close

Enter

Log in using OpenID

localnews - Tbnewswatch

embedDownload
Thunder Bay
presents:
10,000 vehicles
from across Canada.
Auction Direct Wholesale.
WWW.TBNEWSWATCH.COM
YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER
Hobbs again
Canadian Publications Agreement No. 0662445 Vol.10 No. 44
INSIDE
PRECAUTIONS
GUARANTEED
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2014
lowest rate financing.
Visit icarcanada.com
Incumbents rule the day in this year’s municipal election results /2-5
TBRHSC implements Ebola
screening measures /8
WINDSOR SWEEPS
420 Balmoral St. 628-0198
Wolves fall in overtime to
Lancers /25
DONATE A
VEHICLE
Boat or RV to Teen Challenge and help
change a life. Get free pick up and a Fair
Market Value tax receipt for your vehicle.
Don’t forget to turn your clocks back.
JAMIE SMITH
DAYLIGHT SAVINGS
TIME ENDS
SUNDAY AT 2AM
WE ACCEPT GEMS TO JUNKERS.
PLEASE CALL
SECOND TERM:Mayor Keith Hobbs collected 38.6 per cent of the vote, easily defeating challengers Ken Boshcoff and Shane Judge.
I.V.
SEDATION
345-CARS
(2277)
CREATING HEALTHY, BEAUTIFUL SMILES...
Tired of the extra wait?
See the latest technology, the CAD/CAM system, which allows Dr. Mao & Dr. Lau to take a digital scan,
custom design, create, and insert crowns & veneers in a single appointment. Financing available.
ABA DENTAL CLINIC • 626-8001 • abadental.ca •
995 Memorial Ave.• Mon.-Fri. 9am to 5pm; Sat. available.
DR. SHARON LAU & DR. JAMES MAO
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
COME CELEBRATE AT
CHINA HOUSE RESTAURANT
During the Month of November
Ch’ng upsets
in Northwood
M U N I C I PA L E L E C T I O N
By Jodi Lundmark – TB Source
urrounded almost entirely by incumbents who retained their seats Monday,
Shelby Ch’ng stands out as a fresh face in
council chambers.
While former at-large councillor Frank
Pullia won the seat vacated by mayoral
candidate Ken Boshcoff, Northwood rookie
Ch’ng was the only contender to successfully
take on an experienced opponent.
“I’m shocked,” said Ch’ng in council
chambers Monday evening after learning she
would be replacing Mark Bentz as
Northwood’s councillor.
“It’s unbelievable and I am truly humbled
and honoured to be here and to have this
opportunity in my city that I love so much.”
The 31-year-old entrepreneur handily beat
Bentz with 2,157 votes over the incumbent’s
1,639.
She attributes her win to a desire for
change, specifically bridging the generational
gap around the council table.
“They want to close the gender gap. They
want to close the age gap on council and I’m
the candidate. I’m the person who stepped
forward and said �yes, I’ll do it’ and here I
am,’ said Ch’ng.
Despite incumbents easily reclaiming their
seats in most other wards, it came down to
the wire for the Westfort race, with Joe
Virdiramo edging out Frank Scarcello by a
mere 45 votes.
“It was really nerve-wracking and a fingerbiting thing. However, I did come ahead and
I thank all those people who supported me,”
said Virdiramo shortly after the victory was
made official.
“I would have wished I had a higher
number. However, the people spoke and put
me back in and I know that they won’t be
disappointed with the work I’m going to be
doing in the next four years.”
S
LUNCH OR DINNER
READY WHEN YOU ARRIVE
Lunch
Buffet
Dinner
Buffet
$10.95 Regular
$
7.95
$
11.95
$15.95 Regular
Come and enjoy the
China House Restaurant
CHINA HOUSE
1186 Memorial Avenue, in the McIntyre Centre
across from Intercity Mall.
Not in favour
Virdiramo believes his support for the
proposed event centre may have been the
cause of the tight race since many people in
Westfort voiced their opposition.
He also acknowledged his running mates
Scarcello, Beatrice Metzler and John Radl
for their campaigns.
“They worked hard and I congratulate them
for doing that and unfortunately, I am the
winner,” said Virdiramo.
In other ward races, Paul Pugh won the
McKellar seat for a second term with 52 per
cent of the vote and said he was honoured
people felt he deserved to be re-elected.
“I intend to go into it to pursue the goals I
put forward in particular for McKellar ward
which have to do with decent jobs, poverty
related issues and of course infrastructure
JODI LUNDMARK
2
SHELBY CH’NG: Newcomer upended incumbent Mark Bentz to take Northwood ward.
particularly having to do with floods,” he
said.
Neebing was reclaimed by Linda Rydholm
with 58 per cent of the votes over challengers
Geoff Abthorpe and Austin Haner.
Rydholm, who has been the Neebing representative on council for 14 years, said the
people in her ward know her and she feels
the vote reflects they believe she represents
them well.
“I always go door-to door. I go partly of
course to present myself but also to learn
from the residents,” she said, adding she’s
heard that residents are concerned about high
taxes and that big projects are taking priority
over spending at the neighbourhood level.’
Rout was on
Andrew Foulds easily won the Current
River seat for a third time, claiming nearly 65
per cent of the vote.
“I am humbled by the level of confidence
that the residents of Current River have in
me, I’m humbled by the amount of trust they
put in me and I certainly don’t take that for
granted,” Foulds said.
Brian McKinnon won the Red River Ward
for a third term with 3,341 votes, besting
David George Noonan, who pulled 2,072
votes.
McKinnon said he’s humbled and has
nothing but thanks for the people of the ward
for giving him an opportunity to continue
doing the work he’s been doing with council.
“The people have given me their confidence and said �OK, do it again,’” he said,
adding he feels strongly council has been
going in the right direction and making good
decisions as a strong team.
McIntyre Ward was won by incumbent
Trevor Giertuga with almost 43 per cent of
the vote.
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
Hobbs wins again
Incumbent mayor outpaces Boshcoff, Judge for victory
M U N I C I PA L E L E C T I O N
By Jamie Smith – TB Source
eith Hobbs remains this city’s
mayor.
The incumbent remained conservative, wanting to wait until all the
polls were in before admitting
victory over at-large councillor and
former mayor Ken Boshcoff and
retired city hall reporter Shane Judge.
Hobbs’ 14,463 votes was enough
for 38.9 per cent of the vote.
Boshcoff had 12,051 votes and
Judge took 9,531.
The mayor delivered an emotional
speech, tearing up several times as he
thanked his supporters at his
Memorial Avenue campaign headquarters. He said his victory was for
the people struggling in Thunder
Bay.
“We’re going to beat down crime.
We’re going to look at poverty, we’re
going to look at all those kinds of
issues and we’re going to build an
event centre,” he said to loud cheers.
He also credited eight endorsements, including several unions for
the win.
HAPPY COUPLE: Keith and Marissa Hobbs celebrate the mayor’s win Monday night.
“People criticized me for backing
While Boshcoff’s position on an
labour but labour built this city,” he plebiscite on the proposed event
event centre wasn’t a simple yes or
said. “I’m not a fence sitter, I take a centre.
People wanted a yes or no answer no, Judge’s campaign focused on
stand and that’s what people wanted
and I think that’s what people got from him on the issue, but he stopping the proposed facility.
A self-described outsider, Judge
preferred to wait for more informatonight.”
said he knew it would be tough
tion.
Hobbs said he saved the
“With the myriad of taking on two well known incumbest for last in thanking his
issues the city faces - bents for the mayor’s chair.
fiancee and office manager
He said it was disappointing that he
taxation, assessment and
Marisa Hobbs.
“She’s been bullied by “We’re going drawing in new business, didn’t win, but with more than 25 per
adults in this community to beat down maybe the public viewed cent of the vote he believes he had a
all her life and I’m tired of crime. We’re that as one issue,” he credible showing.
The former council reporter ran on
it,” he said.
going to look admitted to media after
the premise that the city couldn’t
conceding defeat.
Meanwhile, across the
at poverty...”
“The public felt repre- afford a new event centre, something
city in an office space
KEITH HOBBS
sented in all those other he received only positive feedback
within the Victoriaville
issues and the council on.
mall where Boshcoff’s
The community reflected on that
approach to those. I like
campaign headquarters
being the person people and decided it wanted one anyway.
were situated, the now
“I’m satisfied with that. At least
former at-large councillor reflected come to in order to solve problems
on the campaign and concluded and have solutions. In this case they put their minds to it,” Judge
said.
people had voted as if it was a they’ve chosen to stay the course.”
JAMIE SMITH
K
Weather Forecast
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
A mix of sun and
clouds
Mainly sunny
A mix of sun and
clouds
Cloudy with showers
A mix of sun and
clouds
Probability of Precipitation: 30%
HIGH 5 LOW -2
Probability of Precipitation: 20%
HIGH 2 LOW -3
Probability of Precipitation: 30%
HIGH 4 LOW -4
Probability of Precipitation: 40%
HIGH 4 LOW 0
Probability of Precipitation: 30%
HIGH 8 LOW 3
It Starts
With a
Click
The tbSOURCE
Classifieds are online,
so it’s easier than
ever to find exactly
what you’re looking for.
MAKE US A PART OF
YOUR DAILY ROUTINE.
w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m
SWAP YOUR RIDE!!!
Winter Tire Safety package
available on selected vehicles!
MORE USED TRUCKS
AND CARS AVAILABLE!!!
2011 FORD MUSTANG 2DR COUPE
V6, 3.7L V6 engine, 6 speed automatic, cruise, air,
power locks,windows, brakes, bucket seats, remote
keyless entry and engine block heater.Colour: Black
Mileage: 50,741 KM Stock #2505A.
2010 F150 FX4 S/CREW
License and H.S.T. Extra
5.4L engine, 3.73 electronic lock axle, chrome running boards, sport cloth cabins chairs, sync voice
activated system, cruise, power windows/locks
/doors, trailer towing package, reverse sensing
system, power driver seat, fog lamps. Colour:
Black Mileage: 58,958 KM Stock #2558A
2011 F150 XLT S/CREW
License and H.S.T. Extra
SELLING PRICE: $15,800
SELLING PRICE: $25,274
3.5L Ecoboost engine, power windows/locks/doors,
3.73ltd slip axle, max trailer tow package, remote start
system, sync, skid plates, power driver seats, keyless
entry, trailer brake controller, cruise, cloth bench seating. Colour: Black Mileage: 85,958 KM Stock #2569A.
Auto, cruise, air, power locks/windows/mirrors, nav,
leather heated seats, remote start, power moonroof.
Colour: Blue Mileage: 11,105 KM Stock #2445A
License and H.S.T. Extra
License and H.S.T. Extra
SELLING PRICE: $18,700
2012 F150 S/CREW XLT
2013 DODGE JOURNEY RT AWD
SELLING PRICE: $27,200
2013 F350 SUPERDUTY
3.5L ECOBOOST ENG., 3.31 Reg axle, power
doors/locks/mirrors, fog lamps, running boards,
chrome bumpers. Colour: Gray Mileage: 93,163
KM Stock #2490A
6.2L V8 engine, 6 speed automatic, a/c, power brakes,
power windows and locks, chrome grill/bumpers, tow
hooks, sync voice capabilities, backup alarm. Colour:
White Mileage: 40,869 KM Stock #2463A
License and H.S.T. Extra
License and H.S.T. Extra
SELLING PRICE: $24,995
SELLING PRICE: $33,200
FINANCING AVAILABLE
ON ALL NEW AND MOST
USED MODELS
400 HIGHWAY 11 / 17 P.O. BOX 837, NIPIGON, ONTARIO P0T 2J0
1-800-465-3304 OR (807) 887-2034
3
Thursday, October 30, 2014
4
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
MUNICIPAL ELECTION
By Jodi Lundmark – TB Source
ccording to the at-large winners of
Monday night’s election, the people have spoken and are saying they’re
satisfied with the direction council has
taken the city the past four years.
All four incumbents running were
re-elected Monday taking the top four
slots with former at-large councillor
Frank Pullia taking the seat vacated by
Ken Boshcoff who took a shot at the
mayor’s seat this election.
Rebecca Johnson said she felt good
winning a seat at the council table for
a fourth term.
“It makes me feel the work I have
done to date is accepted by the
community. I’m very active and so the
community has said the work that I
have done is being recognized.
Therefore, from that one can feel
positive that what you’re doing is the
right thing for the community,” she
said.
A
“The numbers communicate that.”
Johnson pulled in 14,620 votes to
rank third in the at-large race. Iain
Angus topped the list with 15,861
votes followed by Larry Hebert with
14,664 votes. Aldo Ruberto received
14,311 votes and Pullia rounded out
the top five with 14,112.
Angus said he’s honoured the people
of Thunder Bay felt highly enough of
him to elect him for a fourth term.
“I think it’s very clear from tonight’s
results that people are very satisfied
with the direction that council has
been taking the community, that they
want the vast majority of council
members back so that we can keep
doing what we’ve been doing,” he
said.
“I’m very pleased with that.”
Ruberto said he believes the majority
of residents know what’s going on
with the city and the people with
negative views are in the minority.
“Let’s respect what the people have
said. They said keep doing what we’re
doing,” he said.
“When you see so many people
getting back in, it tells you people are
happy with what’s going on contrary
to what people have been trying to say.
They’ve said we believe in the future.
We believe in this council. They know
there’s a great future ahead for this
city.”
In the last municipal election, Pullia
threw his hat into the mayor’s race but
came in third. He said he learned more
from losing than winning.
“You look at things from a different
perspective. One thing you learn is
never to become complacent, to listen
to the people. We are here to represent
them,” he said.
Pullia is ready to rejoin council’s
ranks and says they have a lot of work
ahead of them.
“I look forward to working with my
fellow councillors in moving Thunder
Bay forward,” he said.
Hebert couldn’t be immediately
reached for comment.
