005;389–395.
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Perking JA, Lewis CW, Gruss JS, et al. Furlow
palatoplasty for management of velopharyngeal
insufficiency: A prospective study of 148 consecutive
patients. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. July 2005;116:72–80.
Ploplys E, Muzaffar A, Gruss JS, et al. Early definitive
cranioplasty in infants with cutis aplasia of the scalp.
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. July 2005; 42:442–447.
Sze RW, Hopper RA, Ghioni V, Gruss JS, Ellenbogen
RG, King D, Hing AV, Cunningham ML. MDCT imaging diagnosis of the child with posterior plagiocephaly.
Am J Roentgenol. Nov 2005;185(5):1342–1346.
Sze R, Gruss JS. Ultrasound screening of lambdoid
suture. Year Book in Plastic Surgery, 2005.
Zerr D, Ellenbogen RG, Gruss JS, et al. Surgical
site infections following intracranial surgery for
craniofacial malformations: frequency and risk
factors. Neurosurg. April 2005;56:733–739.
General and Thoracic Surgery
The Division of General and Thoracic Surgery (in the Department of Surgery)
includes dedicated pediatric surgeons who provide comprehensive care for
infants and children with a wide variety of surgical conditions. The division’s
patients range from newborns with birth defects to adolescents with problems that
are best treated in a children’s hospital environment. Our faculty use less painful,
less disfiguring surgical procedures, and they have advanced surgical skills,
particularly with minimally invasive surgical techniques.
Working with Seattle Children’s outstanding hematology and oncology
program and with the bone marrow transplant program, the Division of General
and Thoracic Surgery maintains a strong clinical and research interest in childhood cancer treatment. We also partner closely with Seattle Children’s nationally
regarded nephrology and gastroenterology divisions, yielding a wealth of experience with patients who have end-stage organ failure and require preparation for
organ transplantation and after-transplant care. Our basic research activity is focused on intestinal replacement
using tissue engineering techniques. Surgical outcomes research, surgical oncology and organ transplantation are
areas of significant scholarly activity.
Surgical education and training is another important area of scholarship. Several of the division faculty are active
in University of Washington School of Medicine programs for medical students. General surgery residents from training
programs throughout the Puget Sound region rotate with our service, and we offer an ACGME-accredited fellowship
training program in pediatric surgery. Graduates of our programs include many prominent faculty members at other
universities and training programs, confirming our reputation as one of the top pediatric surgery programs in the country.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Robert S. Sawin, MD, is surgeon-in-chief at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and vice chairman of the
Department of Surgery in the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He completed his
residency at Harvard’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital
and completed a fellowship at Seattle Children’s.
Dr. Sawin helped establish the Children’s liver transplant program and ECMO (extracorporeal membrane
oxygenation) program; in 1990 he performed the first
FACULTY
Robert S. Sawin, MD,
Surgeon-in-Chief
Adam B. Goldin, MD, MPH
Patrick J. Healey, MD
Stephen S. Kim, MD
Daniel J. Ledbetter, MD
John H.T. Waldhausen, MD
Robert S. Sawin
MD, Surgeon-in-Chief
pediatric liver transplant in the Northwest with Dr.
James Perkins, and he performed the region’s first
ECMO cannulation. In addition to a clinical interest in
pediatric liver and tumor surgery, Dr. Sawin developed
a research interest in the biology of pediatric tumors.
He is an active member of the national oncology
cooperative, the Children’s Cancer Group, and has
published many articles on subjects related to cancer
surgery, including the treatment of neuroblastoma,
sarcomas and Wilm’s tumor. He is a reviewer for the
Journal of Pediatric Surgery. Dr. Sawin has been
active in many regional, national and international
surgical societies, and has served as secretary of the
Pacific Association of Pediatric Surgeons and secretary
treasurer of the North Pacific Surgical Association.
Adam B. Goldin, MD, MPH, is pediatric surgeon at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of surgery
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
He received his MD from Rush Medical College of
Rush University, Chicago. He completed his general
surgery residency and clinical research fellowship at
the University of Washington, and earned his MPH
in epidemiology at the university School of Public
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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General and Thoracic Surgery
Health. He also completed a pediatric surgery fellowship at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. Dr. Goldin
cares for children in Seattle Children’s general and
thoracic surgery clinics and has expertise and training in laparoscopic surgery. Specific areas of clinical
interest include pediatric tumors, neonatal surgery
and laparoscopic surgery. Specific areas of research
interest include clinical outcomes and quality of care
in pediatric surgery. Dr. Goldin believes in maintaining
the highest standard of care throughout the scope of
pediatric general and thoracic surgery. He believes
in continual re-evaluation of surgical care delivery
methods, with particular attention to individually
and culturally sensitive delivery.
Patrick J. Healey, MD, is chief of transplantation in
the General and Thoracic Surgery Division at Seattle
Children’s Hospital. Dr. Healey received his MD
from the Boston University School of Medicine.
He completed his general surgery residency at the
Hartford Hospital and completed fellowship training in abdominal transplantation at the University
of Washington and in pediatric surgery at Seattle
Children’s. Dr. Healey has expertise and training in
pediatric transplantation, specifically liver and kidney.
His clinical and research interests include transplantation in infants and small children, neonatal surgery,
congenital anomalies and pediatric tumors.
Stephen S. Kim, MD, is attending surgeon at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and assistant professor in
the Department of Surgery at the University of
Washington School of Medicine and adjunct assistant
professor in the Department of Bioengineering.
He received his MD from the University of Virginia
School of Medicine. He completed his general surgery
residency at the University of Chicago hospitals, his
surgery research fellowship at Children’s Hospital
Boston, and his pediatric surgery fellowship at
Seattle Children’s. Dr. Kim attends and consults on
the inpatient service and sees outpatients in the
general and thoracic surgery outpatient clinics. His
clinical interests include neonatal surgery, minimally
invasive surgery and gastrointestinal diseases. His
research interests include tissue engineering of the
gastrointestinal tract.
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Daniel J. Ledbetter, MD, is attending surgeon at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor
in the Department of Surgery in the University of
Washington School of Medicine. He is co-chair of
the Wound Care Committee at Seattle Children’s.
His interests include endocrine surgery, surgical
critical care and ECMO — extracorporeal membrane
oxygenation, a procedure in which an artificial heartlung machine takes over the work of the lungs, and
sometimes also the heart. His interests also include
neonatal surgery and general and thoracic surgery
of infants and children.
John H.T. Waldhausen, MD, is attending surgeon at
Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor of surgery at
the University of Washington School of Medicine. He
is director of the pediatric surgery fellowship and
of general surgery resident education at Seattle
Children’s. Dr. Waldhausen’s primary research is
in clinical outcomes. He also attends at Children’s
Bellevue Clinic and at Seattle Children’s in the Division
of Transplant Surgery. His clinical activities cover
the broad range of pediatric surgery with a focus
on minimally invasive surgery, congenital surgical
problems and pediatric cancer surgery.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Daniel J. Ledbetter, MD
Listed in America’s Best Doctors, 2005
Robert S. Sawin, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
General and Thoracic Surgery
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Stephen S. Kim, MD
Initial Nonoperative Management and Delayed
Closure for Treatment of Giant Omphaloceles, 38th
annual meeting of the Pacific Association of Pediatric
Surgeons, Vancouver, BC, Canada, May 2005
Robotic Resection of a Choledochal Cyst, 91st Annual
Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons,
Pediatric Surgery Video Session, San Francisco,
October 2005
Robert S. Sawin, MD
Perinatal Management of Giant Omphalocele,
Perinatal Conference, Evergreen Hospital Medical
Center, Kirkland, Wash., June 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Avansino J, Goldman B, Sawin RS, Flur DR.
Primary operative vs. nonoperative therapy for
pediatric empyema: a meta-analysis. Pediatr.
2005;115(6):1652–1659.
Kim SS, Lau S, Lee S, Schaller RT, Healey PJ,
Sawin RS, Ledbetter DJ, Waldhausen JHT.
Pyloromyotomy: a comparison of laparoscopic,
circumumbilical, and right upper quadrant
techniques. J Am Coll Surg. 2005;201:66–70.
Kim SS, Lau S, Lee S, Waldhausen JHT. The
learning curve for laparoscopic pyloromyotomy.
J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech. 2005;15:474–477.
Lau ST, Kim SS, Ledbetter DJ, Healey PJ.
Fraternal twins with Morgagni hernias: a case report.
J Pediatric Surgery. April 2005;40(4):725–727.
Lau ST, Kim SS, Lee SL, Ledbetter DJ. The
anomalous spenic vein: a case report and review of
the literature. J Pediatr Surg. Sep 2005;40(9):1492
Waldhausen JHT. Surgical management of
gastroschisis. Neoreviews. 2005;6:e1–e7.
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Neurosurgery
The Division of Neurosurgery (in the Department of Surgery)
provides inpatient and outpatient surgical services for patients
from infancy through adolescence. Neurosurgery staff work closely
with many medical and surgical specialties at Seattle Children’s
Hospital, consulting with colleagues in anesthesia, pediatric
surgery, neurology, physical medicine and rehabilitation and
the Craniofacial Center.
Using advanced equipment and techniques, division physicians
and staff successfully diagnose unsuspected diseases and surgically
treat congenital malformations of the central nervous system. We
treat conditions including craniofacial deformities, brain tumors,
congenital abnormalities of the head and spine, hydrocephalus,
intractable seizures, neural tube defects, spasticity, trauma and
tumors of the nervous system. With brain tumors as the deadliest
and second-most common type of childhood cancer, the doctors,
nurses and staff of the Division of Neurosurgery face a unique set of concerns when caring for their patients. Children
fighting brain tumors need comprehensive care before, during and after surgery. Division staff provide compassionate,
expert bedside care and work tirelessly to deliver the latest advances in medicine, whether in a routine follow-up appointment
or during an emergency visit. Neurosurgery staff focus not only on the children, but also on their futures.
Alongside engineers, oncologists and radiologists, our neurosurgeons are working to develop tiny molecules called
nanoparticles that will one day be delivered directly to a brain tumor to help treat it. When inserted into cells, these
nanoparticles will be visible on an MRI scan and will enable doctors to detect tumors and differentiate between cancerous
and normal cells. Early detection, combined with better visibility in the operating room, will allow surgeons to remove tumors
without damaging a growing child’s healthy brain tissue. Our physician scientists work daily to improve the odds for children
with brain tumors.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Richard G. Ellenbogen, MD, is chief of the Division of
Neurosurgery and fellowship director of pediatric
neurological surgery at Seattle Children’s Hospital;
he holds the Theodore S. Roberts Endowed Chair
in Pediatric Neurosurgery. He is professor in the
Department of Neurological Surgery and adjunct
professor of radiology at the University of Washington
School of Medicine and serves as chairman of the
Department of Neurological Surgery. He is active on
many Seattle Children’s committees and has served
as president of the Congress of Neurological Surgery.
He has been involved with the American Society
of Pediatric Neurological Surgery and is an active
member of the American Association of Neurological
Surgeons. Dr. Ellenbogen serves as director and
instructor for the Cerebral Vascular Anastomosis
Laboratory of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons,
and has served as an instructor at the Foundation and
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
(USUHS). He served in the US Army, attaining the
rank of Lieutenant Colonel, and received the Bronze
Star, the Meritorious Service Medal, the National
Defense Service Medal and the Army Reserve Medal.
Dr. Ellenbogen has editorial duties on several journals. He has published three books, including Clinical
Neurosurgery and Principles of Neurosurgery, a basic
textbook of neurological surgery. He has authored
numerous articles, book chapters and presentations.
Anthony M. Avellino, MD, is program director for neurosurgery education at Seattle Children’s Hospital.
He is associate professor of neurological surgery and
director of the neurosurgery residency program at the
University of Washington School of Medicine; he also
serves as joint assistant professor of orthopedics and
sports medicine. He received his MD and completed a
research fellowship at Colombia University College of
Physicians and Surgeons in New York. He completed
his residency in neurosurgery and two research fellowships at the University of Washington. Dr. Avellino is
Neurosurgery
a fellow in the American College of Surgeons and an
active member of the American Society of Pediatric
Neurosurgeons, American Association of Neurological
Surgeons, Congress of Neurosurgeons, and Society
for Research into Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida.
He serves as an editorial board member for the
journals Pediatric Neurosurgery and Cerebrospinal
Fluid Research. Dr. Avellino has directed two courses
on neuro-endoscopy for residents and faculty. His
research interests focus on investigations in the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus using proteomic and
genomic techniques, as well as investigations in how
complementary and alternative medicine may influence
pediatric neurosurgical care. Dr. Avellino is widely
published and frequently serves as a guest lecturer.
