Southern farmers loving fat lambs

Farmer
Friday, December 9, 2016
Sediment
tracking
P2
Farm
maths
P14
In association with NZFarmer.co.nz
Southern farmers loving fat lambs
Northern Southland farmers Scott and Steven Romes amongst the chicory on their farm. Story pages 9 and 10.
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2
Farmer 9.12.16
Farming run-off small in estuary
BRITTANY PICKETT
Jacobs River Estuary’s main
tributaries are the Aparima and
Pourakino rivers. ROBYN EDIE/FAIRFAX NZ
M
ost of the sediment
ending up in Jacobs
Estuary is marine,
with farming
appearing to have a small input in
the rest.
DairyNZ water quality
specialist Justin Kitto led a public
meeting in Riverton on Monday to
discuss the sediment moving from
the Aparima and Pourakino
rivers into Jacobs Estuary, at
Riverton.
His information came from the
2014 DairyNZ and Environment
Southland pilot study on sediment
tracking in the estuary, which
found 90 per cent of the sediment
was marine. The final 10 per cent
was terrestrial - from the land with 43 per cent originating from
farming pastures.
‘‘The estuaries could be the
problem child for Southland.‘‘
Estuaries accumulated
sediment, and were susceptible to
accumulating contaminants, he
said. Those contaminants
included terrestrial sediment less
than two millimetres in diameter.
Research suggests terrestrial
sediment could have an adverse
effect on marine ecosystems, and
communities, he said.
All plants produce organic
compounds and leach into soil.
Those compounds have fatty acids
in them, making them traceable
from their bio-markers. The study
was approached by setting up four
monitoring sites in the estuary,
then taking nine river samples
from points on the Pourakino and
Aparima, as well as samples of
relevant land uses.
Kitto said the results found
that 90 per cent of sediment in the
estuary was marine. However, of
the final 10 per cent, 53 per cent
came from bank erosion, 31 per
cent was from sheep pasture, six
per cent was from dairy pasture
and the final six per cent was
from deer pasture.
It also found 80 per cent of
terrestrial sediment came from
the Pourakino River, he said.
The results from the river
samples showed some differences
in what was ending up in the
estuary and what sediment was in
the rivers.
Between Hamilton Burn/
Aparima Confluence and Wreys
Bush 61 per cent of the sediment
was from dairy pasture. While in
the Aparima above Otautau 90 per
cent of sediment was from bank
erosion, five per cent was from
sheep pasture, 2.5 per cent was
dairy swedes and the final 2.5 per
cent was from drain clearance.
The Pourakino River samples
showed 54 per cent of sediment
was from sheep pasture, 17 per
cent was from bank erosion, 12
per cent was dairy, 11 per cent
was deer and five per cent was
from drain clearance.
While the study indicated
some problem areas, it was not to
be taken as gospel because it was
a pilot study and had limitations,
Kitto said.
He also pointed out the study
did not take into account, or
measure, the lag-time of sediment
travelling from the rivers to the
estuary. The sediment was also
not age-dated and could have been
there for a long time, possibly
before land uses began to change
in the area, he said.
However, it was clear that
farming was having an effect on
the sediment in the estuary and it
could be a big ‘‘stresser’’ for the
marine environment in the
future, he said.
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9.12.16 Farmer
Dairy Hub
conversion
underway
BRITTANY PICKETT
S
outhern dairy farmers can
celebrate a victory after
the ground was broken at
the long-awaited Southern
Dairy Hub, but the agri-business
centre has been put on hold until
more funds can be secured.
Driving a digger, Economic
Development Minister Steven
Joyce turned the first sod at the
349 hectare Makarewa farm last
Wednesday.
A partnership between
DairyNZ, AgResearch and the
Southern Dairy Development
Trust made the hub a reality.
But Southern Dairy Hub
chairman Maurice Hardie said
the agri-business centre had to be
put on hold because the project
was too dear to complete at the
moment.
‘‘We always want to make sure
that it self funds. As soon as we
get those ducks in a row we’ll
come back to that discussion.’’
A name sponsor is being
sought for the centre.
Southern farmers have
invested $1.25 million into the
project so far, and representatives
from DairyNZ and AgResearch
recognised that without their
investment neither would have
contributed to the project.
DairyNZ and AgResearch have
invested $5m each in the project.
The hub recognises dairying’s
importance in Southland and
Otago with the forecast for milk
production this season to be
worth $1.9 billion gross, based on
the Fonterra’s latest forecast of $6
a kilogram of milksolids.
Hardie said a $6/kg price was
only a little above the break-even
milk price for the region and
much of the earnings would be
spent on running the farm with
local agri-businesses, including
lending institutions, benefiting
from farmer expenditure.
‘‘With dairying playing such a
major role in the region’s
‘‘We can't do these
trials in other parts
of the country and
extrapolate them. ’’
Tom Richardson
economy, it is essential that dairy
challenges and opportunities be
addressed through local research
and demonstration.’’
The farm will be self-contained
for wintering and young stock,
allowing for research to be
carried out across the whole
system.
Designed to run up to four
200-cow herds, one will be used as
the control herd to demonstrate
top commercial performance,
with 640 cows to be milked in the
coming 2017-2018 season.
The converted site is being
prepared for a dairy shed,
research office space, storage
facilities, barns, and staff housing,
along with farm roads and races,
fencing and the effluent system.
A new dairy shed will be a 60
bale rotary, while the cows will be
friesian crossbred, unless
research requires alternate
breeds.
Southern Dairy Development
Trust chairman Matthew
Richards said they chose the
breed because it best represented
the Southland/Otago herd.
Richards had begun work to find
the herd.
The milking platform will be
over 310ha, with 104 paddocks
split into about 2.9ha each, while
50ha will remain available to
Alliance Group for the first year
to irrigate wastewater out of the
Makarewa plant. The northern
area of the farm will be dedicated
to the milking herd, while the
southern area will be where
young stock are run.
Richardson said he also
wanted to open the hub up to
Southern Institute of Technology
students as a pathway to get
AgResearch chief executive Tom Richardson, Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce and Southern Dairy Hub
chairman Maurice Hardie inspect where the dairy shed for the hub will be built.
BRITTANY PICKETT/FAIRFAX NZ
Economic Development Minister
Steven Joyce breaks ground where
the new dairy shed for the Southern
Dairy Hub will be near Makarewa.
BRITTANY PICKETT/FAIRFAX NZ
talented young people into the
agriculture industry
‘‘We’ve got to grow the talent
in this region and have fewer and
fewer people sleepwalking away
from agriculture.’’
AgResearch chief executive
Tom Richardson said the Crown
entity recognised there had been a
research gap in the Otago/
Southland region.
‘‘We can’t do these trials in
other parts of the country and
extrapolate them. They need to be
done here.’’
DairyNZ strategy and invest-
ment leader and chairman of the
hub research advisory committee
Bruce Thorrold said the strategy
for the hub was about driving up
productivity and driving down
the environmental footprint of
farmers.
‘‘Research will compare and
test new theories and innovation,
including environmental
management, wintering options
and effluent. Farm systems will
also be compared and current
programmes, such as the Forage
Value Index, will be tested and
validated in local conditions to
produce local data.’’
The hub will supply milk to
Fonterra in the 2017/18 season.
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4
Farmer 9.12.16
Hero sells big Otago dairy farms
BRITTANY PICKETT
The North Otago farmer who
saved a woman’s life with a
tractor during floods is selling one
of New Zealand’s larger privatelystructured dairy farming
operations.
The portfolio of farms includes
four stand-alone dairying
operations under Oamaru-based
company Borst Holdings Ltd
which is owned by Five Forks
farmer Richard Borst.
In 2014, Borst drove his digger
into the Kakanui River to save a
woman trapped on the roof of her
car, which had been swept into
the river by flood waters during a
ferocious storm.
He also reached a level of
infamy after appearing in the
news when, along with his wife
Sylvia, he protested the changes
to the Otago Regional Council’s
6A water plan by dumping a
truckload of cow poo in front of
the council’s Dunedin office last
year. The plan introduced stricter
rules around sediment and runoff
from farms into waterways. At
the time Borst said the changes
had ruined his livelihood and
driven him out of farming.
Combined, the 992 hectares of
land produces 1,418,000 kilograms
of milk solids a year from a herd
of 3380 animals.
Pleasant Creek Farm is a 321
One of New Zealand’s larger privatestructured dairy farming operations producing some $8.5 million worth of
milk a year - has been placed on the
market for sale.