FIGHTING DIRT & GRIME ... ONE HOME AT A TIME
Professional Steam Cleaning
For Your Home or Business
• Tile & Grout (Showers & Floors)
• Carpets • Carpet Restoration
• Upholstery
• Pet Odor & Stain Removal
• Vertical Blinds
• Flood Extractions & MORE
Institute of Inspection Cleaning
and Restoration Certificate
www.carpetcrusader.net
[email protected]
807-251-9313
JODI LUNDMARK
Incumbents march on
FRANK PULLIA: Veteran councillor the lone new face in the at-large race in 2014.
REMEMBER
HOW COLD LAST
WINTER WAS?
DON’T LET YOUR
HEATING COST GO
OUT YOUR WINDOWS!
It’s not
too late.
MADE IN THUNDER BAY
408 Simpson Street
622-2880
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
FULL ELECTION RESULTS
Mayor
Keith Hobbs
Ken Boshcoff
Shane Judge
Colin Burridge
Douglas MacKay
Henry Wojak
At-large
Iain Angus
Larry Hebert
Rebecca Johnson
Aldo Ruberto
Frank Pullia
Tamara Johnson
Lawrence Timko
Barry Streib
Terri-Lynne Carter
Andrew Brigham
Sargon Khubyar
Robin Rickards
Chris Holland
Diane Armstrong
Kimberly Coreau
Norm Sponchia
Ian Convey
Wolfgang Schoor
Ed Hailio
Current River
Andrew Foulds
Andy Wolff
Claudio Monteleone
Dick Waddington
14,463
12,051
9,531
412
362
304
15,861
14,664
14,620
14,311
14,112
10,207
9,164
8,972
6,586
5,752
5,465
5,082
4,475
4,406
3,714
3,029
2,856
2,783
1,011
3,098
698
532
448
McIntyre
Trevor Giertuga
Wesley Ramage
Logan Ollivier
Mike Komar
2,363
1,402
1,007
780
McKellar
Paul Pugh
Kristian Kuznak
Douglas Powell
2,237
1,099
923
Neebing
Linda Rydholm
Geoff Abthorpe
Austin Haner
2,141
821
695
Northwood
Shelby Ch’ng
Mark Bentz
Jim Mauro
Frank Armiento
2,157
1,639
1,184
639
Red River
Brian McKinnon
David George Noonan
James Marsh
Paul Sloan
3,341
2,072
558
386
Westfort
Joe Virdiramo
Frank Scarcello
Beatrice Metzler
John P. Radl
1,680
1,635
1,406
805
English Public School Board
Ron Oikonen
11,151
Karen Wilson
10,296
Deborah Massaro
10,038
Trudy Tuchenhagen
9,814
Marg Arnone
9,419
Ellen Chambers
9,416
George Saarinen
9,395
Jack Playford
9,100
Pat Johansen
8,432
Gerry Leach
5,874
Winona Collier
5,821
English Separate School Board
Kathy O’Brien
5,834
Eleanor Ashe
4,958
Tony Romeo
4,924
Bob Hupka
4,921
Don Cattani
4,453
Robert DeGagne
3,928
Tom Mihaljevic
3,561
Stephen Margarit
3,275
French Public School Board
A.M. Gelinauat
Acclaimed
French Separate School Board
Claudette Gleeson
222
Lina Mayer
181
Alain Lauzon
178
Mariette Langevin
172
Donald Pelletier
168
Robert Martinie
110
Long lines blamed for lengthy results delay
M U N I C PA L E L E C T I O N
By Jamie Smith – TB Source
he city is blaming a last-minute
rush to the polls for delays over
municipal election results.
City clerk John Hannam said
everything was running smoothly
until the last hour before the 8 p.m.
close when a few polls saw a rush,
T
delaying results by more than an
hour and a half. People complained
of long lines at the polls and
reported that some potential voters
left frustrated without even casting
their ballots. Some polls stayed
open until 8:30 p.m. to try and
accommodate the rush.
"Everybody decided to come at
the last minute," Hannam said.
Some cities, including Toronto,
had already declared winners
before Thunder Bay's first results
rolled in. Mayor Keith Hobbs said
the delay felt like Game 7 of a
Stanley Cup hockey game. The city
needs to find a way to speed it up.
"This is a horrible process. We're
hearing people have been turned
away at the polls," he said.
i
t
t
Suppe
e
h
g
a
p
S
r
Sunday
November 2nd
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS
Council #8602
301 S. May St.
Take-Out
$
1050
Per person
(Bring your own container)
11:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m FRIDAY BUFFETS
M
11:30-2:00 P
Sit Down $
5:30 - 7:00 p.m.
1250
Per person
Tickets available after 11:00 a.m.
The Next Spaghetti Supper December 7th.
5
6
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Thursday, October 30, 2014
Editorial
EDITORIAL
Opposition
a little flat
he public has spoken and once again
there won’t be much change at city
hall.
With Shane Judge leading the charge,
the anti-event centre vote failed to materialize in any great numbers.
Judge’s message to stop the $114million project, which dominated this
year’s municipal election, was heard by
about a quarter of the electorate, but led
him to no better than a third-place finish,
some 13 percentage points and 4,932
votes behind the incumbent Keith Hobbs.
Hobbs made no bones about his
support for the project, though like most
candidates who backed it, said it won’t
happen if the provincial and federal
governments don’t come to the table with
the lion’s share of the cost.
A vocal – and clearly in the minority –
contingent railed for months against the
event centre, its impact on the city’s
bottom line, and more importantly, the
added taxes they said residents will be
forced to pay.
Once the results came in, with the
exception of Westfort, those who stood
firmly against the project were mere
afterthoughts.
Judge finished third. In the at-large
race, Ed Hailio, Wolfgang Schoor, Ian
Convey and Kim Coreau captured four
of the five lowest vote totals.
The win doesn’t give carte blanche to
the next council to build the facility. But
it gives them a clear mandate to continue
down that road.
T
C O N TAC T U S :
87 North Hill Street,
Thunder Bay, Ontario P7A 5V6
Ph: 807-346-2600 • Fax: 807-345-9923
Editor: Leith Dunick 346-2650
[email protected]
Reporter: Jodi Lundmark 346-3558
[email protected]
Web Manager: Scott Paradis 346-2527
[email protected]
Web Reporter: Jamie Smith 346-2591
[email protected]
Web Reporter: Matt Vis 346-2622
[email protected]
Production:
[email protected]
Pepper O’Connor 346-2598
Jennifer Chicoine 346-2599
Sales Manager:
Kathy Harris 346-2510
[email protected]
Advertising Policy: Ad adjustment for error is
limited to the cost of that portion of the ad where
the error occurred. Member of: Canadian
Community Newspaper Association & Ontario
Community Newspaper Association. Thunder
Bay Source is published every Friday by
T.Bay Post Inc. В© Copyright No. 343384.
ONE YEAR SUBSCRIPTION BY MAIL:
Canada: $95.00, U.S. $170.00 (HST included)
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Curfew supported
To the editor:
community forum hosted by the
CBC at Confederation College in
early October focussed on building
bridges between Indigenous and nonIndigenous peoples. The Respect
campaign adopted by the City was
mentioned as a positive strategy to
bring us together. The challenge is
putting into action the understanding
and compromises required to resolve
differences and divergent lifestyles so
that we can work together towards
shared goals and get along.
One case in point is curfews rejected
by city council in 2011 at the recommendation of the crime prevention
council. The arguments presented
centred on their ineffectiveness to
prevent crime, even though they are
already part of our legal system to
enhance public safety.
First Nations education authorities
on the other hand have adopted
curfews for their high school students’
safety while studying in our community. Families back home want to be
assured that their children are not
roaming around city streets late at
night. And boarding parents who are
kind and generous enough to house
the students rely on curfews to have
them indoors at specified hours.
In the light of the city’s Respect
campaign, we feel that First Nations
that are proactive by adopting curfews
should have been consulted before the
idea was rejected.
With the number of Aboriginal
students who have died while
attending school in Thunder Bay, their
perspective on the matter should be
considered and respected.
It is unlikely that First Nations will
go along with the city’s decision and
abandon curfews unless alternative
solutions are offered to guarantee the
safety of their young students who
must leave home and come here for
high school.
Hence this call for the new city
council to revisit the issue and reconcile with First Nations school
authorities and parents who need help
to keep their children safe.
We need to show that our community cares about protecting
unsupervised minors at night, and
shares some responsibility over the
wellbeing of Aboriginal boarding
students living in our city.
The Regional Multicultural Youth
Council (RMYC) supports curfews in
line with the Child and Family
Services Act. We wrote to the Ontario
Attorney General for guidance, and
the response was as follows: “With
regard to a curfew by-law, the establishment of by-laws is the
responsibility of the local municipality subject to the Municipality Act
and other statutes that may apply to
municipal by-laws. I would suggest
A
that you continue to pursue this matter
with the Thunder Bay Council and
municipal staff.”
Therefore, we feel that city council,
crime prevention council, Thunder
Bay Police Service/Aboriginal
Liaison Unit, and other stakeholders
should consult with the First Nations
and boarding parents, and come up
with a mutually agreed plan for
keeping �visiting’ students safe.
In spite of negative experiences with
residential schools, First Nations
continue to send their children away
to study. They value education as
investment for progress and prosperity
into the future, and want equitable
funding and control to improve the
outcomes.
Social development studies confirm
that the quality of life and standard of
living improve with every year of
schooling completed. Graduates
contribute to the economy and are role
models of success by breaking the
cycle of welfare, poverty, despair,
addictions and criminality.
Corrections Canada statistics reveal
that 80 per cent of young offenders in
federal institutions have below grade
10 education, and 65 percent have less
than Grade 8.
In addition to the pain, mental
anguish, physical damage and lost
production caused by crime, we also
pay heavily to lock people up.
According to the 2013-2014 Office of
the Correctional Investigator’s report,
it costs $117,788.00 on average to
keep a male offender in custody, and
$211,618.00 per year for a federally
sentenced woman inmate.
Individuals requiring such expensive
institutional care can be greatly
reduced if we work together and
implement measures that improve the
academic success and safety of all
children and youth.
Each one of us can play a role by
welcoming and supporting Aboriginal
students migrating to the city to make
them feel accepted and lessen the
culture shock. They need homes to
stay, help to learn urban lifeskills and
acquire social etiquette, empowerment to resist negative influences, and
compassion to heal from addictions.
Many suffer from the intergenerational trauma of residential schools
which feeds into stereotypes, prejudice, racism and discrimination. This
requires empathy and our encourage-
ment to enable them to follow their
academic dreams and realize their
goals.
The RMYC has developed a reception and orientation program for First
Nation students to ease transition to
city life. We run a peer-led afterschool program at Dennis Franklin
Cromarty High School where we plan
and organize together extra-curricular
activities that promote healthy
lifestyles and wellness. We are also
working with boards of education to
make our schools safer, more
accepting, inclusive and equitable so
that more students graduate.
First Nations have adopted curfews
to enhance the safety, wellbeing and
achievement of their students, and the
City should support them in this
regard. This gesture will show respect
and add a step towards building
harmony with far reaching long-term
safety, security and economic benefits
for everyone.
Samantha Smith,
Shane Wong,
Jeevan Chahal,
Regional Multicultural Youth
Council
7
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Perspective
SCHOOLS SUPPLIED
Getting on with things
Will the prime minister use fear as a campaign tool?
By J.R. Shermack
Special to TB Source
was waiting for my takeout order
in a local restaurant the other day
when I got into a conversation with
the lady at the till.
The restaurant wasn’t busy so we
had a few minutes to discuss world
affairs.
It was no surprise that the
tragedies in Montreal and Ottawa
were on our minds so we talked
about that in a calm, Canadian way
without being fearful or angry.
We covered every angle of the
story – the victims, the assailants,
the rescuers, warning signs, mental
illness and the root causes of these
two tragedies.
We did it in less than five minutes
with respect and without fear and
by the time my order was ready we
were both happy to get on with our
Canadian lives.
It’s a crime and a shame what
happened but this is no reason to
change who we are or what we
believe.
Apparently that view is not
shared by everyone.
In fact, now that some time has
passed there is a sinking feeling
across Canada that we have already
overreacted with a knee-jerk
reaction, fueled by raw emotion
alone.
As I listen to bold statements
made by our prime minister I am
reminded of another turbulent
period in recent history.
I
I’m sure Mr. Harper remembers of the entire country.
I can’t escape the feeling that we
very well how George W. Bush
used a national tragedy to launch are playing into someone’s hands
his Politics of Fear campaign on by voluntarily surrendering our
personal freedom.
the American public.
It’s hard for me to believe this is
There is increasing suspicion that
Mr. Harper is prepared to use those what most Canadians want but
same tactics to advance his own anyone who defends their personal
political motives – to scare the freedom is mocked and ridiculed as
Canadian public into re-electing a terrorist sympathizer.
Justin Trudeau expressed his
him.
Have these two unrelated inci- hope “as we go forward that we
dents set Warrior Steve loose on don’t emphasize a culture of fear
Canada and the world in a sort of and mistrust.”
Harper’s Conservatives find that
9/11-lite, you’re either with us or
laughable and have chosen a more
against us campaign?
Politicians of fear create “George W.”approach.
To paraphrase M.
unfounded anxiety and
Trudeau’s father, if
manipulate this fear to
their own advantage by “It’s a crime Canadians are to be
promising to rescue us and a shame stripped of their compaswhat hapsionate, peace-loving
from unseen and unexidentity, I hope they
plained threats.
pened but
respond with a roar
You might recall the
this is no
instead of a whimper.
ultimate deception when
reason to
In spite of this, the lady
President Bush used the
change who at the till and I decided to
9/11 attacks to justify the
we are or
just get on with things and
invasion of Iraq and ultinot let this one sad
mately, hundreds of
what we
episode make us fearful or
thousands of deaths.
believe.”
change who we are.
Our PM doesn’t have the
We didn’t solve any
resources for a mission
like that but his menace is just as problems at the restaurant that
deceiving even if it is more hidden. night but our conversation got me
His government already has plans thinking about Canada and what it
for additional security measures means to be Canadian.
I drove home with my supper,
that will diminish the civil liberties
feeling like an authentic Canuck –
of all free Canadians.
That’s a very disrespectful way to happy, free, peace-loving and just a
honour the sacrifice of those two little bit hungry.