Jeffrey G. Ojemann, MD, is director of epilepsy surgery
at the Pediatric Epilepsy Center at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and associate professor of neurological
surgery at the University of Washington School of
Medicine. He is Richard G. Ellenbogen Chair in
Pediatric Neurosurgery at Seattle Children’s and
research affiliate at the university Center on Human
Development and Disability. He earned his MD and
completed a fellowship in pediatric neurosurgery
at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Louis; he served as epilepsy surgery fellow at the
University of Washington. Dr. Ojemann is extensively
involved in research, with current interests including
functional MRI in children, imaging cerebellar white
matter tracts, visual effects of cerebellar lesions, brain
wave correlates of motor, visual and cognitive behavior,
computational models of brain signals, localization
of epilepsy with novel brain imaging and localization
of epilepsy with high-density EEG techniques.
FACULTY
Richard G. Ellenbogen,
MD, Chief
Anthony M. Avellino, MD
Jeffrey G. Ojemann, MD
Dr. Ojemann is preceptor for the Epilepsy Foundation
Post-Doctoral Fellowship. He has served as ad hoc
reviewer for several journals. He is widely published
and is a frequent lecturer.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Jeffrey G. Ojemann, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors in America,” 2005
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Anthony M. Avellino, MD
Symptomatic Cerebellar Tonsillar Ectopia in
Patients with Lipomyelomeningocele, 49th
Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for
Research into Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida,
Barcelona, Spain, 2005
Pediatric Cervical Spine Surgery Using the
Intraoperative CT Scanner and Smaller NonTraditional Screws and Plates, Annual Meeting
of the American Association of Neurological
Surgeons, San Francisco, 2006
Neural Tube Defects, neurosurgery resident
teaching conference, University of Washington,
January 11, 2005
Neural Tube Defects, Surgical Embryology
Conference, Seattle Children’s, April 21, 2005
Complex Pediatric Cervical Spine Surgery Using
Intra-Operative CT Scanner, Washington State
Association of Neurological Surgeons annual
meeting, Seattle, May 14, 2005
Pediatric Hydrocephalus: History, Endoscopy, and
Innovative Treatment, St. Francis Hospital Pediatric
Section meeting, Federal Way, Wash., June 13, 2005
Richard G. Ellenbogen, MD
Weill Medical College of Cornell University,
New York, August 2005
Richard G. Ellenbogen
MD, Chief
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Neurosurgery
Jeffrey G. Ojemann, MD
Brain Surgery for Seizures, Grand Rounds,
Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital, Spokane, Wash.,
August 24, 2005
Pediatric Brain Tumors, Grand Rounds,
Walla Walla General Hospital, Walla Walla, Wash.,
September 20, 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Altay EE, Fessler AJ, Gallagher M, Attarian HP,
Dehdashti F, Vahle VJ, Ojemann JG, Dowling JL,
Gilliam F. Correlation of severity of FDG-PET
hypometabolism and interictal regional delta
slowing in temporal lobe epilepsy. Epilepsia. 2005;
46(4):573–576.
Ashley WA, Ojemann JG, Park TS, Wippold FJ.
Primary hypothyroidism in a 12-year-old girl
presenting as a suprasellar mass: rapid regression
after initiation of thyroid replacement therapy.
J Neurosurg (Pediatrics 4). 2005;102:413–416.
Avellino AM. Hydrocephalus. In: Treatment of
Pediatric Neurologic Disorders. Singer HS, Kossoff
EH, Hartman AL, Crawford TO, eds. Boca Raton, Fla.:
Taylor & Francis Group, 2005:25–36.
Avellino AM, Carson BS. Increased intracranial
pressure. In: Current Management in Child Neurology,
3rd ed. Maria BL, ed. New York: B.C. Decker, Inc.,
2005: 563–568.
Avellino AM, Mann FA, Grady MS, Chapman JR,
Ellenbogen RG, Alden TD, Mirza SK. The misdiagnosis of acute cervical spine injuries and fractures in
infants and children: the 12-year experience of a level
I pediatric and adult trauma center. Child’s Nervous
System. 2005;21:122–127.
Baciu MV, Watson JM, Maccotta L, McDermott KB,
Buckner RL, Gilliam FG, Ojemann JG. Evaluating
functional MRI procedures for assessing hemispheric
language dominance in neurosurgical patients.
Neuroradiology. 2005;47:835–844.
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Bobola MS, Silber JR, Ellenbogen RG, Geyer JR,
Blank A, Goff RD. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, O6-benzylguanine, and resistance to
clinical alkylators in pediatric primary brain tumor
cell lines. Clin Cancer Res. 2005;11:2747–2555.
Bolger WE, Tadros M, Ellenbogen RG, Judy K,
Grady MS. Endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid leak associated with the use of bone wax
in skull-base surgery. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg.
2005;132:418–420.
Cirak B, Horska A, Barker PB, Burger PC, Carson BS,
Avellino AM. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic
imaging in pediatric pilomyxoid astrocytoma. Child’s
Nervous System. 2005;21:404–409.
Hussain NS, Wang PP, James C, Carson BS,
Avellino AM. Distal ventriculoperitoneal shunt
failure caused by silicone allergy: case report.
Journal of Neurosurgery. 2005;102:536–539.
McDermott KM, Watson JM, Ojemann JG.
Pre-surgical language mapping. Curr Dir Psychol Sci.
2005;14:291–295.
Ojemann JG, McKinstry RC, Mukherjee P, Park TS,
Burton H. Hand somatosensory cortex activity following selective dorsal rhizotomy: report of three cases
with fMRI. Child’s Nervous System. 21:115–121.
Veenstra TD, Conrads TP, Hood BL, Avellino AM,
Ellenbogen RG, Morrison RS. Biomarkers:
mining the biofluid proteome. Molecular and
Cellular Proteomics. 2005;4:409–418.
Wang PP, Avellino AM. Hydrocephalus in children.
In: Principles of Neurosurgery, 2nd ed. Rengachary
SS, Ellenbogen RG, eds. London: Elsevier Science,
2005:117–135.
Yeung LC, Cunningham ML, Allpress AL,
Gruss JS, Ellenbogen RG, Zerr DM. Surgical site
infections after pediatric intracranial surgery for
craniofacial malformations: frequency and risk
factors. Neurosurgery. 2005
Ophthalmology
The Division of Ophthalmology (in the Department of Surgery) works in
conjunction with other specialists to provide the full spectrum of medical and
surgical treatment options for eye diseases in childhood. The division includes
an outpatient clinic, visual sensory laboratory and ocular motor laboratory.
Our Eye Clinic is staffed by full-time pediatric ophthalmologists, residents from the University of Washington and ophthalmic technicians who
are dedicated to providing high-level, comprehensive care for infants and
children with eye problems. The Ophthalmology Clinic provides standard eye
evaluations and consultations for children with complex ocular or medical
problems. Diagnostic evaluations, by a team of clinicians and vision scientists,
employ state-of-the-art technology. Behavioral testing and visual evoked
potential are used to assess vision in preverbal infants or nonverbal children.
Electroretinograms (ERGs) probe function of the macula and retina while
confocal microscopy provides corresponding anatomic details about these
structures in children with retinal diseases. Visual field testing and transient visual evoked potentials measure optic
nerve function and supply information about cortical processing of visual inputs to the brain. Children with strabismus
and eye movement abnormalities receive the benefit of eye muscle imaging technology and quantitative analysis of
their eye movements.
The division’s accomplishments include advanced color visual evoked potential in evaluation of childhood retinal
diseases of the macula, advances in confocal retinal imaging in children without needing eye drops to dilate the pupil,
and predictions of visual outcome in infants born with optic nerve hypoplasia. Our research provides valuable information
for the care of our patients and our ability to communicate with the family about the underlying problems of their
child’s vision disability.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Avery H. Weiss, MD, is chief of the Division of
Ophthalmology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. His clinical
interests include visual disorders, eye movement
abnormalities, cataract and glaucoma, retinoblastoma
and orbital tumors, ocular malformations and
FACULTY
Avery H. Weiss, MD, Chief
John P. Kelly, PhD
James O. Phillips, PhD
ophthalmological manifestations of systemic diseases,
especially genetic, neurologic, rheumatic and craniofacial disorders. His research focuses on three areas:
1) assessment of optic nerve and visual cortical
function in infants with optic nerve and brain
malformations, visual pathway tumors, amblyopia
and cortical visual impairment; 2) eye movements
in normal children and children with brain tumors,
malformations, injuries, autism and nystagmus, and
characterization of abnormalities of the oculomotor
plant in craniofacial disorders; and 3) assessment of
macular development, probing local retinal function
and development of retinal imaging techniques to
study congenital and genetic retinal diseases. He
has served on the editorial board of EyeNet and as a
medical consultant for ABC News, and he has been ad
hoc reviewer for 14 journals. He is an active member
of the Children’s Oncology Group and several other
pediatrics and ophthalmology associations.
Avery H. Weiss
MD, Chief
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
213
Ophthalmology
John P. Kelly, PhD, is a research assistant professor
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and adjunct research
assistant professor at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. He completed a postdoctoral
fellowship at the University of Washington. He is
responsible for clinical electrophysiology and clinical testing in pediatric patients. His interests include
application of signal processing algorithms for
objective measurement of visual responses, brain
adaptations during treatment of amblyopia, retinal
imaging by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, prognostic research of cortical visual impairment and cortical
blindness, optic pathway tumors, optic nerve diseases
and other common pediatric vision disorders. His
interests also extend to development of advances in
technology; he is consultant to the human interface
lab in the College of Engineering at the University
of Washington.
James O. Phillips, PhD, is researcher at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and research associate professor
in the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck
Surgery at the University of Washington. His focus
is translational research, taking innovations in basic
neurophysiology and genetics and applying them to
the diagnosis and treatment of clinical disorders in
children. The clinical oculomotor laboratory (COL) is
a result of this interest. The COL is a first-class clinical
and research laboratory created through collaboration
between basic scientists and clinicians at Seattle
Children’s and the University of Washington. The COL
uses innovations from testing in non human primates
and adult patients at the University of Washington to
guide the development of testing in pediatric patients.
In addition, the COL is used for basic scientific inquiry
into the neural mechanisms underlying pediatric disorders. With his colleagues, Dr. Phillips is studying the
mechanisms and progression of pediatric vestibular
disorders associated with congenital hearing loss,
such as Usher syndrome, and the basic cerebellar
mechanisms potentially underlying autism.
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
John P. Kelly, PhD
Development of Acuity in Infants with Motor Versus
Visual-Sensory-Associated Nystagmus, annual meeting of the Association for the Research in Vision and
Ophthalmology, Fla.
Light Measurement and Human Visual
Electrophysiology, basic sciences lectures,
University of Washington, September 2005
Visual Electrophysiology: The Electroretinogram,
basic sciences lecture, University of Washington,
October 2005
James O. Phillips, PhD
Vestibular and Oculomotor Function in Pediatric
Patients with Posterior Fossa Tumors, Oto-HNS
Alumni Day, 2005
Laboratory Vestibular Testing, Advanced Temporal
Bone Lab, 2005
Disequilibrium and the Ear: I’m Not Dizzy,
I Just Fall Down, Seattle, Wash., 2005
Ears: Hearing and Beyond, Seattle, Wash., 2005
Avery H. Weiss, MD
Analysis and Treatment of Hypertropia in
Plagiocephaly, annual meeting for the Association
for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., May 2, 2005
Eye Movement Disorders in Craniosynostosis,
craniofacial research seminar, Seattle Children’s,
August 22, 2005
Management of Difficult Strabismus Problems,
Pediatric Subspecialty Day program, American
Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting,
Chicago, 2005
AWARDS AND HONORS
Avery H. Weiss, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Ophthalmology Activities at Seattle Children’s,
Alec Matthew Schuldt Guild luncheon and silent
auction, Seattle, November 20, 2005
Ophthalmology
PUBLICATIONS
Fuchs AF, Ling L, Phillips JO. Behavior of the PVP
interneurons of the vestibulo-ocular reflex during
head-free gaze shifts in the monkey. J Neurophysiol.
2005;94(6):4481–4490.
Phillips JO, Noto C, Ibarreta M, Robinson FR.
Context dependence of human and nonhuman primate
saccade adaptation. Soc Neurosci. 2005;859:7.
