Airways Wellington Control Tower

Report Prepared for
Airways New Zealand
Report by
studiopacificarchitecture
Airways Wellington Control Tower
Design Statement
March 2015
Level 2, 74 Cuba Street
PO Box 11-517, Wellington
New Zealand
T: +64 4 802 5444
F: +64 4 802 5446
www.studiopacific.co.nz
Report Prepared by
Andrew Banks, BArch (Hons), NZIA
Evzen Novak, BArch (Hons), ANZIA, RIBA
Report Reviewed by
Marcellus Lilley, BArch, BBSc, ARB (UK), ANZIA
Image sources:
Fig 5 - Aerial photo source: LINZ data service
Fig 11 - Wellington International Airport 2030 Masterplan:
www.wellingtonairport.co.nz/corporate/2030-masterplan
Fig 31 - Wellington Urban Forest:
www.panoramio.com/photo/38981176
Zephyrometer: bloggingmiddleearth.blogspot.co.nz/
2010/04/nit-planes-pains-automobiles.html
Karori Rock Lighthouse: wildbaynz.blogspot.co.nz/2012/07/
red-rocks-and-karori-light-house.html
Fig 32 - Nuremberg Air Traffic Control Tower. Airport Nuernberg:
www.airport-nuernberg.de
Lisbon Harbour Control Tower:
www.kme.com/project/kmefolder/prj/34/1.html
Copyright in this document remains the property of Studio of Pacific
Architecture Ltd.
© Studio of Pacific Architecture Limited February 2015
Contents
1. Introduction 1
1.1 District Plan
1.2 Urban Design Principles
1.3 Design Statement Structure
2. Site 3
2.1 Existing Site
2.2 The Airport Precinct
2.3 Immediate Urban Context 2.4 Wider Rongotai
2.5 Far Context & Urban Grain
2.6 Environmental and Landscape Context
2.7 Future Development
3. Brief 11
3.1 Project Drivers
3.2 Site and Overall Tower Brief
3.3 Tower Functional Brief
4. Design Process 17
4.1 Design Options
4.2 Early Investigations
4.3 Game Changers
4.4 Emergent Concepts
5. Design Concept 19
6. Analysis: Context 23
6.1 Relationship to Context
6.2 Place
6.3 Visual Simulations
6.4 Shading Studies
6.5 Local Precedents
6.6 Other Precedents
7. Analysis: Siting, height and form 29
8. Analysis: Open space + landscaping 31
7.1 Siting
7.2 Height, Scale and Building Proportions
7.3 Wind Effects
8.1 Open Space Treatment
8.2 Access
8.3 Planting
9. Analysis: Materials and Detail 35
9.1 Overall Compositional Coherence
9.2 Elevational Treatment
9.3 Lighting
9.4 Maintenance and Robustness
9.5 Plans Elevations and Sections
10. Summary 39
Tower Site
Fig 1
Visual simulation from Mt Victoria Lookout (Viewpoint Site 1)
Tower Site
Fig 2
Visual simulation from Melrose (Viewpoint Site 2)
Tower Site
Visual simulation from the Airport Terminal (Viewpoint Site 8)
Fig 3
1. Introduction
The subject of this Design Statement is the proposed
new air traffic control tower for Airways New Zealand,
at the Wellington International Airport in Rongotai.
The current air traffic control tower for Wellington
International Airport is located at 34 Tirangi Road,
in amongst predominantly detached residential
housing on the small rise to the west of the airport
runway. There are a number of issues associated
with the existing control tower, which has led to the
proposal for a new control tower on a new site. Such
issues include: (i) the existing tower is over 50 years
old, and as such does not comply with current New
Zealand Building Code standards; (ii) the existing
tower requires significant on-going maintenance and
seismic strengthening in order to remain operational;
(iii) the existing tower penetrates the airport runway’s
Obstacle Limitation Surface (OLS).
The proposed new tower on the northern corner
of Tirangi Road and George Bolt Street allows
Airways to construct a purpose-built facility with
an appropriate level of resilience towards natural
disasters, that complies with current airport
operational safety standards and that considers both
current and future air traffic control requirements for
Wellington International Airport. It also provides the
opportunity to create a structure that is significant as
a Wellington landmark, both locally and regionally.
Evans Bay
Existing Tower
Proposed
Tower Site
N
Lyall Bay
Aerial photo of the airport area
Fig 4
Wellington Control Tower
1
1.1 District Plan
As the height of the proposed tower is greater than
the height limit for (Restricted) Discretionary Activities
in the Airport Precinct (Airport Area), the construction
of the tower is considered a Discretionary
(Unrestricted) Activity under section 11.4.2 of the
Wellington City District Plan. Assessment criterion
11.4.2.5 is the primary assessment criteria associated
with the architectural, landscape and urban design of
the tower, and asks:
Whether the design of buildings is in keeping with the
scale of the development in the immediate area and
accords with good urban design principles.
The purpose of this Design Statement is to
demonstrate that the design of the proposed tower
addresses this assessment criterion.
1.2 Urban Design Principles
In order to address assessment criterion 11.4.2.5,
a series of ‘good urban design principles’ needs to
be established to guide the architectural, urban and
landscape design. The key principles that define
‘good urban design’ in the context of this site and
project include:
1.
2.
3.
The tower should relate to its context. This
means that the tower should have a considered
and positive relationship with both the near
(streetscape and local urban form) and far
(townscape and regional) urban contexts, as
well as the relevant landscape context.
The tower should have design integrity.
This means that the tower should adopt
an architectural form and language that is
meaningful and coherent with respect to its
function and its relationship with its receiving
environment.
The materiality and detail of the tower should
support it contextual relationship and design
integrity. This means that appropriate and
robust materials and detailing are employed to
implement design principles (a) and (b) noted
above.
1.3 Design Statement Structure
This Design Statement is structured to progressively
describe how the above ‘good urban design
principles’ are achieved by the design of the tower.
It does this by describing the design context, and
then demonstrating how the ‘good urban design
principles’ are implemented through the design
response.
Sections 2, 3 & 4 describe the design context in
terms of the physical site context, the project brief
and the process that has led to the current design.
Section 5 describes the design concept of the tower,
while Sections 6-9 provide analysis of the design
concept, with respect to the way in which the ‘good
urban design principles’ are achieved through the
proposed design of the tower.
This Design Statement is to be read in conjunction
with Studio Pacific Architecture’s architectural
drawings.
These principles have been generated concurrently
with the preparation of an Independent Urban
Design Assessment by Morten Gjerde (FNZIA).
The Independent Assessment may use different
descriptions or wording of the principles to those
noted above.
Wellington Control Tower
2
2. Site
2.1 Existing Site
ROA
D
BAY
NGI
LYAL
L
*
TOWER
TIRA
PRO
MEN
AD
E
The site for the proposed tower is located on the
northern side of the corner of Tirangi Road and
George Bolt Street in Rongotai. The site is owned
by Wellington International Airport Limited (WIAL),
and will be leased by Airways New Zealand for the
purposes of constructing and operating the tower.
The legal description of the parcel of land on which
the site is located is Lot 39 DP21360.
The site is currently used as car parking for the
WIAL owned bulk retail park on George Bolt Street.
The site itself is predominantly covered by asphalt,
kerbs, channels and lighting poles associated with its
function as a car park. There are no existing buildings
or significant structures on the site, however there are
two small utility structures to the south of the site, one
a sewer pumping station and the other an electrical
sub station. A large signage structure associated with
the retail park is located between the site and Tirangi
Road.
There is an established soft landscaping margin
between the site and Tirangi Road, which contains a
variety of native planting species including tussocks,
flax, cabbage tree and pohutukawa.
Under the Wellington City District Plan, the site is part
of the ‘West Side’ development area of the Airport
Precinct. Properties opposite the site on Tirangi Road
are zoned Business 1.
- BUS STOPS
- PEDESTRIAN BUILDING ENTRIES
- FOOTPATH
- RETAIL PARK FOOTPATH
- CONSENTED RETAIL PARK
EXTENSION
N
Local pedestrian amenity in the vicinity of the tower
Fig 5
Wellington Control Tower
3
AIRPORT
TERMINAL
RUNWAY
EVANS BAY
EXISTING CONTROL
TOWER
RETAIL PARK
INDOOR SPORTS
CENTRE
PROPOSED
TOWER SITE
LYALL BAY
RONGOTAI
COLLEGE
N
Figure ground drawing of the urban grain in the area
Fig 6
Wellington Control Tower
4
2.2 The Airport Precinct
The ‘West Side’ airport precinct to the north and
east of the site is a significant component of the
surrounding urban context. The existing development
within this precinct includes a low-rise office building,
workshops, a large hanger and car parking sites. The
western apron of the airport extends from the runway
to the eastern side of these sites. The street frontages
to Tirangi Road include a landscaped frontage
associated with the office building at 95 Tirangi
Road, as well as vehicle crossings and hard paving
associated with the workshops at 93 Tirangi Road.
The most significant development in terms of bulk
and location is the private passenger hanger (known
as the ‘Execujet Hangar’), at 91 Tirangi Road. This
building presents an almost blank frontage directly to
Tirangi Road.
2.3 Immediate Urban Context
The tower site is located centrally along the Tirangi
Road street frontage of the Airport Retail Park.
The immediate context and street environment is
consistent with that of a light industrial and large
format retail urban environment.
To the east of the retail park, along Cochrane Street,
similar airport related activities and buildings existing,
including hangers, workshops and the airport fire
service.
The retail park is composed of large-format retail
tenancies, set back from Tirangi Road by a large area
of car parking. While the buildings in the retail park
are generally single storey, their heights are similar
to a two or three storey building. Signage and colour
associated with the branding of retail tenancies
define a large part of the external appearance of
the buildings within the retail park. Within the retail
park, building entrances are defined by a series of
canopies that face out onto the car parking area
and also provide pedestrians with protection from
the weather. The area of car parking between the
retail park and Tirangi Road contains pole mounted
lighting, trolley parks and regularly spaced areas of
soft landscaping.
The terminal concourse on the east side of the
runway features prominently in views from Lyall Bay,
and is also visible via a view shaft down George Bolt
Street, immediately to the south of the site. The airport
runway itself forms a significant part of the midground views of the airport precinct from Lyall Bay.