And one more thing – the takeout
soldiers – by using their deaths for
political advantage at the expense was delicious, too.
LEITH DUNICK
OPINION
HELPING: Churchill Elementary Public School and St. Thomas Aquinas School students accept a
donation from Staples and the Kiwanis Club to help purchase school supplies for students in need.
HOW TO WRITE US:
Simon J.
Dawson
n 1868 the Canadian
government began construction of the 45-mile
Dawson Wagon Road
from Port Arthur to
Lake Shebandowan as
part of a 451-mile land
and water route intended to secure the West
by linking Lake
Superior with the Red
River Settlement.
Simon J. Dawson,
engineer and surveyor was superintendant for the road.
I
etters to the editor are most welcome.
Those kept to 350 words or less
have priority.
L
The Thunder Bay Source reserves the
right to edit submissions for content and
clarity. All attempts will be made to
preserve the core argument of the author.
Address them to:
Thunder Bay Source
87 North Hill Street,
Thunder Bay, ON P7A 5V6
Fax: 345-9923
Email: [email protected]
Visit our website: www.tbnewswatch.com
THIS WEEK’S POLL QUESTION:
your
VOICE
Canada Post has discontinued home mail
delivery in several centres. Given the
cost savings, is this justified?
VOICE
YOUR OPINION ABOUT
THINGS THAT MATTER MOST.
VISIT www.tbnewswatch.com
TO SHARE YOUR IDEAS AND VIEWS ABOUT
OUR WEEKLY POLL QUESTION.
TOTAL VOTES: 502
YES
55.6%
NO
NOT SURE
43.8%
0.6%
Thursday, October 30, 2014
8
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Do you have an opinion to share?
E-mail the editor at
[email protected]
L O C A L NEWS
Ebola precautions in place
Hospital won’t
take chances
when it comes to
deadly disease
HEALTH
By Jamie Smith – TB Source
he province isn’t taking any chances
when it comes to Ebola.
Despite the small risk of the deadly
virus hitting Thunder Bay, a directive
by the Ministry of Health and Longterm Care now has a triage nurse at
Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences
Centre gowned and protected with a
Plexiglass face shield in case a person
turns up at the ER with symptoms.
“She’s looking for people with a
history of travel to West Africa and for
people with a fever of more than 38
degrees,” interim chief of staff Mark
Henderson said.
T
DRUG FREE, SURGERY FREE!
Dr. Alan Cranton is excited to offer the
latest advance in safe, comfortable
and highly effective pain relief and
tissue repair. LASER TREATMENTS
are safe, effective and painless and
decrease the healing time by 30%.
Shoulder Pain
Neck Pain
JAMIE SMITH
Taking turns
Triage nurses will rotate having to
wear the gear every two hours. But one
of them will be wearing it every hour of
every day until further notice.
“The garb is not particularly comfortable,” Henderson said.
While the site may alarm some
patients and visitors at the hospital,
Henderson is reminding the public that
Ebola has never been in Canada.
Even if it was, larger cities would
likely be a warning sign first.
“It must be unbelievably remote
considering where we are in the
country,” he said
PLAN OF ATTACK: A nursing student models gear that must be worn by a triage nurse due to concerns over Ebola.
Back Pain
November 8th from 8am-2pm Picture Store is having a
Hip
Pain
Cranton Wellness Centre
Call 343-7932 for a FREE consultation
www.crantonwellness.com
REDEEM THIS COUPON TO RECEIVE
%
50
вњЃ
No Referrals Necessary
Complimentary Consultations.
come down and get an even better deal than even before on selected items!
вњЃ
Knee
Pain
Yard Sale at the back of their building,
OFF
PICTURE FRAMING ANY SIZE, ANY QUANTITY THE PICTURE STORE AND FRAMING CENTRE
269 Red River Road
345-9989
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
FREEZE UP NOTICE
Habitat build back
on track after delay
Thunder Bay Hydro will be discontinuing underground service
installations during the freeze-up period of
November 14, 2014 to May 15, 2015.
To be eligible for installation prior to this date, a service must have
an Electrical Safety Authority inspection completed by
November 3, 2014.
After freeze-up, all customers, including residential customers in
subdivisions, will be responsible for the digging and backfilling of
their own trench for all underground services.
Project had been postponed because of a lack of funds
T H U N D E R B AY
By Matt Vis – TB Source
fter a brief period of uncertainty this year’s
Habitat for Humanity home build is back on track.
Nearly two months after the organization announced
they would likely have to suspend the build, work is
ongoing at their duplex on Hodder Avenue.
Habitat for Humanity Thunder Bay CEO Diane
Mitchell said a February move in date for the families
is being targeted with exterior work expected to be
completed within the next couple of weeks.
“We are back at it full pin and making great
progress,” Mitchell said. “Once we’re winterized
we’re good for the snow to fly and then we’ll be
working in the house to finish that.”
In September the organization had publicly said the
build would likely have to be pushed back due to a
funding shortfall.
Mitchell said they needed about $75,000 to resume
the project and build the home for the two families,
who have seven children between them.
“It was absolutely shocking beyond my wildest
expectations that we would have enough money to be
able to finish it that quickly,” she said.
“To see two people step forward and provide all the
money was unbelievable. It was amazing and makes
you believe in miracles.”
For any further information and
options, please contact
Thunder Bay Hydro Power Systems
at 343-1176.
MATT VIS
A
GOT THE CASH: Habitat for Humanity needed $75,00 to
resume this house build on Hodder Avenue.
Mitchell said the funding issues were primarily as a
result of a perfect storm of the project being a duplex,
expansion of the ReStore and a decrease in the success
of two of their primary fundraisers.
The organization is planning to continue with the
annual tradition again next year, with a build in the
works on Finlayson Street.
Visit us online at www.tbhydro.com
9
10
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
IN BRIEF
Murder
charge
he charge for one suspect in a Canada
Day homicide investigation was
upgraded to murder last Friday.
Carl Spender Rae, 31, and Becky
Mamakwa, 21, were both arrested and
charged with aggravated assault on July 1
after the alleged robbery and assault of 52year-old Christopher Adams outside of
city hall on the corner of Donald and May
Streets.
The victim died on July 8 at the Thunder
Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre.
Rae appeared in person at the Thunder
Bay Courthouse on Friday and was
arraigned on a second-degree murder
charge.
He was remanded to Nov. 14.
Mamakwa was released on bail on Sept.
12 and her lawyer appeared as agent for
her Friday. She was remanded to Nov. 10,
when it is expected the aggravated assault
charge will be withdrawn and she will be
arraigned for second-degree murder.
Rae remains in custody.
None of the allegations against either of
the suspects have been proven in court. –
Jodi Lundmark
T
Weapons seized
wo male suspects have been arrested
after a domestic situation turned into a
brief standoff Saturday afternoon.
City police officers responded to an
apartment building on the 400 block of
Vickers Street North after receiving
reports of a woman being confined against
her will in a unit, arresting a 25-year-old
man and a 16-year-old man after resolving
the situation and finding a gun with
ammunition.
Police were first alerted to the incident at
about 2:30 p.m. after an anonymous male
called 911. Officers first responding on
the scene were unable to reach anybody
inside.
As negotiators tried to make contact
with people inside, a 16-year-old outside
the scene was identified as a resident of
the apartment and was arrested.
The Emergency Task Unit entered the
apartment shortly after 4:30 p.m. and
found the 25-year-old along with an 18year-old woman, with both claiming to
have been asleep.
Investigators determined the woman
was a victim of domestic violence.
A subsequent search of the apartment
resulted in the discovery and seizure of a
rifle and ammunition.
Both suspects have been charged with
unauthorized possession of a firearm,
careless use of a firearm, and possession
of a prohibited device. The 25-year-old is
also charged with one count of forcible
confinement and assault.
T
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
11
L O C A L NEWS
Infant death ruled medical
Police investigating the disposal of body found near Neebing River
POLICE
By Jodi Lundmark – TB Source
olice say an infant, whose body was discovered on the city’s southside this past
spring, died from a medical issue.
Thunder Bay Police Service officials on
Monday announced an update into the investigation, which began after an infant’s body
was discovered on the bank of the Neebing
River near Tarbutt Street on May 5.
Ever since the discovery, police have been
trying to identify the infant and the family.
Information from the Regional Coroner’s
Office following a post mortem examination
conducted in Toronto revealed that the infant's
death appears to have been due to medical
causes.
Police aren’t releasing any other information
on the infant, including gender or age.
“Our investigators have been working very
hard to try to sift through all the information
they have and ensure they can come to a
positive conclusion in understanding what
occurred,” said Const. Julie Tilbury.
“When our investigators are trying to sift
through things that are truth and non-truths
they have to have certain information that
only people connected to the situation or have
an intimate knowledge would know and that’s
FILE
P
SEEKING FAMILY: The body of an infant was discovered in May on the bank of the Neebing River.
why we’re holding this information back at
this point in time.”
Police say the disposition of the infant's
remains is a matter that continues to be investigated.
“Because we know this infant died of
medical conditions, that part of the investigation would not deem it to be a homicide.
However, we are still investigating the disposition of the remains of this infant and that is
the part the Thunder Bay police are currently
looking into,” said Tilbury.
The Coroner's office maintains custody of
the infant's remains and hopes to release the
remains back to the family once they are identified.
The Regional Coroner's Office along with
the Thunder Bay Police Service urge anyone
with information about this investigation to
come forward to either party.
12
Thursday, October 30, 2014
Live on Location
for Family Fun Day
on North May St
Southern Ave. to Dease St.
Come meet Curious George & Friends
at 447 N. May St.
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
Water conference about
networking and learning
THUNDER BAY
By Jamie Smith – TB Source
n idea started by a handful of people
60 years ago is now an important step
in making sure water supplies are safe
across the region.
The Northwestern Ontario Water and
Wastewater Conference is a chance for
more than 200 operators across the region
to network, train and learn about new technology for water systems.
Conference chair Henry Connor, who’s
also a technology management specialist
with the city, said the conference also has
35 booths with suppliers and companies
showing off the latest ways to keep
drinking water safe.
"Any technology that we can use to help
us do that more efficiently and cheaper is
definitely something we're going to be
focusing on," he said during the conference
at the Valhalla Inn.
Operators can also take training courses
at the conference to make sure they’re
certified, something that’s become a focus
since the Walkerton Inquiry.
Walkerton Clean Water Centre training
coordinator Leona Cunningham said
courses were offered on everything from
valve maintenance to monitoring chlorine.
"Making sure that our drinking water
operators have the knowledge, the skills,
the abilities they need in order to operate
drinking water facilities,” she said.
Saturday,
November 1st, 10am-2pm
We Welcome You...
Almada
Upholstery
Irena’s
Flooring
Prizes, Specials & Deals Galore!!
JAMIE SMITH
A
SAFETY FIRST: The Northwestern Ontario Water and Wastewater Conference hatched more than
60 years ago and is a chance for operators to network, train and learn about new technology.
BATTERIES DEAD? Recycle Instead!
4
2014
ION NOV. -14,
COLLECT
T
Thunder
Bay residents that received a battery recycling bag in the mail are invited
to
t participate in a curbside collection of used single-use household batteries on
t
lig
ghtteed
db
eellow.
ow.
ow
their
regular recycling collection day during the week highlighted
below.
Round up your single-use batteries, including
AAA, AA, C, D, 9 volt and button cells.
Place your batteries in the orange bag and
seal it using the zip tab.
On your recycling collection day that falls
between NOVEMBER 4-14, set the bag
beside your blue bag at the curb.
Residents
who miss the collection date, or those living in apartments are
Re
Re
e
een
nc
encouraged
to visit the website for a battery recycling location near you.
For more information, please visit: www.thunderbay.ca/batteries
в„ў
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
JAMIE SMITH
READ US ONLINE: w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m
TAKEN OUT: Police say the Hells Angels were working out of this clubhouse on Simpson Street.
Police raid Hells
Angels clubhouse
Police say four full-patch members in place in city
POLICE
By Jamie Smith – TB Source
olice say it would be a mistake to think
the Hells Angels left Thunder Bay
completely after a police raid in 2006
seized its clubhouse and dismantled their
charter.
Thunder Bay Police Service raided a
Hells Angels clubhouse on Simpson Street
Wednesday morning as part of an ongoing
investigation.
The club doesn't have enough members to
have a Thunder Bay chapter in place, but
police say there are four full-patch
members in the city taking orders from the
gang's Hamilton chapter.
P
Seizures
In January 2006, during a two-year operation dubbed Project Husky, police arrested
27 suspects and seized the Hells Angels'
clubhouse on Heron St.
"Their presence has never gone away but
certainly their numbers have been diminished since Project Husky," executive
officer Chris Adams said.
He couldn't comment on what was
discovered or seized in the raid.
"Really I can't say anything other than
that this is still a very active investigation,"
he said.
Serious business
The Hells Angels are a worldwide
criminal organization Adams said. Police in
Thunder Bay take that very seriously.
"For anyone to let their guard down
regarding the Hells Angels would be a very
serious mistake," he said.
No one was at the clubhouse when the
police raided it Wednesday morning. In the
afternoon men outside were cleaning up the
red and white building. They said there was
some damage, including a broken door and
window and a busted gate.
13
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
Contract offer rejected
LABOUR
By Matt Vis – TB Source
labour dispute could be on the horizon at
the city’s grain elevators.
Grain workers at four city plants last Friday
rejected the final offer from the Lakehead
Terminal Elevators Association, the collaborative that represents the three major companies
in Thunder Bay.
United Steelworkers local staff representative Herbert Daniher said a “firm majority”
of the members voted against the offer.
“We’ve notified the employer and asked
them to reconvene meetings as early as
possible, likely Monday,” Daniher said.
“We’re now in a legal strike position,
however the employer is also now in a legal
lockout position.”
Either side can halt work by giving a 72
hour notice to the other party but Daniher
said that still remains a last resort.
He hopes the rejection will trigger further
discussion or third-party assistance.
“We need to go back and revisit the matters
with the assistance of the conciliation and
mediation from the federal government and
we’ll see if we can’t come up with a resolution
to the differences between the two parties,”
Daniher said.