Robinson FR, Phillips JO, Weiss AH. Animal
oculomotor data illuminate cerebellum-related
eye movement disorders. In: Animal Models of
Movement Disorders. LeDoux MS, ed. Academic
Press, Elsevier, 2005.
Street VA, Kallman JC, Robertson NG, Kuo SF,
Morton CC, Phillips JO. A novel DFNA9 mutation
in the VWFA2 domain of COCH alters a conserved
cysteine residue and intrachain disulfide bond
formation resulting in progressive hearing loss and
site-specific vestibular and central oculomotor dysfunction. Am J of Med Genetics. 2005;139(2):86–95.
Weiss, AH. Ocular abnormalities in childhood metabolic disorders. In: Harley’s Pediatric Ophthalmology
(major revision), Nelson L, ed. Philadelphia: WB
Saunders Co., 2005:448–475.
Weiss AH, Sze R, Phillips JO. Analysis and treatment
of hypertropia in plagiocephaly. Invest Ophthalmol
Vis Sci. 2005;46:2352.
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Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
The Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (in the Department of Surgery) specializes
in the surgical treatment of congenital and acquired conditions of the jaws, teeth
and face. We provide a range of inpatient and outpatient services, including surgical
correction of jaw deformity, cleft lip and palate and craniofacial abnormalities and
maxillofacial trauma due to infection and pathology. We also offer minor oral surgery
for medically compromised children. Our staff has extensive experience caring for
children of all ages with disabling conditions. Prior to surgical reconstructions, we
work closely with orthodontists and other surgeons to improve facial function and
appearance by creating facial symmetry, properly aligning the jaws and ensuring
proper placement of teeth. Our clinical research focuses on facial growth, distraction
osteogenesis and cleft care.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Mark A. Egbert, DDS, is chief of the Division of Oral
and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and associate professor of OMS at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. He
served as chief of OMS trauma services and the Dental
Department at Harborview Medical Center for 12
years. Dr. Egbert received his dental and OMS training
at the University of Washington and spent one year
studying OMS at the Gemmente Ziekenhuis, Arnhem,
The Netherlands. His particular interests include the
biological basis of facial growth and development,
the management of cleft lip and palate, applications
of distraction osteogenesis in the correction of facial
anomalies and the treatment of pediatric oral and
maxillofacial pathology. Dr. Egbert serves on numerous
review boards for journals, including the International
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, American
Journal of OMS and Triple O. His professional society
memberships include the AAOMS and ACPA, and he
FACULTY
Mark A. Egbert, DDS, Chief
Mark A. Egbert
DDS, Chief
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
has served as president of the Western Society of OMS
and the Washington State Society of OMS. He chairs
and serves on committees of the American Association
of OMS. He has served on the examining committee of
the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
PUBLICATIONS
Rafferty KL, Sun Z, Egbert MA, Baird EE, Herring
SW. Mandibular mechanics following osteotomy
and appliance placement II: Bone strain on the
body and condylar neck. J Oral Maxillofac Surg.
Apr 2006;64(4):620–627.
Rafferty KL, Sun Z, Egbert MA, Herring SW.
Mandibular mechanics after osteotomy and
distraction appliance placement I: Postoperative
mobility of the osteotomy site. J Oral Maxillofac
Surg. Apr 2006; 64(4):610–619.
Otolaryngology
The Division of Otolaryngology (in the Department of Surgery) manages
the complete spectrum of pediatric otolaryngologic disorders including
hearing and speech problems, tonsil disease and sleep apnea, head
and neck masses including thyroid disease and cancer, upper airway
obstruction and voice problems. The division comprises five pediatric
otolaryngologists. The division is closely associated with the Childhood
Communication Center, which brings together staff from audiology, the
cochlear implant team, education, genetics, pediatrics, psychiatry and
speech language services to provide multidisciplinary care to children
with communication needs. Division members also participate in the
Craniofacial Center to serve children with cleft lip and palate and other
craniofacial disorders.
The division has several subspecialty clinics. The Hearing Loss Clinic
provides a multidisciplinary evaluation of children with hearing problems.
The Vascular Anomalies Clinic treats children with birthmarks ranging
from port wine stains to large vascular tumors. Other specialty clinics include Complex Airway Clinic, Voice Clinic, Microtia
Clinic, Velopharyngeal Insufficiency Clinic and Chronic Sinusitis Clinic. The division is closely affiliated with the University
of Washington and the Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center in its research efforts. In addition, the division
supports basic science research with lymphatic malformations. Ongoing research projects include speech processing
for young cochlear implant recipients, gene mapping for vasculogenesis in vascular anomalies, immunologic profiling in
chronic sinusitis patients, outcomes with speech surgery and ototoxicity.
The Division of Otolaryngology is involved in training otolaryngology residents from the University of Washington and
Madigan Army Medical Center. We offer a one-year clinical fellowship in pediatric otolaryngology. Fellows may also pursue
a second year of research funded by the University of Washington Department of Otolaryngology NIH Training Grant.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Scott C. Manning, MD, is chief of the Division of
Otolaryngology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and
professor in the Department of Otolaryngology at
the University of Washington School of Medicine.
He is president of the Northwest Academy of
Otolaryngology. Dr. Manning earned his MD from
FACULTY
Scott C. Manning, MD, Chief
Andrew F. Inglis Jr., MD
Jonathan A. Perkins, DO
Kathleen C.Y. Sie, MD
Scott C. Manning
MD, Chief
Tulane Medical School, completed his residency at
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at
Dallas, and did a fellowship in pediatric otolaryngology with Charles Bluestone and Sylvan Stool in
Pittsburgh. He served as chief of pediatric otolaryngology at Parkland Hospital and Dallas Children’s
Hospital. Dr. Manning’s clinical interests are pediatric
sinusitis, chronic ear disease and vascular anomalies.
Andrew F. Inglis Jr., MD, is attending physician and
surgeon at Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology
at the University of Washington School of Medicine.
He received his MD from the Medical College of
Pennsylvania, completed his residency in general
surgery at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle, and
completed a second residency in the Department of
Otolaryngology at the University of Washington. He
completed a one-year fellowship in pediatric otolaryngology at Seattle Children’s, including a four-month
pediatric otolaryngology fellowship at the Royal
Alexandria Hospital for Children in Sydney, Australia.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
217
Otolaryngology
His clinical interests are pediatric airway problems
and otitis media.
Scott C. Manning, MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
Jonathan A. Perkins, DO, is otolaryngologist at Seattle
Children’s Hospital and associate professor in the
Department of Otolaryngology at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Perkins earned
his DO at the University of Osteopathic Medicine and
Health Sciences, did his residency training in otolaryngology at Madigan Army Medical Center in Fort Lewis,
Wash., and obtained a pediatric fellowship at Seattle
Children’s and the University of Washington. While
practicing all aspects of pediatric otolaryngology, his
primary research interests are communication disorders and vascular anomalies of the head and neck.
Kathleen C.Y. Sie, MD
Resident Research Teaching Award, University of
Washington, Department of Otolaryngology, 2005
Kathleen C.Y. Sie, MD, is director of the Childhood
Communication Center at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and associate professor in the Department
of Otolaryngology at the University of Washington
School of Medicine. She developed the Childhood
Communication Center in 2002 to optimize the
multidisciplinary care available to children with
complex communication needs. She also participates
in the Craniofacial Center. She earned her MD from
the University of Michigan Medical School, completed
a residency in otolaryngology and a fellowship in
auditory research at the University of Washington
and completed a clinical fellowship in pediatric
otolaryngology at Children’s Hospital Boston. Her
clinical efforts are focused on communication issues
of childhood. She directs the Hearing Loss Clinic
and co-directs the Cochlear Implant Program. Dr.
Sie performed the first cochlear implant at Seattle
Children’s in 1994, and performed all of Children’s
cochlear implants until 2005. She also works with
speech language pathologists in the evaluation
and management of children with velopharyngeal
insufficiency (VPI), and she works with colleagues
to perform complex auricular reconstruction using
autologous tissue and on prosthetic management of
microtia. Her research efforts have focused on surgical
outcomes in VPI management and epidemiological
studies on pediatric cochlear implantation.
AWARDS AND HONORS
Andrew F. Inglis Jr., MD
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
218
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Listed in “Best Doctors 2005,” Seattle magazine
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Andrew F. Inglis Jr., MD
Posterior Glottic Stenosis and Endoscopic Repair,
University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine,
Iowa City, April 2005
Persistent Thyroglossal Duct Cysts: An Institution’s
Experience and New Method of Management,
American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology,
Las Vegas, May 2005
Scott C. Manning, MD
Update on Management of Vascular Anomalies in the
Pediatric Age Group, Pediatric Sinusitis, Endoscopic
Repair of Posterior Glottic Stenosis; Update of
Laryngomalacia Management; 73rd Mid-Winter
Clinical Conference, Research Study Club of Los
Angeles, January 21–22, 2005
Laryngomalacia, University of Colorado Mid-Winter
Meeting, Vail, Colo., February 1–3, 2005
Otolaryngology Considerations in Management of
Autoimmune Airway Disease, Pediatric Endocrine
Team Conference, Seattle Children’s, February 4, 2005
Airway Decision Making, Otolaryngology Resident
Conference, University of Washington, April 20, 2005
Oral Board Exam Review, Otolaryngology Resident
Conference, University of Washington, May 4, 2005
Pediatric Sinusitis, Pacific Coast OtolaryngologyOphthalmology Society, Irvine, Calif., June 25, 2005
Pediatric Sinusitis, Allergic Fungal Sinusitis,
Laryngomalacia, University of Wisconsin
Otolaryngology Update, Beaver Creek, Colo.,
July 22–25, 2005
Otolaryngology
Vascular Anomalies (mini-seminar) moderator, American
Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery
annual meeting, Los Angeles, September 27, 2005
Lymphatic Malformations, Vascular Anomaly Study
Group, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York,
December 10, 2005
Pediatric Sinusitis, Providence Family Practice
Infectious Disease Seminar, Seattle, December 16, 2005
Jonathan A. Perkins, DO
Third Annual Craniofacial Lectureship, University of
Mississippi, Jackson, Miss., April 2005
Current Treatment Challenges in Vascular Anomalies,
American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Las
Vegas, May 2005
The Role of the Otolaryngologist in the Management
of Vascular Anomalies (mini-seminar), American
Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery
annual meeting, Los Angeles, September 2005
Second Workshop of Vascular Anomalies: Diagnosis
and Treatment, Medical University of Gdansk,
Gdansk, Poland, November 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Bloom DC, Christenson TE, Manning SC, Eksteen EC,
Perkins JA, Inglis AF, Stool SE. Plastic laryngeal
foreign bodies in children: a diagnostic challenge.
Inter J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2005;69:657–662.
Chinn K, Brown OE, Manning SC. Effects of inhalant
anesthesia: tympanometry validation (R98/217). Inter
J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2005;69(2):187–192.
Harsha WJ, Perkins JA, Lewis C, Manning SC.
Head and neck endocrine surgery in children:
1997 and 2000. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg.
2005;131:564–570.
Manning SC. Sinusitis. In: Conn’s Current Therapy
2005. Elsevier, Inc., 2005:234–236.
Manning SC. Use of SLSE after endoscopy sinus
surgery in children should be strictly limited. Arch
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2005;131(3):269–270.
Manning SC, Inglis AF, Mouzakes J, Carron J,
Perkins JA. Laryngeal anatomic differences in
pediatric patients with severe laryngomalacia. Arch
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2005;131(4):340–343.
Perkins JA, Lewis CW, Gruss J, Eblen L, Sie K.
Furlow palatoplasty for the management of VPI:
results of 148 consecutive patients. Plastic Reconstr
Surg. 2005;116(1):72–80.
Perkins JA, Sidhu M, Manning SC, Ghiono V, Sze
R. Three-dimensional CT angiography imaging of
vascular tumors of the head and neck. Inter J Pediatr
Otorhinolaryngol. 2005;69(3):319–325.
Shikowitz MJ, Abramson AL, Steinberg BM, DeVoti J,
Bonagura VR, Mullooly V, Nouri M, Ronn AM,
Inglis AF, McClay J, Freeman K. Clinical trial of
photodynamic therapy with meso-tetra (hydroxyphenyl) chlorin for respiratory papillomatosis. Arch
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2005;131(2):99–105.
Sidhu MK, Perkins JA, Shaw DWW, Bittles MA,
Andrews RT. Ultrasound-guided endovenous diode
laser in the treatment of congenital venous malformation: preliminary experience. J Vasc Inter Radiol.