SUPPLIED
hectare property split into 42
paddocks, milking 980 cows. The
farm has a five-bedroom
executive style homestead, a fourbedroom manager’s residence, a
second four-bedroom dwelling,
and a trio of two-bedroom staff
quarters.
Kauroo Flats Farm is a 225.4
hectare property split into 32
paddocks, milking 980 cows in an
automated 70 bail rotary shed.
The farm has a four-bedroom
homestead, a four-bedroom
manager’s residence, and two
adjoining one-bedroom flats.
Kinloch Farm is a 247 hectare
property split into 34 paddocks,
consented to milk 700 cows in a 54
bail rotary shed built last year. On
the farm are a three-bedroom
homestead and staff dwellings.
Incholme Farm is a 197.4
hectare property split into 29
paddocks, milking 720 cows in a 46
aside herringbone shed. The farm
also has an impressive dwelling
collection of a four-bedroom
homestead, a three-bedroom
residence, and a two-bedroom
worker’s cottage.
The portfolio is being
marketed for sale by Bayleys
Canterbury salesmen Kurt Snook
and Noel May – with offers closing
on December 15. Snook said the
farms could be bought
individually, in any combination
of entities, or as one entire
portfolio.
‘‘This collection is one of the
largest private dairy farming
portfolios to have come onto the
market since the Crafar and
McVitty portfolios some seven
years ago’’.
May said the dairy operation
had been strategically built up
over years, but a change of
personal circumstances by the
farmer had meant it was being
placed on the market for sale.
‘‘All of the properties are well
irrigated – either pumping water
from springs or with permits to
draw water from the Kakanui
River and its tributaries, or the
Otekaieke River.’’
Each farm grew fodder beet
enabling at least 80 percent of the
cows to be wintered on the farms,
he said.
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SOUTHLAND
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15204 Deutz TTV5130 130hp 450 hours, Vario trans, High Spec unit, 5x Remotes, Front Suspension,
Cab, Suspension, Trima Loader ....................................................................................$114,990
15266 Deutz 5120 Summit, Demo Unit 81 hours, As New c/w X56 Self Leveling Loader.......$112,990
14803 McCormick XTX200 4,350 hours, Front Suspension, Front Weights .............................$68,990
McCormick MC115 115hp
15073 New Holland TS100A 3,750 hours, SR Model, c/w Mailleux Loader .............................$47,990
6,550 hours, Stoll FEL, F/Guards
................................................... Was $36,990 NOW $32,990
PFARM 18360
15010 New Holland TSA 125A 126 hp 6,100 hours, Super Steer front Axles, Mailleux Loader,
4x Remotes .....................................................................................Was $48,990 Now $44,990
18360 McCormick MC115 115 hp 6,550 hours, Stoll FEL, F/Guards..........Was $36,990 Now $32,990
18503 Landini Vision 105 4,000 hours, Factory Cab, Tidy Condition c/w
Trima Loader ...................................................................................Was $31,990 Now $27,990
18246 Kioti Mechron 2200 1,349 hours, ROPS, Very Tidy..........................................................$8,990
18370 Kioti Mechron 2200 1,548 hours, ROPs, very tidy.................. GORE Was $12,990 NOW $7,990
Used Balers
15306 McCormick MB 85 Rops, 85 HP, 2850 Hours, Tidy condition, C/W Pearson Loader,...... $24,990
18393 McHale V660 28,220 Bales, 5 Bar Pick Up, 2011 Model .................Was $55,990 Now $46,990
15172 Belarus 952 Mig 105 hp 2,100 hours, c/w Self Levelling Front End Loader
18489 Welger RP445 Profi 18,000 Bales, c/w Brakes, Very Tidy..............................................$44,990
3rd Service....................................................................................................................$19,990
Used Balers
15285 McHale V660 Baler 2013 Model, 26,500 Bales, c/w Brakes, Very Tidy Baler .................$39,990
15137 Claas 455 RC Rollant 38,500 Bales, Full Spec Baler, Fully Auto, .......Was 32,990 Now $29,990
15141 Welger RP435 Master Baler 38,000 Bales, Tidy Baler, 2-Owners ...Was $32,990 Now $28,990
14673 Welger 535 Round Baler 39,000 Bales, Tidy ..................................Was $32,990 Now $22,990
Deutz 5120 Summit
Gore Listings:
Used Tractors
18201 McHale Fusion 1 74,637 Bales.......................................................Was $44,990 Now $38,990
18220 Case RB 454 10,924 Bales, 5 x 4 Bale, Vari Chamber, Tow Bar Crop Cutter, 2.3m Pick Up,
Exc order .........................................................................................Was $39,990 Now $29,990
17663 Feraboli Trotter 11,000 Bales, 4 x 4 Bale, Fixed Chamber, Net/Twine Capable,
2m Pick Up......................................................................................Was $19,990 Now $11,990
USED WRAPPERS
Demo Unit 81 hours, As New c/w X56
Self Levelling Loader ......................................... $112,990
14760 New Holland BR740 Rotocut 40,000 Bales, 1 Owner, Tidy ............ As Traded Special $14,990
INVERCARGILL 15266
15348 Vicon DMP 2800, 8 disc mower ......................................................................................$7,490
Used Mowers
15347 Kuhn GMD 700II, disc mower .........................................................................................$7,990
18427 Vicon Extra 336 3.6m Centre Suspension Disc Mower only done 40 HA, As New.......$21,990
Used Machinery
18550 Kverneland 2832F, front mounted disc mower..............................................................$14,990
15325 Maschio Falco 4600P, folding p/h, 4.6, c/w packer roller, 2 season’s work....................$29,990
18546 Vicon Extra 232 Disc Mower. 3.2 cut, 1-owner.............................................................$8,990
Used Mowers
Kverneland 7650, trailed wrapper, 5000 bales, 3D wrapping, C/w end tipper................$24,990
15160 Kverneland BE100 7-Furrow Plough Hyd Side Shift, Hyd Vari-Width, Rear Coulter,
Trash Boards .................................................................................................................$28,990
15316 Kverneland DVP 3.15, off-set discs, as new, very tidy...................................................$27,990
15011 New Kverneland CLC Pro 3.0, 10 Tine Chisel Cultivator C/W Wheel kit,
McCormick MB 85 Rops
85 HP, 2850 Hours, Tidy condition, C/W Pearson Loader..... $24,990
INVERCARGILL 15306
Retail.........................................................................INVERCARGILL $19,700 Special $17,700
18462 Mashio DM Rapido 300P c/w Packer Roller, 1-Owner, Very Tidy ...................................$14,990
OBO Giltrap 5000 Slurry Tanker Very Tidy.................................................................................$9,000
18498 Pearson Tandem Axle SF 10 Big Tyres, Side Feed Delivery Wagon, As Traded ................$6,990
OBO Webco Silage Wagon ........................................................................................................$5,990
18453 Duals Snaplock 18.4 R34 4x Clamps per wheel .............................................................$2,990
15100 Taege 2-Bale Trailing Feeder.........................................................................................$5,990
18450 Duals Snaplock 18.4 x 38 4x Clamps per wheel, Tyres well worn...................................$2,250
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18529 Lely Tulip 400H Multidisc hyd folding, C/W packer roller..............................................$19,990
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Shane O’Donnell 0272 157 724
Hamish Craig 0274 328 386
Allen Simpson 0274 323 295
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5
9.12.16 Farmer
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SOUTHLAND
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Ofice
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Claas rear mounted 3100C mower Conditioner Tidy .............................................................$18,000
New Holland L75 c/w FEL......................................................................................................$25,000
Claas 3100FCP Front Mower Conditioner ..............................................................................$10,000
Case MXU110 c/w FEL ..........................................................................................................$48,500
Kuhn GMD 700 Mower..........................................................................................................$4,500
New Holland T6070 c/w FEL..................................................................................................$55,000
New Holland TSA100 FEL......................................................................................................................$38,000
Claas 455 Uniwrapper Baler, 24,000 bales ............................................................................$80,000
John Deere 6534 FEL Very Tidy.............................................................................................. $65,000
Claas Disco 3100 c mower conditioner .................................................................................$15,000
John Deere 6430 FEL.............................................................................................................. $38,000
Krone 320cv Mower Conditioner ...........................................................................................$6,000
Same Silver 95 FEL 3100hrs.................................................................................................... $38,000
Kuhn Trailing Mower Conditioner ...........................................................................................$8,000
Pottinger Nova Cat 350H Mower...........................................................................................$6,500
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LOADERS
Claas Liner 3500 .................................................................................................................$53,000
Claas Liner 4 3000 4 rotor....................................................................................................$25,000
JCB 434 loader, 6700hrs .......................................................................................................$150,000
Claas Liner 3000 4 rotor.......................................................................................................$30,000
JCB 414 loader..................................................................................................................................Coming in
Pottinger Eurotop 770A Twin Rotor.......................................................................................$9,500
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Claas Celtis 456RX c/w FEL ...................................................................................................... $34,000
Amazone FRS204 Front Tank ................................................................................................$15,000
Claas Axion 820 c/w Front links PTO A3002656 ........................................................................ Coming in
Amazone EDX 6000.2 12 Row Maize planter ......................................................................$80,000
Claas Axion 820 c/w Front links PTO A0902291 ........................................................................ Coming in
Tanco Bale Slice....................................................................................................................$5,300
John Deere 6930 c/w FEL L06930G742953............................................................................. $74,000
Claas Arion 650.50 Cebis.......................................................................................................... $128,000
JCB Bucket Grab suit Telehandler .........................................................................................$4,000
Claas Arion 430CIS c/w FEL low hrs very tidy............................................................................ $75,000
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Q-Cut 5.2mtr whole crop front c/w trailer ..............................................................................$42,000
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6
Farmer 9.12.16
Opinion
Time for a break
Healy’s View
Contact us
Address
Otago Southland Farmer,
46 Deveron St, PO Box 805,
Invercargill
Editorial
Reporter
Brittany Pickett
P: (03) 211 1041
M: 027 836 3256
E: brittany.pickett
@fairfaxmedia.co.nz
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nzfarmer.co.nz
Editor
Tim Cronshaw
M: 027 225 0261
E: [email protected]
There’s been a lot of ups and
downs for the industry this year.
