Huntington Beach untington Beach Community Garden Garden

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Huntington
untington Beach Community Garden
October 2015 Newsletter
HBCG Winners at
the OC Fair!
A big shout out to our gardeners who entered the
OC Fair! Our gardeners know how to succeed!
Judy McNulty (A7) entered and won first place with
the doll, and third place with the afghan!
** ANNOUNCEMENT
NNOUNCEMENTS
ENTS **
GENERAL MEETING
Our meetings are held the third Wednesday of the
month at the Lake Park Clubhouse, 11th/12th and Lake
Street, Huntington Beach.
Beach Get to know other
members at 6:30pm
0pm with Meet and Greet; our
program begins at 7:00pm.
We have Educational Meetings February, March, April,
June and October. May is our annual meeting and
elections. September and December are social
functions. We have NO membership meetings in
January, July, August and November.
BOARD MEETING
Board meetings are the first Wednesday of the month,
at the Lake Park Clubhouse. Members are always
welcome. Our next meeting is November 4, 2015,
6:30pm.
Annette Parsons (A12) shared her trifecta ribbons:
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
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HBCG WINNERS
ANNOUNCEMENTS, GARDEN HOURS
HARVEST BRIGADE UPDATE
CONTACT INFORMATION; SOWING & REAPING
GIRL SCOUT AWARDS UPDATE
GOT POWDERY MILDEW? OCTOBER MEETING
THE NEED FOR VEGETABLES; FARM TO FOAM UPDATE
PLOT SHARING; TRANSITION TIME
Like us on
Facebook!
Sheryllyn McClintock
Clintock entered a lot of produce and
only one beet won a ribbon! In the floral category she
did much better with her roses, with several ribbons in
all three rankings.
What did you enter? Email us your details!
Garden Hours:
And OFFICIAL winner of Goofy Teen award is Sam
McClintock, who stayed in the ice house for over an
hour at 32 degrees F, breaking all records by 100%. No
ribbons, but tender joints for days….
Enter at or after 7am, Monday through Saturday
Enter at or after 8am on Sunday
Exit before 7pm Monday through Sunday
Tell us about your entries and ribbons!
Complaints are made when the rules are broken!
Harvest Brigade
Brigade:
Swimming in
Tomatoes!
Part of HBCG’s Mission Statement is to donate food
to the needy of Huntington Beach. Donations are
collected in the container, and delivered a minimum
of 3 days a week (Mon, Weds, Friday). Distribution to
the needy is done through St Mary’s by the Sea (Nena
Taylor); Collette’s Children’s Home (Linda Reely), and
HB Youth Shelter (Barb Limbocker). Thank you, ladies
for making the deliveries!
Donations have continued to increase in July. Over
344 pounds have been delivered to the needy since
Memorial Day! And YES, mostly tomatoes!
HBCG Board Members
Contact Us: [email protected]
President
Vice President
Treasurer
Secretary
Other
Members
Elizabeth Eldridge
Sheryllyn McClintock
Paula Redmond
Marquille Randall
Annette Parsons
Joanne Rasmussen
(714) 625-3378
Bill Clow
Scott Edwards
Sowing and
Reaping
FOR HUNTINGTON BEACH
IN OCTOBER
Sow Indoors:
broccoli*, Brussels
cauliflower*, kale*, leek*, spinach**
sprouts*,
Sow Outdoors:
Since the Garden and Harvest Brigade began, over
4308 pounds have been donated; with over 1501
pounds donated since January 2015. Thank you!
beans, beets, broccoli, Brussels
sprouts, carrots**, cauliflower**, cucumbers, kale,
leek, parsnip, squash*, tomato*, turnip**
July’s
’s donors include: Alison Quoron, Annette Parsons,
Barb Limbocker, Ben & Vicki Bassham, Bill Clow, Bob
Dutton, Bob Lindsay, Bruce Dodd, Chuck Nichols,
Darlene Becica, DeeDee Carillo, Denise Dangora,
Elizabeth
izabeth Eldridge, Gene Barbee, Gerry & Margaret
Button, Greater Huntington Beach Interfaith Brigade
(Harvest Brigade), Ginny Patton, Joanne Rasmussen,
John Magnante, Laura Irving, Lauren Brooks, Laurie
Caprai,, Linda Duchein, Lisa Zylstra, Melissa Walsh,
Michelle
chelle & Chris Cappo, Nena Taylor, Pam Chapman,
Paula Redmond, Patricia Sutton, Rich Hewton (Harvest
Brigade), Robert & Jeannette King, Robert Hart,
Sheryllyn McClintock, Steve Thomas, Terry Harmon,
Todd Harmon, Tom Gill & Sari Jeske, Trudy Reed, and
Valerie Spingola!