2005;16:879–884.
Stern RE, Yueh B, Norton SJ, Lewis CW, Sie K. Recent
epidemiology of pediatric cochlear implantation in
the United States: disparity among children of different ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Laryngoscope.
2005;115(1):125–131.
Thomas RF, Hornung RL, Manning SC, Perkins
JA. Hemangiomas of infancy: treatment of ulceration in the head and neck. Arch Facial Plast Surg.
2005;7:312–315.
Harsha W, Lewis C, Manning SC, Perkins JA.
Pediatric admissions and procedures for lymphatic
malformations in the United States: 1997 and 2000.
Lymphat Res Biol. 2005;2(3).
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
219
Transplant Surgery
The Division of Transplant Surgery (in the Department of Surgery)
at Seattle Children’s Hospital, which offers comprehensive care to
patients with end-stage disease of the intestine, liver and kidneys,
is the only pediatric intestinal transplant program in the Northwest.
Solid organ transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage
organ disease in children. We provide consultation, diagnosis,
treatment and management for end-stage organ failure with skilled
teams of health care professionals focusing on the needs of our
patients and families. A candidate’s team includes the appropriate
members from our staff of doctors — board-certified pediatric
hepatologists, gastroenterologists, nephrologists, surgeons and
transplant surgeons — and pediatric nurses specially trained in the
care of transplant patients and dietitians. We assist our pediatric
transplant candidates and their families before, during and after
organ transplantation, providing physical, emotional and financial
support for the life-changing experience of transplantation.
We use advanced technologies and the most current treatment
protocols, including state-of-the-art interventional radiological procedures, for improved diagnosis, care, management and
recovery. We also provide assistance in accessing and coordinating financial resources.
Educating patients and their families is a critical component of our care. We teach them to monitor and to administer
anti-rejection medications and to recognize signs of infections or rejection. We also help them return to a normal lifestyle,
and provide education to patients’ school staff as well as other physicians and care providers. We conduct psychosocial
evaluations and follow-up and offer directions to patient and family support groups.
We care for children at our Liver Center and we are developing an Intestinal Rehabilitation Clinic for the care of children
with diseases of the intestine requiring Total Parental Nutrition (TPN). Another way we advance treatment is by conducting
clinical research trials of new medications and treatments.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Patrick J. Healey, MD, is chief of the Division of
Transplant Surgery at Seattle Children’s Hospital.
He received his MD from the Boston University
School of Medicine. He completed his general surgery
residency at the Hartford Hospital. He completed
fellowship training in abdominal transplantation
and pediatric surgery at the University of Washington
and Seattle Children’s, respectively. Dr. Healey has
expertise and training in pediatric transplantation,
specifically of the liver and kidney. His clinical and
research interests include transplantation in infants
and small children, neonatal surgery, congenital
anomalies and pediatric tumors.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Simon P. Horslen, MBChB, is medical director of Liver
and Intestinal Transplantation at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and professor of pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. He is helping lead
the expansion of the Children’s transplant program.
Dr. Horslen earned his medical degree from the
University of Bristol, England. He is a founding fellow
of the Royal College of Pediatric and Child Health and
a member of the Royal College of Physicians and is
accredited in general pediatrics and pediatric gastroenterology. He was medical director of the pediatric
transplant program at the University of Nebraska
Medical Center. Clinical and research interests include
metabolic liver disease, intestinal failure and liver
and intestine transplantation. Dr. Horslen is a local
Principal Investigator for the multicenter Studies in
Pediatric Liver Transplantation (SPLIT). He serves
as co-chair of the Education Committee and member
of the Nominations Committee for the International
Transplant Surgery
Pediatric Transplant Society. He is chairman of the
United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS) Pediatric
Liver Transplant Subcommittee and member of other
UNOS committees. He is also active in other organizations, and he gives resident lectures and organizes
symposiums and courses.
Ruth A. McDonald, MD, is medical director of solid
organ transplantation at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and associate professor of pediatrics at the University
of Washington School of Medicine. She also serves
as co-director of several outreach clinics in pediatric
nephrology in Washington, Alaska and Montana. She
earned her MD at the University of Minnesota. She
completed her residency and served as assistant chief
resident, and completed a fellowship in the Division of
Pediatric Nephrology at the University of Washington.
She serves as principal investigator in many multicenter research studies on pediatric renal transplantation. She has a special clinical interest in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and viral infections
after transplant in all solid organ transplant recipients.
She is an at-large member of the Children’s University
Medical Group Board of Directors and chairs the
group’s Clinical Practice Committee. Dr. McDonald
is well known and respected nationally as a leader in
national organ allocation policy development, working actively in several organizations. She serves on the
United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) Pediatric
Committee and has been chair and vice chair; she is a
member of other UNOS committees and serves on the
board of directors.
Karen F. Murray, MD, is director of the hepatobiliary
program at Seattle Children’s Hospital and program
director of gastroenterology education; she is associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at
FACULTY
Patrick J. Healey, MD, Chief
Simon P. Horslen, MBChB
Ruth A. McDonald, MD
Karen F. Murray, MD
Jorge D. Reyes, MD,
Director of Transplant
Services
Patrick J. Healey
MD, Chief
the University of Washington School of Medicine.
She received her MD from Johns Hopkins School of
Medicine and did a pediatrics residency and a chief
resident year at Seattle Children’s. She completed a
clinical and research fellowship in gastroenterology
and nutrition in the combined program at Children’s
Hospital Boston and Massachusetts General Hospital,
Harvard Medical School. Dr. Murray has done
research and work in Bangladesh and Tanzania. In
addition to clinical care in gastroenterology and transplantation, she has an active clinical research program
in hepatology. Her main focus is in the treatment and
pathophysiology of hepatitis C viral infection, and
her studies include the treatment of hepatitis B
viral infection and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
Dr. Murray is president-elect of Seattle Children’s
medical staff. She is a member of the Gastroenterology
Sub-board of the American Board of Pediatrics, and is
on the steering committees of three National Institute
of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
(NIDDK) clinical research networks related to her
research. She mentors pediatrics residents and speaks
at Seattle Children’s noon conferences.
Jorge D. Reyes, MD, is director of Transplant Services
at Seattle Children’s Hospital and chief of the Division
of Transplantation in the Department of Surgery at
the University of Washington. He received his MD
and completed some of his residency in Brazil. He
also held various surgical residencies, research
positions and fellowships in New York, Boston and
at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Reyes is internationally known for his research from the University
of Pittsburgh. He established the intestine program
there, along with some of the techniques involved in
the procedure. He also established the university’s
living liver donor transplant program and its protocol.
He is working to bring both programs to the University
of Washington. He serves as a board member for
LifeCenter Northwest along with several committees
for the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS).
RESEARCH FUNDING
New
Simon P. Horslen
Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation, EMMES
Corporation, National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $56,723
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
221
Transplant Surgery
TEACHING AND PRESENTATIONS
Simon P. Horslen
Intestinal Transplantation, gastroenterology Grand
Rounds, University of Washington, January 21, 2005
Liver and Intestinal Transplant Outreach, Spokane,
Wash., March 2, 2005
Liver and Intestinal Transplant Outreach,
Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital, Tacoma, Wash.,
April 14, 2005
Liver and Intestinal Transplant Outreach, Anchorage,
Alaska, May 26–27, 2005
Isolated Liver Transplantation in Short Gut Patients
— Missed Opportunities?, Ninth International Small
Bowel Transplantation Symposium, Brussels, Belgium,
July 2, 2005
Liver and Intestinal Transplantation Outreach,
Boise, Idaho, July 26, 2005
Growth, Puberty and Cognitive Development and
Post-Graduate Course: Fundamentals of Pediatric
Transplantation (course organizer), Third Congress
of the International Pediatric Transplant Association,
Innsbruck, Austria, August 2005
Neonatal Liver Disease, 75th North Pacific Pediatric
Society meeting, Blaine, Wash., August 28, 2005
Neonatal Liver Disease, Spokane Pediatric
Society, Sacred Heart Hospital, Spokane, Wash.,
October 11, 2005
Liver and Intestine Transplantation in Children,
Pediatric Grand Rounds, Sacred Heart Hospital,
Spokane, Wash., October 12, 2005
Liver Disease in Adolescence (chair and course
organizer), AASLD/NASPGHAN Pediatric
Symposium, AASLD annual meeting, San
Francisco, November 2005
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Ruth A. McDonald, MD
Renal Allograft Allocation in Children, KARS meeting,
Chicago, January 13, 2005
Update on the Transplant Registry, 2004, NAPRTCS
annual meeting, Las Vegas, January 14, 2005
Management of the Sensitized Transplant
Recipient, Dialysis Annual Conference, Tampa, Fla.,
March 2, 2005
Chronic Renal Insufficiency and Failure, Genentech
Training Seminar, San Francisco, March 4, 2005
Extended Donor Criteria and the Pediatric Recipient:
How to Optimize the Deceased Donor List for the
Benefit of Our Patients, American Society of Pediatric
Nephrology annual meeting, Washington, D.C.,
May 16, 2005
Optimizing Living Donor Transplantation in
Children, American Transplant Congress, Pediatric
Symposium, May 21, 2005
Update: NAPRTCS Transplant Registry, Third
Congress of IPTA, Innsbruck, Austria, August 7, 2005
Karen F. Murray
Common GI Problems, guest faculty lecture, noon
conference, University of Washington, April 12, 2005
Neonatal Cholestasis, lecture to nutritionists in the
region, ROSS, May 10, 2005
Pediatric Gastroenterology: Common Problems and
Hepatitis C Infection, plenary speaker, 33rd Annual
Advances in Family Practice and Primary Care,
Seattle, 2005
Cholestasis, guest faculty lecture, noon conference,
University of Washington, 2005
Visiting professor: Pocatello and Boise, Idaho, 2005
Transplant Surgery
Jorge D. Reyes, MD
Transfer of Care to the Community: Where Are the
Gaps? and Enhancing Wellness: Lifelong Success for
the Transplant Patient, panel discussion, Winter AST,
Banff, Alberta, Canada, March 16–20, 2005
Intestinal Transplantation: Historical Notes,
Principles and Controversies, Grand Rounds,
University of Southern California, Los Angeles,
April 16, 2005
Intestinal Transplantation: Historical Notes,
Principles and Controversies, Grand Rounds,
University of Chicago, June 8, 2005
Surgical Strategies to Maximize Organ Utilization in
Intestinal Transplantation, IX International Small
Bowel Transplantation Symposium, Brussels, Belgium,
June 30–July 2, 2005
Transplanting Children with Hepatocellular
Carcinoma — How Do They Differ from Adults,
International Liver Transplantation Society 11th
Annual International Congress, Los Angeles,
July 20–23, 2005
Steroid Avoidance in Intestinal Transplantation,
International Pediatric Transplantation Association
3rd World Congress on Pediatric Transplantation,
Innsbruck, Austria, August 6–9, 2005
Addressing the Medical Care of Live Lung, Liver,
Intestinal and Pancreas Donors, Vancouver Forum for
World Transplant Congress, Vancouver, BC, Canada,
September 14–16, 2005
Intestinal Transplantation: Historical Notes,
Principles and Controversies, Grand Rounds, BarnesJewish Hospital, St. Louis, Mo., October 3, 2005
A Brain, a Heart, and Courage: Evolving Paradigms of
Clinical Tolerance Induction, International Transplant
Nursing Society, Seattle, November 1, 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Ake JA, Jelacic S, Ciol MA, Watkins SL, Murray KF,
Christie DL, Tarr PI. The nephroprotective effect of
intravenous volume expansion during Eschericia coli
0157:H7 infection. Pediatr. 2005;115(6):673–680.
Benfeild MR, Tejani A, Harmon WE, McDonald RA,
Stablein DM, McIntosh M, Rose S, CCTPT study
group. A randomized multicenter trial of OKT3 mAbs
induction compared with intravenous cyclosporine in
pediatric renal transplantation. Pediatr Transplant.
2005;9:282–292.
Bousvaros A, Guandalini S, Baldassano R, Botelho C,
Evans J, Ferry G, Goldin B, Hartigan L, Kugathasan
S, Levy J, Murray KF, Oliva-Hemker M, Rosh J, Tolia
V, Young R, Zholudev A, Vanderhoof J, Hibberd PL. A
randomized, double-blind trial of Lactobacillus GG vs.
placebo in addition to standard maintenance therapy
for children with Crohn disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis.
2005;11(9):833–839.
