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VALUE/Multi-State Collaborative (MSC) to
Advance Learning Outcomes Assessment
Pilot Year Study Findings and Summary
These slides summarize results from a proof-of-concept pilot study involving 59 institutions
in nine states using common rubrics to assess more than 7,000 student work products. The
sample of student work in the pilot represented the near-graduation students across the
participating institutions in the nine states only; therefore, the results are not generalizable
for all students in each participating state or nationwide.
MSC Pilot by the Numbers
• MSC states: Connecticut, Indiana, Kentucky,
Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon,
Rhode Island, Utah
• 59 public institutions uploaded artifacts
• By sector:
– 28 four-year, including 8 research institutions
– 31 two-year
These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
2
MSC Pilot by the Numbers
• 7,215 pieces of student work were submitted
[number of pieces of work approximates number of student
participants]
– Students had to be 75% of the way to completion of
institutional degree requirements
– 2,642 artifacts scored twice (36.6%) in order to measure
inter-rater reliability
• 1,166 assignments were submitted
[number of assignments approximates number of faculty
participants]
These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
3
MSC Pilot Study Student Population Sample by Gender
Relative to Graduating Students in Participating
Institutions
These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
4
MSC Pilot Student Population of Pell-Eligible
vs. Non Pell-Eligible Students
These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
5
MSC Pilot Study Four-Year Student Population Samples by Race
82% of students in MSC sample were White; 80% of students in participating institutions were White
10/17/2015
These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
6
MSC Pilot Study Two-Year Student Population Samples by Race
77% of MSC sample were White students; 81% of students in participating institutions were White
These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
7
MSC Pilot Study Student Population Sample by Age
Relative to Students at Participating Institutions
10/17/2015
These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
8
VALUE Rubrics
Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education
• Assesses student work from
curriculum and co-curriculum
• Provides detailed assessment of
key dimensions/criteria of
learning for each learning
outcome
• Evaluated by faculty and other
educational professionals
• Visible evidence of learning
applied and used in multiple
settings
• Shared framework and
standards of judgment for
quality without standardization
10/17/2015
9
Faculty and Staff Responses to Usefulness of VALUE Rubrics for
Assessing Student Work
Percent of scorers who reported Strongly Agree or Agree with each aspect of rubric use
10/17/2015
10
Quantitative Literacy Rubric Dimensions
Interpretation
Ability to explain information presented in mathematical forms
(e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words)
Representation
Ability to convert relevant information into various mathematical
forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words)
Calculation
Application / Analysis
Ability to make judgments and draw appropriate conclusions based on the
quantitative analysis of data, while recognizing the limits of this analysis
Assumptions
Ability to make and evaluate important assumptions in estimation,
modeling, and data analysis
Communication
Expressing quantitative evidence in support of the argument or purpose of
the work (in terms of what evidence is used and how it is formatted,
presented, and contextualized)
MSC Pilot Study Results—Quantitative Literacy Dimension 4-Year
Institutional Score Distribution
Frequency Percent
% of student work products scored 4-0 by faculty scorers on each dimension of
quantitative literacy
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0
1
2
3
4
Application/ Assumption
Communica Interpretati Representat
Calculation
Analysis
s
tion
on
ion
7.3%
27.6%
9.1%
11.2%
11.2%
13.1%
10.7%
12.8%
5.4%
8.0%
5.1%
7.1%
33.3%
31.5%
19.4%
22.5%
26.4%
26.2%
31.3%
19.7%
47.8%
35.8%
38.2%
38.3%
17.3%
8.4%
18.3%
22.5%
19.1%
15.3%
Total
13.7%
8.2%
26.4%
35.1%
16.7%
Note: Each work product was scored on 6 dimensions of quantitative literacy using a common AAC&U VALUE Rubric.
See Slide 15 for rubric dimension criteria. VALUE rubrics are available at www.aacu.org/value.
