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(IK’ATSI – place up high)
IT’S YOUR FUTURE
JUNIOR
PROGRAMMING GUIDE
2015 - 2016
Highland’s Website can be found at http://highlandsecondary.ca
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Table of Contents
WELCOME TO HIGHLAND ....................................................................................................... 5
THE HOUSE-ADVISOR SYSTEM ............................................................................................ 6
COUNSELLING AND SUPPORT SERVICES ........................................................................ 7
ACADEMIC RECOGNITION ...................................................................................................... 8
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS............................................................................................. 9
INDEPENDENT LEARNING CENTER (ILC) ......................................................................... 10
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) DIPLOMA PROGRAMME ............................ 11
HONOURS PROGRAM ............................................................................................................ 13
HIGHLAND SECONDARY HOCKEY ACADEMY ................................................................. 14
CAREER PLANNING ................................................................................................................ 15
Sandwick Technical Education Project: STEP SD#71 (Comox Valley) ........................ 15
Work Experience 12A & 12B ................................................................................................ 16
Secondary School Apprenticeship – SSA .......................................................................... 16
ACE IT (Accelerated Credit Enrollment in Industry Training).......................................... 17
ACE IT Carpentry 11/12 ............................................................................................................ 19
NAVIGATE (NIDES) ................................................................................................................. 20
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION – ALL GRADES ............................................................. 21
UNDERSTANDING MATHEMATICS 10 ................................................................................ 22
MATHEMATICS PATHWAYS .............................................................................................. 23
GRADE 9 REQUIRED COURSES .......................................................................................... 24
English 9 .................................................................................................................................. 24
Physical Education 9 ............................................................................................................. 24
Mathematics 9......................................................................................................................... 24
Social Studies 9 ...................................................................................................................... 24
Science 9 ................................................................................................................................. 25
GRADE 10 REQUIRED COURSES ........................................................................................ 25
English 10 ................................................................................................................................ 25
English 10 Honours................................................................................................................ 25
English 10 First Peoples ....................................................................................................... 25
Mathematics - Apprenticeship and Workplace Math 10 (A&W 10) ................................ 26
Mathematics - Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10 (FPC 10)............................................ 26
Math 10 Honours .................................................................................................................... 26
Planning 10 ............................................................................................................................. 27
Physical Education 10 ........................................................................................................... 27
Science 10 ............................................................................................................................... 27
Science 10 Honours .............................................................................................................. 27
Social Studies 10.................................................................................................................... 27
Social Studies 10 Honours ................................................................................................... 28
LANGUAGE COURSES ........................................................................................................... 28
French 9 ................................................................................................................................... 28
French 10................................................................................................................................. 28
French 10 Honours ................................................................................................................ 28
Introduction to Spanish.......................................................................................................... 29
GRADE 9/10 ELECTIVES ........................................................................................................ 29
Art 9/10..................................................................................................................................... 29
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Art 9/10 2D .............................................................................................................................. 29
Art 9/10 3D .............................................................................................................................. 29
BAND and MUSIC CLASSES .................................................................................................. 30
Band 9/10 ................................................................................................................................ 30
Chorus 9/10 ............................................................................................................................. 30
Jazz Band 9/10 ....................................................................................................................... 30
MEDIA STUDIES ................................................................................................................... 31
Journalism 9/10 ...................................................................................................................... 34
Yearbook 9/10 ........................................................................................................................ 34
DRAMA CLASSES..................................................................................................................... 34
Drama 9/10.............................................................................................................................. 34
HOME ECONOMICS ................................................................................................................. 35
Global Foods 9/10 .................................................................................................................. 35
Food Studies 9/10 .................................................................................................................. 35
PHYSICAL EDUCATION .......................................................................................................... 35
Fitness 9/10-Soccer Focus ................................................................................................... 35
Fitness 9/10-Basketball Focus ............................................................................................. 35
Hockey Academy ................................................................................................................... 36
Fitness for Girls 9/10.............................................................................................................. 36
TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION .................................................................................................. 36
Jewelry 9/10 ............................................................................................................................ 36
Mechanics/Go-karts 9/10 ...................................................................................................... 36
Programming/Robotics 9/10 ................................................................................................. 37
Robotics/Electronics 9/10 ..................................................................................................... 37
Small Engines 9/10 ................................................................................................................ 37
Industrial Design 9/10 ........................................................................................................... 37
Woodwork 9/10 ....................................................................................................................... 37
MISCELLANEOUS ELECTIVE CLASSES............................................................................. 38
Creative Writing 9/10 ............................................................................................................. 38
Law 9/10 .................................................................................................................................. 38
Global Studies 9/10................................................................................................................ 38
Marine Biology 9/10 ............................................................................................................... 38
4
WELCOME TO HIGHLAND
We extend a very warm welcome to you. Upon arrival at school you automatically
become a member of one of Highland’s Houses and one of its Advisor groups. The
Houses will have approximately 20 Advisor groups in each House. Your assignment to
a House and an Advisor group enables you to develop a close identity with a group of
students and teachers during your stay at Highland. Over the years, this has helped
Highland maintain a positive school culture.
The school year at Highland is divided into two semesters. In each of the semesters
your timetable will consist of four class periods and a lunch period. Classes run from
9:00 am until 3:20 pm, and each class period is one hour and fifteen minutes in length.
At Highland you will find up-to-date technology, featuring networked computer labs in
the library, the drafting room, the multi-media and the graphics lab. Computers are used
for a variety of courses as well as to help you to make career choices in your Grade 11
and Grade 12 years.
Highland is justifiably proud of the standards achieved by its students in the areas of
English, Mathematics, Science, French, and Social Studies. Each year many students
receive local and provincial scholarships as well as university based scholarships. In
addition to “traditional” academic courses, courses are available in music, art,
technology, home economics, physical education, computers, and drama.
Highland began the first year of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme in
September 2012. This two year programme for grades 11 and 12 students is an
academically challenging experience, with a focus on internationalism and service.
We encourage you to become involved in your school. Each year there is a wide range
of intramural events, sports teams, service clubs, student government activities and
music and drama events. These activities will not only provide enjoyment they will also
enable you to develop positive skills and attitudes. By getting involved, you will make
the best of your high school years.
5
THE HOUSE-ADVISOR SYSTEM
The House-Advisor concept used at Highland is often called the “school within a school”
system. The school is organized into two “Houses”. There is a Blue House and a Gold
House, and each House is made up of advisor groups led by a Teacher/Advisor, with
approximately 20 advisees in each group. A Vice-Principal is assigned to each advisor
group. There are advantages of such a decentralized organization for students, parents,
teachers, and administrators alike. One of the main advantages is the “feeling of
belonging” the students develop. They know their Advisor Group peers and have the
advantage of being in a group where there is a mixture of grades. The advisees stay
with these groups until they graduate. This allows the students to get to know others
from their own grade as well as from the other four grades in a non-threatening, nonsubject oriented setting. Positive interpersonal contact is a major component of the
House System. There is a feeling people care about others and many of the students’
needs are met through daily contact with their advisors. Many learning outcomes for
Planning 10, Grad Transitions, and Health and Career Education, are completed in this
setting.
Course Advisors and House Vice-Principal
If you have any difficulties or concerns you should first speak with your Advisor.
Advisors may refer students to counsellors or to their Vice-Principal.
