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HIGH SCHOOL & MIDDLE SCHOOL
SPORTS
On Page 11a
Thursday
January 29, 2009
Volume 43 Issue 18
“NBAF CONGRESSIONAL CONCERN”
TAX INFORMATION
See Letters To The Editor On Page 13a
The Butner
Creedmoor
On Page 14a
NEWS
50Вў
© 2007 GRANVILLE PUBLISHING COMPANY, INC. • CREEDMOOR, NC
www.butnercreedmoornews.org
Serving southern Granville, northern Wake, and northern Durham Counties
Landowners Complain About Dog Hunting
Lee Brantley, a resident of
the Oak Hill community, was
the first to address the Granville
County Commissioners about
problems that he and his nearby
neighbors were having with
hunters with dogs.
Brantley said he and his
adjoining neighbors own about
2,000 acres of land and that
they hunt also on their own
land.
Brantley suggested that the
county commissioners adopt an
ordinance controlling hunting
KELLY MORRIS SEARCH
There will be a search
again this weekend for Kelly
Currin Morris. Volunteers are
being recruited that would be
willing to walk and search for
any signs of the missing
mother of two from Granville
County.
The
search
coordinator has several large
areas that need to be searched.
They have not had the number
of volunteers to search these
areas safely and thoroughly. If
you can help please come to
the Kelly Currin Command
Center in Creedmoor on
Saturday, January 31, 2009
beginning at 8 am and Sunday,
February 1, 2009 at 1 pm.
The location of the search
is the Kelly Currin Morris
Command Center at Hwy 50/
2816 Old Weaver Trail in
Creedmoor.
The Command Center
Phone (919) 812-2310 and the
email
address
is
[email protected]
Members of the First Butner Zoning Board of Adjustment were sworn into office Thursday by Town
Attorney Jim Wrenn. Elected as chairman of the group was Ernest Thompson. Other Board members are
William (Bil) Crosby, Marty Daniel, James Russell, Constance Wortham, John Glenn, Jr. (representing
the Extra Territorial Jurisdiction and Herman (Buddy) Weaver, also representing the Extra Territorial
Jurisdiction. Alternatives appointed were Ronald (Ron) Daniels, Jane Frost and Chan Wynn. The new
board will meet on the 4th Thursday of the month at 7 pm in the SGWASA meeting room on C. Street in an
as needed basis. The board is scheduled to meet February 29th to consider a request by Carolina Sunrock
to expand the company’s Butner Rock Quarry.
FINANCIAL PLANNING
WORKSHOP
A workshop on financial
planning will be held Saturday,
January 31 from 10 a.m. until
12 noon at Rock Springs United
Church of Christ. The
workshop is designed to offer
helpful strategies to eliminate
the pressure of financial
bondage and release the ability
to focus on more enjoyable
aspects of life.
Endya
Perry,
MBA,
manager of business operations
at Hill-Rom will lead the
workshop. Veola P. Johnson is
pastor of Rock Springs United
Church of Christ.
The church is located at
3185 Bruce Garner Road,
Creedmoor.
For additional information,
call 528-2202, or 528-0144.
DATE SET
Butner Citizens Planning
Ahead held a planning session
for Butner Chicken Pickin' Day
and Street Dance by setting the
date of June 5th for the dance
and June 6th for the Chickin
Pickin'. Applications for
vendors, car show participants,
and cookers will be ready for
mail out in March.
Several committees need
additional people. If you are
interested in volunteering,
please contact Marshall Dixon
at 919-575-6691 or attend our
next meeting on Thursday,
February 19, at 7:00 pm. All
meetings are held at 7:00 PM
on the third Thursday, at
Butner Presbyterian Church,
16th Street, Butner.
At the commissioners
second meeting of the month
James Faucette explained to
the commissioners that he had
experienced problems dealing
with hunters who had left one
of his beef cattle dead and
another severely wounded that
required veterinary care.
Faucette indicated to the
commissioners that since the
hunters apparently mistook
the cattle for deer it might be
dangerous for humans on the
land also.
He expressed his real fear
about people who hunt
recklessly on the landowners
property.
“When dogs run deer
through the cattle in the
pasture, it affects the cattle.
They don’t eat as well and
when they don’t eat, they don’t
gain weight. If they don’t gain
weight, the farmers don’t make
any money,” Faucette added.
Another speaker at the
meeting, Lee Brantley asked
the commissioners to craft
regulations to keep other
hunters and hunting clubs off
[Continued From Page 15A]
.
Moss Issues State
Of The City Report
ANOTHER REWARD
OFFERED
J. Michael Thrasher of
Amber Alert International
(AAI) is offering a reward of
$1,000 to anyone finding Kelly
Currin Morris along with 10
years of TMC ID cards for every
child in their family.
AAI is the official provider
of all Amber Alert Safety
Programs, ID cards and DNA
kits, software, websites, online
reporting networks, worldwide.
AAI is based in Raleigh.
with dogs.
Brantley
made
his
suggestion during the public
comment period at the
January 5th commissioners
meeting.
He said he was a former
employee of a state prison
camp in Granville County who
decided to settle for his
retirement in the rural section
of Granville County where he
could find open space and
“peace and quiet.”
The landowner explained
that other counties have
ordinances that prohibits
hunting with dogs without
first
getting
written
permission
from
the
landowners.
Brantley said that the dog
hunters were disrupting and
threatening the safety of
landowners.
Brantley said that despite
the fact that his property is
posted, a lot of hunters violate
the posted warnings. He said
that when he confronted the
hunters about it, they
responded that their dogs
can’t read. They said they had
to follow the dogs to pick them
up after hunting.
Stan Fox of Oxford was named as the recipient of the John Penn Award
at the Granville County Chamber of Commerce’s Annual Meeting and
Banquet held January 26 at the Vance-Granville Community College Civic
Center. The John Penn Award is the highest honor bestowed by the
Granville Chamber. The John Penn Award winner was recognized for
his life’s work including being a five term elected member of the North
Carolina House of Representatives and serving on the Oxford Board of
Commissioners 8 years, Assistance in establishing the first Jaycees
chapter in Granville County, Long-time active member of Kiwanis,
numerous appointments to committees, boards, advisory groups and
other voluntary efforts at both the local and state levels. He currently
serves as a Gubenatorial appointment to the Vance Granville Community
College Board of Trustees. He has established scholarships at both
Vance Granville Community College and UNC-Chapel Hill, and has
received recognition at UNC-CH as a member of the Chancellor’s Club.
He was recipient of the Granville County Board of Education’s “Priceless
Gem Award” for outstanding support of Granville County Schools. He
is a husband, Father and Grandfather, a leader of his synagogue in
Raleigh for over 50 years. A long-time merchant and entrepreneur in
the community. For many years he ran a successful clothing business
and operated his various retail stores and rental property that has led to
renewal of many old, outdated buildings in downtown Oxford. He is one
of the founders of Union Bank and the remodeling of the old bank building
at the corner of Hillsboro and College streets in downtown Oxford. The
award was presented by Tom Houlihan, Bob Williford and Jim Cross.
Fox is shown above with members of his family and award presenter
Houlihan.
.
Annette Myers was presented the Outstanding Community Volunteer
award Monday night at the Granville Chamber of Commerce meeting.
She now serves on the Court Reporter Board and tests to certify court
reporters and she served on the Board of Granville County
Commissioners from 1996 to 2004. She was appointed to the National
Association of Counties Agriculture and Rural Affairs Steering
Committee and also to the Agriculture Steering Committee of the N.C.
Association of County Commissioners. Her volunteer work also
includes the start up committee for the Harbor House Ministry, and she
serves on the Board of Habitat for Humanity is a Red Cross volunteer,
solicits donations and works in the Habitat store. Frances Garrett
presented the award and said, “Annette is always ready to give a hand
to anyone in need.”
Creedmoor Mayor Darryl
Moss gave his 2009 State of the
City Report on Monday
January 27, 2009.
H e
said it was an opportunity to
briefly celebrate the city’s
accomplishments over the past
year and highlight the
programs and achievements
that help keep Creedmoor
moving forward even though
difficult and challenging times.
He added, “The year 2008
was a very difficult and
challenging year. Creedmoor’s
financial crisis, the national
housing mortgage crisis and
the Wall Street financial
meltdown impacted each of us
in different ways. Public
safety, recreation, refuse
collection,
water
and
wastewater and public
landscape maintenance are
just a few examples of
municipal services that are
conducted on a daily basis
which sometimes we all take
for granted” Moss said. “We
should acknowledge the hard
work and dedication of our
board of commissioners, city
staff,
citizen
advisory
committee members and the
numerous active organizations
that contribute to our
progress.”
Finance and
Adminstration
“The number one challenge
we faced last year, and are not
done with yet” Moss said, “was
to address serious deficiencies
in
finance operation.
Specifically, we were cited for
noncompliance by federal and
state taxing authorities,
preparation of financial
statements, failure to perform
reconciliations of significant
accounts and inadequate
interal controls.”
“Approving the hiring of Tom
Mercer as city manager was a
step forward.” Tom took
immediate steps to reorganize
city administration to improve
the
performance
and
responsiveness
of
the
organization. Commissioners
were able to come together on
issues impacting the city and
determine how to work
towards addressing those
issues in a uniform,
transparent fashion.
Public Safety
“Overall crime was down
15% in Creedmoor as of 10-312008 compared to the same
time period in 2007. Felony
arrests went up 26%; Drug
arrests went up 65%; since
2000 the Population went up
22%
and
the
Police
Department staffing has
remained the same.”
Community and
Economic Development
“The year 2008 saw
construction begin on two new
businesses on Main StreetCVS and Cardinal State
Bank.”
“Additionally, Moss said,
“the Creedmoor Business
Park opened its doors with
APU,
an
auto
parts
distributor, as one of its first
tenants.”
“We expect to
see activity at the old
Southern States building and
BP site in the very near
future.”
“Deuard Bowden led an
initiative, the Business
Advisory Council (BAC), to
work on ideas about our city.”
“Community events the
city either sponsored or
partnered on included: the
Annual Easter Egg Hunt in
Partnership
with
the
Creedmoor Chamber of
Commerce; the Inaugural Car
Show, the Annual Music
Festival & Car Show,
featuring Tommy Keith; the
July 4th Celebration at Lake
Rogers in partnership with
the Creedmoor Chamber of
Commerce; a National Night
Out-sponsored
by
the
Creedmoor
Police
Department; National Day of
Play-coordinated
by
Commissoner. Tim Karan and
KaBOOM; Alive After 5 in
partnership with the Granville
County Chamber of Commerce;
Fireman’s
Day
Parade
sponsored by the CVFD;
Creedmoor’s first community
Playground Build; the Lighting
of the Greens & Christmas
Parade-sponsored by the
Creedmoor Chamber of
Commerce. The city was
awarded a $2.1 million grant
from the NC Clean Water
Management Trust Fund
(CMTF) to go towards buying
the Fontaine Development,
roughly 200 acres, for a much
needed recreation complex
which was a giant step forward
Creedmoor was also named a
“Playful City.”
The
Commissioners
restated its request to the
Granville County Board of
Commissioners to extend the
city’s Extra Territorial
Jurisdiction. They continued
their support to the South
Granville Senior Center, and
lived through a record-setting
drought which ultimately
forced the city to buy water
from the South Granville
Water and Sewer Authority.
“Upgrades to our primary
pump station at Joe Peed Road
were accomplished. A bypass
pump at the water plant to
improve water and the delivery
system was commissioned.
The automatic meter reading
system was put into service. A
strategic plan was initiated to
develop a street improvement
program to pave or unpaved
streets. The stoplight at
Highway 56 Crescent DriveHawley School Road will be
installed before the next school
year and Creedmoor has
signed on to Granville County’s
Greenway plan.”
[Continued On PAGE 15A)
CMYK
2a The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday, January 29, 2009
FAT HARRY’S
Cooking Column
by Harry Coleman
On January 20 President Barack Obama made history when
he was sworn in as the country’s first African-American
Commander in Chief.
Millions attended the inauguration, including a contingent
of people from Creedmoor, which included Creedmoor Mayor
Darryl Moss and Michelle Moss, Mary Moss, Elaine Moss and
Dan and Mattie Braswell who were faces in the D.C. crowd.
“We wanted to be able to say we were there to witness
history,” Mayor Moss said.
The group traveled to Washington on Monday morning to
witness the historic event. Both sets of parents said they never
thought they would see this in their lifetime,” Moss said.
The group was special guests of the National League of
Cities. Mayor Moss serves on the NLC Advisory Board. T h e
NLC, located on Pennsylvania Ave. and one block from the White
House, hosted a Presidential Inaugural Event to watch the
inaugural ceremonies and parade.
“We had a great inside location above the street to watch
the parade, we could go inside to the table to get a snack and
get warm or return to the balcony to watch the inaugural
parade,” Moss explained.
“We were all very antsy over the last couple of days before
the trip,” Mayor Moss said. “As the inauguration TV coverage
began it was like, “Oh my goodness, We are going to be there to
see Barack Obama sworn in.” The group was also provided
tickets to the inauguration by Congressman Brad Miller.
The Butner-Creedmoor News Editor Harry Coleman
supplied Darryl with a digital camera for the trip and asked
him to relay his impressions back after the new president was
sworn in.
At the last city meeting before he left the mayor wore his
CNN baseball cap. “It’s the Creedmoor News Network,” Moss
explained to the City Commissioners.
Moss said, “The pride and spirit at the inauguration was
absolutely unbelievable.”
“I was very proud to be able to give my parents and in-laws
an opportunity to be a part of this history.”
Moss said following the inauguration he dedicated himself
to be a better person to help President Obama achieve his
objectives for our nation.”
SOAP OPERA REVIEW
by Toby Goldstein
ALL MY CHILDREN
Zach’s gunshot left Josh
brain dead, forcing Erica to
make a painful decision and
allow David to perform
surgery giving Kendall Josh’s
heart. As the depth of her
feelings for Zach unsettled
Reese, Bianca was certain
she’s ready to marry Reese.
Stunned by a positive
pregnancy test, Amanda had
no idea who fathered the baby
and intended to terminate.
Coming: Tad is furious with
Krystal.
AS THE WORLD TURNS
Craig stunned everyone
with the news of his and
Carly’s engagement. Emily
offered to marry Dusty to
derail Craig’s scheme to get
custody of Johnny, but Dusty
turned her down, hurting
Emily by bringing up her
past. Hearing of Meg’s
ongoing problems keeping
Paul at bay, Dusty suggested
that she marry him, and,
following another example of
Paul’s machinations, Meg
accepted Dusty’s proposal.
Coming: Paul and Meg are on
a collision course.
BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL
Nick faced a crisis of
conscience when he received
another gift, but went ahead
with the fashion show
debuting the new Jackie M
line. Although Nick tried
keeping Katie away, Brooke
convinced her to go and,
realizing she had seen the
designs before, Katie knew
why Nick didn’t want her
there. Stunned by what he
witnessed at the show, Eric
had harsh words for Jackie,
and teamed up with Ridge to
form an attack plan. Coming:
Nick may have made a deal
with the devil.
DAYS OF OUR LIVES
When John, faced with
the truth, decided to stop his
therapy, an enraged Charlotte
confronted Marlena and
ended up sticking John with
a syringe filled with a lethal
toxin. Charlotte was arrested
and Marlena kept a bedside
vigil, rewarded when John
woke up with all his
memories. However, with
John
not
functioning
physically, Marlena took him
to Europe for treatment, after
they were remarried. Coming:
Daniel and Chloe take risks
to be together.
GENERAL HOSPITAL
Narrowly escaping
being caught by Sonny,
Claudia seduced Rick, who
revealed Anthony’s true
agenda. Meanwhile, Sam was
determined to infiltrate
Anthony’s organization to
help Jason and Spinelli. On
Emily’s birthday, Nikolas
revealed his undying love for
her, unaware that Matt has
been flirting with Emily’s
lookalike,
Rebecca.
Reviewing recent events at
the hospital, Patrick realized
there’s a disaster in the
making and rushed to avert
a catastrophe. Coming:
Disaster claims another
victim.
GUIDING LIGHT
Billy’s off-hand comment
made Bill determined to
track
down
Phillip
Spaulding. Alan wasn’t
thrilled to see Cyrus
accompanying Lizzie to the
investors’ meeting, but Cyrus
gave Lizzie a secret that
ensured she had the upper
hand. Coop and Beth took
their relationship public.
Buzz suffered chest pains but
acted as though he had
heartburn.
Coming:
Edmund’s arrival causes fear
and concern.
ONE LIFE TO LIVE
As Jessica confessed to
Natalie and Jared that she
allowed Tess to emerge
because she wanted to kill
them, in her mind, Bess told
Tess the truth about the
death of Jessica’s baby, and
that Jessica is too fragile to
know. Wes revealed to Brody
that the boy he shot in Iraq
was unarmed. Starr covered
for Cole over his increasing
drug use but it created a
deeper rift between them.
Coming: Natalie can’t forgive
Jessica.
YOUNG AND RESTLESS
Amber realized the key
to proving Kay’s identity is
the ring. However, the
pawnbroker denied any
knowledge but later called
the person he sold the ring to.
Clint watched unseen as
Murphy kissed Kay, while
Amber and Daniel planned a
break-in at the pawnshop.
Jack was served with divorce
papers. Coming: Brad isn’t
through causing trouble.
THE
Creedmoor’s First Lady, Michelle Moss, wife of Creedmoor Mayor Darryl
Moss is shown in the top center of the picture above in Washington,
D.C. at the Inauguration of 44th President of the United States Barack
Obama. She is shown with her daughter Mary Moss at left and Darryl’s
mother Elaine Moss at the right. Michelle’s mother Mattie Braswell is
shown in front.
Xavier Wortham, the executive director of the Oxford Housing Authority,
Everett Ward, of the Democratic National Convention, Darryl Moss, Mayor
of Creedmoor, Mildred Council, of the Democratic National Convention
and Barack Obama are shown above at an event at N.C. Mutual Insurance
Company in Durham in June of 2007. At this event Durham Mayor Bill
Bell, Chapel Hill Mayor Kevin Foy and Moss got to spend 30 minutes
with Obama. “He was well prepped,” Moss said, “he knew all about
Creedmoor.”
This Week’s Recipes
SKILLET STEW
1 Chicken, cut up and salted
1 stick margarine
2 stick celery, sliced
3 to 4 carrots, diced
1 to 2 onions, diced
1 can garden peas
1 can cream of celery or cream of chicken soup
Water
In electric fry pan or skillet, brown chicken in margarine
until almost done. Salt and cook all vegetables except pes,
until done. Drain and pour in pan over chicken. Mix peas and
soup. Pour over vegetables and chicken. Cook until done. Eat
over rice.
COLD OVEN POUND CAKE
2 sticks margarine
1/2 c. Crisco
3 c. sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 tsp. almond flavor
1/2 tsp. lemon extract
5 eggs
3 c. plain flour
1/2 tsp. baking powder
1 c. milk
Mix margarine and Crisco well. Add eggs one at a time,
continually mixing. Add flavorings. Add flour and mix well.
Add baking powder and mix. Add milk and mix. Pour in greased
and floured tube pan. Put in cold oven and bake at 350 degrees
for one hour or until done. Top will be brown and spring bake
when touched.
SUPERINTENDENT Beyond
COLUMN
The
By Dr. Timothy Farley
3 R’s
As I sit here watching the snow fall, I reflect on things from
the past and what it may mean for the future. Snow days are
always exciting. The anticipation the evening before, the delight
of waking up to snow covered yards, and the ecstasy of a day off.
(unless you are the superintendent and have to monitor the
weather constantly and make numerous calls...oh well). Weather
events are truly the only time that any one knows or cares who
the superintendent is.
I remember snow days with fondness. I used to sit poised
before the TV waiting for school officials to announce that schools
were closed. My mom bundled me up like Ralphie’s brother in
“A Christmas Story” and out I would go.
Snow days make me ponder the calls I have received recently
and what a show like American Idol have in common with them.
When I was a child, I walked to school rain or shine (No...not
uphill in the snow both ways!). The school was not air conditioned
and events like snow days were rare. We went to school unless a
blizzard prevented us from doing so. Because of my experiences,
I am confounded by two recent calls. One asked if we were having
school or releasing early because of heavy rain. The other asked
the same question a week or so later; this time, the issue was
cold weather. Months ago, I dealt with an angry parent who
complained that our gyms were not air conditioned. Air
conditioned gyms?! We have come a long way in my life time.
We now purchase air conditioned busses for the transport of our
students. I have no idea whether the changes are good or bad; I
do know that the toughness we exhibited when I was younger
seems to have dissipated. Couple this with my observations on
“American Idol” and I believe we are certifiably “softer” as a
people.
