requirements for a certificate of completion - Home

SEBRING HIGH SCHOOL
PROGRAM OF STUDIES
2014-2015
Table of Contents
High School Graduation requirements ................................... 4- 6
IB program, AVID program………………………………….. 7
Assessments ................................................................................ 8
Grading Scale, Grade Point Average (GPA) .............................. 9
Graduation Recognition …………………………………….. 10
Grade Placement Requirements ............................................... 10
Florida Virtual School .............................................................. 10
Honors, AP, Dual-Enrollment, IB ....................................... 10-11
Parent Grade and Attendance Viewer ...................................... 11
Bright Futures, FLVC.org .................................................. 11-12
Course Sequencing .............................................................. 12-13
Course Offerings
Reading ……………………………………………………... 14
Language Arts...................................................................... 14-16
Mathematics......................................................................... 17-19
Science ................................................................................. 20-21
Social Studies ...................................................................... 22-23
Exceptional Educational Courses ............................................. 24
Foreign Language ..................................................................... 25
Art ........................................................................................ 26-27
Theatre Arts .............................................................................. 28
Digital Media ............................................................................ 29
Music – Band ....................................................................... 29-30
Music – Chorus......................................................................... 31
Physical Education ................................................................... 32
Agriculture ................................................................................ 33
Business Technology ................................................................ 34
Cooperative Diversified Education .......................................... 35
Family and Consumer Science ................................................. 36
Culinary Arts ............................................................................ 37
ROTC........................................................................................ 37
Carpentry Construction Technology ........................................ 38
Drafting and Design Technology ............................................. 38
Electives.................................................................................... 39
Career Academy at SFSC ......................................................... 40
Vocational Programs at SFSC ............................................. 41-42
Appendix (sample MIS Form 19.00 and 19.41)....................... 43
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The Program of Studies is
subject to change without
notice based on changes by
the Florida State Legislation,
the State Board of Education
and/or the School Board of
Highlands County.
This document is not for publication and used only for the purpose of assisting students in scheduling.
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4
5
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High School Graduation Requirements
Sebring High School students may choose from the following graduation programs:
 The traditional 24-credit program (2.0 cumulative GPA)
 18 credit, Academically Challenging Curriculum to Enhance Learning (ACCEL) program
 International Baccalaureate Program
Specific requirements for the 24 and 18 credit programs are listed on the charts on pages 3-6.
Requirements for a Certificate of Completion
A certificate of completion will be awarded to a student who completes the minimum number of credits required for
graduation but is unable to earn passing scores on the FCAT or achieve the required cumulative grade point average of 2.0
on a 4.0 scale. The awarding of a certificate of completion is limited to those students choosing the 24-credit general high
school graduation program. A student must be counseled and made aware of the alternatives available.
International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program
The International Baccalaureate Program (IB) provides students the opportunity to participate in a rigorous liberal arts
curriculum. The program is a four-year course of study with two phases: grades 9 and 10 students take preparation
classes in core subject areas. Grades 11 and 12 students may choose to pursue the IB Diploma or they may choose to
complete individual IB classes to obtain IB certificates which would apply towards a standard Sebring High School
Diploma. Unless transferring from another IB Diploma Programme students can apply in 8th, 9th, or 10th grade to enter the
program. In order to enroll in the IB Diploma Programme, a student must have a 3.0 GPA, level 3 on most recent State
standardize assessments and have completed the required pre-requisite courses in each of the IB subject areas.
IB Diploma Requirements
The IB diploma is awarded upon the successful completion of coursework and exit exams in six subject groups (English,
second language, social studies, experimental sciences, mathematics and fine arts). There are also three additional core
requirements; an independent research paper, the Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course and 150 hours of participation in
Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) activities.
For more information or an application contact Jo Anna Cochlin, IB Coordinator, 471-5500,
[email protected]
The AVID Program
The AVID program offers students the opportunity to participate in an AVID elective class as part of their school day.
Students are selected to enroll in an AVID class after an application and interview process. For one class period, they
learn organizational and study skills, work on critical thinking and asking probing questions, get academic help from peers
and college tutors, and participate in enrichment and motivational activities that make college seem attainable. Students
enrolled in AVID are typically required to enroll in at least one rigorous class, such as Honors level or Advanced
Placement, in addition to the AVID elective.
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State Mandated Assessments Requirements for Graduation based on cohort
Entering 9th grade 2011-12
FCAT 2.0 Reading 10
Pass Algebra 1 EOC to receive credit
Pass Geometry , take Geometry EOC
Pass Biology, take Biology EOC
Entering 9th grade 2012-13
FCAT 2.0 Reading 10
Pass Algebra 1 EOC to receive credit
Pass Geometry, take Geometry EOC
Pass Biology, take Biology EOC
Pass US History, (EOC counts as 30% of final grade for US History course)
Entering 9th grade 2013-14
FCAT 2.0 Reading 10
Pass Algebra 1 EOC to receive credit (EOC counts as 30% of final grade)
Pass Geometry , take Geometry EOC (EOC counts as 30% of final grade)
Pass Biology , take Biology EOC (EOC counts as 30% of final grade)
Pass US History, (EOC counts as 30% of final grade for US History course)
Entering 9th grade 2014-15
FCAT 2.0 Reading 10
Pass Algebra 1 EOC to receive credit (EOC counts as 30% of final grade)
Pass Geometry , take Geometry EOC (EOC counts as 30% of final grade)
Pass Biology , take Biology EOC (EOC counts as 30% of final grade)
Pass US History, (EOC counts as 30% of final grade for US History course)
Other Recommended Assessments
Pre-American College Test (PLAN) in10th grade
Per-Scholastic Aptitude Test Nat’l. Merit Competition (PSAT/NMSQT) given only in October
American College Test (ACT) and/or Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)
Postsecondary Education Readiness Test (PERT)
Assessments for Progress Monitoring
Florida Assessment for Instruction in Reading (FAIR)
Performance Matters in Math and Science
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GENERAL INFORMATION
State Grading Scale
Achievement will be measured according to the following scale. A progress report will be sent home mid-way through
each grading period. Report cards are distributed at the end of each marking period. Nine-week grades will be expressed
in numerical values with the following equivalencies:
GPA
Outstanding Progress
A
90-100%
4 quality points
Above Average Progress
B
80-89%
3 quality points
Average Progress
C
70-79%
2 quality points
Lowest Acceptable Progress
D
60-69%
1 quality point
Failure
F
0-59%
0 quality points
*Incomplete
I
0%
* I’s will be converted to the numerical average with 0's put in for missing grades within 10 days after the end of
the nine weeks.
Grades shall be calculated for each year-long course using the following process:
 The nine (9) week grade : by averaging the grades from all course work during the 9 weeks
 The semester grade : each 9 week grade counting 40%, semester exam must count 20%
Grades shall be calculated for each blocked course using the following process:
 The nine (9) week grade: by averaging the grades from all course work assigned during the 9 weeks
 The semester grade : 9 week grade counting 80%, semester exam must count 20%
Final grade for courses with an End of Course (EOC) exam (Algebra 1, Geometry, Biology, US History) will be
determined by:
 The 1st semester and exam grade counting 35%
 The 2nd semester grade counting 35%
 The End of Course (EOC) assessment counting 30%
Course Weighting
A student successfully completing a designated Level 3 course will have an additional weighting added to his/her
cumulative GPA when credit is earned. Beginning with the co-hort year 14/15 students will receive a .5 for Honors, 1.0
for Advanced Placement, Dual Enrollment, or International Baccalaureate courses. Earlier co-hort years will have the .04
weighting added.
Computation of Grade Point Average (GPA)
A student’s state (unweighted) GPA is calculated by adding all the quality points earned and dividing that total by the
number of credits attempted, unless credit is flagged for exemption due to the District Grade Forgiveness Policy.
A student’s district (weighted) GPA is calculated by adding the district weighting for authorized courses to the GPA at the
end of the semester during which that credit was earned.
Grade Forgiveness Policy
State statute: Forgiveness policies for required courses shall be limited to replacing a grade of “D” or “F” with a grade of
“C” or higher earned in the same or comparable course. Forgiveness policies for elective courses shall be limited to
replacing a grade of “D” or “F” with a grade of “C” or higher earned subsequently in an elective course. Forgiveness
policy for middle school students taking high school courses for high school credit shall be limited to replacing
a grade of “C”, “D”, or “F”, with a grade of “C” or higher earned in the same or comparable course. Any
course grade not replaced according to a district forgiveness policy shall be included in the calculation of the
cumulative grade point average required for graduation.
Grade Point Average for Extra-Curricular Activities
All students participating in extra-curricular activities must have a 2.0 cumulative state GPA at the end of each semester.
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Graduation Recognition
For graduation recognition purposes, Summa Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, and Cum Laude recognitions
will be calculated on credits and weight earned by the last day of the first semester of the district calendar.
These recognitions will be determined using the following guidelines:
o Summa Cum Laude (Gold cord)
weighted GPA of 4.4800 or higher
o Magna Cum Laude (Silver cord)
weighted GPA of 4.3200 to 4.4799
o Cum Laude (Bronze cord)
weighted GPA of 4.0001 to 4.3199
Grade Placement (subject to change according to the yearly revised Student Progression Plan)
9th
0 - 5.5 credits
10th
6.0 - 11.5 credits
Must include 1 credit of level 2 English
Must include a passing grade in a level 2 Math
Must have a 2.0 cumulative state GPA
11th
12.0 - 17.5 credits
Must include 2 credits of level 2 English
Must include 1 credit of level 2 Math
And a passing grade in a second level 2 Math
Must have a 2.0 cumulative state GPA
12th
18.0 credits and over
Must be able to meet graduation requirements in May
Must have a 2.0 cumulative state 2.0 GPA
ENROLL/RECEIVE CREDIT/COURSE WEIGHTING TAKEN AT A SCHOOL OTHER THAN A HIGHLANDS COUNTY
SCHOOL
In accordance with the Highlands County Student Progression Plan, prior to enrolling in credit taken at a school/program
other than a school within Highlands County School district, a student and parent must:
 Meet with a guidance counselor to discuss course credit, weighting, relevance to meeting graduation
requirements, and if applicable, provide course syllabus information and discuss the appropriateness of
this method of learning.