BRITTANY PICKETT
I
Quake claims
SARAH MCKENZIE
N
ew Zealand was formed
by the collision of the
Pacific tectonic plate and
the Australian tectonic
plate.
It is no surprise to anyone that
we have earthquakes on a regular
basis, however lately the damage
caused has been far more
extensive.
It is important in light of these
recent natural disasters that you
know what you are able to claim
for and what issues may arise as a
result.
The Earthquake Commission
(EQC) was formed in 1945. It
provides some relief in addition to
private insurance, and all
insurance premiums include an
EQC levy so that the insurance
agencies do not need to take the
full brunt of insurance claims as a
result of earthquakes. EQC
provides cover for:
Private dwellings – up to
$100,000 + GST Contents – up to
$20,000 + GST, excluding high
value items typically required to
be listed separately (like
jewellery, precious stones, money,
works of art, etc.) The land
immediately around your
dwelling, including main access
ways and retaining walls, water
tanks forming part of a water
supply, swimming pools or spa
pools, tanks or water towers that
are an integral part of a
residential building, septic tanks.
As there are limits on what can
be claimed for from EQC, the
balance of outstanding damage
will be borne by your insurance
provider.
The recent earthquakes meant
that insurance companies have
placed embargoes in any new
insurance policies being accepted
within certain affected areas.
The biggest difficulty that
arises is if you have entered into a
sale and purchase agreement for a
property within an affected area.
Many purchasers require
lending from a bank to complete a
purchase, and this requires that
the property is insured.
If you are purchasing a
property within an affected area,
be aware that insurance approval
may be held up pending
investigation of the damage (if
any) on the affected property.
This can include an inspection of
any sheds, farming equipment,
farm fixtures, and any dwellings
covered by the intended policy.
This is important for any party
with an agreement subject to
finance, it is not enough to have
pre-approval from the bank if the
bank won’t give you the money on
settlement because no one will
insure the property you’re
purchasing.
You will need to factor in any
issues with insurance before
confirming finance conditions.
If the agreement was
unconditional before the damage
is caused, the best course of action
is to contact the vendor and
assign all claims for the damage,
and contact your intended insurer
to arrange an inspection as soon
as possible.
It would be prudent to take a
pragmatic approach by allowing
extensions for finance conditions
(if conditional) or delaying
settlement without penalty (if
unconditional) so that the
transaction can take place.
Be practical. New Zealand will
always be an earthquake zone, so
for peace of mind ensure that you
have sufficient insurance cover
whether buying or selling as if
you don’t, this could cause
unwanted stress.
■ Sarah McKenzie is a partner at
Preston Russell Law in
Invercargill.
t’s been an interesting year.
When the year started I didn’t
think I’d be taking over the
Otago Southland Farmer in
May, but I’m glad I have had the
opportunity to do so.
There’s been a lot of ups and
downs for the industry this year
and I’m grateful for the
opportunity to highlight some of
those highs, as well as being
obliged to report the lows.
As this is the last Otago
Southland Farmer for the year it’s
timely to bring up some of these
highlights.
In June, we had a bunch of
southerners make it into the
finals for the Beef + Lamb New
Zealand Sheep Industry Awards.
Despite only one winner in the
competition, it was a great honour
for the finalists to reach the level
they did. For me, it was a great
chance to cut my teeth and learn
about the different sheep
operations happening in Otago/
Southland and pass this on to the
readers.
Then it was announced three
southern farmers would be
putting their romneys on show at
the World Shearing and Wool
Handling Championships in
February.
We’ve had some ups and
downs with the dairy price this
past year, but as the year closes
out things are looking up in the
industry.
The ground has been broken at
the Southern Dairy Hub site, and
next year, all things going well,
milk will be flowing. It’s a big win
for farmers and for the industry
in Southland and Otago as a
whole and we look forward to
seeing it up and running.
While it’s been a big year in
farming, farmers are starting to
look forward to seeing what
comes next year.
We will be taking a break for a
couple of weeks before getting
back into reporting all the
happenings in the farming
industry in the southern region.
I hope you all have a lovely
Christmas and get to take some
time off to spend with your
families. It’ll be a well-deserved
break. Happy holidays.
Natural versus
test tube meat
GRAHAM BUTCHER
I
’ve been thinking about test
tube meat. There’s been
reference to this in the media
and comment about New
Zealand’s agriculture becoming
the ‘‘Detroit’’ of agriculture.
Yes, the Detroit car industry is
not what it was, mainly because of
quality issues and fuel efficiency
problems of five litre V8s. Last
time I looked out the window
thought, there were still plenty of
cars about so I don’t understand
the analogy.
Yes, meat can now be made by
other means. I think, rather than
being the death knell of farming,
it is the factor that will help focus
attention on the quality of natural
meat – the eating experience.
We are seeing this now with
meat quality premiums at
processors, recent moves to look
at getting fat back into meat (fat =
flavour) and continued efforts to
manage pre-slaughter treatment
of animals.
The development of test tube
meat should be the spur to go
further into natural or wild meat
quality to make sure the eating
experience cannot be matched by
the laboratory.
Ahead of us will still be efforts
to remain profitable by becoming
more efficient on farms. And also
ahead of us is a new challenge, to
‘‘The development
of test tube meat
should be the spur
to go further into
natural or wild meat
quality ...
make sure the meat we produce is
the very best it can be. If the
consequence of this is a lower
kilogram of meat ratio per
hectare, then so be it.
We need more effort on meat
quality.
Natural meat must always be
the preferred choice in terms of
eating experience – it’s the only
real advantage we have, and we
must pull ahead of the laboratory
in this issue.
Part of the eating experience is
the story behind what’s on the
plate. Free range, grass fed in
healthy countryside will beat lab
coats every time.
There are more than enough
wealthy folk in the world who will
pay for the genuine article. So,
while lab meat is a threat, it will
only be a threat if we don’t realise
the critical importance of meat
quality and all that those two
words entail.
■ Graham Butcher is a rural
consultant with Rural Solutions
in Gore.
9.12.16 Farmer
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7
8
Farmer 9.12.16
A cruel blow for North Canty - Minister
NATHAN GUY - OPINION
T
he massive earthquake that hit the
upper South Island has had a
devastating impact on farmers,
fishers and growers in the region.
I’ve now made three visits to the affected
regions and the damage is much worse
than I initially expected. It’s estimated
there have been about 100,000 landslides
which have caused widespread damage to
farms as well as roads and rail links.