I watch “Idol” because it scares me. Oh, sure, the
entertainment value is great. Watching the “train wreck”
performances can be great fun. But watching “Idol” and how
many show up to audition for a “shot” at the “big time” is
tragically illustrative of values I find troubling. It is a “sight,”
as my mother-in-law would say, to see thousands of young people
showing up for auditions believing that they are “it.” 99.99% of
them have no talent, yet seem shocked when told so. Some are
even combative and confrontational when told of their delusions
of grandeur. How does this happen? Might it be that for their
entire lives they have felt entitled? Perhaps it is a culture
wherein they are led to believe that they can do no wrong. They
are never corrected or criticized; they are mired in a tradition
that provides kids trophies merely for showing up to play and
not based on actually succeeding. They are rewarded for bringing
in homework, for doing it rather than doing it right. Man that
was a diatribe! Somehow we have been duped into believing
that feeling successful should replace actually being successful.
That needs to change. My point...let us return to demanding
success and to working hard to get it. We need to focus on what
matters and not whether we have air conditioned gyms, school
on a day in which our children (or us) get wet, and not expecting
to win a competition when we have no right. Moreover, would a
competition extolling math or science prowess gain such
attention? We know the answer to that and it is a pity.
If you have a topic you’d like me to address, please email me
at [email protected]us or call my office at 693-4613. Past issues
of this column can be found at our school system website at http:/
/www.gcs.k12.nc.us.
Crossword Puzzle
CROSSWORD CLUES
ACROSS
1 Crones
5 Between ports
9 Progeny
14 __ podrida
15 Young seals
16 Folklore imp
17 Does some hefty
headwork
20 Sharer’s pronoun
21 Ye __ shoppe
22 Runs under water
23 Germ-free
25 Two words of
denial
26 Flies off the
handle
31 Perez or
O’Donnell
34 Wood-shaping
tool
35 Forum frock
36 Period of history
37 Obsolete
41 Role for Will Smith
42 Supports for
glasses
44 Boozer
45 Equestrian
47 Comes apart at the
seams
51 Temple University
athletes
52 Multi-deck game
56 Expiated
59 Irish city
60 Tie the knot
61 Leaves openmouthed
64 Angler’s basket
65 Copied
66 Basilica section
67 Burpee buy
68 Mexican coin
69 Clarinet, e.g.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
DOWN
Tramps
Rat Island native
Harsh reflection
Rode the bench
“__ 13”
Carnivorous plant
Fencing foil
Buffoon
Pixie
Keyboard player
Rotation line
Oenologist’s
interest
13
18
19
24
25
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
38
39
40
43
46
48
49
50
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
62
63
Crime-stopper Eliot
Made dirty
Olive brown
Slugger’s stat
Silent assents
Quick fry
Leaping amphibian
Eye lasciviously
Twosome
Atoll barrier
Type of exam
Agra attire
Tristan’s love
Chips off the old block
Guzzles
Freeloaded
Crete’s highest peak
Expands
Scottish teacakes
City on the Rio Grande
Pilfer
On edge
Said further
Rudiments
Ripped up
S-shaped molding
Manage to deal with
Spring runner
Deface
Your Week Ahead Horoscope
January 28 - February 3, 2009
by Lasha Seniuk
www.mysticstars.net
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Face your long-term
objectives head-on. Friends
may talk you out of money
or depend upon you to pick
up the tab this week. Don’t
get sidetracked by moods or
emotions or short-term
projects.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): If, as studies have
shown,
happiness
is
contagious, then you can
figure out that crankiness
can be viral, as well. Keep a
smile on your face during
the first part of the week
when people tend to be
moody.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): The safest place on a
teeter-totter is the middle.
You won’t get caught up in
the ups and downs that can
be expected in the week
ahead if you refuse to take
sides. Keep your money
safely in your wallet.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Tic-toc! You could feel
like an old-fashioned alarm
clock - and early in the week
suspect that you must wind
down a bit. You can crank
the key and get back on
track with financial plans in
a few days.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Deepening ambitions could
develop this week. Your
partner or significant other
might become obsessed with
a passion that you share.
The focus during the
upcoming month may
revolve around other people.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
It may be time to make
concessions. This week you
could be faced with a choice
that revolves around your
job or your health. Bending
a little will prevent you from
losing sight of long-term
goals.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22.):
You can be bitter or you can
be better. Adopt a rational
approach to your love life
and if someone doesn’t live up
to your expectations this
week, consider changing the
your expectations, not the
other person.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):
There is a saying that if
triangles invented a god, they
would make it three-sided.
You may worship money, love
or success, but this week you
will be passionate about what
most closely resembles
yourself.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Pull off the blinders.
This week you might
experience a temporary blind
spot that prevents you from
understanding what is said
and meant. There is nothing
wrong with asking for
explanations.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Every choice moves us
closer to or farther away from
something. Your brilliant and
so far successful financial
plans are worth pursuing.
This week avoid making
unnecessary changes to them.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): There is a new moon and
solar eclipse in your sign this
week. Perhaps you will be
more
reflective
and
introverted as you get a sense
of your own personal power.
Concentrate on ambitions.
PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20):
Think about a yo-yo on a
string this week. Falling
dangerously in love doesn’t
necessarily guarantee a ring
on the finger. Someone new
and fascinating could have
you wrapped around his or her
finger.
SOLUTION
CMYK
The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday, January 29, 2009 3a
Upcoming Events And Activities
BREAST CANCER
AWARENESS
Amedeo’s North owners,
Rick and Lisa DeAngelis, have
partnered with the Pretty in
Pink Foundation and made
February Breast Cancer
Awareness at their North
Raleigh reesaturant — in
honor and memory of Rick’s
mother, Betty DeAngelis.
The restaurant is located in
the Northridge Shopping
Center at 6006 Falls of Neuse
Road, near Spring Forest Road
in North Raleigh.
For more informationn on
this special month, please visit
www.AmedeosNorth.com.
CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION
Prepared
Childbirth
Education Classes are held at
Granville Medical Center, 1010
College Street in Oxford every
Thursday night from 6:30 pm
until 8:30 pm in the education
classroom.
The classes
specialize in the education of
mothers and couples in
empowering themselves with
knowledge
regarding
pregnancy.
To register for classes or for
additional information call with the grant funds, their
donations brought our total to
919-690-3208.
$17,500!”
FUTURE EDUCATORS
The new titles include
SYMPOSIUM
books for every interest.
Vance
Granville
Nonfiction
titles
were
Community College will host
purchased on the subjects of
the “Future Educators
animals, plants, sports, the
Symposium” on Thursday, Jan.
solar system, music, crafts,
29, from 6 until 9 pm in the
drawing, transportation,
Civic Center on the college’s
geography, history, and science
main campus in Vance County.
experiments.
Admission to the symposium,
The grant was made
which is designed for anyone
possible by funding from the
interested in pursuing a career
Institute of Museum and
in education, is free.
Library Services (IMLS) under
To pre-register, contact
the provisions of the federal
Jacquelin Heath, the head of
Library
Services
and
the Teacher Associate program
Technology
Act
as
at Vance-Granville, at (252)
administered by the State
492-2061, ext. 3298.
Library of North Carolina,
CELEBRATION FOR BOOKS Department of Cultural
The library at Wilton School Resources.
is full of excitement these days
If you made a donation to
as the staff unpacks box after Wilton’s Grant you are invited
box of books purchased with to the celebration planned for
their Library Service and Thursday, January 29, from
Technology Act (LSTA) grant. 1:00 until 6:30 p.m.
“We are practically covered
Don’t miss this opportunity
up with new books!” crows to see the wide variety of new
Librarian Dana King. “The books!
generosity of our students,
JUDGING CLINIC
parents, and community last
A judging clinic will be
fall was unbelievable. Along
offered to horse ethusiast, who
Haven’t received your
$700 Billion bailout yet?
is or may be interested in
showing. The clinic will be
hosted by the Franklin County
4-H Youth Horse Council.
The event will be held in
Oxford, NC on January 31,
2009. Space is limited, and is
available on a first come, first
served basis.
For more information,
please contact the Franklin
County Extension Center at
919-496-3344.
HARD LIVING BAND
Dee’s Music Barn will be
featuring Johnny Goodman &
Hard Living Band. On Sat.
Jan 31st at 7 pm.
The barn is located at 3101
Walters Rd.
Anyone with questions may
call 528-5878.
GREEN FAMILY REUNION
The descendents of Dillard
and Edith Moore Green will
meet on Saturday, January 31
at Bob’s Barbecue on Lake
people in your party.
Road, from 12:00 - 2:00.
All family members are
Due to the volume of calls
asked to attend.
confirmation
of
every
reservation is not possible,
FREE EDUCATION
however, if there are no seats
PROGRAM
available
when
your
A free education program
reservation is made, you will be
titled, “Hypertension In
called and advised of that.
Children” will be held Monday,
The event is sponsored by
February 2nd from 6 to 7 p.m.
Granville Health System, 1010
The event will be held at
College Street, Oxford.
the South Campus of Vance
CAREGIVER SUPPORT
Granville Community College
GROUP
in Creedmoor in Meeting Room
133. It is free and open to the
The Caregiver Support
public. The guest speaker will
[Continued On PAGE 5A]
be Dr. Dereck Davis.
A free dinner will be served
at 6 p.m. along with Dr. Davis’
presentation followed by a
TALK TO
question and answer period.
Seating is limited. To
CHUCK
reserve a seat, please call 919690-3447
or
email
:MIT
3
[email protected]
on or before Jan. 29th and
3333-[\I\M
leave your name, daytime
phone number, and number of
3Ja3+P]KS3.MZO][WV
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Let it Snow
With the recent snowfall
and low temperatures I am
reminded of 2 simple tips to
keep your home running
smoothly.
1st - On any nights
forecasting temperatures in
the teens, make sure that you
leave the HOT water
dripping. This is especially
important at any faucets
located on outside walls. No
need to worry about interior
walls or cold water faucets.
2nd - Whenever you are
going away for more than 1
day, turn off the Main Water
Line going to the entire
house (then turn off your ice
maker). This will keep your
house from flooding if a
water line breaks while you
are away. Remember, water
lines can break year round,
so if you are ever leaving
your home vacant, cut off the
water.
I hope we get more snow
soon !
For all questions and
advice on Real Estate,
whether Buying or Selling,
call Chuck Ferguson,
BROKER at RE/MAX
United at 919.226.2500.
Email [email protected]
To view all homes for sale
in the 8 county region visit
chuckferguson.com. Click
the “Home Search” icon.
CMYK
EDITORIAL PAGE
THE BUTNER-CREEMOOR NEWS
4A
The problems associated
with hunters running dogs on
landowners property without
permission has occupied a
large portion of the last two
Granville
County
Commissioners meetings.
The
hunters
have
responded that their dogs can't
read the land posted signs.
This is true, but the fact
remains that the dog owners
are or should be responsible for
their animals.
Individuals who own
property often have to work for
years to pay off the mortgage
that enables them to own the
land. Even if they inherit the
property, they still bear the
liability to someone who is
injured in an accident on the
land.
Taxes, insurance and
maintenance, none of these
costs are paid by trespassing
hunters.
What if someone walked in
one of the commissioners
homes without knocking, used
their bathroom, forgot to flush
and left without saying
THURSDAY
January 29, 2009
anything. Wouldn't they feel a
little violated?
The same is true for people
who believe they actually own
their own property who have to
clean up from someone using
their property without
permission.
Even just knowing that
there is someone walking
around your land with guns
can be intimidating enough to
make landowners feel they
have to hide out inside their
homes.
In the old days, most
farmers knew who their
neighbors were, trusted them
and seldom had their faith in
their fellowman tarnished.
Some hunters today are
respectful and do not hunt
without permission.
Unfortunately, there are some
who do not follow the longstanding tradition of the
Golden Rule. These are the
hunters who give a bad name
to all hunters and create a
mood from which landowners
seek laws that will be tricky for
law enforcement to enforce.
Harry Coleman
The Butner-Creedmoor News
(USPS 081-160)
(ISSN 1536-3473)
Published every Thursday by Granville Publishing Co.
418 N. Main Street, P.O. Box 726, Creedmoor, NC 27522
Phone: 919-528-2393 • Fax: 919-528-0288
E-Mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.butnercreedmoornews.org
Harry Coleman Editor and Publisher
Bebe Coleman Managing Editor
Periodical Postage
Paid at Creedmoor, N.C. 27522
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Office Manager
Gail Locklear
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In North Carolina, One Year $32.10
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(Rates Includes Sales Tax)
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Send PS Form 3579 to:
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Creedmoor, N.C. 27522
Deadlines
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and Advertising Tuesday at 3:00 P.M.
Typesetters
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Accounting Asst.
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North Carolina Press Association
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Founded in 1965 by Howard F. Jones
В© 2007 by Granville Publishing Co.
Postmaster - Please send address change to the Butner-Creedmoor News
P.O. Box 726, Creedmoor, NC 27522
We’ve seen a lot of yellow
this week, and I predict that
we’ll be seeing even more this
ASUALLY
spring and summer.
And, this coming Monday,
OURS
the groundhog will let us know
how soon spring will arrive this
year.
By Eloise Grady
At the big celebration in
Washington, our beautiful new
First Lady wore a yellow dress. She will set the
style, and I would advise dress shops to stock up on yellow if
they want to sell.
My two daughters have fixed me up for spring with a yellow
coat (first one I ever had) and a yellow dress. I will certainly try
very hard to be a ray of sunshine in all that yellow.
“Eloise, you need a lot of yellow in your dark house,” my
friends and relatives said long ago when we first moved in. I
should have listened instead of being annoyed at people trying
to tell me how to run my business. I would be in style now if I
had bought yellow draperies and carpets.
Sometimes my disposition could stand a little yellow
(sunshine). Recently in one of the newspapers I try to read
every day there was a long article that dealt with pet peeves.
A reporter asked a large number of people to give theirs,
and I would like to add one of mine to this long list. It’s to find
someone hunting on my farm who has put up a “No Hunting”
sign on his own.
In the first place, I’m opposed to anyone’s hunting on my
farm unless he’s so hungry that a rabbit will keep him from
starving to death. In that case, he can have a rabbit or two.
One pet peeve I will never have to worry about, and that is
having a Secret Service agent guarding me at all times, even
when I’ve just had a shower. Nancy Reagan’s mother got a taste
of that during President Reagan’s inaugural festivities. Mrs.
Edith Davis came out of her bath in the raw to find an agent
who was only on guard. She didn’t apologize or give him time
to. She merely said, “Now you’ll have to marry me.”
We can always use a good laugh to lighten the burden of
heavy government with all of its sadness. I feel sure that our
wonderful new First Family, with those two adorable young
daughters, has a sense of humor, which they will need quite
often.
Yellow towels now hang in my old shabby bathroom, and I
plan to get yellow curtains soon. My daughter gave me a bright
light to go in there (fluorescent), and it shows up all my
handiwork.
I did the walls and ceiling myself, and I don’t believe I could
recommend myself for jobs like that. I want folks to look at the
towels and curtains.
C
Y
Separating The Politics From Work
J
im Black will go down
in history as one of the great
scoundrels of North Carolina
politics.
But during his tenure as
speaker of the North
Carolina House, it wasn't
unusual to hear his staff talk
about him as a considerate
boss.
Sure, he probably put
more than a few of those staff
members in some ethically
compromising situations.
His tendencies in that
direction may have played
into decisions by a couple of
his brighter staffers to seek
employment elsewhere.
Still, in a chaotic work
environment, Black was
known to push staffers to go
see their child's school play
or visit a sick relative. When
legislative sessions ended, he
made sure that his
employees took vacation
days. He encouraged them to
end their workdays at a
reasonable hour when
possible.
Longtime Senate leader
Marc Basnight
is a much more
demanding
boss.
It's
not
unusual to see
the lights on in
the offices in
Basnight's
second floor
corner of the
Legislative
Building long after most
people have left for the day.
Long days are a part of the
job when you work for the
Dare County Democrat.
Even so, he engenders a
lot of loyalty among his staff.
Staff and kingpin heavily
rely on each other, and that
reliance creates a strong
bond. Basnight staffers may
burn out, but they typically
don't leave their jobs with
hard feelings.
So, it probably shouldn't
have been surprising to read
recently in The News &
Observer of Raleigh that
Basnight has been paying
bonuses to members of his
staff from his
campaign
IEW fund.
The bonuses
range from
ROM
$1,000
to
ALEIGH $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 .
Basnight
told
the
By Scott
newspaper
Mooneyham
that he pays
the staffers
to reimburse them for both
personal errands and
campaign work performed
outside their normal work
hours.
There's
no
issue
regarding the legality of the
arrangement. State election
laws allow campaign money
to be spent on both
campaign-related activities
and the duties of holding
public office.
It's also legal for state
employees to volunteer for
campaign-related work as
long as they aren't doing it
on state time.
It would be hard to argue
that Basnight's staffers
AV
F
R
aren't putting in a full 40
hours a week for the state
even if he weren't paying
them a dime from his
campaign account.
“I wanted to err on the
side of the taxpayer,"
Basnight said. "We're trying
to do it right."
The disclosure of the
bonuses drew little criticism.
That's because anyone with
any knowledge of high-level
state government jobs knows
that there's always a little
political activity going on
around the office.
Mostly, it's blurry,
smoothing out some problem
to make a key political
supporter happy, all in the
name
of
"constituent
services." Occasionally it's
more obvious -- sending out
campaign literature or
devising political strategy -and crosses the line.
In Basnight's case, at
least he acknowledges that
the campaign activity goes on
and tries to keep it straight.
America Won Another Chance
.
A
nd so it was over. Just
like that. The moving trucks
behind the White House
packed up 43 and unpacked
44. George W. Bush
accompanied the man who
had pilloried him up to the
Capitol. Barack H. Obama
was sworn in to office by the
chief justice he had voted
against confirming.
The transition happened
with all the order we take for
granted in our contentious
democracy. Finally, a
helicopter lifted the former
president into the air and
nearly 2 million people
seemed to exhale as if
witnessing the final fade-out
in a long, long movie.
This swarm of people as
diverse as the extended first
family, as unique as each hat,
as united by emotions as
they were by the frigid air,
began to inch out onto the
streets of the city. Behind me
an older, white Alabama
woman said, again, "I never
thought I'd live to see this
day." It was less a cliche than
the mantra of the day.
Just two years ago, cover
stories asked "Are We Ready
for an African-American
President?" The campaign
posters had urged "Yes We
Can."
Now the souvenirs were
boasting "Yes We Did."
"What the cynics fail to
understand is that the
ground has shifted beneath
them," said the new
president in
his inaugural
address. You
LLEN
could feel this
shift on the
Mall,
the
same ground
where slaves
were
once
sold.
You could
feel Americans of all
colors flush with surprised
pride that we had measured
up to our own dreams.
Walking down K Street,
the boulevard of lobbyists
turned into theavenue of
hawkers, I stopped to get a Tshirt for my grandson. It
showed Obama opening his
neat shirt to reveal a
Superman costume.
His speech, however, had
been more sober than
triumphant. Indeed, during
the run-up to the inaugural,
his inner circle had tried to
tamp down such heroic
expectations. As Spike Lee
had said quietly: "He's not the
messiah." We know that he
can't truly reboot the country
-- in our favorite computer
image -- cleansing it from all
the viruses, the worms and
glitches lodged in our
national hard drive.
But the enthusiasm, the
palpable sense of that muchoverused word "hope," seems
to have arrived in direct
proportion to our need. It's as
if this president is what -- all?
E
-- we have
going for us.
Obama did
OODMAN
not need to do
more
than
touch on the
of
ARGE "sapping
confidence
across
our
land; a nagging
that
By Ellen Goodman fear
America's
decline
is
inevitable, that the next
generation must lower its
sights." What he tapped into
as well is the willingness of
these same Americans to
"pick ourselves up, dust
ourselves off" and, most
astonishingly, invest in
another leader.
Trust has been a bear
market. After the collapse of
faith in every sort of expert - after lenders financed
houses for people who
couldn't afford them, bankers
created systems they couldn't
even describe, and, finally, we
hear, Bernie Madoff ripped
off even his high school
friends -- there is a residue of
resilience.
The latest polls tell us that
a majority of Americans
actually expect this president
to achieve every one of 10
campaign promises from
alternative energy to health
insurance. Web sites and
billboards are collecting
individual hopes like pennies
from heaven and the textmessage on my iPhone
G
AT
L
relayed the "hopes" of one 6year-old grandson who wants
the new president to make
peace and help the poor.
That's all.
The world did not stop for
Barack Obama. Before lunch
was over, he was leaning over
Ted Kennedy, the lion of the
Senate fallen ill. Before the
Punahou band had passed
the parade reviewing stand,
the stock market had
plummeted 332 points.