Development over the road from the tower site is
light-industrial in nature. Similarly to the retail park,
while much of this is single storey, the height of
buildings is more like that of two-storey buildings.
The long, shallow gabled roof forms of the buildings
along the west side of Tirangi Road is consistent with
Melrose
Rongotai, Kilbirnie
& Lyall Bay
the architecture of light industrial and warehouse
buildings.
Tirangi Road is a wide road with a central painted
median, with parallel parking and footpaths on both
sides. The nature and scale of development along
Tirangi Road adjacent to the site means that there is
very little precedent for public activation of the street
edge. Except for the retail park’s larger set-back,
buildings are generally set back a number of metres
from the street with either a landscape or car parking
margin between the building and the footpath.
Key views from the footpath outside the tower site
include the view of Lyall Bay south down Tirangi
Road, the view to the residential area and existing
control tower on the hill to the north of the site,
and the view to the airport runway, terminal and
Strathmore hills down George Bolt Street to the east.
Tirangi Road is defined as a ‘Collector Road’ under
the Wellington City District Plan, and connects to Lyall
Parade to the south, which is a ‘Principal Road’. The
number 14 bus route (Wilton-Rongotai via. Kilbirnie)
services Tirangi Road with a 30 minute frequency.
The bus stop for this service is located directly
outside the tower site.
Seatoun Heights
Tirangi Rise
Fig 7
Topographical cross section from Melrose to Seatoun Heights
Tower
Runway
Miramar
Wellington Control Tower
Strathmore Park
5
2.4 Wider Rongotai
The urban context of wider Rongotai to the south,
north and west of the site contains a variety of
urban activities. To the south, along Lyall Parade,
recreational use of the foreshore is a defining
characteristic of the area. This includes use of the
beach area for surfing, kite boarding walking and
exercise activities. Restaurants and cafes have
appeared along Lyall Parade to compliment this
activity. The most recent of these, the ‘Spruce Goose’
café, involved the relocation and renovation of the
historic Aero Club building to a site on the corner of
Cochrane Street and Moa Point Road, to the south
east of the tower site.
Development to the north of Coutts Street (where the
existing control tower is currently situated) generally
consists of residential housing, mostly one to two
storey detached dwellings. A rise in the topography
of this area means that housing overlooks both the
airport precinct to the east and Rongotai/Kilbirnie to
the west.
The city blocks to the west of Tirangi Road are
largely made up of business activities, which are
generally light-industrial in nature. Buildings in these
blocks are generally single storey factory/warehouse
type structures, but also includes a large format
retail hardware store (Bunnings Warehouse) and
associated car parking. Rongotai College is located
to the west of this, which in addition to its school
buildings also contains large areas of green space
used as sports fields.
2.5 Far Context & Urban Grain
The site can be viewed from a number of far and
elevated vantage points, including Mount Victoria,
Strathmore Heights and Melrose. From these vantage
points, the urban grain of the site and its surrounding
context can be observed.
The tower site itself is centrally located amongst the
grain of urban fabric made up by the light industrial,
large format retail and airport precinct buildings to the
west side of the airport runway. This grain is generally
large footprint and low permeability, interspersed with
areas of open-space car parking. This is bounded to
the west by the open-space created by the airport
runway.
To the north and east, the urban grain and block
structure quickly changes to that of one and two
storey detached and semi-detached residential
dwellings, of the medium density that is typical of flat
residential areas in Wellington.
Mediating between these two grains is the green
open-space created by Rongotai College.
Photos of tower site in its current form
Wellington Control Tower
Fig 8
6
2.6 Environmental and Landscape Context
and marine materials, which is one of the reasons
why significant engineering is required to the substructure of the tower.
The tower site is located on the southern edge of
the Rongotai isthmus, approximately 200m from the
Lyall Bay waterfront, and is almost centrally located
between the ridges of the Strathmore Hills and
Miramar Peninsula to the east and Melrose hills to the
west.
The Greater Wellington Regional Council defines this
general area as ‘Duneland’ in the Wellington Regional
Native Planting Guide 2010. The guide notes
that coastal grasses and shrubland within sandy,
free draining soils would have dominated the soft
landscape of the area in the past. Section 5 of this
design statement outlines how this has influenced the
soft landscaping around the tower.
The surrounding landscape context is defined by
the south coast and the associated coastal edge.
Significant features of the near environment include
the rocky coastal edge at Moa Point to the south east
of the site, the overlooking wind-swept escarpment
at Moa Point, and the sandy duneland of Lyall Bay to
the south of the site. Below the current car park and
imported fill, the site itself is composed of sandy soil
With little existing natural or artificial shelter, the site is
highly exposed to the weather. The prevailing winds
are both the northerly and the southerly. While the
northerly is the most frequent wind, the southerly is
also significant as it is often cold and accompanied
by rain. The winds are laden with salts and residual
sand, which creates a harsh environment for built
structures. The effects of the wind on the site are
described in the Wind Report, which accompanies
the Assessment of Environmental Effects.
The surrounding environment also includes a number
of artificial landscape structures. The most prominent
of these is the airport runway itself. As an elongated
plateau elevated a number of metres above sea level,
the runway is oriented in the north-south direction and
is visible particularly at its north and south extents
as a structured or bunded landscape form. Another
significant artificial structure is the breakwater to
the east end of Lyall Bay, which extends around the
southern end of the runway and RESA tunnel. This is
constructed primarily of concrete, both in-situ as well
as numerous pre-cast blocks and biscuits forming
a rock-like buffer around the southern edge of the
runway.
ROCKY COASTAL
EDGE
WINDSWEPT
ESCARPMENT
MIRAMAR CUTTING
RUNWAY
MIRAMAR CUTTING
RUNWAY
EVANS
BAY
EVANS
BAY
ROCKY COASTAL
EDGE
WINDSWEPT
ESCARPMENT
MOA POINT RESERVE
BREAK WATER
MOA POINT RESERVE
BREAK WATER
TOWER
TOWER
Breakwater prior to the RESA
LYALL BAY
Fig 9a
LYALL BAY
LYALL BAY BEACH
LYALL BAY BEACH
ROCKY COASTAL
EDGE
ROCKY COASTAL
EDGE
WINDSWEPT
ESCARPMENT
WINDSWEPT
ESCARPMENT
Runway adjacent Lyall Bay
Fig 9b
Natural and artificial landscape features in the area
N
N
- NATURAL LANDSCAPE
Fig 10
- ARTIFICIAL LANDSCAPE
- NATURAL LANDSCAPE
Wellington Control Tower
- ARTIFICIAL LANDSCAPE
7
2030 Wellington Airport Master Plan
Fig 11
Wellington Control Tower
8
2.7Future Development
The surrounding retail park site, owned by WIAL, has
a resource consent to expand to the currently vacant
sites to the north. The proposed scheme includes
additional retail tenancies to the north, additional
car parking between the new tenancies and Tirangi
Road, a new vehicle access point to the north of the
tower site, new soft landscaping of a similar scale to
the current car park landscaping, and additional retail
signage.
It is understood construction will commence
shortly on the extended Airport Retail Park. This
addition modifies the existing site, particularly its
entranceways to Tirangi Road.
The Wellington International Airport 2030 Masterplan,
published in January 2010, describes the
development intention of WIAL up to 2030. In addition
to the on-going use of the immediate site area for
commercial activity, the masterplan shows the
intention of the airport to expand the western apron
up to Tirangi Road, to the north of the tower site. The
Master Plan anticipates aviation activities associated
with the expanded western apron, including freight
operations, aircraft maintenance, additional parking
for aircraft and a private jet terminal.
Wellington Airport Runway
Fig 12
Wellington Control Tower
9
View from existing tower to the new tower site
Fig 13
Wellington Control Tower
10
3. Brief
3.1 Project drivers
There are a number of project drivers that contribute
to the proposal for a new Air Traffic Control Tower on
the proposed site. These drivers outline the purpose
of the project, as well as guide design decisionmaking throughout the design and construction
process. These drivers can be described as follows:
Existing Tower Drivers
The proposal for a new tower on a new site is partly
driven by the design and condition of the existing
control tower. The existing tower at 34 Tirangi Road is
over 50 years old and is nearing the end of its useful
life. This means that there are a number of inherent
building and compliance issues associated with the
existing tower. These include:
•
Due to its age, the existing tower does not
comply with current New Zealand Building
Code standards. This includes seismic and fire
engineering design standards;
•
The existing tower requires significant on-going
maintenance and seismic strengthening in order
to remain operational;
•
The existing tower penetrates the airport
runway’s Obstacle Limitation Surface (OLS)
Operational Drivers
The primary purpose of the new control tower is to
create an optimal operational environment for Airways
to undertake its air traffic control operations. While
the tower primarily monitors traffic approaching and
departing Wellington International Airport, it should
also be noted that the tower forms a node of a wider
network of integrated air traffic control facilities, and
therefore also has regional and national significance.
Key operational drivers include:
•
Providing maximum visibility for controllers
through orientation of the tower with the runway
and raising the cab as high as possible without
penetrating the runway OLS;
•
Provision of sufficient space within the tower to
allow for communications equipment and cable
work required to operate the tower;
•
Provision of space within the tower to allow
for future integration of new air traffic control
systems and technologies;
•
Provision of safe and secure entry for night-time
air traffic controller shift changes.
Compliance Drivers
Compliance with the New Zealand Building Code, as
well as other relevant safety standards, is a significant
driver of the project. This includes:
•
Compliance with current seismic engineering
standards for Importance Level 4 buildings;
•
Compliance with current fire engineering
design and compliance standards, including
fire egress, fire detection and fire suppression
systems;
•
Improved accessibility measures, including
accessible car parking provision, a lift within
the tower, and provision of accessible sanitary
facilities within the tower;
•
Ensuring that the tower does not penetrate the
airport runway Obstacle Limitation Surface.
Resilience Drivers
The design of the control tower needs to have a level
of resilience to ensure the on-going operation of the
tower, particularly in post-disaster situations. This is
reflected in its status as an Importance Level 4 (IL4)
building. Key aspects of this include:
•
Base isolation, ground improvements and
seismic engineering design commensurate with
an IL4 building;
•
A 500mm raised building platform for flood
resilience;
•
On site generator and UPS facilities for security
of power supply following a disaster;
•
An external observation deck to enable manual
monitoring of the skies following a disaster.