This was a pilot study. These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
DRAFT
12
MSC Pilot Study Results—Quantitative Literacy Dimension 2-Year
Institutional Score Distribution
Frequency Percent
% of student work products scored 4-0 by faculty scorers on each dimension of
quantitative literacy
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0
1
2
3
4
Application/ Assumption
Communica Interpretati Representat
Calculation
Analysis
s
tion
on
ion
12.4%
35.4%
5.9%
14.5%
15.5%
7.0%
10.0%
17.5%
6.9%
14.1%
11.2%
7.5%
45.0%
24.5%
25.0%
22.7%
29.6%
34.0%
27.8%
18.4%
53.2%
40.5%
35.4%
45.5%
4.8%
4.2%
9.0%
8.2%
8.3%
6.0%
Total
15.4%
11.3%
30.1%
36.4%
6.7%
Note: Each work product was scored on 6 dimensions of quantitative literacy using a common AAC&U VALUE
Rubric. See Slide 15 below for rubric dimension criteria. VALUE rubrics are available at www.aacu.org/value.
This was a pilot study. These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
DRAFT
13
Selected Findings – Quantitative Literacy
Most students in both two-year and fouryear institutions were rated “3” or “4” on
students’ “calculation” skills. Less than half
of work products at four-year institutions
and about one-third of work products at
two-year institutions were rated “3” or “4”
on ability to “make judgments and draw
appropriate conclusions based on
quantitative analysis of data.”
Written Communication Rubric Dimensions
Context of and Purpose for Writing
Includes considerations of audience, purpose, and the circumstances
surrounding the writing task(s).
Content Development
Genre and Disciplinary Conventions
Formal and informal rules inherent in the expectations for writing in
particular forms and/or academic fields (please see glossary).
Sources and Evidence
Control of Syntax and Mechanics
MSC Pilot Study Results—Written Communication Dimension 4-Year
Institutional Score Distribution
Frequency Percent
% of student work products scored 4-0 by faculty scorers on each dimension of written
communication
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0
1
2
3
4
Content
Development
.4%
14.5%
26.9%
35.2%
22.9%
Context/
Purpose
11.6%
29.5%
34.8%
24.1%
Syntax/
Mechanics
1.4%
11.8%
33.3%
34.8%
18.7%
Genre/
Conventions
1.3%
14.7%
30.7%
33.3%
19.9%
Sources/
Evidence
10.6%
16.1%
28.7%
27.4%
17.1%
Total
3.1%
13.6%
30.2%
33.0%
20.1%
Note: Each work product was scored on 5 dimensions of written communication using a common AAC&U VALUE
Rubric. See Slide 18 below for rubric dimension criteria. VALUE rubrics are available at www.aacu.org/value.
This was a pilot study. These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
DRAFT
16
MSC Pilot Study Results—Written Communication Dimension 2Year Institutional Score Distribution
Frequency Percent
% of student work products scored 4-0 by faculty scorers on each dimension of written
communication
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0
1
2
3
4
Content
Development
2.7%
20.0%
30.2%
36.5%
10.6%
Context/
Purpose
1.4%
12.1%
38.8%
30.4%
17.3%
Syntax/
Mechanics
.2%
20.9%
38.4%
32.4%
8.1%
Genre/
Conventions
3.2%
24.6%
41.5%
20.6%
10.1%
Sources/
Evidence
12.8%
27.5%
27.1%
22.3%
10.3%
Total
3.7%
21.3%
35.4%
28.9%
10.6%
Note: Each work product was scored on 5 dimensions of written communication using a common AAC&U VALUE
Rubric. See Slide 18 below for rubric dimension criteria. VALUE rubrics are available at www.aacu.org/value.
This was a pilot study. These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
DRAFT
17
Selected Findings – Written Communication
• Students at two-year colleges have students performing really
well, for example:
•
•
Nearly 50 percent of work products collected from two-year
institutions were scored either “3” or “4” on “content
development” in writing.