Before we stop analyzing the
"new era of responsibility," he
will be held responsible for
everything from tainted
peanut butter in crackers to
enhanced nuclear fuel in
Iran. Already, snarky
blogsters and cablemeisters
are betting how long the
honeymoon will last.
And yet, in a city of people
who had to be together on the
Mall, something in the spirit
chose to believe with the
president
that
"our
patchwork heritage is a
strength, not a weakness."
Something chose to celebrate
that "our time of standing pat
... has surely passed."
In 1787, when the
Constitutional Convention
was over, a woman asked Ben
Franklin whether we had a
republic or a monarchy. "A
republic," he answered, "if
you can keep it." On this
astonishing week, America
won another chance. If we
can grab it.
CMYK
The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday, January 29, 2009 5a
EVENTS
[Continued From Page 3A]
Group’s monthly meeting will
be held Wed. Feb. 4 at
Granville Medical Center from
noon until 1:30 pm. The
meetings are open to the public
and those attending are ask to
bring a bag lunch. Sodas and
cookies will be provided. For
additional information call
Melissa Starr, MSW at 919690-3273.
FAMILY MOVIES
Family movies will be
featured during the month of
February at South Branch
Library, 1547 S. Campus
Drive, Creedmoor, each
Saturday morning at 10:30
a.m.
The movies are FREE and
offered for Kindergarten - 8th
graders and their parents/
adults.
The movie schedule is as
follows:
Feb. 7th: “Wall-E”, Feb.
14th, “Kung Fu Panda”, Feb.
21st, “October Sky”, and Feb.
28th “Annie.”
Those attending may bring
a pillow or cushion for floor
sitting. Anyone with questions
may call 919-528-1752.
COLOR MY WORLD
Why do people do what they
do? Getting along with people
is easier if we understand their
temperament type — what
makes them tick.
North
Carolina
Cooperative Extension is
offering the Color My World
series of workshops on
Mondays, February 2, 9, and
16, 2009 from 6 to 9 pm.
Color My World is a series
of fun, interactive workshops
that use the language of color
to teach temperament types
and interaction styles.
Participants will better
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It’s Open House At Your Church
Locate Our Area Church Directory
@
www.butnercreedmoornews.org
At the end of the Classified section.
South Granville Car Care
M & H Tires & Treads, Inc
1600 Hwy 56, Creedmoor
528-1858 www.mandhtire.net
Quality Drugs, Inc.
309 Central Avenue, Butner
Free Blood Pressure Check
Pharmacists: Jeff Teal, Tracy Teal, Bill McKellar
Bob’s Barbecue
Lake Rd. Creedmoor
528-2081
Ken Davis Trucking
& Backhoe Service
1711 Gate #2 Road, Creedmoor • 575-6920
Minor & Major Auto Repairs • (919) 575-6209
N.C. Auto Inspection Station, Oil Changes & Brakes
J ay Shelley, Owner • 203 East “B” St., Butner, NC 27509
Andrews Ford Inc.
Hwy. 15 Creedmoor 528-1596
“See Your Local Ford Dealer For The Best Buy”
Nathan M. Garren
Attorney at Law
Matthew 22:37-40
Corner Grocery BP
Hwy. 56 - Creedmoor - 528-3341
Barbara Keith and Jimmie Keith • Owners and Operators
“We Appreciate Your Business”
understand themselves and
others.
The first workshop focuses
on understanding yourself and
is for any adult. The second
and third work-shops help
adults better understand
children’s behavior and are for
parents, childcare providers,
teachers or anyone who works
with children. The Five Long
Languages of Children is
included.
The Department of Child
Development approves the
program for nine CHC’s for
childcare providers. The
materials fee for workshop 1 is
$17/person and $23/couple.
The materials fee for all three
workshops is $26/person and
$32/couple.
To register or for more information, call 919-603-1350 or
send/bring payment to the
Granville County Extension
Center (208 Wall St., PO Box
926, Oxford, NC 27565) by
January 21. Make checks
payable to: Granville County.
The workshops will be held
at the Granville County
Extension Center.
ART AUCTION
The Oxford and Henderson
Rotary Clubs are hosting an
Art Auction on February 7,
2009. Proceeds from the fundraiser will be used to fund
Rotary service projects
particularly the Million Meals
initiative begun several years
ago.
With the help of church
groups, scout troops and other
volunteers, more than 200,000
[Continued On PAGE 6A]
CMYK
6a The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday, January 29, 2009
South America. This year the
cost has risen to .25 cent a
meal. To prepare the 80 to
100,000 meals, as in years
[Continued From Page 5A]
past, the cost will be — real
money.
dehy-drated meals have been
To purchase or reserve
packed and sent to starving
tickets, please contact the
areas in Africa, Central and
following Rotarians:
John Currin, 919-693-2469;
Gus Washington, 919-6934661; Bart Cleary, 919-6936171, and Charles Dean 919693-8196.
EVENTS
H appy
16th
HEART HEALTH
Join hundreds of women
from around the Triangle area
as they strive to be heart
healthy! On Feb. 7, Duke Heart
Center is sponsoring its annual
women and heart disease
community education event.
Participate in heart health
screenings, a health fair,
educational topic discussions,
dance demonstrations, free gift
bags, a heart health breakfast
and lunch.
Be entertained by area
dance groups and learn how
women are surviving heart
disease during a red dress
survivorship fashion show.
The cost is $30 per person
Birthday
M arie #4
for the event and $10 per
person for the health
screening.
To register,
please call 1-888-ASK-DUKE.
HORTICULTURE CLASSES
Backyard gardeners who
would like to learn how to grow
fruits, vegetables, turf grass,
trees, ad shrubs are invited to
attend the following upcoming
Home Horticulture classes,
according to Carl Cantaluppi,
Granville County Horticulture
Agent with the NC Cooperative
Extension Service. The dates
and times are as follows:
Tuesday, February 3 - Cool and
Warm Season Vegetables at 7
PM, Tuesday, February 10 Vegetable Insects and Diseases
at 7 PM; Tuesday, February 17
- Tree Fruits and Small Fruits
at 7 PM; Tuesday, February 24
- Lawn Care and Ornamental
Plant Recommendations at 7
PM.
All classes will be held at
the
Granville
County
Extension Center, 208 Wall
Street, in Oxford. Classes will
run from 7- 9 PM. There is no
need to pre-register, just come
if you are interested. You do
not need to attend each class,
just the ones you would like to
attend. The classes are free
and open to the public. Both
new
and
experienced
gardeners are welcome.
For more information,
contact Carl Cantaluppi at control of their spending so
they can pay their bills on time
919-603-1350.
GET THE MONEY MONKEY and save some money, too. It’s
for anyone who has said, “Some
OFF YOUR BACK!
day I’ll get control of my
If you are like most families
spending.”
now, regardless of your income,
The series will be held at
you are looking for ways to
the
Granville
County
spend less and save more. If
Extension Center, Oxford.
you’d like a jump-start to get
Included in this free series are
organized, check out this
all classes with money
opportunity to learn how to get
management
materials,
that money monkey off your
snacks and prizes for
back! The Get the Money
attendance. There will be no
Monkey Off your Back series
childcare provided, but parents
will be offered on Wednesdays,
may bring interested children
February 11, 18, 25 and March
over age 12.
4 from 6 to 8 p.m.
Participants will identify
Who is this series for?
Anyone who wants to take
[Continued On PAGE 7A]
New Exhibit Open
“A VIEW FROM SPACE”
An interactive science exhibit about satellites and
the value of studying Earth from space.
Harris Exhibit Hall • Museum Lane, Oxford NC
(919) 693-9706 • Wed-Fri 10-4 Sat 11-3
Bob’s BBQ
38 Years of Mouth Watering Food!
S howtimes for Jan. 30 - Feb. 5 *No Passes
Sept 26 - Oct
Advance Tickets
on2 Sale Now at Box Office
WE COOK WHILE YOU RELAX
Starting February 6
Slumdog Millionaire, Pink Panther 2
He’s Not That Into You, Push, Coraline
Reserve Our Private Dining Rooms!
(11:00), 1:15, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50
* The Uninvited (PG-13)
BBQ - Stew - Chicken - Seafood - Chicken Livers
Homemade Vegetables & Desserts
(10:55), 1:05, 3:20, 5:40, 7:50, 10:00
DAILY SPECIALS!
(10:45), 1:00, 3:15, 5:35, 7:50, 10:05
Mon. & Wed.
Chicken & Dumplings (All Day)
Tues. & Thurs. BBQ Chicken (starting @ 5:00)
* Taken (PG-13)
* New In Town (PG)
*Underworld: Rise of the Lycans (R)
(10:50), 1:00, 3:10, 5:25, 7:45, 10:10
*Inkheart (PG)
(10:50), 1:25, 4:10, 7:00, 9:40
528-2081
Notorious (R)
(11:00), 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00
Mon. - Sat. 10-8pm • 1589 Hwy 56, Creedmoor
Paul Blart Mall Cop (PG)
(10:40), 12:50, 3:15, 5:35, 7:45, 9:55
Gran Torino (R)
(11:00), 1:40, 4:30, 7:10, 9:55
Trust your property
to the rental experts
FLOYD MANAGEMENT
& REALTY, INC.
Hotel For Dogs (PG)
DUTCH EYE CENTER
(10:30), 12:45, 3:05, 5:20
My Bloody Valentine (R)
7:50, 10:10
Next to Dominos Pizza
Dutch Village • 528-3819
Not Easily Broken (PG-13)
(10:35), 12:55
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (PG-13)
3:30
Specializing in property
management since 1993.
Serving all of Granville County.
Locally owned and operated.
Cynthia & Ronald Currin
Owners/Brokers
(919) 693-3333
[email protected]
REALTOR
EQUAL HOUSING
В®
OPPORTUNITY
1. Special Eye Exams For Diabetics
2. Children’s Vision
3. Treatment Of Disease And Injuries
4. Group Of Budget Frames
* We Honor Medicaid & Medicare Patients
James N. Rowland, OD
Ronnie J. Rowland, OD
Hours: 9 am - 5 pm After Hours 693-3317
Granville County
Animal Shelter
VANCE
FURNITURE
Mon. - Fri.: Noon - 4:30pm
Saturday: 10:00am - 1:00pm
919-693-6749
- Since 1941 Toll Free 1-800-438-3911
We Ship Nationwide • Catalog Sales
REASONS PATIENTS CHOOSE OUR OFFICE:
6 Show Room Floors
Deep Discounts on Fine Furniture
40-50% OFF
Every Day!
Mfg’s Sugg. Retail
This week’s animals are “Hanz”, a domestic
short-hair male w/orange markings. He has a
nice disposition, and gets along with other cats!
“Mick” is a domestic short-hair male with Tabby
markings. He is a nice kitty who gets along well
with other cats, also!
La-Z-Boy • Broyhill • Kincaid • Rowe • Lexington
Sumter Cabinet Classic Leather • Lea • Craftique
Stanley • Howard Miller • Clayton Marcus • Restonic
Pulaski • Hooker • Berkline • Vaughan • American Drew
• Vaughan-Bassett • Peters-Revington • Universal
Aico • And Many More
325 South Garnett St. • Downtown Henderson, NC
Clearance Center • 404 S. Garnett St.
(252) 438-3911 • Fax: (252) 438-6176
www.vancefurniture.com
Mon, Tue, Thur & Fri 9-5:30 • Wed 9-4 • Sat 9-4
A CLASSIFIED USER’S
BEST
FRIEND
528-2393
The Unborn (PG-13)
7:00, 9:45
I -85 & Gregson St., Durham
Movie Hotline: 919-286-1001
www.eastcoastcinemas.com
Pre-Valentine’s Day Dance &
BBQ/Chicken Fundraiser
Live Music/DJ, Karaoke
Door Prizes, Raffles & Valentine gifts
Saturday February 7, 2009, 11am - 9pm
American Legion Post 52
40 American Legion Rd., Franklinton, NC
Advance tickets
Take out $7.00, Eat-in $10.00
Tickets at the door
Take out $8.00, Eat-in Adults, $11.00
Call Denise (919) 630-1969 for info or to purchased your advance tickets
*Snow date Feb. 14, 2009*
Tabbs Creek Animal Hospital
Accredited by American Animal Hospital Association
905 Williamsboro St. (Hilltop Shopping Center), Oxford
919-690-0024
• Dental Cleanings
• Surgeries
• Health Certificates
• Lab Work
• Exams
• Vaccines
• X-rays
Hours:
“Mick”
“Hanz”
View other animals at:
www.petfinder.com
“Please visit. There are lots of great cats & dogs at the shelter now!”
Mon, Wed, Thur, Fri - 8:00am - 5:30pm
Tues & Sat - 8:00am - 12:00pm
By Appointment
Dr. Susan Thompson
*New Clients Welcome*
CMYK
The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday, January 29, 2009 7a
EVENTS
[Continued From Page 6A]
their values about money and
the way they spend; learn to
prioritize spending; learn to set
up and stick with a spending
plan; set up a financial recordkeeping system; find ways to
save money for emergencies;
and develop a plan for paying
off small amounts of debt.
Area Congregations in
Ministry and the North
Carolina
Cooperative
Extension-Granville County
Center are sponsoring the
series.
For more informa-tion or to
register by February 9, call
ACIM at 919-690-0961 or the
Granville County Extension
Center at 919-603-1350.
SPELLING BEE
The Granville Education
Foundation
will
hold
SpellEbration Bee on Thurs.
Feb. 12 from 6:30 pm until 9
pm at J.F. Webb High School.
Rev. Pat Cox, the official
word pronouncer will call out
a word, give its definition and
use it in a sentence. The threeperson team then decides on
the spelling and writes in on a
pad provided.
If a judge
determines the word is spelled
correctly the team is still in the
game if not the team can buy
the word and stay in the
competition. During the last
half of the event words cannot
be bought.
Prizes will be awarded to
the last standing team, the
first team out, the team with
the most team spirit and the
best costumes.
Proceeds from the event
will go to the Granville
Education Foundation to
enhance student performance
by providing resources and
enrichment programs in
partnership
with
the
community and Granville
County Schools. George’s
Oxford Village Pizza is
TECHNO BINGO
sponsoring the event.
The Wilton Elementary
For information call 919- School
Parent-Teacher
693-7047.
Organization will host Techno
DEPRESSION & MOOD
Bingo on Thursday, Feb. 26th
from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. at
DISORDERS
Dr. Stephen Baum of Wilton Elementary School. The
Granville Medical Center will fundraiser will help upgrade
present a program on the school’s technology
Depression
and
Mood resources, such as computers,
disorders on Wed. Feb. 18 from smart boards and software.
Admission is free and open
noon until 1 pm at the
to
the
public. Bingo cards will
Education Classroom, Suite
1022, Granville Medical be sold for 50 cents each or 3
Center, 1010 College Street, for $1.00.
Additionally, $1.00 raffle
Oxford.
tickets
will be sold for gift
A free lunch will be served
baskets.
Twelve baskets will be
at noon, along with Dr. Baum’s
given
away,
each with a unique
presentation and will be
theme,
such
as gardening,
followed by a question and
movie night, arts and crafts,
answer period.
For additional information outside fun, chocolate, and
many more. Refreshments will
call 919-690-3000.
be served.
BOARD RETREAT
All proceeds will benefit
The Granville County
Wilton Elementary School’s
Board of Education will meet
technology resources.
for a Special Called Session on
For more information, or to
Thursday, February 19, 2009
donate to the event, contact
from 1-4 pm in the Granville
Kim Panciera at (919) 562County Schools Adminstrative
4304, or [email protected]
Office Building, 101 Delacroix
“ANNIE GET YOUR GUN”
Street, Oxford, North Carolina
Annie Get Your Gun will be
for the purpose of a Board
performed at City Hall
Retreat.
Auditorium February 27 and
PROGRAM TRAINING
28 and March 6 and 7 at 7:30
The Guardian ad Litem
p.m. and Sunday, March 1st at
Program of District 9
2:30 p. m.. Tickets will be
(Franklin, Warren, Vance and
available at the door for all
Granville Counties) is now
performances. For more
accepting applications for free
information,
visit
upcoming training. First
www.granvillelittletheater.com.
sessions will be held Thursday,
STOVALL REUNION
February 19 in Franklin
BANQUET
County at 113 S. Main St.,
Louisburg in the Hobgood
Graduates and others who
Courthouse Annex at 6:30 pm have attended or taught at
and in Vance at 3 pm in the Stovall High School during its
Vance County Commissioner’s tenure from 1922 to 1963 are
Room in the old courthouse in invited to attend a reunion
Henderson.
banquet on Saturday, April 25,
Anyone 18 years or older 2009 from 4 to 9 p.m. in the
can apply. The Guardian ad gym of the Stovall-Shaw School
Litem Program is a advocacy in Stovall.
group that speaks on behalf of
The banquet will feature a
abused and neglected children catered meal at 6 p.m., old
in Court for more information, class pictures, door prizes,
please call 919-497-3010 or background
music,
a
252-738-9024
or
visit remembrance of our deceased
classmates, and relics of the
www.ncgal.org
school. Classes will sit together
and will be recognized.
A committee of 30 local
alumni is hard at work
planning the “biggest and best
party in Stovall since the first
train came through in 1888.”
Let us know if you have
suggestions.
No attempt will be made by
the committee to send anyone
a registration form for the
event as many addressees and
even names are not known.
Beginning December 10, 2008,
you can pick up the required
registration form at the Town
Hall and Family Grocery in
Stovall, and at Stovall’s Gifts
in Oxford.
More details of the reunion
are covered on the registration
form.
a first come, first served basis
by calling the Granville County
Extension Center at 919-6031350.
The cost for the week
including transportation to
and from camp is $310. A $75
deposit will secure a slot.
Deposits are non-refundable
after February 1, 2009. Ages
for campers are 8-12 years old
as of camp date for regular
campers.
Other opportunities exist
for 13-14 year olds.
For more information,
please call Jamie Haddix or
visit the Eastern 4-H Center
website at www.eastern4h
center.org.
CAR SHOW SLATED
The 2nd Annual Creedmoor
Show will be held May 2 from
9 am until 2 pm on Main Street
in Creedmoor. The event is
sponsored by Champs Tires,
The Butner-Creedmoor News
and No More Stumps. The
vehicle entry fee is $15 and
trophies will be presented for
Best-IN-Show, Ford, Chevy,
Mopar, Import, Bike, Truck,
and Tractor.
Admission to the public is
free. Vendors will include;
Cornwell Tools, Jon’s Main
Street Bar & Grill, Champs
Tire, Granville County Sheriff,
Sparrow Wood Jewelers, SS
Auto Chrome, Interstate
Batteries, Atlantic Tire, Eat n
Sweets and more.
Registration forms are
available at Champs Tire, and
from Tommy Keith. Entry
forms are due by May 1. For
additional information call
528-4547.
Kevin Kennedy and Danielle Porter announce their engagement and
2010 November 13th wedding. Kevin and Danielle will be joined
together along with their sons Kevin Wesley Kennedy and Johnethyn
Rollen-Gregory Kennedy in the presence of family and friends.
4-H CAMP
Registration for 4-H
summer camp with Granville
County is now open.
They will be camping at the
Eastern 4-H Center, located in
Columbia, NC during the week
of June 28th-July 3rd, 2009.
Camper slots are available on
“I Do”
Wedding Photography
• Before, & During Photos
• Receptions
• Will travel to NC Beach
& Mountain areas
• Photos burned to CD
for your keepsake
• Very Reasonable!
“Seven Gables”
Harris - Currin House
Circa 1830
Garden
Weddings • Receptions
Special Events
3248 Hester Road, Creedmoor, NC 27522
(919) 528-4219
r
You
k
o
Bo dding
We w!
No
Last
Wed Minut
e
ding
s To
o!
(919) 283-4637
Contact Stefanie at 919-484-0931, ext. 269
[email protected]
Or you can register for research studies at:
http://domis.med.unc.edu/dccregistry
CMYK
8a The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday, January 29, 2009
The Granville County
Crime Stoppers needs your
help! By calling (919) 693-3100
with information that leads to
the solving of a crime,
Granville County Crime
Stoppers can pay up to
$1,000.00 for information that
leads to the arrest and
conviction of a person or
persons involved in an
unsolved crime you DO NOT
have to give your name when
calling.
NEW CRIMES
On January 22, 2009 an
unknown person or persons
attempted to enter a residence
on Belltown Road, Oxford,
causing damage to the
entrance way. If you have any
information regarding this
incident please call the
Granville County Sheriff ’s
Dept. (919) 693-3213 or
Crimestoppers 919-693-3100.
On January 20, 2009,
unknown person(s) stole a
Hooper Utility Trailer from a
residence in Big Oak Farms
Subdivision. The trailer is
black in color with a 4ft. mesh
wire tailgate and a mesh wire
type floor and has dual axles.