This is a cruel blow to North Canterbury
given they’ve been suffering through a
severe drought for nearly three years.
However there is a whole-of-Government
response underway and the community is
pulling together to get through this.
A support package for the primary
sector with $4 million in funding is now
open for applications through the
Marlborough District Council website.
This will help with non-insurable assets
that could include tracks, on-farm bridges
and water infrastructure.
We’re also putting $500,000 to support
Rural Recovery Co-ordinators in the
Hurunui, Kaikoura and Marlborough
Districts and giving $500,000 in extra
funding for local Rural Support Trusts.
There will be $200,000 per month to
mobilise and support skilled students and
workers for farm recovery work, and Rural
Assistance Payments will be available from
FA
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Work and Income NZ for farmers in real
hardship.
There has also been a major impact on
local fisheries with the coastline rising by
up to four metres in places in an area
nearly 100 kilometres long.
For this reason I’ve taken the
precautionary approach of announcing a
temporary closure of shellfish and seaweed
harvesting in the area – one month for
crayfish and three months for paua and
other shellfish.
We need to understand the medium to
long term impacts on these fisheries, and in
the meantime we need to be careful and
temporarily stop fishing until we have a
clearer picture.
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This is why we have also announced $2
million towards scientific research to
investigate the full impacts of the
earthquake on this fishery.
Fishing is a very important part of the
local economy and community, not just for
the commercial sector but also recreational
and customary. I acknowledge this is
disappointing for locals but most people
realise we need to protect this resource for
the long term.
A support package for businesses
impacted in Kaikoura is in place which
some fishing employees will be able to
access.
❚ Nathan Guy is the Minister for Primary
Industries.
Fonterra
circles Oz
RURAL REPORTERS
New Zealand dairy giant Fonterra is circling
disgruntled Australian farmers in the heart of the
country’s largest farming collectives.
Fonterra has met with about 20 dairy farmers
at Kergunyah, in north eastern Victoria, in
anticipation of increased demand for milk to
supply its Stanhope factory.
Despite being a major player in NZ and
Australia, Fonterra has virtually no footprint in
the Murray-Goulburn heartland, with the Aussie
collective holding about 90 per cent of dairy farm
contracts in north east Victoria while Parmalat
takes virtually all the remaining 10 per cent.
‘‘We’ve had interest from farmers in the area
about partnering with us and we’re exploring
these opportunities,’’ Fonterra Australia’s milk
supply manager Matt Watt said.
Fonterra’s Stanhope site takes milk from about
260 farms in northern Victoria to produce
specialty cheeses and cheddar, powders and ghee.
The site produces a range of specialty cheeses
for the Australian market, including Perfect
Italiano cheeses, parmesan, pecorino, romano,
gouda and ricotta cheeses.
In addition to cheddar for domestic and export
markets, Stanhope also produces ghee, anhydrous
milk fat, whey powders and milk powders for
world markets.
The company is in the middle of a multimillion upgrade of the cheese plant. When the
new plant comes online mid-2017, it is expected to
produce 45,000 tonnes of cheese a year for the
domestic and export markets.
‘‘We’ve been transforming our business, and
it’s in good shape ... We are currently building a
$140 million cheese plant at Stanhope which will
provide a variety of cheeses to our domestic and
export customers.’’
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9
9.12.16 Farmer
Family loving Omega 3 lambs
Balfour farmers
Scott and Steven
Romes amongst
some of the
chicory crop on
their farm.
Being part of the Omega Lamb Primary
Growth Partnership has given a Southland
family the opportunity to be part of the future
of sheep farming. Brittany Pickett reports.
S
cott Romes had no plans to
have sheep on the family
farm once he took over, it
was just going to be him,
crops and a labrador until a
project to develop healthier eating
lamb made him see a future for
sheep farming.
The Romes family run Waifield
Farm, a 450 hectare mixed
cropping and livestock farm
between Balfour and Riversdale
in Southland.
Steven, his wife Helen and son
Scott, 25, work the farm, along
with a few workers.
The Romes became involved
seven years ago with Headwaters
NZ, which has worked to create
the Headwaters breed - a
stabilised composite sheep of
equal parts romney, texel,
perendale and finn with more fat
to withstand hill country
conditions.
Headwaters then became
involved in the Primary Growth
Partnership Omega Lamb with
Alliance Group and the Ministry
for Primary Industries to bring
the fat back into lambs to create a
healthier, better tasting meat.
Four years ago Waifield
became a finishing farm for
Omega lamb.
‘‘A lot of sheep farmers were
going around in circles. We’re
constantly looking for new ideas
to improve our business so it was,
I thought, an opportunity to do
something different,’’ Steven says.
At the time the farm was
rapidly moving towards cropping
and grain because of the state of
the sheep industry.
So Steven saw finishing lambs
as an opportunity to keep sheep
farming as a part of the business.
‘‘We had been sheep farming
for 30-odd years.’’
But for the last 20 years they
have been moving intentionally
towards grain.
‘‘The reason I’ve stuck with a
percentage of sheep is just
because [we are] being, or trying
to keep it, as sustainable as we
can. I like having that diversity.’’
Steven says the project has
given the family a renewed focus
and positivity for the lamb
industry, and for Scott, it’s given
him something to work towards.
‘‘Now you can see you’re
BRITTANY PICKETT/
FAIRFAX NZ
producing a product the
consumer wants. It gives us more
focus on what’s going out the
gate,’’ Steve says.
Since adapting to finishing
Omega lambs, the family has
adopted new technologies on the
farm to help monitor the progress
of lambs.
All lambs are electronic
identified (EID) and weighed to
record their progress. Steven says
it makes what happens on the
farm all the more important.
They also began an EID
programme for their hoggets, so
eventually all ewes on the farm
will be tagged.
‘‘Before, we probably watched
the lambs go out the gate and all
we were interested in was the end
price.’’
The farm still runs its own
breeding ewes, and each year has
about 1300 lambs of its own.
For six to seven weeks they
have about 4500-5000 Omega
lambs on forage crops on the
farm.
They planted 65 hectares of
chicory on the farm and
integrated it into their cropping
system.
‘‘It’s certainly not for everyone
because it’s a challenging plant.’’
Steve says the project has
made him change his way of
Continued on page 10
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Look out for live lines on your property.
If you are working in the vicinity of power lines you need to be careful Stay 4 metres away.
66 BAY ROAD INVERCARGILL
PHONE
03 215 8900
Email
NATHAN JORDAN [email protected] KIERAN BONIFACE
(MANAGER)
www.alltyres.co.nz (FLEET SERVICEMAN)
Sometimes, something as
simple as being focused
on the track or stock and
not noticing what is above
can result in potentially
fatal incidents. Privately
owned low voltage lines on
a property are not always
well maintained and wires
may sag over time.
Common dangers when working near overhead power lines include:
• Hitting wires with diggers, post hole rammers or grain augers.
• Obscured vision carrying round bales on a loader.
• High loads such as silage, bales or a stock crate.
• Be careful with tip trucks - the deck may tilt higher than the power lines.
• Pulling up electric fences on rolling terrain.
Our job is to keep the electricity network safe, your job is to keep yourself
and your workmates safe.
Be aware of your surroundings at all times.
The 4 metre rule for electricity – Stay at least 4 metres away from overhead
wires, for advice please visit www.powernet.co.nz or phone 0800 808 587
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10
Farmer 9.12.16
Project reignites passion for lamb
Continued from page 9
thinking when it comes to the
lamb industry. He likes the idea of
specialising his own system to try
and ultimately improve his own
returns for his product.
‘‘I’ve still got a belief there’s a
bright future for the lamb
industry.
‘‘Unless we do more to
challenge ourselves we’re not
going to get there.’’
After so many years of sheep
farming it is good to be making
headway doing something which
has the potential to make serious
changes to the sheep industry, he
says.
Farmers can no longer expect
someone else to sort out their
returns for them, they have to
take it into their own hands, he
says.
Since Scott came home from
finishing his tertiary studies, he’s
been thrown in the deep end
learning about the Omega Lamb
programme.
‘‘The way things were with
sheep, I wasn’t interested.’’
Since returning and learning
about the project and getting first
had experience in developing a
different kind of lamb, he’s
changed his mind about the
future of sheep on the farm.
He also likes being able to get
involved in farming in a more
scientific and technological way.
Meanwhile, for wife and mum
Helen, being able to see more than
what’s happening on the farm is a
rewarding experience.