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COUNSELLING AND SUPPORT SERVICES
Personal Counselling and Career Counselling
Further to the counseling, guidance and advice students receive from their advisor; the
Counselling Centre is available for special assistance. The Counsellor will:





Assist with specific difficulties by providing confidential, problem centered,
personal counseling.
Assist with particular educational or post-secondary concerns.
Help students resolve conflicts.
Make referrals to district support staff, and outside community agencies or
experts.
Help you acquire the understanding, skills and information necessary for dealing
with problems.
As you develop interests in certain areas you may want to check with the counselor for
career guidance. While this occurs most often at the senior grades, we encourage all
students to begin thinking about what they would like to do after graduation.
Learning Assistance
Learning assistance is available for students who are experiencing difficulty with
particular subject areas or with school skills such as organization, test preparation and
test writing. If you feel you need learning assistance, see your Advisor or House VicePrincipal.
Assessment Services are also available in consultation with parents, advisors and the
Learning Assistance teacher.
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ACADEMIC RECOGNITION
Grading Policy
Procedures for evaluating the progress of students in a course will vary depending on
the learning objectives, the learning environment and the requirements of the individual
student or group of students.
During the first week of a course, each Highland teacher will communicate in detail the
grading policies and practices of the course. Students are encouraged to review these
policies and practices and to discuss them with their parents.
The grading system currently in use is as follows:
A
B
C+
C
CF
Excellent Performance
Very Good Performance
Good Performance
Satisfactory Performance
Minimally Acceptable Performance
Unsatisfactory Performance
86 – 100%
73 – 85%
67 – 72%
60 – 66%
50 – 59%
0 – 49%
Final letter grades also include:
SG
F
I
W
-
Standing Granted
Fail
Incomplete/In Progress
Withdrawn
Work Habit Definitions
E = Excellent
G = Good
S = Satisfactory
U = Unsatisfactory
Honour Roll
The Honour Roll is established by the Grade Point Average, as determined by the
following numerical equivalents and will be awarded at the end of the course.
A = 4, B = 3, C+ = 2.5, C = 2, C- = 1
Students must count all of their courses and have no failing grades in any of their
courses to be on the honour roll at the end of the course. Each term we will recognize
students in every grade with excellent work habits in all their courses.
Academic Gold: 4.0 GPA
3.0 - 3.49 GPA
Academic Silver: 3.5 - 3.99 GPA
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Academic Bronze:
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
80 CREDITS OVER GRADES 10, 11 AND 12
48 required credits:
 Language Arts 10 (4 credits)*
 Language Arts 11 (4 credits)*
 Language Arts 12 (4 credits)*
 Social Studies 10 (4 credits)*
 Social Studies 11, Canadian Civics 11 or B.C. First Nations Studies 12
(4 credits)*
 Science 10 (4 credits)
 Science 11 or 12 (4 credits)*
 Mathematics 10 (4 credits)*
 Mathematics 11 or 12 (4 credits)*
 Physical Education 10 (4 credits)
 Fine Arts and/or Applied Skills ;10, 11 or 12 (4 credits)*
 Planning 10 or 11 (4 credits)
*One from a number of course options
Students must also:
*earn 4 Graduation transition credits, and
* complete a minimum of 28 elective credits
An unlimited number of credits from board or independent school authority authorized or
post-secondary electives may count toward graduation.
A minimum of 16 credits from either ministry or board/authority authorized or postsecondary courses are required at the Grade 12 level.
Five Graduation Programme Exams in Grades 10 – 12 are required for graduation,
including a Grade 12 Language Arts Exam.
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INDEPENDENT LEARNING CENTER (ILC)
Have you ever wanted to learn in your own way? Do you want to take a course that
isn’t available in the regular timetable? Do you want to make your own course? If you
answer yes to any of these, the ILC may be for you.
In the ILC, students set learning goals, and pace themselves through a term, or a
semester, to achieve a specific goal, or complete a specific course. A teacher/facilitator
is present to help students manage the multi-faceted demands of independent learning.
Students have two choices – to complete an online course readily available through any
BC certified distributed learning school OR to complete an Independent Directed Study
(IDS) in any area of interest If you take a certified online course, you receive credit for
that course (ie. not for the ILC block). If you do an IDS course you receive credit for that
work if it is deemed to represent 2-4 credits worth of work.
Independent learning is not for everyone. You need to be able to self-motivate and selfregulate. Only students who have demonstrated some promise as an independent
learner will be eligible to have a block in the ILC. It is expected that students use their
time wisely in the ILC as there is always a waiting list of students wanting to get an ILC
block. The ILC is not a study block, nor is it a place to socialize. If you are not
successful in the ILC, you will not be eligible for another ILC block in the future. Access
to the ILC is a privilege.
For more information about the ILC find the link on the Highland website or just Google
“aimandlearn” - https://sites.google.com/site/aimandlearn/.
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INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) DIPLOMA PROGRAMME
School District 71 Programme of Choice at Highland Secondary School
Highland Secondary school has completed the International Baccalaureate
accreditation process and is now an approved IB World School. We started teaching the
IB programme in September of 2012. School District 71 offers a variety of different
choice programmes and this Grade 11 and 12 programme will be offered at Highland
Secondary. Highland’s Honours programme at the Grade 11/12 level consists primarily
of IB courses. (See the Honours Program section in this guide.)
The International Baccalaureate (IB) is a worldwide community of schools, aiming
through a rigorous academic programme to create a better, more peaceful world.
Successful students in this programme will graduate with an IB Diploma. The IB
Diploma is recognized by post-secondary institutions around the world and many
universities recognize successful IB students by giving them credit for first year
university coursework.
The Diploma Programme is a two-year commitment which students complete during
their Grade 11 and Grade 12 years. As such, students apply for IB during their Grade
10 year. A meeting for prospective parents and students will be held in January, and
applications are submitted directly to Highland Secondary School and are typically due
by mid-February.
Grade 10 students who are not currently at Highland are eligible and welcome to apply.
Such students will need to fill in a district cross-boundary request along with their
applications. The cross-boundary request should clearly indicate the student is applying
to the IB programme. Cross-boundary request forms are available on the SD 71
website.
It is highly advantageous (but not required) for junior students considering IB to
take honours courses at the Grade 10 level. Highland offers a full slate of these
courses, which serve as an introduction to the principles and standards of the
International Baccalaureate. In this way, students will be better prepared for the
expectations of the IB programme when they start it in Grade 11. This means that
current Grade 9 students interested in the IB programme should consider
applying for Grade 10 honours courses when they are doing their programming.
Students will have some choices to make with regard to their IB programming and some
elective space will be available in a student’s IB timetable. The Diploma Programme
requires students to be enrolled in three higher-level (HL) courses and three standardlevel (SL) courses. The application form includes a space where students can indicate
non-IB courses they would like to take.
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The IB courses Highland currently offers are listed below. Students taking the full IB
diploma will take one course from each category, six classes overall. Although we
strongly encourage students to take a course from the Arts in order to foster holistic
learning, students bound for sciences may opt to take both IB Science courses and no
course from the Arts section.
