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FBM KLCI 1795.88
7.29
KLCI FUTURES 1793.00
8.00
STI 3419.15
6.95
RM/USD 3.6165
CPO RM2207.00
32.00
OIL US$49.19
0.41
GOLD US$1289.50
PP 9974/08/2013 (032820)
PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM1.50
THURSDAY JANUARY 29, 2015 ISSUE 1890/2015
FINANCIAL
DAILY
MAKE
BETTER
DECISIONS
www.theedgemarkets.com
NEW AND
IMPROVED
ALGORITHM
FOR STOCKS WITH
MOMENTUM PA G E 7
OFFICIALS
SUSPENDED
Shake-up at the top
in AMMB
4 HOME BUSINESS
5 HOME BUSINESS
Yinson clinches
RM9.16b job
in Ghana
20 F O C U S
3 TANJUNG OFFSHORE
3 HOME BUSINESS
Don’t make MyEG
services mandatory,
says private sector
A mini SUV based on a Golf?
AFTER INTERNAL REVIEW
Company alleges there are ‘possibilities of conflict of interest
and breaches of fiduciary duty’.
Charlotte Chong has the story on Page 3.
12 H O M E
Consult parents on
new Child Act,
says group
15 C O M M E N T
Benefits of
oil price fall
AirAsia X to raise RM500m from rights issue, placement
4 HOME BUSINESS
2.20
2
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
For breaking news updates go to
www.theedgemarkets.com
ON EDGE T V
www.theedgemarkets.com
RHB’s fund
management
unit expects
assets to grow
to RM58b
in 2015
Analyst:
Malaysia’s
fundamentals
remain strong
The Edge Communications Sdn Bhd
Greece wants
‘pan-European’ deal
Denies seeking ‘showdown’ with Europe
ATHENS: Greece’s new anti-austerity government yesterday called
for a “pan-European New Deal”
for bloc-wide growth and denied
seeking a “showdown” with Europe
over controversial plans to redraft
its multibillion bailout.
“There will be no showdown
between our government and the
European Union (EU). There will
be no threats, it’s not about who
climbs down first,” said new Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis.
Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras
earlier told his cabinet that Greece
would seek a “fair, mutually beneficial solution” with its EU peers to renegotiate its €240 billion (RM985.23
billion) EU-IMF (International Monetary Fund) bailout and make its
huge debt socially manageable.
In a speech to the cabinet — his first
since taking office — the 40-year-old
premier however insisted that Greece’s
new leaders were no longer willing to
bow to the “politics of submission”, in
a clear swipe at Brussels and the IMF.
“Our people are suffering and
demand respect... We must bleed to
defend their dignity,” Tsipras said.
But the new government’s radical anti-austerity agenda has
alarmed financial markets, reviving fears that Greece could crash
out of the eurozone.
Greek stocks were shedding over
7% in late afternoon trade — after
losing 3% the previous day — and
yields on 10-year bonds also rose
above the symbolic barrier of 10%.
And in another move that
spooked markets, the government
halted the privatisation of Greece’s
main port, Piraeus, which Chinese
shipping giant China Ocean Shipping Co had planned to turn into
its new European hub.
After his Syriza party stormed to
power on Sunday, Tsipras forged a coalition with the nationalist Independent Greeks, who are equally opposed
to the fiscal cuts imposed over the past
five years in return for bailout loans.
See related story on Page 18
Varoufakis, a fierce critic of the
conditions imposed by creditors,
yesterday called the cuts “a toxic mistake ... that took a toll on human lives,
either lost or undermined.” The ruling Syriza party has made frequent
references to a “New Deal”, harking
back to the stimulus programme that
pulled the United States out of the
Great Depression in the 1930s. — AFP
(266980-X)
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Carlsberg freezes pay and hiring
COPENHAGEN: Danish brewer
Carlsberg said yesterday it had
implemented a hiring and salary
freeze at the start of the year to gird
itself against an economic slowdown in Russia.
The freeze “has been in place since
the beginning of this year,” company
spokesman Jim Daniell told AFP.
“It’s mainly due to the tough microeconomic conditions in Russia,
which our Russian business is facing,” he said, adding that the company was unable to say how long
the measures would be in place.
Exemptions could be made for
seasonal workers “but as far as pay
grades or anything like that, it’s
across the board,” he said.
Carlsberg is Russia’s leading
brewer with a 39% market share.
In November, the group said in
its third-quarter earnings report that
while the value of the Russian beer
market had grown in the first nine
months, volumes had declined by
6% to 7% “due to the uncertain and
China builder says local
govts owe 50 billion yuan
BEIJING: A Chinese infrastructure firm is owed more than 50
billion yuan (RM28.96 billion)
in unpaid bills by local governments, said its billionaire founder, who is taking six debtors to
court as creditors grow nervous
over China’s massive regional
debt. China Pacific Construction Group, ranked last year as
a Fortune 500 company bigger
than Barclays plc and with annual revenues of US$59.6 billion
(RM215.16 billion), is suing the
six local government over one
billion yuan in payments that
were due at the end of 2012. “Different levels of government owe
us a lot of money,” Yan Jiehe said.
“The overdue debt should now
exceed 50 billion yuan,” he added. “We are suing for around one
billion yuan this time.” — Reuters
ECB, Fed encourage flow
to emerging markets
LONDON: Foreign money flows
into emerging markets bounced
back in January, buoyed by the
European Central Bank starting
quantitative easing and by the receding prospect of a US rate hike,
the Institute of International Finance (IIF) said. Following the
sharpest outflows in 18 months
in December, portfolio inflows
in January were expected to tally
US$18 billion (RM64.98 billion),
with bond investment rising to
US$14 billion and US$4 billion
going into stocks. “Portfolio flows
have rebounded in January to
more normal levels, after sizeable outflows in December,” IIF
chief economist Charles Collyns
said in a report published late on
Tuesday. — Reuters
BoE rate hike looking
more likely late this year
Carlsberg said yesterday it had implemented a hiring and salary freeze at the start of
the year to gird itself against an economic slowdown in Russia. Photo by Bloomberg
challenging macro environment.”
Eastern Europe accounted for
35% of Carlsberg’s total volume
and 36% of operating profit in 2013.
Western sanctions and a coinciding slide in the price of oil exports have sent Russia into recession and seen Standard and Poor’s
slap a “junk” rating on Moscow’s
foreign currency debt.
The United States said yesterday
it was ready to increase the sanctions over Russia’s actions in wartorn Ukraine, and the EU has said
it is looking at piling further pressure on the country’s economy in
response to an upsurge in fighting
blamed on Moscow. — AFP
EU investment plan could create 2.1 million jobs
GENEVA: The European Commission’s €315 billion (RM1,294.1 trillion)
investment plan to spur growth could
create more than 2.1 million net new
jobs, lowering the bloc’s jobless rate by
1% by 2018, the International Labour
Organization (ILO) said yesterday.
But if the three-year plan, announced by Commission chief JeanClaude Juncker in November, fails to
attract and leverage private investment, it would create just 400,000
new jobs, barely making a dent in the
EU’s 23 million unemployed, it said.
“If the plan is well designed, by
IN BRIEF
contrast, the number could reach
2.1 million new jobs by 2018. This
would enable a reduction in the unemployment in the European Union by 0.9% point, almost 1% lower
unemployment rate by 2018. It’s a
significant number,” Raymond Torres, director of the ILO’s research
department, told a news briefing.
“The Juncker plan is potentially
an important way to stimulate the
real economy directly in complement to the monetary injections that
have been announced by the European Central Bank,” he added, re-
ferring to the massive bond-buying
programme announced last week.
But investors being asked to
stump up most of the cash have
said Europe needs to come up with
more government money and more
details if its grand plan to boost
growth via new infrastructure projects is to get off the ground.
The plan of loans for infrastructure and small business is meant
to include €252 billion in private
investment to help bring down current EU-wide employment of some
10%, the ILO said. — Reuters
LONDON: The Bank of England
will keep interest rates at a record low until at least October
as inflation remains stubbornly
below target, according to economists in a Reuters poll who
have grown more confident
about their views. Forty-nine
of 60 economists surveyed
this week do not expect any
move from 0.5% before October, whereas in a poll taken just
under two weeks ago, 21 of 44
did. In a poll taken ahead of the
British central bank’s December policy meeting, 45 of 51 had
pencilled in a rate move before
October. Financial markets are
now not fully pricing in a move
until early next year. — Reuters
Thai Airways to cut
around 5,000 jobs
BANGKOK: Thai Airways will
reduce its workforce by around
5,000, or around 20%, over several years through attrition,
the Bangkok Post reported
yesterday, citing the transport
minister. The government approved a restructuring plan
for the state-controlled carrier
on Monday but did not detail
plans to shed jobs. The airline
is among the state companies
which the military has targeted
for reform since seizing power
in a coup in May. — Reuters
HOME BUSINESS 3
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
Three Tanjung Offshore
officials suspended
Company alleges ‘possibilities of conflict of interest and breaches of fiduciary duty’
BY C H A RLOT TE C H ONG
KUALA LUMPUR: Three company
officials in Tanjung Offshore Bhd
have been suspended after an internal review by an independent committee established within the firm.
According to a filing with Bursa
Malaysia yesterday, the company
alleged that there were “possibilities
of conflict of interest and breaches
of fiduciary duty involving two of
its directors, i.e. an executive director of Tanjung and a non-independent non-executive director of
Tanjung, acting both individually
and together”.
After deliberating on the findings
by the independent committee to
the board, Tanjung (fundamental
score: 1.95; valuation score: 2.4) said
it had decided to suspend the services of the said non-independent
non-executive director, executive
director and another individual,
its group adviser, with immediate
effect.
The independent committee
was formed on Jan 8, 2015, with its
members being three independent
directors of Tanjung, namely George
William Warren, Datuk Ab Wahab
Ibrahim and Shahrizal Hisham Abdul Halim. It was formed to review
and make recommendations “on
matters arising from recent media
reports on Tanjung”, according to
the company’s earlier announcement to Bursa.
The independent committee said
it found no faults or improprieties
on several matters, namely the acquisition of a property in the United
Kingdom for £6.7 million (RM36.7
million), as well as the acquisition
of the remaining 49% of Gas Generators (M) Sdn Bhd.
However, it found “deficiencies
in process” in the Philippine operations, which involved washing and
trading of chromite tailings; and
“lapses in control” in its ethylene
prolylene diene monomer project
in China.
Meanwhile, on its “construction
work request (CWR) closure project”,
Tanjung said the independent committee found that “there appears to
be elements of collusion/ collaboration in the ongoing negotiations
with a potential subcontractor which
could result in serious inflation of
costs for Tanjung”.
Tanjung said based on the committee’s finding, “Bourbon had informed that the two directors of Tanjung have approached Bourbon for
a vessel contract in Malaysia during
the period of heads of agreement for
a personal company linked to the
non-independent non-executive
director of Tanjung”.
To recap, Tanjung had a deal with
Bourbon Offshore Asia Pacific Ltd
to inject the latter’s marine assets
into the former, which would eventually result in a reverse takeover of
Tanjung by Bourbon. However, the
deal was mutually terminated in December 2014, following changes in
the prevailing economic, financial
and market conditions, including
declining oil prices.
Tanjung said the actions above
could have resulted in a “loss of
business opportunity and potential income stream related to the
Bourbon deal; the negotiation of
disadvantageous and lopsided contract terms and potential future loss
related to the CWR project; and the
dissemination of confidential company information to third parties
related to both the Bourbon transaction and the CWR project”.
Interestingly, Tanjung didn’t
name the trio whom it suspended
in the late evening announcement
to Bursa.
However, in a statement released
prior to its Bursa filing, it identified
the three individuals as executive director Muhammad Sabri Ab Ghani,
non-independent director Tan Sri
Tan Kean Soon and adviser Datuk
Harzani Azmi.
The statement was issued by Millennium Associates Sdn Bhd on
behalf of Tanjung.
As the largest shareholder, Lembaga Tabung Haji owns a 8.26% stake
in Tanjung. Its last transaction of an
acquisition of 1.45 million shares
was done in December last year.
This is followed by Tan, who holds
a 5.79% equity interest in Tanjung.
Tanjung ended 5% higher at 42
sen yesterday, translating into a
market capitalisation of RM156.26
million.
Shake-up at the top in AMMB
THE EDGE FILE PHOTO
BY JAHABAR SADIQ & JOYCE GOH
KUALA LUMPUR: A major shake-up
at the top level of AmBank Group is
on the cards as the banking industry
braces itself for a tough 2015.
Sources said the banking arm of
AMMB Holdings Bhd (fundamental: 1.7 ; valuation: 3.0) will soon see
the departure of its group managing
director (MD) Ashok Ramamurthy,
MD for wholesale banking coverage
Pushpa Rajadurai, and AmInvestment Bank MD/chief executive officer for wholesale banking products
Kok Tuck Cheong.
“Some of the changes will likely
be announced as early as end of this
week,” a source said.
At press time, AMMB had yet to
respond to questions posed.
Banking analysts when contacted
said they were unaware of anything
brewing. “This is quite surprising.
The market’s perception is that the
team, with Ashok leading it, has
done a good job so far based on
the numbers,” said a banking analyst. “NPL (non-performing loan)
ratios have come down, they have
improved cost efficiency; deposit
base has improved and ROE (return
on equity) has increased.”
Sources said a myriad of issues
surrounding the business were behind the upcoming changes.
Most recently, AmInvestment
was supposed to arrange a RM8.4
billion sukuk bond for 1Malaysia
Development Bhd (1MDB) to fi-
Khazanah
selling TNB
stake worth up
to US$454m
KUALA LUMPUR: State investor Khazanah Nasional Bhd
is selling 112 million shares
worth up to US$454 million
(RM1.64 billion) in Malaysia’s
largest power group Tenaga
Nasional Bhd (TNB), according to a term sheet seen by
Reuters yesterday.
The shares are being
priced at between RM14.40
and RM14.60 per share, according to the sheet, which
is equivalent to a discount
of about 1.35% to 2.7% to the
closing price of TNB shares
yesterday.
The sale will reduce
Khazanah’s stake
in the country’s
largest company
by market value
to 29.64% from
31.64%
The sale will reduce Khazanah’s stake in the country’s
largest company by market value to 29.64% from 31.64% currently, according to Thomson
Reuters data.
TNB on Jan 22 reported a
34.3% jump in its net profit in
the first quarter ended Nov 30,
2014 to RM2.35 billion, mainly
on higher charges and sales of
electricity.
CIMB Group Holdings Bhd
and Credit Suisse are the joint
bookrunners for the sale, the
sheet showed. — Reuters
Tune Ins
appoints
new CEO
Ashok joined the local banking group in
2007. The Edge file photo
nance its 3B power project but this
has been called off. AmInvestment,
together with Goldman Sachs, arranged the first bond issue amounting to RM5 billion for 1MDB in 2009.
Ashok joined the local banking
group in 2007 as a representative of
Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Ltd (ANZ) and was chief
financial officer (CFO) in the same
year the Australians emerged as a
strategic partner and major investor of AMMB.
In October 2008, Ashok was appointed to hold dual roles as deputy
group MD and CFO and succeeded
veteran banker Cheah Tek Kuang as
group MD of AMMB when the latter
retired on April 1, 2012.
Meanwhile, Pushpa and Kok
have had long careers in AmBank
Group. The two have been working
in the local banking group for over
Pushpa (left) and Kok have had long careers in AmBank Group.
two decades and have spent most
of their careers in the investment
banking arena.
Today, ANZ is the single largest shareholder of AMMB with its
23.75% stake. The entry of ANZ
has also boosted AmBank Group’s
product base, strengthened its business policies and improved its asset quality.
Aside from ANZ’s stake, the Employees Provident Fund has a 14.5%
stake in the group, while AmBank
Group chairman — Tan Sri Azman
Hashim — has a 12.97% stake.
For the six months ended Sept 30,
2014 (1HFY14), AMMB’s net profit
rose 11% year-on-year (y-o-y) to
RM1.048 billion. In notes accompanying the results, AMMB said
the improvement in earnings was
also due to other higher operating income of RM392.8 million and
other lower operating expenses of
RM81.8 million.
As for the full financial year ended March 31, 2014 (FY14), AMMB
saw its net profit rising 10% (y-o-y)
to RM1.78 billion.
The stock ended three sen down
yesterday at RM6.57, giving it a market capitalisation of RM19.8 billion.
The Edge Research’s fundamental
score reflects a company’s profitability and balance sheet strength, calculated based on historical numbers.
The valuation score determines if a
stock is attractively valued or not,
also based on historical numbers.
A score of 3 suggests strong fundamentals and attractive valuations.
Go to www.theedgemarkets.com for
more details on a company’s financial dashboard.
KUALA LUMPUR: Tune Ins
Holdings Bhd has appointed
Junior Namjick Cho as its new
chief executive officer.
In a filing with Bursa Malaysia yesterday, Tune Ins (fundamental: 2.7; valuation: 0.65)
said the appointment was effective on Jan 27, 2015.
Prior to his appointment
with Tune Ins, Cho, 43, was
chief executive adviser of AirAsia Zest between January 2013
and October 2014.
According to the statement,
prior to Tune Ins, Cho also held
several positions in insurance
companies such as Cigna International, Allianz Life, MetLife
Korea, and New York-based
MetLife International.
Among the positions he
held was the vice-president
and chief marketing officer of
Cigna International in South
Korea, as well as the managing director of Allianz Life of
South Korea.
He is also now a director of
Tune Insurance Malaysia Bhd.
4 HOME BUSINESS
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
AirAsia X to raise RM500m
Loss-making carrier proposes rights issue and private placement
BY C Y NTHI A B L E M IN
KUALA LUMPUR: AirAsia X Bhd
(AAX), the loss-making long-haul
affiliate of low-cost carrier AirAsia
Bhd, plans to raise RM500 million via
a rights issue and a private placement
to shore up its balance sheets, according to a source close to the matter.
The proposed rights issue is expected to be discussed and approved
in a board meeting that will be held
today.
The meeting will be chaired by
AirAsia (fundamental: 1.3; valuation: 1.8) founder and group
chief executive officer (CEO) Tan
Sri Tony Fernandes, who is due
to return from the 2015 annual
meeting of the World Econom-
ic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
“The proposed rights issue would
be carried out on the basis of one new
share for every two existing shares
held to raise around RM400 million.
“There is also a proposed private
placement of some 10% of the enlarged issued and paid-up share capital of AAX to raise another RM100
million,” said the source.
If approved, these two corporate
exercises will raise about RM500 million and the money would be used
to shore up the company’s balance
sheets for a good one year at least,
added the source.
AAX (fundamental: 0; valuation:
0.3) saw its net loss for the third quarter ended Sept 30, 2014 (3QFY14)
widen 84.8% to RM210.85 million
from RM128.79 million in 2QFY14,
on higher operating expenses, foreign
exchange losses and finance costs. It
was its fourth consecutive quarterly
loss since 4QFY13.
The airline is due to announce
its 4QFY14 financials next month,
and analysts are upbeat that the
airline can return to profit due to
lower fuel prices that coincides
with the seasonally peak fourth
quarter for 2014.
AAX is also undergoing management changes with its CEO Azran
Osman-Rani, rumoured to be on
his way out since last year, serving
his leave pending a replacement,
said the source.
He added that Benyamin Ismail,
who was previously group head of
Don’t make MyEG services
mandatory, says private sector
SHAHRIN YAHYA
BY C H EN SHAUA F UI
KUALA LUMPUR: While supportive of the implementation of the
online system for the employment and management of foreign
workers, a group representing 32
business associations has called
on the government not to make
the renewal of the foreign worker
temporary permit (PLKS) using
the online system provided by
MyEG Services Bhd mandatory.
They also called for the mandatory use of the Foreign Workers
Centralised Management System
(FWCMS), a system designed to
recruit, manage and profile foreign workers through the biometric system and operated by Bestinet Sdn Bhd, to be suspended
with immediate effect.
Associated Chinese Chambers
of Commerce and Industry of Malaysia deputy secretary-general
Tan Sri Teo Chiang Kok (pic) said
the associations and chambers
fully support the implementation
of an e-government system, but
employers must be given the option of using the over-the-counter service provided by the Home
Affairs Ministry (KDN).
He said that the government
should not pass on the cost for
outsourcing its services to a third
party and charge the public for
these services.
“This is part of the government’s duty. We already pay a
levy and licensing fee. This should
cover the cost of processing,” Teo
told a press conference here yesterday.
He added that the RM38 processing fee per foreign worker
charged by MyEG (fundamental:
2.6; valuation: 1.5) would be an
additional burden to businesses,
and the cost would ultimately be
passed on to consumers.
Currently, an employer who
wishes to hire a foreign worker
will have to pay a total of RM1,692
in various fees including the levy
(RM1,250), medical check-up
for workers (RM190 for women, RM180 for men), insurance
(RM127) and immigration processing fee (RM125).
Effective Jan 5, MyEG’s online
service became the only option to
renew the work permit of foreign
workers. Over-the-counter renewals were discontinued.
Some quarters complained that
this effectively means MyEG has
a monopoly on the renewal of the
PLKS. This has led the Malaysia
Competition Commission to initiate a probe on MyEG after a
complaint was lodged against it.
There were also concerns over
additional fees incurred by foreign
workers as it is now compulsory
to use the FWCMS to obtain entry visas.
“We understand both of these
systems are merely under the
‘Proof of Concept’ and only in
the ‘test run’ stage. In this regard,
the systems should not be made
mandatory. Even if they are proven to be efficient, they should only
be an option,” Teo said.
Malaysian Plastics Manufacturers Association president Lim
Kok Boon said that the various
processes involved in the hiring,
renewal and repatriation of foreign workers through KDN or the
government’s outsourced agents
have added to the cost of doing
business. Part of this cost has also
shifted to foreign workers, thus
affecting their income.
Malaysian Association of Foreign Maid Agencies president
Jeffrey Foo also pointed out the
agents in source countries such
as Nepal and Indonesia have decided not to send workers to Malaysia due to the increase in the
entry visa fee charged by the outsourced agents.
The 32 associations also proposed that all matters relating to
the employment of foreign workers be managed by the Ministry of
Human Resources (MoHR), as it
is the designated ministry for human resources and labour issues.
“MoHR currently has more
than 80 branches throughout the
country which can readily be organised to include the provision
of foreign worker-related services
at their counters,” Teo said.
The associations argued that
the role and function of the KDN
should be restricted to the issuance of the calling visa after
approval has been given by the
MoHR.
The associations include the
Malaysian Associated Indian
Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Federation of Malaysian
Foundry and Engineering Industries Associations and SME Association Malaysia.
investor relations for AirAsia, has
filled a new position of deputy CEO
of the airline.
Another top official, AAX chief
financial officer Chew Eng Loke,
is also likely to leave the company,
said the source, adding that talk is
also rife that a former promoter of
the initial public offering (IPO) of
AAX in 2013, Robert Milton, would
come in as group CEO of AAX.
Neither AirAsia nor AAX responded to questions posed by The Edge
Financial Daily at press time.
AAX, which operates Airbus
A330s mainly on routes to Australia, China and Japan, has seen
its shares plunge 46% from its IPO
price of RM1.25 a share while the
benchmark stock index has risen
1.6% since July 2013.
AAX shares closed 2 sen or 2.9%
lower at 67 sen yesterday to give it a
market capitalisation of RM1.6 billion, while AirAsia shares closed flat
at RM2.77, with a market capitalisation of RM7.74 billion.
The Edge Research’s fundamental score
reflects a company’s profitability and
balance sheet strength, calculated
based on historical numbers. The valuation score determines if a stock is
attractively valued or not, also based
on historical numbers. A score of 3
suggests strong fundamentals and
attractive valuations. Go to www.
theedgemarkets.com for more details
on a company’s financial dashboard.
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LPI FY14 net profit rises 40.5%
to RM283m
BY J E F F R E Y TA N
KUALA LUMPUR: LPI Capital Bhd’s
fourth quarter (4QFY14) net profit soared 123% from a year ago to
RM117.1 million or 53 sen a share,
boosted by the realisation of investment gains in equities.
4QFY14 revenue rose 1.5% to
RM299.2 million, in line with the
marginal growth in its core general insurance business, which recorded a revenue growth of 1.4%
to RM298.5 million.
For the full-year period, LPI’s net
profit surged 40.5% to RM283.02
million, while revenue rose 4.5% to
RM1.17 billion from RM1.12 billion
previously, its filing to Bursa Malaysia yesterday showed.
LPI said the higher FY14 profit was largely from its investment
holding segment, which recorded
a higher pre-tax profit of RM85.5
million, mainly due to the realised
gain on disposal of investment in
quoted equities.
LPI (fundamental: 1.7; valuation: 0.35) also declared a second
interim single-tier dividend of 55
sen per share for the financial year
ended Dec 31, 2014. This translates
to a full year distribution of 75 sen
per share.
Separately, LPI announced a
proposed bonus issue on a onefor-two basis that involves the issuance of some 110.66 million new
ordinary shares to reward its shareholder for their “loyalty” and “continuous support”, and to increase
LPI’s capital base to reflect its current scale of operations and assets.
Shares of LPI ended up 10 sen or
0.5% at RM18.50, giving it a market
capitalisation of RM4.09 billion.
BNM keeps OPR at 3.25%
BY S H A L IN I KUMA R
KUALA LUMPUR: Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) has decided to maintain
the Overnight Policy Rate at 3.25%,
following the Monetary Policy Commitee meeting yesterday.
The central bank said while Malaysian financial markets had been
affected by global developments,
there has been no disruption to financial intermediation.
“There remains ample liquidity
in the domestic financial system,
with continued orderly functioning
of the financial markets. The banking institutions are operating with
strong capital and liquidity buffers,
and continue to provide financing to
the economy,” it said in a statement,
noting it would continue to monitor
the risks of destabilising financial
imbalances. BNM added economic
activity will continue to be supported
by growth in domestic demand amid
a moderation in exports in the fourth
quarter of 2014. It believes going forward, domestic demand will remain
the key driver of growth.
“While private consumption
is expected to moderate, it will remain supported by the steady rise
in income and employment, and
the additional disposable income
from the lower oil prices,” said the
central bank.
Meanwhile, it expects investment activity to remain resilient,
with broad-based capital spending
by both the private and public sectors cushioning the lower oil and
gas-related investments.
HOME BUSINESS 5
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
Yinson clinches
RM9.16b job
in Ghana
It is the group’s largest contract to date
KUALA LUMPUR: Yinson Holdings
Bhd has clinched a contract for the
chartering, operation, and maintenance of a floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) facility
of up to US$2.539 billion (RM9.166
billion) for oil and gas (O&G) support operations in Ghana.
Yinson (fundamental: 1.5; valuation: 1.5) told Bursa Malaysia yesterday that a consortium made up of
its indirect wholly-owned subsidiary
Yinson Production (West Africa) Pte
Ltd (YPWA) and Yinson Production
West Africa Ltd (YPWAL), had been
awarded the contract by Italy-based
Eni SpA’s unit in Ghana, Eni Ghana
Exploration and Production Ltd (Eni
Ghana). The FPSO will process O&G
from the Offshore Cape Three Points
(OCTP) block in the Tano Basin,
which is approximately 60km off
the coast of Ghana.
YPWAL is a Ghanaian joint venture company of Yinson Production
Pte Ltd (YPPL) (49%) and Oil and
Marine Agencies Ghana Ltd (51%).
YPPL is an indirect wholly-owned
subsidiary of Yinson principally involved in the ship management services incidental to O&G extraction.
“The contract is for a firm charter
period of 15 years with five-yearly
extension options exercisable by
the client.
“The estimated aggregate value of
the contract (excluding reimbursable and cost escalation) during the
firm charter period is approximately
up to US$2.539 billion) and an estimated total aggregate value of up
to US$3.256 billion if Eni Ghana
exercises all five-yearly extension
options,” said Yinson.
“This contract is a game changer
for Yinson. This is by far our largest
contract to date, [and] brings us into
the top tier of FPSO players, and
Lim: This contract is a
game changer for Yinson.
This is by far our largest
contract to date, [and]
brings us into the top tier
of FPSO players.
demonstrates the excellent strategic
value of our acquisition of Fred Olsen Production in 2013,” said Yinson
chief executive officer Lim Chern
Yuan in a press statement.
The group added that Eni Ghana,
in an announcement on Tuesday,
had informed the market that Eni
Group and its partners had signed
an agreement with the President
of Ghana and the minister of petroleum to proceed with the OCTP
project.
Meanwhile, under the contract,
YPWA is the FPSO chartering company while YPWAL is the company
engaged in the operation and maintenance of the FPSO. “The FPSO is
expected to commence operations
in the OCTP block in 2017,” Yinson
said, adding that the contract will
contribute to its revenue and earnings from the financial year ending
Jan 31, 2018 (FY18) onwards.
“The win is definitely credit positive to the company,” an analyst with
Kenanga Research told The Edge Financial Daily over the phone, adding that his firm may raise Yinson’s
target price (TP) to RM3.
Currently, the firm has an “underperform” call on Yinson, with a
TP of RM2.31.
“We are still working out the exact number and rating. But we are
keeping our earnings forecast unchanged for now as the company
will only realise contributions from
[the job] from FY18,” she said.
Another analyst, who declined
to be named, said there will not be
much change in his calculations as
he had factored the job into his earlier estimation on Yinson. His firm
has a “hold” call on the stock, with
a fair value of RM2.97.
The trading of Yinson’s share
was suspended between 9am and
10am yesterday in conjunction with
the contract announcement. When
trading resumed, the stock rose as
much as eight sen or 2.8% to RM2.98
before shedding its gains to close unchanged at RM2.90, giving it a market capitalisation of RM3.01 billion.
The Edge Research’s fundamental
score reflects a company’s profitability and balance sheet strength, calculated based on historical numbers.
The valuation score determines if a
stock is attractively valued or not,
also based on historical numbers.
A score of 3 suggests strong fundamentals and attractive valuations.
Go to theedgemarkets.com for more
details on a company’s financial
dashboard.
DAP wants special
audit as 1MDB seeks
third repayment delay
KUALA LUMPUR: Putrajaya must
conduct a special audit of 1Malaysia
Development Bhd’s (1MDB) finances
after the strategic investor reportedly
requested for a third extension to repay a local RM2 billion loan, throwing a spotlight on its finances, said a
DAP lawmaker.
Petaling Jaya Utara MP Tony Pua
said 1MDB was “holding Malaysian
banks hostage by seeking a third extension for its overdue RM2 billion
loan”, citing a Bloomberg report yesterday saying “1MDB is planning to
seek another one-month extension”
on its RM2 billion loan “to give it more
time to sell a stake in its energy unit”.
“This news is shocking as 1MDB
has already missed two repayment
deadlines for a RM2 billion debt in
November and December 2014. Even
this RM2 billion loan itself is part of a
rescheduled and restructured debt it
couldn’t pay in November 2013,” he
said in a media statement released
in Kuala Lumpur yesterday.
He said the loan repayment extension raised a bigger question about
the US$1.1 billion (RM3.97 billion)
of funds which recently appointed
1MDB chief executive officer Arul
Kanda Kandasamy had announced
as “redeemed” from its Cayman Islands investment on Jan 13.
“Why couldn’t 1MDB have repaid
the RM2 billion loan with the proceeds of the redemption first to ease
the pressure on 1MDB?” he asked.
“The 1MDB debt crisis and its inability to resolve the meagre amount
relative to its RM42 billion debt betrays the fact that the company is in
serious financial trouble. Its assets are
over-leveraged and illiquid while in all
probability, 1MDB is also unable to
exit its investments without incurring
substantial losses,” he added.
Pua said that Prime Minister and Finance Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak,
who is the chairman of the board of
advisers for 1MDB “can no longer
hide behind the outlandish façade
and rhetoric that 1MDB is financially strong when it has to reschedule its
RM2 billion debt repayment thrice”.
“Instead, Datuk Seri Najib must
instruct a special audit of 1MDB by
the auditor-general or a reputable
independent auditor to uncover its
financial shenanigans,” the DAP lawmaker said.
He pointed out that The Edge Financial Daily had reported that Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) had summoned
key executives of 1MDB over the loan
repayment and warned them of the
consequences of failing to meet the
loan repayment deadline this month.
“The act of even seeking another
extension to the loan, which is only
a fraction of 1MDB’s RM42 billion
debt, is an affront to BNM. 1MDB is
also holding its bankers, in this case
Maybank (Malayan Banking Bhd)
and RHB Bank [Bhd], hostage as the
banks will have little choice but to grant
1MDB a further extension to the loan.
“It is completely unbecoming
and irresponsible for 1MDB, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Ministry
of Finance to bully its financiers. At
the same time, 1MDB’s delinquency
threatens both the creditworthiness
of the Malaysian government and the
stability of the Malaysian banking
system,” Pua said.
The Bloomberg report said the
state-owned investment company
needed more time to repay the debt
as it’s still in discussions with billionaire T Ananda Krishnan, Malaysia’s
second-richest person, citing people
who asked not to be named as the
process was private.
“[Ananda] Krishnan may exercise
an option, granted when he sold energy assets to 1MDB in 2012, to buy part
of the Edra Global Energy Bhd unit, the
people said,” according to the report.
Pua said it was scandalous that
the question of 1MDB’s ability to repay a RM2 billion debt now hinged
entirely on whether Ananda decides
to exercise his options to acquire a
stake in a 1MDB subsidiary.
“Firstly, 1MDB had overpaid Ananda with a RM8.5 billion acquisition of
his power assets in 2012. Now Ananda
holds the trump card to potentially
buy a strategic stake in 1MDB’s energy division at a fire-sale price because 1MDB has a RM2 billion sword
hanging over its head.
“And the new chief executive officer, Arul Kanda, has the cheek to tell
the media that 1MDB is a ‘responsible
borrower’,” he added. — The Malaysian Insider
BV. “We see an extra 10% from the
MTJDA area that we can capture.
From Malaysia’s perspective, there
is a leakage of vessels going to Thailand. We can capture that with Tok
Bali’s strategic location,” Roslan said.
AZRB announced last week that
it was leasing plots of land at the Tok
Bali Port with fuel and water bunkering facilities from TB Supply Base
Sdn Bhd and TB Realty for 32 years.
The company would be investing
RM12 million to RM15 million to build
two 3-litre marine gas oil tanks and
one 5-litre water tank at the Tok Bali
Port. Construction of these facilities
are expected to be completed in two
to three months.
AZRB’s expansion into a new
supply base as well as its optimistic
growth expectation may seem surprising at a time when the O&G sector is
seeing a slump in global crude prices.
However, Roslan dismissed the
threat of lower crude oil price to AZRB’s O&G earnings.
“People make a big deal out of
declining oil prices. Yes, it affects us
but it is not as if Malaysia started exploring and exporting oil when oil
price was at US$100 (RM361) per
barrel. Malaysia has been an oil and
gas player even when oil price was
US$20 per barrel. There will still be
[exploration] activities [regardless of
the low oil prices],” he said.
Tok Bali to boost Ahmad Zaki’s O&G revenue
BY Y EN N E FOO
KUALA LUMPUR: Ahmad Zaki Resources Bhd (AZRB) (fundamental:
0.55; valuation 1.8) is expecting its oil
and gas division (O&G) to contribute
“very good growth” in the next few
years in terms of revenue and profit
after the expansion of its bunkering
operations to the new Tok Bali Port
in Kelantan.
“Seeing that Tok Bali is in a very
strategic location, in three to four
years’ time, we would see very good
growth,” AZRB’s chief operating officer
Datuk Haji Roslan Jaffar told reporters after the signing ceremony of the
sub-lease and throughput agreement
with Tok Bali Port operators yesterday.
Roslan said revenue contribution
from the company’s existing bunkering activities in Kemaman Port in
Terengganu and the new Tok Bali Port,
could increase from 9% to approximately 20% in three to four years’ time.
In terms of profit, operations at
the two East Coast ports would still
contribute up to half of AZRB’s profits. In the nine months ended Sept
30, 2014, AZRB’s profit was RM9.9
million, while revenue was RM498.2
million — to which O&G contributed
7.46% or RM37.16 million.
The main reason for AZRB’s confidence in its Tok Bali Port bunkering
activities is the port’s “unrivalled”
location. It is only 160km away from
land as well as key exploration areas
such as the Malaysia-Thailand Joint
Development Area (MTJDA) and
the Malaysia-Vietnam Commercial
Arrangement Area.
Roslan said once AZRB’s new bunkering facilities are in operation, up to
10 production service contract (PSC)
customers, which are currently visiting the Kemaman Port and Songkhla
Port in Thailand, could be diverted to
Tok Bali. Some PSC customers expected to utilise the Tok Bali Supply
Base are Petronas Carigali Sdn Bhd,
Carigali Hess Operating Co Sdn Bhd,
Talisman Malaysia Ltd, and Hess Exploration and Production Malaysia
6 HOME BUSINESS
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
Penang to see
RM5b FDIs in
manufacturing
Investors are listed firms from China, Europe and the US
THE MALAYSIAN INSIDER
BY SA NGEETHA AM ARTHALINGAM
GEORGE TOWN: Four major investments with initial combined
funds of about RM5 billion in the
manufacturing sector, together
with a growing outsourcing and
services industry, are expected to
cushion the impact of less-thanideal external economic factors
on the state this year.
The major investments are
from four multinational corporations which are in the midst
of finalising approvals with the
authorities and are expected to
set base in the state by year end,
investPenang director Datuk Lee
Kah Choon (pic) told reporters at
the Penang economic briefing for
2015 yesterday.
“The investment horizon is
very good for Penang because
of these four investors, who will
create about 2,000 jobs for engineers, clerical and ground staff.
Two have already sourced for
factories and are hiring workers,” he said.
He declined to name the investors but said they are listed
companies from China, Europe
and the US and are corporations
in the electrical and electronics
(E&E) sector.
He said though the world economy was slowing down due to oil
price slump, which is impacting
Malaysia and weakening the ringgit, Penang is somewhat “shielded” from external forces so far.
Between 2008 and 2013,
Penang was the top capital investment receiver in the country
with an average 13% of investments in Malaysia going to the
state, Lee said, adding that between January and September
last year, a total of RM6 billion
investments was recorded.
He said the figure for capital
investment in 2014 — of which
RM2.7 billion is from domestic
investors and RM3.3 billion from
foreign investors — has already
exceeded the RM4 billion that the
state attracted in 2013.
He expects property investment in the Bayan Baru area
in terms of office rentals and
purchases to contribute to the
state’s economy in the future as
the RM11.3 billion Business Processing Outsourcing Hub is expected be up by 2024.
Lee also anticipates that investments in the services sector
would expand on the back of a
slowly shrinking manufacturing
sector.
“The manufacturing sector is
very important to Penang but it
will slow down. We believe it will
stabilise in future. When we expand the services sector, a large
portion of it will be in support of
manufacturing,” he said.
The manufacturing sector accounted for 48% of the state’s total
output of RM55 billion in 2013,
with the services sector following
closely at 47%, he said.
The state is also expecting
more global shared-services such
as Citigroup Transaction Services
Malaysia, Wilmar International Ltd, Air Asia Bhd, First Solar
Global Service and IHS Inc to
locate here, he said.
He said the manufacturing sector, particularly in the electrical
and electronics segment, benefitted from the weakening ringgit
because exports would increase
and stabilise the industry.
“We saw trade surpluses in
2014 and we expect Penang to
continue contributing to surpluses this year because of the weakening ringgit. The state budget is
also expected to remain in surplus
this year,” he said.
He stressed that though the
weakening ringgit and low crude
oil price were not exactly good
for Malaysia, they have a positive effect on Penang as it is an
export-orientated state.
“The E&E sector will benefit
from the falling ringgit, along with
the US economy rebounding. We
will continue to get foreign direct investments, although we are
mindful of the human resource
situation here. We are working
hard to balance it up.
“Tourism and medical tourism
are expected to increase with Visit
Penang Year this year,” he said,
adding that the tourism sector
contributed more than a third of
the state’s gross domestic product (GDP).
According to estimations by
the Penang Institute and extracts
from the Department of Statistics Malaysia’ Economic Report
2014/2015 for Penang and Malaysia, Penang is expected to see
a GDP growth of 5.4% to the nation’s 5.5% this year.
Petronas to step up diesel exports this year
SINGAPORE: Malaysia’s Petroliam Nasional Bhd (Petronas)
has stepped up its diesel exports in January and will continue to do so through the rest
of this year after it took full
control of a joint-venture refinery in Malacca, traders said
yesterday.
The state-owned oil and gas
firm will export an additional 600,000 to 900,000 barrels
of diesel a month on top of its
current 900,000 to 1.2 million
barrels a month, they said.
Petronas bought 47% of
Malaysian Refining Company
(MRC) from Phillips 66 Asia Ltd,
a subsidiary of US energy company Phillips 66, late last year.
It will take over exports of
oil products from Phillips 66
and hence increase its overall
exports of diesel, traders said.
MRC operates one of two
crude distillation units (CDU)
in Petronas’ 200,000 barrelsper-day refining complex in the
southwestern state of Malacca,
which mainly processes sour
crude.
Petronas operates the other
CDU, which mainly processes
sweet crude.
Traders expect the impact on
Asian gasoil margins to be muted as the overall export volumes
of the oil product will remain
unchanged. — Reuters
EC approves Sime
Darby’s RM5.6b New
Britain Palm Oil buy
BY G H O C H E E Y UA N
KUALA LUMPUR: The European
Commission (EC) has approved
Sime Darby Bhd’s takeover offer for New Britain Palm Oil Ltd
(NBPOL).
Sime Darby (fundamental: 1.3;
valuation: 1.3) said in a filing with
Bursa Malaysia yesterday that it
had obtained the clearance for the
European Union (EU) merger filing for the privatisation of UK and
Papua New Guinea-listed NBPOL.
“The condition of the EU merger filing has now been fulfilled,”
Sime Darby said, adding that the
NBPOL offer had been extended
until March 20 this year.
The EC said in a statement on
its website that it had approved
the NBPOL acquistion under EU
merger regulations.
The regulator said it had approved the exercise as the NBPOL
acquisition was not expected to
result in competition concerns.
“The proposed acquisition
would not raise competition concerns given particularly the parties’ geographic complementarity
within the EU and the presence of
other suppliers of palm oil products,” the commission said.
To recap, Sime Darby in October last year, via its wholly-owned
unit Sime Darby Plantation Sdn
Bhd, proposed to buy the entire stake in NBPOL for £7.15
(RM39.34) a share or £1.07 billion cash.
However, Sime Darby extended the offer period as it needed
to fulfill several conditions such
as obtaining the EC’s declaration
that the offer was compatible with
the internal market.
The privatisation of NBPOL will
see Sime Darby delisting NBPOL
from the UK bourse.
The acquisition of NBPOL includes Kulim (M) Bhd’s 48.97%
stake in NBPOL.
In December 2014, Kulim
shareholders at the company’s
extraordinary general meeting
approved the NBPOL stake sale
to Sime Darby.
Following Kulim shareholders’
approval, Sime Darby said it had
secured 58.7% of NBPOL’s voting
shares as at Dec 3, 2014.
This means Sime Darby had
then fulfilled the condition of securing at least 51% of NBPOL’s
voting rights for the takeover offer
to materialise.
The EC’s consent for Sime Darby’s NBPOL purchase represented
another milestone as the market
anticipated that the takeover offer
would become unconditional.
Sime Darby shares closed up
two sen at RM9.55 yesterday, giving it a market capitalisation of
RM59.32 billion.
The Edge Research’s fundamental score reflects a company’s
profitability and balance sheet
strength, calculated based on historical numbers. The valuation
score determines if a stock is attractively valued or not, also based
on historical numbers. A score of
3 suggests strong fundamentals
and attractive valuations.
RHB Asset Management to grow
portfolio to RM58b in 2015
BY ME E N A L A K S H A N A
KUALA LUMPUR: RHB Asset Management Sdn Bhd aims to grow its
assets under management (AUM)
to RM58 billion by year-end, with
Malaysia expected to be the largest
contributor to the growth.
RHB Asset chief executive officer
Ho Seng Yee said the group grew its
AUM to RM48.56 billion last year.
“It is a fair target for this year and
it is achievable looking at the plans
we have,” he said at a press conference after the launch of the RHBOSK Global Equity Stabiliser Fund.
“We are launching 16 funds in
Malaysia and 25 funds regionally,”
Ho said.
He said as RHB Asset had built
a strong repertoire in Malaysia, the
group expected the local equity
market to significantly contribute
to its AUM despite the volatility
seen this year.
According to Ho, RHB Asset
would leverage RHB group’s established presence, reputation and
network besides growing business
opportunities and good performance of its existing funds.
Ho said the company is launching
16 funds in Malaysia and 25 funds
regionally. Photo by Suhaimi Yusuf
According to RHB’s website,
RHB Asset was established following the merger of RHB Asset and
OSK-UOB Investment Management
Bhd in December 2013.
The merged entity constitutes
Malaysia’s third-largest retail and
institutional fund management firm.
ST O C KS W I T H M O M E N T U M 7
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
www.theedgemarkets.com
This column is an analysis done by Asia Analytica Sdn Bhd on the fundamentals of stocks with momentum that were picked up using proprietary algorithm by
Anticipatory Analytics Sdn Bhd and that first appeared at www.theedgemarkets.com. Please exercise your own judgment or seek professional advice for your specific
investment needs. We are not responsible for your investment decisions. Our shareholders, directors and employees may have positions in any of the stocks mentioned.
PLB ENGINEERING BHD
NEW AND IMPROVED ALGORITHM
TODAY marks the beginning of a new and improved 2nd generation algorithm for Stocks With
Momentum.
Unlike the old algorithm, this improved algorithm will differentiate between stocks that exhibit
positive (+ve) and negative (-ve) momentum. The “+ve” sign next to a stock’s name means it has
a rising price trend on momentum. Conversely, a “–ve” sign indicates the stock has a falling price
trend on momentum.
The new list of stocks will be posted daily on The Edge Markets (www.theedgemarkets.com) by 2.30
pm in the “Stocks with Momentum” box.The list does not constitute a buy or sell recommendation,
but it will give readers a better idea of what the market is buying and when to sell.
From tomorrow, this page will feature a short synopsis of stocks selected from this list. They
can be stocks that have exhibited positive (+ve) or negative (-ve) momentum.
RATIOS
DPS (MYR)
Net asset per share (MYR)
ROE (%)
Turnover growth (%)
Net profit growth (%)
Net margin (%)
ROA (%)
Current ratio (x)
Gearing (%)
Interest cover (x)
PLB ENGINEERING BHD
PLB ENGINEERING BHD
PLB (Fundamental: 0.8/3, Valuation: 1.2/3) saw
a 3.4% fall in its share price to close at RM1.73
yesterday.
The company is involved, principally, in property development, which now contributes a significant 54.7% of revenue. This is followed by the construction arm, which accounts for another 34.4%
of revenue. PLB also holds a 20-year concession
to manage the Pulau Burung sanitary landfill site.
Just two weeks ago, PLB proposed to purchase
42,668.4 square metres of land in Seberang Pe-
rai Utara to increase its land bank. The purchase
consideration of RM7.5 million is to be satisfied
via a mix of internally generated funds and borrowings. Gearing for the company was 56.1% as
at 31 August 2014.
PLB’s revenue between FYAug2012 to FY2014
was boosted by increased property sales. Accordingly, net profit also increased, ranging between
RM10.9 — RM12.8 million over the same period.
The stock is trading at 1.06 times book and a
trailing 12-month P/E of 11.48 times.
ASIA BIOENERGY TECH BHD
ong Corp Ltd and Tan Sri Halim Saad-controlled
Sumatec Resources, collectively hold some 20%
stake in AsiaBio’s enlarged shareholding.
AsiaBio, a technology incubator specialising in
the bioenergy sector, has been loss-making since FYJan2012. For 9M2015, its net loss widened by 39.8%
y-o-y to RM1.3 million. With the acquisition, the company will diversify into downstream O&G activities to
provide transportation services for petroleum products amid the current environment of weak oil prices.
ASIA BIOENERGY TECH BHD
Valuation score*
0.00
1.20
Fundamental score**
TTM P/E (x)
TTM PEG (x)
2.75
P/NAV (x)
TTM Dividend yield (%)
176.48
Market capitalisation (mil)
Shares outstanding (ex-treasury) mil 840.40
1.14
Beta
0.07-0.21
12-month price range
*Valuation score - Composite measure of historical return & valuation
**Fundamental score - Composite measure of balance sheet strength
& profitability
Note: A score of 3.0 is the best to have and 0.0 is the worst to have
YINSON HOLDINGS BHD
ASIA BIOENERGY TECH BHD
Financials
Turnover
EBITDA
Interest expense
Pre-tax profit
Net profit - owners of company
Fixed assets - PPE
Total assets
Shareholders' fund
Gross borrowings
Net debt/(cash)
ASIA BIOENERGY TECH BHD
YINSON HOLDINGS BHD
Valuation score*
1.50
1.50
Fundamental score**
17.19
TTM P/E (x)
0.06
TTM PEG (x)
2.33
P/NAV (x)
0.43
TTM Dividend yield (%)
2,995.12
Market capitalisation (mil)
Shares outstanding (ex-treasury) mil 1,032.80
1.17
Beta
2.31-3.47
12-month price range
*Valuation score - Composite measure of historical return & valuation
**Fundamental score - Composite measure of balance sheet strength
& profitability
Note: A score of 3.0 is the best to have and 0.0 is the worst to have
FY14 ROLLING 12-MTH
0.02
1.26
10.04
73.54
52.52
7.12
7.52
2.73
53.83
12.64
0.05
1.55
10.36
50.43
15.49
5.46
7.23
2.42
55.33
11.99
0.10
1.69
9.62
(16.54)
2.03
6.68
6.57
2.00
56.13
8.94
0.05
1.69
10.01
(16.54)
2.02
6.68
6.96
2.00
56.13
8.99
Valuation score*
1.20
0.80
Fundamental score**
11.10
TTM P/E (x)
5.48
TTM PEG (x)
1.02
P/NAV (x)
2.89
TTM Dividend yield (%)
142.13
Market capitalisation (mil)
82.16
Shares outstanding (ex-treasury) mil
0.63
Beta
1.18-1.79
12-month price range
FY12
FY13
FY14
FY2015Q3
31/1/2012
31/1/2013
31/1/2014
31/10/2014
5.52
(16.12)
0.14
(18.35)
(19.95)
6.44
30.07
24.61
2.45
1.82
2.31
(4.43)
(4.32)
(4.39)
1.29
20.41
20.30
(1.90)
3.70
(4.26)
(0.71)
(0.64)
4.40
23.52
23.47
(7.22)
17.56
(1.07)
0.38
0.39
11.88
64.23
64.21
(33.96)
FY12
FY13
31/1/2012
31/1/2013
31/1/2014
DPS (MYR)
Net asset per share (MYR)
ROE (%)
Turnover growth (%)
Net profit growth (%)
Net margin (%)
ROA (%)
Current ratio (x)
Gearing (%)
Interest cover (x)
0.06
(62.66)
(11.84)
(361.61)
(53.48)
2.48
7.38
(115.32)
0.05
(19.57)
(58.08)
(189.97)
(17.41)
0.81
-
0.06
(2.95)
59.98
(17.43)
(2.94)
3.14
-
YINSON HOLDINGS BHD
Points by Eni Ghana Exploration & Production Limited. Operations are expected to commence in 2017
for a 15-year period with 5 yearly extension options.
Yinson’s revenue has been on an uptrend over the
past five years from RM470.2 million in FYJan2010
to RM941.9 million FYJan2014. Meanwhile, Yinson’s 9MFY15 pre-tax profit jumped 254% y-o-y to
RM170.2 million, mainly attributed to the disposal
of subsidiary and joint venture and higher contributions from marine segment.
31/8/2014
RATIOS
(ALL FIGURES IN MYR MIL)
YINSON (Fundamental: 1.5/3, Valuation: 1.5/3)
provides offshore support services to upstream oil
and gas (O&G) sector. Trading in Yinson’s shares
was halted during the first hour of trading yesterday,
due to an announcement of contract awarded to its
wholly-owned subsidiary Yinson Production (West
Africa) Pte Ltd, and joint-venture company Yinson
Production West Africa Ltd (49%-owned). The contract is worth RM9.16 billion for the floating production storage and offloading at Offshore Cape Three
FY13
31/8/2013
*Valuation score - Composite measure of historical return & valuation
**Fundamental score - Composite measure of balance sheet strength
& profitability
Note: A score of 3.0 is the best to have and 0.0 is the worst to have
(ALL FIGURES IN MYR MIL)
ASIABIO (Fundamental: 1.2/3, Valuation: 0/3) saw
trading volume surge to 93 million shares yesterday
with its share price up 1 sen or 4.8% to 22 sen, after
it announced a proposal to acquire two shipping
companies in an all-share deal for RM168 million.
The two shipping companies — owners of five
oil tankers and three vessels — are expected to generate a net profit of RM8 million in 2014 and RM14
million in 2015. The corporate exercise will see new
shareholders, including Singapore-based Hoe Le-
FY12
31/8/2012
Financials
Turnover
EBITDA
Interest expense
Pre-tax profit
Net profit - owners of company
Fixed assets - PPE
Total assets
Shareholders' fund
Gross borrowings
Net debt/(cash)
YINSON HOLDINGS BHD
FY14 ROLLING 12-MTH
0.08
(4.01)
1,512.10
(4.03)
(2.59)
285.40
-
FY12
FY13
FY14
FY2015Q3
31/1/2012
31/1/2013
31/1/2014
31/10/2014
715.82
33.50
0.01
32.77
26.57
149.99
232.23
157.70
251.94
221.56
865.22
70.04
17.29
44.44
33.88
236.83
425.99
281.23
448.54
424.66
941.86
42.36
28.97
78.75
66.43
1,028.38
1,303.84
535.13
1,290.13
1,023.04
255.22
75.85
12.33
93.05
86.79
1,048.81
1,772.29
1,286.63
848.84
436.10
FY12
FY13
RATIOS
31/1/2012
31/1/2013
31/1/2014
FY14 ROLLING 12-MTH
DPS (MYR)
Net asset per share (MYR)
ROE (%)
Turnover growth (%)
Net profit growth (%)
Net margin (%)
ROA (%)
Current ratio (x)
Gearing (%)
Interest cover (x)
0.02
2.09
19.00
11.70
43.29
3.71
13.19
1.14
140.49
3,107.15
0.02
1.40
15.44
20.87
27.53
3.92
10.30
0.95
151.00
4.05
0.01
2.07
16.27
8.86
96.05
7.05
7.68
0.83
191.18
1.46
0.01
1.25
28.82
25.21
278.92
16.09
17.46
1.65
33.89
3.10
8 I N V E ST I N G I D E A S
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
www.theedgemarkets.com
I N S I D E R A S I A’S S TO C K O F T H E D AY
Note: This report is brought to you by Asia Analytica Sdn Bhd, a licensed investment adviser. Please exercise your own
judgment or seek professional advice for your specific investment needs. We are not responsible for your investment
decisions. Our shareholders, directors and employees may have positions in any of the stocks mentioned.