Since the farm is always
looking to improve, she says the
Chicory crop on the Romes’ farm.
BRITTANY PICKETT/FAIRFAX NZ
‘‘The way things
were with sheep, I
wasn't interested.’’
Scott Romes
idea of Omega lamb breaking into
international markets and being
able to help the wider industry is
exciting.
‘‘A lot of farmers say they want
more money … At least we’re
saying we’ll give this a try and it’s
looking very positive.’’
Omega Lamb general manager
Mike Tate says the project is
about discovering not only how
good lamb can taste but how
much money it can make for
farmers.
‘‘We’ve really taken a different
view and focussed a lot on
thinking around good fats and
oils.’’
Omega 3 fatty acids are
typically associated with fish, but
meat is also a major source of it,
and the project has worked to
elevate the levels of Omega 3 in
their lambs to get them into the
realm of fish, he says.
The lambs have a particular
natural tendency to produce good
fats, and fed on chicory and red
clover they grow fast, he says.
About 450 different family lines
were looked at for their fat
composition and the right lines
were selected. Alliance is now
working on a go-to market
strategy and the meat is being
trialed in the food service sector
in New Zealand and overseas, to
help assess whether it can stand
as a differentiated product in the
market.
The PGP aims to have a high
market value for the lamb, and
Tate says it adds a point of
difference from other lamb
exporters for Alliance.
‘‘Our aim is to grow it to about
one million lambs. It’s not going
to suit everyone but it definitely
gives an option for lamb.’’
And how does it taste? Tate
says it’s like no other lamb - clean,
tender and succulent. ‘‘Our
baseline was to produce a product
with true differentiation.’’
ADVERTORIAL
OPINION: Bank pressure on farm sector continues to tighten
Hayden Yardley,
Chartered Accountant &
Director, Yardley/Lo
D
espite
improvements
to dairy prices
in recent
months, farmers will
still be experiencing
increased pressure from
banks in regards to their
inancial reporting and
inancial visibility of farm
performance. As the farm
accounting specialist
at Yardley/Lo, it is not
unusual to have the rural
bank managers contacting
us monthly for a farm’s
cash-low.
This change comes as
quite a shock to many of
our clients who have never
had to prepare a cash-low
forecast in their farming
careers – and those in that
situation shouldn’t feel
insulted or singled out,
it’s now standard bank
operating procedure.
In a nutshell all
farmers need to be asking
themselves two questions:
‘How eficient am I?’ and
‘Where is my cash going?.’
Traditionally there was
a mutual understanding
between the bank and
farmer that there are good
and bad years - extra
lending for cash-low
deicits would be met by
future good years, as well
as offset by increasing asset
and farm values. Now asset
and farm values are under
pressure, and we’ve had a
number of years of below
average income due to low
commodity prices.
At Yardley/Lo we offer
all new farming clients one
free initial consultation,
simply contact me at
[email protected] to
make an appointment.
For example, previously
if a farm made an operating
loss, the bank would look
at the value of the land and
they would capitalise the
loss against the land value.
This isn’t the case anymore,
I’m regularly hearing,
“We’re not going to fund
operating losses anymore,
farmers have got to learn
to manage their inances
better”. Farms are expected
to have detailed inancial
forecasts and business
plans that prove long term
viability and sustainable
farming operations. These
plans need to show how
the farm is going to adapt
operating expenditure to
match income and to meet
their changing inancial
circumstances.
This is catching many
farmers out. When we are
referred such a farmer from
the bank, 90% of the time
they’re doing a great job
and it just comes down to
tidying up the back ofice.
We put some structure
around their inancials,
pulling years of knowledge
into a documented business
plan and prepare 12 month
cash-low forecasts. We
then couple this together
with a robust reporting
system.
In the 10% of cases
where farms are having real
inancial problems our farm
consultant Dave Yardley
observes that it invariably
comes down to pasture
management. Dave’s been
a farmer and consultant
in Otago and Southland
for over 40 years. He’s
seen irst hand that when
farms really focus on how
to manage pasture and
grass growth, and how to
eficiently use their feed
resources it can yield
dramatic improvements in
performance.
This is the irst in a series
of editorials planned
by Yardley/Lo on farm
accounting. Future topics
to look out for include
Succession Planning,
Pasture Management,
Farm Cash-low Planning,
Capital Expenditure
Planning and Farm
Innovation. To ensure
you don’t miss future
issues subscribe with
Hayden by emailing
[email protected]
11
9.12.16 Farmer
Farmers keen for
the dairy awards
BRITTANY PICKETT
S
outhland/Otago has the
second highest entry total for
a region in the New Zealand
Dairy Industry Awards.
Organisers are pleased with the
many first time entrants in the
competition. Southland/Otago’s
field includes 16 share farmer
entries, 18 dairy manager entires
and 27 dairy trainee entries.
Southland/Otago awards
manager Jono Bavin said it was
exciting to see so many young people
putting their hand up for the
competition.
‘‘It’s good they’re putting their
hands up and wanting to progress
through into the industry.’’
Despite a tough year in the dairy
industry, it was good to see people
taking up opportunities which came
out of tough times, he said.
About 75 per cent of the entries
from Southland/Otago were first
time entrants in the competition.
Bavin said the entrants had the
opportunity to start educating
themselves in the six months before
the competition. He and wife Kelly
won share farmer team for
Southland/Otago last year.
Nationally, a total of 424 entries
were received for the awards.
Awards general manager Chris
Keeping said it was a fantastic
Southland/Otago New Zealand Dairy
Industry Awards managers Kelly and
Jono Bavin. NICOLE JOHNSTONE/FAIRFAX NZ
Work begins at Mataura Valley
DAVE NICOLL
Mataura Valley Milk plant
investors say they plan to start
processing milk by mid-2018.
Mataura Valley general
manager Bernard May said the
foundations and columns for
the factory should be up at the
site before Christmas.
The plant, to be operational
by August 1, 2018, will be
valued at more than $200
million and will employ 65
people. The plant will be able to
produce 46,000 metric tonnes of
product and use 100 million
litres of milk from farmers,
May said.
It would have around 25
suppliers, all within 90km of
the site, he said.
The new plant will
manufacture infant formula,
ultra-high temperature (UHT)
cream and a small amount of
skim milk powder. About 50 per
cent of what the plant produces
would be going to China, May
said.
State-owned Chinese
company China Animal
Husbandry Group (CAHB)
have a 71.8 per cent stake in the
plant, 20 per cent will be held by
Southland farm suppliers and
the remainder by Hamiltonbased milk powder company
BODCO and Mataura directors.
INTRODUCING
THE AVATAR SIDE BY SIDE
From Southern Suzuki
result, considering the economic
climate in the industry over the past
few years.
‘‘To achieve this number of
entries, on the back of a low payout
for the second year in a row, is a
superb result and we are pleased
with the high calibre of entries
across the three competitions.’’
There are 103 farmer entrants
vying for the Share Farmer of the
Year competition, 170 managers in
the Dairy Manager of the Year
competition and 151 trainees in the
Dairy Trainee of the Year
competition.
Keeping said the regions had
worked hard to attract entries and
that all three competitions would be
run in all 11 regions.
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12
Farmer 9.12.16
Special moments
in 12 world titles
Open Country lifts milk price
ANDREA FOX
T
he country’s second
biggest milk processor,
Open Country Dairy,
has lifted its full year
average milk price forecast in
line with the brighter global
market outlook for dairy
products.
The company has told its
farmer-suppliers the full year
forecast is now $5.60-$5.90/kg
milksolids, up from a range of
$4.25-$4.45 in July.
The increase means farmers
providing milk between last
month and January will be
paid $6.10-$6.30/kg in full in
March next year.
The payment for milk
provided between February
and May next year, will earn
$7-$7.30, to be paid in full in
August.
Open Country has also
increased its November to
January advance rate to $4.70,
and the February and March
advance rate to $4.25. The April
and May advance rate has been
lifted to $4.
The privately-owned
company told its suppliers that
improving market conditions
in the past month indicated a
relatively stable outlook for the
global dairy market for the rest
of this dairy season.
SIR DAVID FAGAN - OPINION
Selling Your Woodlot?
Craigpine Timber is looking to buy your Woodlot,
and by cutting out the middleman, can offer you a
better return.
Craigpine Timber Ltd has been milling in Southland
for 90 years and is the second-biggest mill in the
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We are a progressive and modern sawmill with our
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I was lucky enough to represent New
Zealand at nine different world
championships during my career.
