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Where have all our children gone? Two girls, in search of America School suppy lists Growing up in Orofino in the 1930s
- Page 2A
- Pages 10B
- Page 8A
- Page 10A
50 cents plus tax
CLEARWATER TRIBUNE
Volume 99, Number 32 Thursday, August 16, 2012
Two Sections
Published every Thursday at Orofino, Idaho 83544 - Clearwater County - Second Class (USPS 117-340) Section One
Firefighter dies
near Aquarius
Anne Veseth
Anne Veseth, a 20-year-old
Moscow native and a student at
Lewis Clark State College, Lewiston, has been identified by
the U.S. Forest Service as the
firefighter killed Sunday afternoon, Aug. 12, while combating
a wildfire near Aquarius Campground, about 15 miles northeast of Headquarters. Veseth was
a seasonal firefighter for the Nez
Perce-Clearwater National Forests. She was struck by a snag
when a tree fell and crashed into
another tree, causing a domino
effect.
She was part of a Forest Service crew on the Steep Corner
fire, which was under the command of the Clearwater-Potlatch
Timber Protective Association (CPTPA). The actual cause of death
will be determined by the local
county coroner but was initially
reported as being caused by a
falling tree or debris during suppression activities.
Veseth, who was studying auto
mechanics at LCSC, was in her
second season as a wildland firefighter with the Clearwater-Nez
Perce National Forests. She had
been involved in fighting fires
in both Arizona and Colorado
already this year. Veseth was a
Seven-day
weather forecast
WEDNESDAY-Sunny, with a
high near 88 and a low around
53. Calm wind becoming northeast 5 to 8 mph in the afternoon.
THURSDAY-Sunny, with a
high near 89 and a low around
58. Northeast wind around 5
mph.
FRIDAY-Sunny, with a high
near 95 and a low around 55.
SATURDAY-Sunny and hot,
with a high near 98.
SATURDAY NIGHT-A slight
chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low
around 55.
SUNDAY-A slight chance of
showers and thunderstorms.
Mostly sunny, with a high near
93.
SUNDAY
NIGHT-A
slight
chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low
around 58.
MONDAY-A slight chance of
showers and thunderstorms.
Mostly sunny, with a high near
89 and a low around 55.
TUESDAY-Mostly sunny, with
a high near 94.
This weather forecast is provided by the National Weather
Service in Missoula, MT.
qualified level 2 Firefighter involved in initial attack and general wildfire duties for suppression, mop-up and other duties
related to fighting wildfires.
Veseth was the daughter of
Claire Veseth, Moscow, and the
late Roger Veseth. She was the
winner of several academic scholarships her senior year at Moscow but told a Lewiston Tribune
reporter in June 2010 that she
didn’t want to sit and stare at a
computer all day, explaining her
choice to study auto mechanics.
Veseth’s father died in a tubing
accident in 2003 near his home
in Moscow.
According to U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell, “The Forest Service family is in mourning
following the tragic death of one
of our firefighters in Idaho over
the weekend. Our hearts go out
to the family and friends of this
brave young woman.”
Regional Forester Faye Krueger
echoed Tidwell’s sentiments in
her own remarks, “We are devastated by the loss of this young
woman. This is a stark reminder
of the inherent dangers our men
and women face every day on the
fire lines of wildfires all over the
country.”
The Forest Service is assembling a team of investigators
scheduled to arrive earlier this
week. The primary purpose of
the investigation is to understand how and why an accident
occurred to prevent future incidents.
It is critical to begin the investigation as soon as possible
to ensure that important information is not lost, misplaced, or
contaminated. These types of investigations can last from several
weeks to a few months to thoroughly and accurately identify all
factors in the case.
Veseth was initially taken to
Pine Hills Funeral Chapel in Orofino, and then later transported
to Vassar-Rawls Funeral Home
in Lewiston, where arrangements
are pending.
Of the 58 U.S. Forest Service
wildland
firefighter
fatalities
between 2002 and 2011, eight
(14%) were Large Airtanker accidents; 22 (38%) were helicopter
accidents; 10 (17%) were burnovers; 11 (19%) were driving accidents; two (3.5%) were heart
attacks; two (3.5%) were hazard
tree incidents; and three (5%)
were from other causes such as
a fall from a vehicle, fall from a
structure, or being struck by a
vehicle.
Welcome to the
Wild
Weippe Rodeo
FOR MORE INFO
SEE PAGE 1B
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Clearwater County Sheriff Chris Goetz gave a test run, for onlookers, of the new enhanced 911
system Wednesday, at the Clearwater County Courthouse where, the brains of the system, the
Cassidian equipment is housed in a room that is kept at a steady 68 degrees. (See more photos
page 10B.)
E-911, may
the force be with you
By Alannah Allbrett
Clearwater County has the
latest electronic emergency response system in the country. The
E-911, which is a true ”enhanced
911” system, tracks emergency
calls via the Clearwater County
Sheriff’s office.
Over five years in the making,
the system tells dispatchers who
is on the line, pulls up a map of
the caller’s location on a Camatron screen, shows nearby EMT
and hospital services, and provides the caller’s location both
graphically on a map and in written form.
With, “just a few bumps in
wiring issues” Sheriff Chris
Goetz said the project went live
Wednesday, Aug. 8, tying in
calls from landlines for citizens
of Clearwater County. Cassidian
Communications is the company
that manufactured the sophisticated monitoring equipment that
is housed in a special room, kept
at a constant 68 degrees for maximum efficiency.
When a 911 emergency call
comes in, a map automatically
pops up on a computer screen
for the dispatcher, indicating the
caller’s whereabouts. The system
uses a touch screen monitor that
serves as virtual phone. Besides
providing maps and location information, the system allows the
dispatcher to forward calls with
one touch, and they can pass on
live information to other counties
on the system.
The E-911 system operates on
a Windows 7 OS platform and has
24/7 technical support should
something fail. A dispatcher may
place conference calls to tie in
police, fire and ambulance services, as well as hospitals, and
utility companies in the event of
power, flood, fire emergencies.
Rex Ireland, of Frontier Communications, and Paul Stromberg
of Cassidian were both on hand
guiding the installation process
Last Week's
Weather
Clearwater Tribune Online Poll
VOICE YOUR OPINION
Last week’s poll
Campaign ads for this November’s election have been
airing on TV for weeks. Are you sick of them yet?
13% Not so far,
but I expect I will
be by the time
the election rolls
around.
87%
Yes, I am!
This is not a scientific poll.
In This Issue:
Every week our online edition
features a new poll, which will be
posted at 5 p.m. every Tuesday. You
may vote until 5 p.m. Tuesday of the
following week.
This week’s question: What is
your opinion of U.S. Congressman
Paul Ryan as Mitt Romney’s
choice for his running mate?
Visit our website and vote in the
poll beneath the articles in the far
left column, above the quote of the
week.
Please vote once per poll.
Classifieds - 8-9B
Aug. 8
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Aug. 10
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Max.
102
92
92
94
93
98
98
Min.
58
52
52
52
56
58
58
Last Year’s Weather
Max.
Min.
93
50
88
49
89
50
90
50
92
55
90
53
78
51
Pre.
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
Pre.
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
Temps. are read the following morning for the previous
day, i.e. Friday’s listed temp. would be for Thursday.
Obituaries - 6-7A
and seeing it become operational.
The one-touch system, on the
computer screen, makes a regular phone handset obsolete. The
dispatcher also has at his/her
disposal, a numeric keypad to
physically enter phone numbers
if necessary. That type of keypad
is useful in the case of assisting
a hearing impaired caller who
might be contacting 911 services
through specialized phone equipment.
Many times dispatchers get
callers who have dialed wrong
numbers,
such as a person
calling the Department of Motor Vehicles when they need vehicle licensing instead. Sheriff
Goetz said, as “good customer
service” dispatchers can transfer
those calls with one touch to the
screen, saving the caller having
to redial to get the right number.
At present, cellular phones are
not tracked on the new E-911
system, however, plans to include
cell phones are nearing completion. By Aug. 28, Verizon Wireless,will be tied into the system,
and Inland Cellular is scheduled
to be onboard by late October
2012. This will allow law enforcement to track a reported drunk
driver as that vehicle passes
each milepost, even as they leave
Clearwater County to enter Nez
Perce County. Currently, there
are still some dead zones between Kayler’s Bend (along Hwy.
12) to Lenore, where the system
cannot operate. Based on a five
year study on 911 call volumes
in Clearwater County, two Camatron lines were deemed adequate
to handle the calls. Nowadays,
“redundancy” is the key goal of
technology, so four lines were
established to provide backup in
the event of failure to part of any
of the system.
OCI bleachers
Valley
Equipment
Rentals donated equipment to help
construct the new bleachers
at the OCI Logging Arena. The
Clearwater Tribune apologizes
to them for inadvertently omitting their name from the cutline
appearing in last week’s edition
about the new bleachers.
YYYHCEGDQQMEQOENGCTYCVGTVTKDWPG
Clearwater County
Fair Exhibitor Books
Due to excessive mailing costs,
the Clearwater County Fair
Board decided to work with the
Clearwater Tribune to distribute
copies of the 2012 Clearwater
County Fair “Exhibitor’s Handbook” as an insert in the Aug. 8
issue of the Clearwater Tribune.
The paper was available at several locations in Clearwater
County and to those people who
subscribe to the Clearwater Tribune and receive their copy of
the newspaper in the mail. Also,
copies of the Fair Book were distributed to several locations in
Clearwater County which included:
Orofino
Wild Hare, Clearwater Memorial Library, Sunset Mart, Ponderosa, Senior Citizen Center
(Senior Meal Site), Whipples,
Barneys, Glenwood Pharmacy,
Riverside Pharmacy, Community Thrift Store, Waiting room at
Clearwater Valley Hospital, Dr.
Gray’s office and the Clearwater
Tribune.
Ahsahka
The Woodlot.
Peck
Canyon Inn, Post Office.
Cavendish
Sunnyside Fire District, Julie
Huffman.
Weippe
Weippe Public Library, Mary
Ann’s Groceries, Timberline Café,
Elkhorn Bar.
Pierce
Pierce Free Public Library,
Pierce Hardware, S&S Foods,
Pierce Mini Mart.
Further distribution
It is planned to distribute
copies to other businesses in
Clearwater County as well as
City and County offices. If you
are unable to locate a copy of the
“Exhibitor’s Handbook”, please
contact a Fair Board member or
the Clearwater County Extension
Office. Let your friends, neighbors, and relatives know where
they can obtain a handbook.
Court News - 7B
Legal Notices - 2-4B
At the Rex
August 17 - 20, 2012
Rated
PG
Friday - Monday 6:30 p.m. ONLY
Visit us on the Web! www.rextheater.us
161 Main Street/P.O. Box 71, Orofino • E-mail: [email protected] • PH: 208-476-4571 • FAX: 208-476-0765 • Online newspaper at www.clearwatertribune.com
2A—Clearwater Tribune – Orofino, ID – AUGUST 16, 2012
$[%NQCPP/E0CNN
(TQO6JKU%JCKT
By Cloann McNall
The Phantom is not only
good at flipping burgers at
the grill but he’s also good
at flipping snakes out of a
toilet tank.
Friday night while I
was in the laundry room
at home the toilet tried
to flush on it’s own so I
rattled the handle. When
I walked away it made a
strange noise so I took the
lid off and put my hand in
the water and pulled up
the chain on the valve.
Just then I saw a tiny
snake slithering around
the inside wall of the tank.
I yelped, jumped and
slammed the lid down as
quickly as possible. What a
shocker!
The Phantom calmly
came to my rescue bearing
an almost empty iced coffee latte cup, a straw and
rubber gloves.
He took the lid off the
toilet tank and the slithering little snake had moved
to the oppostie side of the
tank and was hanging off
the handle inside the tank.
The Phantom used the
straw to flip the snake into
the cup and popped on the
lid.
It was obvious the snake
was trying to escape a watery death in the tank of a
toilet. The Phantom said
the snake was probably sitting on the valve and made
it flush.
I asked the Phantom later
what he did with the snake
and he said, “I took it to the
airport and let it out by my
hanger.” He said at first the
snake didn’t want to leave
the coffee cup which still
had a little ice and coffee in
it, but once he tapped the
cup on the rocks the little
guy slithered away into the
night.
He said, “He was just
a little garden snake and
won’t hurt anybody.”
Now we are trying to figure out how the snake got
in the tank of the toilet.
The laundry room is downstairs and has a window
that’s ground level.
PS: For all interested
readers,
my son-in-law,
John Baldwin in Spokane
thinks he fixed his garage
door that kept opening and
closing on its own. His wife
Diane said, “We’ll see.”
***
Clouds come floating into
my life, no longer to carry
rain or usher storm, but
to add color to my sunset
sky.
- Rabindranath Tagore
***
Life must be lived and
curiosity kept alive. One
must never, for whatever
reason, turn his back on
life.
- Eleanor Roosevelt
***
Optimism is the faith
that leads to achievement. Nothing can be
done without hope and
confidence.
- Helen Keller
***
Aug. 17 - 20, 2012
Fri. - Mon. 6:30 p.m. ONLY
Rated PG
Visit us on the Web!
www.rextheater.us
The family of Jim Willis
would like to thank everyone for your kind
words, cards, and actions in this time of grief.
There will be a
“Celebration of Life”
Saturday, Sept. 8
starting at 11 a.m.
at Orofino City Park
OH NO
The Big 5-0!
August 18
Happy Birthday,
Mike!
Love, your family
This Week’s
Special
DUSTER SPRAY
(#756) Attracts dust to
cloths and mops until shaken out, no more spreading
dust around. Leaves a dustretarding finish on surfaces. 15.5 oz. Reg. $7.49.
2 FOR $13.48
Save $1.50!
Call for catalog
Pam Jones
(208) 827-1156
10 years ago
Country Cuts, in a 10inch display ad, welcomed
Shan Avila as their newest
beautician.
Megan
Cleveland
of
Pierce was crowned Miss
Idaho Sweetheart Pre-teen
during the state competition, held at the Red Lion
in Lewiston. Megan already
had an extensive background in pageantry, and it
included some other statelevel wins.
20 years ago
Tommy Atkinson and
Dave Milligan were among
the hydro boat racers who
experienced flips while racing in the hydro races at
Dworshak. Atkinson received minor injuries when
he was thrown out of his
boat Saturday. Milligan’s
boat flipped Sunday, and
he escaped without injury.
30 years ago
Eva Wolfe was re-elected
chairman of the District
171 Board of Trustees during the recent reorganization of the board. Eva had
served on the board since
1971, and to date had the
longest board service.
40 years ago
Bob and Betty Jarvis were in charge of 350
pounds of choice beef to
be prepared in a specially
designed pit for Elk River
Days. Royalty for this year’s
Elk River Days were Leslie
Ersland, Queen, and princesses Debbie Trana and
Mari Cox. Other features
of the celebration included
contests, motorcycle races,
boat races, a dance, outdoor church services, a
loggers breakfast, and barbeque.
50 years ago
The Clearwater Tribune’s
50-year edition was published this week. Employees composing the edition
included John Werner
(editor), Lucy Werner (reporter), Irene Dopf (linotype operator), Joe Pakkala
(stereotypist,
pressman),
and Sherry Laudenbach
(bindery).
60 years ago
Earning perfect grades in
their drivers tests were Iola
S. Pease, Headquarters;
Vilda L. Hunt, Pierce; and
Jay W.M. Gillette, Orofino.
Harry L. Pearsall, Orofino,
scored 100 in his chauffeurs test.
70 years ago
Owen A. Hardman, private first class in the U.S.
Army, indicated in a letter to his parents that he
was stationed in Alaska.
Private Hardman stated
he was well, but asked for
more hometown news. His
parents were Mr. and Mrs.
R.L. Hardman, residents of
the Northfork area.
80 years ago
This week’s Gilbert news
reported the following tidbits: Wilber Miller had
threshed his fall wheat;
June Dobson was cutting hay and oats for his
brother, Julian Dobson;
Mr. Waldrup was combining grain for John Miller;
and Frank Grimms went to
Nezperce to get repairs for
a combine.
90 years ago
H.P. Hanson drove in a
new late model Dodge touring car from Lewiston, for
delivery to Harry Morris of
Elk River. The new models had a higher radiator,
which “entirely changes
their body lines and greatly
improves their looks.”
Neva Ennes is turning 75. Please stop by for cake
and coffee and wish her a Happy Birthday on Monday, Aug. 20 from 2-4 p.m. in the basement of the
Nazarene Church, 802 Michigan Ave.
Ascension
Lutheran Church news
By Bruce Hanson
Worship will be at 10
a.m. Sunday, August 19,
along the Clearwater River
at the BLM’s Pink House
recreation area group shelter, west side of Orofino. We
are looking forward to this
joint service with Orofino
United Methodist Church,
which has started to become an annual event.
Bring a lawn chair and
enjoy the beautiful atmosphere and fellowship.
There will be a pot luck
lunch after the service
– coffee and drinking water
provided.
The men’s breakfast Bible
study is at 7:30 a.m. each
Tuesday at The Ponderosa
Restaurant, and the Women’s breakfast Bible study
at 8 a.m. each Thursday at
the Krystal CafГ©.
Sunday, August 26 worship will be back at Ascension at 9 a.m. on 115th
Street along Hwy 12.
5VQTKGUCRRGCTKPIKPVJG%NGCTYCVGT6TKDWPGYKNN
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SENIOR
PORTRAIT
SPECIAL
Sunkissed
Photography
$35.00 +
tax gets
you
1 hour
session
+ CD
Contact Cassie at
208-476-9408
sunkissedphotography2012
@yahoo.com
facebook.com/sunkissed
photographyidaho
Thank You
everyone for
your phone calls,
cards, flowers,
and other
expressions of
support shown
us upon the
passing of Reita.
You have made
a most difficult
time much easier,
knowing so
many cared.
Thank you,
The Family of
Reita Legault
64756
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Where have all our children gone?
This week’s Mystery
“Pair” includes a father
and a son. Dad had something to do with fuel and
also sold cars in Orofino.
He had seven children, all
of them still living, with
six residing in Orofino.
His son shown in the
photo was born in Orofino
and attended all 12 years
of school here, graduating in 1959.
Last week’s
Mystery Maniacs
Last week’s Mystery
Children were 1977 Orofino High School graduates. Class members
gathered for a reunion
last weekend in Orofino. Seniors shown in
the photo were, top row,
l to r, Teresa Klein, Jay
Blake, Mike Clay, Dale
McLean; bottom row, Brian Deyo, Dick Donner,
Julia Walker and Susan
“Opie” Hutchinson.
Debbie Claffey was the
first caller and she was
able to correctly identify
all eight students. Lau-
rella Miller and Cassie
Bansemer also correctly
guessed the eight Maniacs, along with Joanne
Hutchinson (retired secretary from OHS). Rick
Alden guessed Mike Clay,
Jennae Spencer identified
Julia Walker and Gerri
Lemmon guessed Susan
Hutchinson and Dick
Donner.
Seeking future
Mystery Children
If you have a family
member or friend you’d
like to feature as a Mystery Child you may deliver photos to our office located at 161 Main
Street or send via email
to [email protected]
or mail your photo to the
Clearwater Tribune, P.O.
Box 71, Orofino, Idaho
83544.
Remember to include
childhood clues to share
with the readers the week
the photo is to appear,
and reveal information for
the following week.
In virtually every organization, regardless of mission and function, people are frustrated by problems
that seem unsolvable.
- Margaret J. Wheatley
***
Half of the American people have never read a newspaper. Half never voted for president. One hopes it
is the same half.
- Gore Vidal
Weekend
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Super................$26.75
Sunday Brunch 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
We accept Chamber Cash!
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RESTAURANT
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220 Michigan Avenue
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AUGUST 16, 2012 – Orofino, ID – Clearwater Tribune—3A
God’s Law Immutable
(Meaning of immutable is unchangeable, unalterable, invariable)
“The temple of God was opened in heaven, and there was seen in His temple the ark of His testament.” Revelation 11:19. The ark of God’s testament is in the holy of holies, the
second apartment of the sanctuary. In the ministration of the earthly tabernacle, which served “unto the example and shadow of heavenly things,” this apartment was opened only
upon the great Day of Atonement for the cleansing of the sanctuary. Therefore the announcement that the temple of God was opened in heaven and the ark of His testament was
seen points to the opening of the most holy place of the heavenly sanctuary in 1844 as Christ entered there to perform the closing work of the atonement. Those who by faith followed
their great High Priest as He entered upon His ministry in the most holy place, beheld the ark of His testament. As they had studied the subject of the sanctuary they had come to
understand the Saviour’s change of ministration, and they saw that He was now officiating before the ark of God, pleading His blood in behalf of sinners.
The ark in the tabernacle on earth contained the two tables of stone, upon which were inscribed the precepts of the law of God. The ark was merely a receptacle for the tables of
the law, and the presence of these divine precepts gave to it its value and sacredness. When the temple of God was opened in heaven, the ark of His testament was seen. Within the
holy of holies, in the sanctuary in heaven, the divine law is sacredly enshrined—the law that was spoken by God Himself amid the thunders of Sinai and written with His own finger
on the tables of stone.
The law of God in the sanctuary in heaven is the great original, of which the precepts inscribed upon the tables of stone and recorded by Moses in the Pentateuch were an unerring
transcript. Those who arrived at an understanding of the important point were thus led to see the sacred, unchanging character of the divine law. They saw, as never before, the force
of the Saviour’s words: “Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law.” Matthew 5:18. The law of God, being a revelation of His will, a transcript of
His character, must forever endure, “as a faithful witness in heaven.” Not one command has been annulled; not a jot or tittle has been changed. Says the psalmist: “Forever, O Lord,
Thy word is settled in heaven.” “All His commandments are sure. They stand fast for ever and ever.” Psalms 119:89; 111:7, 8.
In the very bosom of the Decalogue is the fourth commandment, as it was first proclaimed: “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labor, and do all they
work: but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle,
nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: for in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the Lord blessed the
Sabbath day, and hallowed it.” Exodus 2:8-11.
The Spirit of God impressed the hearts of those students of His word. The conviction was urged upon them that they had ignorantly transgressed this precept by disregarding
the Creator’s rest day. They began to examine the reasons for observing the first day of the week instead of the day which God had sanctified. They could find no evidence in the
Scriptures that the fourth commandment had been abolished, or that the Sabbath had been changed; the blessing which first hallowed the seventh day had never been removed.
They had been honestly seeking to know and to do God’s will; now, as they saw themselves transgressors of His law, sorrow filled their hearts, and they manifested their loyalty to
God by keeping His Sabbath holy.
Many and earnest were the efforts made to overthrow their faith. None could fail to see that if the earthly sanctuary was a figure or pattern of the heavenly, the law deposited in
the ark on earth was an exact transcript of the law in the ark in heaven and that an acceptance of the truth concerning the heavenly sanctuary involved an acknowledgement of the
claims of God’s law and the obligation of the Sabbath of the fourth commandment. Here was the secret of the bitter and determined opposition to the harmonious exposition of the
Scriptures that revealed the ministration of Christ in the heavenly sanctuary. Men sought to close the door which God had opened, and to open the door which He had closed. But “He
that openeth, and no man shutteth, and no man openeth,” had declared: “Behold, I have set before thee an open door, and no man can shut it.” Revelation 3:7, 8. Christ had opened
the door, or ministration, of the most holy place, light was shining from that open door of the sanctuary in heaven, and the fourth commandment was shown to be included in the law
which is there enshrined; what God had established, no man could overthrow.
Those who had accepted the light concerning the mediation of Christ and the perpetuity of the law of God found that these were the truths presented in Revelation 14. The messages
of this chapter constitute a threefold warning which is to prepare the inhabitants of the earth for the Lord’s second coming. The announcement, “The hour of His judgment is come,”
points to the closing work of Christ’s ministration for the salvation of men. It heralds a truth which must be proclaimed until the Saviour’s intercession shall cease and He shall return to
the earth to take His people to Himself. The work of judgment which began in 1844 must continue until the cases of all are decided, both of the living and the dead; hence it will extend
to the close of human probation. That men may be prepared to stand in the judgment, the message commands them to “fear God, and give glory to Him,” “and worship Him that made
heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters.” The result of an acceptance of these messages is given in the word: “Here are they that keep the commandments of
God, and the faith of Jesus.” In order to be prepared for the judgment, it is necessary that men should keep the law of God. That law will be the standard of character in the judgment.
The apostle Paul declares, “As many as have sinned in the law shall be judged by the law, . . . in the day when God shall judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ.” And he says that
“the doers of the law shall be justified.” Romans 2:12-16. Faith is essential in order to the keeping of the law of God; for “without faith it is impossible to please Him.” And “whatsoever
is not of faith is sin.” Hebrews 11:6; Romans 14:23.
By the first angel, men are called upon to “fear God, and give glory to Him” and to worship Him as the Creator of the heavens and the earth. In order to do this, they must obey His
law. Says the wise man: “Fear God, and keep His commandments: for this is the whole duty of man.” Ecclesiastes 12:13. Without obedience to His commandments no worship can
be pleasing to God. “This is the love of God, that we keep His commandments.” “He that turneth away his ear from hearing the law, even his prayer shall be abomination.” 1 John 5:3;
Proverbs 28:9.
The duty to worship God is based upon the fact that He is the Creator and that to Him all other beings owe their existence. And wherever, in the Bible, His claim to reverence and
worship, above the gods of the heathen, is presented, there is cited the evidence of His creative power. “All the gods of the nations are idols: but the Lord made the heavens.” Psalm
96:5. “To whom then will ye liken Me, or shall I be equal? saith the Holy One. Lift up your eyes on high, and behold who hath created these things.” “Thus saith the Lord that created
the heavens; God Himself that formed the earth and made it: . . . I am the Lord; and there is none else.” Isaiah 40:25, 26; 45:18. Says the psalmist: “Know ye that the Lord He is God: it
is He that hath made us, and not we ourselves.” “O come, let us worship and bow down: let us kneel before the Lord our Maker.” Psalms 100:3; 95:6. And the holy beings who worship
God in heaven state, as the reason why their homage is due to Him: “Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honor and power: for Thou has created all things.” Revelation
4:11.
In Revelation 14, men are called upon to worship the Creator; and the prophecy brings to view a class that, as the result of the threefold message, are keeping the commandments
of God. One of these commandments points directly to God as the Creator. The fourth precept declares: “The seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God: . . . for in six days the
Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day, and hallowed it.” Exodus 20:10, 11. Concerning
the Sabbath, the Lord says, further, that it is “a sign, . . . that ye may know that I am the Lord your God.” Ezekiel 20:20. And the reason given is: For in six days the Lord made heaven
and earth, and on the seventh day he rested, and was refreshed.” Exodus 31:17.
“The importance of the Sabbath as the memorial of creation is that is keeps ever present the true reason why worship is due to God”—because He is the Creator, and we are His
creatures. “The Sabbath therefore lies at the very foundation of divine worship, for it teaches this great truth in the most impressive manner, and no other institution does this. The
true ground of divine worship, not of that on the seventh day merely, but of all worship, is found in the distinction between the Creator and His creatures. This great fact can never
become obsolete, and must never be forgotten.”—J. N. Andrews, History of the Sabbath, chapter 27. It was to keep this truth ever before the minds of men, that God instituted the
Sabbath in Eden; and so long as the fact that He is our Creator continues to be a reason why we should worship Him, so long as the Sabbath will continue as its sign and memorial.
Had the Sabbath been universally kept, man’s thoughts and affections would have been led to the Creator as the object of reverence and worship, and there would never have been
an idolater, an atheist, or an infidel. The keeping of the Sabbath is a sign of loyalty to the true God, “Him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters.” It
follows that the message which commands men to worship God and keep His commandments will especially call upon them to keep the fourth commandment.
In contrast to those who keep the commandments of God and have the faith of Jesus, the third angle points to another class, against whose errors a solemn and fearful warning is
uttered: “If any man worship the beast and his image, and receive his mark in his forehead, or in his hand, the same shall drink of the wine of the wrath of God.” Revelation 14:9, 10.
A correct interpretation of the symbols employed is necessary to an understanding of this message. What is represented by the beast, the image, the mark?
The line of prophecy in which these symbols are found begins with Revelation 12, with the dragon that sought to destroy Christ at His birth. The dragon is said to be Satan
(Revelation 12:9); he it was that moved upon Herod to put the Saviour to death. But the chief agent of Satan in making war upon Christ and His people during the first centuries of
the Christian Era was the Roman Empire, in which paganism was the prevailing religion. Thus while the dragon, primarily, represents Satan, it is, in a secondary sense, a symbol of
pagan Rome.
In chapter 13 (verses 1-10) is described another beast, “like unto a leopard,” to which the dragon gave “his power, and his seat, and great authority.” This symbol, as most Protestants
have believed, represents the papacy, which succeeded to the power and seat and authority once held by the ancient Roman empire. Of the leopardlike beast it is declared: “There
was given unto him a mouth speaking great things and blasphemies. . . .And he opened his mouth in blaspheme His name, and His tabernacle, and them that dwell in heaven. And it
was given unto him to make war with the saints, and to overcome them: and power was given him over all kindreds, and tongues, and nations.” This prophecy, which is nearly identical
with the description of the little horn of Daniel 7, unquestionably points to the papacy.
“Power was given unto him to continue forty and two months. “And, says the prophet, “I saw one of his heads as it were wounded to death.” And again: “He that leadeth into captivity
shall go into captivity: he that killeth with the sword must be killed with the sword.” The forty and two months are the same as the “time and times and the dividing of them,” three years
and a half, or 1260 days, of Daniel 7—the time during which the papal power was to oppress God’s people. This period, as stated in preceding chapters, began with the supremacy of
the papacy, A.D. 538, and terminated In 1798. At that time the pope was made captive by the French army, the papal power received its deadly wound, and the predition was fulfilled,
“He that leadeth into captivity shall go into captivity.”
At this point another symbol is introduced. Says the prophet: “I beheld another beast coming up out of the earth; and he had two horns like a lamb.” Verse II. Both the appearance of
this beast and the manner of its rise indicate that the nation which it represents is unlike those presented under the preceding symbols. The great kingdoms that have ruled the world
were presented to the prophet Daniel as beasts of prey, rising when “the four winds of the heaven strove upon the great sea.” Daniel 7:2. In Revelation 17 an angel explained that
waters represent “peoples, and multitudes, and nations, and tongues.” Revelation 17:15. Winds are a symbol of strife. The four winds of heaven striving upon the great sea represent
the terrible scenes of conquest and revolution by which kingdoms have attained to power.
But the beast with lamblike horns was seen “coming up out of the earth.” Instead of overthrowing other powers to establish itself, the nation thus represented must arise in territory
previously unoccupied and grow up gradually and peacefully. It could not, then, arise among the crowded and struggling nationalities of the Old World—that turbulent sea of “peoples,
and multitudes, and nations, and tongues.” It must be sought in the Western Continent.
What nation of the New World was in 1798 rising into power, giving promise of strength and greatness, and attracting the attention of the world? The application of the symbol admits
of no question. One nation, and only one, meets the specifications of this prophecy; it points unmistakably to the United States of America. Again and again the thought, almost the
exact words, of the sacred writer has been unconsciously employed by the orator and the historian in describing the rise and growth of this nation. The beast was seen “coming up
out of the earth;” and, according to the translators, the word here rendered “coming up” literally signifies “to grow or spring up as a plant.” And, as we have seen, the nation must arise
in territory previously unoccupied. A prominent writer, describing the rise of the United States, speaks of “the mystery of her coming forth from vacancy,” and says: “Like a silent seed
we grew into an empire.”—G.A. Townsend, The New World Compared with the old, page 462. A European journal in 1850 spoke of the United States as a wonderful empire, which
was “emerging,” and “amid the silence of the earth daily adding to its power and pride.”—The Dublin Nation. Edward Everett, in an oration on the Pilgrim founders of this nation, said:
“Did they look for a retired spot, inoffensive for its obscurity, and safe in its remoteness, where the little church of Leyden might enjoy the freedom of conscience? Behold the mighty
regions over which, in peaceful conquest, . . . they have borne the banners of the cross!”—Speech delivered at Plymouth, Massachusetts, Dec. 22, 1824, page 11.
“And he had two horns like a lamb.” The lamblike horns indicate youth, innocence, and gentleness, fitly representing the character of the United States when presented to the
prophet as “coming up” in 1798. Among the Christian exiles who first fled to America and sought an asylum from royal oppression and priestly intolerance were many who determined
to establish a government upon the broad foundation of civil and religious liberty. Their views found place in the Declaration of Independence, which sets forth the great truth that “all
men are created equal” and endowed with the inalienable right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” And the Constitution guarantees to the people the right of self-government,
providing that representatives elected by the popular vote shall enact and administer the laws. Freedom of religious faith was also granted, every man being permitted to worship
God according to the dictates of his conscience. Republicanism and Protestantism became the fundamental principles of the nation. These principles are the secret of its power and
prosperity. The oppressed and downtrodden throughout Christendom have turned to this land with interest and hope. Millions have sought its shores, and the United States has risen
to a place among the most powerful nations of the earth.
But the beast with lamblike horns “spake as a dragon. And he exerciseth all the power of the first beast before him, and causeth the earth and them which dwell therein to worship
the first beast, whose deadly wound was healed; . . . saying to them that dwell on the earth, that they should make an image to the beast, which had the wound by a sword, and did
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live.” Revelation 13:11-14.
The lamblike horns and dragon voice of the symbol point to a striking contradiction between the professions and the practice of the nation thus represented. The “speaking” of
the nation is the action of its legislative and judicial authorities. By such action it will give the lie to those liberal and peaceful principles which it has put forth as the foundation of its
policy. The prediction that it will speak “as a dragon” and exercise “all the power of the first beast” plainly foretells a development of the spirit of intolerance and persecution that was
manifested by the nations represented by the dragon and the leopardlike beast. And the statement that the beast with two horns “causeth the earth and them which dwell therein to
worship the first beast” indicates that the authority of this nation is to be exercised in enforcing some observance which shall be an act of homage to the papacy.
Such action would be directly contrary to the principles of this government, to the genus of its free institutions, to the direct and solemn avowals of the Declaration of Independence,
and to the Constitution. The founders of the nation wisely sought to guard against the employment of secular power on the part of the church, with its inevitable result—intolerance
and persecution. The Constitution provides that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,” and that “no religious
test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office of public trust under the United States.” Only in flagrant violation of these safeguards to the nation’s liberty, can any religious
observance be enforced by civil authority. But the inconsistency of such action is no greater than is represented in the symbol. It is the beast with lamblike horns—in profession pure,
gentle, and harmless—that speaks as a dragon.
“Saying to them that dwell on the earth, that they should make an image to the beast.” Here is clearly presented a form of government in which the legislative power rests with the
people, a most striking evidence that the United States is the nation denoted in the prophecy.
But what is the “image to the beast” and how is it to be formed? The image is made by the two-horned beast, and is called an image to the beast. It is also called an image of the
beast. Then to learn what the image is like and how it is to be formed we must study the characteristics of the beast itself—the papacy.
When the early church became corrupted by departing from the simplicity of the gospel and accepting heathen rites and customs, she lost the Spirit and power of God; and in order
to control the consciences of the people, she sought the support of the secular power. The result was the papacy, a church that controlled the power of the state and employed it to
further her own ends, especially for the punishment of “heresy.” In order for the United States to form an image of the beast, the religious power must so control the civil government
that the authority of the state will also be employed by the church to accomplish her own ends.
