10.3 part 1

CHAPTER 10 • SECTION 3
S
1
Plan & Prepare
Objectives
• Describe the events that led to the War of
1812
CTIO
3
N
E
Reading for Understanding
Key Ideas
BEFORE, YOU LEARNED
NOW YOU WILL LEARN
After Jefferson acquired the Louisiana
Text
Purchase, the nation doubled in size.
The nation gained confidence and
Text
worldwide respect as a result of the
War of 1812.
• Summarize the phases of the War of 1812
as well as its legacy
Vocabulary
TERMS &
AND
NAMES
NAMES
Read for the Essential Question
Help students read for a purpose by reminding
them of the Essential Question: “How did the
events of the Jefferson Era strengthen the
nation?”
Vocabulary
BACKGROUND VOCABULARY
Vocabulary
Embargo
Acttext
of 1807 law that forbade
American ships
from sailing to foreign ports
Vocabulary
text
and closed American ports to British ships
Vocabulary text
Tecumseh (tih•KUM•seh) Shawnee chief
who sought to stop the loss of Native
American land to white settlers
Vocabulary
tribute
(TRIHB•yoot)
text
payment in exchange
for protectiontext
Vocabulary
war hawk westerner who supported
the War of 1812
coercion (ko•ER•shun) practice of forcing
someone to act in a certain way by use of
pressure or threats
impressment
the act of seizing by force;
Vocabulary text
between 1803 and 1812, the British
impressed, or kidnapped, about 6,000
American sailors to work on British ships
Oliver Hazard Perry naval officer who led
the U.S. victory over the British on Lake Erie
in 1813
Best Practices Toolkit
Use the Best Practices Toolkit to model
strategies for vocabulary notetaking. Vary
strategies throughout the year. Choose
from: Knowledge Rating, Predicting ABC’s,
Definition Mapping, Word Sort, Word Wheel,
Frayer Model (Word Squares), Magnet
Words, and Student VOC.
Vocabulary Strategies, TT9–TT16
Reading Strategy
Visual Vocabulary
impressment
Reading Strategy
Re-create
the diagram
shown
NOTETAKING
STRATEGY
Textat
right. As you read and respond
to the KEY QUESTIONS, use the
diagram to record important
events in the order in which they
occurred.
SEQUENCE EVENTS
France and
Britain go to
war 1803
See Skillbuilder Handbook, page R5.
Best Practices Toolkit
Display the Sequence Chain transparency.
• Tell students that sequencing events, or
arranging events in chronological order,
will help them better understand the
relationships among the events, including
cause-and-effect relationships.
Congress passes Embargo Act of 1807
GRAPHIC
GRAPHICORGANIZERS
ORGANIZERS
Go
Go to
to Interactive
Interactive Review
Review @
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352 Chapter 10
PRETEACHING VOCABULARY
• Display the graphic organizer.
• Model finding an event in the text to
follow the first entry. Show students that
heads and subheads, as well as dates, can
help them place events in chronological
order.
• Have students suggest entries.
Sequence Chain, TT31
English Learners
Inclusion
Pronounce and Preview
Matching Definitions
Pronounce each term for students.
Review the meanings of words within
definitions, such as forbade and sought.
Have students write the vocabulary
words on a blank sheet of paper and cut
out each one. Have them do the same
with the definitions. Instruct students to
shuffle the terms and definitions. Then
have them match terms and correct
definitions.
• To modify vocabulary learning, have
students complete worksheets as they
read, instead of afterward.
Unit 4 Resource Book
• Building Background Vocabulary,
p. 86
• Vocabulary Practice, p. 85
352 • Chapter 10
S
TIO
3
CHAPTER 10 • SECTION 3
N
EC
2
3-Minute Warm-Up
The War of 1812
Write on the board or display the transparency:
• Look at the map of “The War of 1812” on page
355. How could a successful blockade hurt the
American war effort? (It could prevent trade
and deliveries of supplies from other countries.)
