Social Studies - Laramie County School District #2

Approved by the Laramie County School District #2
Board of Trustees
June, 2015
1
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements....................................................................................................................................... 3
Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 4
Mission .......................................................................................................................................................... 6
Course/Grade Level Purposes ....................................................................................................................... 6
Kindergarten ................................................................................................................................................. 9
First Grade................................................................................................................................................... 11
Second Grade .............................................................................................................................................. 13
Third Grade ................................................................................................................................................. 15
Fourth Grade ............................................................................................................................................... 18
Fifth Grade .................................................................................................................................................. 22
Sixth Grade .................................................................................................................................................. 25
Seventh Grade............................................................................................................................................. 28
Eighth Grade ............................................................................................................................................... 31
World Geography I (1 semester)................................................................................................................. 35
World Geography II (1 semester)................................................................................................................ 38
World History I (1 semester) ....................................................................................................................... 41
World History II (1 semester) ...................................................................................................................... 43
U.S. History.................................................................................................................................................. 46
American Government (1 semester, 12th grade only) ................................................................................ 51
Economics (1 semester, 12th grade only) ................................................................................................... 54
Contemporary World Issues (elective) ....................................................................................................... 56
Social Psychology (elective) ........................................................................................................................ 59
Glossary - from the 2014 Wyoming Social Studies Standards ................................................................... 61
2
Acknowledgements
Laramie County School District #2 would like to acknowledge the following people for their dedication
support, and hard work put forth during the development of this curriculum:
Social Studies Subject Area Committee (SAC):
Kindergarten
First Grade
Second Grade
Third Grade
Fourth Grade
Fifth Grade
Sixth Grade
Seventh-Twelfth Grade
Paige Epler – BES
Sara Schnell – PBES
Sarah Skinner – PBES
Natalie Freeburg – AES
Eileen Cushing –CES
Candice Halligan – BES
Rhonda Morrison –BES
Will Gray –PBHS
Brooks Hoffman –BHS
Rick Malcolm – PBHS
Michelle Steinhoff – BHS
Barry Ward – BHS
Margie Carr – Curriculum Leadership Institute
Sue Stevens – LCSD2 Curriculum Coordinator
Leanne Person – PBES secretary, for making copies and processing documents
3
Introduction
The purpose of Laramie County School District #2’s Social Studies Curriculum is to provide a
clear, organized framework on which to build instruction in the classroom. The curriculum
includes clear outcomes and components of these outcomes which further clarify the skills
necessary to achieve each outcome. Each outcome also describes the depth of knowledge and
level of rigor required for students to demonstrate their conceptual understanding of the
knowledge and skills outlined in the curriculum.
The Outcomes and Components are grade-level specific. These have been carefully aligned to
the state standards and teachers are expected to align their instruction to these. Outcomes
express the essential learning that all students in the grade level must know or be able to
demonstrate in the content area. They make connections among separate concepts or skills
described in the components. Outcomes require high cognitive levels and direct assessment.
Components state simple and complex concepts or skills that students must know or do in
order to perform each outcome. All outcomes and components are to be included within the
course of instruction for the year. Assessments will be written at the outcome level.
Each outcome has been assigned a code number consisting of symbols for content area, grade
level or course, and outcome number. In the example shown below, SS stands for Social
Studies (content area) – K stands for kindergarten (grade) – 1 symbolizes that it is the first
outcome in this grade level.
Example:
Outcome SS-K-1:
Students will identify and describe major holidays that are significant in the history of
our community, state, and nation.
SS-K-1-1
SS-K-1-2
Identify and describe major holidays celebrated in the community, state,
and United States (SS2.1.2, SS2.2.2, SS2.4.3, SS2.6.2, SS2.6.3)
Identify and describe influential leader(s) in our community, state, and
United States. (SS2.1.3, SS2.4.3, SS2.6.2, SS2.6.3)
Each component has also been given a code number consisting of symbols for the content area,
grade level or course, outcome number, and component number. In the example shown
above, SS stands for Social Studies (content area) – K stands for kindergarten (grade) – 1 stands
for the outcome number – and 2 symbolizes that it is the second component of the outcome.
At the end of each component, the code number in parentheses indicates the Wyoming
Common Core State Standard to which it aligns and includes the grade level, domain, and
standard number. In the above example, the SS stands for Social Studies, 2 stands for K-2 grade
band, 1 stands for standard 1, and 3 stands for benchmark 3. The complete Wyoming Social
Studies Content and Performance Standards document can be found on the Wyoming
Department of Education web site at edu.wyoming.gov.
4
The Social Studies Subject Area Committee (SAC) performed a careful analysis of alignment
between the previous years’ social studies instruction and the current Wyoming Social Studies
Standards adopted in 2014. Based on this analysis, an aligned curriculum was developed to fit
the needs of students and include the required state standards.
There are many steps to the curriculum implementation process. The draft curriculum will be
implemented during the 2015-16 school year. During that time, teachers will provide feedback
to validate the draft curriculum. Based on teacher feedback, the SAC will then make revisions
as they deem necessary and finalize the curriculum. During the 2016-17 school year, the SAC
will select aligned resources and develop common outcome assessments. The following year,
2017-18, teachers will use the assessments and provide feedback to validate. The SAC will
make revisions and finalize the assessments. The curriculum and assessments will be fully
implemented for several years before the curriculum development process begins again.
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Mission
Successful Social Studies students in LCSD2 will demonstrate civic knowledge and responsibility
and describe ever-changing human interactions, cultural diversity, and economic factors and
principles in a global society. They will also analyze events, people, problems and ideas within
historical contexts and apply geographic knowledge to describe interrelationships among
people, places, and the environment.
Course/Grade Level Purposes
Kindergarten
Students will identify and explain ways families contribute to their daily lives.
First Grade
Students will identify and describe the school community and their role as a member.
Second Grade
Students will apply geographical concepts to produce basic maps of their community. They will
identify characteristics of their community.
Third Grade
Students will analyze and evaluate the civic and economic structures of their community to
identify responsibilities of citizens.
Fourth Grade
Students will evaluate and analyze relationships among civic, economic, geographical,
historical, and cultural structures that have contributed to the development of Wyoming.
Fifth Grade
Students will investigate the origin of the United States and describe its governmental
structure. Students will compare and contrast regions in terms of geography, history,
economics, culture, and current events.
Sixth Grade
Students will describe the five themes of geography. They will examine the regions and
countries of the Western Hemisphere to compare and contrast their geographies, cultures,
economics, histories, and governments.
7th Grade Social Studies
Students will examine the development of Wyoming from the frontier to modern day society.
They will diagram the structures of the United States government and the government of
Wyoming.
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8th Grade Social Studies
Students will analyze the people and events up to the Reconstruction Era to deduce their
influence on the development of the United States.
World Geography I (1 semester)
Students will examine the regions of North America, South America, Europe, and Southwest
Asia (Middle East) to classify the geographic features, hypothesize opinions on current issues,
and evaluate historical trends of the area and their influence on each region.
World Geography II (1 semester)
Students will examine the regions of Africa, Asia, and the Pacific realm to classify the
geographic features, hypothesize opinions on current issues, and evaluate historical trends of
the area and their influence on each region.
World History I (1 semester)
Students will examine ancient civilizations, cultures, and religions of the world up to 1450 AD to
determine the development of these regions.
World History II (1 semester)
Students will compare and contrast cultures and events of the Renaissance through World War
II that shaped the development of Europe and the Modern World.
U.S. History
Students will evaluate the ideas, trends, and events which contributed to the development of
the United States. Students will formulate predictions on how these ideas, trends, and events
have influenced the U.S. and helped establish the country we have today.
American Government (semester, 12th grade only)
Students will analyze the development and structure of the Wyoming and U.S. constitutions to
apply these principles to their lives and modern-day society.
Economics (semester, 12th grade only)
Students will formulate solutions to economic problems in a global society and analyze factors
which contribute to personal financial independence.
Contemporary World Issues (elective)
Students will analyze numerous local, state, national, and international events to compose and
organize an opinion and utilize current technological resources to present their research.
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Social Psychology (elective)
Students will examine the development of the human body to describe how it functions.
Students will hypothesize how alterations to the human body influence its development. They
will apply their knowledge of the body to compose a prediction on how societies and people
will interact.
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Kindergarten
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-K-1:
Students will identify and describe major holidays that are significant in the history of our
community, state, and nation.
SS-K-1-1
SS-K-1-2
Identify and describe major holidays celebrated in the community, state,
and United States (e.g., Halloween, Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Veterans
Day, Thanksgiving, Presidents Day). (SS2.1.2, SS2.2.2, SS2.4.3, SS2.6.2,
SS2.6.3)
Identify influential leaders honored by national holidays (e.g., Martin
Luther King, Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, current president).
(SS2.1.3, SS2.4.3, SS2.6.2, SS2.6.3)
Outcome SS-K-2:
Students will identify and describe characteristics, responsibilities, and rules of people,
families, and themselves and identify how they influence our lives.
SS-K-2-1
SS-K-2-2
SS-K-2-3
SS-K-2-4
SS-K-2-5
SS-K-2-6
Identify key people in our home and community. (e.g., parents,
grandparents, principal, law enforcement officers, fire fighters) (SS2.1.1)
Tell characteristics and responsibilities of people in the home and
community and explain how they help us. (SS2.2.1)
Describe rules and responsibilities at home. (SS2.2.1)
Describe rules and responsibilities at school. (SS2.2.1)
Compare rules and responsibilities of home to those at school. (SS2.1.1)
Demonstrate how following rules and responsibilities affects our daily
lives. (SS2.2.2, SS2.2.1)
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Outcome SS-K-3:
Students will identify and differentiate between a need and a want. Students will also
identify and describe how humans adapt to changing events, environmental issues, and the
impact of tools and technology.
SS-K-3-1
SS-K-3-2
SS-K-3-3
SS-K-3-4
Describe how events can change our future. (e.g., moving from house to
house or riding a bike can get you to point B faster.) (SS2.4.1)
Identify and differentiate student needs and wants in home life. (SS2.2.1),
(SS2.3.1)
Identify and describe how we change to survive in our environment (e.g.,
clothing for weather, housing, moving to a new town). (SS2.5.4)
Identify tools and technologies and describe how they make life easier
(e.g., cars/washing machines/flashlights). (SS2.4.2)
Outcome SS-K-4:
Students will describe current events relevant to their lives. (SS2.4.3)
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First Grade
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-1-1:
Students will produce a product (e.g., posters, books, pamphlets) communicating the
significance of major holidays (e.g., Martin Luther King Day, 4th of July, Labor Day) in the
history of our community, state, and nation.
SS-1-1-1
SS-1-1-2
SS-1-1-3
SS-1-1-4
Identify and describe major holidays throughout the community and
state.
Produce a product communicating the significance of major holidays
throughout the community and state. (SS2.1.2, SS2.2.1, SS2.2.2, SS2.4.3)
Identify and describe major holidays throughout the United States.
Produce a product communicating the significance of major holidays
throughout the United States. (SS2.1.2, SS2.2.1, SS2.2.2, SS2.4.3)
Outcome SS-2-1:
Students will identify the symbols and traditional practices that honor patriotism in the
United States.
SS-1-2-1
SS-1-2-2
SS-1-2-3
SS-1-2-4
Identify the United States flag and what the colors, stars, and stripes
symbolize.
Recite the Pledge of Allegiance.
Demonstrate proper respect for the National Anthem.
Identify other symbols that honor patriotism (e.g., the White House,
Liberty Bell, Statue of Liberty, American Eagle).
Outcome SS-2-3:
Students will relate the effects of school rules and responsibilities on students’ roles as
productive citizens throughout the classroom and school community (SS2.1.1).
