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Academic Advising Manual - Carroll College

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Academic Advising
Manual
2013 – 2014
TABLE OF CONTENTS
WELCOME TO CARROLL COLLEGE .................................................................................................................................5
ACADEMIC ADVISING OVERVIEW ..................................................................................................................................6
Principles of Academic Advising ................................................................................................................................6
Developmental Academic Advising ...........................................................................................................................7
NACADA Core Values of Academic Advising ..............................................................................................................7
ADVISING AT CARROLL COLLEGE ...................................................................................................................................9
Types of Academic Advising ......................................................................................................................................9
Freshman Advising .................................................................................................................................................9
Transfer Student Advising ......................................................................................................................................9
Continuing Student Advising .................................................................................................................................9
Returning/Readmit Student Advising ....................................................................................................................9
Withdrawn Students ..............................................................................................................................................9
Advising: Shared Responsibility ..............................................................................................................................10
Advisor Responsibilites in the Advising Process ..................................................................................................10
Advisee Responsibilites in the Advising Process ..................................................................................................10
Advising Terms, Definitions and Processes..............................................................................................................11
Legal Considerations in Academic Advising .............................................................................................................14
Introduction to Legal Considerations ..................................................................................................................14
FERPA ...................................................................................................................................................................14
FERPA: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 ................................................................................15
Tips for Advisors ......................................................................................................................................................17
The Advising Appointment ..................................................................................................................................17
Note and Record Keeping ....................................................................................................................................18
Advisor’s Responsibilities and Student’s Rights to Privacy ..................................................................................19
Referring Students ...............................................................................................................................................20
Special Populations ..................................................................................................................................................20
Undeclared/Deciding ...........................................................................................................................................20
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Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
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Student Athletes ..................................................................................................................................................21
Academic Difficulty ..............................................................................................................................................21
Disabilities ............................................................................................................................................................22
International Students .........................................................................................................................................22
Non-Traditional Students ....................................................................................................................................24
Working Students ................................................................................................................................................25
Programs Requiring Formal Acceptance .............................................................................................................25
ADVISING GUIDES AND RESOURCES ............................................................................................................................26
Degree Requirements Including Core ......................................................................................................................26
Bachelors Degree .................................................................................................................................................26
Core Curriculum–Bachelor Degree ......................................................................................................................26
Associate of Arts Degree......................................................................................................................................27
Multi-Disciplinary Degree ....................................................................................................................................27
Carroll Majors and Major Codes ..........................................................................................................................28
Carroll Minors and Concentration Codes ............................................................................................................29
Writing Intensive, Global Diversity, & National Diversity ........................................................................................30
Accessing Advisee Information Via MyCarroll .........................................................................................................32
Accessing Advising Tools Via MyCarroll…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….33
E-Advising………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………33
Degree Audit………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….35
External Exam Policy ..............................................................................................................................................377
CLEP: College Level Examination Program ........................................................................................................377
Military Training and Education Credit ..............................................................................................................377
AP: Advanced Placement ..................................................................................................................................388
Course Placement Guidelines ................................................................................................................................398
Biology Students Placement Guidelines ............................................................................................................399
Math Placement Guidelines ..............................................................................................................................399
English Placement for Entering Freshmen ...........................................................................................................40
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Language Placement Guidelines ..........................................................................................................................41
Pre-Professional Programs ......................................................................................................................................42
3-2 Engineering: Major in Mathematics ..............................................................................................................42
Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Programs ................................................................................................................42
Pre-Optometry Program ......................................................................................................................................42
Pre-Physician’s Assistant Program .......................................................................................................................42
Pre-Physical Therapy Program .............................................................................................................................42
Pre-Pharmacy Program ........................................................................................................................................43
Pre-Veterinary Program .......................................................................................................................................43
Pre-Law Program .................................................................................................................................................43
SPECIAL PROGRAMS ..............................................................................................................................................444
Internships .........................................................................................................................................................444
Honors Scholars Program ....................................................................................................................................44
Honors Thesis Writing…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….45
Military Science and Leadership (ROTC) Program .............................................................................................466
Education Abroad Programs ..............................................................................................................................466
Financial Aid and Scholarship ............................................................................................................................477
Alpha Advising Information and Forms .................................................................................................................509
Alpha Advising Responsibility Summary ............................................................................................................509
Alpha Advising Timeline .....................................................................................................................................509
Alpha Advising Tools and Forms ..........................................................................................................................51
On Campus Contact Information ................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined.
Campus Offices and Contacts ..............................................................................................................................55
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WELCOME TO CARROLL COLLEGE
Carroll’s goal in academic advising is to assist students in exploring their areas of interest while
providing them with the advice and knowledge that will allow them to pursue those areas of
interest to their fullest extent. This advice is not solely academic but personal and professional
as well. Professors work as academic advisors and pride themselves on being available to
students.
We know that the first year is the most important decision-making period in a student’s career.
Alpha Seminar serves as a critical component to achieving our goals in academic advising. Every
first-year student takes this seminar-style course in their first semester at Carroll. In addition to
the critical reading, writing and thinking skills they develop in this course, their professor serves
as their academic advisor. We believe that the teacher/student relationship serves as the
backbone of the advisor/advisee relationship, and our students enjoy high rates of success
during their time at Carroll and beyond because of that relationship.
The purpose of the Carroll College Academic Advising Manual is to provide background
information on the principles and values of academic advising, define the advising relationship
between advisor and student, define advising terms and procedures, and provide Carrollspecific advising resources such as placement guidelines for courses/majors and accessing
advisee information using MyCarroll.
Comments and suggestions regarding the Carroll College Academic Advising Manual can be
directed to Annette Walstad, Director of Academic Support and Advising. She can be reached
at [email protected], (406) 447-5434, or in person at 119 Borromeo Hall.
Carroll College would like to acknowledge the Academic Advising offices at Elmhurst College,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Montana State University—Bozeman for use of information
from their advising manuals and websites.
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ACADEMIC ADVISING OVERVIEW
“THE FUNDAMENTAL PURPOSE OF ACADEMIC
ADVISING IS TO HELP STUDENTS BECOME
EFFECTIVE AGENTS FOR THEIR OWN
LIFELONG LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT.”
-Art Chickering, 1994
PRINCIPLES OF ACADEMIC ADVISING
Academic advising should provide guidance and a means to assist student’s intellectual, physical, and
social development. For most effective advising, the following should be observed:
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Advising must be systematic, consistent, and continuous with a number of contacts
between the advisor and the student. These contacts must have direction and purpose.
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Advising must be goal-related. Students should be encouraged to explore and establish
academic, career and personal development goals.
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Advising requires a caring environment. The advisor shares responsibility in initiating
advisor-student contact.
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Advising includes modeling behaviors which lead to self-responsibility and selfdirectedness.
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The advising system should be an integration of services and expertise from academic and
student affairs.
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Advisors should utilize as many campus and community resources as possible when
assisting students with academic and career options, services and resources.
Adapted from Winston, R.B., Ender, S.C., & Miller, T.K. (Eds.) (1982). Developmental approaches
to academic advising. New Directions for Student Services, No. 17. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
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Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
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DEVELOPMENTAL ACADEMIC ADVISING
This brief introduction to the topic is based on Gary L. Kramer’s “Advising Students at Different
Educational Levels,” in Gordon et al.’s (2000) Academic Advising: a Comprehensive Handbook. San
Francisco: Jossey-Bass. The book is available in the Academic Support Services and Advising Office.
As emphasized throughout this manual, effective academic advising involves far more than helping
students select their courses. In the past two decades, the field has shifted to a model of “developmental
academic advising” based on a premise of student growth and success. According to Gary L. Kramer,
students are developmentally advised when advisors focus on growth that instills the following in them:
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Awareness of the relationship between education and life
The ability to set realistic academic and career goals as well as a program to achieve them
Awareness of life extending beyond the college years
Thus, advising includes helping students adjust to college, succeed in college, and prepare for life after
college. Along the way students face many tasks, including:
п‚· Developing accurate expectations
п‚· Becoming familiar with college requirements
п‚· Integrating into campus culture
п‚· Navigating through financial issues
п‚· Setting appropriate goals
п‚· Identifying responsibilities and making commitments
п‚· Identifying and using resources effectively
п‚· Reflecting on their learning and experiences
п‚· Connecting academic plans with career goals
п‚· Preparing for the transition to a graduate school or job
A student’s ability to meet these challenges depends on his/her learning style, academic preparation,
problem-solving skills, family/community responsibilities, motivation, and, in part, on the assistance
received from an academic advisor.
NACADA CORE VALUES OF ACADEMIC ADVISING
The National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) is an organization of professional advisors,
faculty, administrators, students and others from a variety of settings who do academic advising or
otherwise work to promote quality academic advising on college and university campuses. As members
of this organization or of the profession of academic advising, or as others who advise or provide related
programs and services to students, we must recognize our responsibility not only to students and the
institutions in which our advising is done, but to society, to colleagues, and to ourselves.
While not all those who do academic advising are professional advisors, anyone carrying out advising
functions should be expected to perform in a professional manner. The Core Values identified and
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discussed here provide a framework against which those who advise can measure their own
performance.
In no way does this Core Values statement try to dictate that all academic advising needs to be done in
precisely the same way by everyone, or that there is one particular advising philosophy or model.
Instead, these are reference points for professionals to use. Furthermore, the Core Values do not carry
equal weight. Advisors will find some Core Values more important than others, depending on their own
philosophies and those of their colleges or universities.
The Power of Academic Advising
Few experiences in students' postsecondary career have as much potential for influencing their
development as does academic advising. Through regular contact with students--whether face-to-face,
through the mail, on the telephone, or through computer mediated systems--advisors gain meaningful
insights into student's academic, social, and personal experiences and needs. Advisors use these insights
to help students feel a part of the academic community, develop sound academic and career goals, and
ultimately be successful learners.
Because of the nature of academic advising, advisors often develop a broad vision of the institution.
Advisors can therefore play an important interpretive role with administrators, faculty, and staff, helping
them further understand students' academic and personal development needs. Advisors can teach
others to identify students who, with additional attention from academic support staff, may achieve
their goals to succeed academically and personally.
Students place a great deal of trust in their advisors. That trust warrants quality programs and services.
It is through our Core Values that students' expectations of academic advising are honored.
Beliefs about Students
Like other educators, academic advisors work to strengthen the importance, dignity, potential, and
unique nature of each individual served within the academic setting. Our work as advisors is guided by
our beliefs that:
п‚· Students can be responsible for their own behavior;
п‚· Students can be successful as a result of their individual goals and efforts;
п‚· Students have a desire to learn;
п‚· Learning needs vary according to individual skills, goals and experiences; and
п‚· Students hold their own beliefs and opinions.
Why Our Core Values Are Important
Out of these beliefs grow our Core Values. Regardless of our professional preparation and experience,
each of us in the field of academic advising is ultimately guided in our work by what we perceive as
important, what we value, and what we believe about those we serve--primarily students, but also
others in the institutions within which we work, and even the institutions themselves.
We recognize the complex nature of academic advising, the wide variety of settings and tasks for which
academic advisors are responsible, and the diverse backgrounds and experiences of academic advisors.
Yet, while values and beliefs are by their very nature individual, there are many that are subscribed to by
those who advise students. Through this statement of Core Values we communicate to others what they
can expect from us. These Core Values may be used to validate our conduct in our diverse roles and our
relationships within the academic community.
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Carroll College is an Institutional Member of NACADA. For a complete list of the NACADA Core Values,
see http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/Core-Values.htm .
ADVISING AT CARROLL COLLEGE
TYPES OF ACADEMIC ADVISING
FRESHMAN ADVISING
All freshmen take a 3-credit Alpha Seminar course during their first semester at Carroll. The Alpha
Seminar instructor serves as academic advisor for the entire academic year for all students enrolled in
the section. Alpha Seminar allows students to establish a personal relationship with the faculty advisor
teaching the course as well as a community with the other students. The purpose of Alpha Seminar is to
introduce the distinctive practices and values of a Catholic liberal arts education. The course revolves
around an interdisciplinary project that incorporates instruction and practice in critical reading, writing
and discussion.
TRANSFER STUDENT ADVISING
A student transferring to Carroll will be assigned an academic advisor in the major/program indicated on
his/her application for admission. The Registrar makes all final decisions regarding the transfer of credit
from other institutions. A copy of the transcript evaluation is part of the advising file.
CONTINUING STUDENT ADVISING
Once a student has completed one academic year at Carroll he/she has the option of declaring a major
and selecting an advisor in the department of the major. Some 2nd year students will remain with their
Alpha Seminar advisors until the second semester of their sophomore year. All students should declare
a major and select an advisor by the time they have completed 45 semester credits or completed their
4th semester, whichever comes first.
RETURNING/READMIT STUDENT ADVISING
Former Carroll students returning to the college after a break in attendance of one or more semester
must apply for readmission. If readmitted, an attempt is made to locate the student’s original advising
file. In the event it was destroyed, a new advising file is created and sent to the advisor. If the student is
returning from suspension and/or is on academic probation, conditions of readmission will be set forth
in writing and a copy will be sent to the assigned advisor.