HOMERITZ CORPORATION BHD
(ALL FIGURES IN MYR MIL)
HOMERITZ CORPORATION BHD
HOMERITZ Corporation Bhd is a manufacturer
of upholstered home furniture — dining chairs,
sofas and bed frames — under Original Design
(including its own brand, Eritz) and Original
Equipment Manufacturing. About 99.3% of
its products are sold overseas to more than
50 countries. Key markets are Asia, Australia,
Europe and the US, with receivables mostly in
US dollars.
The stock is attractive for its exposure to the
strengthening US dollar, high dividend yield
and steady growth.
Revenue has grown annually from RM89.8
million in FYAug11 to RM112.9 million in FY13
while net profit increased an outsized 40% from
RM10.8 million to RM15.1 million during this
period. Operating margins have been expanding on economies of scale and increased productivity and efficiency.
For FY14, the company posted revenue of
RM127.2 million, boosted by an increase in
products sold and the strengthening US dolHOMERITZ CORPORATION BHD
lar. Net profit was RM20.3 million, a significant
33.9% increase from the previous year.
Moving forward, management is upbeat on
demand outlook.
Valuations-wise, the stock trades at a trailing 12-month P/E ratio of 11.06 times, low relative to its growth. Return on equity is high at
24.5%. It has a strong balance sheet with net
cash of RM49.3 million. This equates to 24.6
sen per share or 22.4% of the current share
price of RM1.10.
Last but not least, Homeritz offers good dividend yields. It has a minimum 40% dividend
payout policy.
The final dividend of 3.1sen for FY14 went
“ex” yesterday. This brings total dividends for
FY14 to 5.1 sen per share — up from 3.75 sen in
FY13 — or about 50% of net profit. This translates to a higher than average net yield of 4.6%.
The Edge Research rates Homeritz a Fundamental score of 1.95 out of 3 and Valuation
score of 2.10 out of 3.
Valuation score*
2.10
1.95
Fundamental score**
11.06
TTM P/E (x)
0.33
TTM PEG (x)
2.43
P/NAV (x)
4.24
TTM Dividend yield (%)
224.00
Market capitalisation (mil)
Shares outstanding (ex-treasury) mil 200.00
0.94
Beta
0.61-1.12
12-month price range
*Valuation score - Composite measure of historical return & valuation
**Fundamental score - Composite measure of balance sheet strength
& profitability
Note: A score of 3.0 is the best to have and 0.0 is the worst to have
Income Statement
Turnover
EBITDA
Depreciation
EBIT
Associates
Interest income
Interest expense
Extraordinary gain/(loss)
Pre-tax profit
Net profit - owners of company
Balance sheet
Fixed assets - PPE
Biological assets
Intangibles & goodwill
Cash and equivalents
Total current assets
ST borrowings
Total current liabilities
Total assets
Shareholders' fund
Long term borrowings
HOMERITZ CORPORATION BHD
RATIOS
DPS (MYR)
Net asset per share (MYR)
ROE (%)
Turnover growth (%)
Net profit growth (%)
Net margin (%)
ROA (%)
Current ratio (x)
Gearing (%)
Interest cover (x)
QUANTITY
T O N G ’S
MOMENTUM
P O RT F O L I O
THOSE who have been following this column
would have noticed that I have sold the last of
my remaining stock, Willowglen MSC Bhd,
last Thursday.
As you know, this Momentum Portfolio
bought stocks that were identified by a proprietary algorithm, modelled on trading volume
and price trends. Unfortunately, this 1st generation algorithm did not perform to expectations.
My portfolio did turn a small profit of
RM151, after transaction costs, and outperformed the market by 5.3%. But I was making more miss than hits. So, it was back to the
drawing board.
Come 29th Jan, there will be a new and improved 2nd generation algorithm that I believe
will do much better. Unlike the old algorithm,
this new algorithm will differentiate between
stocks that exhibit upward positive (+ve) and
downward negative (-ve) momentum.
All the stocks will be posted daily on The
Edge Markets (www.theedgemarkets.com) by
2.30 pm. The list does not constitute a buy or
sell recommendation. But I hope it will give
us a better idea of what the market is buying
and when to sell.
For those who are keen to find out more
about these stocks, a short synopsis will be
published under “Stocks with Momentum”
column in The Financial Daily the following
day. Registered users of The Edge Markets will
get a free digital copy of the business paper
delivered to their emails daily.
I will also display my transactions with a brief
commentary on the portfolio under ‘Tong’s
Momentum Portfolio’ on The Edge Markets.
I’m looking forward to the 29th. I hope you
are too. Do watch this space!
BOUGHT PRICE
RM
FY12
FY13
FY14
FY2014Q4
31/8/2012
31/8/2013
31/8/2014
31/8/2014
103.25
20.12
2.52
17.60
0.24
0.17
17.67
14.70
112.91
22.64
2.38
20.26
0.44
0.14
20.57
15.12
127.18
27.95
2.47
25.47
1.10
0.12
26.45
20.25
33.24
6.63
0.65
5.98
0.28
0.03
6.23
5.19
35.32
0.48
24.47
55.56
0.35
9.34
82.01
72.79
2.67
33.53
0.48
34.71
69.79
0.36
11.92
91.88
81.40
2.31
33.06
0.48
51.59
82.54
0.38
10.90
105.18
92.15
1.93
33.06
0.48
51.59
82.54
0.38
10.90
105.18
92.15
1.93
FY12
FY13
31/8/2012
31/8/2013
31/8/2014
0.03
0.36
21.67
14.94
35.96
14.24
19.29
5.95
121.35
0.04
0.41
19.61
9.36
2.85
13.39
17.39
5.85
164.78
0.05
0.46
23.33
12.64
33.92
15.92
20.55
7.57
230.87
BOUGHT VALUE CURRENT PRICE
RM
RM
CURRENT VALUE
RM
FY14 ROLLING 12-MTH
GAIN / LOSS
RM
0.05
0.46
24.49
12.64
33.93
15.92
21.61
7.57
230.97
% GAIN / LOSS
Shares held:
No shares were held.
WATCH OUT FOR
Total
NEW MOMENTUM
TRADES STARTING
29 JAN 2015
Shares bought:
No shares were bought today.
Total shares held
Shares sold:
No shares were sold today.
Total brokerage, fees and duties paid
Net cash balance
100,151.0
Realised profits / (losses)
151.0
Total Portfolio Returns
Annualised returns for portfolio
100,000.00
100,151.0
151.0
Portfolio Beta
Risk adjusted returns for portfolio
0.2%
0.3%
1.000
0.3%
Performance Comparison
FBM KLCI
FBM KLCI Emas
At portfolio start
1,892.65
13,163.69
Current
1,795.88
12,359.44
Change
(5.1%)
(6.1%)
Relative portfolio outperformance
5.3%
6.3%
This is a personal portfolio for information purposes only and does not constitute a recommendation or solicitation or expression of views to influence readers to buy/sell any stocks.
Portfolio started on 8 July 2014 with RM100,000.
B R O K E R S’ C A L L 9
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
OldTown gets into
kitchen business in
China via AEC stake
THE EDGE FILE PHOTO
OldTown Bhd
(Jan 28, RM1.64)
Maintain outperform with a target price (TP) of RM1.79: In an
announcement to Bursa Malaysia, OldTown announced that it
is acquiring a 51% stake in Hong
Kong-based April Eight (China)
Ltd (AEC) from Join Dream Group
Ltd (JD) for HK$3 million (RM1.4
million), through its subsidiary,
OldTown Logistics Sdn Bhd. The
move will pave the way for OldTown to gain access to Guangzhou
Supreme Food Service Ltd, a wholly
foreign-owned subsidiary of AEC,
which is involved in central kitchen business in Guangzhou, China.
We were not surprised by the
move as the group has long indicated its intention to re-strategise and
revamp its business concept and
market positioning in China after
a less successful venture previously, which saw four outlets owned
by previous master licensee closing down. Subsequently, OldTown
opened a directly managed outlet
in China in September 2014. We
are positive on this latest move as
the central kitchen will ensure that
the products supplied to the café
outlets meet the specifications and
food safety standards. The centralised kitchen would also allow for a
more consistent delivery of quality products to the outlets while
ensuring price efficiency due to
consolidated procurement. Funding is not expected to be a problem
to the group as the consideration
of RM1.4 million is minimal to the
group’s net cash position of RM70
million.
The outlook of the group could
OldTown Bhd
FYE MAR (RM MIL)
2014A
2015E
2016E
Turnover
382.2 424.2 466.0
Ebit
66.2
67.5
76.1
PBT
66.4 66.4
74.8
48.9
51.1
57.7
Net profit (NP)
52.0
56.6
Consensus (NP)
10.8
11.3
12.7
EPS (sen)
9.0
4.4
13.0
EPS growth (%)
6.0
7.0
7.5
NDPS (sen)
0.73
0.8
0.8
BV/Share (RM)
PER
15.2
14.6
12.9
2.3
2.1
2.0
Price/BV (x)
Net
N cash N cash N cash
gearing (x)
Net dvd
3.7
4.3
4.6
yield (%)
Source: Kenanga Research
be significantly boosted if the central kitchen can provide the thrust
for the group to penetrate the huge
Chinese market. However, at this
juncture we still adopt a wait-andsee approach in view of the challenging and competitive business
environment in China. Next quarterly financial results are set to be
announced next month and we are
expecting to see improvement in
both fast-moving consumer goods
and restaurant divisions with the
normalisation of earnings after being disrupted by temporary setbacks
in the previous quarters.
We made no changes to our forecast as the move is more supplementary in nature to its restaurant
outlet in China rather than earnings
accretive. Moreover, earnings contribution from China is insignificant
as there is only one outlet in China
as opposed to a total of 245 outlets
the group is operating in Malaysia,
Singapore and Indonesia.
We maintain our “outperform”
call, and our TP of RM1.79 based
on 14.1 times forecast financial year
ending March 31, 2016 price-earnings ratio (PER), which is below its
three-year mean PER.
The risks to our call are
worse-than-expected consumer
sentiments and a delay in expansion
plans. — Kenanga Research, Jan 28
Sasbadi quarterly results within
expectations
Sasbadi Holdings Bhd
(Jan 28, RM1.40)
Reiterate buy with a target price
(TP) of RM2.25: Sasbadi Holdings reported a first quarter for
the financial year ended Nov
30, 2014 (1QFY15) core earnings of RM1.6 million (+35.5%
quarter-on-quarter. There is no
year-on-year comparison as the
group was only listed in July 2014.
Although the group’s 1Q earnings only accounted for 9% of our
full-year earnings, we deem its
quarterly results within expectations since 1QFY15 is a seasonally
weak quarter for the group.
For its FY15 ended Aug 31, 2015
(FY15), we understand that 2Q
(December to February) is expected to post the highest quarterly sales, followed by 3Q (March
to May).
The group has declared 3 sen
interim dividend, which represents greater-than-200% payout
from its reported 1QFY15 earnings
per share (EPS) of 1.3 sen.
We understand that the higher-than-expected dividend payout
is to partly compensate shareholders for no dividends in the last FY.
We believe that the strong dividend payout also implies manage-
ment’s optimism about its earnings prospects going forward.
For now, we are maintaining
our 50% payout assumption for
FY15, which implies an attractive dividend yield of 4.8%. We
keep our earnings unchanged
pending a meeting with the management for an updated post
results. We reiterate our “buy”
call on Sasbadi based on a discounted cash flow-derived TP of
RM2.25. The stock is trading at
an undemanding valuation (10.4
times/8.2 times/6.7 times FY15
to FY17 EPS). Yield is decent at
4.8% for FY15.
The risks to our call are a sudden surge in paper costs which
represents 38% of Sasbadi’s cost
of goods sold, failure to respond
timely to changes in education
policies, and the loss of contract revenues. — AllianceDBS
Research, Jan 28
Sasbadi Holdings Bhd
FYE AUG (RM MIL)
2013A
2014A
2015F
2016F
Turnover
Operating profit
Ebitda
Net profit (pre ex)
EPS (sen)
EPS pre ex (sen)
EPS growth (%)
EPS growth pre ex (%)
Net DPS (sen)
BV per share (sen)
PER (X)
PER pre ex (X)
EV/Ebitda (X)
Net dividend yield (%)
P/BV (X)
Net Debt/Equity (X)
ROAE (%)
78
18
19
13
10.0
10.0
17
23
6.4
50.8
14.2
14.2
8.7
4.5
2.8
Cash
22.1
79
20
23
15
9.6
12.2
(4)
21
0.0
73.8
14.8
11.8
7.0
0.0
1.9
Cash
13.1
87
24
27
18
13.8
13.8
43
14
6.9
80.7
10.4
10.4
5.7
4.8
1.8
Cash
17.1
100
30
33
22
17.5
17.5
27
27
8.8
89.5
8.2
8.2
4.5
6.1
1.6
Cash
20.6
Source: Company, AllianceDBS, Bloomberg Finance L.P.
RHBCap’s transformation programme can be fully ‘ignited’
RHB Capital Bhd
FYE DEC (RM MIL)
Net interest income
Total non-interest
income
Operating revenue
Total provision charges
Net profit
Core EPS (RM)
Core EPS growth (%)
FD Core PER (x)
DPS (RM)
Dividend yield (%)
BVPS (RM)
P/BV (x)
ROE (%)
% change in core
EPS estimates (%)
CIMB/consensus EPS (x)
Source: CIMB, Company reports
2012A
2013A
2014F
2015F
2016F
2,960
3,275
3,245
3,453
3,642
1,870
4,830
(148.5)
1,785
0.76
(1.93)
10.27
0.21
2.72
6.06
1.29
13.4
2,676
5,951
(448.0)
1,831
0.73
(4.36)
10.74
0.16
2.09
6.57
1.19
11.5
3,152
6,398
(413.5)
2,046
0.80
10.00
9.76
0.23
2.94
6.98
1.12
11.8
3,460
6,913
(459.3)
2,244
0.87
9.17
8.94
0.25
3.22
7.62
1.02
11.9
3,781
7,422
(446.0)
2,450
0.95
9.16
8.19
0.27
3.52
8.31
0.94
12.0
(0.01)
1.01
(3.54)
1.03
(4.14)
1.08
RHB Capital Bhd
(Jan 28, RM7.81)
Add with a target price (TP) of
RM10.50: With merger talks called
off, RHB Capital (RHBCap) can fully
concentrate on its transformation
programme dubbed Ignite 17. In
terms of earnings growth, we expect
the lender to “outperform” most of
its peers in 2015 due to the benefits from Ignite and above-industry
loan growth.
We are positive on the implementation of the Ignite 17 transformation programme as this
would help the group improve
in the areas that it has traditionally
been weak, like Islamic banking,
treasury, small and medium enterprises (SMEs), and exposure
to the mass affluent market. The
group will benefit from key initiatives like the launch of group
treasury operations, realignment
of Islamic banking, and SME business models as well as the introduction of wealth management
services in Singapore.
We think that RHBCap would
“outperform” most of its peers in
terms of earnings growth in 2015
because of: (i) its above-industry
loan growth; (ii) benefits from the
implementation of Ignite 17; and
(iii) good traction in investment
banking income.
RHBCap is projected to turn
in a healthy net profit growth of
9.7% (and earnings per share [EPS]
growth of 9.2%) in its financial year
ending Dec 31, 2015 (FY15). This
would be supported by an expected
expansion of 6.4% in net interest
income and 9.7% in non-interest
income. Cost-wise, overheads and
loan loss provisioning would rise
by 6.4% and 11.1% respectively.
The group has shelved its mergers and acquisitions plans in the
near term, including those in overseas market, given the unconducive
environment and its low valuation,
in our view. This would slow down
the pace of regional expansion in
the short term, but we believe that
it is still adamant on becoming
a regional banking group in the
longer term.
We cut our projected FY15 to
FY16 EPS and dividend discount
model-based TP (cost of equity of
11.8%; long-term growth of 4%) to
factor in the higher cost of funds.
RHBCap is rated an “add” and our
top pick for the sector given its: (i)
attractive valuation; (ii) above-industry loan growth; and (iii) expanding investment banking business. — CIMB Research, Jan27
10 B R O K E R S’ C A L L
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
Benalec finalising
funding options
for Tg Piai works
Benalec Holdings Bhd
(Jan 28, RM0.805)
Maintain buy with target price
(TP) of RM1.25: Yesterday, Benalec Holdings Bhd announced
on Bursa Malaysia that its Detailed
Environmental Impact Assessment
(DEIA) study for a proposed reclamation contract in Tg Piai has
been approved by the Department
of Environment (DoE) on Jan 23.
Via its 70%-owned subsidiary,
Benalec had earlier submitted the
DEIA for the Tg Piai Integrated Petroleum & Petrochemical Hub together with State Secretry, Johor
(Inc). The DEIA approval is valid
for two years from the date of the
letter of approval.
Phase 1 of the project is set to
commence next month. Its components involve the construction
of an oil terminal, a jetty, a bridge
linking the island to the mainland,
as well as dredging works.
Benalec is in the midst of finalising its funding options to kickstart reclamation works, which we
believe, could involve around 100
acres (40.46ha) to 200 acres initially.
As at Sept 30 2014, the group
was in a healthy net cash position
of approximately RM48 million.
Furthermore, there are RM312
million worth of land sales (173
acres) with sale and purchase
agreements to be progressively
Benalec Holdings Bhd
FYE JUN (RM MIL)
Revenue
Core net profit
FD Core EPS (sen)
FD Core EPS growth (%)
Consensus net profit
DPS (sen)
PER (x)
EV/Ebitda (x)
Div yield (%)
ROE (%)
Net gearing (%)
Caring has opened only two shopping complex outlets this quarter.
2014
2015F
2016F
2017F
211.0
32.8
4.0
(46.6)
19.3
11.6
1.3
nm
307.3
47.9
5.9
46.2
56.1
2.5
13.2
8.3
3.2
8.4
20.8
492.8
50.4
6.2
5.3
65.0
4.5
12.6
5.7
5.7
8.3
20.9
779.2
91.9
11.3
82.2
80.2
4.5
6.9
3.1
5.7
13.9
4.6
Source: AmResearch, Company report
recognised over the next three financial years.
More importantly, Benalec has
crossed a major milestone in the
group’s quest for repositioning Tg
Piai as a future oil hub.
Undeniably, Tg Piai’s deep water
depth and close proximity to the
Jurong Petrochemical Hub puts it
in a prime position to tap into spillover demand for oil storage from
the various multinational corporations that are currently operating
in Singapore. We nevertheless believe Benalec’s real litmus test starts
now. With the DEIA approval now
secured, investors’ attention will
naturally gravitate towards management’s ability to secure the maiden
offtakers for Tg Piai.
The group recently announced
that its binding term sheet with
1MY Strategic Oil Terminal Sdn Bhd
and the State Secretary, Johor (Inc)
has been extended by another six
months to June 11, 2015.
The deal with 1MY Strategic Oil
is for the reclamation and sale of
about 1,000 acres in Tg Piai for the
construction and operations of a
crude oil and petroleum storage
facility together with a private jetty.
We maintain our buy call on
Benalec Holdings with an unchanged fair value of RM1.25 per
share, pegged at a 45% discount
to its sum-of-parts value. — AmResearch, Jan 28
IGB REIT’s FY14 revenue grows
IGB Real Estate Investment Trust
(Jan 28, RM1.33)
Maintain neutral with an unchanged target price (TP) of
RM1.41: IGB Real Estate Investment Trust (IGB REIT) financial
year ended Dec 31, 2014 (FY14)
core net income (CNI) of RM232.6
million met expectations accounting for 103% of consensus estimate
of RM224.9 million and 105% of
our estimate of RM220.9 million.
IGBREIT announced a final income
distribution per unit (DPU) of 3.90
sen which covers for its distribution
for the third quarter ending Sept
30, 2014 (3QFY14) (2.01 sen) and
4QFY14 (1.89 sen).
Cumulatively for the full FY14,
DPU was 7.79 sen representing 5.2%
dividend yield (after taking into
account withholding tax of 10%).
IGB REIT FY14 revenue grew by
7% year-on-year (y-o-y) to RM461.8
million attributed to higher rental
income. We believe this was likely due to positive rental reversion
at Mid Valley Megamall and The
Gardens Mall.
IGB REIT CNI grew 12.4% y-o-y
to RM232.6million. Growth in
IGB Real Estate Investment Trust
FYE DEC (RM MIL)
Gross revenue
Net rental income (NRI)
Net investment income
Net income
Core net income (CNI)
Realised EPU (sen)
Core EPU (sen)
Net DPU (sen)
Net distribution yield
Core PER
P/NAV
Core ROE (%)
Core ROA (%)
2013
2014
2015F
2016F
430.7
285.7
396.4
311.9
206.9
9.1
6.1
6.3
4.6
21.6
1.3
5.9
4.2
461.8
312.6
404.0
317.6
232.6
9.2
6.8
7.0
5.2
19.4
1.2
6.4
4.6
457.2
323.6
327.8
238.7
238.7
7.0
7.0
7.2
5.3
18.8
1.1
6.5
4.6
473.9
332.9
337.2
245.7
245.7
7.2
7.2
7.3
5.5
18.3
1.1
6.7
4.6
Source: IGB REIT, Forecast by MIDF Research
CNI was stronger than its revenue
growth of 7% y-o-y. This was contributed by improved Net Rental
Income margin to 67.7% in FY14
against 66.3% last year. We believe
that management is likely to have
implemented cost saving measures
as reimbursement costs declined
14% y-o-y to RM44.9 million while
maintenance expenses slipped 6%
y-o-y to RM19 million.
Our TP is based on Dividend
Discount Model (required rate
of return: 7.5%, perpetual growth
rate: 1.3%). Our neutral recommendation is based on the lack of
any near-term rerating catalysts.
The next possible asset injection
(South Key Mall) is still undergoing
construction and is expected to be
completed only in FY17. — MIDF
Research, Jan 28
Caring‘s profits squeezed by lower
selling price
Caring Pharmacy Group Bhd
(Jan 28, RM1.19)
Maintain sell with target price
of RM1: Caring Pharmacy Group
Bhd’s first half ended Nov 30,
2014 (1HFY15) revenue of
RM177.4 million (+5.8% yearon-year (y-o-y) was translated
into core net profit of RM2.6million (-63.4% yoy). Despite top
line being broadly in line, bottom line came in way below
expectations, accounting for
16.2% and 15.7% of HLIB Research and consensus full-year
estimates, respectively, due to
lower-than-expected profit margins due to lower selling prices
from market competition despite
higher volume.
Despite a satisfactory 1HFY15
revenue of RM177.4m (+5.8%
y-o-y), profit after tax and minority interest was squeezed to RM2.7
million (-62.8% y-o-y), which was
mainly due to lower economies
of scale arising from lower selling
prices in order to attract market
share, despite higher volume. It is
noticeable that Caring has been
slowing down its expansion plan
from first quarter 2015 onwards,
with only two shopping complex
outlets this quarter.
The company is now exercising more careful discretion in
outlet location to avoid trespassing competitors’ territories which
would cause damage to its sales.
This explains the slowdown in
outlet expansion observed. Another note is the closing down of
one outlet in this quarter, which
is most likely due to failure to
achieve breakeven after gestation
period. To date, Caring has a total
of 102 outlets. Caring shared that
it will relook its marketing strategies to improve sales in order to
maintain market share. It remains
confident that the company will
continue to be profitable in the
coming quarter.
The risks are the over-aggressive expansion has resulted
in margin compression which
may continue to drag earnings
growth, keen competition from
other pharmacy chains such as
Guardian and Watsons, and slowdown in consumer discretionary
spending.
The positives — established
and trusted pharmacy chain
with reliable service and competitive product pricing; full-time
registered pharmacists available throughout retail operating
hours; benefits from economies
of scale and shared services; the
only pure retail pharmacy chain
listed locally.
The negatives — higher working capital and start-up costs for
new outlets; over-aggressive expansion; intense competition
impact selling prices; shares are
tightly held resulting in relatively
low trading volumes.
We maintain sell with a lower
fair value, reflecting our earnings per share (EPS) revision.
This is derived based on unchanged multiple of 15.5 times
estimated FY16 EPS, two times
discount to the average of other
domestic market oriented retail
pharmacy chain operators in
the region. — HLIB Research,
Jan 28
Caring Pharmacy Group Bhd
FYE MAY (RM MIL)
Revenue
Ebitda
PBT
Patami
Adj Patami
Rep EPS (sen)
Adj EPS (sen)
DPS (sen)
Net dividend yield (%)
PER (x)
P/Book (x)
EV/Ebitda (x)
Net D/E (%)
ROA (%)
ROE (%)
Source: HLIB Research
2014A
2015E
2016E
2017E
338.3
25.4
22.8
15.1
15.1
6.9
6.9
3.0
2.5
17.2
2.3
7.5
N Cash
7.5
13.2
377.4
22.0
19.1
13.2
13.2
6.1
6.1
1.8
1.5
19.6
2.1
8.3
N Cash
6.1
10.7
412.1
23.2
19.8
13.9
13.9
6.4
6.4
1.9
1.6
18.7
1.9
7.7
N Cash
6.0
10.4
449.5
24.4
20.4
14.3
14.3
6.6
6.6
2.0
1.7
18.2
1.8
7.2
N Cash
5.7
10.0
H O M E 11
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
Police, inmates
responsible for
detainee’s death
Coroner rules P Karuna Nithi died after their assault
BY V A N B A L AGA N
SEREMBAN: A coroner ruled yesterday that policemen and inmates
were responsible for the death of an
unemployed man while he was detained at the Tampin district police
headquarters in Negeri Sembilan
two years ago.
Coroner Datuk Jagjit Singh said
that P Karuna Nithi’s death was
caused by 49 multiple injuries by
blunt objects including physical
assault, abuse and unlawful acts
by persons unknown, inclusive of
police officers and other detainees
where Karuna Nithi was held.
Jagjit, who is a Sessions Court
judge in Seremban, said in his verdict
that there was failure or omission to
provide the necessary medical care
and attention that Karuna required.
“There was also failure of the police officers to stop other detainees
from abusing Karuna Nithi in the
police lock-up.”
This is the second verdict this
month where police have been
found responsible for the death
of detainees in police custody.
On Jan 16, coroner Ahmad
Bache held police responsible for
the death of lorry driver P Chandran
through their omission to provide
him with timely medical assistance.
Chandran had been detained
at the Dang Wangi police station
in Kuala Lumpur on Sept 6, 2012
and was held for four days before
his death.
Jagjit said having gone through
all the evidence, he was satisfied
that the cause of Karuna Nithi’s
death was a combination of unlawful acts and omissions by person or
persons unknown.
“The deceased was a healthy
adult with no life-threatening diseases when he entered the lock-up,
but ended up dead three days later
with 49 external injuries,” he said.
He said a custodial death with
that number of injuries should have
“rung alarm bells from the word go”.
Jagjit said he rejected the evidence of forensic pathologist Dr
Sharifah Safoorah Syed Alwee after
extensive examination of the shortcomings in her testimony.
“She had erroneously found that
the cause of death was due to ‘fatty
change in the liver’. But this cannot
be so when the deceased had 49
external injuries,” he said.
Jagjit said CCTV footages from
the police station clearly revealed
Karuna Nithi was beaten by other
inmates and the cops on duty were
privy to what happened.
He said some policemen had
also contributed to the beating,
harassment and bullying based on
evidence adduced from the CCTV.
Jagjit admitted that Karuna Nithi
was a difficult detainee, adding “but
that was no reason to ill-treat him”.
“He was repeatedly transferred
from one cell to another because he
was having hallucinations, raving
and ranting,” he added.
The judge said a policeman also
testified that Karuna Nithi’s welfare was neglected because it was
thought that he was only pretending to be sick while in the lock-up.
Lawyer Eric Paulsen, who appeared for the family of Karuna
Nithi, said this was yet another
landmark verdict of which the authorities must take serious notice.
“The judge reiterated a Court of
Appeal ruling last year that not a
single person should die in a police
lock-up. This is also a small victory
for human rights,” added Eric, who
is also executive director for Lawyers for Liberty.
Co-counsel Dr Dheeraj Bhar, who
was a medical doctor, said the rejection of Sharifah’s evidence had to do
with her credibility as a professional.
“I hope the Malaysian Medical
Council will look into this in light
of what the judge concluded,” he
added. — The Malaysian Insider
MIC veep: Palanivel must hold
crisis meeting within 24 hours
KUALA LUMPUR: MIC vice-president Datuk M Saravanan urged
party president Datuk Seri G Palanivel to hold an emergency Central
Working Committee (CWC) meeting within 24 hours.
He said the meeting was important to clarify the validity of his
sacking as Federal Territory MIC
Liaison Committee chairman.
“Palanivel issued a statement
that I was sacked yesterday (Tuesday) evening and I received a message from him later at night telling
me to continue holding the post.
“When I entered the MIC headquarters this morning, I was obstructed by 20 gangsters who handed me my letter of termination
signed by Palanivel. I am confused,”
he told a media conference at the
MIC headquarters here yesterday.
On Tuesday, Palanivel appointed Datuk Rajoo Vyraperumal as
Federal Territory MIC Liaison Committee chief to replace Saravanan.
He also appointed Tan Sri
Ramasamy Muthusamy as Perak
MIC Liaison Committee chairman
to replace himself (Palanivel), while
Datuk Ganesan Arumugam took
over from Datuk S Sothinathan
as Negeri Sembilan MIC Liaison
Committee chairman.
Saravanan also stressed that if
Palanivel failed to hold the emergency meeting, then he would hold
an emergency meeting with the
support of 15 CWC members.
He also said he would ask Prime
Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak, as
Barisan Nasional (BN) chairman,
to solve the MIC crisis if Palanivel
did not quickly do so.
The Malaysian Insider reported
that a press conference to disclose
more details on MIC’s internal fighting took a dramatic turn earlier yesterday when an anonymous caller
at the start of the event threatened
to kill deputy president Datuk Seri
Dr S Subramaniam and Saravanan.
The threat came in a phone call
to Saravanan, who had requested a
press conference at the party headquarters here. Several other party
members and media personnel had
already gathered for the briefing
scheduled for 1pm on the second
floor of the building.
While waiting for the press
conference to start, Saravanan
answered a call and the caller
threatened to shoot him and Subramaniam.
Saravanan put the call on loudspeaker and the person making the
threat could be heard speaking in
Bahasa Malaysia.
In response, Saravanan said:
“Mari MIC HQ boleh jumpa saya
dan tembak saya” (Come to the
MIC headquarters, you can meet
me and shoot me).
Saravanan and Subramaniam
have been urging Palanivel to act
swiftly in responding to the Registrar
of Societies’ findings that the elections of its CWC members in 2013
were problematic, and that fresh
polls should be held. — Bernama
Datum Jelatek project to
proceed despite protests
BY MD IZ WA N
KUALA LUMPUR: The Datum
Jelatek project in Taman Keramat,
Selangor, will be built as planned
despite protests against it, says the
developer which has again dismissed claims by nearby residents
that the predominantly Malay area
will turn into a “Chinese district”.
DatumCorp International chief
operating officer Shytul Shahryn
Mohamad Shaari told The Malaysian Insider that the project will
continue without further delay,
even if more protests are planned.
“Disturbances like this are normal,
but as what Perbadanan Kemajuan
Negeri Selangor (PKNS) has said before, we will proceed with the work as
it is beneficial to the people,” he said.
The RM1.2 billion project, which
was started in 2008 on a 2.4ha plot
of land next to the Jelatek light rail
transit station, comprises four
blocks of luxury condominiums,
offices, a hotel and shopping centre.
The condos are to be built on the
former site of four blocks of PKNS
flats owned mostly by Malays, which
were demolished in late 2010.
The project received planning
approval in November 2011 from
the Ampang Jaya Municipal Council, but had been postponed several
times over a variety of issues.
The latest protest on Sunday was
by far the most rowdy when some
100 people turned aggressive and
broke into the construction site.
The angry residents began
marching towards the site before
proceeding to tear down the zinc
barrier surrounding it, with several
protesters trespassing into the site.
However, police managed to
bring the situation under control
and the crowd soon dispersed.
“The issue of Malays being sidelined does not arise [as] the news
was untrue, such as the sale of one
or two blocks to foreign parties.
That never happened,” said Shytul.
Shytul clarified that sales were
done by DatumCorp, clarifying
that not a single unit had been
sold to anyone, nor had any money been collected.
“We only have a list of interested buyers,” he told The Malaysian
Insider.
The developer had earlier said
1,097 bumiputera buyers had registered their interest to buy 674 units
in the project.
Commenting on Sunday’s incident, he explained that the developer had already met with residents in
the area and claimed the majority
of them had reacted positively to
the project.
“I can guarantee that Keramat
residents were not directly involved
in the latest demonstrations as we
had already met with them in stages. — The Malaysian Insider
Rowdy protesters tearing down the zinc barrier surrounding the Datum Jelatek project
site on Sunday. The Malaysian Insider file photo
Bestinet denies increasing
visa handling fee
PUTRAJAYA: Bestinet Sdn Bhd, the
solution provider for the Foreign
Workers Centralised Management
System (FWCMS), has denied that
it is responsible for the steep increase in the visa processing fee
for Indonesian workers.
Bestinet in a statement yesterday
said the holistic system was transparent, efficient and convenient.
It was also beneficial to all stakeholders involved in hiring foreign
workers, especially employers, foreign workers themselves, insurance
providers and government agencies
in Malaysia as well as in the source
countries, said the statement.
“As such, Bestinet reiterates that
the visa processing issue in Indonesia does not have anything to do
with the company,” it said.
FWCMS is a multi-touch point
system, involving a full-fledged web-
based online management system
backed by a secure data processing
management infrastructure developed for the government of Malaysia.
The statement said the two major modules under the FWCMS
— bio-medical and electronic application for Visa with Reference
(eVDR) — were fully operational
from Jan 15.
It said the bio-medical module
was implemented in the source
countries, whereas eVDR was implemented in Peninsular Malaysia.
“With the implementation of
eVDR, the application of VDR is
made online and the [time] for the
visa approval is significantly shortened,” said the statement.
For details, employers can call
the FWCMS Customer Service team
at 03-8689 2822 or go online at www.
fwcms.com.my. — Bernama
12 H O M E
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
Consult parents on new
Child Act, says group
Ministry should also take into account Islamic views and Malaysian culture
KUALA LUMPUR: Parents must be
consulted when the new Child Act
is being drawn up, a non-governmental organisation told Putrajaya,
after an uproar erupted over its proposal to outlaw caning of minors.
Ikram Malaysia women’s wing
chief Datin Paduka Che Asmah
Ibrahim said the Women, Family and Community Development
Ministry’s plan to enact a new Child
Act should take into account Islamic views as well as Malaysian
culture.
She added that parents and the
public had to be educated to ensure the welfare of children was
protected.
“Parents need to understand
about disciplining and punishing
their kids. Discipline means setting
a limit on all aspects of life and has
to be inculcated among children
from young. This is aimed at ensuring a harmonious life and not
to scare, or worse, abuse children,”
she said in a statement yesterday.
Che Asmah said people, especially parents, needed to understand that although caning is
mentioned in Islam as a form of
punishment, it cannot be used arbitrarily.
Talks on for
Asean common
time zone
KOTA KINABALU: Asean will continue to consider a common time
zone for Asean capitals, said Foreign Minister Datuk Seri Anifah
Aman.
Speaking to reporters after
chairing the Asean Foreign Ministers’ Retreat here yesterday, he said
the matter was discussed during
the meeting as “there were many
strong reasons to have a common
time zone”.
“This is not a new idea. This
was brought up by our leaders, as
early as 1995, and they discussed
it again around 2004. With Asean
forming an integrated and cohesive community by the end of this
year, we believe a common time
zone for Asean capitals is an idea
worth considering,” he said.
Among the benefits of a common time zone are strengthening
business links and inter-governmental cooperation among Asean
and Asian countries. A common
time zone will allow more time for
communication purposes, tally
stock market activities, enhance
airlines operational systems and
upgrade business and banking
linkages around the Asian region.
Malaysia has taken over the
Asean chairmanship for 2015 from
Myanmar. — Bernama
Che Asmah says parents
need to understand
that although caning is
mentioned in Islam as a
form of punishment, it
cannot be used arbitrarily.
Citing an example, she said caning should not be administered to
minors below 10 years old.
“Caning children who are not
matured in thinking and unable
to comprehend the implications
of their actions is a form of abuse.
“Caning should also be the last
effort to discipline after all others
have failed.”
She said efforts to increase
awareness of children’s welfare
should be done continuously and
stern action has to be imposed on
those found neglecting children.
Besides that, she said discussions needed to be held with religious agencies, experts in physiology and related non-governmental
organisations (NGOs) to obtain a
comprehensive view on the proposed law.
She added that any amendments
to the new Child Act should not
solely adhere to the Convention
on the Rights of the Child, to which
Malaysia is a signatory.
Women, Family and Community
Development Minister Datuk Seri
Rohani Abdul Karim’s recent statement that caning a child could be
an offence under the new Act raised
a storm of protests from politicians
and NGOs who had pressed for a
review of the proposal.
The ministry clarified that it did
not mean to outlaw all forms of caning of children and that instead, the
proposal would see a more detailed
provision on actions, including
caning, which cause physical or
mental injuries to children.
“The ministry is studying and
scrutinising the proposal so that
the legislation will cover all acts
against children causing physical
and emotional injuries deemed as
criminal offences which could be
punishable with heftier imprisonment or fines.
“Besides, the ministry is also
considering alternative punishment such as community service or
counselling or parenting courses,”
said the statement issued by the
ministry’s corporate communications unit on Monday.
Meanwhile, Sisters in Islam said
the Quran and Sunnah prioritised
justice and love among families and
prohibited cruelty and use of force.
“Justifying the use of force in the
name of religion gives a negative
image to Islam. We believe using
soft approaches to discipline children is better than using force,” it
said in a statement.
The NGO said Islam, as a universal religion, is flexible when it
comes to changes, and this included education and children psychology. — The Malaysian Insider
Don’t declare MH370 lost
without evidence — families
KUALA LUMPUR: As the one year
mark of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 draws near, families of those on board said they will
not accept any declaration that the
plane is lost without proof.
Families and representatives of
those on the aircraft that went missing on March 8 last year said they
were concerned about recent rumours that Malaysia is set to make a
major announcement on the plane’s
disappearance today.
“We have stated it before and reiterate again, that we are prepared
for any eventuality, including the
fact that our loved ones may never
come back.
“However, almost all families are
unanimous in our stand that we do
not want to declare our loved ones
dead, without a shred of evidence,”
the support group called Voice 370,
said in a press statement yesterday.
Flight MH370 went off course en
route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing
with 238 people on board. A costly
and massive search for the plane in
the southern Indian Ocean off the
coast of western Australia is still
being conducted.
The support group for the families
said they had referred the rumour
of the impending announcement
to the Joint Action Coordination
Centre (JACC), the Australia-led
body conducting the search.
They said the JACC had assured
them that the ongoing search was
progressing according to plan and
that one third of the area had been
covered.
The support group added that
JACC had also assured them that
there would be no let-up until the
60,000 sq km targeted under the
first phase was searched.
“In a further proactive measure,
they are taking steps to prepare for
recovery in the event that the search
finds evidence of the plane, to ensure little time is lost.
“Therefore, we are perplexed as
to why the Malaysian authorities
are jumping the gun in wanting to
make any announcements, while
the search is a long way from completion,” the group said.
The families said the least they
expected of the Malaysian authorities was for them to wait for the
completion of the first phase of
the search before making any announcement.
They also chided Malaysia for
their uncaring attitude with the
timing of the announcement, given that it was close to the Chinese
lunar new year festival next month
and with a majority of the victims
being Chinese.
“What we appeal for is assurance from the Chinese, Malaysian
and Australian authorities that the
search will not be abandoned anytime soon,” the group said.
They also appealed to aviation
organisations such as the International Civil Aviation Organisation
(ICAO) and the International Air
Transport Association to support
them by urging the relevant authorities to continue the search for the
missing plane and their loved ones.
An interim report on the investigation into MH370 is due to be
released by Malaysia’s Department
of Civil Aviation on March 7, a day
before the first anniversary of the
plane’s disappearance, according
to a Reuters report.
This is reportedly to abide by a
requirement from the ICAO for Malaysia to release an interim report
on the anniversary of the incident.
Voice 370 also said yesterday that
neither the Malaysian authorities
nor MAS had acknowledged “their
existence as a family support group”,
but that the Australian authorities
had recognised and dealt with them
as such. — The Malaysian Insider
Malaysia to
release MH370
report one
day before
anniversary
KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia will
release an interim report on its investigation into Malaysia Airlines
(MAS) flight MH370 on March 7, a
day before the first anniversary of
the jet’s mysterious disappearance,
an official said yesterday.
However, Deputy Transport
Minister Datuk Abdul Aziz Kaprawi
(pic) declined comment on whether
the report would contain any revelations on the fate of the MAS jet.
“It is a report by the investigation
team. It will be a lengthy report of a
few hundred pages,” he said.
The report is being compiled
and released by the Department
of Civil Aviation and is required
by the International Civil Aviation
Organisation (ICAO) one year after
air accidents, he said.
Flight MH370 vanished on
March 8 of last year with 239 passengers and crew aboard en route
from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in
what remains one of history’s great
aviation mysteries.
Malaysian authorities say satellite data indicate the plane inexplicably detoured to the remote southern Indian Ocean, and “deliberate”
on-board action is suspected. But
no firm evidence has turned up yet
despite an ongoing Australia-led
search of the supposed crash region — the most expensive search
and rescue operation in history.
Malaysia launched various investigations into the affair but has
so far released no information on
any findings. Malaysian authorities
released a report required by the
ICAO a few weeks after the incident
last year, but it contained little that
was not already known.
Some next of kin bitterly accuse
the Malaysian government and its
flag carrier of a chaotic and bungled response to the plane’s initial
diversion that allowed the jet to disappear. They continue to maintain
that the truth is being covered up.
Those charges have been strenuously denied.
Various theories have floated
on what happened to the plane
including hijack, rogue pilot action, mechanical malfunction or
a catastrophic event that disabled
the cockpit crew. But no clues have
emerged to bolster any of the scenarios. — AFP
13
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
SHARED PASSION
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14 H O M E
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
Experts: More
floods like those
in Kelantan
Due to global warming, deforestation and lack of enforcement
BY SHERI DA N MAHAV ERA
KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia will see
more severe floods like those that displaced more than 100,000 people in
Kelantan recently due to a combination of global warming, deforestation
and the lack of enforcement.
This was the conclusion of experts
at a forum in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday night to discuss the Kelantan
floods. They argued that all three
factors turned what is an annual occurrence into a national disaster.
The extraordinary rainfall that
Kelantan experienced in the span of
three to four days, said meteorology
expert Dr Liew Ju Neng, was due to a
tropical climate element called the
Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO).
The MJO originates from the Indian Ocean and passes through Malaysia four times a year, said Liew,
who is from Universiti Kebangsaan
Malaysia.
When it comes in contact with
the northeast monsoon that hits the
peninsula at the end of the year, it will
cause more than usual rain, he said
at the forum titled “Kelantan floods:
Coincidence or fate?”
The MJO increases the amount
of easterly winds which carry more
moisture and this leads to the monsoon dumping more rain than usual
when it passes through the peninsula.
On Jan 4, Kelantan Deputy Menteri Besar Datuk Mohd Amar Nik Abdullah said that during the height of
the floods, there were two days when
the amount of rain was equivalent to
the total that Kelantan experienced
for a month last year.
Liew said although the MJO travels through Malaysia four times a
year, extreme storms only happen
when they hit other climate phenomena such as the monsoon.
“Since the 1970s, MJOs are becoming more active. Due to global
warming, MJOs have increased by
40% to 50%. So in the next 30 to 40
years, we will see the MJO passing
through six times a year.”
The increased frequency of MJOs
will lead to more extreme storms,
which can cause floods to be more
severe. The massive floods in Johor
in 2006 and 2007 which had been
caused by extraordinary rainfall were
also due to the MJO, said Liew.
The forum was organised by youth
group Solidariti Anak Muda Malaysia
(SAMM), one of the many non-governmental organisations which have
helped collect and deliver aid to
flood-hit areas in Kelantan.
Rantau Panjang MP Siti Zailah
Mohd Yusoff said it is estimated that
the floods caused RM2 billion in
damages while 2,500 houses were
destroyed in Kelantan alone. Twelve
lives were lost.
The floods that also hit Perak,
Terengganu and Pahang at the end of
last year collectively affected 200,000
residents.
Both Putrajaya and the Kelantan government have been blamed
for not being adequately prepared
for relief operations, as seen in how
whole communities were cut off for
days without food, clothes and the
possibility of rescue.
Sharmila Ariffin of environmental
group Sahabat Alam Malaysia explained that another factor which
worsened floods was the clear-cutting of forests to establish plantations. She said Kelantan was losing
its forests at the highest rate in the
peninsula.
The high rate of deforestation was
due to the creation of timber plantations within permanent forest reserves in Kelantan. In 2014 alone, the
state had about 162,000ha of land
classified as timber plantations.
Although Kelantan has the highest growth rate of timber plantations
in the peninsula, said Sharmila, the
federal government also has a policy
of encouraging plantations all over
the country.
The problem with clear-cutting
forests, said drainage expert Datuk
Fuad Abdul Rahman, is that it exposes topsoil, which runs off and chokes
rivers with sediment.
“When you lose topsoil and
ground vegetation, the land is not
able to absorb rain,” said Fuad, who is
former deputy director-general of the
drainage and irrigation department.
The floods in Kelantan, said forum
moderator Badrul Hisham Shahrin,
was an opportunity for the country
to reflect and become aware of how
such a disaster happened and how
to prevent it from recurring.
The lessons from Kelantan could
be applied to the whole country. As a
SAMM volunteer from the audience
put it: “God should not be blamed
for these floods.”— The Malaysian
Insider
Cartoonist Zunar’s office raided,
books seized
PETALING JAYA: Police raided
the office of political cartoonist
Zulkiflee Anwar Alhaque, or Zunar, yesterday and seized copies
of his books.
The artist, who is in London,
tweeted: “Police in my office,
looking for me. But I currently
in London. So they are taking all
my books.”
It is still unclear if the raid and
seizures are related to an ongoing
police investigation against Zunar,
who in 2010 was detained for two
days under the Sedition Act. He
currently faces possible charges
under the same act.
One of his earlier tweets dated
Jan 26 said he was due to speak
at the University of Oxford and
University of Cambridge. He also
tweeted that he gave a talk entitled “To fight through cartoons” in
London, in an event organised by
the Monsoons Book Club.
Two policemen had come to
Zunar’s office, which shares the
same premises as PKR’s official
party newsletter, Suara Keadilan,
yesterday at around 10.30am.According to a staff member working
at Suara Keadilan, those working
in the office did not cooperate
when asked to give statements
by the officers. At 11.15am, four
more police officers came and
began asking questions and seizing the books, the worker told The
Malaysian Insider.
Zunar tweeted again yesterday afternoon that 149 books
had been seized. They were both
the English and Bahasa Malaysia versions of Conspiracy to Imprison Anwar and Pirates of the
Carry-BN.
In another tweet, he criticised
the police’s actions, saying “Kalau
kartun dirasa fitnah, silakan orang
yg terasa itu kemuka saman sivil.
Tiada masalah. Saya bantah guna
undang2 jenayah spt akta hasutan.” (If the cartoons are defamatory, those who feel aggrieved
should file a civil suit. No problem. I oppose the use of criminal
laws like the Sedition Act.) — The
Malaysian Insider
UTP first M’sian university to use
Cambridge admissions testing
KUALA LUMPUR: Universiti Teknologi Petronas (UTP) signed
a memorandum of agreement
(MoA) with Admissions Testing
Service (ATS), University of Cambridge, yesterday to provide assessment tools and services related to the selection of applicants
for UTP’s foundation and undergraduate programmes.
UTP vice-chancellor Datuk Dr
Abdul Rahim Hashim signed the
MoA on behalf of UTP, while ATS
was represented by its director, Simon Beeston. Education Minister
II Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh witnessed
the ceremony.
Abdul Rahim said that the collaboration with the University of
Cambridge will take UTP one step
closer to becoming the first university in Malaysia to implement
the Thinking Skills Assessment
(TSA) and Cambridge Personal
Styles Questionnaire (CPSQ).
“The signing of the MoA today (yesterday) is a step towards
establishing a better climate that
offers tailored assessment services
to support selection and recruitment for educational institutions,”
said Abdul Rahim.
“UTP takes pride in nurturing
students who are not only technically competent, but who are
also able to exercise the ability
to think critically and synthesise
solutions for real world problems, hence the TSA and CPSQ
assessments are in tandem with
the university’s objective to produce well-rounded graduates,”
he said.
“UTP has been awarded the
highest rating possible with regard
to employability, internationalisation and innovation to name but
three,” said Beeston. — Bernama
Indonesian agencies threaten to stop sending workers
KUALA LUMPUR: Indonesian employment agency operators have
threatened to stop sending workers to Malaysia following a drastic
hike in visa processing fees under
a new system outsourced to Bestinet Sdn Bhd.
An English daily reported that
Malaysian visa fees for Indonesians
had been increased from RM15 to
RM250 under the foreign workers
centralised management system
(FWCMS), which Putrajaya has outsourced to Bestinet, a private firm
now in the limelight because of its
directors who are closely linked to
the federal government.
The English daily said Asosiasi
Perusahaan Jasa Tenaga Kerja Indonesia (Apjati), the body that represents over 500 employment agencies, has written to the Indonesian
Parliament as well as the republic’s
human resources and foreign ministries, urging an immediate halt on
sending workers to Malaysia.
“We strongly reject the increase
in fees. It is an exploitation of our
citizens. Such an increase must be
done through an agreement between both governments.
“Malaysia should have negotiated with our government first,”
Apjati president Ayub Basalamah
was quoted as saying.
“What is worse is that, in addition
to paying the new RM230 processing
fee, the previous RM15, and other
minor charges, we have to provide
details of our workers to a private
company instead of to the Malaysian embassy.”
The additional fees are a “huge
burden” to Indonesians looking to
either work or study in Malaysia,
he added.
Filepic of Indonesian workers. The additional fees are a ‘huge burden’ to Indonesians
looking to either work or study in Malaysia, said Ayub. Photo by The Malaysian Insider
The daily said Apjati is the largest association of private recruitment agencies in Indonesia, with
its members sending more than
150,000 Indonesians to work in Ma-
laysia each year. The hikes mean an
additional cost of about RM34.5
million per year.
Indonesians wanting to work or
study in Malaysia are required to ap-
ply for a visa with reference or more
popularly known as a “calling visa”.
With the exception of domestic
maids, the visa fees are borne by
the Indonesian workers and not by
their employers.
The daily cited Malaysian ambassador to Indonesia Datuk Seri
Zahrain Mohamed Hashim as saying that the embassy had been instructed by the home ministry to
outsource the visa processing.
Zahrain was quoted acknowledging the complaints about higher visa fees from worker groups as
well as students wanting to study
in Malaysia, since the new system
took effect in December. He said
the steep increase in fees was “fair”
as the company had to cover costs,
which included conducting background checks to prevent fraud. —
The Malaysian Insider
COMMENT 15
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
Benefits of oil price fall
Positive effects on PMI indicators and retail sales expected — analysts
BY JAMES SAFT
E
conomies and investors, having suffered
the pain of the tumble
in energy prices, may
soon start to see more
of the benefits.
While markets were quick to
price in the negative effects of falling oil prices on producing countries and companies alike, the
benefits, both to consumers and
economies as a whole, take longer
to arrive.
Brent crude oil prices have tumbled nearly 60% since June to below US$50 (RM180.50) per barrel,
claiming several high-profile victims in the process.
Russia, highly dependent on oil
earnings and suffering from the effects of sanctions over its conduct
in Ukraine, has seen its currency
and stock market tumble. Highyield bonds, a sector with a heavy
concentration of the more specu-
lative oil companies, have fallen
markedly.
Sagging energy prices have also
likely contributed to lower global interest rates, put downward
pressure on inflation in major
economies and may be influencing central banks to keep money
conditions easier than they might
otherwise.
“The effects of the oil price decline are being priced in now, for
example in the Russian currency,
the share price of UK oil companies and the energy sector of the
US high-yield debt market,” Keith
Skeoch, chief executive officer of
Edinburgh-based Standard Life Investments, wrote in a note to clients.
“So on balance we conclude that
supply side rather than demand
side factors are more important,
and into spring 2015 we should start
to see the more beneficial effects
of cheaper energy feed through in
consumer spending and non-oil
corporate investment.”
The worry has always been that
the tumble in oil presaged a more
general downturn in the global
economy, which has happened
in the past.
Though demand is slowing rapidly, notably in China and weaker
parts of the eurozone, other factors argue against interpreting the
energy tumble as a warning sign.
For one thing, broader commodity prices, while retreating, have
fallen only about half as much as
oil, a point not consistent with a
generalised downturn in demand.
At the same time, new supplies
of oil have been coming online,
made possible by new technology
that has been seeping into the market for years, and the Saudi decision
not to tighten supply.
Overall, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) estimates that the
fall in energy prices is 60% attributable to supply issues.
Now we get to the good part.
Both the IMF and World Bank
have recently revised down their
global growth forecasts for 2015.
Both agree, however, that cheaper
petrol at the pump and energy for
factories will give a boost to growth.
The IMF sees an extra 0.7 per-
centage point of growth this year
and 0.8 percentage point in 2016,
while the World Bank sees about a
half a percentage point extra over
the “medium term”.
Analysts at Barclays Bank looked
at the five similar oil price declines
of the past 30 years and found that
while they tended to happen as
growth was slowing, a rebound
comes six to nine months after the
decline in prices.
“We expect to see positive effects
on PMI indicators and retail sales
in coming months, which in itself
should strengthen markets’ belief in
the beneficial global growth effects
of lower oil prices,” Christian Keller
and Apolline Menut of Barclays
wrote in a note to clients.
This may be particularly true
in the United States, where due
to lower energy taxes, more of the
impact of cheaper energy will drop
directly into consumers’ pockets.
Think of a fall in energy prices as
being a bit like quantitative easing
(QE) for Main Street.