 Must receive written approval from the principal or designee prior to enrolling in order to receive high
school credit and course weighting.
The Florida Virtual School – Form 19.00 must be completed and approved prior to on-line approval (see appendix)
The Florida Virtual School is a state-funded public internet based school providing online instruction through an internet
connection. The Florida Virtual School offers courses which are individualized and highly interactive using Web-based,
technology-based, and traditional resources. Seniors taking an online course needed for graduation must submit the final
grade for that course prior to the second Friday in May. For information, see your Guidance Counselor and visit the FLVS
website at www.flvs.net or phone them directly at 407-317-3326.
Academic Dual Enrollment - Form 19.41 must be completed and approved (see Appendix)
Principal-approved credits earned at the college level in dual enrollment programs may be applied to graduation
requirements. The same standards for course content and performance that apply to credits earned in the regularly
assigned school apply to credits earned in dual enrollment programs. Cost of textbooks may be paid by the Highlands
County School Board. A 3.0 overall State GPA is required and must be maintained. In addition, students must apply to
S.F.S.C. and earn qualifying scores on the ACT, SAT, or PERT Tests.
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ACT Reading 19
SAT Verbal 440
PERT Reading 106
Writing 17
Math 21
Math 500
Writing 103 Math 123
Students must have an application and placement test scores on file prior to their registration. The ACT, SAT, and PERT
scores are acceptable as long as they are within the last two years and are at or above the cutoff scores. An orientation
session with S.F.S.C. is required. Letter grades for both high school and college credit will be based on the high school’s
numerical scale. Some out-of-state universities/colleges may not accept Dual Enrollment credit.
Dual Enrollment students who earn a grade of “D” ,”F” or “W” in a college course will be permitted to retake the course
only once as Dual Enrollment after they have sat out of all Dual Enrollment classes for one full academic term.
Honors Courses
Honors courses are planned to include more rigorous content in an effort to make the courses more challenging. In most
honors courses, a research paper will be required.
Advanced Placement Courses
AP courses are college-level courses that each have a nation-wide exam in May. In order to receive weighting for an AP
class the student must take the AP Exam for that course. College credit for AP courses is determined by individual
college/university standards.
International Baccalaureate Courses
To be enrolled in an IB course, a student must have completed the required pre-requisite course(s) and should have at least
a 2.75 GPA in that subject area. Students enroll in IB courses for their 11th and 12th grade years because they are two year
courses. Only students who are in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program can take on-line IB courses.
Changing Classes
Schedule change request must be submitted and course changes completed no later than the second day of each semester.
After two days, requests are subject to Administrative review and decision.
Student Grades and Attendance Viewer
Sebring High School offers the opportunity to parents and students to view up-to-date grades and attendance records.
This is a way to communicate student information at home with the understanding that grades and attendance can change
daily; complete accuracy must be verified by a student’s teacher. As a means of privacy protection, students’ names are
not included on these reports.
In order to access grade and attendance records for a student, follow these steps:
 Log on to the SHS website at www.highlands.k12.fl.us/~shs/ .
 Click “View Student Grades” on the top toolbar. You will see a link to a tutorial “for Instructions on Using the
Pinnacle Grade Viewer, Click Here”
 Enter the user name which is the student’s six digit ID number (printed on student ID cards)
 Enter the password which is the student’s birth date in the format MMDDYY

Select “Sebring High School” in the drop-down menu
STATE OF FLORIDA UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS
Students planning to attend a four-year college or university must meet minimum requirements for freshman entering
Florida public universities. Each student has the responsibility of checking with the individual college of choice to find
out specific requirements since entrance requirements vary according to the college or university. Check each college or
university web site for core admissions requirements.
BRIGHT FUTURES SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
The updated Bright Futures Scholarship eligibility requirements will be available in the guidance office at the beginning
of the school year or when legislative changes have been made.
Call toll-free: 1-800-366-3475 or check their web site: www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org for information.
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FLVC.org
FLVC.org is Florida’s free academic advising web site. By establishing a login ID, students can find their high school
course summary, review current Bright Futures Scholarship information and eligibility, search for colleges, apply for
admission, learn about financial aid and scholarship information and find out about higher education opportunities in
Florida. Many colleges have links to their own websites on FLVC.org. Go to www.FLVC.org and start to plan for your
future.
Suggested Sequencing of Academic Classes
Regular
College Prep
Advanced College Prep
English 1
English II
English III
English IV
English 1
English II
English III
English IV
English 1 Honors
English II Honors
AP English Language
College English I /II or
AP English Literature
Earth Science
Biology
Chemistry 1
Earth Science
Biology
Chemistry 1
Earth Science Honors
Biology Honors
Chemistry Honors
Physics Honors, AP Biology,
Anatomy & Physiology Honors
World History
American History
Economics/Am Gov’t.
World History
US History
Economics/Am Gov’t
World History Honors
AP United States History
Honors Economics / AP Am Gov’t
Visions & Counter visions
Algebra 1
Geometry
Algebra II
Math for College Readiness
Algebra 1
Geometry
Algebra II
Math for College Readiness
College Algebra
Algebra 1
Geometry Honors
Algebra II Honors
College Algebra
College Statistics, College Trigonometry,
College Pre-Calculus, College/ AP Calculus
Spanish I
Spanish II
Spanish III Honors
Spanish I
Spanish II
Spanish III Honors
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International Baccalaureate (IB) Course Sequence
8th grade
Spanish I
recommended
Algebra I or
Geometry Honors
9th grade
Spanish I or II
10th grade
Spanish II or III Honors
Geo Hon or Alg. II Hon
Alg. II Hon or higher
Math
Visions and Counter
visions Honors
World History Honors
English I Honors
English II Honors
Biology Honors
Chemistry Honors
Teen Leadership and
Inquiry Skills
Elective
Elective
Elective
11th grade
IB Spanish SL or HL
Mandarin SL (online)
IB Math Studies SL
or Math HL (online)
IB History HL or
ITGS HL
Economics HL or SL
Psychology HL or SL
IB English HL or SL
12th grade
(online)
(online)
IB Biology HL or
Chemistry SL or
Environmental
Systems
Research/Theory of Knowledge (TOK)
IB Elective:
Art SL or HL or IB Music* (in addition to
band or chorus) or *other Academic Area
To receive an IB Diploma, a student must take at least 3 courses, but no more than 4 courses, at High Level (HL).
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COURSE OFFERINGS
LANGUAGE ARTS
Course
Recommended Prerequisites
English I
English I through ESOL
English Honors I
English II
English II through ESOL
English Honors II
English III
AP English Language and Composition
IB English Literature HL or SL (11th)
English IV College Readiness
Dual/College English I/II
AP English Literature & Composition
IB English Literature HL or SL (12th)
None
ELL classification
Recommendation
1 English credit
ELL classification
1 English credit
2 English credits
2 English (Honors) credits
English Honors II
3 English credits
3 English credits, 3.0 cumulative state GPA
Qualifying test scores (PERT, ACT, or SAT)
3 English credits
IB English Literature HL or SL 11th
Speech
Debate
Literature in the Media
Journalism I
Journalism II, III, IV Yearbook
None
None
2 English credits
None
Journalism I/ Teacher approval
Elective Credit
These reading classes are required for remediation based on FCAT scores.
Intensive Reading Grade 9
Intensive Reading Grade 10
Intensive Reading Grades 11, 12
FCAT Reading Level 1 or 2
FCAT Reading Level 1 or 2
FCAT RDG score under passing (passing scores vary
by Gr 9 entry year)
The State of Florida requires that any student scoring below Level 3 on FCAT Reading MUST receive reading
remediation. The specific reading class is determined by the student’s FAIR score. Reading instruction includes
remediation in phonemic awareness and phonics (if needed), vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension skills. Students are
assessed to determine their proficiency level and receive instruction according to that level.
9th and 10th grade intensive reading is one full year each. Depending on the student’s FAIR placement score, the intensive
reading class will be either daily or every other day.
11th and 12th grade intensive reading may be one semester if the student attains a passing score on the October FCAT
administration. Depending on the student’s FAIR placement score, the Intensive Reading class will either be every day or
every other day.
Students with minimal need for remediation may qualify to receive their reading instruction through a content area class
with a reading endorsed teacher.
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English I
This course is designed to provide instruction in English language skills and in literature. Students will write
approximately 2500 words in this class, including a research paper.
ESOL English 1 and ESOL English II provide the opportunity for limited English-speaking students to earn required
English credit within an ESOL structured program. Instruction in English language skills includes content areas of
literature, grammar, vocabulary and language.
English Honors I
This course is designed to promote academic excellence in English language skills and to provide students with enriched
experiences in literature, composition, speech, and listening skills. Approximately 3000 words of writing will be required,
including a research paper. To enroll in this class, a student should have scored on Level 3 or higher on the Reading
FCAT. Students must read two assigned readings prior to the first day of class. Students are responsible for obtaining the
summer reading list from the teacher.
English II
This course is designed to provide instruction in English language skills and in the study of world literature.
Approximately 3000 words of writing is required, including a research paper.
English Honors II
This is an accelerated class that requires students to think deeply and richly about both fiction and non-fiction. The course
offers a blend of classic and contemporary works from authors of diverse backgrounds. The course places a heavy
emphasis on a variety of writing skills; students will write approximately 4000 words, including a research paper. To
enroll in this class, a student should have scored a Level 3 or higher on the Grade 9 Reading FCAT. Students will have
required reading prior to the first day of class and are responsible for obtaining the reading list and summer assignment(s)
from the teacher. Students should expect a rigorous, challenging, active experience in this course.
English III
This course is designed to provide instruction in English language skills and in the study of American literature. Students
will be required to read a novel outside of the textbook and write a research paper. Approximately 4000 words of writing
will be required.