One American’s Story
From 1801 to 1805, the United States was at war with Tripoli, a state
on the Barbary coast of North Africa. The war began because of attacks
on American merchant ships by Barbary pirates. The United States
tribute, but the pasha (ruler)
had been paying protection money, or tribute
of Tripoli wanted more money.
In February 1804, President Thomas Jefferson sent U.S. Navy Lieutenant Stephen Decatur to destroy the U.S. ship Philadelphia, which
was in the hands of Barbary pirates. Decatur set fire to the Philadelphia
and then escaped under enemy fire. Later, he issued this rallying cry.
Unit 4 Transparency Book
• 3-Minute Warm-Ups, TT6
One American’s Story
More About . . .
Protecting Merchant Ships
Merchant ships have often been targets
during wars. One reason the United States
became involved in World War I was
Germany’s attacks on U.S. merchant ships.
PRIMARY SOURCE
“
Our country! In her [relationships] with foreign nations may she always be
in the right; but our country, right or wrong.
”
—Stephen Decatur, 1816
The conflict with Tripoli showed how hard it was for the United States to
stay out of foreign affairs while its citizens were involved in overseas trade.
Focus & Motivate
Stephen Decatur was a
hero of the war between
the United States and
the North African state
of Tripoli.
3 Teach
The Path to War
The Path to War
KEY QUESTION What conflicts with other nations did the United States have in
the early 1800s?
Talk About It
Jefferson wanted the United States to seek the friendship of all nations
but have “entangling alliances with none.” However, his desire to keep the
United States out of conflict with other nations was doomed from the start.
American merchants were engaged in trade all over the world. Besides, the
United States had little control over the actions of foreign powers.
• Why was Jefferson unable to keep the United
States out of conflicts with other nations?
(Trade around the world put U.S. ships in
constant contact with foreign countries.)
• Sequence Events What events led up to the
War of 1812? (1803 war between France and
England, 1807 Embargo Act, 1809 Treaty of
Fort Wayne, 1811 Tecumseh sides with British)
Problems with France and England War broke out between France and
Great Britain in 1803. The United States tried to stay out of the war. But many
American trading ships made stops in Europe. The British captured any ship
bound for France, and the French stopped all ships bound for Britain.
The Jefferson Era 353
SECTION 3 PROGRAM RESOURCES
ON LEVEL
Unit 4 Resource Book
• Reading Study Guide, p. 65
• Vocabulary Practice, p. 85
• Section Quiz, p. 105
STRUGGLING READERS
Unit 4 Resource Book
• RSG with Additional Support, p. 71
• Building Background Vocabulary,
p. 86
• Section Quiz, p. 105
• Reteaching Activity, p. 108
eEdition with Audio DVD-ROM
ENGLISH LEARNERS
Pupil Edition in Spanish
eEdition with Audio DVD-ROM
eEdition in Spanish DVD-ROM
Unit 4 Resource Book
• Reading Study Guide (Spanish),
p. 77
• RSG with Additional Support
(Spanish), p. 83
Multi-Language Glossary
Test Generator
• Section Quiz in Spanish
INCLUSION
Unit 4 Resource Book
• RSG with Additional Support, p. 71
• Section Quiz, p. 105
• Reteaching Activity, p. 108
GIFTED & TALENTED
Unit 4 Resource Book
• Section Quiz, p. 105
PRE-AP
Unit 4 Resource Book
• Economics in History, p. 88
• Skillbuilder Practice, p. 87
• Primary and Secondary Sources,
p. 96
• Section Quiz, p. 105
TECHNOLOGY
Unit 4 Transparency Book
• 3-Minute Warm-Ups, TT6
• Fine Art, TT7
• Geography, TT8
• Cause-and-Effect Chapter Summary,
TT9
• Essential Question Graphic, TT10
Daily Test Practice Transparencies
• Chapter 10, Section 3, TT35
Power Presentations
ClassZone.com
American History Video Series
Teacher’s Edition • 353