WITHDRAWN STUDENTS
When an advisee does not return to Carroll College the advisor returns the advising file to the Office of
Academic Advising located at 119 Borromeo Hall.
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ADVISING: SHARED RESPONSIBILITY
ADVISOR RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE ADVISING PROCESS
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Be accessible to students on a regular, predictable basis
Encourage students in self-direction, in learning and assuming responsibility for their
own educational plans
Reinforce the responsibilities of advisees
Assist students in selecting courses that reflect individual interests and abilities
Help students with academic planning – re-evaluate plans regularly
Assist students in achieving academic, career and personal goals
Know graduation requirements and other institutional policies outlined in the college
catalog
Refer students to appropriate campus resources
Help students learn about academic policies and procedures
Increase advising skills through regular training
Understand the shared responsibilities among advisor, advisee, and the Advising Office
ADVISEE RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE ADVISING PROCESS
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2013-2014
Make appointments with advisor – give at least 24-hour notice
Be prepared for meeting with your faculty advisor; bring your academic records; bring
questions
Read the Catalog – available on the Carroll webpage at
http://www.carroll.edu/academics/
Become familiar with graduation requirements and other institutional policies and
procedures
Develop plans for taking courses required for graduation
Keep track of your own academic records
Develop plans for achieving academic, career and personal goals
Check class schedules and learn how to navigate MyCarroll
Make use of the full range of campus resources
Apply for graduation [request official degree audit] one year prior to your anticipated
graduation date
See your advisor and course instructor at the first sign of academic difficulty
Take responsibility for your decisions
Understand the shared responsibilities among advisor, advisee, and the Advising Office
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 10
ADVISING TERMS, DEFINITIONS AND PROCESSES
ACADEMIC ADVISORS:
Degree seeking students are assigned to an academic advisor in relation to the grade level and major.
Advisors assist students in developing educational plans that are consistent with their life goals, provide
students with accurate information about academic progression and degree requirements, assist
students in understanding academic policies and procedures, and help students access campus resources
that will enhance their ability to be academically successful.
ADVISING FILE:
The Office of Academic Advising prepares an academic advising folder for every new degree-seeking
student and an advisor is assigned to each student. The typical contents of an advising file includes
admissions application, high school and/or college transcripts, writing sample, and standardized test
scores. The advisor maintains the student advising folder in his or her office, and the folder follows the
student through his/her entire career at Carroll College. Advisors should keep an accurate record of
advising session which will guide future advising and protect against claims of erroneous advising.
ALPHA SEMINAR:
This 3-credit course is required for all first-year students and typically is taken in the fall semester. Alpha
Seminar is taught by a faculty or staff member who serves as the students’ first-year advisor for both the
fall and spring terms. This is a unique opportunity for students to make a real connection with their
advisor, as they spend a minimum of three hours of classroom time a week together, in addition to more
traditional advising appointments. After the freshman year, students select or are assigned faculty
advisors in their majors or areas of interest.
AP CREDIT:
High school students who receive scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the College Board Entrance Examination Board
Advanced Placement Exam (AP) may, upon enrollment, be granted advanced placement and college
credit in appropriate subjects. A grade of “P” is assigned for these credits. For additional information
and a list of approved AP courses refer to the Advisor’s Guide and Resources Section of this manual.
ACADEMIC PROBATION:
After a semester of unsatisfactory work (less than a 2.0 grade point average), a student taking 12 or
more semester hours will be placed on academic probation. The records of part-time students will be
reviewed after an accumulation of 12 or more semester credits. If a total of 12 or more semester credits
have been attempted and the cumulative G.P.A. is unsatisfactory, the student will be placed on
probation. A student is taken off probation and restored to good standing when his/her semester and
cumulative grade point average are both 2.00 and higher.
ACADEMIC SUSPENSION:
Academic suspension will result upon completion of a second consecutive semester of unsatisfactory
work or upon completion of a total of three non-consecutive semesters of unsatisfactory work. A
detailed explanation of these can be found in the catalog.
ACADEMIC RECOVERY PLAN (ARP):
Students who are not making academic and/or financial aid satisfactory progress may be required to
complete an Academic Recovery Plan (ARP) as a condition of continued enrollment at Carroll. The
Director of Academic Advising, in coordination with the Registrar and Director of Financial Aid, assists
student in creating the ARP and monitoring progress. Students who do not comply with the ARP
conditions may be academically and/or financially suspended or sanctioned.
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CALCULATING A GRADE POINT AVERAGE:
Each grade has a corresponding point value: A=4 points; B=3 points; C=2 points; D=1 point; F=no points;
Incomplete=no points. The numerical average is computed by dividing the total grade point by the total
credit hours attempted. In the case of a Pass/Fail course, the "P" grade is not figured into the G.P.A., the
"F" grade is used in the calculation. Courses a student withdraws from during the semester are marked
as “W” on the transcript and are not figured in the grade point average calculation.
CHANGING MAJORS OR ACADEMIC ADVISORS:
Students who wish to declare or change a major, or change advisors, should fill out and return a
"Request for Change of Major and/or Academic Advisor" form available from the Registrar or in the
Registrar section of MyCarroll.
COURSE SUBSTITUTION:
Students wishing to waive or substitute a required course should utilize the form "Request for Waiver or
Course Substitution" that is available from the Registrar. In both instances, approval must be received
from both the department chairperson and the Registrar. The form is available on MyCarroll.
CORE REQUIREMENTS:
Carroll College requires all students to participate in a broad spectrum of academic disciplines. These
include the humanities and fine arts, the social and natural sciences, as well as the reflective disciplines
of philosophy and theology. The specific requirements are outlined in the catalog.
CREDIT LOAD:
The typical course load is 15 credits per semester. Any course load exceeding 18 credits must have the
approval of the Registrar. Many freshmen have difficulty successfully completing 15 credits the first
semester. Recommend a lighter load if academic ability or time constraints are in question.
DECLARING A MAJOR:
Declaring a major is a formal process which requires the student to submit a “Declaration of
Major/Minor” form to the Registrar’s office. Students should declare a major no later than the end of
the sophomore year or after completing 45 semester credits.
DROP/ADD PROCESS:
Drop/Add cards are available from the Registrar. Remind students of the deadlines for making changes,
and the possible consequences for some, of dropping below a minimum of twelve credit hours. Courses
dropped before the drop deadline will not appear on the student's transcript. Students may withdraw
from a class until the deadline for withdrawal. The student's transcript will show a "W" if a course is
dropped between the drop and withdrawal deadlines.
FERPA:
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 is a federal law that protects the privacy of
educational records, allows students to inspect their own educational records, and limits types of
personal information an institution discloses to others. Students enrolled in a post-secondary institution
must provide written permission naming those eligible to review their academic information. A summary
of the complete FERPA guidelines is included in the Advisor Manual. Signed release forms are kept on file
in the Registrar’s office.
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FINANCIAL AID:
Financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office is based on an evaluation of academic
accomplishments, financial needs, and availability of resources. Academic advisors and students should
be aware that changes in enrollment status may result in a revision of financial aid awards. Actions such
as changing the number of enrolled credits, academic probation, and withdrawal from the college may
have an adverse effect on a student’s financial aid. For detailed information see the Financial Aid section
of the catalog or contact the Carroll College Financial Aid office at ext. 5425 or 5424.
4-YEAR PLANS:
Every degree offered at Carroll has a published 4-Year Plan that shows the sequence of required courses
semester by semester. These forms are updated yearly to match the Carroll catalog. Copies of 4-Year
Plans by program are available in the Document Center under Academic Advising on MyCarroll.
GRADE OF INCOMPLETE:
An "I" grade is only given under unusual circumstances which cause a delay in a student's completion of
a course. The student must be doing passing work before an Incomplete can be given. The student must
make specific arrangements with a faculty member for the completion of the course, and a formal
written "Request for Grade of Incomplete" must be filed in the Office of the Registrar before the
assignment of the grade as Incomplete.
GRADE REPORTS:
Midterm and Final Grades are available to both students and advisors on-line through MyCarroll. For the
first year only, the Office of Academic Advising will mail midterm grade reports to parents at the request
of the student. A signed “Release of Midterm Grades” form must be on file with the Director of Advising.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
Graduation requirements are outlined in the Carroll catalog. The correct catalog to use for
determination of requirements is the catalog that was in effect at the time that the student enrolled for
the first time as a regular student at the college. If the student interrupts attendance or changes
majors, he/she is expected to graduate under the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of
readmission or major change. Students can contact the Registrar for adjustments to this requirement.
PART-TIME/FULL-TIME:
A full-time student is one who is enrolled for a minimum of 12 semester credits of college courses. A
part-time student is one who is enrolled for 11 hours or fewer.
PASS/FAIL GRADE:
Certain selected courses are regularly graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Students may, however, take other
courses on a Pass/Fail basis under the following conditions: The student must have completed 60 or
more semester hours of college work with a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0. Only one course per semester may
be taken on this basis, with a maximum of 4 such courses allowable toward graduation. The student may
indicate this choice during registration or the regular "add" period of each semester.
E-ADVISING:
E-Advising is a tool offered through MyCarroll that assists students and advisors in the planning of future
courses for timely and appropriate completion of all degree and CORE requirements.
DEGREE AUDIT:
A degree audit can be performed by both students and advisors in order to create a clear depiction of
where the student is in their completion of both degree and CORE requirements. This tool is available
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through MyCarroll and will show what requirements have been completed as well as those which must
still be completed.
STANDARDIZED TEST SCORES:
Students entering Carroll College must submit either ACT or SAT scores. Test scores are utilized when
considering students for admission to the college, and for placement into certain courses. The Admissions
Office and the Registrar can provide definitive information and answer related questions.
TRANSFERABILITY OF COURSEWORK:
All final decisions regarding transfer of credit from other institutions are made by the Registrar. Carroll
students wishing to take courses at another institution are encouraged to obtain prior approval by utilizing
the form entitled "Request to Enroll in Courses at Another Institution” available from the Registrar.
LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS IN ACADEMIC ADVISING
INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS
The academic advisor is on the "front line" of the college when dealing with students. It is a critical
position, and the success or failure of the student's education and growth is influenced greatly by the
advising function. In today's litigious atmosphere, the advising function is more critical than ever.
In academic affairs, a contractual relationship exists between the student and the institution. The basic
provisions of the college catalog, recruiting brochures, various bulletins, and the student handbook
become part of the contract. The institution sets forth certain requirements for passing courses and for
successful completion of programs and subsequent graduation. If students fail to meet the required
standards they can be penalized through such action as dismissal, suspension, or failure to graduate on
schedule; if the institution fails to respect its own regulations, then the student may seek judicial relief.
It is the responsibility of both the advisor and student to understand the academic requirements and
procedures set forth in the college catalog. Advisors are expected to understand such things as
scheduling and registration procedures and degree and program requirements. Advisors should keep
notes of their discussions with students during advising sessions. An accurate record of advising
sessions will help solve any disputes over the content of previous advising and also serve as legitimate
protection against claims of erroneous advising. Guidance and support for academic advising is
available from the Registrar, Director of Academic Advising, Associate Vice President of Enrollment
Management, and other campus officials.
FERPA
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act commonly known as FERPA is a federal law designed to
protect the privacy of educational records while upholding the right of students to inspect or review
their records and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data. In essence
this means that college students must be permitted to review their own educational records.
Furthermore, colleges may not disclose personally identifiable information about students and their
educational records nor allow inspection of their records by a third party (including parents) without
their written permission, unless the disclosure is covered by certain exceptions permitted by the act.
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FERPA: FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT OF 1974
WHAT IS FERPA?
"a federal law designed to protect the privacy of education records, to establish the right of students and parents
to inspect and review their education records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate and
misleading data through informal and formal hearings." Enforced by the Family Policy Compliance Office, US
Department of Education
THE ESSENCE OF THE ACT FOR HIGHER EDUCATION:
 Eligible students must be permitted to inspect their own education records.
 School officials may not disclose personally identifiable information about students nor permit inspection
of their records without written consent unless the disclosure is covered by certain exceptions permitted
by the act.
WHO IS AN ELIGIBLE STUDENT? An individual who has reached the age of 18 or who attends a postsecondary
institution, regardless of age.
WHAT IS AN EDUCATION RECORD?
 Any record, with certain exceptions, maintained by an institution that is directly related to a student or
students.
 These records include: files, documents, and materials in whatever medium (electronic, written, print,
tapes, disks, film, microfilm, microfiche) which contain information directly related to students and from
which students can be personally (individually) identified.
EXCEPTIONS TO EDUCATION RECORDS:
 Sole possession notes
 Law enforcement records
 Employee records except for records of individuals employed as a result of their status as students work study records are education records
 Doctor/counselor -patient privilege records
 Alumni records after graduation and admission files prior to first day of attendance
WHO IS AN EDUCATION OFFICIAL? A “school official” can be a person:
 Employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position
including law enforcement and health staff personnel
 Elected to the board of trustees
 Individuals or entities employed by or under contract to the college to perform a special task
 Or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting
another school official in performing his or her tasks.
WHAT MAY BE INCLUDED IN DIRECTORY INFORMATION?