QE drives up the price of financial assets owned mostly by the
well-heeled, who are not likely to
increase consumption. But cheaper
petrol and lower utility bills spread
their benefit more widely among
middle-class workers who have
seen their incomes fail to rise in
step with the better-off, and are far
more likely to spend the proceeds.
To be clear, the losers, from Russia to Venezuela to the Dakotas,
will continue to suffer, and capital
investment and spending will be
hit selectively.
Eventually, marginal energy
production will come off-line and
planned investment shelved, meaning that some time in 2016 we likely
will see energy prices rise again.
Until then, we will see tangible
benefits: better spending and investment in major economies and
lower interest rates than we would
otherwise have enjoyed.
It looks like a bit of the right kind
of deflation, if only for a time. —
Reuters
James Saft is a Reuters columnist.
The opinions expressed are his own.
Why Russia’s economy will not collapse
BY C H A RL ES WY PLO SZ
THE rapid depreciation of the ruble,
despite a dramatic — and seemingly
desperate — late-night interest-rate
hike by the Central Bank of Russia
(CBR) last month, has raised the spectre of Russia’s economic meltdown in
1998. Indeed, the West has sought to
animate that specter in its ongoing
confrontation with Russian President
Vladimir Putin. But, though Russia’s
economy is undoubtedly in trouble,
a full-blown collapse is unlikely.
Oil and gas account for more than
60% of Russia’s exports; other primary commodities make up much of
the rest. Given this, the recent sharp
decline in world oil prices obviously represents a major shock — large
enough, when combined with the
effect of increasingly strict Western
sanctions — to provoke a sizeable
recession. To make matters worse,
commodity prices are expected to
remain low for some time. In that
case, the income loss would become
much more than a temporary setback.
But Russia is no economic basket-case-in-waiting — at least not
yet. The situation today is very different from that in 1998, when Russia was running twin fiscal and
current-account deficits. Russia
needed to borrow, and it was borrowing heavily in foreign currency.
This meant that as the ruble depreciated, Russia’s debts rose. Eventually, default became inevitable.
By contrast, in recent years, Russia
has enjoyed a sizeable budget surplus, and public debt is below 20%
Although the Russian currency has fallen, government income in rubles remains approximately unchanged. Photo by Reuters
of gross domestic product (GDP). It
is true that income from oil and gas,
which represents the bulk of government revenue, has been halved
when measured in US dollars. But the
Russian currency has fallen by about
the same percentage, meaning that
the government’s income in rubles
remains approximately unchanged.
Similarly, Russia’s current-account
balance has been mostly in surplus
in recent years. Gross public and private external debt is below 40% of
GDP, and much of it is denominated in rubles. The sharp fall in export
income is rapidly changing the situation, but Russia is starting from a
comfortable position. To panic would
be premature.
The ruble’s free fall has been
driven mainly by capital outflows.
Russia’s famous oligarchs have already stashed most of their wealth
abroad, but they retain significant
savings at home. As the economic
and political situation deteriorates,
they are most likely pulling more
money out. Small savers have every
reason to switch to foreign currency as well.
This has put the CBR in a challenging position. The ruble’s depreciation is bound to fuel inflation,
already around 11% and far above
the CBR’s 5% target. In that context,
raising the interest rate sharply
makes sense, and officials may be
hoping that the hike will stem cap-
ital outflows — despite the risk that
the decision, if interpreted as being
aimed at defending the currency,
could have the opposite effect.
The trouble is that the higher interest rates are bound to deepen Russia’s
economic downturn, making the CBR
an easy scapegoat. Never mind that
the central bank is not responsible
for Russia’s troubles — the run on the
ruble, the recession and the flare-up
of inflation — and that using interest
rates to prevent capital outflows always fails. Embattled politicians can
be counted on to point the finger.
The threat to Putin is clear. He
risks the fate of his predecessor, Boris
Yeltsin, who presided during a period of unusually low oil prices. Until
now, Putin has been lucky, coming to
power just as oil prices started to rise.
Most Russian citizens credit him with
two decades of rising living standards,
following decades of decline.
Putin’s decision not to implement the unpopular reforms that
would have created a strong nonoil export sector may have been
bad for the economy’s long-term
health, but it has allowed him to
maintain widespread public support. His economic good fortune,
combined with his readiness to
stand up to the West, has created
a misguided impression in Russia
that the country is, once again, a
world power.
Many in the United States and
Europe believe that ratcheting
up economic pressure on Russia
will help drive Putin out. This is
an enormously dangerous gamble. As Russian living standards
decline, Putin’s only viable strategy to remain in power will be an
aggressive international posture.
Foreign military adventures, after
all, are most appealing when the
domestic front is on fire.
None of this means that the West
should bow and forsake its principles. But it does mean that the
time has come for a diplomatic
approach that does not depend on
the prospect of Russia’s economic
collapse. — Project Syndicate
Charles Wyplosz is professor of international economics and director of
the International Center for Money
and Banking Studies at the Graduate Institute of International Studies
in Geneva.
16 F E AT U R E
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
Opening up resale opportunities
Foreign investors get an insight into Australian real estate at seminar
BY C EC I L I A C H OW
D
ominique Grubisa, founder and
chief executive officer of Australian
Investment & Migration, spoke at
her first property investment seminar in Asia last year. It was in Kuala
Lumpur. “The response wasn’t what
I thought,” she says. “It was much
bigger in terms of high-net worth
clients. I didn’t expect to see that
kind of wealth.”
Grubisa even opened an office
in Singapore last September, and
intends to open another in Hong
Kong later this year. She was in
Penang last Tuesday, and flew to
Singapore to give a talk to a packed
audience later that evening. She
will be speaking at a conference in
Singapore in March, followed by another in Hong Kong and Shanghai.
Having made a name for herself
in the educational property seminar circuit in cities across Australia,
Grubisa is now lending her expertise to Asian investors who want to
get a foothold in Australian real
estate. She started Global Property
Education last June, and renamed
the company Australian Investments & Migration in December.
In Australia, Grubisa has built
her reputation as a debt and commercial law specialist over the past
two decades, as a practising barrister since 1996 and, prior to that,
as a solicitor since 1994. As a legal
practitioner, she also carries a licence as a migration agent. Grubisa
has a formidable rolodex of contacts
in banking and finance as well as the
real estate industry. She is the author
of books such as Real Estate Riches
Down Under: How to Make a Fortune
Investing in the Australian Property
Market and Managing Debt: Turning
Your Finances Around.
She is sceptical about developers
who hold property investment seminars in Asia. “The developers disguise them as educational, but they
are not,” she says. The fact that she
is not a property agent or developer
“flogging” a property development is
an advantage to foreign investors. “I
can better advise them if it’s a good or
bad investment, but they will still have
to do due diligence,” she explains.
‘Off-plan’
Currently, in Australia, foreigners are
allowed to buy only new properties
sold off-plan by developers or new
properties that have been approved
by the Foreign Investment Review
Board (FIRB). Foreigners are not allowed to buy pre-owned property in
Australia. And when they sell their
property in the secondary market,
they can sell only to Australian citizens or permanent residents.
According to Grubisa, however,
developments sold off-plan are
not the only things that foreigners
can have access to. “But [off-plan
developments] are the only things
that can be legally marketed here
in Asia,” she explains. “Such pro-
Beachfront homes in Bronte, a beachside suburb in Sydney. Photo by Australian Investment & Migration
Grubisa says her patent has
attracted ‘much interest’
from investors in Hong Kong
and China. Photo by
Samuel Isaac Chua/
The Edge Singapore
jects make up less than 1% of the
property in Australia. So, it’s just
the tip of the iceberg.”
Grubisa recalls speaking to a
banker who related the anecdote
of a foreigner who paid A$1 million
(RM2.89 million) for an apartment
purchased off-plan only to find that
when he wanted to sell it, the bank
valuation was only A$600,000.
While visiting Gold Coast in
Queensland one day, Grubisa
encountered a similar scenario. She came across a beautiful
apartment that was owned by a
foreign investor who had paid
A$1.2 million for the unit. The
owner struggled to find a buyer, as a development next door
had units offering the same view,
similar-quality finishes and completed just two years earlier, that
were priced at A$600,000.
Grubisa believes she has found
the remedy for foreigners locked out
of most resale market opportunities
Down Under. She has formulated a
process and legal structure that will
enable non-Australians to invest in
Australian property “safely and in
compliance with Australian regulations”, she says. “It’s brand-new.
I’ve just dusted off the patent for it.”
The patent is for the process,
including the structuring of companies, which will allow foreign
investors to purchase properties.
“It’s not just any company,” emphasises Grubisa. “It has to be of a
certain company structure which
I’ve patented. Not just anyone can
do it. I’ve joined all the dots, put
the system and process in place
for [foreigners] to be able to buy.
So, they can technically have access to the resale market.” There
is no limit to the number of properties they can purchase using
this structure, she adds.
With her patented structure,
more opportunities could open up
for foreign investors in Australia.
“Most migration agents can help
obtain a student or skilled migrant
visa”, Grubisa points out, “but no
one I know can obtain a SIV [Significant Investor Visa] and allow
the complying investment to be in
property. That is our unique selling
point.” On the other hand, most migration agents will encourage the investment to be in managed funds or
government bonds, which gives the
investor little control, she explains.
‘Golden visa’
The SIV scheme was introduced
by the Australian government in
November 2012. The minimum
investment is A$5 million, and visa
holders must stay at least 40 days a
year over a four-year period before
qualifying for permanent residence.
The scheme attracted 1,462 applicants from November 2012 to December 2014. It attracted a total of
A$5.92 billion investments, of which
about A$2.975 billion has been invested in complying assets, with
another A$2.945 billion proposed
to be invested. As at end-December 2014, the top five nationalities
for which visa applications were
granted were: China (88.7%), Hong
Kong (3.5%), South Africa (1.3%),
Malaysia (1%) and Japan (0.8%).
A “premium” SIV was announced
last November targeted at wealthy
foreigners with at least A$15 million to invest in certain assets. The
visa will give them a fast track for
obtaining a permanent residence
after 12 months. “I believe the premium investor visa is an attempt to
attract high-net-worth investors who
do not want to wait four years and
have to spend 160 days in Australia,”
says Grubisa. “They get PR in a year
without the obligation of having to
spend a certain amount of time in
Australia. The A$5 million visa will
remain for those who do not mind
waiting four years and having to
spend 160 days in Australia.”
The signing of the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement last
year now allows Chinese investors
to buy commercial property up to
a value of A$1.078 billion without
requiring FIRB approval. This puts
them on equal footing with US and
New Zealand investors. The current
commercial property limit is A$54
million. The existing screening of
residential property purchases still
applies, though.
Nevertheless, Chinese investors
are already making headline transactions in Australia. The standout
property deal last year was the sale
of a mansion called Villa del Mare
in Point Piper, the most affluent
waterfront suburb in Sydney, where
the likes of Australian moguls James
Packer and Lachlan Murdoch (elder
son of Rupert Murdoch) own
homes. The Mediterranean-style
Villa del Mare, previously owned
by Australian recruitment boss Julia
Ross, fetched A$39 million in October, topping four other transactions
in Point Piper last year that were
above A$30 million each.
The property was reportedly sold
to an Australian company called
Golden Fast Foods Pty Ltd, which
is controlled by Chinese billionaire Xu Jiayin, chairman of Guangdong-headquartered real estate
developer Evergrande Group, and
China’s 15th richest with a net worth
of US$7 billion (RM25.3 billion), according to the Hurun Rich List 2014.
In 2013, the most expensive
mansion sold in Australia was also
in Point Piper — a property called
Altona, which fetched A$54 million.
The buyer was said to be Chinese
businessman Xiuzhen Ding, a resident of Elwood, a beachfront suburb in Melbourne, who purchased
through his investment company
Chimovich Investments.
According to Grubisa, the
only way for a foreigner to purchase a property in Point Piper is
to be an Australian resident or via
a company structure similar to the
one she has patented.
Opening up new asset classes
Many Chinese companies are interested in buying agricultural and
dairy farms, as well as in tying up
with locals to manage these assets,
says Grubisa. Last November, for
instance, Australian mining tycoon
Gina Rinehart agreed to invest A$500
million in partnership with Chinese
state-owned company China National Machinery Industry Corp to form
Hope Dairies Ltd, one of Australia’s
largest dairy farms, to produce premium infant formula, which is seeing
soaring demand in China.
Grubisa also sees foreign investor interest in resort properties,
luxury hotels, major wineries and
vineyards. In addition to investing, foreigners are also looking at
Australia as a “desirable destination” when it comes to education,
she adds. Many want to send their
children to Australia for their education, and eventually to obtain
permanent residence.
Naturally, Grubisa’s structure
of buying property in Australia has
attracted much interest from investors in China and Hong Kong.
For Singaporeans, the interest has
been in buying property using
her patented structure, she says,
“[and] not to live in Australia, as
they are happy where they are”. —
The Edge Singapore
17
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
A NEW WEEKLY PULLOUT IN
THE WALL |
Wealth advisory
landscape —
towards more
holistic planning
INVESTING |
Economic
momentum
picking up in India
CURRENCIES |
Weak ringgit to benefit
some investors
2
4
5
personalwealth
FINANCE |
CTOS sets the
record straight
8
MANAGING YOUR MONEY
THE EDGE MALAYSIA
JANUARY 26,
2015
THE
ETERNAL
OPTIMIST
Citibank’s new CEO Lee Lung Nien
looks at things from the bright side.
But he advises investors to be prudent
and patient, and not to
over-leverage
themselves this
year. Turn to our
Cover Story on
Page 6.
JAN FROM
UAR
ISSU Y 26
E
18 F E AT U R E
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
Monetary mess threatens
gains from oil oversupply
New Greek
debt deal will
mean another
period of
brinkmanship
BY N E IL UN MAC K
Resources companies cancelling investment plans, cutting production
BY A NDY MU KHER JEE
A
sharp oil price decline is generally a
sign of oversupply,
and an oil glut is
normally an economic lubricant.
The oil price is down almost 60%
since June, and about half of the
decline looks like a case of oversupply. But cheap crude might not provide much oomph, because central
banks are gumming up the works.
Of course, oil may not be cheaper merely because there is too much
of it. Some economists think that
the decline in crude prices in the
second half of 2014 (1H14) is primarily because of weak demand.
If they’re right, the excess of crude
will do nothing fast to propel gross
domestic product (GDP) growth.
But judging by the way that the
fall of oil has filtered into other
prices, it looks like the gloomy crew
have it backwards. Compare the
recent collapse in oil to the similar drop in the 1H09. Then the financial crisis led to a sudden and
dramatic collapse in demand for oil
and everything else. About half of
this commodity-led drop in headline inflation immediately filtered
through to the core inflation rate,
which is calculated by stripping
out volatile food and energy prices.
This time around, only about a
quarter of the drop in headline inflation has seeped into core prices,
according to a Breakingviews analysis of price trends in 25 major world
economies, which together account
for US$65 trillion (RM234.65 trillion) of output.
In other words, the disinflationary drag from weak demand is only
half as strong now as six years ago.
That suggests that the other half of
the oil price fall comes from unexpected excess supply — such
as Saudi Arabia’s decision to keep
production intact amidst stumbling prices. If that is right, the supply shock, as economists call it, is
potentially large enough to give a
nice economic push in importing
nations.
The cost savings from cheaper
oil will allow households to buy
more of other things. Governments
in poorer oil-importing countries
will spend less on energy subsidies
and more on infrastructure, as In-
donesia has already started doing.
Oil exporters will suffer, but world
output will get a boost. Simulations by International Monetary
Fund economists Rabah Arezki and
Olivier Blanchard suggest a 0.4%
to 0.8% increase in global GDP in
2016 from what it might otherwise
have been.
However, there are problems. Resources companies are cancelling
investment plans and cutting production where they can. This could
have ripple effects on jobs and wages.
Meanwhile, animal spirits in non-resources industries are being held
back by the inability of central banks
to fix the banking motor. And while
global demand is not collapsing, it
is too low to encourage investment
and consumption.
Worse still, even the subdued
drop in core inflation that the world
economy has witnessed in the past
six months is surreptitiously pushing up the real, or inflation-adjusted, cost of borrowing. That, too, can
be blamed on central banks’ helplessness: nominal interest rates in
rich nations are at rock bottom, and
can’t be cut any further.
The other strategy for monetary
easing is quantitative easing (QE),
or bulking up of the monetary authorities’ balance sheet. This device,
which is already looking worn from
overuse, is getting pressed into service in the eurozone. But the Swiss
National Bank has abruptly turned
off the money-printing machine,
and the Bank of Japan is finding it
hard to crank it up. As QE fatigue
weakens investor expectations of
future inflation, businesses could
become even more nervous to order
new plants and machines.
If China and India don’t cut interest rates aggressively this year,
and if the United States raises them,
the global inflation-adjusted cost of
capital could increase further. That
could be problematic, particularly in Asia. From China and South
Korea to Thailand and Malaysia,
companies and households have
loaded up on so much of debt in
the past few years that their capacity to service the loans is now
stretched. If disinflation leads to
higher real interest rates before it
can jump-start consumer spending and GDP growth, the potential
gains from the oil glut would be
squandered. — Reuters
ECB, Syriza break eurozone’s German spell
BY PI ERRE B RI A NCON
FOR the eurozone, the victory of the
anti-austerity Syriza party in the Greek
election is not just a political test. It
marks the beginning of a new, more
promising phase of the monetary union’s history, the end of a five-month
transition period that saw the monetary union break the German spell.
Austerity at all costs cannot, will not
be at the heart of Europe’s crisis-resolution mechanism, as it has been for
the last five years.
It started last August, with a speech
by Mario Draghi to the world’s leading central bankers in Jackson Hole,
Wyoming, in the United States, when
the European Central Bank (ECB)
president signalled that he was ready
to break long-standing taboos. Now,
for the first time, voters in a monetary
union member state have chosen a
government that built its campaign
around its opposition to austerity. But
the Greeks have also elected a pro-euro, pro-Europe party. New Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras wouldn’t have
received such a broad mandate if he
had not silenced the leftist part of his
movement openly contemplating a
euro exit.
Because of that anti-austerity,
pro-euro stance, Greece will wield
much more influence than its 2% of
eurozone gross domestic product
would normally merit. Other governments worry because much can go
Tsipras speaking to supporters after winning the elections in Athens on Sunday. Just as
Merkel must take into consideration the will of Greek voters, Tsipras must understand
the concerns of German ones. Photo by Reuters
wrong in the high-stakes negotiations
between Athens, its creditor countries
and the ECB. But in quite a few capitals, leaders are silently hoping that
the Greek election becomes a catalyst
for a change in the European conversation. Without abandoning the need
for fiscal prudence, they’re eager to
start talking more about growth, job
creation and the best ways to boost
the economies of the block and its
individual members.
In his Jackson Hole speech, Draghi
signalled that the ECB was reconsidering two key pillars of the Berlin-Brussels consensus. He called for
a rethink of fiscal austerity in countries that could afford stimulus (guess
who?), and he announced that the
ECB was ready to loosen monetary
policy. Then, after cornering German authorities into admitting that
low inflation threatened to become
a problem, he designed the path towards full-blown quantitative easing. In the end, Germany won some
serious concession on loss sharing,
but the massive, open-ended nature
of the bond-buying programme ran
counter to Berlin’s long-held views
on monetary policy.
The eurozone now has as loose
a monetary policy as it will get. It is
also well on the way to a true banking
union — one of the most important
achievements to come out of the crisis. And the terms of the debate are
changing. Governments in France
and Italy, willing to reform but in
need of some fiscal breathing space,
are making the case for well-considered economic stimulus. Together,
the two countries have contributed
50% more than Germany to the two
Greek bailouts, so they should find a
way to make their views heard.
In the next few weeks the eurozone
will go back to its crisis mode. Expect
talk of “insurmountable” differences, final ultimatums, stern warnings,
and last-minute compromises. How
the new government in Athens will
choose to use its victory remains a big
unknown. But like its predecessors,
it will have to show that it is not asking the Germans, the French or the
Italians to pay the taxes that Greeks
don’t pay. Just as German Chancellor
Angela Merkel must take into consideration the will of Greek voters, Tsipras must understand the concerns of
German ones.
The leaders of the monetary union and the European Commission can seize the Greek moment to
shake off their austerity-cum-structural reforms trance. Declaring independence from Berlin doesn’t mean
they can ignore economic realities.
But it gives them the opportunity
to design policies that go beyond
pain and fiscal tightening. Syriza
may err, disappoint or fail, but the
implications of its electoral victory
are already extending far beyond
Greece’s borders. — Reuters
A NEW debt deal for Greece will
mean another unsettled period
of brinkmanship. Markets are relaxed that the anti-bailout Syriza
government will be able to cut a
new arrangement with creditors.
But pressure points lie ahead in
March and July. Getting through
these will need quick progress on
tackling Greece’s bigger challenges.
Alexis Tsipras, the new prime
minister, has little time to negotiate the debt relief he promised
voters before elections. The widespread assumption is that Greece
will get an extension to its existing
bailout package — which includes
liquidity for its banking system —
which would otherwise expire in
February. Even so, the pressure
will mount soon after.
Debt repayments, including
money owed to the International Monetary Fund, may exhaust
Greece’s reserves by the end of
March, Eurobank reckons. Then
in July and August, €6.6 billion
(RM27.153 billion) of bonds held
by the European Central Bank mature. Tsipras could muddle through
this by getting the country’s banks
to buy some new short-term government debt. This, however,
would breach limits on treasury
bills agreed with eurozone lenders.
So for domestic lenders to be able
to support him will require Tsipras to
make progress in talks with international creditors on Greece’s longerterm borrowings. The only alternative would be to default on domestic
obligations. But that could trigger
capital flight, weakening Tsipras’
negotiating hand.
Debt repayments,
including money owed
to the International
Monetary Fund, may
exhaust Greece’s reserves
by the end of March.
The likely outcome is that Greece
gives some ground on reform, in return for a lowering of the country’s
fiscal targets so that debt could be
greater than 110% of gross domestic product (GDP) by 2022, the arbitrary goal agreed on in 2012. The
eurozone could also extend debt
maturities and lower interest rates
on Greece’s bailout loans. This will
only help over time — Bruegel, the
think tank, estimates such measures
could save €32 billion through 2050.
The sums coming due in the near
term may seem small for a country
with total debt equivalent to 176%
of GDP. But the interconnected nature of bargaining over short- and
long-term issues creates the likelihood of several stand-offs ahead.
Markets may be relaxed, but Greece
retains the capacity to deliver repeated shocks in 2015. — Reuters
19
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
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Patronage
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Jokowi’s choice of
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new police chief
>> MALAYSIA
King’s fears put
spotlight on
worsening racial and
religious tensions
>> CAMBODIA
New banks are
rushing in, but
the majority
are seriously
underperforming
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20 FO CU S
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
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A mini SUV based on a Golf?
VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI is a compact crossover that does most things well
Rear seats are split 60:40. It features an
armrest, and it slides, reclines and folds.
There are six airbags and an anti-theft alarm.
BY HA L I M YA ACO B
T
he VW Volkswagen Tiguan 1.4
TSI is a compact crossover that
slots into VW’s lineup beneath
the larger Touareg SUV and it
gets its name from a combination of German words for “tiger”
and “iguana” (strong and nimble?).
Now my first impression of the Volkswagen Tiguan 1.4 TSI (Turbocharged Stratified
Injection) variant (RM179,608) seen cruising along the New Klang Valley Expressway
was that of a small SUV that behaves like a
hatchback.
At least that’s what it looked like to me.
After driving it, I can say there is no way in
which the VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI looks or feels
like a Golf behind the wheel — though the
engines and platform are similar (to that of
the Mk6 Golf TSI’s engine).
And the folks at Volkswagen Group Malaysia assure me that the VW Tiguan 1.4
TSI has been engineered with the goal of
becoming the most capable and satisfying
small crossover available.
So, let’s get on with it. Positioned as the
Touareg’s combative, smaller sibling, the
VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI arrived somewhat late
to the crossover party.
How does it feel?
This VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI 2WD certainly does
strike a more athletic, traditional SUV-style
pose — though one could be pushed to perhaps describe it as “mean” looking.
Well-built and very smart with a lofty
driving position, the VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI has
a twin-charged EA111 1.4 litre twin-charged
direct petrol injection TSI engine mated to a
wet-clutch 6-speed direct shift gearbox for
a captivating performance. The wet-clutch
bit means there’s almost no lag in between
the automatic gear changes.
This combination produces a maximum torque of 240Nm kicking in from a
low 1,500rpm, enabling it to accelerate from
0 to 100kph in 8.9 seconds with a top speed
of 198kph (electronically timed of course).
The interior has ample storage spaces — one is in the central area where a space-saving electronic parking
brake button is present. The whole cabin looks sturdy and solid with plenty of premium features such as the
leather steering wheel and gear knob.
It also means that the four-cylinder engine sends 160 PS at 5,800 rpm and 240Nm
of torque between 1,500rpm and 4,500rpm
to the front wheels.
The engine did struggle out of the toll
gate during the test drive, but once above
3,000rpm, it moved the VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI
more than adequately and was quiet and
responsive at higher speeds.
VW Tiguan 2.0 TSI doesn’t have them) lets it
claim a combined fuel consumption of 7.1
litres per 100km.
Some wind noise did creep in around
110kph during the trip along the highway
to Port Dickson, though not much.
When I needed to hit the brakes, this
Tiguan’s four-wheel discs with ABS slowed
the vehicle down admirably.
The drive
The VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI proved agile and
carlike on the roads around Port Dickson.
It retains enough oomph for you to throw it
around if the mood takes you. It has a mean
tight turning radius and electromechanical
steering (quick and light at low speeds).
It steers accurately and controls body
movements well, and there’s undoubtably
extra traction to push you through corners
which makes this VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI one of
the smoothest, more comfortable cars in its
class (though it isn’t quite like the BMW X3
that costs RM328,800).
Activating the auto-hold button allowed
me to take my foot off the brakes while the
vehicle was on an incline or decline. The auto-hold allows the Tiguan to resume moving
smoothly once you step on the accelerator.
Start/stop and regenerative braking (the
The interior
Inside, the VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI takes a people-first approach to packaging, making it
a comfortable around-town car that also
provides highway comfort.
There’s a familiar VW vibe in here. The
cabin is typically well-designed. Leg, head
and shoulder room are all excellent, although
it’s a bit tight for three people in the back.
The front seats especially are supportive,
offering good visibility from the driver’s seat,
while the materials feel solid with a wellbuilt feeling running throughout.
There is a backseat “tray” which you can
put to good use for surfing on your smartphone/tablet. The interior features include
climatic semi-auto air-con, an electronic
parking brake with auto-hold, Radio RCD
310 (MP3, CD, AUX, eight speakers) and
rain-sensing windscreen wipers.
Conclusion
The VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI is a pleasure to drive,
thanks to its responsive engine and a finely
balanced chassis.
There’s nothing shocking here. Consumption and CO2 levels are among the best in
its class. It falls into the pricier portion of
the market, which is what you would expect given the upmarket badge on the front.
It’s not as cheap as some rivals and the
ride is a bit firm. Rear visibility isn’t great,
while off-road ability is limited.
The Tiguan 1.4 TSI comes with auto halogen headlamps, front fog lamps with static cornering lamps, plus 17-inch “Boston”
five-spoke alloys (Tiguan 2.0 TSI has 17-inch
“New Orleans” multi-spoke alloys) wrapped
in 235/55 series tyres.
Wait, what’s the bummer? It’s the optional
Tech Pack — bi-xenon headlamps with LED
DRLs, bluetooth, climatronic auto dual-zone
air-con, cruise control, dynamic headlight
range adjustment with bending lights, foldable wing mirrors with curb view (when you
engage reverse), a “Premium” multi-function
display, a multi-function steering wheel,
Park Distance Control with reverse camera,
Radio RCD 510 (6.5-inch touchscreen) and
a USB adaptor cable — (whew!) all in for an
extra RM10,000.
I would wish for the Tech Pack to be
included into the fully imported (CBU)
Volkswagen Tiguan 1.4 TSI priced at
RM179,608 nett (OTR without insurance).
A five-year warranty with unlimited mileage is offered. The seats are suede which is
suitable for our weather.
Anything else? It’s a Volkswagen, so it just
gets on with being safe, dependable and a
wee bit posh. Your possible alternative would
be the Audi Q3 1.4 TFSI at RM216,888.
If you really want the VW Tiguan 1.4 TSI to
take off, shift the gear to “S” mode. Road tax is
RM70. Enough said. Log on to www.volkswagen.com.my/Das-Auto for a test drive.
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FO CU S 21
T HURSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
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LAUNCH OF LEXUS NX 200t ... The highly anticipated all-new Lexus NX is set to debut in Kuala Lumpur tonight. Five variants (200t, 200t Premium, 200t Luxury, 200t F Sport and 300h) will be offered at the
grand premiere of this compact crossover SUV. Estimated prices start from RM300,000 for the base 2-litre turbo model, rising up to RM390,200 for the range-topping hybrid variant. The new Lexus NX will be joining a party
dominated by the established BMW X3 and Audi Q5, with the Range Rover Evoque and Porsche Macan thrown into the mix.
Rolls-Royce’s precision engineering
BY JU ST I N HA RPER
WHEN one thinks of a car factory, what
springs to mind is a huge industrial plant
spouting smoke, located near a major city
or town. But Rolls-Royce’s manufacturing
plant is a million miles away from such a
setting. It is based in scenic Goodwood
country estate, among the rolling hills of
Sussex Downs.
The building itself is beautifully designed
and looks more like a country hotel and spa
retreat than a manufacturing plant (a posh
word for factory). The roof is made of living
plants — one of the company’s ways of making the facility environmentally sound. The
reception area is airy and bright; sunlight
spills in through the tall windows. It is here
that guides greet guests before taking them
on an extensive tour of the facility.
My guide, Jane, is a tall, well-spoken Englishwoman who is genuinely passionate
about Rolls-Royce. She proved to be an encyclopaedia when it comes to how the cars
are built. For example, she tells me how 30
litres of paint are used per car, to ensure its
colour lasts for decades.
During my tour of the plant, I witnessed German precision engineering. While inherently
British, Roll-Royce is now owned by German
luxury marque BMW. There are 16 stages
in the car-building process and each takes
exactly 49 minutes. One of the most impressive is the stage where just 16 bolts are used
to attach the drivetrain to the chassis of the
car. The plant’s floors are shiny and squeaky
clean because all the messy work, such as
building the engines, is done at BMW’s factory in Germany.
There is one line for “normal” production-line Rolls-Royces and another for bespoke cars, for customers who have asked for
a specific colour or design. Often, requests
involve the interior, such as monogramming
glove boxes or fitting name plates. Jane tells
of one Middle Eastern monarch who wanted a picture of his favourite hunting bird
stitched onto the headrests.
Another highlight of the tour is watching
how the stargazer ceilings are made for the
interiors. These are a series of intricate fibre
optic lights woven into the ceiling to mirror
a star-lit night. Some customers like to personalise these too, choosing the constella-
01
tion in the sky on the day they were born.
The 43kg wiring for the fibre optics stretches 1km long and each pattern of stars is
different for every Wraith or Ghost car they
go into. A team of five women were busily
weaving and stitching stargazer ceilings to
create this unique effect when I visited the
factory. Each will weave 1,340 lights by hand,
a process that takes 1½ days.
While the growing number of bespoke
orders increases the workload for the staff,
so, too, does the popularity of the RollsRoyce among wealthy Chinese. This is evident from the number of left-hand drive cars
that are being built for China. Some models
of Rolls-Royce also have to be shortened
for the Chinese market: In China, to drive
a vehicle measuring over 6m requires a bus
driver’s licence.
I also toured the wood shop and leather
shop, where materials are prepared and selected. Pieces of fine wood grains are stored in a
climate controlled room and cut in a painstaking process to get the smooth polished finish
found in the Rolls-Royce interior. Large pieces
of hide hang on neat racks in the leather shop.
Each sample is unique and has a natural finish
and sheen. Each car requires a total of 11 bull
hides. If you are a vegetarian and don’t wish
to sit on leather, cashmere could be used. Basically, every little detail has been thought of.
You can also witness a series of rigorous
physical tests each car must undergo. For
example, the water test is to ensure that all
02
01. Rolls-Royce’s manufacturing
plant is based in the scenic
Goodwood country estate,
among the rolling hills of
Sussex Downs.
02. The stargazer ceilings are made
using a series of intricate fibre
optic lights woven into the
ceiling to mirror a star-lit night.
03. Large pieces of hide hang on
neat racks in the leather shop.
03
04. Pieces of fine wood grains
stored in a climate-controlled
room.
04
the seals are waterproof. This is basically a
22-minute power shower for the car. Other
tests are for the steering, suspension and critical components.
Besides tours for the public and those who
have ordered its cars, the Rolls-Royce plant also
welcomes its share of celebrities. During my
visit, Rowan Atkinson popped in to see how
his bespoke Rolls-Royce was coming along.
NASCAR legend Richard Petty was there too,
touring the plant.
In fact, it was a busy time, with some 200,000
petrol heads attending the annual Goodwood
Festival of Speed nearby on the estate. Naturally, Rolls-Royce showed off a few of its models
at the event. — The Edge Singapore
22 W O R L D B U S I N E S S
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
Singapore unexpectedly
eases monetary policy
Joins other global central banks in move as oil plunge threatens deflation
BY MA SAY U K I KITANO
& VI DYA RA N GA NATHAN
SINGAPORE: Singapore’s central
bank unexpectedly eased monetary policy yesterday, saying a
plunge in commodity prices had
significantly changed the city
state’s inflation outlook and joining global policymakers in seeking
to defuse deflationary pressures.
In an unscheduled policy statement, the Monetary Authority of
Singapore (MAS) said it is reducing the slope of its policy band
for the Singapore dollar because
the inflation outlook has “shifted
significantly” since its last review
in October 2014.
The MAS, which said the change
in outlook largely reflected the collapse in global oil prices, kept the
width and mid-point of the band
unchanged.
The surprise easing, the first unscheduled policy change in over a
decade and coming before the April
review, sent the Singapore dollar
skidding to 1.3570 per US dollar, its
weakest since August 2010.
“Imported inflationary pressures
are receding, with global oil prices
likely to stay subdued this year,”
the MAS said.
The central bank said it would
continue to stick with a policy of
allowing the Singapore dollar to
appreciate modestly and gradually against a basket of currencies.
— Reuters
Goldman scans Kaisa fallout for
value in China property debt
F INBARR FLY NN
Twitter woos
users with group
chat and video
features
SAN FRANCISCO: Twitter on
Tuesday began rolling out new
group chat and video features
as it worked to ramp up use
of the one-to-many messaging service.
“Private conversations on
Twitter are a great complement
to the largely public experience
on the platform,” product director Jinen Kamdar, whose
handle is @jinen, said in an
online post.
“The group function lets you
start conversations with any of
your followers and they don’t
all need to follow one another
in order to chat.”
Twitter allows users to send
direct messages to one another;
the new feature expands that
capability to allow shared exchanges involving as many as
20 people, according to Kamdar.
The Twitter application for
smartphones has also been
modified to allow people to
easily capture, edit and share
videos.
The new feature allows for
sharing of videos 30 seconds
or less in length.
“In just a few taps you can
add a video to unfolding conversations, share your perspective of a live event, and show
your everyday moments instantly, without ever having
to leave the app,” Kamdar said.
— AFP
TOKYO: The risk of the first default by a Chinese property developer on a dollar-denominated
bond isn’t unnerving Goldman
Sachs Group Inc’s money managers, as they look for buying
opportunities amid the fallout.
Kaisa Group Holdings Ltd
missed a US$23 million (RM83
million) interest payment earlier
this month, putting it at risk of defaulting on its dollar-denominated
bonds. The spread on high-yield
notes from China in the currency
rose to 1,133 basis points last Monday, the highest since 2012.
“It is actually creating really
some attractive buying opportunities in good-quality assets
that are being thrown out with
the bad,” said Philip Moffitt, head
of Asia-Pacific fixed income at
Goldman Sachs Asset Management, which oversees about US$1
trillion in assets globally. “The
HONG KONG: It’s hard to think of
a better embodiment of China’s
soaring stock market than Shenwan
Hongyuan. Shares in the brokerage
— newly formed from the merger of
China’s 10th and 16th biggest trading houses — reached a valuation of
US$47 billion (RM169.7 billion) on
its first day of trading. That made it
bigger than US brokerage Charles
Schwab, and a fitting emblem of
political investment mania.
China’s securities houses are
surfing a wave of investor exuberance. The listed ones trade at a median 49 times this year’s expected
earnings, according to Eikon, more
than triple the global peer group.
The excitement is mostly confined
to the mainland. Haitong Securities’ Shanghai-listed shares cost
CDL Hospitality Trusts
4Q DPS rises 7.2%
to 3.13 Singapore cents
SINGAPORE: Mainboard-listed
CDL Hospitality Trusts posted a
7.2% increase in its distribution
per stapled security to 3.13 Singapore cents (8.37 sen) for the
fourth quarter ended Dec 31,
2014, up from 2.92 cents a year
ago, The Straits Times reported.
Gross revenue rose 14.4% to
S$45.1 million as the group recognised the full hotel revenue
from Jumeirah Dhevanafushi
and a S$1.3 million rental sum
from Angsana Velavaru in Maldives. The group, comprising
CDL Hospitality Real Estate Investment Trust and CDL Hospitality Business Trust, said its net
property income grew by 6% to
S$38.6 million in the quarter.
Six cleantech SMEs get
Singapore grant to
test-bed projects
SINGAPORE: Six small and
medium enterprises from the
clean technology (cleantech)
industry have received a total
of S$2.5 million (RM6.7 million) in government grants to
test-bed their new sustainable
technologies and solutions, The
Straits Times reported. They
are the first recipients of JTC
Corp and Spring Singapore’s
joint grant call for test-bedding
of sustainable solutions. The
grants will give them a headstart to carry out innovative
test-bedding projects at JTC’s
developments and facilities.
Former SMRT chief Saw
Phaik Hwa to retire as
Auric Pacific CEO
Filepic of a woman near the construction site of Kaisa Plaza in Beijing’s central business
district. Kaisa Group missed a US$23 million interest payment earlier this month, putting
it at risk of defaulting on its dollar-denominated bonds. Photo by Reuters
situation in the property market
is precarious, but that isn’t a new
phenomenon.”
The resignation by Kaisa chairman Kwok Ying Shing in Decem-
ber was the second surprise exit
by a Chinese property tycoon in
six months, as the government
investigates dealings with local
officials. — Bloomberg
China political investment bubble has new anti-hero
BY JOHN FO LE Y
IN BRIEF
49% more than the equivalent in
Hong Kong. Back in October they
were worth roughly the same.
Brokerages benefit when stock
markets rise. But the growth of
margin trading, where investors leverage bets by borrowing
against their shares, has created
something of an Indian rope trick.
Brokers charge fees of around
8.5% on the amount they lend —
creating a much more attractive
spread than banks get on their
loans. Margin credit is around 3%
of the Shanghai market’s value —
more than the New York Stock
Exchange. Even regulatory curbs
haven’t turned the tide.
There is a genuine case for ebullience. Money effectively trapped
in the People’s Republic by capital
controls has to go somewhere. Even
after the recent spurt, the annual-
ised gain in the Shanghai Composite Index since 2010 is just 2%
— far behind China’s economic
growth over that period. Shanghai
stocks trade at an average multiple
of 14.5 times historical earnings —
hardly stretched by international
standards.
Underpinning the boom,
though, is a dangerous belief: that
the rally can be sustained by political will. As growth slows and industrial profits slide, a roaring market
looks increasingly incongruous.
It’s true that if stocks were to collapse, many middle-class individuals would feel distinctly less content — an outcome that politicians
would like to avoid. But frequent
attempts to reverse a bear market
didn’t work in the past. There’s no
reason to think they would now.
— Reuters
SINGAPORE: Auric Pacific
Group has announced that former SMRT head Saw Phaik Hwa
will retire as its chief executive
officer and executive director,
effective from May 1 this year,
The Straits Times reported. She
will remain as a consultant with
the Lippo Group of companies,
and will continue to advise Auric
Pacific on various matters, the
mainboard-listed company said
in a filing with the Singapore Exchange on Tuesday night. Auric,
a diversified unit of the Indonesian conglomerate, has a varied
portfolio in food manufacturing,
distribution and retail.
Report: Olam to redeem
US$750m bonds due in
2018 on Feb 27
SINGAPORE: Mainboard-listed
Olam International announced
yesterday that it will redeem
US$750 million (RM2.71 billion) bonds due in 2018 on Feb
27, The Straits Times reported.
This will be done at 103.375%
of the principal amounts of the
bonds, together with unpaid
accrued interest. The commodities giant, which is in the midst
of revamping its capital structure, earlier in January issued
US$50 million in senior notes
due 2020 to an institutional investor at a fixed coupon rate of
4%. This was part of the US$5
billion euro medium-term note
programme it established on
July 6, 2012.
23
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
T H E STAT E OF T H E NAT ION
Widening services deficit puts pressure on current account surplus 16
M
12.46
KLCI FUTURES 1745.00
8.50
STI 3304.82
1.43
RM/USD 3.4450
CPO RM2169
6.00
OIL US$70.01
0.09
GOLD US$1202.80
PP 9974/08/2013 (032820)
PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM1.50
9 HOME BUSINESS
C
O N T I N U E S O N PAG E 1 8
CO
Genting to complete
RM1b Fox World
theme park by 2016
9 HOME BUSINESS
DBKL pays
ys RM
RM145m
for Plaza Raky
Rakyat site
SPLASH IS WORTHK
AT LEAST RM2.8b,
SAYS GAMUDA BOSS
meet Splash for the first time
ISSN 1675-1205
05
under new menteri besar.
Jeffrey Tan & Kamarul Anwar have
the story on Page 4.
PP 8409/03/2013(031809) MCI (P) 079/02/2014
Airbag recall
should have
come for earlier
car models
Country Garden to
woo back buyers
What bond bets
to make in 2015
Demand grows
for rare whiskies
CITY & COUNTRY
PERSONAL WEALTH
OPTIONS
enterprise
THE WEEK OF
ENTREPRENEURSHIP.
Remaking
real estate Internet
PropertyGuru overhauls
search
engine, organises
roadshows
in the face of collapsing
property prices
and sale
Lenovo’s US$100
bil
gambit
CCoco
Co
o a King
Paul Loo LLip Giam,
group
FFNA G
Group
roup International, CEO of
combines
an en
engineer’s
nginee cool
approach
a hot
ot pass
passion for chocolates and
to build
Asia’s larg
Asia
largest distributor
and retailer
for the swe
sweet confectionery
INVESTMENT
WEEKLY
THE WEEK OF DECEMBER 8 — DECEMBER 14, 2014
655
CWT
Consumers have enjoyed lower petrol prices
from Dec 1. But the sudden drop in global oil
prices raised concerns over Malaysia’s ability
to meet its tight fiscal targets, sending the ringgit
down to a five-year low. Our Cover Story on
Pages 84 to 88 looks at the possible ramifications.
SPECIAL EVENT:
NT:
T:
The Edge Media
dia Group’s Tong
T
Kooi
Ong, Amundi’ss Timothy Te
Teo and
CIMB’s Song Seng Wun on How to
PG20
Profit from thee Market PG
STOCKS WITH
WITTH MOMENTUM:
MOME
CosmoSteel
eeel ggets
ets a new
major shareholder
arrehholder PG12
SingTel’s emerging
merrging market
obile IInternet
units seizee m
mobile
ndd PPG15
G15
trend
SGX’s
S
GX’s M
Magnus
Bö
Böcker
öcke under
pr
ressu PG17
pressure
Economy Watch
t h PG8
tch
Big REITs buoyed
oyed
y by
y shifting
rate outlook,
k, pension
p
n fund
interest and new regulation
reg
gulation
Corporate PG14
G14
DOWNFALL OF A PRINCESS WHO COULD HAVE BEEN QUEEN
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FCL digests Australand
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ase
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Bourse woess
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Riverstone to
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en better
year with expansion
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xpansion
p
p
ahead of schedule
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Investing Ideas
as PG28
Cosco Corp,
p Nam Cheo
Cheong,
ong,
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p, Ezra
p
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6 HOME BUSINESS
Hott Stocks PG43
5 - 11 DECEMBER 2014
&
NOTEWORTHY
WORT
Cheap oil, low
w infl
inflatio
flation and
reforms put India on cusp of
new boom, says CRISIL’s
Joshi
CRIS
www.theedgereview.com
2014 SOPA Award winner for Excellence
ence
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CComfortable
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CCOMMODITIES
OMMODITIIEES
Logistics
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g soa
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a bbyy
focusing on moving and storing copper concentrates
and naphtha. But CEO Loi Pok Yen is only just getting
started. Turn to our Cover Story on Pages 18 and 19
for why this could be the commodity play to own.
For Aggregate Asset Managemen
Management’s
secrets to double-digit returns
Read its partner Teh Hooi Ling’s
Policies urgently needed to tackle ‘new inequalities’ 10
#
1043
12
TRADE WISE 12
CORPORATE 16
1MDB Energy
IPO could
value firm at
RM11 bil
B Y H O K AY TAT, J O S E B A R R O C K
A N D C I N DY Y E A P
1
Boom or bust, Southeast Asian nations betting big on casinos
Malaysia Development Bhd (1MDB) intends to float its power assets at an indicative price of RM1.83 a share, which
will value the entire company — 1MDB
Energy Group Bhd — at RM11.0 billion.
At RM1.83 a share, 1MDB Energy Group
will be priced at a price-earnings ratio of 20
times FY2016 earnings, which is higher than
the current industry range of between 9.0 and
15 times, according to documents prepared
for the listing sighted by The Edge.
Tenaga Nasional Bhd currently trades
at a PER of 13 times while YTL Power International Ltd is trading at around 11 times.
At 20 times PER, shareholders of 1MDB
Energy Group can expect to enjoy a yield
of between 2.5% and 3.5%, according to the
documents. By comparison, at their current
prices, Tenaga has a yield of 2.0% and YTL
Power 6.5%.
According to the documents, 1MDB will
end up with only a 20% stake in the listed
A
L
A
Y
S
I
1 — DECEMBER 7, 2014
A
B U S I N E S S & I N V E S T M E N T W E E K LY
We will be a full-fledged mobile
operator that will provide fixed-wireless,
nomadic and mobile broadband.”
— P1 CEO and MD Puan Chan Cheong
P1 plans 4G launch next year to challenge Big 3 | CORPORATE 22
RETAILERS
BRACE
for leaner times
F R A N K LY S P E A K I N G 7
How will lower oil price
impact the budget? | FGV
hit by losses downstream |
Real-life problems
Retail sales have
been dipping as
consumers tighten
their belts due to the
rising cost of living.
Bearing the brunt
are those dealing
in fashion and nonessential items,
while F&B outlets
seem to be faring
better. With the
implementation of
GST next year, will
things get worse?
See our Cover Story
on Pages 80 to 82.
S U BSCR I B E R COPY /NOT FOR R E SAL E
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heedg
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THE WEEK OF DECEMBER
M
MORE INSIDE 4
Bursa
postpones
deliberation
of EPF appeal
PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM5.00 | SABAH & SARAWAK RM6.00
THE STATE
MOHD IZWAN MOHD NAZAM/THE EDGE
UPDATE
WEEKLYOF
THE NATION
MUI in limelight
for asset sale
plan, Khoo’s
divorce
latest book
$how Me the Money
www.aggregate.com.sg
CO N T I N U E S O N PAG E 83
NOW ON
IPAD &
ANDROID
PP 8409/03/2013(031809) MCI (P) 079/02/2014
ISSN 1675-1205
MEMBER OF AUDIT BUREAU
OF CIRCULATIONS (MALAYSIA)
Saudis won’t let
oil free fall
BUSINESS
MCI (P) 071/03/2014
4 PPS 1519/09/2012
1519/0
(022805)
The Week PG4
4
Bumi Armada
shareholders Fuad
and
uad an
a
nd
Farish buy more
re shares
sha
ares
es
8, 2014
CAREERS
Why CEO Yang
Yuanqing bought
IBM’s X86 server
unit and Google’s
Motorola Mobility
handset business
Has an oil tsunami
unami just
ju
j
hit
d-marine players?
offshore-and-marine
18 COMMENT
DECEMBER
LEARNING.
From AI to
intelligencemarket
Start-up founder
Yu Chih-Han
of Appier offers
advertising
optimisation engine
to help
businesses and
brands push
ads to the right
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CO
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O N T I N U E S O N PAG E 2 0
NOW ON
IPAD &
State government will officially
ANDROID
15 HOME
SINGAPORE (INCLUSIVE OF GST) $5.00
YOUR P
YOUR
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ERSONAL C
COPY/NOT
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OR R
RESALE
ESALE
THE ASCOTT INTERVIEW
www.theedgemarkets.com/sg
gemarke
uala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL)
(
has confirmed that itt will pay RM145 million
to a consortium
ium of le
lender banks to
settle a loan taken by troubled Plaza
Rakyat Sdn Bhd (PRSB),
RSB), the d
developer of Plaza Rakyat. DBKL hass since sec
secured the Plaza
Rakyat site in Jalan Pudu for rredevelopment.
Mayor Datuk Ahmad
mad Phes
Phesal Talib told The
Edge last week that DBKL ag
agreed to pay the
sum after the matter
er was settled
set
by arbitration on July 4.
Petronas delays goahead for Canadian
LNG project
Talk is cheap | Don’t
undermine Petronas’
efforts | Lobster,
anyone?
sword for Malaysia
B Y KAMARUL AZHAR
MEMBER OF AUDIT BUREAU
OF CIRCULATIONS (MALAYSIA)
6 HOME BUSINESS
A
F R A N K LY S P E A K I N G 1 1
12
Japan’s Softbank
invests US$250mil
in MyTeksi
here could be materi
material changes to
the asset base
se of Edra Global Energy
Bhd (formerly
ly known as 1MDB Energy Group Bhd)
d) that co
could affect the
initially estimated
d value of the company
and the timing of its
ts planned
planne initial public
offering (IPO), sources
rces say.
It is understood that at pres
press time, the promoters were talkingg about, among
am
others, the
exclusion of the RM11
11 billion P
Project Track 3B,
a new coal-fired power
wer plant to be built with a
Ringgit declines — Malaysia tells
banks to prevent speculation
www.theedgemarkets.com
I
LOW OIL
PRICE
A double-edged
B Y JOSE BARROCK A N D BEN SHANE LIM
6 HOME BUSINESS
S
OTHER HIGHLIGHTS
GH
HLIGH
T
MAKE
BETTER
DECISIONS
Y
Astro aiming for international viewership CORPORATE 28
Project 3B no
not in
bal’s IPO?
Edra Global’s
FINANCIAL
DAILY
A
Maybank
Global
Gl
obal media companies don’t just have a
eyes listing platform
plattform but the whole value chain: studios,
channels
and distributors. The reality is,
chan
of insurance
that’s who we are.”— Astro CEO Datuk Rohana Rozhan
arm
5.70
CORPORATE 20
FRIDAY DECEMBER 5, 2014 ISSUE 1854/2014
L
1044
#
B U S I N E S S & I N V E S T M E N T W E E K LY
MORE INSIDE 6
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12
FBM KLCI 1745.69
A
8 — DECEMBER
DECEMBE
E R 14,
14 2014
20
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THE WEEK OF DECEMBER
EMBER
PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM5.00 | SABAH & SARAWAK RM6.00
FREE!
with this issue
of The Edge
Associate company
24 W O R L D B U S I N E S S
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
Apple earnings hit record
Quarterly profit rose to US$18b at end of last year on ‘staggering’ iPhone sales
partnership with China Mobile as
powering sales. Sales of iPhones
doubled in Greater China, its No 2
smartphone market, according to
chief financial officer Luca Maestri.
But it was not just China: iPhone
sales leapt 44% in the United States
and doubled in Brazil.
Sales of iPads dipped, but Apple
set new records in the quarter for
sales of Macintosh computers and
revenue from digital goods bought
from its App Store.
Cook remained optimistic about
the long-term potential for Apple’s
iPad line.
He noted that the ranks of firsttime iPad buyers remain strong
in China, Britain, the US and
elsewhere and that the devices
account for the bulk of online
activity and shopping seen from
tablets.
Apple’s board of directors declared a cash dividend of 47 cents
per share to be paid on Feb 12.
Apple shares rose more than
5% to US$115.20 in after-market
trades that followed release of
the high earnings figures. — AFP
SAN FRANCISCO: Apple’s quarterly
profit rocketed to a corporate record
US$18 billion (RM64.98 billion) at
the end of last year on booming
sales of big-screen iPhone models,
especially in China.
The California tech titan also
announced on Tuesday that it had
sold its one billionth device powered by its iOS mobile operating
system, on a day of dizzying figures
— even by Apple’s high standards.
And it said that its highly anticipated Apple Watch wearable devices, unveiled last year to fanfare, are
on track to begin shipping in April.
“We’d like to thank our customers for an incredible quarter which
saw demand for Apple products
soar to an all-time high,” declared
chief executive Tim Cook. “Demand
for iPhone has been staggering,
shattering our expectation.”
Blockbuster sales of the recently
released iPhone 6, in particular, are
signs of huge pent-up demand for
larger-screen smartphones, likely to boost sales throughout this
year, according to Forrester analyst
Frank Gillett.
The record quarterly profit — on
unprecedented revenue of US$74.6
billion — was driven by the sale of
74.5 million iPhones, well ahead of
most analysts’ expectations.
The staggering profit topped the
Yahoo spinning
off stake in
Alibaba
China accuses e-commerce
giant of not curbing fake goods
BY SOPH I E EST I E NNE
BY LULU YILU N C HE N
NEW YORK: Yahoo is spinning off its
stake in Chinese Internet giant Alibaba, splitting off the valuable holdings
in a move that sidesteps taxes.
The strategy laid out on Tuesday
aims to deliver more cash for shareholders than an outright sale of the
US$40 billion (RM144.4 billion) stake,
avoiding a hefty tax bill, and to help
Yahoo’s efforts to refocus under chief
executive Marissa Mayer.
Mayer told a conference call the
deal “maximises value for shareholders” and avoids a potential tax bill of
up to US$16 billion under a traditional
sale of the stake.
She said the move is part of a
broader effort to help Yahoo’s “remixing” of its activities around mobile Internet, video and other forms
of online media.
The spin-off creates a new entity
to hold Alibaba shares, in a move
responding to concerns of activist
shareholders who want the struggling
California group to extract value from
the holdings.
Shares in Yahoo jumped 6.69% to
US$51.20 in after-hours trading as
investors cheered the move.
Yahoo said its board authorised
creation of an independent investment company called SpinCo to hold
the Alibaba shares. SpinCo would be
totally owned by Yahoo shareholders.