On January 23, 2009,
unknown person(s) removed a
well pressure tank and
accessories from a vacant
residence located on Thad
Carey Rd. Damage to pipes and
wiring was also reported.
On January 14, 2009 the
Granville County Sheriff's
Office received a report of a
theft of a small compact
handgun from a motor vehicle
parked at a residence off of
Cash Road. If you have any
information regarding this
incident please call the
Granville County Sheriff's
Dept. at 919-693-3213 or
Crimestoppers at 919-6933100.
On Jan. 12, 2009, unknown
person(s) damaged various
items at the Granville Athletic
Park, located on Belltown
Road. The damaged areas were
the concession stand and
restrooms which consisted of
breaking the restroom mirrors,
damaging the toilets, vending
machines, and multiple
windows.
Patient Satisfaction Survey
Granville Health System
(GHS) has announced that it
will partner with a North
Carolina
health
care
consulting
agency
in
implementing a new customer
service initiative that will run
through 2009.
GHS has commissioned
The Jackson Group to conduct
its outpatient satisfaction
survey. The project seeks
patient input on a number of
services including surgery,
radiology, primary care and the
Granville Specialty Clinic.
The survey, which began
December 1, measures the
level of patient satisfaction
based on the service provided
by Granville Health System. A
combination of written,
computer and Web-based
methods are being utilized to
collect information. The
program includes evaluation of
each patient’s care, discharge
information, general customer
satisfaction and overall
community perception of GHS
services.
The survey results will be
used as GHS continues to
address the growing needs of
It’s A Home Run!
Cover all the bases
with the news and views in
your local newspaper!
Subscribe today! Call 528-2393.
Community
CALENDAR
ACTIVITY
the region and introduce new
services. Also, the survey will
follow up with special needs
assessments, coaching and
training.
“This survey is an
important component of our
commitment to quality service
and it is a great way to reach
community members who use
our facilities on a daily basis,”
says L. Lee Isley, Chief
Executive Officer. “Our success
is strongly tied to patient
satisfaction, and this is
reflected in the organization’s
mission to provide the very
best health care, delivered with
compassion and pride,” Isley
continued.
Granville Health System
provides quality care to more
than 60,000 patients a year
and has over 100 experienced
physicians
representing
numerous specialties on its
medical staff. The main
campus is located at 1010
College Street, Oxford, North
Carolina, 27565. For more
information, visit Granville
Health System’s Web site at
www.granville medical.com
<http://www.
granvillemedical.com/>
F
E
B
MON
2
9
16
23
30
TUES
3
10
17
24
On 01/03/2009, a B&E and
Property Damage to a vehicle
occurred at 2103 Longwood
Drive, Creedmoor. An older
model white in color vehicle
with a loud muffler was seen
leaving the location at the time
the incident occurred. Anyone
with any information, please
contact Capt. Donna Grissom
at 575-6561, Ext. 113 or Crime
Stoppers at (919) 693-3100.
On 01/03/2009, a Larceny of
a yellow Shenke Moped
occurred at 403 West C Street,
Butner. Anyone with any
information please contact
Capt. Donna Grissom at 5756561, Ext. 113, or Crime
Stoppers at (919) 693-3100.
During the month of
December 2008, B&E and
Property Damage to storage
sheds in the area of Gate #1
Road were reported. Padlocks
were cut off and in some cases
property was removed. Anyone
with any information, please
contact Lt. Greg Lewis at 5756561, Ext. 116, or Crime
Stoppers at (919) 693-3100.
During the months of
November and December, B&E
Larceny of appliances occurred
at
unoccupied
new
construction at Wynn Gate #2
Subdivision. Anyone with any
information, please contact Lt.
Greg Lewis at 575-6561, Ext.
116, or Crime Stoppers at (919)
693-3100.
During the month of
January, B&E Larceny of
vehicles occurred at 1571 Duck
Pond Drive, 1581 Brook Drive,
and 2163 Watershed Way.
Items were removed from
vehicles causing damage.
Anyone with any information,
please contact Lt. Greg Lewis
at 575-6561, Ext. 116, or Crime
Stoppers at (919) 693-3100.
During daylight hours on
January 10, unknown persons
removed several boxes
containing hand tools, a TV,
clothes, a 5,000 antenna and a
silver metal briefcase from a
residence on Belltown Road.
On 01/10/2009, unknown
person(s) entered a newly
constructed residence located
on Orkney Drive in Stem and
removed a Kenmore electric
range; black in color. The
residence is located in t he
Prestwick Subdivision on
Brogden Road.
On 01/12/2009, unknown
WED
THURS
FRI
SAT
4
11
18
25
5
12
19
26
6
13
20
27
7
14
21
28
LOCATION/DAY(S)/TIME(S)
person(s) damaged several
pieces of property at the
Granville Athletic Park,
located on Belltown Road.
Major damage occurred at the
newly constructed area and the
concession stand. Person(s)
damaged the rest rooms,
vending machines, and
numerous windows.
Sometime between the late
afternoon hours of January 8,
and the early morning of
January 9, treated decking
lumber materials from a
construction site on Hester
Road was removed.
The Granville County
Sheriff ’s Department is
investigating
a
recent
breaking, entering and larceny
that occurred December 23,
2008 on Sanders Road. Several
guns and items of jewelry were
taken during the incident.
The Granville County
Sheriff ’s Department is
investigating
a
recent
vandalism and theft from an
automobile at a residence on
Northside Drive, Creedmoor,
NC.
During the late night hours
of December 19, 2008 and the
early morning hours of
December 20, 2008, an
unknown person or persons
damaged several large
inflatable Christmas yard
decorations on Hester Road.
The Granville County Sheriff ’s
Department is seeking
information that may be
related to this incident. If you
have
any
information
regarding this matter, please
contact the Granville County
Sheriff ’s Department at 919693-3213, or call Crime
Stoppers at 693-3100.
On 12/31/08, the Granville
County Sheriff’s Department is
investigating an incident of
breaking, entering and larceny
to expensive lighting fixtures
on
Brogden
Road
in
Creedmoor.
Also on 12/31/08, the Dept.
is investigating a breaking and
entering and larceny of several
tools in the area of Beaver Dam
Road, Creedmoor.
In recent months there
have been several incidents of
vehicles passing school buses
and items being thrown from
inside the vehicles at the school
buses causing minor damages.
On or about December 15,
SUN
1
8
15
22
2008, someone threw a beer
bottle and damaged the
window of a vehicle parked at
the P & D Motors sales lot at
2255 Highway 15, Creedmoor,
N. C.
The Granville County
Sheriff ’ Department is
investigating a recent theft of
a bottom plow for a Farmall
140 tractor which occurred at
2166 Marry Lane, Creedmoor,
N. C.
On 12/5/08, a breaking,
entering, larceny, and property
damage was reported to a
vehicle on I-85 near Butner.
Suspect(s) damaged a window
and removed various stereo
equipment.
On 12/6/-08, a larceny was
reported on farm land across
from the Granville Athletic
Park. Suspect(s) removed a
Moultrie camo feed bucket, a
Kenco feed dispenser, and a
brown in color deer stand with
mesh footing and seat.
During the early morning
hours of Tuesday, December 9,
2008, an unknown person or
persons entered the Northern
Granville Middle School,
located at 3144 Webb School
Road, vandalizing the school
facility and removing items
from the school. The Granville
County Sheriff’s Department is
seeking information that may
be related to this incident. If
you have any information
regarding this incident, please
contact Det. Vicki Thorpe at
the Granville County Sheriff ’s
Department, 919-693-3213, or
call Crime Stoppers at 6933100.
On 12/04/08, a report was
filed with the GCSO in
reference to property damage
that occurred to a piece of farm
equipment. The incident took
place at a farm that was
located off of Highway 50,
Creedmoor, N. C. Unknown
suspects took what appeared to
be an air rifle and shot out the
windows of a John Deere
tractor. The incident took place
sometime between 11/22/08
and 12/03/08.
If you have information
concerning this crime or any
other serious crimes in
Granville County, you are
asked to call the Granville
County Crime Stoppers at 919693-3100 in Oxford.
2
0
0
9
CONTACT
AA............................................................................................................................Butner / Mon & Thur. / 8:00 PM.........................................................................................................................................919-575-6688
AA............................................................................................................................Oxford Alano Club / Wed., Thur., Sat. 8 PM; Sun 6 PM
AA............................................................................................................................So. Granville Big Book Study Group / Thompson Bldg. - Corner of Park Ave. & Grey St.
Wed. Night 8 PM / Closed Meeting.....................................................................................................................................919-693-4317
Al-Anon...................................................................................................................Creedmoor / Every Thursday 8pm - 9pm at the Education Building at Credmoor First United Methodist Church, 214 Park Ave, just off of Main St.....................919-528-8112
Alzheimers Support Group........................................................................................Brantwood Retirement Center / 2nd Thur. / 7:00 PM
American Diabetes Association Support Group, Granville Chapter............................Thornton Library, Oxford / 3rd Sun. / 3:00 PM
American Legion Creedmoor.....................................................................................1st Mon. / 7:00 PM............................................................................................................................................................919-528-0827
American Legion Post 161........................................................................................1st Tue. / 7:00 PM
Brassfield Vol. Fire Department/18th Annual “Ladies Auxiliary Day”......................Sat. / 11:00 - 7:00 PM / April 27th.......................................................................................................919-528-4797 or 919-528-3900
Butner Advisory Council...........................................................................................1st Thur. / 7:00 PM............................................................................................................................................................919-575-3032
Butner Advisory Council Workshop...........................................................................3rd Wed. / 6:00 PM............................................................................................................................................................919-575-3032
Butner Lions.............................................................................................................Waffle House / 2nd & 4th Thur. / 6:30 PM..........................................................................................................................919-575-6206
Cancer Support Group...............................................................................................First Baptist Church / 1st, 3rd Tue. / 7:00 PM
Chapel Hill Breast Cancer Support Group..................................................................Cornucopia House Cancer Support Center / 2nd Tue. / 7:30 PM..........................................................................................919-401-9333
Creedmoor Board of Adjustment...............................................................................1st Mon. / 7:30 PM............................................................................................................................................................919-528-3332
Creedmoor Boy Scouts Troop 401.............................................................................7:00pm, Tuesdays @ Creedmoor United Methodist Church................................................................................................919-528-0761
Creedmoor Chamber of Commerce............................................................................2nd Thur. / 7:00 PM...........................................................................................................................................................919-528-1861
Creedmoor Commissioners........................................................................................4th Tue. / 7:30 PM.............................................................................................................................................................919-528-3332
Creedmoor Cub Scout Pack 401................................................................................7:00pm, Mondays @ Creedmoor United Methodist Church................................................................................................919-528-0761
Creedmoor Masonic Lodge 499 AF + AM...................................................................2nd Monday Meal at 6:30 4th Monday Meeting at 7:00...................................................................................................919-691-4289
Creedmoor Lions Club...............................................................................................1st & 3rd Thur. / 7:00 PM.............................................................................................................................919-528-1519 or 528-0506
Democratic Party Meeting........................................................................................Superior Court Room / 2nd Wed. / 7:30
Getting Your Bearings Cancer Patient Support Group................................................Cornucopia House Cancer Support Center / 2nd, 4th Wed. / 7:00 PM.................................................................................919-401-9333
Granville Chamber of Commerce...............................................................................3rd Tue. / 5:30 PM.............................................................................................................................................................919-693-6125
Granville County Board of Adjustment......................................................................2nd Tue. / 7:00 PM............................................................................................................................................................919-693-9001
Granville County Commissioners...............................................................................1st, 3rd Mon. / 7:00 PM.....................................................................................................................................................919-693-4761
Granville County Fraternal Order of Police ..............................................................Last Mon. / 7:30 PM
Granville County Hospital Board............................................................................... 3rd Thur. / 5:00 PM............................................................................................................................................919-693-5115, ext. 735
Granville County Industrial Club...............................................................................1st Wed. Oct-May / 7:00 PM.............................................................................................................................................919-528-1861
Granville County Planning........................................................................................ 3rd Thur. / 7:00 PM..........................................................................................................................................................919-693-9001
Granville County School Board.................................................................................1st Mon. / 7:00 PM
Granville GOP...........................................................................................................2nd Thur. / 6:30 PM / Bob’s BBQ........................................................................................................................................919-693-8134
Granville Residents Against Drugs (GRAD)............................................................... 4th Thur. / 7:00 PM..........................................................................................................................................................919-575-4591
Hawley Athletic Academic Booster Club...................................................................2nd Mon. (no summer schedule) / 7:00 PM........................................................................................................................919-528-2211
Living With Advanced/Metatastic Cancer Support Group..........................................Cornucopia House Cancer Support Center / Fri. / 3:00 PM.................................................................................................919-401-9333
Mind/Body Skills Group............................................................................................Cornucopia House Cancer Support Center /Tue. / 12:00 Noon............................................................................................919-401-9333
PreparedChildbirth Education Classes......................................................................Granville Medical Center, 1010 College St. Oxford / Thursdays 6:30pm - 8:30pm.............................................................919-690-3208
Restorative Chi Gung for Cancer...............................................................................Cornucopia House Cancer Support Center / Thur. / 12:45 PM.............................................................................................919-401-9333
Restorative Yoga for Cancer.....................................................................................Cornucopia House Cancer Support Center / Wed., 11:00 AM; Thur. 6:00 PM.......................................................................919-401-9333
Serenity....................................................................................................................First Baptist Church, Creedmoor / 1st & 3rd Fri. / 7:00 PM
South Granville Band Parents Association................................................................2nd Tue. / 7:30 PM............................................................................................................................................................919-528-0275
South Granville Exchange.........................................................................................Bob’s Barbecue / 1st, 3rd Tue. / 12:00 Noon.......................................................................................................................919-575-6818
South Granville High School Athletic Booster Club....................................................2nd Mon. / 7:00 PM...........................................................................................................................................................919-528-0244
South Granville Jaycees...........................................................................................Butner Public Safety / 1st, 3rd Mon. / 7:00 PM.................................................................................................................919-575-6561
South Granville Rotary Club.....................................................................................Bob’s Barbecue / Wed. / 12:00 Noon..................................................................................................................................919-528-9330
South Granville Women’s Club..................................................................................2nd Mon. / 7:00 PM...........................................................................................................................................................919-528-3518
Stroke Support Group...............................................................................................Doctors. Lounge Maria Parham Hospital / 3rd Mon. / 2:03 PM..........................................................................................252-492-8374
Stem Sunrisers 4-H Club..........................................................................................Stem Fire Department / 2nd Tue. / 7:00 PM
TOPS .................................................................................................................................Take Off Pounds Sensibly in Butner meets every Tuesday at 6:00 P.M. at the Community United Methodist Church Est
Upward Bound Support Ministry...............................................................................St. Andrews Baptist Church / Fri. / 6:30 PM......................................................................................................................919-693-5287
VFW Post 10777.......................................................................................................South Granville EMS Base Off Lake Road / 2nd Thur. / 6:30 PM.........................................................................................919-575-6622
VGCC Board Meeting
3rd Mon. every other month / 7:00 PM...............................................................................................................................919-492-2061
Bob’s Barbecue
Lake Road, Creedmoor
528-2081
To Place Your Service Ad
Call Gail at
418 N. Main Street, Creedmoor
528-2393
The Community Calendar runs once a month – the
last week of each month.
Support your community by advertising on this page. Call...
For Your Printing Needs
Granville Printing
Company
420 North Main Street
Creedmoor
528-3909
THE COMMUNITY CALENDAR IS SPONSORED BY THE MERCHANTS LISTED BELOW.
TO SUBMIT AN EVENT FOR CONSIDERATION TO THE COMMUNITY CALENDAR, CALL PENNY CARPENTER AT 528-2393
Quick Oil Change and Lube Jobs
Specializing in All Brands of Tires & Alignments
NC State Inspections
QUALITY DRUGS, INC.
Bill McKellar, Pharmacist
309 Central Avenue
Butner, N.C. 27509
Christian Faith Center Academy
575-6571
P.O. Box 520 • Creedmoor, NC 27522
528-1581 Ext.12
-Now Accepting Fall Enrollment
M & H TIRES AND TREADS, INC.
1600 HIGHWAY 56, P.O. BOX 56
CREEDMOOR, N.C. 27522
(919) 528-1858
The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday, January 29, 2009 • 9a
GRANVILLE BUSINESS
WhiteRabbit PreSchool
&
PRESLEYBROOKE ACADEMY
Now Enrolling
for 2009
Hometown Dealer
“Shop local. You’ll be glad you did”
Open 24/7 for your convenience at
www.ellington-brimchevrolet.com
We service all makes & models
and will match or beat any price!
106E W est C hurch S t.
C reed m oor, N C 27522
(919) 528-7290 phone
(919) 528-7297 fax
207 Central Ave • Butner, NC
Dependable Cars At Low Prices
Everyone Rides
Experience the joy...
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A loving, safe and nurturing family-friendly
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Capture the smile...
On your child’s face as we make learning fun
through play and enriched curriculm
programs.
Migranes
Fibromyagia
Allergies
Ear Infections
Asthma
Infertility/Childbirth
Sports Injuries
Stiff Neck
High Blood Pressure
Whiplash
Shoulder Pain
Carpal Tunnel
ADD/ADHD
Tinnitus
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acid Reflux
Headaches
General Well Being
Dr. Cheryl Hanly, DC
Hours: Mon., Wed., & Thurs., 7:30 - 5:30 • Tues., 2:30 - 5:00
12:00 - 2:00 Closed
~ CHIROPRACTIC CARE HELPS ~
HAPPY NEW YEAR!
From the staff at A-Z Flooring Gallery
Stop by our Showroom and see the variety of flooring we offer for your
home and talk with our qualified staff or the “boss” himself.
Start the
“New Year”
with new
floors!
Mon. - Sat. • 10am - 6pm
Bad Credit • No Credit • No Problem
575-5800
“Where Quality and Satisfaction
are Important”
A new backsplash in the kitchen would be just
the thing to brighten up the room. Starting at
$350 and up.
www.bpsauto.com
BBQ BARN
Averette Accounting, Inc.
A friendly, family oriented business consisting
of hometown people. We have 24 years of
experience in providing tax preparation,
electronic
filing,
tax
planning
and
bookkeeping services.
Office Hours:
Mon. thru Fri. - 8:00am - 5:00pm
Saturdays by appointment only
Call (919) 528-3336 for more information
or to set up an appointment.
We are accepting new clients for the 2008 tax season.
Now Enrolling
The Perfect
Balance Of
Learning
And Play!
• State licensed program with
Bible & Academic curriculum
• Part-time, Full-time, Drop-in,
Before & After School,Track Out
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• Low teacher - to - child ratios
• Childcare for 6 weeks - 12 years
• Safe, secure facility w/camera for
viewing
• Nutritious lunch and snacks
• Open 6:30 am - 6:00 pm
NOW ENROLLING
FOR
2009
The experienced staff is trained in Early
Childhood, and the child-to-staff ratio is low.
The employees of both facilities take pride in
what they do and work hard to create a safe,
family-friendly, trusting environment where
parents will feel totally comfortable leaving
their children.
Both WhiteRabbit PreSchool and
PRESLEYBROOKE Academy have openings
available in various classrooms. They serve
infants, toddlers, preschool, pre-kindergarten,
before and after school students, and schoolage children.
Choosing the right infant care or preschool
program is one of the most important decisions
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No Job ll
a
T o o S mB i g !
o
o
T
r
O
NC
Insp State
ectio
ns!
102 West B Street, Butner
575-6068
Great Food - Great Service
The Best Eastern NC BBQ
Made on premises
Fresh Fried & BBQ Chicken
Hot Dogs & Fresh, Hand Made Hamburgers
Blue Plate Specials: Chicken & Rice (Mon), Meat Loaf (Wed),
Chicken & Dumplings (Thur)
Homemade banana pudding & pies
BREAKFAST - LUNCH - SUPPER
6 a.m. until 8 p.m. - Monday thru Saturday
Tatum & Edwards, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants & Small Business Consultants
Your One Stop Financial Solution
Tax & Accounting
Investments* & Planning
Tax Preparation
Electronic Filing
Payroll Services
Accounting For:
All Organizations
Bookkeeping
Office Manager
(We pay your bil s!)
919-528-4775
IRA’s, SEP’s, Simple’s, 401K*
Mutual Funds*
College 529 Plans*
Planning Services
College Planning
Retirement Planning
Tax Reduction Strategies
Cash Flow Analysis
102 N. Main Street, PO Box 990, Creedmoor, NC 27522
From Left to Right - Jason Dickerson, Ann Dickerson, Chris
Morton, Thomas Wiggs, & Brock Bradley
from 7:30am - 5:30pm M-F at new location, the lower
level of Gil-Man’s Florist
(formerly the old M&H Tire Service location)
1577 Munns Rd., Creedmoor - 528-3802
1599 NC Highway 56 West, Creedmoor - 528-1010
7909 Creedmoor Rd. Raleigh - 844-1366
2173 Will Suitt Road, Suite F.
(919) 528-1112
“Get your vehicle ready for Winter”,
call or come by today!