 Student’s name
 Address
 Telephone number
 Date/place of birth
 Major fields of study
 Participation in officially recognized activities
and sports
 Height/weight of athletic team members
 Dates of attendance
2013-2014





Degrees and awards received
Enrollment status
Student ID that qualifies as an electronic
identifier
Most recent educational institution attended
Other similar information as defined by the
institution that would not normally be
considered an invasion of a student’s privacy
i.e. class schedules, class rosters, email
addresses and photographs
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 15
DIRECTORY INFORMATION MAY NOT INCLUDE:
 Race
 Gender
 Social security number
 Grades




GPA
Country of citizenship/nationality
Religion
Student ID unless it qualifies as an electronic
identifier
WHAT IS A “LEGITIMATE EDUCATIONAL INTEREST”?
The demonstrated need to know by those officials of an institution who act in the student’s educational interest,
including faculty, administration, clerical and professional employees, as well as other persons who manage
student record information. FERPA does not define “legitimate educational interest”; it states that institutions
must specify the criteria for determining it.
REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPLIANCE
Provide annual notification to students of their FERPA rights to privacy and to:
 Inspect and review their education records
 Request an amendment to their education records
 Right to a hearing if the request for an amendment is unsatisfactory
 Request that the institution not disclose directory information items about them or provide written consent to
release their records
 File a complaint with the US Department of Education
 Know that school officials may obtain information from education records without obtaining prior written
consent; the criteria for determining school officials and what “legitimate educational interests” will entitle
school officials to have access to education records
WHAT ABOUT PARENTS?
 Parents may obtain directory information at the discretion of the institution.
 Parents may obtain non-directory information with signed consent from their child.
 Parents may obtain non-directory information at the discretion of the institution if:
o the child is a legal dependent as defined by internal revenue code of 1986, section 152
o the disclosure is a result of a health or safety emergency as specified in the regulations
o the student is under 21 and has violated a federal, state or local law or any rule or policy of the
institution governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance
IS IDENTIFICATION OR AUTHENTICATION NECESSARY FOR DISCLOSURE?
The regulations require a college to use reasonable methods to identify and authenticate the identity of students,
parents, school officials or other parties to whom they disclose educational records.
EXCEPTIONS TO DISCLOSURE WITHOUT PRIOR, WRITTEN CONSENT:
 Authorized representatives for audit, evaluation, or enforcement of federal & state programs
 Officials of other institutions in which the student seeks to enroll
 For the provision and determination of student financial aid
 Accrediting organizations carrying out their accrediting functions
 Disclosures to comply with a judicial order or a lawfully issued subpoena,
 Persons in an emergency, if the knowledge of information, in fact, is necessary to protect the health or safety
of the student or other persons
 Disclosures of information regarding registered sex offenders
 Information on any student found by a campus disciplinary body to have committed a crime of violence or
non-violent sexual offense.
WHO DO YOU CALL?
REGISTRAR’S OFFICE
(406) 447 – 5435
[email protected] (Cassie Hall)
Final regulations amended December 9, 2008
Reviewed July 2013 by Cathy Day
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TIPS FOR ADVISORS
THE ADVISING APPOINTMENT
Source: Adapted from Darley's Interview Techniques. Prepared by the University of Delaware College of
Arts and Science Advising Center. As retrieved 8/11/04 from the NACADA Clearinghouse of Academic
Advising Resources Web site: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/newadvisor.htm.
Though the variety of topics covered in an advising appointment depends upon the purpose of the
appointment, a certain structure or process is common to all. The following is an overview of some
techniques that can be used in an advising session.
Opening
Greet the student by name and in a relaxed manner. The student may be nervous so a warm welcome
and a low-key question such as "What can I help you with today?” can be reassuring at the same time
that it gets the session started.
Talking with the Student
The student may find it difficult to express himself/herself. Resist the temptation to "help" by putting
words in the student's mouth, finishing the sentence yourself or otherwise taking over the conversation.
Careful phrasing of your questions and indicating that you are receptive to the responses should
facilitate good communication.
Silences in the Conversation
Silences do not necessarily mean a breakdown in communication or a lack of activity. The student (or the
advisor) may be searching for words or reflecting upon something that has already been said.
Admitting Your Ignorance
If the student asks a question regarding factual information to which you do not know the answer, admit
it. Get the information immediately, if possible, or call the student back. While one person cannot be
expected to know everything, it is reasonable to expect the advisor to get the information in question.
Students have greater respect for the advisor who does not hesitate to admit ignorance.
Avoiding the Personal Pronoun
Using the word "I" turns the focus of the advising session away from the advisee, toward the advisor.
Expressions like "if I were you, I would" and "I think" express the advisor's opinion or experiences and are
inappropriate unless they are explicitly requested. Most of the time, the advisor's role is not to express
his/her point of view, but rather, to help the student to formulate his/her own opinion.
Bad News
When the advisor must give the student bad news, it is not helpful to minimize the gravity of the
situation or to be unrealistically optimistic about what the student can do to handle it. However, it is very
important that the advisor continue to express an attitude that is receptive and non-judgmental. He/she
can demonstrate his/her support of the student by helping to put the issue into proper perspective and
focusing attention on the positive actions that can be taken to resolve the problem. This may require
additional appointments.
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Additional Problems
Sometimes the student will have unexpressed questions or problems beyond the one which appears to be
the reason for the appointment. The advisor can give the student an opening by asking, "Is there
something else you would like to ask about?” or "Do you have something else on your mind?
The Frequent Visitor
An advisee that frequently meets with his/her advisor can be challenging in many ways. This student
appears to be receptive to the advisor's suggestions and will often say "I feel so much better after talking
to you," but, in fact, never follows up on the information and strategies discussed during the
appointment. This student seems to continue to hope that talking about something will make it happen.
Other frequent visitors are sympathy seekers, complainers and the overly dependent. While it is true that
their willingness to keep appointments indicates some success on the part of the advisor, they take up
time that could be available to other students.
Setting Limits on the Appointment
The appointment is normally a fixed length of time. It is better if the advisor and advisee realize this from
the beginning. Follow-up appointments can be made, if necessary. However, there are times when an
advisor sees a student in crisis and time constraints need to be set aside.
Ending the Appointment
When the advising session is finished, it is easy to get overly involved in casual conversation. This can
extend the appointment far beyond the allotted time. A phrase such as, "Do you think we have done all
we can for today?” or "Let's make another appointment to get into this further" effectively maintains a
friendly yet professional tone.
NOTE AND RECORD KEEPING
Source: Rensselaer Academic Advising Manual, 6/2008. http://www.rpi.edu/dept/advising/Advisemanual-4-09.pdf
Keeping Notes from Your Advising Sessions
A critical source of information about your advisees will be written records you keep of your discussions
through the semesters. These notes will remind you of student concerns, and help you remember
personal information about students beyond the official school records. Reviewing your notes prior to
meeting with an advisee will remind you of topics to follow up on.
Advisors use a variety of approaches to keeping their notes, as described below. Whatever the
approach, files usually include background information for each student.
п‚· Name
п‚· Phone number
п‚· Email address
п‚· Class year
The following information is then noted for each contact:
 Student’s name (to be sure that the information doesn’t get misfiled)
п‚· Date of contact
п‚· Form of contact (email, phone call, in-office meeting, other)
п‚· Topic(s) of discussion
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п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Decision(s) reached (i.e., courses to be taken, next steps of exploration, etc.)
Referral(s) to services: be sure to track referrals
Printouts or copies of special requests and/or agreements, such as requirement waivers or
course substitutions
Additional Suggestions:
п‚· Hard-copy files can be kept in separate folders, in alphabetical order by name.
п‚· Some advisors prefer to group or color-code files by school year, while others just use a single
alphabetical listing.
п‚· Some advisors find it easier to annotate records electronically rather than in hard-copy. In this
case, session notes could be maintained in a single document for each student, in an advising
directory.
ADVISOR’S RESPONSIBILITIES AND STUDENT’S RIGHTS TO PRIVACY
The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (The Buckley Amendment) requires that
educational institutions maintain the confidentiality of student education records. This means that:
1. The student has the right to access his/her file contents (within 45 days from date of request)
specifically including but not limited to identifying data, completed academic work, achievement
test scores, attendance data, scores on standardized intelligence, aptitude, and psychological
tests, interest inventory results, health data, family background information, teacher and
counselor ratings and observations, and verified reports of serious or recurrent behavior
patterns.
The right of inspection and review does not extend to psychiatric, medical, or counseling records
which are intended for personal, diagnostic, or treatment purposes only, or to items previously
obtained with assurances that confidentiality would be maintained.
2. The student may challenge accuracy and/or inclusion of any file contents, have a hearing if the
challenge outcome is unsatisfactory and submit explanatory statements for inclusion in the
folder.
3. Education records or personally identifiable information from those records are kept
confidential and will not be released to third parties without the student's written consent, with
the following exceptions:
п‚· to college personnel for legitimate reasons
п‚· in connection with a student's financial aid
п‚· to persons in compliance with judicial order
п‚· to officials of other institutions in which the student seeks to enroll
п‚· to accrediting agencies carrying out accreditation
Academic advisors may wish to keep personal notes on advisees separate from the student advising
file and should not pass them on as part of the official student record.
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REFERRING STUDENTS
Advisors are not expected to be all things to students and at times the most appropriate course of action
is to refer the student to other campus or community resources.
 Determine what the referral need is: sometimes students won’t ask for help directly, or
sometimes they ask for help in one area but you can see the problem is more basic or in another
area.
п‚· Talk with the student about the purpose/goal of the referral (cognitive aspect of referral) and
how success will be measured.
 Reassure the student about his or her right to the service requested and the referral source’s
ability to provide it (affective aspect of referral).
п‚· Help the student outline the process (steps to be taken) and try to keep the referral chain as
simple as possible.
п‚· Explore with the student crucial questions that he or she needs to ask and perhaps even role
play a part of the process with the student.
п‚· Make the telephone call to set up the initial appointment with the referral source while the
student is in your office. Perhaps you need to explain the situation or perhaps you can give the
telephone to the student to do so. If the referral source is not accessible by telephone, agree
with the student on a time frame within which he or she will contact the referral source.
п‚· Make an appointment with the student for a return advising session to follow up on with the
student.
п‚· Summarize the referral goals/purposes and specific directions you want to follow up on with the
student.
п‚· When the student returns for the next advising session, discuss results and how he or she feels
the referral went. If the student did not follow through, discuss the reasons. Reexamine the
problem again. Consider whether you need to take a more or less active role. Consider whether
a different referral is necessary.
SPECIAL POPULATIONS
UNDECLARED/DECIDING
Students entering Carroll in the fall of 2013 were able to select a major, but some students chose to
remain undeclared (UNDC). There are students who enter college with firm career and education goals
while others have no idea “what they want to be when they grow up.” Alpha Seminar advisors play a
critical role in helping students not only transition from high school to college but also discern their
future.
Some questions to help undeclared/undecided students start to think about their interests and goals:
 What things interest you the most? (Or, sometimes it’s easier for students to start by
talking about the things they really aren’t interested in or don’t like to do.)
п‚· What do you do in your spare time?
п‚· What were your favorite subjects in high school?
п‚· Do you read for pleasure?
п‚· Do you like math?
п‚· What comes easily to you?
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п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
What do you envision yourself doing 5 or 10 years after college?
How important is working with people?
Do you want to help people?
How important is money to you?
What do you secretly want to do? (This one is really important!)
Once students have started the process of thinking about the answers to these questions, they can also
benefit from making an appointment with Rosie Walsh at the Career Center. Rosie can help students
further examine their values, interests, and abilities, and can help them identify the many influences
that affect decision making.
If your advisee is nervous about being undecided, it may help him or her to focus on the skills that a
degree from Carroll will refine, regardless of major. These include communication skills (reading,
writing, and listening effectively), analytical reasoning skills, an ability to work collaboratively, ethical
skills, and an aesthetic understanding that will help him or her see the world in a different light.
STUDENT ATHLETES
When advising student athletes it is important to keep the lines of communication open between the
student, Advisor, Athletic Director, Coach and the Registrar. Changes in a student athlete’s schedule,
credit load, etc. can affect eligibility. For this reason when a student athlete desires to change his/her
semester schedule he/she must obtain the signature of the Athletic Director in addition to the advisor,
instructor teaching the course, and the Registrar. For more information about advising student athletes
contact the Director of Academic Advising or the Registrar.
ACADEMIC DIFFICULTY
Retention of at risk students is an important advising activity and integral to enrollment maintenance.
Quality academic advising intervention can and does make a difference with exit-prone students and
students in academic difficulty.
Assess the problems
Determine the reasons for poor academic performance. It is imperative that the student be actively
involved in this determination, and the formulation of an "action plan" for positive change.
Advisor involvement
At risk students need high quality academic advising. Early detection of problems is necessary and can
be facilitated by progress reports from the faculty and monitoring student attendance.
Advisor follow-up and consistency
Students in difficulty often do not see an advisor regularly and therefore problems may not be noticed
until they are chronic. Students in difficulty benefit from frequent and consistent advisor contact.
Attention and education
Most students in academic difficulty do not just need to "study harder." Often students need positive
and consistent advising attention to ensure proper course placement, development of study and time
management skills, evaluation of educational and career goals, and encouragement to shift college
course work to a higher priority.