Harvest: eggplant, melon, okra, onions, peas, pepper,
August: Despite the heat, over 221 pounds were
donated in August! Special thanks go to: Autumn
Wineger,, Bill Clow, Bob Dutton, Bruce Dodd, David &
Rose Nathenson, Deb Walter, DeeDee Carillo, Dr
Chuck Nichols, Elizabeth Eldridge, Gene Barbee, Gerry
& Margaret Button, Huntington Beach Interfaith
Council (Harvest Brigade), Joanna Tabata, Joy Stich,
Kathy Williams, Kyle Hancock, Laura Irving, Lauren
Brooks, Laurie Caprai, Linda Duchein, Lisa Zylstra,
Nena Taylor, Pam Chapman, Paula Redmond, Philip
Sneyd, Rich Hewton (Harvest Brigade), Robert &
Jeannette King, Terry Harmon, Trudy Reed, and
Valerie Spingola!
potato, pumpkin, sweet potato, tomato, watermelon
Notes: * Before the 15thof the month;**After the 15th
Girl Scout Gold
Award Update
The beautification project in the northeast corner of
the garden is complete!
Our yearly garden party was held Sunday, September
20th at Joanne Rasmussen's home with approximately
50 members in attendance. Many thanks to Joanne,
Donna Hovis and Marquille Randall for all of their help
with the party. Girl Scout Gold Award candidate
Grace Ellison gave an excellent presentation regarding
the beautification garden she created. Although it
was a very warm day, it was a lovely celebration with
lots of great food.
Grace’s Gold Award project was covered by the HB
Independent. Read it here:
http://www.hbindependent.com/opinion/tn-hbihttp://www.hbindependent.com/opinion/tn
me-1008-reader-report-20150930,0,73216
20150930,0,7321603.story
Thank you everyone!
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reat Powdery Mildew Naturally:
Naturally
How to Treat
Got Powdery
Mildew
Mildew?
LAURI CAPRAI
Powdery
mildew on tomatoes attacks a plant’s
foliage and stems.
Powdery mildew is a fungus that needs living plants in
order to grow, but does not directly “kill” the tomato
plants. The fungi feed on the tomato plant’s cells.
Yellowed (then brown) leaves remain, accompanied
by white powdery growth. This “powdery mildew”
grows as thin layers on the surfaces of the tomato leaf.
Symptoms:
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Yellow patches on lower leaves eventually turn
brown.
White, powdery spots appear on leaf surfaces,
spreading to cover leaves and even stems.
Leaves of the affected plant eventually die and fall off,
leaving fruit exposed to sunscald, and the affected
plants produce fewer and smaller less flavorful
tomatoes.
Some ways to prevent Powdery Mildew
Mildew:
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Soil testing. Powdery mildew thrives when
nitrogen levels are high.
Give them space. Plant tomatoes more than 24
inches
es apart to let air to move among leaves and
prevent the disease from spreading easily. In
addition, stake tomato plants for better
circulation.
Keep weeds down. The fungus can spread easily
among all kinds of plants.
Avoid overhead watering. Wet leaves al
allow fungi
to spread rapidly.
Apply fertilizer at regular intervals. Spikes in soil
nitrogen encourage mildew, but systematic
feeding maintains levels.
Remove and destroy affected plants at the end of
the season.
Mix up a baking soda spray or aspirin fungal spray to
treat the affected plants. See information below,
courtesy of Home Guides.
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/natural-remedieshttp://homeguides.sfgate.com/natural
tomato-blight-powdery-mildew
mildew-43797.html
Baking Soda Spray:
1 tablespoon of baking soda mixed with 2 1/2
tablespoons of vegetable oil. Once you have
thoroughly mixed the baking soda with the oil, add 1
gallon of water and 1/2 teaspoon of castile soap.
For easier application, transfer the baking-soda
baking
mixture to a pump
ump sprayer and thoroughly apply the
spray to the tomato plants, ensuring the mixture
covers both the upper and lower leaves as well as the
soil. Multiple applications every 5 to 7 days may be
needed in order to control the fungal disease. The
baking-soda spray can be used as a preventive
measure or to control the fungus at the first signs of
infection.