First
Language
☐English HL
☐English SL
Second
Language
☐French SL
Social
Studies
☐History HL
Science
Math
Arts
☐Biology HL
☐Chemistry HL
☐Math SL
☐Math Studies
SL
☐Theatre SL
☐Visual Arts
SL
For more information about the programme, please look at the IB Programme section of
Highland’s website at www.highlandsecondary.ca. There you find all the information
required to apply for the IB Programme, including the necessary forms. If you have
questions, please contact the IB Coordinator at [email protected]
Interested students are encouraged to review the Learner Profile to self-reflect on its
characteristics. IB Programme success correlates very well with students who strive to
develop the qualities of the IB Learner Profile, below. IB learners strive to be:
Inquirers
They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and
research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of
learning will be sustained throughout their lives.
Knowledgeable
They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so doing,
they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range
of disciplines.
Thinkers
They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and
approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.
Communicators
They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one
language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in
collaboration with others.
Principled
They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the
dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions
and the consequences that accompany them.
Open-minded
They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the
perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to
seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience .
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Caring
They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They
have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of
others and to the environment.
Risk-takers
They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the
independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in
defending their beliefs.
Balanced
They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve
personal well-being for themselves and others.
Reflective
They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess
and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal
development.”
HONOURS PROGRAM
ENGLISH
GRADE 10
English 10 Honours
English 10
GRADE 11
English 11 IB
MATHEMATICS
GRADE 10
GRADE 11
Foundations of Math 10
Math SL IB
Math 10 Honours
Math Studies IB
Foundations
and
PreCalculus Math 10
SCIENCE
GRADE 10
Science 10 Honours
Science 10
GRADE 12
English 12 IB
English Literature 12
Writing 12
GRADE 12
Math 12 SL IB
Math 12 Studies IB
Calculus 12
GRADE 11
Biology 11 IB
Chemistry 11 IB
Physics 11
GRADE 12
Biology 12 IB
Chemistry 12 IB
Physics 12
SOCIALS
GRADE 10
Social Studies 10 Honours
GRADE 11
History 11 IB
GRADE 12
History 12 IB
LANGUAGE
GRADE 10
French 10 Honours
GRADE 11
French 11 IB
GRADE 12
French 12 IB
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HIGHLAND SECONDARY HOCKEY
ACADEMY
A challenge faced by many student athletes is the task of trying to balance multiple priorities
and achieve results in BOTH academics and athletics. Sometimes results achieved in one area
come at the expense of performance in other areas.
What is a Hockey Academy?
 A program specially developed to help student athletes to excel in both academics and
athletics.
 Providing 2 on-ice skill development practices per week as well as 3/4 off-ice
conditioning sessions per week, all during school hours
 Gives graduation credits (6) for working on your game
Highland’s hockey program is a licensed Hockey Canada Skills Academy (HCSA). This means
that Hockey Canada will standardize and monitor the delivery of the hockey experience by
providing a curriculum guide, training videos, an instructor’s professional development training
seminar and consulting.
Who is it for?
 Students in grade 9 to 12
 Students focused on individual skill development and academic achievement
 Competitive or recreational, beginners or advanced players
 Male or female
 Athletes who want more time on task (skill development)
 Players committed to being the best they can be
 Players striving to obtain College Scholarships or play Junior hockey
Benefits for Student Athletes
 Increased opportunity for developing creative skills and confidence in hockey skills
 Over 45 hours of on-ice instruction, 2 slots per week, during school time
 Late bloomers, late starters, and late maturing players experience tremendous skill
gains
 Each student is assessed twice in the program, comparing their skills to those of elite
level players across Canada (HC standardized individual skill tests)
 Strength/conditioning training programs are developed for students
 Individual video analysis of students skating is done
 Selected guest speakers present many hockey related topics to students in seminars
and classroom presentations
 Identity with a recognized program (HCSA) with proven skill results which build
confidence
Course Fees: $850.00 plus HST/ Students must fill out and return a "Highland Hockey
Academy Application Package" to be considered for this course. Application packages may be
picked up at the office or your house V.P.
For more information call Pati Creamer @ (W) 339-5525 (H) 339-0705
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CAREER PLANNING
Visit our website careers.sd71.bc.ca
A very important component of any Career Planning is connecting
students to the ‘world of work’ through work experience. Work
experience validates whether a student’s interests and predicted career
pathway is realistic or needs adjusting. Highland offers the following
programs to link students with the workforce.
Work Experience – 30 Hour Grad Transition Requirement
Work experience is a Ministry Graduation requirement for all students. Students access
the worksite under regulated hours and conditions, and are closely supervised. While in
high school, students are covered under a provincial agreement for their “Worksafe BC”
in case they get injured while on the job. This only occurs for high school students, so it
is a good way for students to be able to be on a job site, without the employer having to
hire them.
To complete the required minimum 30-hour experience, a student may participate in
one or more of the following venues:
 school-arranged work experience
 day shadowing (one or more short-term industry visit)
 work experience “challenge” (previous or current employment)
 volunteer work/community service
The goal of work experience is to become aware of and practice employability skills
such as punctuality, communication, teamwork, positive work ethics and attitudes.
Students may choose work experience to train for entry-level employment or a
placement related to future career goals.
Sandwick Technical Education Project: STEP SD#71 (Comox Valley)
Sandwick Technical Education Project is an initiative to teach job ready skills to
students so they can be prepared for part time work while still in their schooling years,
and for after graduation. Safety training is one of the main focuses. We are using the
existing Concrete program where students make concrete picnic tables to teach safe
work practices.
Students can sign up through the work experience office for the 6 day project. The
students come out once a week for the six weeks. The project is mainly "hands on" and
covers the following WorkSafe BC topics:
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




Lifting to save your back
Ladder Safety
Fall Arrest
WHMIS
Employer expectations
Lockout
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Work Experience 12A & 12B
(Open to grade10, 11, and 12 students.)
Long-term work experience is open to Grade 10, 11 and 12 students who have an
interest in pursuing almost any career area. In Work Experience 12A & 12B, a student
spends 120 hours training at one or more worksites. By doing this, skills are learned
and questions answered before career decisions are made. Students choose
placements according to their current interests. Students typically work during the
school day or after school and weekends (this course can be extra-session, which
means that a student could have 9 or 10 courses listed on their timetable).
Work Experience can take place over the summer vacation (must have WE12 contract
started) for a grade 11 student and by starting with WE12A a student often turns the
experience into paid employment. Benefits of work experience are:
 4 – 8 credits toward graduation
 Pre-employment job training
 Learning how to run your own business
 Making valuable industry contacts
 Apprenticeship opportunities
 Possibly lead into paid work
 prerequisite for some post-secondary education
Contact the Work Experience Coordinator or Career Center Teacher for
information
Secondary School Apprenticeship – SSA
Secondary School Apprenticeship is open to Grade 10-12 students, 15
years of age or older, who are motivated to gain hands-on training in a designated
trade.
Hidden Apprentice: If a student is presently working in a Trade related job, he/she
should contact their Work Experience Coordinator to see if they qualify as an SSA
student. It can mean receiving graduation credits for learning outside of school, and
qualify for a $1,000 scholarship.
Need more information? Visit the Industry Training Authority web site: www.itabc.ca
16
ACE IT (Accelerated Credit Enrollment in Industry Training)
 ACE IT programs allow students to earn credit towards both high school
graduation and trades qualifications.
 Students in ACE IT programs will complete level 1
apprenticeship technical training in their chosen
trade and gain valuable practical experience.

 Secondary School Apprenticeship (SSA) students also qualify for the ACE IT
program.
 ACE IT programs involve course work at high school and/or college.
 ACE IT programs cover tuition costs.