Get better gas mileage, spend less at the pump get your
fuel injection system serviced!
Let Us Manage Your Office While You
Manage Your Business!
*Kimberly Tatum, Investment Advisor representative. Securities offered through H.D. Vest Investment Servicessm, Member SIPC. Advisory Services
offered through H.D. Vest Advisory Servicessm, Non-bank subsidiaries of Wells Fargo & Company. 102 N. Main Street, Creedmoor, NC 27522.
CMYK
10a The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday, January 29, 2009
Recent Area Deaths
Catherine Coley Mangum Overton
BEATRICE PUCKETT
BEASLEY
Catherine Coley Mangum
Overton, age 91 a resident of
Stem died Friday January 23,
2009 at her home. She was a
native of Granville County and
was the daughter of the late
Henry Newton Coley, Sr. and
Mary Parrish Coley. She was
preceded in death by her
husband E. E. Mangum. They
owned Mangum’s General
Store in Stem. Mrs. Mangum
married Leonard Overton in
1986. Mrs. Overton was a
graduate of Stem High School
and attended Raleigh School of
Commerce. She was a member
of Stem United Methodist
Church since 1927 and was the
oldest active member. She
served as pianist for many
years, a member of the choir
and sang solos for funerals and
weddings.
Mrs.
Overton
served as president of the
Stem
PTA and
Home
Demonstration Club. She
served on the Stem Town
Board, was tax collector and
clerk for many years. She was
a member of the Ruritanette
Club and President for four
years, and she also taught
typing classes at Stem High
School.
Funeral services will be held
on Monday January 26, 2009
at 2:00 P. M. in the Stem
United Methodist Church by
the Rev. Jason Thornton.
Burial will be in Bullock
cemetery in Stem.
She is survived by her
daughter Betsy Breedlove and
son-in-law Steve of Stem;
many nieces, nephews and
cousins; nephew, Walter Coley
and nieces Phyllis Coley Sain,
Mary Frances Coley Ingold
and Nancy Coley She was
preceded in death by her
second husband, Leonard
Overton,
sisters,
Lillian
Nichols, Eva Gooch; brothers,
Euvin Coley, Travis Coley,
Nelson Coley and Henry
Newton Coley, II.
The family would like to say
a very special thank you to
Sheila Tubb, Madeline Long
and all of the staff and very
special nurses from Tender
Loving Care Hospice of
Louisburg. Their love and
compassion to Catherine made
each day more bearable. Betsy
would like to exten a very
special thank you to Deborah,
Doug, Vicki, Ricky, Phyllis
and Bill for all of their love
and support during this
difficult time. They were
always available to lend a
helping hand. Catherine will
be remembered by all for her
wonderful sense of humor,
feistiness and her deep love for
family and friends. She was
affectionately
known
as
“Granny Cat” by Brittany
Special Spencer.
A poem by Catherine; I
lived my life the best I knew, I
loved my kin folk, friends &
neighbors too!, I cherish the
memories of a wonderful mom
and dad, I thank you Lord for
the life I had.
The family will receive
friends one hour prior to the
service at the church. At other
times they will be at the home.
Arrangements are in the
care of Gentry-Newell &
Vaughan Funeral Home.
Online
memorials
w w w. g n v f h . c o m s e l e c t
obituaries.
Beatrice Puckett Beasley,
101, a resident of 193 Bennett
Perry Road, Louisburg, died
Thursday, January 22, 2009 at
her home.
A native of Granville
County, she was the widow of
Owen Beasley, Sr. and the
daughter of the late Lonnie and
Annie Cottrell Puckett. She
was a member of Tabbs Creek
Baptist Church in Oxford,
attended Hill King UMC in
Louisburg, and was a
homemaker.
Funeral services were
conducted at 2 p.m. Sunday at
Tabbs Creek Baptist Church by
Rev. Ken Compton and Rev.
Rhonda Maurer. Burial was in
the church cemetery.
Surviving
are
five
daughters: Christine Thaxton
and Carol Roberts (Owen),
both of Creedmoor, Elizabeth
Faulkner (Bobby) of Louisburg,
Celia Kierzewski (Howard) of
Mine Run, Va., and Florence
Sondys (Joel) of Washington,
N. C.; a son, Sam Beasley, Jr.
(Pat) of Durham; a sister, Lois
Branch of Petersburg, Va., 17
grandchildren; 25 greatgrandchildren; and one great
Nita W. Whitfield
Feb. 7, 1934 to Jan. 27, 2007
God Saw You...
by Author Unknown
God saw you getting tired,
When a cure was not to be.
So He wrapped his arms
around you,
and whispered, “Come to me”.
You didn’t deserve what you
went through,
So He gave you rest. God’s
garden must be beautiful,
He only takes the best
And when I saw you sleeping,
So peaceful and free from pain
I could not wish you back
To suffer that again.
It has been 2 long years
without you. We miss you and
think of you everyday.
However, we are taking good
care of each other and know
you are watching over us. We
hope to continue to make you
proud of us. Please tell all the
“Creedmoor folks” in heaven
that
you
are
making
poundcakes for, that we love
and miss them too. Your love
will always remain in our
hearts.
All our love,
Your Family
great-grandson.
Three
grandchildren, April Faulkner,
Bobby Faulkner, Jr. and Steve
Upchurch, preceded her in
death.
Flowers accepted or
memorials may be to one’s
favorite charity.
Visitation was from 7 to
8:30 p.m. Saturday evening at
Eakes Funeral Home in Oxford
and at other times at the home.
GREGORY SETH SHAW
Gregory Seth Shaw, 23 of
Stem died January 22, 2009 at
his home.
He was a member of the
Stem
Volunteer
Fire
Department in which he joined
in 2005. He was honored in
2007 as First Responder of the
Year and also served as a
Safety Officer.
He is survived by his wife
Stacey Ellington Shaw of Stem,
parents Tim & Tyna Shaw of
Creedmoor, sister JoHannah,
and brother Clayton of
Creedmoor. He is also survived
by Phillip Bates (wife Shannon
and son Myles), Christian
Bates, (Angel and daughter
Brooke), cousins that lived and
grew up with Greg in the
parents home; his fraternal
grandparent, Wanda Shaw, of
Minden La.;
maternal
grandparents, Bobby Ewing
and wife, Sandy, of Beverly
Hills, Fla.; three uncles Phillip
Ewing and son Andy, of
Buffalo, N.Y., daughter Tara
Ewing of Roxboro, Kemp
Ewing, wife, Teresa, and
daughters Courtney and
Emma of Beaufort, NC, and
Chris Ewing, wife Lara and
sons Christian, Jayden and
daughter
McKenze
of
Creedmoor;
two aunts,
Rebecca Prince of Sanford, and
Christian Shaw and daughter
Crystal Wells of Minden, La.;
and two great cousins Chloe
and Ryan Wells.
Please
visit
Greg’s
memorial
at
www.facebook.com. in memory
of Greg Shaw.
In lieu of flowers, donations
can be sent to Concord Baptist
Church, PO Box 237, Stem, NC
27581, c/o Stacey Shaw.
The family received visitors
on Monday, January 26th from
6-9 pm at Eakes Funeral Home
in Creedmoor.
A memorial service was
held on Tuesday, January 27th
at 2 pm at Concord Baptist
Church by Pastor K.J.
Ellington and Pastor Floyd
Jackson.
Quality Drugs, Inc.
309 Central Avenue
Butner
BARBARA DUNCAN
“BOBBIE” WILKERSON
Barbara Duncan “Bobbie”
Wilkerson, 75, a resident of
Oxford, died January 22, 2009
at her home.
She was a native of
Granville County and the
daughter of the late Melvin
Bradsher Duncan and Volsie
Oderine Kearney Duncan. She
was a member of West Oxford
Baptist Church. She was
retired from Granville Medical
Center and had also worked for
Burlington Industries and Dr.
Day’s office. She coached
softball for many years in the
city and county area.
Memorial services were
held on Sunday, January 25,
2009 at 3 pm in West Oxford
Baptist Church by the Rev. Wes
Garner. Burial followed in
Elmwood Cemetery. She is
survived by one daughter,
Sherrie W. Clayton (Michael) of
Durham; two sons, Brad
Wilkerson of Oxford and Jay
Wilkerson of Charlotte, three
sisters, Louise Watkins and
Sandra Green both of Oxford,
Gloria Jones of Richmond,
Texas; three grandchildren,
Keri Crews, Kelly Dickerson,
Lauren Dickerson and three
great grandchildren, Brandon
and Bryson Crews, Jaylyn
Dickerson. She is preceded in
death by one sister, Gwen
Womack.
The family received friends
Sunday prior to the service
from 1:30 until 2:45 pm.
Flowers are accepted or
memorials may be given to
Duke Hospice, 4321 Medical
Park Drive, Durham, NC
27704.
RICKY THOMAS ROBERTS
Ricky Thomas Roberts, 49,
a resident of 235 Ross Avenue,
Henderson, died Tuesday,
January 20th, 2009 at the VA
Hospital in Durham.
He was a native of Vance
County and the son of the late
Homer T. Roberts and Faye
Sanders Murray. He was of the
Baptist faith, an army veteran
and was an auto mechanic.
Funeral services were
Emily Corn Champion and
her granddaughter, Victoria
Anne Hughes, were both
recently named as presidents
of the N. C. Division of the
United Daughters of the
Confederacy (UDC ) and the N.
C. Division of the Children of
the Confederacy (CofC)
respectively.
Champion is the immediate
chapter president of the
Butner Joseph H. Cash UDC
chapter, and Hughes is from
the Brave Young Joe Cash
Children of the Confederacy
chapter (BYJCC) in Butner.
Both chapters are the
newest chapters in North
Carolina and have been
NATHAN M. GARREN
ATTORNEY AT LAW
******************************************
2557 Capitol Drive • Creedmoor, NC 27522
****************************
HOURS
* Mon-Fri. 9 AM - 6 PM *
* Sat. 9 AM - 1 PM *
• Prescriptions filled in 20 minutes or less
• All local insurance plans are accepted
• A person always answers your phone call
• Unusual medicines located within minutes
• Free blood pressure checks
• We compound pet and animal medicines
• We accept all Medicare part D plans
Celebrating 35 years of growth
in South Granville County
(919) 528-8200
Fax: (919) 528-8300
andthompson.com.
CHARLES ALLEN, SR.
Mr. Charles Allen, Sr., 68,
died at his home.
He was born in Johnston
County, September 20, 1941,
He was the son of the late Roby
and Ettie Allen. Charles
graduated from Four Oaks
High School in 1960.
Mr. Allen was a member of
the Oxford community for over
45 years. He was preceded in
death by his four brothers,
Melvin, David, Clifton and
Jake Allen.
Mr. Allen is survived by his
son, Charles Allen, Jr. and wife,
Kristin,
and
four
grandchildren, Brittany Allen,
age 18, Brian Allen, age 17,
Bryce Allen, age 12, and
Brenna Allen, age 9, all of Lake
Wylie, S. C.
At Mr. Allen’s request,
private services will be held for
his immediate family only. The
EMILY TAPP CHADWICK family is being assisted in
Mrs.
Emily
Tapp Durham by Clements Funeral
Chadwick, 72, of 307 Eighth Service, Inc.
Street, Butner, died at Duke
CLEO ADCOCK BARNES
University Medical Center on
Cleo Adcock Barnes, 87, a
Thursday, January 22, 3009 at resident of 114 Kearney Ave.,
8:10 a.m.
Oxford, died Wednesday,
A native of Alamance January
28,
2009
at
County, she was the wife of the Brantwood Nursing Center.
late Raymond Chadwick and
A native of Johnston Co.,
the daughter of David Thomas the widow of Cooper H. Barnes
Tapp and Eva Henderson and the daughter of the late
Tapp, both deceased. She was Nathan and Thelma O’Neal
a retired nurse and a member Adcock. A charter member of
of Salem United Methodist Delrayno Baptist Church and
Church.
retired from High Price
Survivors include her Warehouse.
brother, Randy Tapp and wife,
Funeral services will be
Lynn, of Snow Camp, and a held at 2 pm Friday, January
special friend, Archie Gupton, 30th at Delrayno Baptist
of Butner.
Church by Rev. Hilton Moore,
A graveside service was Jr.
Burial will be in
conducted at Salem United Meadowview Memorial Park.
Methodist Church Cemetery
Surviving are a daughter,
on Saturday, Jan. 24th at 3 Gail Barnes Currin of Oxford,
p.m. by Rev. Cathy Hoyle.
two sons, Jack C. Barnes,
Memorials may be made to Donald H. Barnes, both of
Salem United Methodist Hampstead, five grandchildren
Church, 4471 Salem Church and
twelve
greatRoad, Haw River, NC 27258, grandchildren.
or to a charity of one’s choice.
Visitation was held from 7Rich & Thompson Funeral 8:30 pm Thursday evening at
& Cremation Service in the Eakes Funeral Home in
Burlington was in charge of Oxford and at other times at
arrangements. Condolences 206 Hunters Rd., Oxford, NC
may be offered at www.rich 27565.
Champion, Hughes Named
As Division Presidents
Phone 575-6571 - Fax 575-9306
Jeff Teal Dr. Tracy Teal
Bill McKellar Dr. Sloan Barber
Always two pharmacists on duty to serve you
conducted at 2:00 PM
Saturday, January 24, 2009 in
the Eakes Funeral Chapel in
Creedmoor by Rev. Bill
Shoemaker.
Surviving are his wife,
Shelia Baines Roberts, one son,
Adam Wayne Roberts, both of
the home, one step-son,
Michael Baines of Greensboro,
step-mother, Jessie S. Roberts
of Creedmoor, three sisters,
Debbie Tuttle of New Bern,
Susan Wright of Wilmington,
Bonnie Johnson of Myrtle
Beach, SC, two brothers,
Kenny Murray of Wilmington,
and John Earl Roberts of
Chesapeake, VA. A brother,
Glen Smith preceded him in
death.
The family received friends
from 12:30 to 2:00 PM
Saturday prior to the funeral
at the Eakes Funeral Home in
Creedmoor and at other times
at the home.
Residence: (919) 528-6428
Home Medical Equipment and Respiratory Services
Our PROFESSIONAL STAFF from Intake Specialist, Licensed Respiratory
Therapist, Nurses and Delivery Techs are here to help with your needs…
*Oxygen
*CPAP/Bi-PAP
*Specialty Supplies
*Wheelchairs
*Lift Chairs
*Hospital Beds
*Bathroom Safety Equipment
*Nebulizers
*Walkers
*Post-Mastectomy Supplies
Come visit us today or call & WE WILL DELIVER!!
142 Roxboro Rd., Oxford, NC 27565
919-693-2260 or 1-800-688-5154
Store Hours: M-F 8:30am-5:00pm
Serving Granville, Durham, Vance, Franklin, Warren and Person Counties
“More than you expect…everything you deserve.”
actively involved in Granville
County community activities
as well as serving the state
divisions.
The UDC Butner chapter
celebrated
its
fourth
anniversary on January 5th
and the Brave Young Joe Cash
Children of the Confederacy
chapter was organized several
months after the Butner UDC
was chartered. The BYJCC has
had the last three N. C.
Division C of C presidents.
Jessica Glasgow and Kara
Goss served in the post prior
to Victoria.
Both groups held a joint
Christmas party at Pergamon
Mediterranean Restaurant in
Creedmoor on Dec. 5th.
Members of both groups
delivered Christmas gifts to
the Durham VA Medical
Center. They also presented
drink tabs and cleaning
supplies to the Ronald
McDonald House in Durham
and several boxes of food items
to the Area Congregations in
Ministry (ACIM) in Oxford for
distribution to those in need.
The chapters have set as
their goals to continually learn
about their ancestry as they
study the history of North
Carolina. The groups honor
and respect all the brave young
soldiers that have served and
those that are presently
serving to protect our country.
Shown above is Victoria Anne
Hughes (left), president of the N. C.
Division Children of the
Confederacy (CofC), and Emily
Corn Champion, president of the N.
C. Division United Daughters of the
Confederacy (UDC).
CMYK
A SECTION
JANUARY 29, 2009
SPORTS
BRIEFS
FUNDRAISER
The local Fury Baseball
organization will be holding an “All
You Can Eat Spaghetti” fundraiser
February 7, 2009 from 5-9 pm at
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church
located on 2677 Hwy. 56 Creedmoor.
Adults $8.00 (12 and older) Kids
$5.00 (11 and under).
Spaghetti, Bread, Dessert, Tea,
Soda, Water. Tickets can be
purchased from players or at the
door.)
SGAA SIGN-UPS
South Granville Athletic
Association is currently seeking
players for all spring sports
including: Baseball, Softball and
Instructional Soccer. Sign ups will
take place at the Butner Sports
Arena on Saturday, Saturday,
January 31st from 9-2 and Saturday,
February 7th from 10-6 being the
final sign up. After February 7th
there is a $10 late fee.
You can sign up on-line now, it
is open, you can go to sgaaweb.com
and go ahead and sign up, you MUST
PAY before your paperwork can be
processed.
Volunteers run the entire
organization.
We need help
commissioning and coaching. If
interested please let us know.
Baseball and Softball fee is $70,
girls (ages 3-18) and boys (ages 3-18).
For more information you can
contact Sherri Marshburn 575-4526
for baseball and Andy Rutledge at
528-2900 for softball.
Instructional Soccer fee is $40
and is available for ages 3-18. You
can contact Sean Zimmerman 7649252 or Kathy Wihelm 528-9134 for
more information.
Don’t be standing in line on the final
sign up day. Register early! For
more information, go to sgaaweb.com
and click on “All Sports Information.”
UMPIRE CLINICS
Softball and Baseball clinics for
Umpires will be held at the Butner
Sports Arena on Monday 2/2/09 at 6
pm, on Wednesday 2/4/09 at 6 pm,
on Sunday 2/8/09 at 2 pm and on
Wednesday 2/11/09 at 6 pm. There
will be no charge for the clinics and
will train anyone who wants to
umpire.
For more information call
Ronald Edwards at 919-575-4334.
BOOSTER CLUB MEET
The South Granville High
School Athletic Booster Club will
meet on Monday, February 2nd at 7
pm in the South Granville High
School cafeteria.
Meetings are open to all persons
interested in promoting the athletic
program at South Granville.
Lady Hornets Win, Boys Lose
BY RITA PARRISH
SPORTS EDITOR
[email protected]
The Lady Hornets played
at home this week against
Henderson Middle beating
the Lady Rams 56-34.
During the girls game, the
scored was close in the first
half and ended in a 20 to 20
tie.
In the third quarter, the
Hornets pulled ahead by 10
ending this quarter 38-28.
The Lady Hornets held
steady and finished the game
ahead by 12.
Leading the scorebook for
the Lady Hornets was Jenna
Davis with 19 points followed
by Keena Evans with 16
points. Davis and Evans with
all time highs thus far.
Cord Michalina with the pass to JC Shelley. Stats were not available for the boys game as of press time.
Lady Warriors Defeat Lady
Vikings 53-37
&
South Granville Falls To
Webb 79-69
Lady Hornet Taylor Boyd being guarded by this Lady Ram.
JV Vikings Slay Patriots Eagles Claw Vikings
BY AMANDA DIXON
SPORTS WRITER
[email protected]
Vikings JV slay the
Southern Alamance Patriots JV
88-55.
The Vikings JV dominated
the opening quarter by a 20-2
margin. In the second quarter
the Vikings continued their high
Vikings Beat Patriots
BY AMANDA DIXON
SPORTS WRITER
[email protected]
South Granville bombards
the Southern Alamance Patriots
68-53.
Fireworks are supposed to
happen in July, but not at a
basketball game in the middle of
January. The game provided
just such a spark beginning in
the third quarter.
With
Southern Alamance trailing 3124 the game turned physical.
The coaching staff for Southern
Alamance received a technical
for screaming at the officials
over the physical play. The third
quarter ended with the Vikings
Tiana Jones finished with 13
points as Taylor Boyd added
four to the books. Caitlyn
Robbins and Chelsea Hunter
each scored two.
Defensively, Boyd led with
14 rebounds and Davis with
10. Boyd had five steals and
Davis had three. Cayce Bell
stole the ball twice and Jones
once. Boyd led with four
assists, Bell three, Davis,
Jones and Evans each with
two.
Also contributing to the
win were Cayla Luck,
Aquayla Swann, Deanna
Allen and Teshlyn Smith.