Wellington Control Tower
11
View from existing tower
Fig 14
Wellington Control Tower
12
Architectural Drivers
Due to the significance of the project both in form and
function, a high quality, site-specific design response
is required to envelope the project drivers noted
above. Such a response includes:
•
•
•
Creating a tower with a high degree of
architectural and visual interest, that relates both
to the local site context and the tower’s role in
the aviation industry;
Creating a tower that is robust and resilient to
the local environmental conditions, including the
intense wind, weather, salt and sand conditions
found at the site.
Provision of views for occupiers of the
tower, particularly of the north/south runway
approaches as well as views across the runway
and aprons to the east.
3.2 Site and Overall Tower Brief
Whole of Tower Requirements
A number of brief requirements extend across the
whole or a majority of the tower. These include:
Site
The overall area of the site is approximately 875m2.
The primary function of the site is to allow access to
the tower for Airways operational and maintenance
staff (the tower is not accessible to the public). Key
site brief elements include:
•
Provision of lift access from the ground floor to
level 6;
•
Provision of an access and egress stair up the
full height of the building;
•
Provision of building wide fire detection and
suppression systems;
•
Car parking for 10 staff vehicles, including one
accessible car park;
•
•
Accessible ramp and stair entry to the primary
building entrance;
Acoustic design and treatment to mitigate
the effects of aircraft noise on the internal
environment.
•
A ‘spill containment area’ to allow drop off and
re-fueling of the generator fuel tank within the
building;
•
A security fence including access control and
secure car parks to allow for safe night-time
controller shift changes.
The key functional brief requirements for the project
site and the overall building are as follows:
Wellington Control Tower
13
1 in
LS
O
7
Tower Cab
(CAB) LEVEL 8 +30.41
Lift & Stairs
Rittal Racks & Comms
Distribution
WC/
Lockers
(SUB CAB) LEVEL 7 +27.78
WC
Controller Lounge/
Ready Room
Lift & Stairs
Lobby
WC/
Change
LEVEL 6 +24.51
Lift & Stairs
Controller Offices
Meeting
Room
Lobby
WC
LEVEL 5 +21.24
Lift & Stairs
Training/Meeting
Room
Sick Bay
Lobby
WC
LEVEL 4 +17.97
Lift & Stairs
Communications
Equipment
Workroom
Plant
Lobby
LEVEL 3 +14.70
Lift & Stairs
Mechanical Plant
MSB
UPS
A
UPS
B
Lobby
LEVEL 2 +11.43
Lift & Stairs
Future Proofing
LEVEL 1 +8.16
Lift & Stairs
Generator
Reception/Lobby
Staff
Utility
FAP
GROUND +4.89
Sectional Diagram illustrating the Functional Brief
Fig 15
Wellington Control Tower
14
3.3 Tower Functional Brief
Due to the small building footprint, the varying
functions within the building are generally contained
to individual floors. Because of this, the functional
brief of the tower is best described on a floor-by-floor
basis.
Ground Floor
The ground floor is the main entry to the building,
which also houses the generator and fuel tank (which
need to be located at this level due to weight and
maintenance requirements). Key ground floor brief
elements include:
•
A wind lobby at the main building entry;
•
Space for cycle parking;
•
Provision of shower and toilet facilities;
•
Space for the building fire alarm panel, sprinkler
valve-set and brigade inlet;
•
Space for the emergency power generator and
2000L diesel tank.
Level 1 (Future Proofing)
Level 1 fulfills the brief requirement of providing
space for potential future Airways requirements. This
allows Airways space to adapt the tower to future air
traffic control technologies or provide additional staff
accommodation.
Level 2 (Services and Plant)
Level 2 provides space for the mechanical plant
required to service the building’s fresh air intake,
heating and cooling requirements. It also houses the
building’s main switchboard as well as two separate
and dedicated Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS)
systems.
Level 3 (Operational Communications Systems)
Level 3 provides space for the communications
racks and mainframe required to operate the tower’s
communications system. The brief requires space
for at least 16 communications racks. Provision of
a workspace for Airways technical maintenance
staff is also required, to enable on-going work to the
communications equipment.
Levels 4, 5 & 6 (Tower Controller Floors)
Levels 4, 5 and 6 provide office and support facilities
for the team of air traffic controllers. Due to the
requirement for ready movement of controller staff
between these functions and the cab (particularly in
case of emergencies), these functions are required to
be as close to the cab level as possible.
Level 4 functions as a support floor for the office
space above, with level 5 functioning as office space
for the tower control team, and level 6 functioning
as a ready room and break-out space for controllers
undertaking shift work. Key brief requirements for
these levels include:
•
Provision of a large meeting room, primarily
used for training of air traffic controllers;
•
Provision of a sick bay, which can also function
as a space for ‘horizontal rest’ of shift workers;
•
Space for secure filing of hard copy records;
•
Provision of office space for 5 people, including
a separate office space for the ‘tower team
leader’;
•
•
Provision of lounge space and kitchen facilities
for tower controllers undertaking shift work,
with views towards the northern and southern
approaches, as well as the airport runway and
apron;
Provision of locker, shower and sanitary facilities
for tower controllers undertaking shift work.
Level 7 (Sub Cab)
The sub-cab level provides direct functional support
to the main cab level above. The primary purpose of
this level is to house the computers, equipment and
cable reticulation required to operate the controller
desks in the cab level. It also provides access to an
external observation deck, which allows controllers
to manually observe the sky in case the main cab is
unable to be used. Key brief requirements for this
level includes:
•
Space provision for equipment racks directly
below the controller stations in the cab above;
•
Sanitary facilities for cab controllers;
•
Access to the observation deck;
Level 8 (Cab)
The cab level is the primary functional space within
the tower, allowing the controller team on shift to
view and monitor the airport take-off and landing
approaches, as well as the runway, aprons and
terminal gates. Key brief requirements for the cab
include:
•
Provision of 4 operating controller workstations
with one spare space for future growth;
•
Provision of maximum views and minimum view
shadow to the controller workstations (as close
to 360 degrees as possible);
•
Provision of chart, map and manual reading
stations for controllers;
•
Allowance for a mobile external building
maintenance unit to allow regular cleaning and
re-surfacing of the cab glazing;
•
Provision of kitchenette facilities for use by
controllers during their shift.
Wellington Control Tower
15
A selection of early investigative sketches
Fig 16
Wellington Control Tower
16
4. Design Process
4.1Design Options
Like all design processes the design process for the
tower itself distils a large number of factors that can
be summarised as comprising:
1.
The brief and its functional needs
2.
The site, its history and context
3.
The rules, in the sense of planning rules and
other dicta such as structural standards and
economics
4.
The architect’s own creative background and
instincts
Design of the tower, because it is an object in space
that with its height will inevitably be a landmark,
has led to a large and significant number of design
iterations.
At a superficial level there are hundreds, perhaps
thousands of possibilities for the form of the building.
Some of the huge number of form studies are
illustrated here.
At a functional level, there are a significant number of
givens, some of which, for instance, are:
•
•
•
The tower needs to be at the greatest possible
height to facilitate the best possible view for its
users, Wellington air traffic controllers
The cab and its heart – the sub-cab for
electronics and the ready room for the
controllers – need to be closely associated with
each other
4.2 Early Investigations
During the design process an in depth study of a
number of tower options was undertaken. Three
alternative conforming options (in the sense of the
brief) are briefly discussed here, of which one has
been selected to become the subject of this resource
consent application.
A critical issue throughout the design process is
the relationship of the building’s structural system
to its form. This is because of the tower’s height,
its ‘thinness’, the need to meet IL-4 standards and
the nature of the risks generated by the ground
conditions and location. The structure must be
intrinsically melded with architecture to create a
formal architectonic solution. The design process
sought to integrate rather than separate architectural
and structural requirements.
An early tower variant with a square footprint placed
diagonally to the runway and street, used mass
concrete walls and very large raft foundations to
provide a structured solution. While there appeared
to be a certain economy in this solution, the cost
effectiveness, for instance, of constructing very thick
concrete walls became questionable. In addition, the
building itself was unremarkable and as designers we
and others such as the Wellington City Council Urban
Designer could see that the form didn’t reach the
standard a building of this type could or should.
31,615
Story
29,015
Roof
26,015
Cab
23,390
Sub Cab
20,080
Level 6
16,770
Level 5
13,460
Level 4
9,800
Level 3
6,700
Level 2
Space requirements for critical electronics and
air conditioners. Plant must be provided in the
right places.
3,600
Level 1
500
0
Ground
Floor
Ground level
Early tower variant
Fig 17
-4,390
Sea Level/ Datum
Wellington Control Tower
17
4.3 Game Changers
A further round of investigation into alternative solutions
led to new design possibilities. These relied on two game
changing design elements being developed.
Firstly, it was found that the system of structurally
supporting the tower’s cab roof could be changed from
a triple external column arrangement to a single central
internal column. This suited the controller’s visibility
demands at Wellington Airport and simplified the structural
load pathways in the building.
Secondly, it was also found that using base isolation as
the main means of seismic protection for the building was
cost effective because of the tower’s form, requirements
and situation. This allowed the tower’s shape and form to
be developed using any of a multitude of structure and
architectural techniques.
Two front runners came about from the renewed design
investigations.
4.4 Emergent Concepts
A circular lattice like external structure of pre-cast concrete
elements emerged as one proposal. The structural system
relies on a regular circular plan form at every level and
on the exact repetition of each element. The limitations of
the system along with the inefficiencies of a small circular
plan form and the unenergised appearance, relegated the
lattice form to the sidelines.
+34.850
11 Roof
+30.410
10 Cab
+27.780
9 Sub-Cab
+24.510
8 Level 6
+34.850
11 Roof
+30.410
10 Cab
+27.780
9 Sub-Cab
+21.240
7 Level 5
+21.240
7 Level 5
+17.970
6 Level 4
+17.970
6 Level 4
+11.430
4 Level 2
+8.160
3 Level 1
+8.160
3 Level 1
The subject of this Resource Consent application, the
leaning tower, was chosen after a lengthy exploration of a
variety of building forms, their structural systems and their
capability to work as landmarks on the Tirangi Road site.