ACE IT programs offered through our district, but some occur at NIC
in Campbell River.
 Auto Service Technician
 Carpentry
 Hairdressing
Cooks Training
 Aircraft Structures Technician
 Auto Service Technician
 Electronics Technician Core
 Electrical Foundation
 Plumbing and Piping Foundation
 Welding Level C
 Metal Fabrication
 Heavy Duty Mechanics
 Horticulture
 Auto Body
If interested in any ACE IT or Dual Credit program, go to your Work
Experience office and ask for an application.
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District Apprenticeship programs:
Automotive Service Technician (AST) – Level 1 ACE IT
The Auto Service Technician program will provide opportunity for 16 students to begin
working towards rewarding careers. This program will be delivered at Highland
Secondary's auto shop.
What You Need…
What You Get…
 Mechanical Interest
 Desire to work in a trade involving
mechanics
 Good attendance and a strong work
ethic
 Auto Service Technician Level 1
certification
 20 Grade 12 level credits in one
semester
 Practical “hands on” training
experience
 Valuable industry experience
What You Will Do…
 Spend your final semester of grade 12 fully immersed in mechanics
 4 days in shop and 1 day per week working at a local Auto Service Facility
 Master the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary to successfully write the
Level 1 AST test
Hairdressing ACE IT
This program prepares students with a strong understanding of the foundations of their
trade, and beyond school to the exciting world of cosmetology.
What You Need…
What You Get…
 Present yourself in a confident, ethical
and professional manner
 Desire to work in a trade involving
Cosmetology
 Good attendance and a strong work
ethic
 Complete English or Communications
12 prior to your grade 12 year.
 Cosmetology Industry Association of
B.C. Certificate of Qualification
 40 Graduation credits over two
semesters
 Practical “hands on” training
experience
What You Will Do…
 Spend your entire Grade 12 year fully immersed in Hairdressing
 5 days per week, Monday to Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
 Master the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary to successfully write the
Cosmetology Industry Association of British Columbia Certificate of Qualification
18
Professional Cook 1
Do you enjoy working in a kitchen environment and create tasteful food? Maybe you
can see yourself in the fast-paced tourism industry working where ever you want, and
mix in some travel? Possibly you like to express your creative self through food
preparation. This program can lead to a Red Seal Certification.
What You Need…
 Have a passion in the Culinary field
 Desire to work in the Hospitality and Food
industry
 Good attendance and a strong work ethic
What You Get…
 Professional Cook 1 Certification of
Qualification
 20 Graduation credits
 Practical “hands on” training experience
 Work Based training hours towards your
apprenticeship
What You Will Do…
 Spend at least 2 blocks (8 credits) in the Cafeteria program at
 G.P.Vanier. This can occur in grade11 or 12
 Spend your second semester of your Grade 12 year fully immersed in Cooking at NIC
ACE IT Carpentry 11/12
Thinking about going into the Trades? This District course will prepare you to enter
directly into the work force, and allow you to write the Carpentry Level 1 exam. Getting a
job is not easy, and getting one that pays well is even more challenging. Having diverse
skills opens many doors for you.
This program is similar to a work site. You are in the Carpentry shop, outside, or a
combination of the two, for 1/2 a day. The program will be instructed by a RED Seal
Carpenter and Technology Education teacher. It will be run out of Mark Isfeld
Secondary School. You can travel between both schools for half days if needed.
In addition to choosing the correct courses, go to the Work Experience Office and
complete an ACE IT Carpentry application as soon as possible. Limited number of
seats.
Sample Timetable:
Grade 11 Semester 1
(Highland):
English 11 or Com. 11
Social Studies 11 or FNS 12
Any Math 11
Woodworking course
Grade 11 Semester 2
(Isfeld Secondary):
Any Science 11
Elective course
ACE-IT Carpentry 11A
ACE-IT Carpentry 11B
Summer work experience
Sample Timetable:
Grade 12 Semester 1
(Highland):
English 12 or Com. 12
Construction 12
Drafting 11 or 12
Elective course
Grade 12 Semester 2
(Isfeld Secondary):
ACE-IT Carpentry 12A
ACE-IT Carpentry 12B
(Highland):
Elective course
Elective course
19
NIC in summer to finish off
course.
What you will learn:
-Footing and Wall Forming
-Site Layout and Survey
Instruments
-Residential Framing
-Carpentry Tools and
Equipment use
-Documentation
-Codes
-Drafting and Drawings
-Expectations on a job site
-Safe work practices
NAVIGATE (NIDES)
High School Students may take a FREE course
via distributed learning while attending high school!
There are no tuition fees for BC high school students who in enroll in a secondary (grades 10-12)
course via distributed learning. Resources are provided free of charge.
Students, if you have the energy and drive to be an independent and self-paced learner, you may
wish to take a course via distributed learning at North Island Distance Education School (navigate),
right here in SD#71.
Required core courses and electives are available. Choose from academic courses at the 10-12
level:
English, Math, Social Studies, Science, Physical Education, Planning 10. Elective courses include:
International Languages, Photography, Business courses and Information Technology. Visit the
navigate website www.navigatenides.com to find a complete list of available courses.






Students should consult their school counsellor about suitability of course selection for
graduation in advance of enrolment. (navigate will notify the student’s school of any
enrolments.)
Enroll in a course when you are ready to begin. Students can start most courses at any time.
Unit tests are usually written at the local high school.
Students will require access to an internet capable computer.
navigate teachers are available to students via email or telephone to provide support to
students.
navigate teachers are present at each school on a regular basis to provide academic support
or to supervise tests.
(*Free tuition does not apply to non BC residents. Students in the International Program may
enroll but tuition fees will apply.)
Enrolment Procedure – Enrolment is ONLINE
1. Visit the navigate website www.navigatenides.com and select the Registration Tab.
2. Complete the online Registration Form for Secondary students
3. Complete the online First Assignment for the required course(s).
4. Students will receive an email with their login information for online courses, and any
required resources will be sent from navigate.
2505 Smith Road
Courtenay, British Columbia, Canada, V9J 1T6
1-800-663-7925 250-337-5300 Fax 250-337-2310
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PROGRAMMING INFORMATION – ALL GRADES
The following chart illustrates the various ways that students can progress through the
English, Math, Science and Socials programs at Highland. Use this chart in conjunction
with the appropriate grade level programming sheet when selecting courses.
ENGLISH
GRADE 10
GRADE 11
English 10 Honours →→→
→→
English 11 IB→→
→→
English 12 IB
English 10→→→→→→→
→→
English 11→→→→→→
→→
Writing 12
→→
Literature 12
→→
English 12 First Peoples
English 10 First Peoples
→→
English 11 First Peoples
MATHEMATICS
GRADE 10
Math 10 Honours→→→→
GRADE 11
→→
→→
Foundations and Pre-Calculus
Math 10→→
Apprenticeship and Workplace
Math 10→→
Science 10 Honours→→
GRADE 12
Math 11 SL IB
Math 11 Studies IB
→→
→→
Calculus 12
Math 12
Foundations Math 11 →→
Pre-Calculus Math 11→→
→→
→→
Foundations Math 12
Pre-Calculus Math 12
Apprenticeship and
Workplace Math 11→→
→→
GRADE 10
SCIENCE
GRADE 12
A&W 12
GRADE 11
Any of
the
next five
Science 10→→→
GRADE 12
Biology IB
Chemistry IB
Biology 12 IB
Chemistry 12 IB
Biology 11→→
only to →→→ →
Biology 12
Physics 11→→
only to →→→→
Physics 12
Chemistry 11→→ only to →→→→
Chemistry 12
Earth Science 11
Geography 12
Science and Technology 11
GRADE 10
SOCIALS
Socials 10 Honours→→
GRADE 11
Any of
the next
four
History 11 IB
Socials Honours 11
GRADE 12
Any of
the
next
four
History 12 IB
Geography 12
Socials 10 →→→
Socials 11
Law 12
1st Nations 12
Civilizations 12
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UNDERSTANDING MATHEMATICS 10
“What are the new Pathway Names and what is in them?”