The Lady Hornets are
scheduled to play at home on
Thursday, January 29th
against the Lady Falcons of
Butner-Stem Middle School.
pressure fast paced game and
struck for 18 more points. By the
end of the first half the South
Granville JV held a comfortable
38-22 lead.
The Vikings JV continued to
dominate the JV Patriots by
rolling off 28 points in the third
quarter. The Patriots JV trailed
66-39 at the end of three
quarters. The Vikings held the
Patriots JV to 16 points in the
final frame while lighting up the
board for 22. The Vikings JV
were victorious by a 33-point
margin.
James Pegram led the Viking
JV with 24 points. Brandon
Jefferson finished with 17 points.
Allen Kapherr added 12 points.
Cedric Cash recorded 11 points.
Drew Hall and Amos Tilley
finished with eight points each.
Miles Dillard logged three points.
Darius Smith finished with two
points. Malcolm Jones, Zack
Cooper and C. Hodge each
finished with one point.
leading 47-34.
The fourth quarter featured
a two handed slam by A. J.
Ragland and a technical foul on
Tony Byrd for removing his
jersey while still on the court.
The players settled down and
finished off the Patriots by 15
points.
A.J. Ragland led the Vikings
with18 points. Ian Bosley added
12 points. Tony Cole dropped 10
points against the Patriots.
Mike Page recorded eight points.
Tony Byrd finished with six
points. Kadeem Peace and
Seydric Hester each scored four
points. Brad Cox rounded out
the Vikings scoring with two
points.
Drew Hall for South Granville lights up Southern Alamance for three.
BY AMANDA DIXON
SPORTS WRITER
[email protected]
Eastern Alamance Eagles
claw the South Granville Vikings
87-71.
The Vikings trailed 15-12 at
the end of the first quarter, but
fought back to a 17 all tie at the
6:14 mark in the second quarter.
The Eagles pulled ahead 40-21
going into the locker room at the
half.
South Granville inched back
into the game in the third
quarter closing the gap to 16 as
the buzzer sounded to end the
third quarter. The South
Granville student cheering
section created an opportunity
for the Vikings to get back into
the game by disrupting the
concentration of an Eastern
Alamance player at the foul line.
The player then gestured toward
the crowd and the referees called
a technical on the player. The
Vikings pulled to within 10 at 6353 with 6:55 remaining in the
final quarter. Eastern Alamance
pulled away in the closing
minutes to take the 87-71
conference win.
Cole Ross led the Vikings
with 18 points. Ian Bosley
finished with 15 points. Tony
Byrd scored 13 points. Mike
Page added nine points. Daniel
Johnson and A.J. Ragland each
scored six points. A. Johnson
and D. Braswell scored two
apiece for the Vikings.
Cole Ross # 4 splits Eastern Alamance defenders to score two points.
Lady Vikings Stumble To Lady Patriots
BY AMANDA DIXON
SPORTS WRITER
[email protected]
Tony Byrd #23 drives the lane for two against Southern Alamance.
Lady Vikings stumble
against the Southern Alamance
Lady Patriots 39-26.
Turnovers and poor shooting
usually spell disaster for any
team, which was the case for the
Lady Vikings. The first quarter
alone the Lady Vikings shot 17
percent from the field. This led
to a 7-6 Southern Alamance lead.
The Lady Vikings managed to
score nine in the second quarter
to trail by just six at the half.
The Lady Vikings cut into
the Lady Patriots led by one at
the end of the third quarter.
Trailing 27-22 as the fourth
quarter began the Lady Vikings
turned the ball over eight times.
This allowed the Lady Patriots
to begin pulling away. The Lady
Patriots won by 13.
Stephanie Bauchkey led the
Lady Vikings with 11 points and
eight rebounds.
Jewell
Yarborough finished with five
points and team high nine points.
Rachel Vera scored four points,
grabbed two rebounds and had
two assists. Michelle Hicks
added two points, four rebounds,
and one assist. Lindsey Tilley
finished with two points and
three rebounds. Siera Burwell
recorded two points and five
points. Courtney Estes grabbed
three rebounds and had one
assist. Kelsey Fraser had two Michelle Hicks for the Lady Vikings looks to pass the ball against Southern
rebounds and one assist. Kyra
Alamance.
Hodge had two rebounds.
CMYK
12a The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday January 29, 2009
Panthers Battered Junior Varsity Panthers Fall To Red Rams
BY AMANDA DIXON
BY AMANDA DIXON
SPORTS WRITER
[email protected]
The Red Rams batter
Granville Central 68-50 in a
Northern
Carolina
conference game.
Franklinton built their
lead to 16-4 by the end of the
first quarter. The Panthers
were able to hold the Red
Rams to 14 points in the
second quarter while scoring
10 to close the half trailing
30-14.
The Panthers scored 21
in the third quarter to close
the gap to 13 by the end of
the third quarter 48-35. The
Panthers continued to make
headway against the Red
Rams as they pulled to
within four points with six
minutes to go in the final
frame. The Red Rams were
able to pull away in the
closing minutes for the 6850 conference win.
Coach Mike McDaniel
commented, “ We had eight
turnovers for the entire
game. This is an all time low
for the Men’s Basketball
team.
This is very
impressive being that
Franklinton pressed and
trapped the entire game.”
McDaniel also said, “We fell
down early (missed a lot of
open jump shots and layups), but with a few
adjustments at the half we
were able to make a run in the
third to close within 13 at the
end of the third We kept that
run going in the 4th and got
within four points with about
six minutes to go, but it takes
a lot of energy to make such a
run and we just could not
finish. They made their free
throws down the stretch to
pull away, but I’m very pleased
with how hard my boys played
against a very good team.
Franklinton may be the most
complete (post and guards)
team we’ve played all season.”
Devon Oakley led the
Panthers with 21 points, 12
rebounds and one steal. DJ
Chavis finished with 19 points
including four three pointers,
one block, two steals and five
assists. Tevin Estes added
seven points. Troy Geradi
finished with three points and
two blocks.
Devon Oakley led the
Panthers with 22 points (five
three pointers), nine rebounds
and two steals. DJ Chavis
finished with 14 points, five
rebounds, three steals, one
block and five assists. Charles
Jefferson added three points.
Khadir Fulcher scored two
points. Tevin Estes, Tevin
Wortham and Deshaun Cheek
each recorded two points.
Cheek also led the team with
11 rebounds. Dustin Penny
tallied one point for the
Panthers.
Soaring high. Tevin Hester #5 for Granville Central flies through the Red
Ram defenders. Hester had 24 point for the Panthers.
SPORTS WRITER
[email protected]
Granville Central’s JV falls to
Franklinton Red Rams 71-59 in
a game postponed due to
inclement weather.
The Panthers JV spotted the
Red Rams a 21-eight lead at the
end of the first quarter. The
second quarter was a toss up as
both teams scored nine points as
the Red Rams JV took a 30-17
lead into intermission.
The Panthers began fighting
back in the third quarter scoring
21 points while allowing the Red
Rams to score 23. The Panthers
again cut into the Red Rams lead
with another 21 point quarter,
but could not overcome the first
quarter
deficit.
The
Franklinton JV held on for the
71-59 win.
“The guys played with a lot
of heart and determination
tonight. We put ourselves in a
first quarter hole and had to
fight our way back in the game.
We cut into their lead with a few
good runs. Their guys made a
big shot every time we made a
run. Our guys didn’t give up.
Very pleased with the effort.”
commented Coach Raymond
Noel.
Tevin Hester led the
Panthers JV with 24 points,
seven steals and two assists.
Keyante Lindsey finished with
Devon Oakley #15 drives to the basket for two over the Red Ram defender.
Lady Eagles Defeat Lady Vikings
BY AMANDA DIXON
SPORTS WRITER
[email protected]
Eastern Alamance Lady
Eagles defeated the South
Granville Lady Vikings 70-33.
Briana Taborn returned to
the Lady Vikings line up after
suffering a mild concussion
against Webb, but that could
not help the Lady Vikings
overcome the trapping
defense applied by the Lady
Eagles. The Lady Vikings
trailed 39-23 at the half and
was only able to manage 10
points in the final two
quarters. The Lady Eagles
closed out the 70-33
conference win.
Briana Taborn led the
Lady Vikings with 14 points.
Michelle Hicks added six
points. Stephanie Bauchkey
and Kelsey Fraser each
scored four points. Rachel
Vera finished with three
points. Jewell Yarborough
scored two for the Lady
Vikings. Courtney Estes,
Lindsey Tilley, Siera Burwell
and Kyra Hodge all saw
action for the Lady Vikings.
11 points, six rebounds, three
steals and four assists. Roderick
Nelson recorded a double-double
with 10 points, 10 rebounds and
two blocks. Mike Hart added
four points and four rebounds.
Charlie Norwood had three
points and six rebounds.
Raynard Williams tallied three
points. Kenneth Walls finished
with two points. Tobias Green
added two points and two
rebounds. Michael Blackburn
finished with three steals.
SGAA Tots Learning
Basketball Skills
BY RITA PARRISH
SPORTS EDITOR
[email protected]
The SGAA Tots played
at the Sports Arena last
week and over the
weekend. There are eight
teams this year in the Tots
league. Listed are the
teams, players, sponsors
and coaches.
Green Machine
Sponsor
Butner-Creedmoor
News
Coach: Yvonne ScottPlayers:
Nathaniel
Kornegay, Anna Lewis,
Patrick Conley, Justin
Stansbury, Ray Jackson.
The Pride
Sponsor
Butner-Creedmoor
News
Coaches: Carlson &
Shndra
Tanner-Asst.
Coach John StansburyPlayers: Jarrod Lyons,
John Stansbury, Collin
Tanner, Seth Jones.
Blast
Coach: Brian KilgoreAsst. Coach Talaya
Vaughn-Players: Zamari
Mangum,
Kaden
McLymont, Gavin Cudak,
Brian Kilgore, Jeremy
Daniel.
Warriors
Coach:
Brandon
A u t r e y Asst. Coach: Stuart
Aycock-Players: Bradley
Aycock, Micah Smith,
Caleb Stone, Jor ’im
Harrison,
Trevor
Meredith.
Hornets
Coach:
Melvin
Conyers-Players: Cody
Milko, Brandon Pulliam,
Peyton Tuck, Ryder Hunt.
Tarheels
Sponsor
Valero
Coach: Jeff FaucetteAsst.
Coach
Les
Tr u e h e a r t - P l a y e r s :
Joshua Philpott, Chase
Smith, Baylee Trueheart,
Troy Evans, Conner
Faucette.
Stingers
Coach: Ed MooreAsst. Coach Sherri Moore
& Keith Gardner-Players:
Sha-King Allah, Thomas
Baines, Keith Gardner,
Kendrick Moore.
Knights
Sponsor
Butner-Creedmoor
News
Coach: Yvonne ScottAsst. Coach Tammy
Jackson-Players: Ray
Jackson, Taisean HesterWilliam,
Justin
Stansbury,
Patrick
Conley.
KNIGHTS VS. STINGERS
Briana Taborn #33 drives the lane for two against the Lady Eagles.
Granville Central Lady Panthers Beat Lady Rams
BY AMANDA DIXON
SPORTS WRITER
[email protected]
Kelva Atkins scores 26 as
the Lady Panthers hold off
the hard charging Lady Red
Rams from Franklinton 5545 in the conference clash.
The Lady Panthers took
control of the game from the
opening tip running off 18
straight points before the
Lady Red Rams could put
their first point on the board
at the 2:08 mark in the first
quarter. The quarter ended
with the Lady Panthers
holding a 20-point lead at 244. Panther Coach Steve
Dickinson substituted freely
in the second quarter as the
Lady Red Rams picked up
their intensity level bring the
score to 27-18 at the half.
The Lady Panthers
outscored the Lady Red Rams
13-11 in the third quarter to
maintain an 11-point lead at
40-29. The Lady Panther
reserves hit the floor in the
closing minutes to finish the
game against the Lady Red
Rams. The Lady Panthers
held on for the 55-45 win.
In addition to scoring 26
points, Kelva Atkins finished
with two assists, seven
rebounds and two steals.
Daneisha Hester added eight
points, two assists, one block,
seven points and four steals.
CeCe Crews recorded eight
points, three assists, two
rebounds and four steals.
Briana Haith logged five
points, two assist and five
rebounds. Johnny Jo Watson
scored five points, had one
assist and rebound. Sierra
Colquitt added two points and
two steals. Dominique MooreAlston rounded out the
Panthers scoring with one
point to go with one rebound.
Victoria McAllister finished
with one assist, one rebound
and one steal. Brittny Shells
finished with two rebounds.
Katrina Mebane finished
with one rebound. Kellie
Thornton added one steal.
Hannah Glover also saw
action for the Lady Panthers.
GREEN MACHINE VS. WARRIORS
Holding on. Briana Haith #2 gets fouled while attempting a shot against
the Lady Red Rams from Franklinton as Coach Lester Wilder frowns in
the background. Haith finished with five points.
HORNETS VS. TARHEELS
NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS
$59.95 Down
$15 A Month
No Contract
You must be 18 years or older. Credit Card & Checking Account Only. Ends Jan. 30, 09
THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE!
114 E. Industry Drive, Oxford
919-693-6826
Accepted
10 Year
Rust
Warranty
$1695.00
plus tax
CMYK
The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday, January 29, 2009 13a
Letters To The Editor
NBAF CONGRESSIONAL
CONCERN
The Landmark Quartet will be in concert at Providence Baptist Church
on Sunday, Feb. 1 at 6 pm. The church is located at 5603 Old Route
75, Oxford. Refreshments will be served following the concert.
Consider Growing Your
Vegetable Transplants
BY CARL CANTALUPPI
Growing
your
own
transplants is a challenge, and
it's fun. Besides, you can
realize a number of benefits by
growing your own vegetable
transplants.
The major
advantage is having plants of
the varieties you want. You can
grow just the number you need
of each, and produce them as
you want them. The haz-ard
of importing pest problems is
also reduced, and because you
control the germination
conditions, you get the
maximum number of plants
from costly seed. Vegetable
plants can be grown under
lights indoors, in cold frames,
hotbeds,
or
plastic
greenhouses.
Any shallow containers
with drain holes can be used for
growing trans-plants. For
germinating, the flat inserts
with narrow depressions for
starter
mix
are
very
convenient. They are available
at most garden stores. The
medium for germinating seed
should be sterile and uniformly
fine. It should be well aerated
and well drained, yet have good
water retention properties.
The commercial artificial
starter mixes, available from
garden centers, hardware
stores, or greenhouses are
excellent. You may use the
same medium for grow-ing the
small plants up to transplant
size.
Cool Season Vegetables
Four to six week old
transplants of broccoli,
cabbage, and cauliflower survive well in the garden and are
frost tolerant.
These
vegetables can be started from
seed indoors in early February.
They can be transplanted into
the garden early to mid-March.
Optimum
soil
mix
temperatures for germination
indoors is 70 to 80 degrees F.
Seedlings should emerge in 57 days. Growing tempera-
tures should be 60 to 70
degrees F. during the day and
50 to 60 degrees F. at night.
Warm Season Vegetables
Tomato transplants 6 to 8
weeks old may be set out after
the danger of frost is past,
during early to mid-May. Seed
germination should occur in
about 6 days with 75 to 80
degrees F. soil temperatures.
Tomato seeds should not be
started indoors until midMarch.
Pepper and eggplant
transplants should be 6 to 8
weeks of age to be transplanted
into the garden in mid-May.
Seed should be started indoors
during early March, with seeds
germinating in about 2 weeks.
As soon as developing
seedlings have their first pair
of true leaves (the leaves that
emerge after the seed leaves
emerge), they need to be
transplanted into individual
containers such as styrofoam
cups. Handle them by the leaf,
not by the stem, so that you
don't crush them. Give them
enough room. Crowded plants
become spindly and weak.
Since seedlings of vine
crops (cantaloupes, cucumbers,
watermelon, and squash) do
not transplant well if stems
and roots are injured, and they
are warm season vegetables,
easily injured by frost, sow
them directly into the garden
in mid-May.
Remember to use florescent
lighting for your transplants
and never keep the lights more
than 3 inches above the plants
at any time, or they will
become tall and spindly.
On April 15, we still have a
50% chance of frost to occur in
our area. Remember that the
chance of frost occurrence does
not decrease to 5% until early
May. Putting out warm season
vegetables in the garden before
that time increases the risk of
plant death due to freezing
temperatures.
To The Editor:
The following is my
response to the fax from your
publication asking my opinion
of locating the NBAF on the
mainland United States, as
well as what studies shave
been done, and what might be
the next steps:
“To relocate the National
Bio and Agro Defense Facility
far from the isolation that
Plum Island provides to the
heart of America’s agriculture
industry is a foolish tempting
of fate.
“The Department of
Homeland Security seems to
have given inadequate
consideration to the risks of
transferring foot-and-mouth
and other highly-contagious
diseases to the mainland,
which
prompted
my
Subcommittee on Oversight
and Investigations to examine
the issue for ourselves.
“Despite the concerns over
relocating the Plum Island
facility raised by our
that will have an opportunity
to live here. They will be
blessed by your hard work and
never know what you did.
Thank you from all of the
present residents that live in
Granville County who will
have a better chance to live out
their lives.
This has been an ongoing
silent stress in my life, not
knowing if I should stay and
continue my work or plan on
moving in a few years because
of the Bio lab. You have all been
a blessing to my family and
many others.
It really shows that right
action can influence the world
for good.
GNATS THANKED
Our hearts now have to be
To The Editor:
I am writing this as an open with the residents in Kansas.
Bonnie Barnett-Murphy
letter to all GNAT members:
Creedmoor
I can’t thank you enough for
LOCAL
GOOD
SAMARITANS
all your dedication in making
the Bio Lab go away. Let me To The Editor:
also thank you for all the
I would like to extend
people who don’t know how to sincere thanks to some nice
thank you because they don’t gentlemen. I do not know their
know who you are.
names.
Thank you from all the
Saturday morning I was
future children and families going to church, New Liberty
investigation
and
the
Government Accountability
Office,
DHS
appears
determined to move forward
with its ill-conceived proposal.
“As DHS submits its plans,
my Subcommittee will raise its
concerns with the Obama
administration to ensure that
the potentially devastating
consequences of this decision
are thoroughly considered.”
Bart Stupak
U. S. Congressman (D-MI)
Chairman
House Energy and
Commerce Subcommittee
on Oversight and
Investigations
Genealogical Society Meeting
The monthly meeting of
the Granville County
Genealogical Society 1746,
Inc. will be held February 5,
2009 at 6:30 P.M. in the
Richard H. Thornton Library
Conference Room.
After a short business
meeting, the program will
concentrate on Black History
Month. In February, the
society traditionally focuses
on black families, heritage,
achievements and culture.
We are honored to have as
speaker for the evening Earl
Ijames whose subject will be
Black Confederate Soldiers.
Ijames was born in
Winston Salem, NC, where he
was a graduate of the George
Washington Carver High
School. In 1991, he graduated
from North Carolina State
University. Most of his
professional career was spent
at the North Carolina State
Archives. In June 2008, he was
made Curator of African
American and Community
History at the North Carolina
History Museum in Raleigh.
He has an excellent reputation
as a skilled researcher and
contributor to numerous
community outreach events, as
well as participating in many
varied community services
such as Chairman, Economic
Development,
Wendell
Chamber of Commerce,Wake
County Historic Preservation
Commission, and charter
member of the East Wake
County Kiwanis Club. He has
held leadership roles on the
East Wake Academy Board,
and has served as coach or
SUNROCK HEARING
RESCHEDULED
A public hearing on a
special Use Permit application
orginally scheduled to be held
December 4th in Butner has
been rescheduled for Jan. 29th
it is to consider a request from
Carolina Sunrock to expand
the existing rock quarry to an
additional 135.5 acres zoned
heavy industry. The hearing
was tabled at the request of
Carolina Sunrock.
In a letter to the Town
Council the Sunrock Group
said the they had a difficulty
in
arranging
for
the
appearance of one of their
expert witnesses who had to
travel several hundred miles to
attend the event. They asked
that
the
hearing
be
rescheduled.
Change Made
The Butner Town Council
made the decision at the
December meeting to name a
Butner Zoning Board of
Adjustment rather than
having the Town Council serve
as the Board of Adjustment as
had been done in the past.
assistant coach for youth
football and basketball
leagues.
He is married to Eugenia
Parham,, whose family roots
run deep in Granville County.
They have three children. In
1996, he and his wife moved
a victorian ranch house from
Zebulon, NC to Wendell, NC.
Currently, they are residing
in the house while restoring
it.
Meetings of the Granville
County Genealogical Society
are open to the public, and
guests are always welcome.
Members and guests are
urged to join Earl Ijames at
the Thornton Library in
Oxford as he presents his
tribute to Black History
Month.