Bousvaros A, Murray KF, Leichtner A. Chapra,
LaMont and Bonis, eds. Clinical manifestation and
diagnosis of Crohn disease in children and adolescents.
Up to Date. Wellesly, 2005.
Casale P, Grady RW, Mitchell ME, Healey PJ.
Recurrent urinary tract infection in the post-transplant reflux nephropathy patient: is reflux in the
native ureter the culprit? J Pediatr Transplant.
June 2005;9(3):324–327.
Flynn B, Park BK, Bond G, McGhee W,
Mazariegos G, Sindhi R, Reyes JD, Abu-Elmaged K.
Immunosuppressive strategies for intestinal transplantation: a review of a tolerogenic regimen. Progress in
Transplantation. 2005;15(1).
Gonzalez-Peralta RP, Kelly DA, Haber B, Molleston J,
Murray KF, Jonas MM, Shelton M, Mieli-Vergani G,
Lurie Y, Martin S, Lang T, Baczkowski A, Geffner M,
Gupta S, Laughlin M, International Pediatric Hepatitis
C Therapy Group. Interferon alfa-2b in combination
with ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis
C in children: efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics.
Hepatol. 2005;42(5):1010–1018.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Transplant Surgery
Grant D, Abu-Elmaged K, Reyes JD, Tzakis A,
Langnas A, Fishbein T, Goulet O, Farmer D. 2003
report of the intestine transplant registry: a new
era has dawned. Ann Surg. 2005;241(4).
Macedo C, Shindhi R, Mazariegos GV, Abu-Elmagd K,
Bond GJ, Reyes JD. Sclerosing peritonitis after intestinal transplantation in children. Pediatr Transplant.
2005;9:187–191.
Gross TG, Bucuvalas JC, Park JR, Greiner TC,
Hinrich SH, Kaufman SS, Langnas AN, McDonald
RA, Ryckman FC, Shaw BW, Sudan DL, Lynch JC.
Low-dose chemotherapy for Epstein-Barr virus-positive post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease
in children after solid organ transplantation. J Clin
Oncol. Sep 20, 2005;23(27):6481–6488.
Murray KF, Carithers RL. AASLD practice guidelines:
Evaluation of the patient for liver transplantation.
Hepatol. 2005;41(6):1407–1432.
Harmon WE, McDonald RA, Reyes JD, Bridges ND,
Sweet SC, Sommers CM, Guidinger MK. Pediatric
transplantation. Am J Transplant. April 2005;
5(4 Pt 2):887–903.
Kim SS, Lau ST, Lee SL, Schaller R Jr, Healey
PJ, Ledbetter DJ, Sawin RS, Waldhausen JH.
Pyloromyotomy: a comparison of laparoscopic, circumumbilical, and right upper quadrant operative
techniques. J Am Coll Surg. July 2005;201(1):66–70.
Lau ST, Kim SS, Ledbetter DJ, Healey PJ. Fraternal
twins with Morgagni hernias: a case report. J Pediatr
Surg. April 2005;40(4):725–727.
Macedo C, Donnenberg A, Popescu I, Reyes JD, AbuEmagd K, Shapiro R, Zeevi A, Fung JJ, Storkus WJ,
Metes D. EBV-specific memory CD8(+) T cell phenotype and function in stable solid organ transplant
patients. Transpl Immunol. Jun 2005;14(2):109–116.
Macedo C, Popescu I, Abu-Emagd K, Reyes JD,
Shapiro R, Zeevi A, Berghaus JM, Wang LF,
Lu L, Thomson A, Storkus W, Fung J, Metes D.
Augmentation of type-1 polarizing ability of
monocyte-derived dendritic cells from chronically
immunosuppressed organ-transplant recipients.
Transplant. February 27, 2005;79(4):451–459.
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Murray KF, Finn LS, Taylor SL, Seidel KD, Larson
AM. A comparison of liver histology and alanine
amino transferase levels in children and adults with
chronic hepatitis C. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr.
2005;41(5):634–638.
Reyes JD. Introduction to selected reports from the
Sixth Annual American Transplant Congress. The
Immunology Report 2005; 2(1):3–4.
Reyes JD, Mazariegos GV, Abu-Elmagd K, Macedo
C, Bond GJ, Murase N, Peters J, Sindhi R, Starzl TE.
Intestinal transplantation under tacrolimus
monotherapy after perioperative lymphoid
depletion with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin
(ThymoglobulinВ®). Am J Transplant. February 24,
2005;5:1–7.
Smith JM, McDonald RA. Renal transplantation
in adolescents In: Adolescent medicine clinics:
nephrologic disorders in the adolescent. Sherwinter J,
Foulds DM, Greydanus DE, eds. Philadelphia: Elsevier
Sanders, 2005;(16):201–214.
Sudan D, Dibaise J, Torres C, Thompson J, Raynor S,
Gilroy R, Horslen SP, Grant W, Botha J, Langnas A.
A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of
intestinal failure. J Gastrointest Surg. Feb 2005;
9(2):165–177.
Urology
The clinical branch of the Division of Urology (in the Department of Surgery)
manages all pediatric health care problems relating to the urogenital system. The
division’s medical and surgical treatments take into consideration the growth and
developmental needs of young children. We are the world leader in the treatment
of complex urologic malformations — including exstrophy/epispadias, cloaca,
neurogenic bladder dysfunction, patients with posterior urethral valves and
hydronephrosis — and we also treat routine and common abnormalities and
problems such as urinary tract infection, meatal stenosis and hypospadias.
We use laboratory research and clinical observation to solve problems in
children with urinary malformation and malfunction. The division has a very active
basic research laboratory that is investigating the growth and development of
the lining of the urinary tract, the uroepithelium. Research also includes clinical
studies and trials relating to complex and routine urologic conditions in children.
Our pediatric urologists are supported by registered nurses and nurse
practitioners who specialize in the care of children with bladder and voiding
dysfunction. We offer bladder retraining and biofeedback for voiding abnormalities
and detailed urologic functional assessment using urodynamics.
TEACHING, RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EXPERTISE
Michael E. Mitchell, MD, was chief of the Division of
Urology at Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor
of urology at the University of Washington School of
Medicine until mid-2006 when he retired from Seattle
Children’s. He held the Guild Association Endowed
Chair in Pediatric Urology, which was renamed in his
honor to the Dr. Michael Mitchell Endowed Chair in
Pediatric Urology. He has held leadership positions in
the Society for Pediatric Urology, American Academy
of Pediatrics and American Board of Urology. He
was instrumental in the development of the Inservice
Examination for Pediatric Urology and edited a major
urology textbook. He is widely published and is con-
FACULTY
Michael E. Mitchell, MD, Chief
James A. Bassuk, PhD
Richard W. Grady, MD
Byron D. Joyner, MD
sulting editor for several journals. Dr. Mitchell is
world-renowned for contributions in developing the
concept of the valve bladder syndrome, the procedure
of gastrocystoplasty bladder reconstruction, Mitchell
bladder neck repair, the Mitchell technique of bladder
reconstruction in patients with bladder exstrophy and
new and innovative concepts for the reconstruction
of the genitalia such as found in patients with epispadias. He has also developed new concepts and theories
relating to the embryology of the urinary tract. His
techniques for primary bladder closure in patients
with exstrophy complex are now used worldwide.
Dr. Mitchell is developing a Center of Excellence for
the treatment of bladder exstrophy and patients with
complex urinary malformations. He has received
the Hugh Hampton Young Award for outstanding
contributions to the field of urology.
James A. Bassuk, PhD, is director of research in the
Division of Urology at Seattle Children’s Hospital
and affiliate assistant professor at the University of
Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Bassuk achieved
his PhD in zoology from Iowa State University. He
trained in chemical carcinogenesis at the Institute
for Cancer Research at the Fox Chase Cancer Center
in Philadelphia, in collagen metabolism at the
Michael E. Mitchell
MD, Chief
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
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Urology
University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey
and in angiogenesis in the Department of Biological
Structure at the University of Washington. He has
studied developmental programs that lead to a normal,
functional urinary bladder. He works in a laboratory
at Seattle Children’s Hospital for tissue culture, cell
biology and animal studies and a laboratory at the
University of Washington for molecular biology and
recombinant protein chemistry. Dr. Bassuk also trains
and supervises students, technicians, fellows and residents in the design, performance and interpretation
of experimental designs.
the University of Washington’s Julian S. Ansell
Teaching Award for his new approaches to teaching
residents about interpersonal and communication
skills and professionalism. Dr. Joyner has interests in
clinical research related to voiding dysfunction and
urinary tract infections in children. He is an active
member of many professional societies including the
American Urological Association, American Academy
of Pediatrics, Society of University Urologists and
American College of Surgeons.
RESEARCH FUNDING
Richard W. Grady, MD, is attending physician at Seattle
Children’s Hospital, and fellowship program director and director of clinical research in the Division
of Urology. He is associate professor of urology at
the University of Washington School of Medicine.
Dr. Grady received his MD from the University of
Michigan and completed a urology residency at the
Cleveland Clinic Foundation. His training includes
a research scholarship at the NIH in cell mediated
immunity and a fellowship in pediatric urology at
Seattle Children’s. Dr. Grady’s research interests
include urinary tract infection. He has clinical research
interests in studying complex defects such as exstrophy, neurogenic bladder conditions and intersex states.
Current projects include the development of a multiplatform relational clinical database, a study of quality
of life in patients with spina bifida and several clinical
research trials studying methods to treat these conditions. Dr. Grady is active in regional, national and
international urologic societies. He has an interest
in international medicine and has been a visiting
professor internationally in addition to participating
in medical missions to India and Mongolia.
Byron D. Joyner, MD, is associate professor at the
University of Washington School of Medicine. He is
program director for the Division of Urology at the
university. He received his MD from Harvard Medical
School. He completed his residency at Massachusetts
General Hospital. He completed a research fellowship at Children’s Hospital Boston and two years of
training at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto.
He served for four years in the U.S. Army as chief of
pediatric urology at Madigan Army Medical Center.
He is responsible for the education and competency
training of urology residents. He trained in the Seattle
Children’s Teaching Scholars program and received
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
New
Richard W. Grady, MD
Cranberry as an E.coli Anti-Uroadherence Agent in a
Pediatric Population, National Kidney Foundation,
$50,000
Continuing
James A. Bassuk, PhD
Regulation of Urothelial Cell Behavior by SPARC,
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $249,180
Proteins as Signals in Urothelial Cell Proliferation,
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $260,216
Evaluation of Heterogeneity in Urothelial Cells in
Interstitial Cystitis and Clinical Management of
the Disease by Recombinant Modulators, University
of Washington, National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS, $117,504
PRESENTATIONS AND TEACHING ACTIVITIES
James A. Bassuk, PhD
Bypass of Replicative Senescence in Human Urothelial
Cells; The C-Terminal Ca2+-Binding Domain of
SPARC Confers Anti-Spreading Activity to Human
Urothelial Cells of a Normal and Ex-Strophic
Phenotype; The Nuclear Localization Sequence of
SPARC Influences Its Intracellular Localization and
Activity in Human Urothelial Cells; Spreading of
Embryologically Distinct Urothelial Cells Inhibited by
SPARC; and Validation of Methods for Determination
of Urothelial Cell Viability in the Laboratory, abstracts
Urology
presented at the Urothelial Cell Physiology in Normal
and Disease States Symposium, satellite meeting of
the XXXV International Congress of Physiological
Sciences, San Diego, March 29–30, 2005
Urothelial Tug-of-War: Balancing of Adhesive and
Counteradhesive Forces, podium abstract presented
at the 2005 International Bladder Symposium of
the National Bladder Foundation, Baltimore,
April 15-16, 2005
Distribution of the FGF-10 Receptor Is Indicative
of Targeted Therapy for Turnover of Transitional
Epithelium, abstract presented at the 2005
International Bladder Symposium of the National
Bladder Foundation, Baltimore, April 15-16, 2005
Podium speaker and participant, National Bladder
Foundation International Symposium, Baltimore,
April 15-16, 2005
Richard W. Grady, MD
The Evolution of the Exstrophy Repair, visiting
professorship, Christian Medical College,
Vellore, India, February 2005
DEHP and the Developing GU System, Grand Rounds,
Seattle Children’s, June 2005
Panel on intersex, Society of Pediatric Urology, AUA
national meeting, October 2005
Environmental Toxins and the Developing GU System,
Out of Harm’s Way Conference, Spokane, Wash.,
October 2005
Byron D. Joyner, MD
National Survey of Urology Program Director’s
Assessment, faculty lecturer, ACGME national
meeting, April 2005
Michael E. Mitchell, MD
State of the Art: New Concepts in Vesicoureteral
Reflux, 52nd James C. Kimbrough Urologic Seminar,
Honolulu, January 2005
Why Ectopic Ureteroceles Are Not Ectopic, Pediatric
Urology Winter Forum, Whistler, BC, Canada,
February 2005
Random Thoughts on Pathologic Development of
the Urinary Tract or Why Is an Ectopic Ureterocele
Not Ectopic, John Duckett Memorial Lectureship,
European Society for Pediatric Urology/American
Academy of Pediatrics 2nd Joint Meeting, Uppsala,
Sweden, June 2005
Exstrophy, surgical unit nursing in-service,
Seattle Children’s, September 2005
The Changing Bladder of Early Childhood, Society
for Fetal Urology, Washington, D.C., October 2005
PUBLICATIONS
Carr M, Mitchell ME. Neuroblastoma. In: Urologic
Oncology. Richie JP, D’Amico AV, eds. Philadelphia:
Elsevier Saunders, 2005:737–752.