The 230 workers at four of the city’s eleva-
A
MATT VIS
14
HERB DANIHER: Said a п¬Ѓrm majority of members voted against offer from LTEA.
tors have been working without a contract
since the previous one expired on Jan. 31,
though negotiations had been ongoing for the
past five to six months.
In recent years labour disruptions have been
rare in the local industry as Daniher said job
action hasn’t been taken since 1991.
This has been a record year at the port, due
in large part to an overwhelming harvest in
the prairies last fall as well as a harsh winter
that delayed efforts to move the crop by rail.
Through the end of September more than
six million tonnes of cargo had been
shipped out of the port, with the vast
majority of that being grain. By comparison, there had been nearly 4 million tonnes
shipped out in 2013, which had been
considered a busy year.
Those favourable conditions appear to not
be enough to stop the union from trying to
hold their ground.
Daniher wouldn’t go into detail when
asked for specifics as to what each side was
seeking but made it clear the union was
looking to avoid concessions.
“From our perspective we don’t want to
give anything back. We want to try to move
the matter forward and keep up with the
level of inflation while that’s possible and
try to make some improvements in the
collective bargaining agreement,” he said.
“These are diverse interests that both
parties have and we need to try and find a
contract zone or balancing point to bring a
resolution to it. That’s the objective.”
The affected elevators are the Superior
Elevator, Richardson and the two operated
by Viterra. They combined have a capacity
of nearly 770,000 tonnes.
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
15
L O C A L NEWS
Bullying cycle can be broken: expert
Barbara Coloroso
says getting to people
when they’re young
best way to succeed
T H U N D E R B AY
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
arbara Coloroso says people have
to be taught to be mean.
“It’s not a natural behavior,” the
world-renowned anti-bullying expert
said Wednesday, after speaking with
students at Agnew H. Johnston Public
School.
“Conflict is, and I showed that to the
kids. But you have to be taught to
discriminate to have a pre-judgment, a
B
prejudice. You have to be taught to
stereotype”
Unfortunately, even today, those
types of behaviours are prevalent in
society, though she holds out plenty of
hope for the young generation, though
parents have to be seen to be standing
up for values and against injustice for
the message to sink in.
“The more our kids swim in a culture
of mean, that we create, the less likely
we are to be able to break this. But the
more we are able to create deeply
caring communities for them to be in,
the less likely they are to target.”
Coloroso, who also spoke to parents,
educators and police during her twoday visit to Thunder Bay, said the
message is starting to get through,
especially to younger students.
“I actually have more hope for them,
because we are seeing collectively
more groups saying no, individuals
saying I care about the young person.”
Coloroso was blunt in her talk, asking
students whether they’d seen or heard
any examples of bullying in the
hallways at school or on the playground closer to home.
Nearly every student raised their
hand.
She taught them the difference
between taunting and teasing, goodnatured fun and bullying. She even
asked what they would do if they saw a
slur painted on a wall.
“One kid said you could paint it. One
kid said you could replace the board.
One kid said he could write he’s not a
jerk. They came up with very creative
ideas. I want them to see they have
agency in their lives. You have the
CHOICE
BUILDING
LOTS
power in your life to make a difference.”
The students, a mixture of gradeschool and high-school children, were
surprised to learn how mean other kids
can be.
Nicholas Littlefield, a Grade 8
student, said it was nice to learn strategies to combat bullying, though he
readily admitted he hasn’t seen much at
school.
It was an eye-opener.
“I was surprised at how people are so
mean to other children, who then want
to commit suicide,” he said, having just
learned the tragic fate of murdered gay
teenager Matthew Sheppard and about
Amanda Todd, who was bullied online
to the point she took her own life.
Luckily there’s not much bullying at
Agnew H. Johnston, he said.
“I think there’s the little stuff there
would be in all schools, but I think our
school is doing a pretty good job and
we don’t have too much bullying,” the
teen said.
Nicole Walter-Rowan is Lakehead
Public Schools’ program co-ordinator
and helped bring Coloroso to Thunder
Bay.
Walter-Rowan said it wasn’t enough
to teach out of a textbook or an online
module.
“Barbara gave beautiful, very explicit
examples for kids about the things they
do that have an impact on others and
their own ethical well-being, working
with each other,” Walter-Rowan said.
“And they (learned) things that they
can do to ensure they are all
contributing to a positive learning environment.”
MOUNT McRAE VISTA
General Location = 15th Side Road & Mountain Road
2014
PRICES
Sale conditions all Lots:
SIGNS POSTED
• 1” City water line paid for by developer and to be installed by City to building setback line (if purchaser wants deeper distance, you must contact City immediately;
WALK YOUR LOT
• Purchaser must obtain permit approval from Thunder Bay District Health Unit for actual location of septic field and must follow all requirements of TBDHU & City Engineering SINGLE FAMILY SUBURBAN BUILDING LOTS
• Purchaser must arrange and pay for installation of connection for electricity service with Thunder Bay Hydro Electric Distribution Inc.
• Purchaser must contact City Engineering to arrange for driveway location permit and install own culvert & gravel for driveway
• Notification/Subdivision Agreement registered on title - Purchaser is subject to same - essentially City is warning that the new house must
have a pressure reducing valve because of the higher water pressures due to the Mount Forest Reservoir and that the Purchaser must conform to higher septic field standards such as a raised bed above regular ground level because of clay soil conditions in the area;
• The City has imposed drainage plans on each lot as per diagram attached which will be enforced at building permit time, and each Purchaser
must undertake and promise on closing to abide by the terms of the drainage plan.
LOT 9 55R13811
Plan 55R-13811 - see plan for accurate dimensions - numbers below are approximate:
Lot 9 - (Parts 9&10) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac) Price $99,000 + HST
SOLD
25, 2014
Lot 8 - (Parts 8&11) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac)
SOLD
$1000 DRAWN DAILY
Lot 7 - (Parts 7&13) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac) Price $99,000 + HST
November 1-30, 2014
Lot 6 - (Parts 6&14) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2137.7m2 (23,011ft2 - 0.528ac) Price $99,000 + HST
Lot 5 - (Parts 5&16) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2137.7m2 (23,011ft2 - 0.528ac)
ALL TICKETS IN DRUM FOR ALL DRAWS!
Only 1500 Tickets to be sold
1 day prior to the draw date.
4
Price $99,000 + HST
Lot 4 - ((Parts 4&17) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac) Price $99,000 + HST
Lot 3 - ((Parts 3&19) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2137.8m2 (23,003ft2 - 0.528ac) Price $99,000 + HST
Lot 2 - ((Parts 2&20) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac) Price $99,000 + HST
FIVE $1,000 Bonus Draws & $10,000 Grand Prize Draw
November 30, 2014
LOT 7 55R13811
Lot 1 - ((Parts 1&21 - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac)
SOLD
15TH SIDE ROAD
$5,000 in Early Bird Draws!
LOT 6 55R13811
www.sjЕЊb.net/grand-a-day-draw
Make cheques payable to “GRAND-A-DAY DRAW”
PLEASE PRINT
Mail or Fax to:
St. Joseph’s FoundaƟon of Thunder Bay
63 Carrie St. Thunder Bay, ON P7A 4J 2
FAX: 768-8820
Name: _____________________________________________________ (Note: only 1 name to appear on Жџcket)
Address: ____________________________ City _______________________ Postal Code : ____________
Telephone: ______________________________
Call Today
476-7a6k5e0
to m
!
your offer
SOLD
LOT 2
55R13811
LOT 3
55R13811
15TH SIDE ROAD
LOT 5 55R13811
MOUNTAIN ROAD
LOT 4 55R13811
Email: ___________________________________
______ # of Жџckets at $100 each _____________
VISA, MasterCard or American Express #______________________________________________________
Expiry Date: _________ Signature: _______________________________________________________
Purchaser must be resident of Ontario and at least 18 years of age.
Licence #M738339
Zoning By-law: R1 - Residential Zone 1 - single detached dwelling, min front yard 10m with 50% landscaped open space, min
rear yard 10m, min exterior side yard 6m, min interior side yard 3m, no limit on lot coverage, max height 10m,
Future Development - Developer will make application for further lots along Mountain Road, and apply to City for draft plan
approval for retained lands not fronting on 15th Side Road or Mountain Road; Purchasers to sign undertaking and covenant not to
object to further suburban lot development; Carson Street will be extended from west to meet 15th Side Road between Lots 5 & 6;
there is likely to be development of suburban lots which will abut the sides and rear of all current lots for sale; City is asking for linear parkland dedications (trails) at unspecified locations in proposed subdivision;
Agreement of Purchase & Sale - Purchaser to submit offers on Vendor’s form to be supplied
16
Thursday, October 30, 2014
Life
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
TB
people health home food leisure
GRAND
CASINO
HINCKLEY
November 25,
December 26, 2014
3 Day Tour includes:
• Deluxe Motorcoach
• 2 Nights Hotel
• Breakfast • Shopping Trip
CALL US ABOUT
NEW INCENTIVES FOR
HINCKLEY.
From
204
00
P.P. Dbl. Occ.
Age 18+
Cancellation & Medical Insurance Available & Recommended.
344-8804 Out of Town 1-800-958-0387
New email: [email protected] www.norcantours.ca
1141 Golf Links Rd. • An Iron Range Company • Reg. #02912791
Locals tackle global issue
Area farmers team up
to fight world hunger
AGRICULTURE
By Matt Vis - TB Source
field of wheat grown by local farmers
will play a role in combatting global
hunger.
For more than 10 years a group of
farmers have come together to grow the
grain to sell with the proceeds going to the
Canadian Foodgrains Bank, a non-profit
that has been providing global aid for more
than 30 years.
On Saturday a group of volunteers came
together at the 68-acre field just off
Poleline Road to harvest this year’s wheat.
About 15 farmers contributed to this
year’s growth, whether it be donating time
or equipment to till the soil, seed, weed
control or harvesting.
Group spokesperson Christina Mol said
this year’s crop is expected to produce 100
tonnes of grain, which will likely sell for
about $20,000.
This year’s project required extra time
and dedication due to the difficult season.
A slow start to the year and a cool growing
season delayed the harvest by a month.
“It’s been a wet and rainy year so it’s definitely delayed us. Normally this would be
harvested sometime in September and here
we are at the end of October,” she said.
Many farmers are also busy trying to
A
MATT VIS
Recycling saves energy Recycling uses
less space in landfills Recycling saves
trees Recycling helps climate change
Recycling reduces pollution
Recycling creates jobs.
FIELD DAY: A combine works to harvest grain at a local wheat п¬Ѓeld.
harvest their own fields as quickly as they
can before the arrival of heavy frost.
Once the harvesting is complete the
wheat will be stored at a local grain
handling facility while it awaits purchase.
The proceeds of the sale will be donated to
the Canadian Foodgrains Bank, where it
will be matched at a four-to-one ratio by
the federal government.
Those funds are used to purchase food
from producers in the areas where it is
needed most. In addition to providing food
it also encourages agriculture in third
world areas.
In the past volunteers have travelled to
Ethiopia to see firsthand the difference
their work makes in helping feed those in
need.
“It goes directly to people who need
food,” Mol said.
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
TB Life
Do you have an opinion to share?
E-mail the editor at
[email protected]
Sharing experiences
CHURCH
T H U N D E R B AY
PRESBYTERIAN
By Leith Dunick - TB Source
essa Soderberg is angry. The visually
impaired woman says too often she’ll
enter a store, only to be told her guide dog
isn’t allowed to be there, despite it being
against the law to do so.
“It is very frustrating, even though it’s the
law,” she said on Thursday at the city-hall
launch of the Accessibility Photo and Voice
Challenge.
The challenge, put on by the city’s
Accessibility Advisory Committee, asks
people with a disability to share their experiences through a photo, short video or audio
recording of 30 seconds or less.
“Basically it means we’re going to make
the public more aware of issues around
disabilities, where people feel they are
being disrespected. Hopefully, by
educating people and bringing these stories
to the forefront we will change that and
gain the same amount of respect as everybody else,” Soderberg said.
Scott Garner, the city’s municipal accessibility specialist, said the challenge grew from
feedback the city received after it started its
Respect campaign.
“We were told that some people from the
T
Lakeview Presbyterian Church
278 Camelot Street
The Rev. Harold Hunt, Minister
Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School & Nursery Provided
Phone:
345-8823
LEITH DUNICK
St. Andrew’s
Presbyterian Church
MESSAGE THROUGH PHOTOS: Tessa Soderberg says it can be frustrating as a disabled person in
Thunder Bay, and that she applauds the city’s new Accessibility Photo and Voice Challenge.
disabled community didn’t feel they were
focused on as well. So we wanted to give
them an opportunity to feel they had a voice
with the Respect initiative. So this gives them
that opportunity to submit as part of the challenge, some entries, some experiences, in
order to show the public, show the citizens of
Thunder Bay how they feel about their experiences.”
It’s a learning process, added Garner, who
is also visually impaired.
Seeing is believing, he added, noting once
the public sees how some members of the
disabled community have been treated, they
might stop to think about how they can
change their ways.
The deadline for entries is Nov. 14. For
more information visit www.thunderbay.ca/photovoice, email [email protected]
or phone 625-2240.
17
207 S. Brodie Street
(beside City Hall)
The Rev. Joyce Yanishewski
11am Worship
with
Sunday School &
Child Care provided
DIRECTORY
UNITED
Current River
United Church
333 Morse Street
Sunday Worship 10:30
Little Congregation:
Big Heart!
All Welcome
Knox Shuniah United Church
1 Shuniah Street • 345-5065
[email protected]
[email protected]
Sunday Service:
10:30 a.m. Hospitality to follow
Worship Service Leader:
Chaplain Kerry McLaughlin
Director of Music: Betty E. White
Sunday School lovingly provided
VINEYARD
www.saintapc.ca
LIGHTHOUSE OF HOPE
Call 346-2600
Pastors Tony & Uschi
Sunday Service 10:30am
PHONE: 622-4273
To Advertise In The
Church Directory
257 Park Ave.
767-1705
18
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
TB Life
KASHMIR HAIR BOTOX
READ US ONLINE: w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m
keratin hair system
Trick-or-treaters
in the rural route
EVERY DAY IS A
GOOD HAIR DAY!