+4.890
2 Ground
Floor
+4.390
1 Ground Level
1
#LayID
North Elevation
Scale 1:100
B
C
1
2
3
Fig 18
4
+34.850
11 Roof
Elevation of cab
structure shown
indicatively. Refer
RC-23 for Cab Cross
Section.
Elevation of cab structure shown indicatively.
Refer SK-415 and SK-416 for cab & sub-cab
plan.
+30.410
10 Cab
Note that perimeter walk around space
currently does not comply with the brief.
Tower radius would need to increase approx.
400mm to achieve compliance.
Diagonals continue up to 1,100 AFL in GRC
concrete. Allow stainless steel structural
balustrade in behind.
Elevation of cab structure shown
indicatively.
+30.410
10 Cab
Glazed raked balustrade
to sub-cab
level.
+27.780
+27.780
9 Sub-Cab
9 Sub-Cab
+24.510
8 Level 6
Proprietary aluminium joinery with
insulated glazing unit installed into
rebated opening.
+24.510
8 Level 6
Proprietary aluminium
raked curtain wall
system, flush glazed.
Glazed unit shown blue.
+21.240
7 Level 5
+21.240
7 Level 5
+17.970
6 Level 4
+17.970
6 Level 4
+14.700
5 Level 3
+14.700
5 Level 3
+11.430
4 Level 2
+11.430
4 Level 2
Faceted facade panels suspended from
primary building structure. Actual
window disposition may vary.
Repeating structural unit shown highlighted
red.
'Box' 150mm wide aluminium mullions and
transoms shown. Design TBC.
+14.700
5 Level 3
+11.430
4 Level 2
A
+34.850
11 Roof
+24.510
8 Level 6
A rectangle tower leaning into the prevailing northerly wind
also emerged as a possibility. While the building in some
senses is defying gravity, it also clearly resonated with
the environment in which it sits. An internal centralised
steel structural system supports the cab, the cantilevered
overhanging floors and a cladding strategy that can vary
with orientation.
+14.700
5 Level 3
Later investigations
Proprietary aluminium 3-stage louvres
installed into rebated opening.
Solid panels shown white.
Proprietary 3-stage louvres shown hatched.
+8.160
3 Level 1
CARPARK
+4.890
2
Ground Floor
+4.390
1 Ground Level
+8.160
3 Level 1
TIRANGI
ROAD
+4.890
2 Ground
Floor
+4.390
1 Ground Level
+4.890
2
Ground Floor
+4.390
1 Ground Level
Latice tower concept
1
Fig 19
Leaning tower concept
North Elevation
2
Scale 1:200
2
West Elevation
#LayID Scale 1:100
General Notes: All dimensions to be checked on site.
Revisions:
Copyright in all drawings, specifications and other documents
and in the work executed from them remains the property of
0A 26.03.15
Studio of Pacific Architecture Ltd./Paris Magdalinos Architects
0
23.02.15
Limited.
© Studio of Pacific Architecture Limited 2015
© Paris Magdalinos Architects Limited 2015
Resource Consent
Resource Consent
East Elevation
Wellington Control Tower
Scale 1:200
Consultants:
Project Title:
Structural Engineer:
Holmes Consulting Group
Facade Engineer:
Mott Macdonald
Building Services & Fire
Protection:
Beca
Contractor:
Hawkins Group
A r c hit ec t s
Ur ban Designer s
PRELIMINARY IDESIGN
nt er ior D e s i g n e r s
ROUGH ORDER Studio
COSTING
Pacific Architecture
Paris Magdalinos Architects
Airways Control Tower
Wellington
at
Fig 20
Note: refer to Design Statement for description of
elevational treatment.
RESOURCE CONSENT
DRAFT
Elevations North & East
Scale: 1:200
Orig. Size: A3
18
5. Design Concept
The tower concept, now the subject of this Resource
Consent application, unfolded in the course of a
rigorous design process as has been discussed
in the preceding section. The following sections of
this Design Statement provide further detail on the
concept summarised below.
The tower needs to have a conceptual basis that
recognises several architecturally important tenets
that are important. These precepts are:
•
The height of the building is an inevitable
function of its purpose and because of this the
building itself is inevitably going to become a
landmark in the area,
•
While the building has a very practical life and
purpose, it still must, more than most other
building types, offer a poetic response in its
design, and
•
As the building users mediate the Wellington
climatic environment by controlling the local air
space, the building should say something about
the Wellington environment in which it stands.
Sketch perspective of the leaning tower concept
Fig 21
Wellington Control Tower
19
The concept of a building that leans into the
prevailing winds both follows these precepts and
meets the intrinsic needs of the precepts.
The tower embodies a simple statement about
Wellington’s well known wind prone environment. It
does not shirk from addressing the wind, physically
and metaphorically, and in doing so it makes a poetic
response to the situation in which it sits.
The definition of a landmark as “An object or
feature of a landscape or town that is easily seen
and recognized from a distance, especially one
that enables someone to establish their location”
(Oxford Dictionaries on line) is relatively easily met
– a building of the tower’s height in its location has
a certain inevitability in becoming a landmark but
it is important that the building is established as
a landmark in the positive sense. The tower has a
character that embodies the character of its place
and at the same time has the positive attribute
of being a singular built object that brings an
unexpected edge to its context.
With its lean, the tower has the movement and
dynamism of the wind itself and it also has
directionality. The directionality not only reflects
the prevailing wind but is orchestrated to match
the direction of the airport runway and reflect the
building’s primary purpose. Directionality is also
reflected in the development of the façades.
Photo of Control Tower Model
Fig 22
Wellington Control Tower
20
The tower has two rough faces – east and west – that
refer to the geology of the coastal edge and two
polished faces – north and south – that refer to the
polishing action of sea and wind. The materials reflect
the climatic challenges of the area and are overtly
strong and robust.
Landscaping is used to reinforce the idea of two
parallel rough coastal sides to the building and is
disposed in a singular pattern running parallel to the
east and west faces of the building. Lighting is used
at night to reinforce conceptually the purpose and
ideas behind the building.
The shape of the building is rectangular as it
optimises the efficiency of the space generated
within the small footprint of the building. It contrasts
markedly with the roundness of the tower cab
and enables the references to the materials of the
foreshore to be made. The shape of the tower’s cab,
sitting at the top of the building, is determined by
the practical need for air traffic controllers to see the
runway, runway thresholds and approaches.
The building, as proposed, meets the needs of the
brief described on a floor by floor basis in Section
3 of this Design Statement. The brief, therefore,
describes the provisions made in the building to meet
the requirements of Airways NZ for a facility of this
nature.
Investigative sketches of the leaning tower concept
Fig 23
Wellington Control Tower
21
AI
TE
RUNWAY
PROPOSED
TOWER SITE
LYAL
Figure ground drawing of the semi-industrial area around the Control Tower site
Wellington Control Tower
Fig 24
22
RON
COL
6. Analysis: Context
6.1 Relationship to Context
The tower has been designed with its context,
particularly its coastal Wellington context, in mind.
The tower’s foremost contextual connection to its
place is the very obvious lean into the prevailing
northerly wind. An opposite connection is to the
southerly – while less prevalent than the northerly it is
more boisterous and could be said to be chasing the
tower’s form.
The coastal environment is referenced in the ground
treatment, where dune-like concrete forms parallel
the tower, and in the cladding, where deeply incised
cladding contrasts with smooth sided faces. This is
the rough rocks eaten out of the land by the sea and
the stones polished by the waves combined into one
entity.
The coastal environment also has its share of built
structures: the breakwater of Lyall Bay and the
interlocking protectors on the runway extension for
instance. In a similar vein, the tower has a rugged
and robust external appearance that refers to these
neighbours.
In a functional sense, this is a necessity as the wind
drives particles of sand and salt, rainwater, fuels, dirt
and detritus, in the airport and coast area. It is one
of the more difficult places to provide durability and
longevity, hence the drive for robustness.
6.2 Place
The tower, with its height, is inevitably a landmark in
the area. The other buildings in the neighbourhood,
as noted earlier and visible from the Figure Ground
drawing in Fig 21, generally have large format plan
areas and the height of two to three storey buildings.
In a major contrast to the other buildings in the
neighbourhood, the tower has a very small plan
footprint (of only approx 150m2) and is the rough
equivalent of a nine storey building.
There is a necessary non-conformity with the
surroundings but in the context of a semi-industrial
big box retail and airport area, there is nothing
untoward in locating an airport control tower in Tirangi
Road. The tower itself will generate a positive sense
of place that would not otherwise be possible. The
tower will give an otherwise nondescript part of the
city a clearly identifiable central landmark that is quite
likely to become the central identifying feature in the
area.
Place, in the wider sense of whole segments of the
city, is reflected in the ideas behind the building. The
tower will be visible from the Strathmore/Miramar
ridges through to the Melrose/Hataitai ridge so it
occupies a wider city context.
The wider place of coast and airport, city suburbs
and forested hills, of a particularly windy isthmus
connecting harbour and strait is reflected in the tower
– a rock drawn from the sands bracing itself against
the wind.
Visual simulation from Tirangi Road (Viewpoint Site 6)
Wellington Control Tower
Fig 25
23
Visual simulation from Queens Drive (Viewpoint Site 3)
Fig 26
Visual simulation from Lyall Bay (Viewpoint Site 4)
Fig 27
Visual simulation from Lyall Bay/Tirangi Road (Viewpoint Site 5)
Fig 28
Wellington Control Tower
24
6.3 Visual Simulations
A series of visual simulations have been produced
that insert the proposed tower into photographs
taken at selected locations that will have views of
the proposed building. The simulations have been
produced using the NZILA Guidelines. A selection is
reproduced here from the full simulation submitted
with the application to illustrate the contextual effects
of the tower.
In middle distance views, such as that from
Viewpoint Site 4 on Lyall Bay beach, the tower is
quite prominent and stands above the skyline. The
dominant visual elements are the tower cab, the flat
extended shelf below the cab and the lean of the
building supporting these elements. The building is
clearly distinguishable and unique. In this realm, it
manifests itself as a landmark for the area.
At a long distance away, or indeed at a height above
the building, such as that shown in the simulations
produced at Viewpoint Site 3 in Queen’s Drive or
Viewpoint Site 9 on the Strathmore hills, the tower,
while still clearly visible, tends to merge with the grain
of the buildings and hills around it. It appears at one
with its airport surroundings.