Casale P, Grady RW, Lee RS, Joyner BD,
Mitchell ME. Symptomatic refluxing distal
ureteral stumps after nephroureterectomy and
heminephroureterectomy: what should we do?
J Urol. January 2005;173(1):204–206.
Casale P, Grady RW, Mitchell M, Healey P. Recurrent
urinary tract infection in the post-transplant reflux
nephropathy patient: is reflux in the native ureter the
culprit? Pediatr Transplant. June 2005;9(3):324–327.
Delostrinos CF, Hudson AE, Feng WC, Kosman J,
Bassuk JA. The C-terminal extracellular Ca2+binding domain of SPARC confers anti-spreading
activity to human urothelial cells. J Cell Physiol.
Jan 2006;206(1):211.
Franco I, Horowitz M, Grady RW, et al. Efficacy and
safety of oxybutynin in children with detrusor hyperreflexia secondary to neurogenic bladder dysfunction.
J Urol. Jan 2005;173:221–225.
Grady RW. Systemic quinolone antibiotics in children:
a review of the use and safety. Expert Opin Drug Saf.
2005 Jul;4(4):623-630.
Hudson AE, Feng WC, Delostrinos CF, Carmean N,
Bassuk JA. Spreading of embryologically distinct
urothelial cells is inhibited by SPARC. J Cell Physiol.
Feb 2005;202(2):453–463.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
227
Urology
Joyner BD, Mitchell ME. Ureteropelvic junction
obstruction. In: Pediatric Surgery, 6th ed. Grosfield
JL, O’Neill JA, Forkalsrud CW, Coran AG, eds. Elsevier
Publishers, 2005.
Joyner BD, Seidel K, Stoll D, Mitchell ME. Report
of the National Survey of Urology Program Directors:
attitudes and actions regarding the ACGME
regulations. J Urol. October 2005; publication pending.
Mitchell ME, Black PC, Grady RW. Epispadias
repair: complete penile disassembly. In: Advanced
Urologic Surgery, 3rd ed. Hohenfellner R, Fitzpatrick
JM, McAninch JW, eds. Blackwell Publishing, Ltd.,
2005:194–198.
Porter M, Faizan K, Grady R, Mueller B. Hypospadias
in Washington state: maternal risk factors and prevalence trends. Pediatr. Mar 2005; e-publication.
Walsh T, Joyner BD. Evaluation of the pediatric
patient with a non-traumatic acute scrotum.
AUA Update Series, March 2005.
Zhang D, Kosman J, Carmean N, Grady R, Bassuk
JA. FGF-10 and its receptor exhibit bi-directional
paracrine targeting to urothelial and smooth muscle
cells in the lower urinary tract. Am J Physiol – Renal
Physiol. 2006: (in press).
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Transplant Center
The Children’s Transplant Center offers comprehensive evaluation and care to patients with
end-stage diseases of the heart, liver, kidneys and intestines. We are committed to providing
optimal growth and quality of life for all of our patients — and helping families return to
normal, active lives. The Transplant Center is a leader in pediatric liver, heart and kidney
transplant and viral surveillance, and our graft and survival outcomes are consistently
among the best in the nation.
Our liver transplant program is at the forefront of improving surgical techniques for
split-liver and living donor liver transplants. Our heart transplant program serves some of
the highest volumes of patients in the country; its innovative clinical program can handle
complex neonate and infant transplants. Children’s is one of the top five kidney transplant
centers in the United States and is actively involved in multicenter studies to reduce
patients’ dependence on immunosuppressive drugs. Our pediatric nephrology fellowship
program is one of only six in the country funded by the National Institutes of Health. The
center’s intestinal care program, established in 2005, brings together Drs. Simon Horslen
and Jorge Reyes, who have more combined experience treating children with intestinal
failure than any other physician pair in the nation.
Our physician leadership is also actively involved in shaping national organ donation
policy through the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS).
FACULTY
Robert J. Boucek Jr., MD, Chief of
the Division of Cardiology (see also,
Department of Pediatrics, Division
of Cardiology)
Gordon A. Cohen, MD, PhD, Chief
of the Division of Cardiothoracic
Surgery (see also, Department of
Surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic
Surgery)
Patrick J. Healey, MD, Chief of the
Division of Transplant Surgery
(see also, Department of Surgery,
Division of Transplant Surgery)
Simon P. Horslen, MBChB,
Medical Director for Liver and
Intestinal Transplantation (see
also, Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Gastroenterology and
Department of Surgery, Division
of Transplant Surgery)
Ruth A. McDonald, MD, Medical
Director for Solid Organ Transplant
(see also, Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Nephrology and
Department of Surgery, Division
of Transplant Surgery)
Karen F. Murray, MD, Director of
the Hepatobiliary Program (see
also, Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Gastroenterology and
Department of Surgery, Division
of Transplant Surgery)
Jodi M. Smith, MD (see
also, Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Nephrology)
John H.T. Waldhausen, MD,
Director of Pediatric Surgery
Fellowships and Surgery
Education (see also, Department
of Surgery, Division of General
and Thoracic Surgery)
Delphine Yung, MD (see also,
Department of Pediatrics,
Division of Cardiology)
Jorge D. Reyes, MD, Director of
Transplant Services (see also,
Department of Surgery, Division
of Transplant Surgery)
Robert S. Sawin, MD, Surgeonin-Chief (see also, Department of
Surgery, Division of General and
Thoracic Surgery)
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
229
Research
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Incredible growth, remarkable results and a commitment to the highest ethical
standards are the hallmarks of Seattle Children’s Hospital research program.
Funding for more than 400 pioneering projects continues to expand rapidly.
In 2005, our research program received nearly $26 million in funding from
private foundations, corporations and the government, a 20 percent increase
over 2004. In late 2005, we announced our intention to add up to 1 million
James Hendricks, PhD
Vice President, Research
square feet of additional research space during the next 10 to 20 years.
There has never been a more exciting time for research at Seattle Children’s.
Our commitment to research ensures that the families we serve have access
to state-of-the-art treatments and diagnostic tools.
This report highlights some of the innovative projects and physician-scientists
whose work is influencing the practice of pediatric medicine and advancing the
basic knowledge of the molecular underpinnings of disease. More successes
lie ahead as we work to develop new treatments and therapies that will change
the lives of children and families for the better.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
231
Research
Research is thriving at Seattle Children’s. The breadth and vitality of our research
enterprise is a product of our world-class faculty. These dedicated physician-scientists
are advancing the frontiers of knowledge and making discoveries aimed at preventing,
treating and eliminating childhood disease.
We operate 110,000 square feet of research space at three locations. Children’s
Westlake facility and the hospital’s main campus host 65,000 square feet of wet laboratory
space. The main campus also has a 5,000-square-foot Pediatric Clinical Research Center
and Investigational Pharmacy Service. Clinical and outcomes research are housed in
40,000 square feet at our facility in Seattle’s Metropolitan Park West building. We also
support pediatric research on the University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer
Research Center campuses.
Though research is under way in every medical specialty and scientific discipline
at Seattle Children’s, several areas of strength and achievement stand out in our program.
This section highlights some of the research contributions from our programs in bioethics,
immunology, infectious disease, tissue response to injury, clinical trials development,
cancer and health services research.
Establishing Seattle
Children’s Pediatric
Bioethics Center
In late 2004, Seattle Children’s
established the nation’s first center
devoted exclusively to the study and
debate of ethical issues in health-care
delivery and medical research that
affect children. The mission of the
Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric
Bioethics is to educate health-care
professionals, caregivers, parents
and scientists — and to provide an
unbiased forum where controversies
in the п¬Ѓeld can be openly debated.
In keeping with this mission, the
bioethics center accepts no support
from industry.
In July 2005, the center hosted a
first-of-its-kind event — a conference
to debate the controversial issues that
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arise when children participate in
biomedical research. The conference
drew more than 200 attendees from
the United States, Canada, South
America and Africa.
In additional to hosting an
annual conference, the bioethics
center promotes scholarship on
ethical quandaries, trains the next
generation of pediatricians and
ethicists about pediatric bioethics,
and provides consultation to families,
health-care providers, researchers
and policymakers about pediatric
bioethics.
The center’s goal is to improve
pediatric bioethics practices
and policies on a national and
international level.
The center is named for retired
president and CEO Treuman Katz,
who actively shared in the vision for
the center’s creation.
Research
Immunology
Seattle Children’s is the referral center
for children and adults with immune
problems throughout Washington,
Alaska, Montana and Idaho. We
have genetic testing and diagnostic
capabilities that no one else in our
region has. We also serve as an
international center for prenatal and
neonatal testing, and for testing of
adults to identify carriers of immune
deficiency disorders.
Our faculty and their laboratory
teams are internationally recognized
for their expertise and leadership
in basic, clinical and translational
research related to primary
immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD).
PIDD refers to more than 130
different genetic defects involving the
immune system. As many as 500,000
Americans and 10 million people
worldwide are affected by PIDD, and
unable to п¬Ѓght off bacteria, viruses,
parasites, fungi and malignant cells.
This can lead to frequent infections
that are difficult to fight and to an
increased incidence of cancer.
Because each of these diseases is
caused by a defect in a single gene,
they are a fertile ground for researching
genetic conditions. Several research
teams at Seattle Children’s are working
on therapeutic approaches to mend
the defective genes, including gene
therapy and gene repair.
By the early 1990s, Children’s
researchers were making the connection
between immune deficiencies and
genes. This opened new possibilities
for treatment. Recent work at Children’s
and elsewhere, coupled with improved
methods for gene sequencing, has made
it quicker and easier to identify the
genetic basis of many previously
unknown immune disorders.
Infectious Disease
and Host-Pathogen
Interaction
Childhood infections are a major
cause of morbidity and mortality
in the United States and around
the world. The funding emphasis
on preventing infections by
many national and international
organizations underscores the
global impact these diseases have
on the health of children.
Respiratory illnesses, central
nervous system infection and AIDS
are just a few of the infections
that have a significant impact on
pediatric health and remain a
priority. Seattle Children’s has
been at the forefront of bench and
clinical investigations of pediatric
infection for the past 25 years.
Major areas of interest continue
to focus on bacteria that cause
respiratory, brain and bloodstream
infection in newborns, infants
and young children. This research
investigates the specific traits of
microbes that influence their ability
to establish infection in a human
host. It also studies the immune
mechanisms that thwart infection
by these pathogens.
This work includes basic
science exploration at the molecular
and cellular level, and the use of
animal models of human infections.
The goal is to define mechanisms
Carol H. Miao, PhD: Can gene therapy
answer the question of hemophilia?
Dr. Carol Miao is developing non-viral
gene therapy protocols for the treatment
of hemophilia. Gene therapy holds the
promise of helping hemophilia patients
begin producing sufficient clotting factor,
thus removing or at least lessening their
dependence on weekly infusions. With
this advance, it may be possible for people
born with severe hemophilia to reduce or
eliminate their symptoms over time.
Miao and her colleagues are the first to
use non-viral naked DNA delivery to achieve
therapeutic levels of factor VIII and factor
IX gene expression in hemophilia A and
hemophilia B mouse models, respectively.
Since gene therapy research trials with
humans have had mixed results, the future
for gene therapy in hemophilia is continuing
at a moderate pace. However, many projects
are continuing in animal models. Improved
long-term expression of the new genes
will require the development of better ways
to deliver the new genes into the cells.