• Do you have out of control hair?
• Frizz Free hair for up to 16 weeks
• Deeply conditions
• Reduces blow dry time by a third
• Call now to book your Botox Hair Treatment
with a certified Botox Hair Specialist
(on the West side of the TD Bank Building right across from Tim Horton’s)
1090 Dawson Road • 768-7726 • OPEN Monday to Saturday
FRED
JONES
RURAL ROOTS
o, Halloween. All Hallow’s Eve
when the goulies, ghosties, and longleggity beasties get to go bump in the
night. It sure has changed since I became
a rural rooter.
Growing up in Toronto in the 1950s
and growing out trick-or-treating was
fun. How I recall being forced to sit and
eat a supper before being allowed out to
go from door to door seeking Halloween
goodies.
In those days in a residential area,
trick-or-treating was safe. Being the
youngest in a family of four, I dressed up
and went out alone.
So did most of my friends. No one was
mugged or got hurt.
My mother used to buy Halloween
cookies from a bakery and wrap them in
orange napkins tied with black ribbon to
hand out.
Then came the shock of hearing about
evil-doers handing out apples and other
edibles with razor blades in them! No
more Halloween cookies. Only candy
safely wrapped.
I have canvased several neighbours
both local and some originally, like me,
from somewhere else, all of whom agree
that the cut-off age for going out in
costume hollering “Shell out! Shell out!
The witches are out!” was 12.
S
Too old? 
At 13, we were teenagers and supposed
to have outgrown such childish pastimes.
My son, Douglas, wanted to go out last
Halloween at age 13.
Neither my wife, Laura, nor I discouraged him – well, hardly.
We did mention that since we live in
the country and since he can’t yet drive,
and neither of us felt like driving
anywhere but would if he really wanted
to go trick-or-treating.
In years past, Doug would team up
with a friend and either us or the other
kid’s parent would drive them around.
Turns out that none of his friends were
going out.
He relented (whew!) and chose to
watch vintage horror flicks that I’d
purchased instead.
When I first moved to the country back
in ’79, I received several cars and trucks
that disgorged trick-or-treaters.
It would go on non-stop for about three
hours and then taper off to individual
stragglers.
Then I moved down a concession road
to a wee place you couldn’t see from the
road.
I’d carve a pumpkin and leave it at the
beginning of my driveway to let the
ghosts, goblins, vampires, what-haveyou know that they could approach my
log cabin without fear.
On a good Halloween night, I would
get up to 10 vehicles.
I married La Laura. We had our
children and realized that our wee hoosie
was way too small for a family of four.
We moved across the road and had built
our present home.
You can see Casa Jones from the road
even though it is set back a bit but gradually the number of trick-or-treaters
declined.
We’d still set out a jack-o’-lantern at
the end of the driveway and one or two
on the front stoop but I guess the kids on
our road were growing up and not
wanting to drive from rural home to rural
home.
Safety concerns
Concern about safety had become key
at Halloween and our local volunteer fire
department decided to celebrate
Halloween at the fire hall.
They hand our candy and even set off
fireworks.
They encourage folks to come dressed
in costume but if you don’t, it doesn’t
matter.
Perhaps that is why we’ve seen fewer
and fewer headlights driving down
towards our house.
A rural Halloween involves a lot of
driving. Miles and miles are covered
with the driver-parent trying to figure out
if the house at the end of each driveway
is handing out candy.
It seems that fewer and fewer rural folk
are bothering.
Last Halloween, we didn’t receive any
trick-or-treaters. The year before, only
two cars.
So I figure that a rural Halloween has
changed, evolved into a collective affair,
be it the volunteer firefighters hosting a
Halloween party or a community centre
– much safer and you get to see all of
your neighbours’ kids dressed up in one
spot.
Still, I’m going to carve the pumpkin
and have a bowl of goodies albeit much
smaller than in years previous at my
front door just in case.
So Happy Halloween.
You can reach Rural Roots by e-mail:
[email protected]
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Thursday, October 30, 2014
19
20
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
TB Life
HEALTH CARE
By Jamie Smith - TB Source
hen Marcia Hiiro was asked to
volunteer for a new hospital
program, she jumped at the chance.
Volunteering at Thunder Bay
Regional Health Sciences Centre
already, Hiiro was asked to help
out with the Hospital Elder Life
Program, which prevents delirium
and functional decline when
seniors are in hospital.
Volunteers help by assisting with
meals, taking patients for a walk or
W
just visiting. Hiiro said giving back
and seeing the program’s results,
which launched five weeks ago, is
very rewarding.
“I know that when I walk into a
room I’m welcome,” she said. “I
know that when I leave I have a
smile.”
About 40 per cent of all patients
at the hospital are seniors. Interim
vice-president of patient services
Aaron Skillen said HELP, which
started at the University of
Pittsburgh and is widely established in hospitals across Canada,
made sense and shows that the
hospital is committed to senior
patient care.
“It was time to bring this program
to Thunder Bay,” he said.
Coordinator Kelsey Lecappelain
said while the program hasn’t been
running long, cognitive and
physical assessments have shown
improvement between when a
patient is admitted and when
they’re discharged from the
hospital.
“So far the results have been
positive,” she said.
The 12th Annual
Celebrity Roast
for Easter Seals Kids
ROAST OF
Kathy Harris
and
Clint Harris
An event you will not want to miss!
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Valhalla Inn Ballroom
Symposium 5:30 p.m. - Dinner 6:15 p.m.
Ticket $150, available at Easter Seals’ office,
201-91 Cumberland St. S. or call 345-7622 ext. 4
[email protected]
www.easterseals.org
JAMIE SMITH
Seeing Elder Life results
rewarding for volunteers
WITH A SMILE: HELP volunteer Marcia Hirro says volunteering for program is rewarding.
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
IN THE
bay
Want to Sell?
K
C
I
L
C
ON
US.
arts entertainment culture
Spooktacular is scary fun
T H U N D E R B AY
The tbSOURCE
Classifieds are online, so
it’s easier than ever to sell
those unwanted items.
By Matt Vis - TB Source
alloween can be many different things
for many different types of people. For
adults and older children it is often about
fright.
But for younger children, it’s simply
about getting dressed up in a fun costume
and indulging in excessive amounts of
candy.
More than 500 kids got a head start on
Halloween and visited the Baggage
Building Arts Centre on Sunday for their
third annual Spooktacular celebration.
Baggage Building co-operator Lorraine
Cull said this year organizers put an
emphasis on creating an atmosphere that
was friendly for the younger children.
“This is our third year doing it and each
year we learn something,” Cull said. “Last
year it was that we needed to gear this
event towards younger ones and make it
gentler and not quite as scary.”
Last year the event had a ghost pirate ship
theme that, while it was fun for older attendees, was too scary for too many younger
ones who were terrified.
This year the theme was space time
travel, with the highlight being an outer
space themed maze in the upstairs level of
the building.
The main level had pumpkin carving as
H
MATT VIS
w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m
HALLOWEEN SPIRIT: Baggage Building and Arts Centre hosts third annual Spooktacular.
well as various arts and crafts and activities
stations.
The more welcoming environment was
appreciated by Shannon Berlinquette, the
mother of two sons under the age of five.
“I think it’s a very family friendly atmosphere,” Berlinquette said. “They really
liked the pumpkins.”
The event also introduced the October
tradition to those new to North America.
Lincoln Boothe, who accompanied his
son Caleb, did not celebrate Halloween
growing up in Jamaica.
“It’s good seeing it for me,” he said. “I’m
not used to it…I’m still learning about the
Canadian culture.”
Cull said next year organizers are going
to look at having two separate events with
one being more family friendly and the
second providing a little more fright.
21
22
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
I N   T H E   bay
The Hours That Remain leaves lasting impression
THEATRE REVIEW
By Linda Maehans - TB Source
ne night the highway to something more adventurous in life
beckoned.
Maybe that something lay just
beyond the horizon; Michelle couldn’t
be sure because the headlights on the
big rig stopping on the side of the road
just for her were far too bright. She
squinted at the cab; took a quick
breath, decision made, and climbed
aboard.
As had Sandra; and Laney; and
Loraine before her; leaving others
who loved them behind without a
wave of farewell; turning instants and
moments in time into final forevers.
Magnus’ presentation of The Hours
That Remain by Keith Barker is a
riveting journey into night: the kind of
darkness no one but a murderer would
wish to encounter. The playwright said
his inspiration for the script came
about in part from news reports
BARRY WOJCIECHOWSKI
O
GLARING DRAMA: The Hours That Remain plays at Magnus Theatre until Nov. 8.
around missing native women and the
“Highway of Tears” out in British
Columbia. The title, The Hours That
Remain, is how Barker’s uncle,
following a death in their family,
described the result for those left to
grieve.
Now and here in this city, a trio of
passionate actors call attention to a
disturbing Canadian reality; pose
hard-to-answer or unanswerable questions to audiences willing to think or
consider beyond the here and now.
The on-stage chemistry between
actors Nicole Joy-Fraser (Denise) and
Jonathan Fisher (Daniel) as a couple
grappling with wearying worry is
tangible. They are in a serious predicament with no answers. Despite their
growing disconnect we are buoyed,
for just moments here and there, by
the flashes of love passing between
them.
Fisher’s down-to-earth Daniel, when
we first meet him, is a combination of
humour and stability. Then we sense
and can see his increasing frustration,
confusion and anger for not being able
to “fix” things. Equally convincing is
Joy-Fraser’s Denise: initially a picture
of normalcy, well maybe only slight
anxiety, we see her shift from concern
to fright to bursts of outright panic.
Throughout Nicole’s strong performance she gives us glimpses of a
mysterious beyond.
Which brings me to the third side of
our talent triangle in this cast:
Michaela Washburn and her repertoire
of different personas so essential to the
storyline. Washburn is in turn a bit of a
maverick or a tough cookie with soft
edges; a young woman with a most
appealing spark; a vulnerable target; a
broken doll; yet also a well of strength
with the ability to bind together a
sisterhood of souls – if one can put it
that way. Nice work, Michaela.
The rest of those forever hours that
remain come to us via the set and
lighting: two window frames hung at
different angles in the air; a lonely
wooden bench below; a blacktop
highway running parallel to the beams
of a hardwood floor covered by whitewash. To this reviewer it called to
mind the translucent surface of a
frozen wintery pond. Kudos to
lighting designer Kirsten Watt for
conjuring for us the eerie and at times
glaring drama of this play.
Directed by Mario Crudo, The Hours
That Remain is on at Magnus until
Nov. 8. But guaranteed it will stay in
your thoughts for many more days,
and nights, after that.
THANK YOU!
For helping us to provide uplifting experiences for children with cancer
The National Inside Ride Tour smoked through town on October 14th
and empowered Camp Quality N.W.O. to raise over
$9,000!
The success of this event was possible thanks to the incredible cycling teams
and their equally incredible supporters:
Cheadles Gladiators • Copperfin Credit Union • CQ President’s Choice
Crazy in Love with CQ • Dougall Dynasty • Gillons Cyclepaths
SHIFT Thunder Bay • Team Tinman
And thanks to all of our amazing event volunteers, plus our media,
prize and food sponsors:
Dougall Media • Canadian Tire – Thunder Centre • Canadian Lakehead Exhibition
Confederation College • Copperfin Credit Union
The Keg Steakhouse & Bar • Lynda Lawrie • McDonald’s Restaurants Thunder Bay
Pizza Hut • Bev Schelling • Sportop @ Work • Thunder Bay Police
Up in Smoke Barbeque & Grill • Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre
Vigor Fitness Studio
We hope to see your team there next year!
www.thenationalinsideride.com
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
I N   T H E   bay
Recycling old
ideas into new
ears ago, I made a comment to a coworker that there is no such thing as a
completely original idea.
He was extremely offended as he was
working on an advertising campaign that
he felt was totally unique and yes, original.
I’m not suggesting that his concept wasn’t
good. It just wasn’t original.
Why? Because everything that we do or
say is a reflection of or influenced by what
we’ve seen or learned over the years.
History’s great artists were influenced by
previous generations. Inventors are
constantly inspired by the world around
them.
Even Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet
wasn’t a completely original work. It was
inspired by Arthur Brooke’s poem The
Tragicall Historye of Romeus and Juliet.
And he got the idea from Novelle, which
was written by another poet, Matteo
Bandello, in 1554 … who got the idea
from a story written by Luigi Da Porta in
1530 … who changed the story first (we
think) conceived in the second century by
a man named Xenophon.
It’s the greatest romantic tragedy ever
written. And it’s a knock-off.
But that doesn’t mean Shakespeare’s
version or his words weren’t completely
magical.
It just wasn’t an original production. So
it’s really no surprise that in today’s entertainment industry, remakes of TV series
and movies are becoming more common –
Y
much to the public’s chagrin.
However, reconceiving a beloved old TV
series is a dangerous game. Viewers may
not take too kindly to writers messing with
their idyllic memories.
I don’t know how good Greatest
American Hero really was. But to my
naГЇve 11-year-old brain, it was magic. So
even if it was the TV-equivalent of KLIK,
does it matter?
The biggest hurdle is capturing the power
of the original. How much has to change
to get the same audience reaction? And
given the difference in the audience – we
are, after all, a more jaded and tougher
group to sell – is it realistic to expect the
same response?
More often than naught, the remake fails.
Case in point: Dallas, 90210, The Bionic
Woman, Knight Rider, and V.
Hawaii Five-O with its sexy male leads
and bikini-clad scenery managed to
succeed in grabbing the attention of
modern viewers.
But few who loved the original 1968
series stuck around after the CBS reboot
premiered in 2010.
So now producers are leaning toward
movies for their inspiration. About a Boy
has been a success. And several new
comedies are being peddled based on
Jennifer Lopez’s Monster-In-Law, Tom
Hanks’ Big, and John Candy’s Uncle Buck.
However, movies use a single storyline
that develops the character. TV shows
require multiple stories that allow for
slower character development.