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Referrals to appropriate services
Once a problem assessment has been made, the student must be referred to support services available
on campus to rectify the problem.
Situation
Responsible Party or Referral
Chemical dependency
Excess extracurricular activities
Financial problems
In college only for parents
Inadequate academic preparation
Inappropriate major
International student/language problems
International student/social adjustment
Lack of basic study skills
Lack of good advising
Lack of major/career goals
Learning disabled
Not interested in major
Personal or emotional problems
Physical health problems
Relationship problems
Schedule adjustments
Social problems
Taking inappropriate courses
Taking too many credits
Time management issues
Unbalanced schedule
Working too many hours
*Academic Success and Disability Services
**Academic Support and Advising
Wellness Center
Advisor, ARC* (time management)
Financial Aid Office
Advisor, Career Services, ASA**
ARC, faculty
Career Services, faculty, advisor, ASA
International Programs
International Programs
ARC
Advisor, ASA
Career Services
ARC
Advisor, faculty, ASA , Career Services
Wellness Center
Wellness Center
Wellness Center
Advisor, Registrar/ ASA
Wellness Center, Community Living
Advisor, ARC, ASA
Advisor, ARC, ASA, Registrar
ARC, ASA
Advisor
Advisor, Financial Aid Office
DISABILITIES
The term “disabilities” describes a variety of challenges that some students face, including physical,
mental, emotional, and learning disabilities. A student will be eligible for disability services, if the
disability in question significantly limits a major life activity (such as learning, walking, sleeping, for
instance). Such challenges are not unusual and most often are not in themselves an impediment to
success in college, when appropriate accommodations are provided. In fact, students with learning
disabilities, for instance, typically possess average or above-average intelligence and enjoy high rates of
academic success.
Our aim in the Academic Resource Center & Disability Services Office is to ensure that students with
disabilities enjoy equal access to (rather than assurance of success in) curricular and co-curricular
experiences at Carroll College. In order to create such equal access, our staff works closely with each
student, as well as with other staff members and faculty, in designing and implementing the appropriate
accommodations. A student who wants assistance with disability issues must inform the Director, by
following these steps:
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п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Send Application for Support Services to the Academic Resource Center and Disability Services
office
Meet with the Director to determine disability accommodation needs (preferably, new students
will meet with the Director before the beginning of their first semester, or otherwise as soon
after enrollment as possible). Accommodation requests must be made in a timely manner.
o Sign and date academic waiver forms
o Provide the ARC Director with appropriate documentation for establishing eligibility for
accommodations
o Keep the ARC Director informed of any changes to situation or condition
Returning students should meet with the Director at the end of each semester in order to renew
and revise accommodations requests, as needed, for the following semester. At the student’s
request, the Director will provide students with accommodation letters for professors each
semester. It will be the student’s responsibility to distribute such letters to professors.
Steps for the ARC Office:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
The Director will collect, evaluate, and store disability documentation provided by students (files
remain confidential, and are shared with college personnel on a need-to-know basis)
The Director will work with the student, and with faculty and staff as needed, in order to
determine reasonable accommodations and to ensure that accommodations are implemented
At the student’s request, the Director will provide students with accommodation letters for
professors each semester. It will be the student’s responsibility to distribute such letters to
professors.
Steps for Classroom Instructors:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Instructors should include a disability statement in all course syllabi
Instructors, in collaboration with the ARC Director and with the student, will implement the
approved accommodations (it is vital that all three parties remain involved to ensure adequate
service).
Instructors should communicate readily with the ARC Director and with the student regarding
the student’s disability needs
A Please note: Classroom accommodations are a renewable resource. At the student’s request, new
accommodation letters go out at the beginning of each semester. Instructors who do not receive letters
should refer those students requesting accommodations to ARC.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
Carroll is pleased to welcome both international degree seeking and exchange students to campus.
They come from a wide variety of countries and academic systems, including different academic
calendars. Many of them will be in the U.S. for the first time, so it takes some time to adapt to the
language, the culture and possibly living with a roommate for the first time.
All international students are required to maintain immigration status while in the U.S. Part of
remaining in status includes being a full time student (12+ credits). Though there are exceptions to
this rule, only the director of international programs, who also serves as a secondary advisor to ALL
international students, can grant the exception. Please be sure that any student you recommend drop a
class see the Director of International Programs before signing an add/drop card for the student. The
director will note on the card that the drop has been approved, or will call you to discuss the issue
further.
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The most common challenge that international students face while studying in the U.S. is adapting to
our writing style and classroom culture. Most classrooms around the world are very formal. Students
stand up when the professor comes in and they wait to be dismissed when the class ends. Many
countries also use a circular writing style, while in the U.S. we use a linear writing style. For example, in
many Asian cultures, it is disrespectful to come out and say what a student thinks. Critical thinking is not
encouraged and challenging a professor or another classmate is considered quite rude. It is best to work
with these students to explain that we expect critical thinking skills to be used in the classroom so
students must write in a more direct manner and speak up in class. Passive silence = failing grades.
Other cultures perceive what might be defined as “cheating” as helping fellow classmates. The idea of
plagiarism doesn’t even exist in some cultures. Therefore, these topics need to be clearly explained in
syllabi and in person. American students often need a review of plagiarism as well, so this is something
that is useful for all students.
Contact Michelle Lewis (X5406) or Kim Kelley (X5460) with questions about how to advise international
students.
NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENTS
In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the number of students entering or returning to
school who are older than the traditional-aged students. Though identical academic requirements are
placed on non-traditional and traditional students, please consider:
п‚· The adult student comes to the college with knowledge based on first-hand experience, and
must relate this experience to new learning.
п‚· Adult learners often carry heavier responsibilities than traditional students. These
responsibilities are more likely to be related to their home, family and jobs, rather than the
Carroll community.
п‚· Traditional students tend to store knowledge and learn skills for use when they enter their
chosen professions, while non-traditional students generally enter college in order to utilize
this learning for the solving of immediate personal or career concerns.
п‚· Education for the traditional student is often due to peer or parental pressure, while a nontraditional student normally enters college because of a sincere desire to learn and achieve.
п‚· Most non-traditional students have been out of the "educational system" for some time.
This may require reviewing or relearning math, writing, time management, and study skills.
Other opportunities that may benefit non-traditional students are:
COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP): CLEP provides people of all ages and backgrounds an
opportunity to demonstrate college-level proficiency on the basis of standardized examinations
designed to reflect course curricula. Through CLEP exams, students can demonstrate mastery of general
areas and specific subjects for credit and advanced placement. Additional information concerning dates
and fees is available through the Registrar’s Office and in the catalog.
CREDIT BY CHALLENGE EXAMINATION: Upon application by the Registrar and approval by the
appropriate faculty member, examinations for advanced credit in courses offered by the college may be
taken. Restrictions and fees are outlined in the catalog.
CREDIT FOR MILITARY TRAINING AND EDUCATION: Credit for training and education in the armed forces
of the United States may be allowed veterans in accordance with the recommendation of the American
Council on Education. Inquiries should be directed to the Registrar.
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WORKING STUDENTS
Many Carroll students work while they attend college and should be cautioned to plan their time
carefully. Studies indicate that it is difficult to successfully attend college full time and work full time. If
a student is carrying 15 credit hours during the semester, it is recommended that he or she work no
more than 20 hours per week. If the student is working full time and taking classes, it is recommended
that he or she take a maximum of 6-9 credit hours.
PROGRAMS REQUIRING FORMAL ACCEPTANCE
NURSING: There have been significant changes in the Nursing Department admission criteria which are
important for advising first year students. Clinical placement constraints as well as nursing faculty
shortages have resulted in our limiting the number of students accepted into the Nursing Department in
their sophomore year to 40-44 students. Here are the most important requirements that will impact
freshman applying to the nursing major:
п‚· Required courses for application: BI 201, BI 202, CH 111, CO 101, ENWR 102, PSY 105, PSY 203.
Students may be enrolled in these courses at the time of application. Some substitutions such
as CH 101 + CH 102 = CH 111 are allowed.
п‚· Overall GPA as well as a selected GPA (BI 201, BI 202, CH 111, CO 101, ENWR 102, PSY 105, and
PSY 203) will be considered during the application process.
 Applications will be due in February but students won’t be notified until after spring semester
grades are available in May. We understand that this raises difficulties with financial aid and
registration but we are working with those offices and believe that this will give us a much
better predictor of student success than just one semester worth of grades.
п‚· Freshman students will be eligible for nursing advisors following their acceptance into the
program.
п‚· Minimum GPA requirement for application remains at 2.75. However, students should strive for
well above a 3.0 GPA to be competitive for these limited spaces.
п‚· Complete at least 30 credits (sophomore stand) prior to beginning 200-level nursing courses.
п‚· Students who apply to the nursing major will be required to complete a medication math test
and will be asked to write an essay (on-site). Information will be provided in advance about
these requirements to pre-nursing students.
п‚· Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission to the nursing program.
п‚· Please feel free to contact Jennifer Elison, Nursing Department Chair (X5495) or
[email protected]
TEACHER EDUCATION: All individuals pursuing academic programs that lead to teacher licensure must,
by the end of their sophomore year (before April 1), submit an admission application to the Department
of Education: Health, Physical, and Teacher. It is the student’s responsibility to seek admission to the
program. Students must meet the following criteria including minimum scores on the Pre-Professional
Skills Tests (PPST), grade of “C” or better in CO 101; and a minimum of 2.5 cumulative GPA.
In addition, students will be assessed based on a written essay, faculty recommendations, personal
interview, background check, portfolio, and previous K-12 field experience.
The candidate’s status will be evaluated by the Department of Admissions committee based on the
above criteria. For more information, see the Education: Teacher section of the catalog or contact the
Education Department.
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ADVISING GUIDES AND RESOURCES
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS INCLUDING CORE
BACHELORS DEGREE
To earn the Bachelor of Arts or Science* degree from Carroll College, the following requirements must be met:
l. Completion of the Carroll College Core Curriculum (CORE) for the Bachelor degree;
2. Completion of all program requirements in the major and minor (if one is taken);
3. Completion of 122 semester credits, only 2 of which may be physical education activity courses (HPE 101102); and
4. Achievement of a cumulative 2.0 grade point average in
a.
b.
c.
d.
All courses taken,
The requirements in the major, taken as a unit,
The requirements in the minor, taken as a unit, and
The CORE, taken as a unit.
*NOTE: Bachelor of Science Degrees offered at Carroll College are in Engineering and Nursing.
CORE CURRICULUM–BACHELOR DEGREE
The Carroll College Core Curriculum (the CORE) is the cornerstone of the Carroll experience. A liberal
education integrates the department major, the CORE, and a set of elective courses. While the major enables
students to gain in-depth knowledge in their chosen field, the Core provides a foundation for liberal learning
by introducing students to a broad array of disciplines and enabling them to develop critical intellectual skills.
Thus, the CORE reflects the academic objectives for all students that are articulated in the Carroll College
Goals and the Carroll College Mission Statement: preparing students to understand the diversity of the
contemporary world; helping them to acquire aesthetic, scientific, quantitative, ethical, and religious insights;
aiding them in developing a full range of communication skills; and helping them to appreciate the
interrelationships among branches of knowledge.
I. Foundations: 13 credits to be completed within the first three semesters at Carroll College
LAS 101 Alpha Seminar...................................... 3 credits
(required of all first-year students/fall semester)
TH 101 Theological Foundations ....................... 3 credits
ENWR 102 College Composition........................ 4 credits
CO 101 Basic Communication ........................... 3 credits
Note: Foundations classes may not be used to meet other CORE requirements.
II. Areas of Knowledge: 30-31 credits
Fine Arts (ART, DNC, MUS, THT) ........................ 3 credits
History ............................................................... 3 credits
Mathematics ..................................................... 3 credits
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Literature .......................................................... 3 credits
Natural Sciences (AS, BI, CH, EAS, PHYS) ........ 3-4 credits
(lab course is required)
Philosophy ......................................................... 6 credits
Social Science (AN, EC, GEOG, PO, PSY, SO) ...... 6 credits
Theology............................................................ 3 credits
(TH101 may not be used to fulfill this requirement)
III. Writing-Intensive Requirement (WI): 2 courses, the two WI courses must be selected from two different
disciplines with one in the major.
IV. Diversity Requirement: 2 courses/experiences (one from A and one from B)
A. Global Diversity
i. approved study abroad
ii. class (GD) that meets criteria
iii. approved second language course
B. National Diversity
i. class (ND) that meets criteria
ii. approved experiential learning opportunity
iii. approved second language course
Note: Members of the Honor Scholars Program (HSP) have unique course requirements and fulfill 15 of their
49 Carroll College Core Curriculum (CORE) credits by participating in HSP seminars.
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
The Associate of Arts degree serves the student who does not wish to pursue a four-year baccalaureate
program. It is designed to promote cultural growth and acquaintance with the major areas of study and
to create a strong foundation in one area. Associate of Arts degrees are available with curricula in Art,
Business Administration, Computer Science, English, English Writing, and Communication Theory. For a
complete list of requirements for earning an Associate of Arts degree from Carroll College please consult
the college catalog.