Whenever the church has obtained secular power, she has employed it to punish dissent from her doctrines. Protestant churches that have followed in the steps of Rome by forming
alliance with worldly powers have manifested a similar desire to restrict liberty of conscience. An example of this is given in the long-continued persecution of dissenters by the Church
of England. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, thousands of non-conformist ministers were forced to flee from their churches, and many, both of pastors and people,
were subjected to fine, imprisonment, torture, and martyrdom.
It was apostasy that led the early church to seek the aid of the civil government, and this prepared the way for the development of the papacy—the beast. Said Paul “There shall
come a falling away, . . . and that man of sin be revealed.” 2 Thessalonians 2:3. So apostasy in the church will prepare the way for the image to the beast.
The Bible declares that before the coming of the Lord there will exist a state of religious declension similar to that in the first centuries. “In the last days perilous times shall come. For
men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy, without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers,
incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good, traitors, heady, high-minded, lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God; having a form of godliness, but denying the power
thereof.” 2 Timothy 3:1-5. “Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils.” 1 Timothy
4:1. Satan will work “with all power and signs and lying wonders, and with all deceivableness of unrighteousness.” And all that “received not the love of the truth, that they might be
saved,” will be left to accept “strong delusion, that they should believe a lie.” 2 Thessalonians 2:9-11. When this state of ungodliness shall be reached, the same results will follow as
in the first centuries.
The wide diversity of belief in the Protestant churches is regarded by many as decisive proof that no effort to secure a forced uniformity can ever be made. But there has been for
years, in churches of the Protestant faith, a strong and growing sentiment in favor of a union based upon common points of doctrine. To secure such a union, the discussion of subjects
upon which all were not agreed—however important they might be from a Bible standpoint—might be necessarily waived.
Charles Beecher, in a sermon in the year 1846, declared that the ministry of “the evangelical Protestant denominations” is “not only formed all the way up under a tremendous
pressure of merely human fear, but they live, and move, and breathe in a state of things radically corrupt, and appealing every hour to every baser element of their nature to hush up
the truth, and bow the knee to the power of apostasy. Was not this the way things went with Rome? Are we not living her life over again? And what do we see just ahead? Another
general council! A world’s convention! Evangelical alliance, and universal creed!”—Sermon on “The Bible a Sufficient Creed,” delivered at Fort Wayne, Indiana, Feb. 22, 1846. When
this shall be gained, then, in the effort to secure complete uniformity, it will be only a step to the resort to force.
When the leading churches of the United States, uniting upon such points of doctrine as are held by them in common, shall influence the state to enforce their decrees and to sustain
their institutions, then Protestant America will have formed an image of the Roman hierarchy, and the infliction of civil penalties upon dissenters will inevitably result.
The beast with two horns “causeth [commands] all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in the foreheads: and that no man
might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.” Revelation 13:16, 17. The third angel’s warning is: “If any man worship the beast
and his image, and receive his mark in his forehead, or in his hand, the same shall drink the wine of the wrath of God.” “The beast” mentioned in this message, whose worship is
enforced by the two-horned beast, is the first, or leopardlike beast of Revelation 13—the papacy. The “image to the beast” represents that form of apostate Protestantism which will
be developed when the Protestant churches shall seek the aid of the civil power for the enforcement of their dogmas. The “mark of the beast” still remains to be defined.
After the warning against the worship of the beast and his image the prophecy declares: “Here are they that keep the commandments of God, and the faith of Jesus.” Since those
who keep God’s commandments are thus placed in contrast with those that worship the beast and his image and receive his mark, it follows that the keeping of God’s law, on the one
hand, and its violation, on the other, will make the distinction between the worshipers of God and the worshipers of the beast.
The special characteristics of the beast, and therefore his image, is the breaking of God’s commandments. Says Daniel, of the little horn, the papacy: “He shall think to change times
and the law.” Daneil 7:25, R.V. And Paul styled the same power the “man of sin,” who was to exalt himself above God. One prophecy is a complement of the other. Only by changing
God’s law could the papacy exalt itself above God; whoever should understandingly keep the law as thus changed would be giving supreme honor to that power by which the change
was made. Such an act of obedience to papal laws would be a mark of allegiance to the pope in the place of God.
The papacy has attempted to change the law of God. The second commandment, forbidding image worship, has been dropped from the law, and the fourth commandment has
been so changed as to authorize the observance of the first instead of the seventh day as the Sabbath. But papists urge, as a reason for omitting the second commandment, that
it is unnecessary, being included in the first, and that they are giving the law exactly as God designed it to be understood. This cannot be the change foretold by the prophet. An
intentional, deliberate change is presented. “He shall think to change the times and the law.” The change in the fourth commandment exactly fulfills the prophecy. For this the only
authority claimed is that of the church. Here the papal power openly sets itself above God.
While the worshipers of God will be especially distinguished by their regard for the fourth commandment,—since this is the sign of His creative power and the witness to His claim
upon man’s reverence and homage,—the worshipers of the beast will be distinguished by their efforts to tear down the Creator’s memorial, to exalt the institution of Rome. It was in
behalf of the Sunday that popery first asserted its arrogant claims; and its first resort to the power of the state was to compel the observance of Sunday as “the Lord’s day.” But the
Bible points to the seventh day, and not to the first, as the Lord’s day. Said Christ: “The Son of man is Lord also of the Sabbath.” The fourth commandment declares: “The seventh
day is the Sabbath of the Lord.” And by the prophet Isaiah the Lord designates it: “My holy day.” Mark 2:28; Isaiah 58:13.
The claim so often put forth that Christ changed the Sabbath is disproved by his own words. In His Sermon at the Mount He said: “Think not that I am come to destroy the law,
or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfill. For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled.
Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, he shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven: but whosoever shall do and teach
them, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven,” Matthew 5:17-19.
It is a fact generally admitted by Protestants that the Scriptures give no authority for the change of the Sabbath. This is plainly stated in publications issued by the American Tract
Society and the American Sunday School Union. One of these works acknowledges “the complete silence of the New Testament so far as any explicit command for the Sabbath
[Sunday, the first day of the week] or definite rules for its observance are concerned.”—George Elliott, The Abiding Sabbath, page 184.
Another says: “Up to the time of Christ’s death, no change had been made in the day;” and, “so far as the record shows, they [the apostles] did not . . . give any explicit command
enjoining the abandonment of the seventh-day Sabbath, and its observance of the first day of the week.”—A.E. Waffle, The Lord’s Day, pages 186-188.
Roman Catholics acknowledge that the change of the Sabbath was made by their church, and declare that Protestants by observing the Sunday are recognizing her power. In the
Catholic Catechism of Christian Religion, in answer to a question as to the day to be observed in obedience to the fourth commandment, this statement is made: “During the old law,
Saturday was the day sanctified, but the church, instructed by Jesus Christ, and directed by the spirit of God, has substituted Sunday for Saturday; so now we sanctify the first, not
the seventh day. Sunday means, and now is, the day of the Lord.”
As the sign of the authority of the Catholic Church, papist writers cite “the very act of changing the Sabbath into Sunday, which Protestants allow of; . . . because by keeping Sunday,
they acknowledge the church’s power to ordain feasts, and to command them under sun.”—Henry Tuberville, An Abridgement of the Christian Doctrine, page 58. What then is the
change of the Sabbath, but the sign, or mark, of the authority of the Roman Church—“the mark of the beast”?
The Roman Church has not relinquished her claim to supremacy; and when the world and the Protestant churches accept a sabbath of her creating, while they reject the Bible
Sabbath, they virtually admit this assumption. They may claim the authority of tradition and of the Fathers for the change; but in so doing they ignore the very principle which separates
them from Rome—that “the Bible, and the Bible only, is the religion of Protestants.” The papist can see that they are deceiving themselves, willingly closing their eyes to the facts in
the case. As the movement for Sunday enforcement gains favor, he rejoices, feeling assured that it will eventually bring the whole Protestant world under the banner of Rome.
Romanists declare that “the observance of Sunday by the Protestants is an homage they pay, in spite of themselves, to the authority of the [Catholic] Church.”—Mgr. Segur, Plain
Talk About the Protestantism of Today, page 213. The enforcement of Sundaykeeping on the part of Protestant churches is an enforcement of the worship of the papacy—of the beast.
Those who, understanding the claims of the fourth commandment, choose to observe the false instead of the true Sabbath are thereby paying homage to that power by which alone it
is commanded. But in the very act of enforcing a religious duty by secular power, the churches would themselves form an image to the beast; hence the enforcement of Sundaykeeping
in the United States would be an enforcement of the worship of the beast and his image.
But Christians of past generations observed the Sunday, supposing that in so doing they were keeping the Bible Sabbath; and there are now true Christians in every church, not
excepting the Roman Catholic communion, who honestly believe that Sunday is the Sabbath of divine appointment. God accepts their sincerity of purpose and their integrity before
him. But when Sunday observance shall be enforced by law, and the world shall be enlightened concerning the obligation of the true Sabbath, then whoever shall transgress the
command of God, to obey a precept which has no higher authority than that of Rome, will thereby honor popery above God. He is paying homage to Rome and to the power which
enforces the institution ordained by Rome. He is worshipping the beast and his image. As men then reject the institution which God has declared to be the sign of His authority, and
honor in its stead that which Rome has chosen as the token of her supremacy, they will thereby accept the sign of allegiance to Rome—“the mark of the beast.” And it is not until
the issue is thus plainly set before the people, and they are brought to choose between the commandments of God and the commandments of men, that those who continue in
transgression will receive “the mark of the beast.”
The most fearful threatening ever addressed to mortals is contained in the third angel’s message. That must be a terrible sin which calls down the wrath of God unmingled with
mercy. Men are not to be left in darkness concerning this important matter; the warning against this sin is to be given to the world before the visitation of God’s judgments, that all
may know why they are to be inflicted, and have opportunity to escape them. Prophecy declares that the first angel would make his announcement to “every nation, and kindred,
and tongue, and people.” The warning of the third angel, which forms a part of the same threefold message, is to be no less widespread. It is represented in the prophecy as being
proclaimed with a loud voice, by an angel flying in the midst of heaven; and it will command the attention of the world.
In the issue of the contest all Christendom will be divided into two great classes—those who keep the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus, and those who worship the
beast and his image and receive his mark. Although church and state will unite their power to compel, “all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond” (Revelation 13:16), to
receive “the mark of the beast,” yet the people of God will not receive it. The prophet of Patmos beholds “them that had gotten the victory over the beast, and over his image, and over
his mark, and over the number of his name, stand on the sea of glass, having the harps of God” and singing the song of Moses and the Lamb. Revelation 15:2, 3.
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AUGUST 16, 2012 – Orofino, ID – Clearwater Tribune—5A
Fraser news....
By Norma Brand
Clarabell Brown’s 90th
birthday party was held
at the Fraser Community
Center on Saturday, Aug.
11. The weather cooperated with sunny skies and
a nice breeze. Our temperature remained in the
mid-80 degree range. Tables were arranged inside
the center as well as in the
shade on the north side of
the building.
Clarabell’s sons, Robert
and Neil, and their families traveled many miles
to attend this special celebration. Name tags were
a big help in identifying
everyone, especially for the
many friends that were in
attendance that weren’t familiar with the grandchildren and their families.
Donna and Danny’s son
Kevin, his wife Katy, and
the twins Spencer and Natalie came from Kelso, WA.
Brad and his wife Debbie
came from the Pullman
area. The week before the
birthday party Danette and
her daughters Grace and
Lydia drove to the farm
from Nampa. Cory and
Derek’s families live here in
Fraser which made it easy
for the grandchildren to get
reacquainted while they
were at the farm.
A story board was on
display with many pictures
depicting the events of her
life. Especially charming
were the photos that were
taken in 1922 when she
was a baby and another
one when she was two
years old. She was sitting
on a chair with her brothers, Claud and Harry, and
her sister, Marie, standing
beside her. They looked
like they were taken in a
photography studio, a real
feat for her parents back in
those early days in the Fraser Community.
A potluck lunch took
place at 12 noon; two birthday cakes and ice cream
were served. Clarabell’s
daughter-in-law,
Donna
Brown and her daughter
Danette McIntosh prepared
the meat, potatoes and
several salads and friends
brought side dishes to complete the meal. Needless to
say, there was plenty of
food to go around.
Clarabell’s cousin, Shirley Schoenek, sat down
at the piano and played
several songs while several of the great grandchildren gathered around her.
Hanna Belle, Spencer, and
Natalie Brown couldn’t resist helping Shirley as she
played.
Composer Scott Joplin
probably wondered how all
those extra notes became
part of his music. Family
and friends continued to
visit as the afternoon sped
by, and the great grandchildren had time to get
acquainted. It was a very
special day. Happy Birthday again Clarabell.
Another birthday party
was held at Donna and
Danny’s home on Sunday,
Aug. 12. Their grandchildren, Spencer and Natalie, turned four years old
on Aug. 11. Their cousins joined them in the afternoon for a swim party
and cake and ice cream.
Friends of Kevin and Katy
drove out from Lewiston to
help them celebrate. The
family returned to their
home in Kelso on Tuesday.
Brad Brown and his wife
Debbie helped haul hay
earlier this month. Then
Brad returned to help with
the wheat harvest which
began on Aug. 7 in Fraser.
Reggie Ball celebrated
his birthday on Monday,
Aug. 6. A very tasty stir
fry was cooked up on Carl
Thornton’s huge outdoor
wok. This wok is heated
by a special propane burner. Carl can tell you more
about it if you are inter-
ested. It was great fun to
watch Reggie cook this
meal. Vegetables were added after the chicken and
hamburger were done. Peggy must have spent many
hours slicing and dicing all
the ingredients.
The
Kinney
family
brought potato salad, fresh
baked rolls and homemade
butter. The Brands supplied the greens for the
salad and used fresh veggies from Peggy’s garden to
finish it off. Reggie, there is
nothing like being given the
duty of outdoor chef and
cooking your own birthday
meal. It was very good, and
the cherry and apple pies
that Peggy baked were the
perfect touch to the meal.
The raspberry patch in
the Brand’s garden has really produced berries this
year. On Tuesday, Aug. 7,
Donna Brown, her daughter Danette McIntosh, and
her daughters Grace and
Lydia did the final picking of the season. The girls
had their own containers
to pick in.
When they tired of that
chore they were introduced
to April Eight, the llama,
and Blackjack, the cat.
They told their cousins all
about their day and how
much fun they had. Donna
reported the berries were
made into shortcake, lemonade and jam.
Entries needed for
the Wild Weippe
Rodeo Parade
Carolyn Lage is in need
of more entries for the rodeo parade which will take
place before the rodeo on
Saturday, Aug. 18. You will
have the privilege of showing off your creative ideas
and be in the parade with
the EhCapa Bareback Riders. Call Carolyn at 208435-4845. She will be
happy to help you fill out
your entry forms. Your efforts will be appreciated
by everyone who comes to
watch. See you there!
Mike and Cindy Yantis
enjoyed a visit from family members last week.
The Brands visited with
Mike and his friend, Jerry,
on Tuesday morning after
breakfast at the Ponderosa Restaurant in Orofino.
Mike and Jerry were going
bass fishing on Dworshak
Reservoir after they left the
restaurant. Did you have
any luck, Mike?
Fraser Park is a great
place for any celebration.
On Aug. 4 the wedding of
Nicole Huddleston and Jacob Stephenson was held.
Carolyn Lage reported it
was a very special wedding.
It had a western flair with
red bandanas and sun
flowers. The Fraser Community sends best wishes
to the newlyweds.
Borders/Kingen
family reunion
The Borders/Kingen seventh annual family reunion
was held at Fraser Park on
the weekend of Aug. 1012. Faye Leto reported the
family arrived at the park
on Friday afternoon. They
had a spaghetti feed that
night and played a game of
Glow Stick Rebel. Saturday
morning everyone enjoyed
a breakfast of fruit and
pastries, followed by more
games of Squirrels on the
Loose, Bubble Gum Relays
and Chicken Poop Bingo. If
you are interested on how
to play any of these games
call Faye at 208-435-4501.
The evening meal was
potluck; Uncle Boze was
to furnish the meat. This
he did in “high style”. He
hired the High Country
Inn for the job this year.
Jo Moore catered a great
BBQ of ribs, chicken and
hotdogs. We bet this will be
a meal that will be remembered for a long time.
The Wacky Dessert Contest provided everyone with
Locally owned Health Mart pharmacies honor
most prescription plans, including Medicare.
Visit us on the web at www.glenwoodpharmacy.com
Your locally owned
Glenwood Pharmacy
Glenwood
Pharmacy
1105 Michigan Ave.
Orofino, Idaho 83544
Caring for you and about you
Better Service, Less Wait 208-476-5727
Mon.-Fri. 8:30 am to 6:00 pm, Sat. 9:00 am to 3:00 pm
We take pride in our quality service
We fill prescriptions fast • #1 in customer satisfaction
RIVERSIDE PHARMACY
10340 Hwy 12, Orofino • (208) 476-0329
Hours: Monday - Friday 10 AM - 6 PM
Marie Green and Clarabell Brown
a wide choice of sweets
to try. First place went to
Debbie Haskins for her
Butterfly Worm Cake. Second place went to Glen
Hibbs. He used a Dutch
oven to create a blueberry
cobbler. Third place went
to Gail Hibbs for her Banana Split.
A successful silent auction and raffle provided the
funds for next year’s event.
Karaoke began at 8 p.m.
with a Wacky Costume
Contest. First place was
awarded to Kammie Hibbs.
Second place went to Gail
Hibbs who did a Shaky
Hanky Dance. Gail was assisted by Faye and a bunch
of other family members.
The family sends a special thank you to the Karaoke Lady, Tanya Simler. Tanya has hosted the
Karaoke every year and
always stays through the
early morning hours.
Sunday morning everyone brought something for
a meal for breakfast burritos. It was followed by a
game of Change It Quick
for the women and a game
of Horse Shoes for the
guys.
The family would like to
send a special thank you to
Millie Morris and Faye and
Steven Leto for going beyond and above every year
to make this reunion run
smoothly. Next year the reunion will be held on Aug.
12-14.
How many of you read
the “Down Memory Lane”
column in last week’s
Clearwater Tribune? Under “40 Years Ago,” Deputy
Nick Albers thanked Roy
Cochrell and his son for
helping to change a tire on
his patrol car that blew out
while he was on his way to
an accident. When Mary
Cochrell and her daughterin-law Diane discussed it,
they figured “the son” that
was mentioned must have
been Jason. He would have
been 11 years old then and
would have been still living
at home.
Marie Armitage is happy to be working full time
again in the 4-H program
for Clearwater County.
Cookbooks
Sue Wyatt reported the
Timberline Track Team
cookbooks are in. The recipes submitted by the students through the eighth
grade are featured in the
back of each section. The
cost of the books is $12. If
you would like to have them
mailed to you, add another
$2.50. For those who preordered a cookbook, call
Sue and she will arrange
delivery. A lot of effort went
into editing the book, so if
a recipe was missed she
apologizes. To order a book
call Sue at 208-435-4542
or Janice Hartig at 208464-2253.
Happy Birthday greetings go out to Laine Harris
on Aug. 23.
Harry, Claud, Clarabell and Marie Judd
EPA is way over the line!
Dear Editor:
Recently in Kansas the EPA took enforcement action
against a feedlot for failure to store hay in a “pollutioncontainment zone.” Following the Kansas incident,
ranchers in Billings, MT asked an EPA representative if
hay had been declared a pollutant. The official answer:
YES!
The Environmental Protection Agency got caught
using aerial drones to spy on farmers and ranchers in
Nebraska and Iowa.Nebraska congressman challenged
the agency. The EPA insisted they have authority to
“surveil” (code word: spy on) the private property of
farmers and ranchers because it is a cost effective means
to protect people and the environment from violations of
the Clean Water Act.
The EPA is making its own rules under the pretext of
protecting the environment.The agency can determine
a mud puddle to be a “wetland.” It can issue onerous
fines against property owners when there is no proven
violation. EPA agents are not required to present a
warrant before entering property.
The EPA has absolutely no authority to do this!Article
1, Section 8 of the Constitution does not authorize
Congress to legislate issues of the environment.The 10th
Amendment grants this authority to the states and state
legislatures.The EPA is also violating the 4th Amendment
provision of probable cause.
Using the excuse of protecting the environment, the
EPA is putting our Bill of Rights, our property rights,
farms, ranches and businesses in jeopardy. We must
elect those who endorse limiting the power and control
of a federal agency that can arbitrarily determine hay as
a pollutant, a mud puddle as a wetland and “observe” us
(without our knowledge) with a camera from the air!
Pat Baxter
Orofino
CPTPA fire update
The CPTPA Fire District
is still in high fire danger,
as reported by Cameron
Eck, Fire & Program Manager. All burn permits are
restricted until further
notice, however campfires
Great selection
for kids!
The Brown great-grandchildren at the piano-Emma
holding Hannah Belle, Spencer, Shirley Schoenek,
Natalie, Grace McIntosh and Abby.
Girls Skechers
on sale
for $24.99
Gentle Event
Special Event:
August Г la Mode
Friday, Aug. 17
5 to 7:30 p.m.
Sidewalk Sale • Free scoops of ice cream
Homemade pie (made by the Little Red
Hens) sold by the slice • Live music
Drawing for $50 gift certificate.
Store Hours:
Wed. - Fri. 10:00 - 6:00 • Sat. 9:00 - 3:00
249 Johnson Ave., Orofino
(208) 476-5700
DISCLAIMER
The Clearwater Tribune is not responsible for actions resulting from classified or
display advertising, and reserves the right to refuse libelous news and advertising.
All news submissions, including letters to the editor, are subject to editing.
We welcome letters to the editor of 400 words or less. CLEARWATER TRIBUNE
PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY CLEARWATER PUBLISHING CO., INC.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICES:
Clearwater County, Peck, Lenore-$38.00 per year.
Elsewhere $46.00 per year.
Second class postage paid at Orofino, Idaho.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
CLEARWATER TRIBUNE
P.O. BOX 71
OROFINO, ID 83544
Marcie Stanton, Publisher and Editor; Cloann McNall, Assistant Editor;
Alannah Allbrett, Reporter, Photographer, Ad Composition; Andrea
Dell, Ad Composition, Webmaster; Judy O'Brien, Classifieds; Elizabeth
Morgan, Typesetter, Reporter, Photographer; Pam Jones, Ad Sales,
Subscriptions, Receptionist
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e-mail: [email protected]
Phone (208) 476-4571
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161 Main * Orofino, ID 83544
are allowed in designated
spots.
It is important you report
any fires you see to 911.
Eck notes nationwide
fire updates can be found
at inciweb.org.
Boys Skechers
on sale
for $26.99
Both Styles Regularly Priced at $39.99
We have a wide selection of Skechers for the whole family!
Murray’s Shoe Store
& SHOE REPAIR
+PIOTPOn0SPGJOP476-4223
OBS Design Center
Summer Freezer Sale!
• 10% off ALL
freezers
• Chest or upright
• FREE in-town
“curbside”
delivery
• Just in time
for Lumberjack
days and
hunting season!
Sale runs August 1 to 31, 2012
OBS Design Center
Open Monday
through Friday,
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
209 Johnson Ave., Orofino • (208) 476-7810
6A—Clearwater Tribune – Orofino, ID – AUGUST 16, 2012
Joel “Jody” Wilson, Jr., 73, Orofino
Joel “Jody” Wilson, Jr.,
Orofino, expired at home
August 10, 2012. He was
73.
Joel was born in Orofino
to parents Joel Wilson and
Bessie Prather. He grew up
in Crane Meadows then
moved to Glenwood in Kamiah, then to 87 Alpine
Drive in Orofino.
He graduated from the
eighth grade at the Glenwood Schoolhouse in Kamiah.
Joel worked at Canyon
Ranger Station until he retired. He was a longstanding member of the NRA.
He is survived by sister Josephine Sherard of
Orofino, nephews Leonard
Sherard, Kansas City, KS;
Donnie Sherard, Orofino;
cousins Oscar Wilson and
Penny Wilson, Reuben;
Gene White and Bill White
of Orofino, and Alvis Wilson of Texas in addition
to great-nephews Aaron
Sherard of Reubens, Brian
Sherard, Kevin Sherard
and Gavin Sherard of Orofino and second cousin
Isaac Wilson of Reubens.
Joel was preceded in
death by his mother, Bessie Prather, father Joel Wilson Sr. and sister Donna
Wilson.
There will be a service for
family and friends at the
gravesite, time to be determined.
Richard Lindgren, Vancouver, WA
Richard
(Dick)
Allen
Lindgren, Vancouver, WA,
passed away Saturday, August 4, 2012. He was 83.
Dick was born in Orofino on July 14, 1929, and
raised there. He graduated
from Orofino High School
and continued on to receive
a Bachelor’s Degree from
Northern Idaho College of
Education, now known as
Lewis-Clark State College.
Later Dick earned his
Masters at the University of
Idaho. Following college he
served in the Intelligence
Division of the U.S. Army
in occupied Europe.
Dick worked as a teacher
and a coach, starting his
career in Nezperce, followed
by 20 years in the Klamath
Falls school system in Oregon. He had many hobbies or “projects,” but his
real interests were his family, the kids that he taught
or coached and the many
wonderful people that he
came into contact with
during his career.
Richard
is
survived
by his children, Karin and
Steve Dawson, Mark and
Staci Lindgren, Rob and
Kate Hinchee, Mark and
Mary Anne Hinchee and
Dan and Terri Hinchee. He
was a wonderful grandfa-
ther to 11 grandchildren
and seven great grandchildren. Richard was preceded in death by his dearly
beloved wife, Miriam.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be given
to Hospice Southwest P.O.
Box 1600, Vancouver, WA
98668.
We would like to thank
all of those who enriched
his life and those who allowed their life to be enriched by him….you gave
him purpose and you provided us with endless stories.
Irene Lynch, 93, North Bend, WA
Irene Lynch, 93, died
Aug. 3, 2012 near North
Bend, WA, where she had
been residing with her son
Monte Lynch and his family.
She was born in Gilbert,
Idaho to Leonard F. Tull,
and Emily Hutchinson Tull
on Oct. 28, 1918. She attended schools in Camas,
WA and the Eugene, OR
area until the family moved
back to Orofino in 1930.
A child of the Depression,
she worked to pay for her
education and graduated
as Valedictorian from Orofino High School in 1937.
She married Charles (Bud)
Lynch on March 1, 1937
and they raised five children in a pioneer setting on
the family homestead.
Her children grew up with
the smell of her county fair
blue ribbon bread filling
the house as she taught
them to cook, sew, garden,
milk cows, and dream. She
bought encyclopedias, the
Children’s Classics, and
National Geographic so
they could see the world.
She loved cooking for lots
of people and giving bread
to friends and family. She
made their home a sanctuary for Western Bluebirds.
She was always willing
to undertake a new adven-
turned home to Orofino.
Following his death in
1988 she stayed on Wells
Bench until 2004, when
she moved to North Bend,
WA.
Irene Lynch
ture from a simple picnic at
Aquarius to hiking over the
Arizona desert at night in
search of Halley’s Comet.
A tenacious cancer survivor, she was also a poet
and an ardent reader of
science, history, and literature, a lover of music and
the natural world. She was
a feminist who taught herself to drive and, to the everlasting pride of her husband, made a career with
the Corps of Engineers
at the Dworshak Project,
Bonneville 2nd Powerhouse, Little Goose, Walla
Walla District Personnel
Office.
After she retired in 1983,
she and her husband re-
She was predeceased
by her husband, parents,
brothers Leonard Tull,
Donald Tull, Fred Tull, and
her sister, Annie Watson.
She is survived by her
sister
Carolyn
Cuddy;
daughters Jill Lynch and
Bette (and Dean) Husted;
and sons Monte (and Kitty) Lynch, Tom Lynch and
John Lynch. She is also
survived by her granddaughters Destiny Lynch,
Angela Lynch, and grandsons Josh (and Cecelia)
Husted, Aaron, Jacob and
Jared Lynch. She loved
many nieces and nephews.
A celebration of her life
will be held at the Orofino
Senior Center on Saturday,
Sept. 1, at 5 p.m.
Clarence Shine
memorial get-together
to be held August 19
A memorial get-together
for friends and family of
Clarence Shine will be held
at 11 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 19
at the Orofino City Park.
Come and share memories.
Jan (Workman)
McIver, 60
Jan (Workman) McIver of
Umatilla, OR passed away
Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012 at
St. Maries Regional Medical Center in Walla Walla,
WA. She was 60 years old.
Walter George
Harris, 78
Walter George Harris of
Southwick passed away
Aug. 4, 2012 at his home.
He was 78 years old.
Pine Hills Funeral Chapel and Crematory is in
care of arrangements.
What a peculiar privilege has this little agitation of the brain which
we call thought, that we
must make it the model
of the whole universe.
David Hume
***
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for clarification or errors, if needed.
The smallest bird egg is
believed to be that of the
Vervain Hummingbird,
of Jamaica. It measures
just 0.39 inches and
weighs 0.0132 ounces.
***
Truly fertile music, the
only kind that will move
us, that we shall truly
appreciate, will be a music conducive to dream,
which banishes all reason and analysis.
Albert Camus
Free Notices
Death notices and service notices are published free of
charge.
Deadlines
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to be guaranteed a space in that week’s issue. Obituaries
submitted after that will be included only if space and time
allow. E-mail obituaries to [email protected] or fax them
to (208) 476-0765. (Photos must be e-mailed or brought into
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Church Directory
Orofino
Tabernacle
Peace Lutheran Church
13946 1st Ave. W., Riverside, Orofino
(Look for sign on Hwy. 12 by Deano’s Exxon)
1839 Michigan Ave.
Worship: 8 a.m.
Sundays at 10 a.m.
Wednesdays at 7 p.m.
(Alternate time in case of bad weather, 2 p.m.)
To confirm service time call
476-3810 or 509-758-8261
Nursery, Children’s Church,
Junior and Senior Youth Groups
Pastor Stanton Walker
Phone (208) 476-3757
Mountain Meadows
Baptist Church
Independent
1108 W. Pierce Street
Weippe, ID 83553
Pastor Michael Widener
Sunday School.....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Church Service......11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer Meeting...6:30 p.m.
208-435-4265
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
www.firstbaptistorofino.org
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM
Morning Worship
11:00 AM
(Children’s Church)
Tuesday Awana Clubs 6:00 PM
Evening Worship
7:00 PM
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study
7:00 PM
291 118TH STREET, OROFINO
476-5412 Pastor Hale Anderson
“The Valley’s voice for Biblical, Christian,
conservative Lutheranism”
Pastor David Naumann
(509) 758-8261
Affiliated with the
Church of the Lutheran Confession (CLC)
Ascension Lutheran Church
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
215 115th Street
Sunday Worship.....9:00 a.m.
Handicap Accessible - Rides Provided, Call 476-5622
Pastor Marsha Hendrickson
Church Office.....................476-5622
www.mylutheranchurch.com
[email protected]
Living in God’s amazing grace
St. Theresa’s Catholic Church
208-476-5121 • P.O. Box 1169
Wesleyan Church
“C” Street between Brown & Kalaspo
MASSES
Christian Education......9:30 a.m.
Worship........................10:45 a.m.
Wesleyan Youth....Wed 6:30 p.m.
and AWANA
EVERYONE WELCOME
Malloree Norris, Youth Director
Office Manager: MaryAnn Munda
Event Scheduling: Lisa McFall 476-7895
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.catholicidaho.org
435-4470
Don’t just watch us grow,
come and grow with us.
Saturday...5:00 p.m. Sunday...10:30 a.m.
St. Catherine’s, Kamiah...Sunday 8:00 a.m.
Reconciliation...............4:30 p.m. Saturday
Our Lady of Woodland in Pierce, 10 a.m.,
2nd Saturday of the month, April - October
Rev. Father Sipho Mathabela,
OSB, Administrator
Cream Ridge United
Brethren Church
Charismatic
Pastor: Fred Browning
CH: 208-476-9798 HM: 208-486-6004
Sunday School 9:45
Sunday Morning Fellowship 11:00
Bus service Lewiston, Clarkston
Sunday Only
Tim & Nancy (208-743-3232)
(E-mail: [email protected])
Orofino
Church of the
Nazarene
United Methodist
Church
Sunday School
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting
7:00 p.m.
Church School and
Family Worship
337 College Ave.
James Moore, Pastor
Faith Lutheran
Church, LCMC
Church 464-2411
Opdahl 464-2387
Pastor Terry Gugger
14233 Hwy 12
(208) 476-3019
Christ Centered - Community Minded
Adult Sunday School............9 a.m.
Worship Service..................10 a.m.
Church of God
280 107th St.
Pastor W.L. Boone: 476-5327
Church 476-5617 • Home 476-5284
[email protected]
Clearwater Independent
Baptist Church
First Christian Church
Seventh-day
Adventist Churches
(208) 476-5158
We are an
Independent Baptist Church
Meeting at the Senior Center
930 Michigan Ave., Orofino
Sunday School:
10:00 a.m.
Worship Service:
11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 p.m.
Everyone is welcome!
Pastor Danny Vaughn
208-476-5619
208-816-1256 (cell)
Michigan Avenue & C St.
Sunday School.............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship.......11:00 a.m.
Wed. Ladies Meeting...9:30 a.m.
Clarence Howard, Pastor
Weekday Programs
Call 476-3019 for details
WOMEN’S STUDIES
JR & SR HIGH YOUTH FELLOWSHIPS
WEEKLY MEN’S FELLOWSHIPS
SAMARITAN ROAD: 12 STEPS TO RECOVERY
Pastor Stewart Mackey
802 Michigan Avenue
Orofino, Idaho
Cavendish.........8:30 a.m.
Orofino-Peck...10:45 a.m.
WORSHIP & CHILDREN’S CHURCH 8:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
FUEL For All Ages (Sunday School)
9:45 a.m.
Nursery Provided
611 South Main, Pierce
Pastor Ingrid Aderhold
476-2120
All Are Welcome
Adult Sunday School:
9:45 a.m.
Sunday Worship:
11:00 a.m.
Tuesday: Bible Study
7:00 p.m.
Pastor Hank HeschlГ©
“Where your future is more important than your past”
Pastor Gary Beck, 476-9174
Orofino
Weippe
46418 Hwy 12
Main Street
Church Services.........11:00 a.m.
Sabbath School............9:00 a.m.
Study Group.......Wed. 6:00 p.m.
Community Services & Food Bank
Orofino: Tue. 9:00 - 1:00
Weippe: Wed. 9:00 - 1:00
“The Son of man is Lord also of
the Sabbath.” Mark 2:28
Visit us on the web
www.orofinocc.com
Riverside
Assembly
of God
Pastor David King
12271 Hartford Ave.
Orofino
(208) 476-3560
Adult Sunday School
9:30 a.m.
Church Service
11:00 a.m.
Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
AUGUST 16, 2012 – Orofino, ID – Clearwater Tribune—7A
Eva Jeanette Allen, 85, Lewiston
Mary Ann Dangman is shown admiring Sherry Schlader’s hanging baskets during the Clearwater Compulsive Gardeners recent tour.
Clearwater Compulsive
Gardeners news
By Red Arave
The Clearwater Compulsive Gardeners traveled to
the Fraser/Weippe area on
Tuesday, where we toured
some impressive gardens.