Missionary Baptist Church, in
Franklin County. I had car
trouble at the Corner Grocery,
located between Creedmoor
and Wilton.
A gentleman drove up and
tried to help me. When he was
giving up, two more men drove
up in a truck.
They said, “We can get her
rolling together.”
In a few minutes, my car
was purring like a kitten, and
I was on my way. Of course, I
said, “Thank you, very much.”
I want them to know that I
thanked God for them. I pray
that God will continue to bless
them.
I wish a prosperous,
healthy and happy new year
for them. I hope they read The
Butner-Creedmoor News.
Inez Mann Neal
Butner
New
Arrival
CHLOE ELIZABETH
FRIEDRICHS
Kurt and Kristy Friedrichs
announce the birth of their
daughter, Chloe Elizabeth,
born the 20th day of January,
2009, weighing 7 lbs. and 0 ozs.
at Rex Hospital. Chloe has a
brother, Cody, 14.
Maternal grandparents are
Jesse
E.
Vaughan
of
Mufreesboro, NC and Linda
Sawyer of Colerain, NC.
Paternal grandparents are
Nick Friedrichs of Franklinton,
N. C. and Nancy Miller of
Charleston, S. C.
Say...
I L ove Y ou
In The Butner-Creedmoor News
Thursday, February 12th
Family,
friends
and
sweethearts will never be so
overwhelmed by the love of that
special someone as they will be
when your ad appears in the
newspaper. Each ad will appear
on February 12th.
DEADLINE is February 9th
at 3:00 p.m. All ads must be
prepaid. Up to 25 words may
appear in the ad. The cost is
$15.00. Photos may be included
for an additional $5.00
NAME
Message Here
Message Here
Message
Here
ACTUAL SIZE
GRAND
OPENING
This Sat.
Jan 31st
9:30am - 4:00pm
Upscale Thrift At
Affordable Prices!
HOURS:
Mon - Closed
9:30 - 6:00
Tues - Fri
Sat - 9:30 - 4:00
Closed Sun
Great New
Look:
Painted,
Organized,
Totally
Revitalized
“Good Samaritan”
“A compassionate
person who
unselfishly helps
others”
Hwy #56 - 103 B, Creedmoor (in old Thrift Shop location)
*Ronnie & Denise Pipkin - New Owners*
COMPLETE COUPON & MAIL TO OR BRING BY:
The Butner-Creedmoor News, P.O. Box 726
418 N. Main St., Creedmoor, NC 27522
Message:
From:
Your Name & Daytime Phone:
Address:
ENCLOSE CHECK IN THE AMOUNT OF $15 00 or $20 00
s r
r
TM
ACCEPTED
CMYK
14a The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday, January 15, 2009
Granville Education Foundation Awards Grant
The Granville Education
Foundation has awarded a
Success through Technology
grant to Joe Toler-Oak Hill
Elementary School in the
amount of $5,500. The Success
through Technology Grant
program was created to enhance
student achievement through
the use of technology in the
classroom. The Foundation has
already awarded grants to
Northern Granville Middle
School and Granville Central
High School during this
academic year.
This grant was written by
the parents of first grade
student, Ridge Huff. Randall
and Sandy Huff realized the
importance of new technology
and worked closely with the
principal to develop an
entertaining way to get other
parents and community
members involved in this new
initiative. This grant provides
for three Smart Boards and
three digital projectors. This
technology will be introduced to
the students and community
through a Granville Countystyle game show called, "Are You
Smarter Than A Toler Tiger?"
The Smart Board will then be
used for enhanced classroom
instruction in all subjects.
"The students and staff of
Joe Toler-Oak Hill Elementary
School are the real winners
today," said Principal Melody
Wilson. "Our staff is eager to use
the new technology to raise
awareness of technology and to
better engage students of all
learning styles in the
classroom."
This Success through
Technology grant is made
possible by the Lenovo Hope
Fund of Triangle Community
Foundation.
The Granville Education
Foundation is a non-profit,
community-based organization
working to enhance the
performance of all Granville
County
students.
The
Foundation is independent of
Granville County Schools but
works in collaboration with the
schools and with business and
community partners to provide
funds to enrich and enhance the
educational opportunities
Joe Toler-Oak Hill Elementary School Principal Melody Wilson and
provided by the schools. For
parents, Randall and Sandy Huff accept a check from Granville Education
more information, call the
Foundation President Cindy R. Keene and Technology Committee Chair
Foundation office at 693-7047.
Chuck Layton
IRS Urges Low Income Taxpayers To Review
Their Eligibilty For Earned Income Credit
The Internal Revenue
Service today urged working
taxpayers with low incomes to
review their eligibility for the
Earned Income Tax Credit to
see if they qualify for tax relief.
This year, the IRS and 14,000
volunteer sites are available to
help taxpayers figure out their
eligibility.
The IRS receives the
majority of EITC claims in
February, usually after
workers receive their Forms W2. EITC recipients may also
qualify for free tax preparation
and e-filing through Free File,
which is located on IRS.gov.
“This is an important
program, and you should check
to see if you qualify,” said IRS
Commissioner Mark W.
R A IN S T A X SE R V IC E
Mel A. Rains
Lisa C. Rains
38 Years Experience
“We Do All States”
107 Royall Road
Oxford, NC 27565
919-691-1489
919-693-4658
[email protected]
Everson. “EITC rules can be
complicated so you should
carefully
review
the
qualifications. Know, don’t
guess, if you are qualified. If
in doubt, contact the IRS or its
volunteer partners for help. If
someone prepares your taxes,
seek out a reputable
professional who understands
EITC rules and who will avoid
common mistakes.” The IRS
also reminded military families
that many of them may also
qualify for EITC because
supplemental payments and
combat pay are exempt from
the income calculations.
Friday, Jan. 30 is National
Earned Income Tax Credit
(EITC) Day.
Due to the economic
downturn, individuals who
may not have qualified in the
past may now be eligible for
EITC. A taxpayer who earned
less than $42,000 in 2008 may
be eligible for up to about
$4,800 refundable tax credit.
In
order
to
assist
potentially eligible taxpayers.
The IRS office in Durham at
3306 Chapel Hill Blvd. will be
open for special hours
Saturday Jan. 31, Feb. 7 and
21.
Volunteer organizations
who have been trained by IRS
will also be assisting
taxpayers.
Community
Reinvestment Assoc. of NC at
2107 Hillandale Road, Durham
is one in the local area. State
Employees Credit Union offices
will offer this service in all 224
in North Carolina.
GHS Implements New Initiative
Granville Health System
(GHS) announced that it is
participating in a new quality
and patient safety initiative
endorsed by the North
Carolina Hospital Association.
The program, North
Carolina System for Hospital
Infection Measures (NC
SHIM),
includes
the
development of a voluntary,
confidential, peer-review
protected database to collect
information on various
measures related to infection
prevention in support of the
goal to eliminate hospitalacquired infections (HAI).
The effort began at the
state executive and legislative
level when in August 2007
Governor Easley signed a bill
which formed the Advisory
Commission for Hospital
Infection Incidence. In 2008
the legislation was amended to
re-name the group the Joint
Study Commission on Hospital
Infection
Control
and
Disclosure.
NC SHIM collects data on
ventilator process measures/
bundle compliance, line
insertion process measures/
bundle compliance and central
line-associated bloodstream
infection rate per 1000 central
line days. Future measures for
NC SHIM may include surgical
site infection rates and
methicillin-resistant
Staphylococcus
aureus
(MRSA) rates.
SHIM is North Carolina's
first standardized surveillance
system that will yield statelevel
infection
data.
Participation will also allow
hospitals to begin compliance
with the Joint Commission
National Patient Safety Goal 7
(NPSG.07.04.01). This system
will provide reliable, useful
information that is usually not
found in public reporting of
hospital-level infection rates,
such as:
• Estimating compliance rates
to evidence-based processes of
care to prevent ventilatorassociated pneumonia and
central-line bloodstream
infections
• Using national measurement
specifications, which allows for
comparison of NC infection
Letters To The Editor Policy
вќ‘
вќ‘
вќ‘
вќ‘
вќ‘
вќ‘
The Butner-Creedmoor News welcomes letters to the editor.
The requirements of publication are printed below:
To be published, a letter must bear the SIGNATURE of the writer. A typed or
printed name alone is not sufficient. Unsigned letters will not be published.
The writer’s address and phone number should appear on the letter to allow for
verification. The phone number will not be published.
Because of space limitations, poetry generally cannot be published.
Letters endorsing political candidates or stating positions on referenda will not be
published in the two issues immediately preceding an election.
Generally, the paper will print only one letter from the same writer within
60 days.
The Butner-Creedmoor News reserves the right to edit letters for grammar and
length and to edit or reject letters that are libelous or, in management’s opinion, of
questionable taste.
rates to the nation and other
states
Providing information on best
practices to stimulate quality
improvement
• Preparing for potential public
reporting of infection rates
As
a
participating
organization, Granville Health
System
will
receive
confidential feedback which
will allow the health system to
compare performance against
de-identified NC hospitals,
peer groups, and national
benchmarks and will help
guide GHS’s ongoing efforts to
prevent HAIs.
“The NC SHIM initiative is
an important component of
Granville Health System’s
commitment to patient safety,”
says L. Lee Isley, GHS Chief
Executive Officer. “The
program also supports our
dedication
to
quality
improvement as we maintain
our position as the preferred
health care provider for the
communities we serve,” Isley
continued.
Granville Health System
provides quality care to more
than 60,000 patients a year
and has over 100 experienced
physicians
representing
numerous specialties on its
medical staff. The main
campus is located at 1010
College Street, Oxford, North
Carolina, 27565. For more
information about Granville
Health System, visit GHS
online
at
www.granvillemedical.com.
CMYK
The Butner-Creedmoor News, Thursday,January 29, 2009 15a
Updated Enrichment & Scholarship Information
Listed below is updated
enrichment and scholarship
information provided by South
Granville High School of
Engineering and Applied
Studies.
*Betty S. Abernathy
Memorial Scholarship in
Science Education: This
scholarship will be awarded to
deserving students pursuing a
degree in the area of Science
Education through the College
of Education at East Carolina
University and to those who
wish to pursue a career as a
science educator. The $2,500
($1,250 for each of two
semesters) scholarship will be
awarded to students who meet
the following criteria: (a)
acceptance to attend East
Carolina University, (b)
academic merit Г± at least a 3.0
high school GPA, and (c)
demonstrated commitment to
the study of and a career in
science education, specifically
preparing to be a high school
teacher. The scholarship
award shall be for one
academic year; however, the
scholarship may be renewed
as long as the recipient
continues to meet the
eligibility requirements. For
an application, see your
guidance
counselor.
Application deadline is
January 30.
ARMY
ROTC
Scholarships: Start life
without college debt. Four-,
three- and two-year meritbased,
full-tuition
scholarships are available.
Scholarships include stipends
up to $5,000 in living expenses
per year and additional
allowances for books and fees.
For more information, visit
info.goarmy.com/rotc/2 or call
1-877-936-7724.
The American Legion
High School Oratorical
Scholarship Program: You
are eligible to participate in
this program if you are a
citizen or a lawful resident of
the
United
States.
Contestants must be under
the age of 20 years on the date
of the National Contest and
must be enrolled in a public,
parochial, military, private or
state accredited home school.
Participants in the Oratorical
contest share $138,000 in
college scholarships. Visit The
American Legion on the
Internet at: www.legion.org
for more information.
America’s National
Teenager Scholarships:
America’s National Teenager
Scholarship Organization
(ANTSO) and the North
Carolina National Teenager
Scholarship Organization is
now accepting applications for
the 2009 North Carolina
National Teenager Pageant to
be held March 20-21, 2009, in
Charlotte. Scholarships are
awarded at state and national
levels. Runner-ups also qualify
for
cash
and
college
scholarships.
For more
information,
visit
www.ncscnationalteen.com.
*
Best
Buy
@15
Scholarship Program: One
thousand scholarships of
$1,500 each will be awarded to
9-12 grade students who have
solid grades and are involved
in volunteer community
service or work experience.
Visit their website to apply online at www.bestbuy.com/
scholarships or www.at15.com.
Apply by February 15, 2009.
Boston University: The
University offers a range of
scholarships that recognizes
students who have excelled
both inside and outside the
classroom for their academic
achievement and personal
accomplishments. Several of
the scholarships require that
the student be nominated or
recommended by a principal,
teacher, or advisor. Other
scholarships may require
additional
application
materials such as essays,
personal interviews, portfolios,
or auditions. All scholarship
instructions, recommendation
forms, nomination forms, and
essay materials are available
online
at
www.bu.edu/
admissions/scholarships.
* Aubrey Lee Brooks
Foundation Scholarship:
This scholarship is for
graduating high school
students who will enroll as
first-year college students
during the academic year 20092010 at North Carolina State
University (NCSU), the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), or the
University at North Carolina
at Greensboro (UNC-G), have
financial need and have strong
academic standing. The
maximum Brooks Scholarship
awards will be $8,200 for the
2009-2010 year ($4,100 each
semester). The Aubrey Lee
Brooks Scholarship application
is available and located online
at www.CFNC.org/brooks. This
site provides a link to the CSS
Financial Aid PROFILE, which
is required for determining
financial need. Applicants
should submit the completed
CSS PROFILE online on or
before January 25, 2009; the
completed Brooks Application
should be submitted online on
or before February 1, 2009.
Robert
C.
Byrd
Scholarship Program: This
program is designed to
recognize exceptional high
school seniors who show
promise
of
continued
excellence in postsecondary
education. A minimum GPA is
a 3.5 on an unweighted scale
and a SAT combined total of at
least 1860 or ACT score of 28
or greater is required in order
to be considered. One student
HUNTING
are just drinking .” He said his
wife is scared to go up nearby
roads, because “some hunters
are belligerent or wild.”
Commissioner Chairman
Hubert Gooch explained that
many
of
the
county
commissioners live in rural
areas and have had similar
experiences.
Commissioner
James
Lumpkins asked “Why can’t
hunters and landowners get
along.” He said that he had
been aware of the problem for
a number of years.
Commissioner Ron Alligood
said “It looks like to me the
hunters need to get with the
landowners and get it
straightened out.” Alligood
said, There was an attempt
made at one time to run me off
my own land. “It didn’t work,”
he explained.
Chairman Gooch assured
both the landowners and
hunters that the Granville
Commissioners would address
the concerns that had
“We as a board will address
this issue one way or the other,”
he stated.
Gooch also
commented that he expected
this problem will likely be a
subject of discussion at the
Commissioners
Annual
Retreat which is scheduled for
January 30th and 31st this
year.
[Continued From Page 1A]
his and fellow residents land.
James Morgan, who
described himself as a hunter
who hunts with dogs rose to
say that, “I would put my hand
on a Bible to state that nothing
like this has ever happened
with our hunting club.”
Morgan brought a small
hunting dog to the meeting
which he said is the type dog
that he now uses to hunt.
He also said that his club
has decided to use only
shotguns and buckshot to
ensure a shorter firing
distance.
Harris Seaton, another
speaker said he thought the
custom of hunting with dogs
changed when hunters began
using CB radios, radio
controlled collars and four
wheel drive pick ups to hunt
with the hunters staying close
to their trucks. Seaton said
he felt that with hunters
staying along the roadsides
with loaded guns and more
hunters crowding into rural
neighborhoods, “it’s only a
matter of time before there is
a bad incident.”
Another speaker, Oscar
Anderson said his wife told
him, “They ain’t hunting, they
will be recommended by his/
her high school. If you are
interested in applying for this
scholarship, please see your
guidance
counselor.
Applications must be received
by 5:00pm on February 6, 2009.
Center for Student
Opportunities (CSO): CSO
College Center is an online
clearinghouse of college
program and admissions
information serving firstgeneration, low-income, and
minority student populations.
Learn more about these
outreach, recruitment, and
retention programs by visiting
www.CSOpportunity.org.
The
Christian
Connector
Inc.:
This
organization provides a free
Christian college information
service as well as a $2,500
Christian college scholarship
drawing. Students can log onto
www.christianconnector.com to
request information and
automatically be entered in the
$2,500 scholarship drawing.
*The
Discover(r)
Scholarship Program: This
program will award ten
$30,000 scholarships to diverse
high school juniors based on
their exemplary achievements
in leadership and community
service while overcoming an
obstacle. Scholarships may be
applied towards costs for
college, university, specialized
training or education beyond
high school in any career path
the
winner
chooses.
Applications are available at
http://pull.xmr3.com/p/62217 B E 2 / 5 5 3 0 8 9 8 /
clickto2_mcommunityscholarship.shtml.html. The
application deadline is
January 31, 2009.
Benjamin N. Duke
Scholarship Program: This
scholarship program covers
100% of tuition as well as 100%
of room, board and mandatory
fees. The value of the
scholarship, including summer
enhancement experiences,
exceeds $200,000 over 8
semesters. To be considered:
Apply to Duke. All applicants
to Duke are considered for
Duke’s merit scholarships.
Apply
at:
http://
www.admissions.duke.edu/.
For more information on
Duke’s Financial Aid Initiative,
including the enhanced
financial aid that Duke is
offering,
visit:
http://
dukefinancialaid.duke.edu.
* East Carolina College
of Education Scholarships:
Awards range from $300 to
$6,000.
Information,
application and reference
forms can be found on the
College of Education website
at:
WWW.ECU.EDU/CSE
D
U
C
/
SCHOALRSHIPS.CFM. For
more information, contact
Gayle McLawhorn at 328-6397
([email protected])
Application deadline is
January 30, 2009.
* FAFSA Day 2009: On
Saturday, February 21, 2009
North Carolina’s high school
seniors and their families will
have the opportunity to get
help
completing
and
electronically submitting their
Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) forms.
Students planning to go to any
college can participate in the
FAFSA Day program at any
location; students do not have
to have plans to attend the host
college to receive assistance
from the financial aid officers.
The FAFSA Day program
will also be held at the
Granville County State
Employee’s Credit Union
branch on February 21, 2009.
Registered students and their
families should arrive any time
between 9 a.m. and 12 noon.
For more information about
FAFSA Day, or to register,
contact College Foundation of
North Carolina at 866-866CFNC (toll free) or visit the
FAFSA Day link on the College
Foundation of North Carolina
Web site: CFNC.org/fafsaday.
Registered students should
bring federal tax forms,
completed
FAFSA preapplication worksheets and
other documents that will
expedite the FAFSA filing
process on the day of the
program. To simplify the
FAFSA completion process,
student and parents are
encouraged to obtain a
Personal Identification (PIN)
number prior to the FAFSA
Day program.
To obtain a PIN go to http:/
/www.pin.ed.gov on the
Internet. Students and parents
can still participate in FAFSA
Day, but the process will be
faster for those with numbers.
Be sure to bring both student
and parent PINs on February
21st and to register for FAFSA
Day. Remember students; you
must complete the FAFSA in
order to be eligible to receive
grants, loans, and merit-based
scholarships offered through
state and most private colleges
and institutions. There is no
deadline to complete the
FAFSA this year. However,
seniors are encouraged to
complete the FAFSA by the end
of March, or as soon as parent’s
tax forms have been received.
* 2009 FFA Scholarships:
To register and submit a 2009
application, students can go to
www.ffa.org
and
the
“Scholarship” link or they can
go directly to the Scholarship
homepage
at
http:///
w w w . f f a . o r g /
index.cfm?method=c_programs.Scholarships.
Applicants cannot print the
required signature page until
the advisor has approved their
application.
Applications must be
submitted online and have
advisor approval no later than
February 17, 2009. (The
application will close at 11:59
p.m. Eastern Standard Time.)
FFA must receive a signed
signature page mailed through
the US Postal Service,
postmarked no later than
February 23, 2009 to complete
the application.
*Golden
LEAF
Scholarship
(public
universities): Visit http: //
www.CFNC.org/goldenleaf for
more information. Application
deadline is March 15, 2009.
* Granville County
Board of Education’s
Prospective
Teachers’
Scholarship: If you are a
member of the Class of 2009,
need financial help in college,
are interested in a career in
teaching, and would like to
come back home to teach in
Granville County; you may
qualify for a scholarship that
is worth up to $5600 over four
years. See Mrs. Banks for an
application and more details.
Apply by March 27, 2009.
* Granville County
Extension
Volunteer
Association: The primary
purpose of this scholarship is
to assist students in obtaining
MOSS
the upcoming months and
years that will test our
patience and fortitude.”
“We need to be committed
to working together in
overcoming the economic
distress that impacts each and
every household as well as the
ability of local government to
assist and deliver its basic
services. It will not be easy.
Revenues may decline and
ongoing maintenance of our
infrastructure-streets, water
and facilities are vital. We
continue to play catch up and
the present state of economic
conditions will slow down our
progress. We need to be
vigilant, patient and work
together for the common good
and continue to support our
wonderful City of Creedmoor.”