Yahoo’s current market value is
about US$45 billion, most of which
is in Alibaba shares. Yahoo bought
a 40% stake in the Chinese online
giant in 2005 for US$1 billion. — AFP
HONG KONG: Alibaba Group Holding Ltd has a “credibility crisis”
fuelled by its failure to crack down
on shady merchants, counterfeit
goods, bribery and misleading promotions in online malls, the Chinese government said.
The scathing report by the State
Administration for Industry & Commerce (Saic) accused Alibaba of allowing merchants to operate without required business licences, run
unauthorised stores that co-opt
famous brands, and sell fake wine
and handbags. Alibaba employees
took bribes, and the e-commerce
giant didn’t fix flaws in customer
feedback or internal credit-scoring
systems, the report said.
Bob Christie, a spokesman for
Alibaba, said the Hangzhou-based
company couldn’t immediately
comment. At a meeting with Saic
Apple revenues
74.6
Quarterly
$ billions
57.6
45.6
37.4
By product
$ billions
iPhone
51.2
42.1
iPad
9.0
Mac
6.9
Other
products
Dec
2013
Mar
Jun Sept
2014
Dec
Quarter ending
(iPod, Apple
TV, Beats
Electronics, etc)
2.7
Services
(iTunes,
App store,
iBooks
store, etc)
4.8
Source : Apple
US$15.9 billion made by ExxonMobil in the second quarter of 2012,
according to Standard and Poor’s, to
write Apple into the history books.
As well as the larger screen iPhone 6 models, analysts credited a
officials in July, Alibaba acknowledged that problems exist on its
platform and said it would improve
monitoring efforts and increase
communication with regulators,
the government said.
Though the meeting was held in
July, the report wasn’t published
until now to avoid affecting Alibaba’s initial public offering (IPO),
the government said. The Hangzhou-based company held a record
US$25 billion (RM90.25 billion) IPO
in September.
“The Saic is now teaching Alibaba a lesson and telling it to learn its
place,” said Li Muzhi, a Hong Kongbased analyst at Arete Research Service LLP by phone. “Many Chinese
government agencies are probably
not too happy with Jack Ma’s high
profile, his initiatives in the financial sector and impact on the retail sector.”
Yesterday’s release came the
day after a posting on one of Alibaba’s official Weibo accounts
said government inspectors applied standards inconsistently
and didn’t give merchants enough
time to respond to accusations.
The post was written as a letter to
the official responsible and said
he wasn’t treating China’s biggest
e-commerce operator fairly and
his methods were flawed.
Last week, founder Ma said Alibaba would only share user data
with Chinese authorities if they
were investigating terrorism or other crimes.
“The rest, no,” Ma told Charlie
Rose during a interview in Davos,
Switzerland, last Friday.
Alibaba has worked to get rid
of counterfeits as it expands internationally, saying it removed 90
million listings for products that
breached intellectual-property
rights before its IPO. — Bloomberg
VW bets big to revamp loss-making Phaeton
BY ANDREAS C RE M E R
BERLIN: With Volkswagen (VW)
having embarked on a big cost-cutting drive, industry experts are baffled why the maker of the “people’s car” plans to spend millions
of euros upgrading a loss-making
luxury saloon.
The €76,000 (RM312,563) Phaeton, a pet project of chairman Fer-
dinand Piech, has never met VW’s
original sales target of 20,000 cars
annually. Analysts say the executive saloon, which cost more than
€1 billion to develop and came out
in 2002, should be axed.
But sources at VW told Reuters
the company is now planning a
more advanced version of the
Phaeton — described by Bernstein analyst Max Warburton as
one of the three “most loss-making
European cars of modern times”.
The plans appear all the more
perplexing to analysts as VW has
pledged to make annual cost savings of €5 billion at its passenger-car brand by 2017, as the
world’s second-biggest carmaker by sales seeks to narrow the
gap with global leader Toyota.
— Reuters
IN BRIEF
Core inflation eases interest rate cut pressure
SYDNEY: A pickup in core
consumer prices in Australia has reduced the likelihood
of a near-term interest rate
cut, even as official statistics
showed yesterday that plunging oil prices slowed inflation
in the last three months of 2014.
The Consumer Price Index rose
0.2% from the previous quarter
and 1.7% through the year to
December, the Australian Bureau of Statistics said. However core inflation, which strips
out volatile items and is more
closely watched by the Reserve
Bank, came in at 0.7% for the
quarter and 2.2% through the
year — inside the central bank’s
preferred range of 2% to 3%.
— AFP
Philippine January CPI
likely to be 1.8% to 2.7%
MANILA: Philippine annual
inflation could fall below 2%
for the first time in more than
five years in January, the central bank said yesterday, giving
it leeway to keep interest rates
steady in the near term. Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP)
governor Amando Tetangco
said inflation in January will
likely be between 1.8% and
2.7%, reflecting easing price
pressures. The bottom end of
the range would be the lowest
since August 2009 when the
rate hit 1.7% while the upper
end would equal the rate in
December. BSP meets for the
first time this year on Feb 12.
— Reuters
Taiwan ranks 14th in
economic freedom
WASHINGTON: Taiwan has risen three notches to rank 14th
in the Heritage Foundation’s
Index of Economic Freedom
for 2015, extending gains made
since 2009. In the rankings released by the Heritage Foundation on Tuesday, Taiwan scored
75.1 points in the 2015 index,
up 1.2 from a year earlier, to
take 14th place among the 186
countries covered by this year’s
index, up from the 17th in 2014.
Within the Asia-Pacific region,
Taiwan finished fifth among the
42 countries covered, trailing
only Hong Kong, Singapore,
New Zealand and Australia.
— CNA
Whisky industry worth
billions to UK economy
LONDON: Britain’s whisky
trade is worth over £5 billion
(RM27.46 billion) to the economy each year and provides
over 40,000 jobs, according to
a study released yesterday. The
report by the Scotch Whisky
Association (SWA) found that
despite a slowdown in exports,
billions of bottles of whisky
were sold globally each year.
“Scotch whisky must be recognised as a cultural asset that
boosts growth and jobs, supports communities and combines the best of the traditional
and the modern,” said SWA
chief executive David Frost.
— AFP
25
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26 WORLD
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
Mother of captive begs
PM to save son held by IS
Hostage issue is deepest diplomatic crisis Abe has faced in over two years in office
BY EL A I N E L I ES
& TA K A SHI U MEKAWA
TOKYO: The mother of Islamic State
captive Kenji Goto appealed for his
life yesterday after a new video appeared to show the Japanese journalist saying he had 24 hours to live
unless Jordan released a would-be
suicide bomber.
The voice on the video added
that another hostage, Jordanian
pilot Muath al-Kasaesbeh, had a
shorter time to live. Japan confirmed the existence of the video
at 11pm (1400 GMT) on Tuesday.
The voice said Goto would be
killed unless Jordan freed death
row inmate Sajida al-Rishawi, an
Iraqi woman held by Jordan for her
role in a 2005 suicide bombing that
killed 60 people in Amman.
“Please save Kenji’s life. I call on
you to work with all your strength
in negotiations with the Jordanian
government,” Goto’s mother, Junko Ishido, said in a letter to Prime
Minister Shinzo Abe that she read
Lawyer wants to
meet Yang over
widow’s assets
Ishido reacting during a news conference at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Japan
in Tokyo last week. ‘I call on you to work with all your strength in negotiations with the
Jordanian government,’ she wrote in a letter to Abe. Photo by Reuters
out at a news conference.
“His remaining time is very short
... I beg you to do everything in your
power,” Ishido said, reiterating that
her son was not an enemy of Islam.
Abe said the latest video was
“despicable”. He called on Jordan
to cooperate in working for Goto’s
quick release, but vowed Tokyo
would not give in to terrorism.
Reuters could not verify the authenticity of the video, but Chief
Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga
said it appeared to show Goto. The
voice on the video resembled that
of Goto in an earlier video over
the weekend which the Japanese
and US governments believed was
authentic.
If verified, the video would be
the third involving the 47-year-old
Goto, a veteran war reporter.
The hostage issue is the deepest
diplomatic crisis Abe — who must
tread a fine line between appearing
firm but not callous — has faced in
just over two years in office.
Bassam al-Manaseer, chairman
of the foreign affairs committee in
Jordan’s lower house of parliament,
said in an interview with Bloomberg news agency in Amman that
Jordan was in indirect talks with
Islamic State to secure the release
of Goto and Kasaesbeh.
He said the talks were taking
place through religious and tribal
leaders in Iraq. — Reuters
Singapore to set up new Cyber
Security Agency in April
BY C A ROLY N KHEW
BY IRENE THAM
SINGAPORE: The lawyer acting for
Hedy Mok wants to meet former
China tour guide Yang Yin in jail,
The Straits Times reported yesterday. Lawyer Peter Doraisamy
revealed this yesterday following
a closed-door hearing on an application to recognise a new will
by Mok’s aunt, Chung Khin Chun.
Chung’s earlier will left all her
assets, believed to be worth S$40
million (RM107.11 million), to
Yang, who has been accused by
Mok of taking advantage of the
87-year-old widow. Chung was
diagnosed with dementia last year,
the daily wrote.
The new will does not mention
Yang and leaves most of Chung’s
money to charity.
Doraisamy told reporters he
had filed an application with the
police to ask if he can see Yang in
prison and inform him of the application for the new will directly.
“Yang Yin’s counsel has not had
approval from the prisons to see
their client ... so they can’t take
instructions,” he added.
Yang faces more than 300
charges. Two of them involve
criminal breach of trust for allegedly misappropriating S$1.1 million from Chung, The Straits Times
wrote. Yang has questioned the
widow’s new will, arguing that her
medical condition precludes her
from creating one.
SINGAPORE: A high-level central
agency will be set up to coordinate
public- and private-sector efforts
to protect national systems such
as those in the energy and banking sectors from increasing cyber
threats, The Straits Times reported.
The new Cyber Security Agency
(CSA), which operates from April,
will be formed under and funded
by the Prime Minister’s Office.
It will bring under one roof the
oversight of 10 critical sectors including power, transport and telecommunications.
From April, Minister for Communications and Information Yaacob Ibrahim will also be the minister in charge of cyber security, the
daily wrote.
To be helmed by David Koh,
50, deputy secretary of technology at the Ministry of Defence, the
new agency will plug current cyber
defence gaps, such as breaches involving obscure companies that
could potentially compromise the
security of citizen data, given that
computer systems are more connected today.
The incoming chief executive of
CSA will retain his current position
at the Ministry of Defence.
For starters, the new agency will
have 60 dedicated technical and
policy development staff, with most
to be transferred from the Ministry
of Home Affairs and the Infocomm
Development Authority, the newspaper wrote.
Thailand warns US to mind its own business
BY AMY SAWI TTA LE FE V RE
BANGKOK: Thailand warned the
United States against meddling in
its political affairs yesterday, saying
many Thais had been hurt by the
remarks of a visiting US envoy who
took a swipe at the ruling military
junta’s undemocratic practices.
Thailand, a long-time US ally,
remains under martial law following a coup last May, and the junta
says a general election is at least a
year away.
Relations between the two sides
have deteriorated sharply since the
coup, with Washington freezing
aid and cancelling some security
engagements.
In an address to students at a
Bangkok university on Monday,
Assistant US Secretary of State for
East Asia and the Pacific Daniel
Russel called for more inclusive
politics and the end of martial law.
The comments from Russel, the
highest-level US official to visit
Thailand since the coup, came a few
days after ousted prime minister
Yingluck Shinawatra was banned
from politics for five years and indicted on criminal charges over a
state rice-buying scheme.
“We don’t agree with the assistant secretary of state talking about
politics at Chulalongkorn University. It hurt many Thais,” Thai Deputy
Foreign Minister Don Pramudwinai
told reporters after summoning
the US charge d’affaires, Patrick
Murphy.
“If we comply with [Washington’s wish] and lift martial law and
it leads to problems, how will those
people who are asking for the lifting
of martial law take responsibility?”
he said. “In reality, Thais don’t even
know there is martial law.”
Russel had said while Washington did not take sides in Thai
politics, it was for the Thai people to determine the legitimacy of
the political and legal processes.
He expressed concerns that the
political process did not seem to
represent all elements in Thai society. — Reuters
IN BRIEF
Moscow says N Korean
leader Kim confirms
Russia visit
SEOUL: North Korean leader
Kim Jong Un has confirmed he
will attend celebrations in Russia in May marking the Soviet
victory over Germany in World
War II, South Korea’s Yonhap
news agency said yesterday,
citing a Kremlin spokesman.
The trip would be Kim’s first
foreign visit since taking power
in the reclusive state in 2011,
succeeding his father Kim Jong
Il, who died suddenly, and is
likely to come before he visits
China, the North’s main ally.
“About 20 state leaders have
confirmed their attendance,
and the North Korean leader
is among them,” South Korea’s
Yonhap news agency quoted
the office of Kremlin spokesman as saying in response to its
question to President Vladimir
Putin’s spokesman. — Reuters
Thai ‘Red Shirt’ leader
sentenced to two years
in jail
BANGKOK: A Thai court yesterday sentenced the leader of the
opposition Red Shirt movement
to two years in prison for defaming a former premier, a move analysts said was the latest attack
against critics of the military regime. The ruling comes days after the retroactive impeachment
and announcement of corruption charges against ex-prime
minister Yingluck Shinawatra,
whose government was backed
by the Red Shirts before May’s
army coup. The court convicted
Red Shirts chairman Jatuporn
Prompan on two counts of defamation against former royalist
prime minister Abhisit Vejjajiva
during speeches he made in October 2009. — AFP
Commander of group that
claimed killing Swedish
journalist arrested
KABUL: Afghanistan’s main
intelligence agency said yesterday it had arrested a commander of a militant group
known as the “Suicide Front”
that claimed responsibility last year for the execution-style killing of a Swedish journalist. Nils Horner,
51, who worked for Swedish
Radio and held dual British-Swedish nationality, was
shot dead in the capital’s diplomatic quarter last March.
The killing compounded
fears of deteriorating security ahead of the withdrawal of
most foreign troops. — Reuters
Israeli aircraft strikes
positions in Syria —
Israeli army
JERUSALEM: Israeli aircraft
struck two Syrian army positions early yesterday, the army
said, in retaliation for rockets
launched at the Israel-occupied
Golan Heights a day earlier. The
strike came amid rising frontier tension 10 days after an
Israeli air strike in Syria killed
an Iranian general and several
Lebanese Hezbollah guerrillas.
— Reuters
W O R L D 27
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
Doubts arise over
Philippine autonomy law
Work on the legislation has been suspended because of Sunday’s clash with rebels
BY ROSEMA RI E FRA NCISCO
MANILA: Work to set up an autonomous Muslim region in the
Philippines to end a 45-year insurgency has been suspended and may
be abandoned altogether because
of a clash in which more than 50
people were killed, legislators said
yesterday.
A top official described the clash
between police and rebels on Sunday, which shattered a three-year
ceasefire, as a “misencounter” during a bid to arrest two militants
who had taken refuge with Moro
Islamic Liberation Front (MILF)
fighters, Reuters reported.
AFP reported that nearly 400
counterterrorist policemen were
dispatched to a remote farm on
Mindanao on Sunday to capture or
kill Zulkifli Hir alias Marwan, one
of the 2002 Bali bombers who has
a US$5 million (RM18.1 million)
price on his head.
After killing a person they
thought to be Zulkifli, the police
withdrew but were ambushed by
the Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters, a militant splinter
group that rejects the peace deal
and last year pledged allegiance
to Islamic State fighters in Syria
and Iraq.
The officers escaped but strayed
into territory controlled by the
10,000-member MILF, the main
rebel group, which signed the pact
10 months ago.
The police suffered 44 dead and
12 wounded. Rebels gave no figures
for their own dead or wounded.
— Reuters
Crime levels are low
in Japan and murder
is uncommon, but
occasional killings
tend to make
headlines because of
their lurid nature.
Mori had become acquainted
with her alleged murderer when
she tried to persuade the young
woman to join a religious group.
The killing allegedly occurred at
the student’s apartment in Nagoya, central Japan, with an axe the
suspect had acquired as a junior
high school student, Jiji Press reported. On the day of the murder, she reportedly tweeted: “I
eventually did it.”
The student’s name was not
released because she is a minor
under Japanese law. Crime levels
are low in Japan and murder is
uncommon, however, occasional
killings tend to make headlines
because of their lurid nature. In
August a 16-year-old schoolgirl
confessed to decapitating her
classmate because she “wanted to dissect someone”. — AFP
Nigeria needs regional
force to defeat Boko
Haram
ADDIS ABABA (Ethiopia): Nigeria must accept it cannot
defeat Boko Haram fighters
alone and work with regional
armies in a new multinational
force, the United Nations envoy for the Sahel region said
yesterday. More than 13,000
people have been killed and
more than one million made
homeless by Boko Haram violence since 2009. Though the
Nigerian government earlier
said there was no need for
one, the African Union may
grant a mandate as early as
this week for a regional military force to fight the Islamist
rebels, a vital step towards
securing UN Security Council
backing. — AFP
Australia’s detention of
asylum seekers at sea
ruled legal
Japan teen axe
murderer ‘just
wanted to kill
someone’
TOKYO: A 19-year-old college
girl murdered an elderly woman with an axe and a scarf because she “just wanted to kill
someone” news reports in Japan said yesterday.
The student from the prestigious Nagoya University hit
77-year-old Tomoko Mori
repeatedly with the axe and
then strangled her “because
she wasn’t completely dead”,
the Asahi Shimbun said.
The young woman was
arrested on Tuesday, and
reportedly told investigators: “I
have just wanted to kill someone since childhood. It could
have been anybody.”
IN BRIEF
SYDNEY: Australia’s detention of 157 asylum seekers at
sea for weeks in June was legal, the nation’s High Court
found yesterday in a win for
the government’s hardline immigration stance. In a tight
4-3 decision, the court ruled
the government was entitled
to hold the group of Tamils
from Sri Lanka on a customs
ship with a view to returning
them to India — where they
had set out from. The ruling
means they are unable to seek
compensation for their monthlong detention. — AFP
Obama shaking hands with the crowd after delivering a speech in New Delhi on Tuesday. India’s Modi is widely seen as taking a more
assertive line on China than the previous government. Photo by Reuters
India sends foreign minister to
China after Obama visit
NEW DELHI: India’s foreign minister will travel to China this weekend, New Delhi said yesterday, a
day after Barack Obama ended a
visit aimed at renewing US ties
with the South Asian country.
Sushma Swaraj will go to Beijing
on Sunday to “discuss bilateral, regional and global issues of concern
to both sides” with her Chinese
counterpart Wang Yi, India’s government said in a statement.
They will also hold three-way
talks with Russian Foreign Minister
Sergei Lavrov, the statement said.
The announcement followed
a high-profi le visit to New Delhi by the US president aimed at
cementing ties between the two
countries, which share an interest in curbing China’s growing
regional influence.
Although neither side mentioned China by name during Obama’s three-day visit, the US president welcomed what he called
a “greater role for India in the
Asia-Pacific” and said freedom of
navigation in the region must be
upheld.
India’s new Prime Minister Narendra Modi is widely seen as taking a more assertive line on China
than the previous government.
But experts say Modi will be
careful not to alienate neighbouring China, whose investment he
desperately needs as he tries to
boost India’s economy. — AFP
US threatens tougher action against Russia
KIEV: US Treasury Secretary Jack
Lew said yesterday that Washington
was ready to increase sanctions on
Russia over its actions in war-torn
Ukraine.
Lew’s comments during a visit to
Kiev came one day after EU heads
of state threatened to impose further financial measures against
Moscow in response to the latest
upsurge in violence in Ukraine’s
nine-month war.
“Our first choice is a diplomatic
resolution that allows us to lessen
sanctions. But we are prepared to
do more if necessary. To that end,
we’ll continue to work with our
allies to increase the pressure on
Russia,” Lew told reporters.
Russia denies backing the eastern insurgents and claims that past
measures against it are meant at
undermining President Vladimir
Putin’s 15-year rule.
“At the same time, we’ve been
clear from the beginning: if Mos-
cow fully implements its obligations
pursuant to the Minsk agreement,
sanctions against Russia could be
eased,” Lew added.
He also told his Ukrainian counterpart Natalie Jaresko — a US national confirmed to her post last
month — that Washington was
ready to provide up to US$3 billion (RM10.8 billion) in support
should Kiev press ahead with overdue economic restructuring measures. — AFP
Sri Lanka reinstates
impeached chief justice
COLOMBO: Sri Lanka’s new
president yesterday restored
the country’s former chief
justice after she was controversially impeached by the
previous administration.
Lawyers welcomed Shirani
Bandaranayake with bouquets of flowers when she
went to the Supreme Court in
Colombo after receiving the
news. A government official
who asked not to be named
said President Maithripala Sirisena had written to
Bandaranayake to say her
2013 impeachment was unconstitutional and she should
return to work. — AFP
Military helicopter crash
kills 4 in south Vietnam
HANOI: Four Vietnamese military personnel were killed
when an air force helicopter
crashed during an exercise
yesterday, the army said, in
the second such accident in
seven months. The US-made
UH-1 helicopter went down in
a suburb of Ho Chi Minh City
and all those on board were
killed, said Lieutenant-General Vo Van Tuan, deputy chief
of the staff of the army. “We
are investigating the cause of
the crash,” Tuan told Reuters,
adding that no civilians were
affected. — Reuters
28
live it!
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
T HU
WELLBEING . THE ARTS . WINE+DINE . STYLE+DESIGN . LEISURE
Personal
ASSISTANT
COMPI L ED BY VICHITRA NADES
WORK. LIFE. BALANCE
Don’t miss
a night of
#MusicMedicine
at The Bee and
treat your ears
to the beautiful
vocals of the
talented Diana
Danielle and Mr
Breezy a k a Hadi
Darus. Filled with
soulful acoustic
performances
with genres from R&B to love songs. It is
an event not to be missed for all music
lovers. Admission is RM20 and tonight’s
show will start from 9pm onwards. The
Bee Publika outlet is at Level G2, Publika,
Solaris Dutamas, Jalan Dutamas 1, Kuala
Lumpur. For information, call the outlet
at (03) 6201 8577. Alternatively, log on to
their website at thebee.com.my or connect
with them on social media with the
hashtag #musicmedicine.
0
01
Hope for
Calling all mums-to-be who are based up
north! For three days starting tomorrow,
there will be a Moms and Babies Expo at
the Penang Sunway Carnival Convention
Centre Level 4 from 12.30pm till 9pm.
The expo will include the presence of
several VIP and guests of honour as well
as some not-to-be-missed fun booths
and games. For more information, visit
http://on.fb.me/1zmnCTW or call(03) 7842
7770. Sunway Carnival Convention Centre
is in Lebuh Tenggiri Dua, Pusat Bandar
Seberang Jaya in Prai, Penang.
THE CHINESE
MAYOR
Chinese filmmaker eyes Sundance glory with city tale
C
hinese filmmaker Zhao Qi
is not a newcomer to the
Sundance Film Festival.
He’s had four films here in
the last five years. That’s
pretty impressive, for the
Need a laugh? Tomorrow night there
will be non-stop laughter at a live
stand-up comedy show by the Fantastic
3A — featuring Phoon Chi Ho, Brian
Tan, Aw Yuong Tuck and Sim Tong. The
‘quadruple-threat’ have been performing
at various stand-up shows and they plan
to have you rolling on the floor with
laughter with their latest antics. Tickets
are priced at RM25. Don’t miss the chance
to catch them live tomorrow at 9pm at
the Crackhouse Comedy Club, 1st Floor,
24A, Lorong Rahim Kajai 14, Taman Tun Dr
Ismail, Kuala Lumpur. Call or text 017 6243
412 for reservations or enquiries. Log onto
http://crackhousecomedy.asia/ for details.
uninitiated.
But the Emmy winner hopes his latest one, The Chinese Mayor, will finally
win some silverware at the independent
movie showcase event, held annually in
the Utah mountains, ending this coming
weekend.
The 40-year-old also wants the film to
counter Western misconceptions of his
homeland, and show the reality of the
modern country with a rare portrait of
life in a provincial Chinese city.
“I always think that there’s a misunderstanding about China, especially for
the Chinese government and Chinese
party,” he told AFP in an interview, while
insisting he was not a supporter as such
of the Beijing government.
“I would not say a fan,” cautioned
the producer, but added: “At least he’s
doing something more than the previous administration, which gives more
expectations for people.”
The Chinese Mayor tells the tale
of Geng Yanbo, dubbed “Demolition
Geng” after he became mayor in 2008
of former imperial jewel Datong, some
350km west of Beijing.
The city served as the capital of the
Northern Wei Dynasty during its heyday
1,600 years ago. But decades of mining
in the 20th century has left it dubbed
one of China’s most polluted regions.
Attracting tourists
Geng earned his name from his campaign to demolish much of the city
centre, relocating 40,000 of its 140,000
households, before rebuilding it in ancient style, with a view to attracting
tourists.
He is shown dealing with the com-
plaints of ordinary residents on the
street, regularly deciding individual
cases on the spot, while berating his
city contractors for their incompetence.
The downtrodden locals are shown
lambasting Geng and other party and
city leaders as being out-of-touch with
reality, ignoring their plight in his drive
to push through his overall city renewal plan.
But bizarrely, after the mayor is promoted to a bigger provincial capital and
leaves many of the projects half done,
there is a massive popular outcry calling for him to stay.
“Through making the film we learn it
is never only a black and white world,
or simply good and bad,” said Zhao.
The stereotypical view of corruption-plagued government is unfair, he
argues, or at least is only part of the
whole story — which the producer says
has not been told enough.
“The audience here (in the US) they
0
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T HURSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
WELLBEING . THE ARTS . WINE+DINE . STYLE+DESIGN . LEISURE
02
03
get most of their information from the
mainstream media, which is always a quite
stereotyped one. I don’t think they cover
most parts of China,” he said.
In fact, he said, even Chinese central
television “doesn’t cover most parts of
China either,” he added.
“There is this [story], it needs to be delivered to people. And nobody is doing that
job. I hope that as independent observers,
we’re able to deliver that message.”
Zhao’s previous films at Sundance in-
e
l
s
e.
n
d
h
e
-
d
e,
-
t
d,
e
e
s
y
clude Last Train Home in 2010, China
Heavy Weight in 2012 and Fallen City,
which was nominated for the Grand Jury
Prize in 2013.
He has also won two Emmy Awards in
2012 for his television documentary POV.
“The Chinese Mayor is competing in the
World Documentary contest at this year’s
Sundance festival, which wraps up on Feb
1. The prize winners will be announced
at a ceremony on Saturday around 6pm
(0100 GMT Sunday). — AFP
04
01-03.
Scenes from The Chinese Mayor. Photo by Sundance
04.
Zhao Qi speaking at the premiere of his film The Chinese Mayor during the 2015 Sundance
Film Festival. Photo by AFP
PICK OF THE DAY
This Valentine’s Day, shower your better half with the new limited edition
Cherry Blossom fragrance collection by L’Occitane. Called ‘Sweet Cherry
For Her’, the set of four comes with a Cherry Blossom fragrance, shower
milk, moisturising milk and mini pouch — perfect for anyone on the go.
L’Occitane’s limited edition Cherry Blossom collection is priced at RM375
and can be purchased at all L’Occitane stores nationwide.
30
live it!
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
WELLBEING . THE ARTS . WINE+DINE . STYLE+DESIGN . LEISURE
Zen TODAY
Friends and good manners will carry you where
money won’t go. — Margaret Walker
Movie Review
THE BOY
NEXT DOOR
BY VI C H I T RA N ADES
Director: Rob Cohen
Cast: Jennifer Lopez, Ryan Guzman, Kristin Chenoweth, Ian Nelson, John Corbett,
Hill Harper, Adam Hicks, Bailey Chase, Lexi
Atkins
Rating: ***½ (out of 5 stars)
Length: 91 minutes
Opening: Now showing
The Plot: Newly-single Claire Peterson
(played by Jennifer Lopez, also one of the
producers of the film) is struggling to juggle
work, raise her son and settle her impending
divorce when she meets her new neighbour
— the mysterious and charming Noah Sandborn (Ryan Guzman). Despite the big age
difference, their attraction to one another
is undeniable and what was seemingly a
harmless one-night stand turns violent when
Claire learns her new love-interest harbours
a dangerous obsession with her and will not
stop at anything to take control of her life.
I
t is a shift for those who are used to seeing Lopez as the glamorous pop icon
that she is. (Her 2002 movie Enough,
a high-energy tale of a battered wife’s
fight for survival, is somewhat reminiscent of the challenging role she has
in The Boy Next Door).
Taking on the role of a high school literature teacher in this movie, Lopez is almost
unrecognisable but does a good job por-
traying a single mother who’s battling her
inner demons and coping with the troubles
of parenthood and her dwindling marriage.
It is only after Peterson hesitantly gives
into her temptation and allows Sandborn
to seduce her that she realises her mistake,
but it’s too late. From then on, she is taken
on a journey that will not only test her patience and strength but threatens the safety
of her loved ones.
Peterson’s son Kevin (Ian Nelson) — a
computer whiz trying to fit in — is immediately befriended by Sandborn and this poses
yet more troubles for Peterson.
After much reluctance, she eventually
confides in her best friend and colleague
Vicky (Broadway’s Kristin Chenoweth), who
tries to help her. Fearing for her family’s safety and job security, Peterson is left to fend
off Sandborn on her own and the more she
tries, the more dangerous he gets.
Step Up fans might recognise Guzman
from Step Up Revolution and Step Up: All In,
though his character is a complete contrast
to the clean-cut dancer roles he is used to
playing. Guzman plays a disturbed and angry young man with a dark history, albeit a
genius, who has several deep-rooted issues
that lead to his sociopathic behaviour.
Writers of the flick have stated that the
backbone of the plot was not really about the
violence or obsession, but more of betrayal
and forgiveness, and as the storyline dwells
into Sandborn’s past, you’ll see why. Peter-
01
02
03
01. Peterson slowly learns that Sandborn is not the charming, sweet kid he made himself out to
be.
02. Sandborn harbours a fatal obsession for Peterson and will not let anything gets in his way.
03. Chenoweth (left) plays Peterson’s best friend and confidante.
son and her husband Garrett (John Corbett)
were separated due to the latter’s infidelity
and throughout the movie, she is shown battling with the decision on whether to salvage
her marriage or not. Sandborn in the picture
makes things more complicated, and as it
turns out, he himself was a product of a troubled marriage. He uses Peterson’s family to
4.98
channel all his resentment of his past.
Overall, The Boy Next Door is an entertaining watch, and not entirely a waste of
your time. Although, you might have to think
twice about making it a family movie as it’s
neither a “fun watch” nor is it appropriate
for anyone under 18 as it contains more than
a few gory and explicit scenes.
128.98
S P O RT S 3 1
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
Chelsea pair face fitness
race for Man City clash
Costa could earn a retrospective red card and suspension for stamping
LONDON: Premier League leaders
Chelsea could be without midfielder Cesc Fabregas and defender Filipe Luis for this Saturday’s top-ofthe-table clash against Manchester
City at Stamford Bridge.
Both came off during Chelsea’s 1-0 victory in the Capital One
(League) Cup semi-final second leg
against Liverpool on Tuesday, while
Branislav Ivanovic, who headed
the winner in extra time, is also a
doubt with a cut foot.
“Branislav could finish the game,
Fabregas and Filipe couldn’t,” Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho explained. “Filipe has a calf problem,
Fabregas has a hamstring.”
Mourinho added that Fabregas “said he wasn’t yet injured but
that he would be soon if he continued” but was uncertain whether he
would be available for this Saturday’s game.
off after 78 minutes and was reFabregas was replaced by placed by Cesar Azpilicueta.
Ramires five minutes into the secChelsea’s victory in a thrilling
ond half, while Filipe Luis limped blood-and-thunder game went
English clubs
dominate
international
transfer deals
BY MI KE COL L ET T
LONDON: English clubs are
spending more money in the international transfer market than
any other country in the world
according to a FIFA report published yesterday. The findings
of the 2015 FIFA/TMS Global
Transfer Market Systems Report, covering the last 12 months,
shows English clubs spent more
than US$770 million (RM2.77 billion) on foreign players — about
US$308 million (67%) more than
their nearest rivals Spain.
In total, clubs around the
world spent US$4.06 billion signing players from outside their
own borders. The report does
not include domestic transfers.
Brazil is the most active country
with 1,335 deals — incoming and
outgoing — followed by England
with 1,263 and Portugal with 823.
One area highlighted in the
report for the first time concerns
the transfers of young players
under the age of 18. Spanish
clubs sign more overseas youngsters under 18. Mark Goddard,
general manager of FIFA/TMS,
told a conference call: “It is important to note that the more
minor applications the better ...
the ones that do not break any
rules are approved.” — Reuters
Costa (top) appears to stamp
on Skrtel during their match
at Stamford Bridge on
Tuesday. Photo by Reuters
Tuesday’s win over Liverpool
gave them a 2-1 aggregate success
and they will now meet either Tottenham Hotspur or Sheffield United
in the League Cup final at Wembley
on March 1.
Diego Costa’s fiery temper,
meanwhile, could have earned
him a red card after two stamping
incidents during the match.
The Spain striker appeared to
tread down on Emre Can and Martin Skrtel. The west London club
will be waiting anxiously to see if
the Football Association chooses
to take retrospective action.
Any suspension could rule Costa
some way to alleviating their em- out of the crucial clash at home to
barrassing 4-2 home defeat to third second-placed Manchester City,
tier Bradford City in the FA Cup who they lead by five points, this
last Saturday.
Saturday. — Reuters
Goal-heavy Socceroos say
they have jump on S Korea
BY P ETER HUTC HI S O N
NEWCASTLE: Ange Postecoglou
said he’s not worried about South
Korea’s miserly defence in the Asian
Cup final after the Socceroos underlined their incredible ability to
score through almost any player.
Defenders Trent Sainsbury and
Jason Davidson struck in Tuesday’s 2-0 semi-final win over
UAE to extend Australia’s tournament-leading tally to 12 — with
10 different scorers.
And Australia’s record has given
coach Postecoglou heart as he prepares for a South Korean side which
has reached the final without conceding, the first in 39 years to do so.
“We’ve played five games, we’ve
scored 12 goals and conceded two,
and we’re in the final, I think that
speaks for itself,” said Postecoglou.
Striker Tim Cahill is the only
man to net more than once, with
Massimo Luongo, Mile Jedinak,
James Troisi, Matt McKay, Robbie
Kruse, Mark Milligan and Tomi Juric all grabbing one apiece.
UAE marked Cahill heavily after his two goals in the quarter-final against China, but they were
caught by surprise when Sainsbury
and Davidson popped up for their
first international goals.
“There has been a lot of emphasis
on Timmy, and rightly so because
he was fantastic in the quarter-final, but I think this tournament
has shown that we can score goals
from other areas,” said Postecoglou.
He remains confident over his
attacking philosophy, saying it was
popular with both players and the
nation. No other Asian Cup side has
had more than six different scorers.
“It’s a massive game. We’ve now
been in Asia a little while but we haven’t won anything and this gives
us an opportunity to achieve something,” Postecoglou said. — AFP
S Koreans tough enough for Aussies, says captain Ki
SYDNEY: South Korea could thrive
in the role of underdogs when
they face hosts Australia in the
Asian Cup final this weekend, says
skipper Ki Sung-Yueng.
Having reached the final for
the first time in 27 years battered, bruised and held together by team spirit and sheer
bloody-mindedness, the Swansea City midfielder told South
Korean reporters yesterday that
the Red Devils have the steel to
go all the way.
“I believe it will come down
to mental strength,” said Ki, who
has been a calming influence on
South Korea after losing the influential pairing of Lee Chung-Yong
and Koo Ja-Cheol to injury in the
group stages.
“That will be more important
than physical strength,” he said,
noting that the Australians would
hold the advantage in terms of
power. “This is a great opportunity for South Korean football.”
South Korea’s rich pedigree
speaks for itself, the team famously reaching the World Cup semi-finals in 2002. But they have curiously failed to lift the Asian Cup
since 1960.
“We understand the magnitude
of the game without anyone telling
us,” insisted Ki when reminded
of the fact before this Saturday’s
showdown in Sydney.
But coach Uli Stielike has
moulded a resilient side in his
own image, the former West Germany international renowned in
his playing days as a steely defensive midfielder who went on to
become a fan favourite for Real
Madrid after joining them in 1977.
The Taeguk Warriors have
reached the final without conceding a goal, beating Australia
1-0 along the way to secure top
spot in Group A. — AFP
IN BRIEF
‘Happy’ Bale rules out
Manchester United move
BARCELONA: Real Madrid winger Gareth Bale says he is happy
at the Bernabeu and has no intention of moving to Manchester
United. Despite playing a significant role in Real winning their
celebrated 10th European Cup
and the King’s Cup last season
there has been talk of a move
back to the Premier League for
the Welshman. He has been criticised by a section of the Real
fans and the media for being
greedy on the ball and failing to
link up with his team mates. It
has led to rumours that he could
be part of a deal where United
goalkeeper David de Gea would
move to Real. “I can’t see myself
at Manchester United,” Bale told
Spanish radio. “In an interview
recently I was asked if I was happy in Madrid and I said that I
was very happy here.” — Reuters
Ghana bullish after
winning toughest group
MONGOMO (Equatorial Guinea): Ghana’s confidence has
received a massive boost after
they won what was billed as
the toughest group at the 2015
Africa Cup of Nations, coach
Avram Grant said. The Black
Stars finished top of Group C
by virtue of a better head-tohead record against Africa’s No
1 ranked team Algeria, with the
sides finishing level on six points
while Senegal and South Africa
were eliminated. In this Sunday’s
quarter-final, Ghana could now
face any of the four teams in
Group D — Cameroon, Guinea,
Ivory Coast and Mali . — AFP
Algeria win to advance at
Senegal’s expense
MALABO (Equatorial Guinea):
Algeria secured their spot in
the quarter-finals of the Cup of
Nations on Tuesday thanks to a
2-0 win against Senegal in their
last Group C game in Malabo.
On a dramatic evening, Riyad
Mahrez set Algeria on their way
with the opening goal inside 11
minutes, and for a long time it
looked as if both sides would
be heading through to the last
eight. Tottenham Hotspur midfielder Nabil Bentaleb then produced a superb finish to double
Algeria’s lead eight minutes
from the end to seal a berth in
the knockout stage for Christian Gourcuff ’s men. — AFP
Sven lures Conca back to
China in ‘US$11m’ deal
SHANGHAI: Former England
manager Sven-Goran Eriksson
has lured Argentine star Dario
Conca back to the Chinese Super
League, his club Shanghai SIPG
said yesterday, on a deal reported to be worth almost US$11
million (RM39 million) a year.
“Conca will arrive in Shanghai
soon and will be formally signed
after a medical,” the club said on
its verified account on China’s
Twitter-like Sina Weibo. Conca
returns to China after only a year
at Brazilian club Fluminense,
which he joined following three
seasons at Chinese champions
Guangzhou Evergrande. — AFP
3 2 S P O RT S
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
Djokovic, Wawrinka set
up epic showdown
Ill Serena moves a step closer to 19th Grand Slam title
BY GREG STU TC HBURY
MELBOURNE: Top seed Novak
Djokovic and champion Stan Wawrinka set up “The Djoker v The Man
3.0” at Melbourne Park after impressive quarter-final victories yesterday, while an ill Serena Williams
moved a step closer to her 19th
Grand Slam title.
The American, however, will first
have to overcome the pure hitting of
Madison Keys after the 19-year-old
ended the fairytale run of Serena’s
older sister Venus, despite suffering
from a thigh injury that hampered
her movement.
With many suggesting prior to
the tournament it could signify an
epochal shift in both games, the
teenager represents the up and
comers in the semi-finals after
Djokovic and Wawrinka crushed
the last hopes of “Generation Next”
in the men’s draw.
Doping is public
health issue,
says WADA
TOKYO: Doping in sport is a
public health issue, the head of
the World Anti-Doping Agency
(WADA) said yesterday, because
of the spread of substance abuse
from elite athletes to school gyms.
“Too many people are taking too
many substances they don’t even
know,” WADA director-general
David Howman told AFP in an
interview in Tokyo.
Howman was speaking days
after cycling cheat Lance Armstrong said he would take banned
substances again if faced with
the same circumstances that saw
him dope in 1995. “If I was racing in 2015, no, I wouldn’t do it
again because I don’t think you
have to,” Armstrong told the BBC.
“If you take me back to 1995,
when doping was completely
pervasive, I would probably do
it again.”
Howman was in Tokyo for
a conference involving sports
bodies and the pharmaceutical industry on how to stamp
out drug cheating. “Sometimes
children ... have taken drugs that
their parents don’t know they’re
taking,” he said.
While WADA has been trying to address the issue, “it’s not
our job because sometimes it’s
not elite athletes,” he said. “We
think this is a public health issue and we are supported by the
World Health Organisation and
by many others who now see it’s
not just a sport issue.” — AFP
Djokovic falls on the court after trying to hit a return against Raonic during their men’s
singles quarter-final match yesterday. Photo by Reuters
Djokovic, seeking to become
the second man to win a fifth Australian Open title, beat Canada’s
Milos Raonic 7-6(5) 6-4 6-2 in the
late match on Rod Laver Arena,
hours after Wawrinka had easily
dispatched fifth seed Kei Nishikori
6-3 6-4 7-6(6).
“Definitely expecting a marathon like the last couple of years.
I’m sure that both of us will give
our best to perform our best tennis,” Djokovic said in a courtside
interview. “We always ask for the
best of each other.”
It will be the third successive
year Djokovic and Wawrinka have
met at the Australian Open, with the
man winning those epic clashes ultimately going on to clinch the title.
American teenager Keys proved
to be the ultimate party pooper with
her victory over Venus while at the
same time indicating the mantle of
American women’s tennis should
be in safe hands when it is moved
on from the two sisters.
Serena and Venus had been hoping to provide fans with the first
all-Williams sisters clash at a grand
slam since the 2009 Wimbledon
final in the semi-finals.
Keys, who was inspired at four
years old to take up the game after
seeing Venus play at Wimbledon,
refused to succumb to sentimentality and demonstrated the ball
striking and power hitting, which
had destroyed players of the calibre
of double Wimbledon champion
Petra Kvitova. — Reuters
Super Bowl, Tiger give Phoenix
Open extra spark
SCOTTSDALE (Arizona): The Waste
Management Phoenix Open and Super Bowl are both being staged this
week in the Phoenix area and Patrick
Reed (pic), one of the hottest players
on the PGA Tour, is licking his lips in
anticipation. The National Football
League’s showpiece is the biggest
sports event in the United States while
the US$6.3 million (RM22 million)
Phoenix Open, played at the TPC
Scottsdale, is renowned for its raucous
crowds and the loudest hole in golf.
Add to that the return of former
world No 1 Tiger Woods to PGA Tour
action this week, for the first time in
five months, and you have all the ingredients for a sporting extravaganza
in the Grand Canyon State over the
next five days.
“It’s going to be a lot of fun,” Amer-
ican Reed told Reuters on Tuesday
after completing a practice round
on the par-71 TPC Scottsdale layout.
“We golfers are really looking forward to this week and hopefully we
will hit a lot of good shots and get the
crowds here roaring even louder.”
Reed, aged 24 and already a four-
time winner on the PGA Tour, made
his debut at the Phoenix Open on
Scottsdale’s Stadium Course last year
and has vivid memories of the infamous par-three 16th, the noisiest
hole in golf. Thousands of spectators
cram into the bleachers and sky boxes
surrounding the 163-yard hole, many
more swarming across the grassed
hill that faces the green, and they
loudly boo any golfer who fails to hit
the green off the tee.
Masters champion Bubba Watson, the world No 4, heads a strong
field this week. Tenth-ranked American Matt Kuchar, Rickie Fowler (11th)
and three-time former winner Phil
Mickelson are also competing. The
Super Bowl is played on Sunday at
the nearby University of Phoenix stadium in Glendale, Arizona. — Reuters
Scaled back Singapore Open to return next year
BY PATRICK J O HNS TO N
SINGAPORE: The Singapore Open,
once Asia’s richest golf tournament,
will return next year after a three-year
absence but with a vast drop in prize
money and without the European
Tour on board. The US$1 million
(RM3.61 million) Jan 28 to 31 event
will be co-sanctioned by the Asian
Tour and the Japan Golf Tour (JGTO)
after Japan’s Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corp agreed to a three-year sponsorship of the tournament, last held
in 2012 with a US$6 million purse.
“The Singapore Open was always
one of our best events and one that
our members strove to compete well
in,” Asian Tour chairman Kyi Hla Han
said yesterday. “It is tremendous to
have it back as it is an important event
for our region and our tour.”
Tournament promoters World
Sports Group (WSG) signed a fiveyear contract extension with the Singapore Golf Association days before
Italian Matteo Manassero lifted the
trophy at the Sentosa Golf Club in
November 2012 but they struggled
to find a replacement sponsor for
Barclays who quit that year.
WSG executive chairman Seamus
O’Brien was in the dark as to why no
corporation in wealthy Singapore
wanted to come on board and blamed
the global financial crisis for international sponsors not biting.
With the European Tour no longer
a co-sanctioning partner, the tournament will move to a January date and
serve as a likely curtain raiser for the
Asian and Japan Golf Tour seasons,
with each getting a minimum of 60
spots in a 156-man field, Han said.
— Reuters
IN BRIEF
Managing thigh injury
key to Madison’s success
MELBOURNE: Madison Keys
continued to ride her wave of
success, fuelled in part by celebratory chocolate biscuits, as
she advanced to her first grand
slam semi-final with a gutsy 6-3
4-6 6-4 victory over Venus Williams yesterday. The power-hitting 19-year-old had to battle
through a re-occurrence of the
thigh injury that forced her to
withdraw from Wimbledon last
year to set up a semi-final against
top seed Serena Williams tomorrow. “I felt it since the beginning.
It’s been tight, but it’s been something that with some treatment
its been fine,” Keys told reporters
after she needed an injury time
out during the second set of her
match with Venus, who said the
break cost her momentum in the
match. — Reuters
McIlroy looking for
desert storm
DUBAI: Rory McIlroy says he’d
be focused completely on trying to win a second Dubai Desert Classic title, this week rather
than thinking about his upcoming date in a Dublin court. The
world No 1 has fond memories
of recording his first win as a professional in what is the oldest golf
tournament in the Middle East,
and, having finished second in
his last three starts on the European Tour, McIlroy is hoping to
go one better and add to his 2009
title in the desert. Speaking to the
media on the eve of the tournament, McIlroy said: “One win
here at the Emirates, but seems
every time I come here I have a
chance and I play well. It’s a great
way to start the season. — AFP
Narine withdraws from
Windies World Cup squad
JOHANNESBURG: Off-spinner
Sunil Narine has withdrawn from
the West Indies World Cup squad
while he continues to work on
his controversial bowling action,
the West Indies Cricket Board
(WICB) said on Tuesday. Narine
was reported for a suspect action twice during the Champions
League Twenty20 tournament
in September and was unable
to play in the final for his team
Kolkata Knight Riders. Although
not banned from international
competition he was withdrawn
from the West Indies squad for
their tour of India and is not with
the team currently playing in
South Africa. He was named as
part of the 15-man World Cup
squad however . — Reuters
Bubka to take on Coe for
IAAF presidency
PARIS: Ukrainian pole vault legend Sergei Bubka will challenge
Britain’s Sebastian Coe for the
presidency of the International
Amateur Athletics Federation
(IAAF), he confirmed yesterday.