Advanced Placement English Language and Composition
This course is a college class designed to study the language and rhetoric of various genres of literature. Students must
write several essays, a research paper, and at least 6,000 words per semester. Students must read four books prior to the
first day of class. Students are responsible for meeting with their teacher to obtain the summer reading list and discuss the
course syllabus. College credit is determined by individual college/university standards. Students planning to attend a
highly competitive college are encouraged to take Advanced Placement classes.
IB English Literature HL or SL
The purpose of this two-year course is to develop independent critical competency in the study of literature and to foster a
high level of achievement in writing, reading, and speaking.
English IV College Readiness
This course is emphasizes the reading, language, composition, and vocabulary skills required for success in college
freshman English. Students will analyze various types of informational and literary texts and the writing styles associated
with each. A research paper is also required.
Dual/College English I / II
These courses are designed to offer students college level literature and composition under the guidelines of South Florida
State College. A research paper and approximately 6,000 words of writing are required each semester. Students must
read two books prior to the first day of class. Students are responsible for meeting with their teacher to obtain the summer
reading list and to discuss the course syllabus. Students earning a 3 or higher on the AP Language Exam can take Dual
College English II only. Students earn three college credits for each course.
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Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition
This course is a college class in which students will analyze and write about varying types of literature, with a focus on
British Literature. Several essays, a research paper, and 6,000 words of writing per semester are required. Students must
read four to six books prior to the first day of class. Students are responsible for meeting with their teacher to obtain the
summer reading list and to discuss the course syllabus. College credit is determined by individual college/university
guidelines. Seniors planning to attend a highly competitive college are encouraged to take Advanced Placement classes.
Speech
In this class students will prepare and present speeches, focusing on knowledge of the fundamentals of communication,
the role of context in effective communication, listening skills, message delivery, research skills and message creation for
public speaking.
Debate
This course offers students instruction in the fundamentals of argumentation and problem solving. Students learn logical
thinking, organization of facts, and speaking skills. Opportunities to practice research skills related to debate topics and to
participate in frequent debate situations are included.
Literature in the Media
Students will learn how to look for narrative parallels between traditional (printed) literary texts and non-traditional multimedia texts. Course content includes representative works of literature and related multi-media (e.g. film, television,
cartoons, advertisements, and commercials), literary characteristics reflective of cultural contexts and critical response.
Journalism I
Students will learn newspaper terminology and develop skills in interviewing, internet research, current events,
advertising, mass media, writing in journalistic style, editing, page design, digital photography and computer pagination.
This course is a requirement for students who are interested in joining the yearbook or newsletter staff.
Journalism II, III, and IV Yearbook
Students are responsible for news gathering, photos, advertising, printing, and circulation of the SHS yearbook, the
Nancesowee. Teacher approval is required to enroll.
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MATHEMATICS
Course
Prerequisites
Algebra 1A/1B
Algebra I
Geometry
Geometry Honors
Algebra II
Algebra II Honors
Mathematics for College Readiness
Dual College Algebra
Dual/College Trigonometry
Dual/College Elem. Statistics
Dual/College Pre-Calculus
Dual/College Calculus
None – complete in one year
None
Algebra I
Algebra 1
Geometry
Geometry
Algebra II /Algebra II Honors
Algebra II/Algebra II Honors
3.0 overall State GPA
Qualifying test scores (CPT/ PERT, ACT, SAT)
College Algebra / 3.0 overall state GPA
College Algebra /3.0 overall state GPA
College Trig / 3.0 overall state GPA
College Pre-Calculus / 3.0 overall state GPA
Advanced Placement Calculus AB
IB Mathematical Studies, SL
College Trig / 3.0 state GPA
International Baccalaureate Program
Algebra 1A
The purpose of this course is to develop basic algebraic concepts and processes that can be used to solve a variety of real
world and mathematical problems. This is the first of a two year- sequence of courses, Algebra 1A and Algebra 1B.
Together, the two courses have the same requirements as Algebra 1.
Algebra 1B
The purpose of this course is to develop basic algebraic concepts and processes that can be used to solve a variety of real
world and mathematical problems. This is the second of a two year- sequence of courses, Algebra 1A and Algebra 1B.
Together, the two courses have the same requirements as Algebra 1.
Algebra I
This course is designed to provide the foundation for more advanced mathematics courses and to develop the skills
needed to solve a variety of real-world mathematical problems. Topics include number systems, factoring, exponents,
square roots, solving linear equations and inequalities, coordinate graphing and radical equations.
Geometry
The purpose of this course is to develop the geometric relationships and deductive strategies which can be used to solve a
variety of real-world and mathematical problems. This course introduces basic logic and its use in problem-solving.
Topics include congruence, similarity, perpendicularity, circles and quadrilaterals, formal proof writing, Pythagorean
Theorum, and areas of polygons.
Geometry Honors
The purpose of this course is to give a rigorous in-depth study of geometry with emphasis on methods of proof and the
formal language of mathematics. To enroll in this course, a student should have scored on Level 3 or higher on the Math
portion of the FCAT.
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Algebra II
The purpose of this course is to continue the study of algebraic skills begun in Algebra I. The content will include the
structure and properties of the complex number system; relations and functions, solving equations dealing with
polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions; solving linear equations, inequalities, and systems of equations and
inequalities; solving quadratic equations using factoring techniques and the quadratic formula; and graphing conic
sections.
Algebra II Honors
This course is designed to explore operations and relations among real and imaginary numbers. The content will include
the structure and properties of the complex number system; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series; relations,
functions, and graphs of polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions; a variety of solution strategies for linear
equations, inequalities, and systems of equations and inequalities; the quadratic formula; conic sections; basic matrix
operations; data analysis; and probability, permutations, and combinations.
Mathematics for College Readiness
The purpose of this course is to continue the study of algebraic skills learned in Algebra II. It will prepare students for the
course Algebra for College Students and help make an acceptable score on the college placement test. The following
objectives will be included: operations with the complex numbers, algebraic expressions, relations, functions, polynomial
equations, exponents, logarithms, matrices, compound interest, measure of central tendency, linear equations, inequalities,
quadratic equations, factoring, algebraic fractions and conics.
Dual/College Algebra
The purpose of this course is to continue the rigorous and in-depth study of algebra begun in Algebra II and to provide the
foundation of algebraic skills necessary to be successful in future dual enrollment math courses. The course will include
rational expressions and functions, radical expressions and root functions, quadratic equations and inequalities, conic
sections, operations involving composite functions, inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences,
series, permutations, combinations, and probability.
Dual/College Trigonometry
This is a study of trigonometric functions and their inverses, trigonometric identities and conditional equations, vectors
and complex numbers, techniques of graphing, solutions of triangles, and practical applications of trigonometry.
Dual/College Elementary Statistics
The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop and apply knowledge of statistics and probability to the
statistical process of collection of data, planning the investigation, analyzing the data, and making inferences. The content
will include measures of central tendency and variability, analysis of experimental design, randomness and sampling
techniques, binomial and normal distributions, hypothesis testing, and use of confidence intervals.
Dual/College Pre-Calculus
This course is designed to prepare college bound students for calculus. It will provide the student with a study of
intermediate algebra, analytic geometry, and review of trigonometry. Specific topics will include circular and
trigonometric functions, polynomial functions, partial fractions and their uses, introduction to the concept of limits,
vectors in the plane and in space, and graphing functions (upper and lower bounds).
Dual/College Calculus
This course is designed for those students who have mastered the concepts of college algebra and trigonometry. Topics
include: functions, graphing, continuity, limits, derivatives, integrals, volumes of solids, analytical geometry, and
applications.
Advanced Placement Calculus AB
Like the college course, the purpose of this course is to teach calculus concepts (limits, derivatives, differentiation,
integration, applications of differentiation and integration, series and sequences, and topics in vector calculus) and help
students develop problem-solving skills needed to succeed on the AP test. College credit is determined by individual
college/university standards.
18
IB Mathematical Studies, SL
This course is for students with a variety of backgrounds and abilities, whose strengths lie in other areas than math. The
course concentrates on math topics which are in context with other subjects being studied. The course includes project
work, a piece of written work based on personal research. This project involves an opportunity for the student to carry out
a mathematical investigation in the context of another course being studied, a hobby, or interest of their choice. Topics
include: introduction to the graphical display calculator; number theory; sets, logic, and probability; functions;
trigonometry; statistics; and financial mathematics.
19
SCIENCE
Course
Prerequisites
Earth Science
Earth Science Honors
Biology
Biology Honors
Chemistry 1
Chemistry Honors
Physics Honors
Anatomy & Physiology Honors
Advanced Placement Biology
IB Biology II /III
IB Chemistry II/III
IB Environmental Systems and Societies I/II
None
Recommendation
1 Science credit
1 Science credit
2 Science credits, Geometry credit
Biology and Geometry credit
3 Science credits, Trig recommended
Chemistry or Biology Honors
Grade 12, Chemistry
IB Program Gr 11, 12
IB Program Gr 11, 12
IB Program Gr 11, 12
Earth Science
This course explores origins and the connections between the physical, chemical, and biological processes of the earth
system. Students will learn about the composition of the Earth; the history of the Earth; and how the Earth is constantly
changing. The student will engage in hands-on-experience through practical lab exercises and assignments.
Earth Science Honors
This course promotes academic excellence in science as the student learns about the composition of the Earth; the history
of the Earth; and how the Earth is constantly changing. The student will engage in hands-on-experience through practical
lab exercises and assignments.
Biology
This course is designed to provide students with the general exploratory experiences and activities in the fundamental
concepts of life.
Biology Honors
This course is designed to prepare students for advanced science coursework in high school and college through the study
of advanced exploratory experiences and activities in the fundamental concepts of life. The content includes, but is not
limited to the following units of study: The Nature of Science, Ecology, Cells, Genetics, Changes Through Time, Human
Anatomy and the Diversity of Living Systems including the 6 Kingdoms of Life. Students will take the Florida EOC for
Biology.
Chemistry 1
This course is designed to provide students with the study of the composition, properties, and changes associated with
matter. Course content includes topics such as atomic structure, the periodic table of the elements, bonding, chemical
formulas and equations and solutions acids and bases.