I’ve always said the hardest part
about the world championships is
making the New Zealand team. Once
you’re in there, you’ve got a fair
crack at it.
It was the biggest buzz ever when
I made the team for the 1986 champs
in Perth, following my first Golden
Shears win that year. I finished
second to Aussie Mark Conlan that
year and won the teams title with
my good mate Ricky Pivac. I was
underway.
By 1988 in Masterton I was
getting a real appetite for winning. It
was great to win my first world
individual title and defend the teams
title with Stephen Dodds from
Riversdale.
Then 1994 was a special year,
shearing alongside my best mate
since primary school, Alan
MacDonald. Mickey had an
exceptional shear in the final and
tipped me over into second and we
won my fourth successive world
team title.
If I couldn’t win the individual,
Mickey was the one I wanted to see
get it.
By the time I made my final
appearance in Wales in 2010 I was
David Fagan in his shearing prime in
2003.
MARK DWYER
starting to get on in years.
It has certainly been a special
part of my career. A lot of people ask
whether I would rather win the
world champs or the Golden Shears
in Masterton or New Zealand
champs in Te Kuiti. I can’t split
them.
When I was going well you
wanted to win them all and if you
missed one you were disappointed.
It’s not being greedy. It’s just being
competitive.
❚ Sir David Fagan has won 12 world
titles, is the Chairman of Shearing
Sports New Zealand and a member
of the organising committee for the
World Shearing and Woolhandling
Championships in Invercargill from
February 8-11.
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13
9.12.16 Farmer
Politics could move to the fringe
PETER MCDONALD - OPINION
Farmer Peter McDonald spends a lot
of time picking up rocks on his
Caroline Valley farm.
SUPPLIED
I
often wonder if my life would
have turned out differently if
I didn’t have to pick up so
many rocks.
One thing I’ve learned with all
the effort required to collect rocks
is that it’s just as important to
consider where you place them, if
you are not careful gravity and
cattle can combine to put them
back near enough to where they
came from.
I’m fortunate enough to have a
family that will pitch in and help.
I like to frame the job as ‘‘family
bonding’’ but I guess whatever
way you look at it’s still hard but
incredibly satisfying work.
It would be an easy write to do
a recap of the year. I have to admit
that this is one of my ‘‘pet hates’’.
The local papers and wider
media with their skeleton crews
manning the presses throughout
the holiday break generically
regurgitate en masse all the good,
the bad and ugly from throughout
the year.
One end-of-year local issue that
has caught my attention is our
local National MP is about to be
challenged for the right to
represent the party on behalf of
the good people of the CluthaSouthland electorate in next
year’s election.
A cynical view might be that
this is timed to tidy this all up
before Christmas and by the time
New Year rolls in everyone’s
forgotten it even happened.
This is one of the safest
National seats in the country,
maybe even the coffee mug you
are holding while reading this
would have a fair to middling
chance of coming away with the
win if it was shrouded in the blue
of National.
But seriously, representation
is all about self-interest.
Who has walked in your shoes?
Who has empathy with you and
your community? In short, who
understands you?
While the party may enjoy a
large majority in the electorate,
Farm Effluent Cleaning Ltd
Barry, Lyndon, Grant and Janice
would like to
wish all their customers
a Merry Xmas and a safe and
happy New Year
Covering the Clutha District
Share your stories at
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Join today at
oversixty.co.nz
Wishing all our valued clients a
Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year
Muck Spreading
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my view is it that it does not
benefit the constituency as a
whole; in fact it goes against the
very ethos of National that
competition drives excellence.
Other parties and their local
candidates need to step up to the
mark and I’m looking for this
occurring in the first quarter of
the year.
What has become clear to me
over the years is that, the
National party of today is not the
same National party of my
parents’ day.
Politics follows population,
hence the shift in influence from
rural to urban. It’s votes that
count not the gross domestic
product of any particular region.
Redistributing wealth to your
voters will ensure you maintain
control of the country’s treasury
benches.
So where to for 2017? What 2016
has taught me is that many of the
old rules no longer apply.
Politics could continue its
move from the centre to the
fringes. Political shocks will be
the new normal, we will have to
learn to adapt and move on
quickly. ‘‘Building resilience’’
right through all our systems will
be key.
❚ Peter McDonald is a Dipton
sheep and beef farmer and
previous chairman of Meat
Industry Excellence.
Ph: 03 225 8516
[email protected]
www.otm.nz
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14
Farmer 9.12.16
City kids learn maths on dairy farms
BRITTANY PICKETT
Fernworth
Primary School
pupil David
Clark, 8, collects
grass.
F
or some Fernworth
Primary School pupils it
was their first time out of
Invercargill, for others it
was their first time on a dairy
farm, but for everyone it was a
chance to learn about maths in
the real world.
Pupils from a Fernworth
maths club, in Invercargill, went
to Bristol Grove Dairies, in Grove
Bush, last week to learn about
how farmers use maths to run
their business.
The trip was organised
through the School Kit
programme, which has paired
with DairyNZ, in the I love Rosie
programme, where children learn
about dairy farming in New
Zealand.
Maths teacher Carla Werder
said five of the 22 children had
never left Invercargill, but a
maths trip to the farm provided a
perfect opportunity to learn about
maths outside the classroom.
‘‘Maths is all around us and it
tied in perfectly with valuing the
importance of maths.’’
The children were given the
opportunity to watch cows being
milked and estimate how much
milk they provided. They then
watched the calves being fed, before doing their own dry matter
feed budgeting for the main herd
of cows.
BRITTANY PICKETT/
FAIRFAX NZ
Fernworth Primary School pupils,
Gaynor Lickett and Suzanne Hanning
cart hay.
BRITTANY PICKETT/FAIRFAX NZ
Then they had to compete to
see who could gather up enough
mowed grass to feed a cow for a
day, before a Fonterra tanker
arrived at the farm and collected
milk while the driver explained
his job.
Werder said the children’s
engagement had increased
because there had been a purpose
to learning different maths skills.
Pupil Paige Jukes, 11, had
never been outside of Invercargill
and the experience was
completely different to what she
expected.
Instead of milking machines,
she thought farmers had to milk
cows by hand.
Another first-time farm visitor
Raydin Stookdale, 8, was keen on
becoming a dairy farmer after the
trip. The farm was different to
what he had imagined, with more
than just a paddock, a house and a
couple of tractors.
He was also shocked with how
much maths dairy farmers had to
do on a daily basis.
Farm owner Suzanne Hanning
said a focus for hosting the class
was to try and increase the
understanding of urban children
about what happened on farms.
‘‘There’s quite a disparity
between urban understanding of
rural processes that happen on
farm and what really happens.’’
‘‘We’ve always believed in
young people and really strongly
believed in telling it like it is.’’
For city children, showing off a
dairy farm was like opening up a
‘‘different world’’ for them, where
they could understand that their
milk did not just come from the
supermarket shelf, she said.
‘‘Our main focus is that they
get something out of it and they
learn something, and they feel
happier about their food.’’
Fernworth Primary School pupils
Aiden Stuart, 11.
BRITTANY PICKETT/FAIRFAX NZ
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It’s not Sunday without it.
15
9.12.16 Farmer
STAG SALES
ADVERTISING FEATURE
Black Forest Park - specialist velvet and trophy business
Founded in 1980 by Trevor Currie, Black Forest
Park encompassed 141ha at McDonald Rd,
Outram (just 5 minutes from Dunedin Airport).
onsidered the early days in the NZ Deer Industry,
breeding hinds in particular were expensive and in short
supply when the business was first established.
Trevor’s intention was to breed high quality, geneticallysuperior deer and the opportunity presented itself to import
Stags and hinds from renowned Festl Park in Munich in 1985.
He took this opportunity, the sons of the famous stag King
Richard were introduced, and an intense fully-recorded
breeding program began.
European and English Park deer were later introduced to
the program.
As the new technologies of AI and embryo transfer were
available Trevor embraced these.
Rapid progress was made and many industry-leading deer
were produced.
C
BREEDERS OF HIGHEST
QUALITY, GENETICALLY
SUPERIOR DEER
Richard and Trevor Currie.
Stags such as Kabul, Kurgan, and Bendigo are well known
Sires, instrumental in improving the performance of the
Venison herd. Over the years many of the Black Forest Sires
have won National Velvet prizes and the herd is also
known for being a prolific producer of leading trophy
genetics Stags - such as Brusnik, Salvador, Columbia
and Starr to name a few.