Each pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical
understandings, rigor and critical-thinking skills that have been identified for specific
post-secondary programs of study and for direct entry into the work force. The
content of each pathway has been based on the Western and Northern Canadian
Protocol (WNCP) which governs curriculum in the Western Provinces and Northern
Territories. There are three pathways of courses to consider:
Apprenticeship and Workplace Mathematics (Courses at grade 10, 11 and 12)
This pathway is specifically designed to provide students with the mathematical
understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of
trades at post-secondary and for direct entry into the work force. Topics include
algebra, geometry, measurement, number, statistics and probability.
Foundations of Mathematics (Courses at grade 11 and 12)
This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings
and critical-thinking skills identified for post-secondary studies in programs that do
not require the study of theoretical calculus like Economics, Geography, Arts or
Humanities. Topics include financial mathematics, geometry, measurement,
number, logical reasoning, relations and functions, and statistics and probability.
Most students will choose this pathway.
Pre-calculus (Courses at grade 11 and 12)
This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings
and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs that
require the study of theoretical calculus like Sciences or Engineering. Topics include
algebra and number, measurement, relations and functions, trigonometry,
permutations, combinations and binomial theorem. A small number of students will
choose this pathway because of the higher-level topics included in it.
“Which Math course is best suited to my child?”
While there is no “rule” about which Math course is right for each student, the
decision can be made easier by thinking about your child’s ability in Math, his/her
interest in Math, and his/her future education and career plans. The new courses
have been designed to facilitate student success after high school. For example: If
your child has worked hard in Math 8 or 9, enjoys working on projects or “hands-on”
activities, or intends to pursue a trade or technical job after high school, and then
choose the Apprenticeship and Workplace pathway.
If your child has worked hard in Math 8 or 9, enjoys working on projects or “handson” activities, or is planning further study in the Social Sciences like Economics,
Geography, Psychology, Arts or Humanities at post-secondary, then the
Foundations pathway will be the best choice. If your child has been very
successful in Math 8 and 9, enjoys the challenges of Math, and is thinking about
22
future education or a career that involves Sciences or Engineering at a university,
then starting the Pre-Calculus pathway will be the best choice.
Your child’s education choice after high school depends, in part, on the courses
he/she takes in high school. To find out more information about each pathway
option, please talk to your child’s Principal, counselor and math teacher as well as
visit www.wncp.ca for more curriculum information. Parents need to remember
that grade 10 has ONLY two courses but there are three pathways in grade 11
to 12. Please review the diagram below. Students who choose grade 10
Apprenticeship and Workplace cannot move to the Foundations stream
easily. The learning outcomes of A&W 10 are not designed to support
students going into Foundations 11.
MATHEMATICS PATHWAYS
23
GRADE 9 REQUIRED COURSES
English 9
Unit of Time: 1
Course Number: 9000
English 9 is a mandatory, literature-based course which develops the key concepts
introduced in Grade 8. Students will study short stories, novels, poetry and essays.
Shakespearean drama is introduced. Exceptional students may apply for English 10
Honours after completing this class. This course is taught with Social Studies 9 as
Humanities.
Physical Education 9
Unit of Time: 1
Course Number: 9400
In this course, the students learn to recognize and respect the proper place of sport and
physical fitness as an essential part of the total person. The course is designed to
improve physical strength, cardiovascular efficiency and neuromuscular skills as well as
to impart knowledge of game rules and strategies through involvement in a variety of
individual and team activities. The curriculum covers Team Games, Individual Sports,
Dance, Gymnastics and Alternate Activities.
Mathematics 9
Unit of Time: 1
Course Number: 9100
This course will cover a range of topics that will assist in preparing students for the
challenges of future Math courses. Topics will include: Number operations, Rational
numbers, Algebraic expressions and equations, Powers, Polynomials, Surface area and
Volume of 3-D objects, Geometry, Data Analysis and Probability.
Social Studies 9
Unit of Time: 1
Course Number: 9300
This course covers the various historical and philosophical events in Europe that had a
direct impact on the way European-North America developed. The three revolutions are
discussed and geography, including mapping, is studied. Students will examine what
existed in North America before the European invasion and the early results of the
European arrival. This course ends with the War of 1812. Current events and a First
Nations component will also be included.
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Science 9
Unit of Time: 1
Course Number: 9200
Building on laboratory skills and the methods of scientific inquiry introduced in Grade 8,
students discover some of the more basic principles of physics, chemistry, biology and
space science through experimentation. The biology unit covers cell division and
reproduction. The chemistry unit studies atomic structure, chemical formulae, chemical
changes and chemical equations. The physics unit covers the characteristics of
electricity. The space science unit studies the universe and our solar system.
GRADE 10 REQUIRED COURSES
English 10
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1000
English 10 is a semester-long, literature-based course, involving the study of novels,
short stories, essays, poetry, creative writing and Romeo & Juliet. A provincial
examination worth 20% of a student’s final grade is written at the successful completion
of all course elements.
English 10 Honours
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1040
This course is designed to provide students with skills they will need if they enter the
International Baccalaureate (IB) programme at Highland for 2012 to 2014. English 10
Honours is a rigorous literature-based course involving the study of novels, short
stories, essays, poetry and drama. A provincial exam (20%) of a students' grade is
written at the end of the course. Students are selected based on the recommendation
of their grade 9 teacher. The course, designed to enrich and expand the regular
programme is suited to students with a strong language and literature foundation, and
who are independent learners. *A strong emphasis will be placed on critical thinking,
analysis and synthesis of texts studied. A focus on oral communication will allow
students to articulate a personal response to a literary text, and to integrate literary
criticism into his/her oral responses to literature. Limited to 30 students. Pre-requisite:
High standing in English 9, Work Habits and Teacher Recommendation.
English 10 First Peoples
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1050
English 10 First Peoples is a semester-long course based in contemporary literature
and local history. Studies include novels, poetry, short stories, the essay, creative
writing and contemporary drama. A provincial examination worth 20% of a student's
final grade is written at the successful completion of all course elements.
25
Mathematics - Apprenticeship and Workplace Math 10 (A&W 10)
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1110
This Math course is the first of three in the Apprenticeship and Workplace (A&W)
pathway. A&W10 topics include geometry, measurement and finance. The A&W10 and
11 and 12 courses are specifically designed to provide students with the mathematical
understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of trades at
post secondary and for direct entry into the work force. For more information about the
Math choices at grade see pages 21 -23 of this guide.
Mathematics - Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10 (FPC 10)
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1100
This Math course is the first in a series of 2 pathways for Grades 11 and 12. FPC10
topics include algebra, number, measurement, relations and functions. The FPC10
course leads to a Foundations pathway and a Pre-Calculus pathway. A strong work
ethic is recommended for students to be successful in this course.