About one-third of work products collected from two-year
institutions were scored “3” or “4” on demonstrating the use of
“sources and evidence” in writing.
• Students at four-year colleges and universities are performing at
higher levels overall.
•
•
More than 50 percent of student work at four-year institutions
was scored at either a “3” or “4” overall in terms of written
communication
One still sees much room for improvement overall, especially in
students’ capacity to use “sources and evidence” to make
arguments in their writing.
Critical Thinking Rubric Dimensions
Explanation of issues
Evidence
Selecting and using information to investigate a point of
view or conclusion
Influence of context and assumptions
Student's position
perspective, thesis/hypothesis
Conclusions and related outcomes
implications and consequences
MSC Pilot Study Results--Critical Thinking Dimension 4-Year
Institutional Score Distribution
% of student work products scored 4-0 by faculty scorers on each dimension of
critical thinking
Frequency Percent
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0
1
2
3
4
Conclusions/
Outcomes
6.9%
25.5%
38.7%
21.9%
6.9%
Evidence
4.9%
27.0%
35.2%
26.2%
6.6%
Explanation
of issues
2.2%
16.3%
37.0%
30.4%
14.1%
Context/
Assumptions
12.1%
25.8%
38.6%
14.4%
9.1%
Student's
Position
4.8%
33.2%
32.6%
24.6%
4.8%
Total
6.2%
26.0%
36.6%
23.3%
7.9%
Note: Each work product was scored on 5 dimensions of critical thinking using a common AAC&U VALUE Rubric.
See Slide 12 for rubric dimension criteria. VALUE rubrics are available at www.aacu.org/value.
This was a pilot study. These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
DRAFT
20
MSC Pilot Study Results--Critical Thinking Dimension 2-Year
Institutional Score Distribution
Frequency Percent
% of student work products scored 4-0 by faculty scorers on each dimension of
critical thinking
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0
1
2
3
4
Conclusions/
Outcomes
9.8%
37.9%
38.3%
10.2%
3.8%
Evidence
10.1%
31.2%
37.7%
15.2%
5.8%
Explanation of
Context/
issues
Assumptions
8.8%
11.6%
26.3%
40.1%
36.8%
32.7%
24.6%
15.0%
3.5%
.7%
Student's
Position
9.7%
41.8%
27.9%
17.6%
3.0%
Total
10.0%
36.3%
34.8%
15.5%
3.4%
Note: Each work product was scored on 5 dimensions of critical thinking using a common AAC&U VALUE Rubric.
See Slide 12 for rubric dimension criteria. VALUE rubrics are available at www.aacu.org/value.
This was a pilot study. These results are not generalizable across participating states or the nation in any way. Please use appropriately.
10/17/2015
DRAFT
21
Selected Findings - Critical Thinking
• Consistent with other national studies, many students who had earned at
least 75 percent of credits toward their degrees still are not achieving high
levels of important critical thinking skills. Of the three outcomes evaluated,
critical thinking was the worst.
•
Less than one-third of student work products collected from fouryear institutions were scored a “3” or “4” on “using evidence to
investigate a point of view or reach a conclusion.”
•
Nearly 40 percent of work samples assessed at four-year institutions
were rated only “0” or “1” on how well students “analyzed the
influence of context and assumptions” to draw conclusions.
•
On the other hand, nearly 45 percent of work products from fouryear institutions were rated “3” or “4” in terms of how well students
“explained issues” in their analysis.
•
In short, students can describe and explain, but lack proficiency in
critically examining the assumptions, hypotheses, evidence and
implications of issues and positions, i.e. applying their knowledge.
VALUE/Multi-State Collaborative (MSC)
KEY CONCLUSIONS
 Central to student achievement is the quality of
assignments that will allow us to reap the evidence on
learning
 Faculty collaboration and agreement on quality of
student work across and within institutions is possible
and assessment results can be useful for improvement
of learning
 We can and need to improve what we are doing to
achieve heightened proficiency among all students
10/17/2015
23
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