At a close view, such as those of Viewpoint Sites 5
and 6 in Tirangi Road adjacent to the Airport Retail
Park, the rectangular lean of the main body of the
tower and the materiality of the facade treatments
as they vary from east/west to north/south is most
apparent. The immediate inspection enabled at this
close aspect is repaid with views of the detailed
development of facade systems that are as outside
the ordinary as the building’s overt lean into the
northerly.
6.4 Shading Studies
A series of shading studies have been produced
for winter and summer solstice and the equinox. An
extract from the application drawings is reproduced
here - this is the worst case scenario at winter
solstice. It illustrates that the building, with its slender
form and despite its height, casts a narrow shadow
that swings from Tirangi Road in the morning through
to the Retail area car park by late afternoon. Due to
the nature of the surrounding buildings (large format
with minimal windows) the proposed control tower is
anticipated to have a negligible impact on adjacent
buildings.
WINTER SOLSTICE 21st June
8:00
WINTER SOLSTICE 21st June
8:00
Visual simulation from Strathmore (Viewpoint
Site23rd
9) September
EQUINOX
10:00
12:00
14:00
10:00
16:00
12:00
14:00
EQUINOX 23rd September
10:00
12:00
8:00
Fig 29
SUMMER SOLSTICE 21st December
Shading study for winter solstice - north to left
Wellington Control Tower
Fig 30
25
18:00
14:00
6.5 Local precedents
The nature of Wellington’s climate and its coastal
condition has begun to be recognised in a variety of
built structures and sculptures in the region. Some
are illustrated here.
Of particular note are the works in the Cobham Drive
sculpture park where reaction to the wind is the
particular point of each work.
An earlier antecedent, some kilometres around the
south coast, is the Karori Rock lighthouse with an
inadvertently similar lean. The building stands as a
bulwark against the elements – like the proposed
airport tower, robust enough to continue providing its
safety function despite the environmental conditions.
Hon Peter Fraser Statue, Lambton Quay,
Wellington
Wellington Urban Forest, Evans Bay, Wellington
Karori Rock Lighthouse, South Coast, Wellington
Zephyrometer, Evans Bay, Wellington
Solace in the Wind Sculpture, Wellington
Fig 31
Wellington Control Tower
26
6.6 Other precedents
The ideas inherent in the proposed control tower
have, like all buildings, precedents here and
elsewhere.
A building which references the rocks of the south
coast lies directly across the runway in Wellington
Airport’s International Passenger Terminal. Of course,
the representation is of a vastly different character,
but the new tower will add to a local architectural
family in a similar way to the family of wind generated
forms mentioned earlier.
While not an exhaustive selection, the illustrations
show leaning buildings have been built before, and
the earlier examples both colour our perceptions
and point the way to a new formal rendition of
the proposed control tower. What is unique to the
Wellington tower is that the lean is into the wind. This,
along with its scale, form and materiality, make the
tower one of a kind.
The Rock, Wellington Airport International Terminal
Nuremberg Air Traffic Control Tower, Germany
Bella Sky Hotel, Copenhagen
Lisbon Harbour Control Tower, Portugal
Wellington Control Tower
Fig 32
27
A
B
C
1
Elevation of cab
structure shown
indicatively. Refer
RC-23 for Cab Cross
Section.
2
3
4
Elevation of cab structure shown
indicatively.
Glazed raked balustrade
to sub-cab level.
Proprietary aluminium joinery with
insulated glazing unit installed into
rebated opening.
Proprietary aluminium
raked curtain wall
system, flush glazed.
Faceted facade panels suspended from
primary building structure. Actual
window disposition may vary.
Proprietary aluminium 3-stage louvres
installed into rebated opening.
TIRANGI ROAD
Fig 33
East Elevation
2
Consultants:
East Elevation
Scale 1:200
Project Title:
Note: refer to Design Statement for description of
elevational treatment.
Wellington Control Tower
RESOURCE CONSENT
DRAFT
28
7. Analysis: Siting, height and form
7.1 Siting
The building’s site in Tirangi Road was chosen
after extensive analysis by Airways New Zealand
of a large number of potential sites in the airport’s
vicinity. Detailed reporting of this analysis is provided
separately in the Resource Consent Application.
RUNWAY
Rebuilding on the existing tower site was one of
the investigated options but is not feasible as the
controller’s operational visibility requirements cannot
be met without penetrating the airport’s Obstacle
Limitation Surface (OLS) and this is not permitted.
The selected Tirangi Road site meets Airways’
visibility requirements. It is central to the thresholds
at each end of the runway and has good views to the
apron areas in front of the terminal buildings.
TOWER
The control tower is aligned exactly parallel with the
main 16/34 runway at Wellington Airport. It varies
slightly from true north and varies marginally from the
alignment of Tirangi Road and the street network of
the area.
The alignment with the runway indicates the
significance of the building to all – its paramount
purpose is to ensure the safety of flight operations.
Additionally, the street has a low level of impact for
the building as there is no immutable relationship
such as that between tower and runway.
STRE
[MATCHES RUNWAY
ORIENTATION]
ET N
LYALL BAY
ETW
ORK
N
Diagram showing match of tower and runway alignments
Fig 34
From a visual point of view, the tower has a close
relationship to the runway and other airport activities
and acts as a marker for the airport as a whole.
At a more detailed level, the building is placed on
its site to ensure serviceability while providing for
landscaped integration into its setting.
Wellington Control Tower
29
7.2 Height, scale and building proportions
The resulting tower has an unusual proportion visually
as the height of the building relative to the dimensions
of the cab is not particularly large and might hint at
a block like appearance rather than that which might
be suggested by the term ‘tower’.
7.3 Wind effects
•
The need to maximize height to provide the best
possible visibility for air traffic controllers viewing
the runway and the airport environs.
•
The requirement, generated by the International
Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), to build
below the 1 in 7 Obstacle Limitation Surface
(OLS) discussed in Section 3: The Brief.
However, the lean of the building, the use of a
rectangular floor plan, with a relatively narrow short
side, and the use of contrasting north/south and
east/west cladding systems, lend a dynamic to the
building that is well outside the norms of say an office
block and is clearly evocative of its aviation related
purpose.
The Assessment suggests that the building’s slender
aspect to the wind will mean wind effects are lower
than might otherwise occur with this height of
building. However wind effects are most likely at the
corners of the building and the Assessment suggests
the use of landscape elements to keep pedestrians
approx 2m away from the building corners,
particularly the southern corners.
The tower’s height is controlled by two pragmatic
requirements:
To meet the two requirements, the maximum height of
the building as it reaches the OLS on the subject site
is RL 36.830 or approx 32 metres above ground level.
The plan form size of the building at circa 150m2 is
diminutive in comparison to other nearby buildings or
to commercial buildings generally.
The tower cab size is optimised for the number of
air traffic controllers within and their need to have
visibility. The external deck below the cab must have
full accessibility on all sides with some working space
for access to cleaning gantries.
Each floor of the building provides essential
functionality with the size optimised to provide in
addition to lift, stairs, lobby and ducts, generally
one full function per floor. The design process has
examined these provisions carefully; it is very difficult
to usefully decrease floor area – thus making the
tower more slender – and somewhat pointless to
increase floor area as this increases building cost for
little gain in utility.
The tower could therefore be said to have the
optimum functional scale and proportion.
A Wind Assessment of the likely impacts of the tower
has been prepared by Opus International Consultants
and is attached to the Resource Consent application.
In the development of the landscape concept since
the time of the Wind Assessment, some of the
assumed mitigation measures have been amended or
altered to address potential wind effects.
The landscape concept provides the following wind
effect mitigation measures:
•
Hard landscaping, palisade fencing and dense
planting on the NW and SW corners will keep
pedestrians away
•
Palisade fencing immediately to the north of
the building is intended to partly protect the NE
corner
•
The SE corner is not protected. However, it is not
accessible to the general public and Airways’
own protocols can ensure protection is available
should this prove to be necessary in use.
As the immediate site around the tower is enclosed
by hard landscaping and palisade fencing, no
general access to the general public is available
close to the tower.
Wellington Control Tower
30
8. Analysis: Open space + landscaping
8.1 Open Space Treatment
At ground level, the control tower and its
surroundings occupy little more land area than a
suburban section with its circa 888m2 of leased area.
While there is one long street facing boundary, the
major impact on the site is the surrounding car
parking and access roading for the Airport Retail
Park. Just as the tower itself acts as a landmark
the landscape around it acts as a kind of island
in amongst the asphalt. It is a supporting act and
continuation of the street trees that provide the green
of the near neighbourhood.
The landscape has parallel bands reflecting the
tower’s compositional treatment. These bands are
also used to provide secure fencing around the
building itself. On the east and west sides of the
building a series of structured landscape ‘dunes’
reference the coastal area in which the building
sits. These structures will be formed out of robust
materials such as concrete or folded steel plate.
Planted landscaping also sits on the east and west of
the building. To the north and south a palisade type
fence, constructed from steel poles, provides site
security with a degree of visual permeability.
8.2 Access
The tower site is screened from the street by its
landscape and no formal pedestrian access from the
street is provided, as public access to the building is
not required and is not provided.
Access to and from the building is provided using the
Airport Retail Park car park accessways.
The car park provides access to the east of the tower
in a single direction running from north to south. Ten
car parks are provided in the Airways lease area for
the use of Airways staff and contractors. The existing
tower has a similar provision. Bicycle parking for staff
is provided inside the ground floor of the building.
Much of the leased area will appear to be part of the
wider Airport Retail Park as the area secured and
palisaded has been kept to the minimum necessary
to meet Airways security needs. This ensures that
retailing activity as the major activity in this area is
still visible from Tirangi Road. The main entry sits on
a plinth raised 500mm above ground level, accessed
by ramps and stairs. It is sheltered under the north
facing lean of the building. Additionally, a canopy
will provide direct protection at the main entry to the
building.
The secure area is broadly of a similar extent to
the base isolation raft foundations to the north and
south. Landscape elements define the east and west
secure boundaries. Within the secure area are found
a minority of the dedicated car parks, a containment
area for diesel tankers replenishing the generator fuel
tanks and the building’s main entry.