Since 1996, Black Forest has operated as a
specialist velvet and trophy property at Clinton,
producing over three tonnes of quality velvet per
year and up to 100 trophy stags for the Safari
market.
In 2003 a large deer selling and hospitality
complex was built at Outram where deer sales are
held each year.
As founder of Black Forest Park, Trevor is
passionate about Red Deer and the potential of the
industry.
He is committed to achieving maximum genetic
gain through careful selection and performance
recording using the latest in scientific tools.
Since 2012, Trevor’s son Richard and his wife
Sarah have taken over the running of the Outram
operation and since moving to the Clinton farm in
July of 2013 they now oversee the entire Black
Forest Farming operation.
The annual Black Forest Park Sire Sale will be held
on Saturday, January 14 on-site at McDonald Road,
Outram at 1.30pm. Viewing will be available from
12.30pm.
Catalogues for this Elite two-year-old Sire Stag
Sale will be posted by approx late December, if you
would like a catalogue email [email protected] or phone 027 276 0664 to arrange.
Black Forest Park also has a very good quality lineup available each year from their Clinton operation
of usually 3-yr and 4-yr-old Sires by private treaty.
Some years there may also be surplus master sires
available.
Outstanding trophies are produced from Black
Forest high performing genetics.
Industry operators consistently report that Black
Forest trophy stags set the quality benchmark in the
South Island.
They have a good range available most years from
Silver Medal status through to over 500 SCI. Black
Forest Trophies are bred to produce long wide heavy
heads and a trophy of significance and stature.
Trophy stags are selected from the velvet herd
only with Black Forest Park showing committment to
the on-going development of superior genetics and
management techniques that enable customers to
purchase with confidence.
Each year Black Forest Park produce 90 to 110
quality trophy stags - these are also sold by private
treaty.
To view the 2017 line, visit the website (www.blackforest.nz)
or contact Richard to arrange a visit.
TM
16
Farmer 9.12.16
FERTILISER AND SPRAYING
ADVERTISING FEATURE
FishIT Ltd make use of nutrients already in soil
ishIT Ltd is a small Southland-owned
company established three years ago
following an opportunity to investigate
ways to create a natural biological stimulant
for soil suitable for all soil types using the
sustainable resource of fish from Southland’s
clean coastal waters.
Director Hamish McCallum was brought on
board to help with the project as he had
experience working with many forms of animal
hydrolysate from his time working in the
Middle East and Africa.
Trials were initially held on a 350ha coastal
Southland farm, says Hamish, as it was home
to three different soil types.
This coastal Southland farm, with its peatbased soil, didn’t respond well to traditional
farming practice.
The trial confirmed that the product
enhances the nitrogen cycle to achieve a
temperature related oxidation and release of
minerals from existing reserves of organic
matter.
At the same time new organic residues are
produced from the increased microbial
activity.
Following the trials and the subsequent
success of the soil alteration and resulting
plant growth, it was decided that the product
and results were important enough to share
with the rest of New Zealand and Fish IT Ltd
was born.
Hamish says using fish as a soil conditioner
F
PHOTOS: SUPPLIED
Leithfeild Nursery Edendale (left) Ray Keown Fodder Beet Cattle Flat (right).
isn’t something new, having been around for
centuries in Native America and Alaska.
The substantial breakthrough with FishIT
Ltd’s products is the enzyme reaction with the
raw material and the subsequent conversion of
fish to useable protein
“Our products help to mobilise bound up
nutrients within the soil.”
He says there is a big problem in Southland
soils with phosphate and nitrogen leaching and
surface run off into waterways and ground
water.
Fish IT Ltd have created the ideal tool for
farmers to get the most benefit out of their
soils and enhance the effect of fertilizer inputs
from the traditional farming practices along
with slowing down nutrient loss to water.
“Improving the root zones takes a little time
but once you have done this the response is
dramatic, making pasture crops more resilient
to drought and disease.
The product stimulates worms and fungi
activity, dramatically increasing the root zone.
It is heartening to note that a lot of farmers
and growers are very concerned about what is
happening in their soils. It’s not all about the
green stuff on the top.
Even with appropriate inputs of fertilizer N
or P on the ground to make grass grow there is
still a long-term environmental impact and
unfortunately we are now seeing the results of
this across New Zealand.”
Nurseries in both the South Island and North
Island are also showing a keen interest in the
product.
FishIT Ltd is delighted to have Stan Winter
as the technical adviser for the company. His
knowledge and experience is invaluable for the
growth of the business. Currently he has fuve
long term trials under way in Northern
Southland to evaluate yield and environmental
impact of several products including conventional fertilisers and organic systems.
The team are also very close to producing a
100% organic herbicide which will result in the
reduction of chemicals and sprays for weeds
and noxious plants.
“By using this spray we can open up the cell
walls of a plant to let herbicide in,” he says.
Contact Hamish McCallum (021 819 372) to
discuss your farming requirements or for more
information visit www.fishit.co.nz.
Unlock your
land’s potential
- NATURALLY
In the first 45 days at five independent trial sites,
located in Northern Southland, we grew, on average:
• 1250 kg extra dry matter
• and still going strong.
This is biological farming at its best
Visit our website for full trial results www.fishit.co.nz
CH-7504006AA
Contact: Hamish McCallum
021 819 372 • [email protected]fishit.co.nz
Technical Advisor:
Stan Winter
Made in Southland
17
9.12.16 Farmer
Young breeder sells first rams
BRITTANY PICKETT
W
hen Blair Robertson
was 14 he sold his
first ram; now his son
Jack, 13, is following
in his footsteps.
Merrydowns Stud, which
breeds pure romney and
southdown sheep on 397 hectares
of rolling hill country at
Waikoikoi, on the boundary of
West Otago and Southland, held
its annual ram sale on Tuesday,
with 211 two-tooth rams on offer.
These rams were selected from
the top 25 per cent of lambs born
on type and performance (SIL)
data.
The sale had lively bidding
from buyers from throughout
New Zealand.
Jack had five romney rams on
offer, all of which were sold
during the auction. The young
ram breeder sold his rams under
the Merryvale name, the original
brand which the family began
trading under in 1920.
‘‘I’ve always liked sheep and
farming and just getting outside
and doing stuff with them.’’
Of the 211 rams on offer, 194
were sold. The average price
across the sale was $1130, with
romney rams ranging from $600
to $3800 and southdown rams
ranging from $450 to $3000.
The top price of $3800 was for a
romney ram (Lot 121) which was
brought by Peter and Diane Lowe,
of Ashburton. There were 11 rams
Merrydowns lot 121 romney two-tooth ram sold for $3800.
PGG Wrightson genetics specialist Callum McDonald inspects rams with Blair
and Sally Robertson.
sold to stud breeders throughout
the country – seven southdown
rams and four romney rams.
Blair and Sally Robertson, of
Merrydowns Stud, have the
largest southdown breeding flock
in Australasia and the largest
registered romney breeding flock
in the South Island.
Blair started his romney stud
when he was about 14, but his
ideal romney back then was quite
different to the sheep that were
winning awards at A&P shows, he
said.
Those sheep were bigger and
Blair said he could not see a
future in them.
‘‘Our focus at Merrydowns is
keeping the breeds pure with no
cross-breeding. It has cost us a lot
of money to keep the two breeds
pure and to continue to improve
on what we have year-on-year.’’
His ideal romney has not
changed much through the years;
he wants a sheep with a medium
frame, good constitution, which is
stacked full of meat, has an open
head and strong fertility, he said.
‘‘The market didn’t take to my
ideal romney quickly, but I stuck
to my guns and here we are 28
years later with rams that are
attracting buyers throughout
New Zealand.’’
Merrydowns restarted the
southdown stud in 1999 and have
developed a commercial grunty
type of southdown, he said.
‘‘It was good to see a good
number of potential buyers make
enquiries before the sale that
were new to us. They were all
quality and fertility-focused and
that is what we offer.’’
With so much cross breeding
within the sheep industry the
Robertson’s pride themselves on
breeding purebred romney and
southdown rams, saying it gives
them a point of difference from
other breeders.
PGG Wrightson genetics
specialist Callum McDonald, who
managed the sale on behalf of the
Robertsons, said the family were
producing quality rams with the
performance figures to give
buyers confidence in their nearly
30 years of stud operation.