Our first stop was to the
home of Laura and Bob
Mason, where we enjoyed
their gracious hospitality
and a lovely brunch outdoors on the deck. There
were several bouquets of
Laura’s flowers on the tables and hanging baskets
in the most unique places.
Bob’s vegetable garden was
picture perfect, not a weed
in sight!
There were lots of questions asked and valuable
information learned from
these two gardeners. It
was so peaceful everyone
was reluctant to leave, but
we finally gathered up and
continued on to Colleen
Fahy and Monte Vanderpol’s home.
Colleen’s garden was a
series of raised beds, narrow enough for the whole
bed to be within easy
reach. Each had an individual watering system
and there were winding
paths among them. All the
plants were lush and green
and showed no sign of our
latest heat wave.
Their grand log home
sets back among the privacy of the pine trees. Colleen
invited us inside and it was
a whole other experience
to see the many talents of
this lady! Colleen is a recent new member and we
are glad to have her.
Our final stop was at
Sherry and Larry Schlader’s home. The first magnificent sight is a patriotic red,
white and blue container
of petunias. Throughout
her yard are several showy
containers and hanging
baskets across the front
porch that were glorious
with red geraniums and
candle vines. They were
all a continuous curtain of
color and so pretty.
Sherry’s backyard features her childhood playhouse, restored and incorporated into a corner of a
new storage building. There
was even a “tea party” going on with delicious treats
and ice cold punch. What
a delightful way to wind up
the tour.
Our garden club wishes
to thank Laura and Bob,
Colleen and Sherry for going all out to entertain us
at their homes and in their
lovely gardens. Club members enjoying the day were
Barbara Brown, Anne Isbelle, Deb Walters, Sandy
Goffinet, Shirley Johnson,
Sharon Fitzgerald, Becky
Peltz, Joyce Peltier, Rose
Alene McArthur, Judy Sommers, Nancy Ann Stanfill,
Peggy Ball, Gini Donnelly,
Janet OCrowley, Mary Ann
Dangman, Lorraine Elam
and Red Arave.
We have several new
members and I encourage
everyone to enter the fruits
of their labor in the upcoming county fair. There will
not be a meeting in September due to our participation in the Fair.
Eva Jeanette Allen, 85,
of Lewiston (and formerly
of Pierce) passed away
Tuesday Aug. 7, 2012 at
Wedgewood Terrace after a
brief, serious illness.
She was the middle child
born on Sept. 9, 1926 to
Robert G. and Esther H.
Dinnison at the family farm
in Weippe. She attended
Weippe Grammar School
and Pierce High School
graduating in 1944.
Jeanette
joined
the
Nurses’ Cadet Corp at
Deaconess
Hospital
in
Spokane and received her
RN diploma in 1947. She
worked in Washington,
DC, Albuquerque, NM and
Clarkston hospitals before
marrying Claude Schrempp
and moving to Palo Alto,
CA. She continued nursing
here, then Richland, WA,
Grand Coulee and Rockwood Clinic as a nurse.
This marriage brought
forth her children, Claudia and Robert. She and
Claude returned to Piece in
1956 and owned and operated the Pierce Market. This
marriage ended in divorce.
She returned to nursing at
Clearwater Valley Hospital
and worked at Jaype Mill
until marrying Robert L.
Allen in Pierce. They moved
to a parcel of her parents’
Weippe homestead in 1978
and remained there until
2007 when health issues
brought them to Lewiston.
Jeanette was a hard
worker, starting as a teenager delivering milk to
Pierce residents before
school and her work ethic
continued until health issues slowed her. One of
her last words was “please
clean this room up!” She
and Bob were good community people – always
there to help with any project.
She missed her Pierce
and Weippe friends dearly
Clearwater County Fair
dog show set for Aug. 18
Per Jeanette’s request,
cremation has taken place
and that she wanted no
service and no tears! Her
ashes are to be buried in
the Weippe Cemetery by
her family at a later date.
She requested any memorials be made to the
Weippe Cemetery, 894
Dairy Rd., Weippe, ID
83553, or charity of your
choice.
Christian Church
news
herself. Way to go Alyssa!
By Kathy Eckman
The following is from
June 2009 and is entitled
“Are You Ready?” It comes
from Our Daily Bread.
Please read Acts 13:1-5.
“As they ministered to the
Lord and fasted, the Holy
Spirit said �Now seperate to
me, Barnabas and Saul for
the work.’” Acts 13:2.
Three months before a
planned mission trip, a
friend and I were talking
about the upcoming event.
He said to me, “If anyone
can’t go, I’d be willing to
step in and join you.” This
was not going to be an easy
eight days, for we would be
painting, repairing and fixing stuff in the July heat
Visitors are invited to Dworshak Dam Visitor of Jamaica. Yet, my friend
join U.S. Army Corps of En- Center activities are free was willing to go.
About six weeks before
gineers staff at the Dwor- and open to all ages. Visishak Dam Visitor Center tors age 16 and older must we were scheduled to leave,
on Saturday, Aug. 25, from show photo identification there was an opening. I
8:15 p.m. to 10:15 p.m. for and register at the front emailed my friend, whom I
a free evening program of desk prior to entry. Chil- hadn’t seen in the interim,
stars and music on top of dren under 16 years old and asked if he was still
the dam.
must be accompanied by interested. He immediately
responded, “Sure! And I got
John Olson, visiting as- an adult at all times.
a passport just in case you
tronomy enthusiast, will
have telescopes and bin- Visitors are encouraged asked.” He made sure he
oculars on hand and will to bring a flashlight and a was ready-just in case he
provide a short program lawn chair for comfortable got the call to go.
about star gazing. Dwor- sitting. For more informa- My friend’s preparation
shak Visitor Center volun- tion call 208-476-1255, or reminds me of what hapteers, the dulcimer duo, stop by the Dworshak Dam pened back in the first cenRiverwind, will provide live Visitor Center, open daily tury at Antioch. Paul and
music to accompany visi- from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 Barnabas were among a
number of people getting
tors’ star-gazing activities. p.m.
themselves ready spiritually for whatever God might
ask them to do, or wherever
He might send them. They
didn’t prepare by getting a
The Clearwater County County Fair in September. passport, but they “minisFair Dog Show is sched- Dogs are allowed in the tered to the Lord and fastuled for Saturday, Aug. 18, park for this event, must ed.” (Acts 13:2) And when
at the Orofino City Park..
be kept on leash or con- the Holy Spirit said “sepa This dog show is open tained, and you must clean rate to me Barnabas and
to all Clearwater County up after your dog.
Saul for the work.” (Acts
residents and is part of the For more information 13:2) they were all set for
Clearwater County Fair. or questions, please con- the journey.
The show begins at 1 p.m. tact Kathy at 476-3228 or Are you preparing for
Entry forms are available [email protected] com.
what God might want you
at the Clearwater County
to do? When the Spirit says
Extension Office, ClearwaKindle Fire and
“Go”, will you be ready?”
ter Valley Veterinary ClinKeep your tools ready-God
Nook
now
at
ic, Whipple’s Feed, and the
will find work for you.
Orofino Animal Hospital.
Orofino library
We were happy to have
Classes include Show- Come by the Clearwater Pastor Howard and his wife
manship (Pee Wee, Junior, Memorial Public Library Kathi back with us after
Senior, Adult); Conforma- and check out the new their vacation in Oregon.
tion (for purebred dogs Kindle Fire and Nook. Our Thanks to everyone who
only - Puppy classes, Adult Digital Coach can help you filled in for them while they
classes, Senior classes, navigate through them and were gone. A special thank
Veteran classes); Obedi- answer any questions you you to Eileen Rowan who
ence (Novice Y on leash, may have.
preached the sermons and
Novice A and B); and Fun Don’t miss out. Learn got everything organized
Classes (Matched Pairs, how to get in the loop with while they were gone.
Recall Race, Command e-books and our online We were happy to have
Class, and Costume).
overdrive library using Alyssa Rowan back with
There is no entry fee. Kindle Fire and Nook.
us last Sunday. She was
Premium money for rib- Call or stop by and able to go to Japan to visit
bons won will be avail- schedule an appointment friends. She earned all of
able during the Clearwater this week!
the money for her trip by
Dworshak hosts nighttime
star-gazing and music program
Eva Jeanette Allen
after moving to Lewiston.
Her main interests were
family and her home – inside and out. She liked skiing, swimming, wood shop
and keeping a well groomed
yard.
Jeanette is survived by
her husband, Bob; daughter, Claudia Schrempp
Decker; son, Robert (Anne)
Schrempp; stepdaughter,
Becky Brotnov (Terry Jackson); stepson, Sam (Chris)
Allen; eight grandchildren
and 11 great-grandchildren; little sister, Mildred
Ann Musselman and nephews, Dan (Shelley) Musselman and Jerry (Patricia)
Musselman and several
great nephews and nieces.
She was preceded in
death by her parents; sister, Roberta Gibbar; brothers-in-law, Francis Gibbar
and Leo Musselman and
nephew and niece, Richard
and Connie Gibbar.
Alyssa will be giving a
talk about her trip to Japan
at the Forest Service building on Sunday, Aug. 19 at
6:30 p.m. It is open to the
public. If you are interested
you are welcome to come
and hear her presentation.
Clothing
Giveaway at the
Nazarene Church
Linda Sue Day, 65, Lewiston
Our loving mother, Linda
Sue Day, Lewiston, passed
away Thursday July 19,
2012 at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center at the age
of 65.Linda was born December 8, 1946 at Orofino
to parents Paul James Wyatt and Mary Ruth Farence
of Weippe.
Linda spent her early
years at the family ranch
located on what is now Wyatt Road outside of Weippe.
She attended school in
Weippe and graduated
from Weippe High School
in 1965.
Upon her graduation she
married Darell Chenault
and they moved to Edwards
Air Force Base in California
outside of Rosemond.
In 1968 her first son,
David Ray Chenault, was
born at Edwards Base Hospital.
Linda and Darell later
divorced, and Linda stayed
in California later meeting
and marrying Joe Rodarte.
In 1980 Linda and Joe
divorced and Linda moved
back to the Weippe area.
She went to work for the
Community Action Agency.
In 1983 she married
Robert (Bob) Allen Day.In
1984 her second son James
Allen Day was born, and in
1985 she was blessed with
her third son Brandon Lee
Day.
Linda and Bob moved to
Lewiston in 1988, and in
1989 they settled at their
longtime home on Warner
Avenue in the Orchards.
Linda left Community Action and for a year she
and Bob headed a house
for abused and abandoned
children in Idaho Falls.
When she returned to
northern
Idaho,
Linda
went back into the food
service industry, managing
the kitchens at Farmhouse
Fraternity at the University
of Idaho, and Sigma Kappa
Sorority at Washington
State University.After several years of commuting to
the universities, she took
over as Food Service Manager at Northwest Children’s Home in Lewiston.
She retired from the chil-
Linda Day
dren’s home in 2002, and
she and Bob managed the
campground at Myrtle on
the Clearwater river until
they both retired for good
in 2006.
They enjoyed their retirement until Robert’s death
in November 2010, and
Linda resided at the family
home on Warner battling
various ailments until her
passing.
Linda was preceded in
death by her parents Paul
and Mary Ruth Wyatt of
Weippe; husband Robert
Allen Day of Lewiston; sister Ilo Larson of Lewiston.
She is survived by, sisters Jean Stacy and her
husband Elwood of Weippe;
Sharon Miles and her husband Grant of Weippe;
sons David Ray Chenault
and his wife Alane of Lewiston; James Allen Day and
Brandon Lee Day of Poulsbo WA; grandsons Mitchell Ray, Cody Alan, and
Braeden Dealney Chenault
of Lewiston; and numerous nieces, nephews, and
cousins.
Our family would like to
thank the doctors, nurses,
and staff of St. Joseph Regional Medical Center for
the amazing care and support they have delivered to
Linda over the past several
years.
Mountain View Funeral
Home is handling arrangements for the family, and
the online Book of Memories can be found at www.
mtviewfuneralhome.com,
and due to our mothers request there will be no formal service.
Third Annual
Worship in the Park
The community is invited to attend Sunday morning worship service in the
by Laura Patrick
It’s back to school shop- Orofino City Park on Aug.
ping time and Compassion- 26 at 9:30 a.m. This year
ate Ministries will be giving the music and message will
away clothes for all ages be from singer, songwriter,
and sizes this week, Thurs- and worship leader Branday, Friday and Saturday, don Bee. Brandon is a naAug. 16-18. The doors of tionally known Christian
the church will be open music artist. Go to his webfrom 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on site www.brandonbeemuThursday and Saturday, sic.com and you can check
Brandon Bee
while Friday’s hours will out his music, biography
be from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and videos. His current mer standard in the park.
This event is open to any- CD’s “This Is the Revolu- Chairs will be set up in the
one in Clearwater County tion”, “Inside These Walls” park, but you might want
and the surrounding area. and “Surrendered” are an to bring a lawn chair if you
Tell your friends and come integral part of the mes- prefer. Everyone is encouron in! For information re- sage he brings as he travels aged to pack a picnic lunch
garding this event or any and performs. Many of you and stay following the serothers please contact the had an opportunity to hear vices. Worship in the Park
Brandon earlier this year if is a partnership event orchurch at 476-5158.
you or your children par- ganized by The Church of
ticipated in the week long the Nazarene, Riverside
spring break event called Assembly of God, United
Methodist Churches of
“Activate”.
Brandon
returns
to Orofino, Cavendish and
Orofino for an encore per- Peck, and Orofino Commu Parade entries for the formance to join with lo- nity Church. We hope to
Weippe Rodeo parade can cal churches in leading see you there -- and bring
be picked up at Mary Ann’s what has become a sum- a friend!
Groceries or the Weippe
NOSDA training deadline August 20
Discovery Center. Persons
who do not live in Weippe The registration dead- area of community service,
may enter by calling Caro- line for attending the local please call to register for
lyn at (208) 435-4845.
NOSDA (No One Shall Die training.
Alone) training for new vol The parade begins at 12 unteers is Monday, Aug.
The great trouble with
noon Saturday, Aug. 18. 20. Pre-registration is rebaseball today is that
Line-up for the parade is quired. Call Terry Lester at
most of the players are in
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at 476-7428 or Paula Lohmthe game for the money
the Empire Lumber log eyer at 476-9291. Training
and that’s it, not for the
yard in Weippe.
will be held on Thursday, love of it, the excitement
Rodeo queen
August 23, 10 a.m. to 4 of it, the thrill of it.
The Weippe Rodeo As- p.m. Lunch will be provid- Ty Cobb
sociation is also seeking ed.
***
queen candidates for next NOSDA, a volunteer orA good conversationalist
year’s queen. Interested ganization established in
is not one who remembers
high school girls should 2007, currently has 17 volwhat was said but says
contact Carolyn Lage at unteers dedicated to prowhat someone wants to re435-4845 this week for the viding a caring presence
member.
rules and the horseman- at the end of life by sitting
- John Mason Brown
ship pattern. The deadline with patients in the local
***
for signing up is Aug. 15.
hospital or nursing home The great gift of conversa If you have questions call who have no family availtion lies less in displaying
(208) 435-4845 or (208) able or for a family that
it ourselves than in draw435-4142.
just needs a break.It oper- ing it out of others.
ates
under
the
auspices
of
***
- Jean de la Bruy re
The great gift of con- Clearwater Valley Hospital.
***
versation lies less in NOSDA does not provide In conversation, humor
displaying it ourselves hospice care.
is worth more than wit
volunteers
are and easiness more than
than in drawing it out of More
needed
to
ensure
coverage
others.
knowledge.
- Jean de la Bruy re on an as needed basis. If
- George Herbert
you are interested in this
***
***
Weippe
Rodeo parade
information
8A—Clearwater Tribune – Orofino, ID – AUGUST 16, 2012
Orofino Elementary
School Supply List
Any donations of white board markers, boxes of
band-aids, and reams of copy paper would be greatly
appreciated by the Orofino Elementary School staff and
students.
Kindergarten
2 Boxes of 8 crayons (Not primary/fluorescent)
1 Pkg #2 pencils
1 Set watercolors (prefer Prang/Crayola)
1 School box (plastic lasts longer)
1 Backpack
(Please label above supplies)
1 Bottle anti-bacterial hand gel
1 Box Kleenex
1 Medium bottle of glue (preferably Elmer’s)
1 Pair of scissors (prefers Fiskars)
2 Glue sticks
1 Pink eraser
First grade
3 Boxes of 16 crayons
4 Folders with pockets
1 Pair of pointed scissors (Fiskars)
2 Pkgs #2 Pencils (wood)
1 Set of watercolors
4 Glue sticks
4 Large erasers
2 Large boxes of Kleenex
1 Ream white copy paper
1 Pair of tennis shoes for P.E.
1 Box 16 colored pencils
1 Medium bottle of glue (preferably Elmer’s)
1 Small pencil box
Second grade
1 Box of Crayola crayons
1 Box of colored pencils
1 Small pencil box
2 Pkgs #2 pencils (preferably Ticonderoga)
2 Pink erasers
1 Pair of scissors (preferably Fiskars)
1 Small bottle Glue (preferably Elmer’s)
4 Folders with pockets
3 Wide-ruled spiral notebooks
1 set of watercolors (prefers Prang)
1 Pair of tennis shoes for P.E.
(Please label all supplies)
Third grade
(No three-ring binders, Trapper Keepers, or
individual pencil sharpeners. Please label all
supplies.)
1 or 2 Boxes of 24 crayons (preferably Crayola
Twistable)
2 Pkgs. notebook paper, college ruled
2 Erasers
1 Pkg pencil top erasers
1 Watercolors (preferably Prang or Crayola)
1 Large box of Kleenex
1 Med. bottle of glue and four glue sticks
1 Pair pointed scissors (preferably Fiskars)
4 Pkgs. #2 wood pencils (preferably Mead); no plastic
pencils
3 Folders with pockets
1 Small pencil box
1 or 2 Boxes of colored pencils
2 Pkgs. 3x5 index cards
1 3x5 Index card box
1 Wood ruler with inches (1/4 in. and 1/2 in.) and
centimeters
1 Pair tennis shoes for P.E.
Fourth grade
(No three-ring binders or Trapper Keepers. Please
label all supplies.)
1 Box colored pencils
1 Box crayons (not fluorescent)
1 Large pink eraser
2 Large boxes of Kleenex
1 Bottle rubber cement or two glue sticks
1 Pair scissors (preferably Fiskars)
2 Pkgs #2 pencils (not Eagle brand)
1 Ruler
2 Folders
4 Notebooks or 4 pkgs. loose-leaf paper - college ruled
1 Pair tennis shoes for P.E.
1 Pencil pouch or pencil box
Fifth grade
(No Trapper Keepers. Please label all supplies.)
1 Box of 24 crayons (preferably Twistables)
1 Box colored pencils
1 Pair pointed scissors
1 Twelve-inch ruler
2 Boxes Kleenex (1 box if Mrs. Gilmer’s class)
2 Pkgs #2 pencils (prefers Ticonderoga)
3 Pkgs. college ruled paper
1 Pencil pouch (no pencil boxes, please)
1 4 oz. Bottle with glue and 1 bottle rubber cement
2 Large pink erasers
1 Pkg. markers
1 Pair tennis shoes
2 Folders with pockets
1 Yellow highlighter
Sixth grade
1 Box colored pencils
2 Large erasers
2 Large boxes Kleenex
2 Folders with pockets to go into binder
1 Spiral notebook with approx. 100 sheets
2 Pkgs. notebook paper
1 Pencil pouch
5 Glue sticks
1 Pair pointed scissors
2 Yellow highlighters
2 Pkgs. #2 pencils
1 Pkg. lined index cards
1 Box markers
1 Pair tennis shoes for P.E.
(Please label all supplies.)
Please do not bring the following items: binder or
Trapper Keepers, mechanical pencils, ink pens, or
individual pencil sharpeners.
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The Ultimate Fly
Rod Transporter
- Tested and proven design
- Secure at highway speeds
- No climbing on roof
to unlatch tips
- Perfect for the guide
or avid fisherman
801-698-4484
www.kwikcatch.com
Cavendish-Teakean Elementary
back to school night, supply lists
Cavendish-Teakean Elementary School’s back to
school night takes place Thursday, Aug. 23 from 6 to 7
p.m.
School supply lists
You may want extras of things such as glue sticks,
paper, tissues, pencils, etc., for when your child needs
more for the next semester.
All students
2 packages of notebook paper
*5 spiral notebooks labeled Science, Math, Writers
Workshop, Research, Reading
*1 folder for take-home papers
*1 red folder
*1 green folder
1 glue stick
1 bottle of glue
*1 scissors
1 package of sharpened pencils
2 pens
*1 eraser
*1 highlighter
*1 white board marker
*1 ruler
*P.E. Shoes
Fourth through sixth grade
One three-ring binder and two packages of dividers
labeled as follows: Caesar/Vocab., Math, Reading, Science, Social Studies, Research, Spelling, Language
Optional:
*Water bottle
*Flash drive
*Plastic microwave-safe plate
*Plastic microwave-safe bowl
*Plastic microwave-safe utensils
*Calculator
*White-out
Disinfectant wipes
Kleenex
Zip-lock bags (gallon or quart)
*Please put name on supplies
Kindergarten
1 package of notebook paper
1 folder for take home papers
1 glue stick
1 bottle of glue
Scissors
1 package of sharpened pencils
1 pen
1 eraser
1 white board marker
Ruler
Please keep in mind that students still have recess
even once the weather turns cold and snowy. Your child
will need snow boots, snow pants, a snow coat, a hat,
and gloves. If they would like, students may keep a pair
of slippers and a dry pair of socks at school.
Alyssa Rowan and her host family in Japan. Pictured
(l to r) are Saori, Yurika, Alyssa, Honoka, and Motoaki.
Alyssa Rowan returns from Japan,
will present experiences Aug. 19
Alyssa Rowan of Orofino
returned Aug. 9 from her 4H International Exchange
to Japan. First developed
in 1948 to encourage cultural exchange in the postWorld War II period, the
ultimate goal of 4-H international exchanges is to
encourage “peace through
understanding.” 4-H International Programs are
“homestay”
programs,
where a teen lives with a
host family for a complete
cultural immersion experience.
Alyssa has many stories
and experiences to share.
She would like to invite you
to her presentation on her
exchange Sunday, Aug. 19
at 7 p.m. at the Forest Service building on Highway
12. Be prepared to hear
some Japanese!
QUOTE OF
THE WEEK
“Motivate yourself. Or be miserable. Whatever
is to be done, it’s
your choice.”
- Wayne Dyer
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Timberline Schools student supply lists
Kindergarten
2 Dozen #2 Pencils
2 Large Erasers
1 yellow 2-pocket folder
1 pair of Fiskars scissors
1 Elmer’s glue (4oz)
4 glue sticks
2 boxes 12 crayons
Pencil box
1 box Kleenex tissue
1 backpack
1 bottle hand sanitizer
1 ream of white copy paper
First grade
2 Dozen #2 pencils
5 pencil top erasers
1 pair Fiskars scissors
24 box crayons
1 Medium size regular Elmer’s glue
5 glue sticks
Index cards
Dry Erase markers
Dry Erase marker eraser
1 box Kleenex tissue
2 boxes of crackers for snack
1 backpack
1 bottle hand sanitizer
Second grade
1 Wide-ruled notebook
1 Red 2-pocket folder
1 Yellow 2-pocket folder
1 Package of 24 wooden pencils
1 Pair Scissors
1 Bottle of glue
1 Pencil Box
2 Pink erasers
1 Package of 24 crayons
1 Pair Headphones
1 Bottle Hand Sanitizer
2 Boxes of Kleenex
1 Package of disinfecting wipes
1 Ream of copy paper
Third, fourth, and fifth grades
#2 Pencils - Package of 24
Paper Notebook
Kleenex
1 Ream of copy paper
Ear phones
Hand Sanitizer
Ruler with inches & centimeters
Sanitizing Wipes
Color Pencils
Crayons
Rubber Cement
Expo Markers ( 4-pack)
4 folders
2 notebooks/1 for Reading, 1 for Math
Notebook paper
Sixth grade
Pencils
Rubber Cement
Tissue
Hand Sanitizer
Index Cards
Index Card box
1 Ream printer paper
Scissors
Protractor
Paper
Colored Pencils
2 Folders
Expo Markers (4 pack)
1 Notebook designated for Math
Seventh through twelfth grades
Pencils
Pens
Spiral Notebooks &/or
Binder with paper
1 ream of paper
Sturdy 3 ring binder with metal rings 1 1/2 or 2 inches
Pencil Pouch with rings to hold in binder
8 - dividers
24 - #2 pencils (will need more as the year goes by)
4 - spiral 70 sheet college ruled notebook paper
1 pack - 200 sheets college-ruled loose leaf paper (may
need more later)
1 - 2 pocket folder
2 - large pink erasers (may need more later)
1 - bottle of Elmer’s glue
1 - wooden ruler with inches and centimeters with three
holes in it
1 package - 100 index cards (may need more)
1 - index card box
1 - box of Kleenex
1 ream - copy paper
1 large bottle of hand sanitizer
1 package/container - disinfecting wipes
1 pair - medium sized scissors (optional)
Each teacher might have specific needs when school
begins.
Timberline Kindergarten
Orientation August 27
Kindergarten
students
and parents are invited to
a special orientation day
Monday, Aug. 27.
Students,
with
their
parents, will have a chance
to meet Mrs. Brown and
get acquainted with the all
day kindergarten program.
Kindergarten
students
will not attend school that
day. The first day of school
for kindergarten students
will be Tuesday, Aug. 28.
Students
with
their
parents may drop in at any
time between 8 a.m. and 3
p.m. The class will be open
throughout the day, with a
short break between 11:30
a.m. and 12 noon.
Students are encouraged
to bring their school
supplies.
Mrs. Brown is looking
forward to meeting all of
her new students.
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Timberline Schools registration
New students at Timberline Schools need to register Aug. 21-23, from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Please bring your
student’s immunization records.
Twelfth grade students
are to register Aug. 21, from
9 a.m. until 12 noon.
Eleventh grade students
will also register on Aug.
21, from 1 to 3 p.m.
Tenth
graders register
Aug. 22, from 9 a.m. to 12
noon.
Ninth grade
students
also register on Aug. 22,
from 1 to 3 p.m.
Eighth grade
students
register Aug. 23 from 10
a.m. to 12 noon.
Seventh grade
students also register on Aug.
23, from 1 to 3 p.m.
The Timberline Schools
office will be closed for staff
orientation on Monday,
Aug. 20.
The first day of class is
Monday, Aug. 27.
For new students, please
bring a birth certificate,
immunization record, the
name, address and phone
number of any previous
schools and grades or transcripts.
AUGUST 16, 2012 – Orofino, ID – Clearwater Tribune—9A
Still spots open for four-person
teams at CVHC Golf Scramble
As in years past, the 7th
annual Clearwater Valley Hospital and Clinics
Foundation 18 Hole Golf
Scramble will feature longest drive, longest putt and
closest to the pin competitions as well as a chance at
a $10,000 prize for a hole
in one! This year mulligans will be available for
purchase to spice up the
competition.
Barney’s Harvest Foods
and
Glenwood/Riverside
Pharmacies are sponsoring
teams this year as well as
many individual team entries. “I’d like to thank our
generous sponsors including Life Flight, Potlatch
Credit Union, Walrath Insurance, Outsource, and
US Bank; without them this
event would not be possible!” says Ashley Nygaard,
Clearwater Valley Hospital
Foundation Manager.
“We’re very excited to
hold this event at Kayler’s
this year. We hope everyone has a great time and
can’t wait to see who our
first place team will be.”
The first and second place
teams will receive cash
prizes. All players will receive goodie bags filled with
donated items and other
fun golf accessories.
Cost to play is $50/person or $200/team which
includes greens fees and
lunch. Registration begins
at 8 a.m. and shotgun start
is at 9 a.m.
“Golf carts at Kayler’s are
limited, so if you are able
to bring your own, please
do so,” says Megan Finke,
Golf
Committee
Member. All proceeds from the
scramble will go to benefit
By Brandy Kellar & Kelly Finke
Megan Finke, CVHC Golf
Scramble
Committee
Member, practices her
swing for the upcoming
event on Aug. 18.
the programs and services
of CVHC. Slots are filling
up quickly, so contact Ashley Nygaard at 476-8033 to
sign up your team!
Ladies golf season is
winding down with only
four
teams
remaining.
Those still battling to be
the last team swinging are
Janet Montambo/ Robin
Harbaugh, Teena Gortsema/Misty Barton, Judy
Watson/Carolyn Manfull,
and Jan Finke/Karleen
Leaton. Good luck girls!
We would give you the
complete
standings
of
all teams but our fearless leaders, Heather and
Misty didn’t see the need to
keep loose paperwork lying
around and disposed of the
final sheet… (Whose kid is
that anyway?)
The final week of the
play-off will be on Wednesday, Aug. 22. Anyone wanting to continue playing on
Wednesday nights can join
the Watson League. It lasts
4 weeks. Teams will be by
blind draw and the game
will vary from week to week.
If you want to play, either
show up to watch the final
match on Aug. 22 or signup at the golf course before
that date.
The next tourney will be
the Orofino Ladies Club
Championship on Aug. 18
and 19. Please come support your course.
Ever wish you could play
golf in the dark? Here’s
your chance! Sunday, Sept.
2 the Orofino course will be
having a Night Golf – two
person scramble. You can
use the sign-up sheet at
the course or sign in on the
day of the tourney no later
than 8:15 p.m. If you don’t
have a partner but want to
play, show up and we will
fit you in somewhere. It is
strictly for fun.
Tough round
A man comes home after a terrible round of golf,
his worst ever. He plops
down on the couch in front
of the television, and tells
his wife, “Get me a beer
before it starts.” The wife
sighs and gets him a beer.
Fifteen minutes later, he
says, “Get me another beer
before it starts.” She looks
cross, but fetches another
beer and slams it down
next to him. He finishes
that beer and a few minutes later says, “Quick, get
me another beer, it’s going
to start any minute.”
The wife is furious. She
yells at him “You’ve been
out golfing all day! Is that
all you’re going to do tonight-drink beer and sit
in front of that TV? You’re
nothing but a lazy, drunken, fat slob, and furthermore...”
The man sighs and says,
“It’s started…”
Bald Mountain
workday Aug. 18
Allen Rowan in front of the Lincoln Memorial in
Washington, D.C.
Allen Rowan attends CWF
Conference in Washington, D.C.
Allen Rowan attended
the Citizenship Washing The Clearwater Ski Club ton Focus (CWF) Confermonthly workday at Bald ence in Washington, D.C.
Mountain is scheduled for June 30 to July 8. While
this Saturday, Aug. 18. in DC Allen had the opporDue to the heat the day will tunity to visit many of the
start earlier, at 8 a.m.
monuments, learn about
On the to-do list for this the history of each monuworkday is: clean around ment, attend Bill Writing
the T Bar base, sort workshops and learn about
through safety equipment our federal government.
and brush whacking. If you The 2012 Citizenshiphave questions or would Washington Focus (CWF)
like
more
information, program aids youth in uncontact Chris 435-4782 or derstanding how their [email protected]
dividual actions can make
a difference in our world.
Conducted in Washington,
DC, CWF uses our nation’s
capital as a classroom to
foster youth appreciation,
understanding and involve-
ment in civic responsibility, government operations
and current issues.
Citizenship Washington
Focus helps youth identify
and understand their active
role in society. This unique
4-H youth program combines educational workshops and operational simulations with educational
field trips and professional
consultations. Topic highlights include youth issues,
the U. S. Constitution and
the federal government.
To learn more about
Allen’s experiences please
join us at the Forest Service Building at 6:30 p.m.
Aug. 19 for a presentation
by Allen.
ABATE Friendship Run Sept. 1-3
Pictured are the winners at the 36th annual Lolo Trail Muzzleloaders Rendezvous.
LTML 36th Annual Rendezvous results
By Dusti Howell and Bobbi Kaufman
Lolo Trail Muzzleloader
Club 36th Annual Rendezvous held the fourth weekend of July was a huge
success. We had 51 shooters, one trader, and multiple spectators. This year’s
winners by category were:
LTML 36th Annual Rendezvous Winners
Top Man
Larry Elchleep (Curly)-443
Top Woman
Kathy Walker (Quiet One)253
Rifle Men
1st Gold: Guy Walker
(Ridge Walker) - 203
2nd Silver: Larry Elchleep
(Curly)-193
Tie Breaker
3rd Bronze: Bob Kaufman
(Powder Horn)-193 Tie
Breaker
Rifle Women
1st Gold: Rhonda Scallor
(Wind Walker)-103
2nd Silver: Kathy Walker
(Quiet One)-93
3rd Bronze: Dusti Howell
(Short Fuse)-90
Pistol Men
1st Gold: Larry Adams
(Two Bones)-110
2nd Silver: Dwain Hubbard
(Dwain)-100
Tie
Breaker
3rd Bronze: GD Wright
(Shawnee)-100 Tie Breaker
Pistol Women
1st Gold: Kathy Walker
(Quiet One)-90
2nd
Silver:
Gloria
Elchleep (Silver Lady)-80
3rd Bronze: Sammy Valin
(Tenderfoot)- 40
Hawk/Knife Men
1st Gold: Jim Cochran
(Montana)-160 Tie Breaker
2nd Silver: Larry Elchleep
(Curly)-160 Tie Breaker
3rd Bronze: Gordon Hubbard (No Name)-140
Hawk/Knife Women
1st Gold: Sammy Valin
(Tenderfoot)- 100
2nd Silver: Tonie Campbell (Whipper Will) -90
3rd Bronze: Kathy Walker
(Quiet One)-70
Critter Shoot Men
1st Gold: Larry Elchleep
(Curly)-15 Perfect Score!
2nd Silver: Duane Wolverton (Too Many Horses)-14
Tie Breaker
3rd Bronze: Gordon Hubbard (No Name)-14 Tie
Breaker
Critter Shoot Women
1st Gold: Sammy Valin
(Tenderfoot)- 10
2nd Silver: Kathy Walker
(Quiet One)- 9
3rd Bronze: Rhonda Scallor (Wind Walker)-3
Youth
Only overall for all events
metals gave out for youth.
1st Gold: Alex S. (Thirsty)193
2nd Silver: Jacob Knud-
son (Jacob)- 180
3rd Bronze: Samantha
Hubbard (Samantha)- 173
Dutch Oven
Main Dish: Gary Looney
(Bear Claw)
Dessert: Larry Kaufman
(Smoke Pole)
Bread:
Ryan
Johnson
(Renegade)
The Shenandoah Traditions Flintlock 50 Caliber
rifle raffle prize was won by
Bill “Two Dogs” Kaufman.
We want to thank everyone that purchased one of
our raffle tickets and all
the shooters for making
our rendezvous so successful and fun. We can’t
wait to see you all again
next year!
If anyone is interested
in knowing more about
our club you can contact
Larry Kaufman at 208827-0018/or e-mail: [email protected];
Bill Kaufman 208-4767749; or Guy Walker 208435-4814. Or mail us at
LTML P.O. Box 1794, Orofino Idaho 83544.
The
Friendship
Runs, sponsored by the
Clearwater Chapter ABATE
of North Idaho, is scheduled for Sept. 1-3 at Orofino City Park.