Chemistry Honors
This course is designed to prepare students for advanced science coursework in high school and college through the study
of composition, properties, and changes associated with matter in an accelerated pace. The content includes, but is not
limited to: atomic structure, periodic trends, bonding (ionic, covalent and metallic), nomenclature (ionic, covalent and
organic), identification and prediction of chemical reactions, stoichiometric calculations, energetic, states of matter, gas
laws and solutions. More laboratory experiences will be provided than in regular Chemistry.
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Physics Honors
This course is designed to provide students with an introductory study of the theories and laws governing the interaction
of matter, energy, and the forces of nature.
Anatomy & Physiology Honors
This course provides both a theory and laboratory experience in the structures and functions of the components of the
human body. Course content includes anatomical terminology, cells and tissues, systems of the body, genetics and
disease processes.
Advanced Placement Biology
This course is designed to be the equivalent of the general biology course usually taken during the first year of college.
Students should attain a depth of understanding in topics such as the study of molecules, cells, photosynthesis, cellular
respiration, genetics, evolution, and structure and function of organisms. Students will be expected to take the AP Test in
May. College credit is determined by individual college/university standards.
IB Biology II / III
The purpose of this two-year course is to provide a study of the facts, principles and processes of biology. Topics include
cells, chemistry of life, DNA, genetics, mechanisms of evolution, human health and physiology, plant science, ecology
and conservation. The course includes collection and interpretation of date and formulation of hypotheses from available
data. Students will be expected to take the IB Exam in May of senior year.
IB Chemistry II/ III
The purpose of this two-year course is to provide an in-depth quantitative study of the development and application
of chemistry principles, concepts, and experimental methods. Topics include atomic structure, periodicity, bonding,
energetic, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and organic chemistry with laboratory
applications in the areas of environmental chemistry and human biochemistry. Students will have a greater responsibility
in collecting and processing their data and for designing laboratory experiments ranging from narrowly focused tasks to
open-ended investigations. Students will be expected to take the IB Exam in May of senior year.
IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL
The prime intent for this two-year course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of interrelationships between
environmental systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of
pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. The teaching approach is such that students are
allowed to evaluate the scientific, ethical and socio-political aspects of life. This is a two-year course taken over the
junior and senior year. Students will be expected to take the IB Exam in May of senior year.
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SOCIAL STUDIES
Course
Prerequisites
World History
World History Honors
Visions and Countervisions Honors
United States History
AP United States History
IB History of the Americas
None
Recommendation
World History Honors
World History
World History
World History Honors and
Visions/Countervisions
US History
US History
US History
US History
IB Program Gr 11, 12
None
Economics
American Government
AP American Government* and Economics Honors*
American Political Systems Honors *
IB Theory of Knowledge (TOK)
IB Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS)
*These courses must be taken in conjunction with each other.*
Elective Credit.
Psychology
Law Studies
Gr 11, 12
Gr 11, 12
World History
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire an understanding of the chronological development
of civilization by examining the political, economic, social, religious, military, and cultural events that have affected
humanity.
World History Honors
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire an in-depth understanding of the chronological
development of civilization by examining the political, economic, social, religious, military, and cultural events that have
affected humanity. To enroll in this class, a student should have scored on Level 3 or higher on the Reading FCAT.
Visions and Countervisions Honors
This course is an American History course designed to prepare students for advanced courses in social studies. The
primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the chronological study of major concepts and trends evidenced in the
United States, Europe, and the world from 1848 to the present. Content should include, but is not limited to, the visions of
revolution, nationalism, and imperialism evidenced in European history from 1848 to 1918, international politics from
1819 to 1945 emphasizing post-war Europe, cultural identities following nationalist and independent movements, the
development and rise of communism, domestic issues affecting the United States from 1880 to the present, and the United
States economic, political, and social policies and their effects on the world from 1898 to the present. Students will take
the American History Florida EOC at the end of this course.
United States History
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire an understanding of the chronological development
of the American people by examining significant events.
Advanced Placement United States History
This course offers students the opportunity to acquire an in-depth understanding of the chronological development of our
American history by examining the political, economic, social, religious, military, scientific and cultural events that
affected the growth and development of the nation. Extra research is required. Students are expected to take the AP
Exam in May. College credit is determined by individual college/university standards.
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History of the Americas – International Baccalaureate HL
This two-year course is a Group 3 subject in the IB Diploma Program and a comprehensive examination of the major
events that have shaped the Western Hemisphere. In the first year students will study and analyze historical events that
impacted Latin America, Canada and the United States through the 19th Century. In the second year students will focus
on 20th Century world topics, specifically on the Cold War and the Americas. Students are provided the opportunity to
acquire and demonstrate an understanding of events with emphasis on historical context, cause and effect, continuity and
change, historiography and evaluation and synthesis using historical sources as evidence. Students will take the IB exam
in May of the second year.
Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) – International Baccalaureate HL
This course focuses on the study and evaluation of the impact of informational technology on individuals and society. It
explores the advantages and disadvantages of the use of digitized information at the local and global levels. ITGS
provides the framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions regarding information technology
within social contexts.
Economics
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire understanding of the way in which society used its
limited resources to satisfy unlimited wants and how economic systems solve basic economic problems.
Economics Honors
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire understanding of the way in which society used its
limited resources to satisfy unlimited wants. Students will gain understanding of choices they must make as producers,
consumers, investors and taxpayers. Extra research will be required.
American Government
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire an understanding of American government and
political behavior.
*Advanced Placement American Government
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire an understanding of American government and
political behavior. Students learn general concepts used to interpret American politics and government. Students also
become familiar with the various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute the American political perspective.
Extra research is required. Students are expected to take the AP Exam. College credit is determined by individual
college/university standards. *This course must be taken in conjunction with Economics Honors.
*American Political Systems Honors
This course is paired with AP American Government to continue study of American politics and government in
preparation for the AP American Government Exam. *This course should be taken following AP American Gov’t.
Psychology
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to acquire an understanding of human behavior.
Law Studies
In this course students will learn about the American legal system. They will examine those laws which have an impact
on citizen’s lives and are provided with an introduction to fundamental civil and criminal justice procedures. Course
content will include the adult and juvenile courts, family and consumer law, causes and consequences of crime, individual
rights and responsibilities and career opportunities in the legal system.
IB Theory of Knowledge (TOK)
This course is designed to challenge assumptions of knowledge, examine the reliability of critical sources, consider
different cultural and emotional perceptions and to foster international understanding. This course (TOK) is a key
element in the International Baccalaureate Program.
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EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT EDUCATION COURSES
Specific courses will be scheduled at transition staffing’s, IEP meetings, and/or conferences with
Exceptional Education teachers, school personnel, parents, and students.
Academics may include:
Reading
English
Math
Science
Social Studies
Basic Academic Skills for Functional Living
Electives may include:
Learning Strategies
Career Education
Career Experience
Career Placement
PAES Employment Skills Lab
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FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Course
Prerequisites
Spanish I
Spanish II
Spanish III Honors
IB Spanish IV/V SL or HL
None
Spanish I
Spanish II
Spanish II
Two sequential credits in the same foreign language are required for admission into Florida’s four-year universities, for
admission into many out-of-state colleges and universities, and for the Bright Futures Academic Scholars and Medallion
Scholars Awards.
Spanish I
This course provides a standard introduction to beginning Spanish, including listening, reading, writing, and speaking, as
well as cultural awareness. This class is designed to meet the needs and interests of students with average abilities and not
recommended for Spanish speakers. Students may waiver Spanish I if they demonstrate mastery of the Spanish I
Performance Standards; however, no credit will be given for Spanish I if it is waivered.
Spanish II
This course is designed to reinforce the fundamental skills acquired by the students. This course develops increased
listening, speaking, reading and writing skills as well as cultural awareness.
Spanish III Honors
This course provides advanced use of Spanish for listening, reading, and communication. Hispanic and Spanish culture is
studied through music, art, literature and cuisine.
IB Spanish IV/V SL or HL
These courses enable students to enhance proficiency in Spanish through a linguistic, communicative, and cultural
approach to language learning. There is a continued emphasis on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and
writing skills and on the acquisition of the fundamentals of applied grammar. Activities include dialogue, role-playing,
vocabulary review, conversation practice, listening to native speakers on audiotape and videotape, singing songs and
reciting poems in Spanish, reading stories, novels, and other materials in Spanish, and cultural studies. Students will be
expected to take the IB exam in May of senior year.
25
ART
Course
Prerequisite
Art in World Cultures
None
Art 1 (Drawing & Painting)
Art 2 (Drawing & Painting)
Art 3 (Drawing & Painting)
None
Art 1/Recommendation
Art 2/Recommendation
Ceramics/Pottery I
Ceramics/Pottery II, III
Grades 10 - 12
Ceramics 1/II
AP Studio Art: Drawing
AP Studio Art: 2-D Design
AP Studio Art: 3-D Design
Application/Recommendation
Application/Recommendation
Application/Recommendation
Portfolio I, II, III: Studio Workshop
Recommendation
Advanced Art 1and 2
IB Visual Arts (SL) 3 and 4
High interest in Art and/or the IB Program
Art, International Baccalaureate Program
Art in World Cultures (semester class)
In this course, student survey selected works of art and architecture from around the world. Students explore both the
traditional forms and contemporary interpretations, including analysis of purpose, theme, cultural and historical context,
formal qualities, symbols, and media. Students explore and compare various cultural responses to universal themes, as
evidenced in their art. Students also consider the value of preserving these works in today’s museums and other public
buildings, private collections, and in digital format. This course may incorporate hands-on-activities and consumption of
art materials.
Art I
This is an introductory art class to gradually build a foundation in 2-dimensional media. Students will develop and build
skills by using a variety of drawing and painting mediums such as pencil, charcoal, ink, tempera, and watercolor painting.
Students will learn basic observation and drawing skills, painting skills, perspective, and composition. A variety of visual
images will be produced, some with practical function and others exploring different styles of art. Students will begin
using sketchbooks to improve art skills.