Aspirin Fungal Spray:
The aspirin used as an over-the
the-counter pain medicine
helps to treat powdery mildew attacking your tomato
plants. You must use uncoated
uncoate aspirin tablets
measuring 325 milligrams and dissolve two tablets in 1
quart of water. A garden sprayer or squirt bottle
works well to apply the aspirin spray to the tomato
plants and allows you to thoroughly coat the entire
plant, including the undersides
undersid of the leaves. If after a
week powdery mildew symptoms persist, reapply the
aspirin treatment to the tomatoes. According to the
University of Florida, testing conducted by the
University of Rhode Island concluded that tomato
plants sprayed with the aspirin
aspi fungal spray yielded a
higher crop than tomato plants treated with
commercial fertilizers.
For more information, see www.tomatodirt.com
October Meeting
ROUNDTABLE
Bring your gardening questions! Our experienced
panel is there for you! Find out what to plant for your
fall and winter garden, lessons learned on what works
and what doesn’t, tips and tricks about gardening. We
will also learn how to deal with gophers. 6:30pm at
Lake Park Clubhouse, Huntington
Hunting
Beach.
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The Need for
Vegetables
Vegetables!
You can add spices, beans, salt, and sea weed
depending on your tastes. Pour into a large
serving bowl and enjoy!!!
DEBRA TURNER, HEALTH COACH
Green vegetables are foods most commonly missing
in American diets.
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Nourishing your body with greens may naturally
crowd out foods that aren’t as good for you.
Greens help with your immune system, your blood
and respiratory system.
Leafy greens are high in alkaline which may be
beneficial to people living in heavy pollution areas.
Green vegetables help replenish your alkaline
mineral stores to continue to filter out pollutants.
Green is associated with spring, the time of
renewal, refreshment and vital energy.
Nutritionally greens are very high in calcium,
magnesium, iron, potassium, phosphorous, zinc
and vitamins A, C, E and K.
Explore new vegetables and cooking methods.
Steaming, boiling,
ling, sautéing in oil or water,
waterless cooking and pickling!
Try fermenting – it creates additional health
benefits through the process that is great for your
gut.
Raw salad is so refreshing on warm days and it
won’t weigh you down.
We have an advantage of living in a climate that
allows us to have access to an endless variety of
fruits and vegetables. Eat seasonally – think about
the grounding vegetables – squash, pumpkin,
potatoes in the fall and winter.
Sweet Vegetables
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Have a sweet tooth? Try these vegetables,
egetables, carrots,
corn, onions, beets, winter squash, sweet
potatoes and yams.
Some lesser known vegetables that are semi
semisweet are turnips, parsnips and rutabaga.
Pick 5 from the above vegetables. Chop the
hardest ones into smaller pieces, the softer ones
can be cut into larger pieces. Use a medium pot
and add enough water to barely cover vegetables.
Cook until they reach the desired softness. The
softer they get thee sweeter they get.
From Foam to Farm
Spent Grain
Compost Update
Life has it twists and turns, and due to needs of her
family, the compost project is being dismantled.
Thank you Elizabeth, for all the good you do.
Plot Sharing
Would you like to share your plot? Some of our
gardeners would like to work with another person. If
this is you, please email us at
[email protected]
[email protected]
Transition Time!
August, September and October have been hot! It
can be too hot for tomatoes to set new fruit (they
need cooler evenings),, and it is the end of the growth
cycle for plants we started in spring. (Subsequent
plantings are still growing.) Nearly ripe and over ripe
food is beingg attacked by critters.
Now we harvest. And remove weeds. We evaluate
how our summer garden grew. We reconsider our
goals, buy seeds or seedlings, and prepare for winter.
For those of us love winter gardening, it is time to
refresh our growing areas with
wit new amendment. And
deal with critter tunnels ;-).
For those of us who are absent during the winter, it is
time to prepare your growing areas for spring with
fresh amendment, and nitrogen fixing seeds, like
buckwheat, bush peas, and bush beans. These plants
pla
will give your plot an extra boost of grow power!
Buckwheat seeds are $2.99 from Botanical Interests
for a large bag. They sell out quickly this time of year.
A square plot needs 1-1/2
1/2 packages for growing areas.
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