MULTI-DISCIPLINARY DEGREE
The purpose of the multi-disciplinary major (MDM) is to permit students in good academic standing to
fulfill their personal academic objectives and complete their BA or AA degree at Carroll College through
an integrated program of study that is not possible through an existing major. The program should draw
on the curricula of two or more disciplines and create a coherent academic focus. The student who
wishes to pursue an MDM will choose a principal advisor and one additional faculty who will work with
the student to plan coursework that will provide breadth and depth in the chosen disciplines. For more
information please contact the Registrar’s office.
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 27
CARROLL MAJORS AND MAJOR CODES
Major Code
ACCT.BA
ANZO.BA
BCMB.BA
BIOL.BA
BISE.BA
BUAA.AA
BUSA.BA
CEEV.BS
CEGR.BS
CHEM.BA
CHSE.BA
CLST.BA
COAA.AA
COMH.BA
COMM.BA
CSAA.AA
CSCE.BA
CSCI.BA
CSIS.BA
EDUC
EGAA.AA
ELED.BA
ENEP.BS
ENLT.BA
ENME.BS
ENSE.BA
ENSL.BA
ENVP.BA
ENWR.BA
EVSS.BA
EVST.BA
EWAA.AA
FINC.BA
FREN.BA
Major
Major Code
Accounting
Anthrozoology
Biochemistry/Molecular Biology
Biology
Biology for Secondary Education
Business Administration (AA)
Business Administration
Civil Engineering Environmental Emphasis
Civil Engineering
Chemistry
Chemistry for Secondary Education
Classical Studies
Communication Studies (AA)
Community Health
Communication Studies
Computer Science (AA)
Computer Science With an Emphasis
Computer Science
Computer Information Systems
Education Licensure
English (AA)
Elementary Education
Engineering Science: Environmental & Public Health Emphas
English Literature
Engineering Science: Engineering Mechanics Emphasis
English Secondary Education - Broadfield
English Literature for Secondary Education
Environmental Studies: Environmental Policy & Public Mgmt
English Writing
Environmental Studies: Environmental Science
Ethics & Value Studies
English Writing (AA)
Finance
French
GISC.CERT
HISE.BA
HIST.BA
HPED.BA
HPSE.BA
HPSM.BA
HPSS.BA
HSCI.BA
INTR.BA
MA32.BA
MASE.BA
MATH.BA
MDMJ.AA
MDMJ.BA
NDEG
NURS.BS
PATH.BA
PEDE.BA
PEDU.BA
PHIL.BA
PHYS.BA
PMGT.CERT
PNUR.BS
POLS.BA
POSE.BA
PREL.BA
PSYC.BA
SOCI.BA
SPAE.BA
SPAN.BA
SSSE.BA
THEO.BA
UNDC.BA
WEBC.CERT
Major
Geographic Information Systems
History for Secondary Education
History
Health & Physical Education K-12
History & Political Science for Secondary Education
Health & Physical Education Sport Management
History Pol Sci & Soc Studies - Sec Educ
Health Sciences
International Relations
Engineering 3-2
Mathematics for Secondary Education
Mathematics
Multi-Disciplinary Major (AA)
Multi-Disciplinary Major
Non-Degree Seeking Students
Nursing
Performing Arts Theater
Pre-Elementary Education
Pre-Secondary Education
Philosophy
Physics
Project Management Certificate
Pre-Nursing
Political Science
Political Science for Secondary Education
Public Relations
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish Education K-12
Spanish
Social Studies for Secondary Education
Theology
Undeclared Major
Web Communicatons Certificate
MAJORS REQUIRING A CONCENTRATION
MAJOR
Concentration
Anthrozoology
One of Each: Social or Natural and Canine or Equine
Business Administration
Economics, Management, International Business, or
Marketing
Mathematics
Approved by Faculty Advisor
Environmental Studies
Science or Policy
Public Relations
Marketing, Print Journalism, or TV Production
Sociology
One Specialization Area From Approved List (check with
department)
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 28
CARROLL MINORS AND CONCENTRATION CODES
Updated 7/2013
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 29
WRITING INTENSIVE, GLOBAL DIVERSITY, & NATIONAL DIVERSITY
The following courses were approved to fulfill Writing Intensive, Global Diversity, and National Diversity
core class requirements. Please note that no single course can fulfill both the GD and ND requirement.
A list of the most up-to-date approved WI, GD, and ND courses is available on the Carroll Website at
http://www.carroll.edu/academics/core/classes.cc
Writing Intensive (WI) Courses
ANZ 441 Domestic Animal Behavior
BA 377 Small Business Management
BA 392 International Business
BA 406 Auditing II
BI 289 Physiological Ecology
BI 311 Ecology
BI 370 Evolutionary Analysis
BI 330A Molecular Biology
BI 477 Biology Thesis Writing
CH 306 Instrumental Methods
CHS 405 Senior Seminar in Community Health
CO 279/289 Arts Journalism: Writing About Movies
CO 306 / ENWR 306 Writing for the Media
CO 426-427 Prospector Internship
CS 230 Software Engineering
CS.MA 342 Numerical Computing and Visualization
CS 430 Senior Project
ED 102 Foundations of Education
ENLT 215 Survey of Classical Literature
ENLT 215 British Literature to 1800
ENLT 215 Survey of British Literature II (usually Satre only)
ENLT 215 Survey of American Literature (usually not summer)
ENLT 215 The Family in Literature
ENLT 215 Classics Reinvented
ENLT 215 Literature of the Northwest
ENLT 215 Twentieth-century American Short Story
ENLT 215 Tolkien in Film and Literature
ENWR 203 Advanced Writing: Expository
ENWR 264 Introduction to Creative Writing
ENWR 301 Business Writing
ENWR 303 Grant Writing
ENWR 305 Technical Writing
ENWR 337 Creative Writing Genres: Nature Writing
ENWR 347 Imaginative Writing (summer course 2007)
ENWR 461 Advanced Creative Writing
ENWR 498 English Capstone Workshop
National Diversity (ND) Courses
AS 189 American Indian Astronomy and Star Lore
AN: See SO/AN below
BA 393: The Socio-economic Impact of Gender: India (ND or
GD)
CHS 330 Community Health Methods (ND or GD)
CO 280 Gender Communication
CO/SO 289 Immigration and Cultural Politics
CO/SO 289B Community, Diversity, and Social Change
CO 289N Communication and Community Boundaries
National Diversity (ND) Courses, cont.
NU 414 Community Health Nursing
2013-2014
ENGR 307 Fluid Mechanics
FR 301 Literature francophone du Maghreb
FR 302 French Literature through the 18th Century
FR 401 French Literature through the 19th Century
FR 402 French Literature of the 20th Century
FR 403 Le francais en action
FR 404 Le Conte francais
HI 303 Renaissance History
HI 307 Contemporary Europe
HI 314 History of Modern France
HI 316 History of Modern Germany
HI 494 Historiography
HNR 250 Judeo-Christian Thought
HPE 405 Senior Seminar in Health and Physical Education
IR 495 International Relations Research Seminar
MA 341 Probability and Statistics
CS.MA 342 Numerical Computing and Visualization
NU 307 Nursing Research
NU 406 Nursing Management
PAD 205 Intro to Public Administration
PHIL 256 Social and Political Philosophies (for now: Roncalli
only, starting spring 08)
PHIL 324 Ethical Theory
PO 205 Early Modern Political Thought (probably not in summer)
PO 330 Green Political Thought
PO 495 Senior Seminar
PSY 309 Research Methods
SO 495 Senior Seminar in Sociology
SP 306 Spanish Morphology and Syntax
TESL 392 TESOL Methods and Applications: Reading & Writing
TH 205 Theology and Film
TH 231 Introduction to the Old Testament
TH 232 Introduction to the New Testament
TH 495 Theology Seminar
THT 318/319 Theatre History 1/Theatre History 2
THT 426 Survey of Drama
CO 325 Intercultural Communication (ND or GD)
ENLT 393 The Jazz Age and the Harlem Renaissance ENLT 410
Women's Literature
ENLT 411 African American Literature
ENLT 412 Native American Authors
HI 221 History of the United States
HS 335: Health Policy, Management and Issues (ND or GD)
ILC 289E Health Discrepancies for Native Americans in
Montana
LAS 206 Perspectives on Gender
LL 220 Introduction to Linguistics
NU 414 Community Health Nursing
PO 119 City Politics
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 30
PO 119 City Politics
PSY 216 Social Psychology
SO 102 Introductory Field Service in Sociology
SO 200 Social Problems
SO/AN 208 The FamilySO 215 Contemporary Issues in Rural
and Urban Sociology: The Effects of Globalization on Rural Life
SO 230 Social Movements and Collective Action
SO/AN 218 Introduction to Native American Studies
SO 289 See CO/SO 289
SO 289B See CO/SO 289B
SO 309 Crime and Criminology
SO 310 Field Service in Criminology
SO 312 Juvenile Delinquency and Deviant Behavior
Global Diversity (GD) Courses
(For AN courses see below: SO/AN)
BA 392 International Business
BA 393 Socio-economic Impact Gender: India (ND or GD)
BA 395 Business Study Abroad
CO 325 Intercultural Communication (ND or GD)
CO 420 Globalization, Gender, and Communication
CHS 330 Community Health Methods (ND or GD)
ENLT 334 World Literature
ENLT 416 Myth in Literature
FR 101-102 Elementary French
FR 203-204 Intermediate French
FR 301 Francophone Literature of the Maghreb
FR 302 French Literature through the Eighteenth Century
FR 401 Nineteenth-century French Literature
FR 402 Twentieth-century French Literature
FR 403 French in Action
FR 404 The French Short Story
GK 201-202 Introductory Greek
GK 301-302 Intermediate Greek
GM 101-102 Elementary German
GM 203-204 Intermediate German
GM 405 Neuigkeiten in Deutschland
HI 251 Introduction to East Asia
HI 271 History of Modern Latin America
HI 289 Modern Middle Easter History
HI 291 Modern African History
HI 411 The Holocaust
See also below, SO/AN/HI 4xx, Study Abroad
HS 335: Health Policy: Management and Issues: National and
Global Perspectives (ND or GD)
2013-2014
PSY 216 Social Psychology
SO 102 Introductory Field Service in Sociology
SO 200 Social Problems
SO/AN 208 The Family
SO 313 Field Service in Juvenile Delinquency
SO/AN 317 Ethnic and Racial Relations
SO 351 Medical Sociology
SO 352 Field Service in Medical Sociology
SP 101-102 Acquisition of Spanish I and II
SP 203-204 Acquisition of Spanish III and IV
SP 301-302 Spanish Conversation
SP 403-404 Culture and Literature of Latin America
LA 101-102 Introductory Latin
LA 203-204 Intermediate Latin
LL 220 Introduction to Linguistics
PHIL 203 Islam: Philosophy and Culture
PHIL 223 Oriental Philosophy
PO 115 Introduction to International Relations
PO 280 Introduction to Comparative Politics
PO 328 The Developing World
PO 348 International Negotiations
SA 275 Cultures and Natural History of Belize
SA 275 Exploring Compassionate AIDS Care in Southern Africa
SA 275 Exploring the Language, People, and Medical Spanish
in South America
SA 275: India Psychology East and West
SA 275 West Africa: Language, Culture, and Science
SA 275 A Natural History of the Amazon Basin-Peru
SA 275 I International Experience in Italy
SO/AN 204 Cultural Anthropology
SO 202 The Culture and Justice System in Ireland
SO 314 Sociology of Law
SO/AN 318 American Indians
SP 101 and 102 Acquisition of Spanish I and II
SP 203 and 204 Acquisition of Spanish III and IV
SP 301 and 302 Spanish Conversation
SP 305 Spanish Reading and Writing
SP 307 Spanish Short Story I
SP 401 and 402 Culture and Literature of Spanish I and II
SP 403 and 404 Culture and Literature of Latin America I and II
TESL 391 Methods and Applications: Listening and Speaking
TESL 392 Methods and Applications: Reading and Writing
TH 211 Comparative Religion
TH 245 Eastern Christian Traditions
TH 264 Theologies of Liberation
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 31
ACCESSING ADVISEE INFORMATION VIA MYCARROLL
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Go to MyCarroll on the Carroll website
o Access MyCarroll via the “Carroll Quick Links” drop-down menu on the Home page; or
o MyCarroll icon in the upper right hand corner of the Student Affairs page
Go to the WebAdvisor menu (upper left) and select “WebAdvisor for Faculty”
o Select “Faculty Information”
o Select “Advisees” from the menu if you want a list of advisees with Cumulative GPA and
Ungraded Credits
o Select “My Advisees” from the menu if you want to see detailed information
o Select the desired term (Spring 2013, etc.) from the drop-down menu and enter
“submit”
A list of your advisees for the term should appear
If you are in “My Advisees”, click on the drop-down arrow under the “Action” column and select
the desired function; select the desired term; then �submit”:
o View Transcripts – List all earned credit (Carroll, transfer, AP, etc.)
o View Student Schedule – Shows the student’s current class schedule
o Evaluate Program – Degree audit
o View Student Test Summary – ACT and SAT test results
o View Student Profile – Lists personal information about the student including addresses,
phone numbers, email address, degree program, advisor(s), etc.
o View Retention Cases – (a work in progress)
o Student Educational Planning – Use to plan courses for future semesters
PLEASE NOTE: Use the “BACK” button to move from screen to screen. If you select “OK” on the bottom
of the page it will take you back to the WebAdvisor menu.