The two men are the only candidates so far to succeed Lamine
Diack, who is due to step down
in August. Bubka, 51, said: “I
want to give back to the world
of athletics what it brought me
throughout the different phases
of my life.” — AFP
Markets 3 3
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
BURSA MAL AYSIA MAIN MARKET
Bursa Malaysia
YEAR
HIGH
Sectorial Movement
INDICES
CLOSE
+/-
%CHG
KLSE COMPOSITE
1,795.88
-7.29
-0.40
KLSE INDUSTRIAL
INDICES
CLOSE
%CHG
19.56
0.01
0.05
3,276.24
0.45
0.01
FTSE BURSA 100
12,062.25
-38.77
-0.32
CONSUMER PRODUCT
573.46
-1.03
-0.18
FTSE BURSA MID 70
13,409.40
-3.83
-0.03
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCT
130.65
-1.74
-1.31
FTSE BURSA SMALL CAP
16,011.83
-38.93
-0.24
CONSTRUCTION
290.13
1.15
0.40
FTSE BURSA FLEDGLING
14,738.06
-29.81
-0.20
TRADE & SERVICES
239.13
-0.29
-0.12
FTSE BURSA EMAS
12,359.44
-39.00
-0.31
KLSE FINANCIAL
15,514.69
-125.62
-0.80
FTSE BUR M’SIA ACE
6,460.63
39.99
0.62
KLSE PROPERTY
1,305.08
-7.57
-0.58
FTSE BUR EMAS SHARIAH
12,963.32
-43.20
-0.33
KLSE PLANTATION
8,050.33
55.13
0.69
FTSE BUR HIJRAH SHARIAH
15,041.36
-23.62
-0.16
559.29
-4.06
-0.72
FTSE/ASEAN 40
10,672.19
-40.56
-0.38
KLSE MINING
TECHNOLOGY
+/-
Bursa Malaysia Main Market
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
CONSUMER PRODUCTS
0.750 0.383 0.600
3.938 3.080
—
6.193 4.332 5.700
0.870 0.225
—
4.750 4.050 4.490
4.141 2.630 2.780
7.447 4.063 6.250
74.400 56.015 66.960
0.185 0.075 0.085
0.220 0.095
—
1.507 0.795 0.975
1.210 0.450 1.180
0.579 0.340 0.455
0.365 0.210 0.330
12.907 10.360 11.700
2.640 1.850 1.960
1.060 0.786
—
3.327 2.356 2.840
0.650 0.370 0.400
1.270 0.980 1.000
0.135 0.060 0.070
2.221 1.400 1.700
1.388 0.996 1.300
0.220 0.070 0.085
0.085 0.055 0.070
1.130 0.770
—
47.200 40.360 47.200
0.185 0.075 0.090
0.115 0.085 0.115
0.360 0.170 0.245
0.320 0.170 0.195
2.648 1.792 2.100
0.745 0.325 0.570
1.170 0.620 0.810
18.300 15.137 18.300
0.815 0.575 0.615
1.780 0.850 1.090
0.475 0.270
—
1.150 0.710
—
13.200 11.914 12.200
1.560 0.860 0.940
2.848 1.914 2.250
1.090 0.225 0.455
0.180 0.055
—
7.350 3.849 4.410
1.110 0.514 1.110
0.474 0.315 0.380
3.200 1.940
—
1.206 0.750 0.930
0.655 0.380 0.450
0.150 0.040
—
2.043 0.657 2.000
0.814 0.483 0.690
0.640 0.385
—
4.030 2.138 3.940
1.833 0.767
—
0.580 0.335 0.495
0.690 0.450 0.525
3.110 1.900
—
1.510 0.850
—
0.155 0.095
—
4.670 1.970 4.600
3.549 1.331
—
0.325 0.140 0.220
0.230 0.130 0.180
3.440 1.418 3.430
1.350 0.705 0.850
0.945 0.550 0.640
5.460 2.381 4.980
3.287 2.052 2.800
0.310 0.175 0.200
2.186 1.380 1.680
1.540 0.985 1.050
1.320 1.070 1.240
5.050 4.438 4.900
0.255 0.100 0.130
1.790 1.260
—
71.480 62.944 71.400
2.887 2.260 2.500
0.190 0.100 0.135
0.545 0.148 0.435
0.670 0.600 0.670
0.431 0.145 0.325
3.192 2.123 2.820
7.200 6.480 7.150
2.025 1.360 1.500
22.451 18.004 20.800
0.823 0.575 0.650
0.435 0.205 0.240
0.810 0.340 0.570
1.590 0.595 1.120
0.375 0.165 0.280
0.490 0.360 0.455
1.940 0.775 1.830
16.528 13.420 15.100
0.820 0.480 0.520
1.580 0.703 1.570
1.527 0.606 1.350
2.370 1.321 1.440
3.548 2.784 3.500
1.290 0.800
—
1.890 1.300 1.420
0.600 0.235 0.480
0.475 0.210 0.445
0.940 0.700 0.800
1.105 0.347 0.860
1.945 1.264 1.850
0.090 0.050 0.060
2.334 1.500 2.150
0.895 0.345 0.850
0.680 0.290 0.465
0.740 0.220 0.675
3.800 3.150 3.310
0.715 0.215 0.650
1.680 0.525 1.420
1.711 1.226
—
0.720 0.540
—
0.445 0.250
—
12.398 9.857 10.920
1.750 1.248 1.520
0.825 0.430
—
0.440 0.090 0.120
0.450 0.205 0.330
1.120 0.340 0.425
1.926 1.240 1.610
0.365 0.215
—
1.335 0.781 0.850
1.780 1.190 1.400
2.300 2.000 2.140
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS
1.040 0.717 1.010
0.200 0.115 0.135
0.490 0.156 0.470
0.830 0.240 0.270
1.340 0.760 0.845
* Volume Weighted Average Price
DAY
LOW
CODE
COUNTER
0.600
—
5.600
—
4.380
2.630
6.200
66.000
0.080
—
0.950
1.150
0.445
0.325
11.620
1.960
—
2.800
0.400
0.995
0.070
1.660
1.280
0.080
0.070
—
46.500
0.080
0.105
0.230
0.190
2.090
0.530
0.810
18.100
0.615
1.090
—
—
12.160
0.930
2.200
0.440
—
4.380
1.080
0.370
—
0.920
0.410
—
1.920
0.655
—
3.900
—
0.475
0.505
—
—
—
4.460
—
0.220
0.180
3.200
0.790
0.630
4.900
2.800
0.200
1.630
1.010
1.180
4.900
0.125
—
71.000
2.500
0.135
0.415
0.665
0.305
2.800
7.100
1.480
20.380
0.650
0.225
0.500
1.100
0.265
0.445
1.770
14.880
0.520
1.520
1.300
1.400
3.470
—
1.400
0.470
0.425
0.760
0.860
1.850
0.055
2.120
0.800
0.450
0.620
3.260
0.630
1.390
—
—
—
10.640
1.520
—
0.115
0.330
0.420
1.590
—
0.850
1.400
2.060
7120
7090
2658
7051
6432
7722
7129
4162
7243
7193
9288
7174
7154
7128
2836
2925
7035
7148
9423
2828
5188
7205
7202
5214
7179
7119
3026
7198
7182
5091
9091
7149
7208
7094
3689
9776
2755
8605
9172
3255
5102
5606
5649
5187
3301
5160
7213
7141
5024
8478
5058
5107
7152
8931
5247
7216
8303
6203
7062
0002
5172
7006
9385
7943
8079
7089
8486
7126
7085
7087
5189
3662
7935
5886
5202
5150
3921
4707
7060
7139
7215
5066
0049
7107
4006
7052
3719
5022
9407
6068
5231
4081
5080
7088
4065
7190
8966
7134
7237
7084
9946
5252
5157
7180
4316
7412
7246
8532
7103
7186
7211
7071
4405
7200
7252
9369
7230
7176
4588
7757
7203
5156
7121
5155
5584
7184
5159
7178
5
5131
ACOSTEC
AHEALTH
AJI
AMTEK
APOLLO
ASIABRN
ASIAFLE
BAT
BIOOSMO
BIOSIS
BONIA
CAB
CAELY
CAMRES
CARLSBG
CCB
CCK
CCMDBIO
CHEEWAH
CIHLDG
CNOUHUA
COCOLND
CSCENIC
CSL
DBE
DEGEM
DLADY
DPS
EKA
EKOWOOD
EMICO
ENGKAH
EURO
EUROSP
F&N
FARMBES
FCW
FFHB
FPI
GAB
GCB
GOLDIS
GPHAROS
HBGLOB
HLIND
HOMERIZ
HOVID
HUATLAI
HUPSENG
HWATAI
HYTEXIN
IQGROUP
Q
JAYCORP
JERASIA
KAREX
KAWAN
KFM
KHEESAN
KHIND
KOTRA
KSTAR
LATITUD
LAYHONG
LCHEONG
LEESK
LIIHEN
LIONFIB
LONBISC
LTKM
MAGNI
MAXWELL
MFLOUR
MILUX
MINTYE
MSM
MSPORTS
MWE
NESTLE
NHFATT
NICE
NIHSIN
NTPM
OCNCASH
OFI
ORIENT
PADINI
PANAMY
PAOS
PARAGON
PCCS
PELIKAN
PMCORP
POHKONG
POHUAT
PPB
PPG
PRLEXUS
PW
PWROOT
Q
QL
REX
SASBADI
SAUDEE
SERNKOU
SHCHAN
SHH
SIGN
SINOTOP
SPRITZER
SWSCAP
TAFI
TAKASO
TCHONG
TEKSENG
TEOSENG
TGL
TOMEI
TPC
UMW
UPA
WANGZNG
XDL
XIANLNG
XINQUAN
Q
YEELEE
YEN
YOCB
YSPSAH
ZHULIAN
0.985
0.125
0.460
0.270
0.820
0012
7086
7061
7131
7191
3A
ABLEGRP
ABRIC
ACME
ADVENTA
CLOSING
(RM)
0.600
3.430
5.700
0.310
4.460
2.780
6.250
66.500
0.085
0.135
0.975
1.160
0.455
0.325
11.660
1.960
0.865
2.840
0.400
0.995
0.070
1.670
1.290
0.080
0.070
0.840
47.120
0.085
0.115
0.240
0.195
2.100
0.570
0.810
18.260
0.615
1.090
0.330
0.820
12.160
0.930
2.220
0.440
0.060
4.400
1.110
0.375
2.850
0.920
0.450
—
1.990
0.690
0.570
3.910
1.590
0.485
0.515
2.100
1.180
0.120
4.600
3.420
0.220
0.180
3.300
0.810
0.640
4.980
2.800
0.200
1.660
1.050
1.180
4.900
0.130
1.320
71.380
2.500
0.135
0.430
0.665
0.310
2.800
7.150
1.490
20.700
0.650
0.240
0.520
1.110
0.270
0.445
1.810
15.020
0.520
1.540
1.350
1.420
3.500
1.120
1.400
0.480
0.435
0.760
0.860
1.850
0.060
2.120
0.800
0.465
0.660
3.280
0.640
1.400
1.420
0.590
0.380
10.840
1.520
0.510
0.120
0.330
0.425
1.610
0.270
0.850
1.400
2.120
1.000
0.135
0.465
0.270
0.845
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
UNCH
30
—
—
0.100
2.4
—
—
-0.030
0.030
5.8
0.050
1.9
UNCH
11
UNCH
171.2
0.005
1215
—
—
0.005
344.7
-0.010
0.010 3506.6
-0.015
0.015
64.6
-0.005
0.005
135
UNCH
48.6
-0.040
0.040
4
—
—
0.040
2
UNCH
10
-0.005
0.005
40
0.005
318
-0.030
0.030
52.3
UNCH
77.2
UNCH
677
UNCH
389
—
—
0.620
24.1
UNCH 2512.4
0.010
100
UNCH
134.6
0.005
89.3
UNCH
10.1
0.010
21
UNCH
19.8
0.080
107.7
-0.025
0.025
10
-0.060
0.060
2.7
—
—
—
—
UNCH
224.3
0.020
21
-0.030
0.030
363.4
-0.015
0.015
102.8
—
—
0.020
28.1
0.030 1309.4
UNCH 1758.9
—
—
UNCH
109.4
0.010
25.1
—
—
0.070
371.8
0.035
60.1
—
—
-0.030
0.030
228.8
—
—
-0.020
0.020
193.5
-0.010
0.010
146.5
—
—
—
—
—
—
UNCH
175
—
—
-0.020
0.020
28
UNCH
100
0.060
64.2
UNCH
94.5
UNCH
358.2
0.040
23
UNCH
1
-0.005
0.005
136
0.010
216.4
UNCH
112
-0.020
0.020
33.5
UNCH
18.1
0.005
863.8
—
—
-0.020
0.020
65.6
UNCH
112
UNCH
377
UNCH 7440.9
-0.005
0.005
1015
UNCH
521.6
-0.090
0.090
5
0.050
16.4
-0.010
0.010
176.2
0.320
11.8
-0.010
0.010
2
0.015
2.1
-0.020
0.020
67.2
-0.020
0.020
374
0.005 14791.4
-0.005
0.005
221.9
-0.010
0.010
165
-0.120
0.120
207.9
UNCH
5
-0.040
0.040
305.4
-0.050
0.050
14
0.010
165.9
0.010 1060.6
—
—
-0.030
0.030
77
UNCH
101.4
-0.015
0.015
116.6
-0.040
0.040
5
-0.020
0.020
10
UNCH
10
UNCH
136
-0.030
0.030
18.8
UNCH
65
UNCH
17
-0.015
0.015 43594.5
0.020
1.2
-0.005
0.005
579.2
UNCH
166.2
—
—
—
—
—
—
-0.040
0.040 3370.9
UNCH
13
—
—
0.005
250
-0.020
0.020
67
-0.005
0.005
1111
UNCH
490.8
—
—
UNCH
3.1
-0.020
0.020
6
UNCH
19.6
9
0.560
—
4.604
—
5.640
4.033
4.239
62.855
0.176
—
3.399
0.575
0.433
0.000
12.303
2.454
—
2.599
0.000
0.000
0.080
2.192
1.110
0.199
0.070
—
48.592
0.095
0.000
0.245
1.000
2.594
0.340
0.000
18.260
0.584
0.857
—
—
16.231
1.388
1.980
0.345
—
5.229
0.567
0.340
—
6.066
0.390
—
0.544
0.585
—
3.250
—
0.335
0.503
—
—
—
1.553
—
0.000
0.000
1.650
1.000
0.696
2.636
2.282
0.292
1.465
0.000
1.388
5.000
0.174
—
68.567
2.915
0.135
0.156
0.704
0.180
2.311
8.629
1.769
22.684
0.000
0.000
0.470
0.606
0.258
0.464
0.837
14.816
0.570
1.000
0.711
1.828
4.165
—
0.000
0.229
0.200
0.831
0.000
1.371
0.066
1.802
0.256
0.300
0.268
6.522
0.000
0.600
—
—
—
12.391
1.330
—
0.329
0.230
0.830
1.310
—
0.871
1.336
4.939
9 9
—
12.57
12.69
—
13.37
8.37
13.13
21.02
—
—
226.74
13.66
8.52
12.22
16.76
29.25
11.67
12.07
65.57
—
—
14.30
15.67
—
—
5.84
27.85
40.48
—
—
—
23.60
17.87
8.01
25.71
15.38
36.70
20.37
17.08
18.08
—
23.32
3.32
—
7.84
10.95
14.82
7.74
21.10
—
—
10.11
12.45
10.00
32.58
14.52
—
7.24
6.86
24.95
—
7.84
12.21
—
12.50
8.21
—
6.54
6.76
7.33
3.60
10.36
—
18.44
15.45
2.18
10.90
30.29
14.01
—
537.50
17.78
12.45
10.97
15.56
11.89
13.52
28.02
600.00
—
—
—
15.56
8.11
19.69
10.53
7.64
8.63
13.98
24.19
52.34
12.37
77.42
23.39
36.89
5.91
9.23
100.00
12.32
36.20
21.33
—
12.97
12.28
11.54
8.85
15.95
—
19.33
10.01
10.00
4.04
—
1.34
9.31
—
7.50
13.75
20.70
7
—
2.42
3.25
—
5.61
2.25
3.60
4.65
—
—
1.28
—
2.20
—
5.23
—
2.89
6.16
—
—
—
3.89
6.20
10.00
—
1.79
2.12
—
—
—
—
5.00
—
—
3.01
—
—
—
7.32
5.30
3.23
—
—
—
6.14
4.59
2.67
1.40
2.45
—
—
2.01
5.07
—
0.64
0.75
—
—
4.76
—
—
1.85
1.46
—
—
4.39
—
—
3.61
2.86
—
5.42
—
2.54
4.90
—
1.52
3.29
4.40
—
1.16
4.36
1.94
3.39
0.98
6.71
2.42
3.85
—
—
—
—
2.25
2.76
1.60
3.85
1.62
3.09
5.40
1.00
—
2.14
—
—
—
2.33
2.70
—
1.89
—
—
—
2.74
—
2.66
5.28
1.69
—
2.31
5.26
4.90
—
—
4.71
1.86
—
4.71
4.64
4.72
7
106.7
401.8
346.6
15.5
356.8
219.9
741.8
18,987.7
,
42.4
14.2
786.1
152.9
36.4
63.1
3,592.2
,
197.5
136.4
396.1
16.8
161.2
46.8
286.6
155.4
99.4
47.1
112.6
3,015.7
,
50.0
27.6
40.3
18.7
148.6
46.2
36.0
6,688.4
,
37.6
272.5
27.3
202.8
3,673.5
,
445.0
1,355.3
,
59.2
28.1
1,442.8
,
222.0
286.4
246.6
736.0
18.0
—
172.0
94.7
46.8
1,583.6
,
290.2
32.8
36.6
84.1
156.0
32.0
447.2
173.2
14.5
30.2
198.0
187.6
119.3
216.0
303.8
80.0
893.5
57.1
71.7
3,444.6
,
67.3
305.7
16,738.6
,
187.9
31.5
101.7
746.9
69.1
168.0
4,435.8
,
980.3
1,257.4
,
78.5
16.8
31.2
614.2
208.8
182.6
205.2
17,806.2
,
52.0
176.0
97.7
430.6
4,368.1
,
62.8
177.8
43.2
52.2
87.5
43.0
222.0
118.5
294.5
101.2
37.2
130.7
2,204.2
,
153.6
420.0
57.9
81.8
30.4
12,664.3
,
121.0
81.6
137.9
24.0
143.7
290.9
33.8
136.0
186.3
975.2
975
0.893
0.142
0.280
0.430
1.061
23.42
—
17.42
—
29.86
1.40
—
—
—
—
393.6
35.6
65.3
59.0
129.1
UNCH
0.005
-0.005
0.005
UNCH
0.030
461
9.6
2609.3
10
16.9
# PE is calculated based on latest 12 months reported Earnings Per Share
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
2.453 1.654 2.140
2.010
0.241 0.130 0.150
0.145
0.570 0.450 0.485
0.455
0.400 0.255 0.380
0.350
2.820 1.950 2.160
2.150
1.260 0.200
—
—
1.270 0.583
—
—
0.709 0.342 0.470
0.445
1.490 1.010 1.130
1.120
1.610 0.894 1.150
1.150
6.195 4.650 5.000
4.980
0.725 0.410 0.540
0.510
0.950 0.555 0.740
0.740
0.240 0.110 0.160
0.155
4.895 4.128 4.650
4.650
0.640 0.500
—
—
0.200 0.065
—
—
2.720 2.080
—
—
1.060 0.320 0.565
0.560
0.155 0.110 0.120
0.120
1.790 1.216 1.510
1.500
2.570 2.000
—
—
0.985 0.592 0.935
0.890
0.600 0.350 0.540
0.535
0.355 0.200 0.225
0.225
0.300 0.115 0.150
0.140
2.420 1.940 2.420
2.350
0.270 0.210 0.230
0.220
2.523 1.529 2.180
2.100
1.236 0.846 0.960
0.960
1.390 1.170
—
—
1.860 1.430
—
—
1.600 0.850
—
—
1.740 1.258 1.520
1.500
2.423 1.454 1.610
1.610
1.100 0.487 0.960
0.950
0.115 0.055 0.065
0.060
4.720 1.921 4.270
4.190
1.560 0.500
—
—
5.358 2.220 2.970
2.900
0.360 0.145 0.210
0.210
1.297 0.950 1.020
1.010
0.618 0.470 0.565
0.565
0.630 0.325
—
—
4.650 3.768 4.650
4.430
5.120 3.090 5.100
5.090
0.355 0.180 0.220
0.205
0.480 0.265 0.400
0.400
0.550 0.300 0.350
0.350
0.355 0.280
—
—
1.319 0.896 1.190
1.170
1.900 1.360 1.830
1.800
0.360 0.180 0.330
0.310
0.940 0.385 0.610
0.600
1.550 1.200 1.420
1.390
0.400 0.230
—
—
0.967 0.635 0.780
0.780
0.925 0.450 0.905
0.880
0.774 0.430 0.470
0.445
1.606 0.960 1.080
1.070
3.879 2.300 3.000
2.970
0.605 0.360 0.475
0.475
3.107 1.950 2.360
2.250
1.395 0.948 1.200
1.170
0.919 0.575
—
—
2.560 1.230 1.580
1.510
0.615 0.285
—
—
0.140 0.050 0.075
0.065
0.655 0.355
—
—
1.070 0.715 1.070
0.900
0.200 0.075 0.100
0.095
0.475 0.192 0.335
0.325
0.145 0.085 0.095
0.090
1.603 0.898 1.070
1.060
0.630 0.620
—
—
1.000 0.592 0.730
0.730
7.680 5.623 7.680
7.410
0.380 0.175 0.195
0.190
4.000 1.900
—
—
2.200 0.887 2.130
2.090
0.831 0.608 0.740
0.735
0.832 0.527 0.595
0.595
2.500 0.800 0.860
0.820
1.137 0.767
—
—
0.830 0.382 0.795
0.780
0.525 0.320
—
—
0.165 0.095 0.115
0.110
5.600 3.510 3.770
3.720
0.225 0.110 0.140
0.135
1.150 0.530 0.810
0.805
1.355 1.026
—
—
0.725 0.590 0.715
0.690
0.800 0.280 0.330
0.310
0.165 0.030
—
—
0.195 0.100 0.130
0.125
0.285 0.135 0.175
0.165
0.535 0.280
—
—
1.210 0.850
—
—
1.830 1.300 1.510
1.510
2.751 1.680 1.890
1.860
0.374 0.225 0.240
0.240
0.577 0.328
—
—
0.690 0.360 0.480
0.480
3.430 2.840 2.930
2.920
1.788 1.050
—
—
0.305 0.140 0.145
0.140
1.600 1.200 1.280
1.200
1.140 0.395 0.610
0.585
1.252 0.650 0.990
0.985
0.587 0.355 0.450
0.395
5.520 3.572 5.270
5.150
0.400 0.250 0.380
0.365
7.414 5.050 5.280
5.260
0.810 0.300 0.580
0.575
0.990 0.505
—
—
10.520 7.467 10.520
9.900
0.875 0.470 0.565
0.555
0.385 0.195 0.290
0.275
0.643 0.429 0.550
0.545
0.290 0.125 0.160
0.160
0.105 0.045 0.075
0.070
0.195 0.085 0.155
0.145
0.840 0.460 0.495
0.490
0.380 0.240 0.250
0.250
0.140 0.070 0.085
0.085
5.598 2.552 3.250
3.240
1.120 0.800 0.855
0.850
0.890 0.550 0.820
0.805
0.605 0.320
—
—
1.114 0.720 0.780
0.765
0.550 0.175 0.315
0.315
1.300 0.690 0.715
0.700
1.660 1.126 1.280
1.280
1.920 0.450
—
—
2.120 1.765
—
—
0.620 0.320 0.550
0.480
0.320 0.085 0.095
0.090
1.280 0.680 0.755
0.750
0.700 0.300 0.435
0.410
3.780 2.500
—
—
2.470 0.860 1.600
1.560
1.674 1.140 1.230
1.230
0.485 0.285
—
—
1.160 0.120
—
—
0.180 0.090
—
—
0.704 0.481 0.615
0.590
0.180 0.045
—
—
1.042 0.342 0.960
0.925
1.420 0.800 1.300
1.250
0.150 0.070
—
—
6.925 4.650 5.460
5.320
0.440 0.385 0.420
0.415
4.768 3.565 3.920
3.910
0.340 0.045 0.050
0.050
24.514 20.546 22.480 21.520
3.067 2.300 2.760
2.740
7.750 5.200 7.200
7.050
1.909 0.640 0.955
0.935
3.698 1.076 2.690
2.660
1.220 0.490
—
—
0.590 0.335 0.425
0.420
1.040 0.535 0.720
0.700
0.430 0.290 0.370
0.355
0.723 0.400 0.510
0.500
0.285 0.150 0.210
0.200
1.950 1.130
—
—
CODE
9148
7146
5198
2682
7609
9954
2674
4758
6556
5568
5015
7214
7162
7070
7048
7181
7044
8133
7005
7187
0168
6297
5100
9938
7221
7188
5105
5229
7076
2879
7171
8435
8044
5007
5797
8052
7018
2852
7986
5071
7195
5094
7157
5082
8125
6505
8176
7114
5835
5835PA
7169
1619
7233
8907
9016
7217
7773
5101
7249
2984
7229
0149
3107
5197
7168
3611
7197
5220
7192
2135
7096
0136
7077
3247
5182
5151
5168
9342
7105
5095
3298
5072
5199
7033
8443
5165
2739
5000
9601
9687
7222
2127
7183
7220
7223
8648
2747
7043
7167
4383
0054
7199
6211
3522
5371
5060
9466
7164
6971
7017
7153
7130
3476
5192
8362
3794
9326
5092
5232
8745
3581
2887
4235
9881
5068
9199
5098
7029
8095
5152
3778
5223
8192
7059
6149
5001
7219
5576
7595
5916
3883
7004
5087
7002
5025
4944
7109
7140
5065
7225
5183
9997
5436
5146
6033
3042
7095
7172
8869
6637
8117
8273
9458
9873
7123
7544
COUNTER
ADVPKG
AEM
AFUJIYA
AISB
AJIYA
AKNIGHT
ALCOM
ANCOM
ANNJOO
APB
APM
ARANK
ASTINO
ASUPREM
ATLAN
ATURMJU
AUTOAIR
BHIC
BIG
BKOON
BOILERM
BOXPAK
BPPLAS
BRIGHT
BSLCORP
BTM
CANONE
CAP
CBIP
CCM
CENBOND
CEPCO
CFM
CHINWEL
CHOOBEE
CICB
CME
CMSB
CNASIA
COASTAL
COMCORP
CSCSTEL
CYL
CYMAO
DAIBOCI
DELLOYD
DENKO
DNONCE
DOLMITE
DOLMITE-PA
DOMINAN
DRBHCOM
DUFU
EG
EKSONS
EMETALL
EPMB
EVERGRN
EWEIN
FACBIND
FAVCO
FIBON
FIMACOR
FLBHD
FURNWEB
GBH
GESHEN
GLOTEC
GOODWAY
GOPENG
GPA
GREENYB
GSB
GUH
GWPLAST
HALEX
HARTA
HARVEST
HCK
HEVEA
HEXZA
HIAPTEK
HIBISCS
HIGHTEC
HIL
HOKHENG
HUAAN
HUMEIND
HWGB
IDEALUBB
IMASPRO
IRCB
IRETEX
IRMGRP
JADI
JASKITA
JAVA
JMR
JOHOTIN
JTIASA
KARYON
KEINHIN
KIALIM
KIANJOO
KIMHIN
KINSTEL
KKB
KNM
KOBAY
KOMARK
KOSSAN
KPOWER
KSENG
KSSC
KYM
LAFMSIA
LBALUM
LCTH
LEONFB
LEWEKO
LIONCOR
LIONDIV
LIONIND
LSTEEL
LUSTER
LYSAGHT
MASTEEL
MASTER
MAYPAK
MBL
MELEWAR
MENTIGA
MERCURY
METALR
METROD
MIECO
MINETEC
MINHO
MLGLOBAL
MSC
MUDA
MULTICO
MYCRON
NAKA
NWP
NYLEX
OCTAGON
OKA
ORNA
PA
PCHEM
PENSONI
PERSTIM
PERWAJA
PETGAS
PETRONM
PIE
PMBTECH
PMETAL
PNEPCB
POLY
PPHB
PREMIER
PRESTAR
PWORTH
QUALITY
CLOSING
(RM)
2.140
0.150
0.485
0.380
2.150
0.255
0.770
0.470
1.130
1.150
4.990
0.530
0.740
0.155
4.650
0.535
0.085
2.230
0.565
0.120
1.510
2.250
0.920
0.540
0.225
0.150
2.400
0.220
2.160
0.960
1.370
1.690
1.360
1.520
1.610
0.960
0.065
4.200
0.550
2.920
0.210
1.020
0.565
0.335
4.590
5.090
0.220
0.400
0.350
0.350
1.180
1.800
0.325
0.610
1.420
0.260
0.780
0.905
0.460
1.070
3.000
0.475
2.360
1.180
0.710
1.580
0.520
0.065
0.420
1.070
0.100
0.330
0.095
1.060
0.630
0.730
7.550
0.190
2.900
2.120
0.735
0.595
0.850
0.885
0.795
0.380
0.115
3.770
0.140
0.805
1.190
0.715
0.330
0.040
0.130
0.170
0.310
1.120
1.510
1.870
0.240
0.415
0.480
2.920
1.240
0.145
1.230
0.590
0.990
0.440
5.150
0.365
5.280
0.575
0.600
10.100
0.555
0.285
0.550
0.160
0.075
0.150
0.490
0.250
0.085
3.250
0.855
0.820
0.400
0.770
0.315
0.700
1.280
0.450
1.790
0.525
0.095
0.750
0.435
2.940
1.560
1.230
0.320
0.125
0.150
0.605
0.070
0.960
1.290
0.080
5.320
0.415
3.910
0.050
22.220
2.750
7.170
0.935
2.690
1.060
0.420
0.705
0.360
0.500
0.200
1.150
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
0.040
5.4
-0.005 2132.9
0.025
9.5
0.040
118.8
-0.010
4.8
—
—
—
—
0.025
18.3
UNCH
30
UNCH
11
UNCH
202
-0.010
60.1
-0.005
5.1
-0.005
460
UNCH
0.2
—
—
—
—
—
—
UNCH
16.2
UNCH
112
UNCH
28.3
—
—
0.010
645.5
-0.010
165.2
UNCH
15
0.005
595.3
0.040
325.4
-0.010 2016.3
0.060
838.6
UNCH
11.3
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.020
42.5
UNCH
23.1
0.010
40
0.005
500.1
-0.080 3563.3
—
—
UNCH
967.5
0.005
574.2
0.010
112
-0.005
14
—
—
0.120
9.2
UNCH
37
0.015
1.1
UNCH
113
-0.005
33.5
—
—
-0.010
88.9
-0.030
368.1
0.010 4393.2
-0.005
226.2
0.020
183.2
—
—
UNCH
1
0.015 3476.6
0.010
52
-0.030
16.5
UNCH
24
0.005
30
0.110
124.8
-0.030
323
—
—
UNCH
17.9
—
—
-0.005 3786.9
—
—
0.180
428.8
0.005 4081.6
-0.005
528.1
UNCH
176.5
-0.010
77
—
—
0.040
0.5
0.150
379
-0.005
865.2
—
—
-0.020 1941.4
-0.005
67.6
UNCH
21
-0.010
589
—
—
0.010 1108.1
—
—
0.005
100.3
UNCH
349.8
UNCH
161.3
-0.005
197.5
—
—
0.010
231.9
0.015
20
—
—
UNCH
137.7
-0.005 1661.9
—
—
—
—
-0.030
5
-0.020
12.4
UNCH
5
—
—
-0.010
5
UNCH
30.8
—
—
-0.005 2032.5
-0.040
975.4
-0.015 32483.7
0.010
25
-0.030
783.9
-0.140 1356.3
-0.015
37
UNCH
9.5
-0.005
34.3
—
—
-0.060
500
-0.010
128
-0.005
287.3
UNCH
83.7
UNCH
15
-0.005
274.2
UNCH 1578.9
-0.005
321.9
0.005
10
UNCH 3039.3
0.030
12
-0.045
89
0.005
281.5
—
—
-0.010
39.4
UNCH
10
UNCH
45
UNCH
9
—
—
—
—
0.030 3722.8
UNCH 27294.1
UNCH
26
0.025
6
—
—
-0.030
23
0.020
3.7
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.015
131.8
—
—
0.030 2692.8
0.030
471.6
—
—
-0.230 3563.6
-0.020
43.2
-0.110
10
-0.010
955
-0.120 1620.3
0.010
53.2
0.170
52.4
-0.035
4
UNCH
763.9
—
—
0.015
15.4
-0.015
36.7
-0.005
132.5
UNCH
20.1
-0.005 17780.7
—
—
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
0.000 19.11
0.210
—
0.575 14.26
0.000 71.70
2.206
9.06
—
—
—
—
0.373 12.14
1.137 13.57
0.000 10.45
5.870
9.89
0.502
6.50
1.193 29.37
0.185
—
4.675 23.09
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.360 17.23
0.155
—
2.483 19.97
— 15.16
0.647 15.89
1.342 12.86
0.000
—
0.210
—
3.629
7.13
0.370
1.78
3.176 10.85
1.051
—
— 12.19
—
—
—
—
1.354 10.74
1.600 11.15
0.000 9600.00
0.060 65.00
5.900 17.79
—
—
3.192
7.39
0.000 32.81
1.299
—
0.000 15.44
—
—
4.042 21.07
3.180 13.92
0.300
—
0.000
7.81
0.364 28.23
—
—
0.951
6.43
2.568
6.83
0.195 22.57
0.336
5.19
1.267
4.01
—
6.62
0.000
7.98
0.474
—
1.002 37.10
1.273 27.02
3.009
7.52
0.601 15.52
6.469
8.76
1.001
7.94
— 66.98
1.260
—
— 32.10
0.055
—
—
—
0.740 56.61
0.085
—
0.239 19.08
0.090
—
1.002 13.57
— 196.88
0.000 33.64
7.383 26.78
0.219
—
—
8.47
0.911
6.30
0.672 12.99
0.719 12.29
2.033
—
—
5.59
0.000 15.59
— 21.59
0.142
7.06
1.233
—
0.211
—
1.000
—
— 10.74
0.414
—
1.655 10.75
—
—
0.000 68.42
0.150 20.48
—
—
— 45.34
1.762 12.17
2.390 31.48
0.359 23.30
— 14.98
0.000 10.79
3.204 11.89
—
8.92
0.155
—
2.679 20.33
0.430 19.93
0.000
5.63
0.605
—
3.703 23.49
0.286
—
7.467 15.90
0.000 11.32
—
—
9.834 27.06
0.530
7.03
0.221 13.90
0.474
6.08
0.175
—
0.095
—
0.205
—
0.761
—
0.290
—
0.091 85.00
0.000 12.02
1.078 12.63
0.558
7.62
—
—
1.019 18.87
0.231
0.84
0.000
2.32
1.230
9.65
—
—
— 21.06
0.335
—
0.165
—
0.000
4.61
0.000
—
— 15.03
0.911 16.92
1.685 10.39
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.530 13.72
—
—
0.912
8.50
0.747
9.91
—
—
6.740 17.97
0.558 18.28
3.869 11.04
0.127
—
23.904 26.40
3.040
—
6.873 14.57
0.670
9.92
2.358 19.85
—
—
0.000 11.54
1.000
7.61
0.368 80.00
0.492
6.76
0.236
—
—
—
5.61
—
—
—
1.40
—
6.49
2.13
1.77
5.65
3.91
4.25
3.93
—
7.53
—
—
—
—
—
0.99
3.33
6.52
—
—
—
2.08
11.45
2.55
2.60
3.65
6.51
—
3.18
3.73
1.82
—
1.31
—
2.33
—
4.90
7.96
—
2.94
1.57
—
—
—
—
3.39
3.33
—
—
—
—
5.13
—
1.09
2.62
3.33
2.32
4.24
6.78
2.11
—
—
—
2.60
2.80
—
3.33
—
4.72
—
3.42
1.85
—
—
0.94
5.44
1.01
—
3.95
1.89
—
—
—
—
—
2.94
—
—
—
—
1.76
—
3.57
3.38
0.80
3.67
2.41
—
1.71
3.63
—
6.10
—
3.03
—
1.36
—
1.99
1.74
—
4.26
3.60
—
4.55
—
—
—
—
—
—
3.69
1.75
2.44
—
5.19
—
5.71
6.25
—
3.35
—
—
—
—
—
1.92
6.50
—
—
—
4.96
—
2.50
—
—
3.76
4.82
8.95
—
1.80
5.09
1.39
3.21
3.07
—
—
—
—
4.00
—
—
MKT CAP
(MIL)
43.9
27.3
87.3
45.8
148.8
14.8
103.4
102.9
590.7
129.8
1,006.0
63.6
202.8
45.1
1,179.5
32.7
3.7
554.1
27.2
33.2
779.2
135.1
169.4
77.1
22.1
18.3
365.8
132.0
1,162.6
439.3
164.4
75.7
55.8
414.3
176.9
43.9
28.7
4,365.9
25.0
1,552.3
29.4
387.6
56.5
25.1
522.6
509.0
23.0
18.0
92.2
4.3
162.3
3,479.8
57.0
45.8
233.2
44.5
129.4
464.3
97.0
91.1
652.6
46.6
578.8
121.8
103.0
293.7
41.6
349.8
46.4
191.9
78.4
110.1
41.8
294.6
148.4
77.4
6,006.9
53.4
160.8
210.8
147.3
427.4
757.9
35.9
221.6
30.4
129.1
1,806.2
82.7
56.5
95.2
309.6
43.5
5.2
91.8
76.4
53.8
142.0
140.9
1,820.9
114.2
41.1
29.7
1,297.0
193.0
152.2
317.1
967.0
67.4
53.6
3,293.3
20.6
1,908.6
55.2
89.9
8,581.9
137.9
102.6
170.5
38.7
98.7
208.8
351.8
32.0
133.8
135.1
202.4
40.7
16.8
70.8
71.4
49.0
51.4
21.5
214.8
110.3
63.2
82.4
39.0
294.0
475.9
54.6
57.3
6.9
48.0
117.6
11.9
146.7
97.1
75.7
42,560.0
53.8
388.3
28.0
43,967.4
742.5
550.7
74.8
2,962.0
69.7
67.2
77.5
121.3
91.0
85.4
66.7
34 Markets
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
T HU
BURSA MAL AYSIA MAIN MARKET
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
0.800 0.520
—
—
6.190 3.690 6.050
5.960
0.390 0.240
—
—
0.675 0.560 0.640
0.630
5.918 2.672 3.950
3.950
3.787 2.300 2.820
2.820
0.240 0.150
—
—
1.674 1.172 1.340
1.340
1.550 1.270 1.480
1.480
2.415 0.788 2.380
2.320
1.230 0.415 0.850
0.835
7.490 4.783 6.740
6.680
1.050 0.295 0.800
0.770
0.520 0.300 0.440
0.360
1.385 0.630 0.800
0.785
0.730 0.330 0.400
0.400
0.835 0.460
—
—
6.980 4.600 5.200
5.190
0.716 0.420 0.480
0.470
0.745 0.430 0.475
0.470
0.835 0.296 0.775
0.740
0.755 0.405 0.690
0.685
0.990 0.600 0.690
0.690
1.005 0.540 0.615
0.605
1.693 1.050
—
—
1.290 0.280 0.915
0.900
2.670 1.780 1.960
1.950
2.030 1.168 1.900
1.800
1.682 1.044 1.340
1.340
0.750 0.413 0.730
0.725
3.004 1.561 2.240
2.180
4.381 3.200 3.800
3.770
0.650 0.300 0.360
0.350
1.650 0.630 0.770
0.755
16.760 11.955 15.300 15.300
16.400 12.439
—
—
0.340 0.150
—
—
0.710 0.280
—
—
1.700 0.720
—
—
6.000 2.861 5.830
5.820
0.520 0.260 0.320
0.310
2.440 1.228 2.330
2.280
1.960 1.850 1.920
1.920
0.980 0.650
—
—
1.408 1.181 1.270
1.270
2.378 1.570 2.110
2.080
5.696 4.128 4.970
4.940
0.837 0.591
—
—
0.290 0.145
—
—
1.590 1.112 1.520
1.470
1.960 0.903 1.950
1.920
0.825 0.627
—
—
0.945 0.400 0.810
0.755
3.950 1.281 3.950
3.830
2.067 1.180 1.350
1.320
0.530 0.260 0.335
0.335
2.054 1.200 1.630
1.630
1.880 1.242 1.850
1.800
0.905 0.470 0.645
0.610
0.720 0.410
—
—
2.338 1.724
—
—
1.459 0.950 1.150
1.120
2.640 0.501 1.560
1.550
1.390 0.910 1.070
1.050
0.415 0.220
—
—
1.310 0.700 0.780
0.750
1.640 1.110 1.570
1.550
CONSTRUCTION
0.750 0.260
—
—
0.835 0.575 0.715
0.715
1.602 0.710 0.730
0.710
1.220 0.530 0.820
0.790
0.650 0.500 0.615
0.605
1.383 0.584 1.060
1.040
1.670 1.130 1.200
1.190
1.910 1.474
—
—
1.207 0.598 0.985
0.950
1.440 0.985 1.150
1.150
0.613 0.355 0.445
0.430
1.420 0.712 1.100
1.100
1.990 0.927 1.580
1.500
5.300 4.002 5.100
5.040
1.900 0.993 1.260
1.230
1.720 1.120 1.410
1.370
1.598 1.036
—
—
1.644 1.180
—
—
2.017 1.620 1.730
1.700
6.987 5.447 6.840
6.600
0.650 0.540 0.630
0.620
0.850 0.375 0.525
0.510
0.920 0.400 0.430
0.425
1.264 0.945 1.070
1.060
1.430 1.150 1.320
1.290
1.500 1.190
—
—
1.560 0.916 1.110
1.110
0.700 0.305 0.345
0.345
1.190 0.456 1.190
1.090
0.525 0.265 0.340
0.320
1.690 1.400 1.690
1.590
3.464 1.510 1.960
1.920
0.870 0.359 0.845
0.820
1.790 1.119 1.780
1.700
2.000 1.247 1.600
1.510
0.266 0.125 0.160
0.155
4.767 2.503 4.410
4.360
0.780 0.485 0.630
0.610
0.485 0.265 0.370
0.370
0.614 0.340 0.415
0.410
1.640 1.080 1.150
1.100
0.950 0.820 0.850
0.820
2.325 1.380 1.610
1.550
1.100 0.620 0.965
0.900
0.460 0.185 0.330
0.310
TRADING SERVICES
0.990 0.610 0.690
0.670
4.330 2.640 3.050
3.030
0.270 0.120 0.190
0.165
2.940 2.145 2.790
2.750
7.480 6.300 7.220
7.170
1.680 0.515 0.650
0.630
0.115 0.045 0.060
0.055
12.034 10.000 10.800 10.800
2.040 1.602 1.750
1.750
0.290 0.100 0.130
0.125
1.300 0.980 1.240
1.210
0.275 0.130 0.155
0.155
3.589 2.757 2.950
2.910
0.390 0.260 0.310
0.300
7.290 6.180 7.200
7.120
0.380 0.250 0.275
0.265
1.900 0.720 0.925
0.895
3.327 1.234 2.650
2.610
0.475 0.270
—
—
7.346 6.543
—
—
3.695 1.428 3.390
3.330
0.430 0.380 0.410
0.400
3.267 1.323 3.000
2.960
0.869 0.720 0.800
0.800
0.615 0.355
—
—
3.759 3.302 3.460
3.400
0.970 0.580 0.905
0.890
2.710 1.160 1.360
1.350
5.417 4.380 4.680
4.600
1.220 0.810 0.925
0.910
2.228 1.060 1.200
1.190
0.862 0.530 0.760
0.740
0.710 0.447 0.505
0.505
0.815 0.424
—
—
0.130 0.070 0.080
0.080
0.965 0.599 0.865
0.860
0.075 0.045 0.055
0.050
2.996 1.720 1.910
1.870
0.455 0.150 0.160
0.155
3.826 2.300 2.730
2.710
2.591 1.490 1.740
1.700
0.745 0.445 0.600
0.595
1.935 1.190 1.680
1.630
8.941 5.100
—
—
2.406 1.020 1.200
1.180
0.500 0.300 0.390
0.385
0.590 0.445 0.515
0.510
0.495 0.250
—
—
0.365 0.230 0.240
0.240
0.425 0.130 0.360
0.330
1.050 0.869
—
—
1.538 0.866 1.160
1.130
0.765 0.345
—
—
* Volume Weighted Average Price
CODE
COUNTER
CLOSING
(RM)
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
—
0.070
—
-0.020
-0.070
0.020
—
UNCH
UNCH
-0.040
-0.005
-0.040
-0.045
0.015
-0.045
0.005
—
UNCH
-0.020
0.030
0.010
-0.015
-0.025
0.010
—
0.015
0.030
-0.050
UNCH
-0.005
UNCH
0.020
UNCH
0.005
UNCH
—
—
—
—
-0.140
-0.005
-0.020
UNCH
—
0.030
-0.020
-0.020
—
—
-0.020
0.020
—
0.055
0.050
-0.020
UNCH
-0.010
UNCH
-0.015
—
—
-0.020
0.040
UNCH
—
-0.030
-0.040
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
YEAR
HIGH
—
35.3
—
72.4
2
1
—
2
7.5
170.2
29.2
88.2
166
541.7
16.9
5
—
10.4
98
67
5807.8
25
4
25.7
—
587.6
10
383.9
5
18
2622.6
95
146
857.5
6.3
—
—
—
—
7.3
29
311
20
—
0.5
73.6
580.9
—
—
374.8
167.8
—
3.3
1676.6
225.2
5
192.5
39.1
314.8
—
—
769.8
22.1
29
—
265.1
108.8
—
—
3.770 35.65
—
8.85
0.766 16.15
2.844 17.45
2.586
9.16
—
—
1.447
7.22
1.541 174.12
0.870 15.24
0.491
—
5.621
9.94
0.299
—
0.430
—
0.893
6.31
0.403 22.10
—
9.48
6.998
—
0.580
8.74
0.000 12.02
0.320 20.84
0.420 16.27
0.636 13.69
1.089 10.49
— 368.97
0.635
—
1.980 10.35
1.224
6.87
1.149
7.61
0.472 10.37
2.636 15.38
4.033 10.49
0.350
—
1.134
5.88
0.000 17.75
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
2.939 12.42
0.345
—
1.801
8.69
2.500 12.98
— 13.84
1.426 17.84
1.795
8.89
5.730 17.16
— 12.45
—
—
1.400 12.02
1.014 13.85
— 12.46
1.000
—
1.368
9.26
1.682
9.22
0.000
—
1.686 12.58
3.453 20.29
0.505
—
— 20.83
—
9.06
1.259
9.25
0.904 22.05
0.000 11.75
—
—
0.797
—
0.000 19.00
—
—
—
3.17
1.27
3.62
—
8.21
1.01
5.11
—
3.13
—
—
3.82
2.50
3.81
—
1.23
—
2.22
2.92
3.62
5.95
3.74
—
2.55
2.20
3.73
5.52
2.27
5.29
—
2.65
6.54
6.46
—
—
—
0.86
—
3.03
4.89
—
4.72
4.09
3.23
1.49
—
7.33
2.85
3.31
—
3.21
3.38
—
1.84
4.61
—
—
4.72
2.21
—
6.49
4.00
—
3.97
29.8
524.6
41.2
144.4
540.9
237.7
32.2
97.5
469.2
188.0
62.5
1,543.4
67.8
128.3
142.7
200.0
42.0
1,557.0
88.1
18.8
688.5
169.4
30.9
48.0
448.8
42.3
409.6
218.4
56.0
58.0
1,496.3
1,401.4
160.3
135.9
1,891.4
5.5
21.3
25.4
34.1
235.1
48.2
243.0
185.3
71.2
139.0
265.1
3,072.6
71.7
42.3
568.4
254.8
60.4
89.6
798.6
1,030.6
28.3
217.3
597.0
57.3
22.0
508.8
548.7
391.5
169.6
87.1
74.7
135.9
1.451
3.477
2.500
0.997
1.836
0.200
0.370
3.200
2.250
4.647
8.880
1.976
0.100
0.955
2.617
0.070
0.550
4.837
1.963
4.050
0.065
2.190
5.340
1.090
2.980
1.565
0.430
0.595
0.847
0.365
2.362
0.495
1.896
3.958
1.550
0.670
0.570
0.645
0.250
1.350
0.990
3.076
0.260
7.300
2.203
3.330
1.920
0.775
0.855
1.430
2.770
4.106
7.990
2.430
0.125
0.355
0.550
2.940
0.780
2.520
0.145
1.000
1.080
1.063
2.254
0.220
0.970
0.539
1.113
3.170
1.621
0.420
3.160
1.975
1.710
0.335
4.353
17.800
0.250
4.910
0.295
0.400
4.960
2.372
3.690
0.185
0.505
0.978
0.806
0.670
1.840
0.500
1.170
0.980
1.470
2.000
9.660
1.000
2.890
1.740
2.726
3.060
0.620
2.954
0.315
0.670
2.230
3.596
15.200
1.400
0.665
1.050
7.570
0.670
1.390
0.500
3.135
1.448
3.050
4.610
1.780
0.095
0.920
4.183
0.599
3.612
0.530
3.670
0.145
3.510
1.350
1.730
FINANCE
17.677
2.950
5.131
13.033
12.932
6.750
1.660
4.110
8.290
6.050
1.100
1.590
14.689
14.432
18.324
1.720
1.598
2.049
1.345
0.295
2.166
0.860
18.540
0.710
3.820
10.100
2.680
4.724
2.740
2.526
1.370
20.664
0.374
0.380
7498
7765
7232
7803
5134
9822
9113
7811
5170
7247
9237
4731
7239
7366
7073
5145
5163
4324
5181
7115
7155
7248
7132
7099
5665
7143
6904
7207
8656
7235
7106
5012
4022
5149
4448
4448P
5178
7097
7439
9741
6378
7034
7374
7854
7285
5010
7113
7173
4359
7100
7133
7227
4995
6963
5142
7226
7111
7231
7050
7025
5009
4243
7245
5048
7020
7014
9849
RALCO
RAPID
RESINTC
RUBEREX
SAB
SAM
SANBUMI
SAPIND
SCABLE
SCGM
SCIB
SCIENTX
SCNWOLF
SCOMIEN
SEACERA
SEALINK
SEB
SHELL
SIGGAS
SKBSHUT
SKPRES
SLP
SMISCOR
SMPC
SSTEEL
STONE
SUBUR
SUCCESS
SUPER
SUPERLN
SUPERMX
TAANN
TADMAX
TAS
TASEK
TASEK-PA
TATGIAP
TAWIN
TECGUAN
TECNIC
TEKALA
TGUAN
TIENWAH
TIMWELL
TOMYPAK
TONGHER
TOPGLOV
TOYOINK
TURIYA
UCHITEC
ULICORP
UMSNGB
VERSATL
VS
WASEONG
WATTA
WEIDA
WELLCAL
WONG
WOODLAN
WTHORSE
WTK
WZSATU
YILAI
YKGI
YLI
YOKO
0.710
6.000
0.300
0.630
3.950
2.820
0.170
1.340
1.480
2.350
0.850
6.700
0.775
0.375
0.785
0.400
0.525
5.190
0.470
0.470
0.765
0.685
0.690
0.615
1.070
0.915
1.960
1.820
1.340
0.725
2.200
3.780
0.360
0.755
15.300
16.400
0.175
0.395
0.850
5.820
0.315
2.310
1.920
0.800
1.270
2.080
4.950
0.670
0.185
1.500
1.930
0.755
0.810
3.900
1.330
0.335
1.630
1.800
0.625
0.550
2.120
1.140
1.550
1.060
0.250
0.750
1.560
7007
7078
6173
5190
5932
8761
8591
7528
5253
8877
7047
7161
9261
5398
5226
5169
5169PA
5169PB
6238
3336
8834
4723
9083
3565
5171
9628
5129
5006
9571
5924
5085
5703
8311
7055
5070
7145
9598
5205
9717
5054
5622
5042
9679
7028
2283
ARK
AZRB
BDB
BENALEC
BPURI
BREM
CRESBLD
DKLS
ECONBHD
EKOVEST
FAJAR
FUTUTEC
GADANG
GAMUDA
GBGAQRS
HOHUP
HOHUP-PA
HOHUP-PB
HSL
IJM
IREKA
JAKS
JETSON
KEURO
KIMLUN
LEBTECH
MELATI
MERGE
MITRA
MTDACPI
MUDAJYA
MUHIBAH
PESONA
PLB
PRTASCO
PSIPTEK
PTARAS
SENDAI
SYCAL
TRC
TRIPLC
TSRCAP
WCT
ZECON
ZELAN
0.470
0.715
0.720
0.805
0.610
1.060
1.200
1.820
0.975
1.150
0.445
1.100
1.550
5.070
1.260
1.390
1.410
1.400
1.710
6.820
0.630
0.515
0.430
1.070
1.290
1.500
1.110
0.345
1.180
0.340
1.670
1.940
0.840
1.730
1.560
0.160
4.400
0.620
0.370
0.410
1.150
0.830
1.560
0.920
0.320
—
—
UNCH
86
-0.005
549.6
0.025 21608.6
-0.005
114
0.030
75
-0.020
12.5
—
—
-0.010
548
UNCH
112
0.010 1269.5
UNCH
25.4
0.040
1277
0.030 6724.4
UNCH
982.9
-0.030 1654.5
—
—
—
—
-0.030
57
0.020 5148.7
UNCH
9.5
-0.010 3372.5
-0.005
91
UNCH
95.6
-0.030
119.9
—
—
0.020
3.6
UNCH
23.7
0.080 6987.6
0.025
40
0.070
998.1
-0.010 2291.1
0.005
718.6
-0.060
43.8
0.040 2374.2
0.005
655.2
0.010
55.4
0.010
1755
-0.005
155.2
-0.005
61.4
-0.050
56.4
-0.020
52.5
-0.030
833.2
0.020
302.4
0.005 7776.4
— 223.81
0.931 21.80
0.000
4.26
0.888 27.29
0.799 20.13
1.255
4.66
1.480
8.96
—
6.62
0.000 14.73
2.720 15.25
0.603 33.21
0.000
7.11
1.010
6.89
4.762 15.82
1.178
9.59
1.184
4.35
—
—
—
—
1.930 11.93
5.810 12.62
1.052
—
0.522 27.39
0.000
—
1.180
0.11
1.845
7.83
— 20.63
0.996
6.88
0.340 12.73
0.478
9.10
0.523
—
2.783 17.29
2.322
9.39
0.460 84.85
1.160 11.10
1.391
—
0.299
4.85
6.189 12.74
1.195 38.99
0.298
5.32
0.554 91.11
1.250
3.34
0.000 16.84
2.270 10.97
0.770
—
0.300
3.59
—
2.31
6.22
0.37
2.46
2.83
3.13
1.65
1.03
1.74
—
2.73
2.58
2.37
1.52
—
1.77
1.07
1.75
2.20
—
—
—
—
2.33
—
2.48
—
1.69
—
5.39
2.32
1.19
5.78
7.05
—
3.41
1.61
—
1.22
—
1.20
2.87
—
—
20.2
345.7
218.8
653.3
113.1
366.2
198.1
168.7
521.6
983.8
146.8
99.8
335.4
11,905.4
492.6
476.0
13.6
31.0
996.4
10,188.4
107.6
225.8
80.8
1,072.9
387.7
204.7
133.2
23.1
469.1
78.8
922.5
841.0
428.6
157.9
523.0
50.7
710.5
479.9
118.5
197.0
74.7
96.5
1,704.4
109.6
270.4
5238
6599
7315
5099
5014
5115
0159
6351
7083
5194
5210
1481
6399
7579
6888
5021
7251
7241
6998
5032
5248
3395
5196
4219
6025
1562
7036
9474
2771
5257
5245
7117
7209
7016
5104
5136
5037
5184
0091
5141
5132
7212
7277
5908
5216
2097
5259
5036
7471
0064
5081
5208
7189
AAX
AEON
AHB
AIRASIA
AIRPORT
ALAM
AMEDIA
AMWAY
ANALABS
APFT
ARMADA
ASB
ASTRO
AWC
AXIATA
AYS
BARAKAH
BHS
BINTAI
BIPORT
BJAUTO
BJCORP
BJFOOD
BJLAND
BJMEDIA
BJTOTO
BORNOIL
BRAHIMS
BSTEAD
CARIMIN
CARING
CENTURY
CHEETAH
CHUAN
CNI
COMPLET
COMPUGT
CYPARK
DAYA
DAYANG
DELEUM
DESTINI
DIALOG
DKSH
DSONIC
EASTLND
EATECH
EDARAN
EDEN
EFFICEN
EIG
EITA
EKIB
0.670
3.040
0.185
2.770
7.180
0.640
0.060
10.800
1.750
0.125
1.240
0.155
2.940
0.310
7.140
0.270
0.910
2.650
0.310
7.000
3.360
0.400
3.000
0.800
0.385
3.450
0.905
1.350
4.600
0.910
1.190
0.745
0.505
0.570
0.080
0.860
0.055
1.890
0.155
2.730
1.710
0.595
1.670
6.580
1.190
0.390
0.515
0.350
0.240
0.350
1.050
1.130
0.660
-0.020 4615.5
UNCH
669.2
0.015 6438.1
UNCH 4221.5
UNCH
598.7
0.005 8311.9
UNCH
921
0.020
2.1
-0.050
11
UNCH
146.2
0.020 7187.8
UNCH
321
0.020 5917.3
UNCH
445
-0.060 5820.7
-0.010
69.2