So the transition from movie to television
demands that the audience let go of the
original which is so dear to their heart. But
ironically, that sentiment is exactly why
producers chose a particular remake in the
first place.
Perhaps it’s time to let go and allow
today’s writers to put their spin on old
stories. Because if Billy could do it, it
must be OK. As long as they stay away
from Ralph and his red suit.
North Now is new path for gallery
ART
By Matt Vis - TB Source
he city’s art gallery is highlighting
works produced throughout the entire
region.
Last Friday night the Thunder Bay Art
Gallery launched The North Now exhibition, a juried collection of works from all
across Northern Ontario.
Curator Nadia Kurd said the collection
marks a new path for the art gallery.
T
“This is the first time we’ve done this
type of exhibition. It’s great to get artists
from this region excited about showing
their work here at the gallery,” Kurd said
Friday morning.
“If anything this is showing us there is a
need and a desire to see works from this
region.”
The art gallery received nearly 300
works of art from more than 100 artists,
with 79 pieces selected by a jury
committee for the final collection.
ADVERTISING FEATURE
FROM CHIROPRACTIC TO THE HEALTH CARE AIDE, OUR SPECIAL SECTION OFFERS AN ABUNDANCE OF IDEAS, AND SERVICES.
LIVE A HEALTHY LIFE BY MAKING POSITIVE CHOICES THAT IMPROVE YOUR
PHYSICAL , MENTAL AND SPIRITUAL HEALTH .
SECOND WEEK OF EVERY MONTH
23
24
Thursday, October 30, 2014
Inbound Customer Service Representatives
“We don’t call you, you call us”
Teleperformance is offering a great referral and signing bonus!
What are you waiting for?
Your new career is waiting for you at
251 Red River Rd. or www. Teleperformance.com
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Walk in a Winter Wonderland at
Bloomers and the
Brownhouse Chocolates
Trendy Holiday DГ©cor * Custom Window Boxes
Unique Gifts * Gourmet Treats
OPEN YEAR ROUND
Parts & Accessories Available
Specializing in Rubber Roof & Filon Lamination,
Floor & Wall Rebuilds • Complete Undercarriage Work
• Repairs to RV Furnaces, Fridges, HWH & Convertors.
TSSA Licensed for LP Servicing.
Factory Trained, Fully Licensed,
Master Certified, Serving
Northwestern Ontario over 32 years
Quality,
Personal,
Affordable RV
Service You
Can Trust!
3075 Alice Ave.
off Government Rd.
983-3449
Al Swerhun
SHAW CABLE BASIC 5, HD 210
TBAYTEL 223, HD 873
SHAW DIRECT 304, 537
BELL 223, 1066
Hagi TV Bingo is back!
330 S. Archibald St. • (807)
624-9005
Monday - Friday 9:30am - 5:00pm Saturday 10:00am - 4:00pm
WORD SEARCH
Al’s RV Service & Repair
TV BINGO
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!
TOP DOLLAR
PAID FOR YOUR
UNWANTED VEHICLE
U-PICK (Self Serve)
Car Parts
Pull you own parts
and save Big Bucks!!
807-623-5222
Canada’s Largest Chain of Self-Serve Auto Recyclers
Join us on our new station ckpr/ctv.
This week’s Hagi TV Bingo winner is Ivy Maunu
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
25
Sports
local sports news information coverage
Wolves fall in overtime
UNIVERSITY HOCKEY
third of five assists on the night.
Wright opened the scoring on the power
play at the 6:43 mark of the first, one of
four goals the Wolves would score in six
man-advantage situations.
Drew Palmer, who scored a pair on
Friday, tied it less than four minutes later
and then 36 seconds after that Isak
Quakenbush gave the Lancers their first of
four leads they'd hold on the night. Mike
Hammond tied it at 11:41, but Windsor was
back on top two minutes later.
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
ate goals were the death of the
Lakehead Thunderwolves again.
The Windsor Lancers, in a near carboncopy performance of their Friday night
win, scored with 1:18 to play to tie the
score, then Spencer Pommels netted the
game winner in overtime, securing a 7-6
win and a weekend sweep at Fort William
Gardens on Saturday night.
A night earlier the No. 7-ranked Lancers
scored with 73 seconds to play to tie it,
then Pommels potted the winner with six
seconds to go in regulation.
"I just think we have to bear down a little
bit defensively," said forward Keith
Grondin, who scored once and chipped in a
pair of helpers in the loss.
"We have to start taking more ownership
and take it from there. We're scoring goals
and you shouldn't be losing when you're
scoring that many goals."
L
LEITH DUNICK
Late discipline issue
Grondin isn't sure where to place the
blame. The Thunderwolves took three
costly penalties in the final nine minutes of
regulation and twice the Lancers capitalized, including Ryan Green's equalizer
with 78 seconds to go.
But it was more than that.
"The penalties didn't help, but also, you
look at their team too. They were coming
with pressure. I think they kind of put us on
our heels. And they've got some skilled
players as well who can put the puck in the
net and they just capitalized on their opportunities," Grondin said.
Forward Jake Wright scored twice and
called the loss disappointing.
"I think we outplayed them most of the
game. But the last two games we sat back
in the third and they took it to us," said
Wright, a Sault Ste. Marie native who has
Great shot
CLOSE QUARTERS: Windsor’s Dylan Seguin
(front) battles Lakehead’s Austin McDonald.
three goals in seven appearances.
"It was a tough one. We just fell apart."
Windsor coach Kevin Hamlin agreed it
wasn't the way he wanted to win, but he'll
take the two points.
"It was a real character-building weekend
for us," said the seventh-year coach. "We're
still trying to learn our identity and what
this team is made of. To battle through
some adversity yesterday and win was a
great sign and then again today to do the
same thing, it was a great win for us."
The two sides trade goals back and forth
in the first, the Lancers escaping with a 3-2
lead when Matt Beaudoin one-timed a
Kenny Bradford pass past Lakehead goalie
Justin McDonald. For Bradford it was the
Wright's second of the night stood up as
the only goal of the middle frame until
Dylan Denomme beat McDonald at 18:06,
Windsor looking destined to carry a 4-3
lead into the third. But Kelin Ainsworth
had a different game plan, beating a shaky
Parker Van Buskirk, who was chased four
minutes into the third after Grondin and
Nathan Bruyere, who fired a bullet from
inside the point, scored to give LU a 6-4
lead.
Cue the Windsor comeback, with Taylor
Speed between the pipes.
Palmer closed the gap to one, scoring
from his knees at 7:24. Green's equalizer
also came on the power play, a blast from
just beyond the top of the circle that
McDonald had no chance to see, let alone
stop.
"It's just the same as last night," said
Lakehead coach Bill McDonald. "We can't
hang our hat on being close and not
winning games. Let's be honest. It's not that
we didn't try. We had enthusiasm, we had
energy. Our special teams were pretty
good. But we were playing against a good
team and at inopportune times we seem to
(take) a penalty or (make) a boneheaded
play and it ends up in our net."
The loss dropped the Wolves record to 34-1, while Windsor remained perfect with a
7-0-0 mark.
g at
Financin
%
4.99 %/
5.99
946 Memorial Ave. 345-2552
Toll Free: 1-866-345-2552
HST & Lic.
are not
included.
All inclusive pricing includes
registration, tire and rim warranty,
etching $394, carproof $45, OMVIC
fee $5. All vehicles are used.
Financing eg. $10,000 @ 4.99%
over 36/48/60/72/84 months cost of
borrowing is $1,309/$1,852.
Financing eg. @ $10,000 at 5.99%
over 6/42/48/54/60/72/78/84
months has a cost of
$1,101/$1,263/$1,426/$1,591
/$1,925/ $2,095/$2,254. Financing
OAC. All vehicles are used. $1000
price change credit does not apply
to AS IS sales units.
26
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
sports
NEWS
FOOTBALL
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
he Churchill Trojans don’t know
the meaning of down and out.
After allowing Liam Fors to race 80
yards for a score in the final minute of
play to give the St. Ignatius Falcons a
24-20 lead in their senior varsity high
school football battle, the Trojans
could have hung their heads and
accepted defeat.
But that’s not the Trojan way.
Matthew Currie set the stage, racing
the ensuing kickoff back 43 yards to
the Churchill 52. Then quarterback
Tallon Morris set to work. One play
later, a 58-yard hookup with Nathan
Lemieux, the ball was on the St.
Ignatius five.
Morris then spotted Scott Lawson
for the winning strike, the improbable
T
27-24 win clinching a playoff spot for
a Trojans team that’s now won four
straight contests.
“When they scored a touchdown
with 50 seconds left, everyone kept
their heads high,” said Morris, who
powered the Churchill win with four
touchdown throws, including a 23yarder to Lawson that opened the
scoring in the first quarter and a pair
of scoring tosses to Brennan
Tienhaara.
“We just battled back. We have high
hearts. Everybody still has hopes that
we can do it.”
The final drive was one to
remember, Morris added.
“Lemieux really stepped up and
really called the play. He was like,
�I’m going to do this,’” Morris said.
“We had five yards left, we had a
play for it and it was a touchdown.”
LEITH DUNICK
Trojans stun Falcons on final drive
STRONG FINISH: St. Ignatius running
back Jake Puskas dives for a score Friday.
Clinching the playoff berth was icing
on the cake, he added.
“We started 0-2 and everybody
counted us out of the playoffs,” Morris
said.
The Auxiliary to St Joseph’s Care Group Angels of Light
Angels of Light 2014
October 13 – November 19, 2014
Honour or remember a loved one
and receive an angel ornament.
Pick up donation forms at the
St. Joseph’s Foundation Office
at St. Joseph’s Heritage.
“We came back with four straight
wins. Even they didn’t see it coming.”
Churchill coach Mike Doromko said
it’s just the kind of roll he wants to see
his squad on, with playoffs only three
weeks away.
He said he wasn’t worried after Fors
scored the go-ahead touchdown.
“The coaching staff, we knew we
were getting the ball back with 51
seconds left. We scored a lot quicker
than we actually thought we would,”
Doromko said. “We had three scripted
plays from that position and the kids
knew exactly what they were doing.”
The two teams played a tight
football game the entire way, neither
side taking more than a 10-point lead.
The first-place Falcons cut into the
Trojans 7-0 lead late in the first when
Ryan Grandell nailed a short field goal
to make it 7-3. Jake Puskas gave St.
Ignatius its first lead early in the
second, bursting over the goal line
from four yards out. But Morris hit
Tienhaara, who went 24 yards
untouched up the middle and the
Trojans retook the lead, which they’d
hold until the final minute of play.
Fors appeared to have scored an 82yard rushing major late in the first
half, but the play was called back
because of an unnecessary roughness
penalty.
After Morris connected once again
with Tienhaara early in the third, St.
Ignatius’s Landon Krebs barreled
through a hole from 10 yards out to
pull the Falcons once again within
three point.
The Fort William Stadium loss drops
the Falcons to 5-2, with one game left
on their schedule. The win improves
Churchill to 4-2.
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
sports
27
NEWS
Vikings hang on to beat Gryphons
Tale of two halves
in junior football
playoff preview
FOOTBALL
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
he Hammarskjold Vikings and
Superior Collegiate Gryphons
already knew they had a date in the first
round of the junior varsity football playoffs.
Thursday’s Fort William Stadium tilt
was a chance for one side or the other to
gain momentum heading into next
week’s win-or-go-home match.
The Vikings drew first blood, scoring a
32-18 triumph, but the Gryphons
outplayed their opponent in the second
half, showing they won’t be a pushover
come playoff time, despite finishing the
regular season with an 0-4 mark.
Hammarkskjold’s Zachery Hynna,
who hauled in a 53-yard reception from
Marti Martinez midway through the
second quarter and later scored on a 54yard punt return to put the Vikings up
23-0 at the half, said it was an important
win for a couple of reasons.
LEITH DUNICK
T
BIG WIN: Hammarskjold’s Hunter Campbell (right) rushes with the ball Thursday.
“Winning this first game definitely
helped us out, coming off a loss. We kind
of got killed by (St. Ignatius). Winning
this game heading into the playoffs, I
think it’s motivated our team even more
than we were before,” Hynna said.
It was a tale of two halves, the Vikings
conquering the first, the Gryphons
owning the second.
Vikings running back Will
MacDonough opened the scoring on a
60-yard run, the lone touchdown of the
opening quarter.
But buoyed by the momentum of
Hynna’s touchdowns, which came 75
seconds apart late in the second quarter,
the Vikings couldn’t carry their strong
play into the second half.
The Gryphons got on the board quickly
to start the third, Caleb Niitynen
charging through the gap from a yard
out, after Sean O’Connor connected with
Brendan Stark on a 31-yard completion
that marched Superior to the Vikings
goal line.
O’Connor found the magic touch again
later in the quarter, aided by a spectacular
one-handed Tyler Russell catch that
added six more to the board, the
Gryphons trailing 23-12.
In the fourth, after the Vikings opted
not to kick a field goal deep within
Superior territory – despite Devon Hoier
already kicking a 43-yarder in the
opening half – the Gryphons made it a
one-score contest.
O’Connor broke free on run up the
middle, evading a pair of Vikings
defenders desperately chasing him
down, scoring on a 100-yard run, the
longest in junior varsity football this
season.
Up by just seven – the Gryphons failed
at a two-point convert for the third time
in the contest – the Vikings put it away
on the next possession, capped by a 39yard MacDonough scoring run.
“That last touchdown was almost a
lifesaver. Superior battled hard. They had
a 100-yard run. Next game, who knows
what’s going to happen,” Hynna said.
Hammarskjold coach Mike Steele said
he was happy with the fast start.
“We were looking to respond to our
tough loss to Ignatius last week. We
started quickly, showed some compete
and saw some adversity,” Steele said.
“Superior competed at a really high
level. We were really content with what
we saw and how the boys responded in
the second half toward the end. Superior
put up a great fight.”
St. Ignatius 37, St. Patrick 6: The
Falcons easily won the battle of the
unbeatens, finishing the regular season at
5-0. Nic Cull ran for 210 yards and scord
from 83 yards and 77 yards out to lead
the St. Ignatius charge. Anthony Valente
also had a 40-yard rushing major.