Structured bunds in the landscape
Fig 35
Sketch of planting at tower base
Fig 36
Sketch of palisade fence
Fig 37
Wellington Control Tower
31
EXISTING LANDSCAPE
EXISTING LANDSCAPE
RESOURCE CONSENT
Fig
DRAFT
Landscape
Plan
Note: existing
Airport Retail Park site shown (not consented Retail Park extension).
General Notes:
All dimensions to be checked on site.
Copyright in all drawings, specifications and other documents
and in the work executed from them remains the property of
Studio
of
Pacific
Architecture
Ltd.
© Studio of Pacific Architecture Limited 2015
Revisions:
Consultants:
A r c hit ec t s
Ur ban Designer s
Int e r io r D e s i g n e r s
Scale Bar:
1:[email protected] / 1:[email protected]
0
1
2
3
4
5
6m
Approx North
Project Title:
Rev A: For Information
Date: 12.02.2015
Level 2
T EL : 64 4 8 02 5 4 4 4
74 C ub a St
FA X : 64 4 8 02 5 4 4 6
www.studiopacific.co.nz
P.O. B o x 11- 5 17
W e l l i n g t o n , N Z email: [email protected]
Airways Control Tower
at
Tirangi Road, Wellington
for
Airways New Zealand
Wellington Control Tower
38
Proposed Landscape
Concept
Scale: 1:1
Orig. Size: A3
Drawing No.
Job No.:
SK-469
Printed: 12/02/15,8:23 am
Revision:
1950
A
32
CAD Ref:1950.91 Airways Control Tower [Studio BIM]
Coastal
CoastalTree
TreeDaisy
Daisy
Olearia
Oleariasolandri
solandri
Sand
Sand Coprosma
Coprosma
Coprosma
Coprosma acerosa
acerosa
Coprosma
Coprosma
Coprosma rhamnoides
rhamnoides
Coprosma
Koromik
Koromiko
Hebestr
st
Hebe
Sand Coprosma
Coprosma
Coastal
Tree Daisy
Pohuehue
Pohuehue
Coprosma
acerosa
Coprosma
Olearia
solandri
rhamnoides
Muehlenbeckia
complexa
Muehlenbeckia
complexa
Coprosma
Koromiko
Sand
Coprosma
NZ
Iceplant
Coprosma
rhamnoides
Hebe
Coprosma
strictacrassifolium
acerosa
crassifolium
Disphyma
Koromiko
NZ
Coprosm
Daph
Hebe strp
Pimelea
Coprosm
Pohuehue
NZ
Leafless
Iceplant
Lawyer
Silvery
sand
grass
Silvery
sand
grass
Muehlenbeckia
complexa
Disphyma
Rubus
squarrosus
crassifolium
Spinifex
sericeus
Spinifex sericeus
NZ Iceplant
Pohuehue
Coastal
flaxcrassifolium
Disphyma
Muehlenbeckia
complexa
Phormium cookianum
cookianum
NZ
Icepla
NZ
NZIris
Iris
Disphym
Libertia
Libertiap
8.3 Planting
Planting species are chosen from the Greater
Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) suggested
species list for the immediate coastal area.
Additionally, the existing planted areas of flax and
Shrubs
Scramblers
cabbage trees Scramblers
around
the substation and pump
station on road reserve outside of the leased area
are of course retained. New planting is in informal
bands that reflects the layout of the hard landscaped
built elements. It is suggested that muehlenbeckia,
tussock and flax is used in the new planted areas.
Coastal
Tree
Daisy
Sand
Coprosma
Leafless
Lawyer
Leafless
Lawyer
Olearia
solandri
Coprosma
acerosa
Rubus
squarrosus
Rubus
squarrosus
Coastal Tree Daisy
Olearia solandri
Grasses,
sedges
Grasses,
sedges
Scramblers
andother
otherplants
plants
and
s
Leafless Lawyer
Rubus squarrosus
Shrubs
Scramblers
Leafless Lawyer
Pohuehue
Pingao
Pingao
Rubus squarrosus
Muehlenbeckia
Ficinia
spiralis complexa
Ficinia spiralis
Grasses, sedges
Grasses, sedges
selectionofofplant
plantspecies
speciesappropriate
appropriatefor
forthe
theRongotai
Rongotai'Duneland'
landscapecontext.
context.
A Aselection
landscape
and
other
plants
and'Duneland'
other
plants
RefertotoSection
Section1111'Duneland'
'Duneland'ofofthe
theWellington
WellingtonRegional
Regional
Native
PlantGuide,
Guide,
GreaterWellington
Wellington Regional
Regional Council
Council 2010.
2010.
Refer
Native
Plant
Greater
ges
nts
General Notes:
All dimensions to be checked on site.
Revisions:
General
Notes:
All dimensions
to be and
checked
on site.
Revisions:
Copyright
in all drawings,
specifications
other documents
Copyright
in all
drawings,
specifications
and otherthe
documents
and in the
work
executed
from them remains
property of
A -andS in
the
work
executed
from
them
remains
the
property
of
A
tudio
of
Pacific
Architecture
Ltd.
S t©u Studio
d i o ofoPacific
f
P Architecture
acific
ALimited
r c h i 2015
tecture
Ltd.
© Studio of Pacific Architecture Limited 2015
Pingao
Ficinia spiralis
Pingaosand grass
Silvery
Ficinia spiralis
Spinifex
sericeus
Draftfor
forInformation
Information
Draft
Consultants:
Consultants:
Silvery sand
Coastal
Pingao
flax grass
Spinifex
sericeus
Phormium
Ficinia
spiralis
cookianum
Selection of suggested planting species
Project
ProjectTitle:
Title:
Airways
Airway
A
A rr cc hh ii tt ee cc tt ss
Ur ban Designer s
Ur ban Designer s
Int e r io r D e s i g n e r s
Int e r io r D e s i g n e r s
Coastal
flax grass
NZ
Silvery
Iris sand
Level 2
Level 2
Phormium
cookianum
Libertia
Spinifex
peregrinans
sericeus
74 C ub a St
74 C ub a St
NZ Iris fl
Coastal
at
at Libertia p
TirangiPhormium
Road, Wel
Tirangi Road, We
for
for
Airways
Zeal
39 AirwaysNew
New Zea
T EL : 64 4 8 02 5 4 4 4
T EL : 64 4 8 02 5 4 4 4
FA X : 64 4 8 02 5 4 4 6
FA X : 64 4 8 02 5 4 4 6
www.studiopacific.co.nz
P.O. B o x 11- 5 17
www.studiopacific.co.nz
P .eOl l. i nBgot xo n1, 1 N
- 5Z1 7email: [email protected]
W
W e l l i n g t o n , N Z email: [email protected]
Wellington Control Tower
Fig
33
A
B
C
Roof
+34.850
Elevation of cab
structure shown
indicatively.
Cab
+30.410
Glazed raked balustrade
to sub-cab level.
Sub-Cab
+27.780
Level 6
+24.510
Proprietary aluminium
raked curtain wall
system
Level 5
+21.240
Level 4
+17.970
Level 3
+14.700
Level 2
+11.430
Level 1
+8.160
RETAIL CARPARK
TIRANGI ROAD
Ground Floor
Ground+4.890
Level
+4.390
1
North Elevation
North Elevation
Scale 1:200
Fig 40
Wellington Control Tower
34
9 Analysis: Materials and Detail
9.1 Overall Compositional Coherence
While the building’s most significant point of visual
interest is undoubtedly its lean to the north, at varying
more detailed scales, the design has a consistent
and comprehensive approach to its composition.
The tower cab, the workplace of the air traffic
controllers, is a twelve sided smooth glazed element
with an outward splay. The form of this element
is such that it is typically associated with control
towers irrespective of the close detail. Its shape
and detailing is all intended to maximise the visual
area available uninterrupted to the controllers
within. Everything, down to the cleaning gantry, is
subservient to this over-riding purpose as it is the cab
which gives the tower its reason for existing at all.
The tower cab, with its tendency towards circular,
contrasts markedly with the rectilinear form of the
building below. A flat shelf extends outward from
the tower cab and mediates between the round cab
and the rectangular tower body. Its purpose is to
provide access around the cab for the controllers,
for maintenance of the tower cab and for access
to antennae that provide some of the data streams
required. This high level platform takes on the
material characteristics of the tower below.
The tower itself is conceived as if it were a stone or
rock drawn from the ground; partly rough as rocks
often are on the Wellington south coast and partly
smooth as though polished by the waves and wind.
In this way the elevational treatment has been given
a coherent connection to the coastal context of the
building.
9.2 Elevational Treatment
There are two essential elements to the tower
building: the tower cab in which the controllers
work and the main tower building which provides
for support functions and brings the cab up to its
maximum height. The two elements are treated in
contrasting ways although all materials will respond to
the weathering challenges of the area.
replaced with louvres where plant requirements need
to be met.
The exact treatment of each facade will be the
subject of detail design studies as at the concept
design phase reached so far, the extent and
arrangement of some elements essential to building
function cannot be exactly delineated. In particular,
the exact placement of grilles for mechanical
ventilation, the extent of opaque and translucent
glazing on the north and south façades, the exact
extent of window openings to1the east
and
2 and
3 west,
4
the placement of doors may need to be varied slightly
to accommodate functional requirements.
The twelve sided cab is a smooth glazed object.
The glazing, so essential to the
is Ccarried
A controllers,
B
upwards to form the parapet of the tower cab with
fritted glass as the visible cladding surface. Below the
cab glazing and reaching down to the external deck,
Roof
composite
aluminium cladding is used to provide
+34.850
Elevation of cab
continuity in the smoothness of the cab element.
structure shown
Elevat
indicat
indicatively.
+30.410
The
tower has two sets of contrasting façade
Glazed raked balustrade
treatments.
On the east and west facades, an
Sub-Cab
to sub-cab level.
+27.780
angular
and textured cladding treatment is intended
toLevel
evoke
the rocky terrain of the south coast. The
6
+24.510
cladding
is intended to be created from a preProprietary aluminium
curtain wall
finished material formed into cassettes or rain screenraked
system
Level 5
+21.240
panels,
articulated to create both vertical and inclined
alignments up the height of the facade. The exact
Level 4
material
will be the subject of detailed design, but
+17.970
could include such materials as glass reinforced
Level 3
concrete
or pre-finished metal composite cladding.