Miao and her team are investigating
safer and more efficient non-viral vectors
and delivery methods suitable for clinical
applications.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
233
Research
of virulence or host responses that
influence how disease develops and
how much it injures tissue.
This research is advancing the
understanding of the biological
basis of infections that occur in
healthy children as well as those with
cancer or genetic, developmental
or immune deficiencies. The results
may ultimately lead to improved
diagnoses and new approaches to
disease management. They should also
identify targets for new antimicrobial
therapy and vaccines.
Researchers at Seattle Children’s
have capitalized on these observations
to promote the development of new
antibiotic treatments (such as TOBIв„ў),
to understand how bacteria develop
resistance to antibiotics, and to
identify new vaccine candidates for
disease prevention.
Our HIV/AIDS program has
evolved rapidly during the past 15
years to become one of the sentinel
programs in the country. Our research
continues to contribute significantly
to understanding how the HIV virus
develops resistance to antiviral drugs.
Collaborations with investigators and
similar programs at the University
of Washington and Fred Hutchinson
Cancer Research Center continue to
enhance and strengthen Children’sbased investigations.
Because of our strength in this
п¬Ѓeld we have developed one of the best
training programs for pediatric physicianscientists and non-physician scientists
in host-pathogen interaction. Fully 60%
to 70% of our trainees establish careers
that include research specific to pediatric
infections. Seattle Children’s has
successfully maintained an NIH-funded
training program for 22 years. This type
of program is critical to the success of
developing our future pediatric programs
and to improving pediatric health care.
Tissue Response
to Injury
The body’s response to injury, whether
due to illness, trauma or other insults, can
either help or hinder the healing process.
Understanding the body’s response to
injury at the cellular, tissue and whole
organ level is essential to the development
of therapeutic interventions that will
promote meaningful survival without
disability.
Researchers at Seattle Children’s
investigate this repair process using basic
science tools at the molecular, cellular
and animal model level. The overall goal
is to develop new clinical tools to help
providers manage, treat and eventually cure
acute and chronic diseases of childhood.
Researchers from several disciplines are
investigating how tissue in solid organs
responds to injury.
Our nephrology research program
Hans D. Ochs, MD: Correcting gene mutations in congenital disorders
Dr. Hans Ochs is conducting in vitro studies that may lead to gene therapy for congenital
disorders caused by mutations of genes that are involved in development of the immune
system and immune responses. These studies may provide information necessary to
begin human gene replacement therapy for immunedeficiency disorders, which can
cause multiple disabilities.
For example, adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency and nucleoside phosphorylase
(NP) deficiency are associated with neurological syndromes, liver disease and bone
abnormalities. Presentations of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome include a platelet defect, eczema,
autoimmune disorders and a high incidence of malignancies.
Ochs has generated databases to cover mutations in WASP, Btk, CD40 ligand, SAP,
and other genes causing immune deficiencies. Most recently, his laboratory has focused on
two newly discovered genes causing autosomal recessive hyper-IgM syndrome (activationinduced cytidine deaminase, AID), uracil-DNA glycosylate (UNG), and the scurfy gene,
FOXP3, responsible for a syndrome involving immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy,
enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX).
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SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Research
is investigating pathogenetic
mechanisms of progressive kidney
disease, a process whereby normal
renal tissue is destroyed by п¬Ѓbrosis in
response to injury. These studies have
shown that many of the pathogenetic
pathways that destroy renal tissue are
similar to the way other solid organs
are destroyed by fibrosis — especially
the lungs, liver and heart.
Our urology program is
investigating mechanisms of bladder
regeneration following injury.
The goal is to develop new tissue
engineering strategies to reconstruct a
chronically injured hollow organ, such
as the urinary bladder. The ability to
regenerate or rebuild tissue that has
been damaged by chronic injury is
relevant to most organ systems. These
studies intersect with the disciplines
of vascular and matrix biology and
bioengineering, all disciplines that
have world-renowned experts working
at the University of Washington.
Tissue injury triggered by hypoxia
and ischemia is a common cause of
damage. Some organs such as the liver
and kidneys display a remarkable
ability to recover following time-limited
hypoxia, while for other organs, such
as the brain and heart, even shortlived ischemia may have permanent
and even fatal consequences. Our
cardiology program is investigating
metabolic pathways of cardioprotection
and mechanisms of myocardial
regeneration and repair.
Our neonatology colleagues,
based at the University of Washington,
are investigating mechanisms of
neuroprotection in infants exposed to
brain ischemia. This group also has an
emerging interest in acute lung injury
in collaboration with the newly
established Lung Biology Center
at the University of Washington.
Developing and Leading
Clinical Trials
For several decades, one of Seattle
Children’s greatest research strengths
has been developing and conducting
clinical trials involving new therapies
for children with a variety of chronic
disorders. The successful clinical
trial networks established by our
faculty have brought international
recognition to the hospital. We
have had an international impact
in the following areas:
Pediatric Oncology
Dr. John Hartman helped found the Children’s
Cancer Group in the 1960s. This group,
which evolved into Children’s Oncology
Group (COG), changed the course of
childhood cancers, such as Wilm tumor,
neuroblastoma and acute lymphoblastic
leukemia. Seattle Children’s oncologists
have always played a lead role in developing and leading clinical trials through COG.
The combined efforts of oncology, neurosurgery and pathology have made Seattle
Children’s a leader in the Pediatric Brain
Tumor Consortium. With the establishment
of the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA),
we also became a premier center for bone
marrow transplant and transplant research.
Cystic Fibrosis
Our research and clinical advances in the
treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) are another
example of our leadership. After developing
TOBIв„ў, the inhaled antibiotic that revolutionized the treatment of CF lung infections, Seattle
Children’s gained a preeminent position in
coordinating clinical research for CF. We are
the international center for CF therapeutic
trials. The Data Coordinating Center for the
national CF Therapeutics Development
Network is located at Seattle Children’s.
Clinical Network Trials
The development of new therapeutic agents
for children spans a wide range of clinical
specialties at this institution.
Our nephrology division boasts several
nationally recognized faculty who lead clinical
trial networks related to renal transplant
and chronic renal disorders. Faculty in
rheumatology, endocrinology, critical care
medicine and cardiology have been leaders
in establishing national clinical trial networks,
and remain active in developing and
participating in these therapeutic trials.
Our child psychiatry group is extremely
active in clinical trials involving a variety
of therapeutic agents to treat childhood
depression, psychosis and anxiety.
The creation of the Pediatric General
Clinical Research Center, funded by the
National Center for Research Resources
(NCRR) in 1996, provided infrastructure to
enhance our involvement in early therapeutic
trials (Phase 1 and 2) and has brought together
many of Children’s clinical research activities.
The growth of the Pediatric General Clinical
Research Center has resulted in the center
receiving an outstanding ranking by the NCRR
at the time of the competitive renewal in 2003.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
235
Research
Bonnie W. Ramsey, MD: Changing lives
through research
Dr. Bonnie Ramsey remembers the
moment she decided to devote her
energy to changing the odds in the
fight against cystic fibrosis (CF).
“Two of my patients died within
a week of each other and I knew I
couldn’t continue to hold the hands
of these young boys and girls without
personally trying to affect this disease,”
she recalls.
Ramsey played a vital role in the
Children’s research that developed a
breakthrough cystic fibrosis treatment:
TOBIв„ў, an inhalable form of an existing
antibiotic that delivers medicine directly
to the lungs where it is needed most,
while limiting unnecessary exposure to
others parts of the body.
She continues to be very involved
in clinical research that develops new
treatments to improve and extend the
lives of children with CF. Her dedication
and spirit of inquiry have led to remarkable advances in the treatment of people
with CF, helping double their lifespan
and vastly improving their quality of life.
236
Childhood Cancer
Outcomes–Health Services
The overall aim of Seattle Children’s
pediatric oncology program is to
improve outcomes for children with
malignancy. Since its inception,
basic research in this program has
focused on the developmental aspects
of the formation of blood cells with
the specific goal of developing novel
therapeutic modalities.
We have identified maturationlinked cell surface antigens, and
have used this information to develop
methods for targeted therapy for
malignancies of the blood, and for
isolating and characterizing normal and
malignant human blood-forming cells.
These studies have led to the
development of stem cell transplant
using isolated CD34+ cells, successful
targeted radiotherapy of leukemia and
lymphoma, and the development of an
innovative approach for treating acute
myelogenous leukemia using an
antibody-drug conjugate.
Research in clinical oncology
includes hematopoietic cell therapies
that have led to vast improvements
in treating a number of pediatric
malignancies. Our strong presence in
the Children’s Oncology Group has
enabled us to introduce pilot studies
and lead multisite trials.
Current studies are evaluating
new approaches for expanding and
genetically altering blood-forming
cells for therapeutic purposes. A new
program is studying the formation
of nerves, with a focus on identifying
therapeutic targets in tumors of the
developing brain.
The strength of existing outcomes/health
services research by Children’s-affiliated
investigators is both methodological and
content specific.
A well-networked, interdisciplinary
group of investigators focused on pediatric
outcomes has developed here during
the last few years. This group represents
strengths from a variety of areas at Seattle
Children’s, the University of Washington
School of Medicine and School of Public
Health, the Child Health Institute (CHI),
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
and Group Health Cooperative’s Center
for Health Studies.
This network uses a wealth of research
designs, including randomized controlled
trials, to test new ways to change patient,
family and provider behavior. These
intervention trials are placed in a wide
variety of community settings, such as
schools, child care programs, physician
practices and larger health systems.
For example, the Puget Sound Pediatric
Research Network is a valuable collaboration
between community-based physicians and
academic researchers that investigates
common pediatric conditions. Though the
populations studied vary, there is a special
focus on the most vulnerable children,
including those with special health-care
needs and chronic conditions and
immigrant, refugee and non–English
speaking children and families.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Research
Children’s investigators are
pushing the envelope, using
information technology and the
World Wide Web to improve health
outcomes by changing behavior.
Using existing databases — including
Medicaid and commercial health
insurance plans, hospital discharge
data and Pediatric Health Information
Systems data — this group has been
able to address important questions in
pediatric health care. Their work has
been used to change public policy for
children and to help Seattle Children’s
achieve its mission by improving the
quality of care delivered.
This network of Children’saffiliated investigators has applied
their investigational skills to the
leading health issues facing children
in the United States today, such as
behavioral and mental health, injuries,
chronic illness, care of pediatric acute
illness, and health promotion and
disease prevention.
Elizabeth A. McCauley, PhD:
Recognizing Childhood Anxiety
and Depression
About 20 years ago, Elizabeth
McCauley, PhD, had a career-altering
experience. A young teenager
came to the emergency room
with classic signs of depression.
McCauley and her colleagues
were perplexed. In the early 1980s,
it was still thought that children
weren’t able, cognitively or emotionally, to be depressed.
Having her personal observation butt up against common knowledge inspired
a career-long exploration of childhood anxiety and depression — and McCauley’s
research has helped to establish the study of adolescent depression as a discipline
and to change how depression in children is understood and treated.
A few years ago, she teamed with colleague Ann Vander Stoep, PhD, a University
of Washington child psychiatric epidemiologist, to better understand the factors that
influence emotional distress in children. Their goal was preventing such distress from
progressing to more severe emotional health and behavioral problems.
Partnering with the Seattle Public Schools, McCauley and Vander Stoep
developed the Developmental Pathways Research Program. Under this umbrella,
they are conducting a series of studies that screen middle school students for
signs of emotional distress and provide early interventions that address the issues
causing the distress.
“Initially, we were concerned that we’d uncover a vast need for mental health
services that we wouldn’t have the clinical resources to handle. What we found is that
most of the children have specific, practical needs, such as homework support or a
sense of connectedness. Many of the schools have the resources to meet these needs
right in their buildings.”