Sebastian Foglia had the lone touchdown
for the Saints (4-1), a 23-yard scoring
play.
Churchill 29, Westgate 21: Stefan
Nahachewsky had TD runs of two yards
and one yards in another first-round
playoff preview. He finished with 135
yards rushing. The Tigers Cayden
Boucher led all rushers with 156 yards,
scoring on a four-yard run to cap the
scoring in the fourth.
28
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
sports
READ US ONLINE: w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m
NEWS
CHEER ON OUR JUNIOR A HOCKEY TEAM
THUNDER BAY NORTH STARS
at the FORT WILLIAM GARDENS @ 7:30PM
UPCOMING HOME GAMES:
Saturday, November 1st vs. English River Miners
Wednesday, November 5th vs. English River Miners
Friday, November 21st vs. Dryden Ice Dogs
Box Office opens one hour before home games.
Adults $12.00 * Seniors (65+) $7.00
Students (valid student ID must be presented at door) $7.00
* Children (3-12) $7.00
*Cash Only at the Door*
thunderbaynorthstarsjrahockey.com
MATT VIS
Lakehead Monument Ltd.
Frosty’s Snowplowing
Coin-Op Car Wash
Doug’s Snowplowing
ATHLETIC: Emily Ukrainec practices at Ultimate Gymnastics, a new facility on Alloy Drive.
New gymnastics
club opens doors
Former Border Cats GM facility co-owner
GYMNASTICS
provincial competitions, with the number
growing as they get exposed to more events.
“They’re doing very well,” Bica said.
athleen Varey got her first taste of gym- “When I first started in Thunder Bay in
nastics when she was only one-year- 2010 we had a small group of competitive
athletes at the provincial level, which now
old.
Now 16, Kathleen is a provincial calibre they really like this higher level of competition.”
gymnast who remains dedicated
Co-owner Greg Balec said there
to following her athletic path.
are between 75 and 100 registered
“I’d like to go as far as I can,”
members in the few short months
she said.
the club has been operational.
She is continuing her pursuit of
“I’d like to
“We are catering to recreational
the sport at Ultimate Gymnastics,
the city’s newest club which go as far as I and competitive gymnastics from
18 months all the way up to adult,”
opened recently on Alloy Drive.
can.”
Balec said. “The interest is pretty
Ultimate Gymnastics head
KATHLEEN
amazing. The brand new equipcoach Mirela Bica said the new
VAREY
ment is a big draw.”
4,800 square foot facility has all of
In addition to the thrill of
the equipment any gymnast could
competing, Kathleen enjoys the
hope to have access to as they try
social element of the sport. She has
to perfect their skills.
developed many bonds over her 15
“They can do absolutely
anything they’d like in gymnastics,” she years as a gymnast.
Now, having a new and growing club is a
said.
The club currently has 13 competitive good thing.
“It’s a great activity and you meet such
gymnasts, ranging from the youngest at 10
nice people. You make really good friendto the senior members like Kathleen.
Many of them have been fixtures at ships,” she said.
By Matt Vis – TB Source
K
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
REAL ESTATE
01. City Homes
02. Rural Homes
03. Mobile Homes
04. Lots / Acreage
05. Condos For Sale
06. Cottages
07. Commercial for Sale
08. Investment Property
09. Out of Town
10. Real Estate Wanted
FOR RENT
11. Houses
12. Apartments
13. Rooms
14. Room & Board
15. Shared Accommodations
16. Cottages
17. Commercial
18. Storage/Space
19. Wanted
20. Condos
21. Miscellaneous
MERCHANDISE
22. Bargain corner
23. Misc. For Sale
24. Antiques
25. Music
26. Office Equip.
27. Machinery
28. Pets & Livestock
29. Food
30. Misc. Wanted
VEHICLES FOR SALE
31. Cars
32. Trucks
33. Vans
34. Motorcycles/ATV’s
35. Campers/Trailers
36. Motor Homes
37. Marine Equip.
38. Snowmobiles
39. Parts & Repairs
YARD SALES
40. Current River
41. Northward
42. Southward
43. Westfort
44. Rural
MISCELLANEOUS,
NOTICES, TENDERS
45. Auctions
46. Health
47. Travel
48. Financial
49. Lost & Found
50. Personal
51. Notices
52. Tenders
BUSINESS & SERVICES
53. General Services
54. Home Improvements
55. Bus. Opportunities
56. Training Courses
EMPLOYMENT
57. Help Wanted
58. Careers
59. Child Care
60. Health Care
61. Employment Wanted
62. Students For Hire
ANNOUNCEMENTS
63. Coming Events
64. Craft & Flea Markets
65. Happy Ads
66. Cards of Thanks
67. In Memoriam
68. Death/Funerals
Thunder Bay’s Source reserves the right
to classify ads under appropriate
headings and to set rates therefore and to
determine page locations.
Thunder Bay’s Source reserves the right
to revise, edit, classify or reject any
advertisement and to retain any answers
directed to the Box Reply Service, and to
repay the Customer the sum paid for the
advertisement and box rental.
Box replies on "Hold" instructions not
picked up within 10 days of expiry of an
advertisement will be destroyed unless
mailing instructions are received. Those
answering Box Numbers are requested
not to send originals of documents to
avoid loss.
All claims of errors in advertisements must
be received by the Publisher within 3 days
after the first publication. No refund if ad
is cancelled before expiry date.
Thunder Bay’s Source reserves the right
to increase prices with 30 days written
notice.
tbClassifieds
$
99
9
1/2 PRICE
ADDITIONAL
INSERTIONS
*
*Must be run in consecutive weeks. No additions to ads.
Does not apply to Bargain Corner ads.
1. CITY HOMES
HALF ACRE cozy bungalow equals 4
building lots, mature trees surround property for privacy, garage, central, near new
Subdivision, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
app. please call 475-7277 or 620-6542.
Owner Moving, Must sell Best offer,
won’t last move in NOW. Excellent Neighborhood.
12. APARTMENTS FOR RENT
30. MISC. WANTED
DEADLINE
Classified Word Ads: MONDAY @ 4:00p.m.
Display & Photo Ads: MONDAY @ Noon
Visit our office @
ONLY
$ 80
4
WANTED
$ TOP DOLLAR PAID $
For Scrap Vehicles
DAN’S EMERGENCY
ROAD SERVICE
767-3818
$CASH$
22. BARGAIN CORNER
FOR YOUR
UNWANTED
GUNS
Computer desk for sale. Make an offer.
626-9801.
Any condition
Military • Memorabilia
Mature Responsible Person. Spacious 1
Bedroom Apartment. Available immediately, no pets. Furnishings negotiable.
768-8350
ADS
Must contain price.
Additional words 25Вў.
Cozy bungalow situated due South beside new area now being developed on
West Arthur St. Possible 4 building lots
or bungalow “as is” on half acre.
Wooded, private, owner moving. For appointment please call 620-6542.
$395,00 OBO.
PHONE 346-2600
FAX 345-9923
EMAIL [email protected]
ALL
BARGAIN
CORNER CLASSIFIED
15 words max. for items under $500.
AD UpRATES
to 20 words
Plus HST
29
87 N. Hill Street,
Thunder Bay, ON P7A 5V6
or online at
and on the internet at
https:shop.dougallmedia.com
www.tbnewswatch.com
32. TRUCKS/SUVS
Office Hours:
Mon. - Fri. 8:30a.m. - 5:00p.m.
48. CLASSES
48. CLASSES
2007 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO,
4X4, 3.0L, V6, DIESEL, auto. Loaded,
heated leather, sunroof, new tires. Great
shape. 3 year, 60,000kms warranty.
Certified $12,900 + HST + Licensing.
Gary’s Auto Sales. (807) 344-3543.
2010 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT,
4X4, 5.7L, V8 HEMI auto. Loaded,
62,000kms. Colour match topper. Like
new condition. 12 month warranty. Certified $21,450 + HST + Licensing.
Gary’s Auto Sales. (807) 344-3543.
39. PARTS & REPAIRS
Set of 4 winter Firestone tires, Used one
season only, Mounted on Toyota rims,
balanced 185/60R15, 4 bolt. Paid $1070,
asking $500 obo. 577-6960
40. YARD SALES
Dog house, new, insulated, $120. 6833615.
23. MISC. FOR SALE
Norm’s Northern Auto Body and Paint,
903 Northern Avenue since 1984. We
work with you, and advise you on which
is the best course to take. Reasonable
prices, excellent workmanship, top quality materials, expert paint matching, best
value for dollar in town. 622-2249. Will
work weekends by appointment only.
Sesame Street wooden toddler bed,
Thomas Toddler bedding, Radio Flyer
wood rocking horse, Dora beauty salon
play-center, Blue Plastic rocking horse,
Fisher Price smiley Face potty like new
with sound effects. Call JoAnn 7670021, after 6pm weekdays or anytime on
weekends
Winter tires (4) mounted on 15” rims, fits
Chev-Pontiac. Good condition. $300.
475-9014.
28. PETS & LIVESTOCK
Are you ready? DOG TRAINING. All positive methods. Don’t miss out on our
Winter session. Puppy K, Perfect Pet,
Agility, Building Success, Rally, Tricks,
and more. k9enrichment.com 6238813.
29. FOOD
CHRISTMAS BAKING! 60 pieces of
homemade goodness selling for $35.00
each. Fully licensed kitchen. Please call
986-3826. FOND memories Cake Design.
30. MISC. WANTED
CASH PAID for World War I and II German
& Canadian military items and World War
II P.O.W. art. Call 977-2977.
WANTED. Rifles, Shot guns, Mukets, and
swords. Legally certified to purchase.
627-4764
YARD SALE
November 8th
8am - 2pm
620-9983
$CASH$
On the spot for your scrap
cars, trucks, vans and SUV's.
Same day pick-up with CASH.
Call Marcel
624-7242 or 626-0161
31. CARS
2007 CHEVY HHR LT, 4 cylinder, automatic. Loaded, sunroof, 93,000kms. 12
month warranty. Certified $7890 + HST
+ Licensing. Gary’s Auto Sales. (807)
624-7733.
2007 PONTIAC WAVE, 1.6L, 4 cylinder,
5 speed manual transmission, CD player.
Only 67,000kms. Great shape. 12
month warranty. Certified $4995 + HST
+ Licensing. Gary’s Auto Sales. (807)
344-3543.
2012 DODGE CHALLENGER, 3.6L, V6,
automatic.
Loaded.
One owner.
20,000kms. Balance of gold plan warranty. Certified $19950 + HST + Licensing. Gary’s Auto Sales. (807)
344-3543.
at the back of
The Picture Store
269 Red River Rd.
345-9989
41. YARD SALES - NORTHWARD
MOTHERS MARKET Sat. Nov. 8th at the
West Arthur Community Centre, 1914
Arthur St. W. Admission is $1 for adults.
Doors are open 10 a.m. to noon.
Moving Out Yard Sale. Lots to choose
from. Saturday and Sunday, 9am-4pm.
Corner of Chelsea and Fassina.
NEARLY NEW SALE! Saturday November
1st. St John’s Anglican Church, 228
Pearl St. From 10am-1pm! Bargains galore. $4.00 blue bag special at noon!
46. HEALTH
WHEATGRASS JUICE �Nature’s Finest
Medicine’ Frozen in 1 oz. lidded cups
[email protected] 577-7484
50. PERSONAL
SEX MACHINES NOW IN STOCK!!! 3 different models to choose from. The
Sybian Sex Machine is the most popular
toy in the world and is in very high demand. Go online and check it out. Ask
your wife or spouse about them, and you
will be surprised by what they say. Exclusively at Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your
only “TRUE” one-stop-shop for all your
adult needs in Thunder Bay. 79 Machar.
Open tonight �til midnight.
Tanya Reynolds, Estate Manager
50. PERSONAL
50. PERSONAL
ADULT TOYS - The only Adult Superstore
in Thunder Bay now has over 20,000
different adult toys to choose from.
Rated top 5 in Canada for the best selection, variety and content for adult toys.
Come check out these top sellers in
Canada such as the “Rabbit” for women,
the “Fleshlight” for men and the “WeVibe” for couples. You will be dazzled by
the 60 foot wall of inventory that awaits
you. It’s everything you can imagine
under one roof. Remember, a healthy sex
life is a sign of good health. Exxxxtacy
Superstore. Your only “TRUE” one-stopshop for all your adult needs in Thunder
Bay. 79 Machar. Open tonight �til midnight.
COSTUMES/LINGERIE - The only Adult
Superstore in Thunder Bay now has a
huge selection of costumes, lingerie, nylons, stockings, fetish gear and bondage
accessories to choose from. Come
check out their showroom full of intimate
apparel to expand your horizon in the
bedroom. With over 500 costumes to
choose from, it’s the only place for real
fun in Thunder Bay. Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your only “TRUE” one-stop-shop
for all your adult needs in Thunder Bay.
79 Machar. Open tonight �til midnight.
ATTENTION - Exxxxtacy Superstore is the
official retailer in Thunder Bay for LELO.
These adult toys for women are known
around the world as the Rolls Royce. The
most luxurious adult toys for women.
Made in Sweden, they will amaze you like
never before. Over 18 different demos are
now in stock for your viewing pleasure.
Come see them and ask for them by
name. LELO - the best adult toys for
women in the world. Only available at
Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your only “TRUE”
one-stop-shop for all your adult needs in
Thunder Bay. 79 Machar. Open tonight �til
midnight.
EXTRA EXTRA. Read all about it!!!
Exxxxtacy Superstore has thousand of
new items that have just arrived in all departments. Come check out all the new
movies, all the new adult toys for both
men and women, all the new glassware
in the Water Pipe Emporium and all the
new lingerie/costumes they have in their
beautiful showroom. If you’re looking for
these items on-line, we’ve got it all at
EXXXXTACY SUPERSTORE. Your only
“TRUE” one-stop-shop for all your adult
needs in Thunder Bay. 79 Machar. Open
tonight �til midnight.