SS-1-3-1
SS-1-3-2
SS-1-3-3
SS-1-3-4
Construct a set of classroom rules to govern the classroom.
Compare and contrast their classroom rules to school rules.
Role-play both positive and negative consequences of their actions using
the school rules and responsibilities.
Describe ways following school rules leads to being productive citizens.
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Outcome SS-1-4:
Students will describe how people change their environment and adjust to new environments
to meet their needs and wants.
SS-1-4-1
SS-1-4-2
SS-1-4-3
SS-1-4-4
Define wants and needs.
Explain ways the classroom and school provide for students’ wants and
needs (e.g., school lunch, after school programs and activities, snacks).
(SS2.3.1)
Hypothesize the effects moving to a different school may have on a
student. (SS2.4.1)
List reasons families may move to a community and ways new students
are welcomed. (SS2.5.3)
Outcome SS-1-5:
Students will create and compare and contrast a classroom and a school map using various
media or technologies.
SS-1-5-1
SS-1-5-2
SS-1-5-3
SS-1-5-4
Identify a map and globe and explain the difference. (SS2.5.1)
Create a classroom map using various media or technologies. (SS2.5.1)
Create a school map using various media or technologies. (SS2.5.1)
Compare and contrast a classroom and school map. (SS2.5.2)
Outcome SS-1-6:
Students will describe current events relevant to their lives. (SS2.4.3)
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Second Grade
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-2-1:
Students will use a variety of maps and globes to study their community. They will create a
map of their community including a compass rose and legend using different forms of media.
SS-2-1-1
SS-2-1-2
SS-2-1-3
SS-2-1-4
SS-2-1-5
Label a map with a compass rose (north, east, south, west) using various
resources. (SS2.5.1 SS2.6.1)
Compare various maps using multiple media (e.g., Google maps, physical
maps, globes). (SS2.5.1 SS2.6.1 SS2.6.3)
Identify and differentiate between a compass rose and a legend.
Make a legend for an existing map. (SS2.5.1)
Create a community map including a legend that describes the specific
features on their map and a compass rose. (SS 2.5.1 SS 2.5.2)
Outcome SS-2-2:
Students will identify and describe their community, community culture, and the benefits of
establishing rules within a community.
SS-2-2-1
SS-2-2-2
SS-2-2-3
SS 2-2-4
SS-2-2-5
Identify and define different types of communities (urban, suburban,
rural). (SS2.5.3)
Describe the characteristics which make their community special (e.g.
culture, language, food, religion, clothing, jobs). (SS2.5.3)
Identify and define their community culture.
Identify and describe characteristics of the culture within different types
of communities. (SS 2.2.2)
Identify and describe the benefits of establishing rules within a
community and equate rules with the laws of a community. (SS2.1.4)
Outcome SS-2-3:
Students will identify and describe physical and human characteristics of a community and
discuss the similarities and differences within in a community. (SS2.5.2)
SS-2-3-1
SS-2-3-2
SS-2-3-3
Identify and describe physical characteristics of a community.
Identify and describe human characteristics of a community.
Identify and discuss the similarities and differences within a community.
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Outcome SS-2-4:
Students will identify and give examples of needs, wants, goods, and services within a
community. They will also differentiate between needs, wants, goods, and services and
identify the effect of science or technology on the production of goods and services.
SS-2-4-1
SS-2-4-2
SS-2-4-3
SS-2-4-4
SS-2-4-5
SS-2-4-6
SS-2-4-7
SS-2-4-8
Identify and categorize wants and needs.
Differentiate between wants and needs.
List examples of wants and needs. (SS2.3.1)
Identify and categorize goods and services.
Differentiate between goods and services.
List examples of goods and services within a community. (SS2.3.1)
Identify the effect of science or technology (e.g. assembly lines, robots)
on the production of goods and services. (SS2.3.3)
Describe ways science and technology make life easier. (SS. 2.4.2)
Outcome SS-2-5:
Students will identify the effect of price on buying, selling, and saving decisions. (SS2.3.2)
SS-2-5-1
SS-2-5-2
Define and differentiate between buying, selling, and saving.
Identify the effect of price on buying, selling and saving decisions.
Outcome SS-2-6:
Students will describe current events relevant to their lives. (SS2.4.3)
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Third Grade
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-3-1:
Students will identify and use the features of a variety of maps (e.g. physical maps, Google
Maps, political maps, globes, atlas). They will use mental mapping skills to create a map of
their community. (SS5.5.1)
SS-3-1-1
SS-3-1-2
SS-3-1-3
SS-3-1-4
SS-3-1-5
SS-3-1-6
Identify and use the legend to locate places on a map.
Identify various symbols on a map.
Identify and use the compass rose (cardinal and intermediate directions)
to locate places on a map.
Identify and use the map scale to determine distances between places.
Identify and use the coordinate grid to locate a specific point on a map.
Create a map of their community that contains map features including a
legend, compass rose, map scale and coordinate grid.
Outcome SS-3-2:
Students will describe the physical and human features surrounding their community. They
will analyze reasons a community developed in a specific area.
SS-3-2-1
SS-3-2-2
SS-3-2-3
Define and identify physical features in your community. (e.g. hills, bluffs,
rivers, plains, valleys etc.) (SS5.5.2)
Define and identify human features in your community. (e.g. buildings,
bridges, roads, farms, mines, railroad tracks, etc.) (SS5.5.3)
Analyze reasons a community developed in a specific area and present
findings.
15
Outcome SS-3-3:
Students will compare and contrast their community’s past and present transportation,
resources, and technology and present their findings.
SS-3-3-1
SS-3-3-2
SS-3-3-3
SS-3-3-4
SS-3-3-5
Define past and present.
Compare and contrast past and present transportation in their
community. (SS5.4.2)
Compare and contrast past and present resources in their community.
(SS5.4.2)
Compare and contrast past and present technologies in their community.
(SS5.4.2)
Describe ways their community has changed over time and present
findings. (SS5.4.4)
Outcome SS-3-4:
Students will describe the basic rights and responsibilities of citizens in a community.
(SS5.1.1)
SS-3-4-1
SS-3-4-2
SS-3-4-3
Define citizenship.
Describe rights of a citizen (e.g. voting, right to an education, speech,
arms).
Describe the responsibilities of a citizen (e.g. voting, taxes, licenses).
Outcome SS-3-5:
Students will relate basic economic terms to a community’s economy.
SS-3-5-1
SS-3-5-2
SS-3-5-3
SS-3-5-4
Define economy and economics.
List examples of needs, wants, goods, and services as they relate to a
community’s economy. (SS5.3.1)
Define supply, demand, price, and trade.
Cite examples of supply, demand, price, and trade as related to a
community’s economy. (SS5.3.2)
16
Outcome SS-3-6:
Students will explain the roles and effect of money, banking, saving and budgeting. (SS-5-3-4)
SS-3-6-1
SS-3-6-2
SS-3-6-3
SS-3-6-4
SS-3-6-5
Explain the roles and effects of money in their personal life.
Define banking, saving, and budgeting.
Explain the role and effects of banking.
Explain the role and effects of saving.
Explain the role and effects of budgeting.
Outcome SS-3-7:
Students will select and share current events relevant to local and surrounding communities.
(SS5.4.3)
17
Fourth Grade
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-4-1:
Students will identify and evaluate ways in which culture influences the people of Wyoming.
SS-4-1-1
SS-4-1-2
SS-4-1-3
Identify cultural groups in Wyoming, past and present (e.g., Native
Americans, religions, racial groups, pioneers, cowboys, military, farmers).
(SS5.2.2)
List ways culture is expressed (e.g., language, spirituality, stories,
folktales, songs, dance). (SS5.2.2)
Choose a cultural group in Wyoming, research their cultural contributions
to Wyoming, and present findings. (SS5.2.3)
Outcome SS-4-2:
Students will identify and describe the tensions between cultural groups, social classes,
and/or individuals in Wyoming. (SS5-2-4)
SS-4-2-1
SS-4-2-2
SS-4-2-3
Identify groups or individuals in Wyoming who engaged in conflict (e.g.,
soldiers and Native Americans, tribe against tribe, cattlemen against
sheep ranchers).
Describe the tensions which resulted in the conflicts.
Defend a group’s point of view (e.g., mock debate, skit, role-play, essay).
Outcome SS-4-3:
Students will use Wyoming map features to locate towns, cities, counties, physical features,
attractions, and surrounding states. They will also compute distances between places in
Wyoming. (SS5.5.1)
SS-4-3-1
SS-4-3-2
SS-4-3-3
Define index and mileage chart.
Identify and use index, compass rose, map key, scale, coordinate grid,
and mileage chart to locate Wyoming towns, counties, physical features,
attractions, and surrounding states.
Use a scale and mileage chart to compute distances between places in
Wyoming.
18
Outcome SS-4-4:
Students will use mental mapping skills to create political, physical and historical maps of
Wyoming. (SS5.5.1)
SS-4-4-1
SS-4-4-2
SS-4-4-3
SS-4-4-4
Define political map, physical map, and historical map.
Create a political map of Wyoming, including significant towns and cities,
all counties and county seats, capital, and surrounding states.
Create a physical map of Wyoming, including mountain ranges, bodies of
water, public lands, landforms, etc.
Create a historical map of Wyoming, including trails, forts, battle sites,
etc.
Outcome SS-4-5:
Students will describe physical and human features and settlement patterns in Wyoming.
They will classify and categorize ways ideas, goods, and people move from one area to
another.
SS-4-5-1
SS-4-5-2
SS-4-5-3
SS-4-5-4
Describe physical features in Wyoming (e.g. landforms, topography,
climate, natural resources). (SS5.5.2)
Describe human features in Wyoming (e.g. railroads, town/cities, mines,
forts, etc.). (SS5.5.3)
Describe reasons people settled in Wyoming. (SS5.5.3)
Classify and categorize goods and ideas imported to and exported from
Wyoming. (SS5.5.3)
Outcome SS-4-6:
Students will identify environmental influences on the people in Wyoming and describe
adjustments and changes made to the environment in order to survive. (SS5.5.4)
SS-4-6-1
SS-4-6-2
SS-4-6-3
SS-4-6-4
Identify environmental factors people cannot change and ways to adjust.
Describe how people adjust to the environment.
Identify environmental factors people can change and the changes they
make.
Describe how people change the environment for survival.
19
Outcome SS-4-7:
Students will analyze the basic structure of Wyoming government to outline the rights and
responsibilities of citizens.
SS-4-7-1
SS-4-7-2
SS-4-7-3
SS-4-7-4
SS-4-7-5
SS-4-7-6
Analyze the Wyoming constitution to distinguish the structure and
function of Wyoming’s government. (SS5.1.3)
Identify and describe the purpose of the state legal system. (SS5.1.4)
Identify and describe the three branches of government in Wyoming.
(SS5.1.5)
Describe state political processes (e.g. campaigning and voting). (SS5.1.2)
Outline the rights and responsibilities of Wyoming citizens. (SS5.1.1)
Identify symbols of Wyoming (e.g., state seal, state flag, state tree).
Outcome SS-4-8:
Students will relate basic economic terms to Wyoming's economy.
SS-4-8-1
SS-4-8-2
SS-4-8-3
Define scarcity and choice. (SS5.3.1)
Give examples of needs, wants, goods, services, scarcity, choice, supply,
demand, price, and trade as they relate to Wyoming's economy. (SS5.3.2)
Explain the roles and effect of money, banking, saving, and budgeting in
relation to Wyoming's economy. (SS5.3.4)
Outcome SS-4-9:
Students will identify and assess ways science and technology have affected production and
distribution in Wyoming.
SS-4-9-1
SS-4-9-2
SS-4-9-3
SS-4-9-4
SS-4-9-5
Identify advances in science and technology related to production and
distribution (e.g. railroad, mining technologies, agricultural technologies,
etc.). (SS5.3.3)
Describe ways these advances have affected Wyoming's economy
through production and distribution.SS5.3.3)
Describe ways small changes can lead to big changes. (SS5.4.1)
Describe ways tools and technology make life easier and ways one tool or
technology evolves into another (e.g. telegraph to telephone; wagon to
railway to car). (SS5.4.2)
Identify a tool or technology that impacted Wyoming's growth and justify
its importance. (SS5.4.2)
20
Outcome SS-4-10:
Students will select current events for relevance to Wyoming and determine the impact on
Wyoming's people, economy, etc. (SS5.4.3)
21
Fifth Grade
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-5-1:
Students describe a variety of regions in the United States. Students locate important
political features, regions, and physical features on maps of the United States.
SS-5-1-1
SS-5-1-2
SS-5-1-3
Describe a variety of regions in the United States such as political,
population, and economic regions that result from patterns of human
activity. (SS5.5.1, SS5.5.3)
Describe a variety of regions in the United States such as landform,
climate, and vegetation regions that result from physical characteristics
such as the Great Plain, Rocky Mountains, and Coastal Plains. (SS5.5.2)
Locate on a map important political features, such as capital cities, in the
United States, the 50 states, and regions, such as the Northeast, the
Midwest, and Southwest. (SS5.5.1)
Outcome SS-5-2:
Students will investigate European colonization and significant individuals in the United
States beginning in 1565.
SS-5-2-1
SS-5-2-2
SS-5-2-3
Explain where and why groups of people explored, colonized and settled
in the United States, including the search for religious freedom and
economic gain. (SS5.5.3)
Describe the accomplishments of a significant individual during the
colonial period (e.g. William Bradford, Anne Hutchinson, William Penn,
John Smith, Roger Williams, etc.) (SS5.4.4)
Construct and interpret maps of European colonization and settlement in
the United States. (SS5.5.1)
22
Outcome SS-5-3:
Students will summarize ways conflict between the American colonies and Great Britain led
to American independence.
SS-5-3-1
SS-5-3-2
SS-5-3-3
Describe the importance of the American Revolution and the Declaration
of Independence. (SS5.4.1, SS5.2.4)
Identify the significant individuals of the American Revolution (e.g., John
Adams, Samuel Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Nathan Hale, Thomas
Jefferson, the Sons of Liberty, and George Washington) and their
contributions during the revolutionary period. (SS5.4.4)
Summarize major events leading to the American Revolution and the
establishment of the United States. (SS5.4.1, SS5.2.4)
Outcome SS-5-4:
Students will explain the origins and framework of the United States Constitution.
SS-5-4-1
SS-5-4-2
SS-5-4-3
Identify the issues that led to the creation of the U.S. Constitution.
(SS5.1.3)
Identify major contributors to the United States Constitution (e.g. James
Madison, George Mason, Charles Pinckney, and Roger Sherman).
(SS5.4.4)
Explain the three branches of government of the United States as
outlined in the Constitution. (SS5.1.3, SS5.1.5)
Outcome SS-5-5:
Students will construct a timeline signifying important events (Discovery of America,
Founding of Jamestown, Plymouth, American Revolution, Louisiana Purchase/Lewis and
Clark, War of 1812, Oregon Trail, Gold Rush, Industrial Revolution, Transcontinental Railroad,
and Civil War) in the history of the United States from the discovery of America to the Civil
War.
SS-5-5-1
SS-5-5-2
SS-5-5-3
List the major events in United States history from the Discovery of
America to the Civil War in chronological order. (SS5.4.1, SS5.3.3)
Interpret maps of the major events in United States history (See list
above). (SS5.5.1)
Explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement and
the distribution of population in the United States, past and present.
(SS5.5.2)
23
Outcome SS-5-6:
Students will explain the importance of individual participation in the democratic process.
SS-5-6-1
SS-5-6-2
SS-5-6-3
SS-5-6-4
Distinguish between national and state governments. (SS5.1.2)
Explain the duties individuals have to participate in national civic affairs.
(SS5.1.2)
Describe ways to contact nationally elected and appointed leaders.
(SS5.1.2)
Identify and describe the purpose of the national legal system. (SS5.1.4)
Outcome SS-5-7:
Students will select current events for relevance to the United States and determine the
impact on people, government, and economy. (SS5.4.3)
24
Sixth Grade
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-6-1:
Students will use a variety of geographic tools to identify locations on a map.
SS-6-1-1
SS-6-1-2
SS-6-1-3
Use web based geographic tools (e.g. Google Earth) to explore various
locations of the world. (SS8.5.1)
Label Equator, Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, Prime Meridian,
International Date Line, northern hemisphere, southern hemisphere,
western hemisphere, eastern hemisphere, lines of latitude, lines of
longitude, and absolute location. (SS8.5.1)
Label the seven continents and five major oceans of the world. (SS8.5.2)
Outcome SS-6-2:
Students will use a variety of geographic tools to describe regions of the Western
Hemisphere.
SS-6-2-1
SS-6-2-2
Label the continents and major regions (North America, South America,
Canada, United States, Mexico, Caribbean, primary countries of South
America) of the Western Hemisphere. (SS8.5.1)
Label and compare major landforms and bodies of water of the Western
Hemisphere. (SS8.5.2)
Outcome SS-6-3:
Students will give examples of the five fundamental themes of geography (location, region,
place, movement, and human/environment interaction).
SS-6-3-1
SS-6-3-2
SS-6-3-3
SS-6-3-4
SS-6-3-5
Give examples of location (absolute location, relative location). (SS8.5.1)
Give examples of region (continents, countries, physical regions, cultural
regions). (SS8.5.2)
Give examples of place (physical characteristics, human characteristics).
(SS8.5.2)
Give examples of movement (ideas, people, migration, goods, trade).
(SS8.5.3)
Give examples of human/environment interaction (ecosystems, natural
hazards, modification of environments). (SS8.5.4)
25
Outcome SS-6-4:
Students will apply knowledge of the five fundamental themes of geography (location,
region, place, movement, and human/environment interaction) to describe the people,
places, and environments of the Western Hemisphere.
SS-6-4-1
SS-6-4-2
SS-6-4-3
SS-6-4-4
Relate a current event to at least one of the five themes of geography.
(SS8.5)
Compare and contrast two places in the Western Hemisphere according
to the five themes of geography. (SS8.5)
Evaluate how physical features and changes of a place or region impact
people and events. (SS8.5.2)
Explain how population distribution and settlement patterns impact the
creation and change of places. (SS8.5.3)
Outcome SS-6-5:
Students will differentiate the economic systems and governmental structures of countries of
the Western Hemisphere.
SS-6-5-1
SS-6-5-2
SS-6-5-3
Compare and contrast economic and cultural factors between the United
States and another country. (SS8.3.2)
Synthesize economic and cultural factors to make generalizations about
the standard of living in these countries. (SS8.3.4)
Differentiate the governmental structures of the United States with the
governmental structures of another country. (SS8.1.6)
Outcome SS-6-6:
Students will compare and contrast the ancient cultures of the Western Hemisphere (e.g,
Olmec, Maya, Aztec, Inca, Inuit, or Anasazi).
SS-6-6-1
SS-6-6-2
SS-6-6-3
Outline the distinctive characteristics of an ancient culture (may include
economy, religion, class structure, governments, and struggles). (SS8.2.1)
Describe ways that the human expression (e.g, language, literature, arts,
archeology, traditions, or beliefs) of an ancient culture of the Western
Hemisphere has benefitted modern society (e.g. Mayans developed the
concept of “zero”). (SS8.2.2)
Compare and contrast the ancient cultures of the Western Hemisphere
(e.g, Olmec, Maya, Aztec, Inca, Inuit, or Anasazi).
26
Outcome SS-6-7:
Students will research the aspects (peoples, history, causes, or impacts) of immigration to the
United States.
SS-6-7-1
SS-6-7-2
SS-6-7-3
SS-6-7-4
Describe the factors that led to the migration of various peoples to the
United States (e.g. potato famine in Ireland, anti-Semitism in Europe,
etc.). (SS8.4.1)
Apply current events or articles to the causes and effects of current
immigration issues. (SS8.4.3)
Investigate the history and role of Ellis Island and Angel Island in the
migration of people to the United States. (SS8.4.4)
Utilize primary and secondary sources to investigate various experiences
of immigrants to the United States. (SS8.4.5, SS8.6.4)
Outcome SS-6-8:
Students will analyze human and environmental interactions in the Western Hemisphere to
examine the effects on modern populations.
SS-6-8-1
SS-6-8-2
List a variety of environmental issues (e.g., pollution, clean water,
invasive species, urbanization) in regions of the Western Hemisphere.
(SS8.5.4)
Analyze the effects that a change in the physical environment could have
on human activities and the choices people would have to make in
adjusting to change. (SS8.5.4)
27
Seventh Grade
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-7-1:
Students will identify and investigate the major geographical features and regions of
Wyoming. Research the origins and analyze migration patterns of early people of Wyoming.
SS-7-1-1
SS-7-1-2
SS-7-1-3
SS-7-1-4
SS-7-1-5
SS-7-1-6
Identify the major geographical features of Wyoming. (SS8.5.1)
Locate the regions of Wyoming. (SS8.5.1)
Investigate how geographical features divide Wyoming into regions.
(SS8.5.1)
Research the origins of the early people of Wyoming. (SS8.5.3)
Identify migration routes. (SS8.5.3)
Analyze the migration patterns of the early people of Wyoming to
determine the effect of geographical features and regions on these
patterns. (SS8.5.3, SS8.5.2)
Outcome SS-7-2:
Students will describe interactions between fur trappers and indigenous people in Wyoming.
Students will analyze the fur trapping era to identify the cause and effect of exploration in
Wyoming.
SS-7-2-1
SS-7-2-2
SS-7-2-3
SS-7-2-4
SS-7-2-5
Identify major fur trappers.
Investigate the rendezvous system and its economic impacts. (SS8.3.1,
SS.8.4.2)
Describe the interactions between and cultural differences of fur trappers
and Native Americans. (SS8.2.3, SS8.4.4)
Research the importance of the fur trapping era. (SS8.4.1)
Identify the cause and effect of fur trapping to exploration in Wyoming.
(SS.8.4.1)
28
Outcome SS-7-3:
Students will analyze the trails through Wyoming to investigate the pros and cons of the
western movement. Students will determine ways these trails led to the Indian Wars.
SS-7-3-1
SS-7-3-2
SS-7-3-3
SS-7-3-4
Identify trails through Wyoming.
Investigate the pros and cons of western movement trails. (SS8.5.3)
Compare and contrast the view of land ownership between whites and
Native Americans. (SS8.4.4, SS8.3.5)
Analyze the pros and cons of western movement to determine the cause
of the Indian Wars. (SS8.5.3)
Outcome SS-7-4:
Students will identify the route and investigate the construction and cost of the
transcontinental railroad through Wyoming. Students will determine the effects of the
completion of the transcontinental railroad on the growth of Wyoming.
SS-7-4-1
SS-7-4-2
SS-7-4-3
Identify the route of the transcontinental railroad through Wyoming.
Investigate the construction and cost of the transcontinental railroad
through Wyoming. (SS8.3.1)
Determine the effects of the completion of the transcontinental railroad
on the growth of Wyoming. (SS8.3.3, SS8.4.1, SS8.4.2, SS8.5.4)
Outcome SS-7-5:
Students will analyze the historical development of Wyoming to describe and investigate the
change from a territory to a state. (SS8.1.3)
SS-7-5-1
SS-7-5-2
SS-7-5-3
SS-7-5-4
SS-7-5-5
Describe the process for becoming a territory.
Describe the challenges faced in Wyoming to become a territory.
Describe the process for becoming a state.
Describe the challenges faced in Wyoming to become a state.
Investigate and analyze the solutions the people of Wyoming utilized to
become a state.
29
Outcome SS-7-6:
Students will compare and contrast the structures of various political systems. (SS8.1.6)
SS-7-6-1
SS-7-6-2
SS-7-6-3
SS-7-6-4
Identify and define the various types of political systems.
List the characteristics of various political systems.
Compare and contrast the structures of various political systems.
Compare and contrast the current political parties in the United States.
Outcome SS-7-7:
Students will identify and illustrate the structure and function of the three branches of the
United States government and the government of Wyoming. Students will compare and
contrast the powers of each branch of the state and federal government. (SS8.1.5, SS8.1.3)
SS-7-7-1
SS-7-7-2
SS-7-7-3
SS-7-7-4
Identify and illustrate the powers and responsibilities of the legislative
branch at the federal and state levels.
Identify and illustrate the powers and responsibilities of the executive
branch at the federal and state levels.
Identify and illustrate the powers and responsibilities of the judicial
branch at the federal and state levels.
Compare and contrast the powers and responsibilities of each branch of
government at the national and state levels.
Outcome SS-7-8:
Students will differentiate between United States civil and criminal justice systems. (SS8.1.4)
SS-7-8-1
SS-7-8-2
SS-7-8-3
SS-7-8-4
SS-7-8-5
SS-7-8-6
List the characteristics of the United States civil justice system.
Identify the foundations of the civil justice system.
List the characteristics of the United States criminal justice system.
Identify the foundations of criminal justice system.
Describe the jury process and its functions.
Compare and contrast the civil justice system and the criminal justice
system by creating a project using current technological tools.
Outcome SS-7-9:
Students will explain and describe the processes and qualifications to participate as a voter.
(SS8.1.2, SS8.1.1)
SS-7-9-1
SS-7-9-2
SS-7-9-3
Describe the qualifications to be a legal voter.
Explain the process of becoming a voter in Wyoming.
Demonstrate the process of voting.
30
Eighth Grade
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-8-1:
Students will examine early Native American cultures to assess their impact on the
development of North America and the United States.
SS-8-1-1
SS-8-1-2
SS-8-1-3
SS-8-1-4
Identify the migratory patterns of the earliest Americans. (SS8.5.3)
Explain the effects of migration and environment on the Native American
culture. (SS8.4.2, SS8.5.3)
Compare and contrast Native American groups and their cultures located
in North America. (SS8.2.1)
Assess the impacts of Native Americans on the development of North
America and the United States. (SS8.4.1)
Outcome SS-8-2:
Students will analyze technological advancements and the European explorations to deduce
the impact on the future of the Americas.
SS-8-2-1
SS-8-2-2
SS-8-2-3
SS-8-2-4
SS-8-2-5
List technological advancements which aided exploration. (SS8.4.2)
Analyze various technological advancement to determine the effects on
exploration. (SS8.4.2)
Investigate the impact of early European explorers on the Americas.
Describe the contributions of the Spanish, English, and French in the
Americas. (SS8.2.2, SS8.2.4)
Deduce the impact of European explorations on the Americas.
Outcome SS-8-3:
Students will compare and contrast the early colonization of the United States to evaluate
the success of their individual economies and governments.
SS-8-3-1
SS-8-3-2
SS-8-3-3
SS-8-3-4
SS-8-3-5
Identify early colonization efforts in the United States.
Explain the economy and governments of each colony. (SS8.3.2)
Compare and contrast the economies of the colonies. (SS8.3.1)
Compare and contrast the governments of the colonies.
Evaluate the success of each colony’s economy and government.
(SS8.4.4, SS8.4.1, SS8.3.5)
31
Outcome SS-8-4:
Students will analyze the causes of the American Revolution to predict the content of the
“future” government after the war. (SS8.4.1, SS8.2.4)
SS-8-4-1
SS-8-4-2
SS-8-4-3
SS-8-4-4
SS-8-4-5
SS-8-4-6
Identify religious movements.
Explain tensions caused by religion.
Diagnose issues with various tax acts.
Analyze the significance of tobacco to determine its effect on the
American Revolution.
Research the impact of the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party.
Predict the content of the government after the war.
Outcome SS-8-5:
Students will examine the American Revolution to assess the impact on the United States.
SS-8-5-1
SS-8-5-2
SS-8-5-3
SS-8-5-4
SS-8-5-5
Identify the major battles of the American Revolution.
Analyze the effects of geography to predict the outcomes of a battle.
Describe the outcomes of significant battles (Bunker Hill, Valley Forge,
Lexington, Concord, Yorktown)
Examine the contents of the Declaration of Independence to determine
its effect on the outcome of the American Revolution. (SS8.4.1, SS8.4.4)
Assess the impact of the American Revolution and the Declaration of
Independence on the United States. (SS8.4.1, SS8.4.4)
Outcome SS-8-6:
Students will examine the development of the Constitution of the United States to determine
its framework and governmental structure.
SS-8-6-1
SS-8-6-2
SS-8-6-3
SS-8-6-4
Examine the Articles of Confederation to determine weaknesses.
(SS8.1.3)
Identify the parts of the Constitution of the United States. (SS8.1.5)
Distinguish between rights and responsibilities. (SS8.1.1) (SS8.1.2)
Examine the development of the Constitution of the United States to
determine its framework and governmental structure. (SS8.1.3, SS8.1.5)
32
Outcome SS-8-7:
Students will analyze issues of launching a new nation to predict the future of the nation.
(SS8.4.1)
SS-8-7-1
SS-8-7-2
SS-8-7-3
SS-8-7-4
SS-8-7-5
Describe the presidency of George Washington and its effect on the
nation.
Examine the Whiskey Rebellion to determine the effect of creating a new
nation.
Identify the issues the United States still had with Britain.
Explain the XYZ Affair and the Alien and Sedition Act.
Predict the effects each issue had on the creation of the new nation.
(SS8.4.3)
Outcome SS-8-8:
Students will analyze the term Manifest Destiny to evaluate the movements west and the
impact on the United States.
SS-8-8-1
SS-8-8-2
SS-8-8-3
SS-8-8-4
SS-8-8-5
SS-8-8-6
Define Manifest Destiny and analyze it to determine the driving force
behind westward expansion.
Determine the impact of the Louisiana Purchase and the exploration by
Lewis and Clark. (SS8.4.4)
Describe the significance of the Trail of Tears. (SS8.4.4)
Research the reasoning behind the Oregon Trail and the Gold Rush.
(SS8.4.5, SS8.4.4)
Critique the cause and effect of the Alamo and the Mexican Revolution.
(SS8.4.4)
Assess the impact of the westward expansion on the United States.
(SS8.4.1, SS8.5.3)
33
Outcome SS-8-9:
Students will analyze the causes and effects of the Civil War to determine the impacts on the
economies and how it has affected life today. (SS8.4.1)
SS-8-9-1
SS-8-9-2
SS-8-9-3
SS-8-9-4
SS-8-9-5
SS-8-9-6
SS-8-9-7
SS-8-9-8
Describe the social and political impacts of the cotton industry on the
southern region of the United States. (SS8.3.3, SS8.4.2)
Describe the effect of slavery on the economics. (SS8.3.1, SS8.3.2,
SS8.3.3, SS8.3.5)
Determine the importance of the Underground Railroad.
Compare and contrast the North and South and the debates over slavery.
Research the many battles of the Civil War and the outcomes. (SS8.4.5)
Summarize the Gettysburg Address. (SS8.4.5)
Analyze political and economic problems after the war to predict issues
during the Reconstruction Era.
Determine the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on society of
today. (SS8.4.4)
34
World Geography I (1 semester)
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-WGI-1:
Students will analyze the study of geography to create an opinion about the importance of
the study. Students will examine the five themes of geography to evaluate how people and
the earth interact.
SS-WGI-1-1
SS-WGI-1-2
SS-WGI-1-3
SS-WGI-1-4
Analyze the study of geography to create an opinion about the
importance of the study.
Create a presentation to share their opinion about the importance of
geography, using modern technological tools. (SS12.6.3)
Examine the five themes of geography to determine how people and the
earth interact. (SS12.5.1, SS12.5.2, SS12.5.3, SS12.5.4)
Locate places on a map by using longitude and latitude. (SS12.5.2)
Outcome SS-WGI-2:
Students will examine the various climates of the world to deduce how climate regions are
divided by latitude. Students will identify and describe various landforms and describe how
they influence climates.
SS-WGI-2-1
SS-WGI-2-2
SS-WGI-2-3
SS-WGI-2-4
Describe the various climates of the world. (SS12.5.2)
Deduce ways climate regions are determined by latitude. (SS12.5.2)
Identify and describe various landforms. (SS12.5.2)
Describe how landforms influence climate. (SS12.5.4)
Outcome SS-WGI-3:
Students will define culture and determine ways the spread of culture has shaped the
modern world.
SS-WGI-3-1
SS-WGI-3-2
SS-WGI-3-3
Define culture. (SS12.2.1)
Identify various religions, languages, foods, and cultural practices to
determine the different pieces that make up a culture. (SS12.2.2)
Determine ways the spread of culture impacts daily life. (SS12.2.3)
35
Outcome SS-WGI-4:
Students will identify and describe the major geographic features of North America. Students
will compare and contrast the geographic and cultural differences between the United States
and Canada.
SS-WGI-4-1
SS-WGI-4-2
SS-WGI-4-3
SS-WGI-4-4
Identify and describe the major geographic features of North America.
(SS12.5.2)
Investigate the cultural aspects that define the United States. (SS12.2.3)
Investigate the cultural aspects of Canada. (SS12.2.3)
Compare and contrast the physical geography and cultural aspects of the
United States and Canada. (SS12.5.2, SS12.2.3)
Outcome SS-WGI-5:
Students will identify and locate the regions of Latin America and locate the major geographic
features of Latin America. Students will analyze the cultural aspects that make up Latin
America to diagnose the current issues faced in the region.
SS-WGI-5-1
SS-WGI-5-2
SS-WGI-5-3
Identify and locate the regions of Latin America (Mexico, Central America,
Caribbean, and South America). (SS12.5.2)
Identify various cultural aspects of the different regions of Latin America.
(SS12.2.2)
Analyze the cultural aspects of Latin America to diagnose the current
issues faced in the region. (SS12.2.3)
Outcome SS-WGI-6:
Students will identify the major regions of Europe and the major geographic features of the
continent. Students will investigate the various cultures that make up Europe.
SS-WGI-6-1
SS-WGI-6-2
SS-WGI-6-3
Identify the major regions of Europe. (SS12.5.2)
Identify the major geographic features of Europe. (SS12.5.2)
Investigate the various cultures that make up Europe. (SS12.2.2)
36
Outcome SS-WGI-7:
Students will identify and locate the major geographical features of Southwest Asia. Students
will analyze the cultural aspects that make up Southwest Asia to determine the current issues
facing the region.
SS-WGI-7-1
SS-WGI-7-2
SS-WGI-7-3
Identify and locate the major geographic features of Southwest Asia.
(SS12.5.2)
Investigate the various cultures in Southwest Asia. (SS12.2.2)
Analyze the cultural aspects of Southwest Asia to determine the current
issues facing the region. (SS12.2.3, SS12.4.3)
37
World Geography II (1 semester)
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-WGII-1:
Students will analyze the study of geography to create an opinion about the importance of
the study. Students will examine the five themes of geography to evaluate how people and
the earth interact.
SS-WGII-1-1
SS-WGII-1-2
SS-WGII-1-3
SS-WGII-1-4
Analyze the study of geography to create an opinion about the
importance of the study.
Create a presentation to share their opinion about the importance of
geography, using modern technological tools. (SS12.6.3)
Examine the five themes of geography to determine how people and the
earth interact. (SS12.5.1, SS12.5.2, SS12.5.3, SS12.5.4)
Locate places by using longitude and latitude. (SS12.5.2)
Outcome SS-WGII-2:
Students will describe the various climates of the world to deduce how climate regions are
divided by latitude. Students will identify and describe various landforms and describe how
they influence climates.
SS-WGII-2-1
SS-WGII-2-2
SS-WGII-2-3
Describe the various climates of the world. (SS12.5.2)
Deduce how climate regions are determined by latitude. (SS12.5.2)
Describe how landforms influence climate. (SS12.5.4)
Outcome SS-WGII-3:
Students will define culture and determine ways the spread of culture has shaped the
modern world.
SS-WGII-3-1
SS-WGII-3-2
SS-WGII-3-3
Define culture. (SS12.2.1)
Identify various religions, languages, foods, and cultural practices to
determine the different pieces that make up a culture. (SS12.2.2)
Determine ways the spread of culture impacts daily life. (SS12.2.3)
38
Outcome SS-WGII-4:
Students will identify and describe the major geographic features of North Africa. Students
will compare and contrast the geographic and cultural differences between the United States
and North Africa.
SS-WGII-4-1
SS-WGII-4-2
SS-WGII-4-3
Identify and describe the major geographic features of North Africa.
(SS12.5.2)
Investigate the cultural aspects that define North Africa. (SS12.2.3)
Compare and contrast the physical geography and culture of North Africa
and the United States. (SS12.5.2, SS12.2.3)
Outcome SS-WGII-5:
Students will identify and locate the major geographic features of sub-Saharan Africa. The
students will analyze the cultural aspects that make up sub-Saharan Africa to determine the
current issues faced by the region.
SS-WGII-5-1
SS-WGII-5-2
SS-WGII-5-3
Identify and locate major geographical features of sub-Saharan Africa.
(SS12.5.2)
Identify various cultural aspects of the different regions of sub-Saharan
Africa. (SS12.2.2)
Analyze the cultural aspects of sub-Saharan Africa to determine the
current issues faced in the region. (SS12.2.3, SS12.4.3)
Outcome SS-WGII-6:
Students will identify and locate the major regions of Asia and the major geographic features
of the continent. Students will investigate various cultures within Asia.
SS-WGII-6-1
SS-WGII-6-2
SS-WGII-6-3
Identify and locate the major regions of Asia. (SS12.5.2)
Identify major geographic features of Asia. (SS12.5.2)
Investigate various cultures within Asia. (SS12.2.2)
39
Outcome SS-WGII-7:
Students will identify and locate the regions of the Pacific Realm. Students will analyze the
cultural aspects within the Pacific Realm to determine the current issues facing the region.
SS-WGII-7-1
SS-WGII-7-2
SS-WGII-7-2
SS-WGII-7-3
Identify and locate the regions of the Pacific Realm. (SS12.5.2)
Locate the major geographic features of the Pacific Realm.
Identify various cultural aspects of the different regions of the Pacific
Realm.
Analyze the cultural aspects of the Pacific Realm to determine the current
issues facing the region. (SS12.2.3, SS12.4.3)
40
World History I (1 semester)
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-WHI-1:
Students will identify and compare history and pre-history. Students will research and
evaluate the importance of the eight characteristics of civilization. (SS12.2.2, SS12.5.3)
SS-WHI-1-1
SS-WHI-1-2
SS-WHI-1-3
Identify and compare history and pre-history.
Identify and define the eight characteristics of civilization.
Research and evaluate the importance of the eight characteristics of
civilization: cities, well-organized central government, complex religion,
job specialization, social classes, arts and architecture, public works,
writings.
Outcome SS-WHI-2:
Students will compare and contrast cultures, customs, traditions, religions, and technology of
ancient kingdoms (Mesopotamia, China, Aryan Society, and the Indus Valley). (SS12.4.2,
SS12.2.4, SS12.2.2, SS12.2.1, SS12.4.4, SS12.4.5, SS12.6.3, SS12.6.4)
SS-WHI-2-1
SS-WHI-2-2
SS-WHI-2-3
SS-WHI-2-4
SS-WHI-2-5
Research traditions, cultures, customs, religion, and technology of
Mesopotamia.
Research traditions, cultures, customs, religion, and technology of China.
Research traditions, cultures, customs, religion, and technology of Aryan
Society.
Research traditions, cultures, customs, religion, and technology of Indus
Valley.
Compare and contrast the eight traits of each society and compare their
strengths and weaknesses.
41
Outcome SS-WHI-3:
Students will diagram their traits, beliefs, holidays, and structure. Students will compare and
contrast the religions of Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. (SS12.2.2, SS12.2.4, SS12.4.4)
SS-WHI-3-1
SS-WHI-3-2
SS-WHI-3-3
SS-WHI-3-4
Diagram the traits, beliefs, holidays, and structure of Islam.
Diagram the traits, beliefs, holidays, and structure of Hinduism.
Diagram the traits, beliefs, holidays, and structure of Buddhism.
Compare and contrast the traits, beliefs, holidays, structure of Islam,
Hinduism, and Buddhism.
Outcome SS-WHI-4:
Students will identify, describe, and compare and contrast the early people of the Aegean,
the rise of Greek city-states, and the Hellenistic Age by creating a presentation. (SS12.2.1,
SS12.4.4, SS12.4.2)
SS-WHI-4-1
SS-WHI-4-2
SS-WHI-4-3
SS-WHI-4-4
Identify and describe the early people of the Aegean.
Identify and describe the rise of the Greek city-states.
Identify and describe the Hellenistic Age.
Compare and contrast the Aegean, Greek city-states, Hellenistic Age by
creating a presentation to communicate the findings.
Outcome SS-WHI-5:
Students will describe the rise and fall of the Roman Empire to compare and contrast with
Ancient Greece. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2, SS12.4.4)
SS-WHI-5-1
SS-WHI-5-2
SS-WHI-5-3
SS-WHI-5-4
Describe the rise and fall of the republic.
Describe the change from republic to empire.
Describe the art and architecture of ancient Rome.
Compare and contrast the Roman Empire society to that of Ancient
Greece.
Outcome SS-WHI-6:
Students will analyze to determine the similarities and differences between the Middle Ages,
rise of Europe, and High Middle Ages. (SS12.2.4, SS12.4.1)
SS-WHI-6-1
SS-WHI-6-2
SS-WHI-6-3
SS-WHI-6-4
SS-WHI-6-5
Identify the structure of feudalism.
Dissect the impact of the Black Plague.
Discuss the impact of the Crusades.
Analyze the importance of the protestant reformation.
Determine the similarities and differences between the Middle Ages, the
rise of Europe, and High Middle Ages.
42
World History II (1 semester)
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-WHII-1:
Students will compare the creative, political, social, economic, and cultural changes between
Italy and Central and Western Europe during the Renaissance to determine the impact on
today’s society.
SS-WHII-1-1
SS-WHII-1-2
SS-WHII-1-3
SS-WHII-1-4
Research, using technological devices, changes in art during the
Renaissance in Italy and Central and Western Europe. (SS12.6.3, SS12.4.2,
SS12.1.1)
Identify political, social, economic, and cultural changes.
Compare and contrast the Renaissance in Italy to Central and Western
Europe.
Determine the impact that the Renaissance had on today’s society.
(SS12.2.2, SS12.4.2)
Outcome SS-WHII-2:
Students will analyze the causes and effects of Protestant Reformation to predict the impact
it had on the development of religion worldwide.
SS-WHII-2-1
SS-WHII-2-2
SS-WHII-2-3
SS-WHII-2-4
SS-WHII-2-5
SS-WHII-2-6
SS-WHII-2-7
Explain the problems in the church and why it upset the people.
(SS12.4.4)
Identify Martin Luther and his main ideas.
Research the impacts of Martin Luther’s ideas. (SS12.6.3)
Analyze John Calvin’s ideas to determine their impact.
Compare and contrast the English and Catholic Reformation.
List the causes and effects of English and Catholic Reformation.
Predict the impact the causes and effects had on the development of
religion worldwide. (SS12.4.1)
43
Outcome SS-WHII-3:
Students will compare and contrast different Enlightenment thinkers and their ideas to
determine their influence on society. (SS12.4.4)
SS-WHII-3-1
SS-WHII-3-2
SS-WHII-3-3
SS-WHII-3-4
SS-WHII-3-5
SS-WHII-3-6
Research major Enlightenment thinkers (e.g. John Locke, Voltaire,
Montesquieu, Thomas Hobbs, Mary Wollstonecraft, Adam Smith,
Rousseau, Mozart, Bach, Thomas Payne). (SS12.6.3, SS12.6.4, SS12.4.5)
Illustrate each thinker’s major ideas. (SS12.2.2)
Analyze the impact of each thinker’s ideas.
Compare and contrast each thinker’s ideas.
Form and defend an opinion with supporting facts.
Determine each thinker’s influence on society. (SS12.6.4, SS12.4.4)
Outcome SS-WHII-4:
Students will examine the causes and effects of the French Revolution to evaluate the impact
economic crisis and social classes had on economic and social unrest.
SS-WHII-4-1
SS-WHII-4-2
SS-WHII-4-3
SS-WHII-4-4
SS-WHII-4-5
SS-WHII-4-6
Describe and identify the social classes of France before and during the
French Revolution.
Diagnose the issues with the French social classes.
Identify causes of the economic crisis.
Examine the impact social classes and economic crisis had on France
during the French Revolution.
Research modern day countries with economic and social class problems.
(SS12.6.3)
Evaluate with supporting facts ways France’s economic crisis and social
class issues compared to the United States economic and social issues.
(SS12.4.1, SS12.5.4, SS12.6.4)
44
Outcome SS-WHII-5:
Students will analyze the impact of new technologies in the Industrial Revolution in Great
Britain to show ways it helped shape the modern world. (SS12.4.2)
SS-WHII-5-1
SS-WHII-5-2
SS-WHII-5-3
SS-WHII-5-4
SS-WHII-5-5
SS-WHII-5-6
SS-WHII-5-7
SS-WHII-5-8
Determine the reasons the Industrial Revolution began in Great Britain.
Identify agricultural technology changes as well as energy changes.
Describe major changes in the textile industry.
Show the impact of the railroads on society.
Evaluate the factory system’s impact on industrialization.
Analyze the impacts of agricultural, energy, textile, railroad, and factory
system changes to determine their impact on industrialization.
Research modern technologies that were influenced by the Industrial
Revolution. (SS12.6.3)
Show ways the Industrial Revolution shaped the modern world.
Outcome SS-WHII-6:
Students will analyze the causes and effects of World War I to determine the future political
construction of Europe and future conflicts.
SS-WHII-6-1
SS-WHII-6-2
SS-WHII-6-3
SS-WHII-6-4
SS-WHII-6-5
SS-WHII-6-6
Assess the causes of World War I. (SS12.2.4, SS12.4.4))
Illustrate the features of trench warfare.
Research “modern warfare” new to the war (e.g., airplanes, automatic
machine gun, U boats, zeppelins, poison gas). (SS12.6.3)
Analyze the impact “modern warfare” had on the war, including the U.S.
involvement. (SS12.4.2)
Determine the influence propaganda posters had on the World War I.
Examine the effects of the war and the reconstruction of Europe to
predict future conflicts.
Outcome SS-WHII-7:
Students will analyze totalitarian rulers and beliefs to explain the causes of World War II.
They will examine the causes and effects of the war to predict possible incidents in the
future.
SS-WHII-7-1
SS-WHII-7-2
SS-WHII-7-3
Identify totalitarian rulers. (e.g., Mussolini, Hitler, Stalin, Hirohito)
(SS12.4.1)
Analyze the beliefs of the totalitarian rulers to describe the causes of
World War II. (SS12.4.4)
Examine the causes and effects of the war to predict possible future
incidents. (SS12.4.5)
45
U.S. History
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-US-1:
Students will hypothesize ways the movement west influenced the development of the
United States. Students will examine the industrialization of the United States to formulate
an opinion on ways the government regulates business.
SS-US-1-1
SS-US-1-2
SS-US-1-3
SS-US-1-4
SS-US-1-5
SS-US-1-6
Compare and contrast land use and cultural differences of the Great
Plains. (SS12.2.3, SS12.2.4)
Identify the difficulties and issues farmers dealt with on the Great Plains
and determine ways they worked to solve them.
Hypothesize multiple outcomes of cultural assimilation.
Evaluate the role of natural resources in the industrialization of the
United States. (SS12.2.1, SS12.3.1)
Compare and contrast the role of government in regulating business.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.3.1)
Formulate an opinion on the extent the government should regulate
business. (SS12.2.1, SS12.3.1)
Outcome SS-US-2:
Students will illustrate the impact of immigration on the United States. Students will
diagnose issues with the development of cities and the role of government (political
processes, public education, and voting) for its citizens.
SS-US-2-1
SS-US-2-2
SS-US-2-3
SS-US-2-4
SS-US-2-5
SS-US-2-6
Evaluate the increase of immigration in the late 19th and early 20th
centuries. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2, SS12.4.4)
Illustrate the impact of immigration on the development of the United
States. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2, SS12.4.4)
Diagnose the issues and concerns with the rapid growth of cities and the
role of government for citizens. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2, SS12.4.4)
Identify the political process and predict how it could be abused.
(SS12.2.2, SS12.1.2)
Examine the role of public education in the process of assimilation.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2, SS12.4.4)
Describe how voting restrictions affected African Americans. (SS12.2.2)
46
Outcome SS-US-3:
Students will describe the main changes that the Progressive Movement had and hypothesize
ways the presidents of the Progressive Movement redefined the role and power of the
presidency.
SS-US-3-1
SS-US-3-2
SS-US-3-3
SS-US-3-4
SS-US-3-5
Identify the main ideas of the Progressive Movement.
Describe the main changes that the Progressive Movement brought
about. (SS12.2.1, SS12.4.4)
Identify the role that women played in the Progressive Movement.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.4.4)
Compare and contrast the Progressive presidents and their
accomplishments. (SS12.2.1, SS12.4.4)
Hypothesize the impact the Progressive presidents had on the power of
the president. (SS12.2.1, SS12.4.4)
Outcome SS-US-4:
Students will describe and predict America’s expanding role in the global world. Students will
hypothesize the causes of World War I and evaluate the role of the U.S. during the war and
throughout the peace process.
SS-US-4-1
SS-US-4-2
SS-US-4-3
SS-US-4-4
SS-US-4-5
SS-US-4-6
SS-US-4-7
SS-US-4-8
Describe the concept of globalization and its impact on cultural conflicts
for the United States. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
Predict ways an expanding U.S. would fit into a global perspective in the
late 1800s. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
Identify regions of the world that the U.S. looked to for expansion.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
Evaluate the negative and positive effects of expansion. (SS12.2.1,
SS12.2.2)
Evaluate the role of the U.S. as a major power. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
Hypothesize the causes of World War I. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
Evaluate the role the United States played in World War I. (SS12.2.1,
SS12.2.2)
Estimate if the peace to end World War I would be a lasting peace or a
form of punishment. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
47
Outcome SS-US-5:
Students will examine the effects of World War I to determine the effects on U.S. customs
and way of life. Students will analyze causes of the Great Depression to hypothesize
solutions. Students will evaluate life during the Great Depression and predict the impact of
the New Deal program.
SS-US-5-1
SS-US-5-2
SS-US-5-3
SS-US-5-4
SS-US-5-5
SS-US-5-6
SS-US-5-7
SS-US-5-8
SS-US-5-9
SS-US-5-10
SS-US-5-11
Identify the need for a return to normalcy after World War I. (SS12.2.1,
SS12.2.2)
Evaluate the causes for a rise in consumerism. (SS12.2.2, SS12.3.1)
Determine ways customs and values changed in the 1920s. (SS12.2.1,
SS12.2.2)
Examine the lifestyles of women and minorities to determine ways their
role changed in the 1920s. (SS12.4.4, SS12.2.2)
Diagnose the economic problems and concerns leading to the Great
Depression. (SS12.3.1, SS12.2.1)
Determine the impact of the Great Depression and how people adjusted
to the situation. (SS12.3.1, SS12.2.2)
Hypothesize the success of responses and solutions to the Great
Depression. (SS12.3.1, SS12.4.4)
Examine ways Franklin Delano Roosevelt implemented his plan to end
the Great Depression. (SS12.4.5, SS12.2.1)
Hypothesize ways the New Deal brought relief from the economic
hardships of the Great Depression.
Identify ways the New Deal affected all social and ethnic groups.
Analyze the long term effects of the New Deal as a solution to the Great
Depression.
48
Outcome SS-US-6:
Students will examine the events of World War II to predict ways U.S. involvement impacted
the war effort. Students will hypothesize how major battles and events influenced the war
and determined the outcome. Students will evaluate the origins of the Cold War and its
major events.
SS-US-6-1
SS-US-6-2
SS-US-6-3
SS-US-6-4
SS-US-6-5
SS-US-6-6
SS-US-6-7
SS-US-6-8
SS-US-6-9
Identify how dictators came to power. (SS12.2.1, SS12.4.4)
Determine ways Germany was successful early in World War II.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.4.4)
Evaluate the events of the Holocaust. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2, SS12.4.4)
Examine the events of World War II to predict ways U.S. involvement had
an impact on the war. (SS12.2.2, SS12.4.4)
Critique the lack of U.S. engagement in World War II up to 1941.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.4.4)
Hypothesize the impact of major battles throughout the war. (SS12.2.1,
SS12.4.4, SS12.4.5)
Examine the results of World War II to determine the influence on the
United States. (SS12.2.1, SS12.4.4)
Identify the origins of the Cold War. (SS12.2.1, SS12.4.4)
Evaluate the conflicts during the Cold War (e.g., Korean, China).
(SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2, SS12.4.4)
Outcome SS-US-7:
Students will examine the post World War II world to predict ways the social problems in the
U.S. affected the political changes throughout the 1960s. Students will hypothesize the role
of citizens in the political process. Students will evaluate ways the government adapts to
meet the needs of the people.
SS-US-7-1
SS-US-7-2
SS-US-7-3
SS-US-7-4
SS-US-7-5
Identify the social unrest developing in the United States after World War
II. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2, SS12.4.1)
Evaluate the cause of the political reforms, the New Frontier and the
Great Society. (SS12.2.1, SS12.4.1)
Distinguish ways the different ethnic groups in the U.S. may have
differing outlooks. (SS12.4.1, SS12.2.2)
Evaluate ways groups and organizations could influence and create
change in the government. (SS12.4.1, SS12.2.1)
Evaluate ways passing laws at the federal level influence individuals’ lives.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2, SS12.4.1)
49
Outcome SS-US-8:
Students will describe the role of the United States in the Vietnam War. Students will
describe the reasons for the United States expansion in the Vietnam War to predict long term
outcomes and hypothesize long term effects.
SS-US-8-1
SS-US-8-2
SS-US-8-3
SS-US-8-4
SS-US-8-5
Describe reasons why the United States became involved in Vietnam.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2, SS12.4.1, SS12.4.2)
Hypothesize the effects of the United States’ involvement in Vietnam.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.4.1)
Evaluate the role the United States played in the Vietnam War over time.
(SS12.2.2, SS12.4.1)
Predict the outcome of the United States involvement in the Vietnam
War. (SS12.2.1, SS12.4.1)
Hypothesize the long-term effects of the Vietnam War. (SS12.2.2,
SS12.4.1)
Outcome SS-US-9:
Students will examine the Conservative Movement to determine its long-term effects.
Students will hypothesize the outcomes of foreign policy at the end of the Cold War.
Students will analyze the role of terrorism to determine ways it affects government today.
SS-US-9-1
SS-US-9-2
SS-US-9-3
SS-US-9-4
Evaluate the Conservative Movement‘s effect on government. (SS12.2.1,
SS12.2.2, SS12.4.2)
Hypothesize ways foreign policy affects the U.S. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
Examine terrorism to determine the role it plays in the modern world.
(SS12.2.2, SS12.4.1)
Predict ways terrorism will influence the United States government.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.4.3)
50
American Government (1 semester, 12th grade only)
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-AG-1:
Students will describe, compare, and contrast the four theories of governmental origins.
(SS12.1.6)
SS-AG-1-1
SS-AG-1-2
SS-AG-1-3
SS-AG-1-4
SS-AG-1-5
SS-AG-1-6
Describe Force Theory.
Describe Evolutionary Theory.
Describe Divine Right Theory.
Describe Social Contract Theory.
Compare and contrast the four theories.
Research, design and create a presentation for each of the four theories.
(SS12.1.6, SS12.6.3)
Outcome SS-AG-2:
Students will analyze the Articles of Confederation and the Bundle of Compromises to
describe their contributions to the United States Constitution. (SS12.1.3)
SS-AG-2-1
SS-AG-2-2
SS-AG-2-3
SS-AG-2-4
Evaluate the pros and cons of the Articles of Confederation.
Analyze the Virginia Plan, New Jersey Plan, and the Great Compromise to
appraise their key features.
Outline the key features of and evaluate the 3/5 Compromise and the
Commerce Slave Trade Compromise.
Describe the contributions each had on the United States Constitution.
Outcome SS-AG-3:
Students will compare and contrast the Federalist and Anti-federalist movements as they
relate to the amendment process and the Bill of Rights. (SS12.1.1, SS12.1.2, SS12.1.3,
SS12.1.5)
SS-AG-3-1
SS-AG-3-2
SS-AG-3-3
SS-AG-3-4
SS-AG-3-5
Report the views of a Federalist.
Report the views of an Anti-federalist.
Outline the Bill of Rights.
Compare and contrast the Federalist and Anti-federalist movements.
Diagram the impacts of the Federalist and Anti-federalist movements on
the formal amendment process.
51
Outcome SS-AG-4:
Students will dissect the provisions of Article I to describe the organization and powers of the
legislative branch. (SS12.1.2, SS12.1.3, SS12.1.5)
SS-AG-4-1
SS-AG-4-2
SS-AG-4-3
SS-AG-4-4
SS-AG-4-5
SS-AG-4-6
SS-AG-4-7
SS-AG-4-8
Outline the organization of the legislative branch.
Describe Amendment XVII and the qualifications and terms of both
legislative bodies.
Evaluate the importance of the census provision of Article I.
Describe the impeachment process provision of Article I.
Define expressed, implied, and inherent powers of the legislative branch.
Illustrate the expressed powers of Congress.
Formulate opinions on past, present, and future events related to the
implied and inherent powers.
Summarize powers denied to Congress.
Outcome SS-AG-5:
Students will dissect the provisions of Article II to describe the organization and powers of
the Executive Branch. (SS12.1.3, SS12.1.5)
SS-AG-5-1
SS-AG-5-2
SS-AG-5-3
SS-AG-5-4
SS-AG-5-5
Describe Amendment XXII and the qualifications and terms of the
executive branch.
Describe Amendment XII and the Electoral College process.
Compare and contrast the eight roles of the President.
Compare and contrast the powers of the President.
Describe Amendment XXV and presidential succession.
Outcome SS-AG-6:
Students will dissect the provisions of Article III to describe the organization and powers of
the Judicial Branch. (SS12.1.1, SS12.1.3, SS12.1.4, SS12.1.5)
SS-AG-6-1
SS-AG-6-2
SS-AG-6-3
SS-AG-6-4
Describe the powers of the Supreme Court.
Assess the importance of judicial review.
Outline federal judiciary.
Present a landmark case and its impact on past, present, and future
society.
52
Outcome SS-AG-7:
Students will outline the provisions of the Wyoming Constitution and its effect on
Amendment XIX. (SS12.1.5)
SS-AG-7-1
SS-AG-7-2
SS-AG-7-3
Identify the qualifications and terms of the legislative, executive, and
judicial bodies.
Describe the powers of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of
the state of Wyoming.
Describe the impact Wyoming had on Amendment XIX.
53
Economics (1 semester, 12th grade only)
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-EC-1:
Students will analyze supply, demand, scarcity, prices, incentives, competition, and profits to
determine the impact on what is produced, distributed, and consumed. (SS12.3.1)
SS-EC-1-1
SS-EC-1-2
Identify and define supply, demand, scarcity, prices, incentives,
competition, and profits.
Analyze supply, demand, scarcity, prices, incentives, competition, and
profits to determine the impact on what is produced, distributed, and
consumed.
Outcome SS-EC-2:
Students will analyze and evaluate the ways people organize for the production, distribution,
and consumption of goods and services in various global economic systems to determine
strengths and weaknesses of each system. (SS12.3.2, SS12.3.3)
SS-EC-2-1
SS-EC-2-2
SS-EC-2-3
SS-EC-2-4
Describe production, distribution, and consumption of goods and
services.
Analyze and evaluate traditional, command, and market economies to
determine their strengths and weaknesses of various economic systems.
Identify and explain the seven social economic goals and their impact on
economic decision making.
Determine the impact technology has on global economic systems.
Outcome SS-EC-3:
Students will explain how financial and government institutions make economic decisions.
(SS12.3.4)
SS-EC-3-1
SS-EC-3-2
Identify and describe the Federal Reserve System.
Compare and contrast the monetary policies of the Federal Reserve and
the effects of each.
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Outcome SS-EC-4:
Students will evaluate values and beliefs which influence ways businesses are organized.
(SS12.3.5)
SS-EC-4-1
SS-EC-4-2
SS-EC-4-3
Identify and define business types (e.g., sole proprietorships,
partnerships, corporations).
Compare and contrast the strengths and weaknesses of sole
proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations.
Evaluate values and beliefs which influence ways businesses are
organized.
Outcome SS-EC-5:
Students will formulate a long-term career plan to meet economic needs. (SS12.3.5, SS12.6.3)
SS-EC-5-1
SS-EC-5-2
SS-EC-5-3
Identify economic needs throughout adulthood.
Research potential career paths to determine required education and
salary potential.
Formulate an individualized budget using a hypothetical career choice
and corresponding salary scheduled.
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Contemporary World Issues (elective)
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-CWI-1:
Students will research and analyze numerous local current events to formulate an opinion.
(SS12.4.3)
SS-CWI-1-1
SS-CWI-1-2
SS-CWI-1-3
Summarize three to five local current events, using online resources.
(SS12.6.1)
Form an opinion for each current event. (SS12.6.1)
Create a presentation that analyzes each event to communicate their
personal opinion. (SS12.6.4)
Outcome SS-CWI-2:
Students will research and analyze numerous regional current events to formulate an
opinion. (SS12.4.3)
SS-CWI-2-1
SS-CWI-2-2
SS-CWI-2-3
Summarize three to five regional current events, using online resources.
(SS12.6.1)
Form an opinion for each current event. (SS12.6.1)
Create a presentation that analyzes each event to communicate their
personal opinion. (SS12.6.4)
Outcome SS-CWI-3:
Students will research and analyze three national current events to compare and contrast the
events. (SS12.4.3)
SS-CWI-3-1
SS-CWI-3-2
SS-CWI-3-3
Research using online tools to analyze three national current events.
(SS12.6.1)
Compare and contrast the three national current events.
Create a presentation using current technological tools to communicate
the similarities and differences. (SS12.6.4)
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Outcome SS-CWI-4:
Students will research and analyze three international current events to form an opinion.
SS-CWI-4-1
SS-CWI-4-2
SS-CWI-4-3
Research to find three international current events using online
resources. (SS12.6.1)
Analyze each international event to formulate a personal opinion.
Create a presentation using current technological tools to summarize and
communicate their opinion. (SS12.6.4)
Outcome SS-CWI-5:
Students will research and construct an opinion based on a local current event. Students will
identify and describe how the event chosen will affect them personally, through a
presentation.
SS-CWI-1
SS-CWI-2
SS-CWI-3
SS-CWI-4
Use online resources to research a local current event. (SS12.6.1)
Construct an opinion about the event. (SS12.6.2)
Identify and describe how the event affects them personally. (SS12.6.2)
Create a presentation to communicate their opinion and how it affects
them. (SS12.6.4)
Outcome SS-CWI-6:
Students will research and construct an opinion based on a regional current event. Students
will identify and describe how the event chosen will affect them personally, through a
presentation.
SS-CWI-6-1
SS-CWI-6-2
SS-CWI-6-3
SS-CWI-6-4
Use online resources to research a regional current event. (SS12.6.1)
Construct an opinion about the event. (SS12.6.2)
Identify and describe how the event affects them personally. (SS12.6.2)
Create a presentation that communicates their opinion and how it affects
them. (SS12.6.4)
Outcome SS-CWI-7:
Students will research and construct an opinion based on a national current event. Students
will identify and describe how the event affects them personally, through a presentation.
SS-CWI-7-1
SS-CWI-7-2
SS-CWI-7-3
SS-CWI-7-4
Use online resources to research a regional current event. (SS12.6.1)
Construct an opinion about the event. (SS12.6.2)
Identify and describe how the event affects them personally. (SS12.6.2)
Create a presentation that communicates their opinion and how it affects
them. (SS12.6.4)
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Outcome SS-CWI-8:
Students will research and construct an opinion based on an international current event.
Students will describe how the event affects them personally, through a presentation.
SS-CWI-8-1
SS-CWI-8-2
SS-CWI-8-3
SS-CWI-8-4
Use online resources to research an international current event.
(SS12.6.1)
Construct an opinion about the event. (SS12.6.2)
Identify and describe how the event affects them personally. (SS12.6.2)
Create a presentation that communicates their opinion and how it affects
them. (SS12.6.4)
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Social Psychology (elective)
In accordance with Wyoming State Statute, the following events/days must be appropriately
observed each school year: Constitution Day (September 17), Nellie T. Ross’ Birthday
(November 29), Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (December 7), Wyoming Day (December 10),
and Native American Day (2nd Friday in May).
Outcome SS-SP-1:
Students will analyze the interaction between the body and the mind to evaluate the role of
the brain, the nervous system and the endocrine system. Students will hypothesize how
sensation, perception and consciousness create our perspective of the world around us.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
SS-SP-1-1
SS-SP-1-2
SS-SP-1-3
SS-SP-1-4
SS-SP-1-5
SS-SP-1-6
SS-SP-1-7
SS-SP-1-8
Examine how the nervous system functions.
Analyze how the brain functions.
Examine the roles and functions of the endocrine system.
Predict the role of heredity in development.
Analyze the interpretation of senses.
Examine all of the senses and their interpretation.
Hypothesize on how consciousness can be altered.
Analyze the role of sleep on consciousness.
Outcome SS-SP-2:
Students will predict how learning and cognition influence memory. Students will compare
and contrast intelligence and achievement to evaluate the role of measuring intelligence.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
SS-SP-2-1
SS-SP-2-2
SS-SP-2-3
SS-SP-2-4
SS-SP-2-5
Predict how classical and operant conditioning will affect learning.
Examine the memory process.
Analyze the development of language.
Hypothesize how intelligence is measured.
Analyze how intelligence is influenced.
Outcome SS-SP-3:
Students will analyze physical, social, and cognitive development through infancy to
adulthood to determine the importance of progression through each stage.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
SS-SP-3-1
SS-SP-3-2
SS-SP-3-3
Examine the development of infants through early childhood.
Examine the development of adolescence.
Analyze the stages of adulthood and the events in each stage.
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Outcome SS-SP-4:
Students will examine the importance of motivation, emotion and gender on the formation
of personality. Students will hypothesize strengths and weaknesses of theories of personality
to determine the effectiveness of personality tests. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
SS-SP-4-1
SS-SP-4-2
SS-SP-4-3
SS-SP-4-4
Examine the psychology of motivation and emotions.
Predict how personalities fit into several theories.
Hypothesize how the psychological tests measure achievement, abilities,
and interests.
Examine how gender influences development.
Outcome SS-SP-5:
Students will examine how stress affects the body physically and mentally to assess its impact
on a person’s health. Students will analyze psychological disorders and their effects to
determine ways to treat and overcome the issues. (SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
SS-SP-5-1
SS-SP-5-2
SS-SP-5-3
SS-SP-5-4
SS-SP-5-5
Identify the effects of stress.
Examine ways of coping with stress.
Analyze the components of psychological disorders.
Examine schizophrenia and its effects.
Predict how therapy works for different disorders.
Outcome SS-SP-6:
Students will analyze the formation and evolution of attitudes and beliefs to evaluate the
role of prejudice and social perception. Students will evaluate the interaction that takes
place within societies to compare and contrast individual and group behavior.
(SS12.2.1, SS12.2.2)
SS-SP-6-1
SS-SP-6-2
SS-SP-6-3
SS-SP-6-4
SS-SP-6-5
Identify how attitudes and beliefs can affect behavior.
Examine how persuasion and prejudice affect individuals.
Analyze social perception’s influence on individuals.
Hypothesize how group behavior is influenced by conformity.
Predict the influences of aggression and altruism.
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Glossary - from the 2014 Wyoming Social Studies Standards
Assimilation: Assimilation is the absorption and integration of people, ideas, and/or culture
into a wider society or group.
Example: Assimilation would include the melting pot theory as well as indigenous people being
sent to boarding schools to acquire Western culture.
Budget: A budget is a spending and saving plan based on expected income and expenses. An
orderly program for spending, saving, and investing the money earned to achieve desired goals;
also called a financial plan or spending plan.
Example: Budgets can include the federal budget, state budget, or personal budget.
Cause and Effect: Cause and effect is a way of describing what happens and why. The cause is
the reason that the effect took place. The effect is the event that took place as a result of the
cause.
Example: The invention of the automobile led to drive through restaurants.
Civic Responsibility (Good Citizenship): Civic responsibility is comprised of actions and
attitudes associated with democratic governance and social participation.
Example: Civic responsibility can include participation in government, church, volunteers and
memberships of voluntary associations. Actions of good citizenship can be displayed in
advocacy for various causes include political, economic, civil, environmental, or quality of life
issues. It is also reflected in a general willingness to sacrifice personal desires for the common
good.
Collaboration: Collaboration is the working of one with another; cooperating on a common
product.
Example: Collaboration in government would be bi-partisanship or the United Nations.
Command Economy: Command Economy is an economic system in which a central authority is
in command of the economy; a centrally planned economy.
Example: although most economies today are market-based mixed economies (which are
partially planned), fully command economies of the Soviet-type continue to exist in Cuba, North
Korea and Laos.
Community: community is a group of people with a common characteristic or interest living
together within a larger society.
Example: Chinatown, Little Italy, communes, reservations, neighborhoods, schools, and
classrooms are all communities.
Consumption: In economics, consumption is the final using up of goods and services. The
term excludes the use of intermediate products in the production of other goods (e.g., the
purchase of buildings and machinery by a business).
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Example: The consumption of renewable energy has increased steadily. Renewable energy
currently accounts for about 8.20% of the United States energy consumption. Most of that
comes from biomass and hydroelectric sources.
Continuity and Change: In studying the past we can see that some things remain continuous or
steady, while other things change. Thinking about continuity and change requires us to
compare different points in time-either two points in time from the past or one point from the
past with one from the present. Sometimes what changes and what stays the same are
surprising or obscure. Sometimes change brings progress, other time decline.
Example: The advent of electricity and household technology brought major changes to family
life in the United States, but there were continuities as well. Doing laundry was much easier
and less physically strenuous with washing machines, but laundry remained a household task
that was almost always done by women and the amount of clothing that most people owned
increase, so the time taken to do laundry did not decrease significantly.
Cultural Diversity: Cultural diversity is the cultural variety and cultural differences that exist in
the world, a society, or an institution. Cultural diversity is based on the idea that cultural
identities should not be discarded or ignored, but rather maintained and valued. The
foundation of this belief is that every culture and race has made a substantial contribution to
American history.
Example: Dying languages and urbanization are threats to cultural diversity.
Cultural Groups: these groups are socially defined categories based on common culture or
nationality. Culture can, but does not have to, include common ancestry, appearance, cuisine,
dressing style, heritage, history, language or dialect, religion, symbols, traditions, or other
cultural factor.
Example: Cultural Groups are referenced when people speak of Italian, Samoan, or Japanese
culture. They are referring to the shared language, traditions, and beliefs that set each of these
peoples apart from others. In most cases, those who share your culture do so because they
acquired it as they were raised by parents and other family members who have it.
Current Events: Current events are news items: important political and social events or issues
of the present time.
Example: Current events can be found in places like the newspaper which includes news,
events, highlights, and feature stories from around the world that are significant to students’
lives.
Democratic Society (Democracy): A democratic society is one in which the people have
ultimate political authority.
Example: A democratic society contrasts with other societies where power is either held by
one, as in a monarchy, or where power is held by a small number of individuals, as in an
oligarchy.
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Demographics: The statistical study of human populations especially with reference to size and
density, distribution, and vital statistics.
Example: Demographics include statistical data like distribution of wealth and population.
When moving to a new city or visiting anew area it is helpful to look at demographics to learn
about the people who live in that area.
Distribution: Distribution is the process of making a product or service available for use or
consumption by a consumer or business user, using direct or indirect means (such as a third
party go between).
Example: Product distribution gives you a way to get your product to the consumer. There are
many methods you can use to distribute your product. When choosing the most cost-effective
distribution method, be sure to consider costs associated with direct selling, as well as any
retailer, wholesaler or broker fees, commissions, and shipping.
Economic Principle: Economic Principle is the interrelated economic factors that explain what
may cause what, or what may happen under certain circumstances in economics.
Example: Scarcity, opportunity cost, and efficiency are all considered factors of how they
economy works (or should work), hence, they refer to economic factors.
Environment: Environment is defined as all the external factors influencing the life and
activities of people, plants, and animals. Environment is the social and cultural forces that
shape the life of a person or a population.
Example: Your surroundings, classroom, town, community, or neighborhood are all
environments.
Environmental Modification: Environment modifications are any changes made to the
environment.
Example: Environment modifications are usually made for the purposes of farming. The use of
pesticides to grow crops and the effects it has on the soil and environment would be an
environmental modification.
Geographical Patterns: Geographical patterns are the spatial distributions explainable as a
repetitive distribution.
Example: Sand dunes, the Interstate Highway System, the Great Migration, settlements by
water, and westward expansion are all geographical patterns.
Global Interconnectedness/Interdependence: Global interconnectedness is a state of being
connected reciprocally.
Example: As China is dependent on US consumers to purchase its goods and the US debt to
China steadily increases, the two superpowers demonstrate global interconnectedness.
Globalization: Globalization is the development of an increasingly integrated global economy
marked especially by free trade, free flow of capital, and the tapping of cheaper foreign labor
markets.
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Example: NAFTA, McDonalds in other countries, social media, outsourcing of jobs, or OPEC.
Government: Government is the important political institutions and the customs, laws, and
rules that are used to interact with each other and to govern society.
Example: The government of the United Stated of America is the federal government of the
constitutional republic of fifty states, as well as one capital district, and several other territories.
The federal government is composed of three distinct branches: legislative, executive and
judicial.
Human Characteristics: Human characteristics are the human-designed cultural features of a
place (land use, architecture, forms of livelihood, religion, food, transportation, and
communication networks).
Example: The human characteristics of Wyoming include cell phone towers, cowboy hats,
roads, the Oregon and Mormon Trails, farms, and ranches.
Human/Environment Interaction: Human/Environment Interaction considers how humans
adapt to and modify the environment. Humans shape the landscape through their interaction
with the land; this has both positive and negative effects on the environment.
Example: Some examples of human/environment interaction are pollution, recycling, planting
trees, factories, way of dress, synthetic vs. organic, pest control, and weather patterns.
Location: Location can be absolute or relative. Absolute location provides a definite reference
to locate a place. The reference can be latitude and longitude, a street address, or even the
Township and Range system. Relative location describes a place with respect to its
environment and its connection to other places, or what surrounds a place.
Example: We are north of or south of a relative location. Also, a more specific example would
be that the Wyoming capital city of Cheyenne is located at 41.145548N, 104.802042W.
Macroeconomics: Macroeconomics is the study of the economy as a whole, including topics
such as inflation, unemployment, and economic growth.
Example: Macroeconomics includes the global economy, e-commerce, and international trade.
Market Economy: A market economy is an economy that relies chiefly on market forces to
allocate goods and resources and to determine prices.
Example: the term market economy used by itself can be somewhat misleading. For example,
the United States constitutes a mixed economy (substantial market regulation, agricultural
subsidies, extensive government-funded research and development, Medicare/Medicaid), yet
at the same time it is foundationally rooted in a market economy. Different perspectives exist
as to how strong a role the government should have in both guiding the market economy and
addressing the inequalities the market produces.
Mental Map: Mental maps are maps we have in our minds of places we have experienced.
They are a personal point-of-view perception. They include perceptual images in our mind that
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provide us with an awareness of the location of places and relationships between direction,
distance, size and characteristics of a place.
Example: simple sketches of maps created from memory of an urban area used to reveal five
elements of the city: nodes, edges, districts, paths, and landmarks.
Microeconomics: Microeconomics is the study of the economic behavior and decision making
of small units, such as individuals, families, and businesses.
Example: Microeconomics includes personal and business finances.
Migration: Migration is passing from one region or climate to another.
Example: Westward migration, immigration, and the Silk Road are all examples of migration.
Mixed Economy: a mixed economy is an economy in which private enterprise exists in
combination with a considerable amount of government regulation and promotion.
Example: a mixed economy combines elements of the command and market economies. The
definition of mixed economy remains somewhat subjective. The world’s developed nations are
the most common examples of mixed economies. The United States, Canada, Australia, Japan,
Germany, the United Kingdom, and Italy are all examples of mixed economies. Examples in the
developing world include Mexico, Slovenia, and south Africa.
Movement: Movement includes natural and human phenomena change on Earth’s surface
over time. Humans move, a lot! In addition, ideas, fads, goods, resources, and communication
all travel distances. This theme studies movement and migration across the planet.
Example: Natural phenomena such as ocean currents and air masses move across Earth’s
surface on a continuing basis. Humans interact on Earth from traveling from place to place,
communicating across long distances and transporting goods by land, water, and air.
Multicultural: Multicultural societies are ethnically and/or racially diverse.
Example: the United States is a multicultural society since it includes people from many
different ethnic groups.
Nation: A territorial division containing a body of people of one or more nationalities and
usually characterized by relatively large size and independent states.
Example: A national identity might be American, Arapaho, Shoshone, or German.
Place: Place describes the human and physical characteristics of a location.
Example: Physical characteristics include a description such things as the mountains, rivers,
beaches, topography, and animal and plant life of a place. Human characteristics include the
human-designed cultural features of a place (land use, architecture, forms of livelihood,
religion, food, transportation, and communication networks).
Political Process: Political process is the process followed to resolve important issues that
concern a large number of people.
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Example: Political process refers to those legal activities where citizens are capable of a change
in public policy.
Political System: A political system is a system of politics and government. It is usually
compared to the legal system, economic system, cultural system, and/or other social systems.
Example: A country’s political system includes who should have authority, how religious
questions should be handles, and what the government’s influence on its people and economy
should be.
Population Distribution: Population distribution is the arrangement or spread of people living
in a given area; also, how the population of an area is arranged according to variables such as
age, race, or sex.
Example: An example of locations with variances in population distribution would be urban vs.
rural.
Primary Source: If you are seeking to learn about the past, primary sources of information are
those that provide first-hand accounts of the events, practices, or conditions you are
researching. In general, these are documents that were created by the witnesses or first
recorders of these events at about the time they occurred, and include diaries, letters, reports,
photographs, creative works, financial records, memos, and newspaper articles (to name just a
few types).
Example: Examples of primary sources include:
 Diary of Anne Frank – Experiences of a Jewish family during WWII
 The constitution of Canada – Canadian history
 A journal article reporting NEW research or findings
 Native American beadwork and treaties – Native American history
 Plato’s Republic – Women in Ancient Greece
Production: Production is the act of creating output, a good or service which has value and
contributes to the utility of individuals. The act may or may not include factors of production
other than labor. The function of production, to some extent, is to try to meet the unlimited
wants or consumers.
Example: In a democratic society, production is determined by individuals. People choose the
goods and services they consume and produce, although advertising and consumer demand
influence both. The concept of exchange of money is related to economic production:
consumers use money to purchase goods and services.
Reasoned Judgment: Reasoned judgment is a decision that requires time and effort and results
from careful information gathering, generation of alternatives, and evaluation of alternatives.
Example: Reasoned judgment is reached once a student has taken the time to research a jtopic
and come to a belief based on evidence.
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Region: Regions divide the world into manageable units for geographic study. Regions have
some sort of characteristic that unifies the area. Regions can be formal, functional, or
vernacular.
Example: Formal regions are those that are designated by official boundaries, such as cities,
states, counties, and countries. For the most part, they are clearly indicated and publicly
known. Functional regions are defined by their connections. For example, the circulation area
for a major city area is the functional region of that paper. Vernacular regions are perceived
regions, such as “The South,” “The Midwest,” or the “Middle East;” they have no formal
boundaries but are understood in our mental maps of the world.
Regionalization: Regionalization is to divide into regions or administrative districts: arrange
regionally.
Example: Regionalization has occurred in the United States as Republicans and Democrats
migrate to common communities and create polarized states.
Scarcity: Scarcity is the economic situation where needs or wants exceeds means. Therefore,
people have to make choices.
Example: Scarcity impacts natural resources like uranium and fresh water.
Secondary Source: In contrast to a primary source, a secondary source of information is one
that was created later by someone who did not experience first-hand or participate in the
events or conditions you’re researching. For the purposes of a historical research project,
secondary sources are generally scholarly books and articles. Also included would be reference
sources like encyclopedias.
Example: Examples of secondary sources include:
 A journal/magazine article which interprets or reviews previous findings
 A history textbook
 A book about the effects of WWI
Tribe: A tribe is a social division in a traditional society consisting of families or communities
linked by social, economic, religious, or blood ties, with a common culture and dialect, typically
having a recognized leader.
Example: In contemporary contexts, it is problematic when used to refer to a community living
within a traditional society. It is strongly associated with past attitudes of white colonists
toward so-called primitive or uncivilized peoples living in remote undeveloped places. For this
reason it is generally preferable to use alternative terms such as community or people (Eastern
Shoshone, Northern Arapaho).
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