+14.700
Cab
Level
2
On
the
north and south façades, a smooth polished
+11.430
appearance is sought, reflecting the stones polished
1
byLevel
wave
and water. The raked cladding here is
+8.160
RETAIL CARPARK
TIRANGI ROAD
formed using a proprietary flush glazed aluminium
curtain
wall system. Visual interest is created with a
Ground
Floor
Ground+4.890
Level
+4.390
varying
system of glazing subdivision and a varying
composition of fully transparent, fritted and opaque
glazing. Additionally some glazed sections will be
1
North Elevation
Facete
suspen
structu
Proprie
installe
Fig 41
East Elevation
2
East Elevation
Wellington Control
Tower
Scale 1:200
Scale 1:200
General Notes: All dimensions to be checked on site.
Copyright in all drawings, specifications and other documents
and in the work executed from them remains the property of
Studio of Pacific Architecture Ltd./Paris Magdalinos Architects
Proprie
insulat
dispos
Revisions:
Project Title:
Consultants:
Structural Engineer:
Holmes Consulting Group
Facade Engineer:
Mott Macdonald
A r c hit ec t s
Airways Control Tower
35
Perspective view of the tower at night, lit as it would be in a moderate southeasterly wind
Fig 42
Wellington Control Tower
36
9.3 Lighting
The main generators for the lighting concept are:
•
Lighting reflects the wind idea of the building
itself and therefore its Wellington setting
•
The lighting is data driven in the same way that
Airways own services rely on data taken from
radar and other sources
•
The lighting has a kinetic aspect; this reflects the
nearby kinetic wind sculptures on Cobham drive
•
The rough textured sides are lit; these are the
east and west sides of the building. The smooth
leaning sides on the north and south just glisten
like the unlit seas nearby.
•
The lighting must have no discernible impact
on the controller’s cab where it must not interfere
with safety and clear visibility to the runway, etc
The building is treated in three parts:
1.
The roof does not need a navigational light
at this stage but it may be required: this is a
regulatory safety issue. On the roof balustrade,
there are 4 red lights to point to the 4 cardinal
directions: north, east, south and west.
2.
The cab itself will register as a black round
object at night as its not lit in any way and there
is very little light internally
3.
The rough textured east and west sides of the
tower are lit with LED outdoor lights in an array
to be determined at the detailed design stage.
The lighting will generally provide a wash of
variable colour and this will emphasise the
rough texture of the building panels with heavy
shadows in the indents of the building.
The LED lighting to the tower illustrates the wind
environment in which the tower sits:
1.
The lighting is driven by wind speed, gust and
direction data either collected at the tower or
nearby
2.
The lighting colour is determined by matching
wind direction to the colour wheel so that
southerlies are a cold blue and northerlies are
a warm orange: these are at the opposite sides
of the colour wheel. Other wind directions would
have colours from the colour wheel e.g. the west
is green and east is crimson and so on.
3.
Lighting intensity is matched to wind speed, so
the colouration is more intense and the coverage
of the building runs to a fuller extent when wind
speeds are higher
4.
The lighting also reflects local gusts so slivers
of light appear like a graph reaching up the
building when wind gusts occur
The airport environment is also recognised:
1.
2.
When planes on their takeoff or landing roll pass
perpendicular to the tower on the runway and
when the appropriate data feeds are available
to Airways, the lighting will shimmer as they
[theoretically] move from one side of the tower to
the other
The size and speed of the shimmer varies
according to the size and speed of the plane
It is expected that data feeds are used by the
computerised lighting controllers to create the wind
and plane effects in the lights themselves. As wind
direction does not vary all the time, it is expected that
the lighting colour will be relatively stable but that
windier conditions will be recognisably different to
calm days.
9.4 Maintenance and Robustness
The control tower sits in a very exposed area with a
harsh weather profile not to be envied. Additionally the
effects of sand, salt and fuel residues on the building
fabric and any openings cannot be underestimated.
At the level of the tower cab, the cab glazing is
especially toughened and cleaned and coated at
regular intervals to protect the glass surface from
pitting. A specialised gantry is provided just below the
tower glass level. Additionally the flat shelf, really an
extended deck, at level seven provides maintenance
access to the exterior of the tower cab and gantry
access to the levels below if required.
The tower itself is clad in robust materials suited to
the harsh environment. On the east and west façades,
GRC or similar materials will provide a suitable level
of robustness. On the north and south façades,
a unitised curtain wall system will likewise ensure
weathertightness and durability.
Maintenance access to the tower below the level of
the extended deck can be obtained using access
equipment suspended below the deck or alternatively
using cherry pickers from ground level.
Internal maintenance is facilitated using the lift. As
the building has a wide and complex array of control,
ventilation and electronic systems, easy access is
important to the long term functionality of the building.
At ground level, the diesel tanks for the electrical
generator are replenished at irregular intervals and
a containment pad is proposed at the tanker parking
place adjacent to the generator room.
9.5 Plans Elevations and Sections
For the sake of the completeness of this Design
Statement, the plans submitted with the Resource
Consent application documents are reproduced
overleaf.
Wellington Control Tower
37
E
A
RC-20
4
RC-22
3
2
2,300
1
1,650
4,260
RISER
A
N
4,845
LIFT
KITCHEN/LOUNGE
F
LOBBY
B
2
4
6
7
RC-20
4
3
RC-22
RC-20
2
2,300
1
1,650
4
4,260
3
2,300
1
1,650
4,845
12
14
11
9
RC-22
A
RC-20
SCALE 1:100
RC-22
RESOURCE CONSENT
General Notes: All dimensions to be checked on site.
Copyright in all drawings, specifications and other documents
and in the work executed from them remains the property of
Studio of Pacific Architecture Ltd./Paris Magdalinos Architects
Limited.
© Studio of Pacific Architecture Limited 2015
© Paris Magdalinos Architects Limited 2015
4,260
8
6
A
E
Level 6
1
RC-22
2
C
14,000
W
A
7
10
RC-21
E
13
16
15
18
17
LOCKERS
Stair up to sub-cab level.
8
WC
Level 6
A
RC-22
5
WC/
SHOWER
E
B
3
RISERS
Level 7
B
1
RC-22
Cab
S
RC-21
READY
10,800
RC-20
Revisions:
0
23.02.15
Consultants:
Resource Consent
Structural Engineer:
Holmes Consulting Group
Facade Engineer:
Mott Macdonald
Building Services & Fire
Protection:
Beca
Contractor:
Hawkins Group
4
2
2,300
1,650
Plan Level 6
Project Title:
1
A r c hit ec t s
Ur ban Designer s
Int e r io r D e s i g n e r s
4,260
Paris Magdalinos Architects
93 Station Street
TEL: 64 6 835 6173
www.pmarchitects.co.nz
P.O. Box 790
[email protected]
Napier, NZ
Fire Engineering Design:
Holmes Fire & Safety
Internal layout of tower is indicative only and may
vary with detailed design.
3
Studio Pacific Architecture
Level 2, 74 Cuba St
TEL: 64 4 802 5444
www.studiopacific.co.nz
P.O. Box 11-517
email: [email protected]
Wellington, NZ
Airways Control Tower
Wellington
Scale: 1:100
at
Tirangi Road, Wellington
for
Airways New Zealand
RC-16
Printed: 23/02/15,11:40 am
A
10
Revision:
4,845
RISER
S
RC-21
B
COMMUNICATIONS
B
RC-22
RC-22
4,845
11
12
14
13
18
WC
16
RISERS
4,845
11
12
14
13
16
10
SPARE
COMMUNICATIONS/
WORKROOM
LOBBY
B
RC-22
RISERS
18
WC
B
RC-22
4,845
11
13
12
15
14
17
16
18
UTILITY
N
RC-20
15
B
RC-22
RISERS
CONTROLLER
TEAM LEAD
S
RC-21
B
TRAINING/MEETING
17
B
RC-22
SICK BAY
LOBBY
10,800
B
LOBBY
STORE/
FILES
N
RC-20
15
10,800
B
OFFICE
LIFT
4,845
S
RC-21
10,800
4,845
N
RC-20
Job No.:
PLANT
A
RC-22
Level 5
RC-15
Job No.:
23.02.15
1950
Printed: 23/02/15,11:40 am
Structural Engineer:
Holmes Consulting Group
Facade Engineer:
Mott Macdonald
Building Services & Fire
Protection:
Beca
Contractor:
Hawkins Group
Fire Engineering Design:
Holmes Fire & Safety
0
Internal layout of tower is indicative only and may
vary with detailedRevision:
design.
4,260
E
Consultants:
Resource Consent
CAD Ref:1950.91 Airways Control Tower [Studio BIM]
RC-22
A r c hit ec t s
Ur ban Designer s
Int e r io r D e s i g n e r s
4
3
2
Paris Magdalinos Architects
93 Station Street
TEL: 64 6 835 6173
www.pmarchitects.co.nz
P.O. Box 790
[email protected]
Napier, NZ
2,300
1
Studio Pacific Architecture
Level 2, 74 Cuba St
TEL: 64 4 802 5444
www.studiopacific.co.nz
P.O. Box 11-517
email: [email protected]
Wellington, NZ
1,650
Project Title:
Plan Level 4
at
Tirangi Road, Wellington
for
Airways New Zealand
Drawing No.
Airways Control Tower
Wellington
Scale: 1:100
RC-14
4,260
Printed: 23/02/15,11:39 am
RC-22
23.02.15
Facade Engineer:
Mott Macdonald
Building Services & Fire
Protection:
Beca
Contractor:
Hawkins Group
Fire Engineering Design:
Holmes Fire & Safety
Paris Magdalinos Architects
93 Station Street
TEL: 64 6 835 6173
www.pmarchitects.co.nz
P.O. Box 790
[email protected]
Napier, NZ
Studio Pacific Architecture
Level 2, 74 Cuba St
TEL: 64 4 802 5444
www.studiopacific.co.nz
P.O. Box 11-517
email: [email protected]
Wellington, NZ
Airways Control Tower
Wellington
at
Tirangi Road, Wellington
for
Airways New Zealand
B
9
8
7
6
5
3
2
4
1
Studio Pacific Architecture
Level 2, 74 Cuba St
TEL: 64 4 802 5444
www.studiopacific.co.nz
P.O. Box 11-517
email: [email protected]
Wellington, NZ
4,260
Airways Control Tower
Wellington
Scale: 1:100
at
Tirangi Road, Wellington
for
Airways New Zealand
RC-13
Printed: 23/02/15,11:38 am
and in the work executed from them remains the property of
Studio of Pacific Architecture Ltd./Paris Magdalinos Architects
Limited.