There will be free camping in the city park open
to the public. If you need
a hotel or motel, Orofino
Chamber of Commerce has
a great listing to choose
from via your computeror
cell phone.
Friday night, Sept. 1, will
feature live music by Road
Houz. Saturday morning,
Sept. 2, will be breakfast
at the park, hosted by
the Clearwater Chapter
ABATE.
The Poker Walkabout
sign-up will be at 9 a.m. at
the park with a planning
and information meeting at
11 a.m. at the park pavilion.
The Rodeo in the Park
will be at 1 p.m. If there
is not enough interest, the
ABATE may lead a ride to
Kamiah.
Sunday, Sept. 3 church
services will begin at 9 a.m.
in the Orofino City Park.
The Bike Parade meets
at IGA at 11 a.m. Signup for the Poker Run to
the BOVILL Pig Roast at
Bailey’s, and visit the residents of Brookside Landing. (This agenda is subject
to change.
For more information
please contact Mike Thacker at 208-476-3630.
British Soccer Camp Josh and Coach Luke enjoy
floating the Clearwater River after a day of coaching at British Soccer Camp that Orofino Youth Soccer hosts each summer. In the middle is their river
guide Reid Thomas. OYS will soon have registration
for the fall elementary/preschool league.
&'#&.+0'5
Participating in the British Soccer Camp hosted by Orofino Youth Soccer are
Coach Luke, Dartagnan Romero, Betty Weinert (exchange student), Clara Peterson, Cooper Thomas, Coach Josh, Cody Glaze, Reid Thomas, Kaia Romero, Madison Caldwell, Anson Hanes-Miller. Junior high fall soccer and OHS soccer have
begun their practices. If you are interested in playing call Riverside Physical
Therapy for days and times; 476-7105.
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1860 Days winners and thank yous
Thanks go out to so
many who made this the
best 1860 Days! Giving of
time and energy is put to
the test on a weekend like
this, and the committee is
very indebted to the wonderful involvement of the
community.
Some people and organizations go unnoticed, but
are integral to the success
of this popular event. We
apologize ahead for any
omissions.
Thanks go to: Andie Wendt
- providing public parking; Don Larson - filling
144 water balloons; Joe
Schlicter and the National
Guard - setting up and
running the Climbing Wall;
Mangum Trucking - providing the staging area for the
parade on their lot and donating the truck and driver
to haul the firewood load.
Kenny and Empire Lumber - donation of the load
of firewood for the auction;
Solid Rock for their donation of a load of rock for the
auction.
Also to the city of Pierce
- for their grounds work to
make our town look nice
for the weekend and for
placing barricades; Butler
Trailer Mfg. for their loan of
the trailer for the stage; Mel
Traylor for the loan of the
trailer for the stage; KORT
radio - for the free publicity
spots. The Vug - providing
electricity for the band and
the Gold Miner Charm for
our drawing prize; Pierce
Hardware - working so
closely with the 1860 Days
committee and refinishing
and staining the handsome
picnic table for the drawing; Ben Brown - taking
on the Sunday kids’ games
with enthusiasm;.
Also Cheryl Dotson (Timberline CafГ©) - baking 24
mini pie crusts and donating the chocolate pudding and whipped cream
for the pie-eating contest;
Clearwater County Sheriff’s Office for their sensitive and low-key presence;
the Clearwater Tribune for
the articles and ads they
published.
All of these people had
one thing in common - they
all stepped up and said
�yes’ to our celebration!
The winners of our big
drawing: ВЅ oz. Gold Miner Charm - Louie Turcott,
Orofino.
Barbeque/picnic
table
package - Tim Boyer, Lewiston.
Parade winners
Best Costume: Joanne
Eveland and Lee Harrington.
Best Novelty: Chuck and
Marlene Bouis - Carriage
and Horses w/ past Grand
Marshals.
Best Commercial: Studio
205 Float.
Best Community: Weippe
Explorers 4-H Club.
Best Royalty: Elizabeth
Salzman, Weippe Rodeo
Queen – 2012.
Best Classic Car: 1946
Chevy Truck - Pomponio’s
Olive Garden.
Ping Pong Ball Drop: Alison Davidson, Shayla Cooper, Ben Lawrence, Josey
Stemrich.
Water Ballloon Toss:
(Saturday) Darrin Bonner,
Malakai Diaz.
Ducky Derby Winners:
1st: Mary Anne Marko;
2nd: Hilda Matthews; 3rd:
Hattie Hodges; 4th: Steve
Bonner
While gathering, preparing and organizing the
reams of paperwork needed to form the non-profit
incorporation which would
be known as OCS Drop-In
Center, Inc., many hours
went into the creation of its
Mission Statement, Vision
Statement, Bylaws and
12-Concepts for Non-Profit
Service.
Jan. 5, 2011 OCS was
incorporated and on June
20, 2011 an information
and support meeting was
held to establish a list of
the folks who would likely
be selected to sit on the
Board of Directors for the
early phases of this huge
project.
Of course, Barb Wityczak attended this meeting.
She looked over all the paperwork, held up the stack
of papers which were the
Bylaws for OCS and said,
“These will probably come
in handy, but we need a
building.”
On June 21, 2011 keys
were obtained to a building
on Johnson Avenue and
the board went to work.
The first official board
meeting was held in this
building with Barb present, of course. In fact, she
came to the meeting armed
with the new name for the
Drop-In Center, along with
its logo and letterhead design. How could we say
“Nay”? It was an awesome
name and design!
The board also used this
meeting to select what positions each one on the
board would fill. Of course,
Barb said, “I’ll do promotion because that’s what
I do.” Barb had taken on
the position before things
even got started and never
stopped thereafter. The
OCS board signed the lease
on July 14, 2011.
As one of only two members on the board who had
had any previous board
experience, Barb tirelessly led the group through
many rough spots as they
struggled to learn what being a board member means
to an organization.
Over the months OCS
faced many seeming roadblocks;
however,
Barb
didn’t seem to have the
word “can’t” in her vocabulary. If there was something
that needed to be done or
problem which needed a
resolution, Barb searched
until she was successful in
meeting that need.
Idaho 4-H:
Something to Celebrate
By Bobbi Flowers
Tala Benson after she
participated in the pieeating contest.
Berry/Cherry Bake-Off:
Best of Show - Amy Jared;
Bread - 1st Dorey Stacy,
2nd Heather Fallwell; Pie
- 1st Diane Forsman, 2nd
Victoria Karn; Cake - 1st
Barbara Opdahl; 2nd Jade
Fitzwater; Miscellaneous:
1st Amy Jared; 2nd Jade
Fitzwater.
Dutch Oven Cook-Off:
Main Dish - Melinda Davidson, Burrito Pie; Side
Dish - Dorie Stacy, Four
Cheese Macaroni; Dessert Kirsten Cook, Huckleberry
Blueberry Rhubarb Betty.
Stickhorse
Roundup:
Race: 0-3 age group: Laura
Schlicter; 7 & up, Allison
Lacy; Fancy Dancy Horse
Around: Caleb Marshall
and Mara Skiles.
3-Legged Race: 1st: Riley
Fuchs, Shelby Fuchs; 2nd:
Morgan Turnbull, Khalan
Bonds; 3rd: Maia Cram,
Allyson Lacey.
Sack Race: 1st: Elyss
Dawson; 2nd: Anthony
Fuchs; 3rd: Khalan Bonds
Water
Balloon
Toss
(Sunday): 1st: Mike Cram,
Chase Brouwers; 2nd: Riley Fuchs, Shelby Fuchs;
3rd: Khalan Bonds, Morgan Turnbull.
Idaho 4-H is celebrating 100 years of making
leaders for tomorrow while
serving today. Please join
us on Wednesday, Aug. 22
in recognizing the birth of
Idaho 4-H.
The birth of Idaho 4-H
came through the organization of a club by Lemhi
County school superintendent Elizabeth (Bessie)
McDonald Reed in 1912.
Members’ projects along
with local produce were
displayed resulting in the
launch of Lemhi County’s
first fair. The 4-H name
became widely adopted
throughout the state in the
1920s.
From the original organization of a club in Lemhi
County, 4-H in Idaho has
grown to investing in youth
through volunteer and extension involvement in all
forty-two counties in Idaho.
In 2010-2011, there were
33,869 active 4-H participants statewide and 3,825
volunteers in the State of
Idaho.
In Clifton Anderson’s
book, “History of the College of Agriculture at the
University of Idaho,” some
of the early accomplishments were:
In 1916, Thelma Later, 13, Madison County,
canned more than 500
quarts of fruits and vegetables. Elwin Schever,
16, Latah County, made
$76.95 profit from his gar-
den.
In 1918, Lloyd Gilson
and Walter Remer, club
boys of Nez Perce County
did poorly in school until
they became interested in
4-H club work. Not only
did they become honor students, they also figured out
how to secure three acres
to continue their club work
after their 1st year.
In 1948, 4-H’s International Farm Youth Exchange (IFYE) began. Today, Idaho participates
with Argentina, Australia,
Finland, Japan, and other
countries in hosting delegates from those countries
as well as sending Idaho
youth as delegates for life
changing experiences.This
year we have four youth
currently in Japan for the
summer.
In 1957, with the launch
of the Russian Sputnik, 4H became invested in a focus on science. While there
are still projects in livestock and family consumer
sciences, the science and
technology programs (such
as robotics) is the fastest
growing program area 4-H
offers today.
A 2003 statewide survey found that youth who
participate in 4-H are more
involved as leaders in their
school and community, are
more likely to help others,
and are less likely to be involved in risky behaviors,
such as drinking alcohol,
use illegal drugs, smoke,
or vandalize personal property for fun.
The
Tuft
University
study, which was conducted nationwide to a diverse
audience of adolescents
found that youth in 4-H:
• Have higher educational
achievement and motivation for future education
• Are more civically active
and make more civic contributions to their communities
• Are 3.4 times more likely
to delay sexual intercourse
by Grade 12
• Have shown to have had
significantly lower drug,
alcohol and cigarette use
than their peers
• Are 2.3 times more likely
to exercise and be physically active
• Report better grades,
higher levels of academic
competence, and an elevated level of engagement at
school
• Are nearly two times
more likely to plan to go to
college
August 22, 2012 has
been designated as Idaho
4-H Day. Members, volunteers, and alumni are being
invited to wear their 4-H tshirt or celebratory green
that day as the 100th
birthday will be recognized
at the Lemhi County Fair.
Watch for the ongoing celebration activities in your
community and at fairs to
join in on Idaho 4-H 100th
birthday.
Warren to speak at Clearwater Human
Needs Council meeting Aug. 21
OCS says thank you to Barb Wityczak Bill Warren,
Clearwater the needs of the student communicate better with
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CALL
476-ROCK
The very day Barb was
rushed to Lewiston for the
exam which would begin
all of the many procedures
she would have to endure
over the next months of
her life, Barb had gone
home from a board meeting
where the group had been
at a loss for how to hang
onto the Drop-In without
having enough funds to
pay the way, and she went
online to order the Bingo
Game that continues to be
a mainstay of the center’s
income to this day.
Over
the
next
few
months Barb still did not
miss board meetings. She
was always at her place in
the middle of the table on
speaker phone with her
ideas and other input. Her
strength and stamina to do
what she could to help the
Drop-In Center was phenomenal.
“We at OCS Drop-In
Center will miss our board
member, Barb, but we
will miss her friendship
more. There was never
a time when Barb didn’t
have the time or patience
to listen and help anyone
who crossed her path. She
seemed on the look-out for
folks in need so she could
help them in some way.
And, of course, that was
what she did that made
her who she was,” said the
board.
On Saturday, Aug. 4,
OCS Drop-In Center, Inc.
received its final letter from
IRS officially deeming it
a non-profit tax-exempt
501(c) (3) Public Charity.
“On Sunday, Aug. 5,
Barb left us, stronger and
better prepared for what is
to come from here. We love
you and thank you, Barb,
for everything…from all the
folks at the OCS Drop-In
Center.”
County Extension Agent,
will be the speaker at the
Clearwater Human Needs
Council
meeting
noon
Tuesday, Aug. 21, at the
Krystal CafГ©.
He will speak about
the programs that the local University of Idaho
Clearwater County Extension Office offers. Warren
will also recount the history of extension offices
nationally, in Idaho and in
Clearwater County.
In July, Nancy Butler explained the programs of the
Adult Learning Center that
is located upstairs in Room
205 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) building
at 330 Michigan Ave. in
Orofino.
The Adult Learning Center is a non-profit group
of volunteers that helps
those who are at least 16
years old and out of public school to improve their
skills in reading, writing,
math, English as a second
language and computers.
They also offer pre-GED
and financial literacy tutoring.
Tutors work one-on-one
with individual students
to help them with basic
skills in reading, writing,
math, English as a second language and financial
literacy. Times, sessions
and content are based on
***
By directing our sentiments,
passions, and reason toward
the common human plight,
imagination grants us the advantages of a moral existence.
What we surrender of innocent
love of self is exchanged for the
safeties and pleasures of belonging to a larger whole. We
are born dependent, but only
imagination can bind our passions to other human beings.
- Louise J. Kaplan
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Proud to be serving the Clearwater Region
Summer Hours
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family members that are
online.
For further information
about the ALC, contact
Butler at 476-0733.
CHNC meets every third
Tuesday of the month at
noon at the Krystal CafГ©.
Anyone interested in helping people in Clearwater
County to have better lives
is invited. For further information, email [email protected]
Volunteer, help make
the Orofino pool a reality
The Orofino Swim Team
and the Clearwater Community Complex/ Pool
Committee are challenging
community organizations,
businesses,
individuals
and families to get involved
by organizing their members and/or employees by
signing up to volunteer
and staff the Orofino Swim
Team’s “Play for a Pool”
BINGO Booth.
Help is needed for staffing the Swim Team BINGO
Booth. The shifts are in twohour increments during
the Clearwater County Fair
and Orofino Lumberjack
Days. All of the proceeds
raised go toward building
a desperately needed pool
here in Orofino.
Kiwanis Club of Orofino, Goffinet and Clack,
Clearwater Tribune and
Clearwater Health and
Rehab have raised their
hands and committed to
help. Sign-up now and
help the community get
one step closer by contacting Pam Jones at 208-8271156. Reserve a time slot,
individually or as a group
or family today. Support
the youth of the community.
Everyone
is
encouraged to stop by the BINGO
booth, say �Hi’ and have
some fun playing BINGO
to help make a pool in Orofino a reality.
“Thank you in advance
for supporting the youth of
our Community,” said Teri
Bolling, Board member of
the Clearwater Community
Complex/ Pool Committee
and a Swim Team Mom.
***
In Europe art has to a large degree taken the place of religion.
In America it seems rather to
be science.
- Johan Huizinga
***
What a fuss people make about
fidelity! Why, even in love it is
purely a question for physiology. It has nothing to do with
our own will. Young men want
to be faithful, and are not; old
men want to be faithless, and
cannot: that is all one can say.
- Oscar Wilde
***
I have had, and may have still,
a thousand friends, as they are
called, in life, who are like one’s
partners in the waltz of this
world—not much remembered
when the ball is over.
- George Gordon Noel Byron
$#0-4726%;
(7625)
All sizes
of gravel
and the availability of the
teacher.
There are periodic basic
computer classes for those
who want to learn how to
use them all the way from
how to use a mouse up
through emailing attachments and doing Internet
searches. Some past students have needed help
learning the skills for a
new or changing job. Others just want to be able to
#MVF
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School District news
By Superintendent Bob Vian
District level
During the last budget
cycle the district lost a significant amount of revenue
when the Federal Jobs
Program ended with a loss
of nearly $200,000. In addition we built a budget
without assurance that the
Craig/Wyden “timber money” which Western States
have relied upon for years
would be renewed. In July
we received notice that
there would be Federal
timber funds, but at a level
approximately
$100,000
less than the prior year. In
addition the district lost 45
students over the past year.
State funds are based on
students so funding from
the state will be reduced.
Local taxpayers were
generous and passed our
operating levy of $1.94 million, the same level as the
2011-12 fiscal year.
The budget for 2012-13
was written to “right size”
the district based on fewer
students and funding cuts.
The majority of the cuts to
teaching staff were made
via retirements and resignations. Several Instructional Aides were cut, but
we are currently working
to reallocate funds to rehire some of those lost positions. It is our intent that
no student’s special needs
will be neglected.
Putting money into facilities maintenance was a
major concern. As you will
read in the building reports
several projects are underway. Our goal is to spend
our money locally and
most of the maintenance
work is being performed by
local contractors and companies.
Dr. Kerrie Raines joins
the district as our new
Special Education Director. Dr. Raines served as
a vice-principal, Federal
Programs Officer, and Special Education Director in
Glenn’s Ferry for the past
couple of years.
Ben Jenkins will assume
the duties of Lon Blades,
who retired, as Transportation Director. Ben will continue as the head mechanic along with the Director’s
position.
Cavendish School
Teacher Jenine Nord will
start school with a logging theme this year, preparing for the county fair.
Students will do research
on logging the first couple
of weeks of school. Jenine
By Pam Jones
Kiwanis Club of Orofino
met Tuesday, Aug. 14 at
the Ponderosa. The meeting
was called to order by Vicki
Schneider. The prayer was
given by Amy Hansford and
the pledge was given by
Doug Crockett. A moment
of silence was given for the
fallen firefighter this week
and for the safety of the
other firefighters who are
risking their lives.
There were nine members and one guest at today’s meeting. A few of our
members were involved
with the Blood Drive and
were unable to attend.
Guest speaker was Bob
Vian. Danelle Pedersen’s
name was drawn for the
free lunch. Guy Jurgens
became a member of Kiwanis on Aug. 13, 2002.
The annual corn feed
was held Aug. 14 at Kiwanis Park.
Sign-ups for the Fun Run
which will be Sept. 8 are
coming in slowly. Anyone
interested in participating
or volunteering as a helper
may contact Lyn Anderson
at 476-5908.
Bob Vian, Superintendent for Joint School District #171, spoke to us
today. He was the Principal at Timberline Schools
for the 2011-2012 school
year. During that time he
led THS to become a fourstar school and TES to a
five-star school. He became
Superintendent on July 1.
This year there will be all
new administrative staff,
except for Bob Alverson,
who is in his second year
as the Principal at Orofino
High School.
Bob spoke to us about
the improvements that are
taking place at the schools
and the need for additional
improvements. His future
goals are to bring the Oro-
plans to ask local loggers to
speak to the students. Students will take a field trip
to the Dam Visitor Center
and the Orofino Museum
on Aug. 28 to learn about
logging.
The furnace was replaced
at Cavendish.
Peck
Mindy Pollock will have
the Peck students working on projects for the
Clearwater Fair as well.
The logging theme of the
fair will dictate projects.
Timberline School
New Principal Shaun
Ball has moved to Pierce
from Bonner’s Ferry. He
reported that the one portable which was purchased
has been moved from the
east side of the school. The
portable is sited next to the
current Timberline Elementary building. TES will now
have six classrooms for the
seven K-6 grades. No elementary students will have
classes in the high school
this year. The second portable was returned to the
vendor.
Timberline High School
will have one new teacher
this year; Joe Lawrence
replaces Shannon Poppe,
long time School District
#171 teacher who moved
to Wyoming. Mr. Lawrence
will teach Language Arts.
Joe attended high school
in Lewiston, did his student teaching in Lewiston,
and substituted there last
year.
The new sewer system
is
nearing
completion.
The nearly $300,000 project is being built by local
contractor Riverview Construction. The new system
will replace a system that
used two sewage ponds
that were beyond their life
span. The majority of funds
for the project has come
from the districts $232,784
Building Fund (money from
property which the district
has sold, we are currently
receiving $250 per month
due to the sale of Weippe
Elementary on a contract)
which will be depleted. The
balance will come from
Federal forest funds.
Orofino Elementary
New Principal Shelly
Brooks has joined our staff
from Priest River. Mrs.
Brooks has six years of experience as a high school
principal in Priest River and
Kellogg. Prior to becoming a principal she served
in several administrative
positions and as a Special
Education Teacher.
Diedre Jenkins will become a fulltime fourth
grade teacher. Lindsay
Waggener was hired to fill
Mrs Jenkins’ half time position. Jennifer Jyler will
be the Special Education
teacher at OES.
Mrs. Brooks and head
custodian Justin Howard
have been overseeing several building upgrades at
OES. The portable classrooms are being removed
from the school grounds.
Avista has removed several
power poles and upgraded
insulation on the overhead
wires near the school. Two
restrooms are being remodeled due to floor joist
dry rot and generally poor
condition.
Two classrooms, where
odor problems have persisted for the past couple
of years, were stripped to
subfloor level. New floors
and carpets have been installed to make the classrooms ready for students
and staff for the new school
year.
Orofino High School
Principal Robert Alverson is the “old timer” in the
district administration. He
will begin his second year
as principal at OHS. Doug
South, hired from Marsing High School, will be
the new Vice Principal. Mr.
South will also serve as Activities Director. Doug will
handle all aspects of school
administration
including teacher supervision,
student discipline, and
student safety. Michael
Tetwiller has been hired
to teach math at OHS. Mr.
Tetwiller replaces retired
social studies teacher Bo
Cummings.
Space has been adjusted
to make room for the seventh grade move to OHS.
Seventh grade lockers and
a
computer
classroom
used by the seventh graders were moved from OES.
OHS has received a wiring upgrade to allow all
computer labs to operate
simultaneously, something
that the building wiring
could not handle in the
past. New rain gutters have
been ordered for the front
of the building. Old worn
and torn carpet is being replaced in three classrooms
by local contractors. The
carpet was a safety hazard as students and staff
tripped on the seams that
had four inch gaps of missing carpet.
fino schools to be at least
four-star schools.
The Happy Cup was
passed and everyone was
happy about something.
Next week’s program will
be Sondra Annis who will
talk to us about family history/genealogy.
If you have a business,
hobby, special interest
etc. that you would like to
share with our club please
contact Pam Jones at 208827-1156.
Kiwanis Club meets every Tuesday at noon in the
banquet room of the Ponderosa.
Happenings on the Hilltop
Lisa Weyerts, 435-4007
[email protected]com
435-4007
As many can see the
email for Happenings on the
Hilltop has changed to my
personal account. I apologize for changing it but I
know this email works. I
have had trouble getting
mail from the weippenews
account. So everyone can
feel free to contact me at
[email protected]
This week I got a call
from Jim Aldrich He tried
to email me but I couldn’t
get it to work on the old
site. He wanted to let everyone know how proud he
was that Jim and Paulene’s
granddaughter Kalie Marie
opened for the band that
sung at Pierce’s 1860’s day
on Friday evening. Kalie
opened with three songs
that she sang beautifully.
Grasshopper Raceway
Weippe Fire had the
pleasure of going out to
the Grasshopper Raceway
on Sunday and watching
the dirt bike races. It was
a very warm day but they
had many entries in the
races. Ralph Donaldson
and his wife Patricia made
this racetrack to give people in our area something
fun to enjoy. They plan on
opening the track four days
a week so people can come
out and have fun. He hopes
to have 4 wheeler races in
the next 2-3 weeks.
This is something great
that the community can
enjoy and come out and
support. They also run a
concession stand out there
where you can eat some of
the best hamburgers. Our
community would like to
let the Donaldson’s know
how much we appreciate
them for bringing something new to the Hilltop.
Weippe Rodeo
This weekend Weippe
celebrates the 51st year of
the Wild Weippe Rodeo. Rodeo is Saturday and Sunday afternoon. Saturday at
noon is the Weippe Rodeo
Parade.
Many venders will line
the streets on Friday and
Saturday. Come out and
support the community.
Come out and support the
Rodeo this weekend. I have
enjoyed the rodeo for the
13 years we have been here
and I guarantee a great
show for everyone. Our rodeo people do a great job
every year.
Again if you have had
family or any news for this
weekend or would like me
to share the great time you
had this weekend email or
call me. I am always interested in any coming events
you would like to share.
Have a safe and fun
week.
Saying what we think
gives a wider range of
conversation than saying what we know.
Cullen Hightower
***
My motto was always to
keep swinging. Whether I was in a slump or
feeling badly or having
trouble off the field, the
only thing to do was
keep swinging.
Hank Aaron
***
AUGUST 16, 2012 – Orofino, ID – Clearwater Tribune—11A
John and Kathryn Allen (left) and Don and Cammie Ebert stopped by C-PTPA
between events at last weekend’s Elk River Days. The theme was patriotism and
a salute to military veterans. This election cycle includes two open seats for
Clearwater County Commissioner. John Allen is running to represent District 3
which includes Elk River, and Don Ebert is running for re-election to represent
District 1. They were able to meet and visit with many of the Elk River residents.
Orofino LCSC Outreach Center:
Reflections, appreciation, and planning
As we look toward a
new school year, the Orofino LCSC Outreach Center would like to thank the
businesses and individuals
who have supported LCSC
in our endeavor to provide
solid community programs
for all ages. But first, a little about those programs…
Orofino 2012
Kids’ College
The Orofino Kids’ College
debuted in July in the form
of a week-long program offered to Clearwater County
youth between the ages of
6-12, featuring classes focused in art, environmental science, martial arts,
forensic science, entrepreneurship, and culinary
arts.
Through the donation of
time and money, the outreach center was able to
meet operational expenses
while also providing a robust platform for a youth
program scholarship fund.
Thank you to the following people and businesses
who helped make the Kids’
College a success:
Sponsors
Reggear Tree Farms,
Camas Financial Services,
LLC, Walrath Insurance,
When-to-Fight, LLC, ASE
Signs, Orofino High School
and the Custodial Staff.
Volunteers
Greener
Clearwater
County, Orofino Police
Department, Sarah Johnson, Nez Perce Tribe Officer Mike Shores, Officer
Monte Toombs, Ken Hengen, ManiYAC Teen Center,
Kelly Cummins-Brumley,
ManiYAC Teen Center, Nicole Duff, Gabii Butzman,
James Bolling
Personal
Enrichment Classes
The outreach center
seeks to enrich the lives
of individuals through distinctive service and exceptional programs. To this
end, we provide personal
enrichment classes, ranging from a variety of topics,
such as computer, dance,
art, cooking, youth workshops, fitness, day trips,
business and more. Last
year the center scheduled
47 classes and logged 338
registrations! Often we are
challenged by a lack of
resources, including ven-
ues; however, some classes
have not been affected by
this limitation thanks to
the contribution of two local businesses.
The Best Western Lodge
and management team has
graciously hosted the LCSC
water aerobics classes every Tuesday and Thursday since 2008, and the
Konkolville Motel has been
opening their pool to the
summer swimming lessons
since 2010. We are grateful
to both of these businesses for providing a location
where students can participate in activities that will
improve their health and
safety, and for contributing
to a successful 2011-2012
Looking forward
The outreach center is
gearing up for another
great year, with 15 classes
planned for this fall! Highlights of our new classes
include a dance program,
art class, recreation, and
technology. To learn more
about the Outreach Center’s enrichment courses,
programs, and scholarship
opportunities, please call
476-5731.
Clear/Nez Fire Zone update
The forecast is for continued hot and dry weather, with potential for thunderstorms by the weekend.
Visitors are asked to please
use all appropriate caution
when visiting the forest.
Powell Ranger District
Powell SBW East Complex – (point zone protection) currently totals 1900
acres. The complex is located 37 miles Southwest
of Lolo, MT on the Powell
Ranger District. Remote
cameras are set up on Savage Ridge, which will reduce the need to fly fires in
the north end of the complex. Diablo Lookout was
evacuated. Structure protection has been applied
to Elk Summit Guard Station.
Powell SBW West Complex – (point zone protection) currently totals 451
acres. The Queen Fire is
200 acres. Fire staff evacuated the Bear Mountain
Lookout and repeater, and
successfully protected the
lookout using retardant
drops and heavy helicopters.
Closures - The Area Closure for the Powell SBW
West Complex was removed and there is now
Trail Closures in place.
Fire Managers modified the
Area Closure for the Powell SBW East Complex to
better accommodate recreational opportunities for
forest visitors. Complete
descriptions and maps are
located at:http://www.inciweb.org/.
Red River
Ranger District
The Mallard Fire on the
Salmon River near Whitewater Ranch continues to
look good and is 50 percent
contained as firefighters
continue mop-up of the perimeter of that fire. It has
increased in size over the
last few days to 206 acres.
Although the containment
lines are holding, it should
be noted that there is still
potential for growth.
The 26-acre Diamond
Fire on Moose Butte is
50% contained and being
mopped up. Firefighters
are working to finish mopup on the Matteson Fire,
four miles northeast of Red
River Hot Springs (90%
contained).
Fires in the Frank
Church River of No Return
Wilderness include:
Deer Park Fire (2 miles
south of Sheep Hill Lookout) - spot fire
Bleak Fire (2 miles south
of Poet Creek Campground)
- now 10 acres
Porcupine Fire (three
miles southeast of Granite Springs Campground)
- 100 acres
One other fire, Hot
Springs Fire (2 miles northeast of Poet Creek Campground), is now estimated
at 25 acres. All of these
fires are expected to grow
and are being evaluated for
suppression tactics in view
of values at risk; i.e., Poet
Creek and Granite Springs
campgrounds, Magruder
Road Corridor, trails infrastructure, etc.
Closures - The District
Fire Management Officer
is working to lift the Temporary Flight Restriction
over the Mallard Fire, along
with the trail closures mentioned here. Please call the
district office at 208-8422245 for further information in advance of our next
update.
A portion of the Trail #96
along the Salmon River is
closed between the Whitewater Trailhead and Bat
Point Trail #503. The clo-
sure order for Trail #96 is
posted on www.inciweb.org
under the Mallard Fire.
Trail #207 in the vicinity of Moose Butte is also
closed between its junction
with Dixie Summit Trail
#209 north to its junction
with Porters Trail #508.
Moose Creek
Ranger District
Eight jumpers were dispatch on the Vista Fire
(236 acres+) to do structure
protection on the Seminole
Ranch.
Closures - Racetrack
Campground closure is
in place and includes the
open land area across
from the mouth of Meadow
Creek from the edge of the
river to the Selway Road.
This area is currently being
used by agency helicopters
to support fire operations.
An Area Closure for the
Goat and Ditch Fires is in
place and a full description and map of it and the
Racetrack
Campground
closure can be found at:
http://www.inciweb.org/.
All Clear/Nez Fire Updates
are
posted
at:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/
nezperce.
The public is requested
to immediately report any
evidence of fire to either
the Idaho County Sheriff’s
Office at 911 or 208-9831100 or to the Grangeville
Interagency Dispatch office
at 208-983-6800.
12A—Clearwater Tribune – Orofino, ID – AUGUST 16, 2012
5VQTKGUCRRGCTKPIKPVJG%NGCTYCVGT6TKDWPGYKNN
CNUQCRRGCTQPNKPGCVYYYENGCTYCVGTVTKDWPGEQO
By Margaret Fine
Several seniors attended
the funeral service held
last Tuesday for Margaret
Dugger at the Methodist
Church. The church was
filled to capacity and an
abundance of good food
was furnished for the luncheon after the service.
The Dugger family donated some of the flowers they
had received to the church
and they were much appreciated as they brightened
the church for the Sunday
morning service.
Our thoughts will continue to be with the Dugger
families.
Kitchen remodel
Regarding the kitchen
remodel at the Senior Center, the large hood fan has
been ordered and the project is progressing.
As my friend and I walk
along the dike at our City
Park in the mornings we
are quite often met by
friends with whom we
“pass the time of day.” Last
week we enjoyed a part of
a horse show which was
just getting started. The
wonderful part of this was
we were fortunate to hear a
solo rendition of “The Star
Spangled Banner” sung
by a lady with a beautiful
voice!
For some time we have
enjoyed feeding and visiting the squirrels at the
park but they have left for
the summer because of all
of the activity at the park.
“Fun in the Woods”
Last Friday I was the
guest speaker at the Rotary
Club meeting at the Ponderosa. My part of the program was to tell about the
“good old days” working at
PFI camps as a flunkey in
1942. I ran out of time. I
had more to tell them but
it is all in the book I wrote
“Fun in the Woods”. I was
very favorably impressed
with the Rotary and the
good things they do.
As a thank you gift they
gave me a very special pen.
Inscribed on the pen are
the words “The 4-Way Test
of the things we think, say
or do”.
Thanks to Joe Davis for
inviting me and taking me
to the meeting. Thanks
also to the Rotary for the
nice dinner provided.
Family gatherings
A large family group
gathered at Corrie Shriver’s home last Sunday.
Her son Kenny of Big Lake,
AK, her grandson Mathew
and family from Ohio and
Debbie Hebink of Spokane
were out of town guests. I
was also included in the
get together and enjoyed
visiting with Shrivers of all
ages.
Nellie Chase has also
been entertaining out of
town guests. Her sister,
Rosie and husband Bob
Barnsdale of Michigan and
her daughter Pat and husband Lyman Larson of Boise have been house guests.
They enjoyed a family picnic with other family members at Freeman Creek last
Sunday.
Pinochle
Potluck pinochle parties have resumed at the
Senior Center after a summer vacation. Eight people
enjoyed the evening with
potluck at 5:30 p.m. and
pinochle starting at 6 p.m.
Shirley Johnson had high
score for the ladies and
Cliff Smith had high score
for the men. Mary Margret
Davis had second high for
the ladies and won the 300
pinochle prize.
These parties will continue to be held at the Senior
Center each Saturday evening and everyone is welcome. The address is 930
Michigan Ave. with lots of
free parking.
Nannie Carrico’s daughter Nancy, of Bella Vista,
AR, is visiting family and
friends here in Orofino.
She said she came here to
escape the terrible heat in
Arkansas and found it to
be very hot here also!
***
Humor is merely tragedy
standing on its head with
its pants torn.
- Irvin S. Cobb
and Complete Automotive Repair
330 Main St. • Orofino
(208) 476-0709
www.perfectiontire.com
Easy Credit O.A.C. • 180 Days Same As Cash
Over 130 Years Experience
Beat the Tire Rush
SALE ON ALL TIRES!
Helen Clark, an eight year veteran dispatcher for
Clearwater County Sheriff’s Office, helped to demonstrate the new E-911 by taking a test call from
Clearwater Tribune. Other dispatchers, who fill this
important role, include Rita Kaufman, Wendy Parker,
Sharon Barcus, Cathy Jones, and Holly Hardin.
After a test call from the Clearwater Tribune came
into Clearwater County Sheriff’s dispatch Wednesday, a map, with the address of the caller popped up
to help emergency responders arrive at a true emergency scene more quickly.
Valley Visions donates
money to local schools
Valley Visions, a locally
owned and operated gas
station, would like to welcome students and staff
back to school. It is exciting to see children in the
community make their way
to school in anticipation of
what the new school year
will bring. In an effort to
help Orofino Elementary
and Orofino Jr/Sr High
School, Valley Visions will
donate two cents for every
gallon of fuel sold at their
1160 Michigan Avenue location (next to IGA). The
fundraiser began July 3
and will continue for three
months.
The donation will be split
evenly between the two
Orofino schools and the
money will go directly to the
principals of each school to
use as they see fit for the
benefit of the students.
Valley Visions would like
to encourage motorists to
take extra consideration of
all students and remember
safety while traveling, especially during the hours
students are making their
way to and from school.