Art II
Art II is designed for those who want to further improve skills in drawing, painting, and sketchbooks. The focus will be
on enhancing drawing and painting skills in design, techniques, composition, and perspective to create strong visual
images by using a variety of mediums. Resources will enhance the student’s study in art and students will have the
opportunity to begin to develop their own unique style. Students will also research artists and different periods of art to
create artwork from a period of art/artist.
Art III
Art III is designed for those who want to further develop their own skills in drawing, painting, and sketchbooks. In this
third year visual art course students will be expected to be self-motivated and able to work on in-depth studies of at least
two art media. In conjunction with media exploration, the students will research artists, movements or cultures
emphasizing the corresponding media choice.
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Ceramics/Pottery I
Students will work with clay and investigate traditional methods of building pottery. Techniques investigated will include
pinch pots, slab building, coil method, wheel throwing and a combination of techniques. The tradition of pottery will be
investigated from a cultural perspective. Students will look at the work of famous historical potters as well as
contemporary masters.
Ceramics/Pottery II & III
Students will continue to work on more challenging clay problems, techniques and media. Course work will vary
according to individual interest. Students will explore the unique pottery forms of different cultures as well as the role
pottery has played in the history of mankind.
Advanced Placement Studio Art
This program enables highly motivated students to complete college-level work in studio art while still in high school.
AP Studio Art is not based on a written exam but a portfolio of artwork that is evaluated by the AP Program. Summer
work is a must and will be given to the student a jump start on the class. It is suggested that each AP Art student take a
portfolio class in addition to the AP art class to allow for the time needed to complete the rigorous portfolio requirements.
There are three sections of AP Studio Art to choose from:
AP Studio Art: Drawing
Students develop advanced skills in drawing and painting and other materials.
AP Studio Art: 2-D Design
Students apply research to produce two dimensional art using materials and techniques including drawing, painting,
design, printmaking, collage, papermaking, commercial art, digital imaging and photography.
AP Studio Art: 3-D Design
Students apply research to produce three-dimensional art using materials and techniques including sculpture, architectural
models, apparel, ceramics, assemblage, cast forms, fiber arts and metalwork.
Portfolio I, II, III: Studio Workshops
A student in these courses will further develop awareness, appreciation, and understanding of visual art through studio
production, history and appreciation, and group and personal evaluation. This course is designed for the serious art
student. Students will have the opportunity to explore and discover more about their areas of interest in art, thus
emphasizing individual development and style. Portfolio classes allow further advanced art study for the student who
cannot fit Art II/III or Ceramics II/III into his/her schedule.
Advanced Art 1 and 2
These courses are for highly motivated students that have a strong interest in art and/or in the IB program and want to get
a head start toward Area 6 of the IB program and/or possibly an AP Art course. These courses explore a variety of
materials, artistic ideas, study of cultures and art time periods and the traditional and contemporary art. Students will
complete a variety of projects in drawing, painting, design, ceramics, sculpture, photography and printmaking.
IB Visual Art (SL) 3 and 4
This two year course is for any student who is interested in Art or any IB student that would like to pursue the two year
program toward Area 6 of the IB program. A prerequisite of art is encouraged but not expected and any student with past
experience in art may try for the IB Art certificate. This program enables highly motivated students to complete a
portfolio of studio work and sketchbook work that will be judged as a final exam before a visiting examiner. The students
are also able to turn in their portfolio toward credit in AP Studio Art classes.
27
THEATRE ARTS
Course
Prerequisites
Acting I
Acting 2
Acting 3
Acting 4
None
Acting 1
Acting 2
Acting 3
Acting I
Through improvisation, simple scripted scenes, performance projects, and/or practical application, students learn to
identify what makes performances believable and explore the tools used to create, articulate, and execute them. Upon
completion of this course, students have a strong foundation for future scene work, script analysis, and play production.
Public performance may serve as a culmination of specific instructional goals. Students may be required to attend and/or
participate in rehearsals and performances outside the school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom.
Acting 2
Students examine the various dimensions of characters of characters through analysis, discussion, and classroom
performance, working with scripts from a variety of time periods and cultures. They learn to break down a scene from a
character’s point of view, and also learn to sustain a character and build the relationship between actor and audience.
Public performances may serve as a culmination of specific instructional goals. Students may be required to attend and/or
participate in rehearsals and performances outside the school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom.
Acting 3
Students focus on development of significant acting skills and knowledge of the actor’s literature, compiling a
working actor’s portfolio for exhibition and/or the interview process. They research potential job opportunities
in the film, television, game animation, and theatre industries, as well as scholarships and opportunities at the
university level. An inquiry-based capstone project may be required. Public performances may serve as a
culmination of specific instructional goals. Students may be required to participate in rehearsals and
performances outside the school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom.
Acting 4 Honors
Students create characters for theatrical and film/video productions through scene, character, and technical
analysis. Through improvisation, script writing, and aesthetic creation and collaboration, actors refine their
working knowledge independent thought, articulating and justifying their creative choices. Students’ “critical
eye” becomes more developed and significant mastery of artistic choices becomes evident. An inquiry-based
capstone project may be required. Public performances may serve as a culmination of specific instructional
goals. Students may be required to participate in rehearsals and performances outside the school day to support,
extend, and assess learning in the classroom.
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DIGITAL MEDIA
Digital Media I
Digital Media II & III
Recommendation / Grades 10 - 12
Digital Media I and Recommendation
Digital Media I
Digital Media II and III
This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards
and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in the Arts, A/V Technology and
Communication career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competency-based applied learning that contributes
to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical
skills, and occupation-specific skills, and knowledge of all aspects of the Arts, A/V Technology and Communication career cluster.
The content includes but is not limited to practical experiences in Web page design, interactive presentation development, testing and
production. Specialized skills in multimedia presentations such as video editing, audio features, and simple animation and authoring
software are used to produce a variety of interactive multimedia presentations.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT – BAND
Course
Prerequisite
Band I
Band II
Band III
Band IV
Band V
Band VI
Audition/Recommendation
Audition/Recommendation
Audition/Recommendation
Audition/Recommendation
Audition/Recommendation
Audition/Recommendation
Instrumental Ensemble (Drum Line) I, II, III, IV
Audition
Eurhythmics I , II, III, IV
Audition
Jazz Ensemble (Jazz Band) I , II, III, IV
Audition
Music Theory
Audition/Recommendation
Guitar I
Recommendation
IB Music
IB Program
The band program at Sebring High School is designed to train students to become more expressive musicians, more
proficient sight-readers, and better ensemble members. Being a member of any performance organization is a year-long
endeavor. There will be after school or evening rehearsals and performances. These will be announced in advance and
are required. Students will receive a grade for attendance and participation in these events. Failure to attend a rehearsal
or performance will result in a loss of points for that event. Attendance is mandatory at all public performances as these
performances are a natural outgrowth of the daily classroom activities and instruction in band class.
The Sebring High school Band Program consists of four performing ensembles: Symphonic Band, Concert Band,
Percussion Ensemble (Drum Line), and Color Guard. In the fall, all of these groups combine to form the Spirit of Sebring
Marching Band. All students are required to participate in Marching Band. At the conclusion of football season, all of
these groups prepare during class time and after school rehearsals for their individual performances in winter and spring.
Each group prepares its own program for concerts and evaluations.
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Symphonic Band (Band I – Band VI)
The symphonic band plays the most advance band literature. It is made up primarily of upperclassman, but is open to all
students. Sectionals and full ensemble rehearsals will be held after school throughout the year. Students must audition for
the director to become a member of this band.
Concert Band (Band 1 – Band VI)
This concert band plays more traditional band literature. Only a few after-school rehearsals are held thoughout the year
(after marching season has concluded). Students do not need to audition to become a member of this group.
Percussion Ensemble/Drum Line
All percussion students should be in this class. Members of this ensemble will serve as the Drum Line and Pit members
of the Marching Band. Percussion students interested in becoming members of the Wind Ensemble or Concert Band must
audition for the director (each group will have 3-6 percussionists). Percussion students must have previous musical
training; beginners are not allowed.
Eurhythmics (First Semester Color Guard, Second Semester Winter Guard)
The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop basic skills in creating, performing, and evaluating
choreographed performances as an independent ensemble and in cooperation with the marching band. Emphasis is placed
on equipment manipulation, precision, and the relationship between music and movement. During the second semester,
Eurhythmics Winterguard performs at Basketball games.
Jazz Ensemble (Jazz Band)
This course is a performance ensemble that is not attached to the marching band or concert band. This group reads
intermediate jazz charts, learns the basics of jazz theory for soloing, and goes out into the community for performances.
A few after school rehearsals may be called. Instrumentation includes Saxophones, Trumpets, Trombones, and Rhythm
(Piano, Guitar, Bass, and Drum Set). This group is an audition only Ensemble.
Music Theory
In this course students will learn how to analyze chords and melodies, perform melodic dictation, and sight singing.
Students will be expected to know how to read basic musical notation. Prior musical experience is required. This course
is a year-long course.
Guitar I
Introductory classroom instruction in popular styles of guitar playing: technique, music reading (notation and tablature),
chord symbols, song accompaniment patterns, stage etiquette and ensemble performance. Students will be expected to
provide their own guitar and combination lock for storage in a band room locker. This course is both a lecture and
laboratory course. Lecture materials are reinforced with hands-on experience in class. Students will be expected to
participate in a recital at the end of the school year.
IB Music
Students will develop their knowledge and potential as musicians, both personally and collaboratively. Students may
choose between band and chorus to meet performance requirements and will take an additional online component to meet
additional requirements of the course designed to help students become aware of how artists work and communicate,
enjoy lifelong engagement with the arts, become informed, reflective and critical practitioners in the arts, understand the
dynamic and changing nature of the arts, and explore and value the diversity of the arts across time, place and cultures.