0.010 5088.3
0.020
19.4
—
—
—
—
-0.040
450.7
-0.005 5105.1
0.010
45.5
UNCH
3
—
—
0.010 1230.4
0.005 2790.5
UNCH
178.9
-0.080
55.1
-0.005 1754.5
UNCH
76.8
-0.015 1389.3
-0.025
3
—
—
UNCH
50
-0.020
38.4
UNCH
394.4
-0.020
354.6
-0.005
9570
0.010
366.3
-0.030
118.4
-0.005
1377
0.020 12147.2
—
—
UNCH
878.1
-0.015
9.5
-0.005 1078.4
—
—
-0.005
144.3
0.010 53166.5
—
—
-0.010
75
—
—
1.040
—
15.101 20.05
0.000 12.01
2.412 11.40
8.659 72.31
1.512
9.60
0.089
—
12.480 16.83
1.730 13.06
0.311
—
3.968 20.98
0.140
—
2.917 30.82
0.277
7.67
6.719 26.21
0.310 10.51
1.392 10.42
1.312 17.60
—
—
— 20.14
1.535 14.18
0.525
—
1.679
4.94
0.820 109.59
— 25.67
3.924 13.99
0.489 106.47
1.493 16.54
5.333 13.58
0.000
0.07
1.759 24.14
2.050 10.33
0.516 10.81
—
3.96
0.105
—
0.690 10.01
0.050
—
2.457
8.55
0.381
—
5.370 13.81
4.279
8.41
0.371 27.80
2.979 38.13
—
6.35
9.405 22.20
0.480
—
0.000
3.53
—
—
0.336
—
0.146 42.68
— 12.03
0.958 11.55
—
—
—
1.81
—
1.44
1.08
—
—
3.70
2.36
—
1.43
1.61
3.32
—
3.08
3.70
—
1.13
—
3.64
2.60
2.50
1.67
1.25
—
5.36
—
0.19
6.20
—
2.52
6.71
2.48
1.98
3.75
3.49
—
2.65
—
2.56
3.88
—
0.99
1.44
1.68
—
—
—
—
0.57
2.86
3.54
—
1,588.1
4,268.2
29.6
7,708.8
9,883.6
591.7
71.8
1,775.4
105.0
39.4
7,274.2
102.6
15,293.1
70.9
61,283.5
102.7
695.0
212.0
32.2
3,220.0
2,730.4
1,731.4
1,114.4
4,000.3
90.5
4,661.1
317.9
319.0
4,757.2
212.8
259.1
272.8
64.4
95.3
57.6
104.0
117.4
372.0
256.0
2,394.5
684.0
475.7
8,283.0
1,037.4
1,606.5
95.8
259.6
21.0
74.7
248.2
194.8
146.9
60.6
# PE is calculated based on latest 12 months reported Earnings Per Share
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
1.000 1.140
1.100
1.976 2.640
2.540
1.568 2.070
2.040
0.491 0.710
0.695
1.460
—
—
0.075 0.160
0.155
0.170
—
—
2.900 3.120
3.090
1.060 2.220
2.190
3.780 4.100
3.910
8.300 8.880
8.760
0.763 1.210
1.180
0.005
—
—
0.680 0.775
0.770
2.140 2.400
2.350
0.060
—
—
0.300 0.320
0.320
2.402 4.320
4.120
0.810 1.560
1.530
2.827
—
—
0.035 0.040
0.035
0.615 0.705
0.685
3.434 5.280
5.200
0.630 0.690
0.690
1.900 2.810
2.750
0.636 0.900
0.865
0.140 0.285
0.275
0.250 0.470
0.395
0.420 0.550
0.550
0.215 0.345
0.340
1.740 1.970
1.950
0.305 0.405
0.400
1.480
—
—
2.921 3.900
3.870
1.060 1.520
1.500
0.355 0.430
0.430
0.135 0.355
0.325
0.365 0.445
0.440
0.110 0.180
0.165
0.705 0.850
0.790
0.597 0.910
0.910
2.560 2.850
2.820
0.140 0.180
0.170
6.140 7.150
7.050
1.050 1.330
1.310
2.600 3.230
3.200
1.610 1.920
1.840
0.675 0.690
0.680
0.285 0.680
0.660
0.700
—
—
1.891 2.400
2.310
1.270 1.590
1.470
5.110 7.820
7.750
2.160 2.400
2.370
0.075 0.085
0.080
0.190 0.285
0.270
0.335 0.365
0.360
1.175 2.680
2.570
0.500
—
—
2.110 2.500
2.500
0.080 0.115
0.110
0.773
—
—
0.577
—
—
0.492 0.855
0.810
1.450 1.650
1.630
0.115 0.140
0.140
0.680 0.870
0.860
0.420 0.470
0.450
0.696 0.735
0.725
2.170 2.490
2.460
0.942 1.300
1.260
0.110 0.160
0.150
1.400 1.470
1.400
0.985 1.160
1.150
0.380 0.495
0.480
0.210 0.250
0.250
1.552 3.970
3.900
14.560 17.760 17.540
0.030
—
—
3.930 4.900
4.870
0.147 0.220
0.210
0.230
—
—
4.100 4.590
4.490
1.310 1.950
1.900
2.050 2.970
2.920
0.100 0.150
0.145
0.360 0.380
0.370
0.555 0.685
0.655
0.569 0.660
0.660
0.200 0.500
0.490
0.497 1.770
1.720
0.205 0.245
0.235
0.555 0.585
0.575
0.640
—
—
1.295 1.380
1.370
1.200 1.380
1.360
8.362 9.600
9.450
0.783
—
—
2.003 2.810
2.780
0.633 1.670
1.630
1.994 2.550
2.520
1.779
—
—
0.165 0.225
0.215
2.010 2.360
2.360
0.110 0.160
0.155
0.375
—
—
0.932 2.170
2.140
2.020 3.190
3.180
9.646 15.100 14.800
0.705 1.310
1.290
0.290 0.420
0.395
0.275 0.360
0.345
4.928 7.010
6.950
0.370 0.660
0.645
0.910 1.330
1.310
0.270 0.400
0.400
2.218
—
—
0.733 0.980
0.980
2.300
—
—
1.902 2.730
2.680
1.400
—
—
0.035 0.045
0.045
0.510
—
—
1.280 2.060
2.000
0.400 0.475
0.475
2.470
—
—
0.415
—
—
2.362 3.540
3.500
0.055 0.075
0.075
1.845 2.980
2.890
0.620
—
—
1.395 1.730
1.700
10.300
2.680
3.995
10.017
9.917
5.970
1.102
3.587
6.995
5.050
0.895
1.285
13.299
8.916
14.573
1.120
1.036
1.617
0.742
0.145
1.600
0.540
15.905
0.557
3.100
8.250
2.040
3.345
1.650
1.505
1.193
17.400
0.249
0.273
12.540
2.900
4.790
11.800
—
6.630
—
4.110
8.230
5.590
0.990
1.440
14.380
12.480
17.580
1.410
—
1.940
0.835
0.190
1.640
0.660
18.540
0.680
—
8.900
2.090
3.850
2.120
1.960
1.370
18.240
0.325
0.375
12.500
2.860
4.760
11.800
—
6.500
—
3.960
8.160
5.480
0.970
1.440
14.040
12.000
16.940
1.370
—
1.930
0.810
0.185
1.620
0.650
18.340
0.665
—
8.600
2.050
3.780
2.080
1.930
1.360
18.100
0.315
0.375
CODE
5056
1368
6939
9318
7210
0128
9377
5209
0078
4715
3182
3204
7242
7676
7668
7110
7253
3034
2062
5008
7013
5255
5225
5614
9555
5673
8923
0058
8672
5079
6491
0151
5035
5878
5843
9121
4847
6874
7170
8486
5143
3859
3514
6012
5077
5983
4502
5090
5166
7234
3069
5186
3816
2194
0043
3891
3905
0138
9806
5509
4464
8508
5533
0172
5201
3018
5260
8419
5125
5657
5041
6254
5133
7108
0047
7080
5219
5681
7027
7081
7201
7163
4634
5204
8346
0037
8885
8567
5147
7185
0099
7158
7045
7053
9792
5250
4197
9431
5218
5242
6084
9865
1201
6521
0016
5173
8524
5140
5347
8702
7228
7206
4863
0101
8397
7218
5711
5167
7137
5243
7091
0140
5754
7250
7240
5016
7692
5246
7122
7293
7066
4677
5139
5185
2488
1163
1163PA
1015
5088
5258
1818
1023
2143
5228
5819
5274
1082
5169
5169PA
6688
3379
3441
5096
6483
8621
1198
1058
1155
1171
6459
5237
5053
6009
1295
9296
9296PA
COUNTER
CLOSING
(RM)
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
ENGTEX
FABER
FIAMMA
FITTERS
FREIGHT
FRONTKN
FSBM
GASMSIA
GDEX
GENM
GENTING
GKENT
GLOBALC
GUNUNG
HAIO
HAISAN
HANDAL
HAPSENG
HARBOUR
HARISON
HUBLINE
ICON
IHH
ILB
INTEGRA
IPMUDA
JIANKUN
JOBST
KAMDAR
KBES
KFIMA
KGB
KNUSFOR
KPJ
KPS
KPSCB
KTB
KUB
LFECORP
LIONFIB
LUXCHEM
MAGNUM
MARCO
MAXIS
MAYBULK
MBMR
MEDIA
MEDIAC
MEGB
MESB
MFCB
MHB
MISC
MMCCORP
MTRONIC
MUIIND
MULPHA
MYEG
NATWIDE
NCB
NICORP
NOMAD
OCB
OCK
OLDTOWN
OLYMPIA
OWG
PANSAR
PANTECH
PARKSON
PBA
PDZ
PENERGY
PERDANA
PERISAI
PERMAJU
PESTECH
PETDAG
PETONE
PHARMA
PICORP
PJBUMI
POS
PRESBHD
PRKCORP
RGB
RPB
SALCON
SAMCHEM
SAMUDRA
SCICOM
SCOMI
SCOMIES
SEEHUP
SEG
SEM
SIME
SJC
SKPETRO
SOLID
STAR
SUIWAH
SUMATEC
SURIA
SYMPHNY
SYSCORP
TALIWRK
TASCO
TENAGA
TEXCHEM
TGOFFS
THHEAVY
TM
TMCLIFE
TNLOGIS
TOCEAN
TSTORE
TURBO
UMS
UMWOG
UNIMECH
UTOPIA
UTUSAN
UZMA
VOIR
WARISAN
WIDETEC
WPRTS
YFG
YINSON
YONGTAI
YTL
1.130
2.600
2.040
0.705
1.590
0.155
0.180
3.100
2.210
4.100
8.830
1.210
—
0.770
2.400
0.065
0.320
4.310
1.530
3.240
0.035
0.700
5.230
0.690
2.760
0.870
0.280
0.460
0.550
0.345
1.970
0.405
1.530
3.890
1.500
0.430
0.345
0.445
0.175
0.810
0.910
2.840
0.180
7.130
1.310
3.210
1.900
0.680
0.670
0.825
2.400
1.580
7.800
2.390
0.085
0.280
0.360
2.600
0.730
2.500
0.110
0.930
0.700
0.840
1.640
0.140
0.870
0.455
0.725
2.470
1.290
0.155
1.410
1.160
0.485
0.250
3.900
17.600
0.055
4.900
0.210
0.230
4.590
1.900
2.930
0.145
0.370
0.665
0.660
0.500
1.770
0.235
0.575
0.845
1.380
1.370
9.550
0.850
2.800
1.660
2.530
2.650
0.215
2.360
0.160
0.450
2.150
3.190
14.800
1.300
0.420
0.350
7.010
0.655
1.320
0.400
2.700
0.980
2.950
2.700
1.580
0.045
0.640
2.000
0.475
2.530
0.475
3.520
0.075
2.900
0.640
1.710
-0.020
0.040
0.010
-0.005
—
-0.005
—
-0.020
0.020
0.170
-0.010
0.010
—
0.005
0.010
—
-0.010
0.160
-0.040
—
UNCH
0.005
-0.050
-0.010
-0.010
0.005
-0.005
0.065
UNCH
UNCH
0.020
UNCH
—
0.010
UNCH
UNCH
0.005
-0.005
-0.005
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
-0.030
-0.020
-0.030
0.050
-0.005
UNCH
—
UNCH
0.090
-0.010
-0.020
UNCH
UNCH
-0.005
-0.040
—
UNCH
-0.005
—
—
0.005
UNCH
-0.005
UNCH
-0.015
-0.005
-0.010
0.030
UNCH
-0.040
0.010
-0.010
0.020
UNCH
-0.020
—
0.030
-0.010
—
0.130
-0.050
-0.090
UNCH
-0.010
-0.005
UNCH
0.005
0.020
-0.010
-0.010
—
0.010
0.010
0.020
—
UNCH
0.030
0.010
—
-0.005
-0.020
UNCH
—
-0.040
-0.010
-0.200
UNCH
0.020
-0.010
-0.010
UNCH
-0.030
-0.050
—
0.020
—
UNCH
—
UNCH
—
UNCH
0.015
—
—
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
—
UNCH
1074.2
162.8
16.5
768.2
—
3037
—
1352.3
418.5
5608.9
1477.8
160
—
84.9
34.3
—
55.5
1354.1
0.6
—
26656.6
6640.8
2706.3
32.7
1221.5
6.3
965.9
63468.2
0.5
831
107.9
170
—
322.6
136.1
59.1
9109.8
670
83.1
94.5
41
461.2
2755.6
8118.4
471.1
84.4
1235.5
385.9
3833.1
—
5.3
8959.1
1427.2
3579.8
160
21966.1
940
7381.3
—
10
2191
—
—
2788.9
961.8
106.8
88.8
97.8
762.1
614.5
25.2
9155.1
523
603.1
17015.4
0.1
294
312.2
—
221.1
245
—
556.7
1548.6
21
2136
60
3773.7
41.9
506
250.9
2831.1
565
—
62
164.1
6864
—
14675.3
783
335.8
—
36753.9
3
524
—
94.6
28
11227.8
81.4
2930
5847.9
5901.9
8294.3
377.4
2.9
—
8.1
—
1379.4
—
385
—
1785.5
0.1
—
—
3719
200
7720
—
8942.8
AEONCR
AFFIN
AFG
ALLIANZ
ALLIANZ-PA
AMBANK
APEX
BIMB
BURSA
CIMB
ECM
ELKDESA
HLBANK
HLCAP
HLFG
HOHUP
HOHUP-PA
HWANG
INSAS
JOHAN
KAF
KENANGA
LPI
MAA
MANULFE
MAYBANK
MBSB
MNRB
MPHBCAP
OSK
P&O
PBBANK
RCECAP
RCECAP-PA
12.520
2.860
4.780
11.800
11.600
6.570
1.450
4.100
8.200
5.560
0.990
1.440
14.200
12.480
17.160
1.390
1.410
1.940
0.810
0.185
1.640
0.650
18.500
0.665
3.210
8.690
2.090
3.780
2.110
1.940
1.370
18.140
0.315
0.375
-0.020
17.2
-0.030
224.3
-0.010 3698.5
0.240
0.6
—
—
-0.030 7425.3
—
—
0.100
416.4
0.010
835.1
0.020 12554.7
0.010
15.3
UNCH
14.7
-0.200
813
UNCH
25.6
-0.440
735.4
-0.030 1654.5
—
—
0.010
16
-0.025 3484.6
-0.005
243
UNCH
15
-0.005
310.6
0.100
118
-0.015
87
—
—
-0.230
18132
UNCH 16141.8
-0.080
50.9
0.010
144.5
0.010 1956.1
UNCH
12.4
0.020 6198.1
-0.010
179
UNCH
22.8
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
1.658
6.19
2.565 16.50
1.888
6.70
0.750
7.23
— 11.54
0.075 16.85
—
—
3.875 21.57
2.952 74.16
4.211 18.17
10.196 19.19
1.081
9.96
—
—
0.883
7.50
2.644 13.74
—
—
0.468
8.56
2.654 12.28
0.869
7.76
—
—
0.048 38.89
0.000
1.56
4.042 57.16
0.723
1.04
2.075 22.35
0.670
6.12
0.322
6.39
0.000
5.63
0.000 13.22
0.275
—
1.978
8.58
0.000 13.68
— 18.77
6.116 32.72
2.191 10.23
0.462
7.64
0.152 13.07
0.429 71.77
0.151 26.12
1.000
—
1.286 12.13
3.264 15.23
0.150 10.53
7.027 32.16
1.704 27.41
3.599 11.12
2.650 12.43
1.005
2.99
0.344
—
—
2.91
1.976
7.89
3.738 11.73
1.000 14.97
2.820 21.83
0.094 94.44
0.201
—
0.424
8.45
2.509 61.18
— 32.30
3.644 3571.43
0.115
—
— 344.44
— 19.07
0.816 20.00
2.573 15.06
0.124
—
0.000
7.72
0.494
8.92
0.994
8.37
3.506 22.03
0.984 15.27
0.080
—
2.187 16.15
1.974
9.03
1.458
—
0.346
—
2.757 24.84
30.797 26.82
—
—
4.619 16.27
0.175 12.43
—
—
5.937 18.11
2.589 29.10
1.000
7.96
0.115
9.86
0.386 194.74
0.674 11.75
0.000 12.62
0.350
1.28
0.654 22.61
0.368 44.34
0.721 17.86
— 85.35
1.536 32.78
0.000
1.79
9.647 17.17
— 11.15
4.291 10.23
0.725 24.30
2.459 13.92
—
9.11
0.304
2.11
2.666 11.07
0.118
—
— 562.50
0.982
3.08
2.066 10.16
1.000 11.79
0.865 650.00
0.629 30.22
0.900
—
1.000 26.33
0.384 71.20
1.000
7.35
0.300
—
—
8.85
0.785
7.83
—
9.98
3.400 24.64
— 10.42
0.077
—
—
—
4.650 11.42
0.000
—
—
7.57
—
—
2.533 23.83
0.130
—
5.861 15.97
—
—
1.611 13.18
1.04
3.85
3.92
3.55
3.14
—
—
3.99
0.51
1.68
0.11
5.12
—
1.30
5.83
—
—
5.80
1.63
4.63
—
—
0.38
—
1.81
3.45
—
16.30
7.27
—
4.06
1.23
3.27
1.26
2.67
—
—
—
—
—
4.40
7.04
13.33
5.61
2.29
2.18
7.37
5.47
—
—
3.13
3.16
0.83
1.26
—
—
—
0.48
—
2.60
—
5.38
2.14
—
3.66
—
—
4.95
4.97
—
2.91
—
0.71
1.72
—
—
1.54
3.15
—
4.53
6.00
—
3.29
2.73
—
0.34
—
4.51
3.79
9.00
3.53
—
—
—
7.97
—
3.77
2.35
1.20
1.57
4.74
2.26
—
2.97
—
—
2.33
2.40
1.96
—
—
—
3.68
0.46
1.89
—
1.39
5.10
—
0.37
3.80
—
—
1.89
—
3.56
—
2.19
—
0.43
—
7.02
335.6
2,115.1
294.1
338.6
271.6
156.8
21.5
3,980.4
1,979.6
24,346.0
33,051.1
363.5
—
109.1
485.3
5.2
51.2
9,617.1
278.5
221.9
113.9
824.0
42,773.9
122.8
830.2
63.0
42.5
325.7
108.9
43.5
543.7
87.9
152.5
4,018.0
748.5
63.6
139.0
247.6
14.9
187.6
236.6
4,083.2
189.8
53,522.6
1,310.0
1,254.2
2,107.5
1,147.3
274.6
34.7
583.2
2,528.0
34,817.6
7,277.7
59.4
821.1
848.1
3,125.5
43.9
1,175.6
84.9
207.5
72.0
443.7
743.9
143.3
161.0
127.4
436.4
2,701.9
427.3
134.7
453.7
856.8
578.7
49.0
651.6
17,484.8
2.8
1,268.5
138.2
11.5
2,464.9
919.6
293.0
171.1
317.7
448.6
89.8
71.6
629.2
368.6
1,346.5
43.5
966.3
1,689.7
59,316.6
34.5
16,778.0
249.0
1,868.6
161.7
748.8
668.7
105.6
540.0
938.5
319.0
83,525.4
161.3
157.3
388.9
26,072.8
785.7
555.3
16.4
185.0
105.8
120.0
5,837.4
203.1
44.5
70.9
528.0
57.0
170.0
21.3
12,003.2
45.7
2,995.1
25.7
18,363.6
4.11
5.24
1.88
0.42
0.52
4.40
3.45
5.66
3.90
3.66
—
5.21
2.89
1.20
2.21
—
1.77
1.29
1.23
—
4.57
—
3.89
9.02
3.12
6.33
4.48
4.37
—
3.87
5.77
2.87
4.76
5.33
1,802.9
5,556.8
7,399.9
1,976.4
1,088.8
19,803.2
309.7
6,323.1
4,374.9
46,836.1
266.5
180.0
26,694.7
3,081.3
18,065.5
476.0
13.6
495.0
561.6
115.2
196.8
475.6
4,094.5
202.4
649.6
80,983.1
5,666.3
805.4
1,508.7
1,880.0
337.0
70,422.0
420.1
116.0
15.436
4.253
4.969
10.400
—
7.396
—
1.000
8.033
7.536
1.068
1.512
1.000
1.000
15.806
1.184
—
4.315
0.963
0.160
1.851
0.620
16.538
0.663
—
9.750
2.620
3.648
1.767
1.608
1.467
1.000
0.265
0.000
62.29
8.41
11.96
7.00
—
10.63
8.95
14.28
24.37
11.39
9.60
10.88
11.88
26.42
10.79
4.35
—
1.09
4.31
—
31.84
11.09
18.67
12.81
17.16
11.94
5.63
5.05
5.77
8.90
13.34
15.30
11.01
—
0
9
1
13
2
PROP
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
2
2
0
2
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
2
0
2
1
1
1
2
3
0
2
0
1
0
0
1
2
0
1
1
0
1
2
0
1
3
0
1
0
0
4
0
0
1
2
0
0
4
2
2
1
0
2
3
2
0
1
1
1
1
3
0
1
6
3
1
3
1
0
11
0
2
0
0
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
MINI
1
PLAN
1
19
8
1
1
9
0
8
4
11
1
1
1
2
4
0
2
5
24
3
2
0
3
2
2
1
3
6
0
1
0
4
3
6
2
1
2
2
2
7
28
HOTE
1
1
0
7
TECH
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
5
0
3
* Volu
Markets 3 5
T HURSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
BURSA MAL AYSIA MAIN MARKET . ACE MARKET
AP
IL)
5.6
5.1
4.1
8.6
1.6
6.8
1.5
0.4
9.6
6.0
1.1
3.5
—
9.1
5.3
5.2
1.2
7.1
8.5
1.9
3.9
4.0
3.9
2.8
0.2
3.0
2.5
5.7
8.9
3.5
3.7
7.9
2.5
8.0
8.5
3.6
9.0
7.6
4.9
7.6
6.6
3.2
9.8
2.6
0.0
4.2
7.5
7.3
4.6
4.7
3.2
8.0
7.6
7.7
9.4
1.1
8.1
5.5
3.9
5.6
4.9
7.5
2.0
3.7
3.9
3.3
1.0
7.4
6.4
1.9
7.3
4.7
3.7
6.8
8.7
9.0
1.6
4.8
2.8
8.5
8.2
1.5
4.9
9.6
3.0
1.1
7.7
8.6
9.8
1.6
9.2
8.6
6.5
3.5
6.3
9.7
6.6
4.5
8.0
9.0
8.6
1.7
8.8
8.7
5.6
0.0
8.5
9.0
5.4
1.3
7.3
8.9
2.8
5.7
5.3
6.4
5.0
5.8
0.0
7.4
3.1
4.5
0.9
8.0
7.0
0.0
1.3
3.2
5.7
5.1
5.7
3.6
2.9
6.8
9.9
6.4
8.8
3.2
9.7
3.1
4.9
6.1
6.5
0.0
4.7
1.3
5.5
6.0
3.6
5.0
1.6
5.2
6.8
5.6
4.5
2.4
9.6
3.1
6.3
5.4
8.7
0.0
7.0
2.0
0.1
6.0
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
0.380 0.273
9.700 7.050
1.070 0.655
13.157 8.896
2.540 1.520
PROPERTIES
1.208 0.680
1.480 0.800
0.510 0.400
0.350 0.180
1.504 0.679
1.180 0.556
1.151 0.726
1.880 1.030
2.490 2.270
3.370 2.276
3.900 2.530
2.050 0.435
2.879 1.663
0.399 0.175
2.902 1.865
1.880 0.920
1.075 0.689
0.800 0.445
1.177 0.900
0.553 0.350
0.951 0.490
1.150 0.860
2.051 0.947
0.680 0.430
2.446 1.644
1.900 1.830
1.308 0.515
1.770 1.390
2.970 2.460
3.560 2.335
0.305 0.225
2.190 2.090
0.720 0.370
1.780 1.070
0.105 0.055
0.465 0.242
1.200 0.682
2.425 1.000
0.679 0.415
1.360 1.100
1.742 1.375
0.415 0.280
1.020 0.800
2.296 1.757
0.650 0.475
1.130 0.734
3.251 2.008
0.823 0.550
1.260 0.559
0.550 0.285
0.413 0.190
4.249 2.300
0.523 0.310
0.545 0.185
1.790 1.050
2.140 0.350
0.515 0.170
0.525 0.380
4.420 2.780
2.626 2.200
2.821 1.239
1.728 1.296
0.885 0.350
2.207 1.145
3.514 2.030
2.850 0.770
0.355 0.215
1.210 0.790
1.610 0.840
1.398 0.851
1.490 0.535
3.855 1.867
0.240 0.140
1.597 0.545
6.840 4.287
3.650 2.606
1.750 1.080
3.670 2.461
1.217 0.750
0.455 0.277
11.490 5.610
0.140 0.060
2.581 1.334
0.190 0.110
0.170 0.115
2.828 1.394
1.640 0.950
2.376 1.230
2.279 1.686
2.363 1.630
1.080 0.730
2.158 1.589
1.070 0.725
MINING
1.650 1.120
PLANTATION
1.268 1.010
19.938 16.940
8.120 7.460
1.675 1.362
1.118 0.795
9.771 8.823
0.830 0.440
8.400 7.028
4.519 2.020
11.733 9.000
1.337 0.900
1.070 0.715
1.317 0.954
2.815 2.430
4.030 3.052
0.960 0.650
2.100 1.350
5.235 3.928
24.973 19.600
3.986 2.631
2.950 2.280
0.650 0.400
3.531 2.900
2.300 1.900
2.050 1.610
1.278 0.885
3.168 2.026
6.099 4.600
0.520 0.275
1.660 1.020
0.885 0.510
4.520 3.520
3.742 2.920
6.969 5.110
2.833 2.160
1.118 0.650
2.139 1.400
2.282 1.280
2.636 1.793
7.327 5.926
28.335 22.467
HOTELS
1.100 0.760
1.740 0.890
0.530 0.060
7.966 5.925
TECHNOLOGY
1.000 0.523
0.670 0.290
0.460 0.130
0.415 0.210
0.305 0.170
0.345 0.200
0.410 0.225
1.693 1.020
0.860 0.444
1.766 0.585
0.155 0.045
0.920 0.442
0.600 0.265
0.375 0.247
5.070 2.875
0.900 0.555
3.071 1.344
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
0.375
0.375
7.830
7.760
0.755
0.745
11.800 11.700
1.910
1.830
CODE
COUNTER
9296PA
1066
4898
6139
5230
RCECAP-PA
RHBCAP
TA
TAKAFUL
TUNEINS
AMPROP
A&M
AMPROP-PA
ASIAPAC
BCB
BERTAM
BJASSET
CHHB
CRESNDO
CVIEW
DAIMAN
DBHD
E&O
ECOFIRS
ECOWLD
ENCORP
EUPE
FARLIM
GLOMAC
GMUTUAL
GOB
GPLUS
GUOCO
HOOVER
HUAYANG
HUNZPTY
IBHD
IBRACO
IGB
IJMLAND
INSAS-PR
IOIPG
IVORY
IWCITY
KBUNAI
KELADI
KEN
KSL
L&G
LBICAP
LBS
LIENHOE
MAGNA
MAHSING
MAHSING-OR
MALTON
MATRIX
MEDAINC
MENANG
MJPERAK
MJPERAK-PA
MKH
MKLAND
MPCORP
MRCB
MUH
MUIPROP
MULPHAL
NAIM
OIB
OSKPROP
PARAMON
PASDEC
PJDEV
PLENITU
PRDUREN
PTGTIN
SAPRES
SBCCORP
SDRED
SEAL
SHL
SMI
SNTORIA
SPB
SPSETIA
SUNSURIA
SUNWAY
SYMLIFE
TAGB
TAHPS
TALAMT
TAMBUN
TANCO
TIGER
TITIJYA
TROP
UEMS
UOADEV
WINGTM
Y&G
YNHPROP
YTLLAND
0.815
0.860
0.450
0.240
0.995
0.730
0.840
1.230
2.400
2.830
2.600
1.000
2.170
0.310
2.300
—
0.900
0.530
1.000
0.400
0.550
—
1.330
—
2.170
1.890
0.630
1.770
2.640
3.560
0.305
2.190
0.440
1.420
0.065
0.300
—
2.170
0.535
—
1.570
0.330
0.935
2.040
0.600
0.865
2.790
0.575
0.745
0.320
—
2.940
0.435
0.260
1.340
1.650
0.405
0.405
3.010
—
1.850
1.480
0.470
1.510
2.400
1.980
0.250
0.940
1.030
1.070
0.755
3.020
0.160
1.210
5.800
3.600
1.400
3.370
0.855
0.340
—
0.080
1.950
0.155
0.135
1.960
1.120
1.300
2.110
1.740
0.850
1.990
0.840
0.805
0.860
0.420
0.230
0.980
0.720
0.835
1.180
2.400
2.700
2.580
0.970
2.050
0.300
2.260
—
0.775
0.520
0.995
0.395
0.535
—
1.310
—
2.160
1.870
0.615
1.640
2.630
3.520
0.225
2.130
0.435
1.360
0.065
0.290
—
2.050
0.525
—
1.550
0.325
0.915
1.970
0.475
0.850
2.750
0.570
0.715
0.320
—
2.850
0.430
0.250
1.280
1.440
0.395
0.405
2.950
—
1.850
1.460
0.445
1.480
2.340
1.920
0.240
0.930
1.000
1.030
0.740
3.000
0.155
1.200
5.610
3.550
1.380
3.280
0.845
0.335
—
0.075
1.900
0.145
0.130
1.900
1.060
1.260
2.100
1.710
0.850
1.930
0.835
1007
5959
1007PA
4057
6602
9814
3239
5738
6718
5049
5355
3484
3417
3557
8206
6076
6815
6041
5020
9962
1147
2968
1503
7010
5062
5018
4251
5084
1597
5215
3379PR
5249
5175
1589
3115
6769
7323
5038
3174
8494
5789
3573
7617
8583
8583OR
6181
5236
5040
1694
8141
8141PA
6114
8893
6548
1651
9539
3913
7889
5073
5827
6661
1724
6912
1945
5075
8613
2208
4596
5207
2224
4286
6017
4375
5213
1783
8664
3743
5211
1538
5158
2305
2259
5191
2429
7079
5239
5401
5148
5200
2976
7003
3158
2577
1.390
1.370
2186
KUCHAI
1.020
18.180
—
1.450
0.830
9.280
0.540
—
2.510
10.500
—
1.070
1.080
2.580
—
0.730
1.390
4.800
23.100
3.320
2.760
0.490
3.120
—
1.820
1.000
—
—
0.320
—
0.565
—
3.290
—
—
0.800
1.610
1.300
2.300
6.390
24.500
1.020
18.040
—
1.440
0.820
9.240
0.520
—
2.360
10.420
—
0.900
1.080
2.570
—
0.725
1.390
4.730
22.820
3.320
2.720
0.470
3.030
—
1.800
0.960
—
—
0.320
—
0.550
—
3.290
—
—
0.765
1.600
1.280
2.240
6.390
24.380
7054
1899
5069
5254
8982
1929
3948
5029
5222
2291
7382
2135
7501
5138
2216
2607
6262
1961
2445
2453
5027
1996
2003
6572
4936
5026
5047
2038
1902
9695
5113
2542
2569
5126
5135
2054
5112
5251
9059
2593
2089
AASIA
BKAWAN
BLDPLNT
BPLANT
CEPAT
CHINTEK
DUTALND
FAREAST
FGV
GENP
GLBHD
GOPENG
HARNLEN
HSPLANT
IJMPLNT
INCKEN
INNO
IOICORP
KLK
KLUANG
KMLOONG
KRETAM
KULIM
KWANTAS
MALPAC
MHC
NPC
NSOP
PINEPAC
PLS
RSAWIT
RVIEW
SBAGAN
SOP
SWKPLNT
TDM
THPLANT
TMAKMUR
TSH
UMCCA
UTDPLT
—
1.070
0.390
6.920
—
1.040
0.370
6.900
5592
1643
1287
5517
GCE
LANDMRK
PMHLDG
SHANG
—
0.520
0.180
—
0.190
0.230
0.350
1.370
0.640
1.710
0.070
0.835
0.325
—
4.830
—
2.870
—
0.490
0.175
—
0.190
0.220
0.320
1.360
0.630
1.580
0.070
0.790
0.315
—
4.760
—
2.790
7031
5195
0051
7204
8338
0029
4456
5162
0065
0090
0118
0021
0082
0056
7022
5028
0166
AMTEL
CENSOF
CUSCAPI
D&O
DATAPRP
DIGISTA
DNEX
ECS
EFORCE
ELSOFT
ETITECH
GHLSYS
GPACKET
GRANFLO
GTRONIC
HTPADU
INARI
* Volume Weighted Average Price
CLOSING
C
(RM)
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
0.375
7.810
0.750
11.800
1.850
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
-0.020
UNCH
22.8
1244.2
716.8
16.5
2964.7
0.000
7.601
0.782
1.000
1.895
—
9.68
8.06
12.62
19.66
5.33
1.32
3.73
9.32
2.09
116.0
20,090.9
1,283.9
1,923.5
1,390.8
0.829
2.56
0.932
8.69
0.000
—
0.147
7.19
0.000
5.60
0.596 57.60
0.875 26.18
1.020
9.22
3.069
4.76
2.594
3.38
3.289 15.85
0.380
—
1.920 23.89
0.198 20.67
2.716 172.52
—
5.43
0.725
8.06
0.510
1.90
1.083
9.15
0.462
9.71
0.758
3.35
—
7.89
1.070
6.58
— 15.82
2.133
4.83
2.302
9.22
2.532
3.54
2.016
8.88
2.710 17.50
2.599 10.78
0.000
—
0.000
5.21
0.609
8.22
1.257 40.18
0.076
—
0.262 11.52
—
6.09
2.051
4.78
0.373
2.94
—
9.46
1.661 11.26
0.325
—
1.305
—
2.198
9.53
0.000
—
0.882
5.70
3.220 34.94
0.794 34.34
0.655
8.24
0.515 228.57
—
—
2.646 11.67
0.366
7.64
0.377
—
1.373 14.57
0.000
5.42
0.172
—
1.210
5.74
3.622
2.15
— 17.77
1.350
4.97
1.536
7.77
0.444
—
1.269
2.99
2.699
7.57
1.060 25.52
0.300
—
0.927
5.20
1.217
7.35
0.882
6.87
0.519
3.01
2.150 10.29
0.174
—
0.618 18.13
4.633
9.97
2.873 21.88
0.830 75.68
2.648
4.19
1.086
3.92
0.299
9.01
— 11.37
0.066 14.29
1.411
7.64
0.160
—
0.219
—
1.555
8.34
1.341
3.95
2.305 19.94
1.990
9.09
2.342
6.24
0.000 10.93
1.727 16.78
0.952 30.04
—
1.74
—
—
3.05
1.39
2.40
—
6.67
11.11
3.10
—
1.27
—
—
2.40
1.94
—
4.92
5.00
—
—
1.52
—
5.53
—
4.91
8.47
2.85
1.69
—
—
—
—
—
1.69
2.39
2.33
3.77
3.68
1.92
—
1.08
3.68
—
3.51
5.15
5.26
—
—
2.44
2.81
9.30
—
0.77
—
—
0.99
1.00
2.19
5.41
5.24
8.60
3.38
2.56
—
—
—
3.14
2.80
—
6.29
—
1.67
1.73
3.09
—
3.03
4.73
2.24
5.15
—
3.94
—
—
2.06
5.90
3.15
6.16
2.92
—
1.00
—
480.4
314.0
124.7
227.9
203.2
148.9
929.4
339.1
548.4
279.0
547.5
303.2
2,692.0
226.3
1,145.0
348.3
99.2
73.0
724.2
150.2
247.8
154.2
924.6
21.2
572.9
463.3
449.6
224.1
3,589.4
5,533.9
0.0
8,049.0
193.8
917.5
375.5
223.7
180.2
1,970.5
563.3
99.5
843.8
119.4
307.9
3,821.1
0.0
383.4
1,258.7
280.8
197.7
59.0
21.5
1,195.3
519.1
73.4
2,322.6
84.9
301.8
92.5
750.0
206.4
456.5
616.5
95.8
676.5
631.8
268.3
84.8
131.2
237.2
456.0
164.9
731.2
33.6
544.9
1,986.1
9,040.6
221.7
5,714.0
262.0
1,782.8
509.0
337.6
813.0
48.6
104.5
685.5
1,480.1
5,762.5
3,021.0
561.2
169.5
874.1
705.0
0.805
0.860
0.420
0.230
0.985
0.720
0.835
1.230
2.400
2.790
2.580
0.980
2.150
0.310
2.260
1.250
0.775
0.520
0.995
0.400
0.545
1.050
1.320
0.530
2.170
1.890
0.615
1.770
2.630
3.550
0.230
2.130
0.435
1.370
0.065
0.295
0.940
2.150
0.530
1.360
1.560
0.330
0.925
1.990
0.505
0.855
2.750
0.570
0.740
0.320
0.205
2.850
0.430
0.255
1.300
1.610
0.395
0.405
3.000
2.280
1.850
1.460
0.465
1.480
2.340
1.970
0.245
0.940
1.010
1.070
0.745
3.020
0.160
1.200
5.780
3.560
1.400
3.300
0.845
0.335
6.800
0.080
1.930
0.145
0.135
1.940
1.060
1.270
2.110
1.710
0.850
1.980
0.835
-0.010
95.3
UNCH
20
0.005
21.5
-0.005 1050.5
UNCH
71.4
UNCH
18.4
UNCH
72.6
0.010
0.2
UNCH
32
-0.060
76.3
-0.020
31
-0.020
101.7
0.080 5623.2
UNCH 1154.1
-0.020
680.7
—
—
-0.025
10.1
-0.020
61
-0.005
77.6
UNCH
63
0.005
1472
—
—
UNCH
97.8
—
—
-0.020
273
0.020
7.7
-0.010
590.1
0.070
1.1
UNCH
673.7
0.010 1304.4
0.225 21059.9
-0.060 2392.1
UNCH
107.9
0.010 1854.5
UNCH
380
0.005
170
—
—
0.090 5042.8
-0.005
968.6
—
—
-0.010
146.4
0.005
189.2
0.005
10
-0.050 3783.9
-0.105 4420.3
0.005
583.2
-0.010
148.6
-0.010
165.8
-0.010
58
-0.005
35.5
—
—
-0.010
688.2
UNCH
686.1
0.005
134.9
0.010 2907.5
0.180
423.2
-0.005
518.3
0.010
2
-0.010
463.4
—
—
0.010
15.7
-0.020
26.7
UNCH
395.8
-0.010
76.7
-0.010
50.8
-0.010
25.5
-0.015
8
UNCH
89.7
-0.020
131.8
0.040
147.5
UNCH
195.1
UNCH
25.5
0.005
16
0.010
183.4
-0.020
8.1
0.010 4113.1
0.030
105.2
-0.060
545.4
-0.015
58.9
UNCH
796.5
—
—
UNCH 2894.8
-0.030
795.4
-0.010 3201.4
0.005 17748.3
-0.020
26.5
-0.060 3236.6
-0.030 7094.7
0.010 1798.3
UNCH
4.9
-0.150
0.3
0.010
46.5
UNCH
96
1.380
-0.010
43.7
2.56
0.07
170.8
1.020
18.180
7.900
1.450
0.830
9.280
0.525
8.200
2.510
10.500
1.050
1.070
1.080
2.570
3.680
0.730
1.390
4.800
23.000
3.320
2.760
0.470
3.040
1.990
1.820
1.000
2.750
5.100
0.320
1.020
0.555
4.000
3.290
5.600
2.180
0.765
1.600
1.280
2.260
6.390
24.420
UNCH
0.080
—
UNCH
UNCH
0.030
UNCH
—
0.110
0.020
—
0.180
UNCH
UNCH
—
0.005
-0.010
0.030
0.180
UNCH
0.040
-0.015
0.010
—
0.010
0.010
—
—
-0.005
—
0.005
—
UNCH
—
—
-0.045
-0.010
-0.020
0.010
UNCH
0.020
1
4.7
—
81
59.9
6.1
1852.1
—
7825.6
153.3
—
428.8
3
47.8
—
51.8
0.5
4574.9
999
1
49
237.1
2778.6
—
21.7
13.2
—
—
95
—
136.8
—
1.5
—
—
1452.2
1060.8
1431.7
248.7
2.8
15.7
0.000 27.27
19.530 14.37
— 26.62
0.000 11.00
0.938
9.29
0.000 23.54
0.485 17.86
— 11.34
4.456 11.67
10.947 23.15
— 15.40
0.740 56.61
1.336
1.41
2.617 15.58
— 21.83
0.880
—
1.410 26.03
5.619
9.77
24.513 24.70
0.000 27.69
2.598 10.48
3.488 100.00
3.678 24.09
—
—
1.533 142.19
1.055 10.42
— 12.83
— 19.78
0.343
—
— 27.13
0.811 48.68
— 21.82
3.230 15.22
— 18.24
— 11.50
0.981 18.09
1.861 18.80
0.000
6.12
2.804 21.36
1.000 20.27
26.600 17.13
1.96
3.30
0.63
—
2.41
2.16
—
3.05
6.37
0.29
0.95
2.80
7.41
3.11
1.90
1.49
—
4.17
2.39
0.30
5.43
—
3.13
2.51
—
2.00
0.73
1.76
—
—
—
5.00
0.70
0.89
4.59
1.31
2.26
—
1.03
2.97
1.95
122.4
7,925.6
738.7
2,320.0
264.3
847.9
444.2
1,159.4
9,156.9
8,089.8
234.1
191.9
200.3
2,056.0
3,240.5
307.1
265.8
30,997.0
24,552.6
209.7
858.6
881.3
4,082.1
620.2
136.5
196.5
330.0
358.0
47.9
333.2
726.2
259.4
218.2
2,461.5
610.4
1,133.5
1,414.2
509.6
3,064.0
1,325.8
5,082.6
0.800
1.040
0.385
6.920
—
-0.030
0.015
UNCH
—
475.6
2647.2
2
— 150.94
1.097
—
0.065
—
6.645 22.20
5.00
—
—
1.88
157.6
500.0
357.6
3,044.8
1.000
0.505
0.180
0.260
0.190
0.225
0.335
1.360
0.640
1.610
0.070
0.825
0.320
0.290
4.800
0.570
2.790
—
—
UNCH 11613.2
UNCH
91.1
—
—
UNCH
129.3
-0.005
391.9
0.005 58852.7
UNCH
89.5
UNCH
433.3
-0.100
775.3
UNCH 2330.3
0.060
24019
-0.005 2097.2
—
—
-0.020
564.9
—
—
-0.070 2163.7
—
—
0.579
—
0.378
—
— 200.00
0.255
—
0.230
—
0.264
—
1.201
8.34
0.509 16.58
0.652 16.77
0.070
—
0.796 90.66
0.462
4.03
— 14.08
3.122 21.61
—
—
1.542 13.23
4.00
—
6.39
—
—
—
—
4.04
3.91
2.48
—
—
—
3.45
1.88
—
2.00
49.3
228.1
78.4
254.2
72.8
104.3
259.7
244.8
132.3
291.6
69.9
530.1
220.9
106.6
1,348.9
57.7
1,976.2
# PE is calculated based on latest 12 months reported Earnings Per Share
1.226
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
0.695 0.165 0.190
0.743 0.461 0.725
3.180 1.931 2.430
0.150 0.045
—
6.400 2.963 5.860
1.880 1.590
—
0.745 0.340 0.450
0.880 0.500 0.530
0.425 0.290 0.305
0.480 0.200 0.435
0.650 0.200 0.270
2.080 0.837 2.070
3.050 1.101 3.050
0.960 0.620 0.820
INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECT CO
6.540 4.338 6.450
3.870 3.390
—
3.760 2.290 2.730
1.240 0.420 0.540
5.530 3.440 5.490
1.650 1.332 1.630
CLOSED-END FUND
2.590 2.230 2.390
EXCHANGE TRADED FUND
1.084 1.030
—
1.850 1.655 1.840
1.295 0.891 1.285
1.910 1.740
—
1.200 1.110
—
1.065 0.955
—
REITS
1.200 1.038 1.160
1.508 1.172 1.410
0.955 0.842 0.950
0.850 0.770 0.850
1.250 1.091 1.240
3.668 2.599 3.620
1.660 1.239 1.590
1.530 1.340 1.520
1.350 1.085 1.330
7.000 5.171 6.970
1.579 1.157 1.470
1.330 0.958 1.290
1.600 1.119 1.600
1.447 1.160 1.300
1.760 1.274 1.720
1.040 0.804 1.040
SPAC
0.705 0.605 0.660
0.765 0.565 0.625
0.620 0.390 0.430
DAY
LOW
CODE
COUNTER
CLOSING
(RM)
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
0.190
0.705
2.420
—
5.740
—
0.440
0.525
0.300
0.425
0.270
1.970
2.900
0.780
9393
5161
9334
0143
3867
5011
0083
9008
0041
7160
9075
5005
0097
0008
ITRONIC
JCY
KESM
KEYASIC
MPI
MSNIAGA
NOTION
OMESTI
PANPAGE
PENTA
THETA
UNISEM
VITROX
WILLOW
0.190
0.715
2.430
0.090
5.820
1.740
0.440
0.530
0.305
0.430
0.270
2.020
2.940
0.795
-0.005
0.005
0.010
—
0.060
—
-0.015
-0.010
UNCH
-0.005
-0.030
0.040
0.020
0.010
20
2700.7
13
—
205.9
—
42.3
131
105
756.5
32.6
2898.5
1728.5
546
0.640
0.574
2.047
—
3.211
—
0.678
0.784
0.350
0.213
0.000
0.871
1.148
0.672
—
12.10
9.59
—
17.46
—
—
7.68
—
20.38
—
—
16.79
10.63
—
5.94
1.23
—
2.92
5.75
2.27
—
6.56
—
—
1.49
0.85
2.52
19.5
1,464.3
104.5
72.5
1,221.5
105.1
119.0
205.4
73.6
57.3
29.0
1,361.9
684.7
197.2
6.330
—
2.690
0.525
5.410
1.600
6947
6645
6807
5078
5031
6742
DIGI
LITRAK
PUNCAK
SILKHLD
TIMECOM
YTLPOWR
6.440
3.800
2.700
0.530
5.450
1.610
0.050 12238.7
—
—
-0.020 1719.9
-0.015
747.8
-0.030 1233.1
-0.030 1790.8
4.873
—
3.375
0.385
3.903
1.947
24.79
14.21
5.84
—
10.07
8.80
4.01
5.79
—
—
—
6.21
50,071.0
1,958.1
1,127.2
371.8
3,127.6
11,943.9
2.380
5108
ICAP
2.390
UNCH
40.3
2.360
9.72
—
334.6
—
1.840
1.270
—
—
—
0800EA
0822EA
0823EA
0820EA
0821EA
0824EA
ABFMY1
CIMBA40
CIMBC50
FBMKLCI-EA
MYETFDJ
MYETFID
1.032
1.840
1.285
1.810
1.175
1.015
—
UNCH
UNCH
—
—
—
—
38.3
39
—
—
—
—
0.000
1.035
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
5.81
2.72
—
1.57
2.68
—
681.6
2.5
13.4
3.0
296.0
21.9
1.150
1.410
0.945
0.840
1.230
3.510
1.500
1.510
1.320
6.810
1.440
1.290
1.570
1.290
1.660
1.030
4952
5116
5120
5127
5130
5106
5180
5121
5227
5235SS
5212
5123
5176
5111
5110
5109
AHP
ALAQAR
AMFIRST
ARREIT
ATRIUM
AXREIT
CMMT
HEKTAR
IGBREIT
KLCC
PAVREIT
QCAPITA
SUNREIT
TWRREIT
UOAREIT
YTLREIT
1.150
1.410
0.945
0.845
1.230
3.530
1.530
1.520
1.330
6.900
1.450
1.290
1.580
1.300
1.660
1.030
-0.010
0.010
UNCH
UNCH
-0.010
-0.010
-0.060
0.010
0.020
-0.070
-0.030
UNCH
UNCH
0.010
-0.090
UNCH
22
17.4
241.3
172.2
31
349.9
2848.7
80.7
975.2
111.4
649
82
3361.5
127
42.5
185.2
1.000
1.330
1.019
1.030
0.000
3.340
1.427
1.520
1.216
5.970
1.300
1.180
1.264
1.509
0.000
1.033
21.42
13.04
10.99
19.43
10.11
14.93
11.50
10.40
10.88
13.28
8.56
12.50
11.01
15.01
14.30
7.24
6.43
5.57
7.19
7.62
6.83
5.59
5.82
6.91
5.83
4.88
5.49
6.50
5.47
7.26
6.63
8.21
115.0
981.7
648.6
484.4
149.8
1,933.6
2,721.8
609.0
4,584.9
12,456.8
4,370.0
503.3
4,634.5
364.7
702.0
1,364.1
0.650
0.620
0.425
5234
5256
5241
CLIQ
REACH
SONA
0.660
0.625
0.425
0.010
UNCH
UNCH
772.5
576
3688.9
0.675
0.000
0.440
—
—
—
—
—
—
416.4
798.6
599.6
CLOSING
(RM)
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
Ace Market
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS
0.300 0.152
—
0.125 0.070 0.095
0.570 0.295 0.455
0.230 0.135 0.170
0.290 0.095 0.260
0.050 0.040 0.050
0.620 0.370 0.490
0.220 0.110 0.140
0.745 0.205 0.300
0.392 0.120 0.170
0.330 0.140 0.175
0.150 0.075 0.105
0.431 0.145 0.325
0.200 0.100 0.135
0.160 0.070 0.100
0.180 0.090 0.125
0.400 0.205 0.215
0.460 0.195 0.265
0.250 0.127
—
TECHNOLOGY
0.260 0.061 0.250
0.665 0.300 0.635
0.015 0.005
—
1.300 0.800 0.980
0.445 0.175 0.240
0.090 0.015 0.020
0.180 0.075 0.125
0.105 0.050 0.095
0.195 0.095 0.135
0.310 0.170 0.290
0.145 0.060 0.080
0.225 0.090 0.165
0.075 0.030 0.040
0.200 0.110 0.145
0.215 0.075 0.100
1.110 0.075 1.110
0.120 0.045 0.060
0.230 0.085 0.175
0.285 0.116 0.155
0.630 0.220 0.325
0.733 0.248 0.680
0.300 0.120 0.145
0.555 0.230 0.540
0.085 0.055 0.065
0.375 0.110 0.210
0.265 0.155
—
0.155 0.075 0.095
0.500 0.355
—
0.935 0.550
—
0.320 0.126 0.310
0.150 0.090 0.095
0.695 0.167 0.655
0.405 0.125 0.285
0.385 0.145 0.200
0.400 0.185
—
1.088 0.465 0.860
0.080 0.050 0.060
0.155 0.055 0.080
0.215 0.060 0.160
0.240 0.100 0.130
0.674 0.500
—
0.479 0.155 0.400
0.070 0.040 0.045
0.200 0.090 0.165
0.145 0.113 0.145
0.070 0.035 0.040
0.473 0.300 0.320
0.165 0.095
—
0.945 0.200 0.605
0.140 0.080 0.085
0.403 0.106 0.250
0.295 0.150 0.190
0.395 0.095 0.390
0.260 0.145 0.150
0.075 0.040 0.060
0.780 0.170 0.265
0.230 0.100 0.130
0.115 0.050 0.070
0.490 0.090 0.425
0.656 0.500 0.545
TRADING SERVICES
0.250 0.160 0.250
0.170 0.099 0.140
0.245 0.070 0.245
0.370 0.148 0.270
0.348 0.206
—
0.840 0.138 0.555
0.515 0.260 0.360
0.280 0.100
—
0.811 0.386 0.540
0.310 0.120 0.210
0.385 0.150 0.275
0.460 0.270
—
0.240 0.140 0.180
0.255 0.105 0.160
0.818 0.593 0.735
1.650 0.610 0.715
1.680 0.936
—
0.386 0.200 0.260
0.570 0.400 0.450
0.680 0.402
—
0.390 0.110 0.185
0.150 0.045 0.070
FINANCE
0.730 0.510 0.530
DAY
LOW
CODE
COUNTER
—
0.090
0.455
0.165
0.240
0.045
0.470
0.135
0.295
0.165
0.170
0.105
0.305
0.135
0.090
0.120
0.215
0.245
—
0105
0072
0163
0102
0100
0109
0175
0160
0162
0024
0025
0070
0049
0038
0133
0001
0028
0055
0084
ASIAPLY
AT
CAREPLS
CONNECT
ESCERAM
FLONIC
HHGROUP
HHHCORP
IJACOBS
JAG
LNGRES
MQTECH
OCNCASH
PTB
SANICHI
SCOMNET
SCOPE
SERSOL
TECFAST
0.255
0.095
0.455
0.165
0.245
0.050
0.490
0.140
0.295
0.165
0.175
0.105
0.310
0.135
0.095
0.125
0.215
0.260
0.200
—
—
Unch 9039.6
Unch
103
-0.005 4812.4
Unch
21665
0.005 2533.6
0.010 1480.4
Unch
239.1
-0.010
348
Unch 2096.8
Unch
582
-0.005
175
Unch
521.6
Unch
259
Unch 55125.1
0.005
282.9
Unch
20
0.010
448.1
—
—
— 26.56
0.128
9.22
0.315 36.99
0.149
—
0.000 12.63
0.082
—
0.000
8.49
0.140 466.67
0.214
—
0.305
9.54
0.196
8.62
0.146
—
0.180 12.45
0.122
—
0.080 32.76
0.000 19.23
0.222
—
0.470
—
— 52.63
2.94
—
0.55
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
1.71
—
1.94
—
—
—
—
—
2.50
22.4
37.4
106.9
34.0
46.6
40.0
100.8
46.7
38.9
173.7
42.3
26.6
69.1
20.3
96.3
30.4
108.7
50.8
31.2
0.240
0.575
—
0.965
0.230
0.020
0.120
0.090
0.130
0.270
0.070
0.160
0.040
0.135
0.095
1.030
0.055
0.165
0.155
0.315
0.680
0.140
0.525
0.060
0.200
—
0.095
—
—
0.305
0.095
0.630
0.270
0.195
—
0.850
0.055
0.075
0.155
0.130
—
0.365
0.045
0.160
0.140
0.040
0.320
—
0.580
0.080
0.235
0.190
0.375
0.145
0.060
0.245
0.120
0.070
0.400
0.535
0119
0068
0039
0098
0079
0022
0152
0131
0154
0107
0116
0104
0045
0074
0174
0023
0034
0094
0069
0010
0146
0127
0111
0036
0176
0017
0075
0155
0126
0112
0085
0113
0103
0156
0092
0108
0020
0096
0026
0018
0035
0040
0005
0123
0007
0110
0106
0135
0117
0169
0093
0129
0050
0132
0060
0120
0066
0141
0086
0009
APPASIA
ASDION
ASIAEP
BAHVEST
CWORKS
CYBERT
DGB
DGSB
EAH
EDUSPEC
FOCUS
GENETEC
GNB
GOCEAN
IDMENSN
IFCAMSC
INGENCO
INIX
INSTACO
IRIS
JFTECH
JHM
K1
KGROUP
KRONO
M3TECH
MEXTER
MGRC
MICROLN
MIKROMB
MLAB
MMSV
MNC
MPAY
MTOUCHE
N2N
NETX
NEXGRAM
NOVAMSC
OMEDIA
OPCOM
OPENSYS
PALETTE
PRIVA
PUC
RA
REXIT
SCN
SMRT
SMTRACK
SOLUTN
SRIDGE
SYSTECH
TDEX
TMS
VIS
VSOLAR
WINTONI
YGL
YTLE
0.240
0.625
0.010
0.970
0.240
0.020
0.120
0.090
0.135
0.290
0.080
0.160
0.040
0.140
0.100
1.080
0.055
0.170
0.155
0.320
0.680
0.140
0.535
0.060
0.210
0.210
0.095
0.380
0.550
0.310
0.095
0.640
0.285
0.200
0.210
0.850
0.060
0.075
0.155
0.130
0.600
0.385
0.045
0.165
0.145
0.040
0.320
0.110
0.595
0.085
0.235
0.190
0.385
0.145
0.060
0.255
0.125
0.070
0.415
0.545
-0.005
0.035
—
Unch
-0.015
-0.005
Unch
-0.005
Unch
0.015
0.010
Unch
Unch
Unch
Unch
0.030
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.005
Unch
-0.005
Unch
-0.005
0.005
—
0.005
—
—
-0.005
-0.005
-0.010
Unch
Unch
—
-0.020
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.025
—
0.010
Unch
0.005
0.005
0.005
Unch
—
0.005
Unch
-0.015
Unch
-0.005
Unch
-0.005
0.010
Unch
Unch
0.005
0.005
3017.8
1229.1
—
982.4
340
425
11625.8
10382.4
7144
3683.7
31466.9
1244.3
10
2910.1
461
18446.2
210.1
218.3
560.1
11455.1
130
70.9
3046.3
230