Orofino Kiwanis Lumberjack
Fun Run/Walk Sept. 8
at the Orofino City Park
The annual Orofino Kiwanis Lumberjack Fun
Run/Walk will take place
Saturday, Sept. 8 at the
Orofino City Park.
• Individual and/or Team
competition
• Prizes will be given for
Individual and Team as
well as Overall Male and
Female.
• Race starts at 9 a.m. with
late registration at 8 a.m.
• Registering before Aug.
24 with t-shirt $15.
• Registering before Aug.
24 no t-shirt $10.
• Registering after Aug. 24
with t-shirt $20.
• Registering after Aug. 24
no t-shirt $15.
Registration forms can
be picked up and dropped
off at the following locations:
Eye Clinic of Orofino,
830 Michigan Avenue
Goffinet & Clack, 125 1st
Avenue
Harper
Chiropractic,
10620 Hwy 12.
For more information
call 208-476-5908 or email
[email protected]
Lighting the Olympic flame is a practice continued from the ancient Olympic Games. In Olympia, the site of the ancient Greek games, a flame
was ignited by the sun and then kept burning
until the closing of the games.
10
$
High & Ultra High Performance
Passenger • Light Truck • Winter
Sport Utility Vehicle
OO OIL CHANGE $
95
OFF $
AIR CONDITIONING
SERVICE
Good at Perfection Tire, Orofino
Must present coupon at time of service
EXPIRES AUGUST 31, 2012
FRONT OR REAR
BRAKE SERVICE
99
$
95
(Starting at)
Surfacing Rotors or Drums Extra
Good at Perfection Tire, Orofino
Must present coupon at time of service
EXPIRES AUGUST 31, 2012
29
(Up to 5 qts)
CK Tune-Up, Brakes, Safety Inspection
Good at Perfection Tire, Orofino
Must present coupon at time of service
EXPIRES AUGUST 31, 2012
15
OO
OFF
FUEL INJECTION/TOP ENGINE
DECARBON SERVICE
Improves Fuel Mileage and Performance
Good at Perfection Tire, Orofino
Must present coupon at time of service
EXPIRES AUGUST 31, 201
Fill out a Bridgestone Firestone
credit app and get a lube/oil/
filter (up to 5 quarts) for $15
or $10 off a diesel oil change!
FREE CARWASH
with any service listed above
Bring in any professional
written estimate on auto
repair and we will beat it!
6 months same as cash on approved credit
#%QORCUUKQPCVG%CTG%QORCP[
9'#4'#%%'26+0)0'9%.+'065
AUGUST 16, 2012 – Orofino, ID – Clearwater Tribune—1B
Welcome to the
51st
51stAnnual
Annual
ICA Co-Approved
PRO WEST
FUN FOR
THE WHOLE
FAMILY
Wild Weippe Rodeo
Saturday & Sunday
August 18-19 • 2:00 P.M.
ADMISSION
Adults $7.00 • 6-12 Years $3.00
Under 6 FREE
Sunday, Aug. 19 is
Senior Citizen Day - $6.00
PARADE
Saturday, August 18,
12:00 noon, Main Street
For parade info call (208) 435-4845
Glen and Don
ald Erickson
2012 Grand
Marshals
COWBOY BREAKFAST
Rodeo Grounds
Sunday, Aug. 19, 7 to 11 AM
LOCAL EVENTS
Kids Calf Riding
$8.00 entry fee
Sat. 8-9-10 years old
Sunday: 11-12-13 years old
Jr. Novice Barrels
18 yrs & under, $15.00 entry fee
NOT WON OVER $150
Wild Cow Milking
$8.00 entry fee
For more information call
JoAnne Schlader, 208-435-4142
Rodeo Grounds, 208-435-4180
Elizabeth Salzman
2012 Weippe Rodeo Queen
(Pictured with Eddie White,
our favorite rodeo clown)
EVENTS
ENTRY FEE
Tie Down Roping.................................92.00
Team Roping (enter twice)...(per man) 92.00
Steer Wrestling......................................92.00
Saddle Bronc........................................67.00
Bareback...............................................67.00
Bull Riding............................................77.00
Entry Numbers
Phone: 208-366-2326 • Fax: 208-366-7967
Turnouts: 208-899-0498
Announcer - Hal Olson
Stock Contractor - Bar X Rodeo, John Ely
EVENTS
ENTRY FEE
Barrel Racing.........................................67.00
Breakaway Roping................................67.00
Novice Rough Stock.............................37.00
$300 ADDED PURSE • TR $200 PER SLIDE
RANCH BRONCOS (Saturday Only) $200 Added
ENTRIES
All Open Events Open Monday, Aug. 6, 10 AM - 5 PM (PDT)
Callback: Tuesday, Aug. 7, 6-8 PM (MDT)
COVERED
BLEACHERS
***
NON-ALCOHOL
SECTION
This ad is sponsored by these 2012 Wild Weippe Rodeo Boosters
4Stems
Custom Builders
Carl Stemrich
208-435-4794
476-3413
13030 Hwy 12, Orofino
Les Schwab
Tire Center
Sherry’s Cakes
& Bouquets
302 Johnson Ave.
Orofino 476-5589
119 S. Main
Weippe 435-4793
Full Automotive Repair
330 Main Street, Orofino
476-0709 FX 476-9126
perfectiontire.com/locations/orofino.htm
165 Riverside Ave.
Orofino 476-4576
Pierce Hardware
105 S. Main St.
Pierce 464-2323
1167 Michigan Ave. • Orofino
1-800-843-7128 • 476-7458
www.p1fcu.org
Orofino Body
Shop & Radiator
207 South A.
Orofino 476-4147
Olive’s Auto Parts
403 S. Main St.
Pierce 464-2534
Riverside Lanes
Barlow Truss, Inc.
10820 Hwy 12
Orofino 476-4914
Quality Truss Systems
P.O. Box 37, Weippe
888-282-4348
Atkinson
Distributing Inc.
Orofino • Weippe • Pierce
476-5425
Ronatta’s Cakery
Empire Lumber Co.
Weippe
Operations
208-435-4113
Psalm 40 Feed
White Pine
Credit Union
S&S Foods
201 S. Main, Pierce
464-2844 whitepinecu.com
Murray’s Shoe Store
and Repair Shop
223 Johnson Ave.
Orofino 476-4223
Orofino Physical
Therapy & Wellness
John Garrison * Orofino
1005 Michigan 476-9365
221 Main St., Orofino
(208) 476-4400
Tues. - Sat. 6 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Clearwater Substance
Abuse Workgroup
Working to prevent and reduce
substance abuse in Clearwater County
using a community team approach. In
partnership with Clearwater’s Promise,
CADCA and America’s Promise
302 Johnson Ave.
Orofino 476-5589
501 S. Main St.
Pierce 464-2332
2B—Clearwater Tribune – Orofino, ID – AUGUST 16, 2012
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING - CLEARWATER COUNTY
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF CLEARWATER COUNTY, IDAHO WILL MEET ON AUGUST 27, 2012 AT THE
HOUR OF 10:00 AM AT CLEARWATER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' OFFICE, 150 MICHIGAN AVENUE, OROFINO, IDAHO. FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSIDERING AND
FIXING A FINAL BUDGET AND MAKING APPROPRIATIONS TO EACH OFFICE, DEPARTMENT, SERVICE AGENCY OR INSTITUTION AND FUND FOR THE 2012-2013 FISCAL
YEAR AT WHICH TIME ANY TAXPAYER MAY APPEAR AND BE HEARD UPON ANY PART OR PARTS OF SAID BUDGET; AND THAT THE FOLLOWING TABLE SETS FORTH
THE AMOUNT APPROPRIATED TO EACH DEPARTMENT FOR THE 2012-2013 FISCAL YEAR, THE CURRENT YEAR, TOGETHER WITH THE AMOUNTS EXPENDED FOR
"SALARIES", "BENEFITS", AND "OTHER EXPENSES" DURING THE TWO PREVIOUS YEARS BY THE SAID DEPARTMENTS, TO WIT:
ACTUAL EXPENDITURES
FISCAL YEAR ENDING 9/30/2010
SALARIES
BUDGETED EXPENDITURES
FISCAL YEAR ENDING 9/30/2011
BENEFITS
OTHER
TOTAL
CLERK / AUDITOR
143,339.64
0.00
10,633.78
ASSESSOR
136,690.92
0.00
11,623.14
TREASURER / TAX COLLECTOR
80,710.19
0.00
COMMISSIONERS
69,535.44
CURRENT BUDGET FY ENDING 9/30/2012
TENTATIVE BUDGET FY ENDING 9/30/2013
SALARIES
BENEFITS
OTHER
TOTAL
SALARIES
BENEFITS
OTHER
TOTAL
SALARIES
BENEFITS
OTHER
TOTAL
153,973.42
141,092.26
0.00
12,956.89
154,049.15
164,278.00
0.00
23,150.00
187,428.00
169,206.00
0.00
22,850.00
192,056.00
148,314.06
138,874.68
0.00
12,533.97
151,408.65
180,596.00
0.00
15,247.00
195,843.00
194,557.00
0.00
16,392.00
210,949.00
14,707.26
95,417.45
79,771.34
0.00
17,256.48
97,027.82
90,575.00
0.00
32,135.00
122,710.00
93,292.00
0.00
32,510.00
125,802.00
0.00
8,449.29
77,984.73
69,535.44
0.00
10,677.17
80,212.61
72,493.00
0.00
12,725.00
85,218.00
74,668.00
0.00
12,725.00
87,393.00
7,541.98
0.00
10,745.57
18,287.55
7,441.98
0.00
7,275.92
14,717.90
9,404.00
0.00
24,765.00
34,169.00
9,635.00
0.00
24,765.00
34,400.00
BUILDING AND GROUNDS
35,577.05
0.00
67,376.01
102,953.06
35,466.30
0.00
63,099.67
98,565.97
46,353.00
0.00
111,250.00
157,603.00
37,774.00
0.00
112,300.00
150,074.00
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
33,945.30
0.00
10,544.88
44,490.18
33,036.39
0.00
11,996.87
45,033.26
62,617.00
0.00
12,337.00
74,954.00
59,024.00
0.00
12,337.00
71,361.00
COUNTY AGENT
38,713.89
0.00
20,832.43
59,546.32
38,902.57
0.00
11,174.54
50,077.11
41,179.00
0.00
18,536.00
59,715.00
54,379.00
0.00
19,436.00
73,815.00
DATA PROCESSING
56,199.04
0.00
137,589.06
193,788.10
61,038.60
0.00
123,406.36
184,444.96
58,445.00
0.00
161,150.00
219,595.00
60,198.00
0.00
165,495.00
225,693.00
GENERAL FUND (CURRENT EXPENSE)
CORONER
ELECTIONS
GENERAL
ZONING
2,141.20
0.00
31,878.72
34,019.92
3,090.00
0.00
17,961.50
21,051.50
3,090.00
0.00
46,000.00
49,090.00
3,183.00
0.00
46,000.00
49,183.00
0.00
288,856.46
120,688.40
409,544.86
0.00
306,904.67
127,834.01
434,738.68
0.00
420,328.00
318,844.00
739,172.00
0.00
428,528.00
384,687.00
813,215.00
47,195.00
0.00
15,782.38
62,977.38
39,545.59
0.00
7,442.01
46,987.60
43,577.00
0.00
18,278.00
61,855.00
45,503.00
0.00
14,815.00
60,318.00
SERVICE OFFICER
0.00
0.00
9,799.92
9,799.92
0.00
0.00
10,060.95
10,060.95
0.00
0.00
10,416.00
10,416.00
0.00
0.00
10,816.00
10,816.00
TAX REFUND
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,990.40
1,990.40
0.00
0.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
0.00
0.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
70,056.12
0.00
6,771.82
76,827.94
70,747.08
0.00
6,074.68
76,821.76
98,077.00
0.00
23,875.00
121,952.00
89,145.00
0.00
14,325.00
103,470.00
INSURANCE & BONDS
0.00
0.00
5,219.67
5,219.67
0.00
0.00
5,210.00
5,210.00
0.00
0.00
60,000.00
60,000.00
0.00
0.00
60,000.00
60,000.00
MISDEMEANOR PROBATION
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12,200.00
0.00
8,900.00
21,100.00
12,566.00
0.00
8,900.00
21,466.00
GENERAL FUND (CURRENT EXPENSE)
721,645.77
288,856.46
482,642.33
1,493,144.56
718,542.23
306,904.67
446,951.42
1,472,398.32
882,884.00
420,328.00
899,608.00
2,202,820.00
903,130.00
428,528.00
960,353.00
2,292,011.00
ROAD AND BRIDGE
450,085.26
195,170.88
974,497.92
1,619,754.06
427,778.58
199,347.01
1,022,951.68
1,650,077.27
428,940.00
246,650.00
1,044,409.00
1,719,999.00
392,332.00
229,500.00
1,036,183.00
1,658,015.00
AMBULANCE
172,965.89
44,383.04
333,254.08
550,603.01
172,777.54
45,211.06
162,082.79
380,071.39
256,255.00
69,900.00
556,732.00
882,887.00
265,014.00
69,900.00
470,121.00
805,035.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6,209.12
997.54
21,132.48
28,339.14
16,000.00
8,200.00
36,418.00
60,618.00
46,480.00
18,800.00
40,953.00
106,233.00
148,178.32
65,128.04
65,105.58
278,411.94
133,403.63
64,107.30
32,501.08
230,012.01
180,625.00
89,350.00
75,685.00
345,660.00
197,000.00
94,070.00
77,311.00
368,381.00
0.00
0.00
24,000.00
24,000.00
0.00
0.00
24,000.00
24,000.00
0.00
0.00
25,500.00
25,500.00
0.00
0.00
25,500.00
25,500.00
SHERIFF
781,194.72
0.00
281,193.45
1,062,388.17
739,849.93
0.00
303,248.86
1,043,098.79
799,839.00
0.00
295,000.00
1,094,839.00
807,748.00
0.00
316,000.00
1,123,748.00
JUSTICE - JAIL
243,809.85
0.00
131,538.83
375,348.68
221,974.26
0.00
123,545.65
345,519.91
271,617.00
0.00
139,850.00
411,467.00
279,660.00
0.00
143,850.00
423,510.00
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
203,016.47
0.00
25,260.09
228,276.56
202,267.05
0.00
29,107.74
231,374.79
210,584.00
0.00
36,408.00
246,992.00
216,825.00
0.00
43,842.00
260,667.00
GENERAL
0.00
520,017.97
21,269.22
541,287.19
0.00
524,002.36
4,796.05
528,798.41
0.00
666,500.00
27,000.00
693,500.00
0.00
671,000.00
47,000.00
718,000.00
GENERAL RESERVE
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
200,000.00
200,000.00
0.00
0.00
180,000.00
180,000.00
PUBLIC DEFENDER
0.00
0.00
134,632.56
134,632.56
0.00
0.00
147,382.10
147,382.10
0.00
0.00
165,000.00
165,000.00
0.00
0.00
165,000.00
165,000.00
JUVENILE DETENTION COSTS
0.00
0.00
45,000.00
45,000.00
0.00
0.00
35,651.50
35,651.50
0.00
0.00
45,000.00
45,000.00
0.00
0.00
45,000.00
45,000.00
1,228,021.04
520,017.97
638,894.15
2,386,933.16
1,164,091.24
524,002.36
643,731.90
2,331,825.50
1,282,040.00
666,500.00
908,258.00
2,856,798.00
1,304,233.00
671,000.00
940,692.00
2,915,925.00
DRUG INVESTIGATIVE
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
0.00
0.00
20,486.00
20,486.00
0.00
0.00
19,188.00
19,188.00
INTERLOCK & ELECTRONIC MONITOR
0.00
0.00
393.00
393.00
0.00
0.00
855.00
855.00
0.00
0.00
6,125.00
6,125.00
0.00
0.00
6,488.00
6,488.00
HEALTH DISTRICT
0.00
0.00
61,403.00
61,403.00
0.00
0.00
59,397.00
59,397.00
0.00
0.00
63,142.00
63,142.00
0.00
0.00
77,150.00
77,150.00
HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM
0.00
0.00
22,500.00
22,500.00
0.00
0.00
15,000.00
15,000.00
0.00
0.00
17,000.00
17,000.00
0.00
0.00
20,000.00
20,000.00
HOSPITAL OPERATIONS
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
34,495.00
34,495.00
0.00
0.00
34,495.00
34,495.00
COURT FACILITY
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
927.39
927.39
0.00
0.00
33,260.00
33,260.00
0.00
0.00
19,707.00
19,707.00
DRUG COURT
0.00
0.00
3,691.53
3,691.53
0.00
0.00
3,977.23
3,977.23
0.00
0.00
9,890.00
9,890.00
0.00
0.00
20,935.00
20,935.00
30,144.21
13,345.58
229,053.45
272,543.24
30,035.20
13,962.65
251,329.49
295,327.34
34,794.00
18,150.00
282,847.00
335,791.00
35,838.00
18,400.00
314,985.00
369,223.00
JUNIOR COLLEGE TUITION
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9,451.00
9,451.00
0.00
0.00
20,150.00
20,150.00
0.00
0.00
20,000.00
20,000.00
PARKS AND RECREATION
0.00
0.00
5,809.96
5,809.96
0.00
0.00
5,757.93
5,757.93
0.00
0.00
8,000.00
8,000.00
0.00
0.00
8,000.00
8,000.00
ANIMAL DAMAGE CONTROL
0.00
0.00
2,500.00
2,500.00
0.00
0.00
2,500.00
2,500.00
0.00
0.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
0.00
0.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
118,881.82
52,820.09
17,880.31
189,582.22
119,753.73
56,017.95
35,018.26
210,789.94
91,380.00
53,200.00
57,518.00
202,098.00
94,121.00
53,900.00
70,998.00
219,019.00
JUVENILE SERVICES
CONSOLIDATED ELECTIONS
DISTRICT COURT
FAIR, COUNTY
JUSTICE
JUSTICE
SOCIAL SERVICES
REVALUATION
ENHANCED 911
18,335.53
3,276.04
22,252.43
43,864.00
32,614.94
14,518.17
24,761.06
71,894.17
29,238.00
16,650.00
375,694.00
421,582.00
30,115.00
16,900.00
177,138.00
224,153.00
SOLID WASTE
98,234.93
44,519.81
451,172.75
593,927.49
90,733.55
41,609.00
567,020.93
699,363.48
126,508.00
65,700.00
1,012,636.00
1,204,844.00
174,000.00
113,744.00
767,096.00
1,054,840.00
CURRENT EXPENSE TORT
0.00
0.00
51,362.61
51,362.61
0.00
0.00
58,916.00
58,916.00
0.00
0.00
60,000.00
60,000.00
0.00
0.00
75,000.00
75,000.00
31,538.71
16,578.88
37,947.16
86,064.75
31,808.41
17,729.38
36,629.45
86,167.24
33,075.00
21,550.00
47,529.00
102,154.00
35,020.00
22,250.00
57,070.00
114,340.00
FLOOD RECOVERY
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
78,538.37
78,538.37
0.00
0.00
186,768.00
186,768.00
0.00
0.00
171,972.00
171,972.00
SNOWMOBILE
0.00
0.00
10,476.78
10,476.78
0.00
0.00
11,085.53
11,085.53
0.00
0.00
17,250.00
17,250.00
0.00
0.00
14,985.00
14,985.00
46,858.71
17,045.20
40,659.29
104,563.20
35,581.08
16,457.26
34,085.41
86,123.75
44,102.00
19,600.00
44,363.00
108,065.00
37,770.00
19,950.00
18,571.00
76,291.00
CAPITAL TRUST
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
22,022.19
22,022.19
0.00
0.00
226,418.00
226,418.00
0.00
0.00
250,000.00
250,000.00
DENT BRIDGE TRUST
0.00
0.00
2,806.70
2,806.70
0.00
0.00
306.35
306.35
0.00
0.00
382,913.00
382,913.00
0.00
0.00
383,357.00
383,357.00
FREEMAN CREEK TRUST
0.00
0.00
3,672.64
3,672.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
183,715.00
183,715.00
0.00
0.00
177,076.00
177,076.00
INSURANCE AND GRANT TRUST
0.00
0.00
620,546.33
620,546.33
0.00
0.00
1,245,097.99
1,245,097.99
0.00
0.00
1,332,147.00
1,332,147.00
0.00
0.00
2,246,668.00
2,246,668.00
BHS CAPITAL ACCOUNT
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2,509.00
2,509.00
0.00
0.00
2,509.00
2,509.00
HOSPITAL LOAN TRUST ACCT
0.00
0.00
80,550.96
80,550.96
0.00
0.00
80,550.96
80,550.96
0.00
0.00
140,880.00
140,880.00
0.00
0.00
159,329.00
159,329.00
CVH LOAN TRUST
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
156,284.00
156,284.00
0.00
0.00
156,667.00
156,667.00
CAT FUND TRUST ACCOUNT
0.00
0.00
35,629.76
35,629.76
0.00
0.00
7,675.46
7,675.46
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,261,141.99
4,218,702.72
8,544,734.90
2,963,329.25
1,300,864.35
4,907,254.35
9,171,447.95
3,405,841.00
1,695,778.00
8,271,629.00
13,373,248.00
3,515,053.00
1,756,942.00
8,823,497.00
14,095,492.00
WEEDS
WATERWAYS FUND
3,064,890.19
Grand Totals:
ESTIMATED REVENUE
THE ESTIMATED REVENUE FOR 10/01/2012 TO 09/30/2013 IS AS FOLLOWS:
FUND
BUDGETED EXPENSES
CASH CARRYOVER
OTHER REVENUE
PROPOSED TAXES
TOTAL REVENUE
0001
GENERAL FUND (CURRENT EXPENSE)
2,292,011.00
694,337.00
1,008,478.00
589,196.00
2,292,011.00
0002
ROAD AND BRIDGE
1,658,015.00
366,743.00
1,191,272.00
100,000.00
1,658,015.00
0004
AMBULANCE
805,035.00
446,580.00
254,880.00
103,575.00
805,035.00
0005
CONSOLIDATED ELECTIONS
106,233.00
45,615.00
60,618.00
0.00
106,233.00
0006
DISTRICT COURT
368,381.00
117,332.00
47,474.00
203,575.00
368,381.00
0007
FAIR, COUNTY
25,500.00
2,000.00
389.00
23,111.00
25,500.00
0008
JUSTICE
2,915,925.00
434,722.00
1,445,005.00
1,036,198.00
2,915,925.00
0009
DRUG INVESTIGATIVE
19,188.00
18,620.00
568.00
0.00
19,188.00
0010
INTERLOCK & ELECTRONIC MONITOR
6,488.00
5,487.00
1,001.00
0.00
6,488.00
0011
HEALTH DISTRICT
77,150.00
4,646.00
997.00
71,507.00
77,150.00
0012
HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM
20,000.00
2,674.00
245.00
17,081.00
20,000.00
0013
HOSPITAL OPERATIONS
34,495.00
34,495.00
0.00
0.00
34,495.00
0014
COURT FACILITY
19,707.00
16,847.00
2,860.00
0.00
19,707.00
0015
DRUG COURT
20,935.00
0.00
20,935.00
0.00
20,935.00
0016
SOCIAL SERVICES
369,223.00
0.00
36,559.00
332,664.00
369,223.00
0017
JUNIOR COLLEGE TUITION
20,000.00
15,906.00
4,094.00
0.00
20,000.00
0018
PARKS AND RECREATION
8,000.00
2,338.00
113.00
5,549.00
8,000.00
0019
ANIMAL DAMAGE CONTROL
3,000.00
560.00
40.00
2,400.00
3,000.00
0020
REVALUATION
219,019.00
53,003.00
3,336.00
162,680.00
219,019.00
0021
ENHANCED 911
0023
SOLID WASTE
0024
CURRENT EXPENSE TORT
0027
WEEDS
0034
FLOOD RECOVERY
171,972.00
171,972.00
0037
SNOWMOBILE
14,985.00
7,485.00
0038
WATERWAYS FUND
76,291.00
6,291.00
70,000.00
0.00
76,291.00
0060
CAPITAL TRUST
250,000.00
250,000.00
0.00
0.00
250,000.00
0061
DENT BRIDGE TRUST
383,357.00
382,635.00
722.00
0.00
383,357.00
0062
FREEMAN CREEK TRUST
177,076.00
176,729.00
347.00
0.00
177,076.00
0064
INSURANCE AND GRANT TRUST
2,246,668.00
0.00
2,246,668.00
0.00
2,246,668.00
0065
BHS CAPITAL ACCOUNT
2,509.00
2,509.00
0.00
0.00
2,509.00
0067
HOSPITAL LOAN TRUST ACCT
159,329.00
159,329.00
0.00
0.00
159,329.00
9109
CVH LOAN TRUST
156,667.00
156,317.00
350.00
0.00
156,667.00
9111
CAT FUND TRUST ACCOUNT
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4,010,619.00
7,257,455.00
2,827,418.00
14,095,492.00
224,153.00
135,755.00
88,398.00
0.00
224,153.00
1,054,840.00
292,933.00
761,907.00
0.00
1,054,840.00
75,000.00
4,419.00
1,046.00
69,535.00
75,000.00
114,340.00
2,340.00
1,653.00
110,347.00
114,340.00
0.00
0.00
171,972.00
7,500.00
0.00
14,985.00
14,095,492.00
IN COMPLIANCE WITH DISABILITIES ACT, ANYONE REQUESTING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS MAY CONTACT THE COUNTY CLERK AT 476-5615 AT LEAST ONE WEEK PRIOR TO THE HEARING.
Dated this ____
6th day of August, 2012.
_________________________________________________
Carrie Bird, Budget Officer, Clearwater County, Idaho
Clearwater county Clerk
P O Box 586
Orofino, Idaho 83544
Idaho gas prices
Idaho, August 13- Average retail gasoline prices in
Idaho have risen 6.6 cents
per gallon in the past week,
averaging $3.55/g yesterday. This compares with
the national average that
has increased 5.4 cents
per gallon in the last week
to $3.67/g, according to
gasoline price website IdahoGasPrices.com.
Including the change in
gas prices in Idaho during
the past week, prices yesterday were 12.9 cents per
gallon lower than the same
day one year ago and are
0.7 cents per gallon higher than a month ago. The
national average has in-
creased 24.8 cents per gallon during the last month
and stands 5.7 cents per
gallon higher than this day
one year ago.
“The
national
average has spiked 25-cents
per gallon just in the last
month, thanks to an onslaught of refinery problems- mainly in the Great
Lakes and California,” said
GasBuddy.com Senior Petroleum Analyst Patrick
DeHaan. “While these situations are temporary in
nature, it goes to show this
nations dependence on
domestic refineries. While
oil prices have gained in
recent days, there is some
light at the end of the tunnel for motorists: driving
season will be over in less
than a month and soon
thereafter the EPA also relaxes gasoline mandates,
meaning cheaper winter
fuel,” DeHaan said.
8-16-12c
London
played
host
to the Summer Olympic games in 1908 and
1948. When it hosts
again in 2012, the British capital city becomes
the first city in history to
host the Olympic games
three times.
Young children constantly
invent new explanations
to account for complex
processes. And since their
inventions
change
from
week to week, furnishing
the “correct” explanation
is not quite so important as
***
conveying a willingness to Criticism should be a cadiscuss the subject. Become sual conversation.
an “askable parent.”
W.H. Auden
- Ruth Formanek
***
Loan No. xxxxxx5293 T.S.
No. 1347433-09 Parcel No.
rpa0950006005ba NOTICE
OF TRUSTEE’S SALE On
November 27, 2012, at the
hour of 10:00am, of said day, at
In the entrance to the lobby of
the Michigan Avenue entrance,
Of The Clearwater County
Courthouse, 150 Michigan Avenue, Orofino, Idaho, Pioneer
Title Company of Ada County,
as trustee, will sell at public
auction, to the highest bidder,
for cash, cashier’s check drawn
on a State or National Bank, a
check drawn by a State or Federal Credit Union, or a check
drawn by a State or Federal
Savings and Loan Association,
Savings Association, or Savings Bank, all payable at the
time of sale, the following described real property, situated
in the County of Clearwater,
state of Idaho, and described
as follows, to wit: The north
half of lot 5 and the southerly
30 feet of lot 6, block 6, Orofino original according to the
recorded plat thereof. Commonly known as 411 Berry
Ave Orofino Id 83544. Said
sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or
implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances to satisfy
the obligation secured by and
pursuant to the power of sale
conferred in the Deed of Trust
executed by Chris E Steiner
and Misty D Steiner Husband And Wife as Grantor, to
Clearwater County Land Title
Co, as Trustee, for the benefit
and security of National City
Mortgage A Division of National City Bank as Beneficiary, recorded May 29, 2009, as
Instrument No. 211714, Mortgage records of Clearwater
County, Idaho. THE ABOVE
GRANTORS ARE NAMED
TO COMPLY WITH SECTION 45-1506(4)(a), IDAHO
CODE. NO REPRESENTATION IS MADE THAT THEY
ARE, OR ARE NOT, PRESENTLY RESPONSIBLE FOR
THIS OBLIGATION. The
default for which this sale is to
be made is: Failure to pay the
monthly payment due February
1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments
due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent
sums advanced by beneficiary
pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust.
The estimated balance owing
as of this date on the obligation
secured by said deed of trust is
$200,111.77, including interest, costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the
obligation thereunder or in this
sale, and trustee’s fees and/or
reasonable attorney’s fees as
authorized in the promissory
note secured by the aforementioned Deed of Trust. Pioneer
Title Company of Ada County
8151 W. Rifleman Street Boise
Id 83704 (888)342-2510 Dated: July 23, 2012 Signature/By
Pioneer Title Company of Ada
County Dba Pioneer Lender
Trustee Services. R-415494
08/16, 08/23, 08/30, 09/06
8-16, 23, 30; 9-6-12c
The
Weseman
Cemetery
District will hold a public
hearing on the proposed 20122013 budget on the 17th day of
August, 2012 at 2:30 p.m. at the
Mullikin home at 99 Preston
Dr. in Orofino, ID. 476-3948.
Taxpayers within the Cemetery
District are invited to attend
and provide written or oral
comments on the budget.
Expenses:
Payroll
$ 5,000.00
Insurance
600.00
Maintenance
3,500.00
Miscellaneous
5,700.00
Equipment
6,002.00
Total Expenses $18,802.00
Revenue:
Carryover funds $16,122.00
Tax Levy
2,680.00
Total Revenue $18,802.00
By Secretary of the Board
Weseman Cemetery Board
8-16-12c
The great, the fundamental
need of any nation, any race,
is for heroism, devotion, sacrifice; and there cannot be
heroism, devotion, or sacrifice in a primarily skeptical
spirit.
- Anna Julia Cooper
AUGUST 16, 2012 – Orofino, ID – Clearwater Tribune—3B
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2012-2013 (FY 13)
CITY OF ELK RIVER, IDAHO
A public hearing, pursuant to Idaho Code 50-1002, will be held for consideration of the proposed budget for the fiscal year from
October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. The hearing will be held at City Hall, Elk River, Idaho at 9:00 a.m. on August 20, 2012.
All interested persons are invited to appear and show cause, if any, why such budget should or should not be adopted. Copies of the
proposed City budget in detail are available at City Hall during regular office hours (6:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., weekdays). City Hall
is accessible to persons with disabilities. Anyone desiring accommodations for disabilities related to the budget documents or the
hearing, please contact the City Clerk, (208) 826-3209 at least 48 hours prior to the public hearing. The proposed FY 13 budget is
shown below as FY 13 proposed expenditures and revenues.
PROPOSED EXPENDITURES
General Fund
General government
Public safety
Street
Rental
Capital outlay
Contingency reserve
General Fund Total
Rental Fund
Water Fund
Sewer Fund
Sanitation Fund
Total Estimated Expenditures All Funds
FY 11
Budget
Expenditures
FY 12
Budget
Expenditures
FY 13
Proposed
Expenditures
$83,000
7,000
19,000
102,000
______211,000
96,200
219,615
107,370
31,750
$665,935
$78,700
7,000
19,000
103,000
9,695
216,645
92,250
205,488
138,170
33,338
$685,891
$76,016
7,200
28,760
39,135
108,000
15,939
275,050
232,361
88,285
35,000
$630,696
FY 12
Budget
Revenues
FY 13
Proposed
Revenues
$55,000
$56,500
161,645
92,250
205,488
138,170
33,338
$685,891
218,550
232,361
88,285
35,000
$630,696
ESTIMATED REVENUES/FUNDING RESOURCES
FY 11
Budget
Revenues
Property Tax Levy
General Fund
$53,400
Revenue Sources Other Than Property Tax
General Fund
157,600
Rental Fund
96,200
Water Fund
219,615
Sewer Fund
107,370
Sanitation Fund
31,750
Total Estimated Revenues All Funds
$665,935
The proposed expenditures and estimated revenues for fiscal year 2012-2013 have been adopted by the City Council and entered
in the Journal of Proceedings. Publication dates for the notice of public hearing are August 2, 2012, August 9, 2012 and August 16,
2012.
Dated this 26h day of July, 2012
Rebecca Patterson, Clerk-Treasurer
8-2,9,16-12c
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING – CITY OF OROFINO
NEW FEE & FEE INCREASES – EFFECTIVE
OCTOBER 1, 2012
A public hearing pursuant to Idaho Code 63-1311A, will be held
for consideration of public comment regarding the addition of the
following new fees or fees being increased by five percent (5%)
or more: Sewer Base Fee, Waster/Wastewater Lab Testing Fees
and Lien Administration Fee. Fees are being increased to reflect
actual costs associated with program operations.
Additionally, the City Council is proposing to establish a new ten
(10) year Wastewater Reserve Program that would increase the
monthly Base Sewer Rate by $5.00 until a $20.00 cap has been
reached in 2016. The fee increase for the year 2012-13 would be
used to help meet the current operational expenses of the plant.
Fees from 2013-2016 would be placed in a Dedicated Reserve
Program for future renovation of the Wastewater Treatment
Plant. All city users including the patrons of the Orofino/Whiskey
Creek Water and Sewer District are subject to the new reserve
program.
This hearing will be held at City Hall, Orofino, Idaho at 6:00 PM
on Tuesday, August 28, 2012. All interested persons are invited
to appear and show cause, if any, why such increases should or
should not be adopted. Copies of the proposed fees are available
at City Hall during regular office hours 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
weekdays. City Hall is accessible to persons with disabilities.
Anyone desiring accommodations for disabilities related to this
hearing, please contact City Hall 476-4725 at least 48 hours prior
to the public hearing.
Janet R. Montambo, City Clerk
8-9,16-12c
REQUEST FOR BIDS
Professional Service Bids are being accepted by North Central
Idaho travel Association for Website Redesign/Update and Maintenance. Please see the attached RFP or send request for RFP to:
[email protected] Closing date: Friday, August
17, 2012.
Website Redesign/Update and Maintenance Bid
Request for Scope of Work
North Central Idaho Travel Association (NCITA) is seeking
bids from interested and qualified individuals to complete the following contracted services for the time period August 15, 2012
through November 30, 2012.
NCITA is a non-profit organization existing to develop sustainable and responsible tourism in the five counties of north central
Idaho (Clearwater, Idaho, Latah, Lewis and Nez Perce), and to
promote the region as a vacation, recreation, convention, and
travel destination.
Deadline for Replies: Friday, August 17, 2012.
Electronically deliver to: [email protected]
Rating: Up to 25 points awarded per segment.