Music of the World
Students explore the musical traditions of 20th and 21st century American and global communities around the world
through study of current trends, focusing on the function of music within various cultures (e.g. jazz, world drumming,
mariachi, soul, gamelan, Bollywood, digital). Students examine and report on human activities involving music,
technology, and culture-related influences on music and the sounds and structures of music composition. Classroom
presentations may serve as a resource for specific instructional goals. Students may be required to attend one or more
performances outside the school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom.
30
MUSIC DEPARTMENT- CHORUS
Course
Prerequisites
Mixed Choirs
Chorus I (Freshman Choir)
Recommendation
Recommendation
Audition
Audition
Audition
Chorus II (Concert Choir)
Chorus III (Varsity Choir)
Chorus IV
Chorus V
Vocal Ensemble I (Show Choir), II, III, IV Hon Audition
Women’s Choir
Chorus H/L I, II, III
Recommendation
Keyboard/Piano
Keyboard I Piano
Keyboard II /III Piano
None
Recommendation
IB Music (description pg. 28)
Music of the World (description pg. 28)
IB Program
None
Varsity Choir
This class is designed to provide students with instruction in the application of vocal musicianship and technical skills
through the study of various choral literature. This choir requires many outside performances and activities. Students
must purchase a uniform.
Show Choir
Show Choir is a highly auditioned group that does many outside performances throughout the entire school year.
Auditions are held in the spring of the school year for one week before and after the school day. Adjudicators are brought
in from other schools, etc. to judge.
Concert Choir
This is a mixed choir that sings four-part literature. This class also requires outside activities and performances
throughout the school year. Choir members must purchase a uniform.
Women’s Choir
This class is designed to provide students an opportunity to develop proper vocal technique and sing female literature.
Outside performances and activities are required. Choir members must purchase a uniform. This choir is all female and
performs music from madrigals to pop music.
Freshmen Choir
This choir consists of all ninth grade students who want to sing for SHS. Previous choir experience is good but not
required. Students purchase their own chorus outfit. There are several outside performances and activities throughout the
school year.
Piano-Keyboard
These courses provide the opportunity to develop keyboard skills, including interpretation of notation and performance in
varied styles. No previous music or piano knowledge is necessary. Having a piano at home is helpful but not mandatory.
Students purchase their own books after their instructional levels are determined by the teacher as well as headphones to
use with the digital pianos. No outside performances or activities are required.
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PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Personal Fitness
PE Lifestyles
Beg./Inter./Adv. Aerobics
Team Sports I / Team Sports II
Beg./ Int. /Adv Weight Training
Comprehensive Fitness
Recreation
Track and Field
Intermediate Swimming
Personal Fitness
This course is a State required course designed to provide students with opportunities to develop an individual optimal
level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of physical fitness concepts, and acquire knowledge of the significance of
lifestyle on one’s health and fitness.
PE Lifestyle
This course focuses on fitness-based activities, rather that sports and games. These activities may include
walking/running, exercise, aerobics, swimming, weightlifting and jump rope.
Aerobics (Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced)
These courses provide students the opportunity to develop aerobic skills with relation to one’s health.
Team Sports I, II
The purpose of this course is to enable students to acquire knowledge of team sports play, develop skills in selected team
sports, and improve health-related fitness. Team Sports may include basketball, flag football, soccer, softball, track and
field, water polo, frisbee, and volleyball.
Weight Training (Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced)
These courses provide students with opportunities to acquire basic knowledge and skills in weight training that may be
used in the pursuit of physical fitness and to improve strength, endurance, and enhance body image.
Comprehensive Fitness This course focuses on the health-related component of physical fitness including
cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility and body composition.
Recreation
This course provides opportunities for students to develop physical fitness through individual /group sports and activities.
These may include tennis, golf, softball, fitness regime, martial arts, and skateboard demonstrations.
Track and Field
This course provides opportunities for students to develop physical fitness through track and field events. Students will
acquire basic knowledge of track and field techniques.
Intermediate Swimming
Swimmers must be able to swim 50 yards without stopping and have knowledge of the basic strokes. Swimmers will
improve their skills, techniques and abilities.
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CAREER and TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES
Course
Prerequisites
Agriscience Foundations
Agritechnology 1
Agritechnology 2
Veterinary Assisting 1
Veterinary Assisting 2
Veterinary Assisting 3
Introductory Horticulture 2
None
Agriscience Foundations
Agritechnology 1
None
Veterinary Assisting 1
Veterinary Assisting 2
Agriscience Foundations
Agriscience Foundations
This course explores the different careers in agriculture, develops mechanical and carpentry skills, and explores different
areas in horticulture, livestock production, and citrus production. This course is designed to develop competencies in the
areas of agricultural history and the global impact of agriculture; career opportunities; scientific and research concepts;
biological and physical science principles; environmental principles; agriscience safety; and principles of leadership.
Laboratory-based activities are an integral part of this course. These include the safe use and application of appropriate
technology, scientific testing and observation equipment. This course will satisfy a graduation requirement of a
science with a laboratory component.
Agritechnology 1
This course is designed to develop competencies in the areas of agriscience industry careers; prevention and treatment of
livestock diseases; livestock anatomy; wholesale cuts of meat; animal reproduction; animal safety; animal-health
certification; plant growth; plant fertilization; safe use of pesticides; maintenance of tools and equipment; record keeping;
and employability skills
.
Agritechnology 2
This course is designed to develop competencies in the areas of job and training requirements; professional organizations;
crop identification; planting crops; fertilizer calculations and application; irrigation; pest control; harvesting, packing, and
grading crops, safe equipment operation; finance; and employability skills.
Veterinary Assisting 1
This course is designed to develop competencies in areas such as the history of the animal industry, applied scientific and
technological concepts, safety, terminology, careers, breed identification, animal care and human relations skills.
Veterinary Assisting 2
This course is designed to develop competencies in the areas such as basic first aid; scientific and technological; tools and
equipment; breed identification; and functions of systems.
Veterinary Assisting 3
This course is designed to develop competencies in the areas of animal digestive systems; animal breeding; animal
control; animal overpopulation; animal related laws; and breeds.
Introductory Horticulture 2
This course is designed to develop competencies in the areas of career opportunities; global importance of agriculture;
plant classification; propagation; growing media; nutritional needs; fertilization; irrigation; pest identification; pest
control; pruning; plant installation; transplanting; safe hand-tool use; and employability skills.
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CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
Course
Prerequisites
Introduction to Information Technology
Digital Design 1
Digital Design 2
Digital Design 3
Business Software Applications 1
None
CCC or Intro to IT
Digital Design 1
Digital Design 2
CCC or Intro to IT
Introduction to Information Technology
This course is designed to provide an introduction to information technology concepts and careers as well as the impact
information technology has on the world, people, and industry and basic web design concepts. The content includes
information technology career research; operating systems and software applications; electronic communications
including e-mail and Internet services; basic HTML, DHTML, and XML web commands and design; emerging
technologies and Web page design.
Digital Design I
This course is designed to develop basic entry-level skills required for careers in the digital publishing industry. Students
will be introduced to various computer graphics software programs and techniques pertinent to the graphic design field.
Emphasis will be on the communication of concepts through the medium of design and type. Students will explore the
elements and principles of design by using the computer to create finished designs. Images will be created from the
purposes of advertising, promotion, editorial illustration, brand identity, and packaging. The content includes computer
skills; digital publishing concepts and operations; layout, design, measurement activities; and digital imaging as well as
communication, collaboration and decision-making activities; critical thinking; and problem solving.
Digital Design 2
This course builds upon the design foundations explored in Digital Design 1. Students will further explore intermediate to
advanced concepts and procedures in the preparation of electronic art and design. Students will continue their study of the
software programs introduced to them in the introductory course, and design projects will be more self-directed and
advanced. Particular attention will be paid to elements of design, layout, navigation and ease of finding information on a
website. Students will utilize Adobe Dreamweaver the web page authoring program and HTML to create and refine Web
pages. This is a project-based course and part of the student assessment will be based on practical Web pages created by
students.
Digital Design 3
This course takes an in-depth look at the processes of web design and interactive communications via the Internet.
Students will learn how to plan, design, and maintain fully operational web sites that consist of graphic user interfaces,
sound, motion, text and online forms using applications such as Dreamweaver. Topics include, but are not limited to, how
the Internet works, site development and maintenance, frames, tables, forms, site publishing (ftp and http), and
interactivity. Students will also be introduced to web marketing and e-commerce trends.
Business Software Applications 1
This course is designed to develop proficiency in using the advanced features of software programs to perform officerelated tasks. Students will use the Microsoft Office 2013 Suite to study advanced features of Word, Excel, and Access
by integrating data from each software application. Features will include columns, queries, multiple sheets, managing
databases, transferring data between applications, and adding objects to web pages.
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COOPERATIVE DIVERSIFIED OJT (CDE)
Course
Prerequisites
Cooperative Diversified OJT (CDE)
Priority given to seniors.
Must have a Job and
Enrolled in a career related course
Cooperative Diversified OJT (CDE)
Do you have a job? Would you like to earn high school credit for working? The purpose of CDE is to provide the student
with competencies developed through paid, supervised, on-the-job training.
The student must have a paid, supervised, legal and safe job before enrolling in CDE. Each student’s job placement must
be related to the job preparatory program in which the student is currently enrolled or has completed. Job Preparatory
Programs include Agribusiness Technology; Agriscience Foundations, Agricultural Mechanics and Veterinary Assisting;
Business Technology: Information Technology (previously CCC), Digital Design and Business and Entrepreneurial
Principles; Family and Consumer Science; Culinary Arts and Fashion Design; and Industrial Technology; carpentry,
Building Construction Technologies and Drafting.
Students may schedule CDE for any period of the day and do not have to actually work during their work release periods;
for example, they may work evenings and weekends. Child Labor Law restrictions pertain to students under the age 18
for working hour limitations and unsafe prohibited occupations. Time cars submission is required by the State of Florida.
The student must maintain and turn in time cards to document their hours worked. The cards must be signed and verified
by the employer.
The student must work a minimum of 175 hours to earn a full credit. This is an average of 5 hours per week for each
period the student is enrolled in CDE.