The Foundations 11 and 12 pathway is designed to provide students with the
mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for post-secondary
studies in programmes that do NOT require the study of theoretical calculus like
Economics, Geography, Arts or Humanities.
The Pre-Calculus pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical
understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary
programs that require the study of theoretical calculus like Sciences or Engineering
Study of Commerce. For more information about the Math choices in grades 10-12, see
page 32 of this guide.
Math 10 Honours
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1140
The pace of this course is fast and rigorous. Students should have at least a “B” in
Math 9 along with excellent work habits and teacher recommendation. Students should
be independent learners that are intrinsically motivated to solve problems.
This course is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and
skills they will need if they enter the IB Program or Pre-Calculus 11. The course follows
the Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10 (FPC10) curriculum. Students will study this
curriculum in detail as well as investigate other math topics that better prepare them for
a more rigorous mathematics at the grade 11 level. Students will write the FPC10
provincial exam at the end of the course and receive 4 credits for FPC10.
Pre-requisite High standing in Math 9, strong work habits, and teacher recommendation.
26
Planning 10
Unit of Time: .5
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1900
The aim of Planning 10 is to enable students to become self-directed individuals who
set goals and make thoughtful decisions. The course includes information about the
graduation program, education and careers, healthy lifestyles and financial literacy.
Physical Education 10
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1400
This course is a required Grade 10 course. Personal development, acquisition of skills,
development of fitness, and the development of knowledge are emphasized. The
course is designed for enjoyment and for mastery of skills.
Science 10
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1200
This course studies four essential areas: chemistry, biology, physics and earth science.
Students will be given the opportunity to develop skills in interpreting data, analyzing
chemical reactions and evaluating aspects of climate change.
Science 10 Honours
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1260
Science 10 Honours is designed to provide students with skills they will need if they
enter the International Baccalaureate (IB) Programme at Highland for 2012 to 2014.
Regular curriculum is covered at an accelerated pace and enrichment topics are
developed. Honours science is project oriented, with an emphasis on the development
of investigative and research skills. This course is excellent preparation for serious
science study at the Grade 11 and 12 levels.
Students will write the Science 10 Provincial exam at the end of the course and receive
4 credits for SC10. Students who are not interested in the IB Programme may still
choose this course for grade 10. Limited to 30 students. Pre-requisite: High standing
in Science 9, Work Habits and Teacher Recommendation.
Social Studies 10
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1300
The major focus of this course is Canada – both historical and geographical. Topic
studies will include Canadian history during the 19th and 20th centuries, with emphasis
on British Columbia. BC’s positiion in the world today will be the focal point in the
geography component.
27
Social Studies 10 Honours
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1340
Social Studies 10 Honours is designed to provide students with skills they will need if
they enter the International Baccalaureate (IB) Programme at Highland for 2012 to
2014. This course will be offered as an enriched program with emphasis placed on
inquiry based learning that will develop students ability to reflect critically on the study of
history and geography. Material will be presented thematically and students will be
expected to address different perspectives on various issues in their work. Curriculum
will include the Social Studies 10 material covered at an accelerated pace, and current
events and critical thinking skills will be emphasized to help students become aware of
Canada's place in the International community. Limited to 30 students. Pre-requisite:
High standing in Social Studies 9, Work Habits and Teacher Recommendation
LANGUAGE COURSES
French 9
Unit of Time: 1
Course Number: 9500
The course offers a balanced skill approach to language learning and develops the
student’s abilities in these linguistic areas: 1) Listening, 2) Speaking, 3) Reading, 4)
Writing. The specific program used is the ministry-approved SAVOIR FAIRE SERIES,
which presents clearly and logically the content required at this level. The textbook
used is PASSAGES II. In addition, students are exposed to aspects of Francophone
culture through their involvement in games, activities, projects etc. This will aid in
developing positive attitudes towards second language learning.
French 10
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1500
This course continues to develop what you have been learning in Grades 8/9 (or
previous grades) listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students considering postsecondary education should think seriously about taking French 10 and 11 (a second
language at the Grade 11 level is required for entrance to many courses at university).
French 10 Honours
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 1530
This course will provide the serious language student and those considering entering
the International Baccalaureate Programme (IB) with an enriched second language
experience. Students will explore a wide range of cultural material from the
Francophone world while continuing to develop their language skills of reading, writing,
listening, and speaking. Active engagement in all learning activities will be required for
success. . Limited to 30 students. Pre-requisite: High standing in French 9, Work
Habits and Teacher Recommendation.
28
Introduction to Spanish
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: 4
Course Number: 2519
By the end of the semester, you will be able to communicate in Spanish at a basic level,
both verbally and in writing. You will also have learned a little about the history,
geography, and culture of Latin America and Spain. This course is suitable for students
of all grades who have little or no prior Spanish.
GRADE 9/10 ELECTIVES
Art 9/10
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: Grade 10 - 4
Course Number: Gr. 9 - 9600/Gr. 10 - 1600
This is a creative course in Art covering the basics in both 2D and 3D, including
drawing, painting, colour theory, basic design, printmaking, clay work and sculpture.
Emphasis will be on students improving their ability to express themselves in art as they
develop their skills.
Art 9/10 2D
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9- 9603/Gr. 10 - 1611
This is a fundamental art course in drawing, painting, print making and basic design.
Painting will include colour theory, mixing and brush handling, while print making will
have a selection of silk screen, lino cut, card print or monoprint etching. Design and
technical skills are expanded while creativity and personal choice are fostered.
Art 9/10 3D
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9 - 9604/Gr. 10 - 1621
This is a fundamental course using free standing materials such as clay, cardboard,
wood, soapstone, wire, etc. Fully dimensional works are explored and produced
through many sculptural techniques and options
29
BAND and MUSIC CLASSES
Band 9/10
Unit of Time: 1
Credits: Grade 10 - 4
Course Number: Gr. 9 - 9601/Gr. 10 - 1651
This course continues to develop the instrumental background from Band 8 and Band
9.We will play and perform a variety of fun and challenging music in a wide variety of
styles throughout the year. The emphasis is on group and individual achievement as
well as class cooperation. Students will perform in two major school concerts as well as
at festivals and on the spring band trip. Students need to be members of this class if
they wish to join Jazz Band.
Chorus 9/10
Unit of Time: 0
Credits Grade 10 4
This course introduces students to singing in a group setting, but also welcomes
experienced singers as leaders in the group. The class will work on fun and challenging
songs in 3 and 4 part harmony in a wide variety of styles. No solo singing is required.
Choir meets at lunch and after school, so you do not have to sign up for it on the course
selection sheet. Enrollment will take place in September. Students will perform in two
major school concerts as well as at festivals, the spring choir trip, and the annual retreat
to Camp Homewood on Quadra Island.
Jazz Band 9/10
Unit of Time: 0
Credits: Grade 10 4
This course gives students the chance to develop playing skills in jazz, rock and Latin
music. Basics of jazz improvisation will be introduced, but the main emphasis is on
playing and enjoying different musical styles. Jazz Band meets at lunch and after
school, so you do not have to sign up for it on the course selection sheet. Enrollment
will take place in September. Jazz Band members will perform at two major concerts
during the year as well as on the Spring Music trip. All Jazz Band members must also
be in Band 9/10.