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 32
ACCESSING ADVISING TOOLS VIA MYCARROLL
E-ADVISING
п‚·
п‚·
Go to MyCarroll on the Carroll website
o Access via the “Carroll Quick Links” drop-down menu on the Home page; or
o MyCarroll icon in the upper right hand corner of the Student Affairs page
Go to the WebAdvisor menu (upper left) and select “Faculty Information”
o Select “My Advisees” from the menu
o Select the desired term (Fall 2013, etc.) from the drop-down menu and enter “select”
o A list of your advisees for the term should appear
Side Note:
For students that are not listed as
your Advisee please select the
“Student Educational Planning”
tab under “Faculty Information”
Then enter the Student’s ID or
Name and Select an Action from
the list and click on the submit
button.
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 33
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Click on the drop-down arrow under the “Action” column
o Select “Student Educational Plan”
Select the appropriate active academic program and click “Submit”
The screen to create an academic plan will appear
o Use the “Planned Term” drop down menu to select the semester that is being planned
o Use the “Course Subject” drop down menu and “Course Number” box to select the
classes that are part of the plan
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 34
п‚·
After plan has been made, several options may be selected at the bottom of the page
o Select “Evaluate Program” to perform an audit based off the created plan to ensure that
all requirements are being met by the developed plan
o Select “Course Planning Wizard” to assess where gaps in the proposed plan are. This
tool is also helpful as it allows one to pull up a list of all available classes that may fulfill a
missing requirement (ie. WI, ND, GD, Major or Minor requirements)
DEGREE AUDIT
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Go to MyCarroll on the Carroll website
o Access via the “Carroll Quick Links” drop-down menu on the Home page; or
o MyCarroll icon in the upper right hand corner of the Student Affairs page
Go to the WebAdvisor menu (upper left) and select “Faculty Information”
o Select “My Advisees” from the menu
o Select the desired term (Fall 2013, etc.) from the drop-down menu and enter “select”
o A list of your advisees for the term should appear
Click on the drop-down arrow under the “Action” column
o Select “Evaluate Program” and click “Submit”
Select the “Active Program” you wish to evaluate
o The option is also available to evaluate based off a change in program – “What If…”
o Select the desired classes (“Completed,” “In-Progress,” or “Registered”) that you wish to
be included in the evaluation of the program
o Click “Submit”
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 35
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
The �degree audit’ generates a form titled “Academic Evaluation”
Information provided in this Academic Evaluation (degree audit) includes:
o Student Information including name, program (major), catalog year, anticipated
graduation date, and advisor
o Program Summary lists the different credit and GPA requirements for a Carroll degree
o Core Foundations summary
o Areas of Knowledge summary
o Writing Intensive and Diversity requirements
o Major requirements
o Minor requirements (if the student has a declared minor)
o Other courses – a list of all completed courses not currently used in any other category
Colors Used on the Academic Evaluation:
o Red – Not started
o Orange – Pending completion of unfinished activity
o Blue – In progress
o Green – Complete
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 36
EXTERNAL EXAM POLICY
IB: INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE
High school students who receive a score of 5, 6 or 7 on the International Baccalaureate higher-level
examinations only are granted college credit in appropriate subjects. Credit is not awarded for
subsidiary level examinations, Theory of Knowledge or extended essays. Courses and credits are posted
to the student's Carroll transcript upon receipt of the official International Baccalaureate transcripts.
Credit is awarded only for scores of 5 or higher.
EXAMINATION TITLE
ART (Visual)
Biology
Chemistry
Economics
English Language & Composition
History of Europe
History of the Americas
French Language
German Language
Geography
Mathematics
Music
Physics
Psychology
Social /Cultural Anthropology
Spanish Language
CREDITS
AWARDED
3
4
4
6
4
3
3
6
6
3
3
3
8
3
3
6
CARROLL COURSE
EQUIVALENCY
ART 102
BI 101
CH 198
EC 201 and EC 202
ENWR 102
HI 189
HI 189
FR 101 and FR 102
GM 101 and GM 102
GEOG 201
MA 117
MUS 189
PHYS 101 and PHYS 102
PSY 105
AN 204
SP 101 and SP 102
REVISED 07/29/13
CLEP: COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM
CLEP provides people of all ages and backgrounds an opportunity to demonstrate college-level
proficiency on the basis of standardized examinations designed to reflect course curricula. Through
CLEP exams, students can demonstrate mastery of general areas and specific subjects for credit and
advanced placement. Additional information concerning dates and fees is available through the
Registrar’s Office and in the catalog.
MILITARY TRAINING AND EDUCATION CREDIT
Credit for training and education in the armed forces of the United States may be allowed for veterans
in accordance with the recommendation of the American Council on Education. Inquiries should be
directed to the Registrar.
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 37
AP: ADVANCED PLACEMENT
High school students who receive scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement
Examination are granted college credit in appropriate subjects. Courses and credits are posted to the
student's Carroll transcript upon receipt of the official College Board scores.
EXAMINATION TITLE
Test Scores
ART: 3D Design
Art: Studio Art-Drawing
Art: Studio Art–General
Biology
Calculus AB
Calculus BC
Chemistry
Computer Science A
Computer Science AB
Economics: Micro
Economics: Macro
English Language/Comp.
English Lit./Composition
Environmental Science
European History
French Language
French Literature
German Language
Government & Politics: US
Government & Politics:
Comparative
History of Art
Human Geography
International English
Language
Latin: Vergil
Latin Literature
Music Theory
Physics B
Physics C – Mechanics
Physics C:
Electricity/Magnetism
Psychology
Spanish Language
Spanish Literature
Statistics
United States History
World History
CREDITS
AWARDED
3
4 5
6
6 6
3
3 3
3
3 3
8
8 8
3
6 6
3
6 6
8
8 8
4
4 4
3
3
0
0
6
6
0
0
0
3
3
3
3
6
6
6
3
0
3
3
3
3
7
7
6
6
6
0
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0
0
3
8
4
3
3
3
8
4
3
3
3
8
4
4
4
4
3
0
0
3
6
6
3
3
0
3
6
6
3
6
0
3
6
6
CARROLL COURSE EQUIVALENCY
3
ART 289 (portfolio required)
ART 112 (portfolio required)
ART 102 (portfolio required)
BI 101 and BI 102
MA 112
MA 112
CH 198 and CH 199
CS 110
equivalency not
determined
EC 201
EC 202
credits not awarded
credits not awarded
ES 101 and ES 102
HI 209 and HI 210
credits not awarded
credits not awarded
credits not awarded
PO 104
PO 189
4
ART 289 (portfolio required)
ART 112 (portfolio required)
ART 102 (portfolio required)
BI 101 and BI 102
MA 121 and MA 122*
MA 121 and MA 122*
CH 198 and CH 199
CS 110
equivalency not
determined
EC 201
EC 202
ENWR 101
ENWR 101 and ENLT 215
ES 101 and ES 102
HI 209 and HI 210
FR 101
credits not awarded
GM 101
PO 104
PO 280
5
ART 289 (portfolio required)
ART 112 (portfolio required)
ART 102 (portfolio required)
BI 101 and BI 102
MA 121 and MA 122*
MA 121 and MA 122*
CH 198 and CH 199
CS 110
equivalency not
determined
EC 201
EC 202
ENWR 101 & ENWR 102
ENWR 102 and ENLT 215
ES 101 and ES 102
HI 209 and HI 210
FR 101 and FR 102
credits not awarded
GM 101 and GM 102
PO 104
PO 280
ART 110
GEOG 202
equivalency not
determined
credits not awarded
credits not awarded
MUS 189
PHYS 201 and PHYS 202
PHYS 201
PHYS 202
ART 110
GEOG 202
equivalency not
determined
LA 189
LA 189
MUS 189
PHYS 201 and PHYS 202
PHYS 205
PHYS 206
ART 110
GEOG 202
equivalency not
determined
LA 189
LA 189
MUS 189
PHYS 201 and PHYS 202
PHYS 205
PHYS 206
PSY 105
credits not awarded
credits not awarded
MA 207
HI 219 and HI 220
HI 103 and HI 104
PSY 105
SP 101
credits not awarded
MA 207
HI 219 and HI 220
HI 103 and HI 104
PSY 105
SP 101 and SP 102
credits not awarded
MA 207
HI 219 and HI 220
HI 103 and HI 104
* Students who accept this credit cannot then take MA 121-122 or MA 131. However, students who feel
uncomfortable with their calculus background may opt to decline their AP calculus credit. It will be noted in the
catalog that no student may receive credit for both MA 121-122 and MA 131. REVISED July 2012
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 38
COURSE PLACEMENT GUIDELINES
BIOLOGY STUDENTS PLACEMENT GUIDELINES
Placement into Freshman courses is very difficult. The following guidelines should be tempered with
individual evaluation of personal factors - motivation, study skills, and maturity. These attributes can be
evaluated by high school GPA and difficulty of high school curriculum – AP courses (any area), advanced
science courses: Biology II, Chemistry II, Physics, advanced math courses: pre-calculus, calculus. Math
placement should follow the guidelines provided by the Math, Engineering, and Computer Science
Department.
п‚· ACT scores of 24 (SAT 1650) or better, signs of strong personal factors: Course schedule 1
п‚· ACT scores of 23 (SAT 1570) or better, signs of very strong personal factors: Course schedule 1 or 2
п‚· ACT scores of 22 (SAT 1500) or better, concerns over personal factors: Course schedule 2 or 3
п‚· ACT scores of 21 (SAT 1500) or lower: Course schedule 4
Course schedule 1
Alpha Seminar
Chemistry 101
Biology 171
Math 131 or 121*
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Course schedule 2
Alpha Seminar
Chemistry 101
Biology 171
Core Classes **
Course schedule 3
Alpha Seminar
Chemistry 101
Math (MA 121 or lower)
Core Classes**
Course schedule 4
Alpha Seminar
Math (MA 112/MA 117)
CH 111 (SP sem/background)
Core Classes**
*See placement guidelines for math,
**CORE Classes: ENWR 102, CO 101, TH 101
If math is deferred it can be taken sophomore year,
Pre-calculus can be taken in the spring of the Freshman year; if biology is deferred it can be taken
the sophomore year.
neither option affects a student’s ability to graduate in 4 years
There is no perfect algorithm to ensure academic success. If you are unsure about an individual
registration placement, a biology faculty member can review the file.
MATH PLACEMENT GUIDELINES
The following are the placement guidelines for MA 121/MA 131. Please note that the sequence MA
121-122 is considered to be the equivalent of MA 131. For strong students, it is advantageous to take
MA 131 to complete calculus in 4 credits rather than 6. Placement of students with border-line
background may require discussion between the student and math or science faculty.
PLEASE NOTE: A student must have a pre-calculus class in high school or college before taking MA
121, MA 131, or MA 141 at Carroll. If a student has not taken pre-calculus, place either in MA 117
followed by MA 112, or wait to take MA 112 in the Spring.
Math/Chemistry/Computer Science Majors
п‚· SAT Math score of at least 600 or ACT Math score of at least 25 -> place into MA 131
п‚· SAT Math score between 550 and 590, or ACT Math score of 23 or 24 -> discuss with student
п‚· SAT Math score of 540 or less or ACT Math score of 22 or less -> place into MA 121
п‚· ACT Math score below 22->consult with Mathematics Program Director for placement
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 39
Engineering Majors
ACT Math score of at least 22 or higher-> place into MA 141
ACT Math score below 22->consult with Engineering Program Director for placement
Biology Majors
п‚· SAT Math score of at least 600 or ACT Math score of at least 25, plus previous calculus
experience -> place into MA 131 (Due to the difficult course-load of the freshmen biology major,
a stronger background in mathematics is recommended for MA 131.)
п‚· SAT Math score between 550 and 590, or ACT Math score of 23 or 24, or higher score with no
previous calculus experience -> likely place into MA 121, but discuss with student, using
questions below
п‚· SAT Math score of 540 or less or ACT Math score of 22 or less -> place into MA 121 or defer
math for the first semester and enroll in MA 112 (pre-calculus) in the Spring. Use questions
below to determine appropriate placement of the individual student.
Discussion questions to help determine placement for those with border-line background
п‚· How are your pre-calculus (algebra, trigonometry) abilities? Do you feel that you have strong
algebra skills?
п‚· Have you had calculus before?
п‚· How well do you feel you learned the material in that course?
п‚· Do you feel ready to see that material at a faster pace, or would you appreciate a moderate
pace with some pre-calculus review?
п‚· Do you like math?
Place in courses depending on the answers…
п‚· If the answers to these questions are all affirmative, definitely place the student in MA 131.
п‚· If the answers are affirmative but the student has not had calculus before, then this is still a
borderline case – ask the student which they would be more comfortable with – a fast-paced, 4credit course, or a slower-paced, 6-credit sequence.
п‚· If the answers are somewhat affirmative, but not real strong, then place the student in MA 121.