0 to 5 points: overall qualified experience
0 to 5 points: evidence of work performed in this category on
other projects
0 to 5 points: evidence of familiarity with NCITA
0 to 5 points: evidence of understanding and working in the
tourism industry
0 to 5 points: clarity of bid
Selected contractor will not be an employee of NCITA and will
comply with the terms and conditions of the ITC grant, applicable
state laws, and ITC regulations, when applicable to the service
provided.
SCOPE OF WORK
Website Redesign/Update and Maintenance: The visitnorthcentralidaho.org website (http://www.visitnorthcentralidaho.org/)
is a valuable tool for visitors to find out more about our area, to
connect with our lodging properties and to access our online activities guide, videos and photos. Services will be provided by a
professional firm to oversee and implement the scope of work
created by NCITA using the ITC funds and other to be determined funds obtained through collaboration.
Tasks and Responsibilities:
1. Complete redesign and structuring of website in a WordPress format.
2. Updating, hosting and maintenance of website.
3. Repair all malfunctions.
4. Website consulting and trouble shooting.
Allowable funds paid to selected Contractor for the period August 2012 through November 2012: $5,000.00. NCITA is looking
to build a new website design with the current funding. Once additional grant funds are awarded in August 2012, further funding
will be made available for continued updating and enhancements
of the website. Travel Expenses (mileage and per diem meals):
none.
8-9, 16-12c
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S
SALE Loan No.: 0060211356
T.S. No.: 12-00448-3 On
December 12, 2012 10:00
AM, in the entrance to the
lobby of the Michigan Avenue
entrance to the Clearwater
County
Courthouse,
150
Michigan Avenue, Orofino in
the County of Clearwater, State
of Idaho, Fidelity National
Title Insurance Company, as
Trustee, on behalf of Wells
Fargo Bank, NA, the current
Beneficiary, will sell at public
auction, to the highest bidder,
in lawful money of the United
States, all payable at the time
of sale, the following described
real property, situated in the
County of Clearwater, State of
Idaho, and described as follows:
SITUATE IN THE COUNTY
OF CLEARWATER, STATE
OF IDAHO. NORTH HALF OF
THE SOUTH HALF OF THE
NORTHWEAST QUARTER
OF
THE
SOUTHEAST
QUARTER OF SECTION
22, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH,
RANGE 4 EAST, BOISE
MERIDIAN, LYING WEST
OF THE COUNTY ROAD.
APN#RP36N04E227200A
The Trustee has no knowledge
of a more particular description
of the above referenced real
property, but for purposes of
compliance with Section 60113 Idaho Code, the Trustee has
been informed that the address
of: 18727 UPPER FORDS
CREEK ROAD, OROFINO,
ID, is sometimes associated
with said real property. Said sale
will be made without covenant
or warranty regarding title,
possession or encumbrance to
satisfy the obligation secured
by and pursuant to the power
of sale conferred in the Deed
of Trust executed by FRANK
A.
WOODWORTH,
A
SINGLE PERSON, as original
grantor(s), to PIONEER TITLE
COMPANY , as original trustee,
for the benefit and security of
Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as
original beneficiary, dated as
of November 29, 2005, and
recorded December 1, 2005, as
Instrument No. 201144 in the
Official Records of the Office
of the Recorder of Clearwater
County, Idaho. Please Note:
The above grantor(s) are
named to comply with section
45-1506(4)(A), Idaho Code,
No representation is made that
they are, or are not, presently
responsible for this obligation
set forth herein. The current
beneficiary is: Wells Fargo
Bank, NA, (the “Beneficiary”).
Said sale will be made without
covenant or warranty, express
or implied, regarding title,
possession, or encumbrances,
to pay the remaining unpaid
balance of the obligations
secured by and pursuant to
the power of sale contained in
that certain Deed of Trust. In
addition to cash, the Trustee
will accept a cashier’s check
drawn on a state or national
bank, a check drawn by a
state or federal credit union
or a check drawn by a state
or federal savings and loan
association, savings association
or savings bank specified in
the Idaho Financial Code and
authorized to do business in
Idaho, or other such funds
as may be acceptable to the
trustee. The default(s) for which
this sale is to be made under
Deed of Trust and Note dated
November 29, 2005 are: Failed
to pay the monthly payments
of $827.31 due from October
1, 2011, together with all
subsequent payments; together
with late charges due; together
with other fees and expenses
incurred by the Beneficiary;
The principal balance owing
as of this date on the obligation
secured by said Deed of Trust
is $103,734.79, plus accrued
interest at the rate of 6.00000%
per annum from September 1,
2011. All delinquent amounts
are now due, together with
accruing late charges, and
interest, unpaid and accruing
taxes, assessments, trustee’s
fees, attorney’s fees, and any
amounts advanced to protect
the security associated with
this foreclosure and that the
beneficiary elects to sell or cause
the trust property to be sold to
satisfy said obligation. Dated:
July 20, 2012 Fidelity National
Title Insurance Company,
Trustee 135 Main Street, Suite
1900, San Francisco, CA
94105 415-247-2450 Stephanie
Alonzo, Authorized Signature
SALE
INFORMATION
CAN BE OBTAINED ON
LINE AT www.lpsasap.com
FOR AUTOMATED SALES
INFORMATION please call
714-730-2727
A-4278017
08/02/2012,
08/09/2012,
08/16/2012, 08/23/2012
8-2, 9, 16, 23-12
NOTICE OF
TRUSTEE’S SALE
At 10:00 o’clock A.M.
(recognized local time) on
October 30, 2012, in the Office
of Clearwater County Title,
131 Michigan Ave., Orofino,
ID, Scott D. Stufflebeam,
Attorney At Law, as Successor
Trustee, will sell at public
auction, to the highest bidder,
for cash, in lawful money of
the United States, all payable at
the time of sale, the following
described real property, situated
in Clearwater County, Idaho,
and described as follows, towit:
A portion of the SW1/4SW1/4
of Section 26, Township 36
North, Range 4 East, Boise
Meridian, described as follows:
Beginning at the section corner
between Sections 27, 26, 34
and 35, Township 36 North,
Range 4 East, Boise, Meridian;
thence North 1320 feet; thence
East 660 feet to the True Point
of Beginning; thence South
1320 feet; thence East 660 feet;
thence North 1320 feet; thence
West 660 feet to the True Point
of Beginning.
Information
concerning
the foreclosure action may
be obtained from the Trustee,
whose telephone number is
(208) 785-2413. According
to the Trustee’s records, the
street address of 2365 Hjalmar
Johnson Road, Weippe, Idaho
is sometimes associated with
said property.
Said sale will be made
without covenant or warranty
regarding title, possession, or
encumbrances to satisfy the
obligations secured by and
pursuant to the power of sale
conferred in the Deed of Trust
executed by Kimberly Anne
Stewart, an unmarried person,
as Grantor(s), Land Title of
Nez Perce County, as Trustee,
for the benefit and security of
Creason, Moore & Dokken,
recorded May 15, 2008, as
Instrument No. 208750, all
records of Clearwater County,
Idaho.
The default for which this
sale is to be made is the failure
to make payments on the deed
of trust note and has not paid
the property taxes from 2008
through the present time.
The above Grantor(s) are
named to comply with Section
45-1506(4)(a), Idaho Code.
No representation is made that
they are, or are not, presently
responsible for this obligation.
As of February 29, 2012 the
balance now due is $17,544.01
in Principal; Interest is
$5,719.93,
with
interest
accruing thereafter at the daily
rate of 12.00. Interest continues
to accrue. All delinquencies
are now due together with
any late charges, advances to
protect the security, and fees
and costs associated with this
foreclosure. The Beneficiary
elects to sell or cause said
property to be sold to satisfy
said obligation. Information
concerning the foreclosure
action may be obtained from
the Trustee, whose telephone
number is (208) 785-2413.
DATED June 27, 2012
/s/ Scott D. Stufflebeam,
Attorney At Law
Successor Trustee
7-26; 8-2, 9, 16-12c
OFFICAL NOTICE
OF FILING DEADLINE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: That declarations of candidacy for the office of Board of
Supervisors of the Clearwater
Soil and Water Conservation
District must be filed with the
district clerk/secretary whose
address is 12730 Highway 12
Suite C, Orofino ID., no later
than 5:00 p.m. August 31,
2012.
Thanks to
Such declarations are availCounty Road crew
Dear Editor:
able at the district office; 12730
Special thanks to the Highway 12 Suite C, Orofino
Clearwater County Road ID. 83544 or at the office of the
crew for a job well done on County Clerk. Individuals who
the Freeman Creek Road run as write-in candidates must
under trying conditions, file a declaration of intent no
The county crew chip sealed later than 5:00 p.m. on the 25th
the Freeman Creek Road day prior to the election.
working early to late to get
Signed Cathy L. Bolin,
the project completed with
Clearwater Soil and Water
the temperatures rising by
Conservation District Election
the minute to 95 degrees
Official
plus for most of the days
8-2;
8-16-12c
this week.
The flagging crew was
exceptionally polite. I can’t
believe the number of
trucks hauling oil/gravel all
day long by our place. Our
residents will enjoy that
smooth surface for years
to come -- thanks for your
efforts.
Dean A. Gimmestad
Orofino
208-476-7901
***
Inaction breeds doubt
and fear. Action breeds
confidence and courage.
If you want to conquer
fear, do not sit home and
think about it. Go out
and get busy.
Dale Carnegie
***
New Legals Listing
for August 16, 2012
Trustee’s Sale – Steiner.
Clearwater Co. Public Hrg.
Weseman Cemetery Budget.
PRD Budget 2012.
STATE TIMBER SALE
CR-41-0073, ALPHA ELK
A public oral auction will
be conducted at the Idaho Department of Lands office, 3130
Highway 3, Deary, ID 83823,
at 10:00 a.m. local time, on
Tuesday, August 21, 2012 for
an estimated 9,015 MBF of
timber marked or otherwise
designated for cutting. In addition, there is an unestimated
volume of pulplogs that may
be removed at the option of
the purchaser. Prior to bidding,
eligible bidders shall present
a certified check or bank draft
payable to Treasurer, State of
Idaho, or a bid bond acceptable to the State, in the amount
of $70,397.85 which is 10%
of the appraised net sale value
of $703,978.50. The successful bidder’s deposit will be
forfeited to the State should
the bidder fail to complete the
contract. The State will not accept bids from parties who are
delinquent on payments on existing state contracts. The average starting minimum bid price
is $115.63 per MBF.
The sale is located within
Sections 1 and 2, Township
39N, Range 2E, Sections 21,
28, 35 and 36, Township 40N,
Range 2E, B.M., Clearwater
County, State of Idaho. Sale
duration is 4 years. The sale
may include blowdown and/
or insect and disease infected
timber which may result in additional volume and recovery
reductions. Interested purchasers should carefully examine
the sale and make their own
estimates as to volume recovery, surface conditions, and
proposed construction prior
to bidding on the sale. Additional information concerning
the timber and conditions of
sale is available to the public
and interested bidders on the
department’s timber sale website at https://apps.idl.idaho.
gov/timbersale or from the
Idaho Department of Lands office, Deary, Idaho. Please note
that there are new insurance requirements posted on the timber sale website.
The State Board of Land
Commissioners reserves the
right to reject any and all bids
provided that good and sufficient grounds for rejecting the
bid shall be stated in the rejection notice and shall not be in
violation of applicable law.
If you are disabled and need
some form of accommodation,
please call (208) 877-1121 five
days prior to the date of sale.
For text telephone services,
please call 1-800-377-3529.
7-26, 8-2, 9, 16-12c
AHERIN, RICE
& ANEGON
Darrel W. Aherin
1212 Idaho Street
P.O. Drawer 698
Lewiston, ID 83501-0698
(208) 746-3646
ISB# 1534
Attorney for Petitioners
IN THE DISTRICT COURT
OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL DISTRICT
OF THE STATE OF IDAHO,
IN AND FOR THE COUNTY
OF
CLEARWATER
NO. CV 2012-261
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE MATTER
OF THE ESTATE OF:
JACK LARRY HESTER,
Deceased.
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
have been appointed personal
representatives of the abovenamed decedent. All persons
having claims against the
decedent or the estate are
required to present their claims
within four months after the
date of the first publication of
this Notice or said claims will
be forever barred.
Claims must be presented to
the undersigned at the address
indicated and filed with the
Clerk of the Court.
DATED this 20th day of July,
2012.
READ
LEGALS ONLINE
FOR FREE
/s/
FRANK HESTER
c/o Darrel W. Aherin
1212 Idaho Street
P.O. Drawer 698
Lewiston, ID 83501
Legal notices can be
viewed free of charge at
www.clearwatertribune.com.
Click on the blue “Legal
Notices” tab near the top of
the page, above the log-in box.
/s/
DIANA PARROTT
c/o Darrel W. Aherin
1212 Idaho Street
P.O. Drawer 698
Lewiston, ID 83501
8-9, 16, 23-12c
4B—Clearwater Tribune – Orofino, ID – AUGUST 16, 2012
Clearwater County Commissioners
Final rollover to E-911
PIERCE RECREATION DISTRICT TENTATIVE BUDGET FOR
FISCAL YEAR 2012-2013 (FY13)
A public hearing, pursuant to Idaho Code 31-4330, for consideration of the proposed budget
The Sheriff’s Office upThe road crews are work- Veteran’s Service Office.
for the fiscal year that begins October 1, 2012 and ends September 30, 2013 will be held at the date was given by Sher- ing on chip sealing the
The Board approved
Pierce Community Center’s Joyce Gebhart Room, 6:30 p.m. on August 23rd, 2012.
iff Goetz at the Aug. 6 Freeman Creek Road. The and signed expense and
PROPOSED EXPENDITURES
PROPOSED FY13
Boiler Biomass Conversion ……………………………………..
$157,500
P.C.C. Bldg. Repairs & Maintenance ...………………………….
39,500
Insurance & Expenses …………………...……………………….
15,000
Pierce Community Pool ………………………………………….
16,000
Deer Creek Fishing Tournament………………………………….
1,600
Bald Mt. Patrol & Ski Club ………………………..……………..
1,500
JHB Logging Museum & Play Park ………………………………
900
Tec Center & Friends of TS Library ………………………….......
700
2,106
Judo Club, Youth Activities & Misc. Club ...……………………..
TOTAL PROPOSED EXPENDITURES
$234,806
PROPOSED REVENUE
Cash Carryover October 1st ……………………………………….
$ 1,000
Property Tax & Replacement...……..……………………………..
52,806
Inventory Phase-Out ………………………………………………
15,000
RAC Grant for Boiler Biomass Conversion ………………………
157,500
8,500
Interest on Investments & Misc. ………………………………….
TOTAL PROPOSED REVENUE
$234,806
The proposed expenditures and revenues for fiscal year 2012-2013 have been tentatively
approved by the Pierce Recreation District Board and entered in detail in the Journal of
Proceedings. Taxpayers within the Pierce Recreation District are invited to appear and give
comment on the proposed budget prior to the adoption of the budget. A copy of the proposed
budget is available at the Pierce Community Center for inspection during regular business
hours (208-464-2443).
Carmen R. Syed, Sec/Treasurer
8-16-12c
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING – CITY OF OROFINO, IDAHO
PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2012-2013
A public hearing pursuant to Idaho Code 50-1002 will be held for consideration of the proposed
budget for the fiscal year from October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. The hearing will be held
at City Hall, Orofino, Idaho at 6:00 PM on Tuesday, August 28, 2012. All interested persons are
invited to appear and show cause, if any, why such budget should or should not be adopted. Copies
of the proposed City Budget in detail are available at City Hall during regular office hours 8:00
AM to 5:00 PM weekdays. City Hall is accessible to persons with disabilities. Anyone desiring
accommodations for disabilities related to the budget documents or to the hearing, please contact
City Hall, 476-4725 at least 48 hours prior to the public hearing.
EXPENDITURES
ACTUAL
FUND NAME
FY 2011
GENERAL FUND –
General Administration
$ 269,497
Police & Animal Control
652,690
Fire
88,195
Building & CCED
114,625
Airport
83,386
Contingency
_______-_
Total General Fund
1,208,393
STREET FUND
225,517
RECREATION FUND
71,742
WATER/WASTEWATER FUND
948,454
SANITATION FUND
290,707
VEHICLE REPLACEMENT FUND
51,814
LIABILITY FUND (TORT)
60,004
COMMUNITY BEAUTIFICATION/NUISANCE
834
WATER BOND REDEMPTION
166,566
OROFINO BUSINESS CENTER
58,868
EMAP FUND
1,014
RESERVE FUND
_______TOTAL EXPENSE
$ 3,113,913
REVENUES
FUND NAME
PROPERTY TAX LEVY
General Fund
$ 558,825
Street Fund
229,312
Recreation Fund
49,642
Tort Fund
20,685
Total Tax Levy
858,464
REVENUE SOURCES OTHER THAN PROPERTY TAX
General Fund
679,198
Street Fund
215,594
Recreation Fund
11,693
Water/Wastewater Fund
676,884
Water Bond & Bond Redemption
324,169
Community Beautification
3
Tort
42,848
Sanitation
326,487
Grants
430,980
Vehicle Replacement
57,637
EMAP
5
Business Center
81,046
Reserve Fund
______TOTAL REVENUE
$ 3,705,008
CURRENT
BUDGET
FY 2012
PROPOSED
BUDGET
FY 2013
$ 315,955
754,210
129,800
152,800
584,300
________1,937,065
654,630
68,300
10,035,660
358,950
72,800
69,210
7,800
308,910
80,960
700
1,080,000
$ 14,674,985
$ 294,490
774,690
129,400
161,000
133,490
________1,493,070
443,000
76,150
8,598,190
341,250
67,300
69,210
790
308,350
81,690
2,000
1,224,000
$ 12,705,000
$
$
587,033
230,000
50,000
21,000
888,033
621,558
230,000
50,000
21,000
922,558
825,282
324,630
18,300
1,245,285
3087,910
7,800
48,210
358,950
9,415,125
72,800
700
80,960
813,512
213,000
26,150
1,077,065
308,350
790
48,210
341,250
7,579,125
67,300
2,000
81,690
1,080,000
$ 14,674,985
1,224,000
$ 12,705,000
The proposed expenditures and revenues for fiscal year 2012-2013 have been tentatively approved
by the City Council and entered in detail in the Journal of Proceedings. Publication dates for the
notice of public hearing are August 8, and August 15, 2012 in the Clearwater Tribune.
Janet R. Montambo, City Clerk
8-9,16-12c
Woman still critical following crash
LOWELL-An 86 year old
Maple Valley, WA woman
remains in critical condition following a one-vehicle
accident near Wilderness
Gateway Campground.
Leona Baker was flown
by Life Flight helicopter to
St. Joseph Regional Medical Center following the accident at 12:31 p.m. Aug.
7 on U.S. Highway 12 near
milepost 123. A nursing
supervisor at the hospital
said Wednesday Baker is
in critical condition.
Clifford Baker, 85, also
of Maple Valley, was taken
to Clearwater Valley Hospital in Orofino after the accident. A hospital spokeswoman said Baker was no
longer a patient there, and
she had no additional information as of Aug. 8.
The
Idaho
County
Sheriff’s Office reported
Wednesday the pair had
been westbound on the
highway when their 2006
Chrysler left the roadway,
traveled down an embank-
ment and struck a tree.
The accident was investigated by Deputy Scott
Paulsen.
Joint School District No. 171
August 20 agenda
A regular meeting will be
held August 20, at Orofino
High School at 7 p.m. An
executive session precedes
it at 6:30 p.m.
Consent agenda
Items to be handled will
include surplus text books;
food service mixers; portable air conditioners; and
transportation for a scanner and monitor.
Resignations and
new hires
Doug South, Vice-principal/Activities
Director
– OES; Darline Russell
– Timberline Custodian;
and Pat Christopherson –
Timberline – Asst. football
coach.
Reports and
recognitions
Agenda items include:
ASE banners; Riverside
Construction; enrollment;
building reports; program
reports, and Superintendent report.
Old Business
Biomass heating facility
by Mike Hoffman.
Action items
Action items include:
policy reviews and bus
routes.
You can learn little from
victory. You can learn everything from defeat.
- Christy Mathewson
Clearwater County Board
of Commissioners’ meeting.
The final cut over from the
911 program to the new E911 program should happen Aug. 8. Two dispatchers will be on duty for the
roll over.
There will be techs from
Cassidian, Frontier, Stancil and Clark Communications for the switch to Enhanced 911. The Bulberry
mapping is working with
the new E-911 system. The
trial runs have all been
successful.
Chip sealing
contractor Frank Gurney is
installing guardrails on the
Grangemont Road.
Snowmobile
Groomer program
Chair Ebert advised that
the RAC approved $20,000
funding to go to the Snowmobile Groomer program
for turning Beaver dam
Saddle Warming Hut into a
permanent structure. The
County will pay for the inmate labor for that work.
Veteran’s Service
The Board approved to
pay for the $400 for the
computer program for the
payroll claims. The Board
approved for the projected County Budget for FY
2012/2013 to go to publication for Aug. 16 with the
public hearing set for Aug.
27.
The Board adjourned
session early in order to
attend a tour of Dworshak
Dam with Greg Parker.
There were two executive
sessions held to discuss
personnel and indigents.
Present were Chairman
Don Ebert, Commissioner
Stan Leach and Commissioner Carole Galloway.
Clearwater County sees rise in
percentage of college graduates
By Bill Bishop
and Roberto Gallardo
Clearwater County has
experienced a brain gain
in the last 40 years, joining the rest of the country
in what has been a massive
increase in the number of
adults who have earned college degrees.
In 1970, 5.7 percent
of those over 25 years of
age had college degrees
in Clearwater County. By
2010, 14.4 percent of adults
here had completed college.
The percentage of adults
with college degrees in
Clearwater County was less
than the national average of
27.9 percent in 2010. The
college-educated rate here
was less than the Idaho average of 24.3 percent.
The number of adults in
the United States with college degrees has nearly tripled since 1970, when only
10.7 percent of adults had
graduated from college. But
the percentage of adults
with degrees in rural counties, such as Clearwater
County, while increasing,
has generally fallen behind
the proportion of college-educated residents in urban
counties.
The loss of young, welleducated residents has
posed a long-standing difficulty for rural communities.
“One of the problems that
rural areas face is that in
order to get a college education, young people often
have to leave,” says Judith
Stallmann, an economist at
the University of Missouri.
“Once you leave, that introduces you to other opportunities that you might
not have seen had you not
left.”
The good news for rural America is that it has
caught up in every other
measure of education.
In 1970, 7.8 percent of
adults in rural counties had
some education after high
school, but less than a college degree. By 2010, 27.4
percent of rural adults had
attained some post high
school education without
earning a college diploma.
That level of education was
close to the national average of 28.1 percent.
In Clearwater County, 9.1
percent of adults had some
college in 1970, rising to
28.3 percent in 2010. The
Idaho average in 2010 was
35.1 percent. Clearwater
County had 5,866 adults
(those over 25 years of age)
in 1970 and 6,691 adults in
2010.
Overall, Stallmann says,
the trends show that “rural
people have responded to
the demand for increased
job skills by increasing their
post secondary education.”
Only 15.3 percent of
the adult population in
Clearwater County had
failed to graduate from high
school in 2010. Nationally
15 percent of adults had
not completed high school;
in Idaho, the rate was 11.8
percent.
Mark Partridge, a rural
economist at Ohio State
University, says that regional differences in college graduation rates have
increased in recent years.
Partridge said his studies
have found that rural counties and counties with small
cities in the South and West
didn’t fare as well as those
in the Midwest and Northeast in attracting college
graduates. Even though the
Sunbelt has seen tremendous growth over the past
few decades, the South’s
rural counties haven’t kept
up in terms of attracting
adults with college degrees.
But the problem of keep-
ing college graduates in
rural America is a national
issue and one that is also
enduring.
Types of jobs
Missouri economist Stallmann said this is a reflection of the kinds of jobs that
are generally available in
rural communities. If there
are fewer jobs demanding
college degrees in a community, there are likely to
be fewer college graduates.
“It’s a big deal in a lot of
rural counties because you
don’t see a lot of jobs that
require a college education,”
Stallmann said. Young people graduating from high
school don’t see many jobs
that demand a college diploma, so they don’t think
about coming home once
they leave for the university.
There can be a “self-reinforcing cycle” in rural
communities,
Stallmann
said — young people leave
to gain higher education,
they don’t come back after
college because there aren’t
jobs that demand such education, and their absence
diminishes the chances
that more of these kinds of
jobs will be created.
Nationally, rural counties
and counties with small
cities have caught up with
urban counties in the percentage of adults who have
some post high school education. Stallmann sees this
as a sign that “there are
perhaps more jobs in rural
areas that require post secondary education but not
college.”
Both Stallmann and Partridge said the data on college education rates told
them that rural communities should consider the
kind of jobs being created
locally.
“Rural communities may
need to think about the
types of jobs being created,”
Stallmann said. “There are
some communities that are
doing things like getting local businesses to put an
emphasis on hiring local
kids who got a college education.”
“It really suggests that
rural communities that
aren’t thinking about making themselves attractive to
educated people are really
going to suffer,” Partridge
said.
Bill Bishop is co-editor
of the Daily Yonder (www.
dailyyonder.com), an online
news publication covering
rural America that is published by the Center for Rural Strategies. The Center
for Rural Strategies (www.
ruralstrategies.org) is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote healthy civic discourse
about rural issues.
Roberto Gallardo is an assistant extension professor
at the Southern Rural Development Center at Mississippi State University, (srdc.
msstate.edu)
For the raw information
included in this story and
charts, graphs and a map, visit this site: http://www.dailyyonder.com/educationand-rural-america-datapage/2012/07/06/4165
ORDINANCE NO. 172
AN ORDINANCE BEING THE ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS
ORDINANCE, PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF APPROPRIATION IN
THE AMOUNT OF $572,800. FOR THE CITY OF WEIPPE, IDAHO FOR
THE FISCAL YEAR COMMENCING ON OCTOBER 1, 2012 AND ENDING
ON SEPTEMBER 30, 2013 AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF THE
CITY OF WEIPPE, IDAHO AS FOLLOWS:
SECTION 1. That the following sums of money, or as much thereof as may
be authorized by law, as may be needed or deemed necessary to defray all expenses
and liabilities of the City of Weippe, Idaho be, and the same are hereby appropriated
for the corporate purposes and objects of said City hereinafter specified for the fiscal
year commencing on the first day of October, 2012 and ending on the thirtieth day
of September, 2013.
General
$ 52,100.
Law Enforcement
37,000.
Fire
8,000.
Animal Control
3,700.
Park
2,000.
Street
99,000.
Water
80,000.
Sewer
259,000.
Sanitation
32,000.
TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
$ 572,800.
SECTION 2. That this ordinance shall be in full force and effective from and
after its passage, approval, and publication.
PASSED under suspension of the rules upon which a roll call vote was taken
and duly enacted an ordinance of the City of Weippe, Clearwater County, Idaho at a
convened meeting of the Weippe city council on the 13th day of August, 2012.
ATTEST:
City Clerk
Norman C. Steadman, Mayor
8-16-12c
Tahoe Road #286 to close
for culvert construction
Grangeville–Construction work for the replacement of two large culverts
on Tributary to Browns
Spring Creek and Clear
Creek located on the Moose
Creek Ranger District is
scheduled to start August 13 and will take five
weeks.
It is anticipated that the
culvert at Mile Post 16.1
will be replaced first and
the road will be closed at
this point for two to three
weeks from junction of
road 470 to the junction
of trail 723. Upon completion of the culvert work at
Tributary to Browns Spring
Creek, the construction
crew will move to Mile Post
22.8 where the road will
be closed for two to three
weeks from junction of
road 1129 to the junction
of road 9730.
Once the work is complete at either location,
that closed section of road
will be reopened. Closure
maps are located at: www.
fs.usda.gov/
news/nezperce/news-events
Alternative route for Mile
Post 22.8 work will be road
1129 onto road 1124, then
onto road 464 to come out
at Lytle Cow Camp.
For more information
and updates on road and
trail conditions, contact
the Nez Perce National Forest Information Desk at
(208) 983-1950.
Silence is one of the
great arts of conversation.
- Marcus Tullius Cicero
AUGUST 16, 2012 – Orofino, ID – Clearwater Tribune—5B
For what it’s worth
Growing up in Orofino in the 1930s
By the late Dick Lindgren
Dick Lindgren was born
inВ В Orofino on July 14,
1929, and raised there.
He passed away Saturday,
Aug. 4, 2012, at the age of
83. Below are some of his
recollections of growing up
inВ OrofinoВ inВ theВ 1930s.В Also included is a little of
his family history.
I’ve been told numerous
times that I need to write
some of the things that
might be interesting to my
family. I’m not sure what
that entails.
My mother’s family is
well documented in a booklet put together by Maudie.
Dad’s father came from
Sweden. He spoke Swedish, Norwegian, Danish,
Dutch, German, English
and enough Nezperce to
do business with the local
Indians. His father was a
machinist in the Chicago
railroad yards.
There were 11 children
that came to America, one
by one, when the family
had enough money to bring
them. Grandpa Lindgren
was trained at the Elgin
Watch Works, Elgin Illinois, as a “railroad jeweler.” Railroad jewelers were
placed around the country to work on railroaders
watches. He and Grandma
Lindgren lived in Boone,
Iowa where Dad and his
sister, Helen, were born.
About 1910 Grandpa
and Dad came to Lewiston and Grandpa opened
a shop there. Several years
later,В GrandpaВ filedВ forВ aВ homesteadВ eastВ ofВ OrofinoВ and they moved there and
heВ openedВ aВ shopВ inВ Orofino. They built a house and
a barn on the place which
was covered with timber
except for a couple of areas
which served for pasture.
Grandpa walked the 10 or
12 miles to work several
times a week.
Two of Grandpa’s brothers, Jalmer and Wilhelm,
took up homesteads that
abutted Grandpa’s property. There, land was more
suitable to farming. Uncle
Willie built a nice little
house on his property. I
don’t know much more
about them except that
a Seventh-day Adventist
named Floyd Meckling told
them he would see that
they were properly buried.
They left their ground to
him. Much later in life Rosmarie, Karin, Mark and I
lived there for a year while
I logged.
When WWI broke out
Dad wanted to go in the
army but Grandma and
Grandpa wouldn’t give him
permission. One day while
he was working on the
farm a deputy sheriff came
and told him he was taking
him to town. Dad wanted
to know why and was told
he had been drafted to go
in the army. Turned out
Grandma had received the
draft notice and she burned
it! No son of hers was going
to war. Dad happily packed
his things and took training at Moscow but the armistice was signed before
he ever got out of training.
While dad was still single, he worked for the telephone company putting up
lines and hooking up the
switchboard where he also
learned some about electrical work. He was also a
fireman in Coeur d’Alene and he told me that he was
involved in a pool game
when a man came in selling stock in Sunshine
Mine. Dad said he wasn’t
buying into some mining
scheme - lost his money in
the pool game. Sunshine
Mine made millionaires out
of a number of people.
Sometime around 1920,
Grandma opened a restaurantВ inВ Orofino.В MotherВ andВ Aunt Helen worked for her
and this is where Dad met
Mother. They were married
in 1926. He ran the light
plant in Kooskia for a couple of years and then they
built a “house?” in Orofino. It was shingled and had a
rounded tar paper roof, two
bedrooms with a curtain for
a door, and one long room.
The kitchen was separated
from the living room by
a wood burning kitchen
stove. The toilet was in the
attached woodshed. There
was no bathtub.
The picture of Fred and
me on the pony was taken in a neighbor’s yard
because mother was so
ashamed of our house.
Early in the 1930’s Dad
lost his job at Oud’s Hardware and Furniture, where
he worked mostly as an
electrician. We went to live
with Grandpa and Grandma Schwarz on what we
called “The Ranch.” Emmette, George and Hazel
were there, probably all
in high school in Peck.
My cousin Junior (Ralph
Schwarz) was also there.
His mother had died giving
birth to a baby girl and he
was living with his other
grandmother in Portland
in a rather bad situation.
Aunt Lydia brought him
to us shortly after I was
born. I adored Junior and
althoughВ heВ wasВ fiveВ yearsВ older than I, he always
treated me as an equal.
There was no electricity and no bathroom. Evenings were spent listening
to Hazel play the reed organ and Emmette play the
violin, the guitar or banjo.
We often sang along and
the grownups got a great
kick out of some of my
mispronunciations.
Junior had a shoe box with
two spools attached to the
side, which was our radio.
HeВ liedВ onВ theВ floorВ behindВ it and was the announcer
while I worked the dials.
Grandpa had dairy cows,
pigs, chickens and several
horses. They sold milk and
cream to the dairy in Orofino.В TheyВ tookВ itВ toВ theВ railroad station down on
the river in a Model T Ford
pickup. The dirt road was
very steep. Model Ts had a
gravity system to feed gas
to the engine. Sometimes
people backed up hills to
get gas to the engine.
Emmette and George
overcame this problem by
attaching a tire valve to
the gas cap. Grandpa was
in charge of the tire pump
and when the engine sputtered they would holler
“pump Papa pump,” which
forced gas to the engine.
Hazel took me to gather
eggs once and I decided I’d
gather them whenever it
came handy. This was bad
because I was chasing the
hens off their nests while
they were laying eggs. One
day, so they tell me, I came
screaming out of the chicken coop with a Rock Island
Red rooster with his claws
graspingВ myВ hairВ andВ flapping his wings alongside
my head. They got him off
of me and asked me what
happened and I told them
that the rooster asked me if
IВ wantedВ toВ fightВ andВ IВ saidВ no, but he took me anyway.
I think there’s a bit of the
Garden of Eden in this experience: Grandma took us
out to the orchard and told
us we could take apples off
any tree except this particular one. As soon as she
was out of sight we started
munching. They were not
quite ripe crab apples and
we got a real belly ache
from them, much to her
satisfaction.
We spent at least one
winter on the ranch. Then
Dad got a job with a survey crew on the road which
would follow the Clearwater
River to Kamiah. We lived
inВ OrofinoВ afterВ that.
Sometimes (when there
was an extra dime) Mother
would walk me down to
the railroad station and I
would ride the train to the
Peck depot, where someone would meet me and we
would walk up the hill to
the ranch. Mom, Dad and
Freddy would come in the
Model T and we would go
home Sunday evening. Later, Oud’s Hardware hired
Dad back. Bob Oud came
to tell Dad and when he
left, Mother cried. I think
they were tears of joy because we would be a little
better off.
I started school in 1935
and later that fall we lost
our house and property.
TheВ firstВ thingВ theВ builderВ did was tear the house
down. It was easily out of
place in that neighborhood. We moved into a tiny
house in an alley behind
the Methodist Church. No
bathtub. Dad’s sister, Aunt
Helen and her husband,
Jack Conard and children
Louise, Ruth and Jackie lived next door. Later,
Dwight (Bud) and Linda
were born. We often played
behind the church with
them.
One day as I was coming home from school
Jumbo Dawson, Junior
Cramer and Marlin Hu-
lett were throwing rocks
at me. When I ran up on
the porch, Dad was standing inside the screen door
and told me to lick that kid
or he was gonna lick me.
I started in on Marlin and
the other two ran off. The
Methodist minister was at
his back door and hollered,
“Give it to him, Dickie!”
Mother told Dad he was
teaching me to fight, and he said, “Yep.”
At Christmas Fred and I
got up early and turned on
the light. Dad had hooked it
to the Christmas tree lights
and a Lionel train was running around the base of the
tree!В FredВ andВ IВ finallyВ woreВ that train out playing with
it. We were poor but we always had clean clothes and
never went hungry. Mom
and Dad did their best with
what they had.
The next year, there was
a string tied to the tree
which said “Follow me.” It
led us to the front porch
where Dad had built us
what we called a “bob sled,”
using his old Flexible Flyer
for the back runners and a
short sled that Junior had
for the steering runners.
We had wonderful times
with that for many years.
By this time we had
moved into a bigger house
across the street from the
Conards and close to the
railroadВ tracks.В OrofinoВ Creek ran just beyond the
railroad tracks. This house
had a bathtub! The railroad was built to haul logs
from the high country to
Potlatch Forest lumber
mill in Lewiston. Six days
a week between 90 to 100
car loads of logs came past
our house.
There was a steam locomotive at each end. The
one in back was for braking
power because the grade
was steep in some places.
Each morning a string of
empties went up. Fred and
I would go out near the
tracks as the engine went
by and make motions like
we were milking a cow and
the engineer would oblige
by shooting off steam on
one side of the engine and
then the other several
times. Then we waited for
the pusher engine and did
the same thing. We loved
the smell of the steam and
always tried to be close
enough to get a good whiff.
When the logger came
down on Saturday evening lumberjacks rode the
log cars, piling off at Main
Street and crossing the
creek to the part of town
which was called Canada,
named this because you
could buy whiskey by the
drink at several bars there.
This was illegal in Idaho,
but the local police didn’t
bother and left the jacks
to their boozing as long as
they stayed on that side of
town.
About this time, Aunt
Lydia brought in a Wheaties box with a puppy inside. We named him
Patches and he was our
constant playmate through
our childhood. We didn’t
go anywhere without him
and he didn’t go anywhere
without us. He would lie
asВ flatВ asВ heВ couldВ inВ theВ middle of the sidewalk
waiting for us to come from
school. We would pretend
we didn’t see him and start
in a different direction and
he would come bouncing
and wiggling to us.
В FrankВ GriffithВ wasВ often the conductor on that
railroad line. He had been
a good friend of Grandpa
Lindgren. The leading engine would stop just short
of Main Street and the
crew would go to a cafГ©
and eat. If you wanted to
goВ outВ ofВ townВ upВ OrofinoВ Creek you were out of luck
until they moved the train
on down the river, because
it blocked the only street
heading up the creek.
The conductor and the
switchman left the caboose
and walked the length of
the train looking for “hot
boxes.” The brakes often
overheated coming down
the grade and sometimes
causedВ aВ fireВ inВ theВ lubricatingВ boxВ whichВ wasВ filledВ with oily rags at the end of
each wheel.
В Mr.В GriffithВ oftenВ broughtВ his lunch box in and ate
supper with us. Several
times he put Fred and I in
the caboose and once or
twice we got to ride in the
engine down to where they
stopped. Because we lived
so close to the railroad
hobos often came to our
house looking for something to eat. They were
mostly out of work jacks
and providing they would
chop some wood or hoe the
garden, Mom fed them.
One day while one was
eating on the back steps,
Mom called me to the
back door. Patches was lying there with his mouth
around the man’s ankle
and he was eating very
slowly. I said I would go call
Patches off but Mom said
no that maybe they would
quit coming. Hobos had
a way of marking houses
that would feed and they
generally walked railroad
tracks when they were going somewhere.
Fred started school in
1937. He wasn’t six yet and
I think Mom and Dad put
him in school so Mom could
work. About mid morningВ ofВ theВ firstВ schoolВ day,В Mom opened the back door
and found Fred and Patches on the doorstep. He told
her he didn’t like school
and wasn’t going back.
She marched him back to
school. Oud’s owned an
apartment house and Mom
worked there cleaning, doing wash and ironing.
They also had the wholesale Conoco (gas and oil)
and Dad did the deliveries.
There was a violent strike
by the woods workers
against Potlatch. The state
militia (National Guard
now) came to help control
the situation.
They camped on the
school grounds, which was
only a block away, and
when the bugler blew the
wake up call I would jump
out of bed and go up and
watch them assemble. Non
union mills were still operating and Dad delivered
gas and oil to them. I went
with him once. There was
a soldier on each running
board and one sitting on
the tank in back.
Then
Grandma
and
Grandpa moved off the
ranch. Emmette and George
managed to get them a
place. They sold most of
the livestock, but kept two
horses (Topsy and Duke),
a couple of dairy cows, the
hogs and chickens. They
built a barn, a corn crib, a
smoke house and fixed one shed for Grandpa’s blacksmith shop. He shaped his
own horse shoes and made
different attachments for
his equipment.
The place had a good
orchard and lots of wild
berries. Red raspberries,
loganberries and black
raspberries (we called them
blackcaps). They were wonderful with cream and a little sugar and with a sugar
cookie made with home
churned butter. Mom’s
brothers and sisters often
came on weekends and
there were good eats and
more cousins for Fred and
I to play with.
В ThereВ wasВ aВ fineВ springВ not far from the house and
Dad got busy and piped it
to the house and bought a
pitcher pump so Grandma
had water in the kitchen.
Dad adored his motherin-law and would do anything he could for her. By
this time Grandma was
nearly deaf and Grandpa
had cataracts so bad that
he couldn’t read or tell time
on his pocket watch.
Oud’s had a delivery
pickup and they didn’t
want to park it downtown,
so Dad brought it home
and we were allowed to use
it on weekends. Dad sold
the Model T. We moved
again. This place had two
bedrooms and a bathtub!
I was in the fourth grade
and doing well enough in
school that I was allowed
to go to the bookshelf and
get a book to read when I
finishedВ theВ assignment.
Miss Weaver, my teacher,
pronounced me eligible to
skipВ theВ fifthВ gradeВ ifВ IВ gotВ some help in math during
the summer. Aretha Harvey (Ora and Lilly’s daughter) helped me. While we
lived here Fred and I were
playing in the yard. I fell
on him and it broke his
arm. The break had a chip
which had to be removed
and they took him to Lewiston. I was terribly ashamed
and sad and hated seeing
him in that gloomy looking
hospital with all the Catholic statues hovering over
him. Typically, he was the
darling of the nurses and
rather enjoyed himself, although he never let me forget that I was responsible
for his broken arm.
В OrofinoВ hadВ areasВ whichВ were nicknamed. Canada,
which I mentioned, was
the rough end of town
where the illegal bars and
whorehouses were. Mostly
mill workers lived here. Up
Orofino creek was called Yellow Dog. Gorman’s Addition was the nicer part of
town and had a great hill
for sledding.
We moved to Jingletown,
which was down along
the river. This house was
much bigger. There was
a pole yard behind it and
the railroad wasn’t far beyond that. The White Pine
planing mill had piles of
edgings generally about an
inch wide and one or two
inches thick in all kinds of
lengths. These made great
stick horses and swords to
duel with.
Grandpa became very
ill. He was suffering from a
brain hemorrhage and was
delusional. They brought
him to us and Mom took
care of him until he became rather violent. Dr.
Robertson recommended
that he be moved to State
Hospital North, which was
an insane asylum. This
bothered Mom’s family
very much. He died there
in 1938 or 1939.
Grandma,
Emmette,
George and Junior came to
live with us. Emmette and
George had one bedroom
upstairs and Grandma had
the other. She had a room
with a kitchen stove so she
could cook for the boys.
Junior, Fred and I slept on
a large open area by the
stairs.
Emmette and George
worked at the cement
plant. Some times they
worked days, sometimes
swing shift and sometimes
graveyard.
Junior got a job delivering the Spokesman Review.
I started delivering the Spokane Daily Chronicle, an
evening paper. I am mentioning two incidents to
help you realize what it was
likeВ toВ growВ upВ inВ Orofino.В My route was in Canada
and I did my own collecting. My pockets were full
of coins when I walked into
the White Hotel bar (commonly called Finn Mary’s)
to collect.
There were a good many
drunk jacks in there and
I bumped into one and
he heard the coins in my
pocket jingle. He picked me
up by the shoulders and
started shaking me to hear
me jingle. Mary came out
from behind the bar with
a baseball bat; he dropped
me and I hit the floor running. I wouldn’t go back
there to collect from then
on unless Dad was with
me.
Sometime later a group
of promoters came to town
to try to get more subscriptions for us. During the
morning my man only got
a few subscriptions and at
lunch when he found out
how many the others had
he was determined to get
me more subscriptions. I
told him that the ones he
got me would probably remain subscribers but the
ones the others had would
probably quit the paper
when the free trial ran out.
He stopped in front of a
homemade shack on the
edge of the street above
the planing mill. I told him
I didn’t want to deliver the
paper there. Finn Helga
lived there and she could
be mean. He insisted and
knocked on the homemade
Dutch door. Finn Helga
opened the top part of the
door and stood there peeling a potato with a butcher
knife. He started his spiel
and she said “no”. He kept
on and she said “no” again.
He said, “But Madame” and
she stuck that knife in his
belly and said, “I said no!”
and closed the door. He got
the message.
Junior’s father, Ralph,
movedВ toВ OrofinoВ withВ hisВ wife, Charlotte, a girl just
younger than Fred named
Francis, and Charlotte’s
nephew Dwight Perrin.
They lived nearby and Junior went to live with them.
One day while Junior,
Dwight, Fred and I were
playing in the yard trying
to tackle Patches, a motorized grader went by, working the street in front of the
house.
We had never seen a motorized grader before and
asked Mom if we could follow it. She told us we could
follow it as far as Nelson’s,
which was about halfway
to the North Fork River. We
arrived at Nelson’s in jig
time and Junior suggested
we go on to the North Fork
and swim. His famous
words were, “They’ll never
know.”
When we got to the North
Fork the river was jackstrawed full of logs from
the Potlatch Forest river
drive. We walked the river
to Bruce’s Eddy (where the
Dworshak Dam stands today) before we found open
water. Junior had brought
a can of tobacco and the
rollins so we swam and
smoked for a while. Then
we heard a car honking and there were Mom
and Aunt Charlotte. They
cuffed us into the back
seat and Mom said, “I’ll
bet you’ve been smoking,
too.” Junior, Dwight and I
denied it, but Freddy said,
“Yeah.” Had we gone under
those logs, they would have
never found us.
Sometime later Ralph
moved his family to Grangeville. Then we received
word that Ralph had given
Junior a beating. Emmette
and George got Junior and
brought him back to us.
Grandma died about a
year later. Emmette and
George had sold the farm
and purchased a 1940
Plymouth. They went to
California, and Junior,
now a high school senior,
went to live with his father
again, this time in Pierce.
We moved to a smaller
house and Mom got her
firstВ electricВ range.В GeorgeВ received his draft notice,
came to tell us goodbye
and went off to the war. Junior graduated from high
school (1942) and he and
a friend, Bruce Barwise,
joined the Navy. Bruce was
Aunt Helen’s brother. We
didn’t know her for several
years.
I turned 13 that summer and worked for Oud’s
Pharmacy as a soda jerk
and general gofer. I got $40
a month and worked from
8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Saturday and a
half day Sunday. Dad left
to work in the ship yards
in Bremerton, WA.
One day Buzz Oud
sent me to get a carbonated soda bottle from Finn
Mary’s. I walked into the
bar and stayed close to
the door. She was pouring whiskey for three jacks.
One of them spilled his
and she poured him another. He spilled that, too,
and she said, “What’s the
matter with you? Did you
get [[email protected]#$%$#] last night?”
Then she came around the
bar and said “I’m sorry,
child.”
Sometime after school
started Fred got the measles. Then I got them. I was
way behind in school and
it was going to get worse.
Sometimes Mom kept a
little girl from across the
street and one day while
she was sitting on the toilet (the door was open)
Fred walked by and she
said, “Hey you, come wipe
my butt!” Fred nearly died
laughing.
Aunt Lydia’s husband,
B. J. (Bed) Kinne had a
business associate in Seattle. They had a cottage
at Point No Point near the
tip of the Kitsap peninsula
they would rent to us. Aunt
Lydia took us to Bremerton. Aunt Hazel went along.
The speed limit during the
war was 35 mph. Between
Walla and Yakima we got
into an army convoy which
traveled at 50 mph. There
were big trucks loaded with
cannons, tanks and men
and it was an awesome
sight for a couple of kids
from the back country.
We found Dad, but he
stayed in Bremerton for a
while because he had no
transportation to get to
theВ yards.В WeВ builtВ aВ fireВ inВ theВ fireplaceВ andВ Mom,В Aunt Hazel and Aunt Lydia
backed up to that warming
fireВ andВ liftedВ theВ backsВ ofВ their dresses. All three were
quite heavy at that time.
There they stood laughing
at each other.
Life at Point No Point
was quite interesting. We
sawВ fishingВ boatsВ workingВ together netting salmon.
Dad and I rowed out to
(Cont pg 10B)
6B—Clearwater Tribune – Orofino, ID – AUGUST 16, 2012
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FOR ALL YOUR BOATING NEEDS
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If your style isn’t becoming to you,
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AUGUST 16, 2012 – Orofino, ID – Clearwater Tribune—7B
Magistrate Court
All fines and forfeitures
include court costs unless
otherwisenoted.Notalldetails of sentencing may be
listed.
Infractions
Sonny J. Kinzer, speeding, 63/55, $85. (CCSO
–ClearwaterCountySheriff’sOffice)
PaulM.Simmons,speeding,64/50,$90.(CCSO)
SteveD.Hudson,speeding,55/40,$95.(CCSO)
JohnT.Johnson,speeding,70/55,$90.(ISP–IdahoStatePolice)
Tina C. Eads, boating—
fail to carry life preservers
inwatercraft,$99.(CCSO)
ChristianD.Eads,boating—fail to carry life preservers in watercraft, $99.
(CCSO)
Marriage Affidavits
Jeffrey Alan Jarrett and
NicolaAnnJohnson.
Incidents
8-5-12
Orofino Police Department
(OPD) received traffic complaint resulting in arrest on
Hwy.12.
8-6-12
OPD received report of animal (dog at large) on Cedar
Streetalongwithseveralother
animalcalls.
Clearwater County Sheriff’s
Office (CCSO) received report
ofvanintheditchatNewHope
Loop&CavendishRd.Noinjuriesreported.
CCSO received civil complaintofitemsdestroyedand/
or removed from former property/residenceinWeippe.
CCSOreceivedreportoftwo
looseaggressivedogsthattried
toattack13yearolddaughter
atHwy12and138thSt.
CCSOreportoftraffichazard
onHwy.11,MM28.5.Square
balesofhayintheroadway.
CCSO received request for
public assist on Cavendish
Road.
CCSO received request for
extra patrol on Dent Bridge
Rd. Found tool box open, unknownifanythingismissing.
CCSO received report of intrusionalarmgoingoffatMain
&1stSt.
8-7-12
CCSO received report of
lightbeigedogstandinginthe
middle of the road at GrangemontandDeerCreekRoads.
CCSOreceivedreportof380
stolenfromKamloopLaneand
HiddenVillageDr.
CCSOreceivedreportofseveralhorsesintheroadatHarmony Heights Loop Road and
DeerCreekRoad.
CCSO received request for
ambulance at Upper Fords
CreekRoad.
CCSO received report of indecentexposureonHwy.7.
CCSO delivered emergency
messageon7thAve.Weippe.
CCSOreceivedreportoftwo
vehicle accident, no injuries,
atMM49.5Hwy.12
CCSO received request for
agencyassistat108thSt.and
Hwy. 12. RP heard loud bang
andnoticedmalesubjectpacingandwavinghisarms.
CCSOreceivedreportofdeer
vs.vehiclewestendofWeippe
atMP55,Hwy.11
CCSO received report of
fraudat569MusselshellRoad,
Weippe.
CCSOreceivedreportofdomesticbatteryBlueMoonLane
andHarmonyHeights.
8-8-12
OPDreceivedreportoftraffic hazard (lights out, wires
down,debrisonroadway).
OPD received request for
welfare check and suspicious
circumstances.
OPDreceivedthreerequests
for agency assist at Cedar
Street,AhsahkaRoadandHwy
7.
OPDreceivedmorerequests
foragencyassistatBlueMoon
LaneandHwy.12.
OPDreceivedcivilcomplaint
onFisherRoad.
CCSOreceivedreportofcow
outonGilbertGrade.
CCSO received request for
extrapatrolonGreerRoad.
CCSO received report of
malesubjectincanoenearMP
59Hwy.12.Wearinglifejacket
butappearedtobeneedingassistance.
CCSOreceivedreportofpetittheftatN.MaininWeippe.
Gas drive off at Mary Ann’s
Groceries.
CCSO received report of
cowsbeingoutonDairyRoad,
Weippe.
CCSO received request for
welfarecheckonPonyLane.
CCSO received request for
civil standby on Blue Moon
Lane.
CCSO received notice of
alarmgoingoffatHwy.12and
RiversidePharmcy.
8-9-12
OPDreceivedinformationon
accidentonJohnsonAvenue.
OPD received request for
agency assist on Grangemont
Road.
OPDreceivedreportoftrespassonHartfordAveandalso
dog at large on Hartford Avenue.
OPD received request to
check business on Michigan
Avenue.
OPDreceivednoticeoftrespassonMainStreet.
OPDreceivedreportofburglary at a residence on Ford
Drive.
OPDreceivedreportoftheft
onKalaspoAvenue.
CCSO received traffic complaint of black Camero traveling at a high rate of speed on
GrangemontRoad.
CCSO received report of
unlawful entry. Shop and vehicles have been broken into
onBrookwaterLane.
CCSO received complaint
of telephone scam on Upper
FordsCreekRoadandPunkin
Lane.
CCSO received traffic complaintofWhiteDodgeDurango
passing unsafely and almost
causing an accident on Hwy.
12. Reporting party (RP) willingtosigncomplaint.
CCSO received report of
disorderly conduct on GrangemontRoad.
CCSO received report of
someone shooting after dark
on Brown Road and Middle
RoadinLenore.
8-10-12
OPD received report of dog
atlargeonMainStreet.
OPDreceivedreportoftheft
onJeromeAve.
OPD received traffic complaint(UTL).
OPD received report of dog
atlargeonMichiganAve.
CCSOreceivedreportofpossiblefishandgameviolationin
ThorntonRoad.
CCSO received report of
petit theft at Camp Y Road
and Dent Bridge Road. Three
campers were vandalized and
itemswerestolen.
CCSO received request for
assistance at Headquarters
Road,Pierce.
CCSOreceivedreportofunattendeddeath.
CCSO received threats at
theSheriff’soffice.
8-11-12
OPDreceivedreportofmaliciousinjuryonCedarSt.
OPD received request for
agency assist at MP 52 on
Hwy.7.
OPDreceivedreportofsuspicious circumstances on
MichiganAve.
OPD received requests for
agencyassistonbothHwy.12
and2ndAvenue.
OPD received request to
checkbusinessat10720Hwy.
12.
OPD received request for
welfare check on Michigan
Ave.
CCSOreceivedreportofdisorderly conduct at the Lucky
Inn.
CCSOreceivedreportofbattery on Main St. and Weippe
Ave. Male subject with possiblebrokenhip.
CCSO received complaint
that RP’s former tenants trespassingatDeerCreekRoad.
CCSOreceivedreportofunwantedcattleonprivateproperty.
CCSO received request for
ambulance. Gun shot wound
tolegatMainSt.,Weippe.
CCSO received request for
boating assist, 12 ft. aluminum boat having trouble at
CharliesBay.
CCSO received notice of
suspicious circumstance at
Sunset Mart. Male in hospital
gownstungbybeeonknee.
CCSO received report of
suspicious circumstance. VehicleonitssideonDentBridge
Road.Noonearound.
8-12-12
CCSOreceivedreportoftraffic hazard on Hwy. 12. Kid’s
swimmingpoolinroadway.
CCSOassistedwithawantedsubjectonGilbertGrade.
CCSO was notified of malicious injury at Lebaron Park
inCavendish.Damagedoneto
parkbenchandguestbook.
CCSO received notice of
theft of mail box on Old AhsahkaGrade.
CCSO assigned ambulance
toCanoeCampLaneRVPark
toassistfemalewithcutleg.
Aug. 3
Warranty Deed-#199 PioneerExchangeAccommodation Titleholder to Don
P. Saraceno and Kerri L.
Saraceno, part Lot 6, sec.
11-35N-2EBM.
Warranty Deed Correction—Randy
Hollibaugh
and Lauri Hollibaugh to
RichardC.Betts,partN1/
2NE, sec. 11-35N-2EBM;
subjecttoeasements.
WarrantyDeed-Christine
Betts to Richard C. Betts,
partN1/2NE,sec.11-35N2EBM.
Warranty Deed Correction—Christine Betts and
Richard C. Betts to Randy
Hollibaugh and Lauri Hollibaugh,partN1/2SE,sec.
11-35N-2EBM;
together
with an easement re-recorded.
Quit-Claim Deed-Richard Remen and Johann
Altmiller Remen to Nicholas Altmiller and Shawna
Altmiller, part SWSW, sec.
4-36N-2EBM; subject to
easements.
Aug. 6
Quit-Claim
Deed-Julie James to Lori Joiner,
S1/2N1/2SWNW,
S1/2
SWNW, sec. 1-35N-4EBM;
part SENE, sec. 2-35N4EBM.
Aug. 7
Quit-Claim
DeedThomas J. Dougherty and
Kathleen C. Dougherty to
Public, Lot 6, Clearwater
PlateauSubdivision,Timeshare – Sciota Village Estates,Inc.
WarrantyDeed-RobertG.
Hartig and Carla J. Hartig
to Skyler R. Hendren, Lot
17, 18, 19 and 20, Block
4, Brown’s Addition to the
CityofWeippe.
Quit-Claim Deed-Dana
E. Losey and Sedanna J.
Losey,DanaE.andSedannaJ.LoseyTrust,toRichard E. Trout, part SWSW,
sec.20-36N-3EBM.
OCI meeting
OCI members will meet
Wednesday, Aug. 22, 7
p.m. at the White Pine
Building on Main Street.
Members will also meet
Aug.29,Sept.5andSept.
12 to make final plans for
Orofino Lumberjack Days,
setforSept.13to16.
Anyone interested is invited to attend the meetings.
Low-cost dog
spay/neuters
Second Chance Animal
is offering $20 spays and
neuters for dogs weighing over 40 pounds-available to low-income Idaho
andWashingtonresidents.
Call (208) 553-5357 for
moreinfo.
5VQTKGUCRRGCTKPIKPVJG%NGCTYCVGT6TKDWPGYKNN
CNUQCRRGCTQPNKPGCVYYYENGCTYCVGTVTKDWPGEQO
By Marshall Cook
Mike Dugger opened
the weekly Rotary meeting
of August 10, by jokingly
attributing the following
Thought of the Day to Attorney Dale Cox: ”It is always the best policy to
speakthetruth,unless,of
course, you are an exceptionallygoodliar.”Forthis
tomfoolery, Mike happily
forked over a fine of $1 to
the Sgt-at-Arms amidst a
roomfulloflaughter.
Visitors at the meeting
were Frank Wityczak and
his son, Joey. Joey is the
recipient of this year’s Rotary Memorial Schol-arship. During the meeting,
Joeytookafewminutesto
outlinehisupcomingplans
and goals, and to thank
Rotary. Congratulations,
Joey,andgoodluck!
Several Rotarians then
presented club announcements. The first was that
all the flags have been
ordered to complete the
VFW’s U.S. Flag Project.
When the flags have all
arrived, Mike Dugger will
callforvolunteerstofinish
drilling the flag pole holes
on Johnson Avenue and
will sponsor the finishing
oftherequiredflagpoles.
Everyone was reminded of the upcoming Red
C r o s s / K i w a n i s / R o t a r y
Community Blood Drive
at the Armory Aug 14-16.
Givethegiftoflife!
Last week, the teens
and sponsors of the new
Interact Club again met.
Bylaws have been drafted,
Committeesorganized,and
the group is now working
to involve the High School
andotherkidsintheInteractClub.ARotaryInteract
club is a group of young
people (age 12-18), sponsored by a parent Rotary
club, which offers young
people an opportunity to
perform local and internationalcommunityservice.
A number of Rotarians
were planning to join the
Kiwanis Club members at
their6:30p.m.CornFeed,
August14.Yum!
Joe Davis then introduced the speaker for the
meeting, Margaret (Calland)Fine.Margaretiswell
known to many Orofino
and Clearwater folks, as
she has lived in this area
her entire life. She talked
tothosepresentabouther
daysworkinginthelogging
camps in the 1940s as a
camphelper.Sheistheauthor of the autobiography:
“FunintheWoods.”
Margaret was born in
1923 and for the first 16
years of her life lived on
theranchherfatherhomesteadedintheGrangemont
area. She then attended
schoolinGrangemontand
later moved in with her
AuntandUncleinOrofino
tofinishschool.
After working at various
part-time jobs in Orofino,
attheHelgesonHotel,and
later the Telephone Company, she took a better
paying job in the Potlatch
logging camps as a cook’s
helper and general camp
aide,earninga“darngood”
$84amonth.
Scroungingablacksuitcase, she then set off for
her first job, replacing
“Gypo-Annie” Johnson at
Camp 11. To get at Camp
11,shehadtotakeaGaffney Stage Line bus with a
bunch of hung-over lumberjacks to Headquarters.
As she told Clearwater
Tribune Reporter, Alannah Allbrett in a March 4,
2010article,“shewasthen
toldtocatchthe�speeder’”
– a boxcar on the railroad
line.“Thatis�asinglerailroad car without sides on
it.Somehadcovers;others
didnot.Somehadbenches
to sit on; others did not.’
But this is what the railroademployeesusedtoget
fromonecamptoanother.
After the scenic ride on
thespeeder,wheresheadmired the beauty between
Pierce and Headquarters,
shehadtogetonasupply
truckwithabunchofmen.
�I thought that I should
havebeenaskedtoridein
thecab,butnosuchluck.
Ihadnotenvisionedmein
thebackofasupplytruck
with eight or ten lumberjacks.Ohwell,wemadeit
allright,’saidMargaret.”
Then, Margaret went
on to describe some of
the funny and interesting
things that happened to
her in the logging camps.
Shedescribedhowsheand
the other girls working in
the camps got up at 4:30
a.m.tohelpthecook,baker
and dishwasher fix breakfast; how they went to the
dump to watch the bears;
howshecloggedthedrains
by washing the worn-out
cleaningrags;howshewas
mistakenly shipped a fireplace screen from Montgomery Ward’s; and how
she once got her clothes
starched by the prankplayingkitchencrew.
During her talk, she
quoted Harvey Spears as
At the Orofino Rotary
meeting of Aug. 10, Joey
Wityczak, son of Frank
and the late Barbara
Wityczak, was awarded
the 2012 $1,300 Rotary
Memorial Scholarship to
help continue his university education. Congratulations, Joey!
saying his famous line,
“Onlythestrongshallsurvive and the weak will fall
by the wayside.” This was
a pretty good quote, we
suspect,forthehardwork
required in the woods in
1942sandduringthefirst
partsofWWII!
Lastlyshedescribedhow
they shut Camp 11, the
last of the “horse camps,”
and moved her to Camp
29,a“railroadcamp,”and
eventuallytoherlastcamp,
Camp53.
Margaret told us much
about a bygone era of the
Logging camps, how she
learnedtocarryfiveplates
offoodononearmandfive
bowlsofsoupontheother
so as to not spill food on
the lumberjacks, and how
tobecarefulnottoblowup
the cook stove with flammablefirestarters.
Lastly,shetoldusabout
the unfortunate jack who
was burned badly in the
bunk house and who was
treated with only cold tea
because of 10 foot deep
snow and the absence of
firstaidsupplies.
Thanks, Margaret, for
yourtalesofyearsgoneby
intheloggingcampsofthe
1940s.
Check out the March 4,
2010 Clearwater Tribune
Article entitled: Margaret Calland-Fine, former
logging camp “flunkey.”
Her book, “Fun In The
Woods,” is available from
the Clearwater Historical
Museum, or perhaps from
Margaretherself.
Nextweek,WayneOlsen
willactasgreeter,andAnnie Lozar will present the
ThoughtoftheDay.
LIFELINE Food Bank growing
In February of this year
the fledgling LIFELINE
FoodBankopeneditsdoors
inOrofino.TheFoodBank
is located at 2170 Carney
Dr.UnitGacrosstheparkinglotfromtheDMW.Itis
open twice weekly – Monday from 5:30 – 7PM and
Friday from 11 a.m.– 1
p.m.
This is a significant increase in service from the
once monthly mobile food
bank that visited Orofino.
Since the doors opened,
LIFELINE has served 257
families from Orofino, Ahsahka, Peck and Lenore.
Those families are made
up of 181 children, 330
adults,and106seniors.
LIFELINE is part of the
IdahoFoodBankorganization which is the primary
sourceoffood.Itisstaffed
by community volunteers
and receives additional
donations from local in-
dividuals and merchants.
Although it is comprised
ofvolunteerlabor,thefood
bankstillhasmonthlyexpensesforrentandutilities
and your tax deductible
contributions are always
needed.
Financialdonationsmay
betakentoPotlatchCredit
Union and deposited into
the Food Bank account.
Donations of canned food
and non-perishables (that
are not date expired) can
be taken directly to the
food bank during hours of
operation.Also,wearevery
interested in your donations of fresh garden produce. If your summer garden is abundant and you
have fruit and vegetables
to share, we would love to
acceptyourdonations.
Please contact the food
bankadministrationinadvancetodonateperishables
(as we have limited refrig-
eration space) by emailing
[email protected],
orcallingOrofinoCommunity Church at (208) 4763019.
We are currently looking for a large refrigerator
in good working condition. If you have one you
candonate,pleasecontact
ChrisJensenat(208)4765253. Thank you to all of
the local churches, merchants and organizations
whohavehelpedmakethe
first six months of operation successful. There is a
tremendous need in the
ClearwaterValleyandyour
generosity can help many
families.
READ
LEGALS ONLINE
FOR FREE
Legal notices can be
viewed free of charge at
www.clearwatertribune.com.
Click on the blue “Legal
Notices” tab near the top of
the page, above the log-in box.
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
SEPTIC
SEWING
THE STITCHERY
110 Dworshak Drive, Orofino, ID 83544
Russ Ford
(208) 476-9143
Toll Free 1-877-445-0300
Joanne Eveland
208-476-5909
245 Main St.
Open 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Pickup or delivery in Orofino area
If you can wear it, I can repair it!
STORAGE
VALLEY STORAGE
450 Sheds • 16 Different Sizes
Starting 10’ x 10’ to 26’ x 45’
Door sizes from 4’ x 7’ to 14’ x 14’
WELL DRILLING
Need water?
Call us!
We’ve been drilling in north
central Idaho for over 30 years.
Well
Drilling and
Geothermal
Water Well
Drilling
Nail & Sons
New Commercial Park with
Office/Shop Combinations
Well Drilling, LLC
Contact office above IGA
M-F, 8 AM - 5 PM • 476-3509
FREE ESTIMATES • LICENSED & BONDED
Mark Nail, Owner/Operator
910 sq. ft. or 1170 sq. ft.
(208) 983-2129
8B—Clearwater Tribune – Orofino, ID – AUGUST 16, 2012
476-4571 - Classified
Toll Free: 1-866-703-5374 FAX: 476-0765
e-mail: [email protected]
Auction
Deadline Noon Tuesdays
Auction
Auction
Bazaar
Idaho County Fair Sale
Saturday, August 18, 1:00 p.m.
Clearwater Health and
Rehab community bazaar.
All vendors welcome. To
be held on August 24th 9
a.m.-2 p.m. Please contact
Aly or Danelle to reserve
your spot. 208 476-4568.
8/16-23c
Sales Every Other Friday
For Rent
ATTENTION: LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS
NO SALE AUGUST 17
FEEDER SALE AUGUST 24
www.cottonwoodlivestock.com
Sales start at 12:30 p.m.
“Where it doesn’t cost to sell, it pays!!”
For Consignment & Marketing Information Call:
Dennis Rowland 208-962-3284
Mobile 208-983-7400
Brent Rowland 208-451-4415
Ad Deadline
Auction
Report
Cottonwood Livestock
Auction
August 10, 2012
Market Report
Cattle:
Market Comment: Heavy
feeders 2.00 to 4.00 higher. Light test on Slaughter
Cows. Idaho County Fair
Sale - August 18th. Next
sale - August 24th.
Head Sold: 1205
Steers: 200-400lbs
134.00 to 150.00, 400500lbs 130.00 to 145.00,
500-600lbs 128.00
to 138.00, 600-700lbs
125.00 to 135.00, 700800lbs 121.00 to 132.00
800-950lbs 125.00 to
133.50, 950-up lbs 110.00
to 121.00
Heifers: 200-400lbs
122.00 to 135.00, 400500lbs 122.00 to 135.00,
5 0 0 - 6 0 0 l b s 11 8 . 0 0
to 133.00, 600-700lbs
110.00 to 130.00, 700800lbs 115.00 to 119.50
800-950lbs 105.00 to
119.50, 950-up lbs 100.00
to 111.00
Cows:
Boning: 62.00 to 68.00
Feeder: 65.00 to 75.00
Breaker: 60.00 to 67.00
Canner/Cutter: 53.00 to
61.00
Heiferettes: 89.00 to
110.00
Bulls: 75.00 to 88.00
Baby Calves: 125.00 to
250.00 per head
Stock Cows: 650.00 to
940.00 per head
Pairs: 900.00 to 1150.00
per pair
For Sale
HAY FOR SALE
Grass Hay $100/ton.
Evenings 476-7402. Cell
(days) 208-553-5402.
8/16-30p
WOOD
Red fir for sale. Call 4764470. 7/26-8/16p
ALL CLASSIFIED ADS
must be in by 5:00 PM
MONDAY to be in the current week’s paper.
Disclaimer
Advertising does not
reflect the opinions of
t h i s n e w s p a p e r. T h e
Clearwater Tribune is not
responsible for actions
or transactions resulting
from classified and display
advertisements.
Yard &
Garage Sales
10820 Hwy 12 (Riverside
Lanes) Orofino. 1976 11
ВЅ ft pickup camper by
King, Pioneeer stero system, Fantasia crystal by
Princess House. Lots of
home & garden & new
Partylight goodies. Four
wheels for Izuzu Trooper.
Many craft items & more.
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.
8-16c
Saturday, August 18, 8
a.m. - 4 p.m. 934 Wells
Bench Rd. Drum set, craft
books, bikes, misc. goods.
8/16p
August 18-20, 8 a.m. 4 p.m. Custom cabinet
doors, wood stove, entertainment center, TV,
water skis, dishes, and
much more. 1042 Sunnyside Bench Road, Lenore (1 mile off Cavendish
Grade). 8/16p
APARTMENTS
3 bdrms, 2 1/2 baths, outdoor pets allowed. Country living - $775.00. 208
476-5925. 8/16c
For Sale
Joint School District
No. 171
Vacancy
Announcement
Head Boys Basketball
Coach at Orofino high
School. Direct inquiries
to Doug South, Athletic
Director. Salary: $3735.
Selected applicant will
need to pass a background check and drug
screening. Open until
filled. Applications available at the Administration
Office (208) 476-5593.
EOE/AA
EMPLOYER
VETERAN’S PREFERENCE. 8/9-16c
Work Wanted
DUPLEX
2 bdrm, 1 bath duplex.
Available Sept. 1. $500
deposit, $550/mo, WSG
paid. laundry room. 208553-7095. 8/2(unc)8/23c
HOUSES
Compost. Aged 1 year, no
weeds. You shovel from Big house, LR, fampile. $12/load. Weippe ily room, 3 bdrm, 2 bath.
Shop & outbldgs. Outarea. 435-4870. 8/16p
side pets only. $1100/mo.
$600 deposit. 1370 HarVEHICLES
mony Heights Loop Road
1986 Chevrolet pickup, (formerly Orofino Creek
2 ton, brown & cream. Road). 476-7976 or 208$1,000 or make offer. Can 553-1849. 8/16-23c
be seen at 13624 1st Ave.
West, Riverside. Runs, Available
immediately
body in good shape, good - Cottage on 2+ acres tires, needs work. 541- Riverside. www.lottasites.
667-7280. 8/16c
com/idaho_property.html
WOOD STOVES
The Stove that Jack Built
- High quality, efficient,
durable - this locally
built stove will keep you
warm for generations.
Books, crafts, tools, wom- Wright’s Custom Welden’s clothing (M & L), ing. (208) 476-4014. 1/5
Christmas and fall dГ©cor, - 12/27/12p
kitchen and household
items, furniture. Friday &
Saturday 7 a.m. - 4 p.m.
215 Tamarack. 8/16c
Chad Allbrett
Horseshoeing & Trims
Reasonable rates. All
work guaranteed. (208)
553-6157 or (208) 8168189. 7/19(unc)8/9c
Ranch & Farm
8/2(unc)8/23c
Vehicles For Sale • Vehicles For Sale
USED CARS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Reg.-------- NOW
11 Chrysler 300 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- $26,995 --- $24,995
4-Dr., 3.6 Pentastar V-6, AT, A/C, Full Power, Alloys, Loaded, 27k mi.
10 Dodge Avenger--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- $16,995 --- $15,995
SXT AT, A/C, PW, PDL, Cruise, Tilt, 4-Cyl, 28k mi.
09 Subaru Forester AWD Wagon -------------------------------------------------------------- $18,995 --- $17,995
4-Cyl., 5-Spd., A/C, PW, PDL, TSW, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Sharp! 67k mi.
08 Dodge Charger RT ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- $24,995 --- $22,995
Hemi V-8, AT, A/C, Leather, Sunroof, Navigation, Loaded! 31k mi.
08 Subaru Forester Sport AWD Wagon ------------------------------------------------------ $17,995 --- $16,995
4-Cyl., AT, A/C, PW, PDL, TSW, Cruise, Alloys, Clean, 69k mi.
08 Chrysler Sebring Touring, 4-Dr., V-6 ------------------------------------------------------ $15,995 --- $13,995
AT, A/C, PW, PDL, TSW, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Clean, 48k mi., GREAT MPG!
07 Buick Lacrosse CXL--------------------------------------------------------------------------- $13,995 --- $12,995
4-Dr., V-6, AT, A/C, Full Power, Leather, Alloys, Clean, 68k mi.
07 Dodge Caliber RT AWD, SHARP! --------------------------------------------------------- $15,995 --- $14,995
4-Dr., 4 Cyl., AT, A/C, Leather Heated Seats, Alloys, Loaded, 62k mi.
06 Chrysler 300C, All Wheel Drive ------------------------------------------------------------ $18,995 --- $17,995
Hemi V-8, AT, A/C, Full Power, Leather, Sunroof, Navigation, Loaded! 72k mi.
05 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT, V-6-------------------------------------------------------------- $9,995------ $8,995
AT, Dual A/C, Quad Seats, Full Power, Alloys, Sunroof, One Owner, 90k mi.
Housekeeper
Residential/Commercial
cleaning. Nanny available
week days 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
City limits only. Phone
Vanessa 208-827-2609.
8/16-9/6p
Lost & Found
Found - Large yellow &
blue military themed flag
at Dworshak. Can be
claimed at Clearwater
Tribune office. 8/16
Lost - White ipod touch w/
pink cover between Skull
Creek & Canyon Workcenter on the Northfork.
Pls call 435-4147. 8/16p
Found - Ring at Circle
Beach by Greer. Call to
identify. 827-6368. 8/16
TRAILER
SPACES
Found - A set of Dodge
keys were found 2 weeks
ago at Atkinson DistribTrailer space for rent
$250/mo plus electricity. uting. To claim call 208Cleaning deposit $75. For 476-5425. 8/16-30
more information call 208
476-4531. 7/26-8/16c
For Rent
Trailer space for rent,
108th St., behind bowling alley. $200/mo. water
and sewer included. (208)
476-3666 (home), (208)
476-3168 (office-ask for
Dave). 8/2-8/23c
Visit our online newspa- MANUFACTURED
per at www.clearwatertriHOMES
bune.com
COMPLETE LUXURY 1
Wood - White Fir $100
cord. Red Fir $125. 4764207. 8/16(unc)9/6c
Help Wanted Help Wanted Help Wanted Help Wanted
1 bdrm town apt. in Burns
Bldg. Available Sept. 1.
MISCELLANEOUS $550/mo + deposit (inLarge refrigerator/freezer, cludes utilities). Ref. reDRIVERS
side-by-side doors. $500/ quired. 208 476-4660. DRIVERS-Refrigerated &
O B O . 5 4 1 - 7 2 0 - 0 7 8 6 . 8/9(unc)8/30c
Dry Van Freight. Flexible
8/16c
Home time. Annual Sal1 and 2 bedroom apart- ary: $45K to $60K. Qtr.
Four 20 inch chrome ments starting at $465.00 Bonus. CDL-A, 3 months
spoke wheels - new - only per month. WSG and current OTR exp. 1-800500 miles. $250 per wheel Extended cable included. 414-9569
www.drivekOBO (put custom sheels No pets, no smoking. night.com 8/16p
on truck). 208-791-9239. Call Valley Rentals at
208-476-3509 M-F 8 - 5.
Leave message. 8/16p
8/2(unc)8/23c
BOWFLEX Extreme
Independent care giver,
Home Gym. Used very 1 bdrm apt. $350/mo. seven
years
experilittle, new condition. $600 plus deposit. No smok- ence, looking for clients.
Cash only. 208 476-7860. ing. No pets. 208 476- (208) 435-4011. 8/2-9
3877. 8/16(unc)9/6c
7/26-8/16c
B&R Sales and Service
in Cottonwood - TOYO
Stove specialist, also have
wood, gas, pellet, and
electric stoves and fireplaces. Call Bill at (888)
962-7381. 8/9(unc)8/30c
bed/1 bath with upstairs
loft! $500/mo. 208-4764052. 8/9(unc)8/30c
MOBILE HOME
SPACES
COMMERCIAL
SPACE
Prime retail space on
Johnson Ave. Available
Sept. 1. Approx. 1200 sq.
ft. $1100/mo + deposit
(includes utilities). Ref.
required. 208 476-4660.
8/9(unc)8/30c
Real Estate
For Sale
www.hansongarage.com
(208) 476-5536
HOURS: M-F, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., & Sat., 8 a.m. to Noon or By Appointment
Joint School District
No.171
VACANCIES
Kitchen Server - 2.5
hrs/day at Timberline
Schools. Selected applicant will need to pass
a criminal background
check and a drug screening. Direct inquiries to
Carmen Griffith, Food
Service Director. Salary:
$8.36/hr. Starting date:
August 27, 2012. Open
until filled.
Psychosocial Rehabilitation (PSR) Provider
- 1.5 positions. Numbers
of hours will vary. Direct
inquiries to: Dr. Kerrie
Raines, Special Education Director. Specialist
must have a Bachelor’s
Degree in any field and be
able to meet the USPRA
Requirements for PSR
certifications.Preference
is given to applicants with
experience working with
children and families according to needs defined
in student’s Individualized Education Plan. Salary: $17.00/hour. Open
until filled. Starting date:
August 27, 2012. Applications available at
www.sd171.id.us or the
Administration
Office,
1051 Michigan Avenue,
Orofino. 208-476-5593.
EOE/AA
EMPLOYER
VETERAN’S PREFERENCE 8/16-23c
Potlatch No. 1 Federal
Credit Union is hiring a
part-time or full-time Teller position in our Orofino
Branch. This position requires direct contact with
our members in assisting
them in completion of
their financial transactions. The successful
candidate will have excellent communication skills,
will be team oriented,
have cash handling skills
and must enjoy working
with people. Windows
and ten-key experience a
plus. Our financial institution offers an exciting, rewarding environment and
competitive salary. If you
are qualified and interested in this opportunity,
please send a cover letter
and resume to: P1FCU
Attn: Human Resources
PO Box 897 Lewiston, ID
83501 EOE, Drug Free
Workplace. 8-9,16c
Call 476-4571
to subscribe to
the Clearwater
Tribune.
Lewis-Clark Early
Childhood Program
Join our great team! We
are currently hiring for
the following positions:
Family and Child Services Manager (Multiple
Counties with office
in Kamiah) - Supervise
and direct services to
enrolled preschool children and their families.
This position is responsible for managing three
rural Head Start Centers
in outlying counties. The
FCS Manager will ensure
that the local communities’ and each center�s
needs and program requirements are met. A
BA/BS in ECE or a related
degree with 30 qtr. credits
in ECE required. Head
Start Teacher (Orofino)
– Actively leads a classroom of preschool aged
children. An AA or BA/BS
degree in ECE or related
field with 30 qtr. credits in
ECE required.
Direct Service Aide/
Custodian
(Kamiah)
– Assists the teacher
and family advocate in
Head Start preschool
classrooms. A minimum
of a CDA credential or an
ECE technical certificate
required. These duties
are 16hrs/wk. In addition
to this there is 4hrs/wk
of duties as a custodian.
Temporary Direct Service Aides/Classroom
Aides (Kamiah, Orofino, Weippe) - Performs
general services in the
classroom and kitchen
as well as clerical and
custodial work. This is a
temporary, part-time position with varying work
days and hours. Cook
(Kamiah) - Responsible
for preparation, service,
and purchase of food and
supplies for the center
- requires knowledge of
food service and quantity
food preparation. 23hrs/
wk For complete details
visit the “Employment”
section of our website
http://www.lcearlychildhood.org, contact us at
[email protected] or call Joe
at 208-743-6573. Use our
employment application
to apply. Resumes will
NOT be accepted in place
of applications. This institution is an equal opportunity provider. 8/9-23c
We are currently accepting applications for the
following:
Clearwater
Casino (Lewiston, ID):
Line Cook I [CRC-12018] (Part-time) - This
position closes: Open
Until Filled. Re-advertisement. Line Cook II
[CRC-12-019] (Part-time)
- This position closes:
Open Until Filled. Readvertisement.
Line
Cook III [CRC-12-012]
(Part-time) - This position closes: Open Until
Filled.
Re-advertisement. Valet Attendant
[gaming] [CRC-12-021]
(Part-time) - This position closes: Open Until
Filled. RE-ADVERTISEMENT.
Host/Hostess
[gaming] [CRC-12-024]
(Part-time) - This position closes: Open Until
Filled.
Re-advertisement.
Housekeepers
[HTL-12-025] (Part-time
& On-call) - This position closes: Open Until
Filled.
Re-advertisement.
Dishwashers
[CRC-12-032] (Part-time)
- This position closes:
Open Until Filled. Re-advertisement. Wait Staff
[CRC-12-048] (Part-time)
- This position closes:
Open Until Filled. Readvertisement.
Nez
Perce Express (Lewiston, ID): Maintenance
Worker
[NPX-12-015]
(Part-time & On-call) This position closes:
Open Until Filled. Readvertisement. Itse Ye
Ye Casino (Kamiah,
ID): Short Order Cook
[IYY-12-026](Part-time)
- This position closes:
Open Until Filled. Readvertisement.
Drop
Crew Worker [gaming]
[IYY-12-027]
(On-call)
- This position closes:
08/21/2012. Re-advertisement. Food Service
Clerk [gaming] [IYY-12030] (On-call) - This position closes: Open Until Filled. Re-advertisement. Janitors [IYY-12033] (Part-time & On-call)
- This position closes:
08/21/12. Re-advertisement. For qualification
requirements you may
I am no longer respon- e-mail us at [email protected] for any debts other sino.com Applications are
than my own as of 7/2/12. available on-line at www.
Mike Criss 7/26-8/16p
crcasino.com. 8/16c
Personals
Real Estate For Sale
VIEW LOT
Wixson Heights, 2/3 acre,
city water & sewer, paved
entrance. 208 476-3317.
Mobile home spaces for 8-16(unc)9/6c
rent. (208) 476-4007.
8/9(unc)8/30c
TRY A CLASSIFIED!
Real Estate For Sale
STARTER OR
RETIREMENT HOME
The Real Estaters are a member of the Clearwater
Association of Realtors and its Multiple Listing Service
#101236 – Eight 5+/- acre parcels in the Freeman Creek Bench area. Some with
building pads, lake views. Prices range from $79,000 to $100,000.
#101283 – 20+/- acre parcel with trees, native grasses, views of Dworshak Reservoir
and the surrounding mountains. $68,000
#101358 – 5+/- acres with room for home & shop. Approximately 1/2 meadow
and 1/2 timbered. Partly fenced for livestock. $40,000
#101463 – Well maintained 2 bdrm., 1 bath home with carport built for 2, 2 storage
sheds and lean-to. Views of mountains above Orofino. $87,000
")"--+3*+%)"-+#+))"- "
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USED TRUCKS & SUVs
11 Dodge Durango Crew 4x4, Remote Start, Backup Camera ------------------------- $30,995 --- $29,995
4-Dr., 4x4, 3.6 Pentastar V-6, AT, A/C, Dual A/C, Full Power, Alloys, 26k mi.
11 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo -------------------------------------------------------------- $29,995 --- $27,995
4-Dr., 4x4, 3.6 Pentastar V-6, AT, A/C, Full Power, Alloys, Loaded! 13k mi.
11 Jeep Libery Sport 4x4, 4-Dr. ---------------------------------------------------------------- $21,995 --- $20,995
V-6, AT, A/C, PW, PDL, TSW, Cruise, Alloys, 21k., Warranty
09 Dodge Ram 1500 Crew Cab TRX4 4x4, Hemi V-8, Alpine Audio ----------------- $29,995 --- $28,995
AT, A/C, Full Power, Trailer Tow, Remote Start, Loaded! 45k mi.
08 Dodge Nitro RT 4x4 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- $20,995 --- $19,995
4.0 V-6, AT, A/C, Leather, Trlr. Tow, 20” Alloys, Sunroof, Loaded! 49k mi.
08 Chrysler Aspen Limited 4-Dr. 4x4---------------------------------------------------------- $21,995 --- $19,995
Hemi V-8, AT, Dual A/C, Leather, Loaded, Sunroof, 74k mi.
07 Ford F350 Lariat Crew Cab 4x4, Diesel ----------------------------------------------- SALE! ----- SALE!
AT, A/C, Leather, Full Power, Bedliner, Trailer Tow, One Owner, 102k mi.- $28,995 --- $21,995
07 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab 4x4 ---------------------------------------------------------- $17,995 --- $16,995
V-8, 6-Spd., A/C, TSW, Cruise, Alloys, CD, Trlr. Tow, Clean! 66k mi.
06 Dodge Dakota SLT Club Cab 4x4 ---------------------------------------------------------$15,995 --- $14,995
V-8, AT, A/C, PW, PDL, TSW, Cruise, Alloys, Trlr. Tow, Spotless! 80k mi.
06 Dodge Durango LTD 4x4, Hemi V-8, Rear DVD --------------------------------------- $14,995 --- $13,995
AT, Dual A/C, Full Power, Heated Leather Seats, Alloys, Trlr. Tow, 93k mi.
05 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab SLT 4x4---------------------------------------------------- $14,995 --- $13,995
Hemi V-8, AT, A/C, Full Power, Trailer Tow, Canopy, Winch, 107k mi.
04 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab SLT 4x4---------------------------------------------------- $13,995 --- $12,995
V-8, AT, PW, PDL, Cruise, Tilt, A/C, 99k mi.
04 Chevrolet Colorado Ext. Cab 4x4 ---------------------------------------------------------- $10,995 --- $8,995
AT, A/C, PW, PDL, TSW, Cruise, Alloys, Clean, 154k mi.
03 Dodge Dakota SLT Extended Cab 4x4 --------------------------------------------------- $10,995 --- $9995
V-8, AT, A/C, PW, PDL, Cruise, Tilt, 92k mi. Clean!
00 Dodge Dakota Sport Club Cab 4x4 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- $2,995
V-8, 5-Spd., A/C, TSW, Cruise, Trailer Tow, Lots of miles, but clean and cheap!
96 Chevrolet Tahoe 2-Dr. 4x4 ------------------------------------------------------------------- $4,995 ----- $3,995
5.7 V-8, AT, A/C, PW, PDL, TSW, Cruise, CD, Alloys, Extra Clean, 190k mi.
Your classified ad is on the internet at:
www.clearwatertribune.com
1995 28x60 doublewide, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, den, dining, two porches, central heat and
air. Delivered and basic block set up to 50 miles
included. Well maintained, a beauty. $49,900.
Call
Clearwater Homes
208.476.5566
Equal Housing
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Timber Wanted
•
Timber Wanted
AUGUST 16, 2012 – Orofino, ID – Clearwater Tribune—9B
School Board Mtg. Agenda
JOINT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 171
SCHOOL BOARD
MEETING AGENDA
August 20, 2012
Orofino High School
6:30 p.m. Executive Session
7:00 p.m. Regular Meeting
A. Roll Call
B. Call to Order
1. Flag Salute
2. Approval of Agenda
C. Executive Session (Personnel Hearing)
D. Consent Agenda
1. Approval of Minutes
2. Payment of Bills
3. Surplus
a. Text Books at OHS (large number of single books)
b. Mixers/food service (2)
c. Window air conditioners (10 from portables at OES)
d. Scanner copier #4619 (transportation)
e. Monitor #7352 (transportation)
4. Resignations
5. New Hires (contingent upon drug test and
background check)
a. Doug South, Vice-Principal/Activities Director,
Orofino High School
b. Darline Russell .05 FTE Custodian, Timberline
c. Pat Christopherson, Asst. Football Coach, Timberline
E. Report and Recognitions
1. Recognitions
a. ASE Banners - donated $174.15 worth of banners for
the "Our Kids Are Worth Whatever It Takes" campaign
b. Riverview Construction has donated several hundred
dollars worth of construction work for placement of
the classroom portable at Timberline
2. Enrollment
3. Building Reports
4. Program Reports
5. Superintendent Report
a. Pay for Performance Plan 2012-13
F. Public Comment
G. Old Business
1. Biomass Heating Facility Mike Hoffman
H. Discussion
I. Action Items
1. Policy Review - Second Reading
a. Policy 2220 Relating to Pre-Kindergarten Programs
b. Policy 2440 Relating to Online Courses
c. Policy 2620P Relating to Grading and Progress
Reports
d. Policy 2700P Relating to High School Graduation
Requirements (online classes) (note GPA for
honor roll has been changed to "3.0")
e. Policy 3020P Relating to Average Daily Attendance
(Fractional ADA)
f. Policy 3505 Relating to Concussion Guidelines
g. Policy 5435 Relating to Graduate Credit
Reimbursement (note addition of preferences for
reimbursements - "staff development opportunities
provided by the district, or multiple endorsement)
2. Bus Routes
J. Board Member Comments
K. Adjournment
Ira Tankovich, James Breedlove, and Mathew Faulkner snuggle with Clearwater Humane Society puppies.
Foster mom Cynthia Hedden attempts to coax Honey up the
Clearwater Humane Society’s newly built stairs. Honey was
the first dog to use the stairs, which she now goes up and
down with ease and confidence.
Community service at its best
Shown near the stairs they built are (l to r) James Breedlove,
Ira Tankovich, Juan Guzman, Mathew Faulkner, and Clay
Nulph.
“Brushers” Bobby Adams and Richard
Hensley helped clean up foilage for the
Jace Thompson, Martin Schorzman, and Christopher Yardley
Clearwater Humane Society.
did some weedeating for the Clearwater Humane Society.
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Top row (l to r): for adoption, Babe, Honey, Gizmo; dog missing from Carney Drive. Middle row: lost German Shorthair;
American Staffordshore/Aussie cross puppies for adoption;
lost cat, Tuxedo. Bottom row: for adoption Baxter; Bailie;
stray female and male pit bulls. Call 476-9823 for more information on any of these animals.
v
“Compassionate Care & F r i e n d l y S e r vice”
From standard treatment to surgery, we provide
expert pet care at affordable rates.
SPECIAL SERVICE :
Want to order your pet’s meds on-line?
To learn how, call or visit our site.
807 Michigan Avenue
208-476-5995 orofinoanimalclinic.com
Recently we had much needed help from our local prison.
We have to teach almost all
of the dogs we get to walk on
leash, and learn basic commands. We also have to build
confidence by teaching our
dogs to navigate stairs. For
most of the dogs it is at first
a terrifying experience. The inmates built a set of stairs that
are terrific!
This enables us to teach our
dogs to go up and down stairs
with confidence. Every home
we adopt to has stairs. During
winter when conditions are
icy we will be able to continue
to teach stair climbing without the perils of slipping and
sliding for the trainer and the
dog.
Under supervising correctional officer Chris Schultz
these stairs were built by
Mr. James Breedlove, Mr. Ira
Tankovich, Mr. Juan Guzman, Mr. Matthew Faulkner,
and Mr. Clay Nulph. These
men were enthusiastic and
very professional. These stairs
will serve to build confidence
for hundreds of our dogs for
many years to come.
We train our dogs to walk on
leash in a variety of settings.
Recently we had three dogs get
foxtails in their toes. Each extraction of these foxtails cost
$161.00! That is more than
our adoption fee and does not
include wormings, vaccinations, spay/neuter and microchip.
Because, again under the
supervision of Mr. Chris
Schultz, Mr. Bobby Adams,
Mr. Richard Hensley, Mr.
Jace Thompson, Mr. Martin
Schorzman and Mr. Christopher Yardley weed eated areas
for us to walk our dogs, we
will not have to worry about
foxtails and weeds hurting the
dogs. We will now be able to
walk through areas with trees
to weave in and out of. This
builds skill and confidence in
various leash training maneuvers.
These men also filled the
bottom of our kennels with
gravel. This helps to give our
dogs a clean and safe area.
We cannot thank each of
you enough for your hard
work, politeness and enthusiasm.
We need large stainless
steel bowls for water. We
also need treats for training.
Small milk bones and other
tasty treats are great.
We are almost out of blankets. Please donate your clean
used ones. We cannot use
sleeping bags or comforters.
Dogs will chew the zippers and
stuffing from sleeping bags
and comforters. Blankets and
bedspreads are great!
We really need canned and
dry cat/kitten food and litter
right now. We also need small
ceramic bowls for the kitten
and cat food. We also need
covered litter pans.
We need towels to bathe our
dogs and cats. Please don’t
throw your old towels away—
we will put them to good use.
***We need nylabones and
tug toys for the dogs/puppies
and toys for our cats/kittens
right now.***
You can drop all donations
of food, toys, blankets, etc. at
Orofino Builders Supply. Steve
and Leila Crockett continue
to be animal lovers and great
supporters.
Adoptions by
appointment only.
Call 476-9823.
Gizmo – Three year old Wirehaired Terrier – very sweet and
affectionate.
Babe – Three year old
Golden Retriever – Her owner
passed away and she need a
forever home. Baby loves to do
the “Happy Dance”.
Honey – 1 ½ year old Rottie
X. Very playful and well mannered. Honey loves kisses!
Three eight-week-old American Staffordshire/ Aussie
cross puppies. Adorable and
affectionate. Males only. Pictured.
Baxter and Bailie are fiveyear-old brother and sister
hounds, male and female
hounds (respectively). They
are very gentle and eager to
please. Pictured.
For any information on any
of our animals, call 476-9823.
Please leave your name, telephone number, and the reason you are calling. Please
speak clearly and slowly.
Our policy on strays
All stray dogs and cats are
vaccinated upon arrival for
their safety and the safety of
the other dogs and cats. They
are also neutered and spayed
on the sixth (6) day. All costs
are the responsibility of the
owner claiming the dog or cat.
Strays are held for five (5) days
and then are for adoption.
Lost and found
Found - Tan dog with white
paws, male, not neutered,
wearing a wide, faded red
collar seen running between
Bartlett Street (by IGA) up
past Konkolville/Grangemont
area. He is very friendly. If you
know who owns this dog or the
owner is please call 476-9823.
Pictured.
Picked up on Main St.- Female dog, tan with white on
chest, nose and going up
forehead. She was wearing a
red collar, had no pet ID and
is very friendly. Again, if you
know who owns this dog please
call 476-9823. Pictured.
Lost – July 27 from Carney
Drive off Michigan. Six month
old intact male wearing a black
collar. He has blue eyes. He
has a brown circle around his
left eye, white on muzzle and
forehead, tan ears, tan and
black striping on his back and
legs. Lower half of sides and
stomach are white. Pictured.
Please call if you lost this dog
or know who he belongs to.
Lost on Friday, July 27 on
Hwy 12 at the Lochsa River,
MM 45, German Shorthair
(brown with white speckling),
wearing orange collar with pet
ID. Please call if you have seen
this dog. The owner is devastated and offering a reward.
Pictured.
All stray dogs and cats are
vaccinated and wormed upon
arrival for their safety and the
safety of the other dogs and
cats. They are also neutered
and spayed after a five (5) day
waiting period and then put
up for adoption. All costs are
the responsibility of the owner
claiming the dog or cat.
10B—Clearwater Tribune – Orofino, ID – AUGUST 16, 2012
Gaby Waldman-Fried and Zoey Memmert-Miller, both age 20, set off across
American on their bicycles to find their independence.
Tammy Carey-Pippenger in action at Las Vegas.
Two girls, in
search of America
By Alannah Allbrett
SUMMER SPECIAL
COUPON
At Family Eye Care, Orofino
$
50 OFF
00
Any complete pair of prescription eyeglasses
(May be used for $25.00 off
individual frame or pair of lenses.)
Coupon must be presented at the time of purchase.
Not valid with other coupons, previous purchases or
most insurance programs.
COUPON
LIMIT ONE COUPON PER PERSON
EXPIRES 8/16/12
EYE OPENERS
Rick G. Lundgren, O.D.
FAMILY EYE CARE
iritis (part i)
Iritis is the inflammation of
the iris, the colored portion of
the eye. Iritis, which is often
the result of a disease in another part of the body, can be
a recurring condition. A fairly
common eye problem, iritis usually responds well to treatment.
However, the condition may
become sight threatening when
left untreated.
The iris is a circular muscle
near the front of the eye. Besides
giving color to the eye, the iris
controls the amount of light
which enters the eye through the
pupil. The iris is located behind
the cornea (the clear protective
layer of the eye) and just in front
of the focusing lens.
To see clearly, the proper
amount of light must enter the
eye. Just as the shutter controls
the amount of light which enters
a camera, the iris regulates
the amount of light which enters the eye. The iris contains
two muscles which control the
size of the pupil opening. When
too much light is present, the
muscles cause the pupil to become smaller, reducing excessive
light and glare. In dim light or at
night, the muscles make the pupil larger to increase the amount
of the light entering the eye.
476-5365, 476-4814
180 Michigan Avenue
Orofino, ID 83544
Tammy CareyPippenger takes
first place in Vegas
Tammy
Carey-Pippenger took first place
in Las Vegas, NV, on
Aug. 1-4 at the Cowboy
Mounted Shooting Association (CMSA) Western
Nationals in her Lady’s 1
Division.
Tammy also finished
57th overall out of 190
men and women riders.
This was Tammy’s second win; the weekend before she took first place
in Cashmere, WA.
With the two wins Tammy is now first place in
the nation in her Lady’s 1
Division. In October she
will be in Amarillo, TX,
for the world finals.
Thornton
family reunion
at the Cook’s in
Judgetown
Jim and Barbara Cook
hosted a family gathering in Judgetown over the
weekend. Present were
their children, Ron and
Stacey Cook and Paige of
Post Falls; Mike with son
Wyatt of Kendrick, and
daughter Mia with her son
Teagan of Lewiston; Vicci
and son Bradley of Lewiston; and brother Ray and
Lea Thornton of Greer,
his son Jim Thornton and
daughter of Orofino; sister Beverly and daughter
Terry of Lewiston; brothers
Ray Thornton of Colbert,
WA, Richard and Dena
Thornton of Spokane, WA,
and Randy Thornton of
Clarkston, WA.
If it were a �breezy day,’
one could say two young
women breezed through
town on their bikes enroute
to Lewiston. But it was
anything but a breezy day;
the weather reported it
as, “a sweltering summer
day, with a high of 100 or
more.” Zoey
MemmertMiller and Gaby WaldmanFried started out their
Wednesday morning at
Lolo Pass, MT. They biked
down Hwy. 12 and stopped
in Orofino because they
saw a health food store at
Dr. Dennis Harper’s business.
The girls agreed to meet
with me for a brief talk
about what they were doing. I could have asked
them questions well into
the evening; their story
was that fascinating as it
unfolded, but they planned
to make Lewiston before
nightfall.
Zoey and Gaby are two
single women who grew
up in New York City, one
raised in Manhattan and
the other in the Bronx.
Both are college students
who decided they wanted
a) an adventure, b) to see
more of America, and c) to
promote the wonders of bicycle travel as alternative
transportation. And what
an adventure it’s been.
Starting out on June 4th,
with the support of their
concerned parents, these
two young women set out
as “first time travelers”
with about 100 lbs. of gear
on each of their bikes.
Their chosen route took
them from New York,
through New Jersey, northern Pennsylvania, across
northern Ohio, and up
through Michigan’s “mitten” area to its upper peninsula. From Michigan they
rode to northern Wisconsin, south to Minneapolis,
Minnesota, through South
Dakota to a place they’ve
always wanted to see – Yellowstone National Park in
Wyoming.
Zoey and Gaby camped
out or stayed with people
all along the way. Entering
Yellowstone, they camped
out at Madison Campground, biked another 50
miles the next day and
camped at Bridge Bay.
They were impressed! “It
was very cool; we saw geysers and buffalo!”
When they began their
journey, the girls said they
had three mountain ranges to cross and were only
making about 50 miles
per day. As their strength
and fitness increased, they
were averaging about 65
miles a day in the west.
As we Idahoans know, the
mountains in the west are
nothing to sneeze at. They
had to bike over Badger
Pass (6,755 ft. elevation),
the mountains above Big
Hole, and Chief Joseph
pass (7,264 ft. elevation)
before even reaching Lolo
Pass.
They’ve tubed in the
Clark Fork River in Montana and swam in Idaho’s
Lochsa; Idaho is the eleventh of thirteen states
they will see on their U.S.
journey. At the time of this
writing, they had the goal
of going on to the Pacific
states of Washington and
Oregon.
Zoey and Gaby assured
me they left no brokenhearted men behind in
New York. It would take
quite a guy to keep up with
one of these young women
who has demonstrated her
intrepidation,
fortitude,
and good-natured optimism in undertaking bicycling across the United
States. Singing songs by
Joni Mitchell, Cat Stevens,
Simon
and
Garfunkel,
Crosby Stills and Nash,
and the Fleet Foxes “....I’ve
gone to look for America...”
the girls have cycled, meeting interesting people all
along the way. They have
packed their own gear, and
most times, done their own
bike maintenance.
When asked if grease
from the road caused her
grimy hands, Gaby shook
her head “No.” She had just
replaced the bicycle chain
on her bike. They’ve had
numerous flat inner-tubes
to fix, broken spokes, and
minor mishaps. They said
even their tires are starting
to wear out.
The girls said they’ve seen
a lot of beautiful places and
met fun people. “People all
over the country have been
wonderful,” they shared.
They’ve taken pictures of
“beautiful landscapes, people, funny things, and each
other.” When asked if they
would recommend this trip
to others they responded
instantly, and simultaneously, “DO IT!”
To be inspired by more of
their adventures visit their
blog at: livesimplybikeoften.blogspot.com. They
freely admit that, though
they went to look for their
independence, they have
been dependent upon many
others along the way – not
necessarily a bad thing.
Growing up...........................................
(Continued from 5B)
one boat and asked if we
could buy salmon. The
man said it was illegal to
sell them to us. Dad had a
silver dollar, which were not
common here. He showed
it to the man - the man
picked up a nice Chinook,
put it in our boat and Dad
flipped him the dollar.
Great rafts went by
heading for a sawmill.
Sometimes one got loose
and we would get it for
firewood. Warships of all
kinds came to stand off
the lighthouse at the point
so they could set their
compasses before going out
to fight the Japs. PBY’s, a
large slow moving aircraft
that could set down on
the water, were constantly
patrolling looking for Jap
subs.
Mother and I spent
many hours in the aircraft
spotting shack reporting
planes that were in the
area. We would try to
identify the type of plane,
estimate how high it was
and its direction.
Then we cranked up the
old fashioned phone on the
wall and called to a center
in Seattle where a map of
the area was covered with
models of planes and the
WAFs would use a stick
to move them keeping
track of the air traffic.
One day I heard a great
roar and thought we were
being invaded. I looked
all over the sky and could
see nothing. Then I looked
down and there were four
PT boats roaring across the
water.
Whidby
Island
was
across from us. There they
trained navy fighter pilots.
At Everett the army had a
base. Sometimes Fred and
I would go to the point and
sit and watch them have
mock battles.
The winter was terrible.
Zero degrees and wind
howling. We were snowed
in for a week or 10 days and
missed school again. The
wind was coming through
our front door and right up
the fireplace chimney.
Our neighbor came over
and told me he had a sheet
of plywood and a canvas
and if I would help him we
could put it over the door.
When I stepped out the
back door he had stepped
into the wind whistling
between our houses and
was flying down the drive.
When I caught up with him
I asked why he didn’t let go
of the plywood. He said was
afraid it would beat him to
death.
In the spring of �43 we
moved into Bremerton in
a federal housing project.
Now we had access to
shopping and city buses to
get us around. Ferries ran
to Seattle and sometimes
Mother took Fred and
I while she did some
shopping there. Our unit
was just above a deep,
narrow draw with a creek
running through it. Two
great Douglas Firs had
fallen across the draw and
made a nice bridge for Fred
and I to get to the other
side.
I had missed much school
by now and Bremerton High
was so crowded that juniors
and seniors attended in
the morning and freshmen
and sophomores in the
afternoon.
They
stuck
you wherever they had an
empty desk and I was in
several classes that I knew
nothing about. I convinced
Mom and Dad that it would
be best for me to quit and
go back in the fall, so I
really hadn’t lost anything
because I had skipped the
fifth grade.
***
When choosing flowers for your home, interior
designer Kelli Ellis, who frequently appears on
HGTV, says consider the room’s style. For a traditional style, bring in an arrangement of flowers with full blooms, such as roses or carnations.
In a room with a more playful look, try gerbera
daisies or tulips. Ellis also recommends placing
the flowers in areas that need softening or could
use a burst of color.
Adding flowers enhances celebrations, says
lifestyle party expert Jeanne Benedict, who recommends looking for unexpected ways to decorate the event with flowers,
***
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