The teacher/coordinator must meet with the site supervisor/employer at least once during each grading period for the
purpose of evaluating the student’s progress in attaining the competencies listed in the training plan. The student’s grade
will be determined by a combination of the evaluation grade given by the site supervisor/employer and timely submission
of quarterly agreement forms and monthly time card.
A student may not be enrolled in CDE and Extern at the same job site.
CDE may be taken for one or more semesters. A student may earn multiple credits in this course. Maximum of 3 CDE
credits per school year.
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FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE
Courses
Family Dynamics
Nutrition and Wellness
Parenting Skills
Child Development
Design Service Core (Sewing)
Principles of Fashion Design Services
Family, Home & Consumer Technology
Prerequisites
None
None
None
None
None
Design Service
Gr 11, 12
Family Dynamics
Your home life and family are two of the major factors that bring happiness and fulfillment in life. In this
course we will look at the purpose of dating, engagement and marriage. You will budget and plan your
wedding from the engagement ring to the honeymoon and have the opportunity to participate in a play wedding
and reception. With knowledge, options, and good choices you can plan your future and a happy full life.
Nutrition and Wellness
Love to eat? Want to stay healthy and in shape? Does your food selection sometimes get in the way? Find out
how you can make wise food choices and still enjoy all those foods you like to eat. Compare various types of nutritional
foods and learn about food and food preparation by demonstration, cooking labs, videos and guest speakers.
Parenting Skills
This course equips students with positive parenting skills which are critical for the total development of the child.
Students also develop skills necessary for decision-making and solving critical thinking issues. BTO dolls (electronic
babies) are used in this course to aide students in understanding the demands, requirements, and changes that parents
experience while caring for infants. However, students must make prior arrangements for a ride home on the days that
they have the BTO dolls in their care. These dolls are not allowed on the school bus.
Child Development
Students will gain great knowledge and understanding of human reproduction, birth, and delivery. Students will learn
how a child develops physically, socially, emotionally, and intellectually from conception to adolescence. Students will
develop and stage activities for little children, as well as visit the maternity ward and pediatrics unit of a hospital.
Design Service Core (Sewing)
Want to learn how to sew? From sewing on a button to creating your own fashion design, this course will prepare
students to identify the characteristics of fibers, fabrics, and textiles. We will begin by learning the sewing basics and
grow from there. This course is the core course of the fashion design services program. It is designed to develop
competencies in the areas of the fashion design industry. It includes essential basic skills for working in design services,
leadership and organizational skills, basic principles of design, textile characteristics and care, employability skills,
relationship of human factors to design services, safe use of tools and equipment, and selection of appropriate materials.
Principles of Fashion Design Services
This course is the second course on the Fashion Design Services program. It is designed to further develop competencies
in the area of Fashion Design Services. It includes employment opportunities in fashion design services, basic skills
essential to working in this industry, employability skills, elements and principles of design, the terminology of the
apparel industry, garment construction skills, sales techniques, and entrepreneurship.
Family, Home & Consumer Technology
Are you ready to move out and move on? This course will prepare you to be successful on your own. Part I will cover
skills such as personal finance, budgeting, meal planning, interview skills and career choice. Part II will explore
residential choice and design, transportation, home maintenance, technology and clothing. We will learn some basic
home skills such as sewing, cooking, cleaning, time management, repairs and maintenance throughout the year.
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HOSPITALITY and TOURISM
CULINARY ARTS
Course
Pre-requisites
Culinary Arts 1
Culinary Arts 2
Culinary Arts 3
Culinary Arts 4
Gr 10, 11, 12
Culinary 1
Culinary 2
Culinary 3
Culinary Arts 1
This course covers the history of the food service industry and careers in that industry. Students will learn to plan menus,
make healthy and nutritious food choices, decorate cakes, and prepare simple and exotic dishes. Students travel to a local
restaurant to learn etiquette, business operation, and other aspects of the food industry. Students operate restaurant
equipment and use technology in this class that helps prepare them for living on their own.
Culinary Arts 2
In this course students will learn front-of-the-house and back-of-the-house duties. Students will develop competence in
career and job opportunities. Students will prepare quality food products and present them creatively; demonstrate safe,
sanitary work procedures; understand food science principles related to cooking and baking; and utilize nutrition concepts
when planning meals/menus. .
Culinary Arts 3
This is a continuation of Culinary Arts 2. Students will advance in the level of training for food and catering services.
They will prepare and present a variety of advanced food products; create centerpieces; and research laws specific to the
hospitality industry (including handling of alcohol). In this course the student will research career opportunities in
professional cooking/baking; follow guidelines on food selection, purchasing, and storage; and use communication skills.
Job shadowing is a highlight of this class as well as eating and critiquing area restaurants and their foods. Students enter
culinary competitions and create edible centerpieces. A gourmet “sampling” event will be the grand finale.
Culinary Arts 4
In this course students will prepare various meals and food products including those for individuals with various
nutritional needs and/or dietary restrictions. The relationship between nutrition and wellness will be examined. Cost
control techniques and profitability will be covered as well as analysis of food establishment menus. Students will also
demonstrate basic financial literacy skills.
ROTC
ROTC I - Introduction to Air Force Basics of Drill & Ceremonies
(1st year ROTC students)
ROTC II - Continued lessons on Air Force & Drill & Ceremonies
(2nd year ROTC students)
ROTC III - Communications, Life Skills & Career Opportunities, Drill & Ceremonies (3rd year ROTC students)
ROTC IV - Leadership & Management Drill & Ceremonies
(4th year ROTC students)
rd
th
ROTC V Honors – Must be 3 or 4 year ROTC student and only with ROTC instructor approval
ROTC I- V
Air Force Junior ROTC is a joint cooperative effort between the United States air Force and the secondary school system.
It is designed to build better and more productive citizens, and strengthens character, teaches responsibility, and acquaints
cadets with the present Air Force and careers in the military. Most importantly, Air Force Junior ROTC will help students
become leaders who are confident, self-reliant, and self-disciplined. JROTC promotes community service, instills
responsibility, character, and self-discipline and provides instruction in management and leadership.
37
CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
CARPENTRY and CONSTRUCTION
Building Trades and Construction Design Technology 1
Building Trades and Construction Design Technology 2
Building Trades and Construction Design Technology 3
Building Trades and Construction Design Technology 4
The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment or advanced training in the building construction
industry. These are the first two of a series of courses that could lead to completing the NCCER Certification
exam.
Building Trades and Construction Design Technology 1
The purpose of this course is to develop the competencies essential to the building construction industry. These
competencies include skills and knowledge related to safety practices, understanding all aspects of the industry, the use of
hand and power tools, employability skills, human relations and leadership skills and related construction theory.
Building Trades and Construction Design Technology 2
The purpose of this course is to develop the competencies necessary for the building, construction and repair industry.
These competencies relate to communication and computer skills, construction components, materials and hardware; and
blueprints, specifications, and construction documents.
Building Trades and Construction Design Technology 3
The purpose of this course is to develop the competencies necessary for the building, construction and repair industry.
These competencies relate to entrepreneurship, building codes and regulations, and CAD drawings and construction
documents.
Building Trades and Construction Design Technology 4
The purpose of this course is to provide students with hands on skills in the carpentry and masonry trades.
CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
DRAFTING
Drafting 1
Drafting 2
Students who are interested in a career in any of the following areas would benefit from a Drafting class: Architect, Civil
Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Residential Drafting and Design Construction Foreman, Surveyor,
Building Material Sales or Landscape Designer.
Drafting I
This program focuses on broad transferable skills and the understanding of all aspects of the drafting industry.
Students will learn to use basic Drafting instruments. Course content includes sketching, basic geometric
construction, lettering, multiview drawings, dimensioning, Introduction to Architectual Drafting and Bridge
Design with model building.
Drafting II
This course is designed to provide instruction in drafting skills for pictorial drawing, surface development,
architectural drawing. Students will demonstrate an understanding of civil drawing and electrical/electronic
literacy.
38
OTHER ELECTIVES
Executive Internship Level I, II, III, IV
Gr 11/12
The purpose of Executive Internship is to supplement the existing curriculum by providing community internships.
Students apply textbook learning, leadership skills, and understanding in challenging and creative professional areas. The
students will learn the skills and abilities needed to maintain full-time employment. Students will be responsible to find
their own placement and students must provide their own transportation to their extern location off-campus.
Students may schedule Executive internship for any period of the day and are required to attend their Externship during
the scheduled class period(s). The student must maintain and turn in weekly time cards to document their volunteered
hours. Time cards must be signed and verified by the sponsor/mentor.
The student must work a minimum of 100 hours to earn a full credit. This is an average of 3 hours per week for each
period the student is enrolled in Executive Internship.
The teacher/coordinator will meet with the Extern sponsor/mentor once during each grading period for the purpose of
evaluating the student’s progress. The student’s grade will be determined by a combination of the evaluation grade given
by the sponsor/mentor, weekly meetings, 3 written assignments/9 weeks and timely submission of weekly time cards and
quarterly contracts.
A student may not be enrolled in Extern and CDE at the same job site.
Executive Internship may be taken for one or more semesters. A student may earn multiple credits in this course.
Maximum of 4 credits.
AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)
This rigorous academic elective course prepares students in the AVID program for success in college and careers.
Students receive instruction utilizing a rigorous college preparatory curriculum provided by the AVID Center, tutorfacilitated study groups, motivational activities and academic survival skills. There is an emphasis on analytical writing,
study skills and test taking, note-taking, and research. In AVID, students participate in activities that incorporate
strategies focused on writing, inquiry, collaboration, and reading to support their academic growth.
Inquiry Skills
This 9th grade course provides opportunities to develop and enhance critical-thinking skills and problem solving strategies,
develop strategies for specific study skills improvement in content areas, and develop short-term and long-term
educational goals.
Leadership Skills Development
Gr 9 only
The purpose of this ninth grade course is to teach problem-solving, decision-making, communication skills, leadership
skills, group dynamics, public speaking, time and stress management, human relations, team building, and goal setting.