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MEDIA STUDIES
Unit of Time:1.0
Credits: Grade 10 4
Course Number Gr. 9 9690 Gr 10 1690
(All or some of the digital pathways will be explored in a 4 credit Media Studies
class depending on the interest and/or needs of the students and the preference of
the teacher)..
For those interested in completing a group of courses that will lead into many
different industries, jobs and careers, the DMP might be just the thing. Courses
are run in a series; complete level one and move on to levels two and three.
Students will have the opportunity to build on skills in each level and will be
challenged to take on larger projects.
A student might take several years to complete the pathways work and, when finished,
will have a comprehensive portfolio, options for post-secondary, experience out in the
industry, and a meeting with an industry leader to assess skills. Students may end up
employed with such companies as AI, EA, or move into a broadcasting program at a
number institutions. Students who just want to gain skill in any one or two areas can
take courses as they usually would.
ANIMATION
LEVEL ONE
(grades 910)
- 2D Modeling
LEVEL TWO
- 3D Modeling
(grade 11)
Careers related to Animation include 3D
Modeler, Animator, Art Director, Film and
Video Editor, Flash Animator, Graphic Designer, Stop Motion Animator, Video Game
Designer, Animation Director, Background
Painter, Cartoonist, Character Animator,
Character Rigger, Color Key Artist,
Compos-iting Artist, Concept Artist, Digital
Painter, Di-rector, Effects Animator,
Forensic
Animator,
Inbetweener,
Independent Filmmaker, Key Animator,
Lighting
Technician,
Mathematical
Modeler, Render Wrangler, Storyboard
Artist, Texture Artist, Visual Development
Artist.
- Sculpture for Animation
- Stop Motion Animation
- Advanced 2D Modeling
- Voiceovers & Sound
- Skills Canada
LEVEL THREE
- Special Effects
(grade 12)
- Demo Reel
- Skills Canada
31
Television and Film Production
LEVEL ONE
- Photo Composition
(grades 9-10)
- Camera Shots
- Scriptwriting & Storyboarding
Careers related to Film Production
include Camera Operators Television,
Video & Motion Picture, College
Professors - Art, Drama & Music
Teachers, Directors - Stage, Film,
Television & Radio, Art Directors,Choreographers,
Commercial & Industrial
Designers,
Costume
Attendants,
Demonstrators & Product Promoters,
Desktop
Publishers,
Pro-ducers,
Program Directors, Talent Directors,
Technical
Directors
&
Production
Managers, Advertising Sales Agents,
Appraisers
Real
Estate,
Fashion
Designers,
Fine
Artists
Painters,
Sculptors & Illustrators, Insurance
Adjusters Examiners & Investigators,
Makeup Artists Theatrical & Performance
- Film Studies
- Film Editing
- Submit to Highland Network
News Show
LEVEL TWO
(grade 11)
LEVEL THREE
(grade 12)
- Film Production
- Highland Network News Show
- Produce Highland Network News
- Film Production, Advanced
- Documentary Creation
- Editing, Special Effects
- Skills Canada
Photography
LEVEL ONE
Grades 9-10
Level Two
Grade 11
LEVEL THREE
(Grade 12)
Photo Composition
Intro to Photoshop
Photo Manipulation
Photojournalism
Intermediate
Photoshop
Photo Essay
Yearbook, Newspaper
Photograph Research
a Photographer
Careers related to Graphic Design include: Art
Directors, College Professors-Art, Drama &
Music Teachers, Graphic Designers, Multi-Media Artists & Animators, Painting & Decorating
Workers, Camera Operators, Television, Video
and
Motion
Picture,
Choreographers
Commercial and Industrial Designers, Desktop
Publishers Directors, Stage, Film, Television &
Radio Etchers & Engravers, Fashion Designers,
Film & Video Editors, Fine Artists – Painters,
Sculptors & Illustrators, Floral Designers, Interior
Designers, Jewelers, Landscape Architects,
Makeup Artist, Theatrical & Performance,
Molding & Casting Workers, Public Relations
Specialists, Set and Exhibit Designers
Students will do an
independent study that
will lead to an art show
of their work
32
Web Design
LEVEL ONE
(grades 9-10)
Careers related to Web Design include
Interactive Project Manager, Junior Graphic
Designer, Graphic Designer, Motion Designer,
Social Media Writer, Design Manager, Front End
Web Developer, Lead Designer, Professor of
Sequential
Art,
Production
Designer,
Web/Mobile/Tablet Development, Art Director,
Book Designer, Professor of Illustration, Mid
Level Flash Developer
Intro to HTML
Elements of Design
Intro to Flash & Animated Gifs
Intro to Dreamweaver
LEVEL TWO
(grade 11)
Intro to Photoshop
Dreamweaver
School Web Site Maintenance
LEVEL THREE
(grade 12)
Advanced Web Design
Client Work and School Site
Maintenance
Skills Canada
GRAPHIC DESIGN
LEVEL ONE
Elements & Principals of Design
(grades 9-10)
Intro to Corel Draw & Logos
Intro to Photoshop & Manipulation
LEVEL TWO
Intermediate Photoshop
(grade 11)
Careers related to Graphic Design include:
Creative/Art Director, Layout Artist, Brand
Identify Designer, Logo Designer, Flash
Designer, Illustrator, Technical Illustrator, Photo
Editing / Photoshop Artist, Multimedia Designer,
Photographer, Pre-press Technician, Web
Designer, Film and Television Production,
Broadcast Designer, Visual Journalist, Content
Developer, Pack-age Designer, Layout
Package Designer
Layout and Design (Yearbook, Other)
In House Publishing
LEVEL THREE
(grade 12)
Design on the Web
Photography and Design
Skills Canada
33
Journalism and Yearbook are offered in our Independent Learning Centre)
Journalism 9/10
Ever wonder how a magazine or newspaper is put together? Do you like to write, work
with graphics, design with computers? Have you a yen for putting up your own blog,
online newspaper or magazine or podcast, or for standing in front of a camera doing an
interview for television? In this course, you will learn journalism, such as basic
photography, cartooning, graphic design, how to write a good lead, develop a feature
story, how to conduct an interview. Students in this course will be responsible for
Highland's newspaper, the Beacon, and will have an opportunity to be published locally
and online. Careers related to journalism include Journalism, Photojournalism, Writing,
Scriptwriting, Travel Writing, Self-Publishing, Science and Technical Writing,
Copywriting, Broadcast Journalism, Public Relations, Newspaper Editor, Magazine
Publisher, Advertising and Promotion, Film and Video Editor, Reporter, Overseas
Correspondent.
Yearbook 9/10
A yearbook is the most important document produced during a school year. Students
involved in this class will have the opportunity to record the history by writing about,
taking photographs of and laying out images in Highland’s yearbook. Anyone interested
in graphic design and in working with colour will find this class a great addition to their
portfolio and their resume. Careers related to Yearbook include Journalism,
Photojournalism, Writing, Scriptwriting, Travel writing, Self-publishing, Science and
technical writing, Copywriting, Broadcast journalism, Public relations, Newspaper Editor,
Magazine Publisher, Advertising and promotion, Film and Video editors, Reporter,
Overseas Correspondent.
DRAMA CLASSES
Drama 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 -
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9670/Gr. 10: 1670
Drama is a fun, creative, challenging and active elective. Students will continue to build
on the skills, attitudes and experiences developed in Drama 8. Exploration, ensemble
and imagination are a must! We will work on games , improvisation, voice, movement
and basic acting skills. Students will learn to work from scripts and may choose to
produce a live performance!