[Continued From Page 1A]
CONCLUSION
“In closing,” Mayor Moss
said, “the state of the City of
Creedmoor continues to be on
the upswing.” “We will fix
our finance operation. This
will provide a solid foundation
that allows us to maintain
existing service levels and be
able to respond to changes.”
“However, I would be
remiss in my role as mayor in
delivering the State of the City
address if I did not say that
there are economic challenges
that we as the community,
state and nation will face in
a 4-year degree in life sciences,
agriculture or family and
consumer science or a 2-year
degree in most any service or
business
related
field.
Applicants will be selected for
a one-year term, primarily on
the basis of academia,
activities, and honors.
Financial need is considered.
For more information and to
receive an application, see Mrs.
Banks. Applications are due to
the Extension Center in Oxford
by May 1.
*Harvard University: If
your family earns less than
$60,000 a year and you are an
honor student graduating from
high school soon, you may
qualify for free tuition and no
student loans! To find out more
about Harvard offering free
tuition for families making less
than $60,000 a year, visit
Harvard’s financial website at:
http://www.fao.fas.harvard.edu
or call the school’s financial aid
office at (617) 495-1581.
The
Hispanic
Scholarship Fund (HSF):
This organization provides
college scholarships and
educational outreach support
for the Latino community. HSF
scholarship opportunities are
available to graduating high
school seniors who plan to
enroll in college, community
college students who plan to
transfer to a four-year college
or university, currently
enrolled college students, and
graduate and professional
students. Students must be of
Hispanic heritage, be U.S.
citizens or legal permanent
residents, have a minimum
cumulative grade point
average of 3.0, and apply for
federal financial aid using the
Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA). For
more details about HSF
scholarship programs and to
apply online, visit the HSF
Web site at www.hsf.net.
Imagine America: The
award-winning
Imagine
America Scholarship Program
helps high school seniors
attend career colleges. This
scholarship provides $1,000
toward career education and is
available to recent high school
graduates who are pursuing
postsecondary
career
education at participating
career colleges across the
United States. To be eligible
you must have a grade point
average of 2.5 or greater; you
must demonstrate financial
need;
and
you
must
demonstrate
voluntary
community service during your
senior year. High school
graduates of 2008 have until
December 31, 2008 to apply.
High school graduates of 2009
can start applying January 1,
2009. For more information
visit their Web site at
www.imagine-america.org.
* The Jagannathan
Scholarships: The purpose of
this scholarship program is to
provide scholarship assistance
to graduating high school
seniors who plan to attend a
constituent institution of The
University of North Carolina
(UNC). Recipients are chosen
on the basis of (a) outstanding
academic achievement, as
indicated by an excellent
academic record, (b) financial
need,
(c)
diverse
extracurricular activities, and
(d) evidence of strong
leadership roles.
Special consideration is
given to applicants whose
parents are employees of
TIEPET, Inc., Universal
Fibers, and related companies.
Student applicants are
required to complete a
Jagannathan Scholarship
Application and a Financial
Aid
PROFILE,
a
comprehensive need analysis
form developed by College
Scholarship Service (CSS). A
printable copy of the
Jagannathan Scholarship
Application and a link to CSS
PROFILE are available at
www.cfnc.org/jag.
The
Jagannathan
Scholarship
Application
requires personal information,
a copy of the student’s latest
official grade transcript, an
essay and two letters of
reference. When completing
the PROFILE, applicants
should use the CSS Code 0093
to identify the Jagannathan
Scholarship program. The
applicant must register for the
PROFILE as directed in the
PROFILE Registration Guide,
which can be obtained from
the high school counseling
office or by visiting https://
profileonline.collegeboard.com/
prf/index.jsp. CSS charges a
modest fee for this service;
however, a limited number of
fee waivers are granted to
first-time college applicants
from families with very low
incomes and few assets. The
fee waivers cover the cost of
PROFILE registration and
reporting to up to six colleges
or programs.
Fee waivers are awarded
automatically online based on
family financial information.
Register and submit the
PROFILE with CSS by
February 9, 2009. Have the
completed application with
documentation to the high
school counselor so that it can
be mailed to NCSEAA by
February 16, 2009 (postmark
date).
*Johnson & Wales
University National High
School Student Chef of the
Year: This contest is open to
high school juniors and seniors
throughout the United States.
There are two ways to enter.
You can enter the traditional
way by submitting your
original entry by form. For an
additional chance to win, you
can also enter online at http://
chefcontest.jwu.edu. Entry
deadline is February 23, 2009.
KFC Colonel’s Scholars
Program: The KFC Colonel’s
Scholars is looking for
outstanding seniors with
financial
need
and
entrepreneurial spirit to
qualify for the KFC Colonel’s
Scholars program. Awards are
up to $20,000 for tuition, fees,
textbooks, and room and
board. To qualify, graduating
high school seniors must: (1)
earn a minimum cumulative
GPA of 2.75; (2) enroll in a
public college or university
within their state of legal
residence; (3) plan to pursue a
bachelor’s degree; (4) be a U.S.
citizen or permanent resident;
and (5) demonstrate financial
need.
For questions, visit the
Web site or call toll-free 1-866KFC-7240. Students should
prepare by completing a
FAFSA
(http://
www.fafsa.ed.gov). The online
scholarship application will be
available from December 1,
2008, to February 10, 2009, at
www.kfcscholars.org.
Lincoln College of
Technology: Lincoln College
of
Technology
finalist
scholarship award amounts
range from $3,000 to full
tuition scholarships. Lincoln
College of Technology also
participates and awards
scholarships in the following
competitions: FORD/AAA,
Skills USA and National
Automotive
Technology
Competition.
Any member of the current
high school graduating class
who has demonstrated a
sincere desire for selfimprovement and meets the
program’s
eligibility
requirements may apply.
Finalist selections will be
made 4/8/09.
For more
information please see Mrs.
Banks.
MeritAid.com:
MeritAid.com is a free
resource dedicated to helping
students find merit-based
scholarships from colleges that
reflect their accomplishments
and interests. Students with
a 2.0 GPA or higher often
qualify. There are merit aid
scholarships for students
based on their interests, their
intended majors, leadership
and community service.
*National Academy of
Engineering
2009
EngineerGirl
Essay
Contest: Students in grades
3-12 can compete for cash
prizes. Find the guidelines and
related information about the
contest on the EngineerGirl
w e b s i t e :
www.engineergirl.org/CMS/
Contest.aspx .The deadline is
March 1, 2009.
CMYK
THE BUTNER-CREEDMOOR NEWS
THURSDAY
January 29, 2009
BRIEFS
APPLY FOR FUNDING
Agencies or organizations
that would like to apply for
United Way funding for the
fiscal year beginning July 1,
2009 should contact the
Granville County United Way
office at 693-5205. Agencies
that are currently receiving
funding should receive an
application packet by mail.
Completed applications are
due to the United Way office by
noon on Wednesday, February
25, 2009.
The
Allocations
Committee will review all
applications and schedule an
opportunity for each agency to
make a presentation to a
volunteer Citizen Review
Panel in early April. The
Allocations Committee and
members of all review panels
will
meet
to
review
applications and presentations
and make a recommendation to
the Board of Directors at their
April meeting.
YOU
DECIDE:
By Dr. Mike Walden
COMMUNITY NEWS
Elementary and Middle
LOGO CONTEST
Schools.
Region K Senior Games is
Questions? Call 919-693- pleased to announce a logo
4613. All Elementary Sites are contest for the local games,
Licensed.
which
serve
Franklin,
VOLUNTEERS SOUGHT
Granville, Person, Vance, and
Mt. Vernon Missionary Warren counties. The Senior
Baptist Church in Creedmoor Games Steering Committee is
is seeking volunteers to help looking for a small, simple, and
prepare tax returns for the creative logo that captures the
upcoming tax season. Free essence of our local Senior
Federal and State tax law Games.
Artists must be age 55 or
classes and E-filing training
will be provided.
better at the time the artwork
If interested, please call is done, and a resident of
the church at 528-2715.
Franklin, Granville, Person,
Tax Prep
Vance, or Warren County.
Free e-filing and free tax
Entries must be able to be
return
preparation
is reproduced in one color on
sponsored by the Mount many surfaces, so simplicity is
Vernon Missionary Baptist important. Artwork must be
Church, Creedmoor. Please call able to fit into a 4x4 square.
Donnie Jones at 528-2715 for Entry deadline is January 16,
an appointment.
2009.
What to bring to have your
For an application and/or
tax returns prepared: Social more information, contact your
security cards for you (and your local Senior Center at the
AFTER SCHOOL
spouse, if filing a joint return); following numbers: Franklinvalid picture ID; 1099-SSA 919-496-1131 Louisburg or
PROGRAMS
The Granville County Social Security Benefit 919-494-5611 (Franklinton),
Schools offer Before and After Statement, Stimulus Payment G r a n v i l l e - 9 1 9 - 6 9 3 - 1 9 3 0 ,
School Programs at all receipt, and other income Person-336-599-7484, Vancestatements such as pensions, 252-430-0257, and WarrenVA benefits, etc.
252-257-3111.
The agency application
packet includes information
regarding the allocations
philosophy and guidelines as
set by the Board of the
Granville County United Way.
Agencies that request funding
must supply proof of their taxexempt status, give a brief
program description and
provide budget request and
budget history as well as an
audit or financial review.
The Granville County
United Way currently funds 12
agencies.
Assistance is
available for any agency
regarding completion of the
application or questions
regarding the potential of their
.agency or program to qualify
for United Way funding.
Anyone with questions should
contact Brenda DickersonDaniel, Executive Director at
the United Way office, 6935205.
SHOULD
WE TAKE THE
�BIG TRADEOFF’?
NORTH CAROLINA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
Most economists, including yours truly, think the
economy is in one of the worst recessions in the last 50 years.
Ultimately, unemployment could hit 10 percent. The loss
in household wealth will likely top $10 trillion. And like their
constituents, local and state governments are facing declining
or slowing revenues, meaning many public programs likely
will be curtailed.
To the rescue has come the federal government.
The federal help has come in two ways. First is
additional federal spending, in the form of loans and
investments to banks and other financial firms, tax rebates
to consumers, and - coming in the future - a variety of
infrastructure projects. The total bill for these efforts will
likely top $2 trillion.
The second prong of the federal cavalry has come from
the nation’s central bank, the Federal Reserve. The Federal
Reserve has lowered interest rates to encourage private
borrowing and spending, has made loans to and purchases
of debt from banks and has increased use of their ultimate
weapon: the printing of money.
The theory behind these tactics by the federal
government was developed 70 years ago and is fairly simple.
The essential problem of a recession is a shortfall of spending.
Businesses and consumers aren’t spending enough to
maintain income and employment levels. Consequently, jobs
are cut, and incomes are reduced.
What’s the answer?
One is to just “let things work themselves out.” If
businesses aren’t selling, they’ll drop their prices. If workers
don’t have jobs, they’ll be willing to work for less. At some
point, people will see these lower prices and lower wages as
bargains they can’t pass up. So both spending and hiring
will eventually increase, thereby pulling the economy out of
its nosedive.
In the 19th and early 20th centuries, this was our
approach to recessions. The attitude was that recessions were
self-correcting. In other words, things got so bad that they
were actually good. The glass was half full rather than half
empty. Collectively we pulled ourselves up by our bootstraps.
The problem was that the recessions could be deep very deep - before a change in attitude brought an economic
rebound. And when the greatest of all recessions hit us in
the 1930s, it got people to thinking that there might be a
better way.
The plan that was developed was to use the government
as a countervailing force. So if businesses and consumers
weren’t spending, the idea was to have the government spend.
The government would borrow or create money and use it to
cut taxes - thereby increasing consumer spending power - or
spend it on building or buying things, thus creating work
and jobs for private companies and workers.
The government’s “pump priming” is designed to
increase economic growth and ultimately end the recession.
But as economists have long pointed out, these efforts don’t
come without costs. Increased government borrowing means
a larger government debt, greater future interest payments
on that debt, and either less government money to spend on
other programs or higher taxes. Plus, more money creation
from the Federal Reserve can lead to faster rising prices that is, higher inflation - in the future.
Hence, the “big tradeoff.”
With the federal government spending more to contain
the recession, we can have more income and more jobs now
than would be the case without the federal efforts. For
example, some economists estimate that without the federal
government’s efforts, unemployment could be two percentage
points higher and more than 3 million more jobs could be
lost.
But the downside is that if inflation, taxes and debt are
all higher in two or three years, incomes and jobs will be
lower than they would have been without these negatives.
So we may be trading more growth, more income and more
jobs today for less growth, less income and fewer jobs
tomorrow.
There’s one possible way out of this dilemma.
If the additional government spending today is on
projects and programs that are so beneficial and so
worthwhile that they dramatically boost the productivity and
efficiency of the economy, then the new “buffed” economy
may be able override the adverse effects of more debt and
inflation.
The stakes in our economy are high.
You decide if the big tradeoff we’re embarked upon is a
strategy that will pay off.
Tax & Business
INFORMATION PROVIDED BY
Tatum & Edwards, PA
Certified Public Accountants
Look at Taxes if You Want Higher Business Profits
In today’s economy, every businessperson is looking for
ways to maintain business profits. Ideas for increasing sales
and cutting costs abound. You’ve probably tried most of them.
But there’s one source of cost savings that is often
overlooked, and it can be surprisingly effective.
Most businesspeople don’t think of taxes as a profit
source, but saving a dollar of taxes can be even better for
your financial health than cutting a dollar of costs. Why?
When you reduce your taxes, you get to keep 100% of the
savings. On the other hand, when you increase profits by
increasing sales or cutting costs, you must share a portion
of your additional profit with the IRS.
Consider this example. Say you do an exhaustive study
of your operations and figure out a way to cut $10,000 of
costs. If sales are unchanged, you’ll boost your pretax income
by $10,000. Assuming a 39% corporate income tax bracket,
you’ll pay $3,900 in taxes on the $10,000 income, leaving
$6,100 of after-tax profits.
Now let’s look at an alternative scenario. Assume you
do some serious tax planning and identify $10,000 of tax
savings. That’s $10,000 less that you’ll pay to the IRS and
$10,000 more cash in your bank account. Conclusion: A dollar
of tax savings has more financial impact than a dollar of
cost reductions.
Depending on how efficient your business is, you should
be on the lookout for ways to cut costs. But don’t give up
when you’ve run out of cost-cutting ideas. It’s highly unlikely
that your business is taking advantage of every tax-saving
opportunity available. As this example shows, effective tax
planning could be the most direct way to end up with more
money.
If you own a business, a thorough business and tax
review may reveal tax-cutting opportunities.
Senior Center
Activities Schedule
PO Box 766, Hwy 56E. & Main Street
Creedmoor, NC 27522
Week of Monday, Feb. 2 - - Friday, Feb. 6, 2009
Daily: 8:30 - 11:30 a.m. Walking in the Gym
9:00 - 10:00 Coffee Hour
12:00 - Lunch
For More Information - Call 528-0848
www.granvillecounty.org
Click “Senior Services”
Monday, February 2: 8:45 Game Time, 10:00 Black
History Reflections, 11:15 Devotion: Mandy Moss, 12:00
February Birthday Party, 2:00 Piano Lessons with Joyce
Poisall.
Lunch: 12:00: Confetti Rice w/Chicken, Peas, Roll, Fruit/
Juice, Milk
Tuesday, February 3: 8:45 Game Time, 9:00 Low
Impact Aerobics, 10:00 Bible Study with Mandy Moss, 10:00
Bowling, 11:00 Spanish Class w/Hope Pacheco, 12:30 Water
Aerobics at YMCA.
Lunch 12:00: Spaghetti & Meatballs, Corn, Toss Salad,
Roll, Fruit/Juice, Milk
Wednesday, February 4: 8:45 Game Time, 9:30 Blood
Pressure Clinic, 10:15 Bingo,
Lunch 12:00: Fish, Baked Beans, String Beans, Roll,
Fruit/Juice, Milk
Thursday, February 5: 8:45 Game Time, 9:00 Low
Impact Aerobics, 10:00 Crochet Club, 10:15 Stretch & Wiggle,
12:30 Water Aerobics, 2:00 J.O.Y. Singers Rehearsal.
Lunch 12:00: Beefy Mac, Turnip Greens, Roll, Fruit/
Juice, Milk
Friday, February 6: 8:45 Game Time, 9:00 Making
Crafts w/canvas, 10:00 Quilter’s Club, 1:30 Computer Class.
Lunch 12:00: Hot Dog, Mac. & Cheese, Turnip Greens,
Roll, Fruit/Juice, Milk
BA SECTION
Savvy
Senior
You ask the Senior question ~ We find the Savvy answer
How to Find Long Lost Friends
Dear Savvy Senior
I just turned 60, and before I get any older I would like to
get back in touch with some long-lost friends from years ago.
What’s the best way to find them?
Reaching Back
Dear Reaching,
There are actually many ways to go about tracking down
people you’ve lost touch with, and thanks to the Internet,
it’s much easier to do. Here are some tips and good Web
sources to get you started.
Remembering
Before you start your search, a good first step is to take a
moment and jot down any information you can remember
about the person you’re trying to find. Things like their full
name, age or birth date, last known address or phone number,
old e-mail address, names of family members, etc. Knowing
details can help you turn up clues as you search.
Web Search
After you gather some information, a good place to start
searching is at Google.com. When you get there type in the
person’s first and last name in quotation marks to indicate
you’re searching for a specific phrase (for example, “John
Doe”). Unless your friend has a unique name, you’re likely
to get a ton of results, but don’t give up. You can narrow your
search by adding other criteria like their middle initial or
middle name, the city or state they may live in, or even their
occupation. Also be sure to take advantage of the advanced
search feature which is right on the front page. Some other
good and free people search sites to try are www.411.com
which also has a reverse phone and address look-up,
www.zabasearch.com, www.find-people-free-search.com and
http://people.yahoo.com.
You can also find long lost friends through public records
Web sites which provide a plethora of searching tools and
massive amounts of data. To start digging, stop by
www.searchsystems.net, the largest directory of links to free
public record databases on the Internet. Or for a few dollars,
you can search sites like www.peoplelookup.com,
www.peoplefinders.com, www.public-records-now.com and
www.intelius.com, all of which produce fantastic results.
Back to School
Two sites commonly used to track down former classmates
and old high school sweethearts are Classmates.com and
Reunion.com. Classmates.com claims 40 million users and
offers free registration, but if you want to contact someone,
you need to become a member, which costs $15 for three
months. Reunion.com claims to have 51 million users and
costs $36 for three months. These sites require users to
register with them, so if the person you’re looking for hasn’t
registered, you won’t find them.
Another option is to check out your high school’s alumni
Web page. Not every school has its own site, but many do
and you can look for it by going to any search engine and
typing in the name of your school with the city and state it’s
located in. You can also do a search at www.alumniclass.com,
which is a huge hosting site for thousands of high schools
across the U.S. If you don’t have any luck here, contact your
high school to see if they have any resources or
recommendations.
If you’re looking for old college friends, your best resource
is your university alumni association who are experts at
tracking people down. If they aren’t able to give you the
contact information, they may be able to forward a message
for you. You may also want to try the previously mentioned
sites Classmates.com and Reunion.com, and for help in
hunting down old sorority or fraternity members check out
www.greekpages.com.
Military Buddies
If you’re looking for someone you served with in the
military, Military.com offers a free Buddy Finder service that
has a data base of more than 20 million records. Also try
Militaryconnections.com and Classmates.com.
Deceased Friends
And finally, to find out if the person you’re looking for
has passed away try www.legacy.com, a site that provides
links to obituaries published by the company’s network of
newspaper affiliates. You can also do a death search at
www.ancestry.com – click on “search,” or through the public
records sites previously listed.
Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box
5443, Norman, OK 73070
FINANCIAL FOCUS
CHRIS ELLIS
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENT FIRM
Help Climb Over Interest Rate
Worries with Bond Ladder
Many people buy bonds to help stabilize their investment
portfolios. Yet bond prices also fluctuate, primarily in response
to rising and falling interest rates. These interest-rate
movements can wreak havoc on your bonds unless you can help
yourself climb over them with a "bond ladder."
To build a ladder, you buy short-term, intermediate-term
and long-term bonds. Then, when market interest rates are
low, you'll have your longer-term bonds earning higher interest
rates. And when rates are high, you can take advantage of them
by reinvesting your maturing short-term bonds.
You can diversify your ladder with different types of bonds
or even certificates of deposit. This diversification can't
guarantee a profit or protect against a loss, but it may help you
** Milk is served with each meal - Chocolate milk and reduce the effects of a downturn that primarily hits one type of
bond.
2% low fat milk are available.**