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SC reworking administration of remedial courses - The Sheridan Press

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A1 Front 1013 #123.qxp_A Section Template 10/13/14 11:07 AM Page 1
MONDAY
October 13, 2014
129th Year, No. 123
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
Press
THE SHERIDAN
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
MORE PHOTOS FROM WEEKEND EVENTS,
SPORTS IN ONLINE GALLERIES
SC teams fare well
in first competition
of the season . B1
Sheridan area unit d in pink
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Racers take off from the starting line during “The Link-Partners in Pink Run/Walk” Saturday at Whitney Commons. Funds raised by the event benefit Sheridan Memorial Hospital cancer diagnostics projects.
Candidate forums set for
Tuesday, Wednesday
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — The general election Nov. 4 is just over
three weeks away, and the Sheridan County Chamber of
Commerce Governmental Affairs Committee will again
host a candidate forum to enable members of the public to
connect with candidates for local, state and national office.
“The candidates we choose are our representatives who
have our voice and make decisions in our best interest,”
Sheridan County Chamber of Commerce CEO Dixie
Johnson said. “To connect the public with those candidates
is such an important thing we can do as a chamber and as
a governmental affairs committee.”
Not only do forums allow community members to get to
know the candidates asking for their vote, they also allow
candidates to get a pulse on the concerns and priorities of
their potential constituents, Johnson said.
Johnson said chambers of commerce are one of the primary organizations that host candidate forums around the
state. Forums gather a large amount of candidates in one
place and allow the public to hear first-hand responses to
questions submitted by voters.
It takes a lot of work to coordinate candidate forums,
Johnson said. The committee gathers information from the
county elections office once ballots are final, determines
who has publicly announced write-in campaigns, finalizes
dates, secures a location and contacts candidates.
“We know that to have a successful candidate forum
requires participation. We really appreciate the candidates
taking the time,” Johnson said.
In the weeks leading up to the forum, members of the
public can submit questions they would like to ask candidates for specific seats.
SC reworking administration of remedial courses
School taking a closer
look at students’
educational history, needs
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — With one-third of
all first year students at Sheridan
College beginning their journey to a
degree with remedial math or
English courses, the school has
been working to ensure those starting out a little behind don’t stay
that way for long.
After piloting changes to both the
placement in and the structure of
developmental education courses
last year at the college, some new
initiatives were implemented this
fall that college officials hope will
eliminate exit points from students’
pathways to completion.
Developmental education is an
inherent aspect to community colleges.
The courses — often referred to as
remedial courses — were actually
started to serve adult populations
returning to school out of the workforce or the military, according to
Vice President of Academic Affairs
Richard Hall.
“As they had been out of the academic setting for a while, these
were courses on the skills they had
not used in a long time to brush up
in an academic setting,” he said. “It
slowly crept in to more students
needing remedial education, for
whatever reason.”
Now community colleges serve a
melting pot of populations for reasons varying from returning to
school to wanting cheaper tuition,
smaller class sizes, closer locations
to home, and yes, Hall says, even
some students who are just not
ready to go to a university.
SEE REMEDIAL, PAGE 6
Biketoberfest riders hit
the trails
Racers take off from the starting line in the 25K race during
Biketoberfest Saturday to benefit the Sheridan Community
Land Trust.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SEE FORUMS, PAGE 2
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The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Donna Bell
of Sheridan
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
3 SPORTS
4 COMICS
5 CLASSIFIEDS
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B4
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THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
Wyoming Lottery meeting sales expectations
CHEYENNE (AP) — Seven weeks after
joining the nationwide lottery frenzy, the
Wyoming Lottery is meeting sales expectations and preparing to add two more games
within the next 10 months, state lottery
CEO Jon Clontz said.
Clontz said he projected the lottery,
which started on Aug. 24, would generate
$13 million to $17 million in ticket sales
during the first year.
“We’re on pace to hit somewhere right in
the middle,” he said in an interview with
The Associated Press.
The Wyoming Lottery consists only of
two games now: Powerball and Mega
Millions. Both are national draw games
with jackpots reaching into the hundreds
of millions of dollars.
In the first month, the Wyoming Lottery
recorded $1.8 million in ticket sales. Clontz
said he was expecting about $1.26 million.
While sales have exceeded expectations,
Clontz cautioned that a new lottery can be
like an airplane that takes off at a steep
incline but eventually levels out at a cruising altitude.
“So we kind of have to see how the
trends go and where that cruising altitude
is for us, and that’s going to take longer
than a month,” he said. “But at this point
you can start to see some stabilization, but
that stabilization is still keeping pace with
the projections.”
Clontz said the lottery paid out about
$200,000 in winnings in the first month.
Wyoming gives winners the option to
remain anonymous.
Under state law, the first $6 million in lottery revenue after prizes and expenses goes
to local governments. Anything over $6
million goes to schools.
However, the board that oversees the lottery has decided that $3 million in loans
used to start the operation be paid off first
before any money is handed over to cities
and counties.
“I know we’re going to have cities and
towns wondering where their money is at,
and it will come, but it has to be after the
loan is paid back in full,” Clontz said.
The first loan repayment was to be made
this month, and he expected the entire
amount would be repaid in about a year, he
said.
Meantime, Clontz and his staff are working on bringing two new games to the
state.
“These two games will both be draw
games, but they will be Wyoming games. In
other words not multistate games,” he
said.
The in-state games will offer better odds
for winning because players are competing
against those who bought tickets sold only
in Wyoming and not nationwide.
Clontz said one game that is scheduled to
be available sometime next spring will be a
simple draw game similar to Powerball
and Mega Millions.
No decision has been made on the other
game, which he hopes will be ready to
launch around July. There will be no
scratch games because Wyoming law prohibits those types of games.
FORUM: Set for 7 p.m. each night at SC
FROM 1
Those questions are reviewed by the
Governmental Affairs Committee and
added to the list of questions for the forum.
At the forum, candidates are given a set
amount of time for an introduction, and
then a moderator asks three to six questions, depending on time constraints, of
each candidate in a contested race. There is
a time limit for responses, and all candidates receive the same questions to allow
for comparison by voters.
The candidate forum for the Nov. 4 general election will be hosted by the
Governmental Affairs Committee of the
Tuesday, Oct. 14, 7 p.m.
City, County, Town,
School Board and
Conservation District
positions
Dayton Town Councilmember
(elect 2)
* Eric O. Lofgren
Clifford Reed
Craig Reichert
* Jeremy W. Smith
Dayton Mayor (elect 1)
* Robert (Bob) Alley
* Norm Anderson
Ranchester Councilmember
(2-year unexpired term) (elect
1)
* Gayle Ogle
* Jesse J. Hinkhouse
Uncontested Ranchester candidate:
Ranchester Mayor
* Peter B. Clark
SCSD #1 Trustee (Big Horn /
Tongue River) (elect 2)
* Carol Garber
* Penny A. Mentock-Barkan
* Mary Schilling
SCSD #2 Trustee (Sheridan /
Story) (elect 4)
Marva D. Craft – statement
being read
* Ami N. Erickson
Also at the forum, audience members can
write questions down on index cards that
are gathered by members of the Jaycees
who volunteer to collect and deliver the onthe-spot questions.
“This is just a great way to help connect
the public with the candidates,” Johnson
said. “Furthermore, they’re the ones we the
people are electing, and they want information from us, too. We need to know their
positions so we are able to make an
informed vote before we go to the polls Nov.
4. This provides a platform for that to happen.”
Sheridan County Chamber of Commerce at
7 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at
Sheridan College’s Whitney Presentation
* Jeff Jones
Erica O’Dell
* Ann M. Perkins
* Susan Wilson
Uncontested School Board
Candidates:
SCSD #3 (Arvada / Clearmont)
(elect 2)
Barbara Carlock
Kris Malli
NWCCD Trustee
(Sheridan/Gillette College)
(elect 3)
* Rolf Thor Distad
* Norleen Healy
* Jerry Iekel
* Bob Leibrich
* Mike Watkins
Sheridan County Conservation
District – At Large
(elect 1)
* Robert Brug
* Susan Holmes
Uncontested Conservation
District Candidates:
* Urban member - Edith
Heyward
Rural member - Orrin Connell
Sheridan County
Commissioner (elect 3) * Terry Cram
* Bob Rolston
* Steve Maier
Hall. Candidates who will be at the forum
have an asterisk next to their name. This
schedule is subject to change.
Sheridan City Councilmember
(2-year unexpired term) (elect
1)
* Robert Lloyd Webster
* Thayer Shafer
Sheridan City Councilmember
(4-year term) (elect 3)
* Kelly Gooch
* Alex Lee
* Jesus Rios
* Darryl Szymanski
Wednesday, Oct. 15,
7 p.m.
U.S. and state positions
State Representative – District
29
* R John W. Patton
* R Darryl Szymanski (write-in
candidate)
State Representative – District
30
* I Val Burgess (write-in candidate)
* R Mark Jennings
Uncontested State Legislature
Candidates:
State Senator – District 21 –
Bruce Burns
* State Representative –
District 51 – Rosie Berger
State Representative – District
40 – Mike Madden
Wyoming Superintendent of
Public Instruction
* R Jillian Balow
* D Mike Ceballos
Wyoming Secretary of State
L Kit Carson – statement
being read
R Ed Murray - statement
being read
C Jennifer Young – statement
being read
U.S. Senator
R Mike Enzi – statement
being read
* I Curt Gottshall
* D Charlie Hardy
L Joseph S. Porambo
U.S. Representative
L Richard Brubaker
C Daniel Clyde Cummings
D Richard Grayson
R Cynthia Lummis – statement being read
Wyoming Governor
* L Dee Cozzens
* D Peter Gosar
R Matt Mead – statement
being read
* I Don Wills
Uncontested Statewide
Candidates:
State Auditor – Cynthia Cloud
– statement read
State Treasurer – Mark Gordon
– statement read
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PEOPLE
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
Sheridan County libraries celebrating 50th anniversary
of �Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan County library system is
celebrating the 50th anniversary of Roald Dahl’s “Charlie
and the Chocolate Factory” throughout the month of
October.
There will be golden tickets hidden in library books.
Those who find the tickets will receive a free Wonka
chocolate bar. The library will also celebrate with Wonka
Wednesdays and Fizzy Lifting Fridays.
On Wednesday, the library is having a free movie night
at 6:30 p.m. with popcorn.
On Oct. 22, the library will host a book discussion in
the Inner Circle at 6:30 p.m. Children’s librarian Michelle
Havenga will discuss “Charlie and the Chocolate
Factory” and its impact on generations of children.
A second movie night with popcorn is scheduled for
Oct. 29 at 6:30 p.m.
The Story, Tongue River and Clearmont branches will
also participate in Wonka-related events throughout the
month.
For more information call Christina Schmidt at 6748585, ext. 29.
SC in Johnson County to host music courses
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan College
will hold three community music
courses this fall taught by local musician Lynn Young.
Young will offer “Let’s pick – playing handmade music with friends,”
on Wednesday from 6:30-9 p.m.
The cost is $35. Participants are
encouraged to bring a fiddle, guitar,
banjo, bass or mandolin, or just come
sing and have fun.
“Roots of country music – A listening history” is a two-evening course,
on Oct. 27 and Oct. 29, from 6:30-9
p.m. both nights.
The cost is $35. Participants will
learn about the origins of country
music and listen to vintage recordings and live performances of local
musicians.
Young’s final course, “All about
stringed instruments,” will be held
Nov. 12, from 6:30-9 p.m.
The cost is $20. Participants are
encouraged to bring their instruments to learn about maintenance
and value, as well as how to change
strings and tune instruments.
Participants who register for all
three will receive a $10 discount. The
courses will be offered at the
Sheridan College in Johnson County
campus in Buffalo.
Also, singer/songwriter David
Stewart will offer “The art of song
writing,” on Tuesday in Buffalo from
6-9 p.m.
The cost is $30. Participants will
learn about publishing and crafting a
song, as well as collaborative songwriting efforts.
To register or learn more about the
community education program, call
674-6446, ext. 6000.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Ceramics exhibition on
display this month
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sagebrush Community Art
Center will host "Ceramics Invitational," an exhibition featuring works in clay by well-known ceramicists and college art instructors from around the state.
The opening reception is Thursday from 5-7 p.m.
The reception is open to the public, and refreshments will be served.
The Sagebrush Community Art Center is located at
201 E. Fifth St.
Johnson to sign copies
of �Wait for Signs’
Thursday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Author Craig Johnson will sign
copies of his book “Wait for Signs” on Thursday at
5:30 p.m.
The event will be held at Sheridan Stationery, Books
and Gallery located at 206 N. Main St.
For more information call Robby Smith at 674-8080.
Find us
Texas Gov. Perry
ordered to be in
court Oct. 31
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Indicted Texas Gov. Rick
Perry must appear for a court hearing on Oct. 31.
A judge set the date Monday for a pretrial hearing to
discuss procedural issues, including whether the special prosecutor leading
the case against Perry
was properly sworn in.
The governor was in
Europe and skipped
Monday’s proceedings in
Austin. But he will have
to be there when the
case goes back to court.
Special prosecutor
Michael McCrum has
until Nov. 7 to respond to
two motions to quash
the case. Perry’s lawyers
call the case unconstitutional, but also want it
dismissed on technicalities.
A Texas grand jury
indicted Perry in August
on two felony counts of
abuse of power over a
veto threat involving
public corruption prosecutors.
Perry maintains he
was within his rights.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
В©COPYRIGHT 2014 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
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P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
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Sheridan, Wyoming.
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
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Publisher
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Managing Editor
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Marketing Director
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HONOR OUR MILITARY
Playing firefighter
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Four-year-old Jamie Craft, left, and Kellen Medile, 3, play around the fire pole during the Sheridan FireRescue open house Saturday at the Sheridan fire station.
Colorado climbers
fall after leaving trail; 1 dies
ASPEN, Colo. (AP) — Two men climbing
some of Colorado’s most famous mountains both fell after going off an unfamiliar
trail on their descent, killing one and leading to the rescue of the other two days
later.
Thirty-two-year-old David Richardson
survived but 37-year-old Jarod Wetherell
had died of blood loss by the time
searchers found him Friday on North
Maroon Peak, one of two peaks over 14,000
feet comprising the Maroon Bells near the
ski town of Aspen.
Sheriff ’s Deputy Michael Kendrick told
The Aspen Times that they climbed the
south peak before crossing over and summiting the north peak Wednesday. He says
it’s easy to lose the trail and the only way
to know you’re still on it is by remembering its path from the ascent.