34
HOME ECONOMICS
Global Foods 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9781/Gr. 10: 1781
Ever wonder where the foods we eat come from or what other cultures eat and why?
Join the world tour; cook and eat your way around the world. You learn to expand your
"normal" diet to include foods you might otherwise never learn to make! And some you
already love!
Food Studies 9/10
Unit of Time: 1.0
Credits: Grade 10 - 4
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9780/Gr. 10: 1780
Learn how to make all 5 meals of the day (Breakfast, Lunch, snacks, dinners, desserts).
In this course we focus on improving your kitchen skills and nutrition knowledge while
enjoying good food.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Fitness 9/10-Soccer Focus
Credits: 4
Unit of Time: 1
Course Number: Gr. 9 9450
Gr. 10 1450
This is a soccer based course designed for students looking to enhance their technical
skills, tactical understanding, and soccer specific fitness. The small sided game serves
as the foundational instructional tool towards a more technically and tactically sound
player of the beautiful game. It is well suited to students who are currently competing on
school or community teams. The emphasis will be on developing high levels of
individual skills, team concepts and training methods.
Fitness 9/10-Basketball Focus
Credits: 2
Unit of Time: 0.5
Course Number: Gr. 9 9447
Gr. 10 1447
This course is designed for the competitive basketball player. It is suited for the
individual male/female who wants to learn more about the game of basketball. 50% of
the time will be spent developing basketball skills, strategy, teamwork and fitness. 50%
of the time will be spent on traditional sports like volleyball, soccer, flag football, minor
games and many more. This course helps satisfy the Graduation PE requirements set
out by the Ministry of Education.
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Hockey Academy
Unit of Time: 2.0
Credits: Grade 10 - 8
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9405 and 9406/Gr. 10:
1405 and 1406
This program has been specially developed to help student athletes to excel in both
academics and athletics. As part of the program students receive two on-ice skill
development practices per week as well as 3/4 off-ice conditioning sessions per week,
all during school hours. For more information on this program see page 34 of this
guide.
Fitness for Girls 9/10
Unit of Time: 05
Credits: 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9446 Gr. 10: 1446
Fitness for girls is a class geared toward mind body fitness and overall health and
wellbeing. It is an all girls class designed for promoting active living and enjoying the
benefits that come from incorporating fitness into your life. Students will keep a journal
to monitor the improvement of personal fitness levels (strength, cardio, and flexibility) as
well as mood, nutrition and sleep patterns through out the course. Modes of instruction
may include: yoga, Pilates, step aerobics, core/strength training, belly fit, zumba power
walking and dance. Basic training principles, health and wellness, stress, body image
and nutrition will be explored. Field trips and guest instruction from community fitness
professionals will be a highlight of the course!
TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
Jewelry 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9730/Gr. 10: 1734
Design and make your own unique jewelry. Using a variety of materials including silver
you will learn modern and traditional jewelry construction techniques. You will make
custom copper bracelets, silver rings, one-of-a-kind earrings and more in a class that is
designed to help you feel comfortable using tools. Develop practical skills while having
fun and creating your own custom jewelry.
Mechanics/Go-karts 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9702Gr. 10: 1702
This term course will use the ever popular Go-kart to launch you into the ‘fasten-ating’
world of mechanics! No mechanical experience is necessary to succeed in this course,
all you’ll need is a positive attitude and a willingness to participate in what is mainly a
hands on learning experience. This course may only be taken once, either in grade 9 or
in grade 10.
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Programming/Robotics 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9842/ Gr. 10:1842
In this course we will learn how to make apps for phones and tablets, to program robots
and electronics to perform tasks we want them to do. We will learn skills and gain
abilities needed in today’s technology driven workplace and form a foundation for
students that want to pursue engineering, game design or any job where you work with
computing devices.
Robotics/Electronics 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9721 / Gr. 10: 1722
Robotics is the future. In this class you will learn the basics of electronics and robotics.
One of the best ways to learn is by doing, so in this class you will learn about basic
robotics by building battling bots. Electronic theory is explored by doing many hands on
labs and experiments. You will use the same type of equipment that engineers and
technicians use on the job.
Small Engines 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9700 /Gr. 10: 1704
Do you like things that go FAST? Ever wonder how they do? If so, then this is the
course for you. In a single term you will learn how to diagnose, maintain and repair
small-sized gasoline powered engines. You will completely tear down and rebuild both
a 4-stroke and a 2-stroke engine. And as if that wasn’t enough, you will also compete to
best harness the power of a small 2-stroke aircraft engine to propel a drag boat of your
own creation. This course may only be taken once, in either grade 9 or grade 10.
Industrial Design 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5 Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9701 / Gr. 10: 1752
Learn about engineering principles by build projects such as Pop bottle rockets, bridges
and syringe robots. This class uses wood, metal and plastic to explore creative and fun
ways to solve problems and learn how to work with machine and hand tools.
Woodwork 9/10
Unit of Time: 1.0
Credits: Grade 10 - 4
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9782 / Gr. 10: 1740
In this course, students will learn traditional woodworking skills by making a variety of
prescribed finished wood products. Students will learn how to work safely and efficiently
– skills that are valued in the workplace and that will help you become a successful
woodworker. Practical skills acquired in this course will assist the learner in future
woodwork and other technology education courses.
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MISCELLANEOUS ELECTIVE CLASSES
Creative Writing 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9800 / Gr. 10: 1801
Using writing as a tool for self-exploration and expression students will be offered the
chance to experience writing activities that access their creative source. Through journal
writing, interviewing, observing, playing with language and ideas, visualization
exercises, response to experiences and other forms of expression, guided imagery, and
thoughtful challenges, students will come to see themselves as writers. By developing a
deeper understanding of themselves, their writing strengths and weaknesses and
personal reading/writing preferences, students will leave with a repertoire of approaches
in a variety of genres (which may include poetry, short stories, plays, screenplays,
memoirs, and essays depending on class; preferences). They will also develop the
beginning of a writer’s notebook with a toolbox of skills and ideas to keep them writing
outside of the classroom experience.
Law 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5 Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9862 / Gr. 10: 1800
This is a term course designed to expose students to a wide range of law topics
including criminal law, civil law, the Young Offenders Act and Constitutional Rights. You
will not become an instant lawyer taking this course, but you will become aware of the
necessity of law in today’s society and how the law affects you. This course may only be
taken once, in either grade 9 or grade 10.
Global Studies 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5 Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9875 / Gr. 10: 1675
If you've been thinking about making a difference in your community and your world,
this is the course for you! Class activities will center on discussion, guest speakers, and
field trips, as we strive to make sense of the most interesting global issues, including
environmental and humanitarian topics. This is an ideal course for those interested in
the IB Programme, Eco Team, Interact, and anyone who wants to discover the power
an individual can have in affecting the world for the better.
Marine Biology 9/10
Unit of Time: 0.5
Credits: Grade 10 - 2
Course Number: Gr. 9: 9280 /Gr. 10: 1280
This elective gives students a chance to explore oceanography and marine biomes
Barrier reefs, atolls, the open ocean, the abyss, and the life that lives there are
introduced through a variety of project based activities, video, media and field trips.
Perfect for students living on the west coast and who plan to travel world wide .
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