If the answers are quite negative and the student has low test scores, consider placing the
student in MA 117 in the Fall and MA 112 in the Spring, or deferring math in the Fall and taking
MA 112 in the Spring.
п‚· If a student has not had pre-calculus in high school, do not place the student in MA 121. Place
either in MA 117 followed by MA 112, or wait to take MA 112 in the Spring.
ENGLISH PLACEMENT FOR ENTERING FRESHMEN
ENWR 102 – College Composition II is a foundational CORE requirement for all Carroll students. All
entering students are placed in an appropriate level of English composition based on a review of
academic records which may include ACT English sub scores, SAT writing sub scores, ACT/SAT essay,
Montana Writing Assessment (MWA) essay, AP scores, or IB scores. Students who meet the established
placement guidelines listed below are placed in ENWR 102 while students with no scores or low scores
are placed in ENWR 101.
If advisors have questions about College Composition placement, please contact Dr. Kay Satre, Chair of
the Languages and Literature department, or Annette Walstad, Director of Academic Advising.
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Placement Guidelines
ENWR 102 – College Composition II
Writing Score
ACT/SAT Score
п‚· ACT/SAT essay
п‚· Montana Writing
Placement
п‚· ACT English sub score
п‚· SAT writing sub score
Assessment (MWA)
8+ ACT/SAT essay or 4.0+ MWA
7 ACT/SAT essay or 3.5 MWA
6 ACT/SAT essay or 3.0 MWA
No essay
IB Credit
+
+
+
+
20 ACT or 470 SAT or higher
21 ACT or 500 SAT or higher
22 ACT or 510 SAT or higher
23 ACT or 530 SAT or higher
Score of 4 on the English Language/Comp Exam
Please note: IB Scores of 5, 6 or 7 earn credit for ENWR 102
AP credit
Score of 4 on the English Lang/Comp or English Lang/Lit Exam
Please note: A score of 5 earns credit for ENWR 102
=
=
=
=
=
ENWR 102
=
ENWR 102
ENWR 102
ENWR 102
ENWR 102
ENWR 102
 If a student doesn’t meet the requirements in each category (both the writing score + ACT/SAT sub
score) the file is reviewed by the Language and Literature department or designee.
п‚· ENWR 101 is used in most programs as elective credit and does not satisfy a CORE requirement.
п‚· A student placed in ENWR 101 must successfully complete the course before registering for ENWR
102.
Revised: August 1, 2011
LANGUAGE PLACEMENT GUIDELINES
Placement into foreign language courses at Carroll is based on previous study in high school or college.
If advisors or students are uncertain about the course placement level, or if they wish to request an
exception, they should consult with Language faculty.
HIGH SCHOOL
COURSE PLACEMENT AT CARROLL
One year or less of French, German, or Spanish
FR/GM/SP 101
Two years of French, German, or Spanish
FR/GM/SP 101 or 102
Three years of French, German, or Spanish
FR/GM/SP 203
Four years of French, German, or Spanish
FR/GM/SP 203 or 204
COLLEGE COURSES
COURSE PLACEMENT AT CARROLL
None
FR/GM/SP 101
FR/GM/SP 101
FR/GM/SP 102
FR/GM/SP 102
FR/GM/SP 203
FR/GM/SP 203
FR/GM/SP 204
FR/GM/SP 204
FR/GM/SP upper level courses
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PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS
3-2 ENGINEERING: MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS
Mr. Terence J. Mullen, Advisor
A student who completes the requirements for the 3-2 Engineering Major in Mathematics earns two
degrees: 1) a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in mathematics from Carroll College, and 2) a
Bachelor of Science degree with a major in a selected field of engineering from the affiliate institution.
A complete list of the affiliated schools and the engineering fields available are listed in the catalog.
PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL PROGRAMS
Dr. Sam Alvey, Pre-Dental Advisor
Dr. Dan Gretch, Pre-Medical Advisor
Admission to medical or dental school requires completion of courses in biology, chemistry, physics,
mathematic, and English. While most premedical students graduate from Carroll College with a degree
in biology, the choice of a major field of study is left open to the student. A complete list of
recommended minimum requirements and additional information are listed in the Carroll catalog.
PRE-OPTOMETRY PROGRAM
Dr. Stefanie Otto-Hitt, Advisor
Admission requirements for doctor of optometry programs vary from program to program and students
should check individual web sites for specific information. General requirements include calculus,
statistics, organic chemistry, anatomy, physiology, microbiology and psychology. Carroll students often
major in either biology or chemistry since many of the course requirements coincide with these majors.
However a science degree is not required.
PRE-PHYSICIAN’S ASSISTANT PROGRAM
Dr. Grant Hokit, Advisor
There is a great diversity in the requirements for admission to Physician Assistant programs and the
student is advised to check individual web-sites for specific information. Generally, 1000-2000 hours of
direct patient care is required as is human anatomy and physiology, microbiology and chemistry. A
science major is not required.
PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM
Dr. Grant Hokit, Advisor
Although students interested in physical therapy may select any major, the following are the most
frequently chosen: Health Science, Psychology, Sociology, Health and Physical Education, and Biology.
Students who choose to major in Biology may need to spend extra time in college to complete all major
requirements and all physical therapy requirements as well. Strong academic performance is
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Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
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considered paramount; the degree emphasis is secondary. Although many schools list an overall
minimum GPA of 3.0 for admission, to be competitive a GPA of at least 3.5 is needed. The prerequisite
GPA is usually higher. Additional information and a list of recommended courses can be found in the
Carroll catalog.
PRE-PHARMACY PROGRAM
Dr. Kyle Strode, Advisor
Pharmacy programs usually consist of a pre-pharmacy program followed by four years of pharmacy
school. Beginning in 2001, all pharmacy schools in the U. S. began granting only pharmacy doctoral
degrees. A typical pre-pharmacy student at Carroll would take the courses listed in the pre-pharmacy
program section of the college catalog to meet the pharmacy prerequisites for the University of
Montana, with which we maintain a close relationship. It is possible to finish these pharmacy
prerequisites in two years. Additional information and a list of recommended minimum requirements
for Pre-Pharmacy program can be found in the Carroll catalog.
PRE-VETERINARY PROGRAM
Dr. Brandon Sheafor, Advisor
Students interested in veterinary medicine should take a core of science courses that are required for
admission. Each professional school will have its own set of pre-admission courses and students should
check individual websites for specific information on admission requirements. Most Carroll students
major in either Biology or Chemistry since the course requirements coincide with these majors.
However a science degree is not required. In fact the applicant can be accepted before completion of an
undergraduate degree, but students are advised to pursue a specific major. Additional information and
a list of recommended courses can be found in the Carroll catalog.
PRE-LAW PROGRAM
Dr. Bill Parsons, Advisor
Accredited law schools require the bachelor’s degree for admission, yet rarely do they specify a
particular major field of study. Law schools are particularly interested in applicants who have had broad
exposure to the humanities and social sciences and have proven ability for cogent written and oral
expression. Degrees in English, History, Political Science, Philosophy, Sociology, Mathematics,
Accounting, Economics, Business, and other areas are suitable for the pre-law student. Students
interested in law school are urged to become familiar with the requirements of the specific schools to
which they plan to apply. More information about the pre-law program is available in the catalog. Also
available is the Carroll College Pre-Law Handbook, a short guide to prepare for the study of law and law
school admissions processes.
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SPECIAL PROGRAMS
INTERNSHIPS
Nisan Burbridge, Internship Coordinator
The academic internship program at Carroll College is an experiential education opportunity that
enhances the link between the classroom and the workplace. It is an opportunity for the student to
learn about her/his area of academic interest through practical experience. At Carroll academic
internships are available to junior or senior students in the fall, spring, or summer semesters.
Exceptions to junior or senior status are made on a departmental basis.
An academic internship is a supervised, planned work experience taken for academic credit. It forms an
academic relationship between a student, faculty advisor, and cooperating organization. The internship
must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for academic credit. Credit for internships is
granted through an academic department. Each academic department has a faculty internship advisor.
Internship placements are approved by the faculty internship advisor. In some instances where there is
not a designated faculty internship advisor the department chair may work with faculty to match a
student with an appropriate faculty internship advisor.
An internship may be a single semester experience, or it may continue for longer than one semester; it
may be paid or unpaid. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program.
Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work
experience takes place. The established ratio for number of hours of work to number of credits received
are as follows: 42 hours = 1 credit (internships are typically 1-3 credits). An internship can be started
at any point in the semester; however, it must be a minimum of 8 weeks in duration.
There is a special registration process for internships. Students need to obtain the “Student Guide and
Approval Form” to start the registration process. Academic internships require both a completed
Internship Approval Form and an Internship Proposal. Each student is required to complete academic
requirements assigned by their faculty internship advisor. The student will meet with her/his faculty
internship advisor to establish learning objectives, determine the context and timing of academic
activities, and establish means for academic assessment and evaluation by the site supervisor. (There
will be a few circumstances where an internship may qualify for National Diversity (ND) status – regular
ND policies apply for approval)
Once all the paperwork is completed and submitted to the Career Services Internship Coordinator
students will be registered under the appropriate department course number for internships and the
student will show up on a class roster. It is the responsibility of the student to confirm registration.
Grades will be submitted like all other academic courses.
Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career
Services office.
HONORS SCHOLARS PROGRAM
Dr. Chris Fuller, Director
The Carroll College Honors Scholars Program (HSP) is designed for those students who excel in academic
scholarship, personal character, and social commitment. Enhancing these three qualities is the
educational goal that Carroll College celebrates in its Mission Statement.
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Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
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Members of the four-year Honors Scholars Program (HSP) at Carroll College are selected in their
freshman year from all academic majors. Admission to the program is competitive with no more than
sixteen students accepted into each class. Honors Scholars participate in classroom seminars, attend a
variety of cultural events, and pursue community service projects of their own conception. Beginning in
the spring term of their freshman year, students participate in a sequence of five interdisciplinary
seminars listed as �HNR’ course on their transcripts that fulfill 15 of the 49 Carroll College Core
Curriculum (CORE) credits. The Honors Scholars Program (HSP) upholds rigorous standards in assessing
the work of its students. The HNR seminars substitute for CORE at Carroll College as follows:
п‚· Freshman Spring Semester:
HNR 150- Philosophy
3 credits
п‚· Sophomore Fall Semester:
HNR 250- Theology
3 credits
п‚· Sophomore Spring Semester:
HNR 251- Literature
3 credits
п‚· Junior Fall Semester:
HNR 350- Social Science
3 credits
п‚· Senior Spring Semester:
HNR 450- Philosophy
3 credits
In addition to completing the five course listed above, a student must complete:
п‚· Six (6) credits of History (including either HI101 or HI102, and one additional history course)
п‚· Intermediate proficiency in a foreign language (200 Level)
п‚· Three (3) credits upper-division social science (200-400 level course)
п‚· Fine Arts CORE must come from a visual arts course
п‚· LAS 389 Research Methods
п‚· HNR 499 Honors Thesis
For a complete description of the program and specific course requirements, please consult the college
catalog and website.
HONORS THESIS WRITING
A student does not have to be in the Honors Scholars program in order to complete an Honors Thesis. In
fact many students who write theses are not in the program. A successful completion of a thesis entitles
the student to graduate with Honors. Here are a few important steps in the Honors Thesis:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Pick up the Honors Thesis Application and Honors Thesis Timeline at the Registrar’s Office which
will ask to identify the working title of your Honors Thesis, your thesis director, and your thesis
committee members. You will need a thesis director from your department and two readers—
one from your department and one from outside your department—for your Honors Thesis
committee.
The Honors Thesis Application—with all of the required signatures--is due in the Registrar’s
Office on September 30.
Work with your thesis director and readers to review your project throughout the fall
semester.
The final draft of your Honors Thesis will be due to your committee by February 15.
The thesis, abstract and signature page must be completed by April 1. A pdf of the thesis, the
abstract, and a scan of the completed signature page must be submitted to [email protected]
The oral defense of the Honors Thesis occurs in April. You will be notified of date, time and
location.
The best place to start this process is to pick up the form and timeline in the Registrar’s Office. Talk to
your academic advisor or a faculty member in your department who will serve as your thesis director
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Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
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about ideas for your research project. Discuss your thesis project with your director and have your thesis
director help you identify the other two committee members who will serve as readers. Keep your
academic advisor informed of your work in case he or she can be helpful. Work with your thesis director
to plan when and how you will conduct your research.
MILITARY SCIENCE AND LEADERSHIP (ROTC) PROGRAM
Major Dana Barnicoat, Director
Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) offers Carroll College students the opportunity to serve as
Commissioned Officers in the U.S. Army, the Army National Guard, or the U.S. Army Reserve upon
graduation from College. ROTC enhances a student’s education by providing unique leadership and
management training, along with practical leadership experiences beyond the usual classroom
academics. Students develop many of the qualities basic to success while earning a college degree in
their selected majors and an Army officer’s commission at the same time. Army ROTC can be completed
in two or four years, depending on the student’s qualifications, through the Basic Course and the
Advanced Course.
The basic courses are:
MSL 101- The American Defense Establishment
MSL 102- Introduction to Military Science
MSL 201- Military Skills
MSL 202- Individual/Team Military Tactics
MSL 315- Drill and Conditioning (every semester)
Only qualified, contracted ROTC cadets may take Advance Course classes. Advance Course cadets must
also complete Leadership Development and Assessment Course (5 paid weeks at Fort Lewis, WA, during
the summer between Junior and Senior years.)