‘‘The rams not only look the
part (having good bone, constitution, spring of rib, depth, open
heads, a very good carcass and top
wool) but they back it up with
strong performance data. He is
first and foremost a stockman and
that shows in the high quality animals he produces year after year.’’
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IFTW F
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18
Farmer 9.12.16
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Personal
SEARCHING FOR
SOULMATE
A team of Ni-Vanuatu seasonal workers from the village of Mele take a break from thinning apples in Central Otago.
Pasifika workers key
to Roxburgh orchard
A Central Otago orchardist tells Rob Tipa seasonal workers from the Pacific
have brought his business financial security.
W
ithout the guarantee of a
reliable seasonal labour
force from Vanuatu, a
Central Otago orchardist
says his business would have shrunk
instead of grown.
Southern Orchards at East
Roxburgh has been a party to the
government’s Recognised Seasonal
Employment (RSE) scheme since its
inception as a pilot programme
nearly 10 years ago.
The orchard - at 124ha the largest
of seven orchards in the C A J van
der Voort Group in the Teviot Valley
near Roxburgh - employs 46 NiVanuatu workers for seven months
of the year from October through
until May, mainly to handle peak
demand for thinning and harvesting
its apple crop.
‘‘In the absence of the RSE
scheme, our orcharding operation
would have actually got smaller,
that’s the reality of it,’’ says Chris
Hull, operations manager for the C A
J Group.
‘‘It doesn’t matter what anyone
says, we would not have been able to
harvest or thin our apple crop
because the labour force wasn’t
available.’’
He says Central Otago is unique in
the numbers of seasonal workers
required by the primary sector,
particularly to prune, thin and
harvest pipfruit, stonefruit and grape
crops in the region.
Kiwis who want to work on
orchards are out there, he says, but it
is difficult to find enough of them at
times when they are needed most.
‘‘I know the mantra of the RSE
scheme is always to employ Kiwis
first and that is something we have to
do and we do, but we cannot grow our
business and offer full-time
permanent positions to Kiwis
without having our RSE scheme in
place.
‘‘Because we’re not in close
proximity to a major city or town,
there is no certainty about the supply
of labour for seasonal employment
Public Notices
and this scheme provides that
certainty,’’ Hull says.
‘‘Prior to the RSE scheme it was a
constant battle to find enough staff.
We would have been in the situation
where we couldn’t harvest a crop.’’
The Government has announced
an increase in the RSE scheme of 1000
seasonal workers to 10,500 for the
2016-17 season, a welcome relief for
the growing horticulture industry.
The horticulture and viticulture
industry is New Zealand’s fourthlargest export industry and aims to
increase exports to $10 billion by
2020. Seasonal workers from the
Pacific are an important part of a
sector that employs about 60,000
people throughout New Zealand.
Chris Hull welcomes the increase
in RSE workers and says the C A J
Orchard Group would like to employ
more seasonal and permanent
workers to cope with the group’s
expansion and development plans
over the next five years.
‘‘It gives us some certainty about
our business and seasonal labour
force moving forward, which is
something we didn’t have in the
past,’’ he says.
‘‘By having that certainty we can
grow the business and create new
opportunities for us to employ more
permanent people on our developing
operation.’’
Hull says one of the features of the
RSE scheme that is often ignored is
its importance to the many Pacific
Island villages that supply workers
throughout New Zealand.
RSE workers come from the
eligible Pacific Island countries of
Vanuatu, Tonga, Samoa, Solomon
Islands, Kiribati, Tuvalu, Papua New
Guinea, Nauru and Fiji.
Zebedee Poilapa is a team leader at
Southern Orchards of a group from
Mele village on the Vanuatu main
island of Efate. He says about 60
people from his village ar working in
Central Otago, most in Roxburgh and
two or three in Cromwell.
Poilapa says his village has
everything it needs for a comfortable
subsistence lifestyle in Vanuatu, but
seven months work in New Zealand
orchards every year provides
families with the finance to buy
materials to build permanent
housing and to pay for their
children’s school fees.
In his village most RSE workers
have built new houses for their
families from their savings to replace
traditional leaf huts with thatched
roofs.
Last year Poilapa and his son built
‘‘a big house’’ of 100 square metres
with concrete foundations and a
corrugated iron roof, a house that is
now used by villagers as a safe
shelter during a cyclone.
In the 10 years he has been
working in Central Otago, he says he
has learnt every aspect of orcharding
and has recently completed a First
Aid Certificate training course.
‘‘These guys are worth their
weight in gold because there’s jobs
out there that they have been doing
for 10 years, ‘‘ Hull says.
‘‘They’re here from when the fruit
is just forming on the tree through to
harvest so they know exactly what to
do and how to do it. They’re
experienced, they know what they
are doing and we have a return rate
of about 90 per cent year on year,’’ he
says.
Horticulture New Zealand chief
executive Mark Chapman says the
RSE scheme will celebrate 10 years
next year.
‘‘Some of our growers have had
the same workers coming for the
duration of the RSE scheme and they
have close bonds,’’ he says.
‘‘This is a fantastic scheme and it
is not taking away any local jobs. It is
a win-win initiative that gives
horticulture and viticulture a critical
workforce at its busiest time, while
allowing workers from mostly the
Pacific Islands to gain invaluable
experience and the chance of being
able to send money back to their
communities at home.’’
S/E country guy, tall
with a nice physique
and an all round
handy man. Respectful, well spoken and
well established would
be great future partner
for a country loving
lady aged 35+
Call 0800 315 311
to make contact
today.
7500438
SINGLE AND ALONE
THIS XMAS?
With Christmas just around
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0800 315 311
Taking calls 7 days til late.
www.newbeginningsnetwork.co.nz
7509565
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Property for Sale
Farm Services Available
VERY experienced fencing
contractor
available.
Phone Barry Christie. (03)
7494574
225 5453.
StockFeedandRuralSupplies
WWW.GIBB-GRO.CO.NZ
Fast Grass. Only $5.85 per
hectare plus gst delivered.
Brian 0274 389 822 or 07
7130873
571-0336.
Join today
and meet
your
neighbours
Breeding the difference
34TH ANNUAL ELITE
SIRE STAG SALE
Monday 9th January 2017 @ 1pm
Offering to include 2 & 3yr old sons of:
AMADEUS, LORD HAKA, MORPHEUS,
MCCAW, WOODY, PRINCE PHILIP, HENRY
VIII, GREGOR, ALEXANDER, DAVIDSON,
HENRY JAMES, AND HOUGHTON,
FOLLOWED BY A SELECTION OF
COMMERCIAL SIRES & TROPHY STAGS.
Catalogues posted out in December
ALL ENQUIRIES: Barry Gard
021 222 8964, a/h 03 431 2803
[email protected]
www.foverandeerpark.co.nz
stuff.co.nz
19
9.12.16 Farmer
Spider Control
THINKING OF BUILDING?
Exterior of average 3 bedroom house
$115
Exterior of average 2 storey house $165
• Great value
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PH: 03 418 2840
www.bigriverhomes.co.nz
CH-7505351AA
CH-7505361AA
Single gg $30 Dble gg $40
Rodents, Flies, Borer, Fleas, Wasps,
Cluster flies, Whitetail spiders, etc
0800 66 77 43
Matheson Agri-Services Ltd
South Otago Grain Co.
Supplying Natural, safe & healthy farming products,
also to improve soil health.
MIKE MALEY
• Himalayan
rock salt
• CarboUrea
For Grain Drying & Storage
• CarboPhos
Manufacturers of
• TM soil
activator
STOCK FOOD FOR
ALL FARM ANIMALS
CH-7510689AA
Colin Matheson
CH-7510671AA
P.O. BOX 77 – Balclutha
Ph: (03) 418 1197 A/H: (03) 418 0511
Cell: 0274 181257
• Himalayan
table salt
M: 027 201 0484 H: 03 417 8586
[email protected]
CH-7510700
TOTAL FARM MAINTENANCE
• General Engineering • Hydraulic hose & valve repairs
• Grain & molasses feed systems • ATV service & repair
• Farm machinery service & repair
• Dairy shed construction & installation
Martin Darmody
Ph: 027 227 2410 - A/H 03 413 9202
[email protected]
Agents for
CH-7510668AA
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20
Farmer 9.12.16
- POWER LIMITING
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ALL NEW 2016 800CC
CAN-AM DEFENDER