© Studio of Pacific Architecture Limited 2015
Size:
A3 2015
© Paris Magdalinos Orig.
Architects
Limited
Drawing No.
RC-12
Job No.:
1950
Internal layout of tower is indicative only and may
vary with detailedRevision:
design.
Printed: 23/02/15,11:37 am
0
CAD Ref:1950.91 Airways Control Tower [Studio BIM]
23.02.15
RISER
Facade Engineer:
Mott Macdonald
Building Services & Fire
Protection:
Beca
Contractor:
Hawkins Group
Fire Engineering Design:
Holmes Fire & Safety
A r c hit ec t s
Ur ban Designer s
Int e r io r D e s i g n e r s
Paris Magdalinos Architects
93 Station Street
TEL: 64 6 835 6173
www.pmarchitects.co.nz
P.O. Box 790
[email protected]
Napier, NZ
Studio Pacific Architecture
Level 2, 74 Cuba St
TEL: 64 4 802 5444
www.studiopacific.co.nz
P.O. Box 11-517
email: [email protected]
Wellington, NZ
Airways Control Tower
Wellington
at
Tirangi Road, Wellington
for
Airways New Zealand
B
4,845
RC-22
Plan Level 1
Scale: 1:100
Drawing No.
RC-11
Printed: 23/02/15,11:36 am
General Notes: All dimensions to be checked on site.
Copyright in all drawings, specifications and other documents
and in the work executed from them remains the property of
Studio of Pacific Architecture Ltd./Paris Magdalinos Architects
Limited.
A3 Limited 2015
© Studio of Orig.
PacificSize:
Architecture
© Paris Magdalinos Architects Limited 2015
Job No.:
4,845
16
FUEL TANK
10
C
14,000
W
RC-21
A
RC-22
Fig 43
Ground Floor
1
Project Title:
Structural Engineer:
Holmes Consulting Group
RC-21
B
Level G
A
RC-22
Consultants:
Resource Consent
Revision:
S
GENSET
LOCKERS
RESOURCE CONSENT SCALE 1:100
Revisions:
0
Job No.:
1950
0
Internal layout
of tower is indicative only and may
Revision:
vary with detailed design.
CAD Ref:1950.91 Airways Control Tower [Studio BIM]
RESOURCE CONSENT
Revisions:
0
23.02.15
Consultants:
Resource Consent
Project Title:
Structural Engineer:
Holmes Consulting Group
Facade Engineer:
Mott Macdonald
Building Services & Fire
Protection:
Beca
Contractor:
Hawkins Group
A r c hit ec t s
Ur ban Designer s
Int e r io r D e s i g n e r s
Wellington Control Tower
Fire Engineering Design:
Holmes Fire & Safety
Paris Magdalinos Architects
93 Station Street
TEL: 64 6 835 6173
P.O. Box 790
www.pmarchitects.co.nz
Napier, NZ
[email protected]
Studio Pacific Architecture
Level 2, 74 Cuba St
TEL: 64 4 802 5444
www.studiopacific.co.nz
P.O. Box 11-517
email: [email protected]
Wellington, NZ
Airways Control Tower
Wellington
at
Tirangi Road, Wellington
for
Airways New Zealand
Plan Ground Floor
Scale: 1:100
Drawing No.
RC-10
Printed: 23/02/15,11:36 am
Orig. Size: A3
Job No.:
1950
0
CAD Ref:1950.91 Airways Control Tower [Studio BIM]
WC/
SHOWER
GENERATOR
FAP/VALVE
ROOM
14,000
W
RC-21
Orig. Size: A3
Drawing No.
RISERS
4,845
11
12
14
13
16
17
18
General
Plan Level
2 Notes: All dimensions to be checked on site.
Copyright in all drawings, specifications and other documents
Scale: 1:100
Plan Level 3
Project Title:
RC-22
C
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
8
7
6
5
4
3
9
Level 1
A
A r c hit ec t s
Ur ban Designer s
Int e r io r D e s i g n e r s
B
10
RC-22
Project Title:
Structural Engineer:
Holmes Consulting Group
2
1,650
LOBBY
RC-20
RC-22
C
14,000
Consultants:
Resource Consent
3
Paris Magdalinos Architects
93 Station Street
TEL: 64 6 835 6173
www.pmarchitects.co.nz
P.O. Box 790
[email protected]
Napier, NZ
2,300
RISERS
SCALE 1:100
RESOURCE CONSENT
Revisions:
0
4
N
RC-21
B
4,845
11
13
12
15
14
17
16
18
SCALE 1:100
Fire Engineering Design:
Holmes Fire & Safety
RESOURCE CONSENT
RC-22
A r c hit ec t s
Ur ban Designer s
Int e r io r D e s i g n e r s
BICYCLES
S
SPARE
1
1 Level only.
Floor plans of each level of the building. Internal layouts are indicative
Level 2
Internal layout of tower is indicative only and may
vary with detailed design.
2
1
1
Contractor:
Hawkins Group
RISER
LOBBY
10
General Notes: All dimensions to be checked on site.
Copyright in all drawings, specifications and other documents
and in the work executed from them remains the property of
Studio of Pacific Architecture Ltd./Paris Magdalinos Architects
Limited.
© Studio of Pacific Architecture Limited 2015
© Paris Magdalinos Architects Limited 2015
Facade Engineer:
Mott Macdonald
Building Services & Fire
Protection:
Beca
11
B
RC-22
W
Structural Engineer:
Holmes Consulting Group
13
SPARE
RISERS
RC-21
0
InternalRevision:
layout of tower is indicative only and may
vary with detailed design.
CAD Ref:1950.91 Airways Control Tower [Studio BIM]
A
RC-20
Consultants:
Resource Consent
12
N
RC-20
B
RC-22
Level 2
23.02.15
14
B
UPS B
E
Revisions:
0
1950
A
4,845
S
RC-21
MECHANICAL
PLANT
Job No.:
LIFT
10,800
MSB
LOBBY
10,800
B
4,845
N
RC-20
SCALE 1:100
General Notes: All dimensions to be checked on site.
Copyright in all drawings, specifications and other documents
and in the work executed from them remains the property of
Studio of Pacific Architecture Ltd./Paris Magdalinos Architects
Limited.
© StudioOrig.
of Pacific
Architecture
Limited 2015
Size:
A3
© Paris Magdalinos Architects Limited 2015
A
LIFT
UPS B
15
RISER
A
LIFT
1
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
RESOURCE CONSENT
A
RC-20
15
1
Drawing No.
Revisions:
0
9
2
1,650
at
Tirangi Road, Wellington
for
Airways New Zealand
and in the work executed from them remains the property of
Studio of Pacific Architecture Ltd./Paris Magdalinos Architects
Limited.
© Studio of Pacific Architecture Limited 2015
Orig. Size:
A3 2015
© Paris Magdalinos Architects
Limited
18
3
2,300
Scale: 1:100
17
4
Studio Pacific Architecture
TEL: 64 4 802 5444
Level 2, 74 Cuba St
www.studiopacific.co.nz
P.O. Box 11-517
email: [email protected]
Wellington, NZ
Airways Control Tower
Wellington
8
Fire Engineering Design:
Holmes Fire & Safety
Internal layout of tower is indicative only and may
vary with detailed design.
Paris Magdalinos Architects
TEL: 64 6 835 6173
93 Station Street
www.pmarchitects.co.nz
P.O. Box 790
[email protected]
Napier, NZ
General
Plan Level
5 Notes: All dimensions to be checked on site.
Copyright in all drawings, specifications and other documents
Project Title:
RC-22
A r c hit ec t s
Ur ban Designer s
Int e r io r D e s i g n e r s
Level 3
1
SCALE 1:100
RESOURCE CONSENT
A
RC-20
7
Contractor:
Hawkins Group
A
RC-22
6
Facade Engineer:
Mott Macdonald
Building Services & Fire
Protection:
Beca
5
Structural Engineer:
Holmes Consulting Group
4
E
Consultants:
Resource Consent
C
14,000
W
RC-21
3
23.02.15
A
RC-22
2
Revisions:
0
Level 3
14,000
W
RC-21
Level 4
1
SCALE 1:100
General Notes: All dimensions to be checked on site.
Copyright in all drawings, specifications and other documents
and in the work executed from them remains the property of
Studio of Pacific Architecture Ltd./Paris Magdalinos Architects
Limited.
© Studio of Pacific Architecture Limited 2015
© Paris Magdalinos Architects Limited 2015
2
1
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
W
RC-21
1
1
Level 4
14,000
C
10,800
Level 5
2
1
10
C
38
Revision:
1950
0
CAD Ref:1950.91 Airways Control Tower [Studio BIM]
1950
0
CAD Ref:1950.91 Airways Control Tower [Studio BIM]
A
RISER
LIFT
MEETING
17
RISER
A
LIFT
Orig. Size: A3
Drawing No.
10. Summary
The proposed new Airways Wellington Control Tower
meets complex technical needs in providing for the
safe operation of Wellington International Airport.
Providing effective air traffic control is an aviation
safety issue. This is the driver behind the functional
requirements of the tower and the sole driver behind
the height of the building.
As well as meeting a clear need, the tower building
does this in a way that makes a positive contribution
to its immediate environs, to the wider locations in
which it is visible and to the credibility of the city as a
creative, but challenging, place in which to live and
work or visit.
The tower building’s twelve and a half degree
lean provides an immediate cue to the unusual
circumstances of its place. The winds are faced head
on.
The building’s compositional treatment and texture
register its place at a finer level of detail, suggesting
its coastal and environmental origins.
Its night time lighting reinforces the ideas behind the
building form and provides a graphic and graph like
display of what is currently happening with the winds
that so shape our ideas of the city of Wellington.
Sketch perspective of the tower from the Airport Retail Park
Fig 44
Building Facts and Figures
Height: 32.5m above ground
Nine storeys of accommodation
Lean of 12.5 degrees
Footprint 150m2 at ground floor; 217m2 overall
Ground level is at RL 4.39
Maximum height: RL 36.830
Site area: 888m2
Wellington Control Tower
39