The Advance Courses are:
MSL 301- Individual Leadership
MSL302- Military Strategy and Tactics
MSL 303- Leadership Laboratory (2 semesters)
MSL 401- The Army Officer: Roles and responsibilities
MSL402- Ethics and Justice in the Army
MSL 404- Advance Leadership Practicum (2 semesters)
EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAMS
Shannon Ackeret, Assistant Director for International Programs
Carroll College encourages students to study abroad to enhance their educational experience and to
provide an enriching international exchange between individuals, cultures, and ideas from around the
world. Carroll believes that students learn about themselves, their host country, and their country
through international experiences. Opportunities for full-year, semester, or summer studies in another
country are available to all Carroll students in good standing. Carroll’s Education Abroad Office assists
students with coordinating education abroad options offered for college credit.
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FINANCIAL AID AND SCHOLARSHIP
Janet Riis, Director of Financial Aid
Academic Advisor
Financial Aid Review
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)
When financial aid is granted it is assumed that students will make progress toward a degree. Carroll’s
financial aid, satisfactory academic progress policy is provided to ensure compliance with federal
regulations and to prevent abuse of federal student assistance programs while supporting students’
efforts to attain educational objectives
Measurement Date
SAP measurement is made after completion each term. It is the student's responsibility to know a
violation has occurred whether or not the student receives notification.
Students Must Meet SAP in Two Ways:
Qualitative Measurement
A student must possess a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher. A student must meet the qualitative
standard in addition to the quantitative standards discussed below.
Quantitative Measurement
Students must pass 67% of the cumulative credits attempted at Carroll College in their degree level.
Attempted credits will be based on a student's credit load at the end of the add/drop period for each
term.
Audit and non-credit remedial work are not considered in the measurement of SAP. Remedial and
repeated course work for which a student received credit multiple times is treated as any other course
work. Incompletes are considered as credits attempted when considering maximum time frames.
Transfer credits are also considered when determining maximum time frames. If a student withdrew
from a class or classes, the student is considered to have attempted those classes, even though the
student did not receive any earned credits from registering for the classes. Please note:
п‚· Withdrawal from classes has a negative impact on quantitative SAP measurement. (% complete)
п‚· However, withdrawal from classes has a positive impact on qualitative SAP (GPA)
Maximum Credit Hour Standard (Pace Progression)
A student is expected to earn a degree in a specific amount of time, measured by the credits attempted.
Credits earned at prior post-secondary institutions and accepted toward a Carroll College degree will be
included with Carroll College credits in determining the total credits attempted. The number of
attempted credits allowed is 1.5 times the number of credits required to earn a degree (150%). For
example, if a degree requires 122 credits, a student is eligible for financial aid until they have attempted
183 credits or have earned the credits required for the degree, whichever comes first. Students must
declare a major by the time they earn 45 credits. Students should register only in credits required for
completion of their program. If credits are needed in addition to the required credits listed in the
catalog, an appeal must be completed and reviewed to determine additional eligibility.
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Return of Institutional and Federal Title IV Funds Policy
Purpose
The purposes and intent of this policy are to provide guidance as to how Carroll College will calculate the
amount of Institutional and Federal Title IV funds to be returned for a student who has withdrawn from
all classes.
This policy governs the return of Institutional and Federal Title IV funds disbursed for a student who
completely withdraws from a term, payment period, or period of enrollment. It does not apply to
students who have dropped some classes but remain enrolled in other classes at or through Carroll. The
general assumption is that a student earns aid based on the period of time he/she remained enrolled.
Institutional aid follows the Business Office tuition refund policy which is different than the federal
refund policy.
Earned aid - During the first 60% of the period, a student “earns” Federal Title IV funds in direct
proportion to the length of time he/she remains enrolled. That is, the percentage of time during the
period that the student remained enrolled is the percentage of disbursable aid for that period that the
student earned. A student who remains enrolled beyond the 60% point earns all aid for the period
(typically around the first or second week of November for fall term and around the first or second week
of April for spring term).
The Process — General
1.
Student notifies the Registrar that he/she is withdrawing from the college. The Registrar
provides the student with a withdrawal form.
2.
The student follows the instructions on the form to obtain the necessary signatures indicating
compliance with requirements, and returns the form to the Registrar.
3.
The Registrar gives a copy of the completed withdrawal form to the Financial Aid Office
immediately upon receipt from the student.
4.
The Financial Aid Office calculates the amount of funds to be returned.
5.
The Financial Aid Office notifies the student and the Business Office of funds that the College
must return, and the amount that the student must return.
6.
The Financial Aid Office returns its share of unearned Federal Title IV funds within 45 days after
it determines that the student withdrawal process is complete.
In addition to calculating a return of Federal Title IV funds for students who notify Carroll of withdrawal,
Carroll must also make the calculation for students who do not “officially” withdraw. The Financial Aid
Office reviews final semester grades to determine students with all “F” grades followed by attempts to
determine if the student withdrew from all classes. If so, the last date of attendance is obtained. To
facilitate the process, the Registrar has requested faculty to indicate last date of attendance for all
students awarded an “F” grade. Charges are not adjusted for unofficial withdrawals; therefore,
institutional aid is not adjusted. Federal aid is adjusted based on Federal Title IV return calculations.
2013-2014
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
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Verifying Attendance Procedure- Financial Aid Office
Before federal funds can be disbursed to a student account, Carroll must confirm that he or she has
begun attendance in the classes for which he or she has registered. Carroll College does not have a
student initiated, electronic registration confirmation process. The college is also not required by an
outside entity to take attendance. The following procedures are in place to ensure a student has begun
attendance in each of their classes.
During add/drop week and by census day
Faculty is advised through email by the Registrar each semester to report any student on their class
roster that does not attend the first day of class, or who stops attending prior to census date. The
Business Office, Registrar’s Office, Student Life, Admission Office and Financial Aid Office work closely on
a daily basis prior to census day to determine who is enrolled and also who has made payment
arrangements. Students who are categorized as “never enrolled” are dropped from all classes prior to
census day and aid is cancelled. Students who are enrolled part-time as of census day have aid adjusted
accordingly.
At mid-term
Mid-term grading requires a last date of attendance (LDA) to be entered by faculty for students earning
an F or no grade at mid-term. A quality control report is run after mid-term grades are posted to
determine if students never attended. Aid is adjusted accordingly.
At the time of withdrawal from a class
Withdrawal forms or drop cards require a last date of attendance to be completed by the student
and/or faculty. If a LDA is prior to the first day of class or is recorded as not attending the Registrar’s
Office notifies the Financial Aid Office. Aid is adjusted accordingly. A quality control report is run
monthly to determine if students who withdrew or dropped a class never attended (RGER report). Aid is
adjusted accordingly.
At the time of grading for a student with an incomplete grade (I)
Academic policy states a grade of I can only be given if at least 60% of the term has been passed and
attended. Therefore, no adjustments to aid are necessary. Any exceptions will refer to the Financial Aid
Office.
At the time of grading for a student with an F grade
Faculty enters LDA for students who have a grade of F. A quality control report is run after final grades
are posted to determine if students never attended. Aid is adjusted accordingly. Students who have
earned all F’s and have been determined to have unofficially withdrawn from the college have federal
Return of Title IV aid calculations completed and aid is adjusted accordingly.
At the time of withdrawal from the college
Withdrawal forms have a statement signed by the student indicating they had begun attendance in each
of the classes they are withdrawing from.
LDA will be a required field on the grading module for all W or F grades.
Updated: November 26, 2013
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Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 49
ALPHA ADVISING INFORMATION AND FORMS
ALPHA ADVISING RESPONSIBILITY SUMMARY
Alpha Seminar instructor serves as academic advisor for the entire academic year for all students
enrolled in the section. You will advise your current Alpha students through pre-registration for Fall
2014, which occurs after spring break. Here is a list of reminders for Alpha Advisors:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Alpha Seminar advisors serve in this role for the first year;
Alpha faculty keep their advisees until after spring registration for the next fall (spring 2014
advising for fall 2014 classes);
Students will confirm major(s), minor(s), concentrations, etc. before Spring Break to ensure the
accuracy of Degree Audit (exact procedure TBD)
During the final advising appointment (after spring break 2014), the student will complete the
“Change of Advisor (from Alpha to Department)” form;
This completed form is placed in the student’s advising file and the entire file is returned to
Academic Advising in Room 119, Borromeo Hall;
The Advising Office will make advisor changes in the computer system and redistribute the
folders to the new advisor;
Some majors (Biology, Engineering, etc.) may assign students to advisors in the spring. The
department advisor is listed as the secondary advisor. This will give both the Alpha advisor and
the Department advisor access to student information on MyCarroll;
Undeclared students can remain with the current Alpha advisor but are encouraged to declare a
major as soon as possible. The student must declare a major once they have earned 45 credits.
ALPHA ADVISING TIMELINE
August
п‚· Receive advising files for each student registered in Alpha section
п‚· Review the content of the advising file: cover sheet, schedules, test scores, HS grades, transfer
credit, AP/IB credit, academic advising questionnaire, etc.
п‚· Contact Director of Advising with any questions about placement, course selection, etc.
п‚· The Advisor and/or the student completes the top part of the Alpha Seminar Advising form
during the first class or advising conference
September
п‚· Conduct an initial advising conference
п‚· Refer students to appropriate on- and off-campus services as needed
October
п‚· Review midterm grades for all advisees
п‚· Hold advising conferences with students as needed to discuss poor academic performance
 Suggest adding LAS 185 – Career Exploration and/or LAS 105 – College Success (a section of each
class begins after fall break)
п‚· Refer students to appropriate on- and off-campus services as needed
п‚· Encourage the use of MyCarroll advising tools: e-Advising and Degree Audit
п‚· Schedule advising appointments to discuss Spring 2014 classes
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Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
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November
 Remind students of the last day to withdraw from a class and receive a “W” (November 6, 2013)
п‚· Confirm Spring registration for all advisees
п‚· On-going advising as needed
Late December/Early January (before the semester begins)
п‚· Review final grades for all advisees (available on MyCarroll in late December)
п‚· Contact advisees on probation to discuss steps for academic recovery
п‚· Revise Spring class schedule as necessary (repeat courses, reduce credits, change majors, etc.)
January
п‚· Connect with advisees in some way to welcome them back to campus since you will not see
them in class each week
п‚· Departments may assign advisors to students in their disciplines. These advisors will be listed as
“secondary advisors” and will have access to student information via MyCarroll
February
 Remind students of the last day to withdraw from a class and receive a “W” (March 19, 2014)
п‚· Confirm Spring registration for all advisees
п‚· On-going advising as needed
 Students complete the “Major Confirmation or Declaration” form (TBD)
п‚· Encourage the use of MyCarroll advising tools: e-Advising and Degree Audit
March
п‚· Review midterm grades for all advisees
п‚· Hold advising conferences with individual students as needed to discuss poor academic
performance
п‚· Meet with students for final advising appointment to register for Fall 2014 courses
 Students complete the “Change of Advisor (from Alpha to Department)” form which is retained
by the advisor
п‚· The change of advisor form is filed in the advisee folder and the folder is returned to the
Advising office by the end of the semester
April/May
п‚· Advisor changes are entered into the computer system and the advisee file is sent to the new
advisor
Alpha Advising
Revised July 2013
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Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
Page 51
ALPHA ADVISING TOOLS AND FORMS
ALPHA SEMINAR ADVISING – TRACKING FORM
This form is used to record information from advising sessions. The second page provides space to record
information from additional advising conferences. This form is available in the MyCarroll Document
Center/Academic Advising section in the “Forms” folder: Alpha Seminar Advising – Tracking Form.docx
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BLANK 4-YEAR PLAN DOCUMENT
This form can be used by students and advisor when creating personal 4-year plans for future semesters.
This form is available in the MyCarroll Document Center/Academic Advising section in the “Forms” folder:
Blank 4-year plan form.docx
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TRANSITION FROM ALPHA ADVISOR TO DEPARTMENT ADVISOR
This form is used only by Alpha Advisors during the last advising appointment with an advisee. During this
advising conference the student completes the form shown below and confirms his/her major and requests
a department advisor. Please note that changes cannot be made unless this form is signed by both the
student and advisor. This form is available in the MyCarroll Document Center/Academic Advising section in
the “Forms” folder: Alpha to Depart – Change Major and Advisor form 2013 - FINAL.doc
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SAMPLE 4 YEAR PLAN
A file of 4-Year plans are available to both advisors and students on MyCarroll. Advisors can find 4-Year
plans in the Academic Advising section of the Document Center, and students can find 4-Year plans in the
Academic Documents section which is located under WebAdvisor for Students. Here is an example of a 4year plan:
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ADVISING INFORMATION AND SUPPORT
ACADEMIC SUPPORT AND ADVISING
Annette Walstad, Director
Jake Samuelson, Academic Advisor
2013-2014
Borromeo Hall, Rm. 119
Borromeo Hall, Rm. 117
447-5434
447-5451
Carroll College Academic Advising Manual
[email protected]
[email protected]
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