This course is required for all first-year ninth grade students.
Workplace Technology Applications
offered through Gr 9 Leadership Class
This online course will be offered through the Leadership Skills Development course and meets the new state statute
requiring completion of an online course as a graduation requirement. Students will learn basic concepts of computers
and telecommunications, including use of the Internet, the keyboard and Boolean search strategies, will use word
processing software to set up a spreadsheet file, produce a report, set up a database and will demonstrate knowledge of the
impact computers have on society, as well as the need for ethical use.
39
CAREER ACADEMY AT SOUTH FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE
Located on South Florida State College’s Highlands Campus, The Career Academy at SFSC is a joint venture of the School Board of Highlands
County and the college’s Division of Applied Sciences and Technologies. Students will spend a half day in standard high school academic classes,
taught by Highlands County school district teachers, and a half day in college level technical courses taught by SFSC instructors. Therefore,
students spend the full school day on the SFSC Highlands Campus. Costs are deferred for tuition and books.
By undergoing technical training while in high school, students can earn a high school diploma while completing the requirements for an occupational
certificate. Upon high school graduation, students will be better qualified to hold a well paying job in the technical field of their choosing.
Students attending the Career Academy at SFSC will remain enrolled in the school they are zoned to attend. A Career Academy student, if eligible,
may participate in extracurricular activities at their school of enrollment. However, it is the student’s responsibility to arrange a schedule that will
meet the needs of a particular sport or club activity. Upon meeting the requirements for high school graduation, a Career Academy student will
receive his/her diploma from the school of enrollment and may participate in commencement ceremonies.
Transportation will be provided for Career Academy students. There will be community bus routes that will transport students each morning and
afternoon to the SFSC campus. Students can also eat breakfast and lunch at the academy. At the same time, they can enjoy the activities, events,
facilities, and privileges of being an SFSC student as well as a Highlands County high school student.
The Career Academy is a one year commitment for the student and parent. After the first week of school, no student or parent schedule
change requests will be granted. However, if a student is not successful at the Career Academy, an administrative schedule change may
return that student to his/her high school at any time throughout the school year.
Admission Requirements
Students must meet the following requirements in order to apply for admission to the Career Academy at SFSC:
1. Successful completion of English 1
2. Successful completion of Algebra 1
3. Earn a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0 or higher
4. Be on pace to graduate on time with your peers
5. Earn the minimum score on the FCAT Reading test so that the student does not require a reading remediation class
6. A student’s attendance and behavior records will also be reviewed and considered in the admission process.
The Learning Environment
The [email protected] is a special place where high school students have the opportunity to earn high school credits and participate in college level
vocational courses on a college campus. This requires maturity and responsibility on the part of the student.
 Educational maturity and the ability to work in a college environment will be expected of all students.
 A typical high school environment will be maintained for half of the day while the student takes his/her high school credits in building L on the
SFSC campus.
 Students will work side by side with adult learners in vocational classes for half of the day. These courses will be rigorous.
 The student will enjoy greater freedom on campus, but with that comes greater responsibility. If appropriate behavior is not maintained, the
student may be withdrawn from the program.
 The student must accept and adhere to the schedule and rules that apply at the Career Academy.
Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE)
The TABE test is required of all students in vocational programs to meet Florida Department of Education’s minimum basic skill requirements. The
TABE test is a broad range achievement test that measures basic skills in reading, language, mathematics, and spelling. All students enrolling in a
vocational course at SFSC must take the TABE test. TABE testing is conducted in the Student Service Center in Building B room 255. The student
will need to call the testing center to set up a testing appointment 24 hours in advance at 863-784-7214. To take the complete battery of tests
requires approximately four hours. ALL STUDENTS MUST TAKE ALL SECTIONS OF THE TABE TEST BEFORE THE FIRST DAY OF THE NEW
SCHOOL YEAR. Some programs may have an earlier deadline for TABE testing. The student will need a Florida Drivers License, Florida ID, or
school ID to sit for the test. Access this link for a computer aided tutorial for TABE practice: http://www.testprepreview.com/tabe_practice.htm
High School Academic Course Offerings at the [email protected]
English
Math
Science
Social Studies
Other
English 2
Geometry
Biology
World History
Internship
English 3
Algebra 2
Chemistry
US History
Speech
40
Eng. 4 for Coll. Readiness
Math for Coll. Readiness
Government
Study Hall for FLVS
Economics
NON DISCRIMINATION POLICY
No person shall, on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, age, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, political or religious beliefs, national
or ethnic origin, or genetic information, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any
education program or activity, or in any employment conditions or practices conducted by this School District, except as provided by law.
SFSC Vocational Programs
 The Automotive Collision, Repair, and Refinishing program prepares the student for employment in the auto collision repair and refinishing
industry as a repair technician or an auto collision painter. Course content includes fundamentals of auto body repair, basic sheet metal repair,
painting techniques, science of unibody repair, and panel repair and replacement. TABE score required for certification by the end of this program
– Reading (9), Math (9), and Language (9).
 The Automotive Service Technology program prepares the student to enter the automotive service industry as a technician. Course content
includes brake systems, steering, suspension, manual and automatic transmissions, automotive heating and air conditioning, electrical systems,
and engine repair. TABE score required for certification by the end of this program – Reading (9), Math (10), and Language (9).
 The Air Conditioning, Refrigeration and Heating Technology program prepares the student for employment as a technician or repair person of
home and commercial air conditioning and refrigeration systems. Course content includes the fundamentals of refrigeration, basic electricity, and
heating systems. TABE score required for certification by the end of this program – Reading (9), Math (10), and Language (9).
 The Drafting program prepares students for employment as drafting assistants. Course content includes communication skills, leadership skills,
human relations and employability skills, safe and efficient work practices, blueprint machine operation, use of drafting tools and equipment,
drafting skills, charts and graphs, computer aided drawings, and technical mathematics. TABE score required for certification by the end of this
program – Reading (9), Math (10), and Language (9). There is a possibility of this program being deleted for the 2013-14 school year.
 The Food Management, Production and Services (Culinary) program prepares the student for employment as a kitchen manager and operations cook. The program also provides supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in this occupation. Course content
includes kitchen organization, sanitation, and planning for production; quantity food preparation with emphasis on timing, quality, efficiency, and
cost controls; detailed studies in raw materials, recipes, menu planning, and the use of institutional equipment; and banquet presentation, catering,
and other specialty preparations. Lab experience is an integral portion of this program. This includes instruction use of utensils, equipment, food
and procedures required to prepare meals at The Hotel Jacaranda. TABE score required for certification by the end of this program – Reading (9),
Math (9), and Language (9).
 The Networking Support Services program prepares students for working with sophisticated networking hardware and operating system
software. At the core of this degree program is the Cisco Networking Academy curriculum, designed to prepare students for working with the
ultimate in hi-tech internet equipment and services. Those students who have completed the Network Support Services certificate will be eligible
to articulate 12 credits towards an A.A.S. degree in Networking Services Technology. TABE score required for certification by the end of this
program – Reading (9), Math (9), and Language (9).
 The Computer Electronics Technology program prepares students for employment as technicians in computer and LAN (network) service and
support related businesses and industries. Course content includes AC Circuits, DC Circuits, Digital Devices, PC Hardware Service, PC Software
Service and Network Service. TABE score required for certification by the end of this program – Reading (9), Math (10), and Language (9).
 The Medical Administrative Specialist program prepares the student for employment as an administrative medical office assistant, medical
records clerk, or a receptionist in a medical records office, clinic, or other community health agency. Course content includes basic and advanced
medical office procedures, medical terminology, insurance claim processing, and business communication coupled with instruction in skills basic
to today’s office, such as keyboarding, filing, handling the telephone, work processing, computerized billing, medical document transcribing, and
calculating. Emphasis is placed on employability skills to include resume writing and interview preparation. Students who receive their Medical
Secretary occupational certificate may receive up to 30 credits toward an A.A.S. degree in Office Technology-Medical Secretary. TABE score
required for certification by the end of this program – Reading (10), Math (10), and Language (10).
 The Administrative Assistant program prepares the student for an office occupation such as typist, payroll clerk, accounts payable/accounts
receivable clerk, word processor, receptionist file clerk, general office clerk, secretary, and administrative assistant. Course content includes
accounting (elective), payroll, business English, business communications, keyboarding, introduction to business trends, office machines,
transcription, fundamental basic office procedure, and introduction to computers, work relations, and interpersonal skills. Students who receive the
Secretarial/Administrative Assistant certificate may receive up to 30 credits toward an A.A.S. degree in General Secretarial, Office Systems
Technology. TABE score required for certification by the end of this program – Reading (10), Math (10), and Language (10).
41
 The Medical Assisting program is a three-year program and is for students entering in the 10th grade so they will graduate from high school with
an occupational certificate in medical assisting. Students will study medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, clinical procedures, phlebotomy,
EKG technology, and medical office administration. Upon completion of the program, students are eligible to sit for the exam to become certified
as a Registered Medical Assistant (RMA) through the American Medical Technologists organization (AMT). As a Registered Medical Assistant,
opportunities include employment in hospitals and outpatient facilities, and in physician, chiropractic, podiatrist, and optometrist offices. TABE
score required for certification for this program – Reading (10), Math (10), and Language (10). This program has some out of pocket expenses for
students.
 The Cosmetology program gives personalized instruction in precision hair cutting, styling, and coloring, manicuring and pedicuring, skin care, and
applying makeup. What you learn in the classroom is reinforced by hands-on activities in SFSC’s full-service salon. As you grow in knowledge and
ability, you’ll gain the confidence to unleash your creativity, communicate effectively, and adopt the professional ethics that will guarantee your
success. Receive your cosmetology license by passing the Florida State Board of Cosmetology’s licensing exam. This program is only available
to seniors and there are very specific entrance requirements which include minimum scores on the TABE test and the ability to finish high school
with online/evening classes. TABE score required for admission to this program – Reading (10), Math (10), and Language (10). This program has
some out of pocket expenses for students.
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APPENDIX
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