2481.6
—
50
—
—
937.7
80
5129.9
584.3
988.6
—
36
50.1
8028.9
9161.3
50
—
14788.4
210
6213.3
5252.2
449
10
—
3306.7
187
1843.1
10
31335.7
2207.4
2917
5507.8
11320.9
280
18894.4
135.2
0.111
—
0.460
—
—
—
1.193
—
0.185
—
0.070
—
0.216
—
0.073 50.00
0.208 11.16
0.126 36.71
0.075
—
0.130 13.11
0.060
—
0.169
—
0.123
—
0.085 40.30
0.079
—
0.146
—
0.262 13.48
0.275 50.00
0.000 41.21
0.000
—
0.327 23.16
0.066
—
0.000
—
—
—
0.100
—
—
—
— 13.32
0.260 12.81
0.000
—
0.203 10.70
0.335
—
0.115 54.05
—
—
0.496 38.46
0.070
—
0.088 11.19
0.070 53.45
0.000
—
— 28.85
0.170 15.46
0.047
—
0.100 19.88
0.221 23.39
0.050
—
0.402 18.18
—
—
0.224 10.10
0.100
—
0.322 14.97
0.000 237.50
0.105 40.96
0.121 161.11
0.066
—
0.585 20.56
0.000
—
0.060
—
0.000
—
0.630 21.29
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.74
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
5.45
3.32
—
1.56
—
—
—
2.59
—
—
—
—
1.67
2.60
—
1.82
3.66
—
12.50
—
0.84
—
4.26
—
0.78
—
—
—
—
—
—
7.34
66.7
70.5
8.1
403.8
29.0
2.0
19.6
122.0
114.8
222.2
56.4
56.3
11.6
36.9
42.5
539.7
51.4
23.6
108.8
652.9
85.7
17.2
223.5
34.8
49.8
37.7
18.7
35.8
76.1
87.4
17.8
104.3
26.9
80.5
48.6
373.7
37.5
141.2
76.5
27.8
96.7
86.0
13.1
92.1
154.0
38.7
60.6
22.0
140.0
23.2
46.1
23.0
122.2
49.5
52.2
25.7
35.2
35.9
73.0
735.8
0.225
0.140
0.205
0.270
—
0.540
0.360
—
0.525
0.195
0.265
—
0.180
0.155
0.725
0.700
—
0.250
0.430
—
0.175
0.065
0122
0048
0150
0011
0157
0081
0147
0167
0059
0153
0177
0006
0171
0080
0032
0173
0158
0161
0137
0089
0145
0165
AIM
ANCOMLB
ASIABIO
BTECH
FOCUSP
IDEAL
INNITY
MCLEAN
MMODE
OVERSEA
PASUKGB
PINEAPP
PLABS
RAYA
REDTONE
REV
SCC
SCH
STEMLFE
TEXCYCL
TFP
XOX
0.250
0.140
0.220
0.270
0.280
0.540
0.360
0.175
0.525
0.205
0.265
0.270
0.180
0.155
0.735
0.715
1.300
0.250
0.450
0.570
0.185
0.070
0.005
Unch
0.010
-0.005
—
0.010
Unch
—
-0.010
Unch
-0.005
—
-0.005
Unch
0.005
-0.015
—
-0.005
0.020
—
0.015
Unch
50.1
279
92976
20.7
—
756.9
1.5
—
230.2
12.3
3752.4
—
108.7
223.2
916.9
93.9
—
2430.8
73.8
—
96.1
60.1
0.000
—
0.190
5.11
0.103
—
0.165 14.06
— 17.72
0.078
8.04
0.000 26.67
—
—
0.686 10.06
0.125 19.16
0.165
—
— 29.67
0.150 14.88
0.000
—
0.695 16.59
0.681 22.99
—
9.17
0.000 13.02
0.399 115.38
—
9.18
0.315 19.89
0.164
—
—
28.57
—
2.33
7.14
—
—
—
1.90
2.93
—
—
2.78
—
1.50
—
3.85
6.00
7.78
0.88
—
—
66.5
66.3
184.9
68.0
46.2
76.4
49.8
20.5
85.4
50.2
78.2
13.1
33.8
20.2
389.7
96.3
55.6
103.1
111.4
97.4
37.9
23.2
0.530
0053
OSKVI
0.530
-0.055
0.3
3.77
103.7
0.536
—
36 Markets
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
B U R S A M A L AY S I A E Q U I T Y D E R I VAT I E S
Bursa Malaysia Equity Derivatives
Main Market & Ace Market Warrants
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
CODE
0.180
0.180
0.230
0.295
0.160
0.125
0.150
0.130
0.545
0.055
0.075
0.120
0.110
0.245
0.160
0.330
0.215
0.220
0.430
0.135
0.090
0.140
0.150
0.100
0.105
0.155
0.140
0.100
0.095
0.100
0.105
0.055
0.095
0.195
0.100
0.285
0.205
0.095
0.080
0.120
0.110
0.115
0.055
0.100
0.295
0.375
0.145
0.245
0.175
0.105
0.105
0.085
0.150
0.110
0.105
0.480
0.150
0.135
0.085
0.805
0.045
0.570
0.540
0.905
0.300
0.155
0.225
0.105
0.200
0.060
0.065
0.050
0.275
2.550
0.210
0.115
0.080
0.860
0.335
0.190
0.180
0.095
0.355
0.130
0.720
0.450
0.450
0.120
0.135
0.380
0.520
0.190
0.195
2.180
0.170
0.785
0.060
0.295
0.040
0.445
0.115
0.784
0.100
0.050
0.095
0.155
0.160
0.325
0.085
0.080
0.120
0.150
0.025
0.105
0.130
0.220
0.175
0.330
0.445
0.080
0.795
0.915
0.195
0.275
0.475
0.385
0.585
0.110
0.640
0.610
0.180
0.800
0.975
0.415
0.800
0.990
0.700
0.985
0.325
0.845
1.120
0.535
0.150
0.375
0.120
0.105
0.165
0.115
0.105
0.025
0.335
0.080
0.055
0.090
0.505
0.620
1.160
2.670
0.695
0.150
0.115
3.660
0.135
0.235
3.000
0.230
0.245
0.370
0.570
0.120
0.190
1.060
3.170
3.400
0.245
0.220
0.010
0.010
0.050
0.065
0.025
0.095
0.130
0.050
0.075
0.010
0.005
0.070
0.060
0.085
0.070
0.010
0.095
0.110
0.010
0.080
0.055
0.130
0.025
0.035
0.005
0.005
0.005
0.020
0.005
0.020
0.090
0.015
0.045
0.095
0.085
0.165
0.130
0.005
0.005
0.005
0.015
0.025
0.020
0.045
0.120
0.105
0.010
0.205
0.090
0.030
0.035
0.030
0.055
0.095
0.075
0.230
0.035
0.065
0.060
0.335
0.015
0.205
0.105
0.200
0.220
0.095
0.155
0.005
0.005
0.020
0.040
0.045
0.120
0.685
0.080
0.005
0.050
0.205
0.100
0.005
0.070
0.030
0.065
0.005
0.305
0.115
0.140
0.010
0.090
0.095
0.155
0.030
0.130
0.320
0.070
0.165
0.015
0.070
0.020
0.155
0.020
0.285
0.030
0.040
0.015
0.070
0.075
0.035
0.025
0.025
0.120
0.115
0.010
0.045
0.045
0.120
0.075
0.115
0.040
0.025
0.300
0.200
0.085
0.120
0.065
0.050
0.115
0.045
0.210
0.350
0.090
0.790
0.965
0.080
0.335
0.385
0.260
0.470
0.050
0.425
0.715
0.240
0.115
0.355
0.080
0.005
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.155
0.020
0.040
0.005
0.170
0.130
0.340
1.820
0.200
0.065
0.065
2.030
0.010
0.125
2.560
0.150
0.125
0.140
0.300
0.105
0.060
0.115
0.975
1.700
0.080
0.080
0.010
—
—
0.105
0.035
0.110
0.140
—
0.295
—
—
—
—
—
0.120
0.225
0.160
0.170
0.340
—
0.075
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.025
—
0.175
—
0.245
—
—
—
—
—
0.050
—
0.085
—
0.375
—
—
—
—
0.040
0.050
—
—
—
0.320
—
—
0.075
0.475
—
0.280
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.055
—
0.170
—
—
—
0.060
0.780
—
—
0.090
0.035
0.165
0.055
0.550
0.285
0.290
0.020
0.135
0.130
0.420
0.105
0.165
0.790
0.115
0.165
0.025
0.095
0.020
0.270
0.060
0.450
0.035
0.045
0.050
0.135
0.140
0.075
0.040
0.050
0.120
0.150
0.010
0.060
0.075
0.135
0.155
0.200
0.070
0.035
0.400
0.255
0.150
0.200
0.370
0.290
0.450
0.090
0.635
0.595
0.170
0.800
0.975
0.250
0.550
0.615
0.370
0.730
0.220
0.650
0.865
0.275
0.130
0.375
0.120
0.010
0.025
0.020
0.030
0.020
0.255
0.035
0.050
0.005
0.285
0.400
0.620
2.400
0.395
0.095
0.085
2.550
0.015
0.180
2.690
0.215
0.155
0.315
0.330
0.110
0.070
0.775
2.640
3.400
0.095
0.110
0.010
—
—
0.105
0.030
0.110
0.140
—
0.255
—
—
—
—
—
0.100
0.220
0.155
0.165
0.340
—
0.075
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.020
—
0.165
—
0.240
—
—
—
—
—
0.045
—
0.085
—
0.315
—
—
—
—
0.040
0.050
—
—
—
0.320
—
—
0.075
0.445
—
0.250
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.050
—
0.170
—
—
—
0.055
0.775
—
—
0.085
0.035
0.155
0.050
0.475
0.260
0.270
0.015
0.100
0.120
0.420
0.105
0.160
0.760
0.110
0.165
0.020
0.090
0.020
0.265
0.060
0.435
0.030
0.040
0.045
0.135
0.140
0.065
0.030
0.045
0.120
0.150
0.010
0.060
0.070
0.135
0.150
0.195
0.070
0.035
0.400
0.255
0.145
0.200
0.360
0.270
0.430
0.090
0.620
0.590
0.155
0.790
0.965
0.230
0.535
0.585
0.350
0.730
0.200
0.645
0.860
0.255
0.125
0.355
0.095
0.010
0.020
0.020
0.030
0.015
0.245
0.025
0.045
0.005
0.280
0.400
0.580
2.360
0.390
0.095
0.075
2.450
0.010
0.175
2.670
0.205
0.155
0.300
0.310
0.105
0.065
0.725
2.450
3.300
0.090
0.110
5238CL
5238CM
5238CN
5238CO
5238CP
5238CQ
5238CR
7086WA
7061WB
6599CC
5185CQ
5185CR
5185CS
2488CO
7315WB
509911
509912
509913
509914
509915
509916
509917
5014CK
5014CL
5115CD
5115CE
5115CF
1163CA
1015CS
1015CT
1015CU
0159WA
5194WA
0119WA
7007WB
5210C1
5210C2
5210CS
5210CT
5210CU
5210CV
5210CW
5210CX
5210CY
5210CZ
0068WB
6399CO
6399CP
6399CQ
7070WA
7070WB
0072WA
6888C1
6888CY
6888CZ
7078WA
4162CD
5258CR
5258CT
5258WA
7193WA
3239WA
5248CB
5248CC
5248CD
5248CE
5248CF
3395CP
3395CR
3395CS
3395CU
3395CV
3395WB
5196WA
6025WA
1562CT
7187WA
7036WB
9938WB
2771CJ
7188WB
5229WA
0163WA
7076CB
7076WA
5195WA
5195WB
1023C1
1023C2
5234WA
2852CF
2852CK
5071CH
5071WA
0102WA
8591WB
5214WA
0051WA
7179WA
7212WA
7277CZ
7277WA
7198WA
7198WB
161910
161911
161912
3417CQ
3417CR
3417CT
3417CW
3417CX
0154WA
0154WB
0154WC
3557WC
0107WA
0065WA
8907WB
7182WA
8877WB
6076WA
7047WB
9776WB
0650CJ
0650CK
0650CL
0650CN
0650CO
0650CQ
0650CR
0650CS
0650CT
0650HB
0650HC
0650HD
0650HE
0650HF
0650HG
0650HH
0650HI
0650HJ
0650HK
0650HM
5222C1
5222CU
5222CW
5222CX
5222CY
5222CZ
9318WB
0116WB
0116WC
0128WA
7168WA
7161WA
9261WA
5398WD
5226WA
0078CA
4715C9
2291WA
318217
318221
3182WA
1147WA
0056WA
7022CD
7676WB
1503CA
7253WA
3034CJ
3034WA
5168WA
9342WA
9342WB
WARRANTS
AAX-CL
AAX-CM
AAX-CN
AAX-CO
AAX-CP
AAX-CQ
AAX-CR
ABLEGRP-WA
ABRIC-WB
AEON-CC
AFFIN-CQ
AFFIN-CR
AFFIN-CS
AFG-CO
AHB-WB
AIRASIAC11
AIRASIAC12
AIRASIAC13
AIRASIAC14
AIRASIAC15
AIRASIAC16
AIRASIAC17
AIRPORT-CK
AIRPORT-CL
ALAM-CD
ALAM-CE
ALAM-CF
ALLIANZ-CA
AMBANK-CS
AMBANK-CT
AMBANK-CU
AMEDIA-WA
APFT-WA
APPASIA-WA
ARK-WB
ARMADA-C1
ARMADA-C2
ARMADA-CS
ARMADA-CT
ARMADA-CU
ARMADA-CV
ARMADA-CW
ARMADA-CX
ARMADA-CY
ARMADA-CZ
ASDION-WB
ASTRO-CO
ASTRO-CP
ASTRO-CQ
ASUPREM-WA
ASUPREM-WB
AT-WA
AXIATA-C1
AXIATA-CY
AXIATA-CZ
AZRB-WA
BAT-CD
BIMB-CR
BIMB-CT
BIMB-WA
BIOSIS-WA
BJASSET-WA
BJAUTO-CB
BJAUTO-CC
BJAUTO-CD
BJAUTO-CE
BJAUTO-CF
BJCORP-CP
BJCORP-CR
BJCORP-CS
BJCORP-CU
BJCORP-CV
BJCORP-WB
BJFOOD-WA
BJMEDIA-WA
BJTOTO-CT
BKOON-WA
BORNOIL-WB
BRIGHT-WB
BSTEAD-CJ
BTM-WB
CAP-WA
CAREPLS-WA
CBIP-CB
CBIP-WA
CENSOF-WA
CENSOF-WB
CIMB-C1
CIMB-C2
CLIQ-WA
CMSB-CF
CMSB-CK
COASTAL-CH
COASTAL-WA
CONNECT-WA
CRESBLD-WB
CSL-WA
CUSCAPI-WA
DBE-WA
DESTINI-WA
DIALOG-CZ
DIALOG-WA
DPS-WA
DPS-WB
DRBHCOMC10
DRBHCOMC11
DRBHCOMC12
E&O-CQ
E&O-CR
E&O-CT
E&O-CW
E&O-CX
EAH-WA
EAH-WB
EAH-WC
ECOFIRS-WC
EDUSPEC-WA
EFORCE-WA
EG-WB
EKA-WA
EKOVEST-WB
ENCORP-WA
FAJAR-WB
FARMBES-WB
FBMKLCI-CJ
FBMKLCI-CK
FBMKLCI-CL
FBMKLCI-CN
FBMKLCI-CO
FBMKLCI-CQ
FBMKLCI-CR
FBMKLCI-CS
FBMKLCI-CT
FBMKLCI-HB
FBMKLCI-HC
FBMKLCI-HD
FBMKLCI-HE
FBMKLCI-HF
FBMKLCI-HG
FBMKLCI-HH
FBMKLCI-HI
FBMKLCI-HJ
FBMKLCI-HK
FBMKLCI-HM
FGV-C1
FGV-CU
FGV-CW
FGV-CX
FGV-CY
FGV-CZ
FITTERS-WB
FOCUS-WB
FOCUS-WC
FRONTKN-WA
FURNWEB-WA
FUTUTEC-WA
GADANG-WA
GAMUDA-WD
GBGAQRS-WA
GDEX-CA
GENM-C9
GENP-WA
GENTINGC17
GENTINGC21
GENTING-WA
GOB-WA
GRANFLO-WA
GTRONIC-CD
GUNUNG-WB
GUOCO-CA
HANDAL-WA
HAPSENG-CJ
HAPSENG-WA
HARTA-WA
HARVEST-WA
HARVEST-WB
CLOSE
(RM)
+/(RM)
0.010
0.010
0.060
0.105
0.030
0.110
0.140
0.070
0.290
0.015
0.005
0.085
0.090
0.140
0.110
0.225
0.160
0.170
0.340
0.105
0.075
0.130
0.030
0.045
0.005
0.005
0.005
0.020
0.030
0.035
0.090
0.020
0.055
0.170
0.085
0.245
0.185
0.005
0.005
0.005
0.020
0.045
0.040
0.085
0.240
0.375
0.010
0.225
0.095
0.050
0.040
0.050
0.080
0.095
0.080
0.320
0.045
0.065
0.075
0.470
0.025
0.250
0.465
0.740
0.230
0.105
0.165
0.005
0.010
0.025
0.055
0.050
0.170
2.170
0.100
0.005
0.060
0.775
0.150
0.005
0.090
0.035
0.155
0.055
0.550
0.275
0.280
0.015
0.130
0.125
0.420
0.105
0.160
0.765
0.115
0.165
0.020
0.090
0.020
0.270
0.060
0.440
0.035
0.040
0.045
0.135
0.140
0.065
0.030
0.050
0.120
0.150
0.010
0.060
0.070
0.135
0.155
0.200
0.070
0.035
0.400
0.255
0.150
0.200
0.365
0.280
0.435
0.090
0.620
0.595
0.165
0.800
0.975
0.235
0.545
0.600
0.360
0.730
0.205
0.650
0.865
0.265
0.130
0.375
0.115
0.010
0.025
0.020
0.030
0.020
0.245
0.035
0.050
0.005
0.280
0.400
0.615
2.360
0.395
0.095
0.085
2.550
0.015
0.175
2.680
0.210
0.155
0.310
0.330
0.105
0.070
0.775
2.630
3.390
0.095
0.110
Unch
—
—
-0.010
-0.005
-0.005
0.005
—
-0.020
—
—
—
—
—
0.010
Unch
0.005
Unch
-0.010
—
Unch
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
-0.005
—
Unch
—
0.005
—
—
—
—
—
-0.005
—
Unch
—
0.105
—
—
—
—
-0.010
Unch
—
—
—
Unch
—
—
0.005
0.020
—
-0.030
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Unch
—
Unch
—
—
—
0.005
Unch
—
—
Unch
-0.005
-0.010
0.015
0.075
-0.005
Unch
Unch
0.035
-0.005
-0.005
-0.015
Unch
-0.020
-0.005
-0.035
-0.010
Unch
Unch
-0.005
0.015
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.005
-0.005
-0.010
0.010
Unch
0.010
Unch
0.035
-0.005
Unch
-0.005
Unch
0.005
Unch
0.015
Unch
Unch
Unch
0.005
0.035
-0.005
-0.015
-0.015
-0.005
-0.020
-0.010
Unch
0.190
0.205
Unch
0.015
0.010
0.005
0.005
0.005
0.020
0.015
0.005
Unch
0.015
0.015
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.005
0.005
-0.015
0.010
0.005
Unch
Unch
Unch
0.040
Unch
Unch
-0.005
0.005
Unch
0.005
0.015
-0.020
Unch
Unch
-0.005
Unch
Unch
Unch
0.110
0.160
0.270
Unch
0.015
VOL PARENT
EXE
(‘000)
PRICE PRICE
250
—
—
15
3336.9
200
50
—
158.7
—
—
—
—
—
2774.9
306.7
394.5
723
100
—
100
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
419.3
—
1966.2
—
415
—
—
—
—
—
612
—
100
—
24
—
—
—
—
80
2065.2
—
—
—
17
—
—
100
793.5
—
3.3
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
450.9
—
1380
—
—
—
140.1
66.9
—
—
108
590
1456.8
100
247.2
1515.9
5574.4
910
1044.5
5290.5
10
50
90
228.1
3120
0.3
840.1
39.9
100
691.5
200
5096.2
759.9
792
85.6
5
100
525
591
533
100
18
106.2
150
1225
3.9
3453.7
192.7
20
100
13
20
596
1
24
2680.5
1491
43.6
3655.9
71
1164.7
60
60
7725
124
475.5
1569.5
1.5
6419.7
205
92.2
1550.8
884.9
160
7798
403
1044.5
1420
15
1162.1
455
590.9
124
65
130
30.3
346.4
154.5
257.9
20
430
2.2
163
220
286.3
2473.9
20
935
76
100
109.9
122.4
403.1
110.9
324.6
30
0.670 0.800
0.670 0.800
0.670 0.700
0.670 0.650
0.670 0.850
0.670 0.630
0.670 0.660
0.135 0.150
0.465 0.300
3.040 4.000
2.860 3.875
2.860 3.500
2.860 2.750
4.780 4.302
0.185 0.200
2.770 2.300
2.770 2.380
2.770 2.500
2.770 2.400
2.770 2.700
2.770 3.000
2.770 2.700
7.180 8.000
7.180 7.500
0.640 1.600
0.640 1.550
0.640 1.400
11.800 11.680
6.570 7.000
6.570 7.000
6.570 7.000
0.060 0.250
0.125 0.400
0.240 0.130
0.470 1.000
1.240 1.100
1.240 1.000
1.240 2.242
1.240 2.387
1.240 1.989
1.240 2.000
1.240 1.380
1.240 1.500
1.240 1.270
1.240 1.200
0.625 0.500
2.940 3.280
2.940 3.000
2.940 3.480
0.155 0.200
0.155 0.200
0.095 0.120
7.140 6.650
7.140 6.780
7.140 6.980
0.715 0.700
66.497 67.500
4.100 4.180
4.100 3.880
4.100 4.720
0.135 0.500
0.835 1.000
3.360 2.000
3.360 1.850
3.360 2.800
3.360 3.100
3.360 3.300
0.400 0.480
0.400 0.530
0.400 0.600
0.400 0.430
0.400 0.450
0.400 1.000
3.000 0.700
0.385 0.870
3.450 3.860
0.120 0.200
0.905 0.100
0.540 0.820
4.600 5.500
0.150 0.200
0.220 0.350
0.455 0.490
2.160 2.440
2.160 2.400
0.505 0.460
0.505 0.460
5.560 7.300
5.560 6.500
0.660 0.500
4.200 2.627
4.200 4.500
2.920 2.800
2.920 3.180
0.165 0.100
1.200 1.000
0.080 1.150
0.180 0.270
0.070 0.100
0.595 0.400
1.670 1.780
1.670 1.190
0.085 0.540
0.085 0.100
1.800 1.880
1.800 1.800
1.800 1.700
2.150 2.182
2.150 2.273
2.150 2.455
2.150 2.346
2.150 1.891
0.135 0.300
0.135 0.180
0.135 0.120
0.310 0.300
0.290 0.180
0.640 0.680
0.610 1.000
0.115 0.200
1.150 1.350
1.250 1.000
0.445 0.700
0.615 1.000
1,795 1,840
1,795 1,880
1,795 1,800
1,795 1,800
1,795 1,780
1,795 1,750
1,795 1,730
1,795 1,720
1,795 1,660
1,795 1,880
1,795 1,820
1,795 1,860
1,795 1,780
1,795 1,840
1,795 1,800
1,795 1,800
1,795 1,880
1,795 1,730
1,795 1,735
1,795 1,680
2.510 2.500
2.510 4.200
2.510 3.380
2.510 3.500
2.510 3.500
2.510 3.600
0.705 1.000
0.080 0.100
0.080 0.100
0.155 0.180
0.710 0.750
1.100 1.000
1.550 1.000
5.070 2.660
1.260 1.300
2.210 2.180
4.100 3.800
10.500 7.750
8.830 9.800
8.830 9.400
8.830 7.960
0.545 0.800
0.290 0.120
4.800 4.600
0.770 0.500
1.320 1.600
0.320 0.860
4.310 2.800
4.310 1.650
7.550 4.140
0.190 0.250
0.190 0.250
PR’M
(%)
20.90
20.90
13.43
12.69
29.55
14.55
19.40
62.96
26.88
34.05
35.99
37.24
5.59
1.44
67.57
-0.72
3.25
8.66
6.28
12.64
19.13
16.25
15.60
10.10
151.17
144.53
121.09
4.07
9.28
9.21
14.76
350.00
264.00
25.00
130.85
14.40
10.48
82.16
93.26
61.42
63.23
22.18
30.65
16.13
16.13
40.00
12.59
17.35
31.29
61.29
54.84
78.95
-1.26
5.60
6.72
42.66
8.28
11.46
5.61
26.59
288.89
49.70
1.04
-0.89
10.71
11.01
-1.17
21.88
33.75
53.13
21.25
26.25
192.50
-4.33
151.95
12.45
116.67
-3.31
79.63
19.78
93.33
75.00
41.76
20.60
36.57
45.54
46.53
33.45
26.26
-5.30
2.54
17.14
23.29
35.10
30.30
-2.92
1,362
100.00
71.43
12.61
17.37
-2.40
576.47
64.71
14.44
15.00
13.11
9.72
13.32
21.56
21.78
13.32
129.63
77.78
40.74
40.32
15.52
37.50
75.41
104.35
52.17
0.40
91.01
95.12
6.52
7.80
5.08
3.57
6.03
4.07
2.45
4.69
3.29
13.42
7.42
10.26
3.13
10.59
7.84
7.47
14.33
-0.72
1.43
-2.28
16.55
68.92
38.65
43.43
42.43
46.61
76.60
68.75
87.50
19.35
45.07
27.27
4.19
-0.99
34.52
15.84
5.12
-1.90
12.34
13.39
20.50
85.32
-5.17
11.98
7.79
37.12
190.63
0.93
-0.70
-0.26
81.58
89.47
EXPIRY
DATE
31/03/2015
21/04/2015
07/05/2015
31/07/2015
05/05/2015
01/07/2015
30/12/2015
19/01/2017
07/04/2016
28/08/2015
27/02/2015
11/08/2015
31/12/2015
30/04/2015
28/08/2019
27/02/2015
20/05/2015
17/09/2015
01/06/2015
22/10/2015
22/10/2015
30/12/2015
28/04/2015
30/09/2015
30/01/2015
04/06/2015
07/05/2015
10/02/2015
30/06/2015
12/06/2015
17/09/2015
02/01/2018
13/07/2018
23/12/2024
30/06/2021
03/08/2015
22/10/2015
23/02/2015
30/04/2015
20/05/2015
01/06/2015
28/10/2015
01/07/2015
31/12/2015
15/12/2015
24/03/2019
06/02/2015
27/02/2015
30/06/2015
08/08/2016
20/06/2018
29/01/2019
31/07/2015
06/02/2015
30/06/2015
13/05/2024
30/09/2015
10/02/2015
30/11/2015
04/12/2023
24/08/2020
16/03/2018
31/03/2015
08/04/2015
17/09/2015
30/10/2015
21/08/2015
28/01/2015
30/01/2015
05/05/2015
31/12/2015
01/07/2015
22/04/2022
08/08/2017
16/12/2016
30/01/2015
07/07/2023
28/02/2018
12/01/2019
31/03/2015
23/10/2024
29/12/2016
09/08/2016
30/09/2015
06/11/2019
18/07/2017
07/10/2019
08/07/2015
03/08/2015
08/04/2016
18/03/2015
05/05/2015
30/12/2015
18/07/2016
17/09/2021
21/10/2015
18/09/2017
24/04/2018
22/03/2016
03/10/2016
28/08/2015
10/02/2017
03/01/2018
15/01/2025
30/11/2015
15/12/2015
03/08/2015
29/05/2015
11/08/2015
05/05/2015
30/11/2015
30/12/2015
07/12/2015
24/02/2019
18/06/2019
10/09/2019
24/12/2018
17/07/2019
16/06/2015
22/01/2019
25/06/2019
17/03/2016
24/09/2019
13/07/2018
30/06/2015
30/06/2015
30/06/2015
30/11/2015
30/09/2015
30/06/2015
29/01/2016
30/09/2015
30/09/2015
31/07/2015
30/06/2015
30/06/2015
30/06/2015
30/09/2015
30/11/2015
30/09/2015
30/09/2015
30/06/2015
29/01/2016
30/09/2015
02/09/2015
20/05/2015
28/10/2015
13/11/2015
03/08/2015
30/09/2015
12/10/2019
06/06/2016
06/11/2019
10/03/2015
06/07/2019
20/12/2017
29/09/2015
25/05/2015
20/07/2018
28/09/2015
30/10/2015
17/06/2019
30/04/2015
01/07/2015
18/12/2018
24/12/2019
21/04/2015
01/07/2015
02/10/2020
13/11/2015
05/04/2016
27/02/2015
09/08/2016
29/05/2015
19/11/2019
25/08/2023
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
CODE
1.500
0.435
0.125
0.315
0.150
1.350
0.385
0.025
1.040
0.110
0.555
0.135
0.040
0.750
0.975
0.285
0.185
0.155
2.795
0.140
0.395
0.215
0.470
0.470
0.300
0.070
0.180
0.350
0.120
0.440
0.365
0.380
0.350
0.820
0.040
0.420
0.185
0.400
0.120
0.030
0.315
0.455
0.985
0.250
0.125
1.690
0.970
0.615
0.850
0.070
0.085
0.085
0.090
0.200
0.145
0.589
0.495
0.515
0.315
0.220
0.180
0.625
0.060
1.650
0.625
0.075
0.840
0.070
0.405
0.285
0.675
0.210
2.407
0.275
0.155
0.210
0.305
0.055
0.260
0.020
0.570
0.400
0.325
0.405
0.330
0.255
0.135
0.080
0.067
0.105
0.095
0.225
0.205
0.440
1.880
0.105
0.035
0.650
0.090
0.015
0.140
1.220
0.500
0.700
0.335
0.150
0.205
0.315
2.669
0.210
0.145
0.095
0.255
2.690
0.155
0.290
0.570
0.150
0.070
1.060
0.360
0.200
0.100
0.225
0.120
0.125
0.385
0.295
0.745
1.050
0.350
0.270
0.555
0.555
0.980
0.495
0.130
0.115
0.155
0.285
0.240
0.550
0.345
2.080
0.155
0.095
0.240
0.445
0.135
0.120
0.380
1.220
0.085
0.090
0.565
0.050
0.835
0.445
0.250
0.095
0.835
0.360
0.035
0.150
0.080
0.190
0.245
0.700
0.210
0.145
0.110
0.465
0.465
0.160
0.230
0.270
0.160
0.070
0.280
0.155
0.670
0.345
0.435
0.160
0.080
0.035
0.005
0.650
0.155
0.010
0.750
0.005
0.170
0.015
0.015
0.200
0.030
0.035
0.020
0.055
1.051
0.035
0.170
0.060
0.115
0.115
0.095
0.015
0.070
0.080
0.075
0.150
0.120
0.025
0.015
0.147
0.020
0.280
0.080
0.020
0.005
0.015
0.205
0.125
0.305
0.120
0.040
0.410
0.510
0.270
0.460
0.010
0.035
0.035
0.010
0.080
0.020
0.199
0.230
0.180
0.040
0.185
0.035
0.340
0.045
1.120
0.240
0.030
0.300
0.015
0.100
0.150
0.110
0.010
0.890
0.040
0.005
0.195
0.135
0.025
0.005
0.005
0.050
0.090
0.115
0.140
0.165
0.040
0.115
0.029
0.020
0.030
0.045
0.050
0.060
0.180
0.485
0.005
0.015
0.300
0.005
0.010
0.035
0.475
0.135
0.180
0.085
0.020
0.025
0.060
0.327
0.040
0.085
0.055
0.035
1.300
0.045
0.085
0.360
0.035
0.035
0.825
0.145
0.115
0.005
0.035
0.015
0.005
0.060
0.130
0.100
0.320
0.100
0.230
0.110
0.100
0.585
0.135
0.045
0.015
0.025
0.025
0.115
0.220
0.035
0.830
0.055
0.020
0.090
0.245
0.055
0.115
0.050
0.670
0.005
0.030
0.290
0.020
0.400
0.005
0.010
0.005
0.265
0.010
0.020
0.120
0.005
0.030
0.090
0.090
0.100
0.035
0.100
0.130
0.180
0.020
0.070
0.055
0.100
0.045
0.110
0.080
0.405
0.085
1.430
0.230
0.090
0.040
0.015
0.855
0.225
0.020
0.800
0.005
0.345
0.030
0.020
0.450
0.975
0.075
0.035
0.135
2.480
0.055
0.230
0.100
0.215
0.220
0.135
0.020
0.090
0.135
0.095
0.230
0.320
0.170
0.095
0.560
0.020
0.335
0.110
0.030
0.005
0.030
0.230
0.210
0.625
0.155
0.110
1.310
0.795
0.350
0.570
0.040
0.040
0.045
0.025
0.080
0.020
0.330
0.305
0.195
0.110
0.220
0.085
0.590
0.045
1.140
0.335
0.035
0.480
0.030
0.120
0.265
0.515
0.025
1.240
0.055
0.010
0.210
0.205
0.035
0.020
0.010
0.485
0.400
0.245
0.325
0.285
0.255
0.135
0.045
0.030
0.045
0.055
0.100
0.085
0.190
0.890
0.030
0.025
0.400
0.010
0.015
0.125
0.555
0.230
0.315
0.125
0.030
0.040
0.090
1.740
0.050
0.110
0.085
0.040
1.750
0.095
0.110
0.460
0.060
0.050
0.825
0.195
0.185
0.005
0.115
0.120
0.010
0.360
0.145
0.455
0.610
0.135
0.265
0.150
0.155
0.830
0.420
0.075
0.085
0.100
0.160
0.210
0.310
0.060
1.310
0.070
0.035
0.210
0.415
0.125
0.120
0.135
1.140
0.020
0.035
0.460
0.030
0.545
0.025
0.020
0.025
0.425
0.060
0.020
0.120
0.010
0.065
0.180
0.190
0.135
0.060
0.100
0.195
0.240
0.035
0.090
0.130
0.135
0.070
0.225
0.140
0.490
0.220
1.410
0.230
0.090
0.040
0.005
0.820
0.215
0.015
0.760
0.005
0.340
0.030
0.020
0.425
0.910
0.070
0.035
0.130
2.430
0.050
0.230
0.100
0.205
0.210
0.125
0.015
0.090
0.130
0.090
0.230
0.305
0.170
0.080
0.510
0.020
0.315
0.110
0.030
0.005
0.030
0.230
0.200
0.600
0.155
0.090
1.220
0.740
0.350
0.560
0.020
0.040
0.045
0.025
0.080
0.020
0.310
0.305
0.190
0.110
0.185
0.065
0.510
0.045
1.130
0.310
0.035
0.460
0.025
0.120
0.265
0.475
0.020
1.150
0.055
0.005
0.205
0.190
0.030
0.010
0.010
0.445
0.400
0.215
0.295
0.280
0.240
0.125
0.040
0.025
0.040
0.055
0.090
0.080
0.190
0.890
0.025
0.025
0.400
0.010
0.010
0.120
0.545
0.230
0.315
0.125
0.025
0.040
0.090
1.700
0.040
0.105
0.080
0.040
1.740
0.090
0.105
0.450
0.055
0.045
0.825
0.180
0.185
0.005
0.115
0.105
0.005
0.330
0.135
0.430
0.610
0.130
0.265
0.145
0.145
0.810
0.400
0.075
0.070
0.095
0.145
0.200
0.290
0.050
1.280
0.070
0.035
0.210
0.410
0.120
0.115
0.130
1.120
0.010
0.035
0.460
0.030
0.535
0.025
0.015
0.020
0.410
0.060
0.020
0.120
0.005
0.065
0.160
0.170
0.135
0.055
0.100
0.160
0.235
0.030
0.085
0.125
0.130
0.065
0.200
0.140
0.485
0.205
5095WB
5072WA
5819CK
3301CA
3301CB
5169WA
7213WB
7013WA
5018WB
9601WB
4251WA
5255CA
5255CB
0081WA
0023WA
0166CA
0166CB
0166CD
0166WA
0069WB
8834WB
7183WA
0010WA
0010WB
5175WA
7223WA
0024WA
9083WB
8923WA
7167WA
0111WB
5247CA
5247CB
7216WA
3115WC
3565WE
8303WA
7164CM
7164CP
7164CS
7164HC
7164WA
5878WB
5038CB
5038CD
5038WA
2003WC
8494WA
5789WA
3581WB
5068WA
5068WB
3859CV
8583CT
8583CU
8583WB
6181WB
5098WA
5236CA
115510
1155C9
5983WA
1171CU
1171WA
1694WB
0075WA
3662WB
5186CW
5026WA
3816CW
9571WC
6114CA
6114WB
0156WA
6548WB
1651C1
1651WA
5150WA
5703CA
5703CC
0138CC
0138CD
0138CE
0138CF
0138CG
0138CH
0138CI
0096WA
0096WB
0096WC
7139WA
0083WB
9008WA
9008WB
6661WC
7052CE
0005WA
5125WA
5183CX
0047CH
5681CN
1945WC
8869CA
8869CB
8869CC
8869CD
8869CE
8869CF
8869WC
4634CP
7145WA
0007WA
6807CC
6807WB
7123WA
5256WA
0032WA
0133WB
0133WC
9792WA
0055WA
521810
5218C3
5218C7
5218C9
5218CZ
7155WA
7099WB
0117WA
5213WA
5241WA
8664CP
1201WA
1201WB
5211WA
0148WA
7106CV
7106CW
7106CX
7106CY
7082WB
1538WB
4898CA
5191WA
0132WA
2054CB
534710
534713
534715
5347HA
7228WA
7034WA
7079WA
7079WB
4863C3
0060WA
8397WC
5401CE
5401CF
5401CG
5401WA
5230CC
514810
514812
5148C9
4588CS
5005WA
0120WA
7240WA
0066WA
9679CS
9679WC
9679WD
5156WB
5155WA
7293CA
7293CE
7293CF
7293CG
6742CM
6742WB
2283WA
WARRANTS
HEVEA-WB
HIAPTEK-WA
HLBANK-CK
HLIND-CA
HLIND-CB
HOHUP-WA
HOVID-WB
HUBLINE-WA
HUNZPTY-WB
HWGB-WB
IBHD-WA
ICON-CA
ICON-CB
IDEAL-WA
IFCAMSC-WA
INARI-CA
INARI-CB
INARI-CD
INARI-WA
INSTACO-WB
IREKA-WB
IRETEX-WA
IRIS-WA
IRIS-WB
IVORY-WA
JADI-WA
JAG-WA
JETSON-WB
JIANKUN-WA
JOHOTIN-WA
K1-WB
KAREX-CA
KAREX-CB
KAWAN-WA
KBUNAI-WC
KEURO-WE
KFM-WA
KNM-CM
KNM-CP
KNM-CS
KNM-HC
KNM-WA
KPJ-WB
KSL-CB
KSL-CD
KSL-WA
KULIM-WC
LBICAP-WA
LBS-WA
LIONCOR-WB
LUSTER-WA
LUSTER-WB
MAGNUM-CV
MAHSING-CT
MAHSING-CU
MAHSING-WB
MALTON-WB
MASTEEL-WA
MATRIX-CA
MAYBANKC10
MAYBANK-C9
MBMR-WA
MBSB-CU
MBSB-WA
MENANG-WB
MEXTER-WA
MFLOUR-WB
MHB-CW
MHC-WA
MISC-CW
MITRA-WC
MKH-CA
MKH-WB
MPAY-WA
MPCORP-WB
MRCB-C1
MRCB-WA
MSPORTS-WA
MUHIBAH-CA
MUHIBAH-CC
MYEG-CC
MYEG-CD
MYEG-CE
MYEG-CF
MYEG-CG
MYEG-CH
MYEG-CI
NEXGRAM-WA
NEXGRAM-WB
NEXGRAM-WC
NICE-WA
NOTION-WB
OMESTI-WA
OMESTI-WB
OSKPROP-WC
PADINI-CE
PALETTE-WA
PANTECH-WA
PCHEM-CX
PERISAI-CH
PETDAG-CN
PJDEV-WC
PMETAL-CA
PMETAL-CB
PMETAL-CC
PMETAL-CD
PMETAL-CE
PMETAL-CF
PMETAL-WC
POS-CP
PSIPTEK-WA
PUC-WA
PUNCAK-CC
PUNCAK-WB
PWORTH-WA
REACH-WA
REDTONE-WA
SANICHI-WB
SANICHI-WC
SEG-WA
SERSOL-WA
SKPETROC10
SKPETRO-C3
SKPETRO-C7
SKPETRO-C9
SKPETRO-CZ
SKPRES-WA
SMPC-WB
SMRT-WA
SNTORIA-WA
SONA-WA
SPSETIA-CP
SUMATEC-WA
SUMATEC-WB
SUNWAY-WA
SUNZEN-WA
SUPERMX-CV
SUPERMX-CW
SUPERMX-CX
SUPERMX-CY
SYF-WB
SYMLIFE-WB
TA-CA
TAMBUN-WA
TDEX-WA
TDM-CB
TENAGA-C10
TENAGA-C13
TENAGA-C15
TENAGA-HA
TGOFFS-WA
TGUAN-WA
TIGER-WA
TIGER-WB
TM-C3
TMS-WA
TNLOGIS-WC
TROP-CE
TROP-CF
TROP-CG
TROP-WA
TUNEINS-CC
UEMS-C10
UEMS-C12
UEMS-C9
UMW-CS
UNISEM-WA
VIS-WA
VOIR-WA
VSOLAR-WA
WCT-CS
WCT-WC
WCT-WD
XDL-WB
XINQUAN-WA
YINSON-CA
YINSON-CE
YINSON-CF
YINSON-CG
YTLPOWR-CM
YTLPOWR-WB
ZELAN-WA
CLOSE
(RM)
+/(RM)
1.420
0.230
0.090
0.040
0.005
0.855
0.220
0.020
0.800
0.005
0.340
0.030
0.020
0.425
0.955
0.070
0.035
0.130
2.430
0.055
0.230
0.100
0.205
0.215
0.135
0.020
0.090
0.135
0.090
0.230
0.310
0.170
0.085
0.510
0.020
0.330
0.110
0.030
0.005
0.030
0.230
0.205
0.605
0.155
0.110
1.280
0.740
0.350
0.560
0.020
0.040
0.045
0.025
0.080
0.020
0.315
0.305
0.195
0.110
0.190
0.075
0.570
0.045
1.140
0.335
0.035
0.460
0.030
0.120
0.265
0.510
0.020
1.170
0.055
0.010
0.205
0.205
0.035
0.020
0.010
0.445
0.400
0.220
0.300
0.285
0.240
0.125
0.045
0.025
0.045
0.055
0.090
0.085
0.190
0.890
0.025
0.025
0.400
0.010
0.015
0.120
0.545
0.230
0.315
0.125
0.030
0.040
0.090
1.740
0.050
0.110
0.085
0.040
1.750
0.095
0.105
0.460
0.055
0.045
0.825
0.195
0.185
0.005
0.115
0.120
0.010
0.345
0.135
0.440
0.610
0.130
0.265
0.145
0.145
0.810
0.405
0.075
0.085
0.100
0.155
0.200
0.290
0.050
1.300
0.070
0.035
0.210
0.410
0.120
0.120
0.135
1.130
0.015
0.035
0.460
0.030
0.535
0.025
0.015
0.020
0.415
0.060
0.020
0.120
0.005
0.065
0.170
0.185
0.135
0.055
0.100
0.195
0.240
0.035
0.085
0.125
0.130
0.065
0.210
0.140
0.485
0.215
-0.020
-0.010
-0.010
Unch
-0.005
0.005
0.005
0.005
Unch
Unch
-0.015
Unch
Unch
-0.005
0.030
-0.005
-0.005
-0.015
-0.050
0.005
-0.040
0.005
-0.010
-0.005
0.015
Unch
Unch
-0.025
Unch
Unch
-0.005
-0.010
-0.005
-0.020
Unch
-0.005
-0.030
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.010
-0.010
Unch
0.005
0.015
0.040
-0.035
-0.010
-0.010
-0.020
-0.005
Unch
0.005
-0.020
Unch
-0.020
Unch
-0.005
Unch
-0.010
-0.010
0.030
-0.015
Unch
-0.005
Unch
-0.020
0.005
-0.005
-0.005
0.030
Unch
Unch
Unch
0.005
0.010
0.005
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.025
0.010
-0.015
-0.010
0.005
-0.010
-0.005
0.005
Unch
Unch
-0.005
-0.010
0.005
-0.005
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.020
Unch
Unch
0.030
-0.010
-0.025
-0.010
0.005
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.010
0.005
0.005
0.005
-0.005
-0.010
-0.005
-0.005
Unch
-0.005
-0.005
Unch
0.010
-0.005
-0.005
Unch
0.010
Unch
0.010
Unch
Unch
0.010
-0.010
-0.005
-0.005
-0.005
-0.030
-0.005
-0.010
-0.005
Unch
-0.005
-0.010
0.010
-0.005
-0.020
-0.005
-0.015
-0.020
-0.015
-0.005
-0.030
0.015
-0.020
Unch
Unch
Unch
0.005
-0.010
-0.010
Unch
-0.005
-0.025
0.030
-0.005
-0.005
-0.005
0.005
0.005
0.010
Unch
-0.005
Unch
0.010
-0.005
Unch
0.005
Unch
0.005
0.010
0.005
0.005
-0.005
0.005
VOL PARENT
EXE
(‘000)
PRICE PRICE
193
30
90
20
89.9
298.2
1374.2
1855.1
58.6
1163.3
96
147.3
197.1
259.2
11018.9
510
270
205
98.6
745
12.5
1.5
301.5
5809.4
10.2
192.7
185
39.9
984.3
24
5328.9
40
164.3
34
115
181.3
15
19.8
31.9
250
10
4639.7
331.5
100
1988
1471.5
46.5
50
65
0.4
20
349.8
65
30
20
398.2
5
92.6
1.8
432
29467.7
4.8
42
63
100.2
671.5
23.8
570
0.8
18.8
2232.1
140
172.5
2872.6
50
110
3367.7
720
263.1
50
30
1
4901.7
1236.5
28
350
907.8
70.1
253
1400.1
100
110
58.6
30
4.9
250.1
100
16
110
346.1
80
386.2
50
185
30
370
100
50
100.6
400
100.1
1319.5
555
10
344.8
2292.5
553.8
405.8
815.1
10
588.3
52
30
50
215.2
200
5190.6
43.1
1183.5
10
5003
5
1213.9
5540.5
396.3
364
50
20.3
770
1325
1470
22.4
591
60.7
355.8
120
100
153
406
30
109.8
108.3
260.5
391.6
4.5
2614
159
60
160
763.8
99.5
20
74.8
150
275.1
20
6439.5
4020.3
2
976
277.5
101
12.3
2.2
75.8
343
603
110
2220.1
200
297.5
8006.4
2.120
0.595
14.199
4.400
4.400
1.390
0.375
0.035
1.890
0.140
0.615
0.700
0.700
0.540
1.080
2.790
2.790
2.790
2.790
0.155
0.630
0.330
0.320
0.320
0.435
0.130
0.165
0.430
0.280
1.510
0.535
3.910
3.910
1.590
0.065
1.070
0.485
0.590
0.590
0.590
0.590
0.590
3.890
2.150
2.150
2.150
3.040
1.360
1.560
0.075
0.085
0.085
2.840
1.990
1.990
1.990
0.855
0.855
2.750
8.690
8.690
3.210
2.090
2.090
0.740
0.095
1.660
1.580
1.000
7.800
1.180
2.850
2.850
0.200
0.255
1.300
1.300
0.130
1.940
1.940
2.600
2.600
2.600
2.600
2.600
2.600
2.600
0.075
0.075
0.075
0.135
0.440
0.530
0.530
1.850
1.490
0.045
0.725
5.320
0.485
17.600
1.480
2.690
2.690
2.690
2.690
2.690
2.690
2.690
4.590
0.160
0.145
2.700
2.700
0.200
0.625
0.735
0.095
0.095
1.380
0.260
2.800
2.800
2.800
2.800
2.800
0.765
0.615
0.595
1.200
0.425
3.560
0.215
0.215
3.300
0.515
2.200
2.200
2.200
2.200
0.455
0.845
0.750
1.930
0.145
0.765
14.800
14.800
14.800
14.800
0.420
2.310
0.135
0.135
7.010
0.060
1.320
1.060
1.060
1.060
1.060
1.850
1.270
1.270
1.270
10.840
2.020
0.255
0.475
0.125
1.560
1.560
1.560
0.120
0.425
2.900
2.900
2.900
2.900
1.610
1.610
0.320
Please refer to the bursa malaysia website For the prices of Loan stocks, bonds and overseas structure warrants
1.000
0.690
13.300
6.165
6.850
0.600
0.180
0.200
1.100
0.200
1.410
1.400
1.470
0.100
0.100
2.841
3.106
2.462
0.330
0.330
1.000
0.800
0.150
0.200
0.750
0.170
0.100
0.750
0.320
2.280
0.220
3.180
3.380
0.930
0.131
1.180
0.510
0.850
1.080
0.880
0.580
1.000
4.010
2.000
2.250
1.600
3.850
1.000
1.000
1.000
0.100
0.100
2.850
1.811
2.104
2.380
1.000
0.670
2.667
9.000
10.000
3.200
2.500
1.000
1.000
0.130
2.060
2.380
1.560
6.150
0.900
3.600
2.260
0.200
1.000
1.000
2.300
0.180
2.900
3.280
1.500
1.540
2.100
1.750
2.050
2.000
2.700
0.100
0.260
0.110
0.160
1.000
0.960
0.500
1.000
1.850
0.040
0.600
6.400
1.280
19.000
1.000
1.790
1.750
2.240
3.750
3.500
3.000
1.100
4.800
0.100
0.100
2.800
1.000
0.500
0.750
0.250
0.100
0.100
1.000
0.180
2.500
4.200
3.180
2.800
4.500
0.450
1.000
0.180
0.600
0.350
3.180
0.350
0.175
2.500
0.100
2.300
2.400
2.150
2.500
0.700
1.100
0.800
0.600
0.110
0.880
12.000
13.000
13.800
13.680
0.500
1.000
0.200
0.200
6.600
0.100
1.000
1.200
1.280
1.480
1.000
1.850
1.780
1.280
1.850
10.800
2.180
0.250
0.500
0.120
1.800
2.040
2.250
0.350
1.000
4.641
2.600
3.200
2.600
1.400
1.140
0.250
PR’M
(%)
14.15
54.62
2.54
44.77
57.03
4.68
6.67
528.57
0.53
46.43
184.55
108.57
115.71
-2.78
-2.31
11.33
18.45
10.31
-1.08
148.39
95.24
172.73
10.94
29.69
103.45
46.15
15.15
105.81
46.43
66.23
-0.93
-1.28
-0.51
-9.43
131.69
41.12
27.84
54.24
84.75
56.78
24.31
104.24
18.64
14.65
18.72
33.95
50.99
-0.74
0.00
1,260
64.71
70.59
3.43
2.06
8.50
35.43
52.63
1.17
7.64
11.88
16.97
17.45
26.08
2.39
80.41
73.68
51.81
56.33
68.00
2.63
19.49
29.82
20.35
27.50
296.08
8.46
92.69
65.38
54.64
72.16
0.48
5.38
6.15
1.92
0.77
9.23
23.08
93.33
280.00
106.67
59.26
147.73
97.17
30.19
2.16
29.19
44.44
37.93
21.24
170.10
14.77
4.39
0.74
0.19
6.51
47.21
35.32
21.56
5.58
11.11
31.25
27.59
11.11
1.85
197.50
36.80
-3.40
63.16
52.63
32.25
44.23
15.71
50.43
25.89
21.43
62.50
3.92
84.55
4.20
0.83
12.94
11.66
130.23
48.84
0.30
-1.94
18.18
20.68
11.36
20.68
97.80
64.50
13.33
-1.55
24.14
24.18
2.36
7.23
5.41
4.59
51.19
-7.79
59.26
74.07
7.28
116.67
16.29
15.57
23.58
43.40
33.49
6.49
44.88
19.69
46.85
5.63
16.34
70.59
33.68
40.00
28.21
43.27
59.62
220.83
155.29
101.25
12.07
19.31
7.76
-4.35
0.93
45.31
EXPIRY
DATE
28/02/2020
09/01/2017
28/08/2015
12/06/2015
17/09/2015
21/12/2018
05/06/2018
04/11/2019
02/03/2015
08/04/2015
08/10/2019
13/11/2015
01/07/2015
29/04/2019
15/02/2016
07/05/2015
28/07/2015
01/06/2015
04/06/2018
07/09/2018
25/06/2019
10/06/2019
24/06/2016
20/04/2016
26/04/2017
12/10/2015
14/08/2019
06/02/2019
23/12/2021
21/11/2017
11/12/2015
30/04/2015
28/04/2015
28/07/2016
20/10/2023
26/08/2016
19/10/2016
08/07/2015
28/08/2015
27/11/2015
30/11/2015
15/11/2017
23/01/2019
10/09/2015
01/07/2015
19/08/2016
26/02/2016
17/04/2018
11/06/2018
12/04/2019
03/06/2022
26/05/2023
28/08/2015
30/03/2015
21/04/2015
16/03/2018
29/06/2018
26/10/2015
04/06/2015
02/10/2015
01/07/2015
14/06/2017
21/08/2015
31/05/2016
09/07/2019
17/09/2018
09/05/2017
27/11/2015
28/07/2017
28/08/2015
04/07/2016
31/07/2015
29/12/2017
06/08/2015
21/04/2015
29/01/2016
14/09/2018
09/11/2017
08/07/2015
28/08/2015
23/02/2015
28/07/2015
05/05/2015
05/05/2015
10/09/2015
29/01/2016
03/08/2015
16/05/2022
21/07/2023
15/01/2024
09/08/2017
02/05/2017
19/04/2016
30/05/2018
28/08/2017
28/08/2015
20/03/2018
21/12/2020
30/06/2015
28/10/2015
05/05/2015
04/12/2020
28/05/2015
04/06/2015
28/07/2015
17/09/2015
05/05/2015
05/05/2015
22/08/2019
08/04/2015
16/11/2019
25/12/2024
08/04/2015
20/07/2018
22/04/2016
12/08/2022
04/03/2015
13/03/2018
24/09/2019
14/08/2015
18/04/2023
22/10/2015
05/05/2015
30/11/2015
15/12/2015
20/05/2015
27/06/2017
09/05/2022
01/08/2017
15/04/2019
30/07/2018
30/11/2015
03/03/2021
13/11/2018
17/08/2016
14/04/2019
11/08/2015
12/06/2015
30/09/2015
01/07/2015
11/11/2019
11/11/2020
04/06/2015
30/05/2017
21/09/2018
30/09/2015
04/06/2015
03/08/2015
31/12/2015
29/01/2016
07/04/2016
09/10/2019
07/08/2015
23/12/2018
01/09/2015
16/01/2017
26/12/2018
27/02/2015
30/03/2015
08/07/2015
06/12/2019
27/02/2015
27/11/2015
30/12/2015
31/07/2015
29/05/2015
24/08/2015
01/09/2016
31/03/2024
01/12/2017
15/12/2015
10/03/2016
11/12/2017
22/01/2017
24/06/2019
09/03/2015
21/08/2015
05/05/2015
05/05/2015
31/07/2015
11/06/2018
25/01/2019
Markets 3 7
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
GLOBAL ROUNDUP
Singapore
Hong Kong
15 most active counters
FT Straits Times
STOCK
Index points
3500
3225
2950
3,419.15
2675
2,774.06
+6.95
(+0.20%)
2400
Mar 1, 2010
Jan 28, 2015
VOL (MIL)
ADVANCE SCT
MEMSTAR TECHNOLOGY
INTERNATIONAL HEALTHWAY
SIIC ENVIRONMENT
GOLDEN AGRI-RESOURCES
TRITECH GROUP
PACIFIC ANDES RESOURCES
ARMARDA GROUP
NOBLE GROUP
CHINA NEW TOWN
GLOBAL LOGISTIC PROPERTIES
CHINA FIBRETECH
PACIFIC CENTURY REGIONAL
SINCAP GROUP
EQUATION SUMMIT
Singapore shares closed 0.2% higher yester- Top gainers
day, as the Monetary Authority of Singapore STOCK
(MAS) unexpectedly loosened monetary YONG XIN INTERNATIONAL
policy ahead of this week’s US Federal Re- GREEN BUILD TECH
LERENO BIO-CHEM
serve meeting.
CHINA ESSENCE GROUP
The benchmark Straits Times Index rose UNITED FIBER SYSTEM
6.95 points to close at 3,419.15 points. Trad- ARMARDA GROUP
ing volume was 1.38 billion shares worth MAGNUS ENERGY GROUP
XPRESS HOLDINGS
S$1.23 billion. Advancers outnumbered de- OSSIA INTERNATIONAL
cliners 233 to 177, while 529 stocks closed IPCO INTERNATIONAL
MDR
unchanged.
CORP
The MAS surprised the market by an- LAFE
HOE LEONG CORP
nouncing the reduction of the slope of the ACMA
local dollar’s rise against a basket of curren- STRATECH SYSTEMS
cies of the nation’s key trading partners, as Top losers
consumer prices of the city state faced de- STOCK
flation and oil prices continued to slide. The ELEKTROMOTIVE GROUP
easing was seen to boost Singapore stocks SOUTHERN PACKAGING
as goods and services become more com- TOP GLOBAL
METECH INTERNATIONAL
petitive regionally.
NEW WAVE HOLDINGS
Meanwhile, Chinese monetary stimulus OLS ENTERPRISE
also became the subject of speculation after JOYAS INTERNATIONAL
the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) injected FAR EAST GROUP
TONG CORP
60 billion yuan through its regular reverse HIAP
ENVIRO-HUB HOLDINGS
repo auctions on Tuesday. ING Research CAPTII
said “we think open market operations are ADVANCED HOLDINGS
FASHION HOLDINGS
the first resort and a reserve requirement ASIA
ZHONGXIN FRUIT & JUICE
ratio cut would be a last.”
BLUE SKY POWER
China
3085
CLOSE (S$)
0.032
0.300
0.003
0.007
0.008
0.004
0.004
0.009
0.265
0.006
0.006
0.038
0.056
0.015
0.016
+/– (%)
77.78
50.00
50.00
40.00
33.33
33.33
33.33
28.57
20.45
20.00
20.00
18.75
16.67
15.38
14.29
CLOSE (S$)
0.004
0.120
0.006
0.006
0.007
0.007
0.023
0.150
0.138
0.050
0.042
0.185
0.038
0.021
0.082
UNCH
5.56
UNCH
1.43
-1.14
8.12
UNCH
33.33
2.44
8.57
1.16
5.41
UNCH
-3.77
UNCH
+/– (%)
-20.00
-14.89
-14.29
-14.29
-12.50
-12.50
-11.54
-11.24
-10.97
-10.71
-10.64
-9.76
-9.52
-8.70
-6.82
3,305.74
-47.22
(-1.41%)
2295 3,087.842
1900
China stocks fell yesterday on concerns
about tighter liquidity and a fresh slide
in oil prices, but Hong Kong managed
to eke out gains as telecommunications
counters climbed.
The CSI300 index fell 1.39% to 3,525.32
points by the end of the morning session,
while the Shanghai Composite Index slid
a similar amount to 3,305.74.
“Cyclical factors in the lead up to the
Lunar New Year, including required regulatory payments and moves in fiscal deposits, are putting pressure on the shortterm money supply in the market,” said
Pan Shaochang, an analyst at Dongguan
Securities.
“The expectation of new IPOs and restrictions on margin trading have also reduced net liquidity in the market.”
Chinese regulators will relaunch an investigation into stock margin trading, and
have been given notice banks to tighten
supervision of their lending practices to
ensure loans aren’t funnelled into stock
markets, sources with direct knowledge
of the matter told Reuters.
The news comes as Beijing moves cautiously to suppress the excessive use of leverage to make aggressive bets on Chinese
stock markets, which have gained around
40 percent since November.
20800
18300 21,056.93
+54.53
(+0.22%)
Jan 28, 2015
3,372.58
-41.70
(-1.22%)
Renewed concern over Greece and weak
results at companies such as Siemens and
Philips put an end to a winning run for European stock markets on Tuesday.
The pan-European FTSEurofirst 300 index,
which had risen for the past eight sessions,
closed down by 0.8% at 1,475.84 points.
The eurozone’s blue-chip Euro STOXX
50 index also declined 1.2% after a similar
eight-day winning streak. Those gains were
ignited by the European Central Bank’s plans
to buy government bonds to spur growth in
the struggling euro zone economy.
Greek shares underperformed for the
second day in a row. The benchmark Athens
ATG equity index closed down 3.7 percent
and Greece’s borrowing costs rose.
Investors were worried Greece’s new anti-bailout government would clash with the
European Union over the terms of Greece’s
bailout. Syriza, the party that won Greece’s
election on Sunday, opposes those terms.
Fears that investors could move deposits
out of Greek banks hit the sector. National
Bank of Greece fell 11.8%, while Bank of Piraeus also fell 12%.
“I’m staying away from the financials and
the banks at the moment, because they’re in
the firing line from any fallout from Greece,”
said Mirabaud Securities’ European equity
sales executive Rupert Baker.
+/– (%)
0.016
0.140
6.350
0.077
0.129
0.103
4.450
0.152
0.162
0.131
1.670
5.720
1.100
0.395
3.600
UNCH
40.00
0.95
-1.28
-7.86
7.29
0.23
-15.08
-2.99
12.93
1.21
-0.17
0.92
UNCH
-3.49
CLOSE (HK$)
0.228
0.140
1.070
0.640
1.460
1.770
0.233
4.000
2.210
4.250
0.088
2.940
0.900
2.200
0.760
+/– (%)
62.86
40.00
33.75
28.00
23.73
22.07
21.35
19.40
18.82
18.72
17.33
17.13
15.38
15.18
15.15
CLOSE (HK$)
+/– (%)
1.600
0.055
0.152
0.295
0.129
0.850
0.141
0.360
0.092
13.460
0.260
0.173
0.385
0.068
0.116
-16.67
-15.38
-15.08
-13.24
-11.64
-11.46
-10.76
-10.00
-9.80
-9.05
-8.77
-8.47
-8.33
-8.11
-7.94
Index points
18400
16175
5,405.94
6,811.61
-40.79
(-0.60%)
5320
Mar 1, 2010
CLOSE (HK$)
Dow Jones
Index points
7000
1,110
437.47
248.92
234.30
230.71
227.08
205.53
202.79
191.27
180.12
179.79
167.97
163.10
159.84
151.70
United States
13950
10,403.79
17,387.21
-291.49
(-1.65%)
11725
4760
Jan 27, 2015
VOL (MIL)
CCT LAND HOLDINGS
MISSION CAPITAL
CHINA CONSTRUCTION BANK
OPES ASIA DEVELOPMENT
CHINA NATIONAL CULTURE
CHINA OIL GANGRAN ENERGY
BANK OF CHINA
WAI CHUN MINING INDUSTRY
GAYETY HOLDINGS
ARTINI CHINA CO
ALIBABA PICTURES GROUP
INDUSTRIAL & COMMERCIAL
GOME ELECTRICAL
CHINA NEW ENERGY POWER
HANERGY THIN FILM POWER
Hong Kong stocks moved up 54.53 points, or Top gainers
0.22%, to close on yesterday at 24,861.81 points. STOCK
The benchmark Hang Seng Index traded POLYARD PETROLEUM
between 24,716.68 and 24,983.89. Turnover MISSION CAPITAL
HOLDINGS
totalled HK$80.37 billion. The Hang Seng DIRECTEL
HING LEE HK HOLDINGS
China Enterprises Index ended down 66.74 SAM WOO CONSTRUCTION
KVB KUNLUN FINANCIAL
points, or 0.55%, to close at 11,963.64.
MEDICARE
Three of the four sub-indices gained MINGYUAN
CHIHO-TIANDE GROUP
ground. The Utilities sub- index rose the most HI SUN TECHNOLOGY CHINA
at 0.96%, followed by Properties at 0.62%, MILLENNIUM PACIFIC GRP
Commerce and Industry at 0.3%, while Fi- ENVIRO ENERGY
REALORD GROUP HOLDINGS
nance dipped 0.02%.
E-KONG GROUP
Banking giant HSBC, which accounts for GLOBAL INTERNATIONAL
the largest weighting of the Hang Seng Index, TC ORIENT LIGHTING
lowered 0.41% to HK$73. Bank of East Asia, Top losers
another major bank in Hong Kong, added STOCK
0.63% to HK$31.90. Local bourse operator KATE CHINA HOLDINGS
HKEX fell 0.39% to HK$179.40.
WAI CHUN GROUP
China Mobile, China’s dominant mobile WAI CHUN MINING IND
CAPITAL
carrier, added 0.68% to HK$103.40. China Uni- CROSBY
NEPTUNE GROUP
com, another Chinese telecom giant, edged ASIAN CITRUS HOLDINGS
down 0.17% to HK$12.
CYPRESS JADE AGRICULTURAL
Local property shares closed up. Sun Hung CL GROUP HOLDINGS
AGRICULTURE
Kai, one of Hong Kong ‘s largest property CODE
LAUNCH TECH CO
developers by market value, rose 1.27% to PROSTEN TECHNOLOGY
HK$127.90. Cheung Kong properties, con- CREATIVE ENERGY SOLUTIONS
trolled by billionaire Li Ka-shing, ended up HERITAGE INTERNATIONAL
GLOBAL TECH HOLDINGS
0.76% to HK$145.30.
CHINA NETCOM TECH
5880
Mar 1, 2010
24,861.81
15800
Mar 1, 2010
2730
1960
Jan 28, 2015
23300
6440
2,772.70
Index points
25800
3115
2345
STOCK
FTSE 100
Index points
3500
15 most active counters
Hang Seng
United Kingdom
Euro STOXX 50 Index
Index points
2690
Mar 1, 2010
0.001
0.019
0.275
0.142
0.435
0.173
0.055
0.004
1.050
0.076
2.610
0.039
0.315
0.102
0.007
+/– (%)
Europe
Shanghai Composite
3480
121.20
56.19
53.73
41.53
38.61
35.98
35.94
31.86
25.97
25.28
23.12
21.55
18.51
16.05
14.80
CLOSE (S$)
9500
Jan 27, 2015
Britain’s blue-chip equity index ended
lower on Tuesday after an eight-session
run to a four-month high, with banks
slipping on concerns the Greek crisis
could spread and miners tracking weaker
metals prices.
Mid cap oil producer Afren plunged
71% after saying it was in talks with its
largest bondholders over its liquidity and
funding needs.
The benchmark FTSE 100 index ended
0.6% lower at 6,811.61 points, also reacting to UK data showing gross domestic
product grew more slowly than expected
in the last quarter of 2014.
“UK markets were hit by broad-based
selling after UK growth estimates slipped
... with banks leading the declines under
threat of a looming crisis in Greece spreading across the financial system,” Jasper
Lawler, analyst at CMC Markets, said.
The UK banking index fell 1.2%, tracking a 11.7% fall in Greek banks to a record
low, on worries Greece’s new anti-bailout
government would clash with the European Union over the nation’s debts.
Barclays, Royal Bank of Scotland and
HSBC dropped 0.5% to 1.8%, with traders citing news of UK banks facing hefty
mis-selling claims as one reason for their
weakness.
Mar 1, 2010
Jan 27, 2015
US stocks closed more than 1% lower on
Tuesday as disappointing results from a
number of bellwether companies pointed
to weakening conditions, while an unexpected decline in durable goods orders
also weighed on sentiment.
The Dow Jones industrial average fell
291.49 points, or 1.65%, to 17,387.21,
the S&P 500 lost 27.54 points, or 1.34%,
to 2,029.55 and the Nasdaq Composite
dropped 90.27 points, or 1.89%, to 4,681.50.
The day’s losses were broad, with nine
of the 10 primary S&P 500 sectors lower
on the day, though tech was the biggest
drag by far. The group lost 3.3% in its biggest one-day drop since November 2011,
in the wake of results from industry bellwether Microsoft. Industrial shares fell,
led by Caterpillar.
The two names were the biggest decliners
on the Dow, but fellow components Procter
& Gable and DuPont Co also tumbled.
Microsoft fell 9.3% to US$42.66 a day after the main engine of its historic earnings
power — selling Windows and Office to
big businesses — showed signs of waning.
Heavy machinery marker Caterpillar
gave an outlook below expectations, warning the recent plunge in oil prices would
hurt its energy equipment business. Shares
dropped 7.2% to US$79.85. — Agencies
38 Markets
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
INSIDER MOVES . TRADING THEMES . EVENTS . FOREX
Trading themes
Insider moves (Filings on Jan 27, 2015)
Insider Moves show what substantial shareholders are doing with their stakes, which could be a signal of their views on the company’s outlook.
COMPANY
SHARES ACQUIRED
(DISPOSED)
AEON CO (M)
AFFIN HOLDINGS
AIRASIA
(314,200)
72,100
138,600
ALLIANCE FINANCIAL GROUP
AMMB HOLDINGS
AMMB HOLDINGS
688,600
1,748,800
400,000
AXIATA GROUP
BIMB HOLDINGS
BRITISH AMERICAN TOBACCO (M)
BUMI ARMADA
CAHYA MATA SARAWAK
CAPITAMALLS MALAYSIA TRUST
CAREPLUS GROUP
CIMB GROUP HOLDINGS
CIMB GROUP HOLDINGS
DIGI.COM
DRB-HICOM
FELDA GLOBAL VENTURES HOLDINGS
GAMUDA
GENTING PLANTATIONS
HARTALEGA HOLDINGS
HIBISCUS PETROLEUM
HO HUP CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
HONG LEONG BANK
ICAPITAL.BIZ
(2,712,400)
34,400
14,419
(3,143,900)
841,700
(950,000)
250,000
5,132,500
64,300
(3,750,000)
(500,000)
(200,000)
(2,289,100)
18,000
405,500
30,000
520,000
(269,000)
441,400
IHH HEALTHCARE
IJM CORPORATION
INTEGRAX
IOI CORPORATION
KLCC PROPERTY HOLDINGS
(900,000)
(1,645,400)
233,000
(2,396,300)
123,100
KPJ HEALTHCARE
KRETAM HOLDINGS
KUALA LUMPUR KEPONG
KUMPULAN FIMA
LBI CAPITAL
MALAYAN BANKING
MAXIS
118,000
15,291,000
(12,100)
20,000
(3,100,000)
3,906,100
(1,776,000)
MAXIS
MBM RESOURCES
MISC
MISC
(2,642,700)
(1,000,000)
(143,300)
(1,301,600)
OLDTOWN
701,800
ORIENTAL HOLDINGS
(32,900)
PELIKAN INTERNATIONAL CORP
5,000,000
PETRONAS GAS
(221,400)
POS MALAYSIA
36,000
PRESTAR RESOURCES
88,900
PUBLIC BANK
(331,700)
PUNCAK NIAGA HOLDINGS
1,785,800
SAPURAKENCANA PETROLEUM
11,114,900
SARAWAK CONSOLIDATED INDUSTRIES
3,000
SIGNATURE INTERNATIONAL
(3,000,000)
SIME DARBY
50,000,000
SIME DARBY
(5,938,300)
SUNWAY
144,100
SUNWAY REAL ESTATE INV TRUST
(1,098,100)
SUNWAY REAL ESTATE INV TRUST
SYARIKAT TAKAFUL MALAYSIA
TAN CHONG MOTOR HOLDINGS
TASEK CORPORATION
TELEKOM MALAYSIA
TENAGA NASIONAL
TENAGA NASIONAL
(450,700)
144,700
423,500
(10,600)
652,600
1,779,500
4,755,800
TIME DOTCOM
TOP GLOVE CORPORATION
UMW HOLDINGS
UMW HOLDINGS
184,800
130,700
1,263,300
2,757,500
YTL CORPORATION
1,785,600
SHARES HELD
AFTER CHANGE
TRANSACTION
DATE
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
99,307,400
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
147,460,660
WELLINGTON MANAGEMENT CO., LLP.,
149,798,992
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
241,823,640
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
436,793,137
MONDRIAN INVESTMENT PARTNERS LTD.,
152,970,600
ENGLAND & WALES
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
1,140,329,531
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
150,887,321
MITSUBISHI UFJ FINANCIAL GROUP, INC., JAPAN 15,223,314
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
482,569,400
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
85,240,727
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
198,014,800
NG SHU SI
84,008,600
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
1,258,848,320
MITSUBISHI UFJ FINANCIAL GRP, INC., JAPAN
721,993,496
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
1,023,825,740
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
161,129,000
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
208,038,900
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
215,700,905
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
118,678,800
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
56,621,300
MOHD ZULKEFLI MOHD ABDAH
93,694,000
INSAS PLAZA S/B
27,734,450
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
237,913,583
CITY OF LONDON INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT
17,036,800
CO. LTD., ENGLAND & WALES
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
712,968,000
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
194,498,789
AMIN HALIM RASIP
70,150,435
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
583,657,559
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
110,723,100
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
114,767,195
DATUK LIM NYUK [email protected] FREDDY LIM
1,166,119,485
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
149,182,938
BHR ENTERPRISE S/B
147,203,300
NG TIONG SENG CORPORATION S/B
27,605,829
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
1,183,245,786
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
628,876,300
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
469,818,700
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
55,758,491
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
326,784,511
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
263,993,940
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
FRANKLIN RESOURCES, INC, USA
33,854,400
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
55,512,216
CHIA CHOR MENG
35,309,900
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
238,071,000
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
62,031,000
Y.K.TOH PROPERTY S/B
15,477,200
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
574,653,063
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
21,099,083
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
834,356,294
TAN SRI DATUK AMAR (DR.) HAMID BUGO
14,723,500
HSC HEALTHCARE S/B
20,092,650
PERMODALAN NASIONAL
555,007,054
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
870,472,930
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
94,345,965
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
194,556,400
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
293,190,200
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
13,208,320
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
57,663,600
MITSUBISHI UFJ FINANCIAL GROUP, INC., JAPAN 15,045,159
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
554,377,628
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
810,707,019
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
475,776,800
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
38,534,900
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
36,661,973
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
183,174,493
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
470,303,700
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
765,420,447
DIRECTOR/SUBSTANTIAL
SHAREHOLDER
22/1
22/1
22 & 23/1
Bank for International Settlements (BIS) Property Price Dataset
22/1
22/1
22 & 23/1
21/1
22/1
21/1
22/1
22/1
22/1
23/1
21/1
21/1
22/1
22/1
22/1
22/1
22/1
22/1
22 & 27/1
22, 23 & 26/1
22/1
21 TO 23/1
Volatility in housing prices based on BIS “long series”
22/1
22/1
27/1
22/1
23/1
22/1
22, 23 & 26/1
22/1
22/1
21/1
22/1
23/1
22/1
22/1
21/1
22/1
23/1
22/1
14/1
22/1
22/1
22 & 23/1
22/1
22/1
22/1
23/1
26/1
22/1
21 & 22/1
22/1
22/1
22/1
20 & 21/1
22/1
21/1
22/1
21/1
19 TO 21/1
22/1
22/1
21 & 22/1
22 & 23/1
22/1
While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, the information presented is not an exhaustive list and is not an official record of shareholder
filings. Direct and indirect shareholdings are combined due to space constraints. Readers who are interested should check the official filings filed
with Bursa Malaysia.
Note: * denotes Ace Market
Local events to watch out for today
• BHS Industries Bhd extraordinary general meeting at Redang Room,Bukit Jalil Golf and
Country Resort, Jalan Jalil Perkasa 3, Bukit Jalil, Kuala Lumpur at 10.30 am.
Stocks closest to year low
Stocks closest to year high
STOCK
F&N
HOMERIZ
GENTING
GOPENG
CIMB-C2
HARTA
VS
E&O-CX
ASIABIO
MYEG-CH
MYEG-CD
VITROX
DLADY
MUDAJYA
SUNREIT
HARTA-WA
YINSON-CF
BIMB
MRCB-C1
MITRA
HIGH
(RM)
LOW
(RM)
CLOSE
(RM)
VOLUME
('000)
18.300
1.110
8.880
1.070
0.135
7.680
3.950
0.150
0.245
0.255
0.400
3.050
47.200
1.690
1.600
3.400
0.070
4.110
0.210
1.190
18.100
1.080
8.760
0.900
0.100
7.410
3.830
0.150
0.205
0.240
0.400
2.900
46.500
1.590
1.570
3.300
0.065
3.960
0.205
1.090
18.260
1.110
8.830
1.070
0.130
7.550
3.900
0.150
0.220
0.240
0.400
2.940
47.120
1.670
1.580
3.390
0.065
4.100
0.205
1.180
107.7
1309.4
1477.8
428.8
1044.5
379
1676.6
18
92976
350
1
1728.5
24.1
998.1
3361.5
110.9
110
416.4
110
6987.6
This table shows stocks that are trading near their year high. This
could suggest a build-up in buying momentum, or the possibility that
profit-taking activities could set in later.
STOCK
MAHSING-OR
FBMKLCI-HM
POS-CP
KKB
HSI-H6
UEMS-C12
PENERGY
HSI-H4
HSI-H7
ASIABRN
TMAKMUR
DPS-WA
HSI-H5
MBSB-CU
TSRCAP
MAHSING-CT
FBMKLCI-CT
FBMKLCI-CS
CRESBLD-WB
TENAGA-HA
HIGH
(RM)
LOW
(RM)
CLOSE
(RM)
VOLUME
('000)
0.600
0.375
0.050
1.280
0.240
0.120
1.470
0.640
0.410
2.780
1.300
0.035
0.440
0.045
0.850
0.080
0.975
0.800
0.165
0.120
0.475
0.355
0.040
1.200
0.215
0.120
1.400
0.595
0.400
2.630
1.280
0.030
0.375
0.045
0.820
0.080
0.965
0.790
0.165
0.115
0.505
0.375
0.050
1.230
0.235
0.120
1.410
0.605
0.400
2.780
1.280
0.035
0.390
0.045
0.830
0.080
0.975
0.800
0.165
0.120
4420.3
160
400
975.4
1043.5
150
523
16104.9
70
1.9
1431.7
759.9
4914.6
42
52.5
30
60
60
0.3
30
This table shows stocks that are trading near their year low. This
could suggest a build-up in selling momentum, or the possibility that
bargain hunting could set in later.
Foreign exchange rates
NZ
NZ $
EURO
EURO
0.657
1.522
US
SWISS
BRIT CANADA BRUNEI S’PORE
CHINA
BANGL’H
DENM’K
UAE
PHIL
QATAR
SAUDI SWEDEN
0.930
1.009
1.009
0.939
2.7030
4.666
58.055
4.890
2.743
9,324
45.796
87.882
5.767
32.926
2.719
2.807
6.096
24.293
5.789
1.415
1.535
1.535
1.429
4.1143
7.102
88.367
7.444
4.175
14,192
69.708
133.768
8.778
50.118
4.139
4.272
9.279
36.977
8.811
7.751
1.111
STERLING £
2.038
1.339
1.522
1.370
CANADA $
1.075
0.707
0.803
0.723
0.528
BRUNEI $
0.991
0.651
0.740
0.666
0.486
0.922
SINGAPORE $
0.991
0.651
0.740
0.666
0.486
0.922
1.000
AUSTRALIA $
1.065
0.700
0.796
0.716
0.523
0.991
1.075
1.075
MALAYSIA RM
0.370
0.243
0.276
0.249
0.182
0.344
0.373
0.373
21.434
14.081
16.006
14.404
10.517
19.929
21.620
1.722
1.132
1.286
1.158
0.845
1.602
1.737
100 DANISH KRONER
20.448
13.434
15.270
13.742
10.034
19.013
0.900
0.657
1.245
1.351
1.351
1.257
3.6195
6.248
77.740
6.549
3.673
12,485
61.325
117.681
7.722
44.090
3.641
3.759
8.163
32.530
0.730
1.384
1.501
1.501
1.397
4.0221
6.942
86.387
7.277
4.082
13,874
68.146
130.770
8.581
48.994
4.046
4.177
9.071
36.148
8.614
1.895
2.056
2.056
1.913
5.5085
9.508
118.312
9.966
5.590
19,001
93.330
179.097
11.753
67.101
5.542
5.720
12.423
49.507
11.797
1.085
1.085
1.009
2.9070
5.018
62.437
5.260
2.950
10,028
49.253
94.515
6.202
35.411
2.924
3.019
6.556
26.126
6.226
1.000
0.931
2.6797
4.625
57.555
4.848
2.719
9,244
45.402
87.125
5.717
32.642
2.696
2.783
6.044
24.084
5.739
0.930
2.6795
4.625
57.551
4.848
2.719
9,243
45.398
87.118
5.717
32.640
2.696
2.782
6.043
24.082
5.738
2.8797
4.971
61.850
5.210
2.922
9,933
48.790
93.627
6.144
35.079
2.897
2.990
6.495
25.881
6.167
0.347
1.0000
1.726
21.478
1.809
1.015
3,449
16.943
32.513
2.134
12.181
1.006
1.038
2.255
8.987
2.142
21.622
20.118
57.9350
1,244
104.820
58.791
199,845
981.583
1,884
123.608
705.724
58.282
60.160
130.661
520.684
124.072
1.738
1.617
4.6559
8.036
8.424
4.725
16,060
78.884
151.377
9.934
56.715
4.684
4.835
10.500
41.844
9.971
20.626
20.627
19.193
55.2710
95.40
56.088
190,655
936.45
1,797
117.92
673.27
55.60
57.39
124.65
496.74
118.37
1,670
3,204
210.25
1,200
99.13
102.33
222.24
885.65
211.04
4.912
9.425
0.619
3.531
0.292
0.301
0.654
2.605
0.621
191.898
12.593
71.897
5.938
6.129
13.311
53.045
12.640
1,187
100 UAE DIRHAM
36.457
23.951
27.226
24.500
17.889
33.899
36.774
36.777
34.220
98.5434
170.09
2,117
178.29
1000 INA RUPIAH
0.107
0.070
0.080
0.072
0.053
0.100
0.108
0.108
0.101
0.2899
0.500
6.227
0.525
0.294
100 INDIA RUPEE
2.184
1.435
1.631
1.467
1.071
2.030
2.203
2.203
2.050
5.9022
10.188
126.768
10.679
5.989
339,922
20,359
1.138
0.748
0.850
0.765
0.558
1.058
1.148
1.148
1.068
3.0757
5.309
66.060
5.565
3.121
10,610
52.111
17.340
11.392
12.949
11.653
8.509
16.123
17.491
17.492
16.276
46.8700
80.901
1,007
84.800
47.563
161,676
794.111
1,524
6.562
37.466
3.094
3.194
6.937
27.643
6.587
570.938
47.151
48.670
105.706
421.239
100.375
3.037
1.995
2.268
2.041
1.490
2.824
3.064
3.064
2.851
8.2093
14.170
176.320
14.853
8.331
28,318
139.089
266.908
17.515
100 QATAR RIYAL
36.775
24.161
27.463
24.714
18.046
34.195
37.095
37.098
34.519
99.4040
171.578
2,135
179.848
100.873
342,891
1,684
3,232
212.084
100 SAUDI RIYAL
35.628
23.407
26.606
23.943
17.482
33.128
35.937
35.940
33.442
96.3017
166.224
2,068
174.235
97.725
332,189
1,632
3,131
205.466
1,173
96.879
100 SWEDISH KRONOR
16.404
10.777
12.250
11.024
8.049
15.253
16.547
16.548
15.397
44.3400
76.534
952.339
80.223
44.995
152,949
751.245
1,442
94.602
540.119
44.606
46.043
4.116
2.704
3.074
2.766
2.020
3.828
4.152
4.153
3.864
11.1267
19.205
238.980
20.131
11.291
38,381
188.518
361.762
23.739
135.538
11.193
11.554
100 HK$
HK
0.747
0.880
100 THAI BAHT
THAI
0.491
0.978
100 PHILIPPINE PESO
JAPAN NORWAY
1.023
1.339
100 NORWEGIAN KRONER
INDIA
0.672
1.488
100 JAPAN YEN
INA
1.137
US $
100 BANGLAD’H TAKA
M’SIA
0.747
SWISS FR
100 CHINESE RMB
AUST
8.259
1,211
8.525
18.514
73.780
17.581
103.221
224.186
893.383
212.880
865.501
206.236
217.189
398.501
25.094
94.957
23.829
17.275 11.349 12.901 11.610
8.477 16.063 17.425 17.427 16.215 46.6948
80.599 1,002.915
84.483
47.385
161,072 791.142
1,518
99.626 568.804 46.975 48.488 105.311 419.664
Note: Run your finger down the left-hand side until you reach the country of origin you plan to exchange. Then move your finger until that line intersects with the vertical column of the currency you wish to buy. The figure is how much you will get. The above rates are subject to change and provided by Thompson Reuters.
Markets 3 9
THU RSDAY JA N UA RY 29 , 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DAILY
FUTURES . MONEY MARKET . COMMODITIES
Money market
Index futures
Index points
1980
Open Interest
1,793.00 90000
(-8.00)
Klibor
US Dollar
Long Rolls - KLCI futures
FKLI
Implied interest rate (%)
USD Index
Index points
-4.00
18
(+0.50)
100.00
1790
68000
9
92.75
1600
46000
0
85.50
1410
24000
-9
78.25
94.076
(+0.054)
4.5
3.83
(Unch)
3.5
2000
1220
Jan 4, 2010
Jan 28, 2015
KLCI futures end lower
71.00
-18
Jan 4, 2010
Jan 28, 2015
FBM KLCI futures
INDEX AND FUTURES
OPEN CHANGE IN
The FBM KLCI futures contracts on Bursa CONTRACT SETTLEMENT CHANGE VOLUME INTEREST
OPEN INTEREST
Malaysia Derivatives closed lower yesterday, FBMKLCI 1,795.88 -7.29 171.84M
1,793.00
-8.00
11,839 32,380
-5,248
tracking the weak local equities market and JAN-15
FEB-15
1,789.00
-7.00
8,477 29,080
8,905
overnight losses on the US markets.
MAR-15
1,789.00 -10.00
124
998
57
“Traders are eyeing the US Federal Re- JUN-15
1,781.50 -10.50
5
67
-3
serve’s guideline on interest rate increase TOTAL
20,445 62,525
3,711
which will be announced later tonight (last
BID
OFFER
CLOSE
night),” Phillip Futures’ dealer Lim Eng Wee FUTURES ROLL OVER
JAN/FEB
-3.0
-4.0
-4.0
told Bernama.
He said the market might consolidate to- FUTURES FAIR VALUE
DAYS TO EXPIRY
KLIBOR DIVIDEND FAIR VALUE
morrow (today) amid uncertainty on Bank CONTRACT
3
3.42
0.00
-2.46
Negara Malaysia’s policy measures and the JAN-15
FEB-15
31
3.42
6.04
-2.76
weak ringgit against the US dollar.
ROLL’S FAIR
-0.30
Banking stocks on Bursa Malaysia fell
yesterday as Singapore eased its monetary
policy, which probably prompted regional
central banks to follow its footstep.
March 2015 fell 10 points to 1,789.0 and
Spot month January FKLI contract closed
eight points lower at 1,793.0 and February June 2015 eased 5.5 points to 1,781.5.
— Bernama
2015 declined seven points to 1,789.0.
Commodities
Oct 2, 2006
1.5
Jan 28, 2015
Dollar climbs, but caution
reigns before Fed statement
The dollar rose against a basket of currencies
yesterday, recouping some of the previous
day’s sharp losses, on expectations the Federal Reserve is unlikely to deliver significant
changes to its policy outlook.
Two-year Treasury yields held above
0.51% in European trade, providing support
to the dollar. It fell on Tuesday after weaker-than-forecast corporate earnings and
durable goods data. The dollar index was
up 0.3% at 94.27, having posted its biggest
fall since early October on Tuesday.
Nevertheless, given investors have put in
place a huge amount of long dollar bets since
the second half of last year on expectations
that the Fed will start raising rates this year
as the US economy recovers, there was an
element of caution. — Reuters
Oct 1, 2000
Jan 28, 2015
Klibor
MONTH
SETTLEMENT
PRICE
MAR5
APR5
JUN5
SEP5
DEC5
MAR6
JUN6
SEP6
DEC6
MAR7
JUN7
SEP7
DEC7
MAR8
JUN8
SEP8
DEC8
MAR9
JUN9
SEP9
DEC9
MAR0
TOTAL
CHANGE
96.18
96.18
96.17
96.14
96.12
96.09
96.06
96.04
96.01
96.01
95.96
95.92
95.87
95.87
95.87
95.87
95.87
95.87
95.87
95.87
95.87
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
VOLUME
OPEN
INTEREST
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
0
550
—
80
300
270
120
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
1320
CPO prices react to various factors including soyoil prices, weather conditions and stockpiles. Open interest shows either increasing or decreasing market participation.
CPO vs Soyoil
CPO & Open Interest
CPO RM/ton
2.5
Open Interest
4200
200000
CPO RM/ton
Soyoil US$/Ibs
0.7300
2,494
6400
3450
152500
5100
2700
105000
3800
Crude Oil
Gold
US$/bbl
US$/troy oz
155.0
(RM0.3128/ton)
0.5475
0.3650
2,207
1980
45.44
122.5
(-0.79)
1660
90.0
1340
57.5
1020
(+32)
1950
1200
Jan 6, 2008
2,207
(+32)
57500
10000
Jan 28, 2015
Palm oil climbs more on
weakening ringgit
0.1825
2500
1200
0.0000
Jan 6, 2008
Jan 28, 2015
CPO futures
CONTRACT
FEB-15
MAR-15
APR-15
MAY-15
TOTAL
LAST
2,221
2,217
2,210
2,193
CHANGE
33
32
32
33
VOLUME
OPEN CHANGE IN
INTEREST OPEN INTEREST
265
2,014
2,637 21,668
27,417 62,595
12,179 29,714
55,607 217,925
-323
-1,113
-139
-75
1,472
Malaysian palm oil rose for a second day yesterday, recouping some of its recent losses,
but traders were wary and questioned how
CPO/SOYOIL
far the recovery could go since demand re- CPO FUTURES
INDICATIVE ROLL-OVER FUTURES BASIS (USD)
mained weak.
CURRENT
-76.89
FEB/MAR
4
“Today (yesterday) is a technical retrace- FEB/APR
3 MONTHS AVERAGE
-126.87
11
ment,” said a trader at a foreign commodities FEB/MAY
6 MONTHS AVERAGE
-197.60
28
brokerage in Kuala Lumpur, adding that a MAR/APR
7
weakening in the ringgit yesterday had pro- SGS & ITS EXPORT ESTIMATES (TONNES)
SHIPMENT DAYS
NOV’2014
DEC’2014
JAN’2015
vided support.
401/395
396/407
321/356
The improvement in palm prices yester- 1 - 10TH DAYS
606/598
618/616
545/536
day was a reaction to the decline of more 1- 15TH DAYS
DAYS
844/838
907/912
709/703
than 10% seen since mid-January, a second 11 -- 20TH
25TH DAYS
1099/1103
1083/1077
878/886
trader said.
FULL MONTH
1310/1324
1298/1313
—/—
“The drop was a bit on the sharp side. It MALAYSIAN PALM OIL BOARD
SEP’14
OCT’14
NOV’14
DEC’14
was overdone,” he said. “Nothing is going on.
1,897
1,893
1,751
1,365
The FOB prices are basically unchanged. In PRODUCTION
EXPORT
1,628
1,605
1,513
1,520
the cash market there is nothing.”
STOCKS
2,090
2,166
2,278
2,013
Yesterday’s close, the benchmark April
MPOB Palm oil physical
contract had gained 1.47% to RM2,207 per
DEC 2014
JAN 2015
FEB 2015
tonne, after opening lower at RM2,164. Trad- (IN RM/TON)
DELD
2,190
2,200
2,205
ed volume stood at 55,607 lots of 25 tonnes, CPO
PK EX-MILL
1,778
1,800
1,810
well above the typical 35,000 lots.
CPKO DELD
3,638
3,588
3,604
Despite that high volume, demand for RBD P.OIL FOB
2,266
2,266
2,259
palm oil remained weak, traders said, partly RBD P.OLEIN FOB
2,273
2,273
2,259
2,288
2,284
2,273
as a result of oil prices that have subsided RBD P.STEARIN FOB
around 60% since mid-2014, limiting de- MPOB FFB REF PRICE (MILL GATE PRICE)
REGION
GRADE A
GRADE B
GRADE C
mand for biodiesel.
OER (RM/TON)
OER(RM/TON)
OER (RM/TON)
Malaysia’s Sime Darby Bhd , the world’s top NORTH
20.00% 466
19.00% 445
18.00% 424
oil palm planter by land size, said yesterday SOUTH
20.00% 470
19.00% 449
18.00% 428
20.00% 471
19.00% 450
18.00% 428
it had obtained the European Commission’s CENTRAL
approval to buy New Britain Palm Oil Ltd for EAST COAST 20.00% 467 19.00% 445 18.00% 424
SABAH
22.00% 450
21.00% 431
20.00% 412
about US$1.74 billion. — Reuters
SARAWAK
22.00% 457
21.00% 437
20.00% 418
25.0
Apr 10, 2007
(-2.20)
700
Jan 28, 2015
Oil slips to US$49 on firm
dollar, US stock build
Oil slipped to US$49 a barrel yesterday as
the dollar strengthened, while an industry
report showing a larger-than-expected rise in
US crude inventories also pressured prices.
Crude futures settled up more than 2%
on Tuesday, when the dollar index posted
its biggest one-day fall since early October.
A weak US unit makes dollar-priced commodities cheaper for buyers holding other
currencies.
Brent crude has fallen almost 60% since
June, but since hitting a near six-year low of
US$45.19 two weeks ago, it has stabilised in
a narrow range just below US$50 a barrel.
“The key driver for oil prices in the last
few days has been currency fluctuations ...
we had seen some weakness in the US dollar which helped support prices overnight,”
Ric Spooner, chief analyst at CMC Markets
in Sydney, said. — Reuters
Centrifuged Latex
Jan 28, 2015
Aug 31, 2008
Commodities
AGRICULTURE
UNIT
EXCHANGE
RM/TON
SEN/KG
USC/BSH
USC/BSH
USC/BSH
USC/IBS
US$/TON
USC/IBS
USC/IBS
USC/IBS
MDEX
MRB
CBOT
CBOT
CBOT
CME
NYBOT
NYBOT
NYBOT
NYC
2,207
502.00
380.00
971.75
519.25
151.350
2,754
170.70
15.51
59.46
32
3.00
-1.25
-2.00
-3.75
0.350
8
-0.20
0.02
-0.08
US$/TON
USC/IBS
US$/TROY OZ
US$/TROY OZ
US$/TROY OZ
USC/TROY OZ
RMB/TON
RMB/TON
KLTM
CMX
CMX
NYMEX
NYMEX
CMX
SHF
SHF
19,300
2.48
1,289.50
1,265.80
787.00
18.00
12,865
16,335
-250
0.01
-2.20
1.50
5.50
-0.07
-25
50
LIGHT CRUDE OIL
US$/BBL
HEATING OIL
USC/GAL
NATURAL GAS
US$/MMBTU
BRENT CRUDE
US$/BBL
GAS OIL
US$/TON
NYMEX
NYMEX
NYMEX
ICE
ICE
CRUDE PALM OIL
RUBBER
CORN
SOYBEANS
WHEAT
LIVE CATTLE
COCOA
COFFEE
SUGAR
COTTON
LAST PRICE CHANGE
METAL & PRECIOUS METALS
TIN
COPPER
GOLD
PLATINUM
PALLADIUM
SILVER
ALUMINIUM
ZINC
ENERGY
45.44
-0.79
1.6223 -0.0179
2.858 -0.077
49.19
-0.41
477.00
1.75
Rubber - M’sia SMR 20
Sen/Kg
Sen/Kg
1100
1700
850
1325
600
950
350
575
367.00
100
Jan 7, 2007
1,289.50
(Unch)
Jan 28, 2015
502.00
200
Jan 7, 2007
(+3.00)
Jan 28, 2015
Markets
40
T HUR SDAY JAN UARY 29, 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
F U T U R E S . M O N E Y M A R K E T . C O M M O D I T I E S PA G E 3 9
YOUR DAILY FINANCIAL MARKET S ROUNDUP
I N S I D E R M OV E S . T R A D I N G T H E M E S . E V E N T S . FO R E X PA G E 3 8
G L O BA L M A R K E T S PA G E 3 7
M A I N M A R K E T . A C E M A R K E T L I ST I N G PA G E 3 3
RESEARCH: TAI TS [[email protected]; SUGUMARAN [[email protected]]
KLCI 1,795.88
7.29 FBM ACE
6,460.63
FTSTI 3,419.15
39.99
6.95
NIKKEI 17,795.73
HANG SENG 24,861.81
27.43
STOCK
Index point
KLCI futures
1803.4
1801.8
1,793.00
1800.2
(-8.00)
1798.6
KL Composite Index
1797.0
1795.4
1793.8
1792.2
1,795.88
1790.6
(-7.29)
1789.0
8:45 9:30
10:30
11:30
12:45
14:30
15:30
16:30 17:15
Daily FBM KLCI
1950.0
Moving average - 20-day
KL Composite Index
VOLUME
('000)
CHANGE
(%)
CHANGE
(RM)
CLOSE
(RM)
HIGH
(RM)
LOW
(RM)
63,468
29,468
24,019
21,665
17,781
14,788
11,321
9,040
6,438
5,508
5,043
4,113
4,020
3,656
3,222
2,910
16.46
-11.76
7.84
0.00
-2.44
2.67
0.00
0.00
8.82
4.08
4.37
0.28
5.71
-3.13
5.62
0.00
0.065
-0.010
0.060
0.000
-0.005
0.010
0.000
0.000
0.015
0.010
0.090
0.010
0.010
-0.020
0.050
0.000
0.460
0.075
0.825
0.245
0.200
0.385
0.125
0.095
0.185
0.255
2.150
3.560
0.185
0.620
0.940
0.140
0.470
0.085
0.835
0.260
0.210
0.400
0.130
0.095
0.190
0.265
2.170
3.600
0.190
0.635
0.945
0.145
0.395
0.065
0.790
0.240
0.200
0.365
0.120
0.090
0.165
0.245
2.050
3.550
0.170
0.620
0.900
0.135
Table above is from Reuters Volume break 3x 5-day average volume, meaning the total number of shares
traded for a particular counter on the previous trading day is more than triple the average volume for the
last 5 trading days. The table captures the build-up of interest in these companies and is thus a gauge of
market expectations for these counters.
1,795.88
(-7.29)
1667.5
JOBST
MAYBANK-C9
GHLSYS
ESCERAM
PWORTH
OPENSYS
VSOLAR
AT
AHB
VIS
KSL
SPSETIA
VIS-WA
FBMKLCI-CO
HSI-CH
GOCEAN
1,755.26
Jan 2, 2008
Jan 28, 2015
900
600
300
0
0
Volume (’mil)
FBM KLCI futures
CONTRACT
SETTLEMENT
CHANGE
HIGH
LOW
JAN-15
FEB-15
MAR-15
1,793.00
1,789.00
1,789.00
-8.00
-7.00
-10.00
1804.50
1800.00
1798.00
1790.00
1786.00
1789.00
KLCI
POINTS
CHANGE
(RM)
CLOSE
(RM)
VOLUME
('000)
1.75
0.69
0.67
0.34
0.33
0.29
-0.25
-0.39
-0.41
-0.65
-0.71
-0.80
-0.89
-1.95
-3.18
-3.71
-8.87
1.58
-7.29
0.170
0.110
0.050
0.030
0.180
0.020
-0.120
-0.030
-0.120
-0.200
-0.050
-0.440
-0.060
-0.200
-0.230
-0.230
4.100
2.510
6.440
4.800
23.000
5.560
15.020
7.130
22.220
14.200
5.230
17.160
7.140
14.800
5.320
8.690
5608.9
7825.6
12238.7
4574.9
999.0
12554.7
207.9
8118.4
1620.3
813.0
2706.3
735.4
5820.7
11227.8
3563.6
18132.0
FBM KLCI sensitivity*
GENTING MYS
FELDA GLOBAL
DIGI.COM
IOI CORP BHD
K.LUMPUR KEPONG
CIMB GRP
PPB GROUP
MAXIS BERHAD
PETRONAS GAS
HONG LEONG BANK
IHH HEALTHCARE
HONG LEONG FINANCE
AXIATA GROUP
TENAGA NASIONAL
PETRONAS CHEM
MAYBANK
SUB-TOTAL
OTHERS
GRAND TOTAL
* How stock price changes affected the index on the previous trading day
11.66
KLCI FUTURES 1785.50
14.50
STI 3370.29
15.83
RM/USD 3.6000
CPO RM2245.00
27.00
OIL US$49.34
0.31
GOLD US$1286.00
7.70
PP 9974/08/2013 (032820)
PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM1.50
FRIDAY JANUARY 23, 2015 ISSUE 1886/2015
FINANCIAL
DAILY
MAKE
BETTER
DECISIONS
www.theedgemarkets.com
DiGi.Com aims to be best mobile
Internet provider for mass market
6 HOME BUSINESS
4 HOME BUSINESS
TNB 1Q net profit
up 34.4% on higher
electricity sales
from tariff hike
8 HOME BUSINESS
Ringgit depreciation
‘silver lining’ for
property industry
10 HOME BUSINESS
Sukuk funds
give Malaysia lifeline amid deficit
20 PROPERT Y
New landmark in
Jalan Sultan Ismail
24 COMMENT
Will HK’s peg be the
next to fall?
PR1MA SEES
OPPORTUNITY
AS THE GOING GETS TOUGH
It expects to rope in more private developers to build
affordable homes. Chen Shaua Fui has the story on Page 4.
Kettha statement dashes hopes
for lower power rates
CHANGE
(%)
PRICE
(RM)
PE
RATIO
DIVIDEND
YIELD (%)
92,976.0
71,311.5
63,468.2
58,852.7
55,125.1
53,166.5
43,594.5
36,753.9
32,483.7
31,466.9
31,335.7
29,467.7
27,294.1
26,656.6
24,019.0
21,966.1
21,665.0
21,608.6
21,059.9
18,894.4
0.010
4.76
0.005
7.69
0.065
16.46
0.005
1.52
UNCH
UNCH
0.010
2.94
-0.015
-2.22
-0.005
-2.27
-0.015
-2.48
0.010
14.29
-0.005
-1.28
-0.010
-11.76
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
0.060
7.84
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
0.025
3.21
0.225 4500.00
0.005
1.22
0.220
0.070
0.460
0.335
0.095
0.350
0.660
0.215
0.590
0.080
0.385
0.075
0.095
0.035
0.825
0.280
0.245
0.805
0.230
0.415
—
—
4.83
—
32.76
41.46
—
2.16
20.44
—
41.49
—
—
38.89
84.07
—
12.63
26.44
—
—
0.00
0.00
18.99
0.00
0.00
0.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.38
0.00
0.00
CLOSE
CHANGE
(RM)
47.120
20.700
3.390
11.800
0.230
0.975
0.800
1.610
1.070
23.000
7.170
4.100
0.620
0.320
0.270
0.240
0.225
0.205
0.190
0.180
0.180
0.180
0.170
0.170
HLFG
MAYBANK
PCHEM
HLBANK
TENAGA
Y&G
TECNIC
KOSSAN
INARI-OR
PETGAS
PPB
PERSTIM
0.015
0.035
0.375
0.055
0.130
0.020
0.020
0.120
0.060
0.150
50.00
40.00
38.89
37.50
36.84
33.33
33.33
33.33
33.33
30.43
LIONCOR-WB
SKPETRO-C3
EAH-WA
CSL-WA
TDM-CB
TROP-CE
MBSB-CU
KFM-WA
TROP-CG
UEMS-C10
DOWN
CLOSE
CHANGE
(RM)
17.160
8.690
5.320
14.200
14.800
0.850
5.820
5.150
2.150
22.220
15.020
3.910
-0.440
-0.230
-0.230
-0.200
-0.200
-0.150
-0.140
-0.140
-0.130
-0.120
-0.120
-0.110
0.020
0.005
0.010
0.020
0.035
0.025
0.045
0.110
0.020
0.020
-50.00
-50.00
-33.33
-33.33
-30.00
-28.57
-25.00
-21.43
-20.00
-20.00
KUALA LUMPUR: The FBM KLCI fell 0.4% as banking stocks
weighed on the broader market. Malaysian shares also fell following a lower overnight close in US markets.
At 5pm, the KLCI was down 7.29 points at 1,795.88 on losses in stocks like Malayan Banking and Hong Leong Bank. “The
index fell [yesterday] following the decline in US markets overnight,” a remisier told theedgemarkets.com.
Banking stocks fell amid concerns Singapore’s move to
ease monetary policy might prompt regional central banks Top gainers and losers (ranked by percentage)
to do the same. Yesterday, Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) was
UP
CHANGE
DOWN
CHANGE
to announce its monetary policy statement. The central bank
CLOSE
(%)
CLOSE
(%)
had in November last year maintained its overnight policy rate
INSAS-PR
0.230
4,500
HLIND-CB
0.005
-50.00
at 3.25%.
0.060 100.00
UEMS-C9
0.005 -50.00
Yesterday, an economist told theedgemarkets.com said there TUNEINS-CC
MPCORP-WB
0.010 100.00
LIONCOR-WB
0.020 -50.00
was a possibility of an interest rate cut by BNM.
GENTINGC17
0.015
50.00
SKPETRO-C3
0.005 -50.00
“The trend of slower growth and deflation is a strong argu- FOCUS-WB
0.035
40.00
EAH-WA
0.010 -33.33
ment for a rate cut or monetary easing. Central banks are brac- ASDION-WB
0.375
38.89
CSL-WA
0.020 -33.33
0.055
37.50
TDM-CB
0.035 -30.00
ing themselves for the impact of deflation as falling oil prices CBIP-CB
0.130
36.84
TROP-CE
0.025 -28.57
have contributed to a deflationary trend globally. Some Asian CIMB-C2
0.020
33.33
MBSB-CU
0.045 -25.00
countries like India and South Korea are beginning to warm FGV-CZ
HUBLINE-WA
0.020
33.33
KFM-WA
0.110 -21.43
up to the idea of cutting interest rates.” he said.
PETDAG-CN
0.120
33.33
TROP-CG
0.020 -20.00
Following Singapore’s move to ease monetary policy, the DIALOG-CZ
0.060
33.33
CYBERT
0.020 -20.00
ringgit strengthed to 2.6793 against the Singapore dollar. Against
the US dollar, the ringgit stood at 3.6185. Across Bursa Malay- Top gainers and losers - warrants (ranked by percentage)
sia, 2.01 billion shares worth RM2.31 billion were traded. There
UP
CHANGE
DOWN
CHANGE
were 440 decliners against 340 gainers while 339 counters were
CLOSE
(%)
CLOSE
(%)
unchanged. — by Ahmad Naqib Idris and Jonathan Gan
TUNEINS-CC
0.060 100.00
HLIND-CB
0.005 -50.00
MPCORP-WB
0.010 100.00
UEMS-C9
0.005 -50.00
World equity indices
DOW JONES
S&P 500
NASDAQ 100
FTSE 100
AUSTRALIA
CHINA
HONG KONG
INDIA
I want an edge!
FBM KLCI 1781.75
CHANGE
(RM)
Top gainers and losers (ranked by RM)
DLADY
PANAMY
HARTA-WA
ALLIANZ
INSAS-PR
FBMKLCI-CT
FBMKLCI-CS
MUH
GOPENG
KLK
PIE
GENM
1102.5
820.0
ASIABIO
ASIABIO-WA
JOBST
DNEX
SANICHI
EFFICEN
TAKASO
SUMATEC
KNM
FOCUS
SYSTECH
MAYBANK-C9
MINETEC
HUBLINE
GHLSYS
MUIIND
ESCERAM
BENALEC
INSAS-PR
YGL
TURNOVER
(‘000)
UP
KLCI lower on US markets,
banking stocks
1385.0
291.49
Daily top 20 active stocks
UNUSUAL MARKET ACTIVITIES
FBM KLCI & KLCI futures intraday
DOW JONES 17,387.21
Market movers
Stay hungry. Stay foolish.
— Steve Jobs
1805.0
54.53
CLOSE
CHANGE
17,387.21
2,029.55
4,165.50
6,811.61
5,552.78
3,305.74
24,861.81
29,559.18
-291.49
-27.54
-110.21
-40.79
5.56
-47.22
54.53
-11.86
INDONESIA
JAPAN
KOREA
PHILIPPINES
SINGAPORE
TAIWAN
THAILAND
VIETNAM
CLOSE
CHANGE
5,268.85
17,795.73
1,961.58
7,661.18
3,419.15
9,510.92
1,592.81
583.76
-8.30
27.43
9.18
30.61
6.95
-10.67
3.00
4.46
Email: [email protected]
Fax: (03) 7721 8282
GENTINGC17
FOCUS-WB
ASDION-WB
CBIP-CB
CIMB-C2
FGV-CZ
HUBLINE-WA
PETDAG-CN
DIALOG-CZ
E&O-CX
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