McCauley and Vander Stoep are assessing the effectiveness of a skills-based
intervention designed to help eighth-graders make a successful transition to high
school, and designing two follow-up studies to evaluate their mental health screening
program. The first follow-up study will look at whether the suggested interventions
were acted on by the child and family, and if not, why not. The second will assess
whether the suggested interventions helped when they were acted upon.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
237
Fellows and Residents
2005-2006
Seattle Children’s Hospital Fellows
Adolescent Medicine
Megan A. Moreno, MD
Anesthesiology
James C. Borowiec, MD
Bruce Jones, MD
Martha Pankovich, MD
Ben Pieters, MD
Thomas Satterfield, MD
Critical Care Medicine
J. Elaine Albert, MD
Iain R. Asplin, MD
Teodor Butiu, MD
Angela S. Czaja, MD
Mary King, MD
Mithya Lewis-Newby, MD
Lincoln Smith, MD
Developmental Pediatrics
Gwen M. Glew, MD
Emergency Medicine
Jennifer R. Reid, MD
Elena Shephard, MD
Kimberly Stone, MD
Endocrinology
Harvey K. Chiu, MD
Tracy A. Hentz, MD
Monica S. Thakar, MD
Elizabeth Villavicencio, MD, PhD
Jessica Wright, MD
Pathology
Infectious Disease
Soren Gantt, MD
Oscar G. Gomez, MD, PhD
Jin-Young Han, MD
Nada Harik, MD
William J. Muller, MD, PhD
Audrey R. Odom, MD
Angela J. Peck, MD
Thor A. Wagner, MD
Medical Genetics
238
Stacey Berry, MD
Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine
Paul A. Boutin, MD
Alison A. Golombek, MD
Ray Hsiao, MD
Jeffrey Kaiser, MD
Kari L. Kawakami, MD
Catherine Kuniyoshi, MD
Jon Kuniyoshi, MD
Jennifer K. Shannon, MD
Heather C. Mefford, MD, PhD
Pulmonary
Neonatology
Maneesh Batra, MD
Pamela Statler Chapman, MD
Marcella Mascher-Denen, MD
Katherine Salinas, MD
Nephrology
Amanda D. Bunn, MD
Kera E. Luckritz, DO
David Simon, MD
Amy O. Staples, MD
Priya Verghese, MD
Ikuyo Yamaguchi, MD
Hematology/Oncology
Scott C. Borinstein, MD
Eric J. Chow, MD
Scott J. Diede, MD, PhD
Jacob R. Garcia, MD
Sonia Partap, MD
Randal C. Richardson, MD, MMS
Stephanie A. Robinett, MD
Neurology
Mario T. Coleman, MD
Jessica R. Litwin, MD
Ian Miller, MD
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Danny W. Hsia, MD
Radiology
Amaya Ormazabal, MD
Muzaffer Tepe, MD
Mahesh Thapa, MD
Rheumatology
Sarah Ringold, MD
Jennifer K. Turner, MD
Surgery
Tracy Grikscheit, MD
Andrew M. Schulman, MD
Urology
Margarett Shnorhavorian, MD
Seattle Children’s Hospital Residents
Chief Residents
R2
R3
Sarah E. Archibald, MD
Douglas J. Opel, MD
Josh D. Weldin, MD
Francois P. Aspesberro, MD
Janna P. Bakari, MD
Crystal M. Benson, MD
Amy E. Carter, MD
Aaron M. Dalan, MD
Stephen E. Darling, MD
Sarah A. Denny, MD
Kelly N. Evans, MD
C. Esen Garner, MD
Eric A. Gustafson, MD
Matthew A. Haemer, MD
Susan M. Halbach, MD
Elizabeth N. Jacobson Misbe, MD
Kimberly M. Johnson, MD
Jeremy D. Kassebaum, MD
Scott H. Maurer, MD
Erica A. Michiels, MD
Eva M. Moore, MD
Mary F. Murdoch, MD
Jessica E. Pittman, MD
Camilla A. Richmond, MD
Amanda M. Striegl, MD
Annika K. Sutton, MD
Sarah K. Taylor, MD
Ildiko H. Thomas, MD
Melissa C. Walsh, MD
Victoria L. Wilkins, MD
Holly C. Carey, MD
Eleanor S. Click, MD
John D. Cowden, MD
Sara P. Dow, MD
H. Mollie Greves, MD
Evelyn K. Hsu, MD
Kristin E. Hubert, MD
Matthew P. Kronman, MD
Ellen A. Lipstein, MD
Kira E. Marciniak, MD
Anjuli K. Mehrotra, MD
Kristin C. Nyweide, MD
Maren E. Olson, MD
Zakiya M. Pressley, MD
Alison E. Scott, MD
Heather L. Silverberg, MD
Kevin M. Sullivan, MD
Wendy Sue Swanson, MD
Rupin R. Thakkar, MD
M. Gregory Thompson, MD
Natalie A. Vogel, MD
R1
Mikelle D. Bassett, MD
Andrew C. Beckstrom, MD
Rachel S. Bercovitz, MD
Omar J. Bhutta, MD
Matthew S. Blessing, MD
Ann E. Dahlberg, MD
J. Wesley Diddle, MD
Andrew C. Dietz, MD
Yolanda N. Evans, MD
Reid W. Farris, MD
Rachel A. Fleishman, MD
Erica R. Freeman, MD
Alana S. Golden, MD
Sabrina E. Guse, MD
Hiwot Hiruy, MD
Benjamin K. Jackson, MD
Katie M. Kazmier, MD
Malaika L. Little, MD
Nicolas L. Madsen, MD
Jennifer A. Montoya, MD
Lila N. O’Mahony, MD
Jeffrey P. Otjen, MD
Vijaya L. Soma, MD
Kristina A. Toncray, MD
Kathryn M. Wheeler, MD
Amie C. Wu, MD
Garland G. Youngblood, MD
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
239
Financial Summary
Fiscal Year 2004 – 2005
O P E R AT I N G R E V E N U E S A N D E X P E N S E S F O R T H E
CONTRIBUTIONS TO CHILDREN’S
F I S C A L Y E A R O C T. 1 , 2 0 0 4 – S E P T. 3 0 , 2 0 0 5
Sources of Contributions
DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS
4% Organizations
& Other Donors*
CHILDREN’S HEALTH CARE SYSTEM
1% Children’s Thrift Stores
12% Corporations
Sources of Revenues
Patient Service Revenues
Research and Other Government Grants
Other Revenues
Uncompensated Care Donations
Unrestricted Donations and Restricted
Donations Used in Operations
Investment Income
Total Sources of Revenues
$390,433
36,150
22,182
12,802
18,864
22,946
$503,377
19% Guild Projects
56% Individuals
8% Foundations
* This category includes donations from service groups (such as Elks, Kiwanis,
Foresters) as well as workplace campaigns and non-guild special events.
Uses of Contributions
Uses of Revenues
Uncompensated Care
Salaries and Benefits
Supplies and Other Expenses
Depreciation and Interest
Provision for Renovation, New Equipment
and New Programs
Total Uses of Revenues
$35,833
198,960
166,614
36,234
65,736
$503,377
14% Greatest Need
(unrestricted gifts)
1% Facilities
& Equipment
17% Fundraising
& Administration
35% Uncompensated
Care
15% Research
Volunteers
An average of 1,333 people contributed time and services
each month for a total of 127,400 work hours in 2005.
Here’s where they spent their time:
CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL FOUNDATION,
GUILD ASSOCIATION AND RETAIL
Sources of Revenues
Fundraising Revenues and Support
Children’s Retail (net revenues from thrift stores)
Subtotal
18% Patient Care &
Hospital Programs
$38,766
339
$39,105
2% Patient Care, Outpatient
30% Patent Care,
Inpatient
39% Thrift & Gift Shops
Expenses
Fundraising and Administrative Expenses
Total Net Revenue
240
(–) 6,802
$32,303
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
29% Support Services
Financial Summary
2005 PATIENT STATS
STAFF STATS
> 215,051 total patient visits (76,000 individual patients)
– 165,192 appointments in our outpatient clinics
– 29,497 visits to the emergency room
– 11,608 admissions to the hospital
– 8,754 short-stay visits
> 250 patient beds
> 5.7 days average length of stay
> 4,351 inpatients who had surgical procedures
> 5,831 ambulatory patients who had surgical procedures
> 74,268 diagnostic imaging tests performed
> 904,198 lab tests performed
Where Our Inpatients Come From
5% Alaska, Montana
& Idaho
1% Outside Washington, Alaska,
Montana & Idaho
19% Seattle
43% Other Washington
Locations
32% Other King County
Locations
AS OF JAN. 2, 2006
> 3,450 active staff employed at Children’s
> 970 active medical staff
– 460 hospital-based physicians
– 95 hospital-based mid-level health professionals
– 415 community members of our medical staff
RESEARCH FUNDING
Sources of Extramural Funding
In 2005 our grant and contract revenue (exclusive of philanthropic
gifts) totaled in excess of $25 million. Federal grants accounted
for 68% of the total revenue. Included in this federal figure
is more than $11 million of National Institutes of Health (NIH)
funding where Seattle Children’s was the prime recipient
of the NIH award. This NIH funding to Seattle Children’s Hospital
in 2005 increased by 20% compared to 2004. Based on NIH
award data for 2005, Seattle Children’s Hospital ranked 11th
in its peer group.
0% Other ($-)
22% Foundation
($5,781,515)
Where Our Physicians Travel to Provide Care
10% Corporate
($2,563,288)
(total of 350 clinic days)
6% Kennewick, Wash.
20% Wenatchee,
Wash.
68% Federal
($17,363,941)
9% Other Washington, Alaska,
Montana & Idaho Locations
40% Anchorage &
Other Alaska Locations
25% Yakima, Wash.
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
241
Acknowledgments
Thank you
Annual Report Leadership
Editorial and
Production Team
A special thank-you to the following individuals
who assisted with this report
Kathi Elliott
Patricia Adams
Gretchen Anderson
Emily Andrews
David Barry
Diana Baker
Karen Barket
Allory Bauer
Kathleen Beaudry
Shanda Boyle
Mary Brown
Amy Cheney
E. Chappie Conrad, MD
Sandy Craig
Gordy Darragh
Marti Davis
Barb Droppleman
Scott Ford
Brooke Freed
Millie Gregory
Amy Grover
Marivic Guevarra
Sandy Heatley
Nancy Henry
Cary Holder
Thomas N. Hansen, MD
President,
Chief Executive Officer
James Hendricks, PhD
Vice President, Research
Jennifer Fisch
F. Bruder Stapleton, MD
Senior Editor/Writer
Marketing Communications
Pediatrician-in-Chief
Chairman, Department of Pediatrics,
University of Washington School
of Medicine
Lisa Brihagen
Writer
Marketing Communications
Robert Sawin, MD
Tina Russell
Surgeon-in-Chief
Vice Chairman, Department of Surgery,
University of Washington School
of Medicine
Production Coordinator
Margaret Foster
242
Production Supervisor
Marketing Communications
Phinney/Bischoff
Design House
Design
Project Manager and Content Manager
Marketing Communications
Studio Bolo
Jordis Ruhl
Richard Johnson
Project Consultant
Editor
Produced by the Marketing
Communications Department,
Seattle Children’s Hospital
and Regional Medical Center,
Seattle, Washington
Marge Manwaring
Susan Macek
Nancy LeVine
Interim Director
Feature Photographer
Production and Design
Copyeditor/Proofreader
Lisa McCoy
Copyeditor/Proofreader
SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Mildred Hill
Angel Hui
Kaitlin Jaccard
Casey Jones
Holly Kaopuika
Jason Lane
Joan Laughlin
Tri Le
Stephanie Leak
Amy Leska
Fran McKee
Michelle Metcalf
Richard Molteni, MD
James Parr
Sean Poppoff
Joann Ramezanzedeh
Lynn Rise
Denise Robinson
Lisa Robinson
Anne Thompson
Ellen Veum
Christy Villareal
Bryan Williams, MD
Chris Wong
Seattle Children’s Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Seattle Children’s Hospital
and the Department of Pediatrics,
University of Washington School of Medicine
2005 Academic Annual Report
2005 Academic Annual Report
4800 Sand Point Way N.E.
Seattle, Washington 98105
(206) 987-2000
www.seattlechildrens.org
© 2006 Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. All rights reserved.
10/06
Our Vision
We will be the best
children’s hospital
Our Mission
WE WILL:
> Provide patients and their families
excellent care with compassion
and respect
We believe all children have unique
needs and should grow up without
illness or injury. With the support of
the community and through our spirit
of inquiry, we will prevent, treat and
eliminate pediatric disease.
> Deliver superior, accessible,
cost-effective service
> Attract and retain the best talent
at all levels of the organization
> Be one of the top five pediatric
research institutions in the country
> Be the nation’s premier pediatric
educator
> Achieve worldwide prominence by
integrating patient care, research,
education and advocacy
Our Vision
We will be the best children’s hospital
WE WILL:
> Provide patients and their families excellent care with
compassion and respect
> Deliver superior, accessible, cost-effective service
> Attract and retain the best talent at all levels of the organization
> Be one of the top five pediatric research institutions in the country
> Be the nation’s premier pediatric educator
> Achieve worldwide prominence by integrating patient care,
research, education and advocacy
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