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
RECYCLE
30
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Thursday, October 30, 2014
50. PERSONAL
50. PERSONAL
50. PERSONAL
53. GENERAL SERVICES
53. GENERAL SERVICES
54. HOME IMPROVEMENTS
SPECIALS & DISCOUNTS - The only
Adult Superstore in Thunder Bay now offers “Deals Of The Day” specials, all-day,
everyday at Exxxxtacy Superstore. Save
up to 97% off throughout the entire store
and check out their amazing door crashers. All departments are on sale. XXX
DVD movies as low as $5.00, adult toys
as low as $10.00 and hand pipes as low
as $2.00. The Back- To-School 4:20 sale
is now on in the Water Pipe Emporium.
This is a limited time offer and some restrictions apply. We guarantee to all of
our loyal and faithful customers the best
selection, variety, content and prices in
Thunder Bay. Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your
only “TRUE” one-stop-shop for all your
adult needs in Thunder Bay. 79 Machar.
Open tonight �til midnight.
The 4th annual BACK-TO-SCHOOL sale
is now on at Exxxxtacy Superstore. For a
limited time, Exxxxtacy Superstore is
now offering huge savings, up to 90% off
throughout the entire store. Adult
XXX DVD’s as low as $5.00 each and
buy 3, get 2 free on all DVD’s. All adult
toys are now buy 1, get 2nd and 3rd for
1/2 price. All items in the Water Pipe
Emporium are now buy 1, get 2nd for
$4.20. Huge selection of male/female
sexual enhancement supplements that
work 100% effectively and are always
available. Also visit our lingerie/fetish
showroom full of costumes and bondage
gear. But remember, selection is limited
and it’s only while quantities last. And
don’t forget to ask about their amazing
door crashers!!! It doesn’t get any better
than this Thunder Bay. When it comes
to adult fun, nobody does it like
EXXXXTACY SUPERSTORE!!! Nobody!!!
Open tonight �til midnight. The 2015
Exxxxtacy Superstore adult calendars are
now in!!!
WATER PIPE EMPORIUM - The only
Adult Superstore in Thunder Bay now
has over 50,000 different “PUFFING”
items to choose from. Come check out
the new designs and styles of the thousands of hand-blown glass items exclusively available in the water pipe
emporium at Exxxxtacy Superstore.
Rated top 10 in Canada for the best selection, variety and content for their
hand-blown glass. It’s the only place to
go for all of your “PUFFING” needs in
Thunder Bay. Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your
only “TRUE” one-stop-shop for all your
adult needs in Thunder Bay. 79 Machar.
Open tonight �til midnight.
EXTEND THE LIFE OF YOUR GARMENTS. For all your tailoring needs. Alterations, zippers, hemming, etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service. Home
Visits For Seniors Only!! 767-1705.
Norm’s Northern Auto Body and Paint,
903 Northern Avenue since 1984.
We work with you, and advise you on
which is the best course to take. Reasonable prices, excellent workmanship,
top quality materials, expert paint matching, best value for dollar in town. 6222249. Will work weekends by
appointment only.
Drywall install and repair, painting, and
all renovations for your home or cottage.
Call Handy Hamlin Services at 7085731.
THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH - The only
Adult Superstore in Thunder Bay now
offers male/female sexual enhancement
supplements that are “GUARANTEED” to
make you feel energized and young
again. It’s the male/female version of
Viagra, Cialis and ExtenZe, now available
over the counter without a prescription.
These products will amaze your partner
for hours of intense pleasure. Thousands
of repeat buyers. 100% safe and effective. Extra strength formula now available
and multi-pack discounts are always
in stock. Remember, a healthy sex life
is a sign of good health. Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your only “TRUE” one-stopshop for all your adult needs in Thunder
Bay. 79 Machar. Open tonight �til midnight.
58. CAREERS
XXX MOVIES - The only Adult Superstore
in Thunder Bay now has over 100,000
adult XXX DVD titles for rent/sale. It’s
Canada’s largest adult XXX DVD
Superstore. It’s everything you can
imagine under one roof. Rated #1 in
Canada for the best selection, variety and
content. Daily specials and discounts
are always available. Exxxxtacy
Superstore. Your only “TRUE” one-stopshop for all your adult needs in Thunder
Bay. 79 Machar. Open tonight �til midnight.
58. CAREERS
53. GENERAL SERVICES
AARON’S LANDSCAPING. Fall clean,
leaves, trim trees, hedge, clean eavestrough, dump runs, snow plowing, residential and small commercial.
626-3639.
Anything pick-up! Garbage, old furniture,
rubbish, clean-out debris in houses,
apartments etc. Tear down shed/fences,
clean-up yards, remove small
trees/shrubs, cut lawns. General maintenance work. Frank 628-5919
Free pick-up of washers, dryers, dishwashers, stoves, BBQ’s, microwaves,
misc. scrap. No Electronics. No Refrigeration. Call for pick up 939-1469.
Leave message.
Have your eavestrough cleaned and
hosed out before water damage is done.
Also, window cleaning. Call 623-1971.
Laminate flooring, ceramic flooring, hard
wood flooring, competitively priced and
installed by Handy Hamlin services.
Please Call 708-5731.
Looking for Tree Removal? Fast Safe
& Efficient, with our unique 34in wide
100ft reach manlift. we cut higher than
anybody in town. Free estimates. 6263542
Looking to move? Call FURNITURE RECYCLE today for professional movers
with over 15 years of experience! Senior
discount available 622-1022
Heated, indoor storage available! Many
different sizes! $1/square foot for all of
our available units. Call FURNITURE RECYCLE today 622-1022
RJC Window Cleaning and Handyman
Services. exterior surface cleaning,
eaves trough cleaning & repair, fall yard
clean-up, hedge trimming, pruning of
trees/shrubs, painting, dump runs. Now
offering snow-throw and snow shoveling. What you need not listed? Call
Robert 632-2161. Licensed and insured.
58. CAREERS
58. CAREERS
Christina’s home and Garden, fall clean,
trim, Reno’s, handyman, painting, house
cleaning, snow removal. certified, much
more,621-1505.
Snow plowing and removal. For free estimates, call Lorne at LM Contracting.
472-8918.
TREE REMOVAL SERVICE, from take
down to clean-up. In town rural or at the
cottage. ++ experience very reasonable
rates, free estimates, insured, and seniors discounts. Call 345-4363
54. HOME IMPROVEMENTS
# 1 specializing in all types of fences ,
decks & renovations. Brian 626-6937.
# CWR CONTRACTING. Framing and
Renovation including customized cabinets. Exterior work includes all roofing
work, landscaping, Bobcat services,
Skidsteer and, excavator. Stone/cement/brick, driveway, land levelling,
decks, fences, weeping tile, foundations,
and repairs. Additions and garages.
Work all expertly completed and proudly
provide references. Call for Five Star
Service: 577-0068. Quality workmanship guaranteed.
DRYWALL - The Mudman. New Homes,
basements, garages, 20 years experience Call The Mudman. 251-2838
58. CAREERS
Fences and decks built for you. Custom
or pre-fabricated. For a free estimate call
Handy Hamlin Services at 708-5731.
For furniture, kitchen cupboard and natural woods refinishing call FURNITURE
RECYCLE today. FREE ESTIMATE on all
your restoration needs! 622-1022
PENSIONED PAINTERS looking to stay
active. Very reasonable rates. Neat, fast
working, former housing authority professional painters. Also drywall repairs
& small renovations. 626-6926
57. HELP WANTED
Looking for Bait Harvester. May-June.
Must have own truck. Phone 977-1559.
63. COMING EVENTS
Medical Condition? Get up to $40,000
from the Canadian Government. Do You
or Someone You Know Have any of
These Conditions? Anxiety, Difficulty
walking, Fibromyalgia, Irritable bowel,
Phyiscal Disabilities...ALL medical conditions qualify. Ask us how. Call ONTARIO BENEFITS at 1-888-588-2937
ext. # 101
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
RECYCLE
58. CAREERS
Thursday, October 30, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
63. COMING EVENTS
73.. INFORMATION
ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION, Polish
Branch no.149, Simpson St. Remembrance Day Tea. Sunday November 9th
1pm-3:30pm. $5 person. Everyone is
welcome to join us! Penny Auction table,
bake table and deli table! Thank-you for
your support!
73.. INFORMATION
73.. INFORMATION
73.. INFORMATION
73.. INFORMATION
ANSWERS TO THIS WEEK’S PUZZLES
ON YOUR YARD SALE
64. CRAFT & FLEA MARKETS
Big Flea Market/Craft Show, CLE Coliseum, Saturday November 8th, 10am3pm. Huge variety of items. Table
rentals at 767-5488 345-9738.
Advertise in the
Thunder Bay
Your Community Newspaper
ON-LINE
WWW.
tbnewswatch.com
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
Massage Therapist
30HP & 40HP
TRACTORS
AND
IMPLEMENTS
.com
rs
w.afortektracto
475-5171 • ww
During waking hours are you
in a constant state of doing?
Lori Smetaniuk
able
Gift Certificates Avail
SIRIUS MASSAGE
Certified Foot Reflexologist
633-0384
385 Hebert St.
by appointment only
7A4H1
Thunder Bay Ont.P
2 for1 on all stock!
ssage.com
[email protected]
massage.com
Book Online: sirius
Donate it to
Hours: Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm
touch
Putting youtinbusiness.
with the righ
DAVE KNIGHT OPTICAL
622-0311
FREE AND FAST TOWING ~ VALUABLE
TAX RECEIPT ~ VEHICLES OF ANY AGE
OR CONDITION ACCEPTED ~ ENVIRONME
NTALLY-FRIENDLY PROGRAM
Proceeds Benefit The Kidney Foun
datio
n of Canada
www.kidneycar.ca ~ 1.866.788.CA
RS(2277)
Direct Cabinets
PFAFF
s
Sewing Machine
Direct Cabinets is having an isla
542 S. Syndicate Ave. • 62
14 Years of Experience.
2-
вњЃ
вњЃ
nd sale.
These islands are the entertain
ment
Handcrafted to embellish any area of your kitchen.
kitchen available in
Antique White Dark Mocha and
We’re also featuring Renaiss Dark Cherry wood.
ance Series Kitchens:
Brandywine & Tuscany Map
le
Full Maple ¾’’ Solid American
Maple
Tuesday - Friday 10-5pm
• Saturday 10-2pm
BESTWAY Sewer and Drain
Cleaning Services
49
www.directcabinets.43
ca
ns
Walk-i e
m
welco
346-2273
345-7174
221 Bay Street
Your Ad Could Be Here!
Happiness is a drain that Works
!
Residential Plumbing Repairs,
Mobile Steamer Jetter Unit,
Video Inspection Available,
Grease Trap Cleaning, Pressure Washing
Serving Thunder Bay • FREE Estimates • Ph.
286-2929
(807)707-1898
Has Your Car Reached
The End Of The Road?
Bring in a 2nd prescription
for your husband, wife, child,
friend, cousin it’s 2 for 1.
906 E. VICTORIA AVE. (Corner McKellar)
Registered
Michelle J. Reinelt
d stress
Relieve the pain an
footcarecon
nect.ca
Increase exposure by advertisin
g
in a future directory.
For more info, call 346-2600
Ask for your Account Executive.
Thunder Bay Source
31
32
Thursday, October 30, 2014
Used 2013 Ford F150 Crew Cab 4x4 XLT
Blue, tint, alloys, air, cruise, 36,800km.
Stock #PC6654.
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
2009 Volvo XC90
2011 Dodge Charger SXT
Silver, 3.2L, 6 cylinder, auto, 4x4, AWD, air, cruise, tilt, PW, PDL, heated
p/seats, leather, AM/FM/CD, alloys, tin, sunroof, remote entry, 69,000kms.
Stock #PC6744
White, auto., tint, alloys, only 61,500 km. Stock #k6320b.
29,890
98 *
24,995
110 *
17,999
60 *
WEEKLY
FOR 84 MONTHS
@ 4.99%
WEEKLY
FOR 60 MONTHS
@ 4.99%
WEEKLY
FOR 84 MONTHS
@ 4.99%
Used 2014 Kia Forte LX PLus
White, 4 cylinder, auto, air, cruise, tilt, PW, PDL, heated p/seats, AM/FM/CD,
satellite, alloys, remote entry, 25,300kms. Daily rental. Stock #PC6668
16,995
56 *
1 750
750
2 500
2005 Volvo S80
4dr, auto, leather, sunroof,
144,290km, Stk #K6332B
5 900
Sales/Leasing
Shaun Mcleod
2003 Buick Lesabre
Blue, 4dr., auto, 66,601km, Stk #PC6777A
Sales/Leasing
Wayne Fortes
2000 Kia Sportage
Blue, auto, 131,000km, Stk #PC6731A
Alyssa Craig
Sales/Leasing
Sales/Leasing
Seija Nousiainen
2004 Chevy Epica
Auto, beige, 4dr, 99501km, Stk #K6472A
5.99% over 6/42/48/54/60/72/78/84 months has a cost of
$1,101/$1,263/$1,426/$1,591 /$1,925/ $2,095/$2,254. Financing
OAC. All vehicles are used. $1000 price change credit does
not apply to AS IS sales units.
Tony Kolic
Steve Eaton
AND RECEIVE A
$15 VOUCHER
TO NAXOS
HST & Lic. are not included.
All inclusive pricing includes registration, tire
andrim warranty, etching $394, carproof $45,
4.99 %/ OMVIC
fee $5. All vehicles are used. Financing eg.
$10,000 @ 4.99% over 36/48/60/72/84 months cost of
5.99borrowing
is $1,309/$1,852. Financing eg. @ $10,000 at
%
Used Car Manager
TAKE A TEST DRIVE
g at
Financin
Finance Manager
18,999
Kristine Thompson
2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser
Blue, 4x4, auto., air, alloys, tint, Offroad package, 125,800 km.
Stock #PC6779.
General Sales Manager
SOLD
Sales/Leasing
WEEKLY
FOR 84 MONTHS
@ 4.99%
Document
Category
Automotive
Views
1 050
File Size
40 173 KB
Tags
1/--pages
Report inappropriate content