He says both climbers fell separately at
different times.
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PAGE SIX
A4 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories that
will be talked about today:
1. HONG KONG PROTESTS
ENTER THIRD WEEK
Chanting “open the
road!” an angry crowd
tries to charge barricades
used by pro-democracy
demonstrators to occupy
part of downtown Hong
Kong as a standoff with
authorities continues.
2. WHAT LED TO EBOLA
INFECTION IN DALLAS
HOSPITAL WORKER
The CDC says a “breach
of protocol” at the hospital
where an Ebola victim was
treated before his death
resulted in the infection of
a health care worker.
3. PISTORIUS A �BROKEN
MAN’ AFTER GIRLFRIEND’S
DEATH
The double-amputee
Olympian feels that way
because he lost the woman
he says he loved as well as
his reputation, friends,
income and sense of selfworth, a psychologist for
the defense testifies.
4. FRENCHMAN WINS
ECONOMICS PRIZE
Jean Tirole, 61, wins the
Nobel prize for economics
for research on market
power and regulation.
5. GAY NUPTIALS TO BEGIN
IN ALASKA
Alaska will begin accepting marriage applications
from same-sex couples
after a federal judge struck
down the state’s first-inthe-nation ban on gay marriages.
6. �YOUR CALL MAY BE
MONITORED,’ AND MORE
AP’s Raphael Satter finds
that when financial institutions record phone calls,
they could be taking your
biometric data as well —
callers’ voiceprints to fight
fraud.
7. HOW AMERICANS FEEL
ABOUT HEALTH CARE
About a quarter of privately insured people in
the U.S. say they lack confidence they can pay for a
major unexpected medical
expense, an AP poll finds.
8. WHAT CAUSED A
HALLOWEEN RIDE TO FAIL
A mechanical problem is
blamed for a Jeep towing a
wagon full of passengers
to careen down a hill and
slam into a tree during a
hayride in Maine, killing a
teen and injuring more
than 20.
9. BATTLE OF THE
KITCHEN EXTENDS ONLINE
The chefs of a small
Italian restaurant in
Northern California are
mad at online review site
Yelp, alleging it was extorting them by basing ratings
on whether they advertised, a claim Yelp denies.
10. CARDINALS EVEN NLCS
Kolten Wong hits a gamewinning home run as St.
Louis edges the San
Francisco Giants 5-4 to tie
the NL Championship
Series 1-1, but possibly lose
star catcher Yadier Molina
to injury.
Learning a trade
KENDRA COUSINEAU | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Eight-year-old Maya Saba practices leather working Sunday at the 4-H Project Expo held at the Sheridan County Fairgrounds.
The event allowed members of the public to check out various projects 4-H members have been working on throughout the
year.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Spaghetti dinner to
benefit Legacy
Pregnancy Center
SHERIDAN — The Knights of
Columbus will host a spaghetti
dinner Thursday.
The cost is $8 for adults, $5 for
kids ages 5-12 or $20 for a family.
All proceeds will benefit the
Legacy Pregnancy Center.
The dinner will run from 5-7
p.m. and will be held at the
Knights Hall, located at 301 E.
Brundage St.
More information can be
obtained by calling Holy Name
Catholic Church at 672-2848.
�Best in Class’ teacher
award voting ends
Tuesday
SHERIDAN — The Rib and
Chop House in Sheridan will
take votes for “Best in Class,” a
local teacher award through
Tuesday.
The winner will receive $1,000
from Wyoming Rib and Chop
House to purchase classroom
supplies.
You may vote online at the
Wyoming Rib and Chop House
Facebook page.
The winner will be announced
Wednesday.
For more information call
Kory Gunderson at 406-222-7566.
TUESDAY EVENTS |
• 7 p.m. Candidate forum (local candidates), Whitney Presentation Hall, 3059 Coffeen Ave.
TIPPED OVER |
Czech actor Pavel Landovsky
dies at 78
PRAGUE (AP) — Pavel Landovsky, a Czech actor,
anti-communist dissident and a friend of late president and playwright Vaclav Havel, has died.
Landovsky, 78, died Friday of a heart attack, his
family announced to the national CTK news
agency on Saturday.
Landovsky appeared in numerous movies,
including “Closely Watched Trains,” the Academy
Award winner for the best foreign language film
in 1967.
Many remember him for his role of a brewery
official in Havel’s play “Audience.” In a famed 1976
recording he made with Havel, Landovsky tries to
persuade a brewer worker-dissident to spy on himself.
After Landovsky signed the Charter 77 human
rights manifesto, he faced communist persecution
and emigrated to Austria. He returned home after
the 1989 Velvet Revolution led by Havel ousted the
communist regime.
Entrepreneur who brought Jheri curl
to masses dies
PLANO, Texas (AP) — Comer Cottrell, a black
hair-care entrepreneur who made millions with a
cheap kit that brought the glossy celebrity Jheri
curl into the homes of average African
Americans, has died. He was 82.
Cottrell died Oct. 3 at his home in Plano, Texas,
family spokeswoman Taryn Brown said Thursday.
Cottrell recalled there was a lack of hair-care
products for black servicemen while he was managing an Air Force base exchange in Okinawa,
Japan, in the 1950s.
With $600, Cottrell founded Pro-Line Corp. in
downtown Los Angeles in 1970. Military bases
were his first customers.
Sales ballooned after Pro-Line introduced the
Curly Kit in 1980 and later the Kiddie Kit for
youngsters. An at-home product, Curly Kit allowed
people to reproduce the loose, shiny Jheri curl
hairstyle invented by Jheri Redding and popularized by Michael Jackson, Rick James and other
performers.
The Curly Kit sold for around $8 at barbershops,
beauty parlors and drugstores while the salon
price for a Jheri curl might run to $300.
Cottrell “democratized the Jheri curl,” said Lori
L. Tharps, co-author of “Hair Story: Untangling
the Roots of Black Hair in America.”
“You couldn’t find a black person in America in
their 30s or 40s who didn’t have a Curly Kit or
Kiddie Kit at some time in their childhood or
adulthood,” and its popularity helped drive company sales up from $1 million to $10 million,
Tharps told the Los Angeles Times
(http://lat.ms/1w231Oj).
The Jheri curl’s ubiquity in black communities
was lampooned in pop culture. The 1988 comedy
“Coming to America” featured a fictional product
called “Soul Glo,” which gave users a shiny hairstyle and left a greasy stain on furniture.
With his brother, James, Cottrell turned ProLine into one of the most successful black-owned
companies in the United States. The company
moved to Dallas and had grown to include multinational sales before it was sold to Alberto Culver
for $80 million in 2000.
An influential businessman, Cottrell backed
black civil rights, education and political causes.
He was the first African American member of the
powerful Dallas Citizens Council and helped pave
the way for the election of the city’s first black
mayor, Ron Kirk, in 1995.
A Republican, he and George W. Bush were partowners of the Texas Rangers. Cottrell was the first
African American to own a stake in a Major
League Baseball team, which he held from 1989 to
1998.
Cottrell also contributed more than $3 million to
Paul Quinn College, a financially troubled, historically black school in Texas. “If it weren’t for him,
there probably wouldn’t be a college,” college
President Michael J. Sorrell said.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Oct. 13, 1914, the
Boston Braves swept the
World Series, defeating the
Philadelphia Athletics 3-1 in
Game 4 played at Fenway
Park.
On this date:
In A.D. 54, Roman Emperor
Claudius I died, poisoned
apparently at the behest of his
wife, Agrippina.
In 1307, King Philip IV of
France ordered the arrests of
Knights Templar on charges
of heresy.
In 1775, the United States
Navy had its origins as the
Continental Congress ordered
the construction of a naval
fleet.
In 1792, the cornerstone of
the executive mansion, later
known as the White House,
was laid during a ceremony in
the District of Columbia.
In 1843, the Jewish organization B’nai B’rith was founded in New York City.
In 1932, President Herbert
Hoover and Chief Justice
Charles Evans Hughes laid
the cornerstone for the U.S.
Supreme Court building in
Washington.
In 1944, during World War
II, American troops entered
Aachen, Germany.
In 1957, CBS-TV broadcast
“The Edsel Show,” a one-hour
live special starring Bing
Crosby designed to promote
the new, ill-fated Ford automobile. (It was the first special to
use videotape technology to
delay the broadcast to the
West Coast.)
In 1962, Edward Albee’s
four-character drama “Who’s
Afraid of Virginia Woolf ?”
opened on Broadway.
In 1974, longtime television
host Ed Sullivan died in New
York City at age 73.
In 1981, voters in Egypt participated in a referendum to
elect Vice President Hosni
Mubarak the new president,
one week after the assassination of Anwar Sadat.
In 1999, the Senate rejected
the Comprehensive Nuclear
Test Ban Treaty, with 48 senators voting in favor and 51
against, far short of the 67
needed for ratification. In
Boulder, Colorado, the
JonBenet Ramsey grand jury
was dismissed after 13 months
of work with prosecutors saying there wasn’t enough evidence to charge anyone in the
6-year-old beauty queen’s slaying.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush and
Democratic rival John Kerry
held their third and final
debate in Tempe, Arizona,
trading blows on the Iraq war,
taxes, gun control, abortion
and jobs.
Five years ago: The United
Nations Security Council
voted unanimously to extend
the U.N. peacekeeping mission
in Haiti for a year. Singer Al
Martino, who’d played crooner Johnny Fontane in “The
Godfather” and “The
Godfather: Part III,” died in
Springfield, Pennsylvania, six
days after turning 82. Movie
producer Daniel Melnick
(“Straw Dogs,” �’Network,”
�’Midnight Express”) died in
Los Angeles at age 77.
One year ago: Gunmen
abducted six Red Cross workers and a Syrian Red Crescent
volunteer after stopping their
convoy in northwestern Syria.
(Four of the seven were
released by the next day.) The
Boston Red Sox beat the
Detroit Tigers 6-5 to even the
AL championship series at 1all. Dennis Kimetto broke the
course mark in capturing the
Chicago Marathon in 2 hours,
3 minutes, 45 seconds, leading
a 1-2-3 finish for Kenyan men.
Thought for Today: “Do
you know the difference
between education and experience? Education is when you
read the fine print; experience
is what you get when you
don’t.” — Pete Seeger,
American folk singer and
activist (1919-2014).
A5 Almanac 1013.qxp_A Section Template 10/13/14 10:54 AM Page 1
ALMANAC
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
Checking out old trucks
at Sheridan Fire-Rescue
Eleven-year-old Brodie Juergens sits behind the wheel
of a 1944 vintage fire engine during the Sheridan FireRescue open house Saturday at the fire station.
Here are the results
of Saturday’s
Powerball
lottery drawing:
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Friday
• Activated smoke detector, 2500 block North Main
Street, 5:48 a.m.
• Activated smoke detector, 2100 block Coffeen
Avenue, 4:30 p.m.
• Activated smoke detector, 1000 block Woodland
Park Road, 6:30 p.m.
Saturday
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 1400
block North Main Street,
5:22 p.m.
Sunday
• RMA assist, 1800 block
South Thurmond Street,
12:10 p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Friday
• Trauma, 1400 block West
5th Street, 1:29 a.m.
• Medical, 1100 block Avon
Street, 7:08 a.m.
• Trauma, 1100 block
Avoca Court, 7:35 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
5th Street, 11 a.m.
• Medical, 600 block Big
Goose Road, 12:05 p.m.
• Trauma, 1800 block Fort
Road, 12:18 p.m.
• Medical, 300 block
College Meadow Drive, 1:36
p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 5:04 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 West 5th
Street, 5:05 p.m.
• Event Standby, 1000
block Long Drive, 5:48 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 6:52 p.m.
• Medical, 100 block Box
Cross Road, 8:05 p.m.
• Trauma, 1300 block
Avoca Road, 8:36 p.m.
• Trauma, 800 block
Broadway Street, 10:43 p.m.
• Medical, 1900 block West
Loucks Street, 11:48 p.m.
Saturday
• Medical, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 12:13 a.m.
• Medical, 1800 block Fort
Road, 12:47 a.m.
• Medical, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 3:03 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
5th Street, 3:05 p.m.
• Medical, 5000 block
Coffeen Avenue, 6:46 p.m.
• Medical, 100 block North
Dayton Street, 9:11 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
5th Street, 9:45 a.m.
• Trauma, 400 block North
Jefferson Street, 10:06 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block
North Main Street, 5:21
p.m.
• Trauma, 1600 block
Edwards Drive, 5:38 p.m.
• Trauma, 1000 block
Florence Street, 7:23 p.m.
• Trauma, 1400 block West
5th Street, 8:39 p.m.
• Medical, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 10:23 p.m.
Sunday
• Medical, 1400 block West
5th Street, 1:01 a.m.
• Medical, 200 block West
7th Street, 1:35 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
5th Street, 3 a.m.
• Medical, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 6:25 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
5th Street, 9:52 a.m.
• Medical, 100 block Davis
Tee, 11:16 a.m.
• Medical, 1800 block
South Thurmond Street,
12:09 p.m.
• Medical, 100 block East
Works Road, 3:29 p.m.
• Medical, 200 block Smith
Street, 8:34 p.m.
• Medical, 200 block Smith
Street, 9:14 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
5th Street, 11:29 p.m.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Friday-Sunday
• No admissions or dismissals reported.
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Friday-Sunday
• No reports available by
press time.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Friday
• Dispute, North Main
Street, 1:38 a.m.
• Warrant service, West
13th Street, 8:07 a.m.
• Battery, Kroe Lane, 11:02
a.m.
• Found property, I-90
Eastbound, 11:19 a.m.
• Welfare check, Upper
Prairie Dog Road, 5 p.m.
Saturday
• Motorist assist,
Ranchester, 7:40 a.m.
• Stolen Vehicle, Bowie
Road, 3:23 p.m.
• DUI, Big Horn Avenue,
6:23 p.m.
TUESDAY
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Friday
• Nicole Kaye Patterson,
20, Parkman, minor in possession of alcohol (measurable concentration), circuit
court, probation
violation/revocation, district court, arrested by SPD
• Nathen Ty Gossens, 21,
Greybull, probation violation/revocation, out of
county court, arrested by
SPD
Saturday
• Nolan Patrick Mcintyre,
21, Sheridan, complus auto
insurance, DWUI, circuit
court, arrested by SPD
• Brandon Michael Harley
Larson, 20, Sheridan, probation violation/revocation,
circuit court, MIP/consumption alcohol, 2nd, municipal
court, arrested by SPD
• August Jeffery Kern, 20,
Sheridan, DWUI, circuit
court, speed greater than
reasonable, possession of
paraphernalia, open container, municipal court,
arrested by SPD
• Garrett Tyler Slaybaugh,
33, Sheridan,
possession/controlled
THURSDAY
WEDNESDAY
35
Partly sunny and
warmer
79
Pleasant with
clouds and sun
40
76
Almanac
39
61
31
Temperature
High/low .........................................................54/38
Normal high/low ............................................62/32
Record high .............................................83 in 1991
Record low ...............................................17 in 2009
Smoothies
Precipitation (in inches)
Sunday............................................................ 0.12"
Month to date................................................. 0.16"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.66"
Year to date ...................................................12.86"
Normal year to date ......................................12.14"
Rise
Set
Today
Tuesday
Wednesday
7:20 a.m.
7:22 a.m.
7:23 a.m.
6:27 p.m.
6:25 p.m.
6:24 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Tuesday
Wednesday
10:31 p.m.
11:25 p.m.
none
12:45 p.m.
1:31 p.m.
2:12 p.m.
Last
New
First
24 hours through noon Sunday ...................... 0.12"
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Indexв„ў number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Hardin
37/81
Parkman
39/78
Dayton
37/79
Lovell
39/72
Cody
44/71
Ranchester
37/79
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
33/73
Basin
36/74
35/79
Oct 15
Oct 23
Oct 30
Nov 6
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. В©2014
Clearmont
38/78
Story
37/73
Gillette
37/75
Buffalo
41/76
Worland
32/75
Wright
41/74
Kaycee
38/75
Thermopolis
34/75
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Shown is Tuesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Tuesday's highs.
Full
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
OBITUARIES |
Chester D. Christie
October 12, 1939 - October 10, 2014
Chester D. Christie, 74, of Buffalo,
Wyoming, died Friday, October 10, 2014 in
Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
Mr. Christie was born October 12, 1939 in
Necthess, Texas to David Crockett and
Mertie (Fletcher) Christie. He grew up and
Chester D.
attended schools all over Texas.
Christie
Chester joined the Marine Corps and
served during the early 60’s.
He married Sylvia Haynes in Quartsize, Arizona on April 19,
1958. Chester worked construction for a time, then worked in
maintenance for the State of Wyoming plowing snow in Farson,
Wyoming.
Mr. Christie was a member of the Grace Baptist Church of
Story. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, camping, but most of all,
enjoyed spending time with his family.
Chester was preceded in death by his parents, Mertie and
David; one brother, Donald; and several nephews.
He is survived by his wife, Sylvia, of Buffalo, Wyoming; two
daughters, Wanda Baldwin, husband, Matt, of Superior,
Wyoming, and Terry Schneider, husband, John, of Buffalo,
Wyoming; two sisters, Glenda Christie, Moore, Oklahoma, and
Madge Mcelroy, of Georgia; Three grandchildren, Cody
Christie, Autumn Christie, and David Baldwin; and three great
grandchildren, Emily Christie, Sierra Christie, and Bryson
Fletcher.
Graveside services for Mr. Christie will be 2:00 P. M. Tuesday,
October 14, 2014 at Quiet Rest Cemetery, Story, Wyoming with
Pastor William Dill officiating. Arrangements are with
Champion Ferries Funeral Home.
A Memorial Service will be held in Rock Springs, Wyoming in
early November.
Memorials in memory of Mr. Christie may be made to the
Grace Baptist Church, Story, Wyoming.
National Weather for Tuesday, October 14
Broadus
34/78
34
The Sun
Clarence Harbarger, 74, of Buffalo, WY, passed away on
Sunday, October 12, 2014, in the Amy Holt Care Center, Buffalo,
WY.
OnlineВ condolencesВ may be written atВ www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Add a touch of nostalgia to your event!
Just $110 an hour (2 hour minimum) gets you and
30 of your friends and family to your destination.
Call 672-2485 to reserve your trolley today!
Partly sunny
62
Clarence Harbarger
Sheridan Trolley!
FRIDAY
Partly sunny and
cooler
Estimated jackpot:
$90,000,000
DEATH NOTICES |
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Sunday
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 77
Female inmate count: 13
Inmates at treatment
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate total): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate total): 3
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 7
Number of releases for
the previous day: 5
Number of book-ins for the
weekend: 17
Number of releases for the
weekend: 15
Highest number of inmates
held over the weekend: 79
Charter the
Billings
46/76
Partly cloudy
Substance/misdemeanor,
interfere with officer,
use/under Influence of
Drugs, circuit court,
arrested by SPD
Sunday
• Josephine Walksnice,
33, Lame Deer, Montana,
DWUI, no valid drivers
license, circuit court,
arrested by SPD
• Darren Michael
Casselbury, 20, Twanda,
Pennsylvania, DWUI, circuit court, arrested by
SCSO
• Dayton Twobulls, 42,
Lame Deer, Montana, disorderly conduct, public
intoxication, municipal
court, arrested by SPD
• Darren Vincent
Rogers, 44, Sheridan,
pedestrian under influence, circuit court, arrested by SPD
• Johnny Matthew
Burns, Sheridan, bench
warrant (contempt of
court), municipal court,
arrested by SPD
• Jody Lynn Reynolds,
25, Montana, elude an officer, felony theft, circuit
court, arrested by WHP
• Kenneth Dale Zeimer,
36, Sheridan, warrant, circuit court, arrested by
SPD
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TONIGHT
• 911 hang up, Highway
335, 8:38 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle,
Beckton Road, 11:08 p.m.
Sunday
• Grass fire, Coffeen
Avenue, 12:36 p.m.
• DUI, Coffeen Avenue,
12:43 p.m.
• Assist WHP, 1-90
Eastbound, 2:49 p.m.
• Trespass, Clearmont, 5:23
p.m.
• Domestic, West 15th
Street, 4:49 p.m.
Winning numbers:
10-19-37-38-39;
Powerball 28
Powerplay 2x
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Tue.
Hi/Lo/W
76/50/pc
69/43/s
71/40/s
71/51/pc
69/42/s
75/47/s
71/34/s
64/34/pc
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
76/45/pc
75/39/pc
76/44/s
70/40/pc
64/35/pc
76/42/pc
70/31/pc
61/28/pc
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
63/37/pc
62/32/pc
65/38/pc
58/38/pc
59/36/pc
59/33/pc
63/28/pc
52/27/pc
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Tue.
Hi/Lo/W
65/31/s
70/47/s
65/41/s
69/43/pc
67/42/s
72/36/s
71/53/s
57/29/pc
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
69/36/s
76/47/s
68/35/s
72/40/pc
67/34/pc
81/44/s
75/44/pc
54/25/sh
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
61/31/pc
62/37/pc
59/32/pc
59/35/pc
57/34/pc
68/35/pc
59/36/pc
44/24/pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
Tuesday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A6 Open 1013.qxp_A Section Template 10/13/14 11:04 AM Page 1
A6
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
Linked in pink
A mix of runners and walkers make their way onto Alger
Street during “The Link-Partners in Pink Run/Walk”
Saturday at Whitney Commons. Funds raised through
the event go to Sheridan Memorial Hospital cancer diagnostics projects.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
REMEDIAL: School also reworked classes to fit students’ needs
This thinking led to a shift in the way
placement in remedial courses was identi“Whether it’s not having the skill levels
fied.
or in some cases they may not be ready for
Historically, a placement exam was taken
that type of environment, we pride ourand based on that score, the student’s iniselves on being open door and open
tial course level was selected.
access,” he said.
With three levels of remedial math, stuSheridan College’s number of first-year
dents could enter college as far back as
students in remedial classes appears to be
three semesters worth of catch-up before
on par with national and state averages,
entering college level studies.
though exact comparisons can be hard to
The college identified two major issues
make.
with this model: the first, some students
Some schools track their developmental
may not have done well on the placement
education enrollment numbers by duplicat- exam but could thrive in a college level
ed head counts, meaning each time a seat is course regardless; and the second, historifilled in a remedial course, it counts as a
cally students starting that far behind are
remedial student, even if one student is
less likely to graduate.
taking more than one course.
Now, a placement exam is still adminisSheridan uses unduplicated head counts, tered but along with the score a broader
meaning even if the student is in remedial picture of the student is sought.
math and English they only count as one.
Faculty review students’ high school
careers to see which classes were chosen,
Though statistics vary throughout the
country and can be as high as 60 percent of individual grades and many other records,
students needing developmental education
all of which can show a student has perat the start of their college career, Hall said sistence, drive or just a basic understanding of skills not present on the entry exam,
some of those reportings may be due to
allowing them to be successful without
duplicated head counts.
Sheridan College wants to ensure each
remediation.
students’ success and Hall said that begins
After pulling some students up from
with a correct placement at the beginning.
developmental education who may not have
“If you set them too far behind, you are
needed to be there, the next step was to
decreasing their odds for completion; but if condense the process for any student who
you set them at a level that is too high, you did.
are setting them up for failure,” Hall said.
“We’ve been working really hard the last
“So if you’re really going to truly get to a couple of years to redesign our developplace where you have a correct placement,
mental courses so that our students can get
you need to look at multiple measures,”
through these lower levels more quickly, so
Hall said.
we’re less likely to lose them,” English facFROM 1
ulty member Robin West said. “There are
fewer exit points in their trajectory so they
get more quickly into their college level
work.”
West has been working in developmental
education for approximately 20 years at
Sheridan College and she said more so
than ever before, even remedial level students are being held to college level expectations from the get-go these days.
“For many years we used to look at these
developmental classes as remediating what
they didn’t learn in high school and we
would kind of baby step them up. Our
whole way of looking at it is different
now,” she said. “We start at the college
level and think about what we have to do to
pull them up to there. So right away their
assignments are college-level assignments,
the difference is we’ll give them extra help,
break it down in to more steps, spend more
time on the first essay, work together in
small groups and things of that nature.”
In an attempt to add support without
elongating the graduation timeline as
much, two different redesigned models of
developmental education are now available
in the English department.
What used to be as much as four classes
over two semesters has now been condensed to a one-semester intensive course
that will prepare students for college-level
work by meeting every day.
The second is the co-requisite model — as
opposed to a prerequisite model — meaning they do not have to work up to their
1000 level class, they work harder alongside
it.
Students will enroll in the standard firstyear English course appropriate for their
degree and do an additional writing support course on the side, for more credits
and more help.
Math coordinator John Araas said similar steps have been taken in math remediation, but the core of learning in math is
different.
“Math is a little bit different in that you
have to learn those skills and be proficient
with those skills to do the upper level
math,” he said. “We try to set it up so it’s
not traditional lecture and a talking head
at the front of a classroom, while also providing them the additional support and
directing them to where they can get help
outside of class.”
Araas said the math department also
took the three developmental courses they
used to teach and split them up, rearranged
some things and condensed them down to a
sequence of two classes.
“I applaud the faculty and the folks here
at Sheridan because they are taking steps
to say, �How can we get them to the college
level courses faster?’ but they still make
sure they are prepared for the college level
course work,” Hall said. “Because we know
if we get them to that college level coursework, and they can do it, they have a better
chance of completing not just here but as
they move on.”
Finance
ministers seek
to boost global
recovery
WASHINGTON (AP) — World financial leaders are pledging to act boldly
and ambitiously to give a weak and
uneven global recovery some momentum, but they have often fallen short
in the past when trying to follow
through on their promises.
The pledge from the International
Monetary Fund’s policy-setting committee comes after a week of volatile
swings in the financial markets —
powered by concerns that parts of
Europe may be sliding into another
recession.
The IMF called increasing economic
growth an “utmost priority” during
the fall meeting of the IMF and World
Bank. In a closing statement Saturday
from the steering committee of the
188-nation IMF, the finance leaders
also committed to making the necessary structural changes that would
boost growth.
Officials also endorsed the IMF’s
efforts to support three West African
countries battling the Ebola crisis,
which could be added to ministers’
usual concerns over interest rates
and budgets, particularly if the virus
becomes widespread.
Managing Director Christine
Lagarde said at a news conference
that the IMF has made $130 million
available to Guinea, Liberia and
Sierra Leone, and that the IMF and
other international agencies stood
ready to do more.
“If more is needed, it will be there,”
Lagarde said.
In addition to the $130 million in
interest-free loans being provided by
the IMF, the World Bank is providing
$400 million for the Ebola efforts.
In its closing statement, the World
Bank policy committee said that
“swift and coordinated action and
financial support are critical to contain” the deadly disease.
World Bank President Jim Yong
Kim said that a Thursday meeting
sponsored by the bank to highlight
the funding needs was useful but he
stressed that the situation remained
critical. “We call on all countries that
are watching,. If you have any sense
that you want to help with this epidemic, do it now,” Kim told reporters
at a closing news conference.
International relief agencies
stressed that time was urgent.
“The speed and amount of governments’ pledges will make the difference between Ebola containment or
pandemic,” said Nicolas Mombrial,
an official with Oxfam.
Protesters gathered outside the
bank at midday to complain that
some of its projects harm the environment but their number was
nowhere near the thousands that
used to gather when financial crises
wracked parts of the world.
The IMF and World Bank meetings
were preceded by talks among finance
ministers and central bank presidents of the Group of 20 advanced
and emerging nations, which comprise 85 percent of the global economy.
The G20 focused on measures they
could impliment to strengthen the
global economy and make the recovery more robust.
SPORTS
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Hawaii rallies in 2nd half to tame Wyoming, 38-28
HONOLULU (AP) — Ikaika Woolsey passed for 173 yards
and two touchdowns, all in the second half, as Hawaii rallied past Wyoming Saturday, 38-28.
The Rainbow Warriors (2-4, 1-0 Mountain West) amassed
513 yards of total offense to snap a two-game losing streak.
The Cowboys (3-3, 1-1) dropped their second straight game.
Wyoming held a 14-0 lead early in the first quarter and a
21-10 edge at halftime, but Hawaii stormed ahead with four
second-half scores behind Woolsey, who started the third
quarter after starter Taylor Graham left the game with a
broken foot on the final play before halftime.
Hawaii’s rally started on the last play of the third quarter, when Woolsey released a deep pass just as he was
being hit, finding Quinton Pedroza for a 53-yard touchdown.
SC soccer teams
fall to
W. Nebraska
Men’s team falls 1-4 on
sophomore night
BY KENDRA COUSINEAU
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan
College men’s soccer team
dropped their sophomore
night matchup to Western
Nebraska Community College
on Saturday, losing 1-4.
Still riddled with injuries,
the Generals head out of town
this week for the final games
of the season.
“To qualify (for post-season)
we really could have used one
more win,” coach Jeff
Hallenbeck said.
He added that there is still a
chance for the team, if they
get one more win versus Otero
or Trinidad State this weekend.
“Do we have a chance to get
a win? Absolutely, if we play
good soccer,” Hallenbeck said.
One of the biggest threats
from WNCC Saturday was
speed, and how they flicked
the ball to one or two good
players.
Hallenbeck said that his
team adjusted to that quite
well, and they had a decent
game.
By the end, he put all of his
sophomores in so they could
get a chance to play their last
home game of the season.
Hallenbeck said usually every
player has to work in practice
to earn playing time.
With a less than stellar season, Hallenbeck said it is very
difficult to keep his players
motivated, so if they show
they want it bad enough during practice, he will put them
into the game.
The Generals will face Otero
on Friday then head to
Trinidad State Junior College
(Colorado) on Saturday for
what could be the last game of
the season.
Women’s team
to face Otero Friday
SHERIDAN — Despite having a two-week window to
train, the women’s soccer
team lost to Western
Nebraska Community College
on Saturday 0-2 for their last
home game of the season on
sophomore night.
But all that work, mostly in
their defense organization,
gave the women a chance to
even be in the game, coach
Stefan Skillman said.
“It was a much better
improvement,” Skillman said.
Skillman said that the first
goal scored against them was
just an unlucky bounce, but
by the time WNCC scored
their second goal, his team
was just tired.
WNCC has a give-and-go
combination offense, forcing
the Lady Generals to stick
with who they were covering
and not follow the ball.
“We did a great job of that
today,” Skillman said.
SEE SOCCER, PAGE B2
Four plays later, Trayvon Henderson picked off
Wyoming’s Colby Kirkegaard with the first of his two
interceptions and Woolsey recycled the turnover into a 40yard scoring strike to Marcus Kemp to give Hawaii its first
lead at 31-28.
Diocemy Saint Juste, who rushed for a career-high 135
yards on 17 carries, closed out the scoring with a 16-yard
touchdown with 3:32 to play.
Hawaii rushed for 232 yards.
The Warriors entered the game averaging just 19.8 points
and 336 yards per game offensively.
Woolsey completed 8 of 9 pass attempts, while Graham
was 9-of-17 passing for 108 yards. Pedroza caught a gamehigh seven passes for 118 yards and two touchdowns.
Kirkegaard completed 19 of 30 passes for 221 yards with
two touchdowns. Jalen Claiborne caught six passes for 121
yards and a score and Shaun Wick carried 24 times for 121
yards and a touchdown.
Linebacker Devyn Harris scored on a 78-yard fumble
return in the first quarter.
Henderson, Taz Stevenson and Benneton Fonua had
eight tackles apiece for the Rainbow Warriors.
Mark Nzeocha made a game-high 13 tackles for the
Cowboys.
In addition to Graham’s injury, Hawaii lost running back
Steven Lakalaka to a head injury late in the third quarter.
He did not return.
It was Hawaii’s first win over Wyoming since 1992. The
Cowboys had won the last six meetings, including last
year’s 59-56 overtime win in Laramie.
SC teams fare well in first competitions of season
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — The sounds of
sneakers squeaking across the
hardwood and basketballs swishing through the net riddled the
Golden Dome Saturday when the
Generals and Lady Generals
stepped onto the court to play for
the first time this season.
After a week and a half of
practicing against one another,
both the men’s and women’s
teams got a chance to play
against some new competition,
and it was a good chance to see
where they stack up in the early
stages of the season.
Eight different women’s teams
got the chance to play in the
Sheridan College Jamboree,
including two scrimmages for
the Lady Generals.
Frank McCarthy’s team has a
lot of size and a lot of depth.
With seven of their 14 players 5feet, 10-inches or taller, the Lady
Generals will likely get most of
their buckets from underneath
the hoop. Sierra Toms, a 6-foot-1
sophomore forward, led the Lady
Generals in scoring a year ago,
and is expected be a top-contributor again this season.
After Toms, though, who will
be the second and third options
for Sheridan is yet to be determined. Luckily for the Generals,
they can go nine or 10 players
deep in any game, so the scoring
may not need to come from one
or two players.
Their two biggest problems in
Saturday’s scrimmages could
also be the strongest aspects of
their game. McCarthy is trying
to use the size, speed and depth
of his girls to their advantage,
working on the fast break offense
and a press defense. Sometimes
that speed led to lack of control
and a plethora of turnovers as
the Lady Generals tried to do too
much. Defensively, when the
press worked, they forced a
turnover nearly every time.
When it didn’t work, which was
often Saturday, it led to easy fast
break points for the opponent.
If the team’s depth at the forward position can make up for
their lack of it at guard, the Lady
Generals have a good chance to
beat any team on any given
night.
The men’s team didn’t have any
trouble beating Medicine Hat
College (Canada) Saturday night,
winning 92-62 in their first exhibition game of the year.
Just like the women, the
Generals’ biggest strength comes
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sarah Rawlings looks toward the basket as she moves past a defender during the Sheridan College Jamboree Saturday
at the Golden Dome.
from their depth. Sophomores
Kyi Thomas, Jamir Andrews and
Bennie Lufile showed their leadership and scoring ability
Saturday, with Thomas leading
the team in scoring with 17 points
and Lufile chipping in 16 despite
limited second-half minutes.
Pablo Rivas came off the bench
to show his length and athleti-
cism. The 6-foot-6 freshman
matched Thomas’ 17 points.
Cheyenne Central and Gillette,
all teams the Lady Broncs have
lost to this season.
Espeland had 32 digs and Casey
McInerney had 12 kills.
Those wins put the Lady
Generals up 17-8 overall and 3-3
in the conference.
The girls then traveled to
Hulett on Saturday, and lost in
three sets.
“There’s a reason (Hulett) doesn’t have a conference loss,”
Walker said. “We came out and
played incredibly tough, but we
let one mistake turn into two.”
Walker said serving was a problem for the team, and they got
intimidated by Hulett’s hitters.
Then, the team faced Kaycee
and even though the girls started
out strong again, they lost in
three sets.
Finally, they faced Kaycee’s JV
team and beat them 2-1.
The Lady Panthers play Upton
at home on Saturday for
Senior/Parent night.
SEE GENERALS, PAGE B2
LOCAL VOLLEYBALL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Lady Broncs
volleyball tops Laramie
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan
High School Lady Broncs beat
Laramie in five sets on Saturday,
bringing in their second home
game win of the year.
The Lady Broncs won the first,
third and fourth sets 25-15, 25-13,
and 15-4.
They lost the second and third
sets 21-25 and 15-25.
Sheridan only has three games
left before regionals and won’t be
playing at home until Oct. 31.
They play Cheyenne East,
SC volleyball tops LCCC,
Eastern Wyoming
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan
Lady Generals beat Laramie
County Community College in
five sets on Friday (16-25, 25-20,
25-12,14-25, 15-12).
Jill Espeland had 29 digs and
one ace and Mikayla Hoffman
had 12 kills and two blocks.
On Saturday, the team traveled
to Torrington to take on Eastern
Wyoming and won in four sets
(20-25, 25-18, 26-24, 25-23).
A-C earns first
conference win
CLEARMONT — The ArvadaClearmont High School volleyball
team beat Wright on Friday in
five sets, giving them their first
conference win in two years.
“The girls played some of the
best volleyball I’ve seen them
play,” coach Sarah Walker said.
“It seemed like we couldn’t do
anything wrong.”
B2 Scores 1013.qxp_A Section Template 10/13/14 11:02 AM Page 1
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
3 more touchdowns for Manning as Broncos beat Jets 31-17
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP)
— Julius Thomas started screaming after he caught a dart of a
pass from Peyton Manning while
streaking into the end zone.
“It’s so easy!” the Denver
Broncos tight end shouted.
Well, it was far from the
blowout many predicted, but
Peyton Manning and the Broncos
were in control most of the way
in beating the New York Jets 31-17
on Sunday.
“I like to have fun out there,”
Thomas said. “I was just really
excited.”
And, for good reason. Manning
connected with him twice and
Demaryius Thomas once, leaving
the Broncos’ quarterback two shy
of Brett Favre’s career mark for
passing TDs. Manning has 506
career touchdown passes, and
could tie or break Favre’s record
next Sunday at home against San
Francisco.
“I don’t know if any of them are
big for me, especially in the middle of the season,” Manning said
of the importance of the record.
“We’re playing a tough schedule,
got the 49ers at home and they’ve
been one of the dominant teams
of the past couple years. That’s all
I am thinking about.”
Manning was 22 of 33 for 237
yards — a far cry from last week’s
performance against Arizona,
when he passed for a career-high
479 yards with four TDs.
But he displayed his methodical
best at times in his return to
MetLife Stadium, where he and
the Broncos (4-1) were blown out
by the Seattle Seahawks in the
Super Bowl last February.
“It’s just ridiculous how good he
is,” Jets coach Rex Ryan said.
The Jets (1-5) had a chance to tie
when they got the ball deep in
Big Horn cross-country
runners add
experience to resumes
their own territory with less than
a minute left.
But after a sack put the ball at
the 1, Geno Smith was intercepted
by Aqib Talib, who returned it 22
yards for a sealing touchdown
that sent New York to its fifth
straight loss.
“The game plan was great,”
Smith said. “We should’ve done a
better job.”
The struggling Smith, looking
to keep his starting job, was 23 of
43 for 190 yards and touchdown
passes to Jace Amaro and Eric
Decker, with the one interception.
Decker finished with six receptions for 54 yards, while Amaro
had 10 catches for 68 yards for the
Jets, who play at New England on
Thursday night.
Here are some other things to
know from the Broncos’ victory
over the Jets:
THOMAS DUO: Both of the
FROM STAFF REPORTS
BIG HORN — Big Horn’s two crosscountry runners traveled to Dayton
Saturday for the Tongue River Invite and
added some much needed experience to
their resumes before heading to the conference meet this week.
August Dow shaved another 30 seconds
Broncos’ Thomases — Demaryius
and Julius — were busy against
the Jets.
Demaryius Thomas caught 10
passes for 124 yards, a week after
he set the Broncos’ single-game
record with 226 yards receiving
against Arizona.
Julius Thomas caught his
eighth and ninth touchdown passes, the most by a tight end in NFL
history through his team’s first
five games of a season. He finished with four catches for 51
yards.
GROUND GAMES: Hillman
made his first NFL start in place
of the injured Montee Ball and
rushed for a career-high 100 yards
on 24 carries.
He also became just the fourth
player in team history to reach
100 yards rushing in his first
start, joining Bobby Humphrey
(1989), Mike Anderson (2000) and
off his personal best, finishing in 20:43,
and Bryce Michaud ran a time of 24:15.
“The work is done, it's now about
sharpening up and believing we can
accomplish our goals,” coach Nick Ekel
said.
The Big Horn cross-country team will
head to Hulett this Thursday for the
Powder River Conference Championship.
Chase Iwata Bartelme
brought some energy off
the bench, showing his
toughness on both ends of
the floor to help give the
starters a rest.
The Generals lack a little
bit in size with only two
true centers, Rudy Joly and
RaVonn Posey. If the two
big men can stay healthy, it
shouldn’t be an issue, but it
SHS swimming
takes sixth in
Gillette
FROM STAFF REPORTS
GENERALS: Will play in Casper jamboree this Saturday
FROM B1
Clinton Portis (2002). The Broncos
gained 138 yards overall on the
ground against the team that was
ranked No. 6 in run defense coming in.
“From the way they were playing us,” Manning said, “they didn’t think much of our running
game coming in.”
Meanwhile, the Jets were held
to just 31 yards — and had 9
through three quarters. Smith
was the Jets’ leading rusher with
11 yards.
SMITH STILL STARTING:
Despite Smith’s struggles this season, Ryan announced that he will
start for the Jets at New England.
Smith was 23 of 43 for 190 yards
and two TDs, and was close to
having a turnover-free game until
the late pick-six by Talib. He has
six TD passes and seven INTs in
six games, with a quarterback rating of 69.7.
will put a lot of pressure
on freshmen Tredarius
McCallum and Shamir
Rolle, two smaller forwards, if Posey or Joly
goes down or gets in foul
trouble.
The Generals will play in
a Jamboree at Casper
College Saturday, and the
Lady Generals next game is
a scrimmage against Rocky
Mountain College on Oct.
21.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan guard Tyler Hopkins throws a no look pass during the Generals'
exhibition game against Medicine Hat Saturday at the Golden Dome. The
Generals won the game, 92-62.
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan High School
swimming and diving team competed in
one of its largest meets of the season over
the weekend, finishing in sixth place.
Twenty different high schools and 420
athletes took to the Campbell County
School District Aquatic Center Saturday to
swim in the Gillette Invite. The Lady
Broncs finished with 238.5 points to finish
sixth. Campbell County High School finished first with 576 points.
Pippin Robison was the top swimmer for
Sheridan, taking the only first place finish
for the team in 200-yard freestyle. Her time
of 2:04.14 edged out Campbell’s Katie
Carsrud by less than a second. Robison
also came in fifth in 500-yard freestyle
with her time of 5:39.71.
Mackenzie Dougherty finished third in
th 100-yard butterfly with a time of 1:04.17.
Dougherty and Robison also teamed up
with Katie Beardslee and Sol Montero for
a fourth-place finish in the 400-yard
freestyle relay. Their time of 3:57.96 was
only a half-a-second behind the third place
team.
The Lady Broncs will square off against
many of the same competitors when they
travel to Laramie for the conference meet
beginning Thursday at 8 a.m.
SOCCER: Face tough Trinidad team on the road Sat.
Ever dream of having your principal or teacher
prepare dinner for you and your schoolmates?
Now’s your chance to assign the
HOMEWORK!
Join family and friends at your neighborhood McDonald’s
and enjoy great food and the chance to help your school!
Stop by and support
Tongue River
Elementary
October 16, 2014
5 pm - 8 pm
2590 N. Main • Sheridan, WY
KENDRA COUSINEAU | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Marcus Ferrari, right, and Drew Porter, left, fight a defender from WNCC for the ball Saturday for their last home game of the season.
FROM B1
He added that had the Lady Generals made any of the
shots they took, the team would have been fired up, and he
thinks the game would have ended a little differently.
Alexis Lewis had a great chance at a goal, but the goalie
just barely tipped the ball up enough above her head to
send it over the net.
However, Skillman emphasized that it is not about the
outcome of the game, since he is trying to develop players
to move on and go play great soccer elsewhere.
“I hope to finish strong,” Skillman said, “but we’re going
to have our hands full.”
The team faces Otero on Friday.
“Otero will be pretty fresh, as in, (the coach) might not
have to go to his bench,” Skillman said.
After facing Otero, the Lady Generals will travel to
Trinidad State Junior College (Colorado), which will be
celebrating sophomore night.
“They will be pretty emotionally charged,” Skillman
said.
He added that he is very proud of his team, especially
the sophomores who helped start the program and he
hopes to see them go far in their soccer careers.
B3 Scores 1013.qxp_A Section Template 10/13/14 11:08 AM Page 1
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
WRESTLING |
Young Guns Wrestling
Interstate 64 Final Four
Virginia Beach, Virginia
Elementary 50
Round 1 - Trevor Freeman (Team
Cabarrus) won by fall over Seth Snuffer
(Young Guns) (Fall 2:45)
Round 2 - Snuffer won by decision over
Jonathan Morrison (Great Bridge
Wrestling Club) (Dec 6-2)
Round 3 - Jake Zaltsman (NJ Dynasty)
won by decision over Snuffer (Dec 6-2)
PINK LINK RESULTS |
The Link Partners in Pink
Race Results (Top 20)
1.5 Mile Walk (name; time)
1. Katie Venn; 0:17:28
2. Eric Venn; 0:17:29
3. Stephanie Venn; 0:17:32
4. Abby Venn; 0:17:34
5. Austin Dooley; 0:22:32
6. Grayce Dooley; 0:22:44
7. John Batt; 0:23:37
8. Olalekan Ajayi; 0:23:51
9. Beckie Ajayi; 0:23:51
10. Emma Katschke; 0:23:58
11. Juliana Perkins; 0:24:00
12. Madelyn Katschke; 0:24:14
13. Kathy Corley; 0:24:19
14. Alexandra Wichman; 0:24:20
15. Jenna Allen; 0:24:53
16. Kinley Mayer; 0:24:56
17. Patricia Keeter; 0:24:57
18. Jessica Lucas; 0:24:58
19. Aiden Cleare; 0:24:58
20. Christy Allen; 0:24:58
5K Run/Walk
1. Anita Gussler; 0:22:45
2. Curt Mayer; 0:25:02
3. Mavis Biastoch; 0:25:26
4. Levi Drake; 0:26:27
5. Jennifer Drake; 0:26:36
6. Julia Stellingwerf; 0:27:34
7. Paul Phillips; 0:27:38
8. Jason Szewc; 0:28:05
9. Jason Willett; 0:28:11
10. Maci Turk; 0:28:55
11. Darcie Achord; 0:29:17
12. Macy Fried; 0:29:18
13. Brenden Geissler; 0:30:33
14. Michelle Larson; 0:31:21
15. Mike Thomas; 0:31:35
16. Madeline Scheibel; 0:32:09
17. Kathi Swank; 0:32:10
18. Michael Maixner; 0:32:26
19. Brenda Kralovetz; 0:32:30
20. Anne Jacobsen; 0:32:40
10K Run
1. Nick Flores; 0:37:44
2. Michael Merrill; 0:43:51
3. Casey Cavallero; 0:44:36
4. Lela Carpenter; 0:46:29
5. Josh Port; 0:47:42
6. Jeff Auston; 0:48:41
7. Janeal Fox; 0:51:42
8. Nicole Jarvis; 0:51:43
9. Tina McIntosh; 0:52:17
10. Kimberly Stromer; 0:53:29
11. Brian Venn; 0:53:48
12. Emily Damby; 0:54:22
13. Megan Ahrens; 0:54:50
14. Shawn Parker; 0:54:59
15. Alicia Knight; 0:55:10
16. Annie Wollenzien; 0:56:46
17. Rebecca Quillen; 0:57:15
18. Amanda Alexander; 0:58:49
19. Jenna Mavrakis; 0:59:45
20. Lauren Board; 1:00:42
NCAA |
College Football Scores
The Associated Press
EAST
Albright 38, FDU-Florham 20
Alderson-Broaddus 59, Point (Ga.) 24
American International 48, St. Anselm 26
Amherst 35, Colby 10
Assumption 52, Pace 0
Bethany (WV) 19, Carnegie-Mellon 7
Bloomsburg 41, Millersville 0
Bowdoin 30, Hamilton 24
Brockport 46, Frostburg St. 0
Brown 27, Holy Cross 24, 2OT
Bucknell 45, Lehigh 24
Buffalo St. 38, Ithaca 27
California (Pa.) 48, Slippery Rock 26
Castleton St. 65, Anna Maria 9
Coast Guard 17, Curry 0
Colgate 31, Princeton 30
Concord 50, Urbana 20
Cortland St. 24, College of NJ 14
Dartmouth 38, Yale 31
Dayton 31, Marist 21
Delaware 34, Elon 24
Delaware Valley 52, Lycoming 42
Duquesne 28, CCSU 20
East Stroudsburg 49, Cheyney 21
Edinboro 56, Clarion 28
Endicott 26, Nichols 16
Fitchburg St. 40, Worcester St. 24
Florida St. 38, Syracuse 20
Fordham 60, Penn 22
Framingham St. 28, Westfield St. 7
Glenville St. 34, Charleston (WV) 30
Harvard 24, Cornell 7
Hobart 37, Springfield 7
Husson 40, NY Maritime 0
Indiana (Pa.) 51, Seton Hill 28
LIU Post 28, Stonehill 25
Lafayette 24, Georgetown 21
Lebanon Valley 44, Misericordia 16
Mercyhurst 45, Gannon 38
Merrimack 28, Bentley 25
Middlebury 23, Williams 20, OT
Monmouth (NJ) 61, Columbia 28
Montclair St. 35, S. Virginia 15
Morrisville St. 37, Kean 31
Navy 51, VMI 14
New Hampshire 32, William & Mary 3
New Haven 27, S. Connecticut 14
Norwich 28, Mount Ida 19
Rice 41, Army 21
Richmond 41, Albany (NY) 28
Rochester 20, Merchant Marine 17
Rowan 33, William Paterson 14
Sacred Heart 52, Robert Morris 13
Salisbury 36, Utica 19
Shippensburg 42, Lock Haven 24
St. John Fisher 42, Hartwick 13
St. Lawrence 24, RPI 10
Stony Brook 19, Maine 7
Temple 35, Tulsa 24
Thomas More 42, Geneva 3
Trinity (Conn.) 35, Tufts 14
Villanova 44, Rhode Island 21
W. Connecticut 30, Mass. Maritime 19
W. New England 34, Salve Regina 31
WPI 23, Union (NY) 7
WV Wesleyan 25, W. Virginia St. 22
Wagner 46, St. Francis (Pa.) 39, 2OT
Washington & Jefferson 55, Grove City 14
Waynesburg 35, Case Reserve 15
Wesleyan (Conn.) 24, Bates 10
West Liberty 39, Fairmont St. 16
Westminster (Pa.) 40, Thiel 28
SOUTH
Albany St. (Ga.) 33, Lane 0
Arkansas St. 52, Georgia St. 10
Bethune-Cookman 49, Howard 12
Bluefield South 45, Belhaven 27
Boston College 30, NC State 14
Bowie St. 39, Chowan 11
Campbell 28, Butler 9
Campbellsville 28, Georgetown (Ky.) 24
Centre 44, Berry 7
Clark Atlanta 47, College of Faith 0
Clemson 23, Louisville 17
Coastal Carolina 40, Presbyterian 28
Cumberland (Tenn.) 47, Union (Ky.) 46
Delaware St. 13, Norfolk St. 10, OT
Duke 31, Georgia Tech 25
E. Kentucky 36, E. Illinois 33, OT
East Carolina 28, South Florida 17
Emory & Henry 34, Bridgewater (Va.) 21
Fayetteville St. 27, Shaw 26
Florida A&M 24, Savannah St. 14
Florida Tech 33, West Alabama 32
Fort Valley St. 36, Kentucky St. 21
Gallaudet 16, Becker 12
Georgia Southern 47, Idaho 24
Grambling St. 28, Alcorn St. 21
Hampden-Sydney 55, Washington & Lee
32
Houston 28, Memphis 24
Huntingdon 51, Christopher Newport 31
Jacksonville 45, Morehead St. 26
Jacksonville St. 27, Tennessee St. 20
James Madison 62, Towson 7
Kentucky 48, Louisiana-Monroe 14
LSU 30, Florida 27
Lenoir-Rhyne 32, North Greenville 21
Liberty 55, Appalachian St. 48, OT
Limestone 47, Paine 30
Lindsey Wilson 31, Kentucky Christian 7
MVSU 27, Jackson St. 23
Mars Hill 37, Brevard 31
Marshall 49, Middle Tennessee 24
Maryville (Tenn.) 23, Ferrum 13
Mercer 49, Austin Peay 21
Methodist 63, Greensboro 35
Miami 55, Cincinnati 34
Miles 22, Central St. (Ohio) 12
Mississippi College 56, U. of Faith 14
Mississippi St. 38, Auburn 23
Murray St. 44, SE Missouri 41, 2OT
NC Central 48, SC State 35
NC Wesleyan 48, LaGrange 21
North Alabama 27, UNC-Pembroke 6
Northwestern St. 49, Incarnate Word 12
Rhodes 40, Sewanee 22
Shenandoah 47, Guilford 31
Southeastern (Fla.) 42, BirminghamSouthern 21
Southern U. 35, Alabama A&M 34
St. Augustine's 31, Livingstone 30
St. Joseph's (Ind.) 28, Lincoln (Mo.) 20
Stephen F. Austin 42, Nicholls St. 20
Stillman 48, Benedict 36
Tennessee 45, Chattanooga 10
The Citadel 63, Charlotte 56, 2OT
Troy 41, New Mexico St. 24
Tulane 12, UConn 3
Tusculum 16, Newberry 14
Tuskegee 49, Morehouse 0
UAB 56, North Texas 21
Valdosta St. 40, West Georgia 6
Vanderbilt 21, Charleston Southern 20
Virginia St. 41, Elizabeth City St. 14
Virginia Union 78, Lincoln (Pa.) 13
W. Carolina 26, Wofford 14
Warner 48, Kentucky Wesleyan 45
Webber 70, Edward Waters 14
Wingate 30, Catawba 19
Winston-Salem 37, Johnson C. Smith 0
MIDWEST
Adrian 31, Alma 0
Akron 29, Miami (Ohio) 19
Albion 75, Kalamazoo 22
Ashland 38, Saginaw Valley St. 7
Baker 27, Benedictine (Kan.) 21
Baldwin-Wallace 40, Marietta 33
Bemidji St. 38, Minn.-Crookston 3
Bethany (Kan.) 21, Southwestern (Kan.)
16
Bethel (Minn.) 38, Hamline 14
Bluffton 31, Rose-Hulman 17
Bowling Green 31, Ohio 13
Buena Vista 48, Loras 29
Carroll (Wis.) 30, St. Norbert 6
Cent. Methodist 44, Culver-Stockton 30
Cent. Michigan 34, N. Illinois 17
Cent. Missouri 44, Washburn 0
Cent. Washington 61, S. Dakota Tech 34
Central 47, Luther 7
Concordia (Moor.) 34, Carleton 7
Concordia (Wis.) 62, Aurora 24
Cornell (Iowa) 35, Grinnell 17
Dakota Wesleyan 27, Doane 23
DePauw 54, Oberlin 14
Drake 51, Davidson 14
Dubuque 44, Simpson (Iowa) 10
E. Michigan 37, Buffalo 27
Elmhurst 49, Carthage 42, 2OT
Evangel 54, Avila 20
Ferris St. 68, Tiffin 20
Findlay 47, Walsh 7
Franklin 49, Earlham 20
Friends 45, McPherson 17
Georgia 34, Missouri 0
Graceland (Iowa) 27, Peru St. 20
Grand Valley St. 17, Wayne (Mich.) 3
Grand View 32, Olivet Nazarene 2
Greenville 35, Crown (Minn.) 17
Gustavus 37, St. Olaf 29
Heidelberg 54, Muskingum 21
Hiram 31, Kenyon 8
Hope 38, Rockford 12
Illinois College 31, Monmouth (Ill.) 24
Illinois St. 20, Indiana St. 18
Illinois Wesleyan 31, Millikin 7
Indianapolis 52, McKendree 7
Iowa 45, Indiana 29
Iowa St. 37, Toledo 30
Iowa Wesleyan 34, Martin Luther 14
Jamestown 37, Dakota St. 29
John Carroll 69, Wilmington (Ohio) 0
Lake Erie 42, Notre Dame Coll. 35
Lake Forest 27, Knox 6
Lakeland 35, Concordia (Ill.) 7
Lawrence 21, Beloit 13
Macalester 28, Ripon 20
Malone 42, N. Michigan 35
Manchester 37, Defiance 23
Marian (Ind.) 26, Siena Heights 7
Mary 31, Minot St. 29
Michigan 18, Penn St. 13
Michigan St. 45, Purdue 31
Michigan Tech 21, Northwood (Mich.) 6
Mid-Am Nazarene 20, Missouri Valley 17
Minn. Duluth 44, St. Cloud St. 21
Minnesota 24, Northwestern 17
Missouri S&T 21, Lindenwood (Ill.) 3
Missouri Western 26, Fort Hays St. 7
Morningside 76, Hastings 14
Mount St. Joseph 53, Hanover 28
Mount Union 62, Ohio Northern 0
N. Dakota St. 38, S. Illinois 10
N. Iowa 27, South Dakota 16
NW Missouri St. 51, Lindenwood (Mo.) 20
Nebraska Wesleyan 37, Concordia (Neb.)
34, OT
North Central (Ill.) 58, North Park 26
North Dakota 24, Portland St. 16
Northern St. (SD) 40, Minn. St.-Moorhead
38
Northwestern (Iowa) 38, Briar Cliff 0
Northwestern (Minn.) 33, Minn.-Morris 0
Notre Dame 50, North Carolina 43
Ohio Dominican 9, Hillsdale 3
Oklahoma St. 27, Kansas 20
Ottawa, Kan. 24, St. Mary (Kan.) 14
Otterbein 50, Capital 28
Pittsburg St. 45, Emporia St. 17
Presentation 49, Maranatha Baptist 0
Quincy 59, SW Baptist 34
Robert Morris-Chicago 12, St. Francis (Ill.)
7
S. Dakota St. 32, Missouri St. 28
SW Minnesota St. 28, Upper Iowa 25
Sioux Falls 23, Augustana (SD) 12
St. Ambrose 34, Trinity (Ill.) 23
St. Scholastica 55, Mac Murray 7
St. Thomas (Minn.) 45, Augsburg 27
St. Xavier 53, St. Francis (Ind.) 26
Sterling 31, Bethel (Kan.) 14
Tabor 70, Kansas Wesleyan 35
Taylor 43, Concordia (Mich.) 21
Trine 46, Olivet 42
UMass 40, Kent St. 17
Valley City St. 62, Mayville St. 6
Valparaiso 55, Missouri Baptist 7
W. Illinois 30, Youngstown St. 24
W. Michigan 42, Ball St. 38
Wabash 45, Ohio Wesleyan 13
Waldorf 48, Haskell Indian Nations 19
Wartburg 43, Coe 0
Washington (Mo.) 59, Hendrix 19
Wayne (Neb.) 54, Concordia (St.P.) 14
Westminster (Mo.) 30, Eureka 3
Wheaton (Ill.) 20, Augustana (Ill.) 13
William Jewell 21, Truman St. 17
Wis. Lutheran 17, Benedictine (Ill.) 6
Wis.-Oshkosh 21, Wis.-LaCrosse 18
Wis.-Platteville 24, Wis.-River Falls 14
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 30, Wis.-Eau Claire 3
Wis.-Whitewater 37, Wis.-Stout 0
Wisconsin 38, Illinois 28
Wittenberg 30, Denison 23
Wooster 42, Allegheny 21
SOUTHWEST
Abilene Christian 55, Ave Maria 14
Alabama 14, Arkansas 13
Bacone 47, Texas College 6
Baylor 61, TCU 58
Cent. Arkansas 70, Houston Baptist 0
Cent. Oklahoma 43, Missouri Southern
41, 3OT
Chapman 58, Pomona-Pitzer 0
Chicago 14, Trinity (Texas) 7
Claremont-Mudd 40, La Verne 24
E. New Mexico 62, McMurry 23
Harding 55, Ark.-Monticello 15
Henderson St. 28, SW Oklahoma 14
Langston 28, Oklahoma Baptist 21
Mary Hardin-Baylor 56, Sul Ross St. 9
Mississippi 35, Texas A&M 20
Nebraska-Kearney 34, Northeastern St. 7
Occidental 23, Whittier 17
Okla. Panhandle St. 59, Southwestern
(Texas) 7
Oklahoma 31, Texas 26
Ouachita 41, NW Oklahoma St. 10
Prairie View 34, Alabama St. 24
Redlands 59, Cal Lutheran 27
S. Arkansas 55, Arkansas Tech 21
SE Louisiana 61, Lamar 34
SE Oklahoma 45, S. Nazarene 0
SW Assemblies of God 40, Wayland
Baptist 20
Sam Houston St. 38, McNeese St. 22
Tarleton St. 80, Texas A&M-Kingsville 14
Texas A&M Commerce 41, Angelo St. 40
Texas Lutheran 55, E. Texas Baptist 49
UTEP 42, Old Dominion 35
UTSA 16, FIU 13
West Texas A&M 34, Midwestern St. 13
West Virginia 37, Texas Tech 34
FAR WEST
Cal Poly 30, Weber St. 24
Carroll (Mont.) 55, E. Oregon 7
Chadron St. 45, Adams St. 31
Coll. of Idaho 35, Montana St.-Northern
31
Colorado Mines 44, W. New Mexico 37
Colorado St. 31, Nevada 24
E. Washington 42, S. Utah 30
Fort Lewis 23, CSU-Pueblo 22
Hawaii 38, Wyoming 28
Idaho St. 66, Simon Fraser 14
Linfield 59, George Fox 0
Menlo 35, Arizona Christian 14
Mesa St. 31, NM Highlands 19
Montana St. 77, UC Davis 37
Oregon 42, UCLA 30
Pacific (Ore.) 44, Puget Sound 17
Pacific Lutheran 44, Lewis & Clark 7
Rocky Mountain 45, Montana Tech 39
S. Oregon 31, Montana Western 6
Sacramento St. 43, N. Colorado 38
San Diego 31, Stetson 23
Southern Cal 28, Arizona 26
Utah St. 34, Air Force 16
W. Oregon 19, Dixie St. 14
Washington 31, California 7
Western St. (Col.) 34, Black Hills St. 13
Whitworth 61, Willamette 45
NFL |
National Football League
The Associated Press
All Times EDT
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T
New England
4
2
0
Buffalo
3
3
0
Miami
2
3
0
N.Y. Jets
1
5
0
South
W
L
T
Indianapolis
4
2
0
Houston
3
3
0
Tennessee
2
4
0
Jacksonville
0
6
0
North
W
L
T
Cincinnati
3
1
1
Baltimore
4
2
0
Cleveland
3
2
0
Pittsburgh
3
3
0
West
W
L
T
5
1
0
San Diego
Denver
4
1
0
2
3
0
Kansas City
Oakland
0
5
0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T
Philadelphia
5
1
0
Dallas
5
1
0
N.Y. Giants
3
3
0
Washington
1
5
0
South
W
L
T
Carolina
3
2
1
New Orleans
2
3
0
Atlanta
2
4
0
Tampa Bay
1
5
0
North
W
L
T
Detroit
4
2
0
Green Bay
4
2
0
Chicago
3
3
0
Minnesota
2
4
0
West
W
L
T
Arizona
4
1
0
Seattle
3
2
0
San Francisco 3
2
0
St. Louis
1
3
0
___
Thursday’s Game
Indianapolis 33, Houston 28
Sunday’s Games
Tennessee 16, Jacksonville 14
Detroit 17, Minnesota 3
Baltimore 48, Tampa Bay 17
Denver 31, N.Y. Jets 17
New England 37, Buffalo 22
Carolina 37, Cincinnati 37, OT
Cleveland 31, Pittsburgh 10
Green Bay 27, Miami 24
San Diego 31, Oakland 28
Dallas 30, Seattle 23
Arizona 30, Washington 20
Chicago 27, Atlanta 13
Philadelphia 27, N.Y. Giants 0
Open: Kansas City, New Orleans
Monday’s Game
San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 16
N.Y. Jets at New England, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 19
Seattle at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Miami at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Washington, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Philadelphia, Tampa Bay
Monday, Oct. 20
Houston at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.
MLB |
Postseason Baseball Glance
The Associated Press
All Times EDT
x-if necessary
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(Best-of-7)
American League
All AL games televised by TBS
Kansas City 2, Baltimore 0
Friday, Oct. 10: Kansas City 8, Baltimore
6, 10 innings
Saturday, Oct. 11: Kansas City 6,
Baltimore 4
Monday, Oct. 13: Baltimore (Chen 16-6) at
Kansas City (Guthrie 13-11), 8:07 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 14: Baltimore (Gonzalez 109) at Kansas City (Vargas 11-10), 8:07
p.m.
x-Wednesday, Oct. 15: Baltimore at
Kansas City, 4:07 p.m.
x-Friday, Oct. 17: Kansas City at
Baltimore, 8:07 p.m.
x-Saturday, Oct. 18: Kansas City at
Baltimore, 8:07 p.m.
National League
San Francisco 1, St. Louis 1
Saturday, Oct. 11: San Francisco 3, St.
Louis 0
Sunday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 5, San
Francisco 4
Tuesday, Oct. 14: St. Louis (Lackey 3-3) at
San Francisco, 4:07 (FS1)
Wednesday, Oct. 15: St. Louis (Miller 109) at San Francisco, 8:07 p.m. (FS1)
Thursday, Oct. 16: St. Louis at San
Francisco, 8:07 p.m. (FS1)
x-Saturday, Oct. 18: San Francisco at St.
Louis, 4:07 p.m. (Fox)
x-Sunday, Oct. 19: San Francisco at St.
Louis, 7:37 p.m. (FS1)
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7)
All games televised by Fox
Tuesday, Oct. 21: at American League
Wednesday, Oct. 22: at AL
Friday, Oct. 24: at National League
Saturday, Oct. 25: at NL
x-Sunday, Oct. 26: at NL
x-Tuesday, Oct. 28: at AL
x-Wednesday, Oct. 29: at AL
GOLF |
Golf Capsules
The Associated Press
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) —
China’s Shanshan Feng rallied to win the
LPGA Malaysia on Sunday for her fourth
LPGA Tour title, playing a six-hole stretch
on the back nine in 6 under.
The 25-year-old Feng, four strokes behind
Thailand’s Pornanong Phatlum entering
the round, closed with a bogey-free 8under 63 for a three-stroke victory over
Phatlum.
Feng birdied Nos. 11-14 to tie Phatlum at
16 under and pulled away with a fourstroke swing when she holed a 10-foot
eagle putt on the par-5 16th and Phatlum
made a double bogey on the par-3 15th.
Feng parred the last two holes to finish at
18-under 266 at Kuala Lumpur Golf and
Country Club. She’s projected to jump
from ninth to fifth in the world.
Playing a group behind Feng, Phatlum
birdied the 16th and closed with two pars
for a 70. She was trying to become the
LPGA Tour’s first Thai winner.
Lydia Ko missed a chance to take the No.
1 ranking from Stacy Lewis. The 17-yearold New Zealander needed to win and
have Lewis tie for 12th or worse. Instead,
Ko closed with a 70 to tie for eighth at 11
under. Lewis had a 69 to tie for 21st at 7
under.
SAS CHAMPIONSHIP
CARY, N.C. (AP) — Kirk Triplett won the
SAS Championship for his second victory
of the year and fourth in three seasons on
the Champions Tour.
The 52-year-old Triplett closed with a 3under 69 for a three-stroke victory over
Tom Lehman. Triplett finished at 14-under
202 at Prestonwood Country Club.
Triplett followed each of his three bogeys
with birdies. The three-time PGA Tour
champion also won the ACE Group
Classic in February.
Lehman eagled the par-5 17th in a 70.
Bernhard Langer and Kenny Perry tied for
third at 10 under. Langer, the 2012 winner,
finished with a 68. Perry, the 2011 champion, had a 67.
Langer extended his lead in the seasonlong race Charles Schwab Cup race. He
has a tour-high five wins — two of them
majors — and leads the money list.
PORTUGAL MASTERS
VILAMOURA, Portugal (AP) — France’s
Alexander Levy of France won the shortened Portugal Masters after the third and
final round was washed out because of
further bad weather.
Thunderstorms and water-logged greens
had already led to the event being
reduced to 54 holes Friday, and more rain
Sunday forced European Tour officials to
cut it to 36 holes.
Levy had rounds of 63 and 61 at Oceanico
Victoria to finish at 18-under 124.
Belgium’s Nicolas Colsaerts was second,
three strokes back.
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUESВ® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSERВ® by Art and Chip Sansom
Recently, when a big-eyed,
overweight, beige cat
emerged as the meme for
heavy breathing and earned
center stage on YouTube
(heavy-breathing cat) and
Tumblr (ditto), it seemed a
harmless way to express how
you feel when overwhelmed
by exercise or even a romantic embrace. But the not-socute heavy breathing triggered by enterovirus D-68
that's swept through parts of
North America since midAugust isn't harmless at all.
From coast to coast in the
U.S. and in Canada, hundreds
and hundreds of people have
been treated for severe respiratory illness; some needed
hospitalization. Affecting
mostly infants, kids and
teens (their immune system
hasn't fully developed), this
enterovirus can cause coughing, sneezing, runny nose,
fever and rapid breathing.
Kids with asthma are most
severely affected. Adults who
have been exposed to the
virus before may develop
mild, cold-like symptoms.
But for anyone, when
breathing becomes labored -20 breaths a minute as
opposed to the standard 12 -it's time to get to the ER.
Your best protection from
this fast-traveling bug? Wash
hands frequently and thoroughly (20 seconds under
water with lots of lather).
Keep your hands off your
face and away from your
mouth. Disinfect (using alcohol-based hand sanitizer,
never antibacterial or antimicrobial products) doorknobs
and other shared surfaces
frequently. And keep each
family member's immune
system healthy by making
sure everyone gets enough
sleep; at least 30 minutes of
daily physical activity; five to
nine servings of fruits and
veggies a day; and all of you
share immune-boosting
smiles frequently!
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNESTВ® by Bob Thaves
DEAR ABBY: My lunch
date for today canceled on
me. Generally, when a girl
does this, I delete her number
and move on. But in this
instance, it wasn't a first or
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITSВ® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOPВ® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
second date. We have been
seeing each other for about a
month and have built up
some degree of intimacy.
Moreover, I know she's not
lying when she says she had
a busy week. She apologized
via text not once, but twice.
Nevertheless, I feel that as
genuine as her apology was
and as she has seemed in the
time we have been together,
this incident indicates either
a lack of caring or integrity.
Would I be right to forget
her? Or is this the one time a
cancellation is justified? -CLASSIC OVER-ANALYZER
IN L.A.
DEAR OVER-ANALYZER:
Your problem isn't that you
are a classic over-analyzer;
it's that you seem to be
extremely insecure to the
point of courting rejection
when none is there. People
cannot always control their
schedules. And cancellations
can happen more than once
without it being an indication of lack of interest or caring. I see no reason why you
should "forget" a woman
whose company you enjoy,
unless you are a masochist.
DEAR ABBY: I am a mother
of three grown children who
all have successful careers.
The problem is they seem to
have lost touch with the real
world. They no longer have
compassion or respect for
people who must live with
less, or who are not as welleducated as they are. This
includes my husband and me.
We feel like we no longer fit
into their world. It has
become hard for us to have
any relationship with them.
How can I make them see
that money and status are
not the only things in this
world, and that they should
show more compassion to
others? -- IN TOUCH WITH
THE WORLD IN OHIO
DEAR IN TOUCH: You
have my sympathy, but the
lessons you would like to
teach your adult children are
ones they should have
learned during childhood.
Sometimes people who are
"nouveau riche" try to forget
their humble beginnings by
avoiding the people who
knew them when they were
regular folks. It couldn't hurt
to remind your offspring that
money and status can be lost
as quickly as they were
earned, but family is supposed to be there forever.
DEAR ABBY: I have a wonderful daughter who is a perfect mother and wife. The
problem is, she's in her 40s
and dresses really inappropriately, sometimes wearing
skirts and shorts so short
they barely cover her bottom.
She's also very voluptuous
and always shows cleavage.
When she goes out for the
evening, she shows practically everything.
She takes lots of photographs with her family, and
in all of them she's so
exposed that sometimes
when she gives me prints, I
have to add magic marker so
she looks more modest. She
is a sweet person who is
loved by everyone, so I don't
know how to handle this.
Please help me. -- COVERED
UP IN OAKLAND, CALIF.
DEAR COVERED UP: You
say your daughter is a perfect mother and wife in her
40s. She may display her
assets because it has been a
winning combination for her
so far or because her husband likes it.
The time is long past when
you should tell her what or
what not to wear, even if you
are well-meaning. The best
advice I can offer is to continue wielding your magic
marker and pray for colder
weather.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
TO PLACE YOUR AD
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DEADLINES
B5
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
Travel
LUXURY 2 bdrm
timeshare week. Own
near Disney World. Use
world wide. Best you
can own. Paid $20K.
Illness forces sale. Only
$3800. 406-261-8066.
Pets & Supplies
LAB PUPPIES for sale.
701-651-4663 or
307-763-1121
Rummage Sale
SOMETHING FOR
everyone! New things
added daily. 10/10 10/17. Tues-Fri: 10-3pm
Sat & Sun: 7-2pm
@ 1155 Broadway.
For Lease
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Buildings
for lease, Shop
space,
Warehouse
space, Retail
space, &
office space.
673-5555
Roommate Wanted
ROOMMATE WANTED
$300/mo. Furn. Room
w/ T.V. 1/2 utilities,
cable, wifi & phone.
Smoking ok.
Bill 763-7241
Furnished Apts for Rent
2BD 1BA Beautiful mtn
view near Big Horn.
Up to 2 horses neg.
1 yr. lease req. NO
PETS/NO SMOK.
$900 includes all util.
752-8372
CLEAN, QUIET
boarding rm. $400/mo.
575-0975
WKLY FR $240. Am. Best
Value Inn 672-9757
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
NEWER 3 BR 3 ba.,
2600 sq. ft. condo.
Fplc., fam. rm.,
dishwasher, refrig.,
W/D, AC, deck,
2 car gar., maint. free,
snow remov., near
hosp. & daycare. $1500
+ dep. Call 751-4951
1 BDRM. $750/ mo inc.
util. No smoking/pets.
W/D hookup.
673-2571 or 751-2198
VERY NICE, clean,
2BD. W/D. $750mo w/
$750 dep. No pets.
Avail. immediately.
672-0227 & leave msg.
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
2BR, 1BA townhome
w/appl, new carpet
and paint. $900mo
+ util. Lease & dep.
No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-6772
CLEAN 2 bdrm
townhome with
appliances. $850/mo
+ utilities. Lease &
dep. No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-1415.
4 BR 2 ba., nice
neighborhood, close to
school $1800/mo.
673-5555
2BR, A/C, fenced yard,
1 car gar. Close to
downtown. $700/ mo
+ util. Lease & dep.
Availailable: Nov. 1st.
672-3507.
2 BDRM w/ garage.
Newly remodeled. No
smoking/pets. Lease &
dep. $900/ mo + util.
307-751-1415.
Duplexes, Unfurn. for
Rent
3 BDRM/2.5 ba Condo.
A/C.
W/D
hookup.
Garage.
No
pets/Smoking. $1100 +
dep. Lease. 763-1003
for app.
Storage Space
25'X80' BUILDING.
Storage/office.
Overhead door.
$400/mo. 307-256-6170
Work Wanted
NEED YOUR trees
trimmed and hauled
NEWER, VERY nice 3 away? Call 307-286BR 2 ba., incl. W/S/G. 4019.
1st & last req. No
Help Wanted
smk./no pets. $850/mo,
Heidi's Mobile Home Ct. GENERAL MANAGER
#8, call 763-0675.
Knife River is looking
Mobile Homes for Rent
3 BR 2 ba. Heidi's Mobile for a General Manager
Home Ct. #49. 1st & last for Casper, WY Division
req. No smk., 1 pet only - Minimum Qualifications:
Deposit req.
$725/mo. Over 4 years up to and
763-0675
including 10 years from
post high school, work,
Mobile Hm. Space for
military, institutional or
Rent
vocational environment.
RV SPACE, Big Horn. Ability to provide and
By day, month or year. maintain
proper
674-7718
licensure, medical card
Office Space for Rent
and acceptable driving
1230 N. Main, 1000 SF, record. For complete
job posting, please visit
$750/mo. 752-5526
our
website
2 BEAUTIFUL SUITES
jobs.mdu.com.
for lease. (One with
Knife River is an Equal
kitchen area). Security,
Opportunity/Affirmative
janitorial, & utilities
Action employer. All
included. Conference
qualified applicants will
room avail to tenants.
receive
consideration
672-8700 or 751-3828.
for employment without
COMMERCIAL
regard to race, color,
KITCHEN & bakery
religion, sex, national
w/ retail space. $800.
origin,
disability
or
752-7848.
protected
Veteran
status.
Storage Space
We offer a full benefit
CIELO STORAGE
package which includes
752-3904
401k, Medical, Dental
and Vision. We are a
WOODLANDPARK
drug
free
work
STORAGE.COM
environment
requiring
5211 Coffeen
pre-employment
and
Call 674-7355
random
drug
testing.
New Spaces
Apply
online
at
Available!
jobs.mdu.com
If unable to apply online
INTERSTATE
mail
completed
STORAGE.
application to:
Multiple Sizes avail.
PO Box 730; Casper,
No deposit req'd.
WY 82602-0730
752-6111.
CLASS A CDL Driver
CALL BAYHORSE
needed to work in oil
STORAGE 1005 4th
field in Douglas, WY.
Ave. E. 752-9114.
Housing provided.
E L D O R A D O Flexible schedule. Two
STORAGE Helping you wks on/two off or three
conquer space. 3856 wks on/two off. $714/wk
guaranteed. Usually
Coffeen. 672-7297.
CROWN STORAGE Inc $1600-$1800/wk. 307690-8253.
KROE Lane 674-9819.
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
THE CITY of Sheridan
is looking for a PartTime Landfill Worker to
join our Landfill team
and work 32 hours per
week. Duties include
collection of refuse on
landfill site, assisting
with
dumping
materials,
trimming
weeds,
shop
maintenance,
and
processing recyclables
and waste collections
materials.
Interested
applicants must submit
a City of Sheridan
application
to
55
Grinnell
Plaza,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
This is a fully benefited
position with a hiring
range of $14.81 hr $16.36 hr DOE. Full
job description and
application can be
found
at
www.sheridanwy.net.
The
deadline
for
applications
is
10/21/14. The City of
Sheridan is a drug free
workplace.
C.N.A'S WANTED!!
If you are looking for a
position in a NO LIFT
work environmentcome see us at
Emeritus at Sugarland
Ridge. Our team
members enjoy
employment which
offers flexible
scheduling,
computerized
continuing education
system,
opportunities for growth
and advancement, as
well as a warm, familylike atmosphere. We
currently have
vacancies
for PRN certified
nursing assistants. If
you are energetic,
caring and enjoy giving
excellent care to
seniors, then we want
you to join our family.
Apply in person at
1551 Sugarland Ridge.
P/T
BOOKKEEPER
position available for
local accounting firm.
Must have a minimum
of 3 years experience
with
full
charge
bookkeeping
duties
including
quarterly
payroll
reporting,
financial reporting and
experience
with
QuickBooks. Individual
must be progressive,
energetic and detail
oriented. Must be able
to work independently
and as part of a team.
Send
resume
and
references to Harker
Mellinger CPAs, LLC,
PO Box H, Sheridan
WY 82801
P/T SEASONAL
GRAPHIC ARTIST
NEEDED
Do you have
experience in Adobe
InDesign and/or
PhotoShop? Do you
want to be creative in
a rewarding, fastpaced work
environment?
30 hrs. per week.
Flexible schedule &
Apply to:
The Sheridan Press
[email protected]
ess.com
P.O. Box 2006 or
144 E. Grinnell St.
Sheridan, WY
82801
Now Hiring
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
Exteriors
is
immediately
hiring
experienced Siding,
gutter & window
installers/laborers,
top pay DOE. Call
751-6500.
SECURITY STATE
Bank is accepting
applications for a full
time Teller. Banking
experience is preferred
but not required,
excellent
communication and
customer service skills
are essential. Starting
wage DOE. Benefits
include health/ dental/
vision/ 401K/ PTO.
Send resume to 2070
Coffeen Ave., Sheridan,
WY 82801 attention
Kellie Arndt. Closing
date 10/10/14. Security
State Bank is an equal
opportunity employer of
women, minorities,
veterans and individuals
with disabilities.
WE ARE currently
seeking vacuum truck
drivers to join
our team in
Wyoming. We provide
24/7 service. He or she
must have class A CDL,
with tankers
endorsement. Housing
available! We also offer
Insurance! $18-$22
starting pay! Contact
our office in Wright, WY
307-464-1146. Contact:
Gilbert Moncibaiz at
307-299-9200. Email:
g.moncibaiz10services
@gmail.com
FOOD SERVICE
Cook/Driver needed.
This is a 32 hour/week
(during school year)
position, with benefits.
Please contact Dennis
Decker, SCSD #1 Food
Service Director for
more information @
307-751-2872. E.O.E
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
• Morning and
Evening Servers
• Line Cook
• Maintenance
• House Keeping
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the Front Desk.
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
These Animals are Available
at the Dog & Cat Shelter
84 East Ridge Road
Dogs
Cats
“Junior”, 1 yr. old, NM, black & tan, Min Pin
“Colton”, 2 yr. old, NM, black, Retriever mix
“Dash”, 8 mo. old, NM, black& tan, Shepherd/Husky mix
“Brut”, 2 yr. old, NM, black & brown, brindle Mastiff
“Jax”, 1 yr. old, NM, white & tan, Terrier mix
“Franny”, 2 yr. old, SF, black & white, Border Collie
“Jojo”, 2 yr. old, SF, black, Retriever/Heeler mix
“Blue”, 5 yr. old, NM, black & brown, Tricolor Coonhound
“Tango”, 8 mo. old, NM, brown, Retriever mix
“Bobert”, 7 yr. old, NM, grey & brown, tabby, DSH
“Tutter”, 3 mo. old, NM, black & grey, tabby, DSH
“Bella”, 1 yr. old, SF, gray, DLH
“Muggs”, 6 yr. old, SF, gary, Persian
“Eva”, 4 yr. old, SF, black & white, DSH
“Annie”, 3 yr. old, SF, black & white, DMH
“Leticia”, 4 yr. old, SF, black, DSH
“Bean”, 17 yr. old, NM, cream & brown, Siamese mix
“Bill”, 3 yr. old, NM, Grey, DSH
DSH = domestic short hair DMH = domestic medium hair DLH = domestic long hair
NM = neutered male • SF= spayed female
We have 41 cats and 3 kittens, 18 dogs up for adoption!!
Come up and see what we have for you!
Please bring your aluminum cans either to our Can Hut just inside the Shelter
gates or to our can trailer at Scotty’s Skate Castle. Recycling proceeds are
used to care for the animals.Thanks for your support.
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
MULLINAX
CONCRETE has a Full
Time Data
Entry Position for Fleet
Management and Job
Costing. Must have
exceptional computer
skills and be well
versed in Microsoft
Excel.
Mechanical knowledge
would be helpful.
Please send resume
and
references to P.O. Box
2044 Sheridan, WY.
Mullinax Concrete is a
Drug Free and EOE.
NORTH PARK
Transportation
is hiring for
LINEHAUL DRIVER.
Must have class A
CDL w/ hazmat and
combination. Must be
able to pass
background check
and drug test. Benefits,
health & profit sharing.
Apply in person
648 Riverside.
TACO JOHN'S/GOOD
TIMES & ARBY'S are
looking for F/T & P/T
employees to work
days,
nights
&
weekends
as
crew
members
&
shift
supervisors. Clean cut
appearances & pleasing
personality
are
essential. Stop by our
stores for application
and your interview.
References.
$10.00+
per hr DOE.
RODEWAY INN &
Suites is looking
for front
desk/housekeepers.
Apply in person at 1704
N. Main, Sheridan.
Help Wanted
LPN,
WYO.
Girls
School, Sheridan; Class
Code HSNU06-01594,
Target Hiring Range:
$2966-$3708/mo. The
purpose of this job is to
gather data regarding
the health status and
attend to the healthcare
needs of each resident
admitted
to
the
Wyoming Girls School.
This will be done within
the
scope
and
standards of nursing
practice
for
the
Practical
NEEDED:
RELIABLE Licensed
overnight sitter for 2 Nurse as outlined by
girls (3&6) . Hours 9pm- the Wyoming State
Board of Nursing and
8am. Call 763-7631.
under the direction of
an
RN,
Contract
Physicians and other
professional healthcare
providers. For more
information or to apply
online,
go
to:
http://www.
wyoming.gov/loc/06012
011_1/Pages/default.as
px or submit a State of
Wyoming Employment
Application
to
the
Human
Resource
Division,
Emerson
Building, 2001 Capitol
Avenue, Cheyenne, WY
82002-0060,
Phone:
(307)777-7188,
Fax:
(307)777-6562, along
with transcripts of any
relevant course work.
The State of Wyoming
is an Equal Opportunity
Employer and actively
supports the ADA and
r e a s o n a b l y
accommodates
qualified applicants with
disabilities.
Delivery
problems?
Call The Press
at 672-2431
Hints from Heloise
Cut
in Material
but Not
in Cost
Dear
Readers:
Here is
this
week's
SOUND
OFF,
about
the
price of
towels:
"Why
is it
that when buying good-quality towels, the hand towel or washcloth to
match is not far behind the price of
the bath towel? It makes no sense,
as three or four hand towels could
be made out of the amount of material in a bath towel, and certainly
several washcloths." -- JoAnne B. in
New York
It does not seem to make sense,
but what you really are paying for
is the labor, not the material. So, if
you sew, buy an extra bath towel
and make several hand and face
towels on the cheap. -- Heloise
SEND A GREAT HINT TO:
Heloise
P.O. Box 795000
Heloise
San Antonio, TX 78279-5000
Fax: 1-210-HELOISE
Email: Heloise(at)Heloise.com
FAST FACTS
Dear Readers: Mary, via email,
sent other uses for plastic kennel
replacement trays:
* Put under oily or rusty tools.
* Use as jigsaw-puzzle boards. The
lip keeps the puzzle from sliding off
the table.
* Contain small toys, and use as a
play area for kids.
* Use as under-bed storage.
* Place in mudrooms or porches
to hold muddy or dirty shoes.
-- Heloise
SWIMSUIT SAVING
Dear Heloise: I swim year-round
in an indoor pool. Because of this, I
go through swimsuits very fast. Do
you have any hints that will help
my suits last longer and not fade? -Susan in Texas
Swimming is great exercise for all
ages, but constant exposure to chlorine can cause wear and fading of
swimsuits.
Here's all you need to know: After
swimming, shower (with the suit
on) in cool water, remove the suit
and rinse in water again. No soap
needed -- for the suit, that is! This
process helps remove the chlorine
from the material.
Lay the suit out on a towel. Gently
roll up the towel to remove excess
water. You don't need to wring or
squeeze it a lot. Then just let it airdry. Putting it in the washer and
dryer can make it deteriorate faster
by wearing out the elastic. Another
thing you can do is get several suits
and alternate wearing them. Keep
swimming along! -- Heloise
GREEN HINT
Dear Heloise: I read the hint
about unused envelopes. My husband has relocated his business several times, and we have boxes of
envelopes with the wrong return
address. I use these for my grocery
lists, keeping a stack handy in the
kitchen. Before I go shopping, I sort
through my coupons, tucking any
that I can use inside the envelope. -Roseanne, via email
This is a classic hint that is very
helpful! Depending on where the return address is located, you could
use the envelopes for mail, too. Be
sure there is no bar code on the envelope, and simply place an address
label with the new address over the
old one. -- Heloise
BANDAGE WRAP
Dear Heloise: I had two knee replacements a month apart and had
to keep the bandage dry for two
weeks after each surgery. I used
self-sticking plastic wrap, and it
worked perfectly. Kept the bandage
dry as a bone, and it was easy to put
on. -- B.J., via email
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
Help Wanted
NSI ACADEMY
is seeking the
following positions:
Youth Counselor;
Clinical Therapist;
Case Manager; QA
Coordinator; Special
Ed. Teacher; Cook
(P/T). All applicants
must be 21 years of
age, meet educational
requirements, pass
background checks
and submit to drug
prescreening. Benefit
package available for
Full Time Employees.
Apply to: Human
Resources; NSI
Academy 5 Lane Ln.
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Call: (307) 674-6878
Ext. 119 Fax: (888)
400-5451.
[email protected]
vices.com or Online:
www.sequelemployme
nt.com
Help Wanted,
Professional
A GROWING company
in Story, Wyoming is
looking for a licensed
Massage therapist and
personal trainer. Must
be able to work various
times. Must be licensed
and professional. Must
have experience with
deep tissue massage.
Must
have
sales
experience,
or
the
enthusiasm
to
sell.
Coach, motivate and
inspire members at
every stage of their
fitness journey. Present
and
sell
training.
Provide
exceptional
customer service to
build a loyal client base.
Please send resume to
box 211, c/o The
Sheridan Press, PO
Box 2006, Sheridan,
WY 82801
Help Wanted,
Professional
SENIOR NETWORK
Tech- Advanced
Communications
Technologies, Inc.
(ACT)
Sheridan, WY.
Installs, maintains,
tests, supports all types
of central office (CO),
and outside plant
facilities
as well as customer
networks lines and
equipment. Provides
guidance to Jr Network
Techs on installation
and repair. Full job
description on request.
Combination of
education and exp
equivalent to Assoc.
degree plus 7-10 yrs of
exp in
Telecom/Datacom.
Health/Vision/Dental;
LTD; Life; 401K; Send
resume with letter of
interest to: ACT/Range
HR. * PO Box 127 *
Forsyth, MT 59327; Email
[email protected]
fax: 406-347-2401.
Website:
www.actaccess.net
Help Wanted, Medical
Carlos Castaneda,
a Peruvian-American author with a
doctorate in anthropology who died in
1998, said, "The trick
is in what one emphasizes. We either
make ourselves miserable, or we make
ourselves happy.
The amount of work
is the same."
For a bridge
player, trick one is
what often emphasizes whether he
ends the deal miserable or happy. The
amount of work is
not the same,
though, because the
more effort put in
before playing from
the dummy at trick
one, the more contracts that will be
made.
This week, let's
look at some deals
in which declarer's
play at trick one is
either critical or
lays the foundation
tried and true and once you
find what you enjoy you
like to do it over and over
again. You may be unsettled
or annoyed by those who
prefer to experiment with
the new and different.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
What you see is what you
get. You can't win if you
hold a debate about beliefs
and opinions. Remember,
the glass holds the same
amount, although the optimist sees the glass as half
full and the pessimist sees it
as half empty.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You can win by being
forthright and honest about
the things closest to your
heart, but be aware that
others may have similar big
dreams that they keep
veiled. Camouflaging your
real purpose could backfire.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Little misunderstandings
could cloud the air. Your
loving nature has a chance
to shine, but don't try to analyze your feelings or hold
important discussions
about relationships. Your
patience and kindness can
brighten the atmosphere.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
The only way to make
money may be to spend
money. You could buy in
bulk to economize or consider tucking away a percentage of your income in a
savings plan. Avoid acting
on impulse if money is at
stake.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
You can capitalize on your
winning ways to get your
way. To sell anything, you
must sell yourself first, so
look your best. With Venus
7.6 ACRES between
two polo fields.
Landscaped. Well/
power/gas & water
rights. $400K.
72 Gallatin Lane.
Call 561-914-0915.
Go online today!
www.thesheridanpress.com
Autos-Accessories
LONG BED P/U cap.
Raven. Fiberglass, tan.
Very good condition.
$750. 683-3398.
ATV’s
1998 KAW Prairie 400.
$1500.
1999
Kaw
Prairie 300. $1500.
$2800 for both. Call
683-3398
Campers, Trailers
Phillip Alder
for success. In
today's layout, what
should South do
after West leads a
low spade against
three no-trump?
South starts with
eight top tricks: one
spade (given the
opening lead), three
hearts, two diamonds and two
clubs. The ninth
winner can definitely come from
clubs. But what is
the risk?
If the club finesse
loses, maybe the defenders can run
the spade suit.
To stop that,
declarer must
follow the
"honor from the
shorter side
first" dictum.
Since there are
only two spades
on the board,
South must put
up dummy's
king. Here, he
wins the trick
and can run the
club jack to
guarantee his
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Max Thieriot was born in
Los Altos Hills, Calif., today
in 1988. This birthday guy
currently stars as Dylan
Massett on "Bates Motel."
He's also appeared in
movies such as "House at
the End of the Street," "My
Soul to Take" and "Chloe."
He will next co-star with
Brendan Fraser and Ray Liotta in the upcoming miniseries "Texas Rising."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Discretion is essential,
since revealing secrets that
you promised to keep confidential could cause a crisis.
Try to avoid office politics
and water cooler gossip
even if you think they
might further your ambitions.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You tend to stick to the
HOUSE FOR SALE IN
peaceful Mt.
Shadows, 5BR 3BA 3
car garage, patio &
screened porch, 2 gas
fireplaces, fam rm,
office & built-ins; 3734
sq ft, $444,000 7520427
19.7' KITCO Camper.
DENTAL
ASSISTANT. self contained, tandem
Progressive office adding wheels, Sway bars.
an outgoing, F/T team 307-461-0211.
member. Emphasis on
1979 22' Monarch
excellent patient care, Camp Trailer. Set up for
hands on exp. in medical
hunting/camping.
or dental office helpful,
Equipped w/ furnace,
Send resume & cover letter
fridge, heater,
to: Send reply to box 212,
microwave, 60 gal
c/o The Sheridan Press, PO
water, full size bed.
Box 2006, Sheridan, WY
$2500. 751-0253 or
82801
673-7290. Ask for Dan
or Monty.
Real Estate
PRICE REDUCED!
VERY NICE 4 plex in
1978 Aspen 13'.
Dayton, WY. Great
Sleeps 2 adults+. Inside
investment. FSBO.
completely remodeled.
Serious inquiries only.
Must see to appreciate!
$425K. 307-674-7718.
$2000 OBO. 672-0996
Bridge
TRICK ONE IS THE
CONTRACT'S KEY
Real Estate
contract. Even
though that finesse
loses, declarer's remaining queen-low
in spades is a stopper with West on
lead.
Note, though, that
if South takes the
first trick with his
spade queen, when
West gets in with
his club queen, he
cashes the spade ace
to squash dummy's
king, then takes
three more spade
tricks to defeat the
contract.
Jeraldine Saunders
in your sign, it's easy to become the object of someone's amorous desires.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Hindsight is always
twenty-twenty. Today it is
easy to be objective about
things that have caused a
rift between you and a special someone. Remember
that perfection is not always possible in the realm
of human emotions.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): You could be a collector or a hoarder. You
must learn to discard the
outworn and useless while
keeping the valuable. Put a
stopper on a financial drain
and accept some limitations
that are temporarily in effect.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Time is the one commodity that can't be re-
placed once used. Coworkers or friends may lure you
into frivolous discussions
or interrupt when you're
deep into a project or facing
a deadline. Don't neglect
your duties or commitments to play social games.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Stay in touch with the
trends. Something new and
innovative might brighten
your life; you don't want to
be seen as a stick in the
mud. Act on your creative
ideas or at least write them
down for future use.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): The lesson of the day is
that you shouldn't judge
others unless you're willing
to be judged yourself. Some
people may appear helpful
and sincere but have ulterior motives.
IF OCTOBER 14 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: You're easily
distracted from what's really important, and just as
easily fooled during the upcoming 4-6 weeks. Hold off
on major financial decisions and changes that
might affect your career or
income until December,
when you're more shrewd.
Let your imagination run
wild in March, when you're
feeling good about yourself
and when opportunities for
advancement may appear.
Helpful friends may help
you fill your piggy bank,
and those with your best interests at heart may grow
closer. Count on making important life changes that
will give you lasting pleasure.
101314Legals_Layout 1 10/13/14 9:51 AM Page 1
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
MONDAY OCTOBER 13, 2014
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Robert
Webster
Councilor
307-674-4206
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Public Hearing Notice
Sheridan Planning Commission
/City Council
The following item will be heard before the Planning
Commission of the City of Sheridan, Wyoming, on
October 27, 2014. The meeting will be held in the City
Council Chambers at City Hall, 55 Grinnell Plaza,
Sheridan WY, at 7:00 P.M.
1. Consideration of PL 14-22, WESCO II
Annexation,
annexing approximately 88.71
acres into the City of Sheridan. Additionally, zoning
said 88.71 acres as part of a
B-2 Business District
(see site location map below).
The City Council is scheduled to consider the annexation
petition and zoning request following a public hearing
on November 17, 2014 (7PM, City Council Chambers),
and this hearing is advertised here per the requirements
of WS В§15-1-405.
The Annexation Report for the petition is available in
the City Clerk’s office at the time of publication of this
notice.
The following is a summary of the Annexation Report
with map:
Land Use and Zoning:
This property has historically been a vacant land zoned
with the Sheridan County zoning designation of Urban
Residential. The petitioners have requested B-2
Business Zoning for the property. Any further
development proposal is subject to City of Sheridan
review and approval. Development density and land use
will be governed by the zoning requirements of B-2
Industrial Districts. Detailed information on this zoning
district may be found in Sheridan City Code Appendix A
(http://qcode.us/codes/sheridan).
City Services:
Water and sewer mains to serve the proposed
annexation will need to be extended to the property, as
well as an extension of Dry Ranch Road. The estimated
cost of these infrastructure improvements is S812,446.
An additional $1,044,318 of onsite infrastructure has
been proposed to serve future development. These
estimated costs will be paid by the property owner. The
service cost for public utilities connections will be
dependent on ultimate use and configuration, however,
for new construction, minimum costs of water and
sewer connections would be $3,380 for water service
and $3050 for sewer service. Solid waste collection
rates will be as per Resolution 48-11.
Revenues:
The City of Sheridan presently has an 8 mil property tax
levy based on assessed value. New construction will be
subject to one-time user fees for City taps of at least
$3561 for water and $3050 for sewer. Minimum ongoing
user fees are estimated at $217.20 for water and $144
for sewer per customer per year, and minimum
residential solid waste collection fees are $205.20 per
year. These п¬Ѓgures do not include other sources of
income related to changes in tax revenues not related
to property tax or utility services.
__/s/ Scott Badley_________________________
Scott Badley, City Clerk/Interim Treasurer
B7
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
and billing information are required
with each legal notice. A PDF is
Publish: October 13, 20, 2014.
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Kathy
Coleman
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-675-1960
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE
AND FINAL PAYMENT AND SETTLEMENT
Notice is hereby given that on the 6th day of
November 2014, п¬Ѓnal settlement will be made by the
City of Sheridan, for and on account of a contract with
SSR Construction, Inc. for the 2014 Brundage Lane
Pedestrian Crossing Project.
The above work having been completed and accepted
according to the plans and specifications of MC2
Engineering and Construction, P.C. and the above date
being the 41st day after the п¬Ѓrst publication of this
notice, the said Contractor will be entitled to п¬Ѓnal
settlement and payment therefore.
Any person, partnership, association, agency or
corporation who shall have any unpaid claims against
said Contractor for or on account of the furnishing of
labor, materials, equipment, sustenance, provisions, or
other supplies used or consumed by such contractor
and/or subcontractor in or about the performance of
said work may at any time, up to and including the date
of final settlement and payment, file a verified
statement of any and all amounts due on account of
such claim with:
MC2 Engineering and Construction, P.C.
811 North Main Street
Sheridan, WY 82801
Failure on the part of the claimant to п¬Ѓle such
statement prior to п¬Ѓnal settlement and payment will
relieve absolutely the City of Sheridan, for all or any
liability for such claim.
/s/Nicholas Bateson
Public Works Director
Publish: September 26; October 13, 29 2014.
required if there are any signatures,
with a Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information
WILL cause delay in publication. All
legal notices must be paid in full
before
an
"AFFIDAVIT
OF
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press
legal advertising department at
672-2431 if you have questions.
Your Right
To Know
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
and be informed of government legal
proceedings is embodied in public notices. This newspaper urges every
citizen to read and study these notices.
We strongly advise those seeking
further information to exercise their right of access to public records
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
and public meetings.
B8 NIE 1013.qxp_A Section Template 10/13/14 9:52 AM Page 1
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014
Teacher name: _____________________________
School name:_______________________________
NIE is a national, non-profit service that provides teachers with free
local newspapers and materials for use in the classroom. We partner
with local businesses and organizations to underwrite the cost of
classroom subscriptions. If you teach in a accredited school. K college, and would like to receive The Sheridan Press in your
classroom please send in the form at the right.
Return form to:
The Sheridan Press
Attn: NIE
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wy 82801
or fax to 672-7950
For more information
call 672-2431
Grades taught:___________ Phone:____________
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