central long beach redevelopment project area five

CENTRAL LONG BEACH REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA
FIVE-YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
Fiscal Year 2010 – Fiscal Year 2014
(October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2014)
CITY OF LONG BEACH
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
333 West Ocean Boulevard, 3rd Floor
Long Beach, California 90802
(562) 570-6400
The mission of the Redevelopment Agency of the
City of Long Beach is to improve the blighted areas of Long Beach, revitalize
neighborhoods, promote economic development and the creation of jobs, provide
affordable housing and encourage citizen participation.
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page i
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.
INTRODUCTION...................................................................................................... 1
II.
BACKGROUND ....................................................................................................... 1
III. BLIGHTING CONDITIONS ...................................................................................... 2
IV. REDUCTION OF BLIGHT THROUGH PAST ACTIVITIES ..................................... 7
V.
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN GOALS AND OBJECTIVES ...................................... 10
VI. PROPOSED AGENCY PROGRAMS AND POTENTIAL PROJECTS................... 12
VII. EXPENDITURES ................................................................................................... 18
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1: Project Area Boundaries ................................................................................. 3
Figure 2: Linkage of Goals to Blight Alleviation ............................................................ 11
Figure 3: Linkage of Projects and Programs to Blight Alleviation ................................. 17
Figure 4: Expenditures .................................................................................................. 19
ATTACHMENT
Attachment No. 1: Blight Definitions in Effect at Time of Project Re-adoption
Attachment No. 2: Affordable Housing Compliance Plan
Central Long Beach Redevelopment Project
Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
I.
INTRODUCTION
Health and Safety Code Section 33490 requires redevelopment agencies to adopt
implementation plans for each project area every five years. This document is the
Implementation Plan for the Central Redevelopment Project (“Implementation Plan”) for the
period of fiscal years 2010-2014 (October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2014). Upon
adoption by the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Long Beach (“Agency”), it will
replace the prior Implementation Plan for 2005-2009.
The Implementation Plan must describe the Agency's specific goals and objectives for the
project area during the five-year period of the Plan. It must also include the specific
programs, including potential projects and estimated expenditures, that an agency
proposes to enact during the five-year period. The Plan must contain an explanation of
how the programs will eliminate blight within the project area and implement the Agency's
low- and moderate-income housing obligations. An Implementation Plan is a policy and
program document; it does not identify specific project locations.
An Implementation Plan is composed of two major components: a redevelopment
component and a housing component. The redevelopment component: (1) revisits the
goals and objectives of the Redevelopment Plan; (2) defines the Agency’s strategy to
achieve these goals and objectives; (3) presents the programs, including potential
expenditures that are proposed as a means to attain the Plan’s goals and objectives; and
(4) describes how the goals and objectives, programs and expenditures will eliminate blight
within the Project Area. The housing component is included in the Affordable Housing
Compliance Plan, which has been prepared separately and included as Attachment 2.
II.
BACKGROUND
The Central Long Beach Redevelopment Project Area (Project Area) was originally
adopted on September 21, 1993. Under AB 598, special enabling legislation was enacted
following the civil disturbances in 1992, during which the majority of local damage occurred
in the Project Area. Structural damage to Project Area buildings during the civil
disturbances totaled over $19 million, or 91 percent of the City total. However, after 1993,
property values declined and the Project Area generated no income.
On March 6, 2001, the Redevelopment Agency Board and City Council approved the readoption of the Project Area. Subsequently, property values have increased and the
Project Area is now generating tax increment that can be used to support redevelopment
activities.
The Project Area consists of 2,619 acres, 100 percent of which can be classified as
urbanized. It is generally located in southern Long Beach, south of the I-405 (San Diego)
Freeway, north of downtown, east of the I-710 (Long Beach) Freeway and west of
Redondo Avenue. The Project Area includes major north-south portions of Long Beach
Boulevard, Pacific and Atlantic Avenues, and major east-west sections of Willow Street,
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page 2 of 19
Pacific Coast Highway, Anaheim and Seventh Streets. Also included are major portions of
Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue and Alamitos Avenue (see Figure 1).
The Project Area is characterized by severely deteriorated residential areas; large
underutilized buildings located along Long Beach Boulevard and formerly occupied by auto
dealerships; deficient buildings that house retail outlets with limited market potential; and
by environmental problems. The Project Area has inadequate public facilities and is in
need of public improvement; it lacks neighborhood-serving uses; has limited public open
spaces, few recreational opportunities, and inadequate utilities. The overall purpose of the
redevelopment effort is to re-direct and concentrate commercial facilities in significant
centers and along major arterial corridors, while accommodating residential needs and
preserving existing neighborhoods.
III.
BLIGHTING CONDITIONS
During the process of re-adopting the Project Area in 2001, the conditions of blight were
identified through parcel-by-parcel field surveys that focused on deterioration and assessed
the exterior condition of each structure and site within the Project Area. In addition to
assessing structural and site conditions, the study identified the presence of structurerelated blighting conditions other than deterioration, such as age and obsolescence, faulty
exterior arrangement and interior spacing, and defective design.
The following blighting conditions were noted in one or both of the aforementioned surveys,
and the Strategic Guide for Development of the Central Strategic Area (Strategic Guide),
which confirmed the remain blighting influences that require correction. The Agency Board
adopted the Strategic Guide in June 2005.
Buildings and Structures:
1.
Deterioration and dilapidation were noted to a moderate-to-substantial degree in
20 percent of all blocks within the Project Area at the time of re-adoption. In
addition, 78 percent of all the blocks were moderately to substantially impacted by
structures that exhibited deferred maintenance.
2.
Defective design and character of physical construction remained significant
blighting influences area-wide and 29 percent of the blocks contained faulty
alterations such as illegal garage conversions, evidenced by characteristics of
inadequate ventilation and light, or the use of faulty materials. Conditions include
failure to meet modern building standards established to ensure the health and
safety of building occupants. Buildings of unreinforced masonry and "bootlegged"
additions were examples found in the Project Area. The additions reflected poor
craftsmanship utilizing scrap material, with little regard to integration with the original
design. Exterior plumbing and electrical utility systems were also a blighting
influence in this classification, since they reflect haphazard craftsmanship.
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
Figure 1: Project Area Boundaries
FY10 – FY14
Page 3 of 19
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page 4 of 19
Furthermore, the bootlegged additions reduced on-site parking, which significantly
impacted street parking. This was evidenced in the residential areas between 7 th
and 10th Streets east of Alamitos Avenue.
3.
Age and obsolescence, including physical layout of properties, remained a
problem at the time of re-adoption. Fifty percent of the Project Area’s building stock
was built before 1950, of which 23 percent was constructed from 1920-29, while
1,346 buildings, or 12 percent of the total, was constructed prior to 1920. In total,
40 percent of the blocks within the Project Area contained structures that were
obsolete.
An example of obsolescence was found on Long Beach Boulevard, where the once
thriving automobile dealerships have been made obsolete by modern "auto malls"
that are usually located adjacent to freeways. Atlantic Avenue, Pacific Avenue,
Anaheim Street and Pacific Coast Highway, among other commercial areas, are
outdated commercial strips with no off-street parking and outdated commercial
property design.
4.
Shifting use was a characteristic of the Project Area and other areas that were
stagnating or in decline. Symptoms included buildings or commercial outlets
shifting from one use to another because of an increase in turnover in business
operations and tenancies, usually because of numerous marginal start-ups and
subsequent failures. Shifting may also occur when buildings are converted from
original uses to uses inconsistent with their original design. Shifting uses indicate
that private enterprise is either unwilling or unable to invest sufficient capital to
construct or rehabilitate properties to meet modern space or market requirements.
5.
Incompatible uses, characterized by incompatible residential, commercial and
industrial uses located in close proximity, were prevalent at the time of re-adoption.
Forty-one percent of the blocks in the Project Area contained incidents of
incompatibility. This led to negative visual impacts and environmental problems
such as excessive noise, traffic and environmental hazards. Major examples are
residential - industrial land use conflicts, as well as oil drilling activities adjacent to
residential uses.
Most incompatible uses occurred along major commercial thoroughfares such as
Long Beach Boulevard; Atlantic Avenue; Pacific Coast Highway; and Anaheim
Street; within industrial areas along Daisy and Orizaba Avenues; and areas north of
East 31st Street where oil drilling is prevalent.
6.
Faulty interior arrangement and exterior spacing include conditions of
insufficient floor area, inadequate building setbacks and inadequate parking. Many
buildings constructed in the Project Area over the years to comply with older
building and zoning standards were built with little or no regard for buildings on
adjacent parcels. Structures with inadequate setbacks tend to limit light and
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page 5 of 19
ventilation. Inadequate off-street parking impacts both commercial and residential
sections of the Project Area.
7.
Abnormally high vacancies characterize the area and continue to be a significant
problem in the Project Area. The negative visual impact of vacant buildings serves
as an impediment to revitalization and reinvestment.
Properties
8.
Parcels of irregular shape and inadequate size dominate in some sections of the
Project Area, leading to economic dislocation, deterioration and disuse. This
situation is commonly the result of historical subdivision and development patterns
as well as shifting economic and commercial trends.
9.
Ownership patterns within a block are a critical indicator of the private sector's
ability to upgrade their properties or to undertake new development. Many
commercially-zoned areas in the Project Area are made up of narrow or shallow
lots, requiring the assembly of two or more lots to accommodate expansion or new
development. Such lots are often under individual ownership, making private
assembly difficult and time-consuming. Higher density or updated development is
unlikely without a major land assembly effort.
10.
Inadequate public improvements, facilities and utilities inhibit private owners
and developers in their efforts to upgrade or develop their properties. These
conditions characterize the majority of the Project Area.
11.
Lack of or deteriorated sidewalks, curbs, and gutters pose potential safety,
flooding, and health problems to the Project Area. The lack of and poor condition of
the infrastructure is a deterrent to investment and reinvestment if comparable areas
with more updated improvements are found elsewhere.
12.
Storm drain, street, and alley conditions throughout the Project Area are
demonstrably poor. These conditions cause both negative impacts on the day-today lives of those living and doing business in the Project Area, as well as serving
as an impediment to potential investors.
13.
Traffic, circulation, and parking deficiencies are significant blighting factors in
the Project Area. Several east-west streets in the southern portion of the Project
Area are narrow, which hampers circulation. High traffic volumes on Anaheim
Street, Pacific Coast Highway and Long Beach Boulevard also present circulation
difficulties. Substandard alleys, especially in some residential areas, serve to
impede access. Their condition restricts access for large delivery vehicles and
emergency vehicles, and makes two-way traffic difficult. Parking on the major
commercial corridors is limited.
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page 6 of 19
14.
Overhead utilities are typically found in the alleys behind major Project Area
arterials and, similar to inadequate lot size and depth; restrict the character of
development, which can occur without relocation or under grounding. Overhead
lines also adversely impact the Project Area's appearance and investment potential
by looking cluttered and outdated.
15.
Sewer system deficiencies in the Project Area are aggregating at a faster rate
than maintenance can occur or new sewers can be built.
Social Conditions
16.
Rapid population growth in the Project Area led to severe overcrowding
conditions. At the time of re-adoption, the Project Area’s population totaled 96,800
people, which equated to 23,700 persons per square-mile compared to 9,149
people per square-mile for the rest of the City. This situation has also strained the
existing public service delivery system, which has struggled to keep up with the
increased demand for services in the Project Area. The population in the Project
Area was much younger overall than the City average, leading to problems with
gangs, drugs and related criminal activities. Educational levels were also lower than
City averages, indicating a trend toward a growing disparity between the educated
and the less-educated residents.
17.
The lower median income of Project Area residents, as compared with the City
median has been a significant blighting influence. The Project Area’s per capita
income at the time of re-adoption was $11,100 compared to $20,700 for the rest of
the City. This relatively low income has adversely affected the Project Area in three
ways. First, Project Area residents had little disposable income to maintain or
improve their properties; secondly, it is common for more than one household to
share a dwelling unit so it is affordable; and finally, low Project Area incomes makes
business attraction challenging and new business survival tenuous.
18.
There was an inadequate amount of open space for Project Area residents. City
standards call for eight acres per 1,000 residents, which equates to approximately
800 acres required for the Project Area. Including parks immediately adjacent to
Project Area boundaries, only 61 acres of parks were available for Project Area use
at the time of re-adoption.
19.
Crime rates have been comparatively higher than those of the City and significantly
higher for most serious crimes. Gangs and drugs are blamed as major contributors
to the crime problem in the Project Area. The perception of the Project Area as a
dangerous place to live and work discourages in-migration of relatively affluent
residents, new business owners and investors, and often makes favorable financing
difficult to obtain.
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page 7 of 19
Economic Conditions
20.
Impaired investments in the Project Area are generally characterized by the
following indicators: negative taxable retail sales tax trends; low commercial building
permit activity; high business turnover and low stability; high commercial vacancy
rates; a large number of vacant and underutilized lots; and wholesale relocation of
the new auto sales business out of the Area.
IV.
REDUCTION OF BLIGHT THROUGH PAST ACTIVITIES
The Agency has worked to correct the blighting conditions in the Project Area through a
number of successful efforts.
Neighborhood Revitalization

Completed entitlements of a 350-unit mixed-use development on Ocean Boulevard
and Alamitos Avenue.

Acquired 532-558 Willow Street as part of the land assembly for the Atlantic Avenue
and Willow Street development site to allow for a commercial development to
support Memorial Hospital.

Completed land assembly and entered into an Exclusive Negotiating Agreement for
the development of live/work units at 825-837 East 7th Street.

Incorporated the recommendations identified in the Central Design Guidelines into
new projects to encourage pedestrian-oriented development within the Project Area.

Completed the development of an Implementation Plan to further the improvements
in the Long Beach Design District.

Facilitated the entitlement of 351 residential units and 42,000 square feet of ground
floor retail in a mixed-used project at the southwest corner of Long Beach Boulevard
and Anaheim Street.

Completed site acquisition of 612 Sunrise Boulevard to provide a gateway entrance
to the Sunrise Hotel District.

Entered into Disposition and Development Agreements (DDAs) for the rehabilitation
of four historic homes pursuant to the Willmore District Implementation Plan.

Completed historic rehabilitation of a historic home moved to 419 Daisy Avenue.

Provided additional funding in conjunction with the Neighborhood Code
Enforcement Program to focus more resources on the Pacific Avenue and Hellmann
area neighborhoods.

Provided additional funding in conjunction with the Graffiti Removal Program
throughout the Project Area.
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014

FY10 – FY14
Page 8 of 19
Provided funding through the East Village Artist Loan Program to assist the Garage
Theatre with interior renovations.
Corridor Revitalization

Completed the Alamitos Corridor Street Enhancement Plan that identifies
opportunity sites for streetscape improvement.

Entered into a Property Exchange Agreement with the State of California for the
development of a regional courthouse near Broadway and Magnolia Avenue.

Initiated the Downtown Community Plan and Program Environmental Impact Report
to update the existing zoning standards and to provide design guidelines for future
development.

Completed extensive exterior and on-site improvements to The Willow retail center
located at Willow Street and Caspian Avenue.

Acquired and conveyed three blighted parcels on the northeast corner of Pacific
Coast Highway and Walnut Avenue to Long Beach City College for the expansion of
its Pacific Coast Campus.

Completed the revision of the Planned Development Ordinance (PD30) to allow
more compatible uses within the Arts District and Downtown.

Constructed Renaissance Square, a 12,000-square-foot retail/service center at
1900 Atlantic. The facility will house Union Bank of California on the ground floor
and a center to support working families on the second floor.

Acquired property at Pine Avenue and Pacific Coast Highway to assemble a
suitable retail development site.

Completed the Long Beach Boulevard Redevelopment Study in collaboration with
Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG). Staff assisted in the
preparation of financial and visioning tools to prepare for growth and enhanced
livability on Long Beach Boulevard.
Open Space and Public Art

Facilitated the construction of park and open space facilities in collaboration with the
Departments of Parks, Recreation and Marine and Public Works including
Homeland Cultural Center, Rosa Parks Park, Seaside Park and Drake/Chavez
Greenbelt.

Constructed the Downtown Dog Park at Pacific Avenue and 9th Street

Commissioned and installed temporary art throughout the Project Area’s vacant lots
and storefronts.
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014

FY10 – FY14
Page 9 of 19
Provided funding for land acquisition to allow for the development and/or expansion
of parks including Drake/Chavez Greenbelt, McBride Park Expansion, Orizaba Park
Expansion, and Pacific Right of Way Bike Trail.
Infrastructure and Public Improvements

Completed the installation of pedestrian lighting in coordination with the 1st Street
Reconstruction Project in the East Village District.

Completed the construction of Phase I streetscape improvements to the Magnolia
Industrial Area.

Completed landscaped medians along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

Completed refurbishment and replanting of existing medians on Santa Fe Avenue.

Facilitated the development of the new state-of-the-art Mark Twain Library.

Completed land assembly to allow for the development of a new public safety
building at Anaheim Avenue and Walnut Avenue.
Facilitate the Efficient Administration of the Project Area

Provided staff and administrative support to the Central Project Area Committee.

Supported the implementation strategies for the eight targeted Neighborhood
Centers for concentrated redevelopment activities as identified in the Central Long
Beach Strategic Guide for Development.

Continued to apply the recommendations identified in the Central Design Guidelines
to all new projects in the Project Area.

Continued to collaborate with the Planning Bureau to facilitate Long Beach 2030
and the Downtown Community Plan.

Continued to partner with the Arts Council of Long Beach on new public art.

Continued support of events and organizations throughout the Project Area.
Affordable Housing Programs

Obtained funding and completed construction of the Long Beach Senior Housing
Project located at Atlantic Avenue and Vernon Street.

Purchased 21 properties on Atlantic Avenue between 20 th Street and Hill Street in
cooperation with the Long Beach Housing Development Corporation (LBHDC) for
development of additional affordable housing.

Assisted in the design development of a workforce housing project at 2000-2200
Atlantic Avenue.
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page 10 of 19

Assisted in the design development of a mixed-income housing project at 1235
Long Beach Boulevard.

Provided 20% of the available Project Area tax increment to the Housing
Development Fund.
V.
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Over the term of the Implementation Plan, the Agency will focus on the following goals for
Central Long Beach Redevelopment Project Area while implementing the Strategic Guide
recommendations. Linkage of each goal with conditions of blight within the Project Area is
demonstrated in the matrix shown in Figure 2.
Goal 1:
Neighborhood Revitalization
Improving Project Area neighborhoods through the implementation of quality of life
programs, services and initiatives.
Goal 2:
Corridor Revitalization
Revitalizing major Project Area arterials through a coordinated set of strategies including
land use and zoning changes; creation of improved pedestrian and vehicular uses;
targeted business attraction; and retention efforts.
Goal 3:
Open Space and Public Art Development
Enhancing the Project Area’s livability and civic character through the development of new
open space opportunities and installation of art in the public realm.
Goal 4:
Infrastructure and Public Improvements
Strengthening the economic base of the Project Area and community through infrastructure
and public improvements to stimulate new residential, commercial and industrial
expansion, employment and economic growth.
Goal 5:
Facilitate the Efficient Administration of the Project Area
Supporting Project Area development and revitalization by the planning and
implementation of strategic initiatives, while providing administrative assistance to
community organizations.
Goal 6:
Support the Development of Affordable Housing in Long Beach
Expanding and improving the community's housing supply, particularly housing available to
low- and moderate-income persons and families.
FY10 – FY14
Page 11 of 19
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
Figure 2: Linkage of Goals to Blight Alleviation
Blighting Condition
PHYSICAL BLIGHT
Buildings in which it is unsafe for
persons to live or work:
 Deterioration and dilapidation
 Defective design
 Faulty or inadequate utilities
Factors that prevent or substantially
hinder the economically viable use or
capacity of buildings or lots:
 Substandard design
 Inadequate parking
Adjacent or nearby uses that are
incompatible with each other and which
prevent the economic development of
those parcels or portions of the project
area.
Subdivided lots of irregular form and
shape and inadequate size for proper
usefulness and development that are in
multiple ownership.
ECONOMIC BLIGHT
Depreciated or stagnant property
values or impaired investments,
including, but not necessary limited to
properties containing hazardous
wastes:
 Properties contaminated with
hazardous wastes
Abnormally high business vacancies.
Abnormally low lease rates.
Residential overcrowding and an
excess of bars, liquor stores, or
businesses that cater exclusively to
adults that has lead to problems of
public safety and welfare.
A high crime rate that constitutes a
serious threat to the public safety and
welfare.
CONTRIBUTING CONDITIONS
Inadequate public improvements,
parking facilities, or utilities.
Goal 1
Goal 2
Goal 3
Goal 4
Goal 5
Goal 6
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Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
VI.
FY10 – FY14
Page 12 of 19
PROPOSED AGENCY PROGRAMS AND POTENTIAL PROJECTS
The following narratives describe the proposed programs and potential projects to be
undertaken in the Project Area during the five years covered by the Implementation Plan.
A summary of the linkage of these programs and potential projects with conditions of blight
within the Project Area is included in the matrix shown in Figure 3.
Neighborhood Revitalization Program
Neighborhood Revitalization activities are designed to improve the quality of life in Long
Beach neighborhoods through a variety of means. Code enforcement, graffiti abatement,
acquisition of blighted and negative use properties, and the development of mixed-use and
affordable and market rate housing are some of the strategies the Agency employs under
this program. In addition, the Agency will continue, as opportunities arise, to participate in
major land use management efforts designed to encourage pedestrian-oriented
streetscapes and neighborhood serving uses. These may include design for development,
development strategies, and advice to the City's Planning and Building Bureaus regarding
appropriate zoning for neighborhoods, the development of architectural design guidelines,
and the completion of other related land use studies. Neighborhood Revitalization
activities will address physical blight such as deterioration, dilapidation and deferred
maintenance.
Neighborhood Revitalization Activities / Potential Projects

Neighborhood Code Enforcement Program – An ongoing program implemented
in conjunction with the City’s Neighborhood Services Bureau; The Code
Enforcement Division responds to complaints of violations of the Long Beach
Municipal Code that include substandard buildings; property maintenance;
inoperative vehicles; weed abatement; and land use violations. When violations are
identified, the responsible parties are contacted and requested to abate the
conditions. Failure to correct violations could result in a citation or a referral to the
City Prosecutor’s office. The Neighborhood Code Enforcement Program will
address physical blight such as deterioration, dilapidation and deferred
maintenance.

Graffiti Removal Program – An innovative and effective program implemented to
remove graffiti from public and private property as quickly as possible in order to
improve neighborhoods and discourage further graffiti. The program is offered at no
cost to property owners or tenants including free paint for property owners choosing
to remove the graffiti themselves; a professional paint contractor to insure perfect
paint match when necessary; and a Graffiti Hotline for citizens to report "graffiti
sightings" or request free paint. The Graffiti Removal Program will also address
physical blight. Additionally, new investments and economic opportunities will be
encouraged through a general improvement in the Project Area's appearance.

Shoreline Gateway – The construction of 2.2 acres of previously acquired parcels
located at the northwest corner of Ocean Boulevard and Alamitos Avenue as 350+
for sale condominium units and 20,000 square feet of retail space.
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page 13 of 19

Willmore Implementation Plan – The implementation of strategies identified in the
Willmore Implementation Plan to further development of the Willmore District by
addressing priority issues, long-term goals, and near-term actions.

Orizaba Design District – A strategic design initiative to further the development of
the Orizaba Design District, an area transitioning from industrial warehouse to
creative office uses. The intent is to work closely with the key stakeholders in the
area and address development strategies to brand the area as a design/creative
class district; to identify immediate improvements that can be made in the public
realm; to identity short; medium and long-term strategies to support opportunities;
and address challenges as the area develops.

Willmore Historic Home Preservation – Reducing blight by facilitating the
rehabilitation and preservation of historic properties and the development of vacant
and underutilized properties.
Additionally, the Agency seeks to create
homeownership opportunities by selling the homes to future residents.

Atlantic and Willow Development Site – Assisting with expansion efforts of the
Memorial Medical Center through the attraction and development of medical related
facilities, offices and bio-tech enterprises.

Long Beach Courthouse – The implementation of the Property Exchange
Agreement with the State of California for the construction of a regional court
facility.
Corridor Revitalization Program
The Agency plans to implement Corridor Revitalization in a variety of ways. These may
include projects such as business assistance and expansion, building and facade
improvement assistance, formation of business improvement districts, and the promotion of
new and continuing private sector investment. In addition, the Agency will continue, as
opportunities arise, to participate in major land use management efforts designed to
encourage commercial activities.
These may include design for development,
development strategies, and advice to the City's Planning and Building Bureaus regarding
appropriate zoning for commercial corridors, the development of architectural design
guidelines, and the completion of other related land use studies. Commercial
Revitalization activities will address physical blight such as deterioration, dilapidation and
deferred maintenance.
Corridor Revitalization Activities / Potential Projects

Commercial Façade Improvement Program – The Commercial Façade
Improvement Program provides matching funds to revitalize commercial and
industrial properties in the Central Redevelopment Project Area. The intent is to
assist commercial property owners and tenants to improve or rehabilitate their
building façades and landscaping. The Commercial Façade Improvement Program
will address physical blight such as deterioration, dilapidation and deferred
maintenance.
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page 14 of 19

Commercial Screening Program – The Commercial Screening Program assists in
the addition or upgrade of screening of commercial and industrial properties within
the project area. This will be achieved through matching grants to property owners
or tenants of approved sites, from a single building to commercial centers or
industrial parks. The intent is to assist property owners/tenants to improve/rehab
their building fencing & landscaping. The Commercial Screening Program will
address physical blight such as deterioration, dilapidation and deferred
maintenance.

Long Beach Boulevard Master Plan – Update of PD-29 to allow for the
development of compact, pedestrian-oriented commercial and residential uses
along Long Beach Boulevard, which maximize previous high-capacity transit
infrastructure investments. The goal is to facilitate development of locations along
the corridor suitable for a sustainable, walkable, mixed-use community.

Atlantic Avenue and Vernon Street – The development of property acquired at
Vernon Street and Atlantic Avenue in collaboration with a developer

Pine Avenue and Pacific Coast Highway – The redevelopment of previously
purchased properties to allow for neighborhood serving commercial uses.

Atlantic Avenue and Anaheim Street – The adaptive reuse of a vacant Art Deco
building and the development of uses tying medical related opportunities on Atlantic
Avenue near St. Mary’s Medical Center to other commercial uses appropriate to
Anaheim Street and Long Beach Polytechnic High School.

Anaheim Street and Walnut Avenue – The design and development of public
emergency and disaster response facilities to enhance the Project Area safety.

Martin Luther King Junior Boulevard and Pacific Coast Highway – The
assemblage and development of parcels to accommodate a modern design
retail/commercial project, enhance consumer services and increase business and
employment opportunities.

Pacific Avenue and Pacific Coast Highway – Assemble and development of a
65,000-square-foot site for retail center anchored by 15,000-square-foot store and
an additional 5,000 square feet of retail.
Open Space and Public Art
The Agency has been actively involved in funding the creation of parks and open space.
The Agency and Parks, Recreation and Marine Department staff have been working
cooperatively in the acquisition and development of new projects by targeting sites within
the redevelopment area. These improvements will assist in the removal of blight by
enhancing open space in densely populated neighborhoods currently underserved by
these types of amenities, improving safety of the residents, and helping to create safe,
more cohesive and economically dynamic communities in the Project Area.
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page 15 of 19
The Agency has also made a commitment to support the growing public art collection
throughout the City. As part of improvements to public infrastructure, the Public Arts
Program will be incorporated in a variety of projects such as street medians, sidewalk
treatments, bus stop enclosures, murals, decorative metal work, park developments and
utility boxes. Vacant lots and empty storefronts awaiting development will also be
enhanced through temporary public art installations that are rotated throughout the
redevelopment Project Area. The Agency’s investment in public art is instrumental in
leveraging other redevelopment projects, decreasing blight and contributing to positive
neighborhood transformations.
Open Space and Public Art Activities

Public Arts Program – The Agency has supported the growth of public art by
entering into a contract with the Arts Council for Long Beach for the creation and
installation of public art, as well as pursuing independent endeavors.

Drake/Chavez Park Expansion – The construction of a new pedestrian greenbelt
connecting Drake and Chavez Parks and expanding open space opportunities
within the Project Area.

MacArthur Park / Homeland Center Development – The construction of a new
community theatre and the renovation of existing facilities.

Seaside Park – Development of a 2.5-acre park. Park amenities will include a
soccer field and playground.

Rosa Parks Development – Development of a blighted property to create a
passive park.

McBride Park Expansion – The construction of a new senior center and the
expansion of the existing teen, recreational and community facilities.

Orizaba Park Expansion – The development of acreage for park space and the
construction of new recreation amenities, including a new community center.

Pacific Right-of-Way Bike Trail Development – The acquisition and development
of the undeveloped portions of the former Pacific Electric Railroad right-of-way for
the creation of the Pacific Electric Railroad right-of-way bike trail project.

Craftsman Park – The development of additional open space in the Project Area
through the construction of a neighborhood park at 8 th and Orange featuring
strolling, play, and picnic areas.
Infrastructure and Public Improvements
The Agency proposes to continue to include projects designed to improve the Project
Area's infrastructure. These projects may include street and streetscape improvements;
water distribution system improvements; sewer and storm drain improvements; repair and
under grounding of utilities; construction or rehabilitation and upgrading of police, fire,
public health, educational; and other public facilities buildings and public parking lot
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
FY10 – FY14
Page 16 of 19
improvements. Depending upon the specific projects undertaken under this goal, one or
more of the conditions of blight will be addressed. As capital improvements are made, the
shortfall or gap between adequate levels of service and then current levels will be reduced.
Infrastructure and Public Improvement Projects

Magnolia Industrial District Street Enhancement – Development of streetscape
enhancement to improve the infrastructure deficiencies in the Magnolia Industrial
District.

Alamitos Corridor Streetscape Enhancement – Implementing streetscape
enhancements along Alamitos Corridor that assesses and proposes improvements
such as landscaping, pedestrian street lighting, median landscaping, traffic flow
improvements and public art.

Wrigley Village Improvements – Facilitating right-of-way and other improvements
in Wrigley Village consisting of the planting of parkway and median trees on public
streets; landscaping; pedestrian street/building lighting; median lighting; and
landscaping. It will also feature traffic calming, mid-block pedestrian crossings and
public art.

East Village Streetscape Improvement – Implementation of streetscape
improvements in the East Village District.

Public Facility Expansion – Facilitating the development and expansion of new
and existing public facilities including fire stations; emergency response centers;
public libraries; senior centers; teen and recreational centers; and regional public
facilities that are employment generators.

Cherry Widening Project – Assisting the City of Signal Hill with right-of-way
acquisition of properties in Long Beach for the design and construction of traffic
management construction around the intersection of Cherry Avenue and Pacific
Coast Highway.

Orizaba Design District Improvements – Improving infrastructure through
reconstruction of streets and sidewalks in the Orizaba Design District to aid in the
area’s transition from industrial to pedestrian usage.
Facilitate the Efficient Administration of the Project Area

Implementation of the Strategic Guide for Development for Central Study Area

Implementation of the Central Long Beach Design Guidelines

Provision of staff support to the Central Project Area Committee

Provision of staff support to the East Village Steering Committee and East Village
Association

Implementation of the Downtown Community Plan
FY10 – FY14
Page 17 of 19
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
Affordable Housing Programs
Existing programs to increase the supply of affordable housing will continue. In addition,
blighting conditions such as housing in inappropriate locations and overcrowding may be
impacted.
Infrastructure/
Public
Improvements
Efficient
Admin. of
Project Area
Affordable
Housing
Abnormally high business vacancies.
Abnormally low lease rates.
Residential overcrowding and an excess of
bars, liquor stores, or businesses that cater
exclusively to adults that has lead to problems
of public safety and welfare.
A high crime rate that constitutes a serious
threat to the public safety and welfare.
CONTRIBUTING CONDITIONS
Inadequate public improvements, parking
facilities, or utilities.
Open Space
and Public Art
PHYSICAL BLIGHT
Buildings in which it is unsafe for persons to live
or work:
 Deterioration and dilapidation
 Defective design
 Faulty or inadequate utilities
Factors that prevent or substantially hinder the
economically viable use or capacity of buildings
or lots:
 Substandard design
 Inadequate parking
Adjacent or nearby uses that are incompatible
with each other and which prevent the economic
development of those parcels or portions of the
project area.
Subdivided lots of irregular form and shape and
inadequate size for proper usefulness and
development that are in multiple ownership.
ECONOMIC BLIGHT
Depreciated or stagnant property values or
impaired investments, including, but not
necessary limited to properties containing
hazardous wastes:
 Properties contaminated with hazardous
wastes
Corridor
Revitalization
Blighting Condition
Neighborhood
Revitalization
Figure 3: Linkage of Projects and Programs to Blight Alleviation
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Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
VII.
FY10 – FY14
Page 18 of 19
EXPENDITURES
The Agency has identified various methods for financing redevelopment activity within the
Project Area in addition to using tax increment revenues. These other methods include: (1)
tax allocation bonds; (2) loans, grants and contributions from local entities, state or federal
government programs; (3) advances from developers; (4) public/private partnerships;
(5) proceeds from the sale or lease of Agency-owned property; (6) leveraging tax increment
revenues; and (7) financing proceeds based upon revenues from special assessment or
special tax districts. The Agency will continue to consider other financing sources such as
those discussed above to finance redevelopment activities. However, the Agency will rely
upon tax increment revenues as the primary means of alleviating the Project Area’s various
blighting conditions.
The Agency anticipates expenditures of approximately $63.7 million over the next five
years, with the majority of expenditures for programs and projects and remainder for
repayment of debt obligations and on-going operations and administration of Project Area
Activities. The projected expenditures also include an allowance for a 1-time Supplemental
Educational Revenue Augmentation Fund (SERAF) payment of $7.2 million.
(Continued on next page)
FY10 – FY14
Page 19 of 19
Central Long Beach Project Area Five-Year Implementation Plan
October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2014
Figure 4: Expenditures
FY 2009-10
FY 2010-11
FY 2011-12
FY 2012-13
FY 2013-14
5-Year Totals
% of
Totals
7,229,460
-
-
-
-
7,229,460
11%
3,660,685
3,658,406
3,657,284
3,730,430
3,805,038
18,511,843
115,515
118,375
121,307
123,733
126,208
605,138
Total - Financing Costs
3,776,200
3,776,781
3,778,591
3,854,163
3,931,246
19,116,981
30%
Operations2
4,172,041
3,225,930
3,275,368
3,340,875
3,407,693
17,421,907
27%
Neigh. Code Enforcement
322,000
322,000
322,000
322,000
322,000
1,610,000
Graffiti Abatement
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
625,000
447,000
447,000
447,000
447,000
447,000
2,235,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
125,000
625,000
25,000
25,000
25,000
25,000
25,000
125,000
LBCC & Kroc
100,000
1,900,000
-
-
-
2,000,000
Comm. Façade Prgrm
3,600,000
SERAF1
Financing Costs
Debt Service
Int. on City Interim Loan
Programs
Neighborhood Revitalization
Subtotal - Neigh. Revital.
Corridor Revitalization
Econ. Development Svs
Renaissance Square
600,000
750,000
750,000
750,000
750,000
Comm. Screening Prgrm
50,000
100,000
100,000
100,000
100,000
450,000
Anaheim & Walnut
85,000
950,000
1,000,000
-
-
2,035,000
Long Beach Bl. Master Plan
100,000
100,000
-
-
-
200,000
1,085,000
3,950,000
2,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
9,035,000
Orizaba Park Expansion
-
700,000
3,000,000
-
-
3,700,000
Public Art Development
100,000
200,000
-
-
-
300,000
42,000
42,000
42,000
42,000
42,000
210,000
142,000
942,000
3,042,000
42,000
42,000
4,210,000
Subtotal - Corridor Revit.
Open Space/Public Art
Arts Council Support
Subtotal - Open Space/Pub. Art
Infrastructure/Public Improv.
East Village Streetscape
Magnolia Ind. Dist.
Streetscape
500,000
-
-
-
-
500,000
1,000,000
-
-
-
-
1,000,000
Wrigley Village Improvements
500,000
500,000
500,000
-
-
1,500,000
Orizaba Design District
500,000
500,000
500,000
-
-
1,500,000
2,500,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
-
-
4,500,000
-
-
-
-
-
-
4,174,000
6,339,000
6,489,000
1,489,000
1,489,000
19,980,000
Subtotal – Infra.e/Pub. Improv.
Housing
Total - Programs
31%
Grand Total - Expenditures
19,351,701
13,341,711
13,542,959
8,684,038
8,827,939
63,748,348
100%
Footnotes
1
SERAF = Supplemental Educational Revenue Augmentation Fund.
2
Operations include personnel expenses, operating services and supplies, City services and overhead, and financial management
department services.
Attachment No. 1: Blight Definitions in Effect at Time of Project Re-adoption*
1994-2006 Blight Definitions
CRL Section 33031(a) (Physical Blight)
(1)
Buildings in which it is unsafe or unhealthy for persons to live or work. These conditions can be caused by
serious building code violations, dilapidation and deterioration, defective design or physical construction,
faulty or inadequate utilities, or similar factors.
(2)
Factors that prevent or substantially hinder the economically viable use or capacity of buildings or lots. This
condition can be caused by substandard design, inadequate building size given present standards and
market conditions, lack of parking, or other similar factors.
(3)
Adjacent or nearby uses that are incompatible with each other and which prevent the economic development
of those parcels or other portions of the project area.
(4)
The existence of subdivided lots of irregular form and shape and inadequate size for proper usefulness and
development that are in multiple ownership.
CRL Section 33031(b) (Economic Blight)
(1)
Depreciated or stagnant property values or impaired investments, including but not necessarily limited to,
those properties containing hazardous wastes that require the use of agency authority as specified in Article
12.5 (commencing with Section 33459).
(2)
Abnormally high business vacancies, abnormally low lease rates, high turnover rates, abandoned buildings,
or excessive vacant lots within an area developed for urban use and served by utilities.
(3)
A lack of necessary commercial facilities that are normally found in neighborhoods, including grocery stores,
drug stores, and banks and other lending institutions.
(4)
Residential overcrowding or an excess of bars, liquor stores, or businesses that cater exclusively to adults
that has led to problems of public safety and welfare.
(5)
A high crime rate that constitutes a serious threat to the public safety and welfare.
*Blight definitions in effect in March 2001. Project Area was adopted in September 1993.
Attachment No. 2: Affordable Housing Compliance Plan
PA0910016.LGB:DVB:gbd